WorldWideScience

Sample records for health service hospital

  1. Innovations in health service delivery: the corporatization of public hospitals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Harding, April; Preker, Alexander S

    2003-01-01

    ... hospitals play a critical role in ensuring delivery of health services, less is known about how to improve the efficiency and quality of care provided. Much can be learned in this respect from the experiences of hospital reforms initiated during the 1990s. Innovations in Health Service Delivery: The Corporatization of Public Hospitals is an a...

  2. Study of Marketing Components Affecting Health Care Services in Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javad Akbarian Bafghi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hospitals, in extreme competition, have accepted principles of marketing designed for industrial goods and customers. One of the important factors in health services marketing is the type of services. Organizations, including health centers, require meeting the clients' needs in order to survive and try to promote the way of providing services effectively. The present study aims to identify effective components in providing clinical services in hospitals. Methods: This was a practical and cross-sectional study. Data were collected using a questionnaire completed through random sampling after confirming the validity and reliability. Data were analyzed by SPSS 21 and Lisrel 8.50 using descriptive statistics and factor analysis. Results: The results of this study indicated that nine components had the highest impact on providing health services. Confirmatory factor analysis showed that the quality of providing services in the hospital, offering distinctive services compared with other hospitals, and considering quality of service beyond the patient's expectation had the greatest impact on marketing services in the hospital. Conclusion: Providing quality and distinctive services beyond the patient's expectation enables hospitals to improve their marketing activities and, beside higher level of patient satisfaction, develop their clinical services market share.

  3. Hospital Supply Expenses: An Important Ingredient in Health Services Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulsalam, Yousef; Schneller, Eugene

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to shed light on hospital supply expenses, which form the second largest expense category after payroll and hold more promise for improving cost-efficiency compared to payroll. However, limited research has rigorously scrutinized this cost category, and it is rarely given specific consideration across cost-focused studies in health services publications. After reviewing previously cited estimates, we examine and independently validate supply expense data (collected by the American Hospital Association) for over 3,500 U.S. hospitals. We find supply expenses to make up 15% of total hospital expenses, on average, but as high as 30% or 40% in hospitals with a high case-mix index, such as surgery-intensive hospitals. Future research can use supply expense data to better understand hospital strategies that aim to manage costs, such as systemization, physician-hospital arrangements, and value-based purchasing.

  4. Identifying key hospital service quality factors in online health communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yuchul; Hur, Cinyoung; Jung, Dain; Kim, Minki

    2015-04-07

    The volume of health-related user-created content, especially hospital-related questions and answers in online health communities, has rapidly increased. Patients and caregivers participate in online community activities to share their experiences, exchange information, and ask about recommended or discredited hospitals. However, there is little research on how to identify hospital service quality automatically from the online communities. In the past, in-depth analysis of hospitals has used random sampling surveys. However, such surveys are becoming impractical owing to the rapidly increasing volume of online data and the diverse analysis requirements of related stakeholders. As a solution for utilizing large-scale health-related information, we propose a novel approach to identify hospital service quality factors and overtime trends automatically from online health communities, especially hospital-related questions and answers. We defined social media-based key quality factors for hospitals. In addition, we developed text mining techniques to detect such factors that frequently occur in online health communities. After detecting these factors that represent qualitative aspects of hospitals, we applied a sentiment analysis to recognize the types of recommendations in messages posted within online health communities. Korea's two biggest online portals were used to test the effectiveness of detection of social media-based key quality factors for hospitals. To evaluate the proposed text mining techniques, we performed manual evaluations on the extraction and classification results, such as hospital name, service quality factors, and recommendation types using a random sample of messages (ie, 5.44% (9450/173,748) of the total messages). Service quality factor detection and hospital name extraction achieved average F1 scores of 91% and 78%, respectively. In terms of recommendation classification, performance (ie, precision) is 78% on average. Extraction and

  5. [The accreditation program in hospitals: Clalit Health Services experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Ratson, Edna; Dreiher, Jacob; Wirtheim, Eytan; Perlman, Lily; Gruzman, Carlos; Rosenbaum, Ziv; Davidson, Ehud

    2011-04-01

    Accreditation is a process for assessing the healthcare organization, to determine if it meets a set of requirements designed to improve quality of care. White research regarding the benefits of accreditation is lacking, accreditation has been shown to be associated with promoting quality. Accreditation differs from licensing and quality assurance audits such as ISO. In various countries, the accreditation processes have been in operation in heaLthcare organization for decades. In the U.S.A., the Leading organization for accreditation of healthcare organizations is the Joint Commission. Accreditation Canada is the leading authority for accreditation in Canada. The Australian Council for Healthcare Standards and the King's Fund in the United Kingdom are other noted authorities for accreditation. Several European countries have initiated accreditation programs and some are in the process of implementing such programs. In Israel, no national accreditation system exists, although the Ministry of Health conducts audits on specific issues, and for relicensing of hospitals, and the Scientific Council of the Israel Medical Association conducts audits for recognizing a department as suitable for residency. Clalit Health Services is the first healthcare organization in Israel to gain Joint Commission International (JCI) accreditation. Three hospitals run by Clalit (Ha'emek, Meir and Soroka) have been accredited by JCI, and another four are in the process of accreditation by JCI. An organized national accreditation scheme in Israel is a challenging process, yet it appears to be a central act for promoting the quality of care in hospitals.

  6. Satisfaction with outpatient health services at Jimma Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    satisfaction with services provided. A satisfied patient is more likely to comply with the medical treatment prescribed, provider and continue using medical services. Patient satis-. In a study conducted in Gondar town, 78% of the outpatient visitors to Gondar teaching hospital reported dissatisfaction with services offered at the ...

  7. [Mental Health in the General Hospital: Results of the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ) in Four Hospital Services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Camacho, Leonidas; Escobar, Juan Manuel; Sáenz-Moncaleano, Camilo; Delgado-Barrera, Lucía; Aparicio-Turbay, Soraya; Molano, Juan Carlos; Noguera, Efraín

    2012-03-01

    Few individuals have access to mental health services due in part to underdetection. As it is more likely to consult for medical conditions, primary care may be a useful gateway for early detection of mental health problems. Detection of the frequency of mental health problems in four hospital services at the Fundación Santa Fe de Bogotá: Outpatient unit, hospitalization, emergency department, and primary care through a brief detection questionnaire, the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ). Cross-sectional study of patients seen at the four services who answered a Demographic Data Questionnaire and the PHQ together with information gathered about current medical diagnosis, history of visits, and hospitalizations during the last year. 1094 patients seen at the four hospital services between September 2010 and May 2011 were selected at random. A mental health problem was detected in 36.7% of the total sample. Major depressive disorder (7.3%), alcohol abuse (14.4%), and any anxiety disorder (7.7%) showed the highest prevalence with the emergency department showing the highest frequency of detection. The usefulness of a brief detection questionnaire such as the PHQ in hospital settings is demonstrated and implications in the design of mental health programs in the general hospital are discussed. The need to replicate this study in other settings and to undertake further research is outlined. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  8. Satisfaction with outpatient health services at Jimma Hospital, South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    % of the males visited for own health care. Overall, 57.1% of interviewee believed that the service they received was either good or very good. Satisfaction with health care was found to have a direct relationship with increase in age but has an ...

  9. Advanced services in hospital logistics in the German health service sector

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kriegel, Johannes; Jehle, Franziska; Dieck, Marcel; Mallory, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    ...: What are the developmental options to expand the current capabilities of the hospital contract logistics service providers on the basis of the priorities of the decision-makers in the German hospital sector...

  10. The key to health services in Turkey: new perspectives on leadership and hospital management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Alper A

    2014-01-01

    Health services are one of the most important criteria for making a country function. Turkey has mobilized all of its resources to provide high-quality, easily accessible and patient-friendly services for its population. To achieve this aim, the Turkish health care system has been undergoing a significant transformation through its Health Transformation Programme begun in 2005. The reforms focus on the introduction of a general health insurance system, changing hospital health services, improvements in hospital management and transformational leadership skills. Firstly, all state-run hospitals in the country were merged under the same umbrella, giving millions of people covered by the national security agency access to all of these hospitals. Secondly, all drugs and medical equipment used by patients were made free of charge. Thanks to these developments, hospitals were modernized, and this modernization process in the health sector is still continuing swiftly. On the other hand, for Turkish hospitals to survive, they need to modernize further and become closer to European models, and produce new leaders with new paradigms. In this new and changing health system, hospital leaders and executive officers should be visionaries and strategists advising when to change direction. Following this doctrine, most Turkish hospitals are now run by two top executives: the hospital manager and the chief executive officer who is in charge of business functions. These executives should clearly be the leaders of high-quality, health care organizations.

  11. Health services utilization after induced abortions in Ontario: a comparison between community clinics and hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Østbye, T; Wenghofer, E F; Woodward, C A; Gold, G; Craighead, J

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare postabortion health services utilization of hospital abortion patients with community clinic abortion patients using administrative databases. The study was a retrospective cohort study. The study group consisted of patients with induced abortions (n = 41,039) performed in hospitals or community clinics recorded in the 1995 Ontario Health Insurance Plan claims (OHIP) database. An age-matched cohort of 39,220 women who did not undergo induced abortions was selected from the same data source to serve as controls. The main outcome measures were health services utilization indicators constructed from OHIP data within 3 months postabortion from office consultations, emergency room consultations, and hospital admissions. Hospitalization indicators were constructed from Canadian Institute for Health Information hospital discharge data within 3 months postabortion and included data on hospitalizations for infection, certain surgical events, or psychiatric problems. Postabortion health services utilization and hospitalization were higher in the patient population, regardless of service location, than in the age-matched cohort. Within the abortion patient population, hospital day-surgery patients had higher rates of postabortion utilization and hospitalization than did community clinic patients. Multivariate analysis revealed that hospital day surgery patients had a higher risk of subsequent post-abortion hospitalizations for infections (odds ratio [OR] 1.67, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.23-2.28), surgical events (OR 1.70, 95% CI 1.30-3.24) and psychiatric problems (OR 2.65, 95% CI 1.77-3.98) than community clinic patients. The rates of postabortion health services utilization and risk of hospitalization were lower in community clinic abortion patients than in hospital day-surgery patients. However, it is not possible to fully control for important confounding variables when using these administrative data.

  12. Health promotion services for lifestyle development within a UK hospital – Patients' experiences and views

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haynes Charlotte L

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background UK public health policy requires hospitals to have in place health promotion services which enable patients to improve their health through adopting healthy behaviours, i.e. health education. This study investigated hospitalised patients' experiences of health education for smoking, alcohol use, diet, physical activity, and weight, and their views concerning the appropriateness of hospitals as a setting for the delivery of health education services. Methods Recently discharged adult hospital patients (n = 322 were sent a questionnaire asking about their smoking, alcohol use, diet, physical activity, and weight. For each of these risk factors, participants were asked whether they agreed with screening for the risk factor, whether they received health education, whether it was "helpful", and if they wanted to change their behaviour. Participants were also asked a set of general questions concerning health education within hospitals. Results 190 patients responded (59%. Over 80% agreed with screening for all risk factors. 80% of smokers, 52% consuming alcohol above recommended limits, 86% of obese, 66% consuming less than five fruit and vegetables a day, and 61% of physically inactive participants wanted to change their respective behaviour. However only a third reported receiving health education. While over 60% of patients wanted health education around discharge, the majority of those receiving health education did so at admission. The majority agreed that "hospital is a good place for patients to receive" health education (87% and that "the hospital should provide patients with details of community organisations that provide" health education (83%. Only a minority (31% reported a preference for health education from their GP instead of hospital. Conclusion While the delivery of health education to patients within hospital was poor, hospitals are viewed by patients as an appropriate, and in some cases preferred setting for

  13. Training Pediatric Psychologists for Perinatal Behavioral Health Services in a Pediatric Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Rhonda C; Scharko, Alexander M; Cole, Joanna C M; Patterson, Chavis A; Benton, Tami D; Power, Thomas J

    2016-06-01

    Although pediatric hospitals specialize in providing care to children and adolescents, at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP), our team has been providing behavioral health services for two unique parent populations-parents with a child in the Newborn Infant Intensive Care Unit and pregnant women carrying fetuses with specific birth defects and receiving prenatal care in the Center for Fetal Diagnosis and Treatment. A new training program was developed to expand the scope of pediatric psychologists' practice to include perinatal behavioral health services, specifically for these two unique parent populations served at CHOP. The program includes direct service provision for adult mental health concerns, as well as education and support to help families cope with the existing medical conditions. This article describes the training program and its implementation as a model of training for other pediatric hospitals. The roles of psychologists embedded in these units and hospital privileges are discussed.

  14. 42 CFR 440.20 - Outpatient hospital services and rural health clinic services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... prohibited by State law from furnishing primary health care, “rural health clinic services” means the... services means preventive, diagnostic, therapeutic, rehabilitative, or palliative services that— (1) Are... and supplies are included under this paragraph.) (4) Part-time or intermittent visiting nurse care and...

  15. [Power and health services--the role of hospital architects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyrand, O

    1989-12-10

    Architectural expression influences our surroundings in a symbolic manner. The present architectural design of our health institutions can be traced as far back as to Medieval religious centres. The ultimate aim of this architecture is to demonstrate the power of the system. The present article underlines the importance of designing future health institutions with the aim of preserving and establishing the dignity and confidence of the human beings in the system.

  16. HEALTH WORKERS' PERCEPTIONON THE QUALITY OF SERVICE AND CORPORATE CULTURE OF A TEACHING HOSPITAL IN NIGERIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpan, Etukumana Etiobong; Bassey, Orie Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Quality of service delivery remains the most important issue in hospitals since patients expect higher standard care and services. This quality service is rooted in the culture of the health care organization. Therefore,this study seeks to determine health workers' perception on the quality of service and corporate culture at University of Uyo Teaching hospital, Uyo, Nigeria. A cross-sectional descriptive study was carried out. Using structured questionnaire and convenient sampling technique, data were collected from 250 hospital workers.The responses on questions to elicit the hospital's quality of service and corporate culture were rated on a five-point Likert Scale as follows; Strongly Agree (SA), Agree (A), Neutral(N), Disagree (D) and Strongly Disagree (SD). Data entry and analysis were performed using Epi Info 3.2.2 (CDC, Atlanta, Georgia, USA). The minimum and maximum ages of the respondents were 21 years and 60 years respectively. The mean, median and mode ages in the respondents were 34.6 (± 7.88) years, 33 years, and 30 years respectively. Majority of the study respondents were in the age group of 31-40 years (30%), female (56.8%) and Doctors (36%). The respondents' positive perception on quality of service offered by the hospital was 69.2% (OR 5.05, 95% CI 3.39-7.52, P quality services as obtained in other hospitals. Majority of the workers in all the professions except Medical Doctors accepted that the hospital values the individual workers. Majority of the Pharmacists and Non-clinical staff accepted that the hospital management was flexible and understands the importance of balancing their work and personal life. Majority of the Doctors, Pharmacists and laboratory/image scientists did not accept that top management communicates changes in decisions that affect employees. The perception of health workers on the quality of service rendered by the University of Uyo Teaching Hospital was satisfactory. However, the hospital needs to improve on its

  17. The health services wastes management of a sample of brazilian hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Machline

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses the Health Services wastes management of 70 Brazilian hospitals. As the outcome of a distance course, in 2003, each hospital was required to describe its existing Health Services wastes system and its Plan for improvement.The project was administered by an association of two leading Brazilian educational entities, the Fundação Getulio Vargas and the Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina. Data concerning collection, disposal and final treatment of infectious, hazardous, chemical, radioactive and common wastes were tabulated and analysed. Water supply, liquid effluents and gaseous emissions were also investigated..Their technical and economical aspects were appraised. The research indicates that the sampled hospitals are still in an incipient stage of wastes management. An extensive gap exists between the present situation and the legal and acceptable requirements they should comply with, both on health care and on environmental standpoints.

  18. Hospital service areas – a new tool for health care planning in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widmer Marcel

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The description of patient travel patterns and variations in health care utilization may guide a sound health care planning process. In order to accurately describe these differences across regions with homogeneous populations, small area analysis (SAA has proved as a valuable tool to create appropriate area models. This paper presents the methodology to create and characterize population-based hospital service areas (HSAs for Switzerland. Methods We employed federal hospital discharge data to perform a patient origin study using small area analysis. Each of 605 residential regions was assigned to one of 215 hospital provider regions where the most frequent number of discharges took place. HSAs were characterized geographically, demographically, and through health utilization indices and rates that describe hospital use. We introduced novel planning variables extracted from the patient origin study and investigated relationships among health utilization indices and rates to understand patient travel patterns for hospital use. Results were visualized as maps in a geographic information system (GIS. Results We obtained 100 HSAs using a patient origin matrix containing over four million discharges. HSAs had diverse demographic and geographic characteristics. Urban HSAs had above average population sizes, while mountainous HSAs were scarcely populated but larger in size. We found higher localization of care in urban HSAs and in mountainous HSAs. Half of the Swiss population lives in service areas where 65% of hospital care is provided by local hospitals. Conclusion Health utilization indices and rates demonstrated patient travel patterns that merit more detailed analyses in light of political, infrastructural and developmental determinants. HSAs and health utilization indices provide valuable information for health care planning. They will be used to study variation phenomena in Swiss health care.

  19. [Analysis of the technical efficiency of hospitals in the Spanish National Health Service].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Romero, Carmen; Ortega-Díaz, M Isabel; Ocaña-Riola, Ricardo; Martín-Martín, José Jesús

    To analyse the technical efficiency and productivity of general hospitals in the Spanish National Health Service (NHS) (2010-2012) and identify explanatory hospital and regional variables. 230 NHS hospitals were analysed by data envelopment analysis for overall, technical and scale efficiency, and Malmquist index. The robustness of the analysis is contrasted with alternative input-output models. A fixed effects multilevel cross-sectional linear model was used to analyse the explanatory efficiency variables. The average rate of overall technical efficiency (OTE) was 0.736 in 2012; there was considerable variability by region. Malmquist index (2010-2012) is 1.013. A 23% variability in OTE is attributable to the region in question. Statistically significant exogenous variables (residents per 100 physicians, aging index, average annual income per household, essential public service expenditure and public health expenditure per capita) explain 42% of the OTE variability between hospitals and 64% between regions. The number of residents showed a statistically significant relationship. As regards regions, there is a statistically significant direct linear association between OTE and annual income per capita and essential public service expenditure, and an indirect association with the aging index and annual public health expenditure per capita. The significant room for improvement in the efficiency of hospitals is conditioned by region-specific characteristics, specifically aging, wealth and the public expenditure policies of each one. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Data collection methods in health services research: hospital length of stay and discharge destination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkies, M N; Bowles, K-A; Skinner, E H; Mitchell, D; Haas, R; Ho, M; Salter, K; May, K; Markham, D; O'Brien, L; Plumb, S; Haines, T P

    2015-01-01

    Hospital length of stay and discharge destination are important outcome measures in evaluating effectiveness and efficiency of health services. Although hospital administrative data are readily used as a data collection source in health services research, no research has assessed this data collection method against other commonly used methods. Determine if administrative data from electronic patient management programs are an effective data collection method for key hospital outcome measures when compared with alternative hospital data collection methods. Prospective observational study comparing the completeness of data capture and level of agreement between three data collection methods; manual data collection from ward-based sources, administrative data from an electronic patient management program (i.PM), and inpatient medical record review (gold standard) for hospital length of stay and discharge destination. Manual data collection from ward-based sources captured only 376 (69%) of the 542 inpatient episodes captured from the hospital administrative electronic patient management program. Administrative data from the electronic patient management program had the highest levels of agreement with inpatient medical record review for both length of stay (93.4%) and discharge destination (91%) data. This is the first paper to demonstrate differences between data collection methods for hospital length of stay and discharge destination. Administrative data from an electronic patient management program showed the highest level of completeness of capture and level of agreement with the gold standard of inpatient medical record review for both length of stay and discharge destination, and therefore may be an acceptable data collection method for these measures.

  1. [Evaluation of financial performance of health services: reflections of operational policies in the hospital sector].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonacim, Carlos Alberto Grespan; de Araujo, Adriana Maria Procópio

    2011-01-01

    Discussions about management manners and procedures has been relevant among organization managers in the health services. The health services economic evaluation approaches this theme and is taking an important role around the world, demanding the manager new challenges concerning the continuous search of activities efficiency and efficacy. The objective is to describe the consequences of operational changes in the economic-financial indicators of a Public Hospital. The methodology applied included besides the literature research, a case study in the "Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto--USP". The values found confirm the context of the hospital. One concludes that the average costs present similar behaviors with trend to stabilization, thus confirming improvements in efficiency. The importance of the rendering of accounts for the society related to the use of public resources and how this study can help in this way.

  2. Comparing Some Production Functions for Inpatient Health Services in Selected Public Hospitals in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antelo, Manel; Reyes-Santiás, Francisco; Cadarso-Suárez, Carmen; Rodríguez-Álvarez, María Xosé

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the adequacy of the widely used Cobb-Douglas and transcendental logarithmic (translog) models of the production functions of hospital inpatient services, the authors fitted these and additive models to data for the four most productive health services of 10 public hospitals in Galicia, Spain (the same four in each). Production, measured as admissions weighted in accordance with their diagnosis-related groups (DRGs), was treated as a function of physician full-time equivalents as surrogate labor factor and number of beds as surrogate capital factor. The results suggest that while the Cobb-Douglas and translog models suffice to represent the production functions of services with low average DRG weight, the greater flexibility of additive models is required for services with higher average DRG weight when only these two inputs are considered.

  3. Experiences of Working with the Tobacco Issue in the Context of Health Promoting Hospitals and Health Services: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlfjord, Siw; Kristenson, Margareta; Lindberg, Malou

    2011-01-01

    The worldwide Health Promoting Hospital and Health Services (HPH) network was initiated by the World Health Organizations in the late 1980s. The goal of the network is to change the focus of health services from curing patients to also embrace disease prevention and health promotion. In Sweden the network started in 1996, and involves mainly hospitals and primary care. The network members collaborate in task forces, one of which is working on the tobacco issue. There is limited evidence on the value of working within an HPH organization. The aim of this study was to investigate the experiences of members of the Swedish HPH network tobacco task force. Focus group interviews with task force members were analyzed using implementation theory. Three themes, overall experiences of working with tobacco issues, experiences of working with “free from tobacco in connection with surgery”, and experiences of work in the HPH tobacco task force, emerged from the interviews. The results show that working with the tobacco issue in the context of health-promoting hospitals and health services met with difficulties involving the following important factors: evidence, context, facilitation and adopter characteristics. Leadership, one contextual factor, at national and local level, seems to be crucial if the work is going to succeed. The tobacco task force of the HPH network is an important facilitator supporting the task. PMID:21556199

  4. A management information system to plan and monitor the delivery of health-care services in government hospitals in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramani, K V

    2004-01-01

    Governments all over the world are getting increasingly concerned about their ability to meet their social obligations in the health sector. In this paper, we discuss the design and development of a management information system (MIS) to plan and monitor the delivery of healthcare services in government hospitals in India. Our MIS design is based on an understanding of the working of several municipal, district, and state government hospitals. In order to understand the magnitude and complexity of various issues faced by the government hospitals, we analyze the working of three large tertiary care hospitals administered by the Ahmedabad Municipal Corporation. The hospital managers are very concerned about the lack of hospital infrastructure and resources to provide a satisfactory level of service. Equally concerned are the government administrators who have limited financial resources to offer healthcare services at subsidized rates. A comprehensive hospital MIS is thus necessary to plan and monitor the delivery of hospital services efficiently and effectively.

  5. Status of Medical Library Resources and Services in Teaching Hospitals in Enugu State, Nigeria: implications for quality health care services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluchi C. Okeke

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Considering the need for quality health information and resultant health care services in any society, this study was carried out to look into the status of library and information resources and services provided by medical libraries in Enugu State, Nigeria. The main objective of the study was to find out the information resources and services available for medical library users towards quality health care provision. Five (5 medical libraries of major teaching hospitals were used for the study with 980 registered users as the study population from where 245 users were sampled. Observation checklist was used to collect data on resources while questionnaire was used to collect data from the respondents on the services provided. The Medical Library Association Standard guided the analysis of data from observation while frequency counts and mean scores were used to analyze data from the questionnaire. Major findings showed that even though some of the required resources and services are available and provided the medical libraries, most of the required resources and services are not adequately provided by these libraries.

  6. [NURSING MANAGEMENT: CREATION OF A HOSPITAL COMPLEX. AREA II OF THE MURCIA HEALTH CARE SERVICE (CARTAGENA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léon Navarro, Josefa; Gómez García, Carmen Isabel; Carrillo García, César

    2014-09-01

    This paper analyzes, by a descriptive study, the closing of the Basic Hospital of the Defence the restructuration of the Santa María del Rosell University Hospital, and the moving of both to a new hospital: the Santa Lucía University Hospital. This process was carried out in coordination with a coincident objective: the creation of an only management staff for the area. The aim is the analysis of the opening of a hospital complex that coincided with the restructuration of the health area. This paper analyzes the actions in relation to the scheduling, training and moving, that concerned above 600 hospital beds and 275.000 inhabitants. Analyzes the intervention in infrastructures, logistics and training. The whole process is seen from de nursery point of view, as a professional stratus that knows the roles of the hospital and personnel. The period of the study comprises since October2010, beginning of the activity in the new hospital, to November 2011, moment of the effective culmination of the move. The result of the works carried out was the transfer of people and roles in a very short time (eleven months). All the patients were moved without any event. During the whole process healthcare continuity was obtained, whit the less economic impact, as in patients and professionals. From the point of view of future and practical implications, the basis for a modern and qualified provision of services have been established; and best results from means provided have been obtained in relation to health care quality.

  7. Academic-Hospital Partnership: Conducting a Community Health Needs Assessment as a Service Learning Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumwiede, Kelly A; Van Gelderen, Stacey A; Krumwiede, Norma K

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of this service learning project were to trial nursing student application of the Community-Based Collaborative Action Research (CBCAR) framework while conducting a community health needs assessment and to assess the effectiveness of the CBCAR framework in providing real-world learning opportunities for enhancing baccalaureate nursing students' public health knowledge. In this case study analysis, the CBCAR framework linked service learning and community health needs assessment with public health nursing core competencies. Fifteen nursing students partnered with collaborative members. Student observational field notes and narrative reflections were analyzed qualitatively for fidelity to the CBCAR framework and to evaluate student public health knowledge. Students successfully employed the CBCAR framework in collaboration with the critical access hospital and community stakeholders to design and conduct the community health needs assessment. Service learning themes were real-world solutions, professional development, community collaboration, and making a difference. Students developed skills in six of the eight domains of the Quad Council's core competencies for public health nurses. Community-Based Collaborative Action Research facilitates collaborative partnerships and relationships throughout the research process. Students benefited by applying what they have learned from their education to a real community who lacks resources. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Estimating the costs of psychiatric hospital services at a public health facility in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezenduka, Charles; Ichoku, Hyacinth; Ochonma, Ogbonnia

    2012-09-01

    Information on the cost of mental health services in Africa is very limited even though mental health disorders represent a significant public health concern, in terms of health and economic impact. Cost analysis is important for planning and for efficiency in the provision of hospital services. The study estimated the total and unit costs of psychiatric hospital services to guide policy and psychiatric hospital management efficiency in Nigeria. The study was exploratory and analytical, examining 2008 data. A standard costing methodology based on ingredient approach was adopted combining top-down method with step-down approach to allocate resources (overhead and indirect costs) to the final cost centers. Total and unit cost items related to the treatment of psychiatric patients (including the costs of personnel, overhead and annualised costs of capital items) were identified and measured on the basis of outpatients' visits, inpatients' days and inpatients' admissions. The exercise reflected the input-output process of hospital services where inputs were measured in terms of resource utilisation and output measured by activities carried out at both the outpatient and inpatient departments. In the estimation process total costs were calculated at every cost center/department and divided by a measure of corresponding patient output to produce the average cost per output. This followed a stepwise process of first allocating the direct costs of overhead to the intermediate and final cost centers and from intermediate cost centers to final cost centers for the calculation of total and unit costs. Costs were calculated from the perspective of the healthcare facility, and converted to the US Dollars at the 2008 exchange rate. Personnel constituted the greatest resource input in all departments, averaging 80% of total hospital cost, reflecting the mix of capital and recurrent inputs. Cost per inpatient day, at $56 was equivalent to 1.4 times the cost per outpatient visit at

  9. Inequality in the distribution of health resources and health services in China: hospitals versus primary care institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Xu, Yongjian; Ren, Jianping; Sun, Liqi; Liu, Chaojie

    2017-03-03

    Equity is one of the major goals of China's recent health system reform. This study aimed to evaluate the equality of the distribution of health resources and health services between hospitals and primary care institutions. Data of this study were drawn from the China Health Statistical Year Books. We calculated Gini coefficients based on population size and geographic size, respectively, for the indicators: number of institutions, number of health workers and number of beds; and the concentration index (CI) for the indicators: per capita outpatient visits and annual hospitalization rates. The Gini coefficients against population size ranged between 0.17 and 0.44 in the hospital sector, indicating a relatively good equality. The primary care sector showed a slightly higher level of Gini coefficients (around 0.45) in the number of health workers. However, inequality was evident in the geographic distribution of health resources. The Gini coefficients exceeded 0.7 in the geographic distribution of institutions, health workers and beds in both the hospital and the primary care sectors, indicating high levels of inequality. The CI values of hospital inpatient care and outpatient visits to primary care institutions were small (ranging from -0.02 to 0.02), indicating good wealth-related equality. The CI values of outpatient visits to hospitals ranged from 0.16 to 0.21, indicating a concentration of services towards the richer populations. By contrast, the CI values of inpatient care in primary care institutions ranged from -0.24 to -0.22, indicating a concentration of services towards the poorer populations. The eastern developed region also had a high internal inequality compared with the other less developed regions. Significant inequality in the geographic distribution of health resources is evident, despite a more equitable per capita distribution of resources. Richer people are more likely to use well-resourced hospitals for outpatient care. By contrast, poorer

  10. A National Health Service Hospital's cardiac rehabilitation programme: a qualitative analysis of provision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Driscoll, Jamie M; Shave, Robert; Cushion, Christopher J

    2007-10-01

    This paper reports a study examining the effectiveness of a London National Health Service Trust Hospital's cardiac rehabilitation programme, from the perspectives of healthcare professionals and patients. Cardiovascular disease is the world's leading cause of death and disability. Substantial research has reported that, following a cardiac event, cardiac rehabilitation can promote recovery, improve exercise capacity and patient health, reduce various coronary artery disease risk factors and subsequently reduce hospitalization costs. Despite these findings and the introduction of the National Service Framework for Coronary Heart Disease, there is wide variation in the practice, management and organization of cardiac rehabilitation services. A purposeful sample of three postmyocardial infarction patients registered on the selected hospital's cardiac rehabilitation programme, coupled with 11 healthcare professionals were selected. The patients acted as individual case studies. The authors followed all three patients through phase III of their cardiac rehabilitation programme. The research attempted to explore the roles and procedures of a London hospital's cardiac rehabilitation programme through an interpretative framework involving qualitative research methods. Participant observation and in-depth semi-structured interviews were the instruments used to collect data. Whilst the healthcare professionals were enthusiastic about coronary heart disease prevention, the London NHS trust hospital's cardiac rehabilitation programme had several barriers, which reduced the programme's success and prevented it from achieving National Service Framework targets. The barriers were complex and mainly included service-related factors, such as lack of professional training, weak communication between primary and secondary care and confused roles and identities. Although the study has immediate relevance for the local area, it highlighted issues of more general relevance to cardiac

  11. Selected aspects of the logistics network of public hospitals in the competitive market of health services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Majchrzak-Lepczyk

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The below considerations provide an overview of the issues of sustainable development, logistics, to financial engineering instruments and the role of intellectual capital in the process of transformation of public hospitals. The aim of this research was to assess the competitiveness of the network of public hospitals in the market of health services based on literature studies, as well as empirical research. Methods: Empirical study using a questionnaire survey was conducted in the period from January 2007 to December 2011, in the area of Warmia and Mazury, Pomerania and Wielkopolska. The goal of this questionnaire survey was to know the medical staff reviews issues related to adaptation to the nature of the network of public hospitals methods and logistics tools, sustainable development, corporate social responsibility - CSR. The study was carried out in 104 public hospitals, on a sample of 8975 respondents. Results and conclusions: Analysis of the completed study showed that the logistic processes and their improvement in the health sector play a significant role. The surveyed entities explicitly draw attention to the need for information systems,  pro-environment activities, access to information, or the use of GS1 global standards. These tools allow you to increase the efficiency of supply chains, ensuring not only tracking and tracing of products from the manufacturer to the patient, but also enabling better protection against making a mistake or counterfeit products.

  12. [Barriers and challenges of the functional healthcare risk management units in hospitals of Madrid health service].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo-Hernández, A; Navarro-Royo, C; Arguedas-Sanz, R; Albeniz-Lizarraga, C; Morón-Merchante, J

    2014-01-01

    To identify the barriers and challenges for the effective development of risk management units in hospitals of the Madrid Health Service. Descriptive cross-sectional study aimed at the management teams and members of the functional units of 31 hospitals in the Madrid Health Service. A self-administered questionnaire requesting answers in free text was used, identifying up to five barriers and challenges, and their prioritization by awarding from 1-5 points according to their importance. A discourse analysis was then conducted, grouping common themes and sorting them according to their score. The overall response rate was 94%. The most frequently identified barriers were lack of time (21%), inadequate safety culture (13%), lack of publication of their activities (10%), and lack of training (10%). The most important challenge was developing the training (18%), followed by improving the culture (17%), communication of safety activities (11%), and achieve leadership from the managers of the services (11%). According to the study conditions, the main identified barrier identified was the lack of available time, and the principal challenge found was promoting a proactive learning culture. Copyright © 2013 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. The University Hospital Zurich Offers a Medical Online Consultation Service for Men With Intimate Health Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Weitmann, Sabine; Schulz, Urs; Schmid, Daniel Max; Brockes, Christiane

    2017-05-01

    The University Hospital of Zurich offers a text-based, Medical Online Consultation Service to the public since 1999. Users asked health questions anonymously to tele-doctors. This study focused on the characteristics of male enquirers with intimate health problems, the content of their questions, the medical advice given by tele-doctors and the rating of the service to prove the benefit of an online service for medical laymen. This retrospective study included 5.1% of 3,305 enquiries from 2008 to 2010 using the International Classification of Diseases-10 and International Classification of Primary Care codes relevant for intimate and sexual health problems in men. A professional text analysis program (MAXQDA) supported the content analysis, which is based on the procedure of inductive category development described by Mayring. The average age was 40 years, 63.1% enquirers had no comorbidity, in 62.5% it was the first time they consulted a doctor, and 70.2% asked for a specific, single, intimate health issue. In 64.3%, the most important organ of concern was the penis. Overall, 30.4% asked about sexually transmitted diseases. In 74.4% a doctor visit was recommended to clarify the health issue. The rating of the problem solving was very good. The service was mainly used by younger men without comorbidity and no previous contact with a doctor with regard to an intimate health problem. The anonymous setting of the teleconsultation provided men individual, professional medical advice and decision support. Teleconsultation is suggested to empower patients by developing more health literacy.

  14. The provision of dental implants in the National Health Service Hospital dental services--a national questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterworth, C J; Baxter, A M; Shaw, M J; Bradnock, G

    2001-01-27

    To assess the activity of consultants in restorative dentistry in the United Kingdom in the provision of osseointegrated dental implants within the National Health Service Hospital service and to evaluate their attitudes concerning the relevant medical and oral factors considered in patient selection for implant treatment. Anonymous postal questionnaire in the United Kingdom. Consultants in restorative dentistry. Out of the sample of 145, 109 consultants (75%) completed the questionnaire in 1999. 54 of the 109 consultants (49.5%) are involved in the provision of osseointegrated implant treatment, treating an average of 29 cases/year (range 2-150). However, over one third of the respondents treated 10 or less cases/year. 89% worked with oral surgeons as an implant team. 68% used Branemark (Nobel Biocare) implants as their main system. The majority of consultants felt that smoking, psychoses and previous irradiation were the most important medical factors that contra-indicated implant retained restorations whilst untreated periodontitis, poor oral hygiene and uncontrolled caries were the most important oral contra-indications. Many centres were experiencing significant problems with the funding of implant treatment with one centre receiving no funding. The implications for patient care and specialist training are discussed. There is a marked variation in the number of patients treated with endosseous dental implants within the United Kingdom National Health Service hospitals. Many consultants treat 10 or fewer patients each year. In the main, there is agreement about the factors that contra-indicate implant treatment; these are in line with national guidelines.

  15. Managing preconceived expectations: mental health service users experiences of going home from hospital: a grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keogh, B; Callaghan, P; Higgins, A

    2015-11-01

    What is known on the subject? The time of discharge from a mental health hospital can be challenging for mental health service users, with high rates of readmission in the immediate months following discharge. Although some research exists that explores service users' perspectives of being discharged, little evidence exists that explores the processes influencing or used by service users' to adapt to the transition from in-patient acute mental health service. What this papers adds to existing knowledge? The findings of this grounded theory study demonstrates the strategies service users used to managed their own, as well as their social audiences, preconceived expectations arising from their new identity as 'psychiatric patients' following their discharge from hospital. While there is a move to develop recovery-orientated mental health services, key indicators of recovery-oriented practices were often absent from service users' experiences of service provision. What are the implications for practice? Nurses and other mental health professionals need to recognize their contribution to the architecture of stigma that transcends the physical structures of hospital or ward and are entrenched within attitudes, interactions and practices. The findings of this study can provide guidance to those working with service users and help them to understand the complexities of their experiences when using mental health services, which go far beyond the management of their symptoms. Following a period of hospitalization, the transition to home can result in increased vulnerability and a source of stress for mental health service users. Readmission rates have been suggested as one indicator of the success of the transition from hospital to community care. Despite knowledge of some of the factors that impact on service users following discharge, no coherent model or theoretical framework could be located in the literature, which explains or aides an in-depth understanding of the

  16. Impact of hospital type II violent events: use of psychotropic drugs and mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dement, John M; Lipscomb, Hester J; Schoenfisch, Ashley L; Pompeii, Lisa A

    2014-06-01

    While violence can adversely affect mental health of victims, repercussions of violence against workers is not as well characterized. We explored relationships between workplace violent events perpetrated by patients or visitors (Type II) against hospital employees and the employee use of psychotropic medications or mental health services using a data system that linked violent events with health claims. Significant associations were observed between reported Type II workplace violent events and employee prescription claims for anti-depressants and anxiolytics combined (RR = 1.45, 95% CI = 1.01-2.33) and anti-depressants alone (RR = 1.65, 95% CI = 1.10-2.48). No significant association between reported violent events and health claims for treatment of depression or anxiety was observed. Type II violence experienced by hospital workers may lead to increased use of psychotropic drugs, particularly anti-depressants but also anxiolytics. Our results suggest an important role of employee assistance programs in mitigating the psychological consequences of workplace violent events. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. An Estimation Method of Waiting Time for Health Service at Hospital by Using a Portable RFID and Robust Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishigaki, Tsukasa; Yamamoto, Yoshinobu; Nakamura, Yoshiyuki; Akamatsu, Motoyuki

    Patients that have an health service by doctor have to wait long time at many hospitals. The long waiting time is the worst factor of patient's dissatisfaction for hospital service according to questionnaire for patients. The present paper describes an estimation method of the waiting time for each patient without an electronic medical chart system. The method applies a portable RFID system to data acquisition and robust estimation of probability distribution of the health service and test time by doctor for high-accurate waiting time estimation. We carried out an health service of data acquisition at a real hospital and verified the efficiency of the proposed method. The proposed system widely can be used as data acquisition system in various fields such as marketing service, entertainment or human behavior measurement.

  18. Makerere University College of Health Sciences’ role in addressing challenges in health service provision at Mulago National Referral Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sekandi Juliet

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mulago National Referral Hospital (MNRH, Uganda’s primary tertiary and teaching hospital, and Makerere University College of Health Sciences (MakCHS have a close collaborative relationship. MakCHS students complete clinical rotations at MNRH, and MakCHS faculty partner with Mulago staff in clinical care and research. In 2009, as part of a strategic planning process, MakCHS undertook a qualitative study to examine care and service provision at MNRH, identify challenges, gaps, and solutions, and explore how MakCHS could contribute to improving care and service delivery at MNRH. Methods Key informant interviews (n=23 and focus group discussions (n=7 were conducted with nurses, doctors, administrators, clinical officers and other key stakeholders. Interviews and focus groups were tape recorded and transcribed verbatim, and findings were analyzed through collaborative thematic analysis. Results Challenges to care and service delivery at MNRH included resource constraints (staff, space, equipment, and supplies, staff inadequacies (knowledge, motivation, and professionalism, overcrowding, a poorly functioning referral system, limited quality assurance, and a cumbersome procurement system. There were also insufficiencies in the teaching of professionalism and communication skills to students, and patient care challenges that included lack of access to specialized services, risk of infections, and inappropriate medications. Suggestions for how MakCHS could contribute to addressing these challenges included strengthening referral systems and peripheral health center capacity, and establishing quality assurance mechanisms. The College could also strengthen the teaching of professionalism, communication and leadership skills to students, and monitor student training and develop courses that contribute to continuous professional development. Additionally, the College could provide in-service education for providers on professionalism

  19. Impact of early in-hospital medication review by clinical pharmacists on health services utilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinne M Hohl

    Full Text Available Adverse drug events are a leading cause of emergency department visits and unplanned admissions, and prolong hospital stays. Medication review interventions aim to identify adverse drug events and optimize medication use. Previous evaluations of in-hospital medication reviews have focused on interventions at discharge, with an unclear effect on health outcomes. We assessed the effect of early in-hospital pharmacist-led medication review on the health outcomes of high-risk patients.We used a quasi-randomized design to evaluate a quality improvement project in three hospitals in British Columbia, Canada. We incorporated a clinical decision rule into emergency department triage pathways, allowing nurses to identify patients at high-risk for adverse drug events. After randomly selecting the first eligible patient for participation, clinical pharmacists systematically allocated subsequent high-risk patients to medication review or usual care. Medication review included obtaining a best possible medication history and reviewing the patient's medications for appropriateness and adverse drug events. The primary outcome was the number of days spent in-hospital over 30 days, and was ascertained using administrative data. We used median and inverse propensity score weighted logistic regression modeling to determine the effect of pharmacist-led medication review on downstream health services use.Of 10,807 high-risk patients, 6,416 received early pharmacist-led medication review and 4,391 usual care. Their baseline characteristics were balanced. The median number of hospital days was reduced by 0.48 days (95% confidence intervals [CI] = 0.00 to 0.96; p = 0.058 in the medication review group compared to usual care, representing an 8% reduction in the median length of stay. Among patients under 80 years of age, the median number of hospital days was reduced by 0.60 days (95% CI = 0.06 to 1.17; p = 0.03, representing 11% reduction in the median length of stay

  20. Hospitality Services. Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This guide, which was developed as part of Texas' home economics education program, is intended to assist teachers of a hospitality services course focusing on the food and lodging segments of the hospitality and tourism industry. The first 40% of the approximately 600-page guide consists of strategies for teaching each of 29 essential…

  1. On a hiding to nothing? Assessing the corporate governance of hospital and health services in New Zealand 1993-1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, P; Perkins, R; Powell, M

    2001-01-01

    In New Zealand the governance of public sector hospital and health services has changed significantly over the past decade. For most of the century hospitals had been funded by central government grants but run by locally elected boards. In 1989 a reforming Labour government restructured health services along managerialist lines, including changing governance structures so that some area health board members were government appointments, with the balance elected by the community. More market oriented reform under a new National government abolished this arrangement and introduced (1993) a corporate approach to the management of hospitals and related services. The hospitals were established as limited liability companies under the Companies Act. This was an explicitly corporate model and, although there was some modification of arrangements following the election of a more politically moderate centre-right coalition government in 1996, the corporate model was largely retained. Although significant changes occurred again after the election of a Labour government in 1999, the corporate governance experience in New Zealand health services is one from which lessons can, nevertheless, be learnt. This paper examines aspects of the performance and process of corporate governance arrangements for public sector health services in New Zealand, 1993-1998.

  2. Patient satisfaction against the quality of dental health services at dental polyclinic of Tenriawaru general hospital in Bone regency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuad Husain Akbar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Patient satisfaction against the quality of dental health services was a comparison between the perception of care received by expectation before getting treatment. The research was conducted  at Tenriawaru general hospital in Bone regency  based on the five dimensions of service quality, they were the assurance, empathy, responsiveness, physical appearance, and medical services by using Likert scale. The study was descriptive with a sample of 65 people. The research subjects were all visitors (patient dental polyclinic of Tenriawaru general hospital in Bone regency. Results showed patient satisfaction on dimensions of assurance 84.6% falling into the category satisfied. On the dimensions of empathy showed 81.5% of patients satisfied. On the dimensions of responsiveness showed 36.9% of patients satisfied. On the dimensions of physical appearance showed 84.6% of patients satisfied. On the dimensions of medical services showed 72.3% of patients satisfied. Based on the result of patient satisfaction against the quality of dental health services at the dental polyclinic of Tenriawaru general hospital in Bone regency which reviewed from five dimensions showed patients satisfied against the quality of dental health services at Tenriawaru general hospital in Bone regency.

  3. Concerns and hopes about outsourcing decisions regarding health information management services at two teaching hospitals in Semnan, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahouei, Mehdi; Farrokhi, Maryam; Abadi, Zahra Nasr; Karimi, Arefe

    2016-04-01

    Changes in health programs in Iran have led to an increase in administrative costs. One cost-saving option available to hospital administrators is to outsource administrative services. This study aimed to explore the attitudes of hospital staff towards outsourcing health information management services in advance of a decision being taken, to assist healthcare organisations to assess the potential benefits and challenges of outsourcing such services. Six hundred and four clinical and allied health employees in two hospitals in Iran, who had had prior experience with outsourcing hospital services, responded to a survey designed to measure staff attitudes towards outsourcing health information management services, based on their perceptions of potential costs and benefits for the organisation and their own employment prospects. A 16-item attitude scale, developed by the researchers, was used in the study and demographic data were also collected. Summary statistics showed that approximately one third of the sample (34.53%) had a negative view of outsourcing, one third (35.16%) had a positive view, and 30.31% were neutral. An exploratory factor analysis of items on the attitude scale identified three underlying constructs, labelled: data security and management; workplace environment; and staff and customer satisfaction. One item (concern about the impact of outsourcing on staffing levels) did not load on any of the factors. A separate analysis of this single item showed a significant relationship between the sex of participants and their views on the impact of outsourcing on the number of hospital staff employed (pinformation management services would be positive for the organisation, their working environment or for staff and patient satisfaction. These findings have important implications for healthcare organisations planning to outsource health information services. Further research that focuses on communication skills of senior managers and their ability to

  4. Determinants of patient satisfaction with outpatient health services at public and private hospitals in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayue Tateke

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients have explicit desires or requests for services when they visit hospitals. However, inadequate discovery of their needs may result in patient dissatisfaction. This study aimed to determine the levels and determinants of patient satisfaction with outpatient health services provided at public and private hospitals in Addis Ababa, Central Ethiopia.Methods: A comparative cross-sectional study was conducted from 27 March to 30 April 2010. The study included 5 private and 5 public hospitals. Participants were selected using systematic random sampling. A pre-tested and contextually prepared structured questionnaire was used to conduct interviews. Descriptive statistics, analysis of variance, factor analysis and multiple linear regressions were performed using computer software (SPSS 16.0.Results: About 18.0% of the patients at the public hospitals were very satisfied whilst 47.9% were just satisfied with the corresponding proportions a bit higher at private hospitals. Selfjudged health status, expectation about the services, perceived adequacy of consultation duration, perceived providers’ technical competency, perceived welcoming approach and perceived body signalling were determinants of satisfaction at both public and private hospitals.Conclusions: Although patients at the private hospitals were more satisfied than those at the public hospitals with the health care they received, five of the predictors of patient satisfaction in this study were common to both settings. Thus, hospitals in both categories should work to improve the competencies of their employees, particularly health professionals, to win the interests of the clients and have a physical structure that better fits the expectations of the patients.

  5. Implementation of a large-scale hospital information infrastructure for multi-unit health-care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Sun K; Kim, Dong Keun; Kim, Jung C; Park, Youn Jung; Chang, Byung Chul

    2008-01-01

    With the increase in demand for high quality medical services, the need for an innovative hospital information system has become essential. An improved system has been implemented in all hospital units of the Yonsei University Health System. Interoperability between multi-units required appropriate hardware infrastructure and software architecture. This large-scale hospital information system encompassed PACS (Picture Archiving and Communications Systems), EMR (Electronic Medical Records) and ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning). It involved two tertiary hospitals and 50 community hospitals. The monthly data production rate by the integrated hospital information system is about 1.8 TByte and the total quantity of data produced so far is about 60 TByte. Large scale information exchange and sharing will be particularly useful for telemedicine applications.

  6. Patient satisfaction against the quality of dental health services at dental polyclinic of Tenriawaru general hospital in Bone regency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuad Husain Akbar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Patient satisfaction against the quality of dental health serviceswas a comparison between the perception of care received by expectation before getting treatment. The Research was conducted at Tenriawaru General Hospital in Bone Regency based on the five dimensions of service quality, they were the assurance, empathy, responsiveness, physical appearance, and medical services by using Likert scale. The study was descriptive with a sample of 65 people. The research subjects were all visitors (patient Dental Polyclinic of Tenriawaru General Hospital in Bone Regency. Results showed patient satisfaction on dimensions of assurance 84.6% falling into the category satisfied. On the dimensions of empathy showed 81.5% of patients satisfied. On the dimensions of responsiveness showed 36.9% of patients satisfied. On the dimensions of physical appearance showed 84.6% of patients satisfied. On the dimensions of medical services showed 72.3% of patients satisfied. Based on the result of patient satisfaction against the quality of dental health services at the Dental Polyclinic of Tenriawaru General Hospital in Bone Regency which reviewed from five dimensions showed patients satisfied against the quality of dental health services at Tenriawaru General Hospital in Bone Regency.

  7. Service Robots for Hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Özkil, Ali Gürcan

    believe that these transportation tasks, to a great extent, can be and will be automated using mobile robots. This thesis consequently addresses the key technical issues of implementing service robots in hospitals. In simple terms, a robotic system for automating hospital logistics has to be reliable......, adaptable and scalable. Robots have to be semi-autonomous, and should reliably navigate in large and dynamic environments in the hospital. The complexity of the problem has to be manageable, and the solutions have to be flexible, so that the system can be applicable in real world settings. This thesis...... summarizes the efforts to address these issues. Upon the analysis of the transportation tasks and how they are currently handled in hospitals, a navigation system is envisaged. Visual tags are a part of this system, and a survey was conducted to find out the most prominent ones to be used in mobile robot...

  8. Hospital Service Area File

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This file is derived from the calendar year inpatient claims data. The records contain number of discharges, length of stay, and total charges summarized by provider...

  9. Service utilization in community health centers in China: a comparison analysis with local hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xiaohang

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Being an important part of China's Urban Health Care Reform System, Community Health Centers (CHCs have been established throughout the entire country and are presently undergoing substantial reconstruction. However, the services being delivered by the CHCs are far from reaching their performance targets. In order to assess the role of the CHCs, we examined their performance in six cities located in regions of South-East China. The purpose of this investigation was to identify the utilization and the efficiency of community health resources that are able to provide basic medical and public health services. Methods The study was approved by Peking University Health Science Center Institutional Reviewing Board (NO: IRB00001052-T1. Data were collected from all the local health bureaux and processed using SPSS software. Methods of analysis mainly included: descriptive analysis, paired T-test and one-way ANOVA. Results The six main functions of the CHCs were not fully exploited and the surveys that were collected on their efficiency and utilization of resources indicate that they have a low level of performance and lack the trust of local communities. Furthermore, the CHCs seriously lack funding support and operate under difficult circumstances, and residents have less positive attitudes towards them. Conclusion The community health service must be adjusted according to the requirements of urban medical and health reform, taking into account communities' health needs. More research is required on the living standards and health needs of residents living within the CHC's range, taking into consideration the users' needs in expanding the newly implemented service, and at the same time revising the old service system so as to make the development of CHCs realistic and capable of providing a better service to patients. Several suggestions are put forward for an attainable scheme for developing a community health service.

  10. The development of service user-led recommendations for health and social care services on leaving hospital with memory loss or dementia - the SHARED study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mockford, Carole; Seers, Kate; Murray, Matt; Oyebode, Jan; Clarke, Rosemary; Staniszewska, Sophie; Suleman, Rashida; Boex, Sue; Diment, Yvonne; Grant, Richard; Leach, Jim; Sharma, Uma

    2017-06-01

    Health and social care services are under strain providing care in the community particularly at hospital discharge. Patient and carer experiences can inform and shape services. To develop service user-led recommendations enabling smooth transition for people living with memory loss from acute hospital to community. Lead and co-researchers conducted semi-structured interviews with 15 pairs of carers and patients with memory loss at discharge, 6 and 12 weeks post-discharge and one semi-structured interview with health and social care professionals and Admiral Nurses. Framework analysis was guided by co-researchers. Two focus groups of study participants, facilitated by co-researchers, met to shape and finalize recommendations. Recruitment took place in acute hospitals in two National Health Service (NHS) Trusts in England. Patients were aged 65 and over, with memory loss, an in-patient for at least 1 week returning to the community, who had a carer consenting to be in the study. Poor delivery of services caused considerable stress to some study families living with memory loss. Three key recommendations included a need for a written, mutually agreed discharge plan, a named coordinator of services, and improved domiciliary care services. Vulnerable patients with memory loss find coming out of hospital after an extended period a stressful experience. The SHARED study contributes to understanding the hospital discharge process through the eyes of the patient and carer living with memory loss and has the potential to contribute to more efficient use of resources and to improving health outcomes in communities. © 2016 The Authors. Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Do smoke-free environment policies reduce smoking on hospital grounds? Evaluation of a smoke-free health service policy at two Sydney hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poder, Natasha; Carroll, Therese; Wallace, Cate; Hua, Myna

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate the compliance of hospital staff, inpatients and visitors with Sydney South West Area Health Service's Smoke-free Environment Policy. Six sites were observed at two Sydney hospitals 2 weeks before implementation of the policy and at 2 weeks, 6 months, 12 months, 18 months and 2 years after implementation. There was an overall significant 36% (P≤0.05) reduction in observed smoking incidents on hospital grounds 2 years after implementation. Two years after implementation, observed smoking incidents reduced by 44% (P≤0.05) in staff, 37% (P≤0.05) in visitors and remained unchanged among inpatients. The Smoke-free Environment Policy was effective in reducing visitors and staff observed smoking on hospital grounds, but had little effect on inpatients' smoking. Identifying strategies to effectively manage nicotine addiction and promote cessation amongst hospital inpatients remains a key priority.

  12. Health and social support services in older adults recently discharged from hospital: service utilisation and costs and exploration of the impact of a home-exercise intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farag, I; Howard, K; O'Rourke, S; Ferreira, M L; Lord, S R; Close, J C T; Vogler, C; Dean, C M; Cumming, R G; Sherrington, C

    2016-04-18

    Admission to hospital can lead to persistent deterioration in physical functioning, particularly for the more vulnerable older population. As a result of this physical deterioration, older people who have been recently discharged from hospital may be particularly high users of health and social support services. Quantify usage and costs of services in older adults after hospitalisation and explore the impact of a home-exercise intervention on service usage. The present study was a secondary analysis of data from a randomised controlled trial (ACTRN12607000563460). The trial involved 340 participants aged 60 years and over with recent hospitalisation. Service use and costs were compared between intervention (12 months of home-exercise prescribed in 10 visits from a physiotherapist) and control groups. 33 % of participants were re-admitted to hospital, 100 % consulted a General Medical Practitioner and 63 % used social services. 56 % of costs were associated with hospital admission and 22 % with social services. There was reduction in General Medical Practitioner services provided in the home in the intervention group (IRR 0.23, CI 0.1 to 0.545, p home-based exercise program was evident on service use or costs. Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry ACTRN12607000563460 >TrialSearch.

  13. Taking Specialist Surgical Services to the Rural District Hospitals at One Forth Cost: A Sustainable 'Return on Investment' Public Health Initiative of Patan Hospital, Patan Academy of Health Sciences, Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, J N

    2015-01-01

    The inequitable distribution and centralization of resources and services in urban area persists around the world, more so in developing countries. The challenge to meet the health needs of rural population requires health policy makers, government and concerned organization to put extra efforts. Such efforts require innovative, feasible and sustainable strategies to address the social justice of people living in districts away from capital and urban cities. At Patan Academy of Health Sciences, the medial school curriculum is designed to address these issues. Together with health professionals from Patan Hospital, the main teaching hospital on which the academy evolved, have initiated strategies to bring specialist services, starting with surgical services to remote district hospitals to serve the need of rural population. This initiative is 'desirable, doable and feasible'. Further more, this can be modified for replication and promotion by other academic institutions, central hospitals and government health system.

  14. The way the quality of health services is perceived and treated by the managerial personnel of public hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Rybarczyk-Szwajkowska

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Managerial knowledge and skills as well as profound understanding of goals and objectives of management determine the effectiveness and efficiency in all areas of managerial activities. In particular, this applies to the quality of healthcare services, perceived as a compliance between the effects (of medical treatment and the assumed relevant objectives (defined/desired health condition. The aim of the research was to distinguish and define the way the health service quality is perceived by the hospital managerial personnel. Material and Methods: The questionnaire was mailed to 836 members of the managerial personnel of public hospitals in the Łódź province. Of this number 122 questionnaires were returned. Results: Only 22 (18.49% of respondents presented the definition of quality. Attempts to meet patients’ expectations and to satisfy them were found to be the prevailing perception of the healthcare quality and 96.64% of respondents considered competences of medical staff contributory. Almost 64% of respondents disagree with the opinion that the number of medical staff does not affect the service quality. According to the respondents, a 46% increase in financial resources on average could significantly improve the quality of healthcare services. More than half (66.76% of respondents claim that healthcare services that are available cover 82% of patients’ needs. Almost 57% (56.52% of respondents consider that the subordinate- superior relationship influences their work involvement. According to 42.61% of respondents, the offered incentives encourage actions for the quality improvement. Conclusions: The results of the research indicate the need to develop a clear cut definition of the health service quality by the managerial personnel of public hospitals and to change their understanding, perception and treatment of the discussed issue, which provides a basis for the effective and efficient hospital management. Med Pr 2016

  15. "Medical tourism" and the global marketplace in health services: U.S. patients, international hospitals, and the search for affordable health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Leigh

    2010-01-01

    Health services are now advertised in a global marketplace. Hip and knee replacements, ophthalmologic procedures, cosmetic surgery, cardiac care, organ transplants, and stem cell injections are all available for purchase in the global health services marketplace. "Medical tourism" companies market "sun and surgery" packages and arrange care at international hospitals in Costa Rica, India, Mexico, Singapore, Thailand, and other destination nations. Just as automobile manufacturing and textile production moved outside the United States, American patients are "offshoring" themselves to facilities that use low labor costs to gain competitive advantage in the marketplace. Proponents of medical tourism argue that a global market in health services will promote consumer choice, foster competition among hospitals, and enable customers to purchase high-quality care at medical facilities around the world. Skeptics raise concerns about quality of care and patient safety, information disclosure to patients, legal redress when patients are harmed while receiving care at international hospitals, and harms to public health care systems in destination nations. The emergence of a global market in health services will have profound consequences for health insurance, delivery of health services, patient-physician relationships, publicly funded health care, and the spread of medical consumerism.

  16. Malawi's Mental Health Service

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    health service of Malawi began - not in the com~ munity or in the hospital, .... comes home they may keep him at a distance and half-expect him to .... So a good service often begins in a blaze of publicity, with local leaders and villagers invited to a meeting, performances from health education bands and drama groups, and ...

  17. Comparison of Maternal Health Service Satisfaction Level of National Health Coverage and Non National Health Coverage Patients in Bandung Mother and Child Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rika Yuntiani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Healthcare is financially inaccessible to some people. This results in deterioration of patients’ condition or even death, which is proven by the high level of Maternal Death Rate in Indonesia. The government implemented the National Health Coverage (NHC system to ensure the provision of quality health care for the entire community. This study aimed to examine the NHC and non-NHC patients’ perception to quality maternal healthcare services. Methods: This study was an analytic cross-sectional study conducted from August–October 2014. One hundred and twenty six respondents from Kota Bandung Mother and Child Hospital were included. The tool used in this study was a validity and reliability-tested questionnaire encompassing five dimensions of service quality: tangibles, reliability, responsiveness, assurance, and empathy. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was used to test the hypothesis. Results: The study showed that the majority of NHC(75% and non-NHC patients (89% ware unsatisfied with the maternal healthcare services. Most patients felt unsatisfied towards the reliability dimension which involved complicated referral procedures and examination time that failed to comply with what was promised. Conclusions: There is no difference between NHC and non-NHC patients’ level of satisfaction of maternal health care service in Bandung Mother and Child Hospital.

  18. Improving sexual health for HIV patients by providing a combination of integrated public health and hospital care services; a one-group pre- and post test intervention comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dukers-Muijrers Nicole HTM

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hospital HIV care and public sexual health care (a Sexual Health Care Centre services were integrated to provide sexual health counselling and sexually transmitted infections (STIs testing and treatment (sexual health care to larger numbers of HIV patients. Services, need and usage were assessed using a patient perspective, which is a key factor for the success of service integration. Methods The study design was a one-group pre-test and post-test comparison of 447 HIV-infected heterosexual individuals and men who have sex with men (MSM attending a hospital-based HIV centre serving the southern region of the Netherlands. The intervention offered comprehensive sexual health care using an integrated care approach. The main outcomes were intervention uptake, patients’ pre-test care needs (n=254, and quality rating. Results Pre intervention, 43% of the patients wanted to discuss sexual health (51% MSM; 30% heterosexuals. Of these patients, 12% to 35% reported regular coverage, and up to 25% never discussed sexual health topics at their HIV care visits. Of the patients, 24% used our intervention. Usage was higher among patients who previously expressed a need to discuss sexual health. Most patients who used the integrated services were new users of public health services. STIs were detected in 13% of MSM and in none of the heterosexuals. The quality of care was rated good. Conclusions The HIV patients in our study generally considered sexual health important, but the regular counselling and testing at the HIV care visit was insufficient. The integration of public health and hospital services benefited both care sectors and their patients by addressing sexual health questions, detecting STIs, and conducting partner notification. Successful sexual health care uptake requires increased awareness among patients about their care options as well as a cultural shift among care providers.

  19. Improving mental health service users' with medical co-morbidity transition between tertiary medical hospital and primary care services: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranwell, Kate; Polacsek, Meg; McCann, Terence V

    2016-07-26

    Mental health service users have high rates of medical co-morbidity but frequently experience problems accessing and transitioning between tertiary medical and primary care services. The aim of this study was to identify ways to improve service users' with medical co-morbidity care and experience during their transition between tertiary medical hospitals and primary care services. Experience-based co-design (EBCD) qualitative study incorporating a focus group discussion. The study took place in a large tertiary medical service, incorporating three medical hospitals, and primary care services, in Melbourne, Australia. A purposive sample of service users and their caregivers and tertiary medical and primary care clinicians participated in the focus group discussion, in August 2014. A semi-structured interview guide was used to inform data collection. A thematic analysis of the data was undertaken. Thirteen participants took part in the focus group interview, comprising 5 service users, 2 caregivers and 6 clinicians. Five themes were abstracted from the data, illustrating participants' perspectives about factors that facilitated (clinicians' expertise, engagement and accessibility enhancing transition) and presented as barriers (improving access pathways; enhancing communication and continuity of care; improving clinicians' attitudes; and increasing caregiver participation) to service users' progress through tertiary medical and primary care services. A sixth theme, enhancing service users' transition, incorporated three strategies to enhance their transition through tertiary medical and primary care services. EBCD is a useful approach to collaboratively develop strategies to improve service users' with medical co-morbidity and their caregivers' transition between tertiary medical and primary care services. A whole-of-service approach, incorporating policy development and implementation, change of practice philosophy, professional development education and support for

  20. European Hospital Survey: Benchmarking deployment of eHealth services (2012-2013) Final Report

    OpenAIRE

    PWC Eu Services

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this survey, conducted by PwC Luxembourg in cooperation with GDCC, was to benchmark the level of eHealth use in acute hospitals in all 27 EU Member States and Croatia, Iceland and Norway. The total geographical scope is hereafter referred to as EU27+3. This study builds upon previous studies in the area, most recently the eHealth Benchmarking III study of 20111, hereafter referred to as “the previous study”. The survey targeted the Chief Information Officers (CIOs) of the...

  1. Mother's breast milk supplemented with donor milk reduces hospital and health service usage costs in low-birthweight infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dritsakou, Kalliopi; Liosis, Georgios; Valsami, Georgia; Polychronopoulos, Evangelos; Souliotis, Kyriakos; Skouroliakou, Maria

    2016-09-01

    to compare hospital and health service usage costs of feeding low-birthweight (LBW) infants predominantly with their mother's milk, supplemented with donor milk, with donor milk and preterm formula. prospective matching study. tertiary public perinatal centre, neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and donor human milk bank. 100LBW infants (Group I) fed predominantly with their mother's milk from the first hour of life, supplemented (mainly for the first week of life) with donor milk, were matched on a 1:1 basis with 100LBW infants (Group II) who were fed with donor milk for the first 3 weeks of life followed by preterm formula until hospital discharge. Individualised targeted fortification of human milk was implemented in both study groups. the costs of hospitalisation, doctor visits and prescription drugs for viral infections until 8 months of age were calculated for each infant. Infants fed predominantly with their mother's milk had significantly shorter hospital stays and lower hospitalisation costs. In Group I infants, the duration of enteral gavage feeding was shorter, resulting in significantly lower costs. Up to 8 months of age, Group I infants experienced fewer episodes of viral infections, and the cost of each doctor visit and drug prescription was lower for these infants. feeding LBW infants predominantly with their mother's milk reduces hospital and health service usage costs. feeding LBW infants predominantly with their mother's milk, supplemented with donor milk, followed by exclusive breast feeding seems to result in potential savings in hospital and health service usage costs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The effect of internal marketing on job satisfaction in health services: a pilot study in public hospitals in Northern Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priporas Constantinos-Vasilios

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of internal marketing on job satisfaction in health services, particularly in public hospitals in Northern Greece. Methods A questionnaire with three sections was used. The first one referred to internal marketing by using Foreman and Money's scale, while the second one contained questions on job satisfaction based on Stamps and Piermonte's work. The last section included demographic questions. Three categories of health care professionals, nurses, doctors and paramedic personnel working in public hospitals have participated. Results Doctors tend to be more satisfied with their job than nurses in the same hospitals. Male personnel also tend to be more satisfied with their job than female. Time-defined work contract personnel have a greater level of job satisfaction than permanent personnel. Marital status, position, and educational level have no statistically significant impact on job satisfaction. A slight decline in job satisfaction occurs as the personnel age. Conclusions Internal marketing has a positive effect on the job satisfaction of hospital staff in Northern Greece. Also, doctors and male personnel seem to have greater levels of job satisfaction. Staff with time-defined work contracts with the hospital are more satisfied than permanent staff, and as the staff age, there is a slight decline in job satisfaction.

  3. The effect of internal marketing on job satisfaction in health services: a pilot study in public hospitals in Northern Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of internal marketing on job satisfaction in health services, particularly in public hospitals in Northern Greece. Methods A questionnaire with three sections was used. The first one referred to internal marketing by using Foreman and Money's scale, while the second one contained questions on job satisfaction based on Stamps and Piermonte's work. The last section included demographic questions. Three categories of health care professionals, nurses, doctors and paramedic personnel working in public hospitals have participated. Results Doctors tend to be more satisfied with their job than nurses in the same hospitals. Male personnel also tend to be more satisfied with their job than female. Time-defined work contract personnel have a greater level of job satisfaction than permanent personnel. Marital status, position, and educational level have no statistically significant impact on job satisfaction. A slight decline in job satisfaction occurs as the personnel age. Conclusions Internal marketing has a positive effect on the job satisfaction of hospital staff in Northern Greece. Also, doctors and male personnel seem to have greater levels of job satisfaction. Staff with time-defined work contracts with the hospital are more satisfied than permanent staff, and as the staff age, there is a slight decline in job satisfaction. PMID:21981753

  4. The effect of internal marketing on job satisfaction in health services: a pilot study in public hospitals in Northern Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliopoulos, Efthymios; Priporas, Constantinos-Vasilios

    2011-10-09

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of internal marketing on job satisfaction in health services, particularly in public hospitals in Northern Greece. A questionnaire with three sections was used. The first one referred to internal marketing by using Foreman and Money's scale, while the second one contained questions on job satisfaction based on Stamps and Piermonte's work. The last section included demographic questions. Three categories of health care professionals, nurses, doctors and paramedic personnel working in public hospitals have participated. Doctors tend to be more satisfied with their job than nurses in the same hospitals. Male personnel also tend to be more satisfied with their job than female. Time-defined work contract personnel have a greater level of job satisfaction than permanent personnel. Marital status, position, and educational level have no statistically significant impact on job satisfaction. A slight decline in job satisfaction occurs as the personnel age. Internal marketing has a positive effect on the job satisfaction of hospital staff in Northern Greece. Also, doctors and male personnel seem to have greater levels of job satisfaction. Staff with time-defined work contracts with the hospital are more satisfied than permanent staff, and as the staff age, there is a slight decline in job satisfaction.

  5. Hospitality Services. Student Activity Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This student activity book contains pencil-and-paper activities for use in a hospitality services course focusing on the food and lodging segments of the hospitality and tourism industry. The activities are organized into 29 chapters on the following topics: hospitality services industry; professional ethics; organization/management structures in…

  6. Health and economic effects from linking bedside and outpatient tobacco cessation services for hospitalized smokers in two large hospitals: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fellows Jeffrey L

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extended smoking cessation follow-up after hospital discharge significantly increases abstinence. Hospital smoke-free policies create a period of ‘forced abstinence’ for smokers, thus providing an opportunity to integrate tobacco dependence treatment, and to support post-discharge maintenance of hospital-acquired abstinence. This study is funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (1U01HL1053231. Methods/Design The Inpatient Technology-Supported Assisted Referral study is a multi-center, randomized clinical effectiveness trial being conducted at Kaiser Permanente Northwest (KPNW and at Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU hospitals in Portland, Oregon. The study assesses the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of linking a practical inpatient assisted referral to outpatient cessation services plus interactive voice recognition (AR + IVR follow-up calls, compared to usual care inpatient counseling (UC. In November 2011, we began recruiting 900 hospital patients age ≥18 years who smoked ≥1 cigarettes in the past 30 days, willing to remain abstinent postdischarge, have a working phone, live within 50 miles of the hospital, speak English, and have no health-related barriers to participation. Each site will randomize 450 patients to AR + IVR or UC using a 2:1 assignment strategy. Participants in the AR + IVR arm will receive a brief inpatient cessation consult plus a referral to available outpatient cessation programs and medications, and four IVR follow-up calls over seven weeks postdischarge. Participants do not have to accept the referral. At KPNW, UC participants will receive brief inpatient counseling and encouragement to self-enroll in available outpatient services. The primary outcome is self-reported thirty-day smoking abstinence at six months postrandomization for AR + IVR participants compared to usual care. Additional outcomes include self-reported and biochemically confirmed

  7. Public and private maternal health service capacity and patient flows in southern Tanzania: using a geographic information system to link hospital and national census data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabai, Patrik; Henke, Stefanie; Sušac, Katharina; Kisanga, Oberlin M E; Baumgarten, Inge; Kynast-Wolf, Gisela; Ramroth, Heribert; Marx, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Background Strategies to improve maternal health in low-income countries are increasingly embracing partnership approaches between public and private stakeholders in health. In Tanzania, such partnerships are a declared policy goal. However, implementation remains challenging as unfamiliarity between partners and insufficient recognition of private health providers prevail. This hinders cooperation and reflects the need to improve the evidence base of private sector contribution. Objective To map and analyse the capacities of public and private hospitals to provide maternal health care in southern Tanzania and the population reached with these services. Design A hospital questionnaire was applied in all 16 hospitals (public n=10; private faith-based n=6) in 12 districts of southern Tanzania. Areas of inquiry included selected maternal health service indicators (human resources, maternity/delivery beds), provider-fees for obstetric services and patient turnover (antenatal care, births). Spatial information was linked to the 2002 Population Census dataset and a geographic information system to map patient flows and socio-geographic characteristics of service recipients. Results The contribution of faith-based organizations (FBOs) to hospital maternal health services is substantial. FBO hospitals are primarily located in rural areas and their patient composition places a higher emphasis on rural populations. Also, maternal health service capacity was more favourable in FBO hospitals. We approximated that 19.9% of deliveries in the study area were performed in hospitals and that the proportion of c-sections was 2.7%. Mapping of patient flows demonstrated that women often travelled far to seek hospital care and where catchment areas of public and FBO hospitals overlap. Conclusions We conclude that the important contribution of FBOs to maternal health services and capacity as well as their emphasis on serving rural populations makes them promising partners in health

  8. Dental health service utilisation by resident doctors/medical officers in the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opeodu, O I; Dosumu, E B; Arowojolu, M O

    2012-09-01

    Dental disease is still a serious health problem universally possibly because dental health awareness and dental service utilization is still very low. The reported prevalence of dental diseases, especially periodontal disease, is higher among the black race while their rate of dental service utilization is lower in comparison to Caucasians. The aim of this study was to assess the rate of dental service utilization and identify the factors influencing such utilization by medical doctors and dentists in the University College Hospital, Ibadan. Two hundred 26-item questionnaires were distributed among the resident doctors/medical officers in the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Oyo state. The questionnaire sought to know if there is any previous dental visits, the reason for such visits and any other follow-up visits afterward. One hundred and ninety of the doctors returned the filled questionnaires giving a response rate of 95%. Data analysis was done using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 14.0. Level of statistical significance was set at p dental visit but only 25.3% was within the last one year of the study. Among those that had visited a dentist before, 59.7% did so for the symptomatic treatment of one ailment or the other and only 13.7% of them went back for the follow-up appointment after the resolution of their symptoms. There was a statistically significant difference between the rate of dental service utilization and the gender of the respondents (p dental service utilization and age of the respondents. The study showed that the rate of dental service utilization is low when compared with that of developed countries. Some factors identified as contributing to the lack of dental service utilization among the participants include prolonged and repeated dental appointments and the demand of their work.

  9. 42 CFR 440.140 - Inpatient hospital services, nursing facility services, and intermediate care facility services...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Definitions § 440.140 Inpatient hospital services, nursing facility services, and intermediate care facility... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inpatient hospital services, nursing facility services, and intermediate care facility services for individuals age 65 or older in institutions for...

  10. Barriers to healthy eating by National Health Service (NHS) hospital doctors in the hospital setting: results of a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston, James; Johnson, Carol; Wilson, Sue

    2008-08-28

    With high levels of obesity and related illness, improving the health of the nation is a major public health concern. This study aimed to identify factors that prevent healthy eating among doctors, and that are associated with satisfaction with catering services. Cross-sectional survey of 328 NHS doctors working in two NHS Trusts with on-site hospital canteen. Questionnaire to establish perceived barriers to healthy eating, weekly use and satisfaction with the hospital canteen, lifestyle and dietary habits, gender, age, height, weight, job details, and affect. 70% of doctors reported using their hospital canteen each week, with 2 visits per week on average.Canteen opening times, lack of selection and lack of breaks were the most commonly perceived barriers to healthy eating. Availability of healthy options caused the most dissatisfaction. Only 12% felt the NHS was supportive of healthy eating. 74% did not feel their canteen advocated healthy eating. Canteen use is associated with younger age (r = -0.254, p health score (r = 0.123, p = 0.049). Interventions to encourage regular meal breaks, eating breakfast and drinking more water each day need developing. Improved canteen accessibility and availability of healthy options at evenings and weekends may be beneficial.

  11. [Nutritional care in public hospitals of four Brazilian states: contributions of health evaluation to health surveillance services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Seta, Marismary Horsth; O'Dwyer, Gisele; Henriques, Patrícia; de Sales, Gizene Luciana Pereira

    2010-11-01

    Considering the importance of nutritional care for the quality of care provided to hospitalized patients, the study aims to assess health care in eight public hospitals that have received support from QualiSUS in four Brazilian states. There were semi-structured interviews with nutritionists, direct observation and review of 219 records of patients admitted to the medical clinics. The findings suggest weaknesses in the hospital nutritional care, poor integration between the production of food and nutritional care in the surveyed hospitals, in addition to structural deficiencies. We highlight problems related to the nutritional care process, including its documentation. In 93% of the records there were no records on the nutritional status on admission, or nutritional assessment of patients in nutritional therapy. It was observed that the assessment made by the health surveillance in routine inspections, focusing on the verification of compliance and structural aspects, does not include the detection of a possible nutritional risk for the patient. We suggest the inclusion of other criteria and strategies for surveillance, among them a review of open medical records.

  12. Barriers to healthy eating by National Health Service (NHS hospital doctors in the hospital setting: results of a cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Sue

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With high levels of obesity and related illness, improving the health of the nation is a major public health concern. This study aimed to identify factors that prevent healthy eating among doctors, and that are associated with satisfaction with catering services. Findings Methods: Cross-sectional survey of 328 NHS doctors working in two NHS Trusts with on-site hospital canteen. Questionnaire to establish perceived barriers to healthy eating, weekly use and satisfaction with the hospital canteen, lifestyle and dietary habits, gender, age, height, weight, job details, and affect. Results: 70% of doctors reported using their hospital canteen each week, with 2 visits per week on average. Canteen opening times, lack of selection and lack of breaks were the most commonly perceived barriers to healthy eating. Availability of healthy options caused the most dissatisfaction. Only 12% felt the NHS was supportive of healthy eating. 74% did not feel their canteen advocated healthy eating. Canteen use is associated with younger age (r = -0.254, p Conclusion Interventions to encourage regular meal breaks, eating breakfast and drinking more water each day need developing. Improved canteen accessibility and availability of healthy options at evenings and weekends may be beneficial.

  13. Depression and increased short-term hospitalization risk among geriatric patients receiving home health care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheeran, Thomas; Byers, Amy L; Bruce, Martha L

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the association between depression and hospitalization among geriatric home care patients. A sample of 477 patients newly admitted to home care over two years was assessed for depression. Bivariate and logistic regression analyses examined the likelihood of hospitalization during a 60-day home care episode. The hospitalization rate was similar for the 77 depressed patients and 400 nondepressed patients (about 7%). However, mean time to hospitalization was 8.4 versus 19.5 days after start of care, respectively. Hospitalization risk was significantly higher for depressed patients during the first few weeks. A main effect for depression and a depression-by-time interaction was found when analyses controlled for medical comorbidity, cognitive status, age, gender, race, activities of daily living and instrumental activities of daily living, and referral to home care after hospitalization. Depression appears to increase short-term risk of hospitalization for geriatric home care patients immediately after starting home care.

  14. Investments for medical equipment in a mother and child health hospital: correlation with level of services/departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisanuto, Daniele; Raggi, Roberto; Bavuusuren, Bayasgalantai; Tudevdorj, Erkhembaatar; Doglioni, Nicoletta; Zanardo, Vincenzo

    2011-02-01

    To assess whether investments for medical equipments assigned by a team of experts to a mother and child health hospital located in Mongolia were correlated with structural, organizational, and educational level of its services/departments. A score was used for evaluating the level of each service/department. It was based on a 'structural area' and an 'organizational and educational area'. Destination of funds was determined by a team of experts in collaboration with the head of the service/department. Thirty-three of 36 services/departments (91.6%) were evaluated. A total sum of 4,432,140 Euros to invest in medical equipment was estimated. Assigned investments were inversely correlated with the total (structural plus organizational and educational area) score (n = 33; r =  -0.59; p = 0.0002), and the specific scores for structural area (n = 33; r = -0.46; p = 0.005) and organizational and educational area (n = 33; r =  -0.56; p = 0.0006). A large part of the funds for medical equipment was destined to services/departments with low organizational and educational conditions, limiting the potential effect of the aid meanwhile supporting the most in need departments. Educational efforts and monitoring of specific long-term indicators are mandatory.

  15. Strategic Responses to Fiscal Constraints: A Health Policy Analysis of Hospital-Based Ambulatory Physical Therapy Services in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrier, Molly C.; Williams, A. Paul; Zakus, David; Deber, Raisa B.

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: Ambulatory physical therapy (PT) services in Canada are required to be insured under the Canada Health Act, but only if delivered within hospitals. The present study analyzed strategic responses used by hospitals in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) to deliver PT services in an environment of fiscal constraint. Methods: Key informant interviews (n = 47) were conducted with participants from all hospitals located within the GTA. Results: Two primary strategic responses were identified: (1) “load shedding” through the elimination or reduction of services, and (2) “privatization” through contracting out or creating internal for-profit subsidiary clinics. All hospitals reported reductions in service delivery between 1996 and 2003, and 15.0% (7/47 hospitals) fully eliminated ambulatory services. Although only one of 47 hospitals contracted out services, another 15.0% (7/47) reported that for-profit subsidiary clinics were created within the hospital in order to access other more profitable forms of quasi-public and private funding. Conclusions: Strategic restructuring of services, aimed primarily at cost containment, may have yielded short-term financial savings but has also created a ripple effect across the continuum of care. Moreover, the rise of for-profit subsidiary clinics operating within not-for-profit hospitals has emerged without much public debate and with little research to evaluate its impact. PMID:20808483

  16. Strategic responses to fiscal constraints: a health policy analysis of hospital-based ambulatory physical therapy services in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Michel D; Verrier, Molly C; Williams, A Paul; Zakus, David; Deber, Raisa B

    2009-01-01

    Ambulatory physical therapy (PT) services in Canada are required to be insured under the Canada Health Act, but only if delivered within hospitals. The present study analyzed strategic responses used by hospitals in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) to deliver PT services in an environment of fiscal constraint. Key informant interviews (n = 47) were conducted with participants from all hospitals located within the GTA. Two primary strategic responses were identified: (1) "load shedding" through the elimination or reduction of services, and (2) "privatization" through contracting out or creating internal for-profit subsidiary clinics. All hospitals reported reductions in service delivery between 1996 and 2003, and 15.0% (7/47 hospitals) fully eliminated ambulatory services. Although only one of 47 hospitals contracted out services, another 15.0% (7/47) reported that for-profit subsidiary clinics were created within the hospital in order to access other more profitable forms of quasi-public and private funding. Strategic restructuring of services, aimed primarily at cost containment, may have yielded short-term financial savings but has also created a ripple effect across the continuum of care. Moreover, the rise of for-profit subsidiary clinics operating within not-for-profit hospitals has emerged without much public debate and with little research to evaluate its impact.

  17. The Impact of Health Service of the Community Hospital Located in Thailand’s Border: migrant from Burma, LAOS, and Cambodia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orathai - Srithongtham

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The denial of difficult, dangerous and dirty work done by the Thai People has been the major cause of migrant substitution in Thailand which triggered the urgent need for proper health care. This study was aim to explain the burden and impact of providing health service to the trans-national migrant in community hospital at border area of Laos, Burma and Cambodia. Therefore survey research and data collecting was used through quantitative and qualitative methods. Results: Khemarat and Klong Yai hospital: the financial burden was high however Mae Sai hospital has strong income with less expenditure. The impact of three hospitals was 1 the only way of solving the financial burden is by using the hospital’s money. 2 No data system about trans-nation’s migrant health services has been applied so far by any hospitals here in Thailand 3 Man power of hospital is depended on the Thai people which doesn’t include the migrant which is approximately 50% 4 The language and the cultural had generated several obstacles to health service 5 Problem of prevention and control of Communicable disease such as Malaria, Dengue Hemorrhagic fever, Tuberculosis, and Elephantiasis, 6 No Referral system between Thailand and neighboring countries.  Recommendations: it should be setting the strategy of AEC’s health system at nearby country, concern with the trans-national migrants, and develop the data system of health service of trans-national migrant.

  18. The effect of marketisation on the leadership of National Health Service (NHS) hospitals.

    OpenAIRE

    Leech, Darren

    2013-01-01

    This thesis tests and explores the impact of increasing competition (marketisation) on the leaders of NHS hospitals in England. The research was prompted by the researcher’s observations in practice that language and behaviours were changing to reflect an increasing sense of competition between NHS hospitals.\\ud Whilst published opinions are not difficult to find in relation to changing NHS policy, this unique academic investigation provides a new contribution to knowledge through evidence ge...

  19. [The Unified National Health System and the third sector: Characterization of non-hospital facilities providing basic health care services in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canabrava, Claudia Marques; Andrade, Eli Iôla Gurgel; Janones, Fúlvio Alves; Alves, Thiago Andrade; Cherchiglia, Mariangela Leal

    2007-01-01

    In Brazil, nonprofit or charitable organizations are the oldest and most traditional and institutionalized form of relationship between the third sector and the state. Despite the historical importance of charitable hospital care, little research has been done on the participation of the nonprofit sector in basic health care in the country. This article identifies and describes non-hospital nonprofit facilities providing systematically organized basic health care in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil, in 2004. The research focused on the facilities registered with the National Council on Social Work, using computer-assisted telephone and semi-structured interviews. Identification and description of these organizations showed that the charitable segment of the third sector conducts organized and systematic basic health care services but is not recognized by the Unified National Health System as a potential partner, even though it receives referrals from basic government services. The study showed spatial and temporal overlapping of government and third-sector services in the same target population.

  20. Urban women's socioeconomic status, health service needs and utilization in the four weeks after postpartum hospital discharge: findings of a Canadian cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciliska Donna

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Postpartum women who experience socioeconomic disadvantage are at higher risk for poor health outcomes than more advantaged postpartum women, and may benefit from access to community based postpartum health services. This study examined socioeconomically disadvantaged (SED postpartum women's health, and health service needs and utilization patterns in the first four weeks post hospital discharge, and compared them to more socioeconomically advantaged (SEA postpartum women's health, health service needs and utilization patterns. Methods Data collected as part of a large Ontario cross-sectional mother-infant survey were analyzed. Women (N = 1000 who had uncomplicated vaginal births of single 'at-term' infants at four hospitals in two large southern Ontario, Canada cities were stratified into SED and SEA groups based on income, social support and a universally administered hospital postpartum risk screen. Participants completed a self-administered questionnaire before hospital discharge and a telephone interview four weeks after discharge. Main outcome measures were self-reported health status, symptoms of postpartum depression, postpartum service needs and health service use. Results When compared to the SEA women, the SED women were more likely to be discharged from hospital within the first 24 hours after giving birth [OR 1.49, 95% CI (1.01–2.18], less likely to report very good or excellent health [OR 0.48, 95% CI (0.35–0.67], and had higher rates of symptoms of postpartum depression [OR 2.7, 95% CI(1.64–4.4]. No differences were found between groups in relation to self reported need for and ability to access services for physical and mental health needs, or in use of physicians, walk-in clinics and emergency departments. The SED group were more likely to accept public health nurse home visits [OR 2.24, 95% CI(1.47–3.40]. Conclusion Although SED women experienced poorer mental and overall health they reported similar

  1. VT - Vermont Hospital Service Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Hospital service areas (HSAs) are organized by towns and are based on inpatient discharges where the diagnosis indicated the need for immediate care. Plurality...

  2. Something of value: the introduction of contingency management interventions into the New York City Health and Hospital Addiction Treatment Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, Scott H; Burns, Marylee; Coleman, Peter; Stitzer, Maxine; Wale, Joyce B; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores the impact of the adoption of the contingency management approach by the Chemical Dependency Treatment Services of the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation (HHC). The utilization of this approach grew out of an alliance between NIDA Clinical Trials Network-affiliated clinicians and researchers and a leadership team at the HHC. Interviews and dialogues with administrators, staff, and patients revealed a shared sense that the use of contingency management had: (1) increased patient motivation for treatment and recovery; (2) facilitated therapeutic progress and goal attainment; (3) improved the attitude and morale of many staff members and administrators; and (4) developed a more collegial and affirming relationship not only between patients and staff, but also among staff members.

  3. UHS development and hospital services rationing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, José Mendes

    2009-01-01

    We analyze Brazilian health system in comparative perspective. Middle income beneficiaries migration to pre-paid private insurance makes Brazilian case similar to United States. Public hospital services delivery shows an important retrenchment enhanced by demographic growth and new expectations due to constitutional definitions. Retrenchment is selective and concentrates on obstetric and clinic services and private for-profit services. To ensure equal access it is necessary to improve public spending; diminish out-of-pocket spending; develop organizational reforms; improve government capacity.

  4. Association between osteoporosis, health-related productivity loss and use of hospital services in outpatients of the Brazilian National Health System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Rodrigues Rocha

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims To analyze factors associated with osteoporosis among outpatients of the Brazilian National Health System and to identify their association with hospital and labor economic outcomes. Methods Cross-sectional study carried out in the city of Presidente Prudente / SP. The sample consisted of 542 adults of both sexes and aged ≥ 50 years old. The occurrence of osteoporosis, health-related productivity loss, use of hospital services and level of physical activity were assessed using questionnaires. Statistical analysis was composed of chi-square test, binary logistic regression and Mann-Whitney test. The significance level adopted was p-value <0.05. ResultsThe prevalence of osteoporosis was 14.4% (95% CI: 11.4% - 17.3% and it was associated with female sex (p = 0.001, lower economic status (p-value = 0.036 and obesity (p-value = 0.003. Participants with osteoporosis showed a higher incidence of surgery in the last 12 months (OR = 2.13 [1.04 to 4.35], productivity loss (OR = 1.91 [1.13 to 3.42] and disability retirement (OR = 2.03 [1.20 to 3.43]. Over the past 12 months, the sum of direct and indirect economic loss was R$ 1,382,630.00. Conclusion The female sex, lower economic status and obesity were associated with a higher occurrence of osteoporosis, and consequent higher use of hospital services and significant economic losses.

  5. 42 CFR 136.30 - Payment to Medicare-participating hospitals for authorized Contract Health Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Services (CMS) or its fiscal intermediaries. (e) Basic payment calculation. The calculation of the payment... consistent with CMS instructions to its fiscal intermediaries at the time the claim is processed. Adjustments will be made to correct billing or claims processing errors, including when fraud is detected. I/T/Us...

  6. Length of hospital stay and health services use of medical inpatients with comorbid noncognitive mental disorders: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopmans, Gerrit T; Donker, Marianne C H; Rutten, Frans H H

    2005-01-01

    We reviewed 23 studies on the association between noncognitive mental disorders and the use of general health care services by medical patients admitted to a general hospital. Only studies with a prospective design and with a correction for possible confounding factors were included. In most studies, only service use during index admission was observed, but eight studies included a longer observation period during follow-up after hospital discharge. The 15 studies that were restricted to service use during index admission showed mixed results: length of hospital stay was related to common mental disorders in some studies, but other studies did not find such an association. The eight studies that used a longer observation period showed findings that are more consistent. They demonstrated mainly that symptoms or complaints of depression are related to a higher resource use within general medical services.

  7. Hospitals look to hospitality service firms to meet TQM goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hard, R

    1992-05-20

    Hospitals that hire contract service firms to manage one or all aspects of their hospitality service departments increasingly expect those firms to help meet total quality management goals as well as offer the more traditional cost reduction, quality improvement and specialized expertise, finds the 1992 Hospital Contract Services Survey conducted by Hospitals.

  8. Single Specialty Hospitals and Service Competition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kathleen Carey; James F. Burgess; Gary J. Young

    2009-01-01

    ...: changes in service provision by general hospitals in local markets. Results suggest that general hospitals are stepping up their own offerings of services that are in direct competition with those of specialty hospitals...

  9. Treatment received, satisfaction with health care services, and psychiatric symptoms 3 months after hospitalization for self-poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grimholt Tine K

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients who self-poison have high repetition and high mortality rates. Therefore, appropriate follow-up is important. The aims of the present work were to study treatment received, satisfaction with health care services, and psychiatric symptoms after hospitalization for self-poisoning. Methods A cohort of patients who self-poisoned (n = 867 over a period of 1 year received a questionnaire 3 months after discharge. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS, and Generalized Self-Efficacy Scale (GSE were used. The participation rate was 28% (n = 242; mean age, 41 years; 66% females. Results Although only 14% of patients were registered without follow-up referrals at discharge, 41% reported no such measures. Overall, satisfaction with treatment was fairly good, although 29% of patients waited more than 3 weeks for their first appointment. A total of 22% reported repeated self-poisoning and 17% cutting. The mean BDI and BHS scores were 23.3 and 10.1, respectively (both moderate to severe. The GSE score was 25.2. BDI score was 25.6 among patients with suicide attempts, 24.9 for appeals, and 20.1 for substance-use-related poisonings. Conclusions Despite plans for follow-up, many patients reported that they did not receive any. The reported frequency of psychiatric symptoms and self-harm behavior indicate that a more active follow-up is needed.

  10. Examining health service utilization, hospital treatment cost, and mortality of individuals with epilepsy and status epilepticus in New South Wales, Australia 2012-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Rebecca J; Herkes, Geoffrey; Nikpour, Armin; Bleasel, Andrew; Shih, Patti; Vagholkar, Sanjyot; Rapport, Frances

    2017-12-06

    This study examined the health service utilization and hospital treatment cost of individuals with epilepsy by age group, mortality within 30days, and surgical outcomes for individuals with refractory epilepsy in New South Wales (NSW), Australia. A retrospective examination of linked hospitalization and mortality data for individuals hospitalized with a diagnosis of epilepsy during 2012-2016. Hospitalized incidence rates per 1000 population were calculated, and negative binomial regression was used to examine temporal trends. Mortality within 30days of hospitalization was identified, along with cause of death. There were 44,722 hospitalizations during the five-year period, with a hospitalization rate of 85.6 per 1000 population (95% confidence interval (CI): 84.7-86.4). Total hospital treatment costs were AUD$402.9 million. Children aged ≤17years accounted for 32.0% of hospitalizations. Just over half to two-thirds of hospitalizations for each age group were for a principal diagnosis of epilepsy, with 2976 hospitalizations of individuals for status epilepticus. The overall mean hospital length of stay (LOS) for epilepsy hospitalizations was 5.1days (standard deviation (SD)=9.0). Thirty-day mortality was highest for individuals aged ≥65years (6.7%), and epilepsy was identified as the underlying cause of death for 18.2% of deaths. This research has provided insight into the healthcare utilization profiles of individuals with epilepsy at different ages. Epilepsy hospitalizations constitute a substantial cost to the healthcare system, and better overall management of seizures and comorbid conditions is likely to lead to a reduction in the need for hospitalization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [Mortality following cardiac surgery in the National Health Service Hospitals of the Community of Valencia in 2007: a descriptive analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, R; Pajares, A; Vicente, J L; Aparicio, R; Loro, J M; Moreno, I; Soria, A; López, A; Porta, J; de la Fuente, C; Herrera, P; Tur, A; Osseyran, F; Guillén, A; Martí, F; Llagunes, J; Mateo, E; Aguar, F; Peña, J J; Marqués, J I; Ripoll, A; Reina, C; Ferrandis, P; Muedra, V; Llopis, E; Cantó, M; García, C

    2010-02-01

    To analyze clinical records of cardiac surgery patients in an attempt to identify factors associated with mortality in the postoperative critical care units of the public health service hospitals in the Community of Valencia, Spain, in 2007. Retrospective study of cases from January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2007. The charts of all patients who underwent cardiac surgery with or without extracorporeal circulation were reviewed. A data collection protocol was followed to obtain information on age, sex, body mass index (BMI), presurgical risk factors, type of surgery, duration of extracorporeal circulation, duration of ischemia, cause of death, and length of stay in the postoperative critical care unit. The study population consisted of 2113 patients at 5 public hospitals; 124 patients (70 men, 54 women) died. The mean (SD) age was 70 (9.43) years (range, 36-91 years). The mean BMI was 28.19 kg/m2 (maximum, 42 kg/m2). The mean Euroscore was 21.92 (maximum, 94.29). Hypertension was present as a preoperative risk factor in most patients (74.2%); dyslipidemia was present in 51.6%, diabetes mellitus in 38.7%, stroke in 73%, and renal failure in 2.4%. It was noteworthy was that the group who underwent coronary revascularization had the highest mortality rate (nearly 35% of the 124 patients). The next highest mortality rate (19.4%) was in patients who had combined procedures (valve repair or substitution plus coronary revascularization). Mortality was 18.5% in the group undergoing aortic valve surgery and 11.3% in those undergoing mitral valve surgery. The mean duration of extracorporeal circulation was 148.63 minutes. The mean duration of myocardial ischemia was 94.91 minutes. The most frequent cause of death was cardiogenic shock (54.8%). This was followed by distributive shock (29.8%) and hemorrhagic shock (8.9%). The mean length of stay in the postoperative critical care unit was 13.6 days. Overall mortality was 5.87%. The highest mortality rate among cardiac surgery

  12. A mixed-methods approach to conducting Internal Revenue Service-compliant community health needs assessments: a case example for nonprofit hospital leaders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oglesby WH

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Willie H Oglesby, Ken Slenkovich Department of Health Policy and Management, College of Public Health, Kent State University, Kent, OH, USA Background: The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act created new requirements for nonprofit hospitals to conduct a Community Health Needs Assessment (CHNA at least once every 3 years, with a significant tax penalty for noncompliance. While some resources exist to help nonprofit hospital leaders conduct various aspects of a CHNA, few reflect the new Internal Revenue Service requirements. Methods: Many different models of CHNAs have emerged over the years. Although each has its unique features, the essential elements of a CHNA include engaging stakeholders, defining the community, gathering sufficient representative data, prioritizing information, and reporting results. In this paper, we expand upon this basic approach by offering a practical step-by-step guide to conducting CHNAs that meets new Internal Revenue Service regulations. Results: We developed and tested this methodology in partnership with several nonprofit hospital systems in Northeast Ohio, USA. In this paper, we discuss our use of the methodology and identify recommendations for other nonprofit hospital leaders. Conclusion: The methodology presented in this paper is a cost-effective approach to satisfying new CHNA requirements and nonprofit hospital leaders should consider using it or modifying it to fit their unique needs. Keywords: Affordable Care Act, CHNA, community benefit, community hospital

  13. [Transcatheter aortic valve implantation versus aortic valve replacement: cost analysis from the regional health service and hospital perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berti, Elena; Fortuna, Daniela; Bartoli, Simona; Ciuca, Cristina; Orlando, Anna; Scondotto, Salvatore; Agabiti, Nera; Salizzoni, Stefano; Aranzulla, Tiziana Claudia; Gandolfo, Caterina; De Palma, Rossana; Saia, Francesco

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the cost of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR) procedures, together with the cost of the first-year hospitalizations following the index ones, in 4 Italian regions where diffusion level of TAVI and coverage decisions are different. The cost analysis was performed evaluating 372 patients enrolled consecutively from December 1, 2012 to September 30, 2015. The index hospitalization cost was calculated both from the hospital perspective through a full-costing approach and from the regional healthcare service perspective by applying the regional reimbursement tariffs. The follow-up costs were calculated for one year after the index hospitalization, from the regional healthcare sservice perspective, through the identification of hospital admissions for cardiovascular pathologies after the index hospitalization and computation of the relative regional tariffs. The mean hospitalization cost was € 32 120 for transfemoral TAVI (232 procedures), € 35 958 for transapical TAVI (31 procedures) and € 17 441 for AVR (109 procedures). From the regional healthcare service perspective, the mean transfemoral TAVI cost was € 29 989, with relevant regional variability (range from € 19 987 to € 36 979); the mean transapical TAVI cost was € 39 148; the mean AVR cost was € 32 020. The mean follow-up costs were € 2294 for transfemoral TAVI, € 2335 for transapical TAVI, and € 2601 for AVR. In our study, transapical TAVI resulted more expensive than transfemoral TAVI, while surgical AVR was cheaper than both (less than 40%). Costs of the transfemoral approach showed great variability between participating regions, probably due to different hospital costs, logistics, patients' selection and reimbursement policy. A central level of control would be appropriate to avoid unjustified differences in access to innovative procedures between different Italian regions.

  14. Characteristics of rural hospital services for people with dementia: findings from the Hospital Dementia Services Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bail, Kasia; Hudson, Charles; Grealish, Laurie; Shannon, Kay; Ehsen, Saraah; Peut, Ann; Gibson, Diane; Draper, Brian; Karmel, Rosemary

    2013-08-01

    To obtain information about aged care services in rural New South Wales public hospitals, and to describe key operational aspects of their service delivery models. A mixed methods design was used to combine data collected from: (i) a survey of public hospitals and (ii) qualitative site visits in a sample of eleven rural sites. Rural public hospitals in NSW, Australia. Qualitative data were collected from multidisciplinary clinicians, managers and community service providers who participated in site visits in 2010 and from surveys of NSW public hospitals in 2009/10 about aged care and dementia services. Survey and site visit findings demonstrated that rural hospitals have fewer secure beds for managing patients with disturbed behaviour due to dementia and delirium and fewer speciality aged care staff than metropolitan hospitals. Site visit participants also described how secure environments can aid care for people with dementia even in the absence of clinical specialists. The care of people with dementia in rural hospitals is constrained by access to specialist aged care staff and the physical environment of the hospital. Clinicians are adept at maximising resources to manage diagnosis and transitions for people with dementia. Further understanding of how key operational aspects of clinical leadership and environmental modifications impact on a range of patient outcomes would be valuable. © 2013 The Authors. Australian Journal of Rural Health © National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  15. Framing in policy processes: a case study from hospital planning in the National Health Service in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Lorelei; Exworthy, Mark

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports from an ethnographic study of hospital planning in England undertaken between 2006 and 2009. We explored how a policy to centralise hospital services was espoused in national policy documents, how this shifted over time and how it was translated in practice. We found that policy texts defined hospital planning as a clinical issue and framed decisions to close hospitals or hospital departments as based on the evidence and necessary to ensure safety. We interpreted this framing as a rhetorical strategy for implementing organisational change in the context of community resistance to service closure and a concomitant policy emphasising the importance of public and patient involvement in planning. Although the persuasive power of the framing was limited, a more insidious form of power was identified in the way the framing disguised the political nature of the issue by defining it as a clinical problem. We conclude by discussing how the clinical rationale constrains public participation in decisions about the delivery and organisation of healthcare and restricts the extent to which alternative courses of action can be considered. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Factors associated with referral to mental health services among suicide attempters visiting emergency centers of general hospitals in Korea: does history of suicide attempts predict referral?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Sun-Jin; Lee, Myung-Soo; Yim, Hyeon Woo; Kim, Han Joon; Lee, Kyeongryong; Chung, Hyun Soo; Cho, Junho; Choi, Seung-Pil; Seo, Young Mi

    2011-01-01

    This study examined whether a history of past suicide attempts was a critical factor for referral to mental health services among suicide attempters visiting emergency centers of general hospitals in Korea. In this cross-sectional study, a resident of emergency medicine at each emergency center interviewed 310 suicide attempters visiting five tertiary general hospitals located in Seoul, using standardized questionnaires, during 7 months in 2007. We examined associations between suicide attempt history and referral to mental health services via multiple logistic regressions. Subjects' rate of referral to mental health services was 47.3%. When we controlled for participant age, time of arrival at the emergency center, psychiatric treatment history, use of alcohol, suicide attempt lethality and subjective expectation to suicide attempts, past suicide attempts did not predict referral to mental health services (odds ratio=1.74; 95% confidence interval .88-3.43). Psychiatric interventions for suicide reattempters visiting emergency centers are important for preventing suicide, but providers have not considered suicide attempt history as a critical factor for referral to mental health services. Therefore, we suggest that more effort is needed to systemize psychiatric interventions for suicide reattempters at emergency centers in Korea. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Role of Surgical Services in Profitability of Hospitals in California: An Analysis of Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development Annual Financial Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moazzez, Ashkan; de Virgilio, Christian

    2016-10-01

    With constant changes in health-care laws and payment methods, profitability, and financial sustainability of hospitals are of utmost importance. The purpose of this study is to determine the relationship between surgical services and hospital profitability. The Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development annual financial databases for the years 2009 to 2011 were used for this study. The hospitals' characteristics and income statement elements were extracted for statistical analysis using bivariate and multivariate linear regression. A total of 989 financial records of 339 hospitals were included. On bivariate analysis, the number of inpatient and ambulatory operating rooms (ORs), the number of cases done both as inpatient and outpatient in each OR, and the average minutes used in inpatient ORs were significantly related with the net income of the hospital. On multivariate regression analysis, when controlling for hospitals' payer mix and the study year, only the number of inpatient cases done in the inpatient ORs (β = 832, P = 0.037), and the number of ambulatory ORs (β = 1,485, 466, P = 0.001) were significantly related with the net income of the hospital. These findings suggest that hospitals can maximize their profitability by diverting and allocating outpatient surgeries to ambulatory ORs, to allow for more inpatient surgeries.

  18. [Health Promotion and care of immigrant population in the eighth Municipality of Rome: the experience of the Medicine Service of Solidarity and the University Hospital of Tor Vergata].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palombi, Leonardo; Ercoli, Lucia; Buonomo, Ersilia; Mancinelli, Sandro; De Luca, Simona; Laurenti, Serena; Visconti, Giuseppe; Bollero, Patrizio

    2013-01-01

    The VIII Municipality of Rome is characterized by a high poverty rate, by the presence of many immigrant communities and by the lack of health services available to vulnerable social groups. In 2005 , the " Servizio di Medicina Solidale" of the University Hospital of "Tor Vergata", for the first time intervened in this Municipality regarding Immigrant Health. The paper describes the activities and organization of this service from January 2005 to December 2007. It demonstrates a complex epidemiological picture of 2,374 immigrants, characterized by a young population, mostly women with reproductive health issues, followed by children with infectious and nutritional problems and, ultimately, adults who accessed the service, firstly for gastroenterological problems, secondly for cardiovascular problems and finally for dysmetabolic disorders. The paper describes the culture-centered actions of Health Promotion and Health Education in order to improve health awareness and promote integration of immigrants. The study indicates that the limited number of hospital admissions ( n.20) with respect to the number of outpatient visits (n.70.000) in the first seven years of the service " Medicina Solidale" has significantly reduced the number of unnecessary admissions to emergency wards. In conclusion it is notable that the cost of such intervention results eight times inferior to emergency admissions and further confirms that a Community medicine approach is sustainable.

  19. Defense Health Care: Availability and Quality Measurement of Women’s Health Care Services in U.S. Military Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    such as screening for breast and cervical cancer and certain sexually transmitted diseases . National Perinatal Information Center (NPIC) NPIC is a...data for a subset of these measures. 31A hysterectomy is the surgical removal of part, or all, of the uterus. 32Chlamydia is a sexually transmitted ...care performance measures and includes measures of preventive services for women such as screening for breast and cervical cancer and certain sexually

  20. Integrated health service delivery networks and tuberculosis avoidable hospitalizations: is there a relation between them in Brazil?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popolin, Marcela Paschoal; Touso, Michelle Mosna; Yamamura, Mellina; Rodrigues, Ludmila Barbosa Bandeira; da Cunha Garcia, Maria Concebida; Arroyo, Luiz Henrique; Ramos, Antônio Carlos Vieira; Berra, Thais Zamboni; Santos Neto, Marcelino; de Almeida Crispim, Juliane; Chiaravalotti Neto, Francisco; Pinto, Ione Carvalho; Palha, Pedro Fredemir; da Costa Uchoa, Severina Alice; Lapão, Luís Velez; Fronteira, Inês; Arcêncio, Ricardo Alexandre

    2016-03-01

    The early identification of the Breathing Symptoms within the scope of Primary Health Care is recommended, and is also one of the strategies of national sanitary authorities for reaching the elimination of tuberculosis. The purpose of this study is to consider which attributes and which territories have shown the most significant progress in Primary Health Care, in terms of coordination of Health Care Networks, and also check if those areas of Primary Health Care that are most critical regarding coordination, there were more or less cases of avoidable hospitalizations for tuberculosis. This is an ecological study that uses primary and secondary data. For analysis, coropletic maps were developed through the ArcGIS software, version 10.2. There was also the calculation of gross annual and Bayesian rates for hospitalizations for tuberculosis, for each Primary Health Care territory. There were satisfactory results for attributes such as Population (n = 37; 80.4 %), Primary Health Care (n = 43; 93.5 %), Support System (n = 45; 97.8 %); the exceptions were Logistics System (n = 32; 76.0 %) and Governance System, with fewer units in good condition (n = 31; 67.3 %). There is no evidence of any connection between networks' coordination by Primary Health Care and tuberculosis avoidable admissions. The results show that progress has been made regarding the coordination of the Health Care Networks, and a positive trend has been shown, even though the levels are not excellent. It was found no relationship between the critical areas of Primary Health Care and tuberculosis avoidable hospitalizations, possibly because other variables necessary to comprehend the phenomena.

  1. Hospitality and service: leading real change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerfoot, Karlene M

    2009-01-01

    A patient's decision to recommend a health care organization and the patient's loyalty scores are largely determined by the interaction patients and their families have with the nurses. Hospitality is how the delivery of that product makes the person feel and is a dialogue that requires the server to be "on the guest's side" throughout the experience. The challenge for health care is to help our patients and their families transcend the usual routine care of our health care world and to experience an emotional connection that provides that sense of affiliation and emotional kinship with the organization and the staff. Moving from the service mindset in health care to the hospitality mindset that engages people positively and emotionally is what healing is all about.

  2. Housing as a Social Determinant of Health in Singapore and Its Association with Readmission Risk and Increased Utilization of Hospital Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Lian Leng; Wah, Win; Ng, Matthew Joo; Tan, Shu Yun; Liu, Nan; Lee, Kheng Hock

    2016-01-01

    Residence in public rental housing is an area-level measure of socioeconomic status, but its impact as a social determinant of health in Singapore has not been studied. We therefore aimed to examine the association of public rental housing with readmission risk and increased utilization of hospital services in Singapore. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using retrospective 2014 data from Singapore General Hospital's electronic health records. Variables known to affect readmission risk and health-care utilization were identified a priori and include patient demographics, comorbidities, health-care utilization in the preceding 1 year and clinical variables from the index admission in 2014. Multivariate logistic regression was used to evaluate public rental housing as an independent risk factor for admission risk, emergency department (ED), and specialist outpatient clinic attendances. A total of 14,457 unique patients were analyzed, and 2,163 patients (15.0%) were rental housing residents. Rental housing patients were significantly more likely to be male; required financial assistance; have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; usage of anti-depressant and anti-psychotic medications; longer length of hospital stay during the index admission; and higher Charlson Comorbidity Index scores. After adjusting for demographics and clinical variables, staying in public rental housing remained an independent risk factor for readmission within 15 and 30 days, frequent hospital admissions and ED attendances in Singapore. Our study showed an association between public rental housing with readmission risk and increased utilization of hospital services in Singapore. A deeper understanding of the residents' social circumstances and health seeking behavior would be insightful.

  3. Children admitted to hospital following unintentional injury: perspectives of health service providers in Aotearoa/New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asiasiga Lanuola

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Unintentional injuries are the leading cause of death and hospitalisation among New Zealand children, with indigenous Māori and ethnic minority Pacific children significantly over represented in these statistics. International research has shown that many children hospitalised for injury, as well as their families experience high levels of stress, and ethnic disparities in the quality of trauma care are not uncommon. The research on which this paper is based sought to identify key issues and concerns for New Zealand's multi-ethnic community following hospitalisation for childhood injury in order to inform efforts to improve the quality of trauma services. This paper reports on service providers' perspectives complementing previously published research on the experiences of families of injured children. Methods A qualitative research design involving eleven in-depth individual interviews and three focus groups was used to elicit the views of 21 purposefully selected service provider key informants from a range of professional backgrounds involved in the care and support of injured children and their families in Auckland, New Zealand. Interviews were transcribed and data were analysed using thematic analysis. Results Key issues identified by service providers included limited ability to meet the needs of children with mild injuries, particularly their emotional needs; lack of psychological support for families; some issues related to Māori and Pacific family support services; lack of accessible and comprehensive information for children and families; poor staff continuity and coordination; and poor coordination of hospital and community services, including inadequacies in follow-up plans. There was considerable agreement between these issues and those identified by the participant families. Conclusions The identified issues and barriers indicate the need for interventions for service improvement at systemic, provider and

  4. Factors Contributing To The Sustainability Of 5S Programmes In Government Hospitals In Regional Director Of Health Services Area Kurunegala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. K.W.C.U.K Kendangamuwa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction 5S is the stepping stone for many quality improvement concepts and its roots date back to 16th century. When successfully implemented 5S gives many benefits to the organization as well as its stakeholders. Though 5S itself has a tool to sustain most of the organizations find it difficult to sustain the 5S practice over the time. Therefore the objective of this study was to find out the factors contributing to sustainability of 5S programmes in Government Hospitals in RDHS area Kurunegala. Methodology This study was a descriptive cross sectional study with two components. First component was to identify the 5S sustaining hospitals from not sustaining hospitals by validated evaluation sheet. Second component was to determine the factors contributing to sustainability of 5S programmes in selected study setting. Self-administrated questionnaire was used for this purpose. Total study population was 543 employees of all the categories of hospital staff. Calculated sample size was 422 and 375 were responded to the questionnaire giving response rate of 88.9. Results The study revealed that the implemented 5S programmes were sustaining in eight hospitals out of ten i.e. sustaining rate was 80. When it considered the degree of sustainability 50 of the selected hospitals reported more than 70 sustainability. This was considered as favourable trend in government health sector in healthcare quality point of view. Ten factors were studied as contributing factors for the 5S sustainability. Socio- demographic factors were also considered. Those ten factors were top management commitment leadership of the organization commitment of middle amp frontline managers commitment amp satisfaction of employees training amp changing attitude of employees motivation of employees organizational culture group cohesiveness community participation and customer satisfaction. Study revealed that organizational leadership customer satisfaction community

  5. Effects of healthcare reform on health resource allocation and service utilization in 1110 Chinese county hospitals: data from 2006 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Pengqian; Hu, Ruirong; Han, Qiuxia

    2017-10-01

    The central government of China launched a large-scale, expensive health reform in April 2009 because of the serious health-related problems in the country. This reform aims to re-establish a universal healthcare system, which is expected to provide affordable basic healthcare. Independent two-sample t-test, one-way ANOVA and chi-squared test were conducted to analyze the effect of the health reform on health resource allocation and service utilization in Chinese county hospitals. First, we described the hospitals' financial performance in terms of funding sources, balances and fiscal compensations (for personnel expenditure). Second, we discussed the total number of health personnel as well as the structure (number of medical personnel per thousand population and ratio of doctors and nurses) and quality of the health personnel. Lastly, we investigated the county hospitals' health resource utilization, bed occupancy and average medical expense per visit. Then, we probed different reasons and provided multiple approaches to existing problems. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Alternative quality measures and profitability of hospital inpatient services offered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Self, Donald R; Hegji, Charles E; Self, Robin M

    2010-01-01

    In this analysis, we study the relationship between hospital quality and hospital profits for a sample of 88 Alabama (USA) hospitals. Quality is measured by three groups of procedures performed on newly admitted patients as suggested by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services and the Health Quality Alliance (HQA) as well as a weighted quality measure. Profit is measured for eight hospital services. Profits from cardiac care were most responsive to the quality measures studied. Moreover, profits from six of the inpatient services increased as the weighted quality measure increased. Finally, in two cases quality increased with the relative number of employees a hospital utilized.

  7. Health care's service fanatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlino, James I; Raman, Ananth

    2013-05-01

    The Cleveland Clinic has long had a reputation for medical excellence. But in 2009 the CEO acknowledged that patients did not think much of their experience there and decided to act. Since then the Clinic has leaped to the top tier of patient-satisfaction surveys, and it now draws hospital executives from around the world who want to study its practices. The Clinic's journey also holds Lessons for organizations outside health care that must suddenly compete by creating a superior customer experience. The authors, one of whom was critical to steering the hospital's transformation, detail the processes that allowed the Clinic to excel at patient satisfaction without jeopardizing its traditional strengths. Hospital leaders: Publicized the problem internally. Seeing the hospital's dismal service scores shocked employees into recognizing that serious flaws existed. Worked to understand patients' needs. Management commissioned studies to get at the root causes of dissatisfaction. Made everyone a caregiver. An enterprisewide program trained everyone, from physicians to janitors, to put the patient first. Increased employee engagement. The Clinic instituted a "caregiver celebration" program and redoubled other motivational efforts. Established new processes. For example, any patient, for any reason, can now make a same-day appointment with a single call. Set patients' expectations. Printed and online materials educate patients about their stays--before they're admitted. Operating a truly patient-centered organization, the authors conclude, isn't a program; it's a way of life.

  8. Specialty and full-service hospitals: a comparative cost analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Kathleen; Burgess, James F; Young, Gary J

    2008-10-01

    To compare the costs of physician-owned cardiac, orthopedic, and surgical single specialty hospitals with those of full-service hospital competitors. The primary data sources are the Medicare Cost Reports for 1998-2004 and hospital inpatient discharge data for three of the states where single specialty hospitals are most prevalent, Texas, California, and Arizona. The latter were obtained from the Texas Department of State Health Services, the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development, and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project. Additional data comes from the American Hospital Association Annual Survey Database. We identified all physician-owned cardiac, orthopedic, and surgical specialty hospitals in these three states as well as all full-service acute care hospitals serving the same market areas, defined using Dartmouth Hospital Referral Regions. We estimated a hospital cost function using stochastic frontier regression analysis, and generated hospital specific inefficiency measures. Application of t-tests of significance compared the inefficiency measures of specialty hospitals with those of full-service hospitals to make general comparisons between these classes of hospitals. Results do not provide evidence that specialty hospitals are more efficient than the full-service hospitals with whom they compete. In particular, orthopedic and surgical specialty hospitals appear to have significantly higher levels of cost inefficiency. Cardiac hospitals, however, do not appear to be different from competitors in this respect. Policymakers should not embrace the assumption that physician-owned specialty hospitals produce patient care more efficiently than their full-service hospital competitors.

  9. Indian Health Service: Community Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in common that connects them in some way," community health tends to focus on people in specific geographic areas and the factors which affect their health. Indian Health Service promotes an interdisciplinary approach to promote and provide ...

  10. Housing as a social determinant of health in Singapore and its association with readmission risk and increased utilization of hospital services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lian Leng eLow

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground: Residence in public rental housing is an area-level measure of socioeconomic status but its impact as a social determinant of health in Singapore has not been studied. We therefore aimed to examine the association of public rental housing with readmission risk and increased utilization of hospital services in Singapore.Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study using retrospective 2014 data from Singapore General Hospital’s electronic health records. Variables known to affect readmission risk and healthcare utilization were identified a-priori and include patient demographics, comorbidities, healthcare utilization in the preceding one year and clinical variables from the index admission in 2014. Multivariate logistic regression was used to evaluate public rental housing as an independent risk factor for admission risk, emergency department and specialist outpatient clinic attendances.Results: 14,457 unique patients were analysed and 2,163 patients (15.0% were rental housing residents. Rental housing patients were significantly more likely to be without a spouse; required financial assistance; have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; usage of anti-depressant and anti-psychotic medications; longer length of hospital stay during the index admission; and higher Charlson Comorbidity Index scores. After adjusting for demographics and clinical variables, staying in public rental housing remain an independent risk factor for readmission within 15 and 30 days, frequent hospital admissions and Emergency Department attendances in Singapore.Conclusion: Our study showed an association between public rental housing with readmission risk and increased utilization of hospital services in Singapore. A deeper understanding of the residents’ social circumstances and health seeking behaviour would be insightful.Keywords: social determinant of health; readmission, hospital utilization; housing

  11. A qualitative study of professional and carer perceptions of the threats to safe hospital discharge for stroke and hip fracture patients in the English National Health Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, Justin; Bishop, Simon; Marshall, Fiona

    2016-07-25

    Hospital discharge is a vulnerable transitional stage in patient care. This qualitative study investigated the views of healthcare professionals and patients about the threats to safe hospital discharge with aim of identifying contributory and latent factors. The study was undertaken in two regional health and social care systems in the English National Health Service, each comprising three acute hospitals, community and primary care providers and municipal social care services. The study focused on the threats to safe discharge for hip fracture and stroke patients as exemplars of complex care transitions. A qualitative study involving narrative interviews with 213 representative stakeholders and professionals involved in discharge planning and care transition activities. Narratives were analysed in line with 'systems' thinking to identify proximal (active) and distal (latent) factors, and the relationships between them. Three linked categories of commonly and consistently identified threat to safe discharge were identified: (1) 'direct' patient harms comprising falls, infection, sores and ulceration, medicines-related issues, and relapse; (2) proximal 'contributing' factors including completion of tests, assessment of patient, management of equipment and medicines, care plan, follow-up care and patient education; and distal 'latent' factors including discharge planning, referral processes, discharge timing, resources constraints, and organisational demands. From the perspective of stakeholders, the study elaborates the relationship between patient harms and systemic factors in the context of hospital discharge. It supports the importance of communication and collaboration across occupational and organisational boundaries, but also the challenges to supporting such communication with the inherent complexity of the care system.

  12. [Assessment of the adequacy of health services in day hospital care: experience of an endocrine surgery day care unit at a university polyclinic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, C P; De Crea, C; Traini, E; Tondolo, V; Bellantone, R; Damiani, G; Capalbo, G; Volpe, M; Cambieri, A; Catananti, C

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the appropriateness of the provision of surgical treatment in the day hospital setting and at the same time to evaluate the efficacy of the service provided. The study was conducted on admissions to a day care unit operating in conjunction with the surgery division of a university hospital. The evaluation of appropriateness was carried out using explicit criteria, based on regional regulations and on guidelines drawn up by the Agency for Regional Health Services. The criteria related to the hospital bed equivalent Rotation Index and to the types of DRGs treated and services provided. Efficacy was assessed using the following para-meters: number of US-guided fine needle aspiration biopsies; techniques used; age, sex and nodule size; patient distribution by results of diagnostic examination; cytological classification; percentage of patients with complications. We also evaluated the possibility of transferring short-term (2-3 days) surgical admissions from ordinary regimens to the day care setting. The results of this study yield useful synthetic indicators for assessing the appropriateness both of the day care function as a whole and of individual operating units, providing both administrative and medical staff with a useful frame of reference for the planning of health-care management.

  13. [Situational analysis of the pre-hospital health services for attending accidents and violence against the elderly in Curitiba (PR, Brazil)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mello, Ana Lucia Schaefer Ferreira; Moysés, Samuel Jorge

    2010-09-01

    This study is a situational analysis of the health care services for attending accidents and violence, in Curitiba, focusing the general conditions of infrastructure, planning and support at the pre-hospital assistance level, considering mobile and fixed emergency services dedicated to the victimized elderly. Positive points were evidenced as well as gaps and needs to meet the national guidelines. The investigation integrated quantitative and qualitative approaches and it was carried out on the grounds of the triangulation of methods. It is concluded that on the theme of accidents and violence against the elderly still there is room for important improvements in the actions developed by the researched services: (1) preventive actions are not part of the routine of the services; (2) most of the services does not develop specific services, addressed to the peculiar demands of the elderly; (3) the interviewees' experience reveals difficulties for obtaining hospital beds, either for referral or transfer/admission of patients. Facing the issue of accidents and violence against the elderly in Curitiba requires considering the organization of data, flows, training of professionals and planning in the development of prevention programs, attendance and rehabilitation to the elderly.

  14. Strategic management of Public Hospitals' medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Aimin; Yi, Tao; Li, Xia; Wei, Lei; Huang, Pei; Xu, Xinzhou; Yi, Lihua

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The quality of medical services provided by competing public hospitals is the primary consideration of the public in determining the selection of a specific hospital for treatment. The main objective of strategic planning is to improve the quality of public hospital medical services. This paper provides an introduction to the history, significance, principles and practices of public hospital medical service strategy, as well as advancing the opinion that public hospital service strategy must not merely aim to produce but actually result in the highest possible level of quality, convenience, efficiency and patient satisfaction.

  15. The quality of hospital services in eastern Ethiopia: Patient's

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rate and hence meeting patient satisfaction improves the utilization of health services. Methodology. In Harari region there are two secondary (Zonal) hospitals under the Regional Health Bureau, which act as major referral hospitals for the whole of the eastern part of Ethiopia. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in.

  16. Unit cost of medical services at different hospitals in India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susmita Chatterjee

    Full Text Available Institutional care is a growing component of health care costs in low- and middle-income countries, but local health planners in these countries have inadequate knowledge of the costs of different medical services. In India, greater utilisation of hospital services is driven both by rising incomes and by government insurance programmes that cover the cost of inpatient services; however, there is still a paucity of unit cost information from Indian hospitals. In this study, we estimated operating costs and cost per outpatient visit, cost per inpatient stay, cost per emergency room visit, and cost per surgery for five hospitals of different types across India: a 57-bed charitable hospital, a 200-bed private hospital, a 400-bed government district hospital, a 655-bed private teaching hospital, and a 778-bed government tertiary care hospital for the financial year 2010-11. The major cost component varied among human resources, capital costs, and material costs, by hospital type. The outpatient visit cost ranged from Rs. 94 (district hospital to Rs. 2,213 (private hospital (USD 1 = INR 52. The inpatient stay cost was Rs. 345 in the private teaching hospital, Rs. 394 in the district hospital, Rs. 614 in the tertiary care hospital, Rs. 1,959 in the charitable hospital, and Rs. 6,996 in the private hospital. Our study results can help hospital administrators understand their cost structures and run their facilities more efficiently, and we identify areas where improvements in efficiency might significantly lower unit costs. The study also demonstrates that detailed costing of Indian hospital operations is both feasible and essential, given the significant variation in the country's hospital types. Because of the size and diversity of the country and variations across hospitals, a large-scale study should be undertaken to refine hospital costing for different types of hospitals so that the results can be used for policy purposes, such as revising

  17. Unit Cost of Medical Services at Different Hospitals in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Susmita; Levin, Carol; Laxminarayan, Ramanan

    2013-01-01

    Institutional care is a growing component of health care costs in low- and middle-income countries, but local health planners in these countries have inadequate knowledge of the costs of different medical services. In India, greater utilisation of hospital services is driven both by rising incomes and by government insurance programmes that cover the cost of inpatient services; however, there is still a paucity of unit cost information from Indian hospitals. In this study, we estimated operating costs and cost per outpatient visit, cost per inpatient stay, cost per emergency room visit, and cost per surgery for five hospitals of different types across India: a 57-bed charitable hospital, a 200-bed private hospital, a 400-bed government district hospital, a 655-bed private teaching hospital, and a 778-bed government tertiary care hospital for the financial year 2010–11. The major cost component varied among human resources, capital costs, and material costs, by hospital type. The outpatient visit cost ranged from Rs. 94 (district hospital) to Rs. 2,213 (private hospital) (USD 1 = INR 52). The inpatient stay cost was Rs. 345 in the private teaching hospital, Rs. 394 in the district hospital, Rs. 614 in the tertiary care hospital, Rs. 1,959 in the charitable hospital, and Rs. 6,996 in the private hospital. Our study results can help hospital administrators understand their cost structures and run their facilities more efficiently, and we identify areas where improvements in efficiency might significantly lower unit costs. The study also demonstrates that detailed costing of Indian hospital operations is both feasible and essential, given the significant variation in the country’s hospital types. Because of the size and diversity of the country and variations across hospitals, a large-scale study should be undertaken to refine hospital costing for different types of hospitals so that the results can be used for policy purposes, such as revising payment rates

  18. A review of family carers' experiences of hospital discharge for people with dementia, and the rationale for involving service users in health research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mockford C

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Carole Mockford Division of Health Sciences, Royal College of Nursing Research Institute, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK Abstract: In the UK, service user involvement is an important factor in health policy, and obtaining research funding. It may be helpful in expanding our knowledge in areas where research evidence is poor such as experiences of hospital discharge planning for the family carers of people with dementia. Methods: A rapid review. All study designs published in the English language were eligible for inclusion. Databases included: Medline, Embase, CINAHL, PsycInfo, Cochrane library and Web of Knowledge. A qualitative analysis was undertaken. Results: Four themes were identified: preparation for hospital discharge – dissatisfaction with being kept informed, discharge arrangements and management of conditions; little time to prepare. Communication between staff and families at discharge – insufficient communication regarding services, not being listened to and being undervalued as a resource could compromise post-discharge care. Support services post discharge – carers need help negotiating, and working with, services with regard to timing, and meeting requirements. Coping post hospital discharge – inadequate understanding about ability to cope, and patient's impairment, and family conflict over care may lead to unnecessary re-admission to hospital, or long term care. Evidence of specialist dementia models at discharge is described. Discussion: Carers are not always involved in hospital discharge planning as well as they might be. Issues are complex and depend on a number of factors. Poor communication can be overcome and carers can be better supported to cope post discharge as illustrated in the dementia models. The evidence base is weak but the absence of evidence does not indicate an absence of good practice. Conclusion: Carers who may feel their world is far removed from the academic world may not ordinarily

  19. Evaluation of performance and impacts of maternal and child health hospital services using Data Envelopment Analysis in Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China: a comparison study among poverty and non-poverty county level hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuan; Luo, Hongye; Qin, Xianjin; Feng, Jun; Gao, Hongda; Feng, Qiming

    2016-08-23

    As the core of the county-level Maternal and Child Health Hospitals (MCHH) in rural areas of China, the service efficiency affects the fairness and availability of healthcare services. This study aims to identify the determinants of hospital efficiency and explore how to improve the performance of MCHH in terms of productivity and efficiency. Data was collected from a sample of 32 county-level MCHHs of Guangxi in 2014. Firstly, we specified and measured the indicators of the inputs and outputs which represent hospital resources expended and its profiles respectively. Then we estimated the efficiency scores using Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) for each hospital. Efficiency scores were decomposed into technical, scale and congestion components, and the potential output increases and/or input reductions were also estimated in this model, which would make relatively inefficient hospitals more efficient. In the second stage, the estimated efficiency scores are regressed against hospital external and internal environment factors using a Tobit model. We used DEAP (V2.1) and R for data analysis. The average scores of technical efficiency, net technical efficiency (managerial efficiency) and scale efficiency of the hospitals were 0.875, 0.922 and 0.945, respectively. Half of the hospitals were efficient, and 9.4 % and 40.6 % were weakly efficient and inefficient, respectively. Among the low-productiveness hospitals, 61.1 % came from poor counties (Poor counties in this article are in the list of key poverty-stricken counties at the national level, published by The State Council Leading Group Office of Poverty Alleviation and Development, 2012). The total input indicated that redundant medical resources in poverty areas were significantly higher than those in non-poverty areas. The Tobit regression model showed that the technical efficiency was proportional to the total annual incomes, the number of discharge patients, and the number of outpatient and emergency visits

  20. A Model for Provision of ENT Health Care Service at Primary and Secondary Hospital Level in a Developing Country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingamdenne Paul Emerson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available ENT problems are the most common reason for a visit to a doctor in both rural and urban communities. In many developing countries, there is a lack of ENT specialists and overburdened hospital facilities. To date, there is no comprehensive study that has evaluated the spectrum of ENT disorders in a rural community. Methods. A prospective study was done for a period of three years to profile the cases presenting to the outpatient clinic in a secondary care hospital and in the camps conducted in tribal areas in Vellore District of Tamil Nadu, India. Trained community volunteers were used to identify ENT conditions and refer patients. Results. A total of 2600 patients were evaluated and treated. Otological symptoms were the most commonly reported with allergic rhinitis being the second most commonly reported. Presbycusis was the most common disability reported in the rural community. The other symptoms presented are largely related to hygiene and nutrition. Conclusion. Using trained community workers to spread the message of safe ENT practices, rehabilitation of hearing loss through provision of hearing aids, and the evaluation and surgical management by ENT specialist helped the rural community to access the service.

  1. Service dogs, psychiatric hospitalization, and the ADA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, Russ S; Thomas, Kelly Jones; Leong, Stephanie L; Ragukonis, Frank

    2015-01-01

    A service dog is defined as "any dog that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including a physical, sensory, psychiatric, intellectual, or other mental disability." Some psychiatric patients may depend on a service dog for day-to-day functioning. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) established certain rights and responsibilities for individuals with disabilities and health care providers. Psychiatric hospitalization of a patient with a service dog may pose a problem and involves balancing the requirement to provide safe and appropriate psychiatric care with the rights of individuals with disabilities. This Open Forum examines issues that arise in such circumstances, reviews the literature, and provides a foundation for the development of policies and procedures.

  2. [Humanization health at emergency service in a public hospital: comparison on social representation of professional before and after training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Maria Angélica Carvalho; Artmann, Elizabeth; Trindade, Zeidi Araujo

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the results of a study of the type before and after training in Shelter with Risk classification compared to the humanization of social representations of health among 111 health professionals in an emergency hospital. Data collection was performed using the technique of free evocation and analysis was done using the EVOC software. The results showed changes in the symbolic meaning attributed to terms inducers towards incorporation of the right perspective in the representation of the Unified Health System, the translation of Humanization in health as Shelter, and the progression of understanding the Shelter, the humanistic focus to the qualification of processes of care of the users demand at emergencies. The results indicate that the differences found in the core before and after training were due to an apprenticeship, which based in peripheral elements, was able to question the core elements and interchange between the central and peripheral system, recognizing the functional complementarity between these two systems and the relationships between representations and practices. However, the method does not assert the persistence of such changes in the social representations of the objects studied in depth or measure the changes in daily practices.

  3. [The APULIA HF multicenter study: efficacy of a management protocol shared between hospital and territorial health services for acute decompensated heart failure patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacoviello, Massimo; Pede, Sergio; Aspromonte, Nadia; Bux, Francesca; Panunzio, Mariligia; Donadeo, Vittorio; De Castro, Alessandra; Antoncecchi, Ettore; D'Amato, Nicola; Squiccimarro, Elisabetta; Silvestri, Bartolomeo; Malerba, Lucia; De Gennaro, Luisa; Modugno, Giuseppe; Serafini, Elena; Curci, Biagio; Grande, Dario; Colivicchi, Furio; De Luca, Giovanni; Ignone, Gianfranco; D'Agostino, Carlo; Caldarola, Pasquale

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the efficacy of a management model to reduce hospitalizations in patients recently admitted for acute decompensated heart failure. The management model was based on a close integration between hospital and territory health services. Clinical evaluation, ECG, echocardiographic findings, total body bioimpedance and brain natriuretic peptide serum levels were used to assess clinical stability of patients at discharge and during follow-up. A dedicated nurse (care manager) was involved in patient empowerment, telephone follow-up, check of adherence to therapy and clinical conditions, and management of scheduled evaluations. All hospitalizations occurring prior to or after enrolment in the municipalities involved in the study were considered, as well as the hospitalizations occurring among enrolled patients. A total of 301 patients were enrolled, 226 of them from the Centers of the Puglia Region, Italy. An overall reduction of 6% in total hospitalizations with DRG 127 was observed; the reduction was most evident in the two centers with the smaller reference population (-16% and -26%, respectively). In the group of patients enrolled, an overall reduction in hospital admissions was observed after comparing the period before and after enrolment. A significant increase in the prescription rate of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blockers, beta-blockers and aldosterone antagonists was also observed. Finally, an overall reduction in the costs for patient management was demonstrated. Similar results were obtained in the two additional Centers of the Basilicata and Lazio Regions. An integrated management between hospital and territory allows optimization of the management of heart failure patients, with improvement of therapy and reduction in hospitalizations and management costs.

  4. The importance of relationships in mental health care: A qualitative study of service users' experiences of psychiatric hospital admission in the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slade Mike

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While a number of studies have looked at life on service users' experiences of life on psychiatric wards, no research exists that have approached these experiences from the user perspective since the introduction of community care. Methods This user-led study uses a participatory approach to develop an understanding of the processes and themes which define the user experience of hospitalisation. Nineteen service users who had all had inpatient stays in psychiatric hospitals in London were interviewed in the community. Results Relationships formed the core of service users' experiences. Three further codes, treatment, freedom and environment defined the role of hospital and its physical aspects. Themes of communication, safety, trust, coercion, and cultural competency contributed to the concept of relationships. Conclusion Relationships with an individual which comprised effective communication, cultural sensitivity, and the absence of coercion resulted in that person being attributed with a sense of trust. This resulted in the patient experiencing the hospital as a place of safety in terms of risk from other patients and staff. Barriers to positive relationships included ineffective and negative communication, a lack of trust, a lack of safety in terms of staff as ineffective in preventing violence, and as perpetrators themselves, and the use of coercion by staff. This unique perspective both acts as a source of triangulation with previous studies and highlights the importance of the therapeutic relationship in providing a safe and therapeutic milieu for the treatment of people with acute mental health problems.

  5. 14 April 2014 - UK University College London Hospitals and National Health Service Foundation Trust Chairman R. Murley in the ATLAS cavern with CERN Head of Medical Applications S. Myers and Collaboration Spokesperson D. Charlton.

    CERN Multimedia

    Gadmer, Jean-Claude

    2014-01-01

    Mr Richard Murley Chairman Sir Robert Naylor Chief Executive University College London Hospitals (UCLH) – National Health Service (NHS) Foundation Trust United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

  6. Essential Occupational Health Services.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yucel Demiral,Ali Naci Yildiz

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Coverage of the occupational health services varies between 15%-90% of the workforce. Available services do not always fit the requirements of the occupational health necessities. Moreover, the need for the occupational health services has been growing while the working life has changed in the globalization era. International Labor Office instruments and World Health Organisation primary health care approach and health for all strategy have suggested universal and comprehensive occupational health services. From this point of view, World Health Organisation / International Labor Office and International Commission on Occupational Health jointly developed and proposed basic occupational health services to tackle this challenge. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9(6.000: 673-676

  7. Strategic information for hospital service planning: a linked data study to inform an urban Aboriginal Health Liaison Officer program in Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzenellenbogen, Judith M; Miller, Laura J; Somerford, Peter; McEvoy, Suzanne; Bessarab, Dawn

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to provide descriptive planning data for a hospital-based Aboriginal Health Liaison Officer (AHLO) program, specifically quantifying episodes of care and outcomes within 28 days after discharge. A follow-up study of Aboriginal in-patient hospital episodes was undertaken using person-based linked administrative data from four South Metropolitan hospitals in Perth, Western Australia (2006-11). Outcomes included 28-day deaths, emergency department (ED) presentations and in-patient re-admissions. There were 8041 eligible index admissions among 5113 individuals, with episode volumes increasing by 31% over the study period. Among patients 25 years and older, the highest ranking comorbidities included injury (47%), drug and alcohol disorders (41%), heart disease (40%), infection (40%), mental illness (31%) and diabetes (31%). Most events (96%) ended in a regular discharge. Within 28 days, 24% of events resulted in ED presentations and 20% resulted in hospital readmissions. Emergency readmissions (13%) were twice as likely as booked re-admissions (7%). Stratified analyses showed poorer outcomes for older people, and for emergency and tertiary hospital admissions. Future planning must address the greater service volumes anticipated. The high prevalence of comorbidities requires intensive case management to address case complexity. These data will inform the refinement of the AHLO program to improve in-patient experiences and outcomes.

  8. Satisfacción de los usuarios de 4 hospitales del Servicio Vasco de Salud Patient satisfaction in four hospitals of the Basque Health Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nerea González

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Comparar la satisfacción de los usuarios de 4 hospitales de agudos. Métodos: La población estuvo formada por sujetos que habían sido hospitalizados durante enero y febrero de 2002 en 4 hospitales del Servicio Vasco de Salud-Osakidetza. Se seleccionaron 650 pacientes de cada centro, a quienes se envió un cuestionario de satisfacción compuesto por 34 ítems que se resumen en 6 factores. Se crearon puntuaciones independientes para cada factor. Se compararon las variables sociodemográficas y del episodio, algunas preguntas globales y las puntuaciones medias de los factores en los 4 hospitales. Resultados: Se hallaron diferencias entre los hospitales respecto a la edad, el número de ingresos anteriores, el tipo de servicio, los días de estancia y las preguntas que evaluaban el tiempo de espera desde que el usuario llegó al hospital hasta que fue ingresado. Aunque el grado de satisfacción en general fue alto, se pudieron detectar diferencias en función del hospital y el área evaluados. Así, los usuarios ingresados en el hospital 3 mostraron mayor grado de satisfacción en los factores «información», «trato» y «bienestar», y el grado de satisfacción más bajo en estos factores se detectó en el hospital 1. Los resultados observados en el análisis univariante apenas variaron en el multivariante. Conclusiones: La disponibilidad de un cuestionario de estas características ha permitido obtener resultados comparables entre los hospitales participantes en el estudio, convirtiéndose así en un instrumento que permite detectar áreas de excelencia y de mejora.Objectives: To compare patient satisfaction in 4 acute hospitals. Methods: The sample was composed of individuals admitted to 4 hospitals in the Basque Health Service (Osakidetza, Spain in January and February 2002. Six hundred and fifty patients were selected from each hospital and were sent a satisfaction questionnaire composed of 34 items summarized in 6 factors

  9. Health promoting hospitals: a study on educational hospitals of Isfahan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atefeh Afshari

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: It seems that some of the health promoting hospitals (HPS duties carried out by hospitals. So, to improve the quality of health services, it seems useful to encourage policymakers and health service managers to create coherent policies and guidelines in HPS.

  10. Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Policy Changes and Fiscal Year 2018 Rates; Quality Reporting Requirements for Specific Providers; Medicare and Medicaid Electronic Health Record (EHR) Incentive Program Requirements for Eligible Hospitals, Critical Access Hospitals, and Eligible Professionals; Provider-Based Status of Indian Health Service and Tribal Facilities and Organizations; Costs Reporting and Provider Requirements; Agreement Termination Notices. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-14

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems for FY 2018. Some of these changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Pathway for Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) Reform Act of 2013, the Improving Medicare Post-Acute Care Transformation Act of 2014, the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015, the 21st Century Cures Act, and other legislation. We also are making changes relating to the provider-based status of Indian Health Service (IHS) and Tribal facilities and organizations and to the low-volume hospital payment adjustment for hospitals operated by the IHS or a Tribe. In addition, we are providing the market basket update that will apply to the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits for FY 2018. We are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) for FY 2018. In addition, we are establishing new requirements or revising existing requirements for quality reporting by specific Medicare providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, LTCHs, and inpatient psychiatric facilities). We also are establishing new requirements or revising existing requirements for eligible professionals (EPs), eligible hospitals, and critical access hospitals (CAHs) participating in the Medicare and Medicaid Electronic Health Record (EHR) Incentive Programs. We are updating policies relating to the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) Program, the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program, and the Hospital-Acquired Condition (HAC) Reduction Program. We also are making changes relating to transparency of accrediting organization survey

  11. Occupational health in a hospital setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothy Blacklaws

    1981-09-01

    Full Text Available Health services and especially hospitals, are amongst the employers with the largest number of employees in the country. Those employed in the service have the right to as high a standard of occupational health as found in industry at its best. Health services in hospitals should use techniques of preventive employees and reduces absenteeism due to sickness and other causes. It health requirements of the employees. Hospitals should serve as examples to the public regarding health education, preventive medicine and job safety. Hospitals have a moral and legal obligation to: — provide a safe and healthful working environment for employees; — protect employees from special risks and hazards associated with their occ u p a t i o n s , su c h as c o n t a g io u s diseases; — protect patients from risks associated with unhealthy employees. Experience in other employee groups has shown that an occupational health service results in healthier, more effective employees and reduces absenteeism due to sickness and other causes. It also reduces labour turnover and Workmen’s compensation and other insurance claims.

  12. The Cost of Health Service Waste Management of (HSWM: A Case Study of Intensive Care Unit of Infectious Diseases at a Public Hospital in São Paulo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chennyfer Dobbins Paes da Rosa

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Health Service Waste Management is a set of technical and legal procedures for waste management in any type of health facilities. It is known about the limited resources, so reducing environmental costs can contribute to the management of hospital costs. The objective was to estimate the cost of the phases of HSWM to the Intensive Care Unit for public service. Data collecting was done through a script of questions and observations on site at the Emilio Ribas Infectious Diseases Institute in Sao Paulo. The ABC costing method was used. The most costly step was wrapping (40.68%, followed by segregation (40.17%, which is justified by both being associated with health workers’ salaries. The daily cost of the management of health care waste from segregation to final disposal in the ICU was R$ 4,288.81 a day, being R$ 314.80/bed-patient/day. To know the cost of an activity allows for the analysis of strategies for price negotiation. Health care waste is little remembered when pricing a daily ICU, many managers believe this value to be irrelevant; but< if not measured, it may bring losses to the institution.

  13. Individual health services

    OpenAIRE

    Schnell-Inderst, Petra; Hunger, Theresa; Hintringer, Katharina; Schwarzer, Ruth; Seifert-Klauss, Vanadin Regina; Gothe,Holger; Wasem, Jürgen; Siebert, Uwe

    2011-01-01

    Background The German statutory health insurance (GKV) reimburses all health care services that are deemed sufficient, appropriate, and efficient. According to the German Medical Association (BÄK), individual health services (IGeL) are services that are not under liability of the GKV, medically necessary or recommendable or at least justifiable. They have to be explicitly requested by the patient and have to be paid out of pocket. Research questions The following questions regarding IGeL in t...

  14. [Ophthalmological screening via a hospital boat: field study for planning future health care services in remote villages at the Volta Lake in Ghana].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frimpong-Boateng, A; Rüfer, F; Fiadoyor, S; Nkrumah-Mills, J; Mensah-Tetteh, F; Kudoadzi, N; Roider, J

    2009-09-01

    A maiden voyage on a hospital boat was carried out to determine the spectrum of ophthalmological diseases in a rural and secluded area on the Volta Lake in Ghana in order to improve future health care services. Portable water, electricity, and an operating theatre were available on the hospital boat. Visual acuity was determined using Snellen E charts, and Lea boards were used in children up to the age of 4 years. The anterior segments were examined using hand held slit lamps. After pupil dilation indirect binocular ophthalmoscopy was performed and tonometry was carried out using a Perkins tonometer A total of 1,246 citizens were examined. The mean age was 23.7 years and the mean visual acuity was 6/6 (log MAR 0.0+/-0.3. The main cause of blindness was a cataract with 45.8%, followed by pathological conditions of the optic disc with 29.2%. The hospital boat is suitable for screening and for carrying out minor extraocular operations. Looking just at the technical aspect, it is possible to perform major intraocular operations on the hospital boat. However, due to the lack of immediate follow-up visits, it is advisable to carry out major operations in the next eye clinic on shore.

  15. 42 CFR 409.12 - Nursing and related services, medical social services; use of hospital or CAH facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nursing and related services, medical social... services, medical social services; use of hospital or CAH facilities. (a) Except as provided in paragraph... facilities, and medical social services as inpatient hospital or inpatient CAH services only if those...

  16. Indian Health Service: Find Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Indian Health Service The Federal Health Program for American Indians and ... map can be used to find an Indian Health Service, Tribal or Urban Indian Health Program facility. This ...

  17. Payment for Physician and Other Health Care Professional Services Purchased by Indian Health Programs and Medical Charges Associated With Non-Hospital-Based Care. Final rule with comment period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-21

    The Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) hereby issues this final rule with comment period to implement a methodology and payment rates for the Indian Health Service (IHS) Purchased/Referred Care (PRC), formerly known as the Contract Health Services (CHS), to apply Medicare payment methodologies to all physician and other health care professional services and non-hospital-based services. Specifically, it will allow the health programs operated by IHS, Tribes, Tribal organizations, and urban Indian organizations (collectively, I/T/U programs) to negotiate or pay non-I/T/U providers based on the applicable Medicare fee schedule, prospective payment system, Medicare Rate, or in the event of a Medicare waiver, the payment amount will be calculated in accordance with such waiver; the amount negotiated by a repricing agent, if applicable; or the provider or supplier's most favored customer (MFC) rate. This final rule will establish payment rates that are consistent across Federal health care programs, align payment with inpatient services, and enable the I/T/U to expand beneficiary access to medical care. A comment period is included, in part, to address Tribal stakeholder concerns about the opportunity for meaningful consultation on the rule's impact on Tribal health programs.

  18. Service quality for facilities management in hospitals

    CERN Document Server

    Sui Pheng, Low

    2016-01-01

    This book examines the Facilities Management (FM) of hospitals and healthcare facilities, which are among the most complex, costly and challenging kind of buildings to manage. It presents and evaluates the FM service quality standards in Singapore’s hospitals from the patient’s perspective, and provides recommendations on how to successfully improve FM service quality and achieve higher patient satisfaction. The book also features valuable supplementary materials, including a checklist of 32 key factors for successful facilities management and another checklist of 24 service attributes for hospitals to achieve desirable service quality in connection with facilities management. The book adopts a unique approach of combining service quality and quality theory to provide a more holistic view of how FM service quality can be achieved in hospitals. It also integrates three instruments, namely the SERVQUAL model, the Kano model and the QFD model to yield empirical results from surveys for implementation in hosp...

  19. Trends in hospital librarianship and hospital library services: 1989 to 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibodeau, Patricia L; Funk, Carla J

    2009-10-01

    The research studied the status of hospital librarians and library services to better inform the Medical Library Association's advocacy activities. The Vital Pathways Survey Subcommittee of the Task Force on Vital Pathways for Hospital Librarians distributed a web-based survey to hospital librarians and academic health sciences library directors. The survey results were compared to data collected in a 1989 survey of hospital libraries by the American Hospital Association in order to identify any trends in hospital libraries, roles of librarians, and library services. A web-based hospital library report form based on the survey questions was also developed to more quickly identify changes in the status of hospital libraries on an ongoing basis. The greatest change in library services between 1989 and 2005/06 was in the area of access to information, with 40% more of the respondents providing access to commercial online services, 100% more providing access to Internet resources, and 28% more providing training in database searching and use of information resources. Twenty-nine percent (n = 587) of the 2005/06 respondents reported a decrease in staff over the last 5 years. Survey data support reported trends of consolidation of hospitals and hospital libraries and additions of new services. These services have likely required librarians to acquire new skills. It is hoped that future surveys will be undertaken to continue to study these trends.

  20. The effects of socioeconomic status, accessibility to services and patient type on hospital use in Western Australia: a retrospective cohort study of patients with homogenous health status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holman C D'Arcy J

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aimed to investigate groups of patients with a relatively homogenous health status to evaluate the degree to which use of the Australian hospital system is affected by socio-economic status, locational accessibility to services and patient payment classification. Method Records of all deaths occurring in Western Australia from 1997 to 2000 inclusive were extracted from the WA mortality register and linked to records from the hospital morbidity data system (HMDS via the WA Data Linkage System. Adjusted incidence rate ratios of hospitalisation in the last, second and third years prior to death were modelled separately for five underlying causes of death. Results The independent effects of socioeconomic status on hospital utilisation differed markedly across cause of death. Locational accessibility was generally not an independent predictor of utilisation except in those dying from ischaemic heart disease and lung cancer. Private patient status did not globally affect utilisation across all causes of death, but was associated with significantly decreased utilisation three years prior to death for those who died of colorectal, lung or breast cancer, and increased utilisation in the last year of life in those who died of colorectal cancer or cerebrovascular disease. Conclusion It appears that the Australian hospital system may not be equitable since equal need did not equate to equal utilisation. Further it would appear that horizontal equity, as measured by equal utilisation for equal need, varies by disease. This implies that a 'one-size-fits-all' approach to further improvements in equity may be over simplistic. Thus initiatives beyond Medicare should be devised and evaluated in relation to specific areas of service provision.

  1. Hospital pharmacy services in the Pacific Island countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penm, Jonathan; Chaar, Betty; Moles, Rebekah

    2015-02-01

    Non-communicable diseases have become an increasing problem in the Pacific Island countries (PICs). With the medical supply system often attached to hospitals in PICs, the training of hospital pharmacy staff has become increasingly important. This study aimed to explore hospital pharmacy services in the PICs using these validated surveys (BS26-27 and BS28-31 surveys) focusing upon hospital pharmacists' influence on prescribing and quality use of medicines. The BS26-27 and BS28-31 surveys were distributed online to pharmacy directors in hospitals in the PICs in 2011 and 2013, respectively. Surveys were made available in both English and French. In total, data from 55 hospitals were received (77% of the hospital sample in PICs) for either the BS26-27 or BS28-31 survey. From the responses received, 97% (36/37) of hospitals had a formulary, with 81% (26/32) of hospitals having a Pharmacy and Therapeutics (P&T) committee. Furthermore, 67% (24/36) of respondents stated that they provided some sort of clinical pharmacy service. On average, hospitals had two pharmacists involved in clinical pharmacy services. In BS28-31, over 75% (n=27) of respondents believed having a strong relationship with other health care professionals, having effective communication skills and taking professional responsibility for the medicines prescribed as 'mostly' or 'strongly' facilitating clinical services. Hospital pharmacists' participation on P&T committee and clinical services is common in the PICs. Such services enhance medication selection and reduce wastage. Although there are still too few hospital pharmacists in PICs, additional support aimed at enhancing their team building and communication skills will allow them to expand their roles and continue to improve patient health outcomes. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Evaluation of service quality of hospital outpatient department services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Abhijit

    2011-07-01

    It has become essential for hospital managers to understand and measure consumer perspectives and service quality gaps, so that any perceived gap in delivery of service is identified and suitably addressed. A study was conducted at a peripheral service hospital to ascertain any service gap between consumer expectations and perceptions in respect of the hospital outpatient department (OPD) services. A cross-sectional study was conducted using SERVQUAL as the survey instrument, the instrument being validated for use in the hospital environment. Consumer ratings across 22 items of the survey instrument were collected in paired expectation and perception scores and then service quality gaps were identified and statistically analysed. Service quality gaps were identified to exist across all the five dimensions of the survey instrument, with statistically significant gaps across the dimensions of 'tangibles' and 'responsiveness.' The quality gaps were further validated by a total unweighted SERVQUAL score of (-) 1.63. The study concludes that significant service quality gaps existed in the delivery of the hospital OPD services, which need to be addressed by focused improvement efforts by the hospital management.

  3. Obesity, hospital services use and costs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folmann, Nana Bro; Bossen, Kristine Skovgaard; Willaing, Ingrid

    2007-01-01

    .5-24.9 kg/m2 were defined as normal weight. Individuals with BMI DESIGN: We undertook a 3-year retrospective study of the relationship between obesity and use of hospital resources. Data on hospital contacts and costs were obtained from The National Patient...... Registry and DRG. Analyses were performed using two-part models and Poisson regression. Outcome variables were costs and hospital contacts. RESULTS: This study has demonstrated that obese individuals have a greater use of hospital services and greater hospital costs compared with normal weight individuals...

  4. Food production and service in UK hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mohamed; Jones, Eleri; Redmond, Elizabeth; Hewedi, Mahmoud; Wingert, Andreas; Gad El Rab, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to apply value stream mapping holistically to hospital food production/service systems focused on high-quality food. Multiple embedded case study of three (two private-sector and one public-sector) hospitals in the UK. The results indicated various issues affecting hospital food production including: the menu and nutritional considerations; food procurement; food production; foodservice; patient perceptions/expectations. Value stream mapping is a new approach for food production systems in UK hospitals whether private or public hospitals. The paper identifies opportunities for enhancing hospital food production systems. The paper provides a theoretical basis for process enhancement of hospital food production and the provision of high-quality hospital food.

  5. Nasal Colonization rate of Staphylococcus aureus strains among Health Care Service Employee’s of Teaching University Hospitals in Yazd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalili Mohammad Bagher

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to find the extent of staphylococcal carriages including Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus MRSA in employee's of teaching university hospitals in Yazd. Nasal swabs of 742 employees in four different medical teaching hospitals in Yazd were collected, and tested for detection of staphylococci strains. Out of 742 employees, 94 (12.7% were carrier of staphylococcus aurus and 57 (11.38% for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA respectively. Prevalence of Staphylococci aureus and MRSA in individual hospitals and wards were different. In general the highest carriers were personnel of dialysis ward and the lowest pediatrics wards. Resistance rate of MRSA against Ciprofloxacin, Vancomycin, and Rifampin were found to be as 28.1%, 10.5% and 35.1% respectively.

  6. [Marketing in health service].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameri, Cinzia; Fiorini, Fulvio

    2014-01-01

    The gradual emergence of marketing activities in public health demonstrates an increased interest in this discipline, despite the lack of an adequate and universally recognized theoretical model. For a correct approach to marketing techniques, it is opportune to start from the health service, meant as a service rendered. This leads to the need to analyse the salient features of the services. The former is the intangibility, or rather the ex ante difficulty of making the patient understand the true nature of the performance carried out by the health care worker. Another characteristic of all the services is the extreme importance of the regulator, which means who performs the service (in our case, the health care professional). Indeed the operator is of crucial importance in health care: being one of the key issues, he becomes a part of the service itself. Each service is different because the people who deliver it are different, furthermore there are many variables that can affect the performance. Hence it arises the difficulty in measuring the services quality as well as in establishing reference standards.

  7. Optimal assignment of workers to supporting services in a hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawik, Bartosz; Mikulik, Jerzy

    2008-01-01

    Supporting services play an important role in health care institutions such as hospitals. This paper presents an application of operations research model for optimal allocation of workers among supporting services in a public hospital. The services include logistics, inventory management, financial management, operations management, medical analysis, etc. The optimality criterion of the problem is to minimize operations costs of supporting services subject to some specific constraints. The constraints represent specific conditions for resource allocation in a hospital. The overall problem is formulated as an integer program in the literature known as the assignment problem, where the decision variables represent the assignment of people to various jobs. The results of some computational experiments modeled on a real data from a selected Polish hospital are reported.

  8. Secondary analysis of hospital patient experience scores across England's National Health Service - How much has improved since 2005?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Honeyford

    Full Text Available To examine trends in patient experience and consistency between hospital trusts and settings.Observational study of publicly available patient experience surveys of three hospital settings (inpatients (IP, accident and emergency (A&E and outpatients (OP of 130 acute NHS hospital trusts in England between 2004/05 and 2014/15.Overall patient experience has been good, showing modest improvements over time across the three hospital settings. Individual questions with the biggest improvement across all three settings are cleanliness (IP: +7.1, A&E: +6.5, OP: +4.7 and information about danger signals (IP: +3.8, A&E: +3.9, OP: +4.0. Trust performance has been consistent over time: 71.5% of trusts ranked in the same cluster for more than five years. There is some consistency across settings, especially between outpatients and inpatients. The lowest-scoring questions, regarding information at discharge, are the same in all years and all settings.The greatest improvement across all three settings has been for cleanliness, which has seen national policies and targets. Information about danger signals and medication side-effects showed least consistency across settings and scores have remained low over time, despite information about danger signals showing a big increase in score. Patient experience of aspects of access and waiting have declined, as has experience of discharge delay, likely reflecting known increases in pressure on England's NHS.

  9. Cost-effectiveness of national mandatory screening of all admissions to English National Health Service hospitals for meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: a mathematical modelling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robotham, Julie V; Deeny, Sarah R; Fuller, Chris; Hopkins, Susan; Cookson, Barry; Stone, Sheldon

    2016-03-01

    In December, 2010, National Health Service (NHS) England introduced national mandatory screening of all admissions for meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). We aimed to assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of this policy, from a regional or national health-care decision makers' perspective, compared with alternative screening strategies. We used an individual-based dynamic transmission model parameterised with national MRSA audit data to assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of admission screening of patients in English NHS hospitals compared with five alternative strategies (including no screening, checklist-activated screening, and high-risk specialty-based screening), accompanied by patient isolation and decolonisation, over a 5 year time horizon. We evaluated strategies for different NHS hospital types (acute, teaching, and specialist), MRSA prevalence, and transmission potentials using probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Compared with no screening, mean cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) of screening all admissions was £89,000-148,000 (range £68,000-222,000), and this strategy was consistently more costly and less effective than alternatives for all hospital types. At a £30,000/QALY willingness-to-pay threshold and current prevalence, only the no-screening strategy was cost effective. The next best strategies were, in acute and teaching hospitals, targeting of high-risk specialty admissions (30-40% chance of cost-effectiveness; mean incremental cost-effectiveness ratios [ICERs] £45,200 [range £35,300-61,400] and £48,000/QALY [£34,600-74,800], respectively) and, in specialist hospitals, screening these patients plus risk-factor-based screening of low-risk specialties (a roughly 20% chance of cost-effectiveness; mean ICER £62,600/QALY [£48,000-89,400]). As prevalence and transmission increased, targeting of high-risk specialties became the optimum strategy at the NHS willingness-to-pay threshold (£30,000/QALY

  10. eServices for Hospital Equipment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jonge, M.; Van der Linden, W.P.M.; Willems, H.X.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we explore the idea that by combining different sources of information in a hospital environment, valuable e-services canbe developed that may help in reducing cost and improving quality of service. Companies, like Philips Medical Systems, may have a compe-titive advantage, because

  11. Forensic mental health services: Current service provision and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methodology: This study is a situational analysis of an existing forensic psychiatric service in the Eastern Cape. The design of the study was cross sectional. An audit questionnaire was utilised to collate quantitative data, which was submitted to Fort England Hospital, Grahamstown. A proposed prison mental health service ...

  12. Adapting the SERVQUAL scale to hospital services: an empirical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babakus, E; Mangold, W G

    1992-02-01

    Defining and measuring the quality of service has been a major challenge for health care marketers. A comprehensive service quality measurement scale (SERVQUAL) is empirically evaluated for its potential usefulness in a hospital service environment. Active participation by hospital management helped to address practical and user-related aspects of the assessment. The completed expectations and perceptions scales met various criteria for reliability and validity. Suggestions are provided for the managerial use of the scale, and a number of future research issues are identified.

  13. Hospitals as health educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... educators. Classes may include: Prenatal care and breastfeeding Parenting Baby sign language Baby yoga or massage Babysitting ... for: Retail stores such as sporting goods, health food, and art stores Acupuncture Skin care Eye care ...

  14. Factors Contributing To The Sustainability Of 5S Programmes In Government Hospitals In Regional Director Of Health Services Area Kurunegala

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. K.W.C.U.K Kendangamuwa; Dr. S Sridharan; Dr. D R K Herath; Dr. R.M.M.K. Ratnayake

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction 5S is the stepping stone for many quality improvement concepts and its roots date back to 16th century. When successfully implemented 5S gives many benefits to the organization as well as its stakeholders. Though 5S itself has a tool to sustain most of the organizations find it difficult to sustain the 5S practice over the time. Therefore the objective of this study was to find out the factors contributing to sustainability of 5S programmes in Government Hospitals in RDH...

  15. Occupational health services for farmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuel, D A; Draves, D L; Nycz, G R

    1990-01-01

    There are many unmet health needs in the farming community, needs that are peculiar to the agriculture industry. Health research and regulations to protect the safety of the farmer have lagged far behind those for other sectors of our economy. At a time when health needs are increasing, there is a decreasing availability of hospitals, physicians, nurses, and other health care personnel. The ability of the rural section to pay for these services is also declining. The evidence calls for a multifaceted solution, with improved cooperation and understanding on the part of the consumer as well as the provider. The regional health network is one system that may help solve some of these dilemmas.

  16. School Health Services

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-09-13

    School health services reduce absenteeism and improve academic achievement according to research. If you have school-aged children, you’ll want to listen to this podcast to learn more about healthy school environments and the link between health and academic achievement.  Created: 9/13/2017 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 9/13/2017.

  17. Birthing Centers and Hospital Maternity Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Q&A Recipes En Español Teachers - Looking for ...

  18. “I WENT TO THE NEAREST HEALTH CLINIC...”: FREE DEMAND OF THE EMERGENCY SERVICE OF AUNIVERSITY HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Casarotto

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: compreender os motivos e necessidades que estimulam a população a buscar assistência básica de saúde em um Pronto Socorro de um hospital universitário do interior do Rio Grande do Sul. MÉTODOS: pesquisa de campo, qualitativa, descritiva e exploratória. Coleta de dados por meio de 31 entrevistas semiestruturada, trabalhadas através da análise temática. RESULTADOS: a maioria dos entrevistados era mulheres e a faixa etária predominante entre 20 e 50 anos. Principais motivos foram: falta de resolutividade na atenção básica, seguido pela falta e demora no apoio diagnóstico; o horário de distribuição de senhas na atenção básica; demora da consulta em especialidades médicas e falta de médico na rede básica. CONCLUSÃO: profissionais da saúde, dentre eles a enfermagem, e gestores precisam se aliar à população no enfrentamento dessa problemática, discutindo e pactuando estratégias para atender às necessidades de saúde, buscando um atendimento que vise à universalidade, equidade e integralidade.

  19. How is the sustainability of chronic disease health programmes empirically measured in hospital and related healthcare services?-a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Linda; Dunt, David; Cadilhac, Dominique A

    2016-05-31

    Programmes to address chronic disease are a focus of governments worldwide. Despite growth in 'implementation science', there is a paucity of knowledge regarding the best means to measure sustainability. The aim of this review was to summarise current practice for measuring sustainability outcomes of chronic disease health programmes, providing guidance for programme planners and future directions for the academic field. A scoping review of the literature spanning 1985-2015 was conducted using MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsychINFO and The Cochrane Library limited to English language and adults. Main search terms included chronic disease, acute care, sustainability, institutionalisation and health planning. A descriptive synthesis was required. Settings included primary care, hospitals, mental health centres and community health. Programmes included preventing or managing chronic conditions including diabetes, heart disease, depression, respiratory disease, cancer, obesity, dental hygiene and multiple chronic diseases. Outcome measures included clarifying a sustainability definition, types of methodologies used, timelines for assessment, criteria levels to determine outcomes and how methodology varies between intervention types. Among 153 abstracts retrieved, 87 were retained for full article review and 42 included in the qualitative synthesis. Five definitions for sustainability outcome were identified with 'maintenance of programme activities' most frequent. Achieving sustainability was dependent on inter-relationships between various organisational and social contexts supporting a broad scale approach to evaluation. An increasing trend in use of mixed methods designs over multiple time points to determine sustainability outcomes was found. Despite the importance and investment in chronic disease programmes, few studies are undertaken to measure sustainability. Methods to evaluate sustainability are diverse with some emerging patterns in measurement found. Use of mixed

  20. Obstacles to implementation of an intervention to improve surgical services in an Ethiopian hospital: a qualitative study of an international health partnership project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aveling, Emma-Louise; Zegeye, Desalegn Tegabu; Silverman, Michael

    2016-08-17

    Access to safe surgical care represents a critical gap in healthcare delivery and development in many low- and middle-income countries, including Ethiopia. Quality improvement (QI) initiatives at hospital level may contribute to closing this gap. Many such quality improvement initiatives are carried out through international health partnerships. Better understanding of how to optimise quality improvement in low-income settings is needed, including through partnership-based approaches. Drawing on a process evaluation of an intervention to improve surgical services in an Ethiopian hospital, this paper offers lessons to help meet this need. We conducted a qualitative process evaluation of a quality improvement project which aimed to improve access to surgical services in an Ethiopian referral hospital through better management. Data was collected longitudinally and included: 66 in-depth interviews with surgical staff and project team members; observation (135 h) in the surgery department and of project meetings; project-related documentation. Thematic analysis, guided by theoretical constructs, focused on identifying obstacles to implementation. The project largely failed to achieve its goals. Key barriers related to project design, partnership working and the implementation context, and included: confusion over project objectives and project and partner roles and responsibilities; logistical challenges concerning overseas visits; difficulties in communication; gaps between the time and authority team members had and that needed to implement and engage other staff; limited strategies for addressing adaptive-as opposed to technical-challenges; effects of hierarchy and resource scarcity on QI efforts. While many of the obstacles identified are common to diverse settings, our findings highlight ways in which some features of low-income country contexts amplify these common challenges. We identify lessons for optimising the design and planning of quality improvement

  1. Consumer Health: Products and Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haag, Jessie Helen

    This book presents a general overview of consumer health, its products and services. Consumer health is defined as those topics dealing with a wise selection of health products and services, agencies concerned with the control of these products and services, evaluation of quackery and health misconceptions, health careers, and health insurance.…

  2. Community-oriented services in a psychiatric hospital. Effort to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    “Yaba apa osi” (Yaba to the left side). Consequently, in the year 2000 the hospital stepped up its efforts on destigmatization through public enlightenment programmes and provision of commercial /social as well as general health care services in the institution that would bring or attract the citizenry to its facilities. We carried ...

  3. [Patient participation in hospital wards--health personnel's experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solbjør, Marit; Steinsbekk, Aslak

    2011-01-21

    Users of the Norwegian health services have a legal right to influence the services through user committees, and also to assess the treatment they are being subject to on an individual basis. The aim of this study was to investigate the experience health personnel have with patient participation in hospital wards. Qualitative interview study with 18 health workers from 12 hospital wards in Central Norway Regional Health Authority. Health personnel stated that they took the initiative to patient participation in the hospital ward. User representatives were either appointed by the user committee or chosen because of personal characteristics that suited the ward's needs. Health personnel were positively surprised by the user representatives' qualifications. It was still a challenge to achieve equality between health personnel and user representatives. Health personnel limited patient participation, especially regarding medical issues. Patient participation in hospital wards seems to be regulated by health personnel, who initiate and limit such participation.

  4. MyHealtheVet Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This service provides web services used to obtain MyHealtheVet related data. The service does not support multiple Vista sites data access. Users of this service are...

  5. Are central hospitals ready for National Health Insurance? ICD ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. South Africa (SA)'s planned National Health Insurance reforms require the use of International Statistical Classification of Diseases (ICD) codes for hospitals to purchase services from the proposed National Health Authority. However, compliance with coding at public hospitals in the Western Cape Province ...

  6. Classificação dos resíduos de serviços de saúde de um hospital veterinário Classification of health services waste from a veterinary hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosane Regina Pilger

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available O trabalho avalia aspectos referentes à classificação e segregação dos resíduos gerados no Hospital Veterinário da Ulbra (RS, a partir de estudos realizados para a elaboração do Plano de Gerenciamento dos Resíduos de Serviço de Saúde (PGRSS, para a instituição. O plano foi baseado na resolução RDC nº 306/2004 da ANVISA (Brasil, 2004, que define as diretrizes para o manejo dos resíduos de instituições de saúde, incluindo a segregação, coleta, armazenamento, transporte interno e externo, tratamento e disposição final. A partir da caracterização, classificação e do diagnóstico das atividades de manejo dos resíduos do hospital, foi possível avaliar a importância da segregação, no local de origem, para a redução de resíduos que necessitam de tratamentos especiais, bem como para a redução de riscos de propagação de doenças.This work evaluates some referring aspects to the residues classification and segregation generated in Ulbra’s Veterinary Hospital (RS, starting from studies accomplished in the elaboration of a Residues Health Service Management Plan (PGRSS, for the institution. The plan was based on RDC nº 306/2004 ANVISA’s Resolution (Brasil, 2004, that defines the guidelines for handling the health institutions residues, including the segregation, collection, storage, internal and external transportation, treatment and final disposition. From the characterization, classification and the diagnostic handling activities of hospital residues, it was possible to evaluate the segregation importance, in the origin location, for the residues reduction that need special treatments, as well as for the risks reduction of diseases propagation.

  7. [Tooth decay: epidemiological and therapeutic aspects in dental service of University Teaching Hospital Yalgado Ouedraogo and Municipal Centre of Oral Health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouedraogo, Y; Kabore, W A D; Konsem, T; Fall, M; Millogo, M; Ouattara, S; Ouedraogo, D

    2015-12-01

    In order to improve the prevention and treatment of dental caries in Burkina Faso, we conducted a study on the epidemiological and therapeutic aspects of dental caries in the dental services of University Teaching Hospital Yalgado Ouedraogo and in the Municipal Centre of Oral Health of Ouagadougou. A prospective and descriptive study from October, 15th 2012 to January, 15th 2013 was conducted on a sample of 191 patients. The variables recorded were: patient's identity, age, sex, area of residence, food mode, socioeconomic level, reason for consultation, oral hygiene, DMFT index, degree of tissue damage, the topography of the carious lesions and the applied therapy. Caries prevalence was 93.19% more female consultations, with sex ratio at 0.77. The average age was 31 years for a sample often engaged in trade and the informal sector. Carious lesions were usually limited to less than 4 teeth. The main motivation for the consultation was pain at 82.20%. The use of preventive care is quite low in our population. Extractions still occupy an important part of treatment. We need to improve oral hygiene and show to patients the necessity of routine visits to the dentist every year for early treatment.

  8. Predictors of Language Service Availability in U.S. Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melody K. Schiaffino

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Hispanics comprise 17% of the total U.S. population, surpassing African-Americans as the largest minority group. Linguistically, almost 60 million people speak a language other than English. This language diversity can create barriers and additional burden and risk when seeking health services. Patients with Limited English Proficiency (LEP for example, have been shown to experience a disproportionate risk of poor health outcomes, making the provision of Language Services (LS in healthcare facilities critical. Research on the determinants of LS adoption has focused more on overall cultural competence and internal managerial decision-making than on measuring LS adoption as a process outcome influenced by contextual or external factors. The current investigation examines the relationship between state policy, service area factors, and hospital characteristics on hospital LS adoption. Methods We employ a cross-sectional analysis of survey data from a national sample of hospitals in the American Hospital Association (AHA database for 2011 (N= 4876 to analyze hospital characteristics and outcomes, augmented with additional population data from the American Community Survey (ACS to estimate language diversity in the hospital service area. Additional data from the National Health Law Program (NHeLP facilitated the state level Medicaid reimbursement factor. Results Only 64%of hospitals offered LS. Hospitals that adopted LS were more likely to be not-for-profit, in areas with higher than average language diversity, larger, and urban. Hospitals in above average language diverse counties had more than 2-fold greater odds of adopting LS than less language diverse areas [Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR: 2.26, P< 0.01]. Further, hospitals with a strategic orientation toward diversity had nearly 2-fold greater odds of adopting LS (AOR: 1.90, P< 0.001. Conclusion Our findings support the importance of structural and contextual factors as they relate to

  9. Marketing health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zasa, R J

    1984-01-01

    Indisputably, marketing plays an important role in today's competitive health service industry. It is essential for every medical group manager to learn about the marketing process and his role in pursuing marketing in his medical group. Conducting internal and external assessments, developing promotional techniques and strategies, organizing and implementing a plan, and evaluating results are all critical areas in the marketing effort. When each critical area is carefully examined and steps are properly taken, a marketing approach will be totally consistent with delivery of high-quality patient care services.

  10. The health promoting hospital (HPH): concept and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelikan, J M; Krajic, K; Dietscher, C

    2001-12-15

    Health promoting hospitals (HPH) is a concept for hospital development that builds upon the health promotion concept of the WHO Ottawa Charter for health promotion, where the reorientation of health care services is considered as one of five major action areas for an overall health promotion development. The article outlines what such a re-orientation may mean for the main hospital functions. These include: the health promoting hospital setting; health promoting workplaces, the provision of health (related) services, training, education and research; the hospital as an advocate and "change agent" for health promotion in its community/environment; the "healthy" (metaphorically speaking) hospital organisation. Based on the concept, an international network of WHO, Europe has been developing since the late 1980s. The main projects of the international network so far were the first model project "health and hospital" (Vienna, 1989-1996), the European pilot hospital project of HPH (1993-1996), and the development of national/regional HPH networks (ongoing since 1995). It is argued that the further development of the HPH network will have to take into account some major changes that have occurred in the hospital landscape since the start of the network: the quality movement and, as a sub-set of this, the increasing importance of evidence based medicine.

  11. Service quality of private hospitals: the Iranian patients' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Asghar; Arab, Mohammad; Froushani, Abbas Rahimi; Rashidian, Arash; Ghazi Tabatabaei, S Mahmoud

    2012-02-02

    Highly competitive market in the private hospital industry has caused increasing pressure on them to provide services with higher quality. The aim of this study was to determine the different dimensions of the service quality in the private hospitals of Iran and evaluating the service quality from the patients' perspective. A cross-sectional study was conducted between October and November 2010 in Tehran, Iran. The study sample was composed of 983 patients randomly selected from 8 private general hospitals. The study questionnaire was the SERVQUAL questionnaire, consisting of 21 items in service quality dimensions. The result of factor analysis revealed 3 factors, explaining 69% of the total variance. The total mean score of patients' expectation and perception was 4.91(SD = 0.2) and 4.02(SD = 0.6), respectively. The highest expectation and perception related to the tangibles dimension and the lowest expectation and perception related to the empathy dimension. The differences between perception and expectation were significant (p education level, and previous hospitalization in that same hospital. Also, there was a significant difference between the perception scores based on insurance coverage, average length of stay, and patients' health conditions on discharge. The results showed that SERVQUAL is a valid, reliable, and flexible instrument to monitor and measure the quality of the services in private hospitals of Iran. Our findings clarified the importance of creating a strong relationship between patients and the hospital practitioners/personnel and the need for hospital staff to be responsive, credible, and empathetic when dealing with patients.

  12. Conceptions of health service robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lystbæk, Christian Tang

    2015-01-01

    Technology developments create rich opportunities for health service providers to introduce service robots in health care. While the potential benefits of applying robots in health care are extensive, the research into the conceptions of health service robot and its importance for the uptake...... of robotics technology in health care is limited. This article develops a model of the basic conceptions of health service robots that can be used to understand different assumptions and values attached to health care technology in general and health service robots in particular. The article takes...... a discursive approach in order to develop a conceptual framework for understanding the social values of health service robots. First a discursive approach is proposed to develop a typology of conceptions of health service robots. Second, a model identifying four basic conceptions of health service robots...

  13. Birth of a health service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, G

    On April 18th, independent Zimbabwe celebrated its 3rd birthday. In 1980, within days after taking power, Robert Mugabe's government announced that health care was to be free to everyone earning less then Z150 (60 British pounds) a month--the vast majority of the population. Although the free services are a good public relations policy, more important was the decision to expand the health services at grassroots level and to shift emphasis from an urban based curative system to rural based preventive care. Zimbabwe desperately needs doctors. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the country has some 1400 registered doctors, roughly 1 for every 6000 people. Yet, of the 1400, under 300 work in the government health services and many of those are based in Harare, the capital. Of Zimbabwe's 28 district hospitals, only 14 have a full-time doctor. In some rural areas, there is 1 doctor/100,000 or more people. The nature of the country's health problems, coupled with the government's severe shortage of cash, shows why nursing is so crucial to Zimbabwe's development. If the rural communities, which make up 85% of the population, were to have easy access to a qualified nurse, or even a nursing assistant, the quality of life would double. The only thing that is more important is a clean water supply. Possibly the most important role for nurses in Zimbabwe is that of education. Nurses can spread awareness of basic hygiene, raise the skill of local people in dealing with minor health problems independently, carry out immunization programs, offer contraceptive advice, give guidance on breastfeeding and infant nutrition, and work with practitioners of traditional African medicines to make sure they possess basic scientific knowledge. Rebuilding after the war was not a major problem for the Mugabe health ministry, for in many areas there was simply nothing to rebuild. There were never any health services. A far greater problem has been the top heavy structure of the

  14. Caring for older people. Community services: health.

    OpenAIRE

    Pushpangadan, M.; Burns, E.

    1996-01-01

    Many frail or disabled elderly people are now being maintained in the community, partially at least as a consequence of the Community Care Act 1993. This paper details the work of the major health professionals who are involved in caring for older people in the community and describes how to access nursing, palliative care, continence, mental health, Hospital at Home, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, equipment, and optical, dental, and dietetic services. In many areas, services are evolvi...

  15. Missed opportunities for breast awareness information among women attending the maternal and child health services of an urban tertiary hospital in Northern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lofty-John Chukwuemeka Anyanwu

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Most of the opportunities to educate women on breast awareness were missed at the postnatal and ICs of our hospital. Integrating breast health education into MCH care programs in developing countries will assist in the early detection of breast pathologies.

  16. Attracting Health Insurance Buyers through Selective Contracting: Results of a Discrete-Choice Experiment among Users of Hospital Services in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelien Bergrath

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In 2006, the Netherlands commenced market based reforms in its health care system. The reforms included selective contracting of health care providers by health insurers. This paper focuses on how health insurers may increase their market share on the health insurance market through selective contracting of health care providers. Selective contracting is studied by eliciting the preferences of health care consumers for attributes of health care services that an insurer could negotiate on behalf of its clients with health care providers. Selective contracting may provide incentives for health care providers to deliver the quality that consumers need and demand. Selective contracting also enables health insurers to steer individual patients towards selected health care providers. We used a stated preference technique known as a discrete choice experiment to collect and analyze the data. Results indicate that consumers care about both costs and quality of care, with healthy consumers placing greater emphasis on costs and consumers with poorer health placing greater emphasis on quality of care. It is possible for an insurer to satisfy both of these criteria by selective contracting health care providers who consequently purchase health care that is both efficient and of good quality.

  17. Developing a strategic marketing plan for physical and occupational therapy services: a collaborative project between a critical access hospital and a graduate program in health care management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kash, Bita A; Deshmukh, A A

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a marketing plan for the Physical and Occupational Therapy (PT/OT) department at a Critical Access Hospital (CAH). We took the approach of understanding and analyzing the rural community and health care environment, problems faced by the PT/OT department, and developing a strategic marketing plan to resolve those problems. We used hospital admissions data, public and physician surveys, a SWOT analysis, and tools to evaluate alternative strategies. Lack of awareness and negative perception were key issues. Recommended strategies included building relationships with physicians, partnering with the school district, and enhancing the wellness program.

  18. PROFILE OF PATIENTS AT PEDIATRIC EMERGENCY SERVICES SOETOMO HOSPITAL SURABAYA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ira Dharmawati

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Installation service system at the Emergency Department (ED Soetomo Hospital is a coordinated and integrated system under one roof. Include emergency medical and emergency surgery in a very important component of health services at each hospital. The information published on the patient profile and the usefulness of emergency care services indeveloping countries and developed countries is still very rare. This study aimed to describe the characteristic of patients attending the ED at Soetomo hospital Surabaya. Method: This study was a retrospective study. The profile of patients visiting the ED for 1 year were recorded and presented descriptively. Result: The total number of patients visiting the hospital was 5,835, with a monthly average of 486 patients. The children at the age of 1–5 years presented the largest age group (33.6%. The main diagnosis was respiratory tract infection (31%, diarrhea (17.%, followed by seizure (12.4%. The overall mortality rate was 1.7%. Discussion: Respiratory tract infection in children at the age of 1–5 years still count as a major problem at Soetomo Hospital Surabaya.

  19. Individual health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell-Inderst, Petra; Hunger, Theresa; Hintringer, Katharina; Schwarzer, Ruth; Seifert-Klauss, Vanadin Regina; Gothe, Holger; Wasem, Jürgen; Siebert, Uwe

    2011-01-01

    The German statutory health insurance (GKV) reimburses all health care services that are deemed sufficient, appropriate, and efficient. According to the German Medical Association (BÄK), individual health services (IGeL) are services that are not under liability of the GKV, medically necessary or recommendable or at least justifiable. They have to be explicitly requested by the patient and have to be paid out of pocket. The following questions regarding IGeL in the outpatient health care of GKV insurants are addressed in the present report: What is the empirical evidence regarding offers, utilization, practice, acceptance, and the relation between physician and patient, as well as the economic relevance of IGeL?What ethical, social, and legal aspects are related to IGeL? FOR TWO OF THE MOST COMMON IGEL, THE SCREENING FOR GLAUCOMA AND THE SCREENING FOR OVARIAN AND ENDOMETRIAL CANCER BY VAGINAL ULTRASOUND (VUS), THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS ARE ADDRESSED: What is the evidence for the clinical effectiveness?Are there sub-populations for whom screening might be beneficial? The evaluation is divided into two parts. For the first part a systematic literature review of primary studies and publications concerning ethical, social and legal aspects is performed. In the second part, rapid assessments of the clinical effectiveness for the two examples, glaucoma and VUS screening, are prepared. Therefore, in a first step, HTA-reports and systematic reviews are searched, followed by a search for original studies published after the end of the research period of the most recent HTA-report included. 29 studies were included for the first question. Between 19 and 53% of GKV members receive IGeL offers, of which three-quarters are realised. 16 to 19% of the insurants ask actively for IGeL. Intraocular tension measurement is the most common single IGeL service, accounting for up to 40% of the offers. It is followed by ultrasound assessments with up to 25% of the offers. Cancer screening

  20. Individual health services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schnell-Inderst, Petra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The German statutory health insurance (GKV reimburses all health care services that are deemed sufficient, appropriate, and efficient. According to the German Medical Association (BÄK, individual health services (IGeL are services that are not under liability of the GKV, medically necessary or recommendable or at least justifiable. They have to be explicitly requested by the patient and have to be paid out of pocket. Research questions: The following questions regarding IGeL in the outpatient health care of GKV insurants are addressed in the present report: What is the empirical evidence regarding offers, utilization, practice, acceptance, and the relation between physician and patient, as well as the economic relevance of IGeL? What ethical, social, and legal aspects are related to IGeL? For two of the most common IGeL, the screening for glaucoma and the screening for ovarian and endometrial cancer by vaginal ultrasound (VUS, the following questions are addressed: What is the evidence for the clinical effectiveness? Are there sub-populations for whom screening might be beneficial? Methods: The evaluation is divided into two parts. For the first part a systematic literature review of primary studies and publications concerning ethical, social and legal aspects is performed. In the second part, rapid assessments of the clinical effectiveness for the two examples, glaucoma and VUS screening, are prepared. Therefore, in a first step, HTA-reports and systematic reviews are searched, followed by a search for original studies published after the end of the research period of the most recent HTA-report included. Results: 29 studies were included for the first question. Between 19 and 53% of GKV members receive IGeL offers, of which three-quarters are realised. 16 to 19% of the insurants ask actively for IGeL. Intraocular tension measurement is the most common single IGeL service, accounting for up to 40% of the offers. It is followed by

  1. The fiction of health Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    What we know today as Health Services is a fiction, perhaps shaped involuntarily, but with deep health repercussions, more negative than positive. About 24 centuries ago, Asclepius, god of medicine, and Hygeia, goddess of hygiene and health, generated a dichotomy between disease and health that remains with us until today. The confusing substitution of Health Services with Medical Services began toward the end of the XIX century. But it was in 1948 when the so called English National Health Service became a landmark in the world with its model being adopted by many countries with resulting distortion of the true meaning of Health Services. The consequences of this fiction have been ominous. It is necessary to call things by their names and not deceive society. To correct the serious imbalance between Medical Services and Health Services, Hygeia and Asclepius must become a brother and sisterhood. PMID:24893062

  2. 78 FR 20523 - Community Health Needs Assessments for Charitable Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-05

    ... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Parts 1 and 53 RIN 1545-BL30 Community Health Needs Assessments for... organizations on the community health needs assessment (CHNA) requirements, and related excise tax and reporting... hospital organization to conduct a CHNA and adopt an implementation strategy to meet the community health...

  3. Medicare costs and surgeon supply in hospital service areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricketts, Thomas C; Belsky, Daniel W

    2012-03-01

    To quantify the correlates of variations of Medicare per beneficiary costs at the hospital service area level and determine whether physician supply and the specialty of physicians has a significant relationship with cost variation. The American Medical Association Masterfile data on physician and surgeon location, characteristics and specialty; Census derived sociodemographic data from 2006 ZIP code level Claritas PopFacts database; and Medicare per beneficiary costs from the Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care project. A correlational analysis using bivariate plots and fixed effects linear regression models controlling for hospital service area sociodemographics and the number and characteristics of the physician supply. Data were aggregated to the Dartmouth hospital service area level from ZIP code level files. We found that costs are strongly related to the sociodemographic character of the hospital service areas and the overall supply of physicians but a mixed correlation to the specialist supply depending on the interaction of the proportion of the physician supply who are international medical graduates. The ratio of general surgeons and surgical subspecialists to population are associated with lower costs in the models, again with difference depending on the influence of international medical graduates. There is a strong association between higher costs and the local proportion of physician supply made up of graduates of non-US or Canadian medical schools and female graduates. These results suggest that strategies to reduce overall costs by changing physician supply must consider more than just overall numbers.

  4. Health care reform and the hospital supply chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colletti, J J

    1994-02-01

    With health care reform, hospitals will be differentiated in the marketplace by how well they manage the costs of services. Because products will be market priced, hospital materiel managers will have to minimize all other related acquisition costs. The key opportunities will be in changing processes to eliminate non-value added administrative, supply chain, and process activities and their attendant costs.

  5. Service quality of hospital outpatient departments: patients' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Ehsan

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of patient perceptions of health service quality as an important element in quality assessments has attracted much attention in recent years. The purpose of this paper is to assess the service quality of hospital outpatient departments affiliated to Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences from the patients' perspective. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2014 in Tehran, Iran. The study samples included 500 patients who were selected by multi-stage random sampling from four hospitals. The data collection instrument was a questionnaire consisting of 50 items, and the validity and reliability of the questionnaire were confirmed. For data analysis, exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, Friedman test, and descriptive statistics were used through LISREL 8.54 and SPSS 18 applications. Eight significant factors were extracted for outpatient service quality, which explained about 67 per cent of the total variance. Physician consultation, information provided to the patient, and the physical environment of the clinic were the three determining factors of the quality of outpatient services. The highest and lowest perceptions were related to physician consultation and perceived waiting time dimension, respectively. The mean score of patients' perception of outpatient service quality was 3.89 (±0.60). About 59.5 per cent of patients assessed the quality of outpatient services as good, 38.2 per cent as moderate, and 2.3 per cent as poor. Practical implications - The instrument developed for this study is valid and reliable, and it can help hospital managers to identify the areas needing improvement and correction. According to the findings of this study, the majority of patients had a positive experience with outpatient departments of teaching hospitals, and the services provided in these centres were of adequate quality, based on patient assessments.

  6. Obstacles to implementation of an intervention to improve surgical services in an Ethiopian hospital: a qualitative study of an international health partnership project

    OpenAIRE

    Aveling, Emma-Louise; Zegeye, Desalegn Tegabu; Silverman, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Access to safe surgical care represents a critical gap in healthcare delivery and development in many low- and middle-income countries, including Ethiopia. Quality improvement (QI) initiatives at hospital level may contribute to closing this gap. Many such quality improvement initiatives are carried out through international health partnerships. Better understanding of how to optimise quality improvement in low-income settings is needed, including through partnership-based approach...

  7. Factors Affecting Outsourcing for Information Technology Services in Rural Hospitals: Theory and Evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Whitacre, Brian E.; Fannin, James Matthew; Barnes, James N.

    2008-01-01

    As health information technology becomes more prevalent for most healthcare facilities, hospitals across the nation are choosing between performing this service in-house and outsourcing to a technology firm in the health industry. This paper examines factors affecting the information technology (IT) outsource decision for various hospitals. Using 2004 data from the American Hospital Association, logistic regression models find that governmental ownership and a proxy variable for hospitals tha...

  8. Do Catalan private hospitals enjoy financial health?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judit Creixans Tenas

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The present study reflects the economic and financial analysis of  private hospitals with non-charitable character in Catalonia 2008-2013. The private health sector is considered to be a service activity that develops an important social role. The study positions these analysed centers in the Catalan and Spanish health sector and presents the main economic and financial indicators to diagnose the situation of these companies during the period indicated by analysing short and long-term results and analysis of changes in equity and cash flows of the wineries. Design/methodology/approach: The data used comes from the statements of the Catalan hospital centers in the period 2008-2013 and in particular, it contains a sample of 94 Catalan private hospitals, that mostly are considered large-level accounting (according to the General Accounting Plan. The economic and financial  analysis has carried out using descriptive statistics and analysis results and conclusions have been reached. Findings: The study noted that enables private hospitals in this period have a healthy economic and financial status, although it should improve the management of assets. Most sales are concentrated with a small number of hospitals and, regarding the evolution of the results, produces two distinct stages, the first period of decrease (2008-2010 and the second period of growth and recovery from 2011.. Research limitations/implications: It would be desirable to perform the same study by the Spanish private hospitals in order to compare the economic and financial analysis of the Catalan private sector with the Spanish private sector. Practical implications: It allows us to assess the projection of this sector in recent years in Catalonia in order to take the appropriate economic decisions in this regard. Social implications: The results show the changes that have occurred over the years in the economic crisis of the period analysed. Originality / value: For

  9. Rural hospital ownership: medical service provision, market mix, and spillover effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, Jill R; Nichols, Austin

    2011-10-01

    To test whether nonprofit, for-profit, or government hospital ownership affects medical service provision in rural hospital markets, either directly or through the spillover effects of ownership mix. Data are from the American Hospital Association, U.S. Census, CMS Healthcare Cost Report Information System and Prospective Payment System Minimum Data File, and primary data collection for geographic coordinates. The sample includes all nonfederal, general medical, and surgical hospitals located outside of metropolitan statistical areas and within the continental United States from 1988 to 2005. We estimate multivariate regression models to examine the effects of (1) hospital ownership and (2) hospital ownership mix within rural hospital markets on profitable versus unprofitable medical service offerings. Rural nonprofit hospitals are more likely than for-profit hospitals to offer unprofitable services, many of which are underprovided services. Nonprofits respond less than for-profits to changes in service profitability. Nonprofits with more for-profit competitors offer more profitable services and fewer unprofitable services than those with fewer for-profit competitors. Rural hospital ownership affects medical service provision at the hospital and market levels. Nonprofit hospital regulation should reflect both the direct and spillover effects of ownership. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  10. The development of hospital-based palliative care services in public ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With the recent approval of a South African (SA) National Policy Framework and Strategy for Palliative Care by the National Health Council, it is pertinent to reflect on initiatives to develop palliative care services in public hospitals. This article reviews the development of hospital-based palliative care services in the Western ...

  11. Family dental health care service

    OpenAIRE

    Riana Wardani

    2008-01-01

    The Family Dental Health Care Service is a new approach that includes efforts to serve oral and dental patients that focuses on maintenance, improvement and protection. This oral and dental health approach uses basic dentistry science and technology. The vision of the Family Dental Health Care Service is the family independences in the effort of dental health maintenance and to achieve the highest oral and dental health degree as possible through family dentist care that is efficient, effecti...

  12. In a niche of time: do specialty hospitals outperform general services hospitals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, LeJon; Davis, Jullet A; Gunby, Norris W

    2013-01-01

    Niche hospitals represent a growing segment in the health care industry. Niche facilities are primarily engaged in the treatment of cardiac or orthopedic conditions. The effectiveness of this strategy is of interest because niche hospitals focus on only the most profitable services. The purpose of this research was to assess the financial effectiveness of the niche strategy. We theorize that firm and market-level factors concomitantly with the strategy of the hospital-niche versus traditional-are associated with financial performance. This research used 2 data sources, the 2003 Medicare Cost Report and the 2003 Area Resource File. The sample was limited to only for-profit, urban, nongovernmental hospitals (n = 995). The data were analyzed using hierarchical least squares regression. Financial performance was operationalized using the hospital's return on assets. The principal finding of this project is that niche hospitals had significantly higher performance than traditional facilities. From the organizational perspective, the niche strategy leads to better financial performance. From a societal perspective, the niche strategy provides increased focus and efficiencies through repetition. Despite the limited focus of this strategy, patients who can access these providers may experience better outcomes than patients in more traditional hospitals.

  13. Impact of At-Home Telemonitoring on Health Services Expenditure and Hospital Admissions in Patients With Chronic Conditions: Before and After Control Intervention Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celler, Branko; Varnfield, Marlien; Nepal, Surya; Sparks, Ross; Li, Jane; Jayasena, Rajiv

    2017-09-08

    Telemonitoring is becoming increasingly important for the management of patients with chronic conditions, especially in countries with large distances such as Australia. However, despite large national investments in health information technology, little policy work has been undertaken in Australia in deploying telehealth in the home as a solution to the increasing demands and costs of managing chronic disease. The objective of this trial was to evaluate the impact of introducing at-home telemonitoring to patients living with chronic conditions on health care expenditure, number of admissions to hospital, and length of stay (LOS). A before and after control intervention analysis model was adopted whereby at each location patients were selected from a list of eligible patients living with a range of chronic conditions. Each test patient was case matched with at least one control patient. Test patients were supplied with a telehealth vital signs monitor and were remotely managed by a trained clinical care coordinator, while control patients continued to receive usual care. A total of 100 test patients and 137 control patients were analyzed. Primary health care benefits provided to Australian patients were investigated for the trial cohort. Time series data were analyzed using linear regression and analysis of covariance for a period of 3 years before the intervention and 1 year after. There were no significant differences between test and control patients at baseline. Test patients were monitored for an average of 276 days with 75% of patients monitored for more than 6 months. Test patients 1 year after the start of their intervention showed a 46.3% reduction in rate of predicted medical expenditure, a 25.5% reduction in the rate of predicted pharmaceutical expenditure, a 53.2% reduction in the rate of predicted unscheduled admission to hospital, a 67.9% reduction in the predicted rate of LOS when admitted to hospital, and a reduction in mortality of between 41

  14. Hospital and Health Insurance Markets Concentration and Inpatient Hospital Transaction Prices in the U.S. Health Care Market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauda, Seidu

    2017-05-11

    To examine the effects of hospital and insurer markets concentration on transaction prices for inpatient hospital services. Measures of hospital and insurer markets concentration derived from American Hospital Association and HealthLeaders-InterStudy data are linked to 2005-2008 inpatient administrative data from Truven Health MarketScan Databases. Uses a reduced-form price equation, controlling for cost and demand shifters and accounting for possible endogeneity of market concentration using instrumental variables (IV) technique. The findings suggest that greater hospital concentration raises prices, whereas greater insurer concentration depresses prices. A hypothetical merger between two of five equally sized hospitals is estimated to increase hospital prices by about 9 percent (p insurers would depress prices by about 15.3 percent (p insurer consolidation depressed prices by about 10.8 percent. Additional analysis using longer panel data and applying hospital fixed effects confirms the impact of hospital concentration on prices. The findings provide support for strong antitrust enforcement to curb rising hospital service prices and health care costs. © Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  15. [Effects of hospital mergers on health economy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingebrigtsen, Tor

    2010-05-06

    Norwegian hospitals have been characterised by increasing activity, expansion of services and increasing costs for a long time. Differences in quality and accessibility have been documented between hospitals in various geographic locations. Transferral of hospital ownership to the state (from 2002) aimed at increasing capacities and improving quality of services, but also at restricting the increase of costs. These goals have only been partly met. The structure of hospital trusts and organisation of services are therefore continuously debated. This literature review aims at examining whether hospital mergers can reduce costs and at the same time increase the quality of services offered. Literature was identified through a Medline search using the terms "hospital", "merger" and "cost saving". The results are summarized and discussed. Seven original studies of totally 476 hospital mergers (in the USA, Great Britain and Norway) were identified in the period 1982 - 2000. The literature indicates that hospital mergers have a potential to reduce costs by about 10 % if the process achieves complete fusion of previously independent organisations, with a more optimal dimensioning of services and development of a common organizational culture. Collaboration between top management and the professional bureaucracy are prerequisites for success. Mergers are associated with a significant risk of unexpected problems and temporary reduced quality of the services.

  16. Linking public health agencies and hospitals for improved emergency preparedness: North Carolina's public health epidemiologist program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markiewicz, Milissa; Bevc, Christine A; Hegle, Jennifer; Horney, Jennifer A; Davies, Megan; MacDonald, Pia D M

    2012-02-23

    In 2003, 11 public health epidemiologists were placed in North Carolina's largest hospitals to enhance communication between public health agencies and healthcare systems for improved emergency preparedness. We describe the specific services public health epidemiologists provide to local health departments, the North Carolina Division of Public Health, and the hospitals in which they are based, and assess the value of these services to stakeholders. We surveyed and/or interviewed public health epidemiologists, communicable disease nurses based at local health departments, North Carolina Division of Public Health staff, and public health epidemiologists' hospital supervisors to 1) elicit the services provided by public health epidemiologists in daily practice and during emergencies and 2) examine the value of these services. Interviews were transcribed and imported into ATLAS.ti for coding and analysis. Descriptive analyses were performed on quantitative survey data. Public health epidemiologists conduct syndromic surveillance of community-acquired infections and potential bioterrorism events, assist local health departments and the North Carolina Division of Public Health with public health investigations, educate clinicians on diseases of public health importance, and enhance communication between hospitals and public health agencies. Stakeholders place on a high value on the unique services provided by public health epidemiologists. Public health epidemiologists effectively link public health agencies and hospitals to enhance syndromic surveillance, communicable disease management, and public health emergency preparedness and response. This comprehensive description of the program and its value to stakeholders, both in routine daily practice and in responding to a major public health emergency, can inform other states that may wish to establish a similar program as part of their larger public health emergency preparedness and response system.

  17. Linking public health agencies and hospitals for improved emergency preparedness: North Carolina's public health epidemiologist program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markiewicz Milissa

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2003, 11 public health epidemiologists were placed in North Carolina's largest hospitals to enhance communication between public health agencies and healthcare systems for improved emergency preparedness. We describe the specific services public health epidemiologists provide to local health departments, the North Carolina Division of Public Health, and the hospitals in which they are based, and assess the value of these services to stakeholders. Methods We surveyed and/or interviewed public health epidemiologists, communicable disease nurses based at local health departments, North Carolina Division of Public Health staff, and public health epidemiologists' hospital supervisors to 1 elicit the services provided by public health epidemiologists in daily practice and during emergencies and 2 examine the value of these services. Interviews were transcribed and imported into ATLAS.ti for coding and analysis. Descriptive analyses were performed on quantitative survey data. Results Public health epidemiologists conduct syndromic surveillance of community-acquired infections and potential bioterrorism events, assist local health departments and the North Carolina Division of Public Health with public health investigations, educate clinicians on diseases of public health importance, and enhance communication between hospitals and public health agencies. Stakeholders place on a high value on the unique services provided by public health epidemiologists. Conclusions Public health epidemiologists effectively link public health agencies and hospitals to enhance syndromic surveillance, communicable disease management, and public health emergency preparedness and response. This comprehensive description of the program and its value to stakeholders, both in routine daily practice and in responding to a major public health emergency, can inform other states that may wish to establish a similar program as part of their larger public

  18. Model construction of nursing service satisfaction in hospitalized tumor patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yongyi; Liu, Jingshi; Xiao, Shuiyuan; Liu, Xiangyu; Tang, Xinhui; Zhou, Yujuan

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to construct a satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients. Using questionnaires, data about hospitalized tumor patients' expectation, quality perception and satisfaction of hospital nursing service were obtained. A satisfaction model of nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients was established through empirical study and by structural equation method. This model was suitable for tumor specialized hospital, with reliability and validity. Patient satisfaction was significantly affected by quality perception and patient expectation. Patient satisfaction and patient loyalty was also affected by disease pressure. Hospital brand was positively correlated with patient satisfaction and patient loyalty, negatively correlated with patient complaint. Patient satisfaction was positively correlated with patient loyalty, patient complaints, and quality perception, and negatively correlated with disease pressure and patient expectation. The satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients fits well. By this model, the quality of hospital nursing care may be improved.

  19. The demand for hospital services for patients with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, C J; Morgan, C L; Peters, J R; Kerr, M

    1998-05-01

    To describe the patterns of inpatient and outpatient hospital care for patients with epilepsy in our health district. Routine hospital data for the health district of South Glamorgan (population 408,000) underwent record linkage to identify those records relating to the same patients and to flag those records for patients with epilepsy. This data was analyzed to determine inpatient and outpatient activity by specialty and compared with the nonepileptic population. We identified 2.267 patients representing a prevalence of 0.56%. The average age was 46 years in both male and female patients. This group, which constituted 1.5% of the hospital population, was responsible for 2.8% of all admissions but, because of increased length of stay, utilized 7.3% of all bed days. The total cost of care for this group lies between these two extreme values and is dependent on case severity. The patterns of associated diagnoses differed considerably in three arbitrary age groups (0-18, 19-55, >55 years). This study quantifies for the first time the level of demand that this subpopulation places on the service as a whole, and begins to illustrate that there may be evidence for cost containment by, for example, a reduction in multiple admissions. The demand for inpatient services is greater than we would have predicted.

  20. [Development and application of hospital customer service center platform].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Minya; Zheng, Konglin; Xia, Yong

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces the construction and application of the platform of client service center in the general hospital and discusses how to provide patients with an entire service including service before clinic, on clinic and after clinic. It can also provide references for a new service mode for clinic service.

  1. Health information exchange among US hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler-Milstein, Julia; DesRoches, Catherine M; Jha, Ashish K

    2011-11-01

    To determine the proportion of US hospitals engaged in health information exchange (HIE) with unaffiliated providers and to identify key hospital-level and market-level factors associated with participating in exchange. Using the 2009 American Hospital Association Information Technology survey, supplemented by Dartmouth Atlas, Area Resource File, and other national data, we examined which hospitals participated in regional efforts to electronically exchange clinical data. We used logistic regression models to determine hospital-level characteristics and market-level characteristics associated with hospitals' likelihood of participating in HIE. We found that 10.7% of US hospitals engaged in HIE with unaffiliated providers. In communities where exchange occurred, for-profit hospitals and those with a small market share were far less likely to engage in HIE than nonprofit hospitals or those with a larger market share. Hospitals in more concentrated markets were more likely to exchange and hospitals in markets with higher Medicare spending were less likely to exchange. At the start of implementation of the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act, only a small minority of US hospitals electronically exchange clinical data with unaffiliated providers. Health information exchange is a key part of reforming the healthcare system, and factors related to competitiveness may be holding some providers back.

  2. Indian Health Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter Tribal Partnerships Tribal Partnerships Tribal Leader Letters Urban Leader Letters Tribal Consultation Office of Tribal Self Governance Office of Direct Service and Contracting Tribes Urban ...

  3. Comparison of pharmacy services at critical access hospitals and other rural and small hospitals in Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Stephanie Y; Schumock, Glen T; Ursan, Iulia D; Ursan, Julia D; Walton, Surrey M; Donnelly, Andrew J

    2013-08-01

    The results of a survey evaluating pharmacy services and technology use at critical access hospitals (CAHs) and other small and rural hospitals in Illinois are reported. A mail survey was sent to pharmacy directors at 86 CAHs and other rural and small hospitals in Illinois not designated as CAHs. Independent sample t tests and chi-square statistics were used to compare CAHs and non-CAHs in areas such as pharmacy services, staffing, use of technology, and sterile compounding practices. The survey response rate was 46.5%, with usable data received from 40 hospitals. Analysis of the survey data indicated that hospitals designated as CAHs were significantly less likely than non-CAHs to have automatic therapeutic interchange policies (p = 0.012) and more likely to conduct pharmacist-provided educational programs on medication costs for physicians and other health care personnel (p = 0.037). Relative to non-CAHs, CAHs were significantly less likely to have automated dispensing cabinets (p = 0.016) and to out-source the preparation of sterile products to offsite vendors (p = 0.012); pharmacy directors at CAHs were less likely to report the use of technology for remote medication order entry or review (p = 0.038). At both types of facilities, pharmacists typically have both distributive and clinical responsibilities, and patient-specific clinical pharmacy services (e.g., patient education or counseling, other drug therapy monitoring, medication reconciliation, pharmacokinetic consultations) are offered at similar frequencies. A survey of pharmacy departments at small and rural hospitals in Illinois determined that there were more similarities than differences between CAHs and non-CAHs. The survey indicated significant differences in dispensing processes, the use of technology and drug policy tools, and outsourcing of sterile product preparation.

  4. [Terrorism, public health and health services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcos González, Pedro; Castro Delgado, Rafael; Cuartas Alvarez, Tatiana; Pérez-Berrocal Alonso, Jorge

    2009-01-01

    Today the terrorism is a problem of global distribution and increasing interest for the international public health. The terrorism related violence affects the public health and the health care services in an important way and in different scopes, among them, increase mortality, morbidity and disability, generates a context of fear and anxiety that makes the psychopathological diseases very frequent, seriously alters the operation of the health care services and produces important social, political and economic damages. These effects are, in addition, especially intense when the phenomenon takes place on a chronic way in a community. The objective of this paper is to examine the relation between terrorism and public health, focusing on its effects on public health and the health care services, as well as to examine the possible frames to face the terrorism as a public health concern, with special reference to the situation in Spain. To face this problem, both the public health systems and the health care services, would have to especially adapt their approaches and operational methods in six high-priority areas related to: (1) the coordination between the different health and non health emergency response agencies; (2) the reinforcement of the epidemiological surveillance systems; (3) the improvement of the capacities of the public health laboratories and response emergency care systems to specific types of terrorism as the chemical or biological terrorism; (3) the mental health services; (4) the planning and coordination of the emergency response of the health services; (5) the relations with the population and mass media and, finally; (6) a greater transparency in the diffusion of the information and a greater degree of analysis of the carried out health actions in the scope of the emergency response.

  5. New hospital telemedicine services: potential market for a nighttime telehospitalist service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Richard B; Simpson, Kit N; Kazley, Abby S; Giarrizzi, Dana P

    2014-10-01

    A critical shortage in the supply of physicians in the United States has necessitated innovative approaches to physician service delivery. Telemedicine is a viable service delivery model for a variety of physician and health services. Telemedicine is most effective when applied where physician resources are scarce, patient care is time sensitive, and service volume may be distributed across a network. Shortages in critical care and neurology specialists have led to the use of tele-intensive care unit and telestroke services in hospital settings. These hospital-based telemedicine services have gained acceptance and recommendation. Hospitalist staffing shortages may provide an opportunity to apply similar telemedicine models to hospitalist medicine. This study assesses the potential market for a nighttime telehospitalist service. An analysis of the Florida state hospital discharge dataset investigated the potential market for a new nighttime telehospitalist service. Admissions were filtered and stratified for common hospitalist metrics, time of day, and age of patients. Admissions were further expressed by hour of day and location. Nineteen percent of common hospitalist admissions occurred between 7:00 p.m. and 7:00 a.m., with a range of 17%-27% or 0.23-10.09 admissions per night per facility. Eighty percent of admissions occurred prior to midnight. Nonrural facilities averaged 6.69 hospitalist admissions per night, whereas rural facilities averaged 1.35 admissions per night. The low volume of nighttime admissions indicates an opportunity to leverage a telehospitalist physician service to deliver inpatient medical admission services across a network. Lower volumes of nighttime admissions in rural facilities may indicate a market for telehospitalist solutions to address the dilemma of hospitalist staffing shortages.

  6. Integrating mental health and addictions services to improve client outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Ashley L

    2013-10-01

    Substance use disorders are highly prevalent among adults with mental health disorders. In many health service delivery areas, mental health and addictions services are delivered separately. However, current best practices indicate that integration of mental health and addictions services can lead to better outcomes for clients with co-occurring disorders, including fewer hospitalizations. Service integration in the community can occur in many ways, including full or partial program integration. While the delivery of mental health and addictions services must be responsive to the needs of the local community, fully integrated programs have the strongest evidence base for positive client outcomes.

  7. The public's priorities in health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Giora; Baron-Epel, Orna

    2015-10-01

    Rationing in health services cannot be solved only by cost-effective analysis because social values play a central role in the difficult trade-off dilemma of prioritizing some service over others. To examine the relative importance ascribed by the public to selected components of health services, in the national allocation of resources as well as in their personal insurance. A telephone survey of a representative sample of the Israeli adult population (N = 1225). Two versions of the questionnaire were used. At the national level, interviewees were asked to assume they were the Minister of Health. At the personal level, interviewees were asked to choose items to be included in their personal complementary health insurance. Check-ups for early disease detection and nursing care for the frail elderly got the highest support for extra budget as well as to be included in personal insurance. Other items presented were fertility treatments, cardiac rehabilitation, mental health, dental health, programmes for preventive medicine and health promotion, subsidizing supplemental insurance for the poor, additional staff for primary clinics and building a new hospital. The lowest support was for alternative medicine and for cosmetic surgery. No subgroup in the Israeli society presented a different first priority. The Israeli public does not give high priority to 'nice to have' services but their selections are 'mature' and responsible. Rationing in health care requires listening to the public even if there are still many methodological limitations on how to reflect the public's opinion. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. A survey of hospital outpatient services for chronic diseases in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    communicable diseases, in particular aspects of the organisation of services, and indirect indicators of patient care. Design. A postal survey of services for asthma, epilepsy, diabetes and hypertension at nine hospitals. Assessment over 1 week of ...

  9. How is the sustainability of chronic disease health programmes empirically measured in hospital and related healthcare services?—a scoping review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Linda; Dunt, David; Cadilhac, Dominique A

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Programmes to address chronic disease are a focus of governments worldwide. Despite growth in ‘implementation science’, there is a paucity of knowledge regarding the best means to measure sustainability. The aim of this review was to summarise current practice for measuring sustainability outcomes of chronic disease health programmes, providing guidance for programme planners and future directions for the academic field. Settings A scoping review of the literature spanning 1985–2015 was conducted using MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsychINFO and The Cochrane Library limited to English language and adults. Main search terms included chronic disease, acute care, sustainability, institutionalisation and health planning. A descriptive synthesis was required. Settings included primary care, hospitals, mental health centres and community health. Participants Programmes included preventing or managing chronic conditions including diabetes, heart disease, depression, respiratory disease, cancer, obesity, dental hygiene and multiple chronic diseases. Primary and secondary outcome measures Outcome measures included clarifying a sustainability definition, types of methodologies used, timelines for assessment, criteria levels to determine outcomes and how methodology varies between intervention types. Results Among 153 abstracts retrieved, 87 were retained for full article review and 42 included in the qualitative synthesis. Five definitions for sustainability outcome were identified with ‘maintenance of programme activities’ most frequent. Achieving sustainability was dependent on inter-relationships between various organisational and social contexts supporting a broad scale approach to evaluation. An increasing trend in use of mixed methods designs over multiple time points to determine sustainability outcomes was found. Conclusions Despite the importance and investment in chronic disease programmes, few studies are undertaken to measure sustainability. Methods to

  10. Pre-hospital critical care by anaesthesiologist-staffed pre-hospital services in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, A J; Lossius, H M; Mikkelsen, S

    2013-01-01

    All Scandinavian countries provide anaesthesiologist-staffed pre-hospital services. Little is known of the incidence of critical illness or injury attended by these services. We aimed to investigate anaesthesiologist-staffed pre-hospital services in Scandinavia with special emphasis on incidence...

  11. Factor Analysis 01- Healthcare Service Quality In Medan Government Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Lubis, Arlina Nurbaity; Lumbanraja, Prihatin; Lubis, Rahmawaty; Hasibuan, Beby Kendida

    2016-01-01

    Service sector increases rapidly especially in Indonesia. This can be seen from the distribution of the percentage of Product Domestic Bruto (PDB) based on job vacancy showing that the service sector contribution approaches 50%. One of the service/care industries with rapid growth is healthcare service. It can be seen from the government plan year 2015-2016 to do healthcare reinforcement. Generally, healthcare is identically related to hospital. A hospital is a professional healthcare institu...

  12. Efeito da oferta de serviços de saúde no uso de internações hospitalares no Brasil Impact of health services delivery on hospital admission utilization in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Silva Monteiro Castro

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar o uso de serviços hospitalares no Brasil, incorporando informações sobre a oferta de serviços de saúde. MÉTODOS: Foram analisados dados da Pesquisa Nacional por Amostra de Domicílios, realizada pelo Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística (IBGE em 1998, e também de outras fontes. Foram utilizados modelos hierárquicos, sendo a pessoa o primeiro nível e a unidade da federação de residência, o segundo. Dois modelos foram ajustados separadamente para adultos e crianças: regressão logística, para modelar ter ou não ter tido uma admissão, e regressão de Poisson, para modelar o número das admissões, sendo que o último modelo considerou apenas pessoas que tiveram pelo menos uma admissão. RESULTADOS: O principal fator associado às admissões hospitalares foi necessidade da saúde. As pessoas de menor renda tiveram maior chance de serem internadas, quando controlado por necessidade de saúde e fatores capacitantes (cobertura por seguro da saúde e existência de serviço de saúde de uso regular. Somente de 1 a 3% da variação da utilização das admissões hospitalares foi atribuído às diferenças na oferta de serviços de saúde no nível da unidade da federação. Nos modelos logísticos, o número de leitos hospitalares foi positivamente associado e o de médicos per capita negativamente associado à chance de admissão. Nos modelos de Poisson, nenhuma das variáveis de oferta foi associada à chance de admissão. CONCLUSÃO: Os resultados sugerem a existência de efeito de demanda induzida pela oferta no caso dos leitos hospitalares. A associação inversa das admissões hospitalares com o número de médicos indica a influência do cuidado ambulatorial no uso do hospital.OBJECTIVE: To assess hospital services utilization in Brazil incorporating information about health services delivery. METHODS: Data from the National Household Survey carried out by Brazilian Institute of Statistics and

  13. Utilization of hospital library by health workers in a tertiary health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The task of providing quality health care services require the use of current health information; and hospital library seems to be the most appropriate source of organized and well articulated information for health workers. This descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out between January and June 2003 to determine ...

  14. A study and comparative analysis of managerial and leadership effectiveness in the National Health Service: an empirical factor analytic study within an NHS Trust hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlin, R G

    2002-11-01

    The research described in this article was concerned primarily with identifying the criteria of managerial/leadership effectiveness applying at the middle and front line levels of management within an NHS Trust Hospital using critical incident technique and factor analysis methods. The findings suggest that the self-perceptions of managers and the perceptions of superiors and subordinates are very similar, and only differ on a limited number of criteria. This challenges the 'perspective-specific' models of managerial effectiveness advocated by some researchers. The results are compared against those from a near identical study carried out by the author within one part of the British Civil Service, and the results from a different but comparable factor analytic study carried out by other researchers elsewhere in the NHS. The results suggest the existence of generalized criteria of managerial effectiveness, which lend considerable support to the notion of the 'universally effective manager'. This challenges the 'contingent models' of managerial effectiveness advocated by various expert commentators. In addition, the research supports the new model of transformational leadership offered by Alimo-Metcalfe and Alban-Metcalfe for application within both the NHS and local government, and adds to the empirical base supporting the current drive towards evidence-based practice in management within the healthcare sector.

  15. Effect of changing from the National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey III spirometry reference range to that of the Global Lung Initiative 2012 at Gold Coast Hospital and Health Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embling, Laura A K; Zagami, Debbie; Sriram, Krishna Bajee; Gordon, Robert J; Sivakumaran, Pathmanathan

    2016-12-01

    The categorisation of lung disease into obstructive ventilatory defect (OVD) and tendency to a restrictive ventilatory defect (TRVD) patterns using spirometry is used to guide both prognostication and treatment. The effectiveness of categorisation depends upon having reference ranges that accurately represent the population they describe. The Global Lung Initiative 2012 (GLI 2012) has spirometry reference ranges drawn from the largest sample size to date. This study aimed to determine whether using spirometry reference ranges from the new GLI 2012 dataset, compared to the previously used National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey III (NHANES III) dataset, resulted in a change in diagnosis between OVD, TRVD and normal ventilatory pattern (NVP). Spirometry data were collected from 301 patients, aged 18-80 years, undergoing investigation at the Gold Coast Hospital and Health Service (GCHHS) throughout February and March 2014. OVD was defined as a forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) divided by forced vital capacity (FVC) less than lower limit of normal (LLN). TRVD was defined as FEV1/FVC ≥ LLN, FEV1 < LLN, and FVC < LLN. The LLN values were determined by equations from the GLI and NHANES datasets. Spirometry interpreted using the NHANES III equations showed: 102 individuals (33.9%) with normal spirometry, 136 (45.2%) with an OVD pattern, 52 (17.3%) with a TRVD pattern, and 11 (3.7%) with a mixed pattern. When the spirometry data were interpreted using the GLI 2012 equations 2 (0.7%) individuals changed from OVD to NVP, 2 (0.7%) changed from NVP to OVD and 14 (4.7%) changed from TRVD to NVP. Using the GLI 2012 reference range resulted in a change in diagnosis of lung disease in 5.9% of the individuals included in this study. This variance in diagnosis when changing reference ranges should be taken into account by clinicians as it may affect patient management.

  16. Determinants of hospital choice of rural hospital patients: the impact of networks, service scopes, and market competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Chul-Young; Lee, Keon-Hyung; Fottler, Myron D

    2008-08-01

    Among 10,384 rural Colorado female patients who received MDC 14 (obstetric services) from 2000 to 2003, 6,615 (63.7%) were admitted to their local rural hospitals; 1,654 (15.9%) were admitted to other rural hospitals; and 2,115 (20.4%) traveled to urban hospitals for inpatient services. This study is to examine how network participation, service scopes, and market competition influences rural women's choice of hospital for their obstetric care. A conditional logistic regression analysis was used. The network participation (p market competition had a positive and significant relationship with patients' choice to receive obstetric care. That is, rural patients prefer to receive care from a hospital that participates in a network, that provides more number of services, and that has a greater market share (i.e., a lower level of market competition) in their locality. Rural hospitals could actively increase their competitiveness and market share by increasing the number of health care services provided and seeking to network with other hospitals.

  17. Health services utilization in Jerusalem under terrorism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levav, Itzhak; Novikov, Ilya; Grinshpoon, Alexander; Rosenblum, Joseph; Ponizovsky, Alexander

    2006-08-01

    The authors explored the effects of an escalation of terrorism on the help-seeking behavior of the general population in Jerusalem, a city that offers an adequate supply of medical and psychiatric services. Time-series analyses were applied to examine the utilization of health services (primary medical care and ambulance calls) and mental health services (clinics, hospitals, and telephone hotlines) by Jerusalem residents before and during part of the current intifada. The authors assessed seasonality, general linear trends (from factors such as health education and increased access), short-term intifada impact (reflecting reactions that peaked at the third month and ended 1 year thereafter), and long-term impact (starting at the intifada outbreak and reflecting a more stable population behavior). Adult psychiatric outpatient visits did not change except for the elderly in ongoing care who had both short- and long-term increases. The proportion of recorded ICD-10 diagnoses reflecting intifada-related reactions remained generally stable. Short-term effects included an increase in psychiatric readmissions. First contacts to substance abuse clinics remained unchanged. While long-term effects included a decrease in new psychiatric hospitalizations, the rate of monthly general practitioner visitors and the number of monthly ambulance and hotline calls increased. Except for the elderly and previously hospitalized persons, Jerusalem residents did not increase their use of psychiatric services but did increase their use of some other health services. These results suggest that this terrorism-affected population did not perceive their mental and social suffering as requiring specialized intervention.

  18. The Impact of Quality Service Provided by SRM Hospital on Outpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Amoah-Binfoh

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Consumer’s perceptions about the health care services play an important role when choosing a hospital. The quality of service is crucial to both the outpatients and the service providers. The dimensions of the service quality are reliability, responsiveness, assurance, empathy, and tangibles. Customer’s expectations and experiences vary with services. When there is a shortfall between expectation of service level and perception of actual service delivery, it is called customer gap. The causes of customer gap include; not knowing what customers expect, not selecting the right service designs and standards, not delivering to service standards and not matching performance to promises. This paper focuses on the level of service quality rendered by SRM’s hospital, the patient-physicians’ relationship and to examine the pre and post service of outpatients in the SRM’s hospital. A structured questionnaires and interviews were constructed to provide answers to the research questions using a sample size of 50 [employees and outpatients]. It was found out that some outpatients were satisfied with the services rendered by the hospital with reservations for more improvement. It was also found out that, there were gaps between the outpatients’ expectation and perception about the service rendered by the hospital. It was recommended that a competent marketing executive should be employed since marketing is the voice of the healthcare industry.

  19. The impact of an enhanced interpreter service intervention on hospital costs and patient satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Elizabeth A; Sadowski, Laura S; Rathouz, Paul J

    2007-11-01

    Many health care providers do not provide adequate language access services for their patients who are limited English-speaking because they view the costs of these services as prohibitive. However, little is known about the costs they might bear because of unaddressed language barriers or the costs of providing language access services. To investigate how language barriers and the provision of enhanced interpreter services impact the costs of a hospital stay. Prospective intervention study. Public hospital inpatient medicine service. Three hundred twenty-three adult inpatients: 124 Spanish-speakers whose physicians had access to the enhanced interpreter intervention, 99 Spanish-speakers whose physicians only had access to usual interpreter services, and 100 English-speakers matched to Spanish-speaking participants on age, gender, and admission firm. Patient satisfaction, hospital length of stay, number of inpatient consultations and radiology tests conducted in the hospital, adherence with follow-up appointments, use of emergency department (ED) services and hospitalizations in the 3 months after discharge, and the costs associated with provision of the intervention and any resulting change in health care utilization. The enhanced interpreter service intervention did not significantly impact any of the measured outcomes or their associated costs. The cost of the enhanced interpreter service was $234 per Spanish-speaking intervention patient and represented 1.5% of the average hospital cost. Having a Spanish-speaking attending physician significantly increased Spanish-speaking patient satisfaction with physician, overall hospital experience, and reduced ED visits, thereby reducing costs by $92 per Spanish-speaking patient over the study period. The enhanced interpreter service intervention did not significantly increase or decrease hospital costs. Physician-patient language concordance reduced return ED visit and costs. Health care providers need to examine all the

  20. Health Services Procurement Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Department of Health (Ireland)

    2000-01-01

    The Healthcare Materials Management Board (HMMB) was established following the report to the Materials Management Advisory Group on procurement and materials management in the health sector Download the Report here

  1. Improving service quality in NHS Trust hospitals: lessons from the hotel sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desombre, T; Eccles, G

    1998-01-01

    This article looks to review recent practice undertaken within the UK hotel sector to improve customer service, and suggests ideals that could be implemented within National Health (NHS) Trust hospitals. At a time of increasing competition, hotel firms are using service enhancement as a means to gain competitive advantage, and therefore developing a range of techniques to measure levels of service quality improvement. With continued change in the health service, where greater focus now lies with patient satisfaction, so there is a requirement for managers to adapt techniques presently being offered in other service industries to improve levels of customer service and ensure patients are targeted to define their levels of satisfaction.

  2. Hospitalization and aesthetic health in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Hilary; Donnellan, Claire; O'Neill, Desmond

    2015-02-01

    To assess the impact of hospitalization on arts engagement among older people; and to assess perceptions of whether hospitals are aesthetically deprived environments. A Survey of Aesthetic and Cultural Health was developed to explore the role of aesthetics before, during and after hospital. Study participants were n = 150 hospital in-patients aged >65. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze the data. Attendance at arts events was an important part of life for this sample and a large drop off was noted in continuation of these activities in the year post-hospital stay. Physical health issues were the main causes but also loss of confidence and transport issues. Film, dance, and music were the most popular arts for this sample prior to hospital stay. Noise pollution caused by other patients, lack of control over TV/radio, and access to receptive arts in hospital (reading and listening to music) were important issues for patients in hospital. This study identifies a trend for decreasing exposure to arts beginning with a hospital stay and concludes that older people may need encouragement to resume engagement in arts following a hospital stay. There is relatively limited evidence regarding the nature of, and potential benefit from, aesthetics in healthcare and limited studies with rigorous methodology, and further research is needed to understand the aesthetic preferences of older people in hospital. Copyright © 2015 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The use of electronic health records in Spanish hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marca, Guillem; Perez, Angel; Blanco-Garcia, Martin German; Miravalles, Elena; Soley, Pere; Ortiga, Berta

    The aims of this study were to describe the level of adoption of electronic health records in Spanish hospitals and to identify potential barriers and facilitators to this process. We used an observational cross-sectional design. The survey was conducted between September and December 2011, using an electronic questionnaire distributed through email. We obtained a 30% response rate from the 214 hospitals contacted, all belonging to the Spanish National Health Service. The level of adoption of electronic health records in Spanish hospitals was found to be high: 39.1% of hospitals surveyed had a comprehensive EHR system while a basic system was functioning in 32.8% of the cases. However, in 2011 one third of the hospitals did not have a basic electronic health record system, although some have since implemented electronic functionalities, particularly those related to clinical documentation and patient administration. Respondents cited the acquisition and implementation costs as the main barriers to implementation. Facilitators for EHR implementation were: the possibility to hire technical support, both during and post implementation; security certification warranty; and objective third-party evaluations of EHR products. In conclusion, the number of hospitals that have electronic health records is in general high, being relatively higher in medium-sized hospitals.

  4. Electronic Health Services

    OpenAIRE

    Khalil, Mounir M; Jones, Ray

    2007-01-01

    Information and communication technologies have made dramatic changes in our lives. Healthcare communities also made use of these technologies. Using computerized medical knowledge, electronic patients’ information and telecommunications a lot of applications are now established throughout the world. These include better ways of information management, remote education, telemedicine and public services. Yet, a lot of people don't know about these technologies and their applications. Understan...

  5. 42 CFR 415.162 - Determining payment for physician services furnished to beneficiaries in teaching hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... services furnished in a teaching hospital. (g) Aggregate per diem methods of apportionment—(1) For the... furnished to beneficiaries in teaching hospitals. 415.162 Section 415.162 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... BY PHYSICIANS IN PROVIDERS, SUPERVISING PHYSICIANS IN TEACHING SETTINGS, AND RESIDENTS IN CERTAIN...

  6. A comprehensive health service evaluation and monitoring framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, Carole; Humphreys, John; Wakerman, John

    2015-12-01

    To develop a framework for evaluating and monitoring a primary health care service, integrating hospital and community services. A targeted literature review of primary health service evaluation frameworks was performed to inform the development of the framework specifically for remote communities. Key principles underlying primary health care evaluation were determined and sentinel indicators developed to operationalise the evaluation framework. This framework was then validated with key stakeholders. The framework includes Donabedian's three seminal domains of structure, process and outcomes to determine health service performance. These in turn are dependent on sustainability, quality of patient care and the determinants of health to provide a comprehensive health service evaluation framework. The principles underpinning primary health service evaluation were pertinent to health services in remote contexts. Sentinel indicators were developed to fit the demographic characteristics and health needs of the population. Consultation with key stakeholders confirmed that the evaluation framework was applicable. Data collected routinely by health services can be used to operationalise the proposed health service evaluation framework. Use of an evaluation framework which links policy and health service performance to health outcomes will assist health services to improve performance as part of a continuous quality improvement cycle. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Marketing service guarantees for health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, J S

    1999-01-01

    The author introduces the concept of service guarantees for application in health care and differentiates between explicit, implicit, and conditional vs. unconditional types of guarantees. An example of an unconditional guarantee of satisfaction is provided by the hospitality industry. Firms conveying an implicit guarantee are those with outstanding reputations for products such as luxury automobiles, or ultimate customer service, like Nordstrom. Federal Express and Domino's Pizza offer explicit guarantees of on-time delivery. Taking this concept into efforts to improve health care delivery involves a number of caveats. Customers invited to use exceptional service cards may use these to record either satisfaction or dissatisfaction. The cards need to provide enough specific information about issues so that "immediate action could be taken to improve processes." Front-line employees should be empowered to respond to complaints in a meaningful way to resolve the problem before the client leaves the premises.

  8. Family dental health care service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riana Wardani

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The Family Dental Health Care Service is a new approach that includes efforts to serve oral and dental patients that focuses on maintenance, improvement and protection. This oral and dental health approach uses basic dentistry science and technology. The vision of the Family Dental Health Care Service is the family independences in the effort of dental health maintenance and to achieve the highest oral and dental health degree as possible through family dentist care that is efficient, effective, fair, evenly distributed, safe and has a good quality. To support this effort, the Ministry of Health has issued Health Care Policy and Implementation Guideline as well as the licensing standard for family dentist practice.

  9. [Hospital-based Health Technology Assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavadil, Martin; Rogalewicz, Vladimír; Kubátová, Ivana; Matloňová, Veronika; Salačová, Kristýna

    Hospital-based HTA (HB-HTA) consists in implementation of assessment activities "in" or "for" hospitals; hence, it covers processes and methods supporting organization and execution of health technology assessment (HTA) at the level of individual hospitals. This process is multidisciplinary, systematic and evidence-based.HB-HTA objectives and methods differ from the classic utilization of HTA at the national regulator level. Most experience and information concerning HB-HTA has originated in two large recent projects: activities of the HB-HTA Interest Group of the HTAi international association established in 2006, and the AdHopHTA European research project (20122015).This paper describes four basic organizational models of HB-HTA, their characteristics and utilization in various countries and hospital types. Results of the AdHopHTA project are analyzed, and recommendations for HB-HTA implementation in Czech hospitals are formulated.Key words: hospital-based HTA, medical device, implementation, hospital strategy.

  10. Measuring service line competitive position. A systematic methodology for hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studnicki, J

    1991-01-01

    To mount a broad effort aimed at improving their competitive position for some service or group of services, hospitals have begun to pursue product line management techniques. A few hospitals have even reorganized completely under the product line framework. The benefits include focusing accountability for operations and results, facilitating coordination between departments and functions, stimulating market segmentation, and promoting rigorous examination of new and existing programs. As part of its strategic planning process, a suburban Baltimore hospital developed a product line management methodology with six basic steps: (1) define the service lines (which they did by grouping all existing diagnosis-related groups into 35 service lines), (2) determine the contribution of each service line to total inpatient volume, (3) determine trends in service line volumes (by comparing data over time), (4) derive a useful comparison group (competing hospitals or groups of hospitals with comparable size, scope of services, payer mix, and financial status), (5) review multiple time frames, and (6) summarize the long- and short-term performance of the hospital's service lines to focus further analysis. This type of systematic and disciplined analysis can become part of a permanent strategic intelligence program. When hospitals have such a program in place, their market research, planning, budgeting, and operations will be tied together in a true management decision support system.

  11. Obesity, hospital services use and costs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folmann, Nana Bro; Bossen, Kristine Skovgaard; Willaing, Ingrid

    2007-01-01

    To quantify the association between obesity and somatic hospital costs and number of overall somatic hospital contacts--number of inpatient admissions, number of outpatient visits, and number of emergency department visits--based on anthropometric measurements of waist circumference (WC) and info...

  12. Determinants of health insurance and hospitalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadashi Yamada

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Our paper empirically examines how the decision to purchase private insurance and hospitalization are made based on household income, socio-demographic factors, and private health insurance factors in both Japan and the USA. Using these two data-sets, we found some similarities and dissimilarities between Japan and the United States. As income of households rises, households have a positive effect on purchasing health insurance as a normal good. Another similarity between the two countries is seen in the income effect on risk of hospitalization, which is negative for both Japanese and US cases. For dissimilarity, the insurance premium effect on risk of hospitalization is positive for the Japanese case, while negative for the US case. Since the Japanese insurance data had variables such as payments per day of hospitalization if household gets hospitalized, insurance payments upon death of an insured person, and annuity payments at maturity, we tested to see if these characteristics affect the risk of hospitalization for households; we do not eliminate a possibility of adverse selection. For the US pure health issuance characteristics, an increase in premium of health insurance policies cause individuals to substitute more health capital investment which causes lower risk of hospitalization.

  13. Does participation in health information exchange improve hospital efficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Daniel M

    2017-02-24

    The federal government allocated nearly $30 billion to spur the development of information technology infrastructure capable of supporting the exchange of interoperable clinical data, leading to growth in hospital participation in health information exchange (HIE) networks. HIEs have the potential to improve care coordination across healthcare providers, leading ultimately to increased productivity of health services for hospitals. However, the impact of HIE participation on hospital efficiency remains unclear. This dynamic prompts the question asked by this study: does HIE participation improve hospital efficiency. This study estimates the effect of HIE participation on efficiency using a national sample of 1017 hospitals from 2009 to 2012. Using a two-stage analytic design, efficiency indices were determined using the Malmquist algorithm and then regressed on a set of hospital characteristics. Results suggest that any participation in HIE can improve both technical efficiency change and total factor productivity (TFP). A second model examining total years of HIE participation shows a benefit of one and three years of participation on TFP. These results suggest that hospital investment in HIE participation may be a useful strategy to improve hospital operational performance, and that policy should continue to support increased participation and use of HIE. More research is needed to identify the exact mechanisms through which HIE participation can improve hospital efficiency.

  14. [Quality management and quality assurance in the hospital with special reference to hospital public health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonntag, H G; Möller, J

    1996-12-01

    Due to the law of health reform and health structure the hospitals in the Federal Republic of Germany are asked to not only think about cost reduction but at the same time to also face the requirements of quality management (QM) and quality assurance (QA). For the field of medical and care taking treatment of patients in the hospital the term "quality" can be described as the total of characteristics of the medical services necessary for the realization of all requirements which lead to an optimal patient treatment. Hospital hygiene as part of hygiene in the broader sense deals with the bases of disease prevention of all persons actively or passively connected with the institution hospital as well as with the natural and social hospital environment and, thus, in every respect proves to be a guide discipline for the realization of QM and QA in the hospital. For the realization of an overall concept for QM and QA in the hospital three categories of quality have proved to be worthwhile, namely the structure quality which deals with the quality related arrangement of the frame conditions of hospital productivity the process quality which comprises the improvement of diagnostic, therapeutic, care taking and medical activities in the hospital as well as interactions between the hospital staff and the patient or his relatives, and the outcome quality, which judges the changes in the patient's condition by means of predefined target values. Furthermore, QM in the hospital needs detailed informative activities (initial stage of information) as well as motivating measures (initial stage of conduct) whereas latter has to be considered as an essential basis for a staff-related realization of quality assurance measures in the hospital. Possibilities for a practical realization of QM and QA are shown by means of the modular concept established in the Clinics of the University of Heidelberg. Thereby, one could experience that a successful QM in the hospital requires the declared

  15. Inequities in Chinese Health Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Mullins-Owens

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Chinese health system was once held up as a model for providing universal health care in the developing world in the 1970s, only to have what is now considered one of the least equitable systems in the world according to the World Health Organization. This article begins with a brief look at what equity in health services entails, and considers the inequities in access to health services in China among different segments of the population. This article will consider challenges the current inequities may present to China in the near future if reforms are not implemented. Finally, it will take a look at reforms made by China’s neighbors, Singapore and Thailand, which made their health care more equitable, affordable, and sustainable.

  16. Factor selection for service quality evaluation: a hospital case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameryoun, Ahmad; Najafi, Seyedvahid; Nejati-Zarnaqi, Bayram; Khalilifar, Seyed Omid; Ajam, Mahdi; Ansarimoghadam, Ahmad

    2017-02-13

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to develop a systematic approach to predict service quality dimension's influence on service quality using a novel analysis based on data envelopment and SERVQUAL. Design/methodology/approach To assess hospital service quality in Tehran, expectation and perception of those who received the services were evaluated using SERVQUAL. The hospital service quality dimensions were found by exploratory factor analysis (EFA). To compare customer expectation and perception, perceived service quality index (PSQI) was measured using a new method based on common weights. A novel sensitivity approach was used to test the service quality factor's impact on the PSQI. Findings A new service quality dimension named "trust in services" was found using EFA, which is not an original SERVQUAL factor. The approach was applied to assess the hospital's service quality. Since the PSQI value was 0.76 it showed that improvements are needed to meet customer expectations. The results showed the factor order that affect PSQI. "Trust in services" has the strongest influence on PSQI followed by "tangibles," "assurance," "empathy," and "responsiveness," respectively. Practical implications This work gives managers insight into service quality by following a systematic method; i.e., measuring perceived service quality from the customer viewpoint and service factors' impact on customer perception. Originality/value The procedure helps managers to select the required service quality dimensions which need improvement and predict their effects on customer perception.

  17. Health and the need for health promotion in hospital patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oppedal, Kristian; Nesvåg, Sverre; Pedersen, Bolette

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Integrated health promotion improves clinical outcomes after hospital treatment. The first step towards implementing evidence-based health promotion in hospitals is to estimate the need for health promoting activities directed at hospital patients. The aim of this study was to identify...... of waist and weight), self-reported physical inactivity, daily smoking and hazardous drinking. We used logistic regression to describe the associations between health risk factors and demographic characteristics. RESULTS: Out of 10 included patients, 9 (N = 1522) had one or more health risk factors...

  18. Complex health service needs for people who are homeless.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Gaye; Manias, Elizabeth; Gerdtz, Marie Frances

    2011-11-01

    Homeless people face many challenges in accessing and utilising health services to obtain psychosocial supports offered in hospital and community settings. The complex nature of health issues is compounded by lack of accessibility to services and lack of appropriate and safe housing. To examine the perceptions and experiences of homeless people in relation to their health service needs as well as those of service providers involved with their care. A purposive sampling approach was undertaken with a thematic framework analysis of semi-structured interviews. Participants. Interviews were undertaken with 20 homeless people who accessed the emergency department in an acute hospital in Melbourne, Australia and 27 service providers involved in hospital and community care. Six key themes were identified from interviews: complexity of care needs, respect for homeless people and co-workers, engagement as a key strategy in continued care, lack of after-hour services, lack of appropriate accommodation and complexity of services. Findings revealed the complex and diverse nature of health concerns in homeless people. The demand on hospital services continues to increase and unless government policies take into consideration the psychosocial demands of the communities most vulnerable people efforts to divert hospital demand will continue to fail.

  19. Health Service Utilization and Poor Health Reporting in Asthma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua G. Behr

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The management and treatment of adult asthma has been associated with utilization of health services. Objectives: First, to investigate the likelihood of health service utilization, including primary care, emergency department, and hospital stays, among persons diagnosed with an asthma condition relative to those that do not have an asthma condition. Second, to examine the likelihood of poor physical health among asthma respondents relative to those that do not have an asthma condition. Third, to demonstrate that these relationships vary with frequency of utilization. Fourth, to discuss the magnitude of differences in frequent utilization between asthma and non-asthma respondents. Data Source: Data is derived from a random, stratified sampling of Hampton Roads adults, 18 years and older (n = 1678. Study Design: Study participants are interviewed to identify asthma diagnosis, access to primary care, frequency of emergency department utilization, hospital admissions, and days of poor physical health. Odds-ratios establish relationships with the covariates on the outcome variable. Findings: Those with asthma are found more likely (OR 1.50, 95% CI 1.05–2.15 to report poor physical health relative to non-asthma study participants. Further, asthma respondents are found more likely (OR 4.23, 95% CI 1.56–11.69 to frequently utilize primary care that may be associated with the management of the condition and are also more likely to utilize treatment services, such as the emergency department (OR 1.87, 95% CI 1.32–2.65 and hospitalization (OR 2.21, 95% CI 1.39–3.50, associated with acute and episodic care. Further, it is a novel finding that these likelihoods increase with frequency of utilization for emergency department visits and hospital stays. Conclusion: Continuity in care and better management of the diseases may result in less demand for emergency department services and hospitalization. Health care systems need to recognize that asthma

  20. Quality of Pharmacy Services in Government Hospitals in Addis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Quality of pharmaceutical services can be measured at the levels of the structure, process and outcome. Although quality assessments of pharmaceutical services are common in many parts of the world, there is limited information on the quality of hospital pharmacy services in Ethiopia. This study attempted to assess the ...

  1. Is mortality a good indicator of the clinical quality of National Health Service hospitals? A cross-sectional study of outlier trusts for mortality indices using quality dashboards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diley, Ian; Badrinath, Padmanabhan; Annon, Sarah

    2014-08-01

    This study assessed whether the 14 National Health Service (NHS) acute trusts reviewed by Sir Bruce Keogh in July 2013 were performance outliers on the Acute Trust Quality Dashboard (ATQD) and examined whether high mortality indices results are associated with increased numbers of quality risk alerts and alarms. The proportion of dashboard indicators rated amber or red in the Keogh Review trust group was compared with that for all trusts. Quality performance at primary care level was assessed for lead Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCG) of Keogh Review trusts through the national General Practice High Level Indicators. England. The study examined the performance of all acute NHS trusts in England and the performance of the lead CCGs for all acute NHS trusts included in the Keogh Review. The primary outcome was the proportion of alerts and alarms identified in the summer 2013 ATQD. The mean proportion of indicators scored as alert or alarm across all trusts was 14.1% (13.5-14.7%). For Keogh Review trusts, the mean was 14.5% (12.6-16.4%). There was no significant difference between Keogh Review trusts and all acute trusts in numbers of alerts or alarms or for lead CCG quality performance. This study finds no evidence to suggest the trusts reviewed by Sir Bruce Keogh in spring 2013 were outliers for overall quality of care as defined by the ATQD. The use of mortality indices alone to identify potential quality outliers in secondary care may not be sufficient.

  2. Barriers to mental health services utilization in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria: service users' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack-Ide, Izibeloko Omi; Uys, Leana

    2013-01-01

    There is only one neuro-psychiatric hospital for over four million people in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria. Low-income groups in urban and rural areas who access care through public mental health clinics are at greater risk of not accessing the needed mental health care. This study aimed to explored barriers that prevent people from utilizing mental health services, and to identifies key factors to increase access and improved service delivery. A qualitative study was conducted among 20 service users attending the outpatient clinic of Rumuigbo neuropsychiatric hospital. Ten participants were caregivers and 10 were clients, both having accessed services for at least one year. The mean age was 37.7 years, 60% were males, 40% were unemployed and only 15% had a regular monthly income, while 65% live in rural areas. Barriers observed in mental health services use were physical, financial and cultural. These include absence of service in rural communities, poor knowledge of mental health services, stigma, transportation problems, waiting time at the facility and cost of service. Stigma remains a strong barrier to accessing mental health services, and extensive efforts need to be made to overcome ignorance and discrimination. Mental health services need to be provided throughout the health care system to enable people to access them locally and affordably, preventing the need to travel and promoting service uptake and treatment continuation.

  3. Barriers to mental health services utilization in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria: service users’ perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack-Ide, Izibeloko Omi; Uys, Leana

    2013-01-01

    Introduction There is only one neuro-psychiatric hospital for over four million people in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria. Low-income groups in urban and rural areas who access care through public mental health clinics are at greater risk of not accessing the needed mental health care. This study aimed to explored barriers that prevent people from utilizing mental health services, and to identifies key factors to increase access and improved service delivery. Methods A qualitative study was conducted among 20 service users attending the outpatient clinic of Rumuigbo neuropsychiatric hospital. Ten participants were caregivers and 10 were clients, both having accessed services for at least one year. Results The mean age was 37.7 years, 60% were males, 40% were unemployed and only 15% had a regular monthly income, while 65% live in rural areas. Barriers observed in mental health services use were physical, financial and cultural. These include absence of service in rural communities, poor knowledge of mental health services, stigma, transportation problems, waiting time at the facility and cost of service. Conclusion Stigma remains a strong barrier to accessing mental health services, and extensive efforts need to be made to overcome ignorance and discrimination. Mental health services need to be provided throughout the health care system to enable people to access them locally and affordably, preventing the need to travel and promoting service uptake and treatment continuation. PMID:23785564

  4. 42 CFR 413.122 - Payment for hospital outpatient radiology services and other diagnostic procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment for hospital outpatient radiology services... radiology services and other diagnostic procedures. (a) Basis and purpose. (1) This section implements section 1833(n) of the Act and establishes the method for determining Medicare payments for radiology...

  5. [Hospital emergency health service care as a risk factor for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in residents of long-term care facilities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Alonso, Bárbara; Rodríguez-Álvarez, Cristobalina; Castro Hernández, Beatriz; Arias Rodríguez, Ángeles; Aguirre-Jaime, Armando; Lecuona Fernández, María

    2016-01-01

    To describe the characteristics of frequent users of hospital emergency departments and analyze whether characteristics varied in relation to how revisits were distributed over the course of the year studied. Retrospective study of patients over the age of 14 years who were treated in a hospital emergency department at least 10 times in 2013. Patients were identified in 17 public hospitals in the Spanish autonomous community of Madrid. Data related to the first and successive visits were gathered and analyzed by quarter year. The GEM attended 331 victims; 6 died at the scene of the fire and 43.8 % (135/308) were transferred to a hospital. The cohort included 178 men (57.8% of 308), and 73.0% were between the ages of 18 and 65 years (216/296). SpCO levels were over 10% in 11.4% (35/308); the mean SpCO was 4.33% (95% CI, 3.65%-5.12%). The regression model identified the following variables associated with the decision to transfer the patient to a hospital: presence of burns (P=.014), signs (P<.001) and symptoms (P=.011) of intoxication, and SpCO value (P<.001). The odds ratio for SpCO 10% was 12.59 (95% CI, 4.32-36.69) in relation to transfer to a hospital. Pulse CO-oximetry contributed to the prehospital emergency care of these patients by influencing the decision to transfer the patient to a hospital.

  6. Influence of maternal birthplace on postpartum health and health services use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganann, Rebecca; Sword, Wendy; Black, Margaret; Carpio, Barbara

    2012-04-01

    This study examined differences in health status, rates of postpartum depression, perceptions of health services, unmet service needs, and barriers to service use among women born in and outside of Canada at 6 weeks following postpartum discharge from hospital. A secondary analysis of data gathered for a longitudinal cross-sectional survey of postpartum health and service use was conducted. Data from participants recruited from two urban hospitals were used for this analysis (n = 1,045). Analyses examined differences between women born in and outside of Canada. Immigrant women were significantly more likely to experience fair/poor postpartum health status and risk for postpartum depression. Immigrant women were also more likely to rate community health services as fair/poor, and were less likely to be able to get care for emotional health problems. Postpartum health services need to be responsive and accessible in order to meet the needs of immigrant women.

  7. Impact of hospital atmosphere on perceived health care outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Ritu; Polsa, Pia; Soneye, Alabi; Fuxiang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare service quality studies primarily examine the relationships between patients' perceived quality and satisfaction with healthcare services, clinical effectiveness, service use, recommendations and value for money. These studies suggest that patient-independent quality dimensions (structure, process and outcome) are antecedents to quality. The purpose of this paper is to propose an alternative by looking at the relationship between hospital atmosphere and healthcare quality with perceived outcome. Data were collected from Finland, India, Nigeria and the People's Republic of China. Regression analysis used perceived outcome as the dependent variable and atmosphere and healthcare service quality as independent variables. Findings - Results showed that atmosphere and healthcare service quality have a statistically significant relationship with patient perceived outcomes. The sample size was small and the sampling units were selected on convenience; thus, caution must be exercised in generalizing the findings. The study determined that service quality and atmosphere are considered significant for developing and developed nations. This result could have significant implications for policy makers and service providers developing healthcare quality and hospital atmosphere. Studies concentrate on healthcare outcome primarily regarding population health status, mortality, morbidity, customer satisfaction, loyalty, quality of life, customer behavior and consumption. However, the study exposes how patients perceive their health after treatment. Furthermore, the authors develop the healthcare service literature by considering atmosphere and perceived outcome.

  8. A tale of two cultures: examining patient-centered care in a forensic mental health hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, James D.; Nijdam-Jones, Alicia; Brink, Johann

    2012-01-01

    Several questions remain unanswered regarding the extent to which the principles and practices of patient-centered care are achievable in the context of a forensic mental health hospital. This study examined patient-centered care from the perspectives of patients and providers in a forensic mental health hospital. Patient-centered care was assessed using several measures of complementary constructs. Interviews were conducted with 30 patients and surveys were completed by 28 service providers in a forensic mental health hospital. Patients and providers shared similar views of the therapeutic milieu and recovery orientation of services; however, providers were more likely to perceive the hospital as being potentially unsafe. Overall, the findings indicated that characteristics of patient-centered care may be found within a forensic mental health hospital. The principles of patient-centered care can be integrated into service delivery in forensic mental health hospitals, though special attention to providers’ perceptions of safety is needed. PMID:22815648

  9. Health services use associated with emergency department closure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristian Schultz; Enemark, Ulrika; Foldspang, Anders

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study changes in health services consumption following substantial reduction in the availability of local emergency services in a small municipality population. METHOD: A dynamic cohort (21,000 residents of Viborg County, Denmark, of which 2,300 from Morsø municipality) was followed......, 1997-2003. Data were extracted from administrative registries including information on individual use of emergency services and other hospital care, contact with GPs and socioeconomic background. Health services' use by the Morsø population was measured before reduction in emergency room opening hours...... of substitute health services. By contrast, Morsø women compared to the rest of Viborg county reduced their use of GP services in terms of face-to-face visits (β = -0.08, P = 0.020), telephone consultations (β = -0.11, P = 0.007), home visits (β = -0.48, P = 0.009), and their inpatient hospital utilization (β...

  10. Day hospital and psychosocial care center: Expanding the discussion of partial hospitalization in mental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Augusto Trinta Weber

    Full Text Available Summary Introduction: Since the second half of the twentieth century the discussions about mental patient care reveal ongoing debate between two health care paradigms: the biomedical/biopsychosocial paradigm and the psychosocial paradigm. The struggle for hegemony over the forms of care, on how to deal optimally with the experience of becoming ill is underpinned by an intentionality of reorganizing knowledge about the health/disease dichotomy, which is reflected in the models proposed for the implementation of actions and services for the promotion, prevention, care and rehabilitation of human health. Objective: To discuss the guidelines of care in mental health day hospitals (MHDH in contrast to type III psychosocial care centers (CAPS III. Method: Review of mental health legislation from 1990 to 2014. Results: A definition of therapeutic project could not be found, as well as which activities and techniques should be employed by these health services. Conclusion: The MHDH and PCC III are services that replace psychiatric hospital admission and are characterized by their complementarity in the care to the mentally ill. Due to their varied and distinctive intervention methods, which operate synergistically, the contributions from both models of care are optimized. Discussions on the best mental health care model reveal polarization between the biomedical/biopsychosocial and psychosocial paradigms. This reflects the supremacy of the latter over the former in the political-ideological discourse that circumscribes the reform of psychiatric care, which may hinder a better clinical outcome for patients and their families.

  11. Cultural values and health service quality in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polsa, Pia; Fuxiang, Wei; Sääksjärvi, Maria; Shuyuan, Pei

    2013-01-01

    Several service quality studies show how cultural features may influence the way service quality is perceived. However, few studies specifically describe culture's influence on health service quality. Also, there are few studies that take into account patients' health service quality perceptions. This article seeks to present a first step to fill these gaps by examining patients' cultural values and their health service quality assessments. The study draws on published work and applies its ideas to Chinese healthcare settings. Data consist of hospital service perceptions in the People's Republic of China (PRC), a society that is socially, economically and culturally undergoing major changes. In total, 96 patients were surveyed. Data relationships were tested using partial least square (PLS) analysis. Findings show that Chinese patients' cultural values and their health service assessments are related and that the cultural values themselves seem to be changing. Additionally, further analyses provided interesting results pointing to which cultural values influenced service quality perceptions. The strongest service quality predictor was power distance. The sample is relatively small and collected from only one major hospital in China. Therefore, future research should extend the sample size and scope. Follow-up research could also include cross-cultural investigations of perceived health service quality to substantiate cultural influences on health service quality perceptions. In line with similar research in other contexts, the study confirms that power distance has a significant relationship with service quality perceptions. The study contributes to existing health service literature by offering patients' views on health service quality and by describing relationships between health service perceptions and cultural values--the study's main contribution.

  12. Assessing Community-Based Injury Prevention Services in U.S. Children's Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy L. Weaver

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Not-for-profit hospitals are required to meet federal reporting requirements detailing their community benefit activities, which support their tax-exempt status. Children's hospitals have long provided community injury prevention (IP programming and thus can inform public health outreach work in other areas. This work describes IP programming as a community service offered by children's hospitals in the U.S. Methods: The IP specialist at 232 US-based member institutions of the Children's Hospital Association were invited to complete an assessment of their hospital's IP outreach programming. Results: 47.7 percent of hospitals request financial data from IP programming for tax reporting purposes. Almost all offer injury prevention (IP services; the majority are in the community (60.3% and 34.5% are hospital-based. Most IP units are independent (60.3% and 71.8% are responsible for their own budgets. Conclusions: By integrating dissemination and implementation sciences and community health needs assessments, these findings can help advance community services provided by hospitals to impact public health.

  13. Perceived service quality in healthcare organizations and a research in Ankara by hospital type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İbrahim H. Kayral

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of healthcare services is to protect and improve individuals’ physical, mental and social health and ensure its continuity to increase the level of welfare and happiness in the society. As in all service organizations, service quality has an important place in healthcare organizations. Therefore, measuring the impacts of the efforts made by enterprises for service quality and the clients’ perceptions of the services provided, assessing how their perceptions differ in different dimensions of quality, and taking new measures according to the results are the key to continuous improvement. In this study, with respect to the abovementioned issues, perception of the quality of services provided in the field of health by those who receive them is compared according to different types of hospitals providing such service, and evaluations are made accordingly. Thus, whether patients’ perceptions of service quality differ according to hospital types, in what dimensions of quality these differences occur and perceived quality by different patient profiles like age, sex, incomes etc. are assessed. In the measurement of service quality, a set of 34 questions with six dimensions was used, which was used by Kara, Tarım and Zaim (2003 in several hospitals and then used in several research studies in Turkey on service quality in healthcare enterprises (Çaha, 2007; Kara, 2006. Based on the findings of the research, it can be said that public general branch hospitals are perceived as quality at the same level with private hospitals and even they reach higher levels of patient satisfaction. On the other hand, when the sub-dimensions of quality are examined, it is seen that public hospitals are still behind private hospitals in terms of physical quality.

  14. Hospitableness: the new service metaphor? Developing an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of genuine hospitality in individuals. This paper describes the development of a suite of questions designed to measure these qualities in individuals. This paper describes the development of the instrument and argues for the application of the instrument in wider array of tourist and other contexts than are described here.

  15. Choosing a Doctor or Health Care Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... consider, including What your insurance covers Whether a health care provider or service is accredited The location of a service Hours ... ll find information to help you choose a health care provider or service.

  16. Provisioning of dental health in public hospitals: A case study of District Jalandhar, Punjab

    OpenAIRE

    Shaveta Menon

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Government of India is increasingly emphasizing the provisioning of dental services in public hospitals, but the rural and deprived sections are struggling to get basic dental procedures done in public hospitals. Aim: To study variations within and across public hospitals for provisioning of dental health settings in Jalandhar district of Punjab. Settings and Design: The study area consisted of four Community Health Centers (CHCs) and District Hospital situated in Jaland...

  17. EVALUATION OF MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES IN THE FREE STATE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    interventions have been service-based and do not provide information regarding the experience of patients in the ... outcome variable, whereas in their view clinical, social and quality-of-life information are the main outcome ... State mental health service (MHS) has fewer hospital beds. (especially for chronic cases) than is ...

  18. Service Dogs, Psychiatric Hospitalization, and the ADA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Muramatsu, Russ S; Thomas, Kelly Jones; Leong, Stephanie L; Ragukonis, Frank

    A service dog is defined as “any dog that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including a physical, sensory, psychiatric, intellectual, or other mental disability...

  19. Mental Health Conditions and Symptoms in Pediatric Hospitalizations: A Single-Center Point Prevalence Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doupnik, Stephanie K; Henry, M Katherine; Bae, Hanah; Litman, Jessica; Turner, Shanarra; Scharko, Alexander M; Feudtner, Chris

    2017-03-01

    Children and adolescents necessitating hospitalization for physical health conditions are at high risk for mental health conditions; however, the prevalence of mental health conditions and symptoms among hospitalized children and adolescents is uncertain. The objective of this study was to determine the proportion of hospitalized children and adolescents who have diagnosed mental health disorders or undiagnosed mental health problems. In this single-center point prevalence study of hospitalized children between the ages of 4 and 21 years, patients or their parents reported known mental health diagnoses and use of services using the Services Assessment for Children and Adolescent, and they reported patient mental health symptoms using the Pediatric Symptom Checklist, 17-item form (PSC-17). Of 229 eligible patients, 119 agreed to participate. Demographic characteristics of patients who enrolled were not statistically significantly different from those of patients who declined to participate. Among participants, 26% (95% confidence interval [CI], 18%-35%) reported a known mental health diagnosis. On the PSC-17, 29% (95% CI, 21%-38%) of participants had a positive screen for mental health symptoms. Of those with a positive screen, 38% (95% CI, 21%-55%) had no known mental health diagnosis, and 26% (95% CI, 12%-43%) had not received ambulatory mental health services in the 12 months before hospitalization. Mental health conditions and symptoms are common among patients hospitalized in a tertiary children's hospital, and many affected patients are not receiving ambulatory mental health services. Copyright © 2016 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Health care inequalities: hospitalization and socioeconomic position in Rome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Materia, E; Spadea, T; Rossi, L; Cesaroni, G; Areà, M; Perucci, C A

    1999-01-01

    Although the interest for equity is growing, scanty attention has been reserved so far in Italy to health care inequalities. The relation between hospitalization and socioeconomic position in Rome has been studied by evaluating overall heterogeneity and differences in access to effective non-discretionary treatments or at high degree of generic or specific inappropriateness. An area-based socioeconomic index was assigned to 86.4% out of 554.168 discharges of Rome residents identified during 1997 through the hospital information system. The analysis was performed by comparing standardized hospitalization rates across socioeconomic groups through linear trends and risk ratios. A significant inverse relation of overall hospitalization with socioeconomic position was observed for both acute admissions (+44% for most deprived males) and day hospital (+25%). No difference was found in use of effective treatments such as admissions in coronary care units for acute myocardical infarction or surgery for hip fractures. The inverse relation between socioeconomic position and acute hospitalization blunted in day hospital for inguinal hernia repair and actually reversed for cataract removal among females. The hospitalization risk for minor skin diseases, an ambulatory care sensitive condition, resulted inversely associated to socioeconomic position. An excess of hospitalization was also observed for poorest females undergoing appendectomy. Results indicate that observed heterogeneity between socioeconomic groups does not depend only on different health needs but also on an unequal utilization of services: although disadvantaged groups have equal access to treatments of non-discretionary effectiveness, they hardly use innovative services and are more vulnerable in receiving unnecessary treatments.

  1. Review of paediatric cardiology services in district general hospitals in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Hannah; Singh, Yogen

    2016-03-01

    Following the Safe and Sustainable review of Paediatric Services in 2012/2013, National Health Service England recommended that local paediatric cardiology services should be provided by specially trained paediatricians with expertise in cardiology in all non-specialist hospitals. To understand the variation in local paediatric cardiology services provided across district general hospitals in the United Kingdom. An internet-based questionnaire was sent out via the Paediatrician with Expertise in Cardiology Special Interest Group and the Neonatologists with Interest in Cardiology and Haemodynamics contact databases and the National Health Service directory. Non-responders were followed-up via telephone. The response rate was 80% (141 of 177 hospitals), and paediatricians with expertise in cardiology were available in 68% of those. Local cardiology clinics led by paediatricians with expertise in cardiology were provided in 96 hospitals (68%), whereas specialist outreach clinics were held in 123 centres (87%). A total of 11 hospitals provided neither specialist outreach clinics nor any local cardiology clinics led by paediatricians with expertise in cardiology. Paediatric echocardiography services were provided in 83% of the hospitals, 12-lead electrocardiogram in 96%, Holter electrocardiogram in 91%, and exercise testing in only 47% of the responding hospitals. Telemedicine facilities were established in only 52% of the centres, where sharing echocardiogram images via picture archiving and communication system was used most commonly. There has been a substantial increase in the availability of paediatricians with expertise in cardiology since 2008. Most of the hospitals are well-supported by specialist cardiology centres via outreach clinics; however, there remains significant variation in the local paediatric cardiology services provided across district general hospitals in the United Kingdom.

  2. Public Health Services for Foreign Workers in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Normah Awang; Wahab, Haris Abd; Bakar Ah, Siti Hajar Abu; Islam, M Rezaul

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to know the status of the foreign workers' access to public health services in Malaysia based on their utilization pattern. The utilization pattern covered a number of areas, such as frequency of using health services, status of using health services, choice and types of health institutions, and cost of health treatment. The study was conducted on six government hospitals in the Klang Valley area in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Data were collected from 600 foreign patients working in the country, using an interview method with a structured questionnaire. The results showed that the foreign workers' access to public health services was very low. The findings would be an important guideline to formulate an effective health service policy for the foreign workers in Malaysia.

  3. Health and the need for health promotion in hospital patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oppedal, Kristian; Nesvåg, Sverre; Pedersen, Bolette

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Integrated health promotion improves clinical outcomes after hospital treatment. The first step towards implementing evidence-based health promotion in hospitals is to estimate the need for health promoting activities directed at hospital patients. The aim of this study was to identify...... the distribution and association of individual health risk factors in a Norwegian hospital population and to estimate the need for health promotion in this population. METHODS: We used a validated documentation model (HPH-DATA Model) to identify the prevalence of patients with nutritional risk (measurements....... In total 68% (N¿=¿1026) were overweight, 44% (N¿=¿660) at risk of under-nutrition, 38% (N¿=¿574) physically inactive, 19% (N¿=¿293) were daily smokers and 4% (N¿=¿54) hazardous drinkers. We identified a new clinical relevant association between under-nutrition and smoking. The association between hazardous...

  4. Returns to Scale in the Production of Hospital Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Ralph E.

    1967-01-01

    The primary purpose of this article is to investigate whether or not economies of scale exist in the production of hospital services. In previous studies the results have implied the existence of economies of scale, but the question has not been satisfactorily resolved. The factor most responsible for clouding the issue is the overwhelming prevalence of product differences in the outputs of hospitals. In this study a method which avoids the problem of product differentiation is developed. The analysis strongly supports the conclusion that hospital services are produced subject to economies of scale. PMID:6054380

  5. Addressing geographic access barriers to emergency care services: a national ecologic study of hospitals in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Thiago Augusto Hernandes; da Silva, Núbia Cristina; Amaral, Pedro Vasconcelos; Barbosa, Allan Claudius Queiroz; Rocha, João Victor Muniz; Alvares, Viviane; de Almeida, Dante Grapiuna; Thumé, Elaine; Thomaz, Erika Bárbara Abreu Fonseca; de Sousa Queiroz, Rejane Christine; de Souza, Marta Rovery; Lein, Adriana; Lopes, Daniel Paulino; Staton, Catherine A; Vissoci, João Ricardo Nickenig; Facchini, Luiz Augusto

    2017-08-22

    Unequal distribution of emergency care services is a critical barrier to be overcome to assure access to emergency and surgical care. Considering this context it was objective of the present work analyze geographic access barriers to emergency care services in Brazil. A secondary aim of the study is to define possible roles to be assumed by small hospitals in the Brazilian healthcare network to overcome geographic access challenges. The present work can be classified as a cross-sectional ecological study. To carry out the present study, data of all 5843 Brazilian hospitals were categorized among high complexity centers and small hospitals. The geographical access barriers were identified through the use of two-step floating catchment area method. Once concluded the previous step an evaluation using the Getis-Ord-Gi method was performed to identify spatial clusters of municipalities with limited access to high complexity centers but well covered by well-equipped small hospitals. The analysis of accessibility index of high complexity centers highlighted large portions of the country with nearly zero hospital beds by inhabitant. In contrast, it was possible observe a group of 1595 municipalities with high accessibility to small hospitals, simultaneously with a low coverage of high complexity centers. Among the 1595 municipalities with good accessibility to small hospitals, 74% (1183) were covered by small hospitals with at least 60% of minimum emergency service requirements. The spatial clusters analysis aggregated 589 municipalities with high values related to minimum emergency service requirements. Small hospitals in these 589 cities could promote the equity in access to emergency services benefiting more than eight million people. There is a spatial disequilibrium within the country with prominent gaps in the health care network for emergency services. Taking this challenge into consideration, small hospitals could be a possible solution and foster equity in access

  6. Gearing service quality into public and private hospitals in small islands: empirical evidence from Cyprus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arasli, Huseyin; Ekiz, Erdogan Haktan; Katircioglu, Salih Turan

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop and compare some determinants of service quality in both the public and private hospitals of Northern Cyprus. There is considerable lack of literature with respect to service quality in public and private hospitals. Randomly, 454 respondents, who have recently benefited from hospital services in Famagusta, were selected to answer a modified version of the SERVQUAL Instrument. The instrument contained both service expectations and perceptions questions. This study identifies six factors regarding the service quality as perceived in both public and private Northern Cyprus hospitals. These are: empathy, giving priority to the inpatients needs, relationships between staff and patients, professionalism of staff, food and the physical environment. Research results revealed that the various expectations of inpatients have not been met in either the public or the private hospitals At the micro level, the lack of management commitment to service quality in both hospital settings leads doctors and nurses to expend less effort increasing or improving inpatient satisfaction. Hospital managers should also satisfy their employees, since job satisfaction leads to customer satisfaction and loyalty. Additionally, hospital administrations need to gather systematic feedback from their inpatients, establish visible and transparent complaint procedures so that inpatients' complaints can be addressed effectively and efficiently. The hospitals need to organize training sessions based on the critical importance of service quality and the crucial role of inpatient satisfaction in the health care industry. Future studies should include the remaining regions in Cyprus in order to increase research findings' generalizability. Additionally, including other dimensions such as hospital processes and discharge management and co-ordination may provide further insights into understanding inpatients' perceptions and intentions.

  7. Service quality of private hospitals: The Iranian Patients' perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarei Asghar

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Highly competitive market in the private hospital industry has caused increasing pressure on them to provide services with higher quality. The aim of this study was to determine the different dimensions of the service quality in the private hospitals of Iran and evaluating the service quality from the patients' perspective. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted between October and November 2010 in Tehran, Iran. The study sample was composed of 983 patients randomly selected from 8 private general hospitals. The study questionnaire was the SERVQUAL questionnaire, consisting of 21 items in service quality dimensions. Results The result of factor analysis revealed 3 factors, explaining 69% of the total variance. The total mean score of patients' expectation and perception was 4.91(SD = 0.2 and 4.02(SD = 0.6, respectively. The highest expectation and perception related to the tangibles dimension and the lowest expectation and perception related to the empathy dimension. The differences between perception and expectation were significant (p Conclusion The results showed that SERVQUAL is a valid, reliable, and flexible instrument to monitor and measure the quality of the services in private hospitals of Iran. Our findings clarified the importance of creating a strong relationship between patients and the hospital practitioners/personnel and the need for hospital staff to be responsive, credible, and empathetic when dealing with patients.

  8. Improving Health Care Efficiency Through the Integration of a Physician Assistant into an Infectious Diseases Consult Service at a Large Urban Community Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Decloe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Physician assistants (PAs have recently been introduced into the Canadian health care system in some provinces; however, there are little data demonstrating their impact.

  9. Estimating prevalence of drug and alcohol presentations to hospital emergency departments in NSW, Australia: impact of hospital consultation liaison services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Kerryn; Reeve, Rebecca; Viney, Rosalie; Burns, Lucinda

    2016-09-30

    The impact of drug and alcohol misuse has been the subject of widespread media discussion in the past year, particularly in the context of restricted alcohol trading hours in an effort to reduce alcohol-fuelled violence. A recent study evaluating NSW Health's drug and alcohol consultation liaison (CL) services1 demonstrates how pervasive drug and alcohol problems are, and the impact they have on the health system. This paper highlights how expanding CL services to fill current unmet need could deliver a range of benefits to patients and hospitals.

  10. [Health services utilization by the immigrant population in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regidor, Enrique; Sanz, Belén; Pascual, Cruz; Lostao, Lourdes; Sánchez, Elisabeth; Díaz Olalla, José Manuel

    2009-12-01

    To compare health services utilization between the immigrant and indigenous populations in Spain. We used information provided by the following four health surveys carried out around 2005: Catalonia 2005; city of Madrid 2005, Canary Islands 2004 and the Autonomous Community of Valencia 2005. The health services studied were general practice, specialist services, emergency services, hospitalization, and two preventive services: pap smear test and mammography. In general, most health services were less frequently used by the immigrant population than by the Spanish population. The health services showing the least differences between the two populations were general practice and hospitalization, while the greatest differences were found in the use of specialist and preventive services. The most heterogeneous results were found in general practice and hospitalization, since some immigrant groups showed a relatively high frequency of use in some geographical areas and a relatively low frequency in other areas. The results of the present study reproduce those found in other studies carried out in countries with similar social and economic characteristics to Spain. Like previous results, the present results are difficult to explain. Future research should aim to use other study designs and to test hypotheses not put forward by the scientific community to date.

  11. Hospital discharge of elderly patients to primary health care, with and without an intermediate care hospital – a qualitative study of health professionals’ experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unni Alice Dahl

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Intermediate care is an organisational approach to improve the coordination of health care services between health care levels. In Central Norway an intermediate care hospital was established in a municipality to improve discharge from a general hospital to primary health care. The aim of this study was to investigate how health professionals experienced hospital discharge of elderly patients to primary health care with and without an intermediate care hospital.  Methods: A qualitative study with data collected through semi-structured focus groups and individual interviews. Results: Discharge via the intermediate care hospital was contrasted favourably compared to discharge directly from hospital to primary health care. Although increased capacity to receive patients from hospital and prepare them for discharge to primary health care was viewed as a benefit, professionals still requested better communication with the preceding care level concerning further treatment and care for the elderly patients. Conclusions: The intermediate care hospital reduced the coordination challenges during discharge of elderly patients from hospital to primary health care. Nevertheless, the intermediate care was experienced more like an extension of hospital than an included part of primary health care and did not meet the need for communication across care levels.

  12. Hospital discharge of elderly patients to primary health care, with and without an intermediate care hospital – a qualitative study of health professionals’ experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unni Alice Dahl

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Intermediate care is an organisational approach to improve the coordination of health care services between health care levels. In Central Norway an intermediate care hospital was established in a municipality to improve discharge from a general hospital to primary health care. The aim of this study was to investigate how health professionals experienced hospital discharge of elderly patients to primary health care with and without an intermediate care hospital. Methods: A qualitative study with data collected through semi-structured focus groups and individual interviews.Results: Discharge via the intermediate care hospital was contrasted favourably compared to discharge directly from hospital to primary health care. Although increased capacity to receive patients from hospital and prepare them for discharge to primary health care was viewed as a benefit, professionals still requested better communication with the preceding care level concerning further treatment and care for the elderly patients.Conclusions: The intermediate care hospital reduced the coordination challenges during discharge of elderly patients from hospital to primary health care. Nevertheless, the intermediate care was experienced more like an extension of hospital than an included part of primary health care and did not meet the need for communication across care levels.

  13. Outsourcing to increase service capacity in a New Zealand hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, C; Palmer, E

    1999-01-01

    Service firms manage variability using both demand-side tactics (levelling customer demand), and supply-side tactics (increasing available capacity). One popular way of increasing available capacity is the outsourcing of non-core services. This article uses a case study to examine the impact of an outsourced non-core service on a hospital's overall service system. Findings show that the outsourced service provides access to more sophisticated technology, increases in-house capacity and saves capital expenditure. However, the outsourcing also increases the scheduling problems that the hospital faces. These problems are largely due to communication delays from the involvement of more than one organisation. These delays decrease the response time available to match changes in demand for the outsourced service. Given the obvious benefits of such outsourcing, the article concludes that management should pay close attention to the communication pathways between organisations, in order to minimise the end effects identified in this study.

  14. 45 CFR 96.45 - Preventive health and health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Preventive health and health services. 96.45... Direct Funding of Indian Tribes and Tribal Organizations § 96.45 Preventive health and health services... preventive health and health services block grant. (b) For the purposes of determining eligible applicants...

  15. Cultural competency assessment tool for hospitals: evaluating hospitals' adherence to the culturally and linguistically appropriate services standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weech-Maldonado, Robert; Dreachslin, Janice L; Brown, Julie; Pradhan, Rohit; Rubin, Kelly L; Schiller, Cameron; Hays, Ron D

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. national standards for culturally and linguistically appropriate services (CLAS) in health care provide guidelines on policies and practices aimed at developing culturally competent systems of care. The Cultural Competency Assessment Tool for Hospitals (CCATH) was developed as an organizational tool to assess adherence to the CLAS standards. First, we describe the development of the CCATH and estimate the reliability and validity of the CCATH measures. Second, we discuss the managerial implications of the CCATH as an organizational tool to assess cultural competency. We pilot tested an initial draft of the CCATH, revised it based on a focus group and cognitive interviews, and then administered it in a field test with a sample of California hospitals. The reliability and validity of the CCATH were evaluated using factor analysis, analysis of variance, and Cronbach's alphas. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses identified 12 CCATH composites: leadership and strategic planning, data collection on inpatient population, data collection on service area, performance management systems and quality improvement, human resources practices, diversity training, community representation, availability of interpreter services, interpreter services policies, quality of interpreter services, translation of written materials, and clinical cultural competency practices. All the CCATH scales had internal consistency reliability of .65 or above, and the reliability was .70 or above for 9 of the 12 scales. Analysis of variance results showed that not-for-profit hospitals have higher CCATH scores than for-profit hospitals in five CCATH scales and higher CCATH scores than government hospitals in two CCATH scales. The CCATH showed adequate psychometric properties. Managers and policy makers can use the CCATH as a tool to evaluate hospital performance in cultural competency and identify and target improvements in hospital policies and practices that undergird the provision

  16. Access to reproductive health services among childbearing women ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this article is to show the relationship between women education, affordability of hospital delivery, availability of government health center and the use of reproductive health services among childbearing women in Akute Community of Ogun State, Nigeria. The article begins with a background of the ...

  17. Efficient health care service delivery using network analysis: a case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Efficient health care service delivery using network analysis: a case study of Kwara State, Nigeria. ... Ethiopian Journal of Environmental Studies and Management ... This paper addresses challenges with prompt health care delivery using Network Analysis of Critical Path Model (CPM) to plan the hospital capacity with a ...

  18. Relationships Between Service Personal Values, Service Value, Satisfaction, and Loyalty: A Study Regarding Services of Private and State Hospitals in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metin Argan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Service and value are the two inseparable concepts in experiential service environment. Service personal value is a concept that is subjectively assessed from a consumer perspective, and is associated with service value, consumer satisfaction and loyalty. In this context, the purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between services personal values, service value, satisfaction, and loyalty. Data were collected from persons (996 receiving services from private hospitals and state hospitals using convenience sampling method. The scales of service personal values, service value, satisfaction and loyalty were adapted from literature. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA was used to investigate validity and reliability of the scales. Then, a structural equation model (SEM was developed and tested using data with Lisrel 8.80 software. The results of the study indicate significant relationships between services personal values, service value, satisfaction, and loyalty. The results of the study have significant implications as to how well private hospital managers design strategies of health service, satisfaction, and loyalty.

  19. [Health, hospitality sector and tobacco industry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abella Pons, Francesc; Córdoba Garcia, Rodrigo; Suárez Bonel, Maria Pilar

    2012-11-01

    To present the strategies used by the tobacco industry to meet government regulatory measures of its products. To demonstrate the relationship between tobacco industry and the hospitality sector. Note that the arguments and strategies used routinely by the hospitality industry have been previously provided by the tobacco industry. Location of key documents by meta-search, links to declassified documents, specific websites of the tobacco and hospitality industry, news sources and published articles in health journals. This review reveals the close relationship between tobacco industry and hospitality sector. It highlights the strategies carried out by the tobacco industry, including strategic hoarding of information, public relations, lobbying, consultation program, smoker defence groups, building partnerships, intimidation and patronage. The arguments and strategies used by the hospitality industry to match point by point that used by the tobacco industry. These arguments are refutable from the point of view of public health as it is scientifically proven that totally smoke-free environments are the only way to protect non-smokers from tobacco smoke exposure and its harmful effects on health. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  20. Non-use of Formal Health Services in Malawi: Perceptions from Non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, non-users of health services were defined as people who ... hospitals constitute the primary level, while district hospitals constitute the ... owned by religious organisations and is a non-profit ... qualitative component of the study.

  1. 78 FR 64953 - Medicare Program; Inpatient Hospital Deductible and Hospital and Extended Care Services...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-30

    ... computed the change in average case- mix for hospitals paid under the Medicare prospective payment system...-mix analysis. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background Section 1813 of the Social Security Act (the... applicable for services furnished in the following calendar year (CY). II. Computing the Inpatient Hospital...

  2. Increasing primary health-care services are Associated with acute short-term hospitalization of Danes aged 70 years and older

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard Fournaise, Anders; Espensen, Niels; Jakobsen, Søren

    2017-01-01

    Background: Ageing is accompanied by increased risk of morbidity and subsequent risk of acute hospitalisation. With ageing populations, health-care providers focus on prevention of acute admissions of older adults by timely identification and treatment in the community. However, identifying...... an emerging acute disease can be difficult in older adults due to atypical and vague symptoms, but may be expressed by increased contact to health-care providers. Method: During a 12-month period, all 70+-year-old people short-term (.... Monitoring health-care use may timely identify older adults at risk of acute hospitalisation....

  3. A cross-sectional study of the differences in diabetes knowledge, attitudes, perceptions and self-care practices as related to assessment of chronic illness care among people with diabetes consulting in a family physician-led hospital-based first line health service and local government health unit-based health centers in the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Grace Marie V; Kegels, Guy

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate differences in diabetes knowledge, attitudes and perceptions (KAP), self-care practices as related to assessment of chronic illness care among people with diabetes consulting in a family physician-led tertiary hospital-based out-patient clinic versus local government health unit-based health centers in the Philippines. People with diabetes consulting in the said primary care services were interviewed making use of questionnaires adapted from previously tested and validated KAP questionnaires and the patients' assessment of chronic illness care (PACIC) questionnaire. Adherence to medications, diabetes diet, and exercise and the number of diabetes consultations were asked. Analysis of variance was used to determine differences in KAP, self-care practices, and PACIC and regression analysis was used to determine any associations of the abovementioned variables to the PACIC ratings. A total of 549 respondents were included in the study. Differences in knowledge, attitudes, perceptions, PACIC, utilization of health services, and adherence to medications and exercise were all statistically significant. Ratings for diabetes knowledge, positive attitudes, and the perceptions of support attitudes and the abilities to perform self care, and the proportions of those properly utilizing health services and adhering to medications and exercise were higher while ratings for negative attitudes, perceived support needs, perceived support received and PACIC were lower among those consulting in the family physician-led health service. Combining family medicine-based approaches with culturally competent diabetes care may improve knowledge, attitudes, perceptions and self-care practices of and collaborative care with people with diabetes.

  4. Perception of hospital accreditation among health professionals in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algahtani, Hussein; Aldarmahi, Ahmad; Jr, Juan Manlangit; Shirah, Bader

    2017-01-01

    Hospital accreditation assesses hospital performance against explicit standards. Studies of the efficacy of accreditation are limited, but suggest that Joint Commission International (JCI) accreditation is efficient in improving the safety and quality of care in accredited hospitals. This study aimed to assess the perceptions of health professionals on the impact of JCI accreditation and implementation of change towards the delivery of quality patient care. Cross-sectional survey. King Abdulaziz Medical City in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Between June 2016 and September 2016, a validated questionnaire was distributed to physicians, nurses, medical technologists, dietitians, and other allied healthcare professionals. The questionnaire consisted of 19 items covering participation in accreditation, benefits of accreditation, and the quality of results of accreditation. Demographic data collected on the participants included age, gender, educational attainment, profession, length of service, and department. Participation in accreditation, benefits of accreditation, and quality of results of accreditation. Hospital accreditation was given a worthy response from the general view of 901 health professionals. The mean (standard deviation) of scores on a 5-point Likert scale were 3.79 (0.68) for participation in accreditation, 3.85 (0.84) for benefits, and 3.54 (1.01) for quality of results. As perceived by health professionals in our survey, accrediation had a positive impact on the process and implementation of change in the hospital that resulted in improvement in the delivery of patient care and other health services. Single institution study with no comparison made to other small, medium, or large-sized JCI-accredited hospitals in Saudi Arabia. Patient satisfaction before and after accreditation was not included.

  5. A Strategic Marketing Plan for Women and Infant Services, DeWitt Army Community Hospital and the DeWitt Health Care System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Soh, Kelly

    1999-01-01

    ..." for attracting and retaining more patients. Maternal/Child Health is DeWitt's second most important product line, with a target market of 25,000 female beneficiaries between the ages of 18 and 45...

  6. Community readiness and health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oetting, E R; Jumper-Thurman, P; Plested, B; Edwards, R W

    2001-01-01

    Community readiness theory is a practical tool for implementing changes in community health services. The theory provides methods for assessment, diagnosis, and community change. First, community key informants are asked semi-structured questions that provide information about what is occurring in the community in relation to a specific problem. The results evaluate readiness to deal with that problem on six dimensions; existing efforts, knowledge about the problem, knowledge about alternative methods or policies, leadership, resources, and community climate. The eventual result is a diagnosis of the overall stage of community readiness. There are nine stages, tolerance or no awareness, denial, vague awareness, preplanning, preparation, initiation, institutionalization or stabilization, confirmation/expansion, and professionalization. Each stage requires different forms of interventions in order to move the community to the next stage until, eventually, initiation and maintenance of health services programs and policies can be achieved.

  7. Costing hospital surgery services: the method matters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregoire Mercier

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Accurate hospital costs are required for policy-makers, hospital managers and clinicians to improve efficiency and transparency. However, different methods are used to allocate direct costs, and their agreement is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to assess the agreement between bottom-up and top-down unit costs of a large sample of surgical operations in a French tertiary centre. METHODS: Two thousand one hundred and thirty consecutive procedures performed between January and October 2010 were analysed. Top-down costs were based on pre-determined weights, while bottom-up costs were calculated through an activity-based costing (ABC model. The agreement was assessed using correlation coefficients and the Bland and Altman method. Variables associated with the difference between methods were identified with bivariate and multivariate linear regressions. RESULTS: The correlation coefficient amounted to 0.73 (95%CI: 0.72; 0.76. The overall agreement between methods was poor. In a multivariate analysis, the cost difference was independently associated with age (Beta = -2.4; p = 0.02, ASA score (Beta = 76.3; p<0.001, RCI (Beta = 5.5; p<0.001, staffing level (Beta = 437.0; p<0.001 and intervention duration (Beta = -10.5; p<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: The ability of the current method to provide relevant information to managers, clinicians and payers is questionable. As in other European countries, a shift towards time-driven activity-based costing should be advocated.

  8. Trends of increase in western medical services in traditional medicine hospitals in china

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moseley Charles B

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Compare changes in types of hospital service revenues between traditional Chinese medicine (TCM hospitals and Western-medicine based general hospitals. Methods 97 TCM hospitals and 103 general hospitals were surveyed in years of 2000 and 2004. Six types of medical service revenue between the two types of hospitals were compared overtime. The national statistics from 1999 to 2008 were also used as complementary evidence. Results For TCM hospitals, the percentage of service revenue from Western medicine increased from 44.3% to 47.4% while the percentage of service revenue from TCM declined from 26.4% to 18.8% from 1999 to 2004. Percentages of revenue from laboratory tests and surgical procedures for both types of hospitals increased and the discrepancy between the two types of hospitals was narrowed from 1999 to 2004. For TCM hospitals, revenues from laboratory tests increased from 3.64% to 5.06% and revenues from surgical procedures increased from 3.44% to 7.02%. General hospitals' TCM drug revenue in outpatient care declined insignificantly from 5.26% to 3.87%, while the decline for the TCM hospitals was significant from 19.73% to 13.77%. The national statistics from 1999 to 2008 showed similar trends that the percentage of revenue from Western medicine for TCM hospitals increased from 59.6% in 1999 to 62.2% in 2003 and 66.1% in 2008 while the percentage of revenue from TCM for TCM hospitals decreased from 18.0% in 1999, 15.4% in 2003, and 13.7% in 2008. Conclusion Western medicine has become a vital revenue source for TCM hospitals in the current Chinese health care environment where government subsidies to health care facilities have significantly declined. Policies need to encourage TCM hospitals to identify their own special and effective services, improve public perception, increase demand, strengthen financial sources, and ultimately make contributions to preserving one of the national treasures.

  9. Effects of the Personalized Recovery Oriented Services (PROS) Program on Hospitalizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Candace; Frimpong, Eric; Huz, Steve; Ronsani, Adrienne; Radigan, Marleen

    2017-10-02

    Though the recovery model has been implemented widely in outpatient mental health settings, there are no large sample evaluations of recovery oriented psychiatric rehabilitation programs that address both serious mental illness (SMI) and co-occurring disorders (COD) using a more comprehensive Medicaid reimbursable approach. This study examined preliminary hospitalization outcomes, for adults with SMI and COD enrolled in the NYS Personalized Recovery Oriented Services (PROS) program. McNemar's chi-square test was used to examine changes in hospitalization rates from pre-PROS admission to post-PROS discharge in a sample of 12,006 adults discharged from PROS. Negative binomial regression models were used to calculate adjusted rates of hospitalizations and hospital days. Demographic, psychosocial, and diagnosis predictor variables were extracted from the OMH web-based Child and Adult Integrated Reporting System. Hospitalization data were extracted from the Mental Health Automated Recordkeeping System, and Medicaid. From pre-admission to post-discharge, psychiatric hospitalization rate decreased significantly, from 24% to 14%. Substance related hospitalizations also decreased significantly, from 5% to 3%. Average number of hospitalizations and number of days hospitalized decreased even after adjusting for sociodemographic factors. PROS serves a high number of COD patients, and the number of psychiatric and substance related hospitalizations decreased after an episode of PROS, as did the number of days hospitalized. Findings support the maintenance of psychiatric rehabilitation models that include recovery oriented components. Further analyses with control samples are proposed.

  10. Doctor Shortage and Health Services*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1971-08-14

    Aug 14, 1971 ... Doctor Shortage and Health Services*. 883. C. J. H. BRINK, RA., M.D., B.CH., D.P.H., D.T.M. ... Matriculation Board should have altered the regulations to remove· the stumbling block of English Higher .... emergencies the sick Pantu must resort to r~e witchdoctor or sometimes to the nurse or midwife in the ...

  11. [The Hospital Pharmacy Survey in Brazil: a proposal for hierarchical organization of hospital pharmaceutical services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messeder, Ana Márcia; Osorio-de-Castro, Claudia Garcia Serpa; Camacho, Luiz Antonio Bastos

    2007-04-01

    This paper discusses the development of a methodological approach to classify hospital pharmacies according to their performance, measured by structure and process indicators. The method considers the influence exerted on performance by the level of care in the hospital and the interdependence among pharmaceutical activities. Algorithms for assessing performance of hospital pharmacies were constructed for each level of care. Different weights were used for core activities in the pharmacy and other specific activities, according to the level of care in the hospital where the respective service was provided. This methodology allowed classifying hospital pharmacies from best to worst, based on performance. Independently of level of care in the hospital, no hospital pharmacies were classified as high-performance, and more than 50% were classified as low-performance.

  12. Competition among Turkish hospitals and its effect on hospital efficiency and service quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torun, Nazan; Celik, Yusuf; Younis, Mustafa Z

    2013-01-01

    The level of competition among hospitals in Turkey was analyzed for the years 1990 through 2006 using the Herfindahl-Hirschman Index (HHI). Multiple and simple regression analyses were run to observe the development of competition among hospitals over this period of time, to examine likely determinants of competition, and to calculate the effects of competition on efficiency and quality in individual hospitals. This study found that the level of competition among hospitals in Turkey has increased throughout the years. Also, competition has had a positive effect on the efficiency of hospitals; however, it did not have a significant positive effect on their quality. Moreover, there are important differences in the level of competition among hospitals that vary according to the geographical region, the type of ownership, and the type of hospital. This study is one of the first to evaluate the effects of health policies on competition as well as the effects of increasing competition on hospital quality and efficiency in Turkey.

  13. The return of the heart hospital. A hospital that specializes in providing cardiovascular services can meet community needs but will compete with existing community hospitals for market share.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert B

    2002-10-01

    A hospital that provides cardiovascular services and embraces a heart-hospital brand and strategy can achieve competitive advantage. Providers that want to compete aggressively for cardiovascular services are developing a specialty-based carve-out strategy. A heart-hospital initiative can cannibalize revenues from a hospital's other programs and services. A successful heart-hospital strategy requires physician buy-in. A heart hospital needs a brand that customers will value.

  14. Measuring patient-perceived hospital service quality: a conceptual framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Yogesh P; Chary, Satyanarayana T

    2016-04-18

    Purpose - Although measuring healthcare service quality is not a new phenomenon, the instruments used to measure are timeworn. With the shift in focus to patient centric processes in hospitals and recognizing healthcare to be different compared to other services, service quality measurement needs to be tuned specifically to healthcare. The purpose of this paper is to design a conceptual framework for measuring patient perceived hospital service quality (HSQ), based on existing service quality literature. Design/methodology/approach - Using HSQ theories, expanding existing healthcare service models and literature, a conceptual framework is proposed to measure HSQ. The paper outlines patient perceived service quality dimensions. Findings - An instrument for measuring HSQ dimensions is developed and compared with other service quality measuring instruments. The latest dimensions are in line with previous studies, but a relationship dimension is added. Practical implications - The framework empowers managers to assess healthcare quality in corporate, public and teaching hospitals. Originality/value - The paper helps academics and practitioners to assess HSQ from a patient perspective.

  15. Nursing management in hospital emergency service: integrative review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Cristina Antonelli

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This is an integrative literature review, which aims to analyze scientific articles that discuss the work of nurses in the management of hospital emergency services. The databases used were Latin American and Caribbean Health Science Literature (LILACS, Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE, Integrated Building Environmental Communications System (IBECS, Scientific Electronic Library Online (SciELO and Nursing Database (BDENF. To conduct the survey, 10 articles were selected and classified into two themes, namely: "analyzing the work of the nurse in hospital emergency services" and "organizing the nurse work in hospital emergency services". The first category discussed the functions of the nurse and the satisfaction of these professionals, and the second, the problems identified in the hospital emergency service and strategies to organize the service, respectively. The theme developed showed how the work of the nurse presents as manager of that service, in addition to various strategies to alleviate or eliminate the identified problems in the urgency and emergency units of the hospital services.

  16. Unplanned Hospital Visits - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Unplanned Hospital Visits – provider data. This data set includes provider data for the hospital return days (or excess days in acute care) measures, the unplanned...

  17. HCAHPS - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of hospital ratings for the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS). HCAHPS is a national, standardized survey of hospital...

  18. Hospital Compare

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human ServicesHospital Compare has information about the quality of care at over 4,000 Medicare-certified hospitals across the country. You can use Hospital Compare to find...

  19. The Effect of Hospital Service Quality on Patient's Trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Ehsan; Daneshkohan, Abbas; Khabiri, Roghayeh; Arab, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The trust is meant the belief of the patient to the practitioner or the hospital based on the concept that the care provider seeks the best for the patient and will provide the suitable care and treatment for him/her. One of the main determinants of patient's trust is the service quality. This study aimed to examine the effect of quality of services provided in private hospitals on the patient's trust. In this descriptive cross-sectional study, 969 patients were selected using the consecutive method from eight private general hospitals of Tehran, Iran, in 2010. Data were collected through a questionnaire containing 20 items (14 items for quality, 6 items for trust) and its validity and reliability were confirmed. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and multivariate regression. The mean score of patients' perception of trust was 3.80 and 4.01 for service quality. Approximately 38% of the variance in patient trust was explained by service quality dimensions. Quality of interaction and process (P quality of the environment had no significant effect on the patients' degree of trust. The interaction quality and process quality were the key determinants of patient's trust in the private hospitals of Tehran. To enhance the patients' trust, quality improvement efforts should focus on service delivery aspects such as scheduling, timely and accurate doing of the service, and strengthening the interpersonal aspects of care and communication skills of doctors, nurses and staff.

  20. Patients' satisfaction of service quality in Saudi hospitals: a SERVQUAL analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Borie, Hussein M; Damanhouri, Amal M Sheikh

    2013-01-01

    Saudi Arabian hospital performance, vis-á-vis patient satisfaction with service provision, has emerged as a key policy and planning concern. Keeping in view public and private hospital service quality, this article seeks to provide guidelines to the on-going Saudi Arabian health service reorganization, which emphasizes decentralization, bed-capacity expansion, research-based policymaking and initiatives in the health insurance sector. The article outlines an empirical study that compares patient satisfaction with service quality in Saudi Arabian public and private sector hospitals. The authors employ a stratified random sample (1,000 inpatients) from five Saudi Arabian public and five private hospitals. Data were collected through questionnaire using the SERVQUAL scale. For reducing the language bias the questionnaire was translated into Arabic. The response rate was 74.9 percent. Data were analyzed using SPSS and appropriate descriptive and inferential statistical techniques. Cronbach's alpha for five service-quality dimensions (tangibles, reliability, responsiveness, safety and empathy) were high and the SERVQUAL instrument proved to be reliable, valid and appropriate. The results showed that sex, education, income and occupation were statistically significant in influencing inpatients' satisfaction, and all the null hypotheses were rejected. Only inpatient age was not significant. The study highlights service quality influence in the design of broader healthcare strategies for Saudi Arabian public and private hospitals. It demands that management researchers and analysts must identify regional service quality consistencies and related inpatient demographic indicators. The study offers some insights into, and guidance for, hospital quality assurance in Saudi Arabia in general and the urban hospital setting in the Middle-East in particular.

  1. The Health Literacy Environment of Hospitals and Health Centers. Partners for Action: Making Your Healthcare Facility Literacy-Friendly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudd, Rima E.; Anderson, Jennie E.

    2006-01-01

    The "health literacy environment" of a healthcare facility represents the expectations, preferences, and skills of those providing health information and services. Some of these demands are in the form of physical aspects of the hospital or health center, such as signs and postings. At the same time, access to and navigation of health services…

  2. [Organizational structure and the hospital nursing service: theoretical aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnol, Carla Aparecida; Fernandes, Marcia Simoni

    2004-08-01

    This work aims at approaching some theoretical aspects related to organizational structure, focussing on the structure of the nursing service in the majority of hospitals. We found, through a literature, that some hospitals are adopting new management practices, changing rigid hierarchical structures to flexible and well coordinated ones. In this context of organizational changes, nursing needs to discuss its classical organizational structure and management still based on taylorist principles in order to fulfill actual demands and needs of clients and workers.

  3. Managerial strategies to reorient hospitals towards health promotion: lessons from organisational theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röthlin, Florian

    2013-01-01

    Reorienting health services towards health promotion is one of the major health promotion strategies stipulated by the Ottawa Charter). Important contradictions, tensions and barriers to health promotion implementation associated with organisational structures have, thus far, been underexposed in the hospital health promotion discourse. This paper aims at identifying risks and the chances for hospital management to strategically and sustainably reorient their hospitals towards health promotion. The paper combines theories and findings from organisational science and management studies as well as from capacity development in the form of a narrative literature review. The aim is to focus on the conditions hospitals, as organisational systems with a highly professionalised workforce, provide for a strategically managed reorientation towards health promotion. Models and principles helping managers to navigate the difficulties and complexities of health promotion reorientation will be suggested. Hospital managers have to deal with genuine obstacles in the complexity and structural formation of hospital organisations. Against this background, continuous management support, a transformative leadership style, participative strategic management and expert governance can be considered important organisational capacities for the reorientation towards a new concept such as health promotion. This paper discusses managerial strategies, effective structural transformations and important organisational capacities that can contribute to a sustainable reorientation of hospitals towards health promotion. It supports hospital managers in exploring their chances of facilitating and effectively supporting a sustainable health promotion reorientation of their hospitals. The paper provides an innovative approach where the focus is on enhanced possibilities for hospital managers to strategically manage the reorientation towards health promotion.

  4. Action Research on Development and Application of Internet of Things Services in Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Arum; Chang, Hyejung; Lee, Kyoung Jun

    2017-01-01

    Services based on the Internet of Things (IoT) technologies have emerged in various business environments. To enhance health service quality and maximize benefits, this study applied an IoT technology based on NFC and iBeacon as an omni-channel service for patient care in hospitals. Application of the IoT technology based on NFC and iBeacon was conducted in a general hospital during August 2015 through June 2016, and the development and evaluation results were aligned to an action research framework. The five phases in the action research included diagnosing, planning action, taking action, evaluating action, and specifying learning phases. During the first two phases, problems of functional operations in a hospital were diagnosed and eight service models were designed by using iBeacon and NFC to solve the problems. Service models were applied to the hospital by installing beacons, wearable beacons, beacon scanners, and NFC tags during the third phase. During the fourth and fifth phases, the roles and benefits of stakeholders participating in the service models were evaluated, and issues and knowledge of the whole application process were derived and summarized from technological, economic, social and legal perspectives, respectively. From an action research perspective, IoT-based healthcare services were developed and verified. IoT-based services enable the hospital to acquire lifelog data for precision medicine and ultimately be able to go one step closer to precision medical care. The derived service models could provide patients more enhanced healthcare services and improve the work efficiency and effectiveness of the hospital.

  5. Health care and social media platforms in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarroll, Michele L; Armbruster, Shannon D; Chung, Jae Eun; Kim, Junghyun; McKenzie, Alissa; von Gruenigen, Vivian E

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this article is to illustrate user characteristics of a hospital's social media structure using analytics and user surveys. A 1-year retrospective analysis was conducted along with an Internet survey of users of the hospital's Facebook, Twitter, and blog. Of the survey respondents (n = 163), 95.7% are female and 4.3% are male; most are ages 50-59 years (31.5%) and 40-49 years (27.8%); and 93.2% are Caucasian. However, the hospital system database revealed 55% female and 37% minority population, respectively. Of the survey respondents, 61.4% reported having a bachelor's degree or higher, whereas only 11.7% reported having a high school degree/equivalent or lower. However, within the hospital patient databases, 93% of patients have a high school degree/equivalent or lower and only 3% have a bachelor's degree or higher in our women's services population. Social media were used to seek personal health information 68.7% (n = 112), to learn about hospital programming 27.6% (n = 45), and to seek family health information 25.2% (n = 41). Respondents younger than 49 years of age were more likely to seek personal health information using social media compared to those 50 years of age and older (p = .02). Respondents with a bachelor's degree or higher education were statistically less likely to search for physician information compared to those less educated individuals (p = .04). We conclude that social media may play an important role in personal health information, especially for young female respondents; however, the survey provides strong evidence that further research is needed to ensure that social network sites provided by hospitals are reaching the full spectrum of health system patients.

  6. Language services in hospitals: discordance in availability and staff use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschurtz, Brette A; Koss, Richard G; Kupka, Nancy J; Williams, Scott C

    2011-01-01

    Despite efforts to advance effective patient-provider communication, many patients' language needs continue to be unmet or inappropriately addressed by healthcare providers (Wielawski 2010; Patek et al. 2009; Wilson-Stronks and Galvez 2007). This study presents a picture of the language resources currently provided by hospitals and those resources practitioners actually use. Questionnaire data were collected from 14 hospitals in Florida's Palm Beach, St. Lucie, and Martin counties on availability, staff awareness, and staff use of linguistic resources and services. Inconsistencies were identified between the language tools, services, and resources hospitals provide and those staff use. In addition, a large majority of staff respondents still rely upon someone accompanying the patient for communication with patients who have limited English proficiency, despite evidence that this practice contributes to miscommunication and serious medical errors (Flores et al. 2003; Flores 2005; HHS OMH 2001; Patek et al. 2009). Hospitals that use bilingual staff as interpreters often do not test the competency of these staff, nor do they assess the utilization or effectiveness of the tools and resources they provide. Hospitals can improve the cultural and linguistic care they provide if they (1) address the practice of using ad hoc interpreters, (2) effectively disseminate information to hospital staff regarding how and when to access available resources, and (3) collect patient population data and use it to plan for and evaluate the language services they provide to their patients.

  7. Hospitalization in older adults: association with multimorbidity, primary health care and private health plan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Pereira Nunes

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE Evaluate the association of multimorbidity, primary health care model and possession of a private health plan with hospitalization. METHODS A population-based cross-sectional study with 1,593 elderly individuals (60 years old or older living in the urban area of the city of Bagé, State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The outcome was hospitalization in the year preceding the interview. The multimorbidity was evaluated through two cut-off points (≥ 2 and ≥ 3. The primary health care model was defined by residence in areas covered by traditional care or by Family Health Strategy. The older adults mentioned the possession of a private health plan. We performed a gross and adjusted analysis by Poisson regression using a hierarchical model. The adjustment included demographic, socioeconomic, functional capacity disability and health services variables. RESULTS The occurrence of overall and non-surgical hospitalization was 17.7% (95%CI 15.8–19.6 and 10.6% (95%CI 9.1–12.1, respectively. Older adults with multimorbidity were admitted to hospitals more often when to older adults without multimorbidity, regardless of the exhibition’ form of operation. Having a private health plan increased the hospitalization by 1.71 (95%CI 1.09–2.69 times among residents in the areas of the Family Health Strategy when compared to elderly residents in traditional areas without a private health plan. CONCLUSIONS The multimorbidity increased the occurrence of hospitalizations, especially non-surgical ones. Hospitalization was more frequent in older adults with private health plan and those living in Family Health Strategy areas, regardless of the presence of multiple diseases.

  8. The seven common pitfalls of customer service in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo, Rene T

    2015-01-01

    Operating simultaneously like a repair shop, prison, and hotel, hospitals are prone to seven common pitfalls in customer service. Patient care is often fragmented, inscrutable, inflexible, insensitive, reactive, myopic, and unsafe. Hospitals are vying to be more high-tech, rather than high-touch even though staff engagement with patients rather than facilities and equipment strongly influence patient satisfaction. Unless processes, policies, and people are made customer-centered, the high quality of the hospital's human and hardware resources will not translate into high patient satisfaction and patient loyalty.

  9. Service Quality Assessment of Hospitals in Asian Context: An Empirical Evidence From Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiq, Muhammad; Naeem, Muhammad Azhar; Munawar, Zartasha; Fatima, Iram

    2017-01-01

    Hospitals vary from one another in terms of their specialty, services offered, and resource availability. Their services are widely measured with scales that gauge patients' perspective. Therefore, there is a need for research to develop a scale that measures hospital service quality in Asian hospitals, regardless of their nature or ownership. To address this research need, this study adapted the SERVQUAL instrument to develop a service quality measurement scale. Data were collected from inpatients and outpatients at 9 different hospitals, and the scale was developed using structural equation modeling. The developed scale was then validated by identifying service quality gaps and ranking the areas that require managerial effort. The findings indicated that all 5 dimensions of SERVQUAL are valid in Asian countries such as Pakistan, with 13 items retained. Reliability, tangibility, responsiveness, empathy, and assurance were ranked first, second, third, fourth, and fifth, respectively, in terms of the size of the quality gap. The gaps were statistically significant, with values ≤.05; therefore, hospital administrators must focus on each of these areas. By focusing on the identified areas of improvement, health care authorities, managers, practitioners, and decision makers can bring substantial change within hospitals.

  10. Niveles de dependencia y utilización de servicios en los hospitales psiquiátricos de Aragón Dependency levels and health care services' utilization in psychiatric hospitals in Aragon (Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos de Miguel

    2004-06-01

    assess their dependency levels, and to analyze health care services' utilization by these patients. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study between July 1 and November 31. The questionnaire used was the Resident Assessment Instrument- Mental Health (RAI-MH. The sample consisted of 437 patients living in public psychiatric hospitals in Aragon. These hospitals provide care to chronically mentally ill patients and to patients undergoing rehabilitation. The Resource Utilization Group (RUG-I system was used to classify patients by their dependency levels for activities of daily life (ADL.Results: Of the 437 patients, 259 (59.3% were men with a mean age of 62.2 years. A total of 82.1% of the patients were classified as RUG-I group 1. Patients in groups 1 and 2 required more formal health care services. At least one visit by a psychiatrist was required by 25.3% of patients in group 1 and by 15.2% of those in group 2 compared with no visits by the other groups. Nursing interventions were more frequently required by patients in the more dependent groups. All of the of patients in groups 2 to 8 needed daily physical assistance for ADL vs. 26.3% of those in group 1. In the multivariate analysis, predictive variables were the hospital and type of unit. Conclusions: There is wide variation in health care services' utilization by patients living in psychiatric hospitals, which is related to dependency levels. Many psychiatric patients do not need formal psychiatric care. Health care professionals should assess the real needs of patients to provide each of them with appropriate care.

  11. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Violence Tribal Affairs Underage Drinking Veterans and Military Families Wellness Workforce Featured Campaign Recovery Month Recovery ... areas. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services ( ...

  12. Managing Cancer Care - Finding Health Care Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Caregivers Questions to Ask about Advanced Cancer Research Managing Cancer Care Finding Health Care Services Costs & Medical ... Feelings Planning for Advanced Cancer Advanced Cancer & Caregivers Managing Cancer Care Finding Health Care Services Managing Costs ...

  13. Experiences of community service environmental health practitioners

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anusha Karamchand; Emilie J Kistnasamy

    2017-01-01

    Orientation: The community service initiative, a 1-year placement of health graduates, significantly improved human resource availability in the South African public health sector, even though the process...

  14. Recognition of delirium on pediatric hospital services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Patrick; Frosch, Emily

    2012-01-01

    Identify the frequency with which pediatric care teams recognize delirium in patients referred for psychiatric consultation, whether their diagnosis is substantiated by the involved consultant, and whether this diagnosis is documented in the discharge problem list. A retrospective chart review was conducted on all inpatient children receiving consultation from the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry service between 2003 and 2011. Additionally, the problem lists of all inpatient pediatric discharges during that period were examined for the diagnosis of "delirium" or "encephalopathy". Six of the 515 children referred to psychiatry for any reason were diagnosed with delirium by the pediatric team. The diagnosis was confirmed by psychiatry in all cases. An additional 47 cases of delirium were diagnosed by psychiatry in this same cohort, a condition never mentioned in the pediatric chart. Only 8 of the total 53 patients (15.1%) diagnosed with delirium by pediatrics and/or psychiatry had this condition listed in the discharge problem list. Overall, diagnoses of delirium or encephalopathy were included in only 89 of the total 64,046 problem lists for any pediatric discharge. Delirium was not noted or mentioned in 88.7% of delirious patients referred for psychiatric consultation, potentially because it was never diagnosed by pediatrics. There is a low documentation rate of this condition on the discharge problem list, even in those children so diagnosed by pediatrics. These findings highlight the important role of the consultation psychiatrist as an educator as well as a diagnostician. Copyright © 2012 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Use of Adult Day Care Centers: Do They Offset Utilization of Health Care Services?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iecovich, Esther; Biderman, Aya

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Based on the medical offset effect, the goal of the study was to examine the extent to which users and nonusers of adult day care centers (ADCC) differ in frequency of use of out-patient health services (visits to specialists) and in-patient health services (number of hospital admissions, length of hospitalizations, and visits to…

  16. Health service utilization and reported satisfaction among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: There is no adequate health service or counseling specifically suitable for adolescents in Ethiopia. Adolescents' satisfaction on the health service provided is important to increase utilization and quality of care. The objective of this study was to assess health service utilization, reported satisfaction and ...

  17. OPERATIONS STRATEGY IN HEALTH SERVICES: A CASE STUDY OF THE OPERATORS OF SUPPLEMENTAL HEALTH IN SURANCE

    OpenAIRE

    Abelha, Marli Camara; Gonçalves,Antônio Augusto; Pitassi,Claudio

    2014-01-01

    The health supplement consists of operators of health plans, hospitals, imaging centers, laboratories and additional diagnostic and treatment services, an interlocking network of relationships. In this paper, through a survey of managers, evaluated the use of performance indicators in the health insurance. The result showed that they work with trade-off in costs and that indicators such as speed, flexibility, reliability has predominant participation in operational services. La salud suple...

  18. INPATIENTS SATISFACTION WITH NURSING SERVICES AT KING KHALID UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL, RIYADH, SAUDI ARABIA

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Doghaither, Abdulla H.

    2000-01-01

    Abstract: Recent development and changes in health care services in Saudi Arabia have encouraged a search a search for comprehensive and established measurements of the quality of care. Patient satisfaction with nursing care in particular has ferquently been used as a sensitive and objective measure of quality of hosiptal services. Objectives: The objectives of this study are: (1) to assess the level of inpatient satisfaction with nursing care (PSWC) in the various wards of the hospital; (2) ...

  19. Determinants of patient satisfaction with public hospital services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladhari, Riadh; Rigaux-Bricmont, Benny

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this research is to propose and test a model of the causal relationships among the constructs of perceived service quality, consumption emotions, and satisfaction among users of public hospital services. The conceptual model proposed in this study postulates that: (a) perceived service quality is positively related to positive emotions and negatively related to negative emotions; (b) perceived service quality is positively related to patient satisfaction; and (c) positive emotions are positively related to patient satisfaction and negative emotions are negatively related to patient satisfaction. The model was tested with data from an empirical study in the Canadian public hospital setting. Data were collected from 314 respondents. The relationships between the constructs were tested using structural equation modeling by means of the EQS software. All hypothesized relationships were supported. The results confirm that perceived service quality exerts both direct and indirect effects (through positive and negative emotions) on satisfaction. The study demonstrates that emotions play an important role in determining satisfaction with hospital services.

  20. 'Being a conduit' between hospital and home: stakeholders' views and perceptions of a nurse-led Palliative Care Discharge Facilitator Service in an acute hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatasalu, Munikumar Ramasamy; Clarke, Amanda; Atkinson, Joanne

    2015-06-01

    To explore and critically examine stakeholders' views and perceptions concerning the nurse-led Palliative Care Discharge Service in an acute hospital setting and to inform sustainability, service development and future service configuration. The drive in policy and practice is to enable individuals to achieve their preferred place of care during their last days of life. However, most people in UK die in acute hospital settings against their wishes. To facilitate individuals' preferred place of care, a large acute hospital in northeast England implemented a pilot project to establish a nurse-led Macmillan Palliative Care Discharge Facilitator Service. A pluralistic evaluation design using qualitative methods was used to seek stakeholders' views and perceptions of this service. In total, 12 participants (five bereaved carers and seven health professionals) participated in the evaluation. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with bereaved carers who used this service for their relatives. A focus group and an individual interview were undertaken with health professionals who had used the service since its inception. Individual interviews were also conducted with the Discharge Facilitator and service manager. Analysis of all data was guided by Framework Analysis. Four key themes emerged relating to the role of the Discharge Facilitator Service: achieving preferred place of care; the Discharge Facilitator as the 'conduit' between hospital and community settings; delays in hospital discharge and stakeholders' perceptions of the way forward for the service. The Discharge Facilitator Service acted as a reliable resource and support for facilitating the fast-tracking of end-of-life patients to their preferred place of care. Future planning for hospital-based palliative care discharge facilitating services need to consider incorporating strategies that include: increased profile of the service, expansion of service provision and the Discharge Facilitator's earlier

  1. What is the perceived impact of Alexander Technique lessons on health status, costs and pain management in the real life setting of an English hospital? The results of a mixed methods evaluation of an Alexander Technique service for those with chronic back pain

    OpenAIRE

    McClean, S.; Brilleman, S.; Wye, L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Randomised controlled trial evidence indicates that Alexander Technique is clinically and cost effective for chronic back pain. The aim of this mixed methods evaluation was to explore the role and perceived impact of Alexander Technique lessons in the naturalistic setting of an acute hospital Pain Management Clinic in England.\\ud \\ud Methods: To capture changes in health status and resource use amongst service users, 43 service users were administered three widely used questionnai...

  2. The labour ward analgesic service at King Edward VIII Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dence of shivering9 and an improved sense of maternal well-being.lo. In summary, the study presented here shows that the analgesia service provided ro the labour ward at King. Edward VIII Hospital is at present grossly inadequate. In particular, a high proportion (76%) of mothers with a specific indication for epidural ...

  3. HOSPITAL IMAGE AS A MODERATING VARIABLE ON THE EFFECT OF HOSPITAL SERVICE QUALITY ON THE CUSTOMER PERCEIVED VALUE, CUSTOMER TRUST AND CUSTOMER LOYALTY IN HOSPITAL SERVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indrianawati Usman

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This is an explanatory research, analyzing the hospital image as a moderating variable on the effect of hospital service quality on customer perceived value and trust. Research was conducted at several hospitals in Surabaya Indonesia, especially to outpatients. Data was collected by survey to the outpatients of the hospitals. The purpose of this research was empirically examining the effects of hospital service quality on customer perceived value and customer trust, examine effects of customer perceived value and customer trust on customer loyalty. Moreover This research also examined the variable of hospital image as a moderating variable in the effects of hospital service quality on customer perceived value and customer trust. The result of this research gave a perspective to hospital management about the importance of building patient trust, since trust is very important, even more important than satisfaction level. Further studies with more emphasis on identifying the factors building patient trust to the hospital in order to raise customer loyalty should be conducted.

  4. Delivering Rural Health in a Changing Health Model: A Qualitative Study Involving Four Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Debajyoti; Gaines, Kristi; Valipoor, Shabboo

    2016-10-01

    An exploratory examination of rural hospital staff experiences to determine whether the physical state of rural healthcare facilities influence the healthcare experience and perception of care quality. Rural hospitals have served as the backbone of rural communities in the United States. Over time, these facilities have witnessed enhanced expectations, expanding their scope of operations from acute care to diversified services through linked provider networks and disaster management. Simultaneously, financial challenges, increasing emphasis on safety and quality, and the Affordable Care Act have introduced new challenges for rural hospitals. Currently, there is little empirical knowledge in this domain from a facility perspective. An exploratory qualitative study was conducted, involving semistructured interviews of upper and mid-level administrators in four rural hospitals located in West Texas. All questions attempted to obtain the subject's knowledge, ideas, and opinions concerning the physical design of the hospitals and the hospital experience. According to data on staff experiences, two classes of factors surfaced as potential influencers of hospital experience and care quality: (1) care configuration and (2) outdated building. Care configuration pertains to positioning facilities designed with inpatient care focus to a market expanding in outpatient services. Outdated buildings affect several issue including perceived provider quality and spatial accommodations for safe/efficient care and thereby also affecting the healthcare experience. Physical infrastructure of rural hospitals may have important and meaningful implications for population health performance in rural America. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. An investigation Into Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospitals in China: Development Trend and Medical Service Innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang; Suo, Sizhuo; Li, Jian; Hu, Yuanjia; Li, Peng; Wang, Yitao; Hu, Hao

    2016-06-07

    This paper aims to investigate the development trend of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) hospitals in China and explore their medical service innovations, with special reference to the changing co-existence with western medicine (WM) at TCM hospitals. Quantitative data at macro level was collected from official databases of China Health Statistical Yearbook and Extracts of Traditional Chinese Medicine Statistics. Qualitative data at micro level was gathered through interviews and second-hand material collection at two of the top-level TCM hospitals. In both outpatient and inpatient sectors of TCM hospitals, drug fees accounted for the biggest part of hospital revenue. Application of WM medical exanimation increased in both outpatient and inpatient services. Even though the demand for WM drugs was much higher in inpatient care, TCM drugs was the winner in the outpatient. Also qualitative evidence showed that TCM dominated the outpatient hospital service with WM incorporated in the assisting role. However, it was in the inpatient medical care that WM prevailed over TCM which was mostly applied to the rehabilitation of patients. By drawing on WM while keeping it active in supporting and strengthening the TCM operation in the TCM hospital, the current system accommodates the overriding objective which is for TCM to evolve into a fully informed and more viable medical field.

  6. Hospital-based bereavement services following the death of a child: a mixed study review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Leigh A; Wakefield, Claire E; Russell, Vera; Cohn, Richard J

    2015-03-01

    There has been a breadth of research on the grief experience of parents following the death of a child. However, the role and impact of hospital-based bereaved services remain unclear. To identify services offered to bereaved families in perinatal, neonatal, and pediatric hospital settings and summarize the psychosocial impact of these services and published recommendations for best practice hospital-based bereavement care. Systematic review of qualitative, quantitative, and mixed method studies guided by the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses checklist and methodological quality appraised in accordance with the Mixed Method Appraisal Tool. MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health, and PsychINFO were searched to find studies describing hospital-based bereavement services/interventions for parents, siblings, and grandparents. In all, 14 qualitative, 6 quantitative, and 10 mixed method studies were identified. Nine descriptive articles were also included. Qualitatively, family members described feeling cared for and supported by staff, a reduction in sense of isolation, and improved coping and personal growth. Quantitatively, bereavement services have most effect for parents experiencing more complex mourning. It is recommended that bereavement services be theoretically driven and evidence based, offer continuity of care prior to and following the death of a child, and provide a range of interventions for the "whole family" and flexibility in service delivery. There is a role for transitional hospital-based services/interventions for families in the lead up to and following the death of a child. Further mixed method research is required to inform best practice bereavement care guidelines in the perinatal, neonatal, and pediatric hospital settings. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Perceived nursing service quality in a tertiary care hospital, Maldives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nashrath, Mariyam; Akkadechanunt, Thitinut; Chontawan, Ratanawadee

    2011-12-01

    The present study explored nurses' and patients' expectations of nursing service quality, their perception of performance of nursing service quality performed by nurses, and compared nursing service quality, as perceived by nurses and patients. The sample consisted of 162 nurses and 383 patients from 11 inpatient wards/units in a tertiary care hospital in the Maldives. Data were collected using the Service Quality scale, and analyzed using descriptive statistics and the Mann-Whitney U-test. The results indicated that the highest expected dimension and perceived dimension for nursing service quality was Reliability. The Responsiveness dimension was the least expected dimension and the lowest performing dimension for nursing service quality as perceived by nurses and patients. There was a statistically significant difference between nursing service quality perceived by nurses and patients. The study results could be used by nurse administrators to develop strategies for improving nursing service quality so that nursing service delivery process can be formulated in such a way as to reduce differences of perception between nurses and patients regarding nursing service quality. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. The role of public relations for image creating in health services: a sample patient satisfaction survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirdar, YalçIn

    2007-01-01

    This study discusses the role of public relations for image creating in health services. Hospitals require public relations activities to distinguish them from competitors, provide bidirectional communication between the society and the hospital, and assist to create of a strong hospital image and culture. A satisfaction survey was conducted on 264 patients who have received health services at Maltepe University Hospital. The research focused on how the Hospital's examination, care, catering and physical services; doctor and nurse politeness towards patients and patient relatives, their attitudes and behaviors; examination, check-in, bedding and discharge operations; public relations activities in and out of the hospital were perceived. Another subject of the study was the degree of recommendation of patients who have been served by the hospital's health services to prospective patients seeking treatment.

  9. Costing of services of Vietnamese hospitals: identifying costs in one central, two provincial and two district hospitals using a standard methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flessa, Steffen; Dung, Nghiem Tran

    2004-01-01

    The People's Republic of Vietnam is currently in a period of transition from a purely socialistic country towards a so-called socialist market economy. Since the introduction of the Doi Moi policy in 1987, health care services have been liberalized, medical practitioners have received the right to open private hospitals and private pharmacies are booming. However, the majority of inhabitants strongly depends on governmental hospital services. These services are currently going through a financial crisis. This demands the quest for efficiency and the wise allocation of public funds. The efficient allocation of funds depends on the quotient between costs and health outcomes, but the costs of health services in Vietnamese hospitals are unknown. Therefore the study analysed five hospitals in Vietnam and determined the average costs as well as the main cost drivers. The full costs of five hospitals were analysed, including depreciation and the value of donations. The costs were allocated to cost centres and cost units by a stepping-stone method. As expected, the average costs per inpatient day at a central hospital are about 300% of the costs of provincial hospitals and about 600% of the costs of district hospitals. However, the costs of some laboratory procedures and operations done at district hospitals are higher than those of provincial or even central hospitals. The main reason for the high costs of some procedures at district hospitals was the low quantity of these procedures at that level. This is a strong indicator that some procedures, in particular major operations, should not be performed in Vietnamese district hospitals.

  10. Current status, challenges and the way forward for clinical pharmacy service in Ethiopian public hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilal, Arebu Issa; Tilahun, Zelalem; Gebretekle, Gebremedhin Beedemariam; Ayalneh, Belete; Hailemeskel, Bisrat; Engidawork, Ephrem

    2017-05-19

    Clinical pharmacy service has evolved steadily over the past few decades and is now contributing to the 'patient care journey' at all stages. It is improving the safety and effectiveness of medicines and has made a significant contribution to the avoidance of medication errors. In Ethiopia, clinical pharmacy service is in its initial phase, being started in July 2013. This study therefore aimed at assessing the status, challenges and way forward of clinical pharmacy service in the country. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in six regional states and one city- administration in September 2014. A total of 51 hospitals were included in the study. Both qualitative and quantitative methods were employed for data collection. A total of 160 pharmacy graduates, and 51 pharmacy heads participated in the study. Internal Medicine and Pediatric wards were the major wards where the graduates provide clinical pharmacy service. Almost 94% of the new graduates were found to be involved in clinical pharmacy service, but 47% of them rated their service as poor. The overall satisfaction of the graduates was close to 36%. Thirteen hospitals discontinued and two hospitals not even initiated the service largely due to shortage of pharmacists and lack of management support. About 44% of the surveyed hospitals documented the clinical pharmacy service provided using either developed or adopted formats. Lack of awareness by the medical fraternity, high attrition rate, lack of support from the management as well as from the health care team, readiness of the graduates to deliver the service, and shortage of pharmacists were identified by the key informants as the major stumbling block to deliver clinical pharmacy service. Clinical pharmacy service is initiated in most of the surveyed hospitals and a large proportion of the graduates were involved in the service. Although there is a great enthusiasm to promote clinical pharmacy service in the surveyed hospitals, efforts made to

  11. Postdischarge community pharmacist-provided home services for patients after hospitalization for heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalista, Tom; Lemay, Virginia; Cohen, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    To establish a community pharmacist-provided home health service to improve medication adherence and reduce 30-day heart failure-related hospital readmissions. Visiting Nurse Services of Newport and Bristol Counties located in Portsmouth, RI, from December 2013 to April 2014. Each patient received one in-home visit provided by a Postgraduate Year 1 community pharmacy resident within 1 week of admission to visiting nurse services followed by two follow-up telephone calls, 1 week and 4 weeks after the visit. The in-home visit consisted of a baseline assessment of medication adherence using the Morisky 8-Item Medication Adherence Questionnaire as well as pharmacist-provided education regarding chronic heart failure management. The follow-up telephone calls were used to reassess patient adherence and to monitor for hospital readmission within 30 days of the initial in-home visit. Community pharmacist-provided in-home medication reconciliation and medication teaching has not been described in the literature previously. In addition, pharmacists are often not included on home health care teams placing patients undergoing transitions in care at risk for potential medication-related errors. Improvement in medication adherence and reduction in 30-day heart failure-related hospital readmission rates. Ten patients were enrolled from December 2013 through April 2014. Following intervention, all patients saw improvements in adherence questionnaire scores during follow-up. Hospital readmission rates for patients seen by the pharmacist were lower compared with agencywide figures over a similar time period. A community pharmacist-provided in-home medication teaching service for patients following recent hospital discharge helps facilitate successful transitions of care from an inpatient to outpatient setting, improves medication adherence and has produced lower observed 30-day heart failure-related hospital readmission rates. Expansion of this or a similar service within the

  12. 75 FR 48235 - Rural Health Care Universal Service Support Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-09

    ... nursing facilities, and renal dialysis centers. The Commission also proposes to eliminate the offset... facilities that provide services traditionally provided at hospitals, such as skilled nursing facilities and... prioritize funding requests for rural health care support to the extent demand exceeds the annual $400...

  13. Challenges to the current provision of mental health services and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    banzi

    The history of the development of mental health services in Africa falls into four phases, firstly the pre-colonial phase, with care being under the traditional and spiritual healers, then the rise of asylums for mainly custodial confinement, followed by modern large asylum-like mental hospitals during and soon after the colo-.

  14. Percepción del paciente y su relación comunicativa con el personal de la salud en el servicio de agudos del Hospital de Caldas. Manizales (Colombia Perception of the patient and its communicative relation with the personnel of the health in the service of sharp of the Hospital of Caldas, Manizales, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Guillermo Jaramillo Echeverri

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available El presente estudio trató de comprender la percepción que tienen los pacientes y el tipo de relación comunicativa que establecen con el personal de la salud (médico, enfermera y auxiliar de enfermería durante su estancia en el servicio de Agudos del hospital de Caldas. El grupo de investigación comprendió este hecho social y cultural a través de categorías como la percepción del paciente respecto al personal de la salud: Médicos, Enfermeras y Auxiliares de Enfermería, y la Comunicación que establece el paciente, específicamente, con el médico y la auxiliar de enfermería.The present study tried to understand the perception that have the patients and the communicative type of relation that establish with the personnel of the health (medical, nurse and to help of nursing during its stay in the service of Sharp of the hospital of Caldas. The group of investigation understood this cultural and social fact through categories as: the perception of the patient respect al personal of the health: Medical, Nurses and you Help of Nursing, and the Communication that establishes the patient, specifically with the doctor and the assistant of nursing.

  15. Understanding patient e-loyalty toward online health care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Caro, Eva; Cegarra-Navarro, Juan Gabriel; Solano-Lorente, Marcelina

    2013-01-01

    Public health institutions are making a great effort to develop patient-targeted online services in an attempt to enhance their effectiveness and reduce expenses. However, if patients do not use those services regularly, public health institutions will have wasted their limited resources. Hence, patients' electronic loyalty (e-loyalty) is essential for the success of online health care services. In this research, an extended Technology Acceptance Model was developed to test e-loyalty intent toward online health care services offered by public health institutions. Data from a survey of 256 users of online health care services provided by the public sanitary system of a region in Spain were analyzed. The research model was tested by using the structural equation modeling approach. The results obtained suggest that the core constructs of the Technology Acceptance Model (perceived usefulness, ease of use, and attitude) significantly affected users' behavioral intentions (i.e., e-loyalty intent), with perceived usefulness being the most decisive antecedent of affective variables (i.e., attitude and satisfaction). This study also reveals a general support for patient satisfaction as a determinant of e-loyalty intent in online health care services. Policy makers should focus on striving to get the highest positive attitude in users by enhancing easiness of use and, mainly, perceived usefulness. Because through satisfaction of patients, public hospitals will enlarge their patient e-loyalty intent, health care providers must always work at obtaining satisfied users and to encourage them to continue using the online services.

  16. Assessing performance of Botswana's public hospital system: the use of the World Health Organization Health System Performance Assessment Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitio-Kgokgwe, Onalenna; Gauld, Robin Dc; Hill, Philip C; Barnett, Pauline

    2014-09-01

    Very few studies have assessed performance of Botswana public hospitals. We draw from a large research study assessing performance of the Botswana Ministry of Health (MoH) to evaluate the performance of public hospital system using the World Health Organization Health Systems Performance Assessment Framework (WHO HSPAF). We aimed to evaluate performance of Botswana public hospital system; relate findings of the assessment to the potential for improvements in hospital performance; and determine the usefulness of the WHO HSPAF in assessing performance of hospital systems in a developing country. This article is based on data collected from document analysis, 54 key informants comprising senior managers and staff of the MoH (N= 40) and senior officers from stakeholder organizations (N= 14), and surveys of 42 hospital managers and 389 health workers. Data from documents and transcripts were analyzed using content and thematic analysis while data analysis for surveys was descriptive determining proportions and percentages. The organizational structure of the Botswana's public hospital system, authority and decision-making are highly centralized. Overall physical access to health services is high. However, challenges in the distribution of facilities and inpatient beds create inequities and inefficiencies. Capacity of the hospitals to deliver services is limited by inadequate resources. There are significant challenges with the quality of care. While Botswana invested considerably in building hospitals around the country resulting in high physical access to services, the organization and governance of the hospital system, and inadequate resources limit service delivery. The ongoing efforts to decentralize management of hospitals to district level entities should be expedited. The WHO HSPAF enabled us to conduct a comprehensive assessment of the public hospital system. Though relatively new, this approach proved useful in this study.

  17. The Cost of Medical Services per Patient and the Efficiency of Hospital Care Activity – an Insight from the Romanian Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violeta ISAI

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The cost of medical services is a concept which cannot be overlooked from the managerial strategy of hospitals, given the fact that it reflects the expenses incurred in order to make the medical act possible. It adds up the direct and indirect costs which are recorded under hospital departments, regarded as cost centres. The result of the calculation is materialized in Expenses Settlement drawn for every discharged patient. The cost thus determined underlies the calculation of efficiency, both at hospital level and at each department and helps at conducting comparative analyses between different health care institutions. In fact, hospital financing is based on average costs established per case, according to the diagnosis groups. The financing system allows monitoring the quality of services and increasing efficiency through cost control. The present study analyses the calculation of the cost of medical services and of the efficiency for average level hospitals from Romania.

  18. Child & Adolescent Mental Health Services - first annual report 2008

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2009-10-01

    This Annual Report provides the first comprehensive survey carried out on community CAMHS teams and includes preliminary data collected by The Health Research Board on the admission of young people under the age of 18 years to inpatient mental health facilities. As many measures in this report do not have historic comparators it provides a baseline foundation that will be built upon in subsequent years providing an indication of trends that cannot yet be drawn on the basis of this report. The next report will include day hospital, liaison and inpatient services. Subsequent reports will further extend the mapping of mental health services for young people.

  19. Psychiatric social workers in legal aid services in hospitals: Exploring roles in Indian context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Treesa Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mental health and legal problems are interlinked in many ways. People facing legal issues may develop mental health problems, and people with mental illness and family also face legal issues. In India, Legal Services Authorities Act, 1987 gives provision for free legal aid services for the poor sections of society. Authors explain the roles of psychiatric social workers in legal aid services in hospitals. Social case work as a method of social work is suitable in legal aid services. Counseling, referrals, collateral contacts, advocacy and networking are major services from the social work perspective. Knowledge about laws and mental illness is essential for social workers to work in legal aid clinics (LACs.

  20. Health economic evaluation of home and hospital-based care in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Type 2 Diabetes is a main concern of public health in contemporary world with remarkable mortality, delayed complications and health costs. Governments are obliged to improve the quality of health care and consider appropriate strategies to reduce the costs. An alternative strategy for hospital services is care ...

  1. Service users' perceptions about their hospital admission elicited by service user-researchers or by clinicians.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donoghue, Brian

    2013-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Service users may express positive, ambivalent, or negative views of their hospital admission. The objective of this study was to determine whether the background of the interviewer-service user-researcher or clinician-influences the information elicited. The primary outcome was the level of perceived coercion on admission, and secondary outcomes were perceived pressures on admission, procedural justice, perceived necessity for admission, satisfaction with services, and willingness to consent to participate in the study. METHODS Participants voluntarily and involuntarily admitted to three hospitals in Ireland were randomly allocated to be interviewed at hospital discharge by either a service user-researcher or a clinician. Interviewers used the MacArthur Admission Experience Survey and the Client Satisfaction Questionnaire. RESULTS A total of 161 participants were interviewed. No differences by interviewer status or by admission status (involuntary or voluntary) were found in levels of perceived coercion, perceived pressures, procedural justice, perceived necessity, or satisfaction with services. Service users were more likely to decline to participate if their consent was sought by a service user-researcher (24% versus 8%, p=.003). CONCLUSIONS Most interviewees gave positive accounts of their admission regardless of interviewer status. The findings indicate that clinicians and researchers can be more confident that service users\\' positive accounts of admissions are not attributable to a response bias. Researchers can also feel more confident in directly comparing the results of studies undertaken by clinicians and by service user-researchers.

  2. The fee-for-service shift to bundled payments: financial considerations for hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scamperle, Keely

    2013-01-01

    Skyrocketing health care costs are forcing payers to demand delivery efficiencies that preserve and promote quality care while reducing costs. Hospitals are challenged to meet the pressure from payers to deliver value and outcome-based health care while preserving sufficient financial margins. The fee-for-service (FFS) model with its perverse incentives to incur high-volume services is no longer, if ever, sufficient to ensure quality, cost-efficient health care. In response, payers have sought to force the issue through accelerated efforts to bundle payments to providers. It is theorized that by tying together providers throughout the continuum or episode of care for a patient, efficiencies in delivery inclusive of cost reductions will be obtained. This article examines the bundled payment models and the financial considerations for hospital facility providers.

  3. Mental Health Conditions and Medical and Surgical Hospital Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doupnik, Stephanie K; Lawlor, John; Zima, Bonnie T; Coker, Tumaini R; Bardach, Naomi S; Hall, Matt; Berry, Jay G

    2016-12-01

    Mental health conditions are prevalent among children hospitalized for medical conditions and surgical procedures, but little is known about their influence on hospital resource use. The objectives of this study were to examine how hospitalization characteristics vary by presence of a comorbid mental health condition and estimate the association of a comorbid mental health condition with hospital length of stay (LOS) and costs. Using the 2012 Kids' Inpatient Database, we conducted a retrospective, nationally representative, cross-sectional study of 670 161 hospitalizations for 10 common medical and 10 common surgical conditions among 3- to 20-year-old patients. Associations between mental health conditions and hospital LOS were examined using adjusted generalized linear models. Costs of additional hospital days associated with mental health conditions were estimated using hospital cost-to-charge ratios. A comorbid mental health condition was present in 13.2% of hospitalizations. A comorbid mental health condition was associated with a LOS increase of 8.8% (from 2.5 to 2.7 days, P < .001) for medical hospitalizations and a 16.9% increase (from 3.6 to 4.2 days, P < .001) for surgical hospitalizations. For hospitalizations in this sample, comorbid mental health conditions were associated with an additional 31 729 (95% confidence interval: 29 085 to 33 492) hospital days and $90 million (95% confidence interval: $81 to $101 million) in hospital costs. Medical and surgical hospitalizations with comorbid mental health conditions were associated with longer hospital stay and higher hospital costs. Knowledge about the influence of mental health conditions on pediatric hospital utilization can inform clinical innovation and case-mix adjustment. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  4. Customer Relationship Management and Hospital Service Quality in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Health care delivery has become one of the fundamental issues being given attention by governments of most developing countries. The Objective of this study therefore is to examine how Customer Relationship Management can be employed to bring about improve health service quality in Nigeria. The data for the study ...

  5. Patients’ perception of quality service delivery of public hospitals in Nigeria using analytical hierarchy process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Olateju Oyatoye

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patients are recently more aware and conscious. This is because of the belief that a high level of quality can translate into patient satisfaction. This is critical for healthcare providers as they deal with life. This recognition by both the service provider and service receivers made the government to establish units of service commission (SERVICOM in each of the governmental agencies including hospitals in Nigeria to monitor the level of quality of service delivery. However, to what extent do patients’ perceptions about health services seem to have been largely recognized remain unclear by health care providers, despite the (SERVICOM units in public institutions in Nigeria? Method: A cross-sectional analytical study using convenient sample method, based on the fact that not every patient of the selected hospitals can be chosen, was performed on 400 patients who received health services at four different public hospitals in Ogun state Nigeria. The selection of these hospitals was based on the zones in the state (Egba, Ijebu, Remo and Yewa area of Ogun-state. The instrument was a valid and reliable analytical hierarchy process based questionnaire containing five service quality dimensions. Data were analyzed using SPSS, Expert choice and Microsoft Excel software to determine the perception of patients towards service quality delivery in pairwise comparison of judgment consistent at less than 10%. Results:The results showed the composite priorities of the patients’ perception with respect to determinants of the patients’ perception towards quality of services delivered in the public hospitals in Nigeria. The most important factor to patients was the reliability dimension with composite priority 0.24 or 24% followed by the responsiveness dimension with 0.22 assurance dimension 0.21, tangibility dimension with 0.21, and the least determinant factor was the empathy dimension with 0.1101. Conclusion: Based on the results, the

  6. Health services research and development in practice: an Australian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagar, Kathy; Cromwell, David; Owen, Alan; Senior, Kate; Gordon, Robert; Green, Janette

    2003-10-01

    While there is a growing literature on how health services research can inform health policy decisions, the practical challenge is for health services researchers to develop an effective interface with health policy-making processes and to produce outputs that lead to outcomes. The experience of the Centre for Health Service Development at the University of Wollongong, Australia, is used to illustrate the issues so commonly described in the literature and to reflect on our experience of trying to remain viable while producing relevant and valid research. A case study in a specific policy area - namely, the development of case-mix classifications and information systems to inform policy and funding in the subacute and non-acute hospital and community care sectors - is used as a practical example of the research-policy interface.

  7. Measuring service quality in a hospital colposcopy clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewski, Mik; Wisniewski, Hazel

    2005-01-01

    The issues surrounding the measurement and provision of service quality in a health care setting are becoming increasingly important to nursing. This research study aims to apply the SERVQUAL measurement instrument in a Scottish colposcopy clinic. The study involved adapting the SERVQUAL instrument to the colposcopy setting and asking a sample of patients to complete the questionnaire. Patient expectations of service were obtained on first attendance at the clinic. Patient perceptions of service received were obtained on completion of treatment. Perceptions and expectations are then compared to identify where the largest service gaps exist. Although patient satisfaction with the overall service provided was generally high, the instrument provided evidence of where specific service improvements were needed. The largest service quality gap was for the reliability of service. The research also revealed the need for improved premises. Although the study has a limited sample size, it does appear that the SERVQUAL instrument has a useful diagnostic role to play in assessing and monitoring service quality in nursing, enabling nursing staff to identify where improvements are needed from the patients' perspective. The study has raised a number of issues which would form the basis for useful further research. Service quality from the patients' perspective should be routinely monitored and assessed. The findings should be useful to nursing staff seeking to assess, and improve, service quality.

  8. Provision of general paediatric surgical services in a regional hospital.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Zgraj, O

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: In Ireland, specialist paediatric surgery is carried out in paediatric hospitals in Dublin. General surgeons\\/consultants in other surgical specialities provide paediatric surgical care in regional centres. There has been a failure to train general surgeons with paediatric skills to replace these surgeons upon retirement. AIM: To assess paediatric surgical workload in one regional centre to focus the debate regarding the future provision of general paediatric surgery in Ireland. METHODS: Hospital in-patient enquiry (HIPE) system was used to identify total number of paediatric surgical admissions and procedures. Cases assessed requiring hospital transfer. RESULTS: Of 17,478 surgical patients treated, 2,584 (14.8%) were under 14 years. A total of 2,154 procedures were performed. CONCLUSION: Regional centres without dedicated paediatric surgeons deliver care to large numbers of paediatric patients. The demand for care highlights the need for formal paediatric services\\/appropriate surgical training for general surgical trainees.

  9. [Quality assurance of cooked food in conventional hospital food service].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Giusti, Maria; Tufi, Daniela; Tassoni, Alessandra; Del Cimmuto, Angela; Villari, Paolo

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the hospital food service of the Azienda in preserving microbiological quality and temperature of cooked foods during the distribution to the different wards of the hospital. During three years, microbiological parameters and temperatures were monitored in the central kitchen before distribution (T0), in the first (T1) and in the last ward (T2) of the distribution route during a three-year period for a total of 337 analytical determinations. Temperature values before distribution improved during the study period, whereas the capacity of keeping adequate temperature values during the distribution decreased over time, in spite of the introduction of a new technology after the first year of the study. No significant deteriorations of the microbiological quality of the cooked foods were detected. The results of the study clearly indicate that an integrated approach involving new technology, work organization and personnel training is needed in preserving food quality in hospitals.

  10. Hospitality: transformative service to children, families, and communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melton, Gary B

    2014-11-01

    Hospitality is an ancient moral practice that was deeply embedded in early Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Hospitality requires acceptance of, service to, and respect for people who lack a place in the community. The contemporary importance of this practice reflects the social disconnection and economic disadvantage of many young parents and the high frequency of separation of young people, including many young parents, from their communities. Such social deterioration substantially increases the risk of child maltreatment. Building on the proposals of the U.S. Advisory Board on Child Abuse and Neglect, Strong Communities for Children demonstrated the effectiveness of community building in reducing such risk. It further suggested the importance of both relying on and learning from hospitable people in strengthening support for children and their parents. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  11. Estrutura de maternidades do Sistema Único de Saúde do Rio de Janeiro: desafio à qualidade do cuidado à saúde The structure of Brazilian National Health Service Maternity Hospitals in Rio de Janeiro: the challenge of providing quality health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Magluta

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: avaliar a estrutura de maternidades pertencentes ao Sistema Único de Saúde (SUS do Estado do Rio de Janeiro. MÉTODO: REalizou-se uma avaliação normativa, com corte transversal de maternidades selecionadas, vinculadas ao SUS no ano de 2005. Foram selecionadas 67 maternidades por amostragem de conveniência. Foram empregados um roteiro de observação e um de entrevistas com chefes de serviço e profissionais. Aspectos da estrutura destes serviços foram analisados, utilizando-se como referência a conformidade com as normas disponibilizadas pelo Ministério da Saúde e preconizadas na literatura. Esses aspectos foram: instalação, equipamentos, equipe de saúde, capacitação de profissionais e disponibilidade de diretrizes clínicas. RESULTADOS: a presença dos requisitos da estrutura avaliados difere entre os estratos de complexidade, sendo menos frequente nas maternidades de menor complexidade. Os aspectos da estrutura física, disponibilidade de diretrizes clínicas e a presença dos profissionais nos serviços foram mais adequados do que a capacitação oferecida pelos serviços. CONCLUSÕES: SÃo necessários investimentos na capacitação dos profissionais, ampliação da disponibilidade de diretrizes clínicas e melhoria da estrutura física, visando qualificar o cuidado perinatal e adequá-lo às regulamentações nacionais.OBJECTIVES: to evaluate the structure of Brazilian National Health Service (SUS maternity hospitals in the State of Rio de Janeiro. METHODS: a normative cross-sectional evaluation was carried out of selected SUS maternity hospitals in the year 2005. Sixty-seven maternity hospitals were selected as a sample for reasons of convenience. Hospitals were observed and interviews conducted with health service managers and health workers. Various aspects of the structure of these services were examined, taking as a point of reference the norms provided by the Ministry of Health and outlined in the literature

  12. Acceptance of Swedish e-health services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary-Louise Jung

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Mary-Louise Jung1, Karla Loria11Division of Industrial Marketing, e-Commerce and Logistics, Lulea University of Technology, SwedenObjective: To investigate older people’s acceptance of e-health services, in order to identify determinants of, and barriers to, their intention to use e-health.Method: Based on one of the best-established models of technology acceptance, Technology Acceptance Model (TAM, in-depth exploratory interviews with twelve individuals over 45 years of age and of varying backgrounds are conducted.Results: This investigation could find support for the importance of usefulness and perceived ease of use of the e-health service offered as the main determinants of people’s intention to use the service. Additional factors critical to the acceptance of e-health are identified, such as the importance of the compatibility of the services with citizens’ needs and trust in the service provider. Most interviewees expressed positive attitudes towards using e-health and find these services useful, convenient, and easy to use.Conclusion: E-health services are perceived as a good complement to traditional health care service delivery, even among older people. These people, however, need to become aware of the e-health alternatives that are offered to them and the benefits they provide.Keywords: health services, elderly, technology, Internet, TAM, patient acceptance, health-seeking behavior

  13. Utilization of PMTCT services at Juba Teaching Hospital, South Sudan

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and ART treatment;. Testing positive who delivered in a facility and were. 3. Utilization of PMTCT services at Juba Teaching. Hospital, South Sudan. Idyoro Joseph .... Alive. Yes. No. 297. 3. 99.0. 1.0. Educational level. None. Primary. Intermediate. Secondary. College/university. 14. 46. 11. 118. 111. 4.7. 15.3. 3.7. 39.3. 37.0.

  14. The primary health care service in Soweto

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    M.Cur. (Nursing Administration) With the Declaration of Alma Ata in September, 1978, a new era in health care delivery, the primary health care era with its slogan of "health for all by the year 2000' dawned. Much thought had to be put into new legislation and reorganizing of health services in South Africa. Soweto, devastated by riots in 1976, suffered badly when all health care services collapsed. Out of this crisis was born a primary health care service that provides Soweto with prevent...

  15. Level of knowledge in prevention of oral health in pregnant women treated in two national peruvian hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    Sotomayor Camayo, Justiniano; Profesor de la Facultad de Odontología UNMSM.; Reyes Soto, Soledad; Profesor de la Facultad de Odontología UNMSM.; Ochoa Tataje, Julio; Profesor de la Facultad de Odontología UNMSM.; Mallma Medina, Adrián; Profesor de la Facultad de Odontología UNMSM.; Correa Olaya, Eufemia; Profesor de la Facultad de Odontología UNMSM.; Arieta Miranda, Jessica; Estudiante de Posgrado de la Facultad de Odontología UNMSM.; Silva Valencia, Manuel; Estudiante de Posgrado de la Facultad de Odontología UNMSM.; Watanabe Velásquez, Romel; Profesor de la Facultad de Odontología UNMSM.; Ayala de la Vega, Gerardo; Profesor de la Facultad de Odontología UNMSM.; Chuquihuaccha Granda, Vilma; Profesor de la Facultad de Odontología UNMSM.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the level of knowledge on prevention in oral health in pregnant women attending the Obstetrics and Gynecology Service of the Hipolito Unanue Nacional Hospital and San Jose Hospital-2011. We performed a prospective descriptive study, and Cross, in 249 pregnant women attending the Obstetrics and Gynecology Service of the Hipolito Unanue Hospital and 158 patients who came to San Jose Hospital (2011). A questionnaire was administered to measure the level...

  16. Health and human services in an age of maturity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, M G

    1986-12-01

    Catholic health care organizations are experiencing a tension between evangelical mission and expanding competition in medical markets. For the voluntary, not-for-profit health and human services system to survive and grow, hospital communities must find new revenue sources that do not create dependence on state and federal monies. The United States entered the Age of Maturity in 1985 as the "baby boomers" born between 1945 and 1957 became 40 years old, requiring health care providers to begin to plan for their care in old age. This large aging population, combined with a longer life span for Americans, will put increased burdens on health care organizations, particularly for chronic care, up to the year 2020 or beyond. Changes in family structure and social networks will be necessary as more people care for older relatives. The ratio of nonworkers to workers will increase, further burdening national and state tax bases, Social Security, and other worker-contributor programs. Investment banks are one option to finance the older population's increased needs for health and human services. Investment banks are funded by donations from the private sector (local and national businesses), the public sector (state, national, and local agencies), and new for-profit ventures for older persons. The contributions themselves remain in a central fund, with only the interest generated being used to fund local organizations committed to financial self-sufficiency and to helping the elderly. Older persons will carry increased economic and political clout in the Age of Maturity and will constitute a large percentage of hospitals' business. Therefore hospitals will have to develop a strong market position among the elderly. They must consider integrating a new service mix of both health and human services. Candidates for new hospital services for the elderly include housing programs, long-term care and continuum of care programs, employment programs, retirement planning, estate

  17. Implementing change in the National Health Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, M C; Cox, M A

    1999-01-01

    This paper will outline the current changes being imposed on the National Health Service. The literature on change management will be employed to propose some guidelines for health service managers. The National Health Service (NHS) spent much of the 1980s and 1990s learning about the transition from administration to management and must now make the transition from management to leadership. The emphasis is now focused less on doing and more on being.

  18. Equitable Distribution of Public Hospitals According to Health Needs in Malaysia: Does It Exist or Not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw Chien, Gan; Chee-Khoon, Chan; Wai, Victor Hoe Chee; Ng, Chiu Wan

    2015-11-01

    The goal of ensuring geographic equity of health care can be achieved if the geographic distribution of health care services is according to the health needs. This study aims to examine whether acute Ministry of Health hospital beds are distributed according to population health needs in various states within Peninsular Malaysia. The health needs of each state are indicated by the crude death rate. Comparisons of the share of hospital beds to that of population with differential health needs were assessed using concentration curve and index. In most years between 1995 and 2010, the distribution of hospital beds in Peninsular Malaysia were concentrated among states with higher health needs. This is in line with the principle of vertical equity and could be one advantage of a central federal government that can allocate health care resources to prioritize states with higher health care needs. © 2015 APJPH.

  19. How do health insurer market concentration and bargaining power with hospitals affect health insurance premiums?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trish, Erin E; Herring, Bradley J

    2015-07-01

    The US health insurance industry is highly concentrated, and health insurance premiums are high and rising rapidly. Policymakers have focused on the possible link between the two, leading to ACA provisions to increase insurer competition. However, while market power may enable insurers to include higher profit margins in their premiums, it may also result in stronger bargaining leverage with hospitals to negotiate lower payment rates to partially offset these higher premiums. We empirically examine the relationship between employer-sponsored fully-insured health insurance premiums and the level of concentration in local insurer and hospital markets using the nationally-representative 2006-2011 KFF/HRET Employer Health Benefits Survey. We exploit a unique feature of employer-sponsored insurance, in which self-insured employers purchase only administrative services from managed care organizations, to disentangle these different effects on insurer concentration by constructing one concentration measure representing fully-insured plans' transactions with employers and the other concentration measure representing insurers' bargaining with hospitals. As expected, we find that premiums are indeed higher for plans sold in markets with higher levels of concentration relevant to insurer transactions with employers, lower for plans in markets with higher levels of insurer concentration relevant to insurer bargaining with hospitals, and higher for plans in markets with higher levels of hospital market concentration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Clinicians' satisfaction with a hospital blood transfusion service: a marketing analysis of a monopoly supplier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, S J; McClelland, D B; Murphy, W G

    1993-12-01

    One of the objectives of the NHS reforms is to improve customer focus within the health service. In a study to assess the quality of customer service provided by the Edinburgh and South East Scotland Blood Transfusion Service a 19 item questionnaire survey of the main clinical users of the service was performed to ascertain their satisfaction, measured on a 5 point anchored scale, with important aspects of the service, including medical consultation, diagnostic services, blood and blood components or products and their delivery, and general satisfaction with the service. Of 122 clinicians in medical and surgical disciplines in five hospitals in Edinburgh, 72 (59%) replied. Fourteen (22%) indicated dissatisfaction with any aspect of the medical consultation service, owing to inadequate follow up of clinical contacts and unsatisfactory routing of incoming calls. Diagnostic services were criticised for the presentation, communication, and interpretation of results. The restricted availability of whole blood, the necessity to order platelets and plasma through the duty blood transfusion service doctor, and the use of a group and screen policy, attracted criticism from a small number of clinicians. Ten of 68 respondents expressed dissatisfaction with delivery of blood and components to the wards and theatres. The findings indicate that the clinicians served by this blood transfusion service are largely satisfied with the service. Changes are being implemented to improve reporting of laboratory results and measures taken to improve liaison with clinicians.

  1. Federally Qualified Health Center Substitution of Local Health Department Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, Jeremy W; Bekemeier, Betty R; Conrad, Douglas A; Grembowski, David E

    2017-10-01

    Strategic and budgetary considerations have shifted local health departments (LHDs) away from safety net clinical services and toward population-focused services. Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) play an increasing role in the safety net, and may complement or substitute for LHD clinical services. The authors examined the association between FQHC service levels in communities and the presence of specific LHD clinical services in 2010 and 2013. Data from LHD surveys and FQHC service data were merged for 2010 and 2013. Multivariate regression and instrumental variable methods were used to examine FQHC service levels that might predict related LHD service presence or discontinuation from 2010 to 2013. There were modest reductions in LHD service presence and increases in FQHC service volume over the time period. LHD primary care and dental service presence were inversely associated with higher related FQHC service volume. LHD prenatal care service presence, as well as a measure of change in general service approach, were not significantly associated with FQHC service volume. LHDs were less likely to provide certain clinical services where FQHCs provide a greater volume of services, suggesting a substitution effect. However, certain clinical services, such as prenatal care, may complement the public health mission-and LHDs may be strategically placed to continue to deliver these services. Copyright © 2017 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Hospital image and the positioning of service centers: an application in market analysis and strategy development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S M; Clark, M

    1990-09-01

    The research confirms the coexistence of different images for hospitals, service centers within the same hospitals, and service programs offered by each of the service centers. The images of individual service centers are found not to be tied to the image of the host facility. Further, service centers and host facilities have differential rankings on the same service decision attributes. Managerial recommendations are offered for "image differentiation" between a hospital and its care centers.

  3. Service quality and patient experiences of ambulatory care in a specialized clinic vs. a general hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Regge, Melissa; De Groote, Hélène; Trybou, Jeroen; Gemmel, Paul; Brugada, Pedro

    2017-04-01

    Health care organizations are constantly looking for ways to establish a differential advantage to attract customers. To this end, service quality has become an important differentiator in the strategy of health care organizations. In this study, we compared the service quality and patient experience in an ambulatory care setting of a physician-owned specialized facility with that of a general hospital. A comparative case study with a mixed method design was employed. Data were gathered through a survey on health service quality and patient experience, completed with observations, walkthroughs, and photographic material. Service quality and patient experiences are high in both the investigated health care facilities. A significant distinction can be made between the two facilities in terms of interpersonal quality (p = 0.001) and environmental quality (P ≤ 0.001), in favor of the medical center. The difference in environmental quality is also indicated by the scores given by participants who had been in both facilities. Qualitative analysis showed higher administrative quality in the medical center. Environmental quality and patient experience can predict the interpersonal quality; for environmental quality, interpersonal quality and age are significant predictors. Service quality and patient experiences are high in both facilities. The medical center has higher service quality for interpersonal and environmental service quality and is more process-centered.

  4. [Empirical analysis of relationship between scales and outputs of inpatient services of public comprehensive hospitals in Beijing area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Wei-yan; Tang, Shu-nv; Hu, Mu

    2011-06-18

    To analyze the relationship between scale and outputs of inpatient services of public general hospitals. Data on hospital scales and outputs were drawn from Beijing Health Statistics Annuals and the Database of Inpatient Record administered by Beijing Health Bureau. The outputs of inpatient services were measured, risk-adjusted by Beijing Diagnosis Related Groups (BJ-DRGs). Based on the Cobb-Douglas production function, regression analysis was used to evaluate the contribution of manpower and material resources to the changes in outputs of hospitals on different scales, respectively. Public general hospitals with 200-800 beds were at the stage of economical scale. In the 200-500-bed hospitals, investment of both human and material resources contributed to output changes. In the 501-800-bed hospitals, output changes were positively correlated with manpower input, but not with material resources. In the specific environment in Beijing, medium-sized hospitals are appropriate when the government plan to build hospitals mainly focused on inpatient services. The larger the scale of hospitals is, the more important is the manpower imput. The personnel system reform for public hospitals is urgent.

  5. 26 CFR 1.501(e)-1 - Cooperative hospital service organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... performs, on a centralized basis, one or more of the following services and only such services: data...-hospitals), warehousing, billing and collection, food, clinical (including radiology), industrial...

  6. Where Nursing Counts. Careers for Nurses in the Indian Health Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Public Health Service (DHEW), Rockville, MD. Indian Health Service.

    To meet the health needs of Native Americans, the Indian Health Service (IHS) administers a large community health and medical care program, operating 51 hospitals, 99 health care centers, and 108 health stations in 24 states. Registered nurses can be employed by the IHS through either of two systems: the Commissioned Corps of the U.S. Public…

  7. Using the Hospital Nutrition Environment Scan to Evaluate Health Initiative in Hospital Cafeterias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrick, Jennifer Willahan; Bellini, Sarah Gunnell; Spelman, Julie

    2015-11-01

    Health-promoting environments advance health and prevent chronic disease. Hospitals have been charged to promote health and wellness to patients, communities, and 5.3 million adults employed in United States health care environments. In this cross-sectional observational study, the Hospital Nutrition Environment Scan (HNES) was used to measure the nutrition environment of hospital cafeterias and evaluate the influence of the LiVe Well Plate health initiative. Twenty-one hospitals in the Intermountain West region were surveyed between October 2013 and May 2014. Six hospitals participated in the LiVe Well Plate health initiative and were compared with 15 hospitals not participating. The LiVe Well Plate health initiative identified and promoted a healthy meal defined as cafeterias were scored on four subcategories: facilitators and barriers, grab-and-go items, menu offerings, and selection options at point of purchase. Overall, hospitals scored 35.3±13.7 (range=7 to 63) points of 86 total possible points. Cafeterias in health initiative hospitals had significantly higher mean nutrition composite scores compared with non-health initiative hospitals (49.2 vs 29.7; Pcafeterias. Additional research is needed to quantify and strategize ways to improve nutrition environments within hospital cafeterias and assess the influence on healthy lifestyle behaviors. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [Maintenance of work ability among hospital health care professionals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knezević, Bojana; Golubić, Rajna; Belosević, Ljiljana; Milosević, Milan; Mustajbegović, Jadranka

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the values of the Work Ability Index (WAI) and to analyze the factors that may be associated with work ability among hospital health care professionals. A total of 1856 health care professionals employed at 5 Zagreb hospitals participated in this cross-sectional study. Data were collected using the Work Ability Index Questionnaire and Occupational Stress Assessment Questionnaire for hospital health care professionals. The average WAI of all participants was 38.68+/-6.28, indicating very good work ability. WAI was significantly higher in men than in women, 40.43+/-5.81 and 38.27+/-6.32, respectively (pnurses (pnurses (pnurses, suggesting that the jobs of highly educated participants, which are characterized by broad decision-making latitude and promotion possibilities maintain work ability better in comparison with low decision-making latitude jobs and low control jobs. About 5 percent of all participants had poor WAI. We identified the following significant predictors of suboptimal WAI among health care professionals: female sex, age, service accrual, and stressors related to organization and financial issues (phazards (p=0.040), and shift work (p=0.001). The average WAI of all participants indicated very good work ability, but small percent of them had poor WAI. Our results suggest the need of preventive measures that would target maintenance of work ability at an organizational and individual level. The organizational level should include the provision of a sufficient number of workers, adequate financial resources for work and adequate salaries, less paperwork, positive collaboration with the public, especially media, and education of medical staff on the risks and hazards at work. The individual level should include individual assessment of sensitivity to night work and shift work considering age and health status, and training in stress management techniques.

  9. Swedish entrepreneurs' use of occupational health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarsson, Kristina; Andersson, Ing-Marie; Josephson, Malin

    2011-10-01

    Small-scale enterprises are less often covered by occupational health services and have insufficient awareness about health and risks in the work environment. This study investigated how Swedish entrepreneurs in small-scale enterprises use occupational health services. The study used a questionnaire sent in two waves, 5 years apart. At baseline, 496 entrepreneurs responded, and 251 participated 5 years later. The questionnaire included items about affiliation with and use of occupational health services, physical and psychosocial work environments, work environment management, sources of work environment information, and membership in professional networks. Only 3% of entrepreneurs without employees and 19% of entrepreneurs with employees were affiliated with an occupational health service. Entrepreneurs affiliated with occupational health services were more active in work environment management and gathering information about the work environment. The occupational health services most used were health examinations, health care, and ergonomic risk assessments. Affiliation with occupational health services was 6% at both measurements, 4% at baseline, and 10% 5 years later. 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. Mapping health outcomes from ecosystem services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keune, Hans; Oosterbroek, Bram; Derkzen, Marthe; Subramanian, Suneetha; Payyappalimana, Unnikrishnan; Martens, Pim; Huynen, Maud; Burkhard, Benjamin; Maes, Joachim

    The practice of mapping ecosystem services (ES) in relation to health outcomes is only in its early developing phases. Examples are provided of health outcomes, health proxies and related biophysical indicators. This chapter also covers main health mapping challenges, design options and

  11. Convergence of PPTCT with RCH Services in a District Hospital, Haryana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puneet Bhagat

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The integration of PPTCT and RCH activities is an important strategy for universal screening of ANC mothers through available government health infrastructure in a district. The objective of this study was to understand process and analyzing outcome of convergence of PPTCT & RCH services in a District Hospital. Methods: The study was a descriptive study conducted in district hospital, Gurgaon. Results: In the district hospital Gurgaon percentage of women counseled at ICTC has increased from 77% to 89.4% and percentage of women tested has increased from 75% to 87.8% during 2010 and 2011. However, not all women tested positive delivered at hospital. Only 6.7% women were knowing about transmission of HIV from mother to baby. About 60% ANC registration are delayed primarily due to lack of family support (71%. Majority of ANC women got HIV screening at district hospital due to non-availability of facility at CHC/PHC levels. About 58% of Institutional deliveries in the State are in private hospitals, but they still need to be involved in PPTCT. Conclusion: Currently, convergence of PPTCT and RCH services seems to be fragmented and at initial stage. Convergence need to be taken up at policy, planning, implementation, capacity building, resource mobilization and monitoring for success of the initiative in the state.

  12. Migration to an electronic journal collection in a hospital library: implications for reference service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardyn, Tania P; Young, Caroline S

    2007-01-01

    This article provides a perspective on the migration to an electronic-only journal collection in a hospital library and its effect on reference services, information-seeking, and library use patterns. Bellevue Hospital Center in New York, NY is one of the first major teaching hospitals in the United States to begin a fundamental shift to a current, electronic-only journal collection. This article describes the process and develops a model for use by other hospital libraries, with commentary on the impact on reference services to library users. Key findings are that physicians, residents, and nurses have come to expect electronic journal collections and use the Internet in the hospital library to access electronic journals. Similar to many academic health sciences libraries, the reference desk in a hospital library has become more like a technical support desk. Users who contact the library have questions about access to the library's electronic resources or about searching techniques. In the future, medical reference librarians will continue to assist searchers who cannot find what they are looking for and will assist those who repeatedly get results that do not match their information needs.

  13. Family Health Services project: the way forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabiri, O M

    1993-01-01

    Nigerians did not readily accept family planning when Family Health Services (FHS) began in 1988. FHS has made much headway in training, IEC (information, education, and communication), and constituency building and advocacy. Its staff have identified obstacles to implementation, especially program sustainability and management structure. Key limits to sustainability of IEC efforts were inadequately trained personnel and inability of trained personnel to apply what they learned at work stations. The Federal Ministry and Social Services' role in the FHS project was not clearly defined. Some private sector factors contributing to a confused management structure were inadequate method mix, high contraceptive cost, poor monitoring of quality of care, and no coordination of family planning training with the public factor. FHS has since decided to focus its efforts on increasing the demand for and availability of modern contraceptives and improving the quality of family planning services of both the public and private sectors. FHS hopes that accomplishing these activities will reduce fertility, morbidity, and mortality. Strategic plans include a regional focus, quality of care, a variety of methods offered, intensification, hospital and clinics, a management information system, contraceptive logistics, distribution regulations, and addressing social, cultural, and behavioral factors. To effectively implement the strategy, USAID and the Federal Ministry held a workshop in 1993 to effect full integration of Nigerian experience in the 2nd phase of the project (FHS II). Participants reviewed the strengths and weaknesses of the first phase and agreed on implementation. For example, nongovernmental organizations should implement FHS II. FHS II includes training, IEC, and commodities/logistics.

  14. Quality assessment of occupational health services instruments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, F. J.; de Kort, W. L.; Verbeek, J. H.

    1993-01-01

    Interest in the quality of instruments for occupational health services is growing as a result of European legislation on preventive services stressing, for example, risk identification and assessment. The quality of the services can be enhanced when the quality of the applied instruments can be

  15. Maternal health services in South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Heads of nursing teaching institutions. Primary care staff. Opinions on service development. Views on reproductive health services and requirements for .... Sexuality education. Infertility investigation. Menopause services. Cervical cancer screen. Table Ill. Time in clinic and time receiving care in the Northern Cape and North ...

  16. Post-abortion and induced abortion services in two public hospitals in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darney, Blair G; Simancas-Mendoza, Willis; Edelman, Alison B; Guerra-Palacio, Camilo; Tolosa, Jorge E; Rodriguez, Maria I

    2014-07-01

    Until 2006, legal induced abortion was completely banned in Colombia. Few facilities are equipped or willing to offer abortion services; often adolescents experience even greater barriers of access in this context. We examined post abortion care (PAC) and legal induced abortion in two large public hospitals. We tested the association of hospital site, procedure type (manual vacuum aspiration vs. sharp curettage), and age (adolescents vs. women 20 years and over) with service type (PAC or legal induced abortion). Retrospective cohort study using 2010 billing data routinely collected for reimbursement (N=1353 procedures). We utilized descriptive statistics, multivariable logistic regression and predicted probabilities. Adolescents made up 22% of the overall sample (300/1353). Manual vacuum aspiration was used in one-third of cases (vs. sharp curettage). Adolescents had lower odds of documented PAC (vs. induced abortion) compared with women over age 20 (OR=0.42; 95% CI=0.21-0.86). The absolute difference of service type by age, however, is very small, controlling for hospital site and procedure type (.97 probability of PAC for adolescents compared with .99 for women 20 and over). Regardless of age, PAC via sharp curettage is the current standard in these two public hospitals. Both adolescents and women over 20 are in need of access to legal abortion services utilizing modern technologies in the public sector in Colombia. Documentation of abortion care is an essential first step to determining barriers to access and opportunities for quality improvement and better health outcomes for women. Following partial decriminalization of abortion in Colombia, in public hospitals nearly all abortion services are post-abortion care, not induced abortion. Sharp curettage is the dominant treatment for both adolescents and women over 20. Women seek care in the public sector for abortion, and must have access to safe, quality services. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Evaluation of an aged care nurse practitioner service: quality of care within a residential aged care facility hospital avoidance service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Trudy; Craswell, Alison; Rossi, Dolene; Holzberger, Darren

    2017-01-13

    Reducing avoidable hospitialisation of aged care facility (ACF) residents can improve the resident experience and their health outcomes. Consequently many variations of hospital avoidance (HA) programs continue to evolve. Nurse practitioners (NP) with expertise in aged care have the potential to make a unique contribution to hospital avoidance programs. However, little attention has been dedicated to service evaluation of this model and the quality of care provided. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the quality of an aged care NP model of care situated within a HA service in a regional area of Australia. Donabedian's structure, process and outcome framework was applied to evaluate the quality of the NP model of care. The Australian Nurse Practitioner Study standardised interview schedules for evaluating NP models of care guided the semi-structured interviews of nine health professionals (including ACF nurses, medical doctors and allied health professionals), four ACF residents and their families and two NPs. Theory driven coding consistent with the Donabedian framework guided analysis of interview data and presentation of findings. Structural dimensions identified included the 'in-reach' nature of the HA service, distance, limitations of professional regulation and the residential care model. These dimensions influenced the process of referring the resident to the NP, the NPs timely response and interactions with other professionals. The processes where the NPs take time connecting with residents, initiating collaborative care plans, up-skilling aged care staff and function as intra and interprofessional boundary spanners all contributed to quality outcomes. Quality outcomes in this study were about timely intervention, HA, timely return home, partnering with residents and family (knowing what they want) and resident and health professional satisfaction. This study provides valuable insights into the contribution of the NP model of care within an aged care

  18. Nursing management in hospital emergency service: integrative review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Renata Cristina Antonelli; José Aparecido Bellucci Junior

    2014-01-01

    This is an integrative literature review, which aims to analyze scientific articles that discuss the work of nurses in the management of hospital emergency services. The databases used were Latin American and Caribbean Health Science Literature (LILACS), Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE), Integrated Building Environmental Communications System (IBECS), Scientific Electronic Library Online (SciELO) and Nursing Database (BDENF). To conduct the survey, 10 articles...

  19. Innovations in plant health services in Nicaragua

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Solveig; Centeno, Julio; López, Julio

    2013-01-01

    Establishing a few community-based plant clinics in Nicaragua led to a series of innovations in plant health service delivery. A grassroots experiment became a nationwide initiative involving local service providers, universities, research institutions and diagnostic laboratories. This led....... The development of the national plant health system was constrained by existing work cultures that limit the scope of individual and institutional innovations....

  20. Acceptance of Swedish e-health services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Mary-Louise; Loria, Karla

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate older people’s acceptance of e-health services, in order to identify determinants of, and barriers to, their intention to use e-health. Method: Based on one of the best-established models of technology acceptance, Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), in-depth exploratory interviews with twelve individuals over 45 years of age and of varying backgrounds are conducted. Results: This investigation could find support for the importance of usefulness and perceived ease of use of the e-health service offered as the main determinants of people’s intention to use the service. Additional factors critical to the acceptance of e-health are identified, such as the importance of the compatibility of the services with citizens’ needs and trust in the service provider. Most interviewees expressed positive attitudes towards using e-health and find these services useful, convenient, and easy to use. Conclusion: E-health services are perceived as a good complement to traditional health care service delivery, even among older people. These people, however, need to become aware of the e-health alternatives that are offered to them and the benefits they provide. PMID:21289860

  1. Private equity investment in health care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Catherine J; Rudsenske, Todd; Vaughan, James S

    2008-01-01

    Sophisticated private equity investors in health services provide venture capital for early-stage companies, growth capital for mid-stage companies, and equity capital for buyouts of mid-stage and mature companies. They pursue opportunities in provider sectors that are large and have a stable reimbursement environment, such as acute care services; sectors with room to execute consolidation strategies, such as labs; alternative-site sectors, such as "storefront" medicine; and clinical services, such as behavioral health, that are subject to profitably increasing quality and lowering costs. The innovations created through private equity investments could challenge established health services organizations.

  2. Value added telecommunication services for health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danelli-Mylonas, Vassiliki

    2003-01-01

    The successful implementation and operation of health care networks and the efficient and effective provision of health care services is dependent upon a number of different factors: Telecommunications infrastructure and technology, medical applications and services, user acceptance, education and training, product and applications/services development and service provision aspects. The business model and market development regarding policy and legal issues also must be considered in the development and deployment of telemedicine services to become an everyday practice. This chapter presents the initiatives, role and contribution of the Greek Telecommunications Company in the health care services area and also refers to specific case-studies focusing upon the key factors and issues of applications related to the telecommunications, informatics, and health care sectors, which can also be the drivers to create opportunities for Citizens, Society and the Industry.

  3. Decentralisation of Health Services in Fiji: A Decision Space Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Jalal; North, Nicola; Ashton, Toni

    2015-11-15

    Decentralisation aims to bring services closer to the community and has been advocated in the health sector to improve quality, access and equity, and to empower local agencies, increase innovation and efficiency and bring healthcare and decision-making as close as possible to where people live and work. Fiji has attempted two approaches to decentralisation. The current approach reflects a model of deconcentration of outpatient services from the tertiary level hospital to the peripheral health centres in the Suva subdivision. Using a modified decision space approach developed by Bossert, this study measures decision space created in five broad categories (finance, service organisation, human resources, access rules, and governance rules) within the decentralised services. Fiji's centrally managed historical-based allocation of financial resources and management of human resources resulted in no decision space for decentralised agents. Narrow decision space was created in the service organisation category where, with limited decision space created over access rules, Fiji has seen greater usage of its decentralised health centres. There remains limited decision space in governance. The current wave of decentralisation reveals that, whilst the workload has shifted from the tertiary hospital to the peripheral health centres, it has been accompanied by limited transfer of administrative authority, suggesting that Fiji's deconcentration reflects the transfer of workload only with decision-making in the five functional areas remaining largely centralised. As such, the benefits of decentralisation for users and providers are likely to be limited. © 2016 by Kerman University of Medical Sciences.

  4. Analysis the Development of Mother and Infant Health in Sampang District Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rukmini Rukmini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The hospital have a strategic role in efforts to reduce maternal and infant mortality. This study aimed to determine the development of maternal and infant health services carried out in Sampang District hospital between 2010 and May 2012. Methods: The quantitative study with ecology design carried out in Sampang District hospital east Java Province Indonesia in 2012. The collection of secondary data such as coverage of maternal and infant health care in the period of 2010 to May 2012, as well as qualitative data collection with in depth interview to the Head of Service, Obstetrics and Gynecology Specialist Doctors and midwives. Data were analyzed descriptively. Result: In Sampang District hospital in period 2010 – May 2012 showed, an increase in maternal and child health services, where an increase in the handling of complications of pregnancy, normal delivery or Sectio Caesar and management of newborn complications and maternal and neonatal deaths are relatively increased . The coverage of family planning services was still low and the vast majority was IUD. Conclusion: The maternal and child health services in Sampang District hospital in period of 2010 – May 2012, showed an increase in the quantity of service coverage. The majority cases of delivery in hospitals were referral cases and complications. Howefer, the number of Sectio Caesar, maternal and neonatal mortality were still high. Recommendation: Sampang District Health Offi ce and Sampang District Hospital should create a policis and programs to reduce neonatal mortality in an integrated, continuous with proper implementation of standard procedures at every level of service, supported by well trained human resources, infrastructure and adequate fi nancing.

  5. Literature Study : The Nature of Service, The Nature of Hospitality, The Nature of Experiences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esselink, P. (Priscilla)

    2010-01-01

    In this report the concepts services, hospitality and experiences will be discussed. The goal of this report is to provide insight in what is written in literature about services, hospitality and experiences and to help defining the concept hospitality services for the Research Centre of the Saxion

  6. Investigating health system performance: An application of data envelopment analysis to Zambian hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masiye Felix

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Zambia has recently articulated an ambitious national health program designed to meeting health-related MDGs. Public expectations are high and Zambia continues to receive significant resources from global and bilateral donors to support its health agenda. Although the lack of adequate resources presents the most important constraint, the efficiency with which available resources are being utilised is another challenge that cannot be overlooked. Inefficiency in producing health care undermines the service coverage potential of the health system. This paper estimates the technical efficiency of a sample of hospitals in Zambia. Methods Efficiency is measured using a DEA model. Vectors of hospital inputs and outputs, representing hospital expended resources and output profiles respectively, were specified and measured. The data were gathered from a sample of 30 hospitals throughout Zambia. The model estimates an efficiency score for each hospital. A decomposition of technical efficiency into scale and congestion is also provided. Results Results show that overall Zambian hospitals are operating at 67% level of efficiency, implying that significant resources are being wasted. Only 40% of hospitals were efficient in relative terms. The study further reveals that the size of hospitals is a major source of inefficiency. Input congestion is also found to be a source of hospital inefficiency. Conclusion This study has demonstrated that inefficiency of resource use in hospitals is significant. Policy attention is drawn to unsuitable hospital scale of operation and low productivity of some inputs as factors that reinforce each other to make Zambian hospitals technically inefficient at producing and delivering services. It is argued that such evidence of substantial inefficiency would undermine Zambia's prospects of achieving its health goals.

  7. Older UK sheltered housing tenants' perceptions of well-being and their usage of hospital services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Glenda; Bailey, Cathy; Hodgson, Philip; Gray, Joanne; Barron, Emma; McMillan, Christine; Marston, Roy; Binks, Eleanor; Rose, Joanne

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine sheltered housing tenants' views of health and well-being, the strategies they adopted to support their well-being, and their use of health and social care services through a Health Needs Assessment. Sheltered housing in the UK is a form of service-integrated housing for people, predominantly over 60. The study used a parallel, three-strand mixed method approach to encompass the tenants' perceptions of health and well-being (n = 96 participants), analysis of the service's health and well-being database, and analysis of emergency and elective hospital admissions (n = 978 tenant data sets for the period January to December 2012). Tenants' perceptions of well-being were seen to reinforce much of the previous work on the subject with strategies required to sustain social, community, physical, economic, environmental, leisure, emotional and spiritual dimensions. Of the tenants' self-reported chronic conditions, arthritis, heart conditions and breathing problems were identified as their most common health concerns. Hospital admission data indicated that 43% of the tenant population was admitted to hospital (886 admissions) with 53% emergency and 47% elective admissions. The potential cost of emergency as opposed to elective admissions was substantial. The mean length of stay for emergency admissions was 8.2 days (median 3.0 days). While elective hospital admission had a mean length of stay of 1.0 day (median 0.0 days). These results suggest the need for multi-professional health, social care and housing services interventions to facilitate sheltered housing tenants' aspirations and support their strategies to live well and independently in their own homes. Equally there is a need to increase tenants' awareness of health conditions and their management, the importance of services which offer facilitation, resources and support, and the key role played by prevention and reablement. © 2016 The Authors. Health and Social Care in

  8. Psychopathology of adolescents with an intellectual disability who present to general hospital services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodoratos, Oreste; McPherson, Lyn; Franklin, Catherine; Tonge, Bruce; Einfeld, Stewart; Lennox, Nicholas; Ware, Robert S

    2017-10-01

    Adolescents with intellectual disability have increased rates of psychopathology compared with their typically developing peers and present to hospital more frequently for ambulant conditions. The aim of this study is to describe the psychopathology and related characteristics of a sample of adolescents with intellectual disability who presented to general hospital services. We investigated a cohort of adolescents with intellectual disability in South East Queensland, Australia between January 2006 and June 2010. Demographic and clinical data were obtained via mailed questionnaires and from general practice notes. Psychopathology was measured with the Short Form of the Developmental Behaviour Checklist. Of 98 individuals presenting to hospital, 71 (72.5%) had significant levels of psychopathology. Unknown aetiology for the intellectual disability was associated with presence of problem behaviours. Adolescents with more severe intellectual disability were more likely to have major problem behaviours. Co-morbid physical health issues were not associated with psychopathology. Only 12 (12.1%) adolescents had undergone specialized mental health intervention. The general hospital environment may offer opportunities for liaison psychiatry services to screen and provide management expertise for adolescent individuals with intellectual disability presenting for physical health issues.

  9. Migrating from user fees to social health insurance: exploring the prospects and challenges for hospital management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atinga Roger A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2003 Ghana introduced a social health insurance scheme which resulted in the separation of purchasing of health services by the health insurance authority on the one hand and the provision of health services by hospitals at the other side of the spectrum. This separation has a lot of implications for managing accredited hospitals. This paper examines whether decoupling purchasing and service provision translate into opportunities or challenges in the management of accredited hospitals. Methods A qualitative exploratory study of 15 accredited district hospitals were selected from five of Ghana’s ten administrative regions for the study. A semi-structured interview guide was designed to solicit information from key informants, Health Service Administrators, Pharmacists, Accountants and Scheme Managers of the hospitals studied. Data was analysed thematically. Results The results showed that under the health insurance scheme, hospitals are better-off in terms of cash flow and adequate stock levels of drugs. Adequate stock of non-drugs under the scheme was reportedly intermittent. The major challenges confronting the hospitals were identified as weak purchasing power due to low tariffs, non computerisation of claims processing, unpredictable payment pattern, poor gate-keeping systems, lack of logistics and other new and emerging challenges relating to moral hazards and the use of false identity cards under pretence for medical care. Conclusion Study’s findings have a lot of policy implications for proper management of hospitals. The findings suggest rationalisation of the current tariff structure, the application of contract based payment system to inject efficiency into hospitals management and piloting facility based vetting systems to offset vetting loads of the insurance authority. Proper gate-keeping mechanisms are also needed to curtail the phenomenon of moral hazard and false documentation.

  10. Strengths of the Northwell Health Laboratory Service Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Balfour MD

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available From 2009 to 2015, the laboratories of the 19-hospital North Shore-LIJ Health System experienced 5 threatened interruptions in service and supported 2 regional health-care providers with threatened interruptions in their laboratory service. We report our strategies to maintain laboratory performance during these events, drawing upon the strengths of our integrated laboratory service line. Established in 2009, the laboratory service line has unified medical and administrative leadership and system-wide divisional structure, quality management, and standardization of operations and procedures. Among many benefits, this governance structure enabled the laboratories to respond to a series of unexpected events. Specifically, at our various service sites, the laboratories dealt with pandemic (2009, 2 floods (2010, 2012, 2 fires (2010, 2015, and laboratory floor subsidence (2013. We were also asked to provide support for a regional physician network facing abrupt loss of testing services from closure of another regional clinical laboratory (2010 and to intervene for a non-health system hospital threatened with closure owing to noncompliance of laboratory operations (2012. In all but a single instance, patient care was served without interruption in service. In the last instance, fire interrupted laboratory services for 30 minutes. We conclude that in a large integrated health system, threats to continuous laboratory operations are not infrequent when measured on an annual basis. While most threats are from external physical circumstances, some emanate from unexpected administrative events. A strong laboratory governance mechanism that includes unified medical and administrative leadership across the entirety of the laboratory service line enables successful responses to these threats.

  11. Strengths of the Northwell Health Laboratory Service Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balfour, Erika; Stallone, Robert; Castagnaro, Joseph; Poczter, Hannah; Schron, Deborah; Martone, James; Breining, Dwayne; Simpkins, Henry; Neglia, Tom; Kalish, Paul

    2016-01-01

    From 2009 to 2015, the laboratories of the 19-hospital North Shore-LIJ Health System experienced 5 threatened interruptions in service and supported 2 regional health-care providers with threatened interruptions in their laboratory service. We report our strategies to maintain laboratory performance during these events, drawing upon the strengths of our integrated laboratory service line. Established in 2009, the laboratory service line has unified medical and administrative leadership and system-wide divisional structure, quality management, and standardization of operations and procedures. Among many benefits, this governance structure enabled the laboratories to respond to a series of unexpected events. Specifically, at our various service sites, the laboratories dealt with pandemic (2009), 2 floods (2010, 2012), 2 fires (2010, 2015), and laboratory floor subsidence (2013). We were also asked to provide support for a regional physician network facing abrupt loss of testing services from closure of another regional clinical laboratory (2010) and to intervene for a non-health system hospital threatened with closure owing to noncompliance of laboratory operations (2012). In all but a single instance, patient care was served without interruption in service. In the last instance, fire interrupted laboratory services for 30 minutes. We conclude that in a large integrated health system, threats to continuous laboratory operations are not infrequent when measured on an annual basis. While most threats are from external physical circumstances, some emanate from unexpected administrative events. A strong laboratory governance mechanism that includes unified medical and administrative leadership across the entirety of the laboratory service line enables successful responses to these threats. PMID:28725768

  12. Total quality management (TQM) in a hospital library: identifying service benchmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, W W; Reel, L B

    1992-10-01

    Hospitals are turning to total quality management (TQM) to lower costs of providing care. A hospital library in a TQM environment needs to embrace corporate goals while maintaining its accountability as a contributor to quality patient care. Alliant Health System (AHS) Library at Norton Hospital and Kosair Children's Hospital in Louisville, Kentucky, conducted a study to establish TQM benchmarks and to examine the significance of its role in clinical care. Using a methodology designed to allow both library user and nonuser to respond, 2,091 surveys were distributed to physicians and nursing and allied health personnel. Areas surveyed included frequency of library use, impact of information received on clinical judgments, cognitive value of the information, and satisfaction with library products and services. Results confirm that the library has a substantial clinical role. Eighty-eight percent of reporting physicians agreed that information from the library contributed to higher quality care. Nursing and allied health were less convinced of the importance of the library's clinical role. Sixty-nine percent of nursing personnel and 58% of allied health personnel agreed that the library contributed to higher quality care. Nursing and allied health personnel also used the library less frequently than physicians. With these results as benchmarks, improving the clinical role of the library will take commitment to the TQM process and a willingness to change.

  13. A conceptual overview of a proactive health psychology service: the Tripler Health Psychology Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, L C; Folen, R A; Porter, R I; Kellar, M A

    1999-06-01

    The military patient population, the demanding environment in which medical services are provided, and the rigors of the operational environment create a unique challenge for service members as well as military health care providers. Within the military medical system, the subspecialty of clinical health psychology may provide patient care and consultation interventions necessary to meet the demands of the unique Army medical and military communities. As funding and other resources decrease, military health psychologists can provide high-quality care to difficult-to-manage patients while increasing outcome efficacy and decreasing costs to the hospital. This paper provides a definition of clinical health psychology and a description of its unique interventions and applications and how these unique skills augment medical services. Moreover, we offer a conceptual model for an innovative health psychology program that will assist other military treatment facilities in designing programs to increase outcome efficacy and concurrently reduce costs and utilization of services.

  14. Health service quality scale: Brazilian Portuguese translation, reliability and validity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocha Luiz Roberto Martins

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Health Service Quality Scale is a multidimensional hierarchical scale that is based on interdisciplinary approach. This instrument was specifically created for measuring health service quality based on marketing and health care concepts. The aim of this study was to translate and culturally adapt the Health Service Quality Scale into Brazilian Portuguese and to assess the validity and reliability of the Brazilian Portuguese version of the instrument. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional, observational study, with public health system patients in a Brazilian university hospital. Validity was assessed using Pearson’s correlation coefficient to measure the strength of the association between the Brazilian Portuguese version of the instrument and the SERVQUAL scale. Internal consistency was evaluated using Cronbach’s alpha coefficient; the intraclass (ICC and Pearson’s correlation coefficients were used for test-retest reliability. Results One hundred and sixteen consecutive postoperative patients completed the questionnaire. Pearson’s correlation coefficient for validity was 0.20. Cronbach's alpha for the first and second administrations of the final version of the instrument were 0.982 and 0.986, respectively. For test-retest reliability, Pearson’s correlation coefficient was 0.89 and ICC was 0.90. Conclusions The culturally adapted, Brazilian Portuguese version of the Health Service Quality Scale is a valid and reliable instrument to measure health service quality.

  15. Health Service Quality Scale: Brazilian Portuguese translation, reliability and validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Luiz Roberto Martins; Veiga, Daniela Francescato; e Oliveira, Paulo Rocha; Song, Elaine Horibe; Ferreira, Lydia Masako

    2013-01-17

    The Health Service Quality Scale is a multidimensional hierarchical scale that is based on interdisciplinary approach. This instrument was specifically created for measuring health service quality based on marketing and health care concepts. The aim of this study was to translate and culturally adapt the Health Service Quality Scale into Brazilian Portuguese and to assess the validity and reliability of the Brazilian Portuguese version of the instrument. We conducted a cross-sectional, observational study, with public health system patients in a Brazilian university hospital. Validity was assessed using Pearson's correlation coefficient to measure the strength of the association between the Brazilian Portuguese version of the instrument and the SERVQUAL scale. Internal consistency was evaluated using Cronbach's alpha coefficient; the intraclass (ICC) and Pearson's correlation coefficients were used for test-retest reliability. One hundred and sixteen consecutive postoperative patients completed the questionnaire. Pearson's correlation coefficient for validity was 0.20. Cronbach's alpha for the first and second administrations of the final version of the instrument were 0.982 and 0.986, respectively. For test-retest reliability, Pearson's correlation coefficient was 0.89 and ICC was 0.90. The culturally adapted, Brazilian Portuguese version of the Health Service Quality Scale is a valid and reliable instrument to measure health service quality.

  16. 78 FR 29628 - Community Health Needs Assessments for Charitable Hospitals; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Parts 1 and 53 RIN 1545-BL30 Community Health Needs Assessments for... provide guidance to charitable hospital organizations on the community health needs assessment...

  17. Hizmet Kalitesi - Müşteri Memnuniyeti İlişkisinin Hastane Türlerine Göre Karşılaştırılması : Devlet, Özel ve Üniversite Hastaneleri Uygulaması = An Analysis of the Relationship Between Service Quality and Customer Satisfaction According to Type of Health Services Provider : An Application at Public, Private and University Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teoman DUMAN

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Current study attempted to identify dimensions of hospital service quality and analyzed relationships between service quality dimensions and overall patient satisfaction within different hospital service provider categories. The research was conducted with 225 patients at public, university and private hospitals in two southern metropolis of Turkey. Patients' service quality perceptions were measured with four factors; services before the treatment, physician services, care for private needs-laboratory services and perceptions about physical environment. First factor analysis and variance analysis was conducted. Then it was followed by regression analyses. Multiple regression analyses revealed that services before the treatment and perceptions about physical environment were significant determiners of overall patient satisfaction at public hospitals whereas physician services, care for private needs-laboratory services and perceptions about physical environment were significant indicators of overall patient satisfaction at university hospitals. As for private hospitals, all four factors show significant relationships with overall patient satisfaction.

  18. Integrating mental health services: the Finnish experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ville Lehtinen

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to give a short description of the most important developments of mental health services in Finland during the 1990s, examine their influences on the organisation and provision of services, and describe shortly some national efforts to handle the new situation. The Finnish mental health service system experienced profound changes in the beginning of the 1990s. These included the integration of mental health services, being earlier under own separate administration, with other specialised health services, decentralisation of the financing of health services, and de-institutionalisation of the services. The same time Finland underwent the deepest economic recession in Western Europe, which resulted in cut-offs especially in the mental health budgets. Conducting extensive national research and development programmes in the field of mental health has been one typically Finnish way of supporting the mental health service development. The first of these national programmes was the Schizophrenia Project 1981–97, whose main aims were to decrease the incidence of new long-term patients and the prevalence of old long-stay patients by developing an integrated treatment model. The Suicide Prevention Project 1986–96 aimed at raising awareness of this special problem and decreasing by 20% the proportionally high suicide rate in Finland. The National Depression Programme 1994–98 focused at this clearly increasing public health concern by several research and development project targeted both to the general population and specifically to children, primary care and specialised services. The latest, still on-going Meaningful Life Programme 1998–2003 which main aim is, by multi-sectoral co-operation, to improve the quality of life for people suffering from or living with the threat of mental disorders. Furthermore, the government launched in 1999 a new Goal and Action Programme for Social Welfare and Health Care 2000–2003, in

  19. Health Services Cost Analyzing in Tabriz Health Centers 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massumeh gholizadeh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives : Health Services cost analyzing is an important management tool for evidence-based decision making in health system. This study was conducted with the purpose of cost analyzing and identifying the proportion of different factors on total cost of health services that are provided in urban health centers in Tabriz. Material and Methods : This study was a descriptive and analytic study. Activity Based Costing method (ABC was used for cost analyzing. This cross–sectional survey analyzed and identified the proportion of different factors on total cost of health services that are provided in Tabriz urban health centers. The statistical population of this study was comprised of urban community health centers in Tabriz. In this study, a multi-stage sampling method was used to collect data. Excel software was used for data analyzing. The results were described with tables and graphs. Results : The study results showed the portion of different factors in various health services. Human factors by 58%, physical space 8%, medical equipment 1.3% were allocated with high portion of expenditures and costs of health services in Tabriz urban health centers. Conclusion : Based on study results, since the human factors included the highest portion of health services costs and expenditures in Tabriz urban health centers, balancing workload with staff number, institutionalizing performance-based management and using multidisciplinary staffs may lead to reduced costs of services. ​

  20. Barriers of Pre-Hospital Services in Road Traffic Injuries in Tehran: The Viewpoint of Service Providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrokh Alinia

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Iran is one of the countries with considerable road traffic injuries. Pre-hospital interventions have an important role in preventing mortalities and disabilities caused by traffic accidents.The present study aimed to explore the barriers of pre-hospital care in traffic injuries in Tehran, Iran. Methods: A qualitative content analysis approach was conducted based on 21 semi-structured interviews with 18 participants. A purposeful sampling method was applied until reaching data saturation. Interviews were transcribed verbatim, and then data condensing, labeling, coding and defining categories were performed by qualitative content analysis. Results: Four main barriers including 4 main categories and 13 subcategories emerged; they included Barriers related to people, Barriers related to metropolitan infrastructure,Barriers related to the profession and Barriers related to managerial issues. Conclusion: Based on the findings of this study, pre-hospital service barriers in traffic accidents have many dimensions including cultural, structural and managerial domains. Policy makers in health system can use these findings to promote the quality of pre-hospital services, especially in the field of traffic injuries.

  1. Mobility trends of Patients across Italian Regions: implications for planning and evaluation of hospital services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nante, N; Messina, G; Lispi, L; Serafini, A; Prisco, G; Moirano, F

    2016-01-01

    The study of patients' mobility is useful for health planning and identifying deficiencies in care supply. The Italian Health Service, with 21 different regional realities, can be considered as a macrocosmic test bench. Our study aims: (1) to describe the trend of patients' hospital mobility across the Italian Regions; (2) to offer an immediate visual approach for decision making; (3) to identify some factors involved in patient's mobility. Observational cross sectional study. We used ordinary and day hospital discharge data from 1998 to 2014. The study was carried out using: (1) the Gandy's Nomogram (GN), a graphical tool that assesses the power of attraction and the escape's containment of hospital regional networks; (2) the vector analysis; (3) the trend analysis with Cuzik's test; (4) the panel data analysis, with multiple logistic regression model. The mean number of annual admissions, in Italian hospitals, was 10,976,290, progressively decreasing from 2001 to 2014, and 7% of it occurred "in mobility". We have drawn the different paths of patients' mobility by Regions and observed critical situations almost in Regions of Southern Italy, compared with Regions of the Centre-North. Moreover we analyzed the factors implied in such mobility, highlighting that attraction is influenced by the hospitalization rate in private structures, by the percentage of graduates in the Regions, and by the number of hospital beds/10,000 inhabitants; while escapes are influenced by GDP per capita, by the number of hospital beds/10,000 inhabitants and by the sanitary expenses per capita of the Region. We have shown the potentialities of the GN, applicable at micro level but also on a large scale in the analysis of patients' hospital mobility; and this, together with panel data analysis, can lead to a more conscious and effective health planning.

  2. Utilization of health care services by migrants in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graetz, V.; Rechel, B.; Groot, W.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Our study reviewed the empirical evidence on the utilization of health care services by migrants in Europe, and on differences in health service utilization between migrants and non-migrants across European countries. Sources of data: A systematic literature review was performed......, searching the databases Medline, Cinahl and Embase and covering the period from January 2009 to April 2016. The final number of articles included was 39. Areas of agreement: Utilization of accident and emergency services and hospitalizations were higher among migrants compared with non-migrants in most...... countries for which evidence was available. In contrast, screening and outpatient visits for specialized care were generally used less often by migrants. Areas of controversy: Utilization of general practitioner services among migrants compared with non-migrants presents a diverging picture. Growing points...

  3. Assessment of Service Quality in Teaching Hospitals of Yazd University of Medical Sciences: Using Multi-criteria Decision Making Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafii, Milad; Rafiei, Sima; Abooee, Fatemeh; Bahrami, Mohammad Amin; Nouhi, Mojtaba; Lotfi, Farhad; Khanjankhani, Khatere

    2016-08-01

    Hospitals as integrated parts of the wide-ranging health care systems have dominant focus on health care provision to meet, maintain and promote people's health needs of a community. This study aimed to assess the service quality of teaching hospitals of Yazd University of Medical Sciences using Fuzzy Analytical Hierarchy Process (FAHP) and Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS). A literature review and a qualitative method were used to obtain experts' viewpoints about the quality dimensions of hospital services to design a questionnaire. Then, using a self-made questionnaire, perceptions of 300 patients about the quality of delivered services were gathered. Finally, FAHP was applied to weigh each quality dimension and TOPSIS method to rank hospital wards. Six dimensions including responsiveness, assurance, security, tangibles, health communication and Patient orientation were identified as affecting aspects of hospital services quality among which, security and tangibles got the highest and lowest importance respectively (0.25406, 0.06883). Findings also revealed that in hospital A, orthopedics and ophthalmology wards obtained the highest score in terms of quality while cardiology department got the lowest ranking (0.954, 0.323). In hospital B, the highest and the lowest ranking was belonged to cardiology and surgical wards (0.895, 0.00) while in hospital C, surgical units were rated higher than internal wards (0.959, 0.851). Findings emphasized that the security dimension got the lowest ranking among SERVQUAL facets in studied hospitals. This requires hospital executives to pay special attention to the issue of patients' security and plan effectively for its promotion.

  4. Going beyond information management: using the Comprehensive Accreditation Manual for Hospitals to promote knowledge-based information services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schardt, C M

    1998-10-01

    In 1987, the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) initiated the Agenda for Change, a major revision in the evaluation process for hospitals. An essential component of that change was to shift the emphasis away from standards for individual departments to standards for hospital-wide functions. In recent years, hospital librarians have focused their energy and attention on complying with the standards for the "Management of Information" chapter, specifically the IM.9 section on knowledge-based information. However, the JCAHO has listed the health sciences librarian and library services as having responsibilities in six other chapters within the Comprehensive Accreditation Manual for Hospitals. These chapters can have a major impact on the services of the hospital library for two reasons: (1) they are being read by hospital leaders and other professionals in the organization, and (2) they articulate specific ways to apply knowledge-based information services to the major functions within the hospital. These chapters are "Education"; "Improving Organizational Performance"; "Leadership"; "Management of Human Resources"; "Management of the Environment of Care"; and "Surveillance, Prevention, and Control of Infection." The standards that these chapters promote present specific opportunities for hospital librarians to apply knowledge-based information resources and service to hospital-wide functions. This article reviews these chapters and discusses the standards that relate to knowledge-based information.

  5. Attitudes of mental health professionals towards service user involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortteisto, Tiina; Laitila, Minna; Pitkänen, Anneli

    2017-08-22

    Patient-centred care and user involvement in healthcare services are much emphasised globally. This study was the first step in a multicentre research project in Finland to improve service users' and carers' opportunities to be more involved in mental health services. The aim of the study was to assess attitudes of professionals towards service user involvement. The data were collected via an online questionnaire from 1069 mental health professionals in four hospital districts. Altogether, 351 professionals responded. Data were analysed using appropriate statistical methods. According to the results, attitudes of healthcare professionals were more positive towards service users' involvement in their own treatment than in other levels of services. There were also differences in gender, age groups, working places and experiences in the attitudes of professionals concerning service users' involvement in their own treatment. These should be taken into account in the future when planning education for mental health professionals. In spite of governmental guidance on service user involvement and the growing body of knowledge of the benefits associated with it, change in attitudes towards user involvement is slow. Special attention should be paid to the attitudes of professionals working in inpatient care and of those with less working experience. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  6. Occupational Health Services Integrated in Primary Health Care in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiei, Masoud; Ezzatian, Reza; Farshad, Asghar; Sokooti, Maryam; Tabibi, Ramin; Colosio, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    A healthy workforce is vital for maintaining social and economic development on a global, national and local level. Around half of the world's people are economically active and spend at least one third of their time in their place of work while only 15% of workers have access to basic occupational health services. According to WHO report, since the early 1980s, health indicators in Iran have consistently improved, to the extent that it is comparable with those in developed countries. In this paper it was tried to briefly describe about Health care system and occupational Health Services as part of Primary Health care in Iran. To describe the health care system in the country and the status of occupational health services to the workers and employers, its integration into Primary Health Care (PHC) and outlining the challenges in provision of occupational health services to the all working population. Iran has fairly good health indicators. More than 85 percent of the population in rural and deprived regions, for instance, have access to primary healthcare services. The PHC centers provide essential healthcare and public-health services for the community. Providing, maintaining and improving of the workers' health are the main goals of occupational health services in Iran that are presented by different approaches and mostly through Workers' Houses in the PHC system. Iran has developed an extensive network of PHC facilities with good coverage in most rural areas, but there are still few remote areas that might suffer from inadequate services. It seems that there is still no transparent policy to collaborate with the private sector, train managers or provide a sustainable mechanism for improving the quality of services. Finally, strengthening national policies for health at work, promotion of healthy work and work environment, sharing healthy work practices, developing updated training curricula to improve human resource knowledge including occupational health

  7. Children With Special Health Care Needs: Child Health and Functioning Outcomes and Health Care Service Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caicedo, Carmen

    This study describes health, functioning, and health care service use by medically complex technology-dependent children according to condition severity (moderately disabled, severely disabled, and vegetative state). Data were collected monthly for 5 months using the Pediatric Quality of Life Generic Core Module 4.0 Parent-Proxy Report. Health care service use measured the number of routine and acute care office visits (including primary and specialty physicians), emergency department visits, hospitalizations, nursing health care services, special therapies, medications, medical technology devices (MTDs), and assistive devices. Child physical health was different across the condition severity groups. The average age of the children was 10.1 years (SD, 6.2); the average number of medications used was 5.5 (SD, 3.7); the average number of MTDs used was 4.2 (SD, 2.9); and the average number of assistive devices used was 4.3 (SD, 2.7). Severely disabled and vegetative children were similar in age (older) and had a similar number of medications, MTDs, and assistive devices (greater) than moderately disabled children. The advanced practice nurse care coordinator role is necessary for the health and functioning of medically complex, technology-dependent children. Copyright © 2016 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Hospital Staff and Patient Recognition Toward Opening of Medical Services Market, and Factors in Selecting a Foreign Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Ryu, Hyang Jin; Park, Eun Cheol; Sohn, Tae Yong; Yu, Seung Hum

    2007-01-01

    Purpose The objectives of this study are to compare the hospital employees' and patients' recognition and attitudes toward the opening of the medical services market, to analyze the differences between hospital employees and patients on the factors in selecting a foreign hospital. Materials and Methods This study collected and analyzed data using systematic questionnaires that were self-administered by employees and outpatients to compare their recognition of the opening of the medical servic...

  9. The Relationship between Self-rated Health and Hospital Records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Torben Heien

    This paper investigates whether self-rated health (SRH) co-varies with individual hospital records. By linking the Danish Longitudinal Survey on Aging with individual hospital records covering all hospital admissions from 1995-2006, I show that SRH is correlated to historical, current, and future...... hospital records. I use both measures separately to control for health in a regression of mortality on wealth. Using only historical and current hospitalization controls for health yields the common result, that SRH is a stronger predictor of mortality than objective health measures. The addition of future...... hospitalizations as controls shows that the estimated gradient on wealth is similar to one in which SRH is the control. The results suggest that SRH is able to capture diseases at prodromal stages and that with a sufficiently long time series of individual records, objective health measures can predict mortality...

  10. Focus on vulnerable populations and promoting equity in health service utilization--an analysis of visitor characteristics and service utilization of the Chinese community health service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiaoxin; Liu, Ling; Cao, Shiyi; Yang, Huajie; Song, Fujian; Yang, Chen; Gong, Yanhong; Wang, Yunxia; Yin, Xiaoxu; Xu, Xing; Xie, Jun; Sun, Yi; Lu, Zuxun

    2014-05-26

    Community health service in China is designed to provide a convenient and affordable primary health service for the city residents, and to promote health equity. Based on data from a large national study of 35 cities across China, we examined the characteristics of the patients and the utilization of community health institutions (CHIs), and assessed the role of community health service in promoting equity in health service utilization for community residents. Multistage sampling method was applied to select 35 cities in China. Four CHIs were randomly chosen in every district of the 35 cities. A total of 88,482 visitors to the selected CHIs were investigated by using intercept survey method at the exit of the CHIs in 2008, 2009, 2010, and 2011. Descriptive analyses were used to analyze the main characteristics (gender, age, and income) of the CHI visitors, and the results were compared with that from the National Health Services Survey (NHSS, including CHIs and higher levels of hospitals). We also analyzed the service utilization and the satisfactions of the CHI visitors. The proportions of the children (2.4%) and the elderly (about 22.7%) were lower in our survey than those in NHSS (9.8% and 38.8% respectively). The proportion of the low-income group (26.4%) was apparently higher than that in NHSS (12.5%). The children group had the lowest satisfaction with the CHIs than other age groups. The satisfaction of the low-income visitors was slightly higher than that of the higher-income visitors. The utilization rate of public health services was low in CHIs. The CHIs in China appears to fulfill the public health target of uptake by vulnerable populations, and may play an important role in promoting equity in health service utilization. However, services for children and the elderly should be strengthened.

  11. Personal health care services through digital television.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niiranen, S; Lamminen, H; Mattila, H; Niemi, K; Kalli, S

    2002-06-01

    Personal health care has obtained increasing importance in the field of health care as the populations' age in the industrialised countries and resources available for health care remain limited. Personal health care through digital television is an exiting possibility in the realisation of new types of services answering to this demand for increased personal action and responsibility in health care. The possibilities of digital television in health care are studied in the Health Care Television (HCTV) research project of the Digital Media Institute at Tampere University of Technology. In this paper personal health care services are studied mainly from the perspective of the interactive service infrastructure of digital television. Firstly we present the general infrastructure of digital television and the different interactive service types of digital television. The usage of these service types in personal health care applications is also discussed. Finally, a web-based application based on chronic atrial fibrillation and its test use is presented. The application is used as a research platform for personal health care applications in digital television.

  12. Financial Performance of Academic Health Center Hospitals, 1994-2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Allen; Koenig, Lane; Sen, Namrata; Ho, Silver; Gilani, Jawaria

    This study examined how competitive market dynamics between 1994 and 2000 have affected the financial stability of Academic Health Center (AHC) hospitals and their ability to support their academic and social missions. It looked at the financial challenges facing AHC hospitals through a survey involving 1,138 teaching hospitals. Findings…

  13. Health Care Practices for Medical Textiles in Government Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akubue, B. N.; Anikweze, G. U.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the health care practices for medical textiles in government hospitals Enugu State, Nigeria. Specifically, the study determined the availability and maintenance of medical textiles in government hospitals in Enugu State, Nigeria. A sample of 1200 hospital personnel were studied. One thousand two hundred…

  14. Meaningful Use of Health Information Technology by Rural Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Jeffrey; Casey, Michelle; Moscovice, Ira; Burlew, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study examines the current status of meaningful use of health information technology (IT) in Critical Access Hospitals (CAHs), other rural, and urban US hospitals, and it discusses the potential role of Medicare payment incentives and disincentives in encouraging CAHs and other rural hospitals to achieve meaningful use. Methods: Data…

  15. Medicare Program: Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment and Ambulatory Surgical Center Payment Systems and Quality Reporting Programs; Organ Procurement Organization Reporting and Communication; Transplant Outcome Measures and Documentation Requirements; Electronic Health Record (EHR) Incentive Programs; Payment to Nonexcepted Off-Campus Provider-Based Department of a Hospital; Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) Program; Establishment of Payment Rates Under the Medicare Physician Fee Schedule for Nonexcepted Items and Services Furnished by an Off-Campus Provider-Based Department of a Hospital. Final rule with comment period and interim final rule with comment period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-14

    This final rule with comment period revises the Medicare hospital outpatient prospective payment system (OPPS) and the Medicare ambulatory surgical center (ASC) payment system for CY 2017 to implement applicable statutory requirements and changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. In this final rule with comment period, we describe the changes to the amounts and factors used to determine the payment rates for Medicare services paid under the OPPS and those paid under the ASC payment system. In addition, this final rule with comment period updates and refines the requirements for the Hospital Outpatient Quality Reporting (OQR) Program and the ASC Quality Reporting (ASCQR) Program. Further, in this final rule with comment period, we are making changes to tolerance thresholds for clinical outcomes for solid organ transplant programs; to Organ Procurement Organizations (OPOs) definitions, outcome measures, and organ transport documentation; and to the Medicare and Medicaid Electronic Health Record Incentive Programs. We also are removing the HCAHPS Pain Management dimension from the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) Program. In addition, we are implementing section 603 of the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015 relating to payment for certain items and services furnished by certain off-campus provider-based departments of a provider. In this document, we also are issuing an interim final rule with comment period to establish the Medicare Physician Fee Schedule payment rates for the nonexcepted items and services billed by a nonexcepted off-campus provider-based department of a hospital in accordance with the provisions of section 603.

  16. Hospital Managers’ Perception of Recent Health Care Reform in Teaching Hospitals of Qazvin, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakaria Kiaei

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background The main purpose of any government from a healthcare reform is to improve the service quality and raised public satisfaction. Objectives As the important role of managerial human resources in any organizational changes, this paper tried to examine the point of view of this group about the recent reform in governmental hospitals of Qazvin. Patients and Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in January 2015. The statistical population consisted of 50 executive managers of Qazvin teaching hospitals. The data gathering instrument was a research-made questionnaire with approved reliability and validity (α = 0.84. Data analyse was performed in SPSS version 20 using descriptive and analytic statistics (analysis of variance (ANOVA, Pearson correlation test and one sample t-test. Results A total of 43.2% of managers believed that this reform was a good restrictor for malpractices in healthcare and 31.8% believed that it will not be so useful to improve the society health status. The average score of resource preparation, insurance companies coordination, changing the routine workflows, and finally achieving the goals, had a meaningful difference (P ˂ 0.05 and the average score of these fields were upper than average. Conclusions The findings showed that based on the managers’ point of view, the reform plan was able to achieve its primary goals; however, it could not meet their exceptions in improving the society health status. Therefore, it is necessary to design some interventions for changing this perception.

  17. Development of a medication review service for patients with enteral tubes in a community teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tracey; Eisenhart, Alison; Costello, Jennifer

    2017-06-01

    The results of a study to develop a hospital-wide medication review service for patients with enteral tubes to improve patient safety are presented. Inappropriate enteral administration of medications can result in occluded tubes, altered clinical response, and an increase in adverse effects. At Saint Barnabas Medical Center, a 600-bed community teaching hospital located in Livingston, New Jersey, a medication review service for patients with an enteral tube was developed. A phased approach was used. In phase 1, a retrospective chart review revealed that 43% of our patients with enteral tubes received at least one medication that should not be crushed. In phase 2, we identified formulary medications that should not be crushed based on guidance from the Institute for Safe Medication Practices. We added a "do not crush" warning to the identified medications in our electronic medication administration record and automated medication dispensing system. In phase 3, we created an automatic substitution list of medications. Phase 4 involved the development of the program in our health information technology platform. An electronic task list alerted pharmacists about patients with enteral tubes who required medication review and potential medication substitutions, as well as patients with newly removed enteral tubes who can be placed back on their original medications. In phase 5, we provided education to prescribers, nurses, and pharmacists. A hospital-wide medication review service for patients with enteral tubes at our community teaching medical center was developed. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Additional funding mechanisms for Public Hospitals in Greece: the case of Chania Mental Health Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golna Christina

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives To investigate whether the long term lease of public hospital owned land could be an additional financing mechanism for Greek public (mental health hospitals. Methods We performed a financial analysis of the official 2008 data of a case - study hospital (Mental Health Hospital of Chania. We used a capital budgeting approach to investigate whether value is created for the public hospital by engaging its assets in a project for the development of a private renal dialysis Unit. Results The development of the private unit in hospital owned land is a good investment decision, as it generates high project Net Present Value and Internal Rate of Return. When the project commences generating operating cash flows, nearly €400.000 will be paid annually to the Mental Health Hospital of Chania as rent, thereby gradually decreasing the annual deficit of the hospital. Conclusions Revenue generated from the long term lease of public hospital land is crucial to gradually eliminate hospital deficit. The Ministry of Health should encourage similar forms of Public Private Partnerships in order to ensure the sustainability of public (mental hospitals.

  19. Measuring patients' satisfaction with pharmaceutical services at a public hospital in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khudair, Imran Fahmi; Raza, Syed Asif

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study pharmacy service impact on patient satisfaction and to determine what factors saliently link with pharmaceutical service performance at Hamad General Hospital. A patient satisfaction questionnaire was designed using the literature and consultation with Hamad General Hospital medical experts. The questionnaire contained 22 items that focused on five influencing factors: promptness; attitude; supply; location; medication education; and respondent demographic aspects. A total of 220 respondents completed the questionnaire. An exploratory factor analysis was used to group items and a structural equation model was developed to test causality between five factors along with their influence on patient satisfaction. The study establishes statistical evidence that patient satisfaction is positively influenced by service promptness, pharmacist attitude, medication counseling, pharmacy location and waiting area. Several socio-demographic characteristics have statistically different effect on satisfaction, notably: gender; marital status; health status; age; educational level; and ethnicity. However, medication supply did not influence patient satisfaction. Pharmaceutical services are recognized as an essential healthcare-system component. Their impact on customer satisfaction has been investigated in many countries; however, there is no such study in Qatar. The findings identify pharmaceutical service performance indicators and provide guidelines to improve Qatari pharmaceutical services.

  20. Rapid access for older people to an specialist mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, Joanne; Oldknow, Helen

    This article outlines an initiative to provide rapid access to specialist services for older people with mental health difficulties living in care homes. It outlines the main aims of the service and its impact. The service has significantly reduced unnecessary hospital admissions.

  1. Service network analysis for agricultural mental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuller Jeffrey D

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Farmers represent a subgroup of rural and remote communities at higher risk of suicide attributed to insecure economic futures, self-reliant cultures and poor access to health services. Early intervention models are required that tap into existing farming networks. This study describes service networks in rural shires that relate to the mental health needs of farming families. This serves as a baseline to inform service network improvements. Methods A network survey of mental health related links between agricultural support, health and other human services in four drought declared shires in comparable districts in rural New South Wales, Australia. Mental health links covered information exchange, referral recommendations and program development. Results 87 agencies from 111 (78% completed a survey. 79% indicated that two thirds of their clients needed assistance for mental health related problems. The highest mean number of interagency links concerned information exchange and the frequency of these links between sectors was monthly to three monthly. The effectiveness of agricultural support and health sector links were rated as less effective by the agricultural support sector than by the health sector (p Conclusion Aligning with agricultural agencies is important to build effective mental health service pathways to address the needs of farming populations. Work is required to ensure that these agricultural support agencies have operational and effective links to primary mental health care services. Network analysis provides a baseline to inform this work. With interventions such as local mental health training and joint service planning to promote network development we would expect to see over time an increase in the mean number of links, the frequency in which these links are used and the rated effectiveness of these links.

  2. Performance evaluation of hospitals that provide care in the public health system, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Cristiano de Azevedo Ramos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To analyze if size, administrative level, legal status, type of unit and educational activity influence the hospital network performance in providing services to the Brazilian Unified Health System.METHODS This cross-sectional study evaluated data from the Hospital Information System and the Cadastro Nacional de Estabelecimentos de Saúde (National Registry of Health Facilities, 2012, in Sao Paulo, Southeastern Brazil. We calculated performance indicators, such as: the ratio of hospital employees per bed; mean amount paid for admission; bed occupancy rate; average length of stay; bed turnover index and hospital mortality rate. Data were expressed as mean and standard deviation. The groups were compared using analysis of variance (ANOVA and Bonferroni correction.RESULTS The hospital occupancy rate in small hospitals was lower than in medium, big and special-sized hospitals. Higher hospital occupancy rate and bed turnover index were observed in hospitals that include education in their activities. The hospital mortality rate was lower in specialized hospitals compared to general ones, despite their higher proportion of highly complex admissions. We found no differences between hospitals in the direct and indirect administration for most of the indicators analyzed.CONCLUSIONS The study indicated the importance of the scale effect on efficiency, and larger hospitals had a higher performance. Hospitals that include education in their activities had a higher operating performance, albeit with associated importance of using human resources and highly complex structures. Specialized hospitals had a significantly lower rate of mortality than general hospitals, indicating the positive effect of the volume of procedures and technology used on clinical outcomes. The analysis related to the administrative level and legal status did not show any significant performance differences between the categories of public hospitals.

  3. Hospital waiting time: the forgotten premise of healthcare service delivery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillay, Datuk Ir M S; Ghazali, Roslan Johari Dato Mohd; Manaf, Noor Hazilah Abd; Abdullah, Abu Hassan Asaari; Bakar, Azman Abu; Salikin, Faisal; Umapathy, Mathyvani; Ali, Roslinah; Bidin, Noriah; Ismail, Wan Ismefariana Wan

    2011-01-01

    This is a national study which aims to determine the average waiting time in Malaysian public hospitals and to gauge the level of patient satisfaction with the waiting time. It also aims to identify factors perceived by healthcare providers which contribute to the waiting time problem. Self-administered questionnaires were the main method of data collection. Two sets of questionnaires were used. The first set solicited information from patients on their waiting time expereince. The second set elucidated information from hospital employees on the possible causes of lengthy waiting time. The questionnaires were administered in 21 public hospitals throughout all 13 states in Malaysia. A total of 13,000 responses were analysed for the patient survey and almost 3,000 were analysed for the employee survey. The findings indicate that on average, patients wait for more than two hours from registration to getting the prescription slip, while the contact time with medical personnel is only on average 15 minutes. Employee surveys on factors contributing to the lengthy waiting time indicate employee attitude and work process, heavy workload, management and supervision problems, and inadequate facilities to be among the contributory factors to the waiting time problem. Public healthcare in Malaysia is in a state of "excess demand", where demand for subsidised healthcare far outstrips supply, due to the large fee differential between public and private healthcare services. There is a need for hospital managers to reduce the boredom faced by patients while waiting, and to address the waiting time problem in a more scientific manner, as has been carried out in other countries through simulation and modelling techniques. Healthcare organisations are keen to address their waiting time problem. However, not much research has been carried out in this area. The study thus fills the lacuna in waiting time studies in healthcare organisations.

  4. Tuberculosis in hospital department health care workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Saleiro

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tuberculosis (TB is considered an occupational disease in health care workers (HCW and its transmission in health care facilities is an important concern. Some hospital departments are at higher risk of infection. Objective: To describe TB cases detected after TB screening in HCW from a hospital department (Ear, Nose and Throat – ENT who had had contact with active TB cases. Material and methods: All HCW (73 from Hospital São João's ENT Unit who had been in contact with two in-patients with active TB underwent TB screening. Those who had symptoms underwent chest X-ray and mycobacteriological sputum exam. Results: Of 73 HCW who underwent TB screening, TB diagnosis was established in 9 (8 female; median age: 30 years; 1 doctor, 6 nurses, 2 nursing auxiliaries. Pulmonary TB was found in 8 and extra- -pulmonary TB in 1. Microbiology diagnosis was obtained in 7 cases by sputum smear, n = 2; culture exam in bronchial lavage, n = 4 and histological exam of pleural tissue, n = 1. In 4 cases, Mycobacterium tuberculosis genomic DNA was extracted from cultures and molecular typing was done. All cases had identical MIRU types, which allowed identification of the epidemiological link. Conclusion: Nosocomial TB is prominent and efforts should be made to implement successful infection control measures in health care facilities and an effective TB screening program in HCW. Molecular typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis facilitates cluster identification. Resumo: Introdução: A tuberculose é considerada uma doença ocupacional nos profissionais de saúde e a sua transmissão, nas instituições de saúde, constitui um problema importante. Alguns serviços hospitalares estão particularmente expostos a risco de infecção. Objectivo: Caracterizar os casos de tuberculose detectados na sequência de um rastreio efectuado aos profissionais de saúde de um serviço hospitalar

  5. Occupational health and safety services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwantes, J.H.; Hooftman, W.; Michiel, F.

    2014-01-01

    The position, role and aim of the protective and preventive services (article 7 of the Framework directive (89/391/EEC within the legal OSH-system will be the focus point of this article. Article 13 of the EU Treaty gives the EU the possibility to draft a legal framework on occupational safety and

  6. What is the perceived impact of Alexander technique lessons on health status, costs and pain management in the real life setting of an English hospital? The results of a mixed methods evaluation of an Alexander technique service for those with chronic back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClean, Stuart; Brilleman, Sam; Wye, Lesley

    2015-07-28

    Randomised controlled trial evidence indicates that Alexander Technique is clinically and cost effective for chronic back pain. The aim of this mixed methods evaluation was to explore the role and perceived impact of Alexander Technique lessons in the naturalistic setting of an acute hospital Pain Management Clinic in England. To capture changes in health status and resource use amongst service users, 43 service users were administered three widely used questionnaires (Brief Pain Inventory, MYMOP and Client Service Resource Inventory) at three time points: baseline, six weeks and three months after baseline. We also carried out 27 telephone interviews with service users and seven face-to-face interviews with pain clinic staff and Alexander Technique teachers. Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics and qualitative data were analysed thematically. Those taking Alexander Technique lessons reported small improvements in health outcomes, and condition-related costs fell. However, due to the non-randomised, uncontrolled nature of the study design, changes cannot be attributed to the Alexander Technique lessons. Service users stated that their relationship to pain and pain management had changed, especially those who were more committed to practising the techniques regularly. These changes may explain the reported reduction in pain-related service use and the corresponding lower associated costs. Alexander Technique lessons may be used as another approach to pain management. The findings suggests that Alexander Technique lessons can help improve self-efficacy for those who are sufficiently motivated, which in turn may have an impact on service utilisation levels.

  7. Clinical Preventive Services for Older Adults: The Interface Between Personal Health Care and Public Health Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Chesley L.; Shenson, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    Healthy aging must become a priority objective for both population and personal health services, and will require innovative prevention programming to span those systems. Uptake of essential clinical preventive services is currently suboptimal among adults, owing to a number of system- and office-based care barriers. To achieve maximum health results, prevention must be integrated across community and clinical settings. Many preventive services are portable, deliverable in either clinical or community settings. Capitalizing on that flexibility can improve uptake and health outcomes. Significant reductions in health disparities, mortality, and morbidity, along with decreases in health spending, are achievable through improved collaboration and synergy between population health and personal health systems. PMID:22390505

  8. Enhancing Health-Care Services with Mixed Reality Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stantchev, Vladimir

    This work presents a development approach for mixed reality systems in health care. Although health-care service costs account for 5-15% of GDP in developed countries the sector has been remarkably resistant to the introduction of technology-supported optimizations. Digitalization of data storing and processing in the form of electronic patient records (EPR) and hospital information systems (HIS) is a first necessary step. Contrary to typical business functions (e.g., accounting or CRM) a health-care service is characterized by a knowledge intensive decision process and usage of specialized devices ranging from stethoscopes to complex surgical systems. Mixed reality systems can help fill the gap between highly patient-specific health-care services that need a variety of technical resources on the one side and the streamlined process flow that typical process supporting information systems expect on the other side. To achieve this task, we present a development approach that includes an evaluation of existing tasks and processes within the health-care service and the information systems that currently support the service, as well as identification of decision paths and actions that can benefit from mixed reality systems. The result is a mixed reality system that allows a clinician to monitor the elements of the physical world and to blend them with virtual information provided by the systems. He or she can also plan and schedule treatments and operations in the digital world depending on status information from this mixed reality.

  9. Occupational Health Stress in the Service Sector

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fozia Malik; Shaan Shahabuddin

    2015-01-01

      The basic purpose of the current study was to explore the occupational health stress reasons, consequences, and job outcomes in the service sector as well as to suggest stress management techniques to overcome stress...

  10. Estimation of health care costs and cost recovery: the case of Rafidya Hospital in Palestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younis, Mustafa Z; Jabr, Samer F K; Plante, Catherine; Forgione, Dana A

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop an estimation model for health care costs and cost recovery, and evaluate service sustainability under an uncertain environment. The Palestinian National Authority's recent focus on improving financial accountability supports the need to research health care costs in the Palestinian territories. We examine data from Rafidya Hospital from 2005-2009 and use step-down allocation to distribute overhead costs. We use an ingredient approach to estimate the costs and revenues of health services, and logarithmic estimation to prospectively estimate the demand for 2011. Our results indicate that while cost recovery is generally insufficient for long-term sustainability, some services can recover their costs in the short run. Our results provide information useful for health care policy makers in setting multiple-goal policies related to health care financing in Palestine, and provide an important initiative in the estimation of health service costs.

  11. The Danish National Health Service Register

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, John Sahl; Olivarius, Niels de Fine; Krasnik, Allan

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: To describe the Danish National Health Service Register in relation to research. Content: The register contains data collected for administrative and scientific purposes from health contractors in primary health care. It includes information about citizens, providers......, and health services but minimal clinical information. Validity and coverage: The register covers everyone living in Denmark and data is available from 1990. No validity studies have been reported. Because the data is connected to reimbursement the coverage is assumed to be good. CONCLUSION: The strengths...

  12. Patient satisfaction with a hospital-based neuropsychology service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foran, Amie; Millar, Elisa; Dorstyn, Diana

    2016-09-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to develop and pilot a measure of patient satisfaction that encompasses themes, activities, settings and interactions specific to the neuropsychological assessment process. Methods A focus group of out-patients (n=15) was surveyed to identify the factors commonly associated with a satisfactory neuropsychological experience. Responses informed a purposely designed 14-item patient satisfaction scale (α=0.88) that was completed by 66 hospital out-patients with mild to moderate cognitive impairment. Results Satisfaction with the neuropsychological assessment process was generally reported, with the testing phase (85%) rated significantly more favourably than the pre-assessment (79%) and feedback (70%) phases. Commentaries provided by 32 respondents identified interpersonal facilitators to a satisfactory neuropsychological assessment experience, but also dissatisfaction with physical aspects of the testing environment in addition to service availability. Conclusions The patient satisfaction scale can be used as a quality assurance tool to evaluate neuropsychological service delivery. Large-scale research is needed to confirm the scale's psychometric properties. Further research may also include a broader perspective on the consumers' experience of neuropsychological services.

  13. Health-related behaviour among managers of Slovenian hospitals and institutes of public health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerneja Farkas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Behavioural risk factors have a significant impact on health. We aimed to assess health-related behaviour, health status, and use of healthcare services among managers of Slovenian hospitals and institutes of public health. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study which included management (directors, scientific directors, directors’ deputies of Slovenian hospitals and institutes of public health (63 respondents; 57% women; overall mean age: 51±7 years; response rate: 74%. Data were obtained using an anonymous self-administered questionnaire. Results: About 35% of respondents were directors. More than half of the respondents were overweight or obese (52%, the majority were not sufficiently physically active (59% and overloaded with stress (87%. Hypercholesterolemia (36%, spinal disease (17%, and arterial hypertension (16% were most common chronic diseases. Whilst only few participants visited their general practitioner due their health complaints, blood pressure (76%, cholesterol (51%, and glucose (54% were measured within last year in most of the respondents. Conclusion: Our findings point to a high prevalence of overweight and obesity as well as workplace-related stress among Slovenian public health managers. Therefore, effective preventive strategies should be focused on stress management along with promotion of healthy behavioural patterns.

  14. Maternal health services in South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acceptable services are reasonable and minimalist. Women .mVolume 88 No.6 June 1998 SAMJ want to feel attended to, to be treated with care and respect, to deliver in a safe, clean environment and to know that the service can deal with complications. Many problems cited relate to poor communication between health ...

  15. The effects of health information technology adoption and hospital-physician integration on hospital efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Na-Eun; Chang, Jongwha; Atems, Bebonchu

    2014-11-01

    To determine the impact of health information technology (HIT) adoption and hospital-physician integration on hospital efficiency. Using 2010 data from the American Hospital Association's (AHA) annual survey, the AHA IT survey, supplemented by the CMS Case Mix Index, and the US Census Bureau's small area income and poverty estimates, we examined how the adoption of HIT and employment of physicians affected hospital efficiency and whether they were substitutes or complements. The sample included 2173 hospitals. We employed a 2-stage approach. In the first stage, data envelopment analysis was used to estimate technical efficiency of hospitals. In the second stage, we used instrumental variable approaches, notably 2-stage least squares and the generalized method of moments, to examine the effects of IT adoption and integration on hospital efficiency. We found that HIT adoption and hospital-physician integration, when considered separately, each have statistically significant positive impacts on hospital efficiency. Also, we found that hospitals that adopted HIT with employed physicians will achieve less efficiency compared with hospitals that adopted HIT without employed physicians. Although HIT adoption and hospital-physician integration both seem to be key parts of improving hospital efficiency when one or the other is utilized individually, they can hurt hospital efficiency when utilized together.

  16. Health systems: changes in hospital efficiency and profitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büchner, Vera Antonia; Hinz, Vera; Schreyögg, Jonas

    2016-06-01

    This study investigates potential changes in hospital performance after health system entry, while differentiating between hospital technical and cost efficiency and hospital profitability. In the first stage we obtained (bootstrapped) data envelopment analysis (DEA) efficiency scores. Then, genetic matching is used as a novel matching procedure in this context along with a difference-in-difference approach within a panel regression framework. With the genetic matching procedure, independent and health system hospitals are matched along a number of environmental and organizational characteristics. The results show that health system entry increases hospital technical and cost efficiency by between 0.6 and 3.4 % in four alternative post-entry periods, indicating that health system entry has not a transitory but rather a permanent effect on hospital efficiency. Regarding hospital profitability, the results reveal an increase in hospital profitability only 1 year after health system entry, and the estimations suggest that this effect is a transitional phenomenon. Overall, health system entry may serve as an appropriate management instrument for decision makers to increase hospital performance.

  17. "Hospital utilization by Mexican migrants returning to Mexico due to health needs"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de la Sierra-de la Vega Luz A

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A total of 12.7 million Mexicans reside as migrants in the United States, of whom only 45% have health insurance in this country while access to health insurance by migrants in Mexico is fraught with difficulties. Health insurance has been shown to impact the use of health care in both countries. This paper quantifies hospitalizations by migrants who return from the US seeking medical care in public and private hospitals in the US-Mexico border area and in communities of origin. The proportion of bed utilization and the proportion of hospitalizations in Mexico out of the total expected by migrants in the US were estimated. Methods The universe included 48 Ministry of Health and 47 private hospitals serving municipalities of high or very high migration in Mexico, where 17% of remittance-receiving households are located, as well as 15 public and 159 private hospitals in 10 Mexican cities along the border with the US. Hospitals were sampled through various methods to include 27% of beds. Patients and staff were interviewed and data triangulated to quantify migrants that returned to Mexico seeking medical care. Official hospital discharge statistics and secondary data from migration databases and published statistics were analyzed to identify bed occupancy, general migrant hospitalization rates and the size of the migrant population that maintains close relationships with households in communities of origin. Results Up to 1609 migrants were admitted to public hospitals (76.6% and 492 to private hospitals (23.4% serving municipalities of high and very high migration intensity in 2008. Up to 0.90% of public hospital capacity was used. In the border area up to 908 and 2416 migrants were admitted to public (27.3% and private (72.7% hospitals, respectively. Up to 1.18% of public hospital capacity was used. Between 2.4% and 20.4% of the expected hospitalization needs of migrants with dependent households are satisfied through these

  18. The impact of chaplaincy services in selected hospitals in the eastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkum, K H

    1985-09-01

    Surveys a stratified sample of patients in six different hospitals and compares their perceptions of hospital chaplaincy and other pastoral care efforts with related hospital services. Reports the presence of a strong impact of pastoral care services and discusses these findings from the perspective of a theory of expressive and instrumental social orientations as explicated by the sociologist Talcott Parsons.

  19. 38 CFR 17.49 - Priorities for outpatient medical services and inpatient hospital care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... medical services and inpatient hospital care. 17.49 Section 17.49 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.49 Priorities for outpatient medical services and inpatient hospital care. In scheduling appointments for outpatient medical...

  20. Patient experience with outpatient encounters at public hospitals in Shanghai: Examining different aspects of physician services and implications of overcrowding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhua Bao

    Full Text Available Over 90% of outpatient care in China was delivered at public hospitals, making outpatient experience in this setting an important aspect of quality of care.To assess outpatient experience with different aspects of physician services at China's public hospitals and its association with overcrowding of the hospital outpatient departments.Retrospective analysis of a large survey of outpatient experience in Shanghai, China. We tested the hypotheses that patient experience was poorer with physician-patient communication, education, and shared decision-making and where and when there was greater overcrowding of the hospital outpatient departments. Ordered logistic models were estimated separately for general and specialty hospitals.7,147 outpatients at 40 public hospitals in Shanghai, China, in 2014.Patient experience with physician services were self-reported based on 12 questions as part of a validated instrument. Indicators of overcrowding included time of visit (morning vs. afternoon, Monday vs. rest of the week and hospital outpatient volume in the first half of 2014.Overall, patients reported very favorable experience with physician services. Two out of the 12 questions pertaining to both communication and shared decision-making consistently received lower ratings. Hospitals whose outpatient volumes were in the top two quartiles received lower patient ratings, but the relationship achieved statistical significance among specialty hospitals only.Inadequate physician-patient communication and shared decision-making and hospital overcrowding compromise outpatient experience with physician services at Chinese public hospitals. Effective diversion of patients with chronic and less complex conditions to community health centers will be critical to alleviate the extreme workloads at hospitals with high patient volumes and, in turn, improve patient experience.

  1. The Distribution of Health Services in Iran Health Care System: A Case Study at East Azerbaijan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Almaspoor-khangah

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is necessary that various aspects of health information and statistics are identified and measured since health problems are getting more complex day by day. Objective: This study is aimed to investigate the distribution of health services in the health care system in Iran and the case of study is East Azerbaijan province. Methods: This research was a retrospective, descriptive, cross-sectional study. The statistical population included all health service providers in East Azerbaijan Province in the public, private, charity, military, social security, and NGO sectors. In this study, the data from all functional health sectors, including hospitals, health centers, and clinical, rehabilitation centers and all clinics and private offices were studied during 2014. The data relevant to performance were collected according to a pre-determined format (researcher- built checklist which was approved by five professionals and experts Health Services Management (content validity. Results: The study findings showed that the public sector by 45.28% accounted for the highest share of provided services and the private sector, social security, military institutions, charities and NGOs institutions by 25.47%, 18.92%, 4.37%, 3.3%, and 2.66% next rank in providing health services in East Azerbaijan province have been allocated. Conclusion: The results show that most of the health services in East Azerbaijan Province belongs to the public sector and the private sector has managed to develop its services in some parts surpassed the public sector. According to the study findings, Policies should be aimed to create balance and harmony in the provision of services among all service providers.

  2. Improving the seniors' transition from hospital to the community: a case for intensive geriatric service workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAiney, Carrie A; Hillier, Loretta M; Paul, Janice; McKinnon Wilson, Jane; Tersigni Phelan, Anna; Wagner, Fred; O'Connor, Sheli

    2017-01-01

    Limited continuity of care, poor communication between healthcare providers, and ineffective self-management are barriers to recovery as seniors transition back to the community following an Emergency Department (ED) visit or hospitalization. The intensive geriatric service worker (IGSW) role is a new service developed in southern Ontario, Canada to address gaps for seniors transitioning home from acute care to prevent rehospitalization and premature institutionalization through the provision of intensive support and follow-up to ensure adherence to care plans, facilitate communication with care providers, and promote self-management. This study describes the IGSW role and provides preliminary evidence of its impact on clients, caregivers and the broader health system. This mixed methods evaluation included a chart audit of all clients served, tracking of the achievement of goals for IGSW involvement, and interviews with clients and caregivers and other key informants. During the study period, 632 clients were served. Rates of goal achievement ranged from 25%-87% and in cases where achieved, the extent of IGSW involvement mostly exceeded recommendations. IGSWs were credited with improving adherence with treatment recommendations, increasing awareness and use of community services, and improving self-management, which potentially reduced ED visits and hospitalizations and delayed institutionalization. The IGSW role has the potential to improve supports for seniors and facilitate more appropriate use of health system resources, and represents a promising mechanism for improving the integration and coordination of care across health sectors.

  3. E-HEALTH CLOUD FOR NIGERIAN TEACHING HOSPITALS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    share. The emerging field is E-Health. E-Health is an intersection of medical informatics, public health and business. It refers to health services and information delivered or enhanced through the Internet and related technologies. One of the attendant benefits of E-Health is Electronic Health Records (EHR). 2.0 Comparative ...

  4. Exploring barriers to accessing physiotherapy services for stroke patients at Tema general hospital, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nketia-Kyere, Mercy; Aryeetey, Genevieve Cecilia; Nonvignon, Justice; Aikins, Moses

    2017-01-01

    Physiotherapy has been shown to reduce the risk of disability among stroke patients. Poor adherence to physiotherapy can negatively affect outcomes and healthcare cost. However, very little is known about barriers especially to physiotherapy services in Ghana. The objective of this study was to assess the barriers to physiotherapy services for stroke patients at Tema General Hospital (TGH). The individual/personal and health system barriers to physiotherapy services at TGH were determined. A cross-sectional study design was employed. A simple random sampling technique was used to recruit 207 respondents for a face-to-face interview. Interviewer-administered questionnaires were used to collect data on individual/personal barriers of respondents to physiotherapy services and were described using the Likert's scale. Health system barriers were assessed using a self-structured questionnaire which had section under the following heading: human factors, physiotherapy modalities, physical barriers and material/equipment factors. The time spent waiting for physiotherapy and attitude of physiotherapist towards patients; physiotherapy modality such as electrotherapy, exercise therapy and massage therapy among others were some of the indices measured. Respondents' adherence to Medication was assessed with the Morisky 8-item medication adherence questionnaire. Data were entered and analysed using Epi info 7 and STATA 12.0. Associations between the variables were determined using a chi-square test and logistic regression model was used to test the strength of associations between the independent and the dependent variables. The level of statistical significance was set at p physiotherapy services. For medication adherence level, patients with low medication adherence level were about 21 times the odds of defaulting on accessing physiotherapy services five times or more as compared to those with medium adherence level (OR 20.63, 95% CI 8.96, 42.97). It was concluded in the

  5. Hepatitis A among health workers in Paris hospitals. Occupational Health Physicians of Paris Hospital (AP-HP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domart, M; Mlika-Cabanne, N; Henzel, D; Pouliquen, A; Florentin, A; Marande, J L; Xerri, B; Aufrere, A; Larouzé, B

    1999-08-01

    To design a vaccination strategy against hepatitis A among hospital employees, we carried out a serological survey of hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection in 10 university hospitals in the Paris area. Subjects under 60 years of age were consecutively enrolled by occupational health services and tested for IgG to HAV by ELISA. Of the 1,516 subjects recruited, 926 were health workers (HW), 322 clerks, and 268 cooks or kitchen employees. Among HW and clerks the HAV seroprevalence was 53.8% (95% CI: 44.0-65.6), increasing with age and being higher among employees of African or Caribbean origin than those from Europe (83.6% vs 45.6%, P originating from Europe were close (46.8% vs 42.6%) and remained so after adjustment for age. HAV seroprevalences in HW caring for adults and those caring for children were also similar (45.2% vs 40.1%). Seroprevalence was higher in assistant nurses than in nurses (51.3% vs. 39.8%, P origin and age.

  6. 77 FR 76052 - Health Resources and Services Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Agency Information Collection Activities... and Services Administration (HRSA) publishes periodic summaries of proposed projects being developed...: The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) plans to conduct a survey of the National...

  7. Rural health service managers' perspectives on preparing rural health services for climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Rachael; McGirr, Joe

    2017-08-17

    To determine health service managers' (HSMs) recommendations on strengthening the health service response to climate change. Self-administered survey in paper or electronic format. Rural south-west of New South Wales. Health service managers working in rural remote metropolitan areas 3-7. Proportion of respondents identifying preferred strategies for preparation of rural health services for climate change. There were 43 participants (53% response rate). Most respondents agreed that there is scepticism regarding climate change among health professionals (70%, n = 30) and community members (72%, n = 31). Over 90% thought that climate change would impact the health of rural populations in the future with regard to heat-related illnesses, mental health, skin cancer and water security. Health professionals and government were identified as having key leadership roles on climate change and health in rural communities. Over 90% of the respondents believed that staff and community in local health districts (LHDs) should be educated about the health impacts of climate change. Public health education facilitated by State or Federal Government was the preferred method of educating community members, and education facilitated by the LHD was the preferred method for educating health professionals. Health service managers hold important health leadership roles within rural communities and their health services. The study highlights the scepticism towards climate change among health professionals and community members in rural Australia. It identifies the important role of rural health services in education and advocacy on the health impacts of climate change and identifies recommended methods of public health education for community members and health professionals. © 2017 National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  8. Linking public health agencies and hospitals for improved emergency preparedness: North Carolina's public health epidemiologist program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Markiewicz, Milissa; Bevc, Christine A; Hegle, Jennifer; Horney, Jennifer A; Davies, Megan; MacDonald, Pia D M

    2012-01-01

    In 2003, 11 public health epidemiologists were placed in North Carolina's largest hospitals to enhance communication between public health agencies and healthcare systems for improved emergency preparedness...

  9. Use of health information technology by children's hospitals in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menachemi, Nir; Brooks, Robert G; Schwalenstocker, Ellen; Simpson, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the adoption of health information technology by children's hospitals and to document barriers and priorities as they relate to health information technology adoption. Primary data of interest were obtained through the use of a survey instrument distributed to the chief information officers of 199 children's hospitals in the United States. Data were collected on current and future use of a variety of clinical health information technology and telemedicine applications, organizational priorities, barriers to use of health information technology, and hospital and chief information officer characteristics. Among the 109 responding hospitals (55%), common clinical applications included clinical scheduling (86.2%), transcription (85.3%), and pharmacy (81.9%) and laboratory (80.7%) information. Electronic health records (48.6%), computerized order entry (40.4%), and clinical decision support systems (35.8%) were less common. The most common barriers to health information technology adoption were vendors' inability to deliver products or services to satisfaction (85.4%), lack of staffing resources (82.3%), and difficulty in achieving end-user acceptance (80.2%). The most frequent priority for hospitals was to implement technology to reduce medical errors or to promote safety (72.5%). This first national look at health information technology use by children's hospitals demonstrates the progress in health information technology adoption, current barriers, and priorities for these institutions. In addition, the findings can serve as important benchmarks for future study in this area.

  10. Changing relations between hospitals and primary health care: new challenges for hospital management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maarse, J A; Mur-Veeman, I M; Tijssen, I M

    1990-01-01

    Hospitals in the Netherlands are now operating in a rapidly changing environment. Most changes directly result from government's policy to achieve effective cost containment in health care. Some of them basically affect the existence and functioning of hospitals. These changing environmental conditions inspire hospitals to undertake innovative activities to protect or even strengthen their position. This will be illustrated below by a case in which a small acute hospital attempted to establish a close relationship with primary health care in order to protect its position. Our focus will be upon this innovative initiative and upon some management problems that must then be resolved.

  11. [Marketing mix in health service].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameri, Cinzia; Fiorini, Fulvio

    2015-01-01

    The marketing mix is the combination of the marketing variables that a firm employs with the purpose to achieve the expected volume of business within its market. In the sale of goods, four variables compose the marketing mix (4 Ps): Product, Price, Point of sale and Promotion. In the case of providing services, three further elements play a role: Personnel, Physical Evidence and Processes (7 Ps). The marketing mix must be addressed to the consumers as well as to the employees of the providing firm. Furthermore, it must be interpreted as employees ability to satisfy customers (interactive marketing).

  12. Employer-provided health insurance and hospital mergers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmon, Christopher

    2013-07-01

    This paper explores the impact of employer-provided health insurance on hospital competition and hospital mergers. Under employer-provided health insurance, employer executives act as agents for their employees in selecting health insurance options for their firm. The paper investigates whether a merger of hospitals favored by executives will result in a larger price increase than a merger of competing hospitals elsewhere. This is found to be the case even when the executive has the same opportunity cost of travel as her employees and even when the executive is the sole owner of the firm, retaining all profits. This is consistent with the Federal Trade Commission's findings in its challenge of Evanston Northwestern Healthcare's acquisition of Highland Park Hospital. Implications of the model are further tested with executive location data and hospital data from Florida and Texas.

  13. Readiness of Health Centers and Primary Hospitals for the Implementation of Proposed Health Insurance Schemes in Southwest Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abazinab, Sabit; Woldie, Mirkuzie; Alaro, Tesfamichael

    2016-09-01

    In response to the 2005 World Health Assembly, many low income countries developed different healthcare financing mechanisms with risk pooling stategy to ensure universal coverage of health services. Accordingly, service availability and readiness of the health system to bear the responsibility of providing service have critical importance. The objective of this study was to assess service availability and readiness of health centers and primary hospitals to bear the responsibility of providing service for the members of health insurance schemes. A facility based cross sectional study design with quantitative data collection methods was employed. Of the total 18 districts in Jimma Zone, 6(33.3%) districts were selected randomly. In the selected districts, there were 21 functional public health facilities (health centers and primary hospitals) which were included in the study. Data were collected by interviewer administered questionnaire. Descriptive statistics were calculated by using SPSS version 20.0. Prior to data collection, ethical clearance was obtained. Among the total 21 public health facilities surveyed, only 38.1% had all the categories of health professionals as compared to the national standards. The majority, 85.2%, of the facilities fulfilled the criteria for basic equipment, but 47.7% of the facilities did not fulfill the criteria for infection prevention supplies. Moreover, only two facilities fulfilled the criteria for laboratory services, and 95.2% of the facilities had no units/departmenst to coordinate the health insurance schemes. More than nine out of ten facilities did not fulfill the criteria for providing healthcare services for insurance beneficiaries and are not ready to provide general services according to the standard. Hence, policy makers and implementers should devise strategies to fill the identified gaps for successful and sustainable implementation of the proposed insurance scheme.

  14. Mothers' health services utilization and health care seeking ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: data from different studies showed health care behaviour and estimated per capita health care expenditure for the general population, but the specific data for infants at different levels of care are lacking. The objectives of this study were to describe mothers' health service utilization during pregnancy and ...

  15. [Psychosocial stress environment and health workers in public health: Differences between primary and hospital care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Rodríguez, Antonio; Gutiérrez-Bedmar, Mario; Bellón-Saameño, Juan Ángel; Muñoz-Bravo, Carlos; Fernández-Crehuet Navajas, Joaquín

    2015-01-01

    To describe the psychosocial environment of health professionals in public health in primary and hospital care, and compare it with that of the general Spanish working population, as well as to evaluate the effect of psychosocial risk factors on symptoms related to perceived stress. Cross-sectional study with stratified random sampling. Health care workers in the province of Granada, distributed in 5 hospitals and 4 health districts. A total of 738 employees (medical and nursing staff) of the Andalusian Health Service (SAS) were invited to take part. CopSoQ/Istas21 questionnaire developed for the multidimensional analysis of the psychosocial work environment. Stress symptoms were measured with the Stress Profile questionnaire. The response rate was 67.5%. Compared with the Spanish workforce, our sample showed high cognitive, emotional, and sensory psychological demands, possibilities for development and sense of direction in their work. Primary care physicians were the group with a worse psychosocial work environment. All the groups studied showed high levels of stress symptoms. Multivariate analysis showed that variables associated with high levels of stress symptom were younger and with possibilities for social relations, role conflict, and higher emotional demands, and insecurity at work. Our findings support that the psychosocial work environment of health workers differs from that of the Spanish working population, being more unfavorable in general practitioners. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Human resources for health in southeast Asia: shortages, distributional challenges, and international trade in health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanchanachitra, Churnrurtai; Lindelow, Magnus; Johnston, Timothy; Hanvoravongchai, Piya; Lorenzo, Fely Marilyn; Huong, Nguyen Lan; Wilopo, Siswanto Agus; dela Rosa, Jennifer Frances

    2011-02-26

    In this paper, we address the issues of shortage and maldistribution of health personnel in southeast Asia in the context of the international trade in health services. Although there is no shortage of health workers in the region overall, when analysed separately, five low-income countries have some deficit. All countries in southeast Asia face problems of maldistribution of health workers, and rural areas are often understaffed. Despite a high capacity for medical and nursing training in both public and private facilities, there is weak coordination between production of health workers and capacity for employment. Regional experiences and policy responses to address these challenges can be used to inform future policy in the region and elsewhere. A distinctive feature of southeast Asia is its engagement in international trade in health services. Singapore and Malaysia import health workers to meet domestic demand and to provide services to international patients. Thailand attracts many foreign patients for health services. This situation has resulted in the so-called brain drain of highly specialised staff from public medical schools to the private hospitals. The Philippines and Indonesia are the main exporters of doctors and nurses in the region. Agreements about mutual recognition of professional qualifications for three groups of health workers under the Association of Southeast Asian Nations Framework Agreement on Services could result in increased movement within the region in the future. To ensure that vital human resources for health are available to meet the needs of the populations that they serve, migration management and retention strategies need to be integrated into ongoing efforts to strengthen health systems in southeast Asia. There is also a need for improved dialogue between the health and trade sectors on how to balance economic opportunities associated with trade in health services with domestic health needs and equity issues. Copyright © 2011

  17. [Quality assurance in occupational health services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalak, J

    1996-01-01

    The general conditions influencing the quality assurance and audit in Polish occupational health services are presented. The factors promoting or hampering the implementation of quality assurance and audits are also discussed. The major influence on the transformation of Polish occupational health services in exorted by employers who are committed to cover the costs of the obligatory prophylactic examination of their employees. This is the factor which also contributes to the improvement of quality if services. The definitions of the most important terms are reviewed to highlight their accordance with the needs of occupational health services in Poland. The examples of audit are presented and the elements of selected methods of auditing are suggested to be adopted in Poland.

  18. Conscientious Objection and Reproductive Health Service Delivery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    Lack of access to quality reproductive health services is the main contributor to the high maternal mortality and morbidity in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). This is partly due to a shortage of qualified and experienced health care providers. However conscientious objection amongst the available few is a hitherto undocumented ...

  19. Service Quality Of Diagnostic Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology In A Tertiary Care Hospital Of Lahore (Process Measure As Patient's Perspective).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Zainab; Usmani, Rabia Arshed; Rizvi, Amna; Wazir, Salim; Zahra, Taskeen; Rasool, Hafza

    2017-01-01

    Quality of any service is the most important aspect for the manufacturer as well as the consumer. The primary objective of any nation's health system is to provide supreme quality health care services to its patients. The objective of this study was to assess the quality of diagnostic fine needle aspiration cytology service in a tertiary care hospital. As Patient's perspectives provide valuable information on quality of process, therefore, patient's perception in terms of satisfaction with the service was measured. In this cross sectional analytical study, 291 patients undergoing fine needle aspiration cytology in Mayo Hospital were selected by systematic sampling technique. Information regarding satisfaction of patients with four dimensions of service quality process, namely "procedure, sterilization, conduct and competency of doctor" was collected through interview on questionnaire. The questionnaire was developed on SERVQUAL model, a measurement tool, for quality assessment of services provided to patients. All items were assessed on 2- point likert scale (0=dissatisfied, 1=satisfied). Frequencies and percentages of satisfied and dissatisfied patients were recorded for each item and all items in each dimension were scored. If the percentage of sum of all item scores of a dimension was ≥60, the dimension was 'good quality'. Whereas quality' dimension. Data was analysed using epi-info-3.5.1. Fisher test was applied to check statistical significance. (p-value service quality process, Procedure (48.8%), Sterilization (51.5%) and practitioner conduct (50.9%) were perceived as 'poor' by the patients. Only practitioner competency (67.4%) was perceived as 'good'. Comparison of dimensions of service quality scoring with overall level of patient satisfaction revealed that all 4 dimensions were significantly related to patient dissatisfaction (pservice quality of therapeutic and diagnostic procedures in public hospitals should be routinely monitored from the patients

  20. Green Infrastructure, Ecosystem Services, and Human Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutts, Christopher; Hahn, Micah

    2015-08-18

    Contemporary ecological models of health prominently feature the natural environment as fundamental to the ecosystem services that support human life, health, and well-being. The natural environment encompasses and permeates all other spheres of influence on health. Reviews of the natural environment and health literature have tended, at times intentionally, to focus on a limited subset of ecosystem services as well as health benefits stemming from the presence, and access and exposure to, green infrastructure. The sweeping influence of green infrastructure on the myriad ecosystem services essential to health has therefore often been underrepresented. This survey of the literature aims to provide a more comprehensive picture-in the form of a primer-of the many simultaneously acting health co-benefits of green infrastructure. It is hoped that a more accurately exhaustive list of benefits will not only instigate further research into the health co-benefits of green infrastructure but also promote consilience in the many fields, including public health, that must be involved in the landscape conservation necessary to protect and improve health and well-being.

  1. Not just bricks and mortar: planning hospital cancer services for Aboriginal people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durey Angela

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aboriginal people in Australia experience higher mortality from cancer compared with non-Aboriginal Australians, despite an overall lower incidence. A notable contributor to this disparity is that many Aboriginal people do not take up or continue with cancer treatment which almost always occurs within major hospitals. Thirty in-depth interviews with urban, rural and remote Aboriginal people affected by cancer were conducted between March 2006 and September 2007. Interviews explored participants' beliefs about cancer and experiences of cancer care and were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and coded independently by two researchers. NVivo7 software was used to assist data management and analysis. Information from interviews relevant to hospital services including and building design was extracted. Findings Relationships and respect emerged as crucial considerations of participants although many aspects of the hospital environment were seen as influencing the delivery of care. Five themes describing concerns about the hospital environment emerged: (i being alone and lost in a big, alien and inflexible system; (ii failure of open communication, delays and inefficiency in the system; (iii practicalities: costs, transportation, community and family responsibilities; (iv the need for Aboriginal support persons; and (v connection to the community. Conclusions Design considerations and were identified but more important than the building itself was the critical need to build trust in health services. Promotion of cultural safety, support for Aboriginal family structures and respecting the importance of place and community to Aboriginal patients are crucial in improving cancer outcomes.

  2. Not just bricks and mortar: planning hospital cancer services for Aboriginal people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Sandra C; Shahid, Shaouli; Bessarab, Dawn; Durey, Angela; Davidson, Patricia M

    2011-03-14

    Aboriginal people in Australia experience higher mortality from cancer compared with non-Aboriginal Australians, despite an overall lower incidence. A notable contributor to this disparity is that many Aboriginal people do not take up or continue with cancer treatment which almost always occurs within major hospitals.Thirty in-depth interviews with urban, rural and remote Aboriginal people affected by cancer were conducted between March 2006 and September 2007. Interviews explored participants' beliefs about cancer and experiences of cancer care and were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and coded independently by two researchers. NVivo7 software was used to assist data management and analysis. Information from interviews relevant to hospital services including and building design was extracted. Relationships and respect emerged as crucial considerations of participants although many aspects of the hospital environment were seen as influencing the delivery of care. Five themes describing concerns about the hospital environment emerged: (i) being alone and lost in a big, alien and inflexible system; (ii) failure of open communication, delays and inefficiency in the system; (iii) practicalities: costs, transportation, community and family responsibilities; (iv) the need for Aboriginal support persons; and (v) connection to the community. Design considerations and were identified but more important than the building itself was the critical need to build trust in health services. Promotion of cultural safety, support for Aboriginal family structures and respecting the importance of place and community to Aboriginal patients are crucial in improving cancer outcomes.

  3. Hospital Adoption of Health Information Technology to Support Public Health Infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Daniel M; Diana, Mark L

    2016-01-01

    Health information technology (IT) has the potential to improve the nation's public health infrastructure. In support of this belief, meaningful use incentives include criteria for hospitals to electronically report to immunization registries, as well as to public health agencies for reportable laboratory results and syndromic surveillance. Electronic reporting can facilitate faster and more appropriate public health response. However, it remains unclear the extent that hospitals have adopted IT for public health efforts. To examine hospital adoption of IT for public health and to compare hospitals capable of using and not using public health IT. Cross-sectional design with data from the 2012 American Hospital Association annual survey matched with data from the 2013 American Hospital Association Information Technology Supplement. Multivariate logistic regression was used to compare hospital characteristics. Inverse probability weights were applied to adjust for selection bias because of survey nonresponse. All acute care general hospitals in the United States that matched across the surveys and had complete data available were included in the analytic sample. Three separate outcome measures were used: whether the hospital could electronically report to immunization registries, whether the hospital could send electronic laboratory results, and whether the hospital can participate in syndromic surveillance. A total of 2841 h