WorldWideScience

Sample records for health research reporting

  1. Guidelines for reporting health economic research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, F S; McLawhorn, A S

    2016-02-01

    Health economic evaluations potentially provide valuable information to clinicians, health care administrators, and policy makers regarding the financial implications of decisions about the care of patients. The highest quality research should be used to inform decisions that have direct impact on the access to care and the outcome of treatment. However, economic analyses are often complex and use research methods which are relatively unfamiliar to clinicians. Furthermore, health economic data have substantial national, regional, and institutional variability, which can limit the external validity of the results of a study. Therefore, minimum guidelines that aim to standardise the quality and transparency of reporting health economic research have been developed, and instruments are available to assist in the assessment of its quality and the interpretation of results. The purpose of this editorial is to discuss the principal types of health economic studies, to review the most common instruments for judging the quality of these studies and to describe current reporting guidelines. Recommendations for the submission of these types of studies to The Bone & Joint Journal are provided. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B:147-51. ©2016 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  2. Reporting Qualitative Research: Standards, Challenges, and Implications for Health Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peditto, Kathryn

    2018-04-01

    This Methods column describes the existing reporting standards for qualitative research, their application to health design research, and the challenges to implementation. Intended for both researchers and practitioners, this article provides multiple perspectives on both reporting and evaluating high-quality qualitative research. Two popular reporting standards exist for reporting qualitative research-the Consolidated Criteria for Reporting Qualitative Research (COREQ) and the Standards for Reporting Qualitative Research (SRQR). Though compiled using similar procedures, they differ in their criteria and the methods to which they apply. Creating and applying reporting criteria is inherently difficult due to the undefined and fluctuating nature of qualitative research when compared to quantitative studies. Qualitative research is expansive and occasionally controversial, spanning many different methods of inquiry and epistemological approaches. A "one-size-fits-all" standard for reporting qualitative research can be restrictive, but COREQ and SRQR both serve as valuable tools for developing responsible qualitative research proposals, effectively communicating research decisions, and evaluating submissions. Ultimately, tailoring a set of standards specific to health design research and its frequently used methods would ensure quality research and aid reviewers in their evaluations.

  3. Biomedical Research Group, Health Division annual report 1954

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langham, W.H.; Storer, J.B.

    1955-12-31

    This report covers the activities of the Biomedical Research Group (H-4) of the Health Division during the period January 1 through December 31, 1954. Organizationally, Group H-4 is divided into five sections, namely, Biochemistry, Radiobiology, Radiopathology, Biophysics, and Organic Chemistry. The activities of the Group are summarized under the headings of the various sections. The general nature of each section`s program, publications, documents and reports originating from its members, and abstracts and summaries of the projects pursued during the year are presented.

  4. Building research infrastructure in community health centers: a Community Health Applied Research Network (CHARN) report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likumahuwa, Sonja; Song, Hui; Singal, Robbie; Weir, Rosy Chang; Crane, Heidi; Muench, John; Sim, Shao-Chee; DeVoe, Jennifer E

    2013-01-01

    This article introduces the Community Health Applied Research Network (CHARN), a practice-based research network of community health centers (CHCs). Established by the Health Resources and Services Administration in 2010, CHARN is a network of 4 community research nodes, each with multiple affiliated CHCs and an academic center. The four nodes (18 individual CHCs and 4 academic partners in 9 states) are supported by a data coordinating center. Here we provide case studies detailing how CHARN is building research infrastructure and capacity in CHCs, with a particular focus on how community practice-academic partnerships were facilitated by the CHARN structure. The examples provided by the CHARN nodes include many of the building blocks of research capacity: communication capacity and "matchmaking" between providers and researchers; technology transfer; research methods tailored to community practice settings; and community institutional review board infrastructure to enable community oversight. We draw lessons learned from these case studies that we hope will serve as examples for other networks, with special relevance for community-based networks seeking to build research infrastructure in primary care settings.

  5. Exploring sex and gender differences in sleep health: a Society for Women's Health Research Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallampalli, Monica P; Carter, Christine L

    2014-07-01

    Previous attempts have been made to address sleep disorders in women; however, significant knowledge gaps in research and a lack of awareness among the research community continue to exist. There is a great need for scientists and clinicians to consider sex and gender differences in their sleep research to account for the unique biology of women. To understand the role of sex differences in sleep and the state of women's sleep health research, the Society for Women's Health Research convened an interdisciplinary expert panel of well-established sleep researchers and clinicians for a roundtable meeting. Focused discussions on basic and clinical research along with a focus on specific challenges facing women with sleep-related problems and effective therapies led to the identification of knowledge gaps and the development of research-related recommendations. Additionally, sex differences in sleep disorders were noted and discussed in the context of underlying hormonal differences. Differences in sleep behavior and sleep disorders may not only be driven by biological factors but also by gender differences in the way women and men report symptoms. Progress has been made in identifying sex and gender differences in many areas of sleep, but major research gaps in the areas of epidemiology, sleep regulation, sleep quality, diagnosis, and treatment need to be addressed. Identifying the underlying nature of sex and gender differences in sleep research has potential to accelerate improved care for both men and women facilitating better diagnosis, treatment, and ultimately prevention of sleep disorders and related comorbid conditions.

  6. Income non-reporting: implications for health inequalities research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turrell, G

    2000-03-01

    To determine whether, in the context of a face to face interview, socioeconomic groups differ in their propensity to provide details about the amount of their personal income, and to discuss the likely consequences of any differences for studies that use income based measures of socioeconomic position. The study used data from the 1995 Australian Health Survey. The sample was selected using a stratified multi-stage area design that covered urban and rural areas across all States and Territories and included non-institutionalised residents of private and non-private dwellings. The response rate was 91.5% for selected dwellings and 97.0% for persons within dwellings. Data were collected using face to face interviews. Income response, the dependent measure, was binary coded (0 if income was reported and 1 for refusals, "don't knows" and insufficient information). Socioeconomic position was measured using employment status, occupation, education and main income source. The socioeconomic characteristics of income non-reporters were initially examined using sex specific age adjusted proportions with 95% confidence intervals. Multivariate analysis was performed using logistic regression. Persons aged 15-64 (n = 33,434) who were reportedly in receipt of an income from one or more sources during the data collection reference period. The overall rate of income non-response was 9.8%. Propensity to not report income increased with age (15-29 years 5.8%, 30-49 10.6%, 50-64 13.8%). No gender differences were found (men 10.2%, women 9.3%). Income non-response was not strongly nor consistently related to education or occupation for men, although there was a suggested association among these variables for women, with highly educated women and those in professional occupations being less likely to report their income. Strong associations were evident between income non-response, labour force status and main income source. Rates were highest among the employed and those in receipt of

  7. Health and Safety Research Division progress report, April 1, 1981-September 30, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-02-01

    Research progress for the reporting period is briefly summarized for the following sections: (1) health studies, (2) technology assessments, (3) biological and radiation physics, (4) chemical physics, (5) Office of Risk Analysis, and (6) health and environmental risk and analysis

  8. Racial Health Disparities in a Military County: A Research Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbar Aghajanian

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Since 1972 CDC has sponsored the annual National Health Interview Survey (NHIS. The survey collects data from a large sample of US households, a sample of adults in each household, and a sample of children in each household. But unfortunately county level data on health status are not available as readily and consistently as compared to the national level. This paper describes a telephone-based survey of health on one county to overcome the gaps in the national samples. It is concluded that phone surveys are a cost-effective way to provide for local information on the health status the population. Sample questions are included in the article.

  9. Performance Data Report: Space Medicine Division, Human Research Program, Behavioural Health and Performance Research Element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Camille; Keeton, Kathryn E.; Schmidt, Lacey L.; Slack, Kelley J.; Patterson, Holly N.; Leveton, Lauren B.; Holland, Albert W.

    2012-01-01

    This report is the result of a collaborative effort between NASA?s Behavioral Health & Performance (BHP) Research and Operations Group to investigate and determine the availability of data pertaining to behavioral performance (and other pertinent variables) that have been collected by the laboratories at NASA?s Johnson Space Center. BHP?s Operations and Research groups collaborated to systematically identify what types of performance data are needed in relevant BHP performance domains and also to conduct structured interviews with NASA personnel to identify which data do or do not exist currently (and for instances where such data exist, to evaluate the type, quality, accessibility, and confidentiality of those data). The authors defined outcome categories of performance that encapsulate BHP performance domains, mapped BHP Research Risks and Gaps onto those performance outcome categories, and identified and prioritized indicators for each outcome category. The team identified key points of contact (subject matter experts [SMEs]) as potential interviewees, created a template for structured interview questions about sources and accessibility of performance data, and coordinated and conducted structured interviews with the SMEs. The methodology, results, and implications of this effort, as well as forward work needed, are discussed in this report.

  10. Public health research in the UK: a report with a European perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Mark; Dyakova, Mariana; Clarke, Aileen

    2014-06-01

    Public health research is of growing interest within Europe. Bibliometric research shows the UK with a high absolute output of public health publications, although lower per capita than Nordic countries. UK contributed to a European Union (EU) project PHIRE to assess public health research and innovation. UK health research structures, and programmes funded in 2010, were determined from internet search. Expert informants were asked to comment on national uptake of eight projects EU collaborative health projects. The Faculty of Public Health and the UK Society for Social Medicine discussed the findings at a meeting with stakeholders. Health research in UK is funded by research councils, the National Health Service (NHS) and independent foundations. Reviews and reports on public health research have encouraged diversified funding. There were 15 programmes and calls in 2010. The UK participated in all eight EU projects, and there was uptake of results for four. Strategic coordination between public health researchers and practitioners, and the UK research councils, ministries of health and medical charities would strengthen research for policy and practice. With growing expertise and capacity across other EU countries, the UK should take more active leadership in European collaboration. © The Author 2013, Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved.

  11. Medical and Health Sciences Division research report 1975--1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-10-01

    Progress is reported on studies on the effects of irradiation and carcinogenic chemical environmental pollutants on the immune system of mammals; fundamental studies of membrane properties and lipid metabolism in neoplasms and respiratory diseases induced by chemical irritants, carcinogens, and mutagens; the development and testing of radiopharmaceuticals labeled with 11 C, 67 Ga, 157 Dy, or 171 Er as tumor-localizing agents; and the completion of a radiation emergency assistance center and training program. A list is included of 60 publications during the period covered by this report that give details of the studies

  12. Research inventory of child health: A report on roadmaps for the future of child health research in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Ottova, Veronika; Alexander, Denise; Rigby, Michael; Staines, Anthony; Hjern, Anders; Leonardi, Matilde; Blair, Mitch; Tamburlini, Giorgio; Gaspar de Matos, Margarida; Bourek, Ales; Köhler, Lennart; Gunnlaugsson, Geir; Tomé, Gina; Ramiro, Lucia; Santos, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    RICHE was the response to a call under HEALTH-2009-3.3-5, with the title of 'European child health research platform'. The call text asked us to “address the diversity and fragmentation in child health research in Europe in an inclusive multidisciplinary way, identifying existing research programmes in Member States, recent advances and identification of gaps to explore road maps for the future of child health research in Europe”. Project structure A consortium, with a final total of 23 pa...

  13. Health and Safety Research Division progress report, July 1, 1984-September 30, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This report summarizes progress made for the period July 1984 through September 1985. Sections describe research in health studies, dosimetry and biophysical transport, biological and radiation physics, chemical physics, and risk analysis

  14. Health and Safety Research Division progress report, July 1, 1984-September 30, 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    This report summarizes progress made for the period July 1984 through September 1985. Sections describe research in health studies, dosimetry and biophysical transport, biological and radiation physics, chemical physics, and risk analysis. (ACR)

  15. RESEARCH REPORTS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study is concerned with the productivity of nurses working within the. Primary ..... rience more work-related stress and report this as overall poor health, than ... performance, and reduces the possibility of staff loss through burnout (Watson,.

  16. Research Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) research efforts span many topics, methods, and interests. Some projects address the Agencys immediate...

  17. Report of the Independent Expert Group on the Future of European Public Health Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jørn

    2013-01-01

    Directorate General has set up an independent expert group. Its task was to take stock of the impacts, challenges and limitations of EU-funded public health research under the current and previous research framework programmes, and to identify priorities for future research. The experts, who worked in two...... agendas and national policy agendas? How to improve the uptake of evidence generated from public health research in the development of public health policy? This report summarises the recommendations from Subgroup 2.......The next EU research and innovation framework programme 'Horizon 2020' will address a number of important societal challenges including health, demographic changes and well-being. To prepare the work in these areas, the Health Directorate of the European Commission's Research & Innovation...

  18. Occupational health, waste management, and environmental research program of the Health Division 1981. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voelz, G.L.

    1983-09-01

    The primary responsibility of the Health Division at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is to provide effective programs in health, safety, waste processing, and environmental protection for the Laboratory. During 1981, evaluations of respiratory protective equipment included 3 special DOE contractor supplied-air suits or hoods and 10 commercial supplied-air devices. Preliminary results of chemical permeation tests of different protective garment materials are reported. Industrial hygiene field studies of oil shale work were conducted at the Geokinetics true in situ facility and the Rio Blanco modified in situ facility. An occupational medical survey of workers at the Geokinetics, Inc., facility was completed. Research on the generation and characterization of aerosols was continued for inhalation studies of man-made mineral fibers and oil shale aerosols. The distribution of 241 Am in a whole body was determined by tissue analyses. Preliminary results of mortality in workers formerly employed at the Rocky Flats plant were reported. A simplified method for the analysis of plutonium in urine has been developed. Instrumentation development resulted in a portable computer system for field data analysis and a small, computerized, wristwatch-style radiation dosimeter. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1981 showed the highest estimated radiation dose due to Laboratory operations is about 4% of the dose due to the natural radioactivity here. A study was completed on alternative strategies for long-term management of Los Alamos transuranic wastes. A successful 10-day test burn of pentachlorophenol-contaminated wastes was conducted in the Controlled Air Incinerator. Decontamination factors for five fission products in the off-gas handling system of the incinerator were measured

  19. Reporting intellectual capital in health care organizations: specifics, lessons learned, and future research perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veltri, Stefania; Bronzetti, Giovanni; Sicoli, Graziella

    2011-01-01

    This article analyzes the concept of intellectual capital (IC) in the health sector sphere by studying the case of a major nonprofit research organization in this sector, which has for some time been publishing IC reports. In the last few years, health care organizations have been the object of great attention in the implementation and transfer of managerial models and tools; however, there is still a lack of attention paid to the strategic management of IC as a fundamental resource for supporting and enhancing performance improvement dynamics. The main aim of this article is to examine the IC reporting model used by the Center of Molecular Medicine (CMM), a Swedish health organization which is an outstanding benchmark in reporting its IC. We also consider the specifics of IC reporting for health organizations, the lessons learned by analyzing CMM's IC reporting, and future perspectives for research.

  20. Health and Safety Research Division progress report, April 1, 1981-September 30, 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-02-01

    Research progress for the reporting period is briefly summarized for the following sections: (1) health studies, (2) technology assessments, (3) biological and radiation physics, (4) chemical physics, (5) Office of Risk Analysis, and (6) health and environmental risk and analysis. (ACR)

  1. Research implications of the Institute of Medicine Report, Epilepsy Across the Spectrum: Promoting Health and Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesdorffer, Dale C.; Beck, Vicki; Begley, Charles E.; Bishop, Malachy L.; Cushner-Weinstein, Sandra; Holmes, Gregory L.; Shafer, Patricia O.; Sirven, Joseph I.; Austin, Joan K.

    2012-01-01

    In March 2012 the Institute of Medicine (IOM) released the report, Epilepsy Across The Spectrum: Promoting Health And Understanding. This report examined the public health dimensions of the epilepsies with a focus on four areas: public health surveillance and data collection and integration; population and public health research; health policy, health care, and human services; and education for providers, people with epilepsy and their families, and the public. The report provided recommendations and research priorities for future work in the field of epilepsy that relate to: increasing the power of data on epilepsy; prevention of epilepsy; improving health care for people with epilepsy; improving health professional education about epilepsy; improving quality of life for people with epilepsy; improving education about epilepsy for people with epilepsy and families; and raising public awareness about epilepsy. For this article, the authors selected one research priority from each of the major chapter themes in the IOM report: expanding and improving the quality of epidemiological surveillance in epilepsy; developing improved interventions for people with epilepsy and depression; expanding early identification/screening for learning impairments in children with epilepsy; evaluating and promoting effective innovative teaching strategies; accelerating research on the identification of risk factors and interventions that increase employment and improve quality of life for people with epilepsy and their families; assessing the information needs of people with epilepsy and their families associated with epilepsy-related risks, specifically sudden unexpected death in epilepsy; and developing and conducting surveys to capture trends in knowledge, awareness, attitudes, and beliefs about epilepsy over time and in specific population subgroups. For each research priority selected, examples of research are provided that will advance the field of epilepsy and improve the lives

  2. Research Reports: Heroin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... D. Director National Institute on Drug Abuse Research Report Series HEROIN What is heroin and how is ... and Human Services | National Institutes of Health Research Report Series drug abuse and its consequences to identify ...

  3. Conference Report: "Health Policy and Programs Evaluative Research for Social Change". An Ibero-American Symposium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Mercado-Martínez

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available This is a report of the "Health Policy and Programs Evaluative Research for Social Change" Ibero-American Symposium held in Guadalajara, Mexico November 1-3, 2006. Attendees represented eight countries, and were associated with NGO's and academic and health services organizations. The most important themes included in the debates were the meaning of qualitative and evaluative health research for social change, the challenges of teaching for change, ethical challenges, and possibilities for making the findings of qualitative research available to different groups or stakeholders (users, policy makers, professionals, and the population as a whole. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0802194

  4. Health and Safety Research Division. Progress report, October 1, 1979-March 31, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-08-01

    Research progress for the period October 1, 1979 through March 31, 1981 is reported. Research conducted by the Office of Integrated Assessments and Policy Analysis, Health Studies Section, Technology Assessments Section, Biological and Radiation Physics Section, and Chemical Physics Section is summarized. (ACR)

  5. Health and Safety Research Division. Progress report, October 1, 1979-March 31, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-08-01

    Research progress for the period October 1, 1979 through March 31, 1981 is reported. Research conducted by the Office of Integrated Assessments and Policy Analysis, Health Studies Section, Technology Assessments Section, Biological and Radiation Physics Section, and Chemical Physics Section is summarized

  6. Research reports (Annual reports)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-05-01

    This compilation of research reports is the third one to be published once a year in the frame of a comprehensive reporting on current investigations with regard to reactor safety. There are three types of reports: RS Research Reports, LRA Research Reports, GFK Research Reports. The RS Research Reports and the LRA Research Reports give information on the investigations sponsored by the Bundesminister fuer Forschung und Technologie (BMFT) and partly by the Bundesminister des Innern (BMI [SR 100, At T 85 a]) as individual reactor safety research projects. The GFK Research Reports inform about theoretical and experimental investigations on reactor safety conducted by the Gesellschaft fuer Kernforschung mbH (GFK), Karlsruhe. The Laboratorium fuer Reaktorregelung und Anlagensicherung (LRA), Muenchen-Garching, executes nine individual research projects comprehended under number At T 85 a. The work carried out by the GFK is included in the main project 'Nuclear Safety' (PNS). The single reports are attached to the main parts and focal points of the Research Program Reactor Safety. Therefore, at the head of the reports, under 'Project Number', not only the RS-, LRA- or GFK-Number but also the number of the main part of the Research Program which the reported investigation contributes to is noted. (orig.) [de

  7. ASA conference on radiation and health: Health effects of electric and magnetic fields: Statistical support for research strategies. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-05-01

    This report is a collection of papers documenting presentations made at the VIII ASA (American Statistical Association) Conference on Radiation and Health entitled Health Effects of Electric and Magnetic Fields: Statistical Support for Research Strategies. Individual papers are abstracted and indexed for the database.

  8. Research report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitley, J.E.

    1990-07-01

    The SURRC (Scottish Universities Research and Reactor Centre) is a multidisciplinary research centre shared by a consortium of Scottish Universities. Funding is jointly by the University Funding Committee and commercially from Research Councils, government departments and industry. The focus of research lies in earth, environmental and biomedical sciences. The research activities are discussed under the following headings: environmental radioactivity and nuclear geochemistry, neutron activation analysis, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, body composition studies, stable isotopes in biological sciences, nuclear physics, luminescence dating and dosimetry radiation effects in electrical insulation, gamma-ray irradiation processing, radiogenic isotopes in geology, stable isotope geology, laser microprobe mass spectrometry for geology and NERC Radiocarbon Laboratory work. There are also reports on the reactor itself; reactor operation, production of radioactive isotopes and application of radioactive tracers. The educational aspects of the Centre, safety aspects, staffing, funding and all publications are reported. (UK)

  9. The proxy problem: Child report versus parent report in health-related quality of life research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theunissen, N.C.M.; Vogels, T.G.C.; Koopman, H.M.; Verrips, G.H.W.; Zwinderman, K.A.H.; Verloove-Vanhorick, S.P.; Wit, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    This study evaluates the agreement between child and parent reports on children's health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in a representative sample of 1,105 Dutch children (age 8-11 years old). Both children and their parents completed a 56 item questionnaire (TACQOL). The questionnaire contains

  10. Health and Safety Research Division progress report for the period April 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaye, S.V.

    1992-03-01

    This is a brief progress report from the Health and Safety Research Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Information is presented in the following sections: Assessment Technology including Measurement Applications and Development, Pollutant Assessments, Measurement Systems Research, Dosimetry Applications Research, Metabolism and Dosimetry Research and Nuclear Medicine. Biological and Radiation Physics including Atomic, Molecular, and High Voltage Physics, Physics of Solids and Macromolecules, Liquid and Submicron Physics, Analytic Dosimetry and Surface Physics and Health Effects. Chemical Physics including Molecular Physics, Photophysics and Advanced Monitoring Development. Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis including Human Genome and Toxicology, Chemical Hazard Evaluation and Communication, Environmental Regulations and Remediation and Information Management Technology. Risk Analysis including Hazardous Waste.

  11. The reporting characteristics and methodological quality of Cochrane reviews about health policy research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiu-xia, Li; Ya, Zheng; Yao-long, Chen; Ke-hu, Yang; Zong-jiu, Zhang

    2015-04-01

    The systematic review has increasingly become a popular tool for researching health policy. However, due to the complexity and diversity in the health policy research, it has also encountered more challenges. We set out the Cochrane reviews on health policy research as a representative to provide the first examination of epidemiological and descriptive characteristics as well as the compliance of methodological quality with the AMSTAR. 99 reviews were included by inclusion criteria, 73% of which were Implementation Strategies, 15% were Financial Arrangements and 12% were Governance Arrangements; involved Public Health (34%), Theoretical Exploration (18%), Hospital Management (17%), Medical Insurance (12%), Pharmaceutical Policy (9%), Community Health (7%) and Rural Health (2%). Only 39% conducted meta-analysis, and 49% reported being updates, and none was rated low methodological quality. Our research reveals that the quantity and quality of the evidence should be improved, especially Financial Arrangements and Governance Arrangements involved Rural Health, Health Care Reform and Health Equity, etc. And the reliability of AMSTAR needs to be tested in larger range in this field. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The quality of reports of medical and public health research from Palestinian institutions: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarqouni, Loai; Abu-Rmeileh, Niveen Me; Elessi, Khamis; Obeidallah, Mohammad; Bjertness, Espen; Chalmers, Iain

    2017-06-09

    Over the past decade, there has been an increase in reports of health research from Palestine, but no assessment of their quality. We have assessed the quality of reports of Palestinian health research and factors associated with it. This is a systematic review. We searched Medline and Scopus for reports of original research relevant to human health or healthcare authored by researchers affiliated with Palestinian institutions and published between January 2000 and August 2015 inclusive. We used international guidelines to assess report quality, classifying as adequate those with ≥50% of items completely addressed. Of 2383 reports identified, 497 met our inclusion criteria. Just over half (264; 55%) of these were published after 2010. 354 (71%) of first authors were affiliated with Palestinian institutions; 261 (53%) reports had coauthors from outside Palestine. The majority of the reports in our study were inadequately reported (342; 69%), and none had adequately reported all items. Of 439 observational studies, 11 (2.5%) reports provided adequate descriptions of eligibility criteria and selection procedures; 35 (8%) reported efforts to address potential sources of bias; 50 (11.4%) reported the basis for the study sample size; and funding sources were mentioned in 74 reports (17%). Higher reporting quality was associated with international affiliation of the first author (prevalence ratio (PR) 1.6 (95% CI 1.2 to 2.1)), international collaboration (PR 2.9 (95% CI 1.7 to 5.0)), international funding (PR 1.9 (95% CI1.5 to 2.5)), publication after 2005 (PR 3.9 (95% CI 1.8 to 8.5)) and four or more coauthors (PR 1.5 (95% CI 1.1 to 2.1)). Although the quality of reports of Palestinian research has improved in recent years, it remains well below an acceptable standard. International reporting guidelines should be used to guide research design and improve the quality of reports of research. The systematic review protocol was registered in the International Prospective

  13. Health and Safety Research Division progress report for the period October 1, 1991--March 31, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berven, B.A.

    1993-09-01

    This is a progress report from the Health and Safety Research Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Information is presented in the following sections: Assessment Technology, Biological and Radiation Physics, Chemical Physics, Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis, Risk Analysis, Center for Risk Management, Associate Laboratories for Excellence in Radiation Technology (ALERT), and Contributions to National and Lead Laboratory Programs and Assignments--Environmental Restoration

  14. Health and Safety Research Division progress report for the period October 1, 1991--March 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berven, B.A.

    1993-09-01

    This is a progress report from the Health and Safety Research Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Information is presented in the following sections: Assessment Technology, Biological and Radiation Physics, Chemical Physics, Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis, Risk Analysis, Center for Risk Management, Associate Laboratories for Excellence in Radiation Technology (ALERT), and Contributions to National and Lead Laboratory Programs and Assignments--Environmental Restoration.

  15. Methodological Reporting in Qualitative, Quantitative, and Mixed Methods Health Services Research Articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisdom, Jennifer P; Cavaleri, Mary A; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J; Green, Carla A

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Methodologically sound mixed methods research can improve our understanding of health services by providing a more comprehensive picture of health services than either method can alone. This study describes the frequency of mixed methods in published health services research and compares the presence of methodological components indicative of rigorous approaches across mixed methods, qualitative, and quantitative articles. Data Sources All empirical articles (n = 1,651) published between 2003 and 2007 from four top-ranked health services journals. Study Design All mixed methods articles (n = 47) and random samples of qualitative and quantitative articles were evaluated to identify reporting of key components indicating rigor for each method, based on accepted standards for evaluating the quality of research reports (e.g., use of p-values in quantitative reports, description of context in qualitative reports, and integration in mixed method reports). We used chi-square tests to evaluate differences between article types for each component. Principal Findings Mixed methods articles comprised 2.85 percent (n = 47) of empirical articles, quantitative articles 90.98 percent (n = 1,502), and qualitative articles 6.18 percent (n = 102). There was a statistically significant difference (χ2(1) = 12.20, p = .0005, Cramer's V = 0.09, odds ratio = 1.49 [95% confidence interval = 1,27, 1.74]) in the proportion of quantitative methodological components present in mixed methods compared to quantitative papers (21.94 versus 47.07 percent, respectively) but no statistically significant difference (χ2(1) = 0.02, p = .89, Cramer's V = 0.01) in the proportion of qualitative methodological components in mixed methods compared to qualitative papers (21.34 versus 25.47 percent, respectively). Conclusion Few published health services research articles use mixed methods. The frequency of key methodological components is variable. Suggestions are provided to increase the

  16. Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) University of California at Davis, California. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report for the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) Site (the Site) includes 1996 environmental monitoring data for Site air, soil, ground water, surface water, storm water and ambient radiation. DOE operation of LEHR as a functioning research location ceased in 1989, after the completion of three decades of research on the health effects of low-level radiation exposure (primarily strontium-90 and radium-226), using beagles to simulate effects on human health. During 1996, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) conducted activities at the Site in support of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Environmental remediation and the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of Site buildings. Extensive environmental data were collected in 1996 to evaluate appropriate remedial actions for the Site.

  17. Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) University of California at Davis, California. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report for the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) Site (the Site) includes 1996 environmental monitoring data for Site air, soil, ground water, surface water, storm water and ambient radiation. DOE operation of LEHR as a functioning research location ceased in 1989, after the completion of three decades of research on the health effects of low-level radiation exposure (primarily strontium-90 and radium-226), using beagles to simulate effects on human health. During 1996, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) conducted activities at the Site in support of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Environmental remediation and the decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) of Site buildings. Extensive environmental data were collected in 1996 to evaluate appropriate remedial actions for the Site

  18. Searching for rigour in the reporting of mixed methods population health research: a methodological review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, K M; Elliott, S J; Leatherdale, S T; Robertson-Wilson, J

    2015-12-01

    The environments in which population health interventions occur shape both their implementation and outcomes. Hence, when evaluating these interventions, we must explore both intervention content and context. Mixed methods (integrating quantitative and qualitative methods) provide this opportunity. However, although criteria exist for establishing rigour in quantitative and qualitative research, there is poor consensus regarding rigour in mixed methods. Using the empirical example of school-based obesity interventions, this methodological review examined how mixed methods have been used and reported, and how rigour has been addressed. Twenty-three peer-reviewed mixed methods studies were identified through a systematic search of five databases and appraised using the guidelines for Good Reporting of a Mixed Methods Study. In general, more detailed description of data collection and analysis, integration, inferences and justifying the use of mixed methods is needed. Additionally, improved reporting of methodological rigour is required. This review calls for increased discussion of practical techniques for establishing rigour in mixed methods research, beyond those for quantitative and qualitative criteria individually. A guide for reporting mixed methods research in population health should be developed to improve the reporting quality of mixed methods studies. Through improved reporting, mixed methods can provide strong evidence to inform policy and practice. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Health and Safety Research Division progress report, October 1, 1988--March 31, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-09-01

    The Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) continues to maintain an outstanding program of basic and applied research displaying a high level of creativity and achievement as documented by awards, publications, professional service, and successful completion of variety of projects. Our focus is on human health and the scientific basis for measurement and assessment of health-related impacts of energy technologies. It is our custom to publish a division progress report every 18 months that summarizes our programmatic progress and other measures of achievement over the reporting period. Since it is not feasible to summarize in detail all of our work over the period covered by this report (October 1, 1988, to March 30, 1990), we intend this document to point the way to the expensive open literature that documents our findings. During the reporting period the Division continued to maintain strong programs in its traditional areas of R ampersand D, but also achieved noteworthy progress in other areas. Much of the Division's work on site characterization, development of new field instruments, compilation of data bases, and methodology development fits into this initiative. Other new work in tunneling microscopy in support of DOE's Human Genome Program and the comprehensive R ampersand D work related to surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy have attained new and exciting results. These examples of our progress and numerous other activities are highlighted in this report

  20. Health and Safety Research Division progress report, October 1, 1988--March 31, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-09-01

    The Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) continues to maintain an outstanding program of basic and applied research displaying a high level of creativity and achievement as documented by awards, publications, professional service, and successful completion of variety of projects. Our focus is on human health and the scientific basis for measurement and assessment of health-related impacts of energy technologies. It is our custom to publish a division progress report every 18 months that summarizes our programmatic progress and other measures of achievement over the reporting period. Since it is not feasible to summarize in detail all of our work over the period covered by this report (October 1, 1988, to March 30, 1990), we intend this document to point the way to the expensive open literature that documents our findings. During the reporting period the Division continued to maintain strong programs in its traditional areas of R D, but also achieved noteworthy progress in other areas. Much of the Division's work on site characterization, development of new field instruments, compilation of data bases, and methodology development fits into this initiative. Other new work in tunneling microscopy in support of DOE's Human Genome Program and the comprehensive R D work related to surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy have attained new and exciting results. These examples of our progress and numerous other activities are highlighted in this report.

  1. Methodological reporting in qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods health services research articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisdom, Jennifer P; Cavaleri, Mary A; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J; Green, Carla A

    2012-04-01

    Methodologically sound mixed methods research can improve our understanding of health services by providing a more comprehensive picture of health services than either method can alone. This study describes the frequency of mixed methods in published health services research and compares the presence of methodological components indicative of rigorous approaches across mixed methods, qualitative, and quantitative articles. All empirical articles (n = 1,651) published between 2003 and 2007 from four top-ranked health services journals. All mixed methods articles (n = 47) and random samples of qualitative and quantitative articles were evaluated to identify reporting of key components indicating rigor for each method, based on accepted standards for evaluating the quality of research reports (e.g., use of p-values in quantitative reports, description of context in qualitative reports, and integration in mixed method reports). We used chi-square tests to evaluate differences between article types for each component. Mixed methods articles comprised 2.85 percent (n = 47) of empirical articles, quantitative articles 90.98 percent (n = 1,502), and qualitative articles 6.18 percent (n = 102). There was a statistically significant difference (χ(2) (1) = 12.20, p = .0005, Cramer's V = 0.09, odds ratio = 1.49 [95% confidence interval = 1,27, 1.74]) in the proportion of quantitative methodological components present in mixed methods compared to quantitative papers (21.94 versus 47.07 percent, respectively) but no statistically significant difference (χ(2) (1) = 0.02, p = .89, Cramer's V = 0.01) in the proportion of qualitative methodological components in mixed methods compared to qualitative papers (21.34 versus 25.47 percent, respectively). Few published health services research articles use mixed methods. The frequency of key methodological components is variable. Suggestions are provided to increase the transparency of mixed methods studies and

  2. The development and validation of an instrument to measure the quality of health research reports in the lay media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeraatkar, Dena; Obeda, Michael; Ginsberg, Jeffrey S; Hirsh, Jack

    2017-04-20

    The media serves as an important link between medical research, as reported in scholarly sources, and the public and has the potential to act as a powerful tool to improve public health. However, concerns about the reliability of health research reports have been raised. Tools to monitor the quality of health research reporting in the media are needed to identify areas of weakness in health research reporting and to subsequently work towards the efficient use of the lay media as a public health tool through which the public's health behaviors can be improved. We developed the Quality Index for health-related Media Reports (QIMR) as a tool to monitor the quality of health research reports in the lay media. The tool was developed according to themes generated from interviews with health journalists and researchers. Item and domain characteristics and scale reliability were assessed. The scale was correlated with a global quality assessment score and media report word count to provide evidence towards its construct validity. The items and domains of the QIMR demonstrated acceptable validity and reliability. Items from the 'validity' domain were negatively skewed, suggesting possible floor effect. These items were not eliminated due to acceptable content and face validity. QIMR total scores produced a strong correlation with raters' global assessment and a moderate correlation with media report word count, providing evidence towards the construct validity of the instrument. The results of this investigation indicate that QIMR can adequately measure the quality of health research reports, with acceptable reliability and validity.

  3. Environmental research programme. Ecological research. Annual report 1994. Urban-industrial landscapes, forests, agricultural landscapes, river and lake landscapes, terrestrial ecosystem research, environmental pollution and health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    In the annual report 1994 of the Federal Ministry of Research and Technology, the points of emphasis of the ecological research programme and their financing are discussed. The individual projects in the following subject areas are described in detail: urban-industrial landscapes, forests, agricultural landscapes, river and lake landscapes, other ecosystems and landscapes, terrestrial ecosystem research, environmental pollution and human health and cross-sectional activities in ecological research. (vhe) [de

  4. Programs director's report for the Office of Health and Environmental Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    Since its establishment, the Department of Energy's Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) has had responsibility for conducting biological research to develop the knowledge needed to identify, understand, and anticipate the long-term health consequences of energy use and development, including the potential health impacts of radiation. The Health Effects Research Program has established the basis for understanding the health consequences of radiation for humans, developed radiation dosimetry methodology, characterized and evaluated the health impacts of fossil fuels, and developed and conducted research to determine the health impacts of inhaled toxicants. The results of this research have provided input for setting genetic standards for radiation and chemical exposure

  5. Programs director`s report for the Office of Health and Environmental Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    Since its establishment, the Department of Energy`s Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) has had responsibility for conducting biological research to develop the knowledge needed to identify, understand, and anticipate the long-term health consequences of energy use and development, including the potential health impacts of radiation. The Health Effects Research Program has established the basis for understanding the health consequences of radiation for humans, developed radiation dosimetry methodology, characterized and evaluated the health impacts of fossil fuels, and developed and conducted research to determine the health impacts of inhaled toxicants. The results of this research have provided input for setting genetic standards for radiation and chemical exposure.

  6. Research Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawes, Lyn

    2004-06-01

    This paper examines what is important about talk between learners during school science and, having identified this, suggests how we can ensure that what we consider important happens. By looking at the interaction between teachers and learners talking about science, it is possible to indicate ways in which learners can be helped to continue this learning conversation with one another when teacher support is withdrawn. Strategies for teaching and learning are examined. The paper reports on the findings of a research project designed to teach children how to negotiate their ideas about science concepts through rational dialogue. Children's development of scientific concepts in classrooms is undertaken through structured activity and mediated through oral language. Children must move forward simultaneously in their use of specialized vocabulary and in their understanding of current scientific explanations, models and ideas. New language and new ways of using language are learned by doing, which means for children, primarily speaking and listening. Children's understanding of science can benefit from teaching them to understand that spoken language is a powerful tool for thinking together.

  7. Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research Centers Impact Report: Advances in protecting children's health where they live, learn, and play

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 1997, EPA and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) partnered to form the Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research Centers. This impact report summarizes the history of the program, scientific findings since the program's incept...

  8. Health Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA scientists are helping communities and policymakers develop and implement policies and practices designed to improve public health, especially for groups such as children, the elderly or the socioeconomically disadvantaged.

  9. Occupational health and environment research 1983: Health, Safety, and Environment Division. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voelz, G.L.

    1985-05-01

    The primary responsibility of the Health, Safety, and Environment (HSE) Division at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is to provide comprehensive occupational health and safety programs, waste processing, and environmental protection. These activities are designed to protect the workers, the public, and the environment. Evaluation of respiratory protective equipment included the XM-30 and M17A1 military masks, use of MAG-1 spectacles in respirators, and eight self-contained units. The latter units were used in an evaluation of test procedures used for Bureau of Mines approval of breathing apparatuses. Analyses of air samples from field studies of a modified in situ oil shale retorting facility were performed for total cyclohexane extractables and selected polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. Aerosols generation and characterization of effluents from oil shale processing were continued as part of an inhalation toxicology study. Additional data on plutonium excretion in urine are presented and point up problems in using the Langham equation to predict plutonium deposition in the body from long-term excretion data. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1983 showed the highest estimated radiation dose from Laboratory operations to be about 26% of the natural background radiation dose. Several studies on radionuclides and their transport in the Los Alamos environment are described. The chemical quality of surface and ground water near the geothermal hot dry rock facility is described. Short- and long-term consequences to man from releases of radionuclides into the environment can be simulated by the BIOTRAN computer model, which is discussed brirfly

  10. Occupational health and environment research 1984: Health, Safety, and environmental Division. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voelz, G.L.

    1986-05-01

    The primary responsibility of the Health, Safety, and Environment (HSE) Division is to provide comprehensive occupational health and safety programs, waste processing, and environment protection. Two supplied-air suits tested for their functional protection were considered to be unacceptable because of low fit factors. Respiratory protective equipment testing for the uS Air Force, Navy, and Army was performed during 1984. The laser aerosol spectrometer (LAS-X) has been shown to operate successfully for measuring and sizing aerosols used for quality assurance testing of high-efficiency particulate air filters used at DOE facilities. Radioanalyses for 239 Pu and 241 Am are presented for the complete skeletal parts of two persons. Air samples from work areas in a coal gasification plant in Yugoslavia show minimal concentration of organic vapors, amines, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, and phenols. Aerosol characteristics of oil shale vapors and manmade vitreous fibers used in ongoing inhalation toxicology studies are presented. Epidemiologic studies of smoking patterns among Los Alamos employees reveal 24.3% smokers compared with the US rate of 32.5%. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1984 showed the highest estimated radiation dose to an individual at or outside the Laboratory boundary to be about 25% of the natural background radiation dose. Surveillance studies on water and sediment transport of radionuclides, depleted uranium, and silver are described. Bibliographic review of the rooting depth of native plants indicates that even many grass species will root to depths greater than the earth overburden depths to cover low-level radioactive waste sites

  11. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research, Davis, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-03-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) at the University of California, Davis (UC Davis), conducted November 16 through 20, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the LEHR. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation, and is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations at the LEHR and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE National Laboratory or a support contractor. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Environmental Survey Interim Report for the LEHR at UC Davis. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the LEHR Survey. 75 refs., 26 figs., 23 tabs

  12. Health and Safety Research Division progress report, October 1, 1982-June 30, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaye, S.V.

    1984-08-01

    The work accomplished by the Health and Safety Research Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory is summarized. Research, assessments and technical measurements done by the division between October 1982 and June 1984 are summarized. Separate analytics were written for each chapter

  13. Health and Safety Research Division progress report for period ending April 30, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaye, S.V.

    1978-08-01

    The research goal of the Health and Safety Research Division is to conduct basic and applied research that contributes new scientific knowledge with emphasis in biophysical areas that lead to a better understanding of how alternative energy-related technologies affect man. Included in the basic research are fundamental processes that are important to understand formation, mobility, toxicity, detection, and characterization of pollutants. The applied research includes the integration of data from basic and applied studies through development of concepts and methodologies that can be used for energy-related assessments with primary focus on the health and safety of man. The division has no responsibilities for on-site health and safety.

  14. Method and reporting quality in health professions education research: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, David A; Levinson, Anthony J; Garside, Sarah

    2011-03-01

    Studies evaluating reporting quality in health professions education (HPE) research have demonstrated deficiencies, but none have used comprehensive reporting standards. Additionally, the relationship between study methods and effect size (ES) in HPE research is unknown. This review aimed to evaluate, in a sample of experimental studies of Internet-based instruction, the quality of reporting, the relationship between reporting and methodological quality, and associations between ES and study methods. We conducted a systematic search of databases including MEDLINE, Scopus, CINAHL, EMBASE and ERIC, for articles published during 1990-2008. Studies (in any language) quantifying the effect of Internet-based instruction in HPE compared with no intervention or other instruction were included. Working independently and in duplicate, we coded reporting quality using the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) statement, and coded study methods using a modified Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (m-NOS), the Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument (MERSQI), and the Best Evidence in Medical Education (BEME) global scale. For reporting quality, articles scored a mean±standard deviation (SD) of 51±25% of STROBE elements for the Introduction, 58±20% for the Methods, 50±18% for the Results and 41±26% for the Discussion sections. We found positive associations (all pquality and MERSQI (ρ=0.64), m-NOS (ρ=0.57) and BEME (ρ=0.58) scores. We explored associations between study methods and knowledge ES by subtracting each study's ES from the pooled ES for studies using that method and comparing these differences between subgroups. Effect sizes in single-group pretest/post-test studies differed from the pooled estimate more than ESs in two-group studies (p=0.013). No difference was found between other study methods (yes/no: representative sample, comparison group from same community, randomised, allocation concealed, participants blinded

  15. PREVALENCE OF SELF-REPORTED SPINAL PAIN IN BRAZIL: RESULTS OF THE NATIONAL HEALTH RESEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUIZA GOMES SANTOS

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To identify the prevalence and distribution of cases of self-reported spinal disorders by persons who are 18 years or older living in Brazil according to sociodemographic variables. Methods: We used the Pesquisa Nacional de Saúde (PNS, national health research, developed by the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (IBGE in partnership with the Ministry of Health. The data obtained from the website of IBGE System of Automatic Recovery - SIDRA were analyzed using the SPSS Statistics software version 20.0, IBM. Results: In Brazil 19% of the adult population report chronic spinal pain, 15.26% (± 4.56 men and 20.08% (+/- 4.11 women. After the age of 60, the prevalence is higher. Regarding skin color 18.26% (± 3.53 are white, 17.27% (± 6.65 are black and 17.93% (± 4.05 are brown, with no statistical difference. As for education, 23.55% (±5.70 had low or absent schooling (p < 0.001. The southern region of Brazil has the highest percentage (23.3% of adults with chronic problems in the spine, and the state with the highest percentage is Paraná, with 26%. Conclusions: The results showed that there is a relationship between spinal pain and sociodemographic characteristics, pointing to the southern region as the most affected by spinal disorders when compared to other regions of the country.

  16. Failure to Report Effect Sizes: The Handling of Quantitative Results in Published Health Education and Behavior Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Adam E; Szucs, Leigh E; Reyes, Jovanni V; Ji, Qian; Wilson, Kelly L; Thompson, Bruce

    2016-10-01

    Given the American Psychological Association's strong recommendation to always report effect sizes in research, scholars have a responsibility to provide complete information regarding their findings. The purposes of this study were to (a) determine the frequencies with which different effect sizes were reported in published, peer-reviewed articles in health education, promotion, and behavior journals and (b) discuss implications for reporting effect size in social science research. Across a 4-year time period (2010-2013), 1,950 peer-reviewed published articles were examined from the following six health education and behavior journals: American Journal of Health Behavior, American Journal of Health Promotion, Health Education & Behavior, Health Education Research, Journal of American College Health, and Journal of School Health Quantitative features from eligible manuscripts were documented using Qualtrics online survey software. Of the 1,245 articles in the final sample that reported quantitative data analyses, approximately 47.9% (n = 597) of the articles reported an effect size. While 16 unique types of effect size were reported across all included journals, many of the effect sizes were reported with little frequency across most journals. Overall, odds ratio/adjusted odds ratio (n = 340, 50.1%), Pearson r/r(2) (n = 162, 23.8%), and eta squared/partial eta squared (n = 46, 7.2%) accounted for the most frequently used effect size. Quality research practice requires both testing statistical significance and reporting effect size. However, our study shows that a substantial portion of published literature in health education and behavior lacks consistent reporting of effect size. © 2016 Society for Public Health Education.

  17. Enhancing the contribution of research to health care policy-making: a case study of the Dutch Health Care Performance Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegger, Ingrid; Marks, Lisanne K; Janssen, Susan W J; Schuit, Albertine J; van Oers, Hans A M

    2016-01-01

    The Dutch Health Care Performance Report, issued by the National Institute of Public Health and the Environment, aims to monitor health care performance in The Netherlands. Both the National Institute and the Ministry of Health wish to increase the contribution of the Report to health care policy-making. Our aim was to identify ways to achieve that. We used contribution mapping as a theoretical framework that recognizes alignment of research as crucial to managing contributions to policy-making. To investigate which areas need alignment efforts by researchers and/or policy-makers, we interviewed National Institute researchers and policy-makers from the Ministry of Health and assessed the process for developing the 2010 Report. We identified six areas where alignment is specifically relevant for enhancing the contributions of future versions of the Dutch Health Care Performance Report: well-balanced information for different ministerial directorates; backstage work; double role actors; reports of other knowledge institutes; data collection/generation and presentation forms. The contribution of health care performance reporting to policy-making is complex and requires continuous alignment efforts between researchers and policy-makers. These efforts should form an inseparable part of health care performance reporting and although this demands considerable resources, it is worth considering since it may pay back in better contributions to policy-making. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Health and Safety Research Division progress report for the period April 1, 1987--September 30, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaye, S.V.

    1989-03-01

    The mission of the Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) is to provide a sound scientific basis for the measurement and assessment of human health impacts of radiological and chemical substances. Our approach to fulfilling this mission is to conduct a broad program of experimental, theoretical, and field research based on a strong foundation of fundamental physical studies that blend into well-established programs in life sciences. Topics include biomedical screening techniques, biological and chemical sensors, risk assessment, health hazards, dosimetry, nuclear medicine, environmental pollution monitoring, electron-molecule interactions, interphase physics, surface physics, data base management, environmental mutagens, carcinogens, and tetratogens

  19. Health and Safety Research Division progress report for the period April 1, 1987--September 30, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaye, S.V.

    1989-03-01

    The mission of the Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) is to provide a sound scientific basis for the measurement and assessment of human health impacts of radiological and chemical substances. Our approach to fulfilling this mission is to conduct a broad program of experimental, theoretical, and field research based on a strong foundation of fundamental physical studies that blend into well-established programs in life sciences. Topics include biomedical screening techniques, biological and chemical sensors, risk assessment, health hazards, dosimetry, nuclear medicine, environmental pollution monitoring, electron-molecule interactions, interphase physics, surface physics, data base management, environmental mutagens, carcinogens, and tetratogens.

  20. Research Report 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This research report reviews the research activities carried out by the various institutes and units of the South African Medical Research Council during the past year. These activities include research on, inter alia: infectious diseases such as typhoid, malaria and AIDS; the health problems associated with rapid urbanization; heart disease; oesophageal cancer; the treatment of bleeding disorders using In-111-labelled blood platelets and the effects of ionising and non-ionising radiation on rodent tumors. Seperate abstracts were prepared for 2 of the papers in this volume. The remaining papers were considered outside the subject scope of INIS

  1. Program director`s overview report for the Office of Health & Environmental Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, D. [ed.

    1994-02-01

    LBL performs basic and applied research and develops technologies in support of the Office of Health and Environmental Research`s mission to explore and mitigate the long-term health and environmental consequences of energy use and to advance solutions to major medical challenges. The ability of the Laboratory to engage in this mission depends upon the strength of its core competencies. In addition, there are several key capabilities that are cross-cutting, or underlie, many of the core competencies. Attention is focused on the following: Facilities and resources; research management practices; research in progress; program accomplishments and research highlights; program orientation; work for non-OHER organizations DOE; critical issues; and resource orientation.

  2. Health Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-09-01

    Futui’e Structure of Veterans’ Health Program (Aug. 11, 1992, GAO/T-HRD-92-53). Recombinant Bovine Growth Hormone: FDA Approval Should be Withheld Until...the Mastitis Issue Is Resolved (Aug. 6, 1992, GAO/PEMD-92-26). VA Health Care: Inadequate Controls Over Scarce Medical Specialist Contracts (Aug. 5

  3. GSF Research Center for Environment and Health, Hydrological Institute. 1994 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    The 1994 annual report of the Institute of Hyrdology presents the findings of 12 current research projects on different subjects in hyrdology. It is supplemented by information on cooperation with other scientific institutions in the form of lists of publications and reports, lectures and posters, university teaching projects, and finished and current dissertations. (VHE) [de

  4. Program director`s report for the Office of Health and Environmental Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    LBNL performs basic and applied research and develops technologies in support of the Department of Energy Office of Health and Environmental Research`s mission to explore and mitigate the long-term health and environmental consequences of energy use and to advance solutions to major medical challenges. The ability of the Laboratory to engage in this mission depends upon the strength of its core competencies. In addition, there are several key capabilities that are crosscutting, or underlie, many of the core competencies. They are: bioscience and biotechnology; environmental assessment and remediation; advanced detector systems; materials characterization and synthesis; chemical dynamics, catalysis, and surface science; advanced technologies for energy supply and energy efficiency; particle and photon beams; national research facilities; computation and information management; engineering design and fabrication technologies; and education of future scientists and engineers. Research in progress and major accomplishments are summarized for projects in analytical technology; environmental research; health effects; molecular carcinogenesis; general life sciences; human genome project; medical applications; and imaging of E-binding proteins.

  5. A cross sectional observational study of research activity of allied health teams: is there a link with self-reported success, motivators and barriers to undertaking research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenke, Rachel J; Mickan, Sharon; Bisset, Leanne

    2017-02-06

    Team-based approaches to research capacity building (RCB) may be an efficient means to promote allied health research participation and activity. In order to tailor such interventions, a clearer understanding of current patterns of research participation within allied health teams is needed. Different self-report measures exist which evaluate a team's research capacity and participation, as well as associated barriers and motivators. However, it remains unclear how such measures are associated with a team's actual research activity (e.g., journal publications, funding received). In response, this observational study aimed to identify the research activity, self-reported success, and motivations and barriers to undertaking research of eight allied health professional (AHP) teams and to explore whether any relationships exist between the self-reported measures and actual research activity within each team. A total of 95 AHPs from eight teams completed the research capacity and culture survey to evaluate team success, barriers and motivators to undertaking research, and an audit of research activity from January 2013 to August 2014 was undertaken within each team. Kendell's correlation coefficients were used to determine the association between research activity (i.e., number of journal publications, ethically approved projects and funding received) and the self-reported measures. Seven out of eight teams rated their teams as having average success in research and demonstrated some form of research activity including at least two ethically approved projects. Research activity varied between teams, with funding received ranging from $0 to over $100,000, and half the teams not producing any journal publications. Team motivators demonstrated a stronger association with research activity compared to barriers, with the motivator "enhancing team credibility" being significantly associated with funding received. No significant association between self-reported research

  6. Social desirability and self-reported health risk behaviors in web-based research: three longitudinal studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Göritz Anja S

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background These studies sought to investigate the relation between social desirability and self-reported health risk behaviors (e.g., alcohol use, drug use, smoking in web-based research. Methods Three longitudinal studies (Study 1: N = 5612, 51% women; Study 2: N = 619, 60%; Study 3: N = 846, 59% among randomly selected members of two online panels (Dutch; German using several social desirability measures (Marlowe-Crowne Scale; Balanced Inventory of Desirable Responding; The Social Desirability Scale-17 were conducted. Results Social desirability was not associated with self-reported current behavior or behavior frequency. Socio-demographics (age; sex; education did not moderate the effect of social desirability on self-reported measures regarding health risk behaviors. Conclusions The studies at hand provided no convincing evidence to throw doubt on the usefulness of the Internet as a medium to collect self-reports on health risk behaviors.

  7. One Health approach to identify research needs in bovine and human babesioses: workshop report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McElwain Terry F

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Babesia are emerging health threats to humans and animals in the United States. A collaborative effort of multiple disciplines to attain optimal health for people, animals and our environment, otherwise known as the One Health concept, was taken during a research workshop held in April 2009 to identify gaps in scientific knowledge regarding babesioses. The impetus for this analysis was the increased risk for outbreaks of bovine babesiosis, also known as Texas cattle fever, associated with the re-infestation of the U.S. by cattle fever ticks. Results The involvement of wildlife in the ecology of cattle fever ticks jeopardizes the ability of state and federal agencies to keep the national herd free of Texas cattle fever. Similarly, there has been a progressive increase in the number of cases of human babesiosis over the past 25 years due to an increase in the white-tailed deer population. Human babesiosis due to cattle-associated Babesia divergens and Babesia divergens-like organisms have begun to appear in residents of the United States. Research needs for human and bovine babesioses were identified and are presented herein. Conclusions The translation of this research is expected to provide veterinary and public health systems with the tools to mitigate the impact of bovine and human babesioses. However, economic, political, and social commitments are urgently required, including increased national funding for animal and human Babesia research, to prevent the re-establishment of cattle fever ticks and the increasing problem of human babesiosis in the United States.

  8. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    The International Journal of Health Research is an online international ... The journal welcomes original research papers, reviews and case reports on ..... mediator generated by endothelial cells, ... Springer Science and Business Media,.

  9. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    The International Journal of Health Research is an online international journal ... research papers, reviews and case reports on current topics of special ... formulated as Gastroretentive Drug Delivery System ...... In vivo gastric studies were run.

  10. Improving capacity in ethnicity and health research: report of a tailored programme for NHS Public Health practitioners

    OpenAIRE

    Salway, Sarah; Piercy, Hilary; Chowbey, Punita; Brewins, Louise; Dhoot, Permjeet

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To determine whether an intervention designed to enhance research capacity among commissioners in the area of ethnicity and health was feasible and impactful, and to identify programme elements that might usefully be replicated elsewhere.\\ud Background: How healthcare commissioners should be equipped to understand and address multiethnic needs has received little attention to-date. Being able to mobilise and apply evidence is a central element of the commissioning process that requires d...

  11. Environmental research - ecological research. Annual report 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    In the annual report 1996 of the Federal Ministry of Research and Technology, the points of emphasis of the ecological research programme and their financing are discussed. The individual projects in the following subject areas are described in detail: urban-industrial landscapes, forests, agricultural landscapes, river and lake landscapes, other ecosystems and landscapes, terrestrial ecosystem research, environmental pollution and human health and cross-sectional activities in ecological research. (vhe) [de

  12. New directions in e-learning research in health professions education: Report of two symposia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triola, Marc M; Huwendiek, Sören; Levinson, Anthony J; Cook, David A

    2012-01-01

    The use of Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI) is rising across health professions education. Research to date is of limited use in guiding the implementation and selection of CAI innovations. In the context of two symposia, systemic reviews were discussed that evaluate literature in Internet-based learning, Virtual Patients, and animations. Each session included a debate with the goal of reaching consensus on best current practices and future research. Thematic analysis of the discussions was performed to arrange the questions by theme, eliminate redundancy, and craft them into a cohesive narrative. The question analysis revealed that there are clear advantages to the use of CAI, and that established educational theories should certainly inform the future development and selection of CAI tools. Schools adopting CAI need to carefully consider the benefits, cost, available resources, and capacity for teachers and learners to accept change in their practice of education. Potential areas for future research should focus on the effectiveness of CAI instructional features, integration of e-learning into existing curricula and with other modalities like simulation, and the use of CAI in assessment of higher-level outcomes. There are numerous opportunities for future research and it will be important to achieve consensus on important themes.

  13. Avatar Web-Based Self-Report Survey System Technology for Public Health Research: Technical Outcome Results and Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savel, Craig; Mierzwa, Stan; Gorbach, Pamina M; Souidi, Samir; Lally, Michelle; Zimet, Gregory; Interventions, Aids

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on a specific Web-based self-report data collection system that was developed for a public health research study in the United States. Our focus is on technical outcome results and lessons learned that may be useful to other projects requiring such a solution. The system was accessible from any device that had a browser that supported HTML5. Report findings include: which hardware devices, Web browsers, and operating systems were used; the rate of survey completion; and key considerations for employing Web-based surveys in a clinical trial setting.

  14. Editorial research and the publication process in biomedicine and health: Report from the Esteve Foundation Discussion Group, December 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marušić, Ana; Malički, Mario; von Elm, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Despite the fact that there are more than twenty thousand biomedical journals in the world, research into the work of editors and publication process in biomedical and health care journals is rare. In December 2012, the Esteve Foundation, a non-profit scientific institution that fosters progress in pharmacotherapy by means of scientific communication and discussion organized a discussion group of 7 editors and/or experts in peer review biomedical publishing. They presented findings of past editorial research, discussed the lack of competitive funding schemes and specialized journals for dissemination of editorial research, and reported on the great diversity of misconduct and conflict of interest policies, as well as adherence to reporting guidelines. Furthermore, they reported on the reluctance of editors to investigate allegations of misconduct or increase the level of data sharing in health research. In the end, they concluded that if editors are to remain gatekeepers of scientific knowledge they should reaffirm their focus on the integrity of the scientific record and completeness of the data they publish. Additionally, more research should be undertaken to understand why many journals are not adhering to editorial standards, and what obstacles editors face when engaging in editorial research. PMID:24969914

  15. How Are Health Research Priorities Set in Low and Middle Income Countries? A Systematic Review of Published Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Skye; Henderson, Klara J.; Kaldor, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Priority setting is increasingly recognised as essential for directing finite resources to support research that maximizes public health benefits and drives health equity. Priority setting processes have been undertaken in a number of low- and middle-income country (LMIC) settings, using a variety of methods. We undertook a critical review of reports of these processes. Methods and Findings We searched electronic databases and online for peer reviewed and non-peer reviewed literature. We found 91 initiatives that met inclusion criteria. The majority took place at the global level (46%). For regional or national initiatives, most focused on Sub Saharan Africa (49%), followed by East Asia and Pacific (20%) and Latin America and the Caribbean (18%). A quarter of initiatives aimed to cover all areas of health research, with a further 20% covering communicable diseases. The most frequently used process was a conference or workshop to determine priorities (24%), followed by the Child Health and Nutrition Initiative (CHNRI) method (18%). The majority were initiated by an international organization or collaboration (46%). Researchers and government were the most frequently represented stakeholders. There was limited evidence of any implementation or follow-up strategies. Challenges in priority setting included engagement with stakeholders, data availability, and capacity constraints. Conclusions Health research priority setting (HRPS) has been undertaken in a variety of LMIC settings. While not consistently used, the application of established methods provides a means of identifying health research priorities in a repeatable and transparent manner. In the absence of published information on implementation or evaluation, it is not possible to assess what the impact and effectiveness of health research priority setting may have been. PMID:25275315

  16. Health and environmental effects of oil and gas technologies: Research needs. A report to the Federal Interagency Committee on the health and environmental effects of energy technologies. Draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    This report discusses health and environmental issues associated with oil and gas technologies as they are currently perceived - both those that exist and those that are expected to emerge over the next two decades. The various sections of this report contain discussions of specific problem areas and relevant new research activities which should be pursued. This is not an exhaustive investigation of all problem areas, but the report explores a wide range of issues to provide a comprehensive picture of existing uncertainties, trends, and other factors that should serve as the focus of future research. The problem areas of major concern include: effects of drilling fluids, offshore accidents, refineries and worker health, soil biota and petroleum spills, indoor air pollution, information transfer, and unconventional resources. These are highlighted in the Executive Summary because they pose serious threats to human health and the environment, and because of the sparsity of accumulated knowledge related to their definition

  17. Health and environmental effects of oil and gas technologies: Research needs. A report to the Federal Interagency Committee on the health and environmental effects of energy technologies. Draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    This report discusses health and environmental issues associated with oil and gas technologies as they are currently perceived - both those that exist and those that are expected to emerge over the next two decades. The various sections of this report contain discussions of specific problem areas and relevant new research activities which should be pursued. This is not an exhaustive investigation of all problem areas, but the report explores a wide range of issues to provide a comprehensive picture of existing uncertainties, trends, and other factors that should serve as the focus of future research. The problem areas of major concern include: effects of drilling fluids, offshore accidents, refineries and worker health, soil biota and petroleum spills, indoor air pollution, information transfer, and unconventional resources. These are highlighted in the Executive Summary because they pose serious threats to human health and the environment, and because of the sparsity of accumulated knowledge related to their definition.

  18. Improving capacity in ethnicity and health research: report of a tailored programme for NHS Public Health practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salway, Sarah; Piercy, Hilary; Chowbey, Punita; Brewins, Louise; Dhoot, Permjeet

    2013-10-01

    To determine whether an intervention designed to enhance research capacity among commissioners in the area of ethnicity and health was feasible and impactful, and to identify programme elements that might usefully be replicated elsewhere. How healthcare commissioners should be equipped to understand and address multiethnic needs has received little attention to-date. Being able to mobilise and apply evidence is a central element of the commissioning process that requires development. Researching ethnicity and health is widely recognised as challenging and several prior interventions have aimed to enhance competence in this area. These have, however, predominantly taken place in North America and have not been evaluated in detail. An innovative research capacity development programme was delivered to public health staff within a large healthcare commissioning organisation in England. Evaluation methodology drew on 'pluralistic' evaluation principles and included formative and summative elements. Participant evaluation forms gave immediate feedback during the programme. Participants also provided feedback at two weeks and 12 months after the programme ended. In addition, one participant and one facilitator provided reflective accounts of the programme's strengths and weaknesses, and programme impact was traced through ongoing partnership work. The programme was well received and had a tangible impact on knowledge, confidence and practice for most participants. Factors important to success included: embedding learning within the participants' work context; ensuring a balance between theory and practical tips to enhance confidence; and having sustained interaction between trainers and participants. Despite positive signs, the challenging nature of the topic was highlighted, as were wider structural and cultural factors that impede progress in this area. Although it is unrealistic to expect such programmes to have a major impact on commissioning practices, they may well

  19. Self-Reported Dietary Restrictions and Dietary Patterns in Polish Girls: A Short Research Report (GEBaHealth Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Galinski

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Dietary restraint is a commonly reported practice observed among young females. The practice remains controversial and can be interpreted as a beneficial self-regulating behavior or the opposite, an eating disorder that may have a detrimental effect on health. The aim of this short report was to investigate if dietary restrictions are associated with dietary patterns in a representative sample of Polish girls. Analyses were carried out on data from the Girls’ Eating Behavior and Health (GEBaHealth study. The sample included 1107 girls, ranging in age from 13 to 21 years old. Restrictions regarding food quantities and selected food groups were assessed using a standardized interview. Dietary patterns were identified with Principal Component Analysis (PCA, based on dietary data collected with Food Frequency Questionnaires (FFQs. Logistic regression analysis was used to study the associations between self-reported restrictions and each dietary pattern. In the total sample, 30.5% of girls reported following some food restrictions. The most common restrictions regarded consumption of sugar and/or sweets (23.7%, high-fat foods (22.4%, and fats (21.3%. Girls who declared following any restrictions, restrictions in food quantity and restrictions in the consumption of sugar and/or sweets, high-fat foods, fats, cereals and/or bread and/or potatoes were more likely to adhere to the “fruit and vegetables” (considered pro-healthy dietary pattern (adjusted odds ratios (ORs: 1.55, 95% CI: 1.14–2.12; 1.61, 95% CI: 1.17–2.21; 1.81, 95% CI: 1.30–2.52; 1.46, 95% CI: 1.04–2.06; 1.96, 95% CI: 1.38–2.80 and 3.25, 95% CI: 1.97–5.37, respectively, and less likely to adhere to the “fast foods and sweets” (unhealthy and “traditional Polish” (rather unhealthy patterns, compared to girls who declared no restrictions. Declared restrictions in the consumption of foods high in sugar, fat, and starch were observed in girls in the “fruit and

  20. Development of a health-based air quality index for Canada : public opinion research 2004-05 : final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-05-01

    Canadians rely on an air quality indexes (AQIs) to inform them about air pollution conditions in their communities. However, there is no AQI common to all of Canada, and there is a lack of consistency in the way in which air quality is calculated and reported, as well as in the use of health-based messages. This paper reported findings of a public opinion research survey conducted to gauge Canadians' awareness, perceptions and behavioural responses to air quality, air pollution and AQIs. The aim of the study was to guide the development of health messages to more effectively communicate the AQI to Canadians with respect to the health risks associated with poor air quality. Telephone surveys were conducted immediately following a poor air quality episode to measure the public's awareness and response to these events, as well as residents' general awareness and use of AQIs. A separate research project was then conducted which consisted of in-depth qualitative interviews with 28 individuals recruited from the general population. A comprehensive national telephone survey was then conducted following the summer 2004 'smog season', which focused on the public's awareness of air pollution and AQIs. Results from the first 2 phases of the research were then presented at a workshop comprised of health and environmental communities specializing in air issues in Canada. Focus groups were then held to test public reaction to new AQI communications concepts derived from the research. Results indicated that Canadians widely identify air pollution as a significant environmental problem. However, the information from AQIs had a limited impact in terms of prompting actions to reduce personal exposure. A new type of national AQI for Canada was developed that conveyed information on air quality conditions and their significance. Key features include a 0 to 10 point unbounded scale showing current air quality conditions; a forecast of future conditions; standardized information

  1. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    collaboration among scientists, the industry and the healthcare professionals. ... forum for the communication and evaluation of data, methods and findings in health ... research articles, 3,000 for technical notes, case reports, commentaries and ...

  2. Health and Safety Research Division: Progress report, October 1, 1985-March 31, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, P.J.

    1987-09-01

    This report summarizes the progress in our programs for the period October 1, 1985, through March 31, 1987. The division's presentations and publications represented important contributions on the forefronts of many fields. Eleven invention disclosures were filed, two patent applications submitted, and one patent issued. The company's transfers new technologies to the private sector more efficiently than in the past. The division's responsibilities to DOE under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) program includes inclusion recommendations for 3100 properties. The nuclear medicine program developed new radiopharmaceuticals and radionuclide generators through clinical trials with some of our medical cooperatives. Two major collaborative indoor air quality studies and a large epidemiological study of drinking water quality and human health were completed. ORNL's first scanning tunneling microscope (STM) has achieved single atom resolution and has produced some of the world's best images of single atoms on the surface of a silicon crystal. The Biological and Radiation Physics Section, designed and constructed a soft x-ray spectrometer which has exhibited a measuring efficiency that is 10,000 times higher than other equipment. 1164 refs

  3. Health and Safety Research Division: Progress report, October 1, 1985-March 31, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, P.J.

    1987-09-01

    This report summarizes the progress in our programs for the period October 1, 1985, through March 31, 1987. The division's presentations and publications represented important contributions on the forefronts of many fields. Eleven invention disclosures were filed, two patent applications submitted, and one patent issued. The company's transfers new technologies to the private sector more efficiently than in the past. The division's responsibilities to DOE under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) program includes inclusion recommendations for 3100 properties. The nuclear medicine program developed new radiopharmaceuticals and radionuclide generators through clinical trials with some of our medical cooperatives. Two major collaborative indoor air quality studies and a large epidemiological study of drinking water quality and human health were completed. ORNL's first scanning tunneling microscope (STM) has achieved single atom resolution and has produced some of the world's best images of single atoms on the surface of a silicon crystal. The Biological and Radiation Physics Section, designed and constructed a soft x-ray spectrometer which has exhibited a measuring efficiency that is 10,000 times higher than other equipment. 1164 refs.

  4. An analysis of electricity generation health risks. A United Kingdom perspective. Research Report No. 20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, D.J.; Roberts, L.E.J.; Simpson, A.C.D.

    1994-01-01

    This report deals with normalised (per GWa) health risk estimates associated with the construction, routine operation and decommissioning of seven feasible large-scale UK electricity generation options. Occupational risk estimates of prompt and delayed fatalities are the most robust of the statistics, though still subject to many sources of unavoidable uncertainty. The indications are that the occupational risks for each of the seven cycles, when combined for each cycle, currently lie in the range of about 0.1 to 0.2 to a maximum of about 1 to 2 fatalities per GWa, with tidal power and gas lying at the lower end of this range, and coal and off-shore wind at the higher end. Significant public health risks, at least of the type included within the remit of this project, were not identified for the renewable cycles. Comparisons between the nuclear and fossil cycles are fraught with difficulty. Individual radiation doses to the public from the nuclear (and fossil) cycles are insignificant compared to those from natural background radiation, but collective doses may appear significant if integrated over thousands of years and continental or global populations. Estimating health effects due to small collective doses to populations that may exist in the far future has little scientific justification, and in any event the estimates pale into insignificance when compared with those resulting from exposure to natural radiation were this to be calculated on the same basis. This problem is further compounded when comparison between nuclear and fossil cycles is attempted, since the latter produce copious quantities of either solid, liquid or gaseous effluents, which may contain heavy metals, carcinogens and known respiratory irritants, but for which neither short nor long-term public health implications have been quantified with confidence. The risks of major accidents in the UK have been considered and found to exist for most, perhaps all, of the seven options considered. Some

  5. [Transparency as a prerequisite of innovation in health services research: deficits in the reporting of model projects concerning managed care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiethege, J; Ommen, O; Ernstmann, N; Pfaff, H

    2010-10-01

    Currently, elements of managed care are being implemented in the German health-care system. The legal basis for these innovations are § 140, § 73, § 137, and §§ 63 et seq. of the German Social Code - Part 5 (SGB V). For the model projects according to §§ 63 et seq. of the German Social Code a scientific evaluation and publication of the evaluation results is mandatory. The present study examines the status of evaluation of German model projects. The present study has a mixed method design: A mail and telephone survey with the German Federal Social Insurance Authority, the health insurance funds, and the regional Associations of Statutory Health Insurance Physicians has been conducted. Furthermore, an internet research on "Medpilot" and "Google" has been accomplished to search for model projects and their evaluation reports. 34 model projects met the inclusion criteria. 13 of these projects had been terminated up to 30/9/2008. 6 of them have published an evaluation report. 4 model projects have published substantial documents. One model project in progress has published a meaningful interim report. 12 model projects failed to give information concerning the evaluator or the duration of the model projects. The results show a significant deficit in the mandatory reporting of the evaluation of model projects in Germany. There is a need for action for the legislator and the health insurance funds in terms of promoting the evaluation and the publication of the results. The institutions evaluating the model projects should obligate themselves to publish the evaluation results. The publication is an essential precondition for the development of managed care structures in the health-care system and in the development of scientific evaluation methods. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Research Reports: Inhalants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adolescent Brain Comorbidity College-Age & Young Adults Criminal Justice Drugged Driving Drug Testing Drugs and the Brain ... research findings for the educated lay public, legislators, educational groups, and practitioners. The series reports on research ...

  7. Research Reports: Methamphetamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adolescent Brain Comorbidity College-Age & Young Adults Criminal Justice Drugged Driving Drug Testing Drugs and the Brain ... research findings for the educated lay public, legislators, educational groups, and practitioners. The series reports on research ...

  8. Research Reports: Marijuana

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adolescent Brain Comorbidity College-Age & Young Adults Criminal Justice Drugged Driving Drug Testing Drugs and the Brain ... research findings for the educated lay public, legislators, educational groups, and practitioners. The series reports on research ...

  9. National Institutes of Health Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Late Effects Initiative: The Research Methodology and Study Design Working Group Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Bronwen E; Hahn, Theresa; Martin, Paul J; Mitchell, Sandra A; Petersdorf, Effie W; Armstrong, Gregory T; Shelburne, Nonniekaye; Storer, Barry E; Bhatia, Smita

    2017-01-01

    The increasing numbers of hematopoietic cell transplantations (HCTs) performed each year, the changing demographics of HCT recipients, the introduction of new transplantation strategies, incremental improvement in survival, and the growing population of HCT survivors demand a comprehensive approach to examining the health and well-being of patients throughout life after HCT. This report summarizes strategies for the conduct of research on late effects after transplantation, including consideration of the study design and analytic approaches; methodologic challenges in handling complex phenotype data; an appreciation of the changing trends in the practice of transplantation; and the availability of biospecimens to support laboratory-based research. It is hoped that these concepts will promote continued research and facilitate the development of new approaches to address fundamental questions in transplantation outcomes. Copyright © 2017 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Health Clinic Cost Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Healthcare Cost Report Information System (HCRIS) Dataset - Independent Rural Health Clinic and Freestanding Federally Qualified Health Center (HCLINIC).This data...

  11. Workgroup report: Drinking-water nitrate and health - Recent findings and research needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, M.H.; deKok, T.M.; Levallois, P.; Brender, J.; Gulis, G.; Nolan, B.T.; VanDerslice, J.

    2005-01-01

    Human alteration of the nitrogen cycle has resulted in steadily accumulating nitrate in our water resources. The U.S. maximum contaminant level and World Health Organization guidelines for nitrate in drinking water were promulgated to protect infants from developing methemoglobinemia, an acute condition. Some scientists have recently suggested that the regulatory limit for nitrate is overly conservative; however, they have not thoroughly considered chronic health outcomes. In August 2004, a symposium on drinking-water nitrate and health was held at the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology meeting to evaluate nitrate exposures and associated health effects in relation to the current regulatory limit. The contribution of drinking-water nitrate toward endogenous formation of N-nitroso compounds was evaluated with a focus toward identifying subpopulations with increased rates of nitrosation. Adverse health effects may be the result of a complex interaction of the amount of nitrate ingested, the concomitant ingestion of nitrosation cofactors and precursors, and specific medical conditions that increase nitrosation. Workshop participants concluded that more experimental studies are needed and that a particularly fruitful approach may be to conduct epidemiologic studies among susceptible subgroups with increased endogenous nitrosation. The few epidemiologic studies that have evaluated intake of nitrosation precursors and/or nitrosation inhibitors have observed elevated risks for colon cancer and neural tube defects associated with drinking-water nitrate concentrations below the regulatory limit. The role of drinking-water nitrate exposure as a risk factor for specific cancers, reproductive outcomes, and other chronic health effects must be studied more thoroughly before changes to the regulatory level for nitrate in drinking water can be considered.

  12. Teen Pregnancy and School-Based Health Clinics. A Family Research Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosbacker, Barrett

    To combat the problem of teenage pregnancy, public health clinics have made birth control counseling and free contraceptives available to minors and many public schools have implemented sex education programs. Despite the development and implementation of these programs, teenage sexual activity and pregnancy have increased. The increase in…

  13. Searching for Rigour in the Reporting of Mixed Methods Population Health Research: A Methodological Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, K. M.; Elliott, S. J.; Leatherdale, S. T.; Robertson-Wilson, J.

    2015-01-01

    The environments in which population health interventions occur shape both their implementation and outcomes. Hence, when evaluating these interventions, we must explore both intervention content and context. Mixed methods (integrating quantitative and qualitative methods) provide this opportunity. However, although criteria exist for establishing…

  14. A research framework for pharmacovigilance in health social media: Identification and evaluation of patient adverse drug event reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao; Chen, Hsinchun

    2015-12-01

    Social media offer insights of patients' medical problems such as drug side effects and treatment failures. Patient reports of adverse drug events from social media have great potential to improve current practice of pharmacovigilance. However, extracting patient adverse drug event reports from social media continues to be an important challenge for health informatics research. In this study, we develop a research framework with advanced natural language processing techniques for integrated and high-performance patient reported adverse drug event extraction. The framework consists of medical entity extraction for recognizing patient discussions of drug and events, adverse drug event extraction with shortest dependency path kernel based statistical learning method and semantic filtering with information from medical knowledge bases, and report source classification to tease out noise. To evaluate the proposed framework, a series of experiments were conducted on a test bed encompassing about postings from major diabetes and heart disease forums in the United States. The results reveal that each component of the framework significantly contributes to its overall effectiveness. Our framework significantly outperforms prior work. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Naval Health Research Center Command Annual Report Calendar Year 1987 and FY-88

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    information and survey data at the Navy’s overseas laboratories in Cairo, Jakarta, Peru , and Manila were developed. The health status of a number of Navy...computerized data collection techniques for outpatient information and survey data at the Navy’s foreign laboratories in Cairo, Peru , Jarkata, and...negatively associated with tobacco use, "preventive/avoidance" behaviors, age, and ever being overweight . Identifying such factors may help to structure

  16. Health effects[1997 Scientific Report of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahieu, L.

    1998-07-01

    The objectives of the research in the field of epidemiology , performed at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN are (1) to study cancer mortality and morbidity in nuclear workers in Belgium; (2) to document the feasibility of retrospective cohort studies in Belgium; (3) to participate in the IARC study. For radiobiology, the main objectives are: (1) to elucidate the mechanisms of the effects of ionizing radiation on the mammalian embryo during the early phase of its development, (2) to assess the genetic risks of maternal exposure to ionizing radiation, (3) to elucidate the mechanisms by which damage to the brain and mental retardation are caused in man after prenatal irradiation. The main achievements in these domains for 1997 are presented.

  17. Writing Research Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessler, Daniel I; Shafer, Steven

    2018-01-01

    Clear writing makes manuscripts easier to understand. Clear writing enhances research reports, increasing clinical adoption and scientific impact. We discuss styles and organization to help junior investigators present their findings and avoid common errors.

  18. OJJDP Research 2000 Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Justice, Washington, DC. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

    This report summarizes the activities and achievements of the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention's (OJJDP) Research Division from August 1999 to the present in the areas of research, evaluation, and statistics. It provides new findings on very young offenders; the causes and correlates of delinquency; juvenile transfers to…

  19. Nuclear science research report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Research activities in nuclear science carried out during 1976 are summarized. Research centers around nuclear structure and the application of nuclear techniques to solid state science, materials, engineering, chemistry, biology, and medicine. Reactor and accelerator operations are reported. (E.C.B.)

  20. Home Health PPS - Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Abt Associates July 21, 2010 Analysis of 2000-2008 Home Health Case-mix Change Report estimates the extent to which the observed increases in average case-mix were...

  1. Health Journalism: Health Reporting Status and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshvari, Mahrokh; Yamani, Niko; Adibi, Peyman; Shahnazi, Hossein

    2018-01-01

    Media play crucial role in disseminating health information. Due to the importance of accurate health news reports, and the national need to professionalism in health journalism, this study aimed to investigate the characteristics of health journalists, and health reporting status and the challenges involved. Using consensus sampling, this descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on all health news reporters in Isfahan (34 journalists) in 2015-2016. Data collection was done via a researcher-made questionnaire. Content validity of the questionnaire was determined by qualitative method and based on the opinions of six experts. The test-retest reliability coefficient was 98.0. Data analysis was done by Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, version 16 and descriptive statistics and content analysis were used for analyzing the responses to two open questions. Among 34 journalists, 56% were women and 44% men; the majority of journalists (65%) had no specialized training on health reporting, 35% of journalists were not able to understand the health issues, and the knowledge of medical terminology in 59% of them was moderate to low. The most important required skill for reporters was the ability to interpret medical research reports (88%), 97% were eager to participate in specialized health education. Our study showed that health journalists lacked knowledge and specialized training for dissemination of health news. This has brought about serious challenges. Thus, development and implementation of training courses in close collaboration with educational department of the Ministry of Health and news programs professionals at Islamic Republic of Iran Broadcasting is highly recommended.

  2. [Problems with Using Hospital Quality Reports as a Secondary Data Source for Health Services Research in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraska, R A; de Cruppe, W; Geraedts, M

    2017-07-01

    Background Since 2005, German hospitals are required by law to publish structured quality reports (QRs). Because of the detailed data basis, the QRs are being increasingly used for secondary data analyses in health services research. Up until now, methodological difficulties that can cause distorted results of the analyses have essentially been overlooked. The aim of this study is to systematically list the methodological problems associated with using QR and to suggest solution strategies. Methods The QRs from 2006-2012 form the basis of the analyses and were aggregated in a database using an individualized data linkage procedure. Thereafter, a correlation analysis between a quality indicator and the staffing of hospitals was conducted, serving as an example for both cross-sectional as well as longitudinal studies. The resulting methodological problems are described qualitatively and quantitatively, and potential solutions are derived from the statistical literature. Results In each reporting year, 2-15% of the hospitals delivered no QR. In 2-16% of the QRs, it is not recognizable whether a report belongs to a hospital network or a single location. In addition, 6-66% of the location reports falsely contain data from the hospital network. 10% of the hospitals changed their institution code (IC), in 5% of the cases, the same "IC-location-number-combination" was used for different hospitals over the years. Therefore, 10-20% of the QRs cannot be linked with the IC as key variable. As a remedy for the linking of QR, the combination of the IC, the address and the number of beds represents a suitable solution. Using this solution, hospital network reports, location reports and missing reports can be identified and considered in an analysis. Conclusions Secondary data analyses with quality reports provide a high potential for error due to the inconsistent data base and the problems of the data linkage procedure. These can distort calculated parameters and limit the

  3. Reporting unethical research behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, N S; Korenman, S G; Berk, R; Liu, H

    1999-10-01

    Scientists, as professionals, have a responsibility to self-regulate. However, whistleblowing is rare. We investigated scientists' infrequent disclosure of unethical behavior by studying their responses to scenarios describing unethical research acts and compared their responses to those of research administrators. A cross-sectional survey was administered to National Science Foundation-funded principal investigators and their institutions' representatives (IRs) to the Office of Research Integrity. Both scientists and IRs proposed to respond to nearly all research behaviors that they rated as unethical. Scientists more often proposed responses limited to the research team (58% vs. 25% of cases, p unethical behavior were not. Scientists appear to perceive that they uphold their responsibility to respond to unethical behavior by disclosures within the research team, whereas administrators propose to report to externally accountable individuals, raising the question of whether scientists' behavior constitutes professional self-regulation or cover up.

  4. Tanzania Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tanzania Journal of Health Research (TJHR) aims to facilitate the advance of health sciences by publishing high quality research and review articles that communicate new ideas and developments in biomedical and health research. TJHR is ...

  5. Forging Links for Health Research

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The central objective of GFHR is "to help correct the 10/90 gap" (GFHR 1999, p. ...... reports on health inequities as mediated by gender, ethnic group, and geography, ...... Yet, research with strong elements of community participation may be ...

  6. Research report 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This research report for 1980 of the Department of Nuclear Science and Technology of the Royal Naval College, Greenwich contains sections covering work on nuclear marine technology, space-borne instrumentation and computing. Conferences and seminars held and also attended by members of staff are given. Publications are listed. (U.K.)

  7. Research report 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitley, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    The SURRC, opened in 1963 in the grounds of the National Engineering Laboratory, East Kilbride, was originally established in order to provide the Scottish Universities with the research and teaching facilities associated with a research reactor. Colleagues from the consortium universities now have access to a range of state-of-the-art equipment suitable for research in the broad areas of nuclear, isotopic and earth sciences. The research activities reported for 1992 fall into eleven categories; environmental radioactivity and nuclear geochemistry including radiocarbon dating, neutron activation analysis and tracer studies, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, body composition studies, stable isotopes in medical and biological science, luminescence dating and dosimetry, radiation effects in electrical insulation gamma ray irradiation processes, radiogenic isotopes in geology, stable isotope geochemistry and laser microprobe mass spectrometry for geology. Details of staffing, teaching activities and reactor operation are also given. (author)

  8. Co-ordinated research project on health impacts of mercury cycling in contaminated environments studied by nuclear techniques. Report on the second research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    The specific research objective of this coordinated research project is to study and assess the factors influencing the dynamics of Hg cycling and its impact on human health in mercury contaminated ecosystems, especially in tropical environments, using radioisotopes and enriched stable isotope tracers and/or complementary analytical techniques. Areas of research include: Evaluation of the relevant environmental factors influencing mercury transformations, transportation (mass balances), and partitioning in ecosystems; Development, validation and application of appropriate methodologies for the measurement of Hg methylation and de-methylation rates in various environmental compartments; Development, validation and application of appropriate methodologies for the measurement of Hg fluxes at natural interfaces such as sediment-water, water-air, land-air, plant-air, and saline-water-fresh-water, etc.; Determination and evaluation of the human exposure to Hg using bio-indicators such as hair, blood, and urine in light of epidemiological requirements; Preparation of an appropriate test sample of tropical sediment for comparability studies. Expected research outputs are: Recommended approaches for the determination of mercury methylation and de-methylation rates and flux measurements; A compilation of reliable data on mercury methylation and de-methylation rates and fluxes in contaminated tropical ecosystems for comparison with existing data from temperate regions; Generated knowledge on factors influencing mercury transformations, transport and partitioning in various ecosystems; Test sample of tropical sediment for comparability studies; Database of bio-indicator measurements (hair, blood, and urine, etc.) of human Hg exposure in contaminated tropical ecosystems; and Recommended countermeasures for the prevention and/or reduction of mercury contamination in polluted areas. This compilation contains country reports on the Second Research Coordination Meeting, Minamata

  9. Co-ordinated research project on health impacts of mercury cycling in contaminated environments studied by nuclear techniques. Report on the second research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The specific research objective of this coordinated research project is to study and assess the factors influencing the dynamics of Hg cycling and its impact on human health in mercury contaminated ecosystems, especially in tropical environments, using radioisotopes and enriched stable isotope tracers and/or complementary analytical techniques. Areas of research include: Evaluation of the relevant environmental factors influencing mercury transformations, transportation (mass balances), and partitioning in ecosystems; Development, validation and application of appropriate methodologies for the measurement of Hg methylation and de-methylation rates in various environmental compartments; Development, validation and application of appropriate methodologies for the measurement of Hg fluxes at natural interfaces such as sediment-water, water-air, land-air, plant-air, and saline-water-fresh-water, etc.; Determination and evaluation of the human exposure to Hg using bio-indicators such as hair, blood, and urine in light of epidemiological requirements; Preparation of an appropriate test sample of tropical sediment for comparability studies. Expected research outputs are: Recommended approaches for the determination of mercury methylation and de-methylation rates and flux measurements; A compilation of reliable data on mercury methylation and de-methylation rates and fluxes in contaminated tropical ecosystems for comparison with existing data from temperate regions; Generated knowledge on factors influencing mercury transformations, transport and partitioning in various ecosystems; Test sample of tropical sediment for comparability studies; Database of bio-indicator measurements (hair, blood, and urine, etc.) of human Hg exposure in contaminated tropical ecosystems; and Recommended countermeasures for the prevention and/or reduction of mercury contamination in polluted areas. This compilation contains country reports on the Second Research Coordination Meeting, Minamata

  10. Co-ordinated research project on health impact of mercury cycling in contaminated environments studied by nuclear techniques. Report on the final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Mercury is a global pollutant because of its ability to undergo long distance transport into the atmosphere. In view of these global concerns the IAEA has organised a CRP to elucidate the biological, chemical, and physical factors, which influence the transformations of Hg and its compounds in the ecosystem and the dynamics of the mercury recycling. Under the title 'Health impacts of mercury cycling in contaminated environments studied by nuclear techniques' the CRP was started in October 1999 and concluded in February 2004. This report provides an overview of the various activities performed under the CRP by the various participants. The overall achievements are summarized and those aspects that require a further deeper look are also pointed out. The individual country reports are also given which detail on the progress made by the respective participants, during the CRP period. It is hoped that the results would encourage further research activities on these and related issues in the respective countries with the CRP participant as a catalyst to further these studies

  11. The Osservasalute Health Report 2010: the contribution of a wide and independent Italian research network to decision making in healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Giulio de Belvis

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Italian Observatory Healthcare Report (IOHR - 8th edition [1] aims to help policy makers in the process of decision making through a set of validated indicators resulting from the multidisciplinary activity of several public health experts. Its main task is to gather comparable data on the health status and the quality of health care services throughout the Italian regions. Methods: The report adopts a European approach in order to build a benchmarking activity and the selection criteria of indicators include: meaning, feasibility and quality, comparability and reliability. Each indicator is analyzed by experts in terms of meaning, pattern, validity and limits, graphic representation; recommendations are included for decision makers. A peer reviewing is performed for quality assessment. Results: The IOHR 2010 included 96 indicators, analysed by 203 authors. Through comparable regional data coming from different sources, an overview of the Italian Health System, and a gauging of the impact that different regional organizational and institutional arrangements have on the quality of health services, have been provided. Though data analysis showed a North-South gradient in the quality and the organization of health care services, nevertheless, the overall health status of Italian population is good. Risk factors, lifestyles and prevention together with geographical and social differences in health status and service access are the main priorities. Conclusions: The IOHR helps monitoring the health status in the Italian regions through specific indicators characterized by scientific strictness. It contributes to identifying the situations of excellence and disseminating public health care control tools in order to facilitate the decision making process.

  12. Building and strengthening capacity for cardiovascular research in Africa through technical training workshops: a report of the joint course on health research methods by the Clinical Research Education Networking and Consultancy and the Ivorian Society of Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzekem, Bonaventure Suiru; Kacou, Jean Baptiste; Abanda, Martin; Kramoh, Euloge; Yapobi, Yves; Kingue, Samuel; Kengne, Andre Pascal; Dzudie, Anastase

    Africa bears a quarter of the global burden of disease but contributes less than 2% of the global research publications on health, partially due to a lack of expertise and skills to carry out scientific research. We report on a short course on research methods organised by the Clinical Research Education Networking and Consultancy (CRENC) during the third international congress of the Ivorian Cardiac Society (SICARD) in Abidjan, Cote d'Ivoire. Results from the pre- and post-test evaluation during this course showed that African researchers could contribute more to scientific research and publications, provided adequate support and investment is geared towards the identification and training of motivated early-career scientists.

  13. The Observatory Health Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Murianni

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Background: The number of indicators aiming to provide a clear picture of healthcare needs and the quality and efficiency of healthcare systems and services has proliferated in recent years. The activity of the National Observatory on Health Status in the Italian Regions is multidisciplinary, involving around 280 public health care experts, clinicians, demographers, epidemiologists, mathematicians, statisticians and economists who with their different competencies, and scientific interests aim to improve the collective health of individuals and their conditions through the use of “core indicators”. The main outcome of the National Observatory on Health Status in the Italian Regions is the “Osservasalute Report – a report on health status and the quality of healthcare assistance in the Italian Regions”.

    Methods: The Report adopts a comparative analysis, methodology and internationally validated indicators.

    Results: The results of Observatory Report show it is necessary:

    • to improve the monitoring of primary health care services (where the chronic disease could be cared through implementation of clinical path;

     • to improve in certain areas of hospital care such as caesarean deliveries, as well as the average length of stay in the pre-intervention phase, etc.;

    • to try to be more focused on the patients/citizens in our health care services; • to practice more geographical interventions to reduce the North-South divide as well as reduce gender inequity.

    Conclusions: The health status of Italian people is good with positive results and outcomes, but in the meantime some further efforts should be done especially in the South that still has to improve the quality and the organization of health care services. There are huge differences in accuracy and therefore usefulness of the reported data, both between diseases and between

  14. Environmental research programme. Ecological research. Annual report 1995. Urban-industrial landscapes, forests, agricultural landscapes, river and lake landscapes, terrestrial ecosystem research, environmental pollution and health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    In promoting ecology research, the federal ministry of science and technology (BMBF) pursues the aim to enhance understanding of the natural resources indispensable to the life of man, animals and plant societies and their interrelations, and to point out existing scope for action to preserve or replenish them. Consequently, ecology research makes an essential contribution towards effective nature conservancy and environmental protection. The interactions between climate and ecosystems also form an important part of this. With regard to topical environmental issues concerning agricultural landscapes, rivers and lakes, forests and urban-industrial agglomerations, system interrelations in representative ecosystems are investigated. The results are to be embodied in directives for the protection or appropriate use of these ecosystems in order to contribute towards a sustainable development of these types of landscapes. The book also evaluates and assesses which types of nuisances, interventions and modes of use represent hazards for the respective systems. (orig./VHE) [de

  15. Assessment of capabilities and research needs in the area of health effects of low-level ionizing radiation. A joint report to the Congress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-08-01

    The report summarizes the capabilities, research needs and on-going projects of the Environmental Protection Agency and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission related to the health effects of low-level ionizing radiation. The statutory authorities of both EPA and NRC related to radiation protection and radiation research are also briefly described. An introductory general section describes current efforts to improve Federal radiation research and general methods used by both agencies for radiation dose assessment and the estimation of the potential health effects of low-level ionizing radiation. Separate sections describe the respective authorities, needs, capabilities, and current research programs of the two agencies. The report was prepared to fulfill a requirement by the US Congress which is contained in Section 5(c) of Public Law 95-601

  16. Research Journal of Health Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AFRICAN JOURNALS ONLINE (AJOL) · Journals · Advanced Search · USING AJOL ... The Research Journal of Health Sciences is dedicated to promoting high quality research work in the field of health and related biological sciences. It aligns ...

  17. Native Health Research Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Indian Health Board) Welcome to the Native Health Database. Please enter your search terms. Basic Search Advanced ... To learn more about searching the Native Health Database, click here. Tutorial Video The NHD has made ...

  18. Health Physics Division annual report for the period ending December 31, 1972 Part I : Research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1973-01-01

    The Health Physics Division of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India) is responsible for: (i) assessment and control of radiation and industrial hazards in various research establishments and industrial installations of the Department of Atomic Energy and (ii) prescribing limits and conditions in respect of waste releases to the environment from the above establishments and installations. For effective discharge of these responsibilities, the Division is engaged in various research programmes in the following areas: (1) radiation dosimetry (2) instrumentation (3) pollution (4) environmental radioactivity, both natural and artificial (5) radioactive contamination and nuclear safety (6) industrial hygiene and safety (7) radioecology (8) micrometeorology. These programmes are described in brief. (M.G.B.)

  19. Research report 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Scottish Universities Research and Reactor Centre (SURRC) at East Kilbride provides research and teaching facilities associated with a research reactor for the Scottish Universities. The document contains details of current (1994) research programs. Research covers a broad range of subjects, often pursued with the collaboration of other institutions. A wide range of experimental facilities exists funded by a mixture of grants and commercial contracts. (UK)

  20. Inventory of Health and Physical Fitness Promotion Materials, Research and Articles from Periodicals of General Interest. Final Report. Report No. 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzo, Robert; And Others

    This document reports on an effort to identify, collect, and catalog: (1) various fitness- and health-related promotion materials available to the general public by federal, state, and local agencies; and (2) informational items distributed by the private sector. Printed materials are categorized as: (1) currently available brochures and pamphlets…

  1. Research report 1973

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scientific progress achieved in 1973 is reported in 29 contributions. The main problems are: a) plasma heating and waves, b) plasma focus and shock wave investigations, c) short-time technique and d) laser applications in plasma diagnostics. Furthermore, the report contains an index of the scientific reports, publications, lectures and dissertations in the period under review. (GG/LH) [de

  2. Research report 1972

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A report is given in 28 contributions on the scientific progress achieved in 1972. The main problems are: a) plasma heating and waves in the plasma, b) plasma focus c) short-time technique and d) laser applications. The report furthermore contains an index of the scientific reports, publications, lectures and dissertations in the period under review. (GG/LH) [de

  3. Short research report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-10-02

    Oct 2, 2016 ... education as part of health sector strengthening. Several governments in ... A sharing of resources through regional and international partnerships has been established. ... J Southern African Studies 2013;39(2):465-480.

  4. Short Research Report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-09-02

    Sep 2, 2017 ... Zambia is a nation of nine million people, and has too few physicians to meet the country's health needs. Following the ... A needs assessment was undertaken to better understand the landscape into which Zambian family medicine is being placed. Methods. .... leaders within Zambia's healthcare hierarchy.

  5. Short Research Report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-12-02

    Dec 2, 2017 ... pants in the pre-test assessment and training; 14 completed all three sessions, i.e. the pre-test ... checklist was used in a pre- and post-test design to assess procedural proficiency, and a rating system categorised scores. ... 3 Skills Laboratory, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Pretoria, South Africa.

  6. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    The International Journal of Health Research is an online international journal ... The journal is devoted to the promotion of health sciences and related disciplines (including medicine, pharmacy, nursing, biotechnology, cell and molecular ...

  7. [Radiobiology research.] Annual report, fiscal year 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-11-01

    This report summarizes research activities for the period from 1 October 1983 to 30 September 1984 at the Laboratory for Energy-related Health Research (LEHR). This report has been divided into several topical sections outlining the scope of research at LEHR including ''Radionuclide Toxicity Studies,'' ''External Radiation Effect Studies,'' ''Skeletal Biology Studies,'' ''Cellular and Molecular Studies,'' ''Biomedical and Toxicological Studies,'' ''Physical and Chemical Studies,'' and ''Nuclear Medical Studies.''

  8. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    The International Journal of Health Research is an online international journal ... disciplines (including medicine, pharmacy, nursing, biotechnology, cell and ... collaboration among scientists, the industry and the healthcare professionals.

  9. Researching health promotion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Platt, Stephen David; Watson, Jonathan

    2000-01-01

    ... the progress towards developing and implementing health promotion interventions that: * * * * are theoretically grounded, socio-culturally appropriate and sustainable involve the redistribution of resources towards those most in need reflect the principles of equity, participation and empowerment incorporate rigorous, methodologically ...

  10. Ethical challenges that arise at the community interface of health research: village reporters' experiences in Western Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantler, Tracey; Otewa, Faith; Onyango, Peter; Okoth, Ben; Odhiambo, Frank; Parker, Michael; Geissler, Paul Wenzel

    2013-04-01

    Community Engagement (CE) has been presented by bio-ethicists and scientists as a straightforward and unequivocal good which can minimize the risks of exploitation and ensure a fair distribution of research benefits in developing countries. By means of ethnographic fieldwork undertaken in Kenya between 2007 and 2009 we explored how CE is understood and enacted in paediatric vaccine trials conducted by the Kenyan Medical Research Institute and the US Centers for Disease Control (KEMRI/CDC). In this paper we focus on the role of paid volunteers who act as an interface between villagers KEMRI/CDC. Village Reporters' (VRs) position of being both with the community and with KEMRI/CDC is advantageous for the conduct of trials. However it is also problematic in terms of exercising trust, balancing allegiances and representing community views. VRs role is shaped by ambiguities related to their employment status and their dual accountability to researchers and their villages. VRs are understandably careful to stress their commitment to self-less community service since it augments their respectability at community level and opens up opportunities for financial gain and self-development. Simultaneously VRs association with KEMRI/CDC and proximity to trial participants requires them to negotiate implicit and explicit expectations for material and medical assistance in a cultural setting in which much importance is placed on sharing and mutuality. To ensure continuity of productive interactions between VRs, and similar community intermediaries, and researchers, open discussion is needed about the problematic aspects of relational ethics, issues concerning undue influence, power relations and negotiating expectations. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Short Research Report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-06-02

    Jun 2, 2017 ... The objective of this study was for 2nd-year students enrolled for ... Ethical clearance was obtained from the DUT Research Ethics Committee ... (82%) and that it helped them to gain an easier and better understanding of.

  12. Constrained Optimization Methods in Health Services Research-An Introduction: Report 1 of the ISPOR Optimization Methods Emerging Good Practices Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crown, William; Buyukkaramikli, Nasuh; Thokala, Praveen; Morton, Alec; Sir, Mustafa Y; Marshall, Deborah A; Tosh, Jon; Padula, William V; Ijzerman, Maarten J; Wong, Peter K; Pasupathy, Kalyan S

    2017-03-01

    Providing health services with the greatest possible value to patients and society given the constraints imposed by patient characteristics, health care system characteristics, budgets, and so forth relies heavily on the design of structures and processes. Such problems are complex and require a rigorous and systematic approach to identify the best solution. Constrained optimization is a set of methods designed to identify efficiently and systematically the best solution (the optimal solution) to a problem characterized by a number of potential solutions in the presence of identified constraints. This report identifies 1) key concepts and the main steps in building an optimization model; 2) the types of problems for which optimal solutions can be determined in real-world health applications; and 3) the appropriate optimization methods for these problems. We first present a simple graphical model based on the treatment of "regular" and "severe" patients, which maximizes the overall health benefit subject to time and budget constraints. We then relate it back to how optimization is relevant in health services research for addressing present day challenges. We also explain how these mathematical optimization methods relate to simulation methods, to standard health economic analysis techniques, and to the emergent fields of analytics and machine learning. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Improving Health Care Efficiency and Quality Using Tablet Personal Computers to Collect Research-Quality, Patient-Reported Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abernethy, Amy P; Herndon, James E; Wheeler, Jane L; Patwardhan, Meenal; Shaw, Heather; Lyerly, H Kim; Weinfurt, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    Objective To determine whether e/Tablets (wireless tablet computers used in community oncology clinics to collect review of systems information at point of care) are feasible, acceptable, and valid for collecting research-quality data in academic oncology. Data/Setting Primary/Duke Breast Cancer Clinic. Design Pilot study enrolling sample of 66 breast cancer patients. Methods Data were collected using paper- and e/Tablet-based surveys: Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy General, Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast, MD Anderson Symptom Inventory, Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy (FACIT), Self-Efficacy; and two questionnaires: feasibility, satisfaction. Principal Findings Patients supported e/Tablets as: easy to read (94 percent), easy to respond to (98 percent), comfortable weight (87 percent). Generally, electronic responses validly reflected responses provided by standard paper data collection on nearly all subscales tested. Conclusions e/Tablets offer a valid, feasible, acceptable method for collecting research-quality, patient-reported outcomes data in outpatient academic oncology. PMID:18761678

  14. Research laboratories annual report 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The publication is the 1994 annual report of the Israel atomic energy commission in a new format. The report includes three invited papers and a bibliographic list of publications by the commission scientific researches

  15. Research laboratories annual report 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    The publication is the 1994 annual report of the Israel atomic energy commission in a new format. The report includes three invited papers and a bibliographic list of publications by the commission scientific researches.

  16. Research Report: HIV/AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adolescent Brain Comorbidity College-Age & Young Adults Criminal Justice Drugged Driving Drug Testing Drugs and the Brain ... research findings for the educated lay public, legislators, educational groups, and practitioners. The series reports on research ...

  17. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    It seeks particularly (but not exclusively) to encourage multidisciplinary research and collaboration ... Submission of Manuscript: The International Journal of Health Research uses a journal management software to allow authors ... access to medicine, infrastructural decay, quality of health professional, poor adherence to ...

  18. Research report 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    In 1976 the activities coordinated with the sientific programs of the IPP Garching have been continued. In the section 'wave and plasma heating', a) the THETA-pinch experiment has been finished, b) the investigations concerning the propagation of linearly polarized Alfven waves have been extended to wave types without axial symmetry, and c) for an investigation of the coupling of waves to current heated plasmas, the construction of a linear set-up has been started. In the section 'laser applications', the theoretically expected advantages of time-resolved scattering diagnostics, with a pulsed laser could be verified experimentally. For stationary scattering in the IR (10.6 μm), the energy-resolved measurement of the ion line of the magnetic-field-stabilized high-current arc could be demonstrated. For the pulsed scattering diagnostic at 10.6 μm with modulation detection, preliminary data of the thermal high current arc plasma spectrum have been recorded. The development of a stationary single-mode CO 2 laser for time-resolved scattering in the IR region with modulation detection has been put forward. In the section 'short-time techniques', the pulse width of the high-pressure nitrogen lasers could be reduced to tau = 40 psec at 15 bar. Single pulses smaller than 10 psec could be obtained by a combination of a nitrogen laser with an extremely short resonator used as a dye-laser. In the section 'dense plasma' ('plasma focus') the scaling laws of the stored energy and neutron yield have been studied. The theoretical work for interpretation of the processes occuring during the dense phase of the focus and the preparations for radiation absorption near the plasma frequency have been put forward. The annual report includes a complete list of scientific publications, reports and statements of 1976. (GG) [de

  19. Co-ordinated research project on health impacts of mercury cycling in contaminated environments studied by nuclear techniques. Report on the first research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The specific research objective of this coordinated research project is to study and assess the factors influencing the dynamics of Hg cycling and its impact on human health in mercury contaminated ecosystems, especially in tropical environments, using radioisotopes and enriched stable isotope tracers and/or complementary analytical techniques. Areas of research include: Evaluation of the relevant environmental factors influencing mercury transformations, transportation (mass balances), and partitioning in ecosystems; Development, validation and application of appropriate methodologies for the measurement of Hg methylation and de-methylation rates in various environmental compartments; Development, validation and application of appropriate methodologies for the measurement of Hg fluxes at natural interfaces such as sediment-water, water-air, land-air, plant-air, and saline-water-fresh-water, etc.; Determination and evaluation of the human exposure to Hg using bio-indicators such as hair, blood, and urine in light of epidemiological requirements; Preparation of an appropriate test sample of tropical sediment for comparability studies. Expected research outputs are: Recommended approaches for the determination of mercury methylation and de-methylation rates and flux measurements; A compilation of reliable data on mercury methylation and de-methylation rates and fluxes in contaminated tropical ecosystems for comparison with existing data from temperate regions; Generated knowledge on factors influencing mercury transformations, transport and partitioning in various ecosystems; Test sample of tropical sediment for comparability studies; Database of bio-indicator measurements (hair, blood, and urine, etc.) of human Hg exposure in contaminated tropical ecosystems; and Recommended countermeasures for the prevention and/or reduction of mercury contamination in polluted areas.

  20. Co-ordinated research project on health impacts of mercury cycling in contaminated environments studied by nuclear techniques. Report on the first research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The specific research objective of this coordinated research project is to study and assess the factors influencing the dynamics of Hg cycling and its impact on human health in mercury contaminated ecosystems, especially in tropical environments, using radioisotopes and enriched stable isotope tracers and/or complementary analytical techniques. Areas of research include: Evaluation of the relevant environmental factors influencing mercury transformations, transportation (mass balances), and partitioning in ecosystems; Development, validation and application of appropriate methodologies for the measurement of Hg methylation and de-methylation rates in various environmental compartments; Development, validation and application of appropriate methodologies for the measurement of Hg fluxes at natural interfaces such as sediment-water, water-air, land-air, plant-air, and saline-water-fresh-water, etc.; Determination and evaluation of the human exposure to Hg using bio-indicators such as hair, blood, and urine in light of epidemiological requirements; Preparation of an appropriate test sample of tropical sediment for comparability studies. Expected research outputs are: Recommended approaches for the determination of mercury methylation and de-methylation rates and flux measurements; A compilation of reliable data on mercury methylation and de-methylation rates and fluxes in contaminated tropical ecosystems for comparison with existing data from temperate regions; Generated knowledge on factors influencing mercury transformations, transport and partitioning in various ecosystems; Test sample of tropical sediment for comparability studies; Database of bio-indicator measurements (hair, blood, and urine, etc.) of human Hg exposure in contaminated tropical ecosystems; and Recommended countermeasures for the prevention and/or reduction of mercury contamination in polluted areas

  1. Underrepresented minority high school and college students report STEM-pipeline sustaining gains after participating in the Loma Linda University Summer Health Disparities Research Program.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena M Salto

    Full Text Available An urgent need exists for graduate and professional schools to establish evidence-based STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math pipeline programs to increase the diversity of the biomedical workforce. An untapped yet promising pool of willing participants are capable high school students that have a strong STEM interest but may lack the skills and the guided mentoring needed to succeed in competitive STEM fields. This study evaluates and compares the impact of the Loma Linda University (LLU Summer Health Disparities Research Program on high school (HS and undergraduate (UG student participants. The primary focus of our summer research experience (SRE is to enhance the research self-efficacy of the participants by actively involving them in a research project and by providing the students with personalized mentoring and targeted career development activities, including education on health disparities. The results of our study show that our SRE influenced terminal degree intent and increased participant willingness to incorporate research into future careers for both the HS and the UG groups. The quantitative data shows that both the HS and the UG participants reported large, statistically significant gains in self-assessed research skills and research self-efficacy. Both participant groups identified the hands-on research and the mentor experience as the most valuable aspects of our SRE and reported increased science skills, increased confidence in science ability and increased motivation and affirmation to pursue a science career. The follow-up data indicates that 67% of the HS participants and 90% of the UG participants graduated from college with a STEM degree; for those who enrolled in graduate education, 61% and 43% enrolled in LLU, respectively. We conclude that structured SREs can be highly effective STEM strengthening interventions for both UG and HS students and may be a way to measurably increase institutional and biomedical

  2. BMFT. Subproject environmental research, ecological research. Annual report 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes the 1991 ecological research activities (ecosystems research, urban ecology, tropical ecology, forest decline, ecology of soils and waters, ecotoxicology, environmental pollution and health, protection of biotopes and protection of the species) which the project sponsors 'biology, energy, ecology' (Forschungszentrum Juelich) and 'environmental research and climatological research' (GSF-Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit) have been supervising on behalf of the Federal Ministry for Research and Technology to promote the subproject 'environmental research'. A general survey introduces the promoted projects, and standardized data sheets briefly introduce the individual activities. The appendix gives the project indices, the indices of joint projects, and a list of the supported companies and institutions. (BBR) [de

  3. Research report--Volunteer infant feeding and care counselors: a health education intervention to improve mother and child health and reduce mortality in rural Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosato, Mikey; Lewycka, Sonia; Mwansambo, Charles; Kazembe, Peter; Phiri, Tambosi; Chapota, Hilda; Vergnano, Stefania; Newell, Marie-Louise; Osrin, David; Costello, Anthony

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this report is to describe a health education intervention involving volunteer infant feeding and care counselors being implemented in Mchinji district, Malawi. The intervention was established in January 2004 and involves 72 volunteer infant feeding and care counselors, supervised by 24 government Health Surveillance Assistants, covering 355 villages in Mchinji district. It aims to change the knowledge, attitudes and behaviour of women to promote exclusive breastfeeding and other infant care practices. The main target population are women of child bearing age who are visited at five key points during pregnancy and after birth. Where possible, their partners are also involved. The visits cover exclusive breastfeeding and other important neonatal and infant care practices. Volunteers are provided with an intervention manual and picture book. Resource inputs are low and include training allowances and equipment for counselors and supervisors, and a salary, equipment and materials for a coordinator. It is hypothesized that the counselors will encourage informational and attitudinal change to enhance motivation and risk reduction skills and self-efficacy to promote exclusive breastfeeding and other infant care practices and reduce infant mortality. The impact is being evaluated through a cluster randomised controlled trial and results will be reported in 2012.

  4. Strengthening public health research for improved health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Gea-Izquierdo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Research in public health is a range that includes from fundamental research to research in clinical practice, including novel advances, evaluation of results and their spreading. Actually, public health research is considered multidisciplinary incorporating numerous factors in its development. Establishing as a mainstay the scientific method, deepens in basic research, clinical epidemiological research and health services. The premise of quality and relevance is reflected in international scientific research, and in the daily work and good biomedical practices that should be included in the research as a common task. Therefore, the research must take a proactive stance of inquiry, integrating a concern planned and ongoing development of knowledge. This requires improve international coordination, seeking a balance between basic and applied research as well as science and technology. Thus research cannot be considered without innovation, weighing up the people and society needs. Acting on knowledge of scientific production processes requires greater procedures thoroughness and the effective expression of the results. It is noted as essential to establish explicit principles in review and evaluation of the adjustments of actions, always within the standards of scientific conduct and fairness of the research process. In the biomedical scientific lines it have to be consider general assessments that occur related to the impact and quality of health research, mostly leading efforts to areas that require further attention. However, other subject areas that may be deficient or with lower incidence in the population should not be overlook. Health research as a source of new applications and development provides knowledge, improving well-being. However, it is understandable without considering the needs and social demands. Therefore, in public health research and to improve the health of the population, we must refine and optimize the prevention and

  5. Guidelines for Reporting Medical Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Mathilde; Thomsen, Simon Francis

    2016-01-01

    As a response to a low quality of reporting of medical research, guidelines for several different types of study design have been developed to secure accurate reporting and transparency for reviewers and readers from the scientific community. Herein, we review and discuss the six most widely...... accepted and used guidelines: PRISMA, CONSORT, STROBE, MOOSE, STARD, and SPIRIT. It is concluded that the implementation of these guidelines has led to only a moderate improvement in the quality of the reporting of medical research. There is still much work to be done to achieve accurate and transparent...... reporting of medical research findings....

  6. Guidelines for Field Research Reports

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Jean-Claude Dumais

    Your Award Grant Agreement specifies the number of reports required throughout your tenure as well as the due dates for such reports. The form of your report will vary, depending on the nature of your research, your methodological approach, and your participation in related activities such as conferences, etc. However ...

  7. Research report 1976. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The research report describes the work of the faculties of Bochum university in 1976, the so-called 'overlapping institutes' and the special research sectors 'biological signal reception and processing', ('Bionach'), 'plasma physics Bochum/Juelich', and the institute for development research and policies. (HK) [de

  8. Research report 1976. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The research report describes the work of the faculties of Bochum university in 1976, the so-called 'overlapping institutes' and the special research sectors 'biological signal reception and processing', ('Bionach'), 'plasma physics Bochum/Juelich', and the insitute for development research and policies. (HK) [de

  9. Research report 1975/1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, M.D.; Lakey, J.R.A.

    1976-09-01

    The activities of the Royal Naval College, Greenwich, Department of Nuclear Science and Technology, during 1975/1976 are reported under sections entitled: general; radiation physics and technology; environmental studies; chemistry and materials; engineering research; computing; the Jason Research and Training Reactor; personal research interest. (U.K.)

  10. Health physics research abstracts No. 13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-05-01

    No. 13 of Health Physics Research Abstracts is the continuation of a series of bulletins published by the IAEA since 1967 and which collect reports from Member States on health physics research in progress or just completed. The present issue contains 370 reports received up to March 1987 and covers the following topics: Personnel monitoring, dosimetry, assessment of dose to man, operational radiation protection techniques, radiation levels, effects of radiation, environmental studies, pathways and monitoring, analysis and evaluation of radiation hazards resulting from the operation of nuclear facilities, radiation accidents and emergency preparedness, epidemiology of radiation damage, optimization of radiation protection, research programmes and projects

  11. Health physics research abstracts No. 12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-11-01

    The No. 12 of Health Physics Research Abstracts is the continuation of a series of Bulletins published by the IAEA since 1967 and which collect reports from Member States on Health Physics research in progress or just completed. The present issue contains 386 reports received up to December 1984 and covering the following topics: personnel monitoring, dosimetry, assessment of dose to man, operational radiation protection techniques, biological effects of radiations, environmental studies, pathways and monitoring, radiation hazards resulting from the operation of nuclear facilities, radiation accidents and emergency plans, epidemiology of radiation damage, optimization of radiation protection, research programs and projects

  12. Annual report of Radiation Effects Research Foundation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The Radiation Effects Research Foundation was established in April, 1975, as a private nonprofit Japanese Foundation supported equally by the Government of Japan through the Ministry of Health and Welfare, and the Government of the United States through the National Academy of Sciences under contract with the Energy Research and Development Administration. First, the messages from the chairman and the vice-chairman are described. In the annual report, the review of ABCC-RERF studies of atomic bomb survivors, the summary of research activities, the research projects, the technical report abstracts, the research papers published in Japanese and foreign journals, and the oral presentation and lectures, all from April 1, 1978, to March 31, 1979, are reported. Also the report from the Secretariat and the appendixes are given. The surveys and researches carried out in Hiroshima and Nagasaki have offered very valuable informations to the atomic bomb survivors. Many fears were eliminated, medical interests were given to the serious effects of the exposure to atomic bombs, and many things concerning the cancer induced by radiation were elucidated. The knowledges obtained will save many human lives in future by utilizing them for setting up the health and safety standard in the case of handling ionizing radiation. The progress in researches such as life span study, adult health study, pathology study, genetics program, special cancer program and so on is reported. (Kako, I.)

  13. Mapping to Estimate Health-State Utility from Non-Preference-Based Outcome Measures: An ISPOR Good Practices for Outcomes Research Task Force Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wailoo, Allan J; Hernandez-Alava, Monica; Manca, Andrea; Mejia, Aurelio; Ray, Joshua; Crawford, Bruce; Botteman, Marc; Busschbach, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Economic evaluation conducted in terms of cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) provides information that decision makers find useful in many parts of the world. Ideally, clinical studies designed to assess the effectiveness of health technologies would include outcome measures that are directly linked to health utility to calculate QALYs. Often this does not happen, and even when it does, clinical studies may be insufficient for a cost-utility assessment. Mapping can solve this problem. It uses an additional data set to estimate the relationship between outcomes measured in clinical studies and health utility. This bridges the evidence gap between available evidence on the effect of a health technology in one metric and the requirement for decision makers to express it in a different one (QALYs). In 2014, ISPOR established a Good Practices for Outcome Research Task Force for mapping studies. This task force report provides recommendations to analysts undertaking mapping studies, those that use the results in cost-utility analysis, and those that need to critically review such studies. The recommendations cover all areas of mapping practice: the selection of data sets for the mapping estimation, model selection and performance assessment, reporting standards, and the use of results including the appropriate reflection of variability and uncertainty. This report is unique because it takes an international perspective, is comprehensive in its coverage of the aspects of mapping practice, and reflects the current state of the art. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Health research over 50 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohde, A. [CONCAWE, Brussels (Belgium)

    2013-04-01

    CONCAWE has been working on health issues since its formation in 1963. In the early years, the focus of this work was on occupational health hazards and risks in the refining industry. Over the years, especially in the past decade, broader human health issues have been at the centre of environmental and regulatory debate, with 'health effects' increasingly being the driver behind environmental improvement and occupational health initiatives. Against this background, CONCAWE's health research has expanded to deal with these new and emerging issues. Health issues are complex and need to be addressed by experts in several different areas. Through its member companies, CONCAWE has been able to maintain, as its 'Health Management Group', a strong team of occupational physicians, toxicologists, industrial hygienists, exposure and risk assessors, and product stewards with particular expertise in oil industry-related issues. Academic researchers are also called upon to undertake specialised research, as appropriate. In the 40th anniversary Review (October 2003), we reviewed CONCAWE's involvement in three initiatives: (1) the Clean Air for Europe Programme (CAFE), an EU strategy for air quality management; (2) chemicals legislation and the increasing demand to inform the public about health and environmental hazards of chemicals; and (3) a global environment and health strategy with a special focus on children (EU SCALE initiative). Interestingly, these initiatives from 10 years ago continue to influence CONCAWE's work on health research, its objectives being to identify key healthrelated issues and gaps, develop cost-effective, leveraged research programmes to address these gaps, and provide CONCAWE members with advice, guidance and support on the significance of these issues based on scientific and professional evaluations. In this 50th anniversary article, we summarise CONCAWE's involvement in three new or expanded areas: chemicals legislation and its requirements under

  15. Nuclear Safety Research Department annual report 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majborn, B.; Damkjaer, A.; Nielsen, S.P.; Nonboel, E.

    2001-08-01

    The report presents a summary of the work of the Nuclear Safety Research Department in 2000. The department's research and development activities were organized in two research programmes: 'Radiation Protection and Reactor Safety' and 'Radioecology and Tracer Studies'. In addition the department was responsible for the tasks 'Applied Health Physics and Emergency Preparedness', 'Dosimetry', 'Environmental Monitoring', and Irradiation and Isotope Services'. Lists of publications, committee memberships and staff members are included. (au)

  16. Normative and counter-normative stress messages and symptom reporting: implications for health promotion and a methodological artefact for stress research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Eamonn; Lawrence, Claire

    2013-05-01

    There is increasing use of counter-normative health messages (i.e., evidence-based health information about cause-effect relationships that run counter to shared normative beliefs, e.g., stress can lead to personal growth). The current studies examine the effect of normative and counter-normative messages about stress on levels of symptom reporting. Predictions are derived from reactance, social comparison, and self-enhancement theories. Two studies focus on the development of the messages, and two experimental studies examine the effect of manipulating normative and counter-normative messages on symptom reports. The final study controls for mere-measurement effects and explores the role of stress process variables (appraisals and coping). Exposure to a normative message (stress causes ill health) results in reduced symptom reporting compared to a counter-normative message (stress provides challenge, growth, and development) and control groups. The results suggest that people may use symptom reporting strategically to indicate coping. Based on the argument that beliefs about stress and health are stored as mental models, the theoretical associations derived from stress theory are only observed when a normative message is presented. Counter-normative stress messages may carry no tangible benefits compared to normative messages. Some stress research may suffer from inherent methodological bias when normative information is provided in information and consent sheets. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? At present, nothing is known about counter-normative health messages, despite the fact that they are becoming widely used as a public intervention. What does this study add? A clear operational definition of counter-normative messages. A test of three competing theories for counter-normative messages that focus of the stress-symptom link. Demonstrating for the first time, that in the domain of stress and health, counter-normative messages

  17. Selecting a dynamic simulation modeling method for health care delivery research-part 2: report of the ISPOR Dynamic Simulation Modeling Emerging Good Practices Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Deborah A; Burgos-Liz, Lina; IJzerman, Maarten J; Crown, William; Padula, William V; Wong, Peter K; Pasupathy, Kalyan S; Higashi, Mitchell K; Osgood, Nathaniel D

    2015-03-01

    In a previous report, the ISPOR Task Force on Dynamic Simulation Modeling Applications in Health Care Delivery Research Emerging Good Practices introduced the fundamentals of dynamic simulation modeling and identified the types of health care delivery problems for which dynamic simulation modeling can be used more effectively than other modeling methods. The hierarchical relationship between the health care delivery system, providers, patients, and other stakeholders exhibits a level of complexity that ought to be captured using dynamic simulation modeling methods. As a tool to help researchers decide whether dynamic simulation modeling is an appropriate method for modeling the effects of an intervention on a health care system, we presented the System, Interactions, Multilevel, Understanding, Loops, Agents, Time, Emergence (SIMULATE) checklist consisting of eight elements. This report builds on the previous work, systematically comparing each of the three most commonly used dynamic simulation modeling methods-system dynamics, discrete-event simulation, and agent-based modeling. We review criteria for selecting the most suitable method depending on 1) the purpose-type of problem and research questions being investigated, 2) the object-scope of the model, and 3) the method to model the object to achieve the purpose. Finally, we provide guidance for emerging good practices for dynamic simulation modeling in the health sector, covering all aspects, from the engagement of decision makers in the model design through model maintenance and upkeep. We conclude by providing some recommendations about the application of these methods to add value to informed decision making, with an emphasis on stakeholder engagement, starting with the problem definition. Finally, we identify areas in which further methodological development will likely occur given the growing "volume, velocity and variety" and availability of "big data" to provide empirical evidence and techniques

  18. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    Reference Ranges for Fasting Profiles and Oral Glucose Tolerance Test ... Submission of Manuscript: The International Journal of Health Research uses a journal management software to allow .... medical textbooks [4, 5] and internet. In the.

  19. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    2008-11-03

    Nov 3, 2008 ... The International Journal of Health Research is an online ... forum for the communication and evaluation of data, methods and findings ... Introduction ... worms are pathogenic for human beings. .... McGraw Hill Co., New York,.

  20. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    The International Journal of Health Research is an online international journal allowing ... forum for the communication and evaluation of data, methods and findings in health sciences and related ... Conclusion: Permeation rate of drugs across the ..... New Delhi, McGraw Hill Medical Publishing ... Human skin permeation of.

  1. Research laboratories annual report 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-08-01

    The 1990-1991 activities, of the Israel Atomic Energy Commission's research laboratories, are presented in this report. The main fields of interest are chemistry and material sciences, life and environmental sciences, nuclear physics and technology

  2. Health effects of coal technologies: research needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-09-01

    In this 1977 Environmental Message, President Carter directed the establishment of a joint program to identify the health and environmental problems associated with advanced energy technologies and to review the adequacy of present research programs. In response to the President's directive, representatives of three agencies formed the Federal Interagency Committee on the Health and Environmental Effects of Energy Technologies. This report was prepared by the Health Effects Working Group on Coal Technologies for the Committee. In this report, the major health-related problems associated with conventional coal mining, storage, transportation, and combustion, and with chemical coal cleaning, in situ gasification, fluidized bed combustion, magnetohydrodynamic combustion, cocombustion of coal-oil mixtures, and cocombustion of coal with municipal solid waste are identified. The report also contains recommended research required to address the identified problems.

  3. Accelerating Scientific Advancement for Pediatric Rare Lung Disease Research. Report from a National Institutes of Health-NHLBI Workshop, September 3 and 4, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Lisa R; Trapnell, Bruce C; Mandl, Kenneth D; Swarr, Daniel T; Wambach, Jennifer A; Blaisdell, Carol J

    2016-12-01

    Pediatric rare lung disease (PRLD) is a term that refers to a heterogeneous group of rare disorders in children. In recent years, this field has experienced significant progress marked by scientific discoveries, multicenter and interdisciplinary collaborations, and efforts of patient advocates. Although genetic mechanisms underlie many PRLDs, pathogenesis remains uncertain for many of these disorders. Furthermore, epidemiology and natural history are insufficiently defined, and therapies are limited. To develop strategies to accelerate scientific advancement for PRLD research, the NHLBI of the National Institutes of Health convened a strategic planning workshop on September 3 and 4, 2015. The workshop brought together a group of scientific experts, intramural and extramural investigators, and advocacy groups with the following objectives: (1) to discuss the current state of PRLD research; (2) to identify scientific gaps and barriers to increasing research and improving outcomes for PRLDs; (3) to identify technologies, tools, and reagents that could be leveraged to accelerate advancement of research in this field; and (4) to develop priorities for research aimed at improving patient outcomes and quality of life. This report summarizes the workshop discussion and provides specific recommendations to guide future research in PRLD.

  4. Garbage in, Garbage Out: Data Collection, Quality Assessment and Reporting Standards for Social Media Data Use in Health Research, Infodemiology and Digital Disease Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoonsang; Huang, Jidong; Emery, Sherry

    2016-02-26

    Social media have transformed the communications landscape. People increasingly obtain news and health information online and via social media. Social media platforms also serve as novel sources of rich observational data for health research (including infodemiology, infoveillance, and digital disease detection detection). While the number of studies using social data is growing rapidly, very few of these studies transparently outline their methods for collecting, filtering, and reporting those data. Keywords and search filters applied to social data form the lens through which researchers may observe what and how people communicate about a given topic. Without a properly focused lens, research conclusions may be biased or misleading. Standards of reporting data sources and quality are needed so that data scientists and consumers of social media research can evaluate and compare methods and findings across studies. We aimed to develop and apply a framework of social media data collection and quality assessment and to propose a reporting standard, which researchers and reviewers may use to evaluate and compare the quality of social data across studies. We propose a conceptual framework consisting of three major steps in collecting social media data: develop, apply, and validate search filters. This framework is based on two criteria: retrieval precision (how much of retrieved data is relevant) and retrieval recall (how much of the relevant data is retrieved). We then discuss two conditions that estimation of retrieval precision and recall rely on--accurate human coding and full data collection--and how to calculate these statistics in cases that deviate from the two ideal conditions. We then apply the framework on a real-world example using approximately 4 million tobacco-related tweets collected from the Twitter firehose. We developed and applied a search filter to retrieve e-cigarette-related tweets from the archive based on three keyword categories: devices

  5. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    Research on this matter should also be encouraged to inform future practice. Keywords: Volunteering; Health research; Nonprofit organization. Mohammad A Al- ... “organizations”. According to Porter and Kramer. [3], the number of volunteer organizations in the. USA is increasing which might help address the society's high ...

  6. Health physics research abstracts no. 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-07-01

    The present issue No. 11 of Health Physics Research Abstracts is the continuation of a series of Bulletins published by the Agency since 1967. They collect reports from Member States on Health Physics research in progress or just completed. The main aim in issuing such reports is to draw attention to work that is about to be published and to enable interested scientists to obtain further information through direct correspondence with the investigators. The attention of users of this publication is drawn to the fact that abstracts of published documents on Health Physics are published eventually in INIS Atomindex, which is one of the output products of the Agency's International Nuclear Information System. The present issue contains 235 reports received up to December 1983 from the following Member States. In parentheses the country's ISO code and number of reports are given

  7. Research report 1978/1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakey, J.R.A.; Lynn, N.M.

    1979-11-01

    The report of the Department of Nuclear Science and Technology, Royal Naval College, Greenwich, covers the following topics: general; personnel; education; formation of Nuclear Marine Technology Unit and progress report on the work of the Unit; radiation physics and technology; marine environment; surface chemistry in reactor systems; engineering research; computing; library and publications. (U.K.)

  8. Information Logistics Research report 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, A.; Hajdasinski, A.K.; Willems, J.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this research report is to further explore the concept of Information Logistics (IL), which refers to the usage and dispatch of information and methods of logistics able to support those processes. This report is based upon 6 questions that examine IL in organizations, healthcare

  9. Research laboratories annual report 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    The report book presents the various research activities within the Israel Atomic Energy Commission, during 1992 calendar year. The discipline reported here are (by chapters): theoretical physics and theoretical chemistry, optics and lasers, solid states and nuclear physics, material sciences, chemistry, radiopharmaceuticals, labelled compounds and environmental studies, radiation effects, dosimetry and protection, instrumentation and techniques

  10. Understanding FE Mergers. Research Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, Natasha

    2009-01-01

    This report presents research findings and discussion to help develop an understanding of what gives rise to mergers and, when they do happen, what makes them work. The research has focused on merger activity between further education (FE) colleges since incorporation in 1993. Mergers are highly contextual, and part of ensuring success is…

  11. Vulnerable participants in health research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Helle Merete; Nanna, Kappel

    2011-01-01

    Ethical guidelines for conducting research are embedded in the Helsinki declaration of 1964. We contend that these abstract and intentionally universal guidelines need to be appropriated for social and health care research in which purpose and methods often deviate from medical research. The guid......Ethical guidelines for conducting research are embedded in the Helsinki declaration of 1964. We contend that these abstract and intentionally universal guidelines need to be appropriated for social and health care research in which purpose and methods often deviate from medical research...... and problems of vulnerable patients and - at the same time - respect their integrity without exposing them unnecessarily? The article illuminates the interactional construction of roles and relationships and how they affect the contextual construction of vulnerability. In this respect we demonstrate...

  12. Report of a workshop on environment and health. Evaluating European air quality research and translating priorities into actions 19-20 January 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taalman, R.; Rushton, E.; Minsavage, G.

    2010-11-01

    Scientists, academics, regulators, and representatives of industry and non-governmental organizations from some 18 countries around the world convened at the Bedford Hotel and Congress Centre, Brussels, Belgium on January 19-20, 2009 to participate in a Workshop on Environment and Health: Evaluating European Air Quality Research and Translating Priorities into Actions. The Workshop was organized by CONCAWE with contributions from the European Commission.s DG Research, Session Chairpersons and other distinguished presenters. The workshop provided scientific updates in a number of key areas including toxicology, epidemiology and exposure assessment of airborne pollutants. Invited platform presentations and submitted posters followed by facilitated discussions amongst participants resulted in a series of recommendations which are summarized in the present report.

  13. Report: Cultural Research Centre (CRC)

    OpenAIRE

    Cross-Cultural Foundation of Uganda

    2010-01-01

    This report arises from research carried out in Iganga and Namutumba districts in late 2006/early 2007 by the Cultural Research Centre (CRC), based in Jinja. Our research focus was to gauge the impact of using Lusoga as a medium of instruction (since 2005 in "pilot" lower primary classes) within and outside the classroom. This initiative was in response to a new set of circumstances in the education sector in Uganda, especially the introduction by Government of teaching in local languages in ...

  14. Health communication: lessons from research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, A V

    1981-01-01

    In discussing the lessons learned from research in the area of health communication, focus is on basic strategic issues; the scope of health communications in terms of audience, information, education and motivation approaces and India's satellite Instructional Television Experiment (SITE). Health communication is the process by which a health idea is transferred from a source, such as a primary health center, to a receiver, community, with the intention of changing the community's behavior. This involves the formulation of specific strategies for the conduct of health and family welfare communication. In the processs of health communication, it has been a common practice in India as well as in other developing countries to depend upon a plethora of communication media. Yet, despite maximum utilization of the mass media and interpersonal channels of communication, questions remain about the efficacy of the system in bringing about change. Thus, the need to draw upon lessons from research becomes obvious. Communication effectiveness researches have concentrated on 3 basic strategic issues: the question of physical reception of messages by the audience; interpretation or understanding of messages on the part of the audience in accordance with the intention of the communicator; and effectiveness of communication on the cognitive, affective and behavioral dimensions of the audience. Innumberable researches in communication have provided several lessons which have expanded the scope of health communication. This expansion can be observed in terms of audiences reached, information disseminated, education undertaken, and motivation provided. Research has identified several distinct groups to whom specific health messages have to be addressed. These include government and political elites, health and family welfare program administrators, and the medical profession and clinical staff. Information on health needs to include both the concept of health and the pertinent ideas

  15. Hohenheim University. 1991 research report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geiler, U.

    1992-06-01

    The 1991 Research Report of the Hohenheim University near Stuttgart is based on data collected in 1989 and extensively in 1990 and 1991. The progress reports were sent to all of the faculties, institutions, particular research areas and centres of the University. Questions were posed regarding current and recently completed projects. The final version was adapted for print. The survey also enquired about financial support from third parties. The numerous contacts abroad of the Hohenheim University are also documented in this book. Finally, it was asked under which of the nine main Hohenheim research programme headings the particular project could be listed. (orig.) [de

  16. IAEA research contracts. Seventh annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1967-01-01

    This volume is the seventh annual report and presents full summaries of 52 final reports from contracts, sponsored under the Agency's Research Contract Programme, which were completed during 1966. Including these, a total of 188 summaries have been published in the various fields in which support is provided under the IAEA Research contract program. In every case the summary of the contractor's final report has been prepared by that member of the Agency's scientific staff who has been most closely connected with the particular branch of research concerned. The scientific data are the responsibility of the contractor, though the Agency is responsible for any additional observations. The reports presented are related to research in the field of radioactive waste management and environmental sciences; health physics and radiation protection; radiobiology; safeguards methods; nuclear reactors physics and nuclear fuels; radioisotope applications in agriculture, medicine and hydrology, food preservation by irradiation

  17. IAEA research contracts. Sixth annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1966-04-01

    This volume is the sixth annual report and presents full summaries of 37 final reports from contracts, sponsored under the Agency's Research Contract Programme, which were completed during 1965. Including these, a total of 136 summaries have been published in the various fields in which support is provided under the IAEA Research contract program. In every case the summary of the contractor's final report has been prepared by that member of the Agency's scientific staff who has been most closely connected with the particular branch of research concerned. The scientific data are the responsibility of the contractor, though the Agency is responsible for any additional observations. The reports presented are related to research in the field of radioactive waste management and environmental sciences; health physics and radiation protection; radiobiology; safeguards methods; nuclear reactors physics and nuclear fuels; radioisotope applications in agriculture, medicine and hydrology.

  18. IAEA research contracts. Seventh annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1967-05-01

    This volume is the seventh annual report and presents full summaries of 52 final reports from contracts, sponsored under the Agency's Research Contract Programme, which were completed during 1966. Including these, a total of 188 summaries have been published in the various fields in which support is provided under the IAEA Research contract program. In every case the summary of the contractor's final report has been prepared by that member of the Agency's scientific staff who has been most closely connected with the particular branch of research concerned. The scientific data are the responsibility of the contractor, though the Agency is responsible for any additional observations. The reports presented are related to research in the field of radioactive waste management and environmental sciences; health physics and radiation protection; radiobiology; safeguards methods; nuclear reactors physics and nuclear fuels; radioisotope applications in agriculture, medicine and hydrology, food preservation by irradiation.

  19. IAEA research contracts. Sixth annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1966-01-01

    This volume is the sixth annual report and presents full summaries of 37 final reports from contracts, sponsored under the Agency's Research Contract Programme, which were completed during 1965. Including these, a total of 136 summaries have been published in the various fields in which support is provided under the IAEA Research contract program. In every case the summary of the contractor's final report has been prepared by that member of the Agency's scientific staff who has been most closely connected with the particular branch of research concerned. The scientific data are the responsibility of the contractor, though the Agency is responsible for any additional observations. The reports presented are related to research in the field of radioactive waste management and environmental sciences; health physics and radiation protection; radiobiology; safeguards methods; nuclear reactors physics and nuclear fuels; radioisotope applications in agriculture, medicine and hydrology

  20. Improving African health research capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarus, Jeff; Wallace, Samantha A; Liljestrand, Jerker

    2010-01-01

    The issue of strengthening local research capacity in Africa is again high on the health and development agenda. The latest initiative comes from the Wellcome Trust. But when it comes to capacity development, one of the chief obstacles that health sectors in the region must confront is the migrat......The issue of strengthening local research capacity in Africa is again high on the health and development agenda. The latest initiative comes from the Wellcome Trust. But when it comes to capacity development, one of the chief obstacles that health sectors in the region must confront...... is the migration of health professionals to countries that offer more lucrative opportunities, like those in western Europe. To combat this ''brain drain'', already back in 1984, the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (Sida) created a training programme in which healthcare professionals from...... Africa conducted the bulk of their research in their own countries. However, the model was only partly successful. Several years ago, we assessed the preconditions for the renewal of Sida support for research and research training activities in the region. Based on our work to develop a critical mass...

  1. Health Plans - Trend Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This page contains several useful trend and competition indicators. Certain files will be updated monthly while others will be updated quarterly. The files are the...

  2. Dental Health Services Research Unit celebrates 30 years: Report of conference to mark the 30th anniversary of the Dental Health Services Research Unit (DHSRU) at Dundee, held on 1st December 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Kenneth A; Pitts, Nigel B

    2009-04-01

    Over the years, several members of the staff of the Dental Health Services Research Unit (DHSRU) at Dundee have published papers in Primary Dental Care. Furthermore, its Director, Professor Nigel Pitts, together with Drs Jan Clarkson and Gail Topping have co-edited a number of the Faculty of General Dental Practice (UK)'s standards manuals and contributed to others. It had been suggested to the Unit by several parties that, having been in funded existence for some 30 years, it would be appropriate to mark this anniversary with a conference to explore 'Dental Health Services Research: After 30 years, what was the impact, what have we learned and where are we going?' So, following a range of consultations, the conference was convened at the West Park Conference Centre in Dundee with a mixed audience representing both dental research and dental practice.

  3. Writing a qualitative research report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnard, Philip

    2004-07-01

    A research project in nursing or nursing education is probably only complete once the findings have been published. This paper offers a format for writing a qualitative research report for publication. It suggests, at least, the following sections: introduction, aims of the study, review of the literature, sample, data collection methods, data analysis methods, findings, discussion, conclusion, abstract. Each of these sections is addressed along with many written-out examples. In some sections, alternative approaches are suggested. The aim of the paper is to help the neophyte researcher to structure his or her report and for the experienced researcher to reflect on his or her current practice. References to other source material on qualitative research are given.

  4. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    The journal welcomes original research papers, reviews and case reports on current topics of special interest and relevance. ... Lipid solubility and molecular size are the major limiting factors for ... as natural digestive aids and as carriers for.

  5. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    disciplines (including medicine, pharmacy, nursing, biotechnology, cell and ... The journal welcomes original research papers, reviews and case reports on current ..... Asian J. Pharm. 2008; 2:73-76. 5. Rasenack N, Muller BW. Dissolution rate.

  6. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    2008-06-12

    Jun 12, 2008 ... The journal welcomes original research papers, reviews and case reports on current ... serpentine, reserpine, narcotine, caffeine, ... were fed on healthy diet and maintained in ... (i) Effect of methanolic extract of Plumeria.

  7. Research laboratories annual report. 1973 and 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-02-01

    This report presents brief summaries of the research carried out at the Israel A.E.C. laboratories during the two years 1973 and 1974 in the following fields: theoretical physics and chemistry, neutron and reactor physics, solid state physics and metallurgy, laser-induced plasma research, nuclear physics and chemistry, radiation chemistry and applications of radiation and radioisotopes, physical and inorganic chemistry, analytical chemistry, health physics, environmental studies, instrumentation and techniques. (B.G.)

  8. Health services research in urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hua-Yin; Ulmer, William; Kowalczyk, Keith J; Hu, Jim C

    2011-06-01

    Health services research (HSR) is increasingly important given the focus on patient-centered, cost-effective, high-quality health care. We examine how HSR affects contemporary evidence-based urologic practice and its role in shaping future urologic research and care. PubMed, urologic texts, and lay literature were reviewed for terms pertaining to HSR/outcomes research and urologic disease processes. HSR is a broad discipline that focuses on access, cost, and outcomes of Health care. Its use has been applied to a myriad of urologic conditions to identify deficiencies in access, to evaluate cost-effectiveness of therapies, and to evaluate structural, process, and outcome quality measures. HSR utilizes an evidence-based approach to identify the most effective ways to organize/manage, finance, and deliver high-quality urologic care and to tailor care optimized to individuals.

  9. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    engineering fields). It seeks particularly (but not exclusively) to encourage multidisciplinary research and collaboration among scientists, the industry and the healthcare ... The journal welcomes original research papers, reviews and case reports on current topics of special .... software package version 6.1 (CDC, Atlanta,.

  10. Nuclear physics research report 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The paper presents the 1988 Nuclear Physics Research Report for the University of Surrey, United Kingdom. The report includes both experimental nuclear structure physics and theoretical nuclear physics research work. The experimental work has been carried out predominantly with the Nuclear Structure Facility at the SERC Daresbury Laboratory, and has concerned nuclear shapes, shape coexistence, shape oscillations, single-particle structures and neutron-proton interaction. The theoretical work has involved nuclear reactions with a variety of projectiles below 1 GeV per nucleon incident energy, and aspects of hadronic interactions at intermediate energies. (U.K.)

  11. Research workshop to research work: initial steps in establishing health research systems on Malaita, Solomon Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kekuabata Esau

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Atoifi Adventist Hospital is a 90 bed general hospital in East Kwaio, Malaita, Solomon Islands providing services to the population of subsistence villagers of the region. Health professionals at the hospital and attached College of Nursing have considerable human capacity and willingness to undertake health research. However they are constrained by limited research experience, training opportunities, research systems, physical infrastructure and access to resources. This brief commentary describes an 'Introduction to Health Research' workshop delivered at Atoifi Adventist Hospital in September 2009 and efforts to move from 'research workshop' to 'research work'. The Approach Using a participatory-action research approach underpinned by decolonising methodologies, staff from Atoifi Adventist Hospital and James Cook University (Queensland, Australia collaboratively designed, implemented and evaluated a health research workshop. Basic health research principles and methods were presented using active learning methodologies. Following the workshop, Atoifi Adventist Hospital and Atoifi College of Nursing staff, other professionals and community members reported an increased awareness and understanding of health research. The formation of a local Research Committee, improved ethics review procedures and the identification of local research mentors followed the week long workshop. The workshop has acted as a catalyst for research activity, increasing structural and human resource capacity for local health professionals and community leaders to engage in research. Discussion and Conclusions Participants from a variety of educational backgrounds participated in, and received benefit from, a responsive, culturally and linguistically accessible health research workshop. Improving health research systems at a remote hospital and aligning these with local and national research agendas is establishing a base to strengthen public health

  12. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    in relation to the use of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) as car fuel. Methods: ... Public health and environmental impact of. LPG were not .... and valid insurance was reported for 78.7%. (N=181) ... economical point of view for advertising and.

  13. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    2009-06-06

    Jun 6, 2009 ... disciplines (including medicine, pharmacy, nursing, biotechnology, cell and molecular biology, and related engineering fields). ... International Journal of Health Research, June 2009; 2(2): 195-199 (e2213p91-95) ... were measured in the diabetic and non-diabetic rats. .... People with Type 2 diabetes are at.

  14. IAEA research contracts. Fifth annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1965-01-01

    This volume is the fifth annual report and presents full summaries of 26 final reports from contracts, sponsored under the Agency's Research Contract Programme, which were completed during 1964. In addition to the summaries describing more general work in 'Health physics and radiation protection', seven reports are included which describe work done under the Agency's first highly-coordinated programme in which various applications of Ca-47 in the fields of medicine and health physics were explored. In every case the summary of the contractor's final report has been prepared by that member of the Agency's scientific staff who has been most closely connected with the particular branch of research concerned. The scientific data are the responsibility of the contractor, though the Agency is responsible for any additional observations. The reports presented are related to research in the field of radioactive waste management and environmental sciences; health physics and radiation protection; radiobiology; safeguards methods; nuclear reactors physics and nuclear fuels; radioisotope applications in agriculture and medicine

  15. IAEA research contracts. Fifth annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1965-04-01

    This volume is the fifth annual report and presents full summaries of 26 final reports from contracts, sponsored under the Agency's Research Contract Programme, which were completed during 1964. In addition to the summaries describing more general work in 'Health physics and radiation protection', seven reports are included which describe work done under the Agency's first highly-coordinated programme in which various applications of Ca-47 in the fields of medicine and health physics were explored. In every case the summary of the contractor's final report has been prepared by that member of the Agency's scientific staff who has been most closely connected with the particular branch of research concerned. The scientific data are the responsibility of the contractor, though the Agency is responsible for any additional observations. The reports presented are related to research in the field of radioactive waste management and environmental sciences; health physics and radiation protection; radiobiology; safeguards methods; nuclear reactors physics and nuclear fuels; radioisotope applications in agriculture and medicine.

  16. Research laboratories annual report 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    The 1993 annual report of the Israel Atomic Energy Commission presents, in brief and concise form, recent results and achievements of the well established program of the basic and applied research carried out by the scientists and engineers of the Israel Atomic Energy Commission in collaboration with colleagues at the other institutions in Israel and abroad. In terms of contents, the report presents the usual combination of topical basic applied research. Much of the work has been published or submitted for publication in the international scientific or technical literature. The main headings in the report are: theoretical physics and theoretical chemistry; optics and lasers; solid states and nuclear physics; materials sciences; chemistry; environmental studies and radiopharmaceuticals; radiation effects, dosimetry and radioprotection; and instrumentation and techniques

  17. Co-ordinated research project on isotopic evaluations of maternal and child health nutrition to help prevent stunting. Report on the 1. research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The concept for the Co-ordinated Research Programme on isotopic evaluations of maternal and child nutrition to help prevent stunting was a consequence of discussions held between IAEA staff and participants in a regional training course on 'Isotope Techniques in Human Nutrition' held in Lima, Peru in June 1996. The intention then was to develop research on factors influencing the success of lactation and the consequent effects on the breast-fed child. The project would have Latin American participants to promote regional exchange of expertise and ideas. Initial participation was from Argentina, Chile, Mexico, Peru and Venezuela. Brazil and Pakistan have now been added to these. There are three Specific Research Objectives: (1) To develop stable isotope methods for measuring breast-milk intake using regionally available equipment. (2) To apply the methodology in the assessment of milk intake in infants in relation to maternal nutrition, socio-economic status and education, and infant nutrition and intake of macro- and micro-nutrients. (3) To use information gathered at 2) to determine the need for supplementation programmes for mothers and/or infants, and educational programmes for the mothers

  18. Co-ordinated research project on isotopic evaluations of maternal and child health nutrition to help prevent stunting. Report on the 1. research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-09-01

    The concept for the Co-ordinated Research Programme on isotopic evaluations of maternal and child nutrition to help prevent stunting was a consequence of discussions held between IAEA staff and participants in a regional training course on `Isotope Techniques in Human Nutrition` held in Lima, Peru in June 1996. The intention then was to develop research on factors influencing the success of lactation and the consequent effects on the breast-fed child. The project would have Latin American participants to promote regional exchange of expertise and ideas. Initial participation was from Argentina, Chile, Mexico, Peru and Venezuela. Brazil and Pakistan have now been added to these. There are three Specific Research Objectives: (1) To develop stable isotope methods for measuring breast-milk intake using regionally available equipment. (2) To apply the methodology in the assessment of milk intake in infants in relation to maternal nutrition, socio-economic status and education, and infant nutrition and intake of macro- and micro-nutrients. (3) To use information gathered at 2) to determine the need for supplementation programmes for mothers and/or infants, and educational programmes for the mothers Refs, figs, tabs, graphs

  19. Assessment of acculturation in minority health research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Molly; Thayer, Zaneta; Wadhwa, Pathik D

    2017-03-01

    Acculturation represents an important construct in the context of health disparities. Although several studies have reported relationships between various aspects of acculturation and health in minority populations, crucial inconsistencies remain. One likely reason for these inconsistencies may relate to limitations in the conceptualization and operationalization of acculturation, particularly in the context of health research. The acculturation construct underwent major conceptual and operational change when it was adapted from anthropology to psychology, and we argue another major shift is now required for use of this construct in health research. Issues include determining whether acculturation measures should focus on an individual's internal attitudes or overt behaviors; whether they should characterize cultural orientation status at a given point in time or change over time; whether measures should be culture-specific or more global in nature; how the issue of multiculturalism should be addressed; how measures can optimally incorporate multiple dimensions of acculturation; and whether proxy measures should be used. These issues are important in the context of health research because of their implications for determining the direct and indirect effects of cultural change on health-related biological and behavioral processes. We elaborate on and address each of these issues from a perspective that spans multiple disciplines across the biological and social sciences, and offer concrete recommendations with the ultimate goal of achieving a better understanding of the role of acculturation in minority health and health disparities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Assessment of acculturation in minority health research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Molly; Thayer, Zaneta; Wadhwa, Pathik D.

    2017-01-01

    Acculturation represents an important construct in the context of health disparities. Although several studies have reported relationships between various aspects of acculturation and health in minority populations, crucial inconsistencies remain. One likely reason for these inconsistencies may relate to limitations in the conceptualization and operationalization of acculturation, particularly in the context of health research. The acculturation construct underwent major conceptual and operational change when it was adapted from anthropology to psychology, and we argue another major shift is now required for use of this construct in health research. Issues include determining whether acculturation measures should focus on an individual’s internal attitudes or overt behaviors; whether they should characterize cultural orientation status at a given point in time or change over time; whether measures should be culture-specific or more global in nature; how the issue of multiculturalism should be addressed; how measures can optimally incorporate multiple dimensions of acculturation; and whether proxy measures should be used. These issues are important in the context of health research because of their implications for determining the direct and indirect effects of cultural change on health-related biological and behavioral processes. We elaborate on and address each of these issues from a perspective that spans multiple disciplines across the biological and social sciences, and offer concrete recommendations with the ultimate goal of achieving a better understanding of the role of acculturation in minority health and health disparities. PMID:28135691

  1. Nuclear Safety Research Department annual report 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majborn, B.; Damkjaer, A.; Nielsen, S.P.; Nonboel, E

    2001-08-01

    The report presents a summary of the work of the Nuclear Safety Research Department in 2000. The department's research and development activities were organized in two research programmes: 'Radiation Protection and Reactor Safety' and 'Radioecology and Tracer Studies'. In addition the department was responsible for the tasks 'Applied Health Physics and Emergency Preparedness', 'Dosimetry', 'Environmental Monitoring', and Irradiation and Isotope Services'. Lists of publications, committee memberships and staff members are included. (au)

  2. Garbage in, Garbage Out: Data Collection, Quality Assessment and Reporting Standards for Social Media Data Use in Health Research, Infodemiology and Digital Disease Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jidong; Emery, Sherry

    2016-01-01

    Background Social media have transformed the communications landscape. People increasingly obtain news and health information online and via social media. Social media platforms also serve as novel sources of rich observational data for health research (including infodemiology, infoveillance, and digital disease detection detection). While the number of studies using social data is growing rapidly, very few of these studies transparently outline their methods for collecting, filtering, and reporting those data. Keywords and search filters applied to social data form the lens through which researchers may observe what and how people communicate about a given topic. Without a properly focused lens, research conclusions may be biased or misleading. Standards of reporting data sources and quality are needed so that data scientists and consumers of social media research can evaluate and compare methods and findings across studies. Objective We aimed to develop and apply a framework of social media data collection and quality assessment and to propose a reporting standard, which researchers and reviewers may use to evaluate and compare the quality of social data across studies. Methods We propose a conceptual framework consisting of three major steps in collecting social media data: develop, apply, and validate search filters. This framework is based on two criteria: retrieval precision (how much of retrieved data is relevant) and retrieval recall (how much of the relevant data is retrieved). We then discuss two conditions that estimation of retrieval precision and recall rely on—accurate human coding and full data collection—and how to calculate these statistics in cases that deviate from the two ideal conditions. We then apply the framework on a real-world example using approximately 4 million tobacco-related tweets collected from the Twitter firehose. Results We developed and applied a search filter to retrieve e-cigarette–related tweets from the archive based

  3. 2016 Research Outreach Program report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hye Young [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kim, Yangkyu [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-10-13

    This paper is the research activity report for 4 weeks in LANL. Under the guidance of Dr. Lee, who performs nuclear physics research at LANSCE, LANL, I studied the Low Energy NZ (LENZ) setup and how to use the LENZ. First, I studied the LENZ chamber and Si detectors, and worked on detector calibrations, using the computer software, ROOT (CERN developed data analysis tool) and EXCEL (Microsoft office software). I also performed the calibration experiments that measure alpha particles emitted from a Th-229 source by using a S1-type detector (Si detector). And with Dr. Lee, we checked the result.

  4. IAEA research contracts. Ninth annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1969-01-01

    This volume is the seventh annual publication of the summaries of final reports received during 1968 in connection with contracts and agreements awarded by the IAEA Research Contract Programme. Ninety nine such summaries are included, thus bringing to 323 the total number published so far. In every case the summary of the contractor's final report has been prepared by that member of the Agency's scientific staff who has been most closely connected with the particular branch of research concerned. The scientific data are the responsibility of the contractor, though the Agency is responsible for any additional observations. The reports presented are related to research in the field of radioactive waste management and environmental sciences; health physics and radiation protection; radiobiology; safeguards methods; nuclear reactors physics and nuclear fuels; radioisotope applications in agriculture, medicine and hydrology, food preservation by irradiation

  5. IAEA research contracts. Ninth annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1969-06-01

    This volume is the seventh annual publication of the summaries of final reports received during 1968 in connection with contracts and agreements awarded by the IAEA Research Contract Programme. Ninety nine such summaries are included, thus bringing to 323 the total number published so far. In every case the summary of the contractor's final report has been prepared by that member of the Agency's scientific staff who has been most closely connected with the particular branch of research concerned. The scientific data are the responsibility of the contractor, though the Agency is responsible for any additional observations. The reports presented are related to research in the field of radioactive waste management and environmental sciences; health physics and radiation protection; radiobiology; safeguards methods; nuclear reactors physics and nuclear fuels; radioisotope applications in agriculture, medicine and hydrology, food preservation by irradiation.

  6. Strategies for public health research in European Union countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaud, Olivier; McCarthy, Mark; Conceição, Claudia

    2013-11-01

    'Health' is an identifiable theme within the European Union multi-annual research programmes. Public Health Innovation and Research in Europe (PHIRE), led by the European Public Health Association, sought to identify public health research strategies in EU member states. Within PHIRE, national public health associations reviewed structures for health research, held stakeholder workshops and produced reports. This information, supplemented by further web searches, including using assisted translation, was analysed for national research strategies and health research strategies. All countries described general research strategies, outlining organizational and capacity objectives. Thematic fields, including health, are mentioned in some strategies. A health research strategy was identified for 15 EU countries and not for 12. Ministries of health led research strategies for nine countries. Public health research was identified in only three strategies. National research strategies did not refer to the European Union's health research programme. Public health research strategies of European countries need to be developed by ministries of health, working with the research community to achieve the European Research Area.

  7. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    The journal welcomes original research papers, reviews and case reports on current topics of special ... demand in the market. .... Phase solubility studies showed the effect of three CD .... can be easily scaled up to the industrial level ... the drug caused by kneading process and ... Influence of cyclodextrins and chitosan on.

  8. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    disciplines. The journal welcomes original research papers, reviews and case reports on current topics of special ... software to allow authors track the changes to their submission. All manuscripts must ... and Drug Development, University .... Table 2: Knowledge of emergency contraception methods among the study group.

  9. Development of a Student Health Assessment System: Health Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behaviors in Middle-School Students. Research Report. ETS RR-10-04

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCann, Carolyn; Roberts, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    Newly developed assessments of nutrition and exercise knowledge, attitudes, and behavior were administered to 383 eighth-graders. Evidence for the validity of assessment scores was evaluated with five findings. First, parent- and self-reported behaviors were similar and congruent for healthy eating and exercising but not for sedentary behaviors or…

  10. Research utilization among children's mental health providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferguson H Bruce

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children with emotional and behavioural disorders should be able to count on receiving care that meets their needs and is based on the best scientific evidence available, however, many do not receive these services. Implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP relies, in part, on the research utilization practices of mental health care providers. This study reports on a survey of research utilization practices among 80 children's mental health (CMH service provider organizations in Ontario, Canada. Methods A web-based survey was distributed to 80 CMH service provider organizations, to which 51 executive directors and 483 children's mental health practitioners responded. Research utilization was assessed using questions with Likert-type responses based on the Canadian Health Services Research Foundation's Four-A's approach: access, assess, adapt, apply. Results There was general agreement among executive directors and practitioners regarding the capacity of their organizations to use – access, assess, adapt, and apply – research evidence. Overall, both groups rated their organizations as using research information 'somewhat well.' The low response rate to the practitioner survey should be noted. Conclusion These findings provide a useful benchmark from which changes in reported research utilization in the Ontario CMH sector can be tracked over time, as a function of EBP training and implementation initiatives, for instance. The need to improve access to research evidence should be addressed because it relates to the eventual implementation and uptake of evidence-based practices. Communities of practice are recommended as a strategy that would enable practitioners to build capacity in their adaptation and application of research evidence.

  11. Research utilization among children's mental health providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barwick, Melanie A; Boydell, Katherine M; Stasiulis, Elaine; Ferguson, H Bruce; Blase, Karen; Fixsen, Dean

    2008-04-09

    Children with emotional and behavioural disorders should be able to count on receiving care that meets their needs and is based on the best scientific evidence available, however, many do not receive these services. Implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP) relies, in part, on the research utilization practices of mental health care providers. This study reports on a survey of research utilization practices among 80 children's mental health (CMH) service provider organizations in Ontario, Canada. A web-based survey was distributed to 80 CMH service provider organizations, to which 51 executive directors and 483 children's mental health practitioners responded. Research utilization was assessed using questions with Likert-type responses based on the Canadian Health Services Research Foundation's Four-A's approach: access, assess, adapt, apply. There was general agreement among executive directors and practitioners regarding the capacity of their organizations to use - access, assess, adapt, and apply - research evidence. Overall, both groups rated their organizations as using research information 'somewhat well.' The low response rate to the practitioner survey should be noted. These findings provide a useful benchmark from which changes in reported research utilization in the Ontario CMH sector can be tracked over time, as a function of EBP training and implementation initiatives, for instance. The need to improve access to research evidence should be addressed because it relates to the eventual implementation and uptake of evidence-based practices. Communities of practice are recommended as a strategy that would enable practitioners to build capacity in their adaptation and application of research evidence.

  12. IAEA research contracts. Third annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1963-01-01

    During the period in which the Agency's research programme has been operative, nearly 150 research contracts have been placed with institutions in 35 Member States. While considerable emphasis was placed initially on research of a more fundamental nature - as reflected by the summaries presented herein of work under contracts awarded in the early stages of the programme - recent policy has shifted the major emphasis toward research of a practical nature, as the results of this type of research are likely to be of more immediate interest to Member States, and particularly to the developing nations. In every case, the summary of the contractor's final report has been prepared by that member of the Agency's scientific staff who has been closely connected with that particular subject of research. Thus, the scientific data reported in the summary remain the responsibility of the contractor, the Agency being responsible for any additional observations. The reports in the field of Radioactive waste management and environmental research included are: Research Contract No.20. Studies in the uptake of radioisotopes by edible marine products; Research Contract No. 33, Behaviour of fission products in soil; Research Contract No.100, Ionic interaction near clay surfaces. Reports dealing with Health physics and radiation protection presented are: Research Contract No.14, The effect of radiation on plant cells and its modification with protective substances; Research Contract No.32, Determination of the enrichment factors of calcium isotopes on ion exchange resins and the investigation of the various systems of electrolytic separation; Research Contract No. 53, Selection of sulphydryl compounds for radiation protection, using a new microbiological method; Research Contract No. 79, A study of the uptake of radioactive calcium in the skeleton. Reports related to Radiobiology are: Research Contract No.11, Genetical investigations on the effect of ionizing radiation on human cells

  13. IAEA research contracts. Third annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1963-04-01

    During the period in which the Agency's research programme has been operative, nearly 150 research contracts have been placed with institutions in 35 Member States. While considerable emphasis was placed initially on research of a more fundamental nature - as reflected by the summaries presented herein of work under contracts awarded in the early stages of the programme - recent policy has shifted the major emphasis toward research of a practical nature, as the results of this type of research are likely to be of more immediate interest to Member States, and particularly to the developing nations. In every case, the summary of the contractor's final report has been prepared by that member of the Agency's scientific staff who has been closely connected with that particular subject of research. Thus, the scientific data reported in the summary remain the responsibility of the contractor, the Agency being responsible for any additional observations. The reports in the field of Radioactive waste management and environmental research included are: Research Contract No.20. Studies in the uptake of radioisotopes by edible marine products; Research Contract No. 33, Behaviour of fission products in soil; Research Contract No.100, Ionic interaction near clay surfaces. Reports dealing with Health physics and radiation protection presented are: Research Contract No.14, The effect of radiation on plant cells and its modification with protective substances; Research Contract No.32, Determination of the enrichment factors of calcium isotopes on ion exchange resins and the investigation of the various systems of electrolytic separation; Research Contract No. 53, Selection of sulphydryl compounds for radiation protection, using a new microbiological method; Research Contract No. 79, A study of the uptake of radioactive calcium in the skeleton. Reports related to Radiobiology are: Research Contract No.11, Genetical investigations on the effect of ionizing radiation on human cells

  14. Leveraging electronic health records for clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Sudha R; Curtis, Lesley H; Temple, Robert; Andersson, Tomas; Ezekowitz, Justin; Ford, Ian; James, Stefan; Marsolo, Keith; Mirhaji, Parsa; Rocca, Mitra; Rothman, Russell L; Sethuraman, Barathi; Stockbridge, Norman; Terry, Sharon; Wasserman, Scott M; Peterson, Eric D; Hernandez, Adrian F

    2018-04-30

    Electronic health records (EHRs) can be a major tool in the quest to decrease costs and timelines of clinical trial research, generate better evidence for clinical decision making, and advance health care. Over the past decade, EHRs have increasingly offered opportunities to speed up, streamline, and enhance clinical research. EHRs offer a wide range of possible uses in clinical trials, including assisting with prestudy feasibility assessment, patient recruitment, and data capture in care delivery. To fully appreciate these opportunities, health care stakeholders must come together to face critical challenges in leveraging EHR data, including data quality/completeness, information security, stakeholder engagement, and increasing the scale of research infrastructure and related governance. Leaders from academia, government, industry, and professional societies representing patient, provider, researcher, industry, and regulator perspectives convened the Leveraging EHR for Clinical Research Now! Think Tank in Washington, DC (February 18-19, 2016), to identify barriers to using EHRs in clinical research and to generate potential solutions. Think tank members identified a broad range of issues surrounding the use of EHRs in research and proposed a variety of solutions. Recognizing the challenges, the participants identified the urgent need to look more deeply at previous efforts to use these data, share lessons learned, and develop a multidisciplinary agenda for best practices for using EHRs in clinical research. We report the proceedings from this think tank meeting in the following paper. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. "Conclusions about exposure to ETS and health that will be unhelpful to us": how the tobacco industry attempted to delay and discredit the 1997 Australian National Health and Medical Research Council report on passive smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotter, L; Chapman, S

    2003-12-01

    Major reviews of the health effects of passive smoking have been subjected to tobacco industry campaigns to refute the scientific evidence. Following the 1992 US Environmental Protection Agency review, the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) initiated a review of the health effects of passive smoking. At the time of this review, evidence that environmental tobacco smoke causes disease was being increasingly accepted in courts of law and voluntary adoption of smoking restrictions was rapidly growing. To demonstrate how the tobacco industry attempted to delay and discredit the publication of a report on passive smoking that the tobacco industry anticipated to contain recommendations that would be unfavourable to their business. A search of tobacco industry documents on the Master Settlement Agreement websites was conducted using the terms and acronyms representative of the NHMRC review. The tobacco industry sought to impede the progress of the NHMRC Working Party by launching an intensive campaign to delay and discredit the report. The main strategies used were attempts to criticise the science, extensive use of Freedom of Information provisions to monitor all activity of the group, legal challenges, ad hominem attacks on the credibility of the Working Party members, rallying support from industry allies, and influencing public opinion through the media. The Australian tobacco industry deliberately impeded the NHMRC Working Party's progress and successfully prevented the publication of the report's recommendations. The tobacco industry's motivation and capacity to disrupt the advancement of scientific knowledge and policy in tobacco control should be recognised and anticipated.

  16. Represented Speech in Qualitative Health Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musaeus, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Represented speech refers to speech where we reference somebody. Represented speech is an important phenomenon in everyday conversation, health care communication, and qualitative research. This case will draw first from a case study on physicians’ workplace learning and second from a case study...... on nurses’ apprenticeship learning. The aim of the case is to guide the qualitative researcher to use own and others’ voices in the interview and to be sensitive to represented speech in everyday conversation. Moreover, reported speech matters to health professionals who aim to represent the voice...... of their patients. Qualitative researchers and students might learn to encourage interviewees to elaborate different voices or perspectives. Qualitative researchers working with natural speech might pay attention to how people talk and use represented speech. Finally, represented speech might be relevant...

  17. Strengthening public health nutrition research and training capacities in West Africa: Report of a planning workshop convened in Dakar, Senegal, 26-28 March 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kenneth H; McLachlan, Milla; Cardosa, Placido; Tchibindat, Félicité; Baker, Shawn K

    2010-01-01

    A three-day workshop was convened in Dakar, Senegal, to provide participants from West African and international academic and research institutions, public health agencies, and donor organisations an opportunity to review current public health nutrition research and training capabilities in West Africa, assess needs for strengthening the regional institutional and workforce capacities, and discuss appropriate steps required to advance this agenda. The workshop included presentations of background papers, experiences of regional and international training programmes and small group discussions. Participants concluded that there is an urgent need to: (1) increase the throughput of public health nutrition training programmes, including undergraduate education, pre-service and in-service professional training, and higher education in public health nutrition and related research skills; and (2) enhance applied research capacity, to provide the evidence base necessary for nutrition program planning and evaluation. A Task Team was appointed to inform the regional Assembly of Health Ministers of the workshop conclusions and to develop political and financial support for a regional nutrition initiative to: (1) conduct advocacy and nutrition stewardship; (2) survey existing training programmes and assist with curriculum development; and (3) develop a plan for a regional applied research institute in Public Health Nutrition.

  18. Research and Development. Annual Report 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This report discusses the research and development activities in which NVE has been involved in 2000. These activities fall into three categories: watercourse research, hydrological research and energy related research. The HYDRA research programme, which studied flooding and human intervention, is discussed in particular. The report includes a list of research and development reports that were published in 2000.

  19. Ethics in Public Health Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Valerie A.; Garbrah-Aidoo, Nana; Scott, Beth

    2007-01-01

    Skill in marketing is a scarce resource in public health, especially in developing countries. The Global Public–Private Partnership for Handwashing with Soap set out to tap the consumer marketing skills of industry for national handwashing programs. Lessons learned from commercial marketers included how to (1) understand consumer motivation, (2) employ 1 single unifying idea, (3) plan for effective reach, and (4) ensure effectiveness before national launch. After the first marketing program, 71% of Ghanaian mothers knew the television ad and the reported rates of handwashing with soap increased. Conditions for the expansion of such partnerships include a wider appreciation of what consumer marketing is, what it can do for public health, and the potential benefits to industry. Although there are practical and philosophical difficulties, there are many opportunities for such partnerships. PMID:17329646

  20. Health and Safety annual report 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    In the 1993 Health and Safety Report for BNFL, data showing improvements in radiological and conventional safety are given. Other aspects discussed are emergency planning, the level of incidents, occupational health services, litigation and the compensation scheme, the transport of radioactive materials, research covering transgenerational epidemiology, mortality and cancer studies, genetics and radiobiology, and dosimetry, and finally a summary of radioactive discharges and environmental data. (UK)

  1. Research laboratories annual report 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-08-01

    The 1987 report reflects a continuation of trends and patterns established in previous years. It does not reveal novel revolutionary developments and does not open new horizons and vistas. Rather, the report represents what we believe is a sound and mature program striving to achieve a proper balance between innovative basic research and economically viable practical applications. In the field of nuclear power, six entries are devoted to an analysis of the economics, safety and vulnerability of HTGR's. Theoretical work on more advanced concepts of hybrid and fusion reactors, is also a part of our research program. In plasma physics, the highly innovative applied topic of electrothermal propulsion was added to the more familiar research on laser induced plasmas and use of cool, low density plasmas to produce coatings and other thin layers of refractory materials. Results from the airborne radiometric survey carried out in collaboration with the Geological Survey of Israel and some of the techniques developed for this purpose are shown here for the first time. Of particular interest are the anomalies found in the Gevanim Valley in the Machtesh Ramon area and their interpretation. Noteworthy achievements in radiopharmaceutics include the development of a new improved 99 Mo/ 99m Tc generator and successful clinical tests of the innovative generator of ultrashort-lived 191m Ir. The food irradiation program has reached the stage of true commercial implementation: over 50 tons of spices and condiments were treated for the food industry in 1987. In the field of non-nuclear applications, important achievements were attained in the development of surgical holmium solid state lasers and their application to gastroenterology, cardiac and vascular surgery, urology, neurosurgery and other disciplines

  2. "You're just one of the group when you're embedded": report from a mixed-method investigation of the research-embedded health librarian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greyson, Devon; Surette, Soleil; Dennett, Liz; Chatterley, Trish

    2013-10-01

    Embedded librarianship has received much attention in recent years. A model of embeddedness rarely discussed to date is that of research-embedded health librarians (REHLs). This study explores the characteristics of Canadian REHLs and the situations in which they are employed. The authors employed a sequential, mixed-method design. An online survey provided descriptive statistics about REHLs' positions and work experiences. This informed a series of focus group interviews that expanded upon the survey. Through constant comparison, we conducted qualitative descriptive analysis of the interviews. Based on twenty-nine survey responses and four group interviews, we created a portrait of a "typical" REHL and discovered themes relevant to REHL work. REHLs may identify more strongly as researchers than as librarians, with corresponding professional needs and rewards. REHLs value "belonging" to the research team, involvement in full project lifecycles, and in-depth relationships with nonlibrarian colleagues. Despite widely expressed job satisfaction, many REHLs struggle with isolation from library and information science peers and relative lack of job security. REHLs differ from non-embedded health librarians, as well as from other types of embedded librarians. REHLs' work also differs from just a decade or two ago, prior to widespread Internet access to digital resources. Given that research-embedded librarianship appears to be a distinct and growing subset of health librarianship, libraries, master's of library and information science programs, and professional associations will need to respond to the support and education needs of REHLs or risk losing them to the health research field.

  3. IAEA research contracts. Fourth annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1964-01-01

    This volume represents the fourth annual report on the results obtained under the Agency's research contract programme. During the short life of this programme, which is not quite six years old, a total investment of more than three million dollars has been made to support research in selected fields at institutes in 50 Member States. Extensive summaries are presented herein for all final reports relating to contracts which were completed during 1963. As it is the policy of the Agency to encourage publication in the open scientific literature of the results of work done under research contracts, a number of papers have also appeared in the appropriate journals - the Agency having been notified of 75 such publications in 1963. A complete list of references to these is given at the end of this report. The scientific data presented in the summaries of course remain the responsibility of the contractor. The Agency, however, is responsible for any additional observations. The reports presented are related to research in the field of radioactive waste management and environmental sciences; health physics and radiation protection; radiobiology; nuclear reactors physics and nuclear fuels; radioisotope applications in agriculture and medicine

  4. IAEA research contracts. Fourth annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1964-04-01

    This volume represents the fourth annual report on the results obtained under the Agency's research contract programme. During the short life of this programme, which is not quite six years old, a total investment of more than three million dollars has been made to support research in selected fields at institutes in 50 Member States. Extensive summaries are presented herein for all final reports relating to contracts which were completed during 1963. As it is the policy of the Agency to encourage publication in the open scientific literature of the results of work done under research contracts, a number of papers have also appeared in the appropriate journals - the Agency having been notified of 75 such publications in 1963. A complete list of references to these is given at the end of this report. The scientific data presented in the summaries of course remain the responsibility of the contractor. The Agency, however, is responsible for any additional observations. The reports presented are related to research in the field of radioactive waste management and environmental sciences; health physics and radiation protection; radiobiology; nuclear reactors physics and nuclear fuels; radioisotope applications in agriculture and medicine.

  5. [Progress in research of mobile health intervention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Z; Ning, P S; Cheng, P X; Hu, G Q

    2016-10-10

    With the rapid development of mobile communication technology and the growing popularity of smartphones worldwide, mobile health has become an extension of e-Health and Tele-Health, and is of value in the research and practice of public health. In this paper, we systematically assessed research literature of mobile health' s application on disease prevention and control as well as health promotion. Based on the characteristics of current literature, this paper focused on the application of mobile health in maternal health promotion, chronic disease management, and communicable disease prevention and control to provide reference for the mobile health intervention research in China.

  6. Research Award: Global Health Research Iniave

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Corey Piccioni

    2013-08-07

    Aug 7, 2013 ... IDRC is one of the world's leaders in generang new knowledge to meet global challenges. We offer a number of research awards providing a unique opportunity to enhance research skills and gain a fresh perspecve on crucial development issues. These one‐year, paid, in‐house programs of training and ...

  7. Accelerator research studies. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-06-01

    Progress is reported in both experimental studies as well as theoretical understanding of the beam transport problem. Major highlights are: (a) the completion of the first channel section with 12 periods and two matching solenoids, (b) measurements of beam transmission and emittance in this 12-lens channel, (c) extensive analytical and numerical studies of the beam transport problem in collaboration with GSI (W. Germany), (d) detailed measurements and calculations of beam propagation through one lens with spherical aberration and space charge, and (e) completion of the emittance grids at the Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory. Our main objectives in Task B of our research program are: (a) study of collective acceleration of positive ions from a localized plasma source by an intense relativistic electron beam (IREB), (b) external control of the IREB beam front by a slow-wave structure to achieve higher ion energies - the Beam Front Accelerator (BFA) concept, (c) study of ion and electron acceleration and other applications of a plasma focus device, and (d) theoretical studies in support of (a) and (b). Our research in these areas has been oriented towards obtaining an improved understanding of the physical processes at work in these experiments and, subsequently, achieving improved performance for specific potential applications

  8. Safety and health annual report 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The 1996 report on the Health and Safety performance of the nuclear fuel cycle company BNFL at its sites in the United Kingdom demonstrates a continuing improvement. The site locations and developments are briefly described and international developments in subsidiary organisations noted. Other sections of the report cover health and safety policy, radiological and industrial safety, emergency planning, incidents, occupational health services, compensation scheme developments, transport, putting radiation in perspective, and safety and health research. Data are provided on: radioactive discharges; industrial safety of BNFL and contractors' employees; radiation dose summaries for BNFL and contractors' employees. There is evidence of the expected plateauing out of doses to BNFL employees at a level less than or similar to background radiation. (UK)

  9. Research Award: Maternal and Child Health

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Office 2004 Test Drive User

    goals and work in one of IDRC's dynamic program or division teams. IDRC's Maternal and Child Health program supports research that seeks to address health ... Interrelationships and root causes of poor health outcomes and dysfunctional ...

  10. Conjoint analysis applications in health--a checklist: a report of the ISPOR Good Research Practices for Conjoint Analysis Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, John F P; Hauber, A Brett; Marshall, Deborah; Lloyd, Andrew; Prosser, Lisa A; Regier, Dean A; Johnson, F Reed; Mauskopf, Josephine

    2011-06-01

    The application of conjoint analysis (including discrete-choice experiments and other multiattribute stated-preference methods) in health has increased rapidly over the past decade. A wider acceptance of these methods is limited by an absence of consensus-based methodological standards. The International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR) Good Research Practices for Conjoint Analysis Task Force was established to identify good research practices for conjoint-analysis applications in health. The task force met regularly to identify the important steps in a conjoint analysis, to discuss good research practices for conjoint analysis, and to develop and refine the key criteria for identifying good research practices. ISPOR members contributed to this process through an extensive consultation process. A final consensus meeting was held to revise the article using these comments, and those of a number of international reviewers. Task force findings are presented as a 10-item checklist covering: 1) research question; 2) attributes and levels; 3) construction of tasks; 4) experimental design; 5) preference elicitation; 6) instrument design; 7) data-collection plan; 8) statistical analyses; 9) results and conclusions; and 10) study presentation. A primary question relating to each of the 10 items is posed, and three sub-questions examine finer issues within items. Although the checklist should not be interpreted as endorsing any specific methodological approach to conjoint analysis, it can facilitate future training activities and discussions of good research practices for the application of conjoint-analysis methods in health care studies. Copyright © 2011 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Stimulating innovative research in health promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larouche, Annie; Potvin, Louise

    2013-06-01

    The Global Working Group on Health Promotion Research (GWG HPR) of the International Union for Health Promotion and Education (IUHPE) presents a collection of four articles illustrating innovative avenues for health promotion research. This commentary synthesizes the contributions of these articles while attempting to define the contours of research in health promotion. We propose that innovation in research involves the adoption of a reflexive approach wherein consideration of context plays different roles. The reflexive process consists of questioning what is taken for granted in the conceptualization and operationalization of research. It involves linking research findings and its theoretical foundations to characteristics and goals of the field and observed realities, while orienting reflection on specific objects. The reflexive nature of the research activity is of paramount importance for innovation in health promotion. With the publication of this series, the GWG HPR wishes to strengthen health promotion research capacity at the global level and reaffirm health promotion as a specific research domain.

  12. Qualitative and quantitative methods in health research

    OpenAIRE

    V?zquez Navarrete, M. Luisa

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Research in the area of health has been traditionally dominated by quantitative research. However, the complexity of ill-health, which is socially constructed by individuals, health personnel and health authorities have motivated the search for other forms to approach knowledge. Aim To discuss the complementarities of qualitative and quantitative research methods in the generation of knowledge. Contents The purpose of quantitative research is to measure the magnitude of an event,...

  13. Annual report 1992 - Austrian Research Centre Seibersdorf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillebrand, G.

    1994-01-01

    This is a non-technical progress report (in English) of the activities of the Research Centre Seibersdorf in the fields of energy and safety, materials research, isotope and radiation techniques, environment protection, health and food and industrial consulting. Within other non nuclear related highlights the newly built radio-pharmaceutical laboratory is described, which will guarantee the reliable supply of products and develop new diagnostic and therapeutic preparations. A newly developed whole-body counter for measuring internal radiation is in use in the Vienna General Hospital to obtain better information of the patient's metabolism and can thus assess the efficiency of pharmaceuticals. The research in the field of toxicology and carcinogenicity was intensified. Geological dating was performed for the 'Continental Deep-Drilling Programme' on behalf of the Max Planck Institute. Environmental data acquisition was mainly conducted in the field of ozone, water quality, air pollution and electro-smog (quittner, rieger)

  14. Annual report 1992 - Austrian Research Centre Seibersdorf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillebrand, G.

    1994-01-01

    This is a non-technical progress report (in German) of the activities of the Research Centre Seibersdorf in the fields of energy and safety, materials research, isotope and radiation techniques, environment protection, health and food and industrial consulting. Within other non nuclear related highlights the newly built radio-pharmaceutical laboratory is described, which will guarantee the reliable supply of products and develop new diagnostic and therapeutic preparations. A newly developed whole-body counter for measuring internal radiation is in use in the Vienna General Hospital to obtain better information of the patient's metabolism and can thus assess the efficiency of pharmaceuticals. The research in the field of toxicology and carcinogenicity was intensified. Geological dating was performed for the 'Continental Deep-Drilling Programme' on behalf of the Max Planck Institute. Environmental data acquisition was mainly conducted in the field of ozone, water quality, air pollution and electro-smog (quittner, rieger)

  15. Good and Bad Research Collaborations: Researchers' Views on Science and Ethics in Global Health Research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Parker

    Full Text Available There has been a dramatic rise in the scale and scope of collaborative global health research. A number of structural and scientific factors explain this growth and there has been much discussion of these in the literature. Little, if any, attention has been paid, however, to the factors identified by scientists and other research actors as important to successful research collaboration. This is surprising given that their decisions are likely to play a key role in the sustainability and effectiveness of global health research initiatives. In this paper, we report on qualitative research with leading scientists involved in major international research collaborations about their views on good and bad collaborations and the factors that inform their decision-making about joining and participating actively in research networks. We identify and discuss eight factors that researchers see as essential in judging the merits of active participation in global health research collaborations: opportunities for active involvement in cutting-edge, interesting science; effective leadership; competence of potential partners in and commitment to good scientific practice; capacity building; respect for the needs, interests and agendas of partners; opportunities for discussion and disagreement; trust and confidence; and, justice and fairness in collaboration. Our findings suggest that the sustainability and effectiveness of global health research collaborations has an important ethical or moral dimension for the research actors involved.

  16. Good and Bad Research Collaborations: Researchers' Views on Science and Ethics in Global Health Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Michael; Kingori, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    There has been a dramatic rise in the scale and scope of collaborative global health research. A number of structural and scientific factors explain this growth and there has been much discussion of these in the literature. Little, if any, attention has been paid, however, to the factors identified by scientists and other research actors as important to successful research collaboration. This is surprising given that their decisions are likely to play a key role in the sustainability and effectiveness of global health research initiatives. In this paper, we report on qualitative research with leading scientists involved in major international research collaborations about their views on good and bad collaborations and the factors that inform their decision-making about joining and participating actively in research networks. We identify and discuss eight factors that researchers see as essential in judging the merits of active participation in global health research collaborations: opportunities for active involvement in cutting-edge, interesting science; effective leadership; competence of potential partners in and commitment to good scientific practice; capacity building; respect for the needs, interests and agendas of partners; opportunities for discussion and disagreement; trust and confidence; and, justice and fairness in collaboration. Our findings suggest that the sustainability and effectiveness of global health research collaborations has an important ethical or moral dimension for the research actors involved.

  17. Building National Health Research Information Systems (COHRED ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Building National Health Research Information Systems (COHRED). This grant will allow the Council on Health Research for Development (COHRED) to create, host and maintain a web-based resource on national health research in low- and middle-income countries in partnership with institutions in the South. Called ...

  18. Trends in funding for research on pain: a report on the National Institutes Of Health grant awards over the years 2003 to 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, David H; Empy, Court; Davis, Phillip; Lipschitz, David; Dalton, Peter; Nakamura, Yoshio; Chapman, C Richard

    2008-12-01

    In recent years, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has experienced unprecedented reductions in its customary annual budget increases. Consequently, researchers, health care policy planners and others have a pressing need for accurate information on NIH funding patterns. We created a unique and objective system for compiling, classifying, and analyzing data on NIH grant awards and funding for research on pain, nausea, and dyspnea using naïve observers, cross-validation by multiple raters, and face validation by experts. We present results of our method and analyses for the period from 2003 to 2007. Following a 12% increase from 2003 to 2004, funding for pain research fell by 9.4% per year on average over the next 3 years. The percent of the total NIH budget going to support pain research increased to 0.78% in 2004 but fell to 0.61% in 2007. A piecewise regression model confirmed the declining trend represented a significant fit to the data (R(2)=0.98, p=0.024). Separate breakdowns by Institutes showed similar patterns. Analyses of nausea and dyspnea research support revealed small but steady increases over the same period. Declining support for pain research disproportionate to decreases in the NIH budget signals a need for measures to promote funding for meritorious applications. Results of 5 year trends in numbers of grants and funding for research in pain, nausea, and dyspnea by the NIH show overall declines for pain but slight increases for nausea and dyspnea. Declining support for pain research that exceeds the reductions in the total NIH budget signals a need for measures to increase pain research funding.

  19. Basic petroleum research. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roesjoe, Bjarne; Stiksrud, Helge

    2004-01-01

    An overview of projects in the field of basic petroleum research (PetroForsk) is presented. A brief presentation of some of the projects is included, as well as political comments on the value of these projects. The research program Basic Petroleum Research (PetroForsk) was established in 1998 and ended in 2004. The program has been part of the Research Council of Norway's long-term effort in petroleum research (ml)

  20. The President's Report on Occupational Safety and Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Washington, DC.

    This report describes what has been done to implement the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 during its first year of operation. The report examines the responsibilities of the Department of Labor for setting safety and health standards and also explores the activities of the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare in research and…

  1. A Research Agenda for Humanitarian Health Ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Matthew; Schwartz, Lisa; Pringle, John; Boulanger, Renaud; Nouvet, Elysée; O'Mathúna, Dónal; Arya, Neil; Bernard, Carrie; Beukeboom, Carolyn; Calain, Philippe; de Laat, Sonya; Eckenwiler, Lisa; Elit, Laurie; Fraser, Veronique; Gillespie, Leigh-Anne; Johnson, Kirsten; Meagher, Rachel; Nixon, Stephanie; Olivier, Catherine; Pakes, Barry; Redwood-Campbell, Lynda; Reis, Andreas; Renaldi, Teuku; Singh, Jerome; Smith, Maxwell; Von Schreeb, Johan

    2014-01-01

    This paper maps key research questions for humanitarian health ethics: the ethical dimensions of healthcare provision and public health activities during international responses to situations of humanitarian crisis. Development of this research agenda was initiated at the Humanitarian Health Ethics Forum (HHE Forum) convened in Hamilton, Canada in November 2012. The HHE Forum identified priority avenues for advancing policy and practice for ethics in humanitarian health action. The main topic areas examined were: experiences and perceptions of humanitarian health ethics; training and professional development initiatives for humanitarian health ethics; ethics support for humanitarian health workers; impact of policies and project structures on humanitarian health ethics; and theoretical frameworks and ethics lenses. Key research questions for each topic area are presented, as well as proposed strategies for advancing this research agenda. Pursuing the research agenda will help strengthen the ethical foundations of humanitarian health action. PMID:25687273

  2. Brief report : ethical problems in research practice

    OpenAIRE

    Colnerud, Gunnel

    2013-01-01

    Most accounts of the ethical problems facing researchers across a broad spectrum of research fields come from ethicists, ethics committees, and specialists committed to the study of ethics in human research. In contrast, this study reports on the ethical questions that researchers, themselves, report facing in their everyday practice. Fifty-five Swedish researchers contributed 109 examples of ethical dilemmas, conflicts, and problems in research. They were all researchers at the postdoctoral ...

  3. National Nuclear Research Institute (NNRI) - Annual Report 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The 2015 report of the National Nuclear Research Institute (NNRI) of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC) lists various programmes undertaken by the Institute under the following headings: Water resources programme, Energy Research programme, Environmental and Health Safety Programme, Digital Instrumentation programme, Nuclear Applications and Materals programme and Radiation Occupational safety programme. Also, included are abstracts of publications and technical reports.

  4. Research symposium proceedings. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-12-31

    THE research symposium was organized to present the cutting edge research for PET by individuals from leading institutions throughout the world. The Institute for Clinical PET (ICP) has focused its annual meeting on the clinical applications of PET.

  5. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    The journal is devoted to the promotion of health sciences and related disciplines ... women of African and Asian ancestry were also transported from their home countries to. America to work. Movement from ... barriers to health care utilization.

  6. Progress report, Health Sciences Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-05-01

    In Health Physics Branch, work is continuing on development of neutron dosimetry techniques, new thermoluminescent dosimeters, and portable tritium-in-air monitoring instruments. Development of beneficial uses of waste heat has continued in the Environmental Research Branch. Other work includes studies in meteorology, biogeochemistry of nuclear waste management areas, and soil and groundwater studies. Research activity in the Radiation Biology Branch is dealing with the effects of radiation upon a variety of living organisms. Both genetic and mutagenic effects of damage to DNA are being studied as well as repair mechanisms and human diseases caused by repair mechanism deficiencies. In the Biomedical Research Branch, a collaborative study is being undertaken into the retention and excretion of uranium in fuel fabrication workers. (O.T.)

  7. Enhancing transparency in reporting the synthesis of qualitative research: ENTREQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The syntheses of multiple qualitative studies can pull together data across different contexts, generate new theoretical or conceptual models, identify research gaps, and provide evidence for the development, implementation and evaluation of health interventions. This study aims to develop a framework for reporting the synthesis of qualitative health research. Methods We conducted a comprehensive search for guidance and reviews relevant to the synthesis of qualitative research, methodology papers, and published syntheses of qualitative health research in MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL and relevant organisational websites to May 2011. Initial items were generated inductively from guides to synthesizing qualitative health research. The preliminary checklist was piloted against forty published syntheses of qualitative research, purposively selected to capture a range of year of publication, methods and methodologies, and health topics. We removed items that were duplicated, impractical to assess, and rephrased items for clarity. Results The Enhancing transparency in reporting the synthesis of qualitative research (ENTREQ) statement consists of 21 items grouped into five main domains: introduction, methods and methodology, literature search and selection, appraisal, and synthesis of findings. Conclusions The ENTREQ statement can help researchers to report the stages most commonly associated with the synthesis of qualitative health research: searching and selecting qualitative research, quality appraisal, and methods for synthesising qualitative findings. The synthesis of qualitative research is an expanding and evolving methodological area and we would value feedback from all stakeholders for the continued development and extension of the ENTREQ statement. PMID:23185978

  8. Health, safety and environmental research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinner, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    This report outlines the Health, Safety and Environmental Research Program being undertaken by the CFFTP. The Program objectives, relationship to other CFFTP programs, implementation plans and expected outputs are stated. Opportunities to build upon the knowledge and experience gained in safely managing tritium in the CANDU program, by addressing generic questions pertinent to tritium safety for fusion facilities, are identified. These opportunities exist across a broad spectrum of issues covering the anticipated behaviour of tritium in fusion facilities, the surrounding environment and in man

  9. Juelich Research Center. Annual report 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-10-01

    The Research Centre Juelich (KFA) as one of the thirteen national research centres in the Federal Republic of Germany is probably unique in that it concentrates equally on four essentials for mankind - energy, health and environment, materials and matter as well as information. These basic requirements are reflected by the four priority programmes characterizing research at the KFA in the nineties. The research priorities are: Properties of Matter and Material Research; Basic Research on Information Technology; Health, Environment, Biotechnology; Energy Research and Technology; Nuclear Fusion; Basic Nuclear Research; Interdisciplinary Analyses and Methods. (orig./HSCH) [de

  10. Using mixed methods in health research.

    OpenAIRE

    Tariq, S.; Woodman, J.

    2013-01-01

    Mixed methods research is the use of quantitative and qualitative methods in a single study or series of studies. It is an emergent methodology which is increasingly used by health researchers, especially within health services research. There is a growing literature on the theory, design and critical appraisal of mixed methods research. However, there are few papers that summarize this methodological approach for health practitioners who wish to conduct or critically engage with mixed method...

  11. The Conduct and Reporting of Child Health Research: An Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Published in 2012 and Evaluation of Change over 5 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Allison; Hartling, Lisa; Vandermeer, Ben; Caldwell, Patrina; Contopoulos-Ioannidis, Despina G; Curtis, Sarah; Fernandes, Ricardo M; Klassen, Terry P; Williams, Katrina; Dyson, Michele P

    2018-02-01

    For child health randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in 2012, we aimed to describe design and reporting characteristics and evaluate changes since 2007; assess the association between trial design and registration and risk of bias (RoB); and assess the association between RoB and effect size. For 300 RCTs, we extracted design and reporting characteristics and assessed RoB. We assessed 5-year changes in design and reporting (based on 300 RCTs we had previously analyzed) using the Fisher exact test. We tested for associations between design and reporting characteristics and overall RoB and registration using the Fisher exact, Cochran-Armitage, Kruskal-Wallis, and Jonckheere-Terpstra tests. We pooled effect sizes and tested for differences by RoB using the χ 2 test for subgroups in meta-analysis. The 2012 and 2007 RCTs differed with respect to many design and reporting characteristics. From 2007 to 2012, RoB did not change for random sequence generation and improved for allocation concealment (P < .001). Fewer 2012 RCTs were rated high overall RoB and more were rated unclear (P = .03). Only 7.3% of 2012 RCTs were rated low overall RoB. Trial registration doubled from 2007 to 2012 (23% to 46%) (P < .001) and was associated with lower RoB (P = .009). Effect size did not differ by RoB (P = .43) CONCLUSIONS: Random sequence generation and allocation concealment were not often reported, and selective reporting was prevalent. Measures to increase trialists' awareness and application of existing reporting guidance, and the prospective registration of RCTs is needed to improve the trustworthiness of findings from this field. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Impact of public health research in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Peter; Curtis, Tine

    2004-01-01

    research. Two health surveys have been carried out in Greenland by the National Institute of Public Health, and a follow-up is being planned together with the Directorate of Health. The results have been widely used by politicians, administrators, and health care professionals.......In 1992, the Greenland Home Rule Government took over the responsibility for health care. There has since been a growing cooperation between the Directorate of Health and researchers in Denmark and Greenland, for instance by the Directorate supporting workshops and funding a chair in health...

  13. Criticism of health researches: why and how

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Ashrafi-rizi

    2016-04-01

    and value of literature “(12, 13. The critic also accepts or rejects the content by reason, logic, scientific arguments and citation.” So, to do a critical study, four techniques are essential: asking questions, inferring, relevant content and association between the work content with other works, and evaluation “(12. Also in this stage, taking note is done carefully. In the third stage, the notes are arranged and final edit based on the structure of the target journal is done. Time and accuracy at this stage add to the quality of the final text. Scientific journals usually allocate a space to the critique of scientific texts. Some of the journals are also published just with the aim of texts critique. Guide to writing critique on scientific literature is different in different journals, but the following parts exist in most journals: title, introduction, bibliography of critic, bibliography of work like first and second name of the writer, title of work and features of publication (place of publication, publisher and the year of publication, main subject of the work (headings and sub-heading, author’s competence, comparison of the work with similar ones(the purpose is to know whether new content has been produced, critique of the text (content, punctuation, structure and appearance, summary and conclusion (in this part , the reviewer points to the ability and competence of the author in writing, success or failure of the author in predicting the target, strengths and weaknesses of the text and especially refers to the particular characteristics. The fourth stage, as the final stage, is writing critique and is known as a Review Report (Critique Report. Now the final text is ready to be sent to the target journal. Research review, particularly health research, is a critical process for stakeholders to recognize the value of the produced knowledge. Critics or reviewers need some skills for fair critique such as research methodology, introduction to statistics

  14. Improving Defense Health Program Medical Research Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-08

    research , including a Business Cell; 87 Research Development, 88 Research Oversight, 89 and Research Compliance offices;90 and the Center...needed for DHP medical research , such as the Army’s Clinical and Translational Research Program Office, 38 the Navy’s Research Methods Training Program... research stated, “key infrastructure for a learning health system will encompass three core elements: data networks, methods , and workforce.” 221

  15. The 2016 CIOMS guidelines and public-health research ethics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-12-01

    Dec 1, 2017 ... CIOMS International Ethical Guidelines for Biomedical Research Involving ... mention of public health in relation to social value. • The new guideline 7, .... reports, can be obtained from conventional media sources such as.

  16. Health and safety at the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeNeveu, D.M.

    1982-04-01

    This report outlines the health and safety program at the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment. It describes the procedures in place to ensure that a high standard of conventional industrial and radiation safety is maintained in the workplace

  17. Involving Nepali academics in health research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neupane, Dinesh; van Teijlingen, E; Khanal, V

    2013-01-01

    Many academics from Nepal do not involve in research activities. There are several factors hindering the involvement such as inadequate human resources and lack of financial resources. Despite limited human and financial resources, we believe it is still possible to attract many Nepali academics...... in health research. This paper purposes some ideas to increase involvement of Nepali academics in health research....

  18. Research and Technology Report: 1997

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakimoto, Philip; Friedman, Jonathan (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    This volume highlights the most significant results from research and development projects sponsored through NASA's Office of Equal Opportunity Programs, Minority University Research and Education Division, in collaboration with Headquarters Program Offices, during Academic Year 1996-97 and Summer 1996. It includes the work of major multidisciplinary research groups, such as those sponsored under NASA's University Research Centers at Minority Institutions and Institutional Research Awards programs, as well as that of individual principal investigators sponsored under the Faculty Awards for Research or other MUREP programs. It encompasses contributions from 863 students and 388 faculty-level researchers at institutions eligible to compete for MUREP funding, including: Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU), Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSI), Tribal Colleges and Universities (TCU), and accredited minority colleges or universities with a 50 percent or greater underrepresented minority student enrollment. It stands as a testimony to NASA's response to Executive Orders 12876, 12900, and 13021, which mandate increased Federal support to these classes of institutions. We firmly believe that maintaining America's leadership in aerospace and related areas depends on fully utilizing the talents available at the Nation's minority universities.

  19. Predicting physical health: implicit mental health measures versus self-report scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousineau, Tara McKee; Shedler, Jonathan

    2006-06-01

    Researchers have traditionally relied on self-report questionnaires to assess psychological well-being, but such measures may be unable to differentiate individuals who are genuinely psychologically healthy from those who maintain a facade or illusion of mental health based on denial and self-deception. Prior research suggests that clinically derived assessment procedures that assess implicit psychological processes may have advantages over self-report mental health measures. This prospective study compared the Early Memory Index, an implicit measure of mental health/distress, with a range of familiar self-report scales as predictors of physical health. The Early Memory Index showed significant prospective associations with health service utilization and clinically verified illness. In contrast, self-report measures of mental health, perceived stress, life events stress, and mood states did not predict health outcomes. The findings highlight the limitations of self-report questionnaires and suggest that implicit measures have an important role to play in mental health research.

  20. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    (27.9%) and 17.0% for general/teaching hospitals and only. 12.3% for primary ... and that within the public sector, the higher levels of health facilities are ... health facilities attributed mostly to issues of easy access ..... and tertiary education.

  1. Participatory Action Research in Health Systems: Empowering ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2014-12-02

    Dec 2, 2014 ... Home · Resources · Publications ... A new publication, Participatory Action Research in Health Systems: a methods ... organizations, most African countries adopted direct payment for health services as the primary means.

  2. The Nordic Health Promotion Research Network (NHPRN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringsberg, Karin C

    2015-08-01

    The Nordic Health Promotion Research Network (NHPRN) was established in 2007 at the Nordic School of Public Health (NHV). This article aims to describe the foundation of the NHPRN, the development and the present status of the work of NHPRN. The NHPRN consists of about 50 senior and junior researchers from all Nordic countries. It is a working network that aims to develop the theoretical understanding of health promotion, to create research cooperation in health promotion from a Nordic perspective and to extend the scope of health promotion through education. Network members meet biannually to discuss and further develop research within the field and are also responsible for the Nordic conference on Health Promotion, organized every 3 years. The NHV hosted the network between 2007 and 2014; and the World Health Organisation (WHO) will assume this role in 2015. © 2015 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  3. Metalcasting competitiveness research. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piwonka, T.S.

    1994-08-01

    This report comprises eleven separate reports: prediction of non- metallic particle distribution, electromagnetic separation of inclusions from molten Al alloy, clean steel castings, waste stream identification and treatment, elastic wave lithotripsy for removal of ceramic from investment castings, metal penetration in sand molds, mold-metal interface gas composition, improved Alloy 718, specifications for iron oxide additions to no-bake sands, criteria functions for defect prediction, and computer-aided cooling curve analysis.

  4. Research in electrohydrodynamics. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1973-01-01

    An overview is presented in the form of publications for NASA research in electrohydrodynamics. Data cover basic electrohydrodynamics, management of liquids in zero gravity, continuum feedback control, and magnetohydrodynamics and ferrohydrodynamics. (GRA)

  5. Activities report of PTT Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the field of postal infrastructure research, activities were performed on postcode readers, radiolabels, and techniques of operations research and artificial intelligence. In the field of telecommunication, transportation, and information, research was made on multipurpose coding schemes, speech recognition, hypertext, a multimedia information server, security of electronic data interchange, document retrieval, improvement of the quality of user interfaces, domotics living support (techniques), and standardization of telecommunication prototcols. In the field of telecommunication infrastructure and provisions research, activities were performed on universal personal telecommunications, advanced broadband network technologies, coherent techniques, measurement of audio quality, near field facilities, local beam communication, local area networks, network security, coupling of broadband and narrowband integrated services digital networks, digital mapping, and standardization of protocols.

  6. International research collaboration in maritime health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Olaf Chresten

    2011-01-01

    . The area is regulated by international standards based on international research-based knowledge on health and safety. Moreover, many of the world's seafarers come from developing countries with specific disease problems like HIV and no possibility of independent maritime health research. The international......The new ILO-2006-convention and the EU Commission's strategic objectives for the EU maritime transport policy 2008-2018, mentions the necessity of a modern health and safety system for maritime transportation. However, there is no specific strategy for the development of maritime health and safety...... maritime health research is sparse, and an increase in such research is necessary to help benefit needed shipping as a highly globalized industry. This paper presents an example of such research, accompanied by a discussion of methods and opportunities to increase international maritime health research....

  7. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Home > Vol 5, No 1 (2012) ... pharmacy, nursing, biotechnology, cell and molecular biology, and related engineering and social science fields. ... Public Health Implication of Mycotoxin Contaminated Pawpaw (Carica papaya L) on ...

  8. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    2009-12-28

    Dec 28, 2009 ... forum for the communication and evaluation of data, methods and findings in health sciences and related disciplines. .... al [8] for the detection of schistosome DNA in faeces. ..... save the inhabitants from the socio- economic ...

  9. Impact of the economic crisis on the health of older persons in Spain: research clues based on an analysis of mortality. SESPAS report 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benmarhnia, Tarik; Zunzunegui, Maria-Victoria; Llácer, Alicia; Béland, Francois

    2014-06-01

    Older adults are seldom considered in studies on the health impact of economic recessions or crises. However, they constitute a population group that is highly vulnerable to decreases in investment in health and social services and social security. Our aim is to examine the relationship between the economic crisis starting in 2008 and the health status of older adults in Spain. More specifically, we analyze changes in trends of mortality in relation to the crisis, the specific impact of winter on mortality and gender differences in the crisis' impact on mortality. Using data from the National Institute of Statistics of Spain on people over 60 years of age, the number of monthly deaths by age and sex from January 2005 to December 2012 was analyzed. Interrupted time series analyses and the "difference in differences" method were used. During the crisis, for adults 60 years and older: 1) the observed mortality seems to be decreasing at a slower rate than what would have been expected in the absence of the crisis; 2) there has been an increase in winter mortality; 3) the impact of the crisis has been greater for female than for male mortality. These results suggest sizable effects of the economic crisis on the mortality of older adults and argue for research done using more detailed analyses integrating economic indicators. Copyright © 2013 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Impact of the economic crisis on the health of older persons in Spain: research clues based on an analysis of mortality. SESPAS report 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarik Benmarhnia

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Older adults are seldom considered in studies on the health impact of economic recessions or crises. However, they constitute a population group that is highly vulnerable to decreases in investment in health and social services and social security. Our aim is to examine the relationship between the economic crisis starting in 2008 and the health status of older adults in Spain. More specifically, we analyze changes in trends of mortality in relation to the crisis, the specific impact of winter on mortality and gender differences in the crisis’ impact on mortality. Using data from the National Institute of Statistics of Spain on people over 60 years of age, the number of monthly deaths by age and sex from January 2005 to December 2012 was analyzed. Interrupted time series analyses and the “difference in differences” method were used. During the crisis, for adults 60 years and older: 1 the observed mortality seems to be decreasing at a slower rate than what would have been expected in the absence of the crisis; 2 there has been an increase in winter mortality; 3 the impact of the crisis has been greater for female than for male mortality. These results suggest sizable effects of the economic crisis on the mortality of older adults and argue for research done using more detailed analyses integrating economic indicators.

  11. RB research reactor Safety Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sotic, O.; Pesic, M.; Vranic, S.

    1979-04-01

    This RB reactor safety report is a revised and improved version of the Safety report written in 1962. It contains descriptions of: reactor building, reactor hall, control room, laboratories, reactor components, reactor control system, heavy water loop, neutron source, safety system, dosimetry system, alarm system, neutron converter, experimental channels. Safety aspects of the reactor operation include analyses of accident causes, errors during operation, measures for preventing uncontrolled activity changes, analysis of the maximum possible accident in case of different core configurations with natural uranium, slightly and highly enriched fuel; influence of possible seismic events

  12. Community Mental Health Clinic Cost Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Healthcare Cost Report Information System (HCRIS) Dataset - Community Mental Health Center (CMHC). This data was reported on form CMS-2088-92. The data in this...

  13. [Health research and health technology assessment in Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, Manuel Antonio; Cabieses, Báltica; Paraje, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Health research is considered an essential element for the improvement of population health and it has been recommended that a share of the national health budget should be allocated to develop this field. Chile has undertaken efforts in the last decades in order to improve the governmental structure created to promote the development of health research, which has increased human resources and funding opportunities. On the other hand, the sustained economic growth of Chile in the last decades suggests that the health expenditure will maintain its increasing trend in the following years. This additional funding could be used to improve coverage of current activities performed in the health system, but also to address the incorporation of new strategies. More recently, health technology assessment (HTA) has been proposed as a process to support decisions about allocation of resources based on scientific evidence. This paper examines the relationship between the development of health research and the HTA process. First, it presents a brief diagnosis of the situation of health research in Chile. Second, it reviews the conceptual basis and the methods that account for the relationship between a HTA process and the development of health research. In particular, it emphasizes the relevance of identifying information gaps where funding additional research can be considered a good use of public resources. Finally, it discusses the challenges and possible courses of action that Chile could take in order to guarantee the continuous improvement of an articulated structure for health research and HTA.

  14. How to Report Exotic Animal Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Girolamo, Nicola; Winter, Alexandra L

    2017-09-01

    Reporting the results of primary research is a key step in knowledge creation. Many well-conducted studies are rejected by journal editors, criticized by peers, or unsuitable for systematic reviewers because of poor reporting. This article summarizes the most important methodological items to report when writing an original research article. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Annual Research Technical Report 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso V, G.; Viais J, J.; Mendoza G, G.; Ramirez S, J.R.; Castillo M, J.A.

    2005-09-01

    This report has among its objectives to carry out the Probabilistic Safety Analysis Level 1 for the IRIS inside the project of development of reactors of IV Generation. To generate computational calculation tools for the analysis of the reactors of IV Generation. To generate computational tools to optimize the use of the nuclear fuel. (Author)

  16. RB research reactor safety report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sotic, O.; Pesic, M.; Vranic, S.

    1979-04-01

    This new version of the safety report is a revision of the safety report written in 1962 when the RB reactor started operation after reconstruction. The new safety report was needed because reactor systems and components have been improved and the administrative procedures were changed. the most important improvements and changes were concerned with the use of highly enriched fuel (80% enriched), construction of reactor converter outside the reactor vessel, improved control system by two measuring start-up channels, construction of system for heavy water leak detection, new inter phone connection between control room and other reactor rooms. This report includes description of reactor building with installations, rector vessel, reactor core, heavy water system, control system, safety system, dosimetry and alarm systems, experimental channels, neutron converter, reactor operation. Safety aspects contain analyses of accident reasons, method for preventing reactivity insertions, analyses of maximum hypothetical accidents for cores with natural uranium, 2% enriched and 80% enriched fuel elements. Influence of seismic events on the reactor safety and well as coupling between reactor and the converter are parts of this document

  17. Status Report on Speech Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-01

    closer to the vowel than do initial consonants. A speculative reason why final consonants may nestle closer to the vowel derives once again from...Report, SR-91.] Chaiyanara, P. M. (1983). Dialek Melayu Patani dan Bahasa Malaysia : Satu Kajian Perbandingan dari segi Fonologi, Morfologi dan Syntaksis

  18. Research Reports / Rapports de recherche

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    chifaou.amzat

    Council for the Development of Social Science Research in Africa, 2008. (ISSN 0850-3907) ... of Kenya's post-colonial era.1 It explores the concept and reality of an ... emergence of a new national generational cohort.3 The existence, defini-.

  19. Qualitative research and dental public health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roslind Preethi George

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of Qualitative Research (QR methods are now getting common in various aspects of health and healthcare research and they can be used to interpret, explore, or obtain a deeper understanding of certain aspects of human beliefs, attitudes, or behavior through personal experiences and perspectives. The potential scope of QR in the field of dental public health is immense, but unfortunately, it has remained underutilized. However, there are a number of studies which have used this type of research to probe into some unanswered questions in the field of public health dentistry ranging from workforce issues to attitudes of patients. In recent health research, evidence gathered through QR methods provide understanding to the social, cultural, and economic factors affecting the health status and healthcare of an individual and the population as a whole. This study will provide an overview of what QR is and discuss its contributions to dental public health research.

  20. Researching health inequalities with Community Researchers: practical, methodological and ethical challenges of an 'inclusive' research approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salway, Sarah; Chowbey, Punita; Such, Elizabeth; Ferguson, Beverly

    2015-01-01

    Public health research sometimes uses members of communities as researchers. These are called Community Researchers. The advantage of using Community Researchers is that it enables people who live in communities to participate in research by designing the research, gathering data and being involved in analysis. This 'participatory' approach also has the potential to reach communities that might otherwise not be included in research. There are few studies that report the experiences of Community Researchers who take part in such research. This study helps fill this gap by exploring the issues and challenges faced by Community Researchers involved in a study of health and poverty in ethnically mixed areas of east London, UK. Through the accounts of 12 researchers, the study reveals that being a community 'insider' had advantages: many felt they had been able to gain the trust of respondents and access people for the research that would have otherwise been missed. The role of Community Researcher was, however, difficult to manage with some researchers feeling burdened by their role and the increased knowledge they had about the lives of those in their community. In addition to the personal challenges for the Community Researchers, the findings raise various ethical and methodological issues that need consideration in participatory research. Background Inclusive research approaches are increasingly employed by public health researchers. Recent methodological development includes the engagement of Community Researchers (CRs), who use their knowledge and networks to facilitate research with the community with which they identify. Few studies have explored the experiences of CRs in the research process, an important element of any comprehensive assessment of the pros and cons of such research endeavours. We report here on the experiences of CRs engaged in a study of health inequalities and poverty in ethnically diverse and disadvantaged areas of London, UK. Methods We

  1. [Marketing research in health service].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameri, Cinzia; Fiorini, Fulvio

    2015-01-01

    Marketing research is the systematic and objective search for, and analysis of, information relevant to the identification and solution of any problem in the field of marketing. The key words in this definition are: systematic, objective and analysis. Marketing research seeks to set about its task in a systematic and objective fashion. This means that a detailed and carefully designed research plan is developed in which each stage of the research is specified. Such a research plan is only considered adequate if it specifies: the research problem in concise and precise terms, the information necessary to address the problem, the methods to be employed in gathering the information and the analytical techniques to be used to interpret it. Maintaining objectivity in marketing research is essential if marketing management is to have sufficient confidence in its results to be prepared to take risky decisions based upon those results. To this end, as far as possible, marketing researchers employ the scientific method. The characteristics of the scientific method are that it translates personal prejudices, notions and opinions into explicit propositions (or hypotheses). These are tested empirically. At the same time alternative explanations of the event or phenomena of interest are given equal consideration.

  2. Building health research systems to achieve better health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González Block Miguel

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Health research systems can link knowledge generation with practical concerns to improve health and health equity. Interest in health research, and in how health research systems should best be organised, is moving up the agenda of bodies such as the World Health Organisation. Pioneering health research systems, for example those in Canada and the UK, show that progress is possible. However, radical steps are required to achieve this. Such steps should be based on evidence not anecdotes. Health Research Policy and Systems (HARPS provides a vehicle for the publication of research, and informed opinion, on a range of topics related to the organisation of health research systems and the enormous benefits that can be achieved. Following the Mexico ministerial summit on health research, WHO has been identifying ways in which it could itself improve the use of research evidence. The results from this activity are soon to be published as a series of articles in HARPS. This editorial provides an account of some of these recent key developments in health research systems but places them in the context of a distinguished tradition of debate about the role of science in society. It also identifies some of the main issues on which 'research on health research' has already been conducted and published, in some cases in HARPS. Finding and retaining adequate financial and human resources to conduct health research is a major problem, especially in low and middle income countries where the need is often greatest. Research ethics and agenda-setting that responds to the demands of the public are issues of growing concern. Innovative and collaborative ways are being found to organise the conduct and utilisation of research so as to inform policy, and improve health and health equity. This is crucial, not least to achieve the health-related Millennium Development Goals. But much more progress is needed. The editorial ends by listing a wide range of topics

  3. Federal report on research 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    Current challenges to science and research in the field of scientific-technological innovation are: to safeguard the competitiveness of particularly high-grade and demanding products in those parts of the world market where competition is hard; careful, responsible and at the same time economically reasonable use of nature and the natural resources; scientific and technological efficiency of this country as a partner in the world. The newly oriented research policy approves technical progress and invites top performances. One of the most important immediate problems is the training of qualified young scientists. The federal government views the technological development also in relation to the risks, but is convinced that possible disadvantages can be reduced to become negligible. Information technology, new material, bio and laser technologies, having interindustrial importance, play a part in economy world-wide as key technologies. Besides expenditure for sciences, measures and promotion instruments, the main points of emphasis of promotion as well as the international cooperation are described in detail as to their tasks, structure and volume; furthermore the individual research institutions of the Federal Republic of Germany are pointed out. The statistics appended contain the financial data regarding science expenditure. (HSCH) [de

  4. [Qualitative research in health services research - discussion paper, Part 2: Qualitative research in health services research in Germany - an overview].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbach, U; Stamer, M; Holmberg, C; Güthlin, C; Patzelt, C; Meyer, T

    2012-08-01

    This is the second part of a 3-part discussion paper by the working group on "Qualitative Methods" in the German network of health services research (DNVF) that shall contribute to the development of a memorandum concerning qualitative health services research. It aims to depict the different types of qualitative research that are conducted in health services research in Germany. In addition, the authors present a specific set of qualitative data collection and analysis tools to demonstrate the potential of qualitative research for health services research. QUALITATIVE RESEARCH IN HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH - AN OVERVIEW: To give an overview of the types of qualitative research conducted in German health services research, the abstracts of the 8th German Conference on Health Services Research were filtered to identify qualitative or mixed-methods studies. These were then analysed by looking at the context which was studied, who was studied, the aims of the studies, and what type of methods were used. Those methods that were mentioned most often for data collection and analysis are described in detail. QUALITATIVE RESEARCH AT THE CONFERENCE FOR HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH 2009: Approximately a fifth of all abstracts (n=74) had a qualitative (n=47) or a mixed-methods approach combining quantitative and qualitative methods (n=27). Research aims included needs assessment (41%), survey development (36%), evaluation (22%), and theorizing (1%). Data collection mostly consisted of one-on-one interviews (n=45) and group discussions (n=29). Qualitative content analysis was named in 35 abstracts, 30 abstracts did not reference their method of analysis. In addition to a quantitative summary of the abstract findings, the diversity of fields addressed by qualitative methods is highlighted. Although drawing conclusions on the use of qualitative methods in German health services research from the analysis of conference abstracts is not possible, the overview we present demonstrates the

  5. Research and experience report 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-06-01

    In order to carry out its regulatory responsibilities for nuclear facilities, it is essential that the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI) remains informed of the latest developments in science and technology. Hence, it supports and coordinates research into regulatory safety. Some of the findings from this research feed directly into the guidelines. Research projects provide training and thereby ensure that ENSI and its experts possess the required expertise. ENSI also contributes to many international projects. The research into fuels and materials relates to the reactor core and the multiple barriers used for the containment of radioactive materials. It looks primarily at stresses on fuel rod cladding caused by mechanisms like ageing and the increasingly high burn-up rates. Within OECD, specialist databases are being created, e.g. on pipe damage, fire damage or common cause errors. ENSI has given considerable attention to external events; it has been conducting research into earthquakes, plane crashes and energy-rich surges in the high-voltage network. The research on operator behaviour in accidents in nuclear power plants (NPPs) is looking at the reliability of operators under difficult conditions but also on the influence of control room lay-out on the performance of operating staff. Analysis of system behaviour and accident sequences in conditions ranging from normal operations to accidents involving core melt-down is part of a research on computer models in order to provide a more comprehensive simulation of plant behaviour. Research in radiological protection ranges from the technology used to measure radiation to aero-radiometry and the development of new methodologies for radionuclide analyses. Work is continuing on the procedures specified in the Sectoral Plan for deep geologic repositories. In addition to the ongoing research at the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory into Opalinus Clay as a host rock, the research includes the design and monitoring

  6. Privacy and Security in Mobile Health (mHealth) Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Shifali; Yttri, Jennifer; Nilse, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    Research on the use of mobile technologies for alcohol use problems is a developing field. Rapid technological advances in mobile health (or mHealth) research generate both opportunities and challenges, including how to create scalable systems capable of collecting unprecedented amounts of data and conducting interventions-some in real time-while at the same time protecting the privacy and safety of research participants. Although the research literature in this area is sparse, lessons can be borrowed from other communities, such as cybersecurity or Internet security, which offer many techniques to reduce the potential risk of data breaches or tampering in mHealth. More research into measures to minimize risk to privacy and security effectively in mHealth is needed. Even so, progress in mHealth research should not stop while the field waits for perfect solutions.

  7. Mixed methods research in mental health nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettles, A M; Creswell, J W; Zhang, W

    2011-08-01

    Mixed methods research is becoming more widely used in order to answer research questions and to investigate research problems in mental health and psychiatric nursing. However, two separate literature searches, one in Scotland and one in the USA, revealed that few mental health nursing studies identified mixed methods research in their titles. Many studies used the term 'embedded' but few studies identified in the literature were mixed methods embedded studies. The history, philosophical underpinnings, definition, types of mixed methods research and associated pragmatism are discussed, as well as the need for mixed methods research. Examples of mental health nursing mixed methods research are used to illustrate the different types of mixed methods: convergent parallel, embedded, explanatory and exploratory in their sequential and concurrent combinations. Implementing mixed methods research is also discussed briefly and the problem of identifying mixed methods research in mental and psychiatric nursing are discussed with some possible solutions to the problem proposed. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing.

  8. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    elearning

    2008-03-04

    Mar 4, 2008 ... international forum for the communication and evaluation of data, methods and findings in health sciences and related disciplines. ... school students in Benin City is still poor and the adolescents still engage in ... people often have to overcome the stigma and discrimination, and address some of the most ...

  9. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    2008-09-19

    Sep 19, 2008 ... forum for the communication and evaluation of data, methods and findings in health sciences and related disciplines. .... Table: Effect of hepatoprotective activity of the fruits of Coccinia grandis against CCl4-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Bilurubin. Treatment. SGOT ... and loss of functional integrity of the cell.

  10. Radiation Research Department annual report 2003

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majborn, Benny; Damkjær, A.; Nielsen, Sven Poul

    2004-01-01

    This report presents a summary of the work of the Radiation Research Department in 2003. The main research areas were dosimetry, nuclear emergency preparedness, radioecology, and radioanalytical techniques. List of publications, committee memberships andstaff members are included....

  11. UVVVR research reports 1972 - 1975. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Abstracts are presented of research reports issued by the Institute for the Research, Production and Applications of Radioisotopes in Prague in the years 1972 to 1975. The abstracts are completed with the authors' and subject indexes. (L.O.)

  12. Radiation Research Department annual report 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majborn, B.; Damkjaer, A.; Nielsen, S.P. (eds.)

    2004-06-01

    This report presents a summary of the work of the Radiation Research Department in 2003. The main research areas were dosimetry, nuclear emergency preparedness, radioecology, and radioanalytical techniques. Lists of publications, committee memberships and staff members are included. (au)

  13. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    It seeks particularly (but not exclusively) to encourage multidisciplinary research and collaboration ... teaching of the subject and their self-rated unseriousness about the subject. ..... ac.nz/~iase/publications/5/stan0219.pdf. 4. Wakeford RE.

  14. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    It seeks particularly (but not exclusively) to encourage multidisciplinary research and collaboration among ... in the medical wards of a teaching hospital and to generate discussions .... Manual data entry which is the current practice in most ...

  15. Benefit sharing in health research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-08-02

    Aug 2, 2015 ... [4] Those who contribute to scientific research ought to share in its benefits. .... women to form new relationships, social networks and develop a sense of ... or discoveries about the indigenous biological resources before.

  16. Research culture in allied health: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, Donna; McKinstry, Carol; Cotchett, Matthew; Williams, Cylie; Haines, Terry

    2016-01-01

    Research evidence is required to guide optimal allied health practice and inform policymakers in primary health care. Factors that influence a positive research culture are not fully understood, and nor is the impact of a positive research culture on allied health professionals. The aim of this systematic review was to identify factors that affect allied health research culture and capacity. An extensive search of 11 databases was conducted in June 2015. Studies were included if they were published in English, had full-text availability and reported research findings relating to allied health professions. Study quality was evaluated using the McMaster Critical Review Forms. Fifteen studies were eligible for inclusion. A meta-analysis was not performed because of heterogeneity between studies. Allied health professionals perceive that their individual research skills are lower in comparison to their teams and organisation. Motivators for conducting research for allied health professionals include developing skills, increasing job satisfaction and career advancement. Barriers include a lack of time, limited research skills and other work roles taking priority. Multilayered strategies, such as collaborations with external partners and developing research leadership positions, aimed at addressing barriers and enablers, are important to enhance allied health research culture and capacity.

  17. [Legitimizing and responsibilities of public health reports: public health reports or social court reports?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgers, D; Streich, W

    1996-11-01

    Since 1970 various initiatives have been taken to improve the information bases of health reporting. However, the efforts made up to now by the Länder, the Federal Government and its corporate bodies are characterised by a lack of experience and shortage of resources; moreover, they are viewed with a critical eye by the public and in the political area. In this contribution the authors describe various topics and delimitations of a health reporting system which go far beyond health statistics and health programmes altogether. The chances of a national health reporting system are based on the assumption that an objective judgement based on expert knowledge and science will be possible and that beyond all particularistic interests, expert knowledge can be organised in a democratic process. Public health reporting varies between two extremes: On the one hand, the current reporting in the media on health-related subjects which is characterised by disagreement among experts, particularistic interests and emotions, and on the other hand the national health reporting, which, on the platform of policy marketing and political image shaping, is suspected of degenerating to a kind of "royal court reporting". A health reporting system based on expert knowledge and characterised by topics with relevance to health policy, expert quality of its information and neutrality to particularistic interests, should go beyond these two extremes. Given the political conditions of budgeting and distribution conflicts, health reporting has to deal with two main aspects: effectiveness and efficiency of employed resources and with the problems of a fair distribution of these resources to provide equal chances in the health sector. What cannot be solved, by questions of procedure, however, is the problem of truth and objective knowledge as well as the problem of confidence. If the general public lacks confidence in national expert knowledge, a society discourse will not lead to political

  18. Status report on fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkhart, Werner

    2005-01-01

    At the beginning of the twenty-first century mankind is faced with the serious problem of meeting the energy demands of a rapidly industrializing population around the globe. This, against the backdrop of fast diminishing fossil fuel resources (which have been the main source of energy of the last century) and the increasing realization that the use of fossil fuels has started to adversely affect our environment, has greatly intensified the quest for alternative energy sources. In this quest, fusion has the potential to play a very important role and we are today at the threshold of realizing net energy production from controlled fusion experiments. Fusion is, today, one of the most promising of all alternative energy sources because of the vast reserves of fuel, potentially lasting several thousands of years and the possibility of a relatively 'clean' form of energy, as required for use in concentrated urban industrial settings, with minimal long term environmental implications. The last decade and a half has seen unprecedented advances in controlled fusion experiments with the discovery of new regimes of operations in experiments, production of 16 MW of fusion power and operations close to and above the so-called 'break-even' conditions. A great deal of research has also been carried out in analysing various socio-economic aspects of fusion energy. This paper briefly reviews the various aspects and achievements of fusion research all over the world during this period

  19. Impact of public health research in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Peter; Curtis, Tine

    2004-01-01

    In 1992, the Greenland Home Rule Government took over the responsibility for health care. There has since been a growing cooperation between the Directorate of Health and researchers in Denmark and Greenland, for instance by the Directorate supporting workshops and funding a chair in health resea...

  20. Motivators, enablers, and barriers to building allied health research capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pager, Susan; Holden, Libby; Golenko, Xanthe

    2012-01-01

    Purpose A sound, scientific base of high quality research is needed to inform service planning and decision making and enable improved policy and practice. However, some areas of health practice, particularly many of the allied health areas, are generally considered to have a low evidence base. In order to successfully build research capacity in allied health, a clearer understanding is required of what assists and encourages research as well as the barriers and challenges. Participants and methods This study used written surveys to collect data relating to motivators, enablers, and barriers to research capacity building. Respondents were asked to answer questions relating to them as individuals and other questions relating to their team. Allied health professionals were recruited from multidisciplinary primary health care teams in Queensland Health. Eighty-five participants from ten healthcare teams completed a written version of the research capacity and culture survey. Results The results of this study indicate that individual allied health professionals are more likely to report being motivated to do research by intrinsic factors such as a strong interest in research. Barriers they identified to research are more likely to be extrinsic factors such as workload and lack of time. Allied health professionals identified some additional factors that impact on their research capacity than those reported in the literature, such as a desire to keep at the “cutting edge” and a lack of exposure to research. Some of the factors influencing individuals to do research were different to those influencing teams. These results are discussed with reference to organizational behavior and theories of motivation. Conclusion Supporting already motivated allied health professional individuals and teams to conduct research by increased skills training, infrastructure, and quarantined time is likely to produce better outcomes for research capacity building investment. PMID

  1. Using geographic information systems (GIS) to identify communities in need of health insurance outreach: An OCHIN practice-based research network (PBRN) report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angier, Heather; Likumahuwa, Sonja; Finnegan, Sean; Vakarcs, Trisha; Nelson, Christine; Bazemore, Andrew; Carrozza, Mark; DeVoe, Jennifer E

    2014-01-01

    Our practice-based research network (PBRN) is conducting an outreach intervention to increase health insurance coverage for patients seen in the network. To assist with outreach site selection, we sought an understandable way to use electronic health record (EHR) data to locate uninsured patients. Health insurance information was displayed within a web-based mapping platform to demonstrate the feasibility of using geographic information systems (GIS) to visualize EHR data. This study used EHR data from 52 clinics in the OCHIN PBRN. We included cross-sectional coverage data for patients aged 0 to 64 years with at least 1 visit to a study clinic during 2011 (n = 228,284). Our PBRN was successful in using GIS to identify intervention sites. Through use of the maps, we found geographic variation in insurance rates of patients seeking care in OCHIN PBRN clinics. Insurance rates also varied by age: The percentage of adults without insurance ranged from 13.2% to 86.8%; rates of children lacking insurance ranged from 1.1% to 71.7%. GIS also showed some areas of households with median incomes that had low insurance rates. EHR data can be imported into a web-based GIS mapping tool to visualize patient information. Using EHR data, we were able to observe smaller areas than could be seen using only publicly available data. Using this information, we identified appropriate OCHIN PBRN clinics for dissemination of an EHR-based insurance outreach intervention. GIS could also be used by clinics to visualize other patient-level characteristics to target clinic outreach efforts or interventions. © Copyright 2014 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  2. [Health services research for the public health service (PHS) and the public health system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollederer, A; Wildner, M

    2015-03-01

    There is a great need for health services research in the public health system and in the German public health service. However, the public health service is underrepresented in health services research in Germany. This has several structural, historical and disciplinary-related reasons. The public health service is characterised by a broad range of activities, high qualification requirements and changing framework conditions. The concept of health services research is similar to that of the public health service and public health system, because it includes the principles of multidisciplinarity, multiprofessionalism and daily routine orientation. This article focuses on a specified system theory based model of health services research for the public health system and public health service. The model is based on established models of the health services research and health system research, which are further developed according to specific requirements of the public health service. It provides a theoretical foundation for health services research on the macro-, meso- and microlevels in public health service and the public health system. Prospects for public health service are seen in the development from "old public health" to "new public health" as well as in the integration of health services research and health system research. There is a significant potential for development in a better linkage between university research and public health service as is the case for the "Pettenkofer School of Public Health Munich". © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Annual safety research report, JFY 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-09-01

    In the safety infrastructure research working group report, 'the effective conducting of nuclear safety infrastructure research', published by METI in March 2010, the roles of regulatory agencies and JNES and their cooperation, and the research road map for nuclear safety regulation researches were summarized. As for the regulatory issues the governments or JNES considered necessary, JNES had compiled' safety research plan' in respective research areas necessary for solving the regulatory issues (safety research needs) and was conducting safety research to obtain the results, etc. Safety research areas, subjects and research projects were as follows: design review of nuclear power plant (4 subjects and each subject having several research projects totaled 19), control management of nuclear power plant (3 subjects and each subject having several research projects totaled 11), nuclear fuel cycle (2 subjects and each subject having several research projects totaled 5), nuclear fuel cycle backend (2 subjects and each subject having several research projects totaled 6), nuclear emergency preparedness and response (3 subjects and each subject having several research projects totaled 5) and bases of nuclear safety technology (3 subjects and each subject having several research projects totaled 7). In JFY 2010, JNES worked on the 53 research projects of 17 subjects in 6 areas as safety researches. This annual safety research report summarized respective achievements and stage of regulatory tools necessary for solving regulatory issues according to the safety research plan, JFY 2010 Edition as well as the situation of the reflection for the safety regulations. (T. Tanaka)

  4. Health policy, health systems research and analysis capacity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Health Policy and Systems Research and Analysis (HPSR&A) is an applied science that deals with complexity as it tries to provide lessons, tools and methods to understand and improve health systems and health policy. It is defined by the kinds of questions asked rather than a particular methodology.

  5. Report 1985 of the Austrian Research Centre Seibersdorf. Abridged version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwach, G.W.

    1987-01-01

    The report gives a short survey of the work carried out by the Austrian Research Centre Seibersdorf in 1985. The working programme comprises five main areas: Energy and safety; Materials research, isotope and radiation techniques; Measuring techniques and information processing; Environmental protection, health and food; Industrial consulting. (Author)

  6. Population health intervention research training: the value of public health internships and mentorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamelin, Anne-Marie; Paradis, Gilles

    2018-01-01

    Better alignment between academia and public health practice and policies are critical to improve public health actions. Training of future researchers to address complex issues and to conduct transdisciplinary and collaborative research will help improve this alignment. In this paper, we describe the role of internship placements and mentorship for trainees' skills development in population health intervention research and the benefits of embedding research trainees within public health organizations. This qualitative descriptive study assessed the perceptions of the role and benefits of internships and mentorship for population health intervention research training among former doctoral and postdoctoral students, public health mentors, and senior public health managers who participated in the 4P Program, a research training program which bridges academic training and the public health system in Quebec, Canada. Two types of interviews were conducted: telephone semi-structured interviews by an external evaluator and face-to-face trainee "exit" interviews by the Program co-director. Semi-annual evaluation reports from each trainee were also reviewed. Qualitative data were subjected to a thematic analysis. Internships provided trainees with a working knowledge of the public health system and the context in which decisions and public health interventions are implemented. It was an opportunity for trainees to interact with knowledge-user partners and assess the gap between research and practice. Effective mentorship was key to help trainees interpret the public health reality and develop population health intervention research skills. Trainees learned to ask the "how" questions that are critical for in-depth understanding of complex interventions and the conditions under which they can be best implemented. Conditions of success of internships and mentorship for population health intervention research included the alignment of the interests between the trainee, the

  7. Progress report and research proposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Research carried out includes: interpretation of mean-free-paths of projectile fragments from relativistic heavy-ion collisions; inelastic excitation and spin-flip in heavy ion reactions; inelastic scattering and the optical potential for 16 O + 28 Si; elastic scattering of protons by 6 Li; scattering of light ions by 6 Li; specific distortion effects in 3 H + α and 3 He + α systems; specific distortion effects in the d + α system and charge form factor of 6 Li; detailed investigation of exchange effects in 3 He + α and α + 16 O scattering; study of the n + 6 Li system with flexible cluster wave function; core-exchange effects in like-ion scattering; reaction cross-section for collision of nuclei at high energy; study of 46 48 Ca(α,p) reactions; the proximity potential for heavy-ion reactions on deformed nuclei; quasi-bound state resonances for a particle in a two-dimensional well; time evolution kernels, uniform asymptotic expansions; and a generator coordinate theory of normalization kernels of cluster systems, application of Gel'fand polynomials to permutation and SU 4 symmetries of cluster wave functions

  8. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    2008-12-31

    Dec 31, 2008 ... of DHS full reports of the countries. The study population consists of women aged 15-49 interviewed during the surveys that had been exposed to the risk of having ever had a pregnancy (that is, ever been exposed to the risk of pregnancy termination). Pregnancy termination is defined in the DHS as: any ...

  9. Manganese Health Research Program (MHRP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    to Prion 21 Klein Bradley Dept. of Biomedical Sciences & Pathobiology College of Veterinary Medicine Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA...PhD Struve, Melanie , BS Norris, Amy, PhD Higgins, Alan, PhD 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 7

  10. Focus Group in Community Mental Health Research: Need for Adaption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupančič, Vesna; Pahor, Majda; Kogovšek, Tina

    2018-04-27

    The article presents an analysis of the use of focus groups in researching community mental health users, starting with the reasons for using them, their implementation in mental health service users' research, and the adaptations of focus group use when researching the experiences of users. Based on personal research experience and a review of scientific publications in the Google Scholar, Web of Science, ProQuest, EBSCOhost, and Scopus databases, 20 articles published between 2010 and 2016 were selected for targeted content analysis. A checklist for reporting on the use of focus groups with community mental health service users, aiming to improve the comparability, verifiability and validity was developed. Adaptations of the implementation of focus groups in relation to participants' characteristics were suggested. Focus groups are not only useful as a scientific research technique, but also for ensuring service users' participation in decision-making in community mental health and evaluating the quality of the mental health system and services .

  11. Maritime health: a review with suggestions for research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLachlan, Malcolm; Kavanagh, Bill; Kay, Alison

    2012-01-01

    International maritime health has largely developed within the sphere of occupational health services and international health problems. We reviewed publications in the journal International Maritime Health from 2000 to 2010 to establish the coverage of the journal and the scope of research in maritime health. We identified six thematic categories: healthcare access, delivery and integration; telehealth; non-communicable diseases and physical health problems; communicable diseases; psychological functioning and health; and safety-related issues. We describe the research within these themes and report on their publication prominence. We also analyse the research in terms of its geographical focus, the population groups addressed and the research methodologies used. We suggest a broadening of maritime research to include randomised controlled trials, longitudinal studies and more qualitative research; more research addressing the context for non-European seafarers; and research on seafarers spouses and family supports and obligations. We also recommend more research on psychosocial and cultural issues and on telehealth, as well as the development of a stronger systems perspective for promoting maritime health.

  12. [Evaluation of arguments in research reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botes, A

    1999-06-01

    Some authors on research methodology are of opinion that research reports are based on the logic of reasoning and that such reports communicate with the reader by presenting logical, coherent arguments (Böhme, 1975:206; Mouton, 1996:69). This view implies that researchers draw specific conclusions and that such conclusions are justified by way of reasoning (Doppelt, 1998:105; Giere, 1984:26; Harre, 1965:11; Leherer & Wagner, 1983 & Pitt, 1988:7). The structure of a research report thus consists mainly of conclusions and reasons for such conclusions (Booth, Colomb & Williams, 1995:97). From this it appears that justification by means of reasoning is a standard procedure in research and research reports. Despite the fact that the logic of research is based on reasoning, that the justification of research findings by way of reasoning appears to be standard procedure and that the structure of a research report comprises arguments, the evaluation or assessment of research, as described in most textbooks on research methodology (Burns & Grove, 1993:647; Creswell, 1994:193; LoBiondo-Wood & Haber, 1994:441/481) does not focus on the arguments of research. The evaluation criteria for research reports which are set in these textbooks are related to the way in which the research process is carried out and focus on the measures for internal, external, theoretical, measurement and inferential validity. This means that criteria for the evaluation of research are comprehensive and they should be very specific in respect of each type of research (for example quantitative or qualitative). When the evaluation of research reports is focused on arguments and logic, there could probably be one set of universal standards against which all types of human science research reports can be assessed. Such a universal set of standards could possibly simplify the evaluation of research reports in the human sciences since they can be used to assess all the critical aspects of research reports

  13. Summer 2017 Microfluidics Research Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcculloch, Quinn [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-25

    Liquid-liquid Extraction (LLE), also known as solvent extraction, represents a large subset of chemistry where one or more solutes are transferred across an interface between two immiscible liquids. This type of chemistry is used in industrial scale processes to purify solvents, refine ore, process petroleum, treat wastewater, and much more. Although LLE has been successfully employed at the macroscale, where many liters/kgs of species are processed at large flow rates, LLE stands to benefit from lab-on-a-chip technology, where reactions take place quickly and efficiently at the microscale. A device, called a screen contactor, has been invented at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to perform solvent extraction at the microscale. This invention has been submitted to LANL’s Feynman Center for Innovation, and has been filed for provisional patent under U.S. Patent Application No. 62/483,107 1. The screen contactor consists of a housing that contains two different screen materials, flametreated stainless steel and polyether ether ketone (PEEK) thermoplastic, that are uniquely wetted by either an aqueous or an organic liquid phase, respectively. Liquids in this device flow longitudinally through the screens. The fine pore size of the screens (tens of microns) provide large capillary/adhesional forces while maintaining small hydraulic pressure drops. These physical characteristics are paramount to efficient microscale liquid phase separation. To demonstrate mass transfer using the screen contactor, a well-known chemical system 2 consisting of water and n-decane as solvents and trimethylamine (TEA) as a solute was selected. TEA is basic in water so its concentration can easily be quantified using a digital pH meter and an experimentally determined base dissociation constant. Characterization of this solvent system and its behavior in the screen contactor have been the focus of my research activities this summer. In the following sections, I have detailed

  14. Horonobe underground research program. Research report of 2002 FY investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-06-01

    Main results of investigation about Horonobe deep underground research center in 2002 FY were reported. It consists of six chapters: introduction, main results, selection of research center area, underground science research, R and D of geological disposal, and the environmental survey and research center on the ground. The research center area at about 3 km north of Horonobe (B1) was selected in the four areas: A, B1, B2 and C on the basis of data, researches in the sky, aboveground and underground and other conditions. The model of geological environment was constructed by physical, geological, surface water supply researches. Development of geological environment monitoring techniques, investigation of long stabilization of geological environment and design of underground facilities are reported. The basic design of preparation of research center was investigated. (S.Y.)

  15. Bibliography of Water Quality Research Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Research and Development.

    Prepared for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), this bibliography of published reports covers information concerning the advancement of water pollution control technology and knowledge. The reports provide a central source of information on the research, development, and demonstration activities in the water research program of the EPA,…

  16. African Primary Care Research: writing a research report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couper, Ian; Mash, Bob

    2014-06-06

    Presenting a research report is an important way of demonstrating one's ability to conduct research and is a requirement of most research-based degrees. Although known by various names across academic institutions, the structure required is mostly very similar, being based on the Introduction, Methods, Results, Discussion format of scientific articles.This article offers some guidance on the process of writing, aimed at helping readers to start and to continue their writing; and to assist them in presenting a report that is received positively by their readers, including examiners. It also details the typical components of the research report, providing some guidelines for each, as well as the pitfalls to avoid.This article is part of a series on African Primary Care Research that aims to build capacity for research particularly at a Master's level.

  17. African Primary Care Research: Writing a research report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mash, Bob

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Presenting a research report is an important way of demonstrating one's ability to conduct research and is a requirement of most research-based degrees. Although known by various names across academic institutions, the structure required is mostly very similar, being based on the Introduction, Methods, Results, Discussion format of scientific articles. This article offers some guidance on the process of writing, aimed at helping readers to start and to continue their writing; and to assist them in presenting a report that is received positively by their readers, including examiners. It also details the typical components of the research report, providing some guidelines for each, as well as the pitfalls to avoid. This article is part of a series on African Primary Care Research that aims to build capacity for research particularly at a Master's level. PMID:26245441

  18. What makes health promotion research distinct?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodall, James; Warwick-Booth, Louise; South, Jane; Cross, Ruth

    2018-02-01

    There have been concerns about the decline of health promotion as a practice and discipline and, alongside this, calls for a clearer articulation of health promotion research and what, if anything, makes it distinct. This discussion paper, based on a review of the literature, the authors' own experiences in the field, and a workshop delivered by two of the authors at the 8th Nordic Health Promotion Conference, seeks to state the reasons why health promotion research is distinctive. While by no means exhaustive, the paper suggests four distinctive features. The paper hopes to be a catalyst to enable health promotion researchers to be explicit in their practice and to begin the process of developing an agreed set of research principles.

  19. Keeping nurse researchers safe: workplace health and safety issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Jennieffer; Welch, Anthony

    2012-07-01

    This article is a report of a qualitative study of workplace health and safety issues in nursing research. Researcher health and safety have become increasing concerns as there is an increased amount of research undertaken in the community and yet there is a lack of appropriate guidelines on how to keep researchers safe when undertaking fieldwork. This study employed a descriptive qualitative approach, using different sources of data to find any references to researcher health and safety issues. A simple descriptive approach to inquiry was used for this study. Three approaches to data collection were used: interviews with 15 researchers, audits of 18 ethics applications, and exploration of the literature between 1992 and 2010 for examples of researcher safety issues. Data analysis from the three approaches identified participant comments, narrative descriptions or statements focused on researcher health and safety. Nurse researchers' health and safety may be at risk when conducting research in the community. Particular concern involves conducting sensitive research where researchers are physically at risk of being harmed, or being exposed to the development of somatic symptoms. Nurse researchers may perceive the level of risk of harm as lower than the actual or potential harm present in research. Nurse researchers do not consistently implement risk assessment before and during research. Researcher health and safety should be carefully considered at all stages of the research process. Research focusing on sensitive data and vulnerable populations need to consider risk minimization through strategies such as appropriate researcher preparation, safety during data collection, and debriefing if required. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Applied health physics and safety annual report for 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auxier, J.A.; Davis, D.M.

    1977-08-01

    Progress is reported in the following areas of research: personnel monitoring; health physics instrumentation; atmospheric monitoring; water monitoring; radiation background measurements; soil samples; laboratory operations monitoring; radiation incidents; laundry monitoring; accident analysis; and industrial safety

  1. Child & Adolescent Mental Health Services - first annual report 2008

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2009-10-01

    This Annual Report provides the first comprehensive survey carried out on community CAMHS teams and includes preliminary data collected by The Health Research Board on the admission of young people under the age of 18 years to inpatient mental health facilities. As many measures in this report do not have historic comparators it provides a baseline foundation that will be built upon in subsequent years providing an indication of trends that cannot yet be drawn on the basis of this report. The next report will include day hospital, liaison and inpatient services. Subsequent reports will further extend the mapping of mental health services for young people.

  2. Effective and Sustainable Health Research Partnerships : a ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC frequently supports collaborative Canada-South research on subjects of vital ... to structure and manage Canada-South research partnerships more effectively. ... Africa, Latin America and Canada leading to region-specific working papers on ... for the Joint Canada-Israel Health Research Program 2018 competition.

  3. Forest health monitoring: 2007 national technical report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbara L. Conkling

    2011-01-01

    The Forest Health Monitoring Program produces an annual technical report that has two main objectives. The first objective is to present information about forest health from a national perspective. The second objective is to present examples of useful techniques for analyzing forest health data new to the annual national reports and new applications of techniques...

  4. Forest health monitoring: 2008 national technical report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin M. Potter; Barbara L. Conkling

    2012-01-01

    The Forest Health Monitoring (FHM) Program’s annual national technical report has three objectives: (1) to present forest health status and trends from a national or a multi-State regional perspective using a variety of sources, (2) to introduce new techniques for analyzing forest health data, and (3) to report results of recently completed evaluation monitoring...

  5. A consensus statement on how to conduct inclusive health research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankena, T K; Naaldenberg, J; Cardol, M; Garcia Iriarte, E; Buchner, T; Brooker, K; Embregts, P; Joosa, E; Crowther, F; Fudge Schormans, A; Schippers, A; Walmsley, J; O'Brien, P; Linehan, C; Northway, R; van Schrojenstein Lantman-de Valk, H; Leusink, G

    2018-04-11

    The active involvement of people with intellectual disabilities in research, or inclusive research, is relatively common. However, inclusive health research is less common, even though it is expected to lead to appropriate healthcare and increased quality of life. Inclusive health research can build upon lessons learned from inclusive research. A total of 17 experts on inclusive (health) research without intellectual disabilities and 40 experts with intellectual disabilities collaborated in this consensus statement. The consensus statement was developed in three consecutive rounds: (1) an initial feedback round; (2) a roundtable discussion at the 2016 International Association for the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities World Congress; and (3) a final feedback round. This consensus statement provides researchers with guidelines, agreed upon by experts in the field, regarding attributes, potential outcomes, reporting and publishing, and future research directions, for designing and conducting inclusive health research. Consensus was reached on how to design and conduct inclusive health research. However, this statement should be continuously adapted to incorporate recent knowledge. The focus of this consensus statement is largely on inclusive health research, but the principles can also be applied to other areas. © 2018 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Governance of Transnational Global Health Research Consortia and Health Equity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Bridget; Hyder, Adnan A

    2016-10-01

    Global health research partnerships are increasingly taking the form of consortia of institutions from high-income countries and low- and middle-income countries that undertake programs of research. These partnerships differ from collaborations that carry out single projects in the multiplicity of their goals, scope of their activities, and nature of their management. Although such consortia typically aim to reduce health disparities between and within countries, what is required for them to do so has not been clearly defined. This article takes a conceptual approach to explore how the governance of transnational global health research consortia should be structured to advance health equity. To do so, it applies an account called shared health governance to derive procedural and substantive guidance. A checklist based on this guidance is proposed to assist research consortia determine where their governance practices strongly promote equity and where they may fall short.

  7. Annual safety research report, JFY 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-08-01

    As for the regulatory issues the governments or JNES considered necessary, JNES had compiled 'safety research plan' in respective research areas necessary for solving the regulatory issues (safety research needs) and was conducting safety research to obtain the results, etc. Safety research areas, subjects and research projects were as follows: design review of nuclear power plant (5 subjects and each subject having several research projects totaled 20), control management of nuclear power plant (3 subjects and each subject having several research projects totaled 6), nuclear fuel cycle (2 subjects and each subject having several research projects totaled 4), nuclear fuel cycle backend (2 subjects and each subject having several research projects totaled 6), nuclear emergency preparedness and response (3 subjects and each subject having several research projects totaled 7) and bases of nuclear safety technology (3 subjects and each subject having several research projects totaled 6). In addition to these 49 research projects of 18 subjects in 6 areas, JNES worked on 19 research projects of 7 subjects in added areas (specific research projects on of the disaster at Fukushima Daiichi NPP accident and other challenges JNES considered necessary) in JFY 2012. This annual safety research report summarized respective achievements and state of regulatory tools necessary for solving regulatory issues according to the safety research plan, JFY 2012 Edition as well as the situation of the reflection for the safety regulations, and also described 16 research projects of 4 subjects: examination for new safety regulation (8 research projects), development of newly necessary evaluation methods (one research project), evaluation of the validity for the work for convergence at Fukushima Daiichi NPP accident (4 research project) and horizontal development to other nuclear power plants (3 research projects), and 3 research projects of 3 subjects as other challenges. A list of JNES

  8. Nuclear safety research project. Annual report 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hueper, R.

    1996-08-01

    The reactor safety R and D work of the Karlsruhe Research Centre (FZK) has been part of the Nuclear Safety Research Project (PSF) since 1990. The present annual report 1995 summarizes the R and D results. The research tasks are coordinated in agreement with internal and external working groups. The contributions to this report correspond to the status of early 1996. An abstract in English precedes each of them, whenever the respective article is written in German. (orig.) [de

  9. Annual reports | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC publishes an annual report presenting our financial statements and results. It also profiles IDRC-funded researchers, and highlights key projects and achievements. It is the main way we report to Parliament and inform Canadians. Download our most recent annual report, or select from the following list, dating back ...

  10. Mental health research and philanthropy: possible partnerships?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Dorothy

    2005-01-01

    Mental health research has received relatively little philanthropic support in Australia compared with other areas of health research. Philanthropic trusts do not generally provide recurrent funding or make grants for that perceived to be the responsibility of the state or the market. The emergence of 'strategic philanthropy' however, provides potential for mental health researchers to form partnerships with philanthropic foundations, particularly on initiatives that are focused on prevention and innovative and sustainable models with the capacity to 'go to scale' across the service system.

  11. Netherlands Energy Research Foundation Annual Report 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    This Annual Report includes a brief survey of the nuclear research activities of the Netherlands Energy Research Center (ECN) in Petten during 1987. They cover the following subjects: reactor safety, processing, storage and disposal of radioactive waste, advanced nuclear reactors, radiation protection, nuclear analysis, and contributions to the European thermonuclear-fusion research. (H.W.). 20 figs.; 18 fotos; 1 tab

  12. Nuclear Safety Research Department annual report 2000

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majborn, B.; Nielsen, Sven Poul; Damkjær, A.

    2001-01-01

    The report presents a summary of the work of the Nuclear Safety Research Department in 2000. The department's research and development activities were organized in two research programmes: "Radiation Protection and Reactor Safety" and "Radioecology andTracer Studies". In addtion the department...

  13. Nuclear Safety Research Department annual report 2001

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majborn, B.; Damkjær, A.; Nielsen, Sven Poul

    2002-01-01

    The report presents a summary of the work of the Nuclear Safety Research Department in 2001. The department's research and development activities were organized in two research programmes: "Radiation Protection and Reactor Safety" and "Radioecology andTracer Studies". In addition the department...

  14. Radiation Research Department annual report 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majborn, B.; Damkjaer. A.; Nielsen, S.P.

    2003-06-01

    The report presents a summary of the work of the Radiation Research Department in 2002. The departments research and development activities are organized in two research programmes: 'Radiation Physics' and 'Radioecology and Tracer Studies'. In addition the department is responsible for the task 'Dosimetry'. Lists of publications, committee memberships and staff members are included. (au)

  15. Environment and safety research status report: 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    The 1993 status report discusses ongoing and planned research activities in the GRI Environment and Safety Program. The objectives and goals, accomplishments, and strategy along with the basis for each project area are presented for the supply, end use, and gas operations subprograms. Within the context of these subprograms, contract status summaries under their conceptual titles are given for the following project areas: Gas Supply Environmental and Safety Research, Air Quality Research, End Use Equipment Safety Research, Gas Operations Safety Research, Liquefied Natural Gas, Safety Research, and Gas Operations Environmental Research

  16. European public health reports between expectations and reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Cornelius-Taylor

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite the great variety of regional and national health reports that have been drawn up in the European Region, authors and users demand that health reports should be conceived as an instrument for health policy. Under the research project “Evaluation of national and regional health reports (Eva PHR” within the Health Monitoring Programme of the European Union, the policy impact of health reports drawn up in 19 European countries has been analysed with the objective of identifying best practice models. Modelled on an agreed list of criteria, regional and national health reports were analysed with regard to their contents, structure and political relevance. Simultaneously, a qualitative analysis of semi-structured interviews held with policy makers (politicians, decision-makers in administration and stakeholders on the experiences, ideas and expectations they have with regard to health reporting was carried out. The presently prevailing practice of descriptive health reporting is characterised by a great heterogeneity among all received reports and by a discrepancy between the expectations of policy makers and actual health reporting. Whereas most health reports in Europe focus on covering the widest possible range of issues and on presenting existing data and indicators accordingly, most decision makers attach considerable importance to linking epidemiology with information about health care provision, financing and evaluation of programmes and activities. To increase the policy relevance of public health reporting, authors should work in close collaboration with policy makers and consider different kinds of products with differing forms and content. Furthermore, the development of methodical instruments for routine policy oriented health reporting could close the current gap between the perceptions of authors and users.

  17. Health and safety annual report 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This report on health and safety provides a review of the impact of the Comapny's activities on its workforce, the public and the environment. New sections include safety auditing, emergency planning and health and safety research. BNFL operates five sites in north west England and southern Scotland. The head office and Engineering Design Centre is at Risley, near Warrington. Fuel is manufactured at Springfields near Preston, uranium is enriched for modern nuclear power stations at Capenhurst near Chester and spent fuel is reprocessed at Sellafield. BNFL also operate Calder Hall (Sellafield) and Chapelcross (Scotland) power stations and a disposal site for low-level radioactive wastes at Drigg near Sellafield. Radiation sources and BNFL's radioactive discharge are first explained generally and then specifically for each BNFL site. Industrial and radiological safety within BNFL are described. (UK)

  18. Results of the Community Health Applied Research Network (CHARN) National Research Capacity Survey of Community Health Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hui; Li, Vivian; Gillespie, Suzanne; Laws, Reesa; Massimino, Stefan; Nelson, Christine; Singal, Robbie; Wagaw, Fikirte; Jester, Michelle; Weir, Rosy Chang

    2015-01-01

    The mission of the Community Health Applied Research Network (CHARN) is to build capacity to carry out Patient-Centered Outcomes Research at community health centers (CHCs), with the ultimate goal to improve health care for vulnerable populations. The CHARN Needs Assessment Staff Survey investigates CHCs' involvement in research, as well as their need for research training and resources. Results will be used to guide future training. The survey was developed and implemented in partnership with CHARN CHCs. Data were collected across CHARN CHCs. Data analysis and reports were conducted by the CHARN data coordinating center (DCC). Survey results highlighted gaps in staff research training, and these gaps varied by staff role. There is considerable variation in research involvement, partnerships, and focus both within and across CHCs. Development of training programs to increase research capacity should be tailored to address the specific needs and roles of staff involved in research.

  19. Progress report Health Sciences Division - 1984 July 01 to December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-02-01

    This progress report contains a topical summary of major research in the Health Sciences Division. Separate reports are included for each of the following branches: Health Physics, Environmental Research, Radiation Biology, Biomedical Research and Medical. Some of the main areas of interest discussed are health and safety aspects of tritium. This includes instrumentation, environmental studies, metabolism, dosimetry and health effects

  20. Translating research for health policy: researchers' perceptions and use of social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, David; Gollust, Sarah E; Pany, Maximilian; Seymour, Jane; Goss, Adeline; Kilaru, Austin; Meisel, Zachary

    2014-07-01

    As the United States moves forward with health reform, the communication gap between researchers and policy makers will need to be narrowed to promote policies informed by evidence. Social media represent an expanding channel for communication. Academic journals, public health agencies, and health care organizations are increasingly using social media to communicate health information. For example, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention now regularly tweets to 290,000 followers. We conducted a survey of health policy researchers about using social media and two traditional channels (traditional media and direct outreach) to disseminate research findings to policy makers. Researchers rated the efficacy of the three dissemination methods similarly but rated social media lower than the other two in three domains: researchers' confidence in their ability to use the method, peers' respect for its use, and how it is perceived in academic promotion. Just 14 percent of our participants reported tweeting, and 21 percent reported blogging about their research or related health policy in the past year. Researchers described social media as being incompatible with research, of high risk professionally, of uncertain efficacy, and an unfamiliar technology that they did not know how to use. Researchers will need evidence-based strategies, training, and institutional resources to use social media to communicate evidence. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  1. Applying dynamic simulation modeling methods in health care delivery research - the SIMULATE checklist: Report of the ISPOR simulation modeling emerging good practices task force

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marshall, Deborah A.; Burgos-Liz, Lina; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Osgood, Nathaniel D.; Padula, William V.; Higashi, Mitchell K.; Wong, Peter K.; Pasupathy, Kalyan S.; Crown, William

    2015-01-01

    Health care delivery systems are inherently complex, consisting of multiple tiers of interdependent subsystems and processes that are adaptive to changes in the environment and behave in a nonlinear fashion. Traditional health technology assessment and modeling methods often neglect the wider health

  2. The Health Information Literacy Research Project*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz-Rossi, Sabrina; Funk, Carla J.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: This research studied hospital administrators' and hospital-based health care providers' (collectively, the target group) perceived value of consumer health information resources and of librarians' roles in promoting health information literacy in their institutions. Methods: A web-based needs survey was developed and administered to hospital administrators and health care providers. Multiple health information literacy curricula were developed. One was pilot-tested by nine hospital libraries in the United States and Canada. Quantitative and qualitative methods were used to evaluate the curriculum and its impact on the target group. Results: A majority of survey respondents believed that providing consumer health information resources was critically important to fulfilling their institutions' missions and that their hospitals could improve health information literacy by increasing awareness of its impact on patient care and by training staff to become more knowledgeable about health literacy barriers. The study showed that a librarian-taught health information literacy curriculum did raise awareness about the issue among the target group and increased both the use of National Library of Medicine consumer health resources and referrals to librarians for health information literacy support. Conclusions: It is hoped that many hospital administrators and health care providers will take the health information literacy curricula and recognize that librarians can educate about the topic and that providers will use related consumer health services and resources. PMID:19851494

  3. Building the national health information infrastructure for personal health, health care services, public health, and research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Detmer Don E

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Improving health in our nation requires strengthening four major domains of the health care system: personal health management, health care delivery, public health, and health-related research. Many avoidable shortcomings in the health sector that result in poor quality are due to inaccessible data, information, and knowledge. A national health information infrastructure (NHII offers the connectivity and knowledge management essential to correct these shortcomings. Better health and a better health system are within our reach. Discussion A national health information infrastructure for the United States should address the needs of personal health management, health care delivery, public health, and research. It should also address relevant global dimensions (e.g., standards for sharing data and knowledge across national boundaries. The public and private sectors will need to collaborate to build a robust national health information infrastructure, essentially a 'paperless' health care system, for the United States. The federal government should assume leadership for assuring a national health information infrastructure as recommended by the National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics and the President's Information Technology Advisory Committee. Progress is needed in the areas of funding, incentives, standards, and continued refinement of a privacy (i.e., confidentiality and security framework to facilitate personal identification for health purposes. Particular attention should be paid to NHII leadership and change management challenges. Summary A national health information infrastructure is a necessary step for improved health in the U.S. It will require a concerted, collaborative effort by both public and private sectors. If you cannot measure it, you cannot improve it. Lord Kelvin

  4. Rethinking global health research: towards integrative expertise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacLachlan Malcolm

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Bamako Call for Action on Research for Health stresses the importance of inter-disciplinary, inter-ministerial and inter-sectoral working. This challenges much of our current research and postgraduate research training in health, which mostly seeks to produce narrowly focused content specialists. We now need to compliment this type of research and research training, by offering alternative pathways that seek to create expertise, not only in specific narrow content areas, but also in the process and context of research, as well as in the interaction of these different facets of knowledge. Such an approach, developing 'integrative expertise', could greatly facilitate better research utilisation, helping policy makers and practitioners work through more evidence-based practice and across traditional research boundaries.

  5. Checklist for One Health Epidemiological Reporting of Evidence (COHERE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghan F. Davis

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available One Health is defined as the intersection and integration of knowledge regarding humans, animals, and the environment, yet as the One Health scientific literature expands, there is considerable heterogeneity of approach and quality of reporting in One Health studies. In addition, many researchers who publish such studies do not include or integrate data from all three domains of human, animal, and environmental health. This points to a critical need to unify guidelines for One Health studies. This report details the Checklist for One Health Epidemiological Reporting of Evidence (COHERE to guide the design and publication format of future One Health studies. COHERE was developed by a core writing team and international expert review group that represents multiple disciplines, including human medicine, veterinary medicine, public health, allied professionals, clinical laboratory science, epidemiology, the social sciences, ecohealth and environmental health. The twin aims of the COHERE standards are to 1 improve the quality of reporting of observational or interventional epidemiological studies that collect and integrate data from humans, animals and/or vectors, and their environments; and 2 promote the concept that One Health studies should integrate knowledge from these three domains. The 19 standards in the COHERE checklist address descriptions of human populations, animal populations, environmental assessment, spatial and temporal relationships of data from the three domains, integration of analyses and interpretation, and inclusion of expertise in the research team from disciplines related to human health, animal health, and environmental health.

  6. Leadership research in business and health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, Connie; Larson, Elaine

    2002-01-01

    To summarize research on leadership in the health care and business literature and to identify the outcomes of leadership on individuals, groups, and organizations. A computerized search and review of research studies was conducted in the health care and business literature from 1970-1999. Studies were categorized and analyzed according to participants, design, primary topic area, and effects or outcomes of leadership. Most of the health care and business literature on leadership consisted of anecdotal or theoretical discussion. Only 4.4% (n = 290) of 6,628 articles reviewed were data-based. Further, the largest proportion of the research (120/290, 41.4%) was purely descriptive of the demographic characteristics or personality traits of leaders. Other studies showed the influence of leadership on subordinates (27.9%). Only 15 (5.2%) of 290 research articles include correlations of qualities or styles of leadership with measurable outcomes on the recipients of services or positive changes in organizations. Research on leadership in the health care and business literature to date has been primarily descriptive. Although work in the social sciences indicates that leadership styles can have a major influence on performance and outcomes, minimal transfer of this work to the health care system is evident. Limited research on leadership and health care outcomes exists, such as changes in patient care or improvements in organizational outputs. In this era of evidence-based practice, such research, although difficult to conduct, is urgently needed.

  7. Progress report, Biology and Health Physics Division, April 1 to June 30, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-09-01

    Interim results are reported on research at CRNL in health physics (dosimetry, instrumentation, monitoring); environmental research (limnology, radionuclide migration and kinetics); populaton research (tumor induction in mammals, human health records); and biology (radiobiology, genetic studies). (E.C.B.)

  8. Progress report, Biology and Health Physics Division, October 1 to December 31, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Interim research results are reported in health physics (dosimetry, monitoring), environmental research, population research (tumor induction in mammals, human health record linkage), and biology (radiobiology of rodents, bacteria, bacteriophage T4, and insects). (E.C.B.)

  9. Training program attracts work and health researchers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skakon, Janne

    2007-01-01

    Each year in Canada, the costs of disability arising from work-related causes – including workers’ compensation and health-care costs – exceed $6.7 billion. Despite the significant financial and social impacts of worker injury and illness, only a small fraction of Canadian researchers are dedicated...... to examining work disability prevention issues. An innovative program that attracts international students, the Work Disability Prevention Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Strategic Training Program, aims to build research capacity in young researchers and to create a strong network that examines...

  10. Research Award: Ecosystems and Human Health (Ecohealth ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Jean-Claude Dumais

    2012-09-12

    Sep 12, 2012 ... Research Award: Ecosystems and Human Health (Ecohealth) ... Your proposal should demonstrate an understanding of the ... demonstrated ability to work independently, and strong written and oral communications skills are ...

  11. Technical specifications: Health Physics Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-03-01

    These technical specifications define the key limitations that must be observed for safe operation of the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) and an envelope of operation within which there is assurance that these limits will not be exceeded

  12. International Journal of Health Research: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    International Journal of Health Research: Submissions ... The journal is devoted to the promotion of pharmaceutical sciences and related disciplines ... adverse drug events, medical and other life sciences, and related engineering fields).

  13. Designing and Conducting Health Systems Research Projects ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Giving girls and women the power to decide. Addressing Africa's unmet need for family planning by intensifying sexual and reproductive and adolescent health research. View moreGiving girls and women the power to decide ...

  14. Radiological and Medical Sciences Research Institute (RAMSRI) - Annual Report 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The Radiological and Medical Sciences Research Institute (RAMSRI) is the fourth Research and Development Institute of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC), undertaking research in human health and nutrition. This annual report covers the major activities undertaken by RAMSRI for the year 2015. The activities are grouped under the following headings: Establishment; Personnel and Organisation; Major Activities of Centres; Ongoing IAEA TC Projects; Human Resource Development; IAEA Coordinated Meetings Hosted; Publications; Achievements; Challenges; Projections for the Year 2016; and Recommendations.

  15. National Nuclear Research Institute Annual Report 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The report highlights the activities of the National Nuclear Research Institute (NNRI) of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission for the year 2013, grouped under the following headings: Centres under the institute namely Nuclear Reactors Research Centre (NRRC); Accelerator Research Centre (ARC); Engineering Services Centre (ESC); National Radioactive Waste Management Centre (NRWMC); Nuclear Chemistry and Environmental Research Centre (NCERC); Nuclear Applications Centre (NAC) and National Data Centre (NDC). (A. B.)

  16. Imagining roles for epigenetics in health promotion research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Colleen M; Koehly, Laura M

    2017-04-01

    Discoveries from the Human Genome Project have invigorated discussions of epigenetic effects-modifiable chemical processes that influence DNA's ability to give instructions to turn gene expression on or off-on health outcomes. We suggest three domains in which new understandings of epigenetics could inform innovations in health promotion research: (1) increase the motivational potency of health communications (e.g., explaining individual differences in health outcomes to interrupt optimistic biases about health exposures); (2) illuminate new approaches to targeted and tailored health promotion interventions (e.g., relapse prevention targeted to epigenetic responses to intervention participation); and (3) inform more sensitive measures of intervention impact, (e.g., replace or augment self-reported adherence). We suggest a three-step process for using epigenetics in health promotion research that emphasizes integrating epigenetic mechanisms into conceptual model development that then informs selection of intervention approaches and outcomes. Lastly, we pose examples of relevant scientific questions worth exploring.

  17. Environmental research program: FY 1987, annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-03-01

    This multidisciplinary research program includes fundamental and applied research in physics, chemistry, engineering, and biology, as well as research on the development of advanced methods of measurement and analysis. The Program's Annual Report contains summaries of research performed during FY 1987 in the areas of atmospheric aerosols, flue gas chemistry, combustion, membrane bioenergetics, and analytical chemistry. The main research interests of the Atmospheric Aerosol Research group concern the chemical and physical processes that occur in haze, clouds, and fogs. For their studies, the group is developing novel analytical and research methods for characterizing aerosol species. Aerosol research is performed in the laboratory and in the field. Studies of smoke emissions from fires and their possible effects on climatic change, especially as related to nuclear winter, are an example of the collaboration between the Atmospheric Aerosol Research and Combustion Research Groups

  18. Environmental research program: FY 1987, annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-03-01

    This multidisciplinary research program includes fundamental and applied research in physics, chemistry, engineering, and biology, as well as research on the development of advanced methods of measurement and analysis. The Program's Annual Report contains summaries of research performed during FY 1987 in the areas of atmospheric aerosols, flue gas chemistry, combustion, membrane bioenergetics, and analytical chemistry. The main research interests of the Atmospheric Aerosol Research group concern the chemical and physical processes that occur in haze, clouds, and fogs. For their studies, the group is developing novel analytical and research methods for characterizing aerosol species. Aerosol research is performed in the laboratory and in the field. Studies of smoke emissions from fires and their possible effects on climatic change, especially as related to nuclear winter, are an example of the collaboration between the Atmospheric Aerosol Research and Combustion Research Groups.

  19. Electronic health records to facilitate clinical research

    OpenAIRE

    Cowie, Martin R.; Blomster, Juuso I.; Curtis, Lesley H.; Duclaux, Sylvie; Ford, Ian; Fritz, Fleur; Goldman, Samantha; Janmohamed, Salim; Kreuzer, J?rg; Leenay, Mark; Michel, Alexander; Ong, Seleen; Pell, Jill P.; Southworth, Mary Ross; Stough, Wendy Gattis

    2016-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) provide opportunities to enhance patient care, embed performance measures in clinical practice, and facilitate clinical research. Concerns have been raised about the increasing recruitment challenges in trials, burdensome and obtrusive data collection, and uncertain generalizability of the results. Leveraging electronic health records to counterbalance these trends is an area of intense interest. The initial applications of electronic health records, as the pr...

  20. Electronic health records to facilitate clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowie, Martin R; Blomster, Juuso I; Curtis, Lesley H; Duclaux, Sylvie; Ford, Ian; Fritz, Fleur; Goldman, Samantha; Janmohamed, Salim; Kreuzer, Jörg; Leenay, Mark; Michel, Alexander; Ong, Seleen; Pell, Jill P; Southworth, Mary Ross; Stough, Wendy Gattis; Thoenes, Martin; Zannad, Faiez; Zalewski, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) provide opportunities to enhance patient care, embed performance measures in clinical practice, and facilitate clinical research. Concerns have been raised about the increasing recruitment challenges in trials, burdensome and obtrusive data collection, and uncertain generalizability of the results. Leveraging electronic health records to counterbalance these trends is an area of intense interest. The initial applications of electronic health records, as the primary data source is envisioned for observational studies, embedded pragmatic or post-marketing registry-based randomized studies, or comparative effectiveness studies. Advancing this approach to randomized clinical trials, electronic health records may potentially be used to assess study feasibility, to facilitate patient recruitment, and streamline data collection at baseline and follow-up. Ensuring data security and privacy, overcoming the challenges associated with linking diverse systems and maintaining infrastructure for repeat use of high quality data, are some of the challenges associated with using electronic health records in clinical research. Collaboration between academia, industry, regulatory bodies, policy makers, patients, and electronic health record vendors is critical for the greater use of electronic health records in clinical research. This manuscript identifies the key steps required to advance the role of electronic health records in cardiovascular clinical research.

  1. European Birth Cohorts for Environmental Health Research

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vrijheid, M.; Casas, M.; Bergström, A.; Carmichael, A.; Cordier, S.; Eggesbø, M.; Eller, E.; Fantini, M. P.; Fernández, M. F.; Fernández-Somoano, A.; Gehring, U.; Grazuleviciene, R.; Hohmann, C.; Karvonen, A. M.; Keil, T.; Kogevinas, M.; Koppen, G.; Krämer, U.; Kuehni, C. E.; Magnus, P.; Majewska, R.; Andersen, A. M. N.; Patelarou, E.; Petersen, M. S.; Pierik, F. H.; Polanska, K.; Porta, D.; Richiardi, L.; Santos, A. C.; Slama, R.; Šrám, Radim; Thijs, C.; Tischer, C.; Toft, G.; Trnovec, T.; Vandentorren, S.; Vrijkotte, T. G. M.; Wilhelm, M.; Wright, J.; Nieuwenhuijsen, M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 120, č. 1 (2012), s. 29-37 ISSN 0091-6765 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : environment pollution * child health * European birth cohorts Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 7.260, year: 2012

  2. Health Benefits of Leisure. Research Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegenthaler, K. L.

    1997-01-01

    Research indicates that leisure participation enhances health at various levels, reducing stress and promoting better physical and mental health. Participation in personally meaningful leisure activities serves as a buffer to life's stressful events. Leisure professionals must work to promote leisure as a priority in people's lives. (SM)

  3. The effect of animal health compensation on 'positive' behaviours towards exotic disease reporting and implementing biosecurity: A review, a synthesis and a research agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Andrew Peter; Moxey, Andrew Paul; Vosough Ahmadi, Bouda; Borthwick, Fiona Ann

    2015-11-01

    With an increasing burden on public sector budgets, increased responsibility and cost sharing mechanisms for animal diseases are being considered. To achieve this, fiscal and non-fiscal intervention policies need to be designed such that they consistently promote positive disease risk management practices by animal keepers. This paper presents a review of the available evidence towards whether and how the level and type of funding mechanism affects change within biosecurity behaviours and the frequency of disease reporting. A Nuffield Health Ladder of Interventions approach is proposed as a way to frame the debate surrounding both current compensation mechanisms and how it is expected to change behaviour. Results of the review reveal a division between economic modelling approaches, which implicitly assume a causal link between payments and positive behaviours, and socio-geographic approaches which tend to ignore the influence of compensation mechanisms on influencing behaviours. Generally, economic studies suggest less than full compensation rates will encourage positive behaviours, but the non-economic literature indicate significant variation in response to compensation reflecting heterogeneity of livestock keepers in terms of their values, goals, risk attitudes, size of operation, animal species and production chain characteristics. This may be of encouragement to Western Governments seeking to shift cost burdens as it may induce greater targeting of non-fiscal mechanisms, or suggest more novel ways to augment current compensation mechanisms to both increase responsibility sharing and reduce this cost burden. This review suggests that a range of regulatory, fiscal and nudging policies are required to achieve socially optimal results with respect to positive behaviour change. However, the lack of directly available evidence which proves these causal links may hinder progress towards this optimal mixture of choice and non-choice based interventions. Copyright

  4. A novel performance monitoring framework for health research systems: experiences of the National Institute for Health Research in England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hallsworth Michael

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR was established in 2006 with the aim of creating an applied health research system embedded within the English National Health Service (NHS. NIHR sought to implement an approach for monitoring its performance that effectively linked early indicators of performance with longer-term research impacts. We attempted to develop and apply a conceptual framework for defining appropriate key performance indicators for NIHR. Method Following a review of relevant literature, a conceptual framework for defining performance indicators for NIHR was developed, based on a hybridisation of the logic model and balanced scorecard approaches. This framework was validated through interviews with key NIHR stakeholders and a pilot in one division of NIHR, before being refined and applied more widely. Indicators were then selected and aggregated to create a basket of indicators aligned to NIHR's strategic goals, which could be reported to NIHR's leadership team on a quarterly basis via an oversight dashboard. Results Senior health research system managers and practitioners endorsed the conceptual framework developed and reported satisfaction with the breadth and balance of indicators selected for reporting. Conclusions The use of the hybrid conceptual framework provides a pragmatic approach to defining performance indicators that are aligned to the strategic aims of a health research system. The particular strength of this framework is its capacity to provide an empirical link, over time, between upstream activities of a health research system and its long-term strategic objectives.

  5. A novel performance monitoring framework for health research systems: experiences of the National Institute for Health Research in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Turabi, Anas; Hallsworth, Michael; Ling, Tom; Grant, Jonathan

    2011-03-24

    The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) was established in 2006 with the aim of creating an applied health research system embedded within the English National Health Service (NHS). NIHR sought to implement an approach for monitoring its performance that effectively linked early indicators of performance with longer-term research impacts. We attempted to develop and apply a conceptual framework for defining appropriate key performance indicators for NIHR. Following a review of relevant literature, a conceptual framework for defining performance indicators for NIHR was developed, based on a hybridisation of the logic model and balanced scorecard approaches. This framework was validated through interviews with key NIHR stakeholders and a pilot in one division of NIHR, before being refined and applied more widely. Indicators were then selected and aggregated to create a basket of indicators aligned to NIHR's strategic goals, which could be reported to NIHR's leadership team on a quarterly basis via an oversight dashboard. Senior health research system managers and practitioners endorsed the conceptual framework developed and reported satisfaction with the breadth and balance of indicators selected for reporting. The use of the hybrid conceptual framework provides a pragmatic approach to defining performance indicators that are aligned to the strategic aims of a health research system. The particular strength of this framework is its capacity to provide an empirical link, over time, between upstream activities of a health research system and its long-term strategic objectives.

  6. Research and development in health education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wistoft, Karen

    2009-01-01

    relatable to health educational development. The overall value theme is elucidated by two development projects that transform as well as challenge specific health-educational practices. This forms the basis of the development of a critical, constructive and practice-oriented perspective on competence......Health professionals working in the field of health promotion and education experience certain value conflicts: their professional and personal values, the values of their clients or of the health services clash with pedagogic values such as participation, involvement, learning and competence...... development. My educational research is concerned with the exploration and development of the knowledge about values and health education related to competence development among health professionals. The purpose is to contribute to systematic knowledge development with a view to support and diversify...

  7. Joint research report for 1974--1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    A general progress report is given on the research being carried out in the Biophysics Laboratory of the IIT Department of Physics and the Department of Medical Physics at Michael Reese Medical Center on pulse radiolysis experiments

  8. Research report on radiation protection 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-07-01

    In this research report on radiation protection the results achieved in 1981 of the research and development projects assisted by the Federal Minister of the Interior are made accessible above all to the scientists and engineers participating in this research program as well as to the research institutions on the field of radiation protection, to the members of the commission on radiological protection and of the commission for reactor safety and to the supervising and licensing authorities. The report is a compilation of individual reports, which are composed by the consignees respectively the recipients of the allowances themselves as a documentation of the progress of their works. Each individual report contains informations concerning the objectives of the project, works carried out, results achieved and further work planned. (orig.) [de

  9. Mol - Research Division Report 1986 - 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delbarre, J.

    1987-03-01

    This report covers the research activities carried out at the SCK-CEN, Mol during the second semester of 1986. It deals with chemistry, chemical engineering, biology, nuclear metrology, analytical chemistry. (MCB)

  10. Information Science Research Institute. Quarterly progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nartker, T.A.

    1994-06-30

    This is a second quarter 1194 progress report on the UNLV Information Science Research Institute. Included is symposium activity; staff activity; document analysis program; text retrieval program; institute activity; and goals.

  11. Mol - Research Division report 1987 - 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delbarre, J.

    1988-03-01

    This report covers the research activities at the SCK-CEN, MOl, during the second semester of 1987. It deals with materials physics, nuclear physics, metallurgy, ceramics, nuclear chemistry, chemical engineering, biology, nuclear metrology and analytical chemistry. (MCB)

  12. FY2012 Engineering Research & Technology Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, Monya

    2014-07-22

    This report documents engineering research, development, and technology advancements performed by LLNL during fiscal year 2012 in the following areas: computational engineering, engineering information systems, micro/nano-devices and structures, and measurement technologies.

  13. Mol - Research Division Report 1986 - 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delbarre, J.; Assche, P. van

    1986-11-01

    This report covers the research activities carried out at the SCK-CEN, Mol from the middle of 1985 till mid 1986. It deals with materials science, metallurgy, ceramics, nuclear chemistry, chemical engineering, biology, nuclear meteorology and analytical chemistry. (MCB)

  14. Mol - Research Division report 1987 - 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delbarre, J.

    1987-10-01

    This report covers the research activities at the SCK-CEN, Mol, during the first semester of 1987. It deals with material physics, nuclear physics, metallurgy, ceramics, nuclear chemistry, chemical engineering, biology, nuclear metrology and analytical chemistry. (MCB)

  15. Four centuries on from Bacon: progress in building health research systems to improve health systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanney, Stephen R; González-Block, Miguel A

    2014-09-23

    In 1627, Francis Bacon's New Atlantis described a utopian society in which an embryonic research system contributed to meeting the needs of the society. In this editorial, we use some of the aspirations described in New Atlantis to provide a context within which to consider recent progress in building health research systems to improve health systems and population health. In particular, we reflect on efforts to build research capacity, link research to policy, identify the wider impacts made by the science, and generally build fully functioning research systems to address the needs identified. In 2014, Health Research Policy and Systems has continued to publish one-off papers and article collections covering a range of these issues in both high income countries and low- and middle-income countries. Analysis of these contributions, in the context of some earlier ones, is brought together to identify achievements, challenges and possible ways forward. We show how 2014 is likely to be a pivotal year in the development of ways to assess the impact of health research on policies, practice, health systems, population health, and economic benefits.We demonstrate how the increasing focus on health research systems will contribute to realising the hopes expressed in the World Health Report, 2013, namely that all nations would take a systematic approach to evaluating the outputs and applications resulting from their research investment.

  16. Constrained Optimization Methods in Health Services Research - An Introduction : Report 1 of the ISPOR Optimization Methods Emerging Good Practices Task Force

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crown, William; Buyukkaramikli, Nasuh; Thokala, Praveen; Morton, Alec; Sir, Mustafa Y.; Marshall, Deborah A.; Tosh, Jon; Padula, William V.; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Wong, Peter K.; Pasupathy, Kalyan S.

    2017-01-01

    Providing health services with the greatest possible value to patients and society given the constraints imposed by patient characteristics, health care system characteristics, budgets, and so forth relies heavily on the design of structures and processes. Such problems are complex and require a

  17. Improving children's oral health: an interdisciplinary research framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casamassimo, P S; Lee, J Y; Marazita, M L; Milgrom, P; Chi, D L; Divaris, K

    2014-10-01

    Despite the concerted efforts of research and professional and advocacy stakeholders, recent evidence suggests that improvements in the oral health of young children in the United States has not followed the prevailing trend of oral health improvement in other age groups. In fact, oral health disparities in the youngest children may be widening, yet efforts to translate advances in science and technology into meaningful improvements in populations' health have had limited success. Nevertheless, the great strides in genomics, biological, behavioral, social, and health services research in the past decade have strengthened the evidence base available to support initiatives and translational efforts. Concerted actions to accelerate this translation and implementation process are warranted; at the same time, policies that can help tackle the upstream determinants of oral health disparities are imperative. This article summarizes the proceedings from the symposium on the interdisciplinary continuum of pediatric oral health that was held during the 43rd annual meeting of the American Association for Dental Research, Charlotte, North Carolina, USA. This report showcases the latest contributions across the interdisciplinary continuum of pediatric oral health research and provides insights into future research priorities and necessary intersectoral synergies. Issues are discussed as related to the overwhelming dominance of social determinants on oral disease and the difficulty of translating science into action. © International & American Associations for Dental Research.

  18. Mental health research, ethics and multiculturalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailes, Marion J; Minas, I Harry; Klimidis, Steven

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we examine ethical issues relevant to conducting mental health research with refugees and immigrant communities that have cultural orientations and social organisation that are substantially different to those of the broader Australian community, and we relate these issues to NH&MRC Guidelines. We describe the development and conduct of a mental health research project carried out recently in Melbourne with the Somali community, focusing on ethical principles involved, and relating these to the NH&MRC National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Research Involving Humans, and the NH&MRC document Values and Ethics: Guidelines for Ethical Conduct in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Research. The experience of conducting mental health research with the Somali community highlights the fact that the principles of inclusion and benefit enunciated in the NH&MRC document Values and Ethics are particularly pertinent when conducting research with refugees and immigrant communities that are culturally distant to those of the broader Australian community. These principles inform issues of research design and consent, as well as guiding respectful engagement with the participating community and communication of the research findings.

  19. Progress report - Health Sciences Division - 1985 July 01 -December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-02-01

    This progress report contains a topical summary of major research in the Health Sciences Division. Separate reports are included for each of the following branches: Dosimetric Research, Environmental Research, Radiation Biology, and Medical. Some of the aspects discussed include measurement and application of environmental isotopes, dosimetry and employee monitoring, environmental processes of radioisotope transport, the effects of ionizing radiation on living cells (cancer, hyperthermia, DNA, etc.), and statistics of hospital procedures

  20. Health physics research abstracts No.14: Information on research in progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The present issue No. 14 of Health Physics Research Abstracts is the continuation of a series of bulletins published by the Agency since 1967. They collect reports from Member States on Health Physics research in progress or just completed. The main aim in issuing such reports is to draw attention to work that is about to be published and to enable interested scientists to obtain further information through direct correspondence with the investigator. The present issue contains 381 reports received up to September 1988

  1. UCLA accelerator research ampersand development. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This report discusses work on advanced accelerators and beam dynamics at ANL, BNL, SLAC, UCLA and Pulse Sciences Incorporated. Discussed in this report are the following concepts: Wakefield acceleration studies; plasma lens research; high gradient rf cavities and beam dynamics studies at the Brookhaven accelerator test facility; rf pulse compression development; and buncher systems for high gradient accelerator and relativistic klystron applications

  2. Research 1970/1971: Annual Progress Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta. Science Information Research Center.

    The report presents a summary of science information research activities of the School of Information and Computer Science, Georgia Institute of Technology. Included are project reports on interrelated studies in science information, information processing and systems design, automata and systems theories, and semiotics and linguistics. Also…

  3. Inertial fusion research: Annual technical report, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, J.T.; Terry, N.C.

    1986-03-01

    This report describes the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research activities undertaken at KMS Fusion (KMSF) during 1985. It is organized into three main technical sections; the first covers fusion experiments and theoretical physics, the second is devoted to progress in materials development and target fabrication, and the third describes laser technology research. These three individual sections have been cataloged separately

  4. The Agricultural Research Department annual report 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The annual report begins with a general review of the research work of the department. The activities of the year are described in 5 short project reports and in the lists of publications and of lectures and seminars. Further, the report includes 4 review articles on selected subjects related to the work on the department, and a list of the staff and students of the year. (author)

  5. CDC Health Disparities and Inequalities Report--U.S. 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Women's Health Health Literacy Health Equity CDC Health Disparities & Inequalities Report (CHDIR) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... 2011 Report More Information CDC Releases Second Health Disparities & Inequalities Report - United States, 2013 CDC and its ...

  6. Belledune area health study : summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-02-01

    The Belledune area has been home to various industrial activities such as mining, smelting, fertilizer plants, battery-recycling plants, gypsum plants, sawmills, and a coal-fired electricity generating facility. These industries have had various types and quantities of emissions over the past 4 decades that may have impacted on the health of people in the area. This report provided details of the Belledune Health Area Study. The objective of the study was to ensure that the concerns of residents were addressed and that the historical and human health risks associated with past and current industrial activities were quantified. The current health status of residents in the area was examined with reference to environmental exposures, and recommendations for future studies and research based on the results of the study were presented. Two main components were used: the human health risk assessment (HHRA), and community health status assessment (CHSA). Best estimate calculations for residents in the core communities showed that exposures to cadmium, lead and mercury were predicted to be below toxicity reference values. In Belledune itself, child exposures to cadmium and mercury were above the toxicity reference value. Results indicated that the health status pattern for the study area was different from that found in the surrounding areas. There was a statistically significantly elevated incidence of oral, respiratory, and prostate cancer and elevated incidences of kidney and colorectal cancer. There was a higher mortality rate than expected, and there were more deaths than expected due to circulatory disease, cancer and other causes such as accidents and suicides. An expanded survey of blood lead among child residents and pregnant women was recommended. A program was launched to collect data on metal concentrations in fish from the Baie des Chaleurs and additional data on vegetables from the Greater Belledune area. Future research on some of the factors associated

  7. Belledune area health study : summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-02-01

    The Belledune area has been home to various industrial activities such as mining, smelting, fertilizer plants, battery-recycling plants, gypsum plants, sawmills, and a coal-fired electricity generating facility. These industries have had various types and quantities of emissions over the past 4 decades that may have impacted on the health of people in the area. This report provided details of the Belledune Health Area Study. The objective of the study was to ensure that the concerns of residents were addressed and that the historical and human health risks associated with past and current industrial activities were quantified. The current health status of residents in the area was examined with reference to environmental exposures, and recommendations for future studies and research based on the results of the study were presented. Two main components were used: the human health risk assessment (HHRA), and community health status assessment (CHSA). Best estimate calculations for residents in the core communities showed that exposures to cadmium, lead and mercury were predicted to be below toxicity reference values. In Belledune itself, child exposures to cadmium and mercury were above the toxicity reference value. Results indicated that the health status pattern for the study area was different from that found in the surrounding areas. There was a statistically significantly elevated incidence of oral, respiratory, and prostate cancer and elevated incidences of kidney and colorectal cancer. There was a higher mortality rate than expected, and there were more deaths than expected due to circulatory disease, cancer and other causes such as accidents and suicides. An expanded survey of blood lead among child residents and pregnant women was recommended. A program was launched to collect data on metal concentrations in fish from the Baie des Chaleurs and additional data on vegetables from the Greater Belledune area. Future research on some of the factors associated

  8. Radiation Research Department annual report 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majborn, B.; Damkjaer, A.; Nielsen, S.P. (eds.)

    2003-06-01

    The report presents a summary of the work of the Radiation Research Department in 2002. The departments research and development activities are organized in two research programmes: 'Radiation Physics' and 'Radioecology and Tracer Studies'. In addition the department is responsible for the task 'Dosimetry'. Lists of publications, committee memberships and staff members are included. (au)

  9. Reporting Standards for Research in Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    In anticipation of the impending revision of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, APA’s Publications and Communications Board formed the Working Group on Journal Article Reporting Standards (JARS) and charged it to provide the board with background and recommendations on information that should be included in manuscripts submitted to APA journals that report (a) new data collections and (b) meta-analyses. The JARS Group reviewed efforts in related fields to develop standards and sought input from other knowledgeable groups. The resulting recommendations contain (a) standards for all journal articles, (b) more specific standards for reports of studies with experimental manipulations or evaluations of interventions using research designs involving random or nonrandom assignment, and (c) standards for articles reporting meta-analyses. The JARS Group anticipated that standards for reporting other research designs (e.g., observational studies, longitudinal studies) would emerge over time. This report also (a) examines societal developments that have encouraged researchers to provide more details when reporting their studies, (b) notes important differences between requirements, standards, and recommendations for reporting, and (c) examines benefits and obstacles to the development and implementation of reporting standards. PMID:19086746

  10. Forest health monitoring: 2005 national technical report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark J. Ambrose; Barbara L. Conkling

    2007-01-01

    The Forest Health Monitoring program's annual national technical report presents results of forest health analyses from a national perspective using data from a variety of sources. The report is organized according to the Criteria and Indicators for the Conservation and Sustainable Management of Temperate and Boreal Forests of the Santiago Declaration. The results...

  11. Forest health monitoring: 2006 national technical report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark J. Ambrose; Barbara L. Conkling

    2009-01-01

    The Forest Health Monitoring Program’s annual national technical report presents results of forest health analyses from a national perspective using data from a variety of sources. The report is organized according to the Criteria and Indicators for the Conservation and Sustainable Management of Temperate and Boreal Forests of the...

  12. Co-ordinated research project on assessment of levels and health-effects of airborne particulate matter in mining, metal refining and metal working industries using nuclear and related analytical techniques. Report on the second research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    publications and technical reports. g) Improvements in workplace monitoring have been achieved in the targeted industries leading to better knowledge of actual health hazards

  13. Activity report of Computing Research Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1997-07-01

    On April 1997, National Laboratory for High Energy Physics (KEK), Institute of Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo (INS), and Meson Science Laboratory, Faculty of Science, University of Tokyo began to work newly as High Energy Accelerator Research Organization after reconstructing and converting their systems, under aiming at further development of a wide field of accelerator science using a high energy accelerator. In this Research Organization, Applied Research Laboratory is composed of four Centers to execute assistance of research actions common to one of the Research Organization and their relating research and development (R and D) by integrating the present four centers and their relating sections in Tanashi. What is expected for the assistance of research actions is not only its general assistance but also its preparation and R and D of a system required for promotion and future plan of the research. Computer technology is essential to development of the research and can communize for various researches in the Research Organization. On response to such expectation, new Computing Research Center is required for promoting its duty by coworking and cooperating with every researchers at a range from R and D on data analysis of various experiments to computation physics acting under driving powerful computer capacity such as supercomputer and so forth. Here were described on report of works and present state of Data Processing Center of KEK at the first chapter and of the computer room of INS at the second chapter and on future problems for the Computing Research Center. (G.K.)

  14. UKAEA underlying research programme annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, J.P.

    1988-11-01

    Work from all technical areas of the Authority's underlying research programme is described. This is typically in the form of an interim progress report for the year April 1987 to March 1988. The seventeen chapters report research into radiation damage, fracture studies, chemical effects at surfaces, surface physics and corrosion, fluid mechanics and heat transfer, nuclear studies, neutron beam studies, theoretical sciences, instrumentation, reactor physics and control, fabrication processes, laser isotope separation, nuclear fuel cycle studies, quantum electronics, radiological protection, and miscellaneous underlying research. (author)

  15. Forest health monitoring: 2009 national technical report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin M. Potter; Barbara L. Conkling

    2012-01-01

    The annual national technical report of the Forest Health Monitoring Program of the Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, presents forest health status and trends from a national or multi-State regional perspective using a variety of sources, introduces new techniques for analyzing forest health data, and summarizes results of recently completed Evaluation...

  16. Cultural values: can they explain self-reported health?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roudijk, B.; Donders, R.; Stalmeier, P.F.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Self-reported health (SRH) is a measure widely used in health research and population studies. Differences in SRH have been observed between countries and cultural values have been hypothesized to partly explain such differences. Cultural values can be operationalized by two cultural

  17. Summary of Forest health monitoring: 2006 national technical report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark J. Ambrose

    2009-01-01

    Forest Health Monitoring (FHM), together with cooperating researchers both in and outside of the Forest Service, continues to investigate a variety of issues relating to forest health. This report provides some of the latest analyses and results. The broad range of indicators presented demonstrates one reason it can be difficult to draw general conclusions about the...

  18. 1997 Annual report. Technological Research Direction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares

    1998-01-01

    This document describes the results for one year of work. Here is presented the goals of the Technological Research Direction of the National Institute of Nuclear Research in Mexico, which is promoting and developing the production of high technologies in the nuclear sciences and related disciplines as well as to generate the technologies, products, quality insume for academic organizations, health, industrial and commercial that are required. (Author)

  19. Qualitative research and its place in health research in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Teijlingen, E; Simkhada, B; Porter, M; Simkhada, P; Pitchforth, E; Bhatta, P

    2011-01-01

    There has been a steady growth in recent decades in Nepal in health and health services research, much of it based on quantitative research methods. Over the same period international medical journals such as The Lancet, the British Medical Journal (BMJ), The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) and the Journal of Family Planning and Reproductive Health Care and many more have published methods papers outlining and promoting qualitative methods. This paper argues in favour of more high-quality qualitative research in Nepal, either on its own or as part of a mixed-methods approach, to help strengthen the country's research capacity. After outlining the reasons for using qualitative methods, we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the three main approaches: (a) observation; (b) in-depth interviews; and (c) focus groups. We also discuss issues around sampling, analysis, presentation of findings, reflexivity of the qualitative researcher and theory building, and highlight some misconceptions about qualitative research and mistakes commonly made.

  20. Oil shale research and coordination. Progress report, 1980-1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chappell, W R

    1981-01-01

    Purpose is to evaluate the environmental and health consequences of the release of toxic trace elements by an oil shale industry. Emphasis is on the five elements As, Mo, F, Se, and B. Results of four years' research are summarized and the research results over the past year are reported in this document. Reports by the task force are included as appendices, together with individual papers on various aspects of the subject topic. Separate abstracts were prepared for the eleven individual papers. A progress report on the IWG oil shale risk analysis is included at the end of this document. (DLC)

  1. [Qualitative research methodology in health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedregal, Paula; Besoain, Carolina; Reinoso, Alejandro; Zubarew, Tamara

    2017-03-01

    Health care research requires different methodological approaches such as qualitative and quantitative analyzes to understand the phenomena under study. Qualitative research is usually the least considered. Central elements of the qualitative method are that the object of study is constituted by perceptions, emotions and beliefs, non-random sampling by purpose, circular process of knowledge construction, and methodological rigor throughout the research process, from quality design to the consistency of results. The objective of this work is to contribute to the methodological knowledge about qualitative research in health services, based on the implementation of the study, “The transition process from pediatric to adult services: perspectives from adolescents with chronic diseases, caregivers and health professionals”. The information gathered through the qualitative methodology facilitated the understanding of critical points, barriers and facilitators of the transition process of adolescents with chronic diseases, considering the perspective of users and the health team. This study allowed the design of a transition services model from pediatric to adult health services based on the needs of adolescents with chronic diseases, their caregivers and the health team.

  2. Reliability assessments in qualitative health promotion research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Kay E

    2012-03-01

    This article contributes to the debate about the use of reliability assessments in qualitative research in general, and health promotion research in particular. In this article, I examine the use of reliability assessments in qualitative health promotion research in response to health promotion researchers' commonly held misconception that reliability assessments improve the rigor of qualitative research. All qualitative articles published in the journal Health Promotion International from 2003 to 2009 employing reliability assessments were examined. In total, 31.3% (20/64) articles employed some form of reliability assessment. The use of reliability assessments increased over the study period, ranging from qualitative articles decreased. The articles were then classified into four types of reliability assessments, including the verification of thematic codes, the use of inter-rater reliability statistics, congruence in team coding and congruence in coding across sites. The merits of each type were discussed, with the subsequent discussion focusing on the deductive nature of reliable thematic coding, the limited depth of immediately verifiable data and the usefulness of such studies to health promotion and the advancement of the qualitative paradigm.

  3. Fostering Social Determinants of Health Transdisciplinary Research: The Collaborative Research Center for American Indian Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy J. Elliott

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Collaborative Research Center for American Indian Health (CRCAIH was established in September 2012 as a unifying structure to bring together tribal communities and health researchers across South Dakota, North Dakota and Minnesota to address American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN health disparities. CRCAIH is based on the core values of transdisciplinary research, sustainability and tribal sovereignty. All CRCAIH resources and activities revolve around the central aim of assisting tribes with establishing and advancing their own research infrastructures and agendas, as well as increasing AI/AN health research. CRCAIH is comprised of three divisions (administrative; community engagement and innovation; research projects, three technical cores (culture, science and bioethics; regulatory knowledge; and methodology, six tribal partners and supports numerous multi-year and one-year pilot research projects. Under the ultimate goal of improving health for AI/AN, this paper describes the overarching vision and structure of CRCAIH, highlighting lessons learned in the first three years.

  4. Challenges for Multilevel Health Disparities Research in a Transdisciplinary Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, John H.; Lehman, Amy; Hade, Erinn; Ferketich, Amy K.; Sarah, Gehlert; Rauscher, Garth H.; Abrams, Judith; Bird, Chloe E.

    2008-01-01

    Numerous factors play a part in health disparities. Although health disparities are manifested at the level of the individual, other contexts should be considered when investigating the associations of disparities with clinical outcomes. These contexts include families, neighborhoods, social organizations, and healthcare facilities. This paper reports on health disparities research as a multilevel research domain from the perspective of a large national initiative. The Centers for Population Health and Health Disparities (CPHHD) program was established by the NIH to examine the highly dimensional, complex nature of disparities and their effects on health. Because of its inherently transdisciplinary nature, the CPHHD program provides a unique environment in which to perform multilevel health disparities research. During the course of the program, the CPHHD centers have experienced challenges specific to this type of research. The challenges were categorized along three axes: sources of subjects and data, data characteristics, and multilevel analysis and interpretation. The CPHHDs collectively offer a unique example of how these challenges are met; just as importantly, they reveal a broad range of issues that health disparities researchers should consider as they pursue transdisciplinary investigations in this domain, particularly in the context of a large team science initiative. PMID:18619398

  5. Milestones in Nordic Health Promotion research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haglund, Bo J A; Tillgren, Per

    2018-02-01

    Based on the storytelling tradition and analyses of conference material, this article provides an overview of the evolving Nordic Health Promotion Research Network (NHPRN) and its conferences over the last 20 years. The story goes from the planning of the first conference in Bergen, Norway, back in 1996 to the eighth conference in Jyväskylä, Finland, in 2016. There have been three phases of development. During the first phase, 1996-2007, the five first conferences were initiated and implemented by departments of public health in the Nordic countries. The World Health Organization (WHO) collaborative centres of Health Promotion in Bergen University and a group at Karolinska Institute, Department of Social Medicine, creating supportive environments for health in Stockholm played key roles in initiating and supporting NHPRN. During the second phase, 2007-2014, the network was strengthened and supported by the Nordic School of Public Health (NHV) in Gothenburg. The third phase started when NHV closed down in 2015 and networking activities were transferred to the European Office of WHO in Copenhagen. The Nordic Health Promotion Research Conference series has served several purposes and will continue to do so. They are important Nordic meeting places, stimulating Health Promotion research, as well as explicitly managing ongoing concerns in the international Health Promotion community. This is reflected in the shift of foci over time. The content of the conferences has been highly responsive to whatever challenges are particularly relevant at different points in time, while also contributing to developing Health Promotion as a discipline, given that every conference has built on the previous ones.

  6. Health and environmental research. Summary of accomplishments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-04-01

    This is a short account of a 40-year-old health and environmental research program performed in national laboratories, universities, and research institutes. Under the sponsorship of the federal agencies that were consecutively responsible for the national energy mission, this research program has contributed to the understanding of the human health and environmental effects of emergining energy technologies. In so doing, it has also evolved several nuclear techniques for the diagnosis and treatment of human ills. The form of this presentation is through examples of significant, tangible accomplishments in each of these areas at certain times to illustrate the role and impact of the research program. The narrative of this research program concludes with a perspective of its past and a prospectus on its future.

  7. Portraying Reflexivity in Health Services Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rae, John; Green, Bill

    2016-09-01

    A model is proposed for supporting reflexivity in qualitative health research, informed by arguments from Bourdieu and Finlay. Bourdieu refers to mastering the subjective relation to the object at three levels-the overall social space, the field of specialists, and the scholastic universe. The model overlays Bourdieu's levels of objectivation with Finlay's three stages of research (pre-research, data collection, and data analysis). The intersections of these two ways of considering reflexivity, displayed as cells of a matrix, pose questions and offer prompts to productively challenge health researchers' reflexivity. Portraiture is used to show how these challenges and prompts can facilitate such reflexivity, as illustrated in a research project. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. Nuclear Safety Research Department annual progress report 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majborn, B.; Brodersen, K.; Damkjaer, A.; Hoejerup, C.F.

    1994-02-01

    The report describes the work of the Nuclear Safety Research Department during 1993. The activities cover health physics, reactor physics, operation of the small reactor DR1, and radioactive waste management. Lists of staff and publications are included together with a summary of the staff's participation in international committees. (au) (2 tabs., 12 ills.)

  9. Nuclear Safety Research Department annual progress report 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majborn, B.; Brodersen, K.; Damkjaer, A.; Hoejerup, C.F.

    1995-03-01

    The report describes the work of the Nuclear Safety Research Department during 1994. The activities cover health physics, reactor physics, operation of the small reactor DR1, and radioactive waste management. Lists of staff and publications are included together with a summary of the staff's participation in international committees. (au) (1 tab., 12 ills.)

  10. Nuclear Safety Research Department annual progress report 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majborn, B; Brodersen, K; Damkjaer, A; Hoejerup, C F [eds.

    1995-03-01

    The report describes the work of the Nuclear Safety Research Department during 1994. The activities cover health physics, reactor physics, operation of the small reactor DR1, and radioactive waste management. Lists of staff and publications are included together with a summary of the staff`s participation in international committees. (au) (1 tab., 12 ills.).

  11. Nuclear Safety Research Department. Annual progress report 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majborn, B.; Brodersen, K.; Hoejerup, C.F.; Heikel Vinther, F.

    1992-03-01

    The report describes the work of the Nuclear Safety Research Department during 1991. The activities cover health physics, reactor physics, operation of the educational reactor DR 1, and waste management. Lists of staff and publications are included together with a summary of participation in international working groups etc. (au) (5 ills., 59 refs.)

  12. Nuclear Safety Research Department annual progress report 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majborn, B.; Brodersen, K.; Hoejerup, C.F.; Heikel Vinther, F.

    1993-03-01

    The report describes the work of the Nuclear Safety Research Department during 1992. The activities cover health physics, reactor physics, operation of the Danish educational reactor DR1, and waste management. Lists of staff and publications are included together with a summary of the staff's participation in international committees. (au)

  13. Nuclear Safety Research Department. Annual progress report 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heikel Vinther, F.

    1991-07-01

    The report describes the work of the Nuclear Safety Research Department during 1990. The activities cover health physics, reactor physics, operation of the educational reactor DR 1, and waste management. Lists of staff and publications are included together with a summary of participation in international working groups etc. (au) 3 ills., 30 refs

  14. Enhancing the reporting and transparency of rheumatology research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Robin; Bliddal, Henning; Henriksen, Marius

    2013-01-01

    Manuscripts and abstracts from biomedical journals frequently do not contain proper information for meeting required standards and serving the multiple needs of their end users. Reporting guidelines and checklists help researchers to meet those standards by providing rules or principles......, to present a structured overview of reporting guidelines that rheumatology journals could apply, and to encourage their use by journal authors, editors, and reviewers, including those of Arthritis Research & Therapy. Internationally recognized reporting guidelines exist for a diversity of research areas. We...... encourage colleagues to consult the 'Enhancing the QUAlity and Transparency Of health Research' (EQUATOR) network when writing scientific papers. EQUATOR is an international initiative that seeks to improve the reliability and value of biomedical research literature by promoting transparent and accurate...

  15. Agricultural research department. Annual report 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The annual report gives a general review of the research work of the department. The activities of the year are described in short project reports followed by a list of publications, posters and lectures. Further, the report gives three review articles on selected subjects related to the work: ''Chitinase in barley and rape seed'', ''Symbiotic nitrogen fixation'' and ''Biological control of powdery mildews''. Included in the report are also a list of the staff members, guest scientists and students, lectures given at the department, and a list of travel - and other acitivities. (author) 10 refs

  16. Health physics practices at research accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, R.H.

    1976-02-01

    A review is given of the uses of particle accelerators in health physics, the text being a short course given at the Health Physics Society Ninth Midyear Topical Symposium in February, 1976. Topics discussed include: (1) the radiation environment of high energy accelerators; (2) dosimetry at research accelerators; (3) shielding; (4) induced activity; (5) environmental impact of high energy accelerators; (6) population dose equivalent calculation; and (7) the application of the ''as low as practicable concept'' at accelerators

  17. Mobile health in China: a review of research and programs in medical care, health education, and public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corpman, David W

    2013-01-01

    There are nearly 1 billion mobile phone subscribers in China. Health care providers, telecommunications companies, technology firms, and Chinese governmental organizations use existing mobile technology and social networks to improve patient-provider communication, promote health education and awareness, add efficiency to administrative practices, and enhance public health campaigns. This review of mobile health in China summarizes existing clinical research and public health text messaging campaigns while highlighting potential future areas of research and program implementation. Databases and search engines served as the primary means of gathering relevant resources. Included material largely consists of scientific articles and official reports that met predefined inclusion criteria. This review includes 10 reports of controlled studies that assessed the use of mobile technology in health care settings and 17 official reports of public health awareness campaigns that used text messaging. All source material was published between 2006 and 2011. The controlled studies suggested that mobile technology interventions significantly improved an array of health care outcomes. However, additional efforts are needed to refine mobile health research and better understand the applicability of mobile technology in China's health care settings. A vast potential exists for the expansion of mobile health in China, especially as costs decrease and increasingly sophisticated technology becomes more widespread.

  18. Alberta Reclamation Research annual report, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The Reclamation Research Technical Advisory Committee (RRTAC) was appointed by the Alberta Land Conservation and Reclamation Council to assist in technical matters related to the development and administration of the Council's research program. RRTAC develops reclamation research under four major program areas, and activities in these areas during the year are described in this report. The Plains Coal Reclamation Research Program addresses questions relating to groundwater and soil reconstruction in plains coal mining zones. The Mountain and Foothills Reclamation Research Program focuses on water management, soil reconstruction, reforestation, and wildlife habitat development, with objectives including control of erosion on a variety of disturbances such as coal mines and ash pits. The Oil Sands Reclamation Research Program is attempting to develop techniques to establish self-sustaining, erosion-free cover on oil sand tailings pond dikes, and to return tailings sand storage and overburden dumps to productive forests. The Oil and Gas Reclamation Research Program is concerned with disposal of drilling wastes and reclamation of lands disturbed by oil and gas activities. Under each program, the objectives, basic problems investigated, and research approach are presented, followed by description of specific projects involving such subjects as hydrology, revegetation, soil-water interactions, landscape and watershed design, soil reconstruction and amendment, and soil compaction. A list of research reports is included. 69 refs., 8 figs

  19. Ethical issues in perinatal mental health research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, Anna R; Shivakumar, Geetha; Lee, Simon Craddock; Inrig, Stephen J; Sadler, John Z

    2009-11-01

    To review the background of current ethical standards for the conduct of perinatal mental health research and describe the ethical challenges in this research domain. Current literature reflects a growing sentiment in the scientific community that having no information regarding the impact of psychiatric treatment on the mother and developing fetus/infant poses dangers that may exceed the risks involved in research. However, without sufficient consensus across the scientific community, both regulatory bodies and perinatal researchers find themselves without a framework for decision making that satisfactorily limits the risks and facilitates the benefits of participation of pregnant and lactating women in clinical research. Psychiatric research in perinatal mental health is critically important as it enables clinicians and patients to participate in informed decision-making concerning treatment for psychiatric disorders. Specific areas of concern include fetal safety, maternal risk, the therapeutic misconception, commercial interests, forensic/legal issues, the informed consent process, and study design. Developing guidelines that address ethical challenges and include the views and concerns of multiple stakeholders could improve the access of perinatal women to the benefits of participation in mental health research in addition to providing evidence-based mental healthcare for this subpopulation.

  20. Conflicting health information: a critical research need.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Delesha M; Geryk, Lorie L; Chen, Annie T; Nagler, Rebekah H; Dieckmann, Nathan F; Han, Paul K J

    2016-12-01

    Conflicting health information is increasing in amount and visibility, as evidenced most recently by the controversy surrounding the risks and benefits of childhood vaccinations. The mechanisms through which conflicting information affects individuals are poorly understood; thus, we are unprepared to help people process conflicting information when making important health decisions. In this viewpoint article, we describe this problem, summarize insights from the existing literature on the prevalence and effects of conflicting health information, and identify important knowledge gaps. We propose a working definition of conflicting health information and describe a conceptual typology to guide future research in this area. The typology classifies conflicting information according to four fundamental dimensions: the substantive issue under conflict, the number of conflicting sources (multiplicity), the degree of evidence heterogeneity and the degree of temporal inconsistency. © 2015 The Authors. Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Commentary: Writing and Evaluating Qualitative Research Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Deborah; Aroian, Karen J.; McQuaid, Elizabeth L.; Deatrick, Janet A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To provide an overview of qualitative methods, particularly for reviewers and authors who may be less familiar with qualitative research. Methods A question and answer format is used to address considerations for writing and evaluating qualitative research. Results and Conclusions When producing qualitative research, individuals are encouraged to address the qualitative research considerations raised and to explicitly identify the systematic strategies used to ensure rigor in study design and methods, analysis, and presentation of findings. Increasing capacity for review and publication of qualitative research within pediatric psychology will advance the field’s ability to gain a better understanding of the specific needs of pediatric populations, tailor interventions more effectively, and promote optimal health. PMID:27118271

  2. Commentary: Writing and Evaluating Qualitative Research Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yelena P; Thompson, Deborah; Aroian, Karen J; McQuaid, Elizabeth L; Deatrick, Janet A

    2016-06-01

    To provide an overview of qualitative methods, particularly for reviewers and authors who may be less familiar with qualitative research. A question and answer format is used to address considerations for writing and evaluating qualitative research. When producing qualitative research, individuals are encouraged to address the qualitative research considerations raised and to explicitly identify the systematic strategies used to ensure rigor in study design and methods, analysis, and presentation of findings. Increasing capacity for review and publication of qualitative research within pediatric psychology will advance the field's ability to gain a better understanding of the specific needs of pediatric populations, tailor interventions more effectively, and promote optimal health. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Reporting Guidelines and Checklists Improve the Reliability and Rigor of Research Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, J Haxby

    2016-03-01

    The Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy (JOSPT) requires the use of robust research reporting guidelines for all research report submissions, including the newly adopted RECORD (REporting of studies Conducted using Observational Routinely-collected health Data) statement. We remind authors submitting research to JOSPT to identify the appropriate guideline and checklist for their study design, and to submit a completely and accurately completed checklist with their manuscript. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(3):130. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.0105.

  4. UKAEA underlying research programme annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, D.P.

    1990-01-01

    Investment in fundamental research is essential to the success of an organisation such as Atomic Energy Authority (AEA) Technology whose business is the selling of Research and Development (R and D) and the services relating to it. Such research supplies the scientific understanding that underpins the technical expertise of the organisation, develops new skills and techniques, and stimulates technical innovation. The resulting scientific and technical excellence is the hall-mark of a major contract R and D organisation. Fundamental research in the AEA is co-ordinated through the Underlying Research Programme. This Report describes progress made during the financial year 1988/89 within all Technical Areas of the Programme, and additionally summarises the AEA's Underlying Research on the Safe Integral Reactor design and on 'Cold Fusion'. Highlights of recent technical achievements within the Programme are described in a separate brochure. (author)

  5. Allied health research positions: a qualitative evaluation of their impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenke, Rachel J; Ward, Elizabeth C; Hickman, Ingrid; Hulcombe, Julie; Phillips, Rachel; Mickan, Sharon

    2017-02-06

    Research positions embedded within healthcare settings have been identified as an enabler to allied health professional (AHP) research capacity; however, there is currently limited research formally evaluating their impact. In 2008, a Health Practitioner industrial agreement funded a research capacity building initiative within Queensland Health, Australia, which included 15 new allied health research positions. The present project used a qualitative and realist approach to explore the impact of these research positions, as well as the mechanisms which facilitated or hindered their success within their respective organisations. Forty-four AHP employees from six governmental health services in Queensland, Australia, participated in the study. Individual interviews were undertaken, with individuals in research positions (n = 8) and their reporting line managers (n = 8). Four stakeholder focus groups were also conducted with clinicians, team leaders and professional heads who had engaged with the research positions. Nine key outcomes of the research positions were identified across individual, team/service and organisational/community levels. These outcomes included clinician skill development, increased research activity, clinical and service changes, increased research outputs and collaborations, enhanced research and workplace culture, improved profile of allied health, development of research infrastructure, and professional development of individuals in the research positions. Different mechanisms that influenced these outcomes were identified. These mechanisms were grouped by those related to the (1) research position itself, (2) organisational factors and (3) implementation factors. The present findings highlight the potential value of the research positions for individuals, teams and clinical services across different governmental healthcare services, and demonstrate the impact of the roles on building the internal and external profile of allied health

  6. The salutogenic model of health in health promotion research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelmark, Maurice B; Bull, Torill

    2013-06-01

    Despite health promotion's enthusiasm for the salutogenic model of health, researchers have paid little attention to Antonovsky's central ideas about the ease/dis-ease continuum, defined in terms of 'breakdown' (the severity of pain and functional limitations, and the degree medical care is called for, irrespective of specific diseases). Rather, salutogenesis research has a strong focus on how sense of coherence relates to a wide range of specific diseases and illness endpoints. We address two questions: Why has Antonovsky's health concept failed to stimulate research on breakdown, and how can the present emphasis on disease be complemented by an emphasis on positive well-being in the salutogenic model? We show that (i) the breakdown concept of health as specified by Antonovsky is circular in definition, (ii) it is not measured on the 'required' ease/dis-ease continuum, (iii) it is not measureable by any validated or reliability-tested assessment tool, and (iv) it has not so much been rejected by health promotion, as it has not been considered at all. We show that Antonovsky came to view breakdown as but one aspect of well-being. He was open to the idea of well-being as something more positive than the absence of pain, suffering and need for medical care. We suggest ways to move salutogenesis research in the direction of well-being in its positive sense.

  7. Engineering Research Division report on reports calendar year 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorton, M.E.

    1979-01-01

    Each year the Engineering Research Division of the Electronics Engineering Department has issued an internal report listing of all formal publications produced by the division during the calendar year. The report for 1978 is being issued in two sections (the second section has been expanded from the former format due to a change in collection of information implemented during the calendar year 1978). The first section (covering January 1978 through June 1978) lists the titles, report numbers, authors, dates, an author index, and, when applicable, conferences or journals to which the paper was submitted. The second section (covering July 1978 through December 1978) provides, in addition to the above information, abstracts for each paper, and an appendix with keywords. Future publication reports will include abstracts and a keyword appendix for all reports. It is expected that the new format will make the publication report a more useful document

  8. Bhabha Atomic Research Centre : annual report 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Research and development (R and D) activities of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) carried out during 1990 are reported. The main thrust of the R and D activities of BARC is on : (1)providing support to the nuclear power programme, (2)designing, building and utilising research reactors, (3)working in related frontline technologies, and also (4)basic research in frontier areas of science. These activities are described in brief under the chapters entitled : (1)Physical Sciences (2)Chemical Sciences (3)Materials and Material Science (4)Radioisotopes (5)Reactions (6)Fuel Cycle (7)Radiological Safety and Protection (8)Electronics and Instrumentation (9)Engineering Services (10)Life Sciences and (11)General. At the end of each chapter a list of papers and reports published in the subject field indicated by the title of the chapter is given. (N.B.). figs., tabs

  9. Bhabha Atomic Research Centre annual report : 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The main thrust of the various research and development (R and D) activities of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Bombay, is towards the implementation of India's nuclear power programme. To that end, its R and D activities cover the entire nuclear fuel cycle, reactor technology; applications of radioisotopes and radiations in agriculture, medicine and industries; and radiation protection in nuclear installations. The report presents in summarised form the R and D activities carried out during 1989 in the chapters entitled: Physical Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Materials and Materials Sciences, Radioisotopes, Reactors, Fuel Cycle, Radiological Safety and Protection, Electronics and Instrumentation, Engineering Services, Life Sciences and General. At the end of each chapter, a list of publications by the staff scientists in the corresponding subject field is given. The list includes published journal articles and technical reports, and papers presented at conferences, symposia etc. The report also covers the R and D activities of the outstation units of BARC, namely, Nuclear Research Laboratory, Srinagar; High Altitude Research Laboratory, Gulmarg; and Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Calcutta. BARC is also engaged in basic an applied research in frontier areas of science such as plasma and fusion physics, accelerators and lasers, high temperature superconductivity, condensed matter physics, high pressure physics, high resolution spectroscopy, chemical reaction dynamics and laser induced chemistry, electronics and robotics: radiation biology, and genetic engineering. Report is illustrated with a number of figures, graphs, and coloured pictures. (M.G.B.) figs., refs

  10. Co-ordinated research project on use of nuclear and related analytical techniques in studying human health impacts of toxic elements consumed through foodstuffs contaminated by industrial activities. Report on the first research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    The overall objective of the Co-ordinated research project is to provide a scientific basis for better assessment of selected pollutants in the food chain with a view to elucidating their impacts on human health and nutrition. Results of this study will enhance the existing body of knowledge and can be used to develop preventive strategies. Specific objectve: To determine the extent to which toxic element levels in food are affected by surrounding industrial activities and to assess potential human exposure from the consumption of such foodstuffs. EXPECTED RESEARCH OUTPUTS (RESULTS): Harmonized protocols and procedures for sampling and analyses; ? Compiled results for toxic element levels and their average daily dietary intake (ADDI) / dietary intake; Evaluated toxic element exposure levels based on biological indicators (where applicable); Publications of the study results in an IAEA TECDOC, and in peer-reviewed journals by participants. ACTION PLAN (ACTIVITIES) a. Core research activities: 1 Identification of the study areas and population groups. 2 Collection of information on food consumption patterns of the population groups under study (e.g. through questionnaires). 3 Development of harmonized protocols and validation of analytical methodologies in compliance with ISO/IEC 17025. 4 Collection and analysis of food samples, and estimation of the dietary intake. 5 Collection and analysis of biological indicators where applicable. 6 Evaluation of possible relationships between human exposures and biological indicators for the pollutants studied. 4b. Supplementary activities: ? Speciation studies of pollutants. ? Comparison of present and previous data on relevant parameters. ? Possible production and distribution of laboratory intercomparison samples. 7. Recommendations for nuclear analytical techniques ? Nuclear analytical technique (NAT) such as INAA, PIXE, PIGE, XRF should be the primary technique of analysis; Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA

  11. Community Empowerment for School Health: Action Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Mathew

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: One of the authors living in Yelagiri Hills incidentally noticed that the one government school and two hostels there, were facing acute issues with performance and multiple student health issues. Hence the action research was undertaken to address the problem and simultaneously to empower the local community. Methods: It was a mixed-method action research study comprising of quantitative surveys (before- after design and qualitative approach (participatory intervention. At baseline survey 177 children in two residential hostels and one government school were examined using a locally adapted Global School based Student Health Survey questionnaire. The hemoglobin level was estimated using WHO hemoglobin color scale. The participatory interventions were carried out through School Health Committee. Periodic health checkup with hemoglobin levels and school performance were examined. After one year, 230 children were examined in the follow up survey using the same questionnaire. Results: There was significant improvement in the personal hygiene and reduction in related morbidity among the children. The number of students of hemoglobin level less than 12gm% decreased from 31.4% to 11.3%.The number of students of hemoglobin level more than or equal to 12gm% increased from 68.6% to 88.7%. There was significant decline in anemia from 31.4% from baseline to 11.3% at follow up survey. There was also significant decrease in the malnutrition. Conclusion: The need based participatory health promoting school initiative for tribal children at Yelagiri hills led to a significant improvement in the school performance and general health conditions of the children. The school health committee has played a vital role in the sustainability of the project. The action research could bring positive improvements in health status of school children through active participation of students, parents, teachers and community members.

  12. Small Wind Research Turbine: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corbus, D.; Meadors, M.

    2005-10-01

    The Small Wind Research Turbine (SWRT) project was initiated to provide reliable test data for model validation of furling wind turbines and to help understand small wind turbine loads. This report will familiarize the user with the scope of the SWRT test and support the use of these data. In addition to describing all the testing details and results, the report presents an analysis of the test data and compares the SWRT test data to simulation results from the FAST aeroelastic simulation model.

  13. IAEA research contracts. First annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1961-01-01

    The present volume is the first issue of what will become a regular annual publication by the Agency. It contains summaries of the final reports on all those contracts which have expired before 31 December 1960 with a few exceptions. In every case, the summary of the contractor's final report has been prepared by that member of the Agency's scientific staff who has been closely connected with that particular subject of research. Thus, the scientific data reported in the summary remain the responsibility of the contractor, the Agency being responsible for any additional observations. The reports of the following contracts are included: Research Contract No.2, The investigation of electrophysiological responses of biological systems, in particular of nerve cells, to irradiation with small doses of X-ray and other types of ionizing radiation, Research Contract No.3, Investigation on the mode of the protective action of certain sulfhydryl compounds against radiation effects on the synthesis of deoxyribonucleic acid, using tritium-labelled thymidine, Research Contract No.6, Investigation and development of a new method of monitoring and dosimetry for low fluxes of fast neutrons, involving the use of a bubble chamber, Research Contract No.13, Effects of incorporated radioisotopes upon the stability of genetic materials, Research Contract No.16, Interrelationship of root absorption and leaf absorption of radioisotopes in herbaceous plants, Research Contract No. 23, The uptake of radioactive wastes by lowland rice from contaminated soils due to irrigation water and its decontamination, Research Contract No.28, Comparison between mutation rates induced by acute and chronic gamma irradiation

  14. IAEA research contracts. First annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1961-07-01

    The present volume is the first issue of what will become a regular annual publication by the Agency. It contains summaries of the final reports on all those contracts which have expired before 31 December 1960 with a few exceptions. In every case, the summary of the contractor's final report has been prepared by that member of the Agency's scientific staff who has been closely connected with that particular subject of research. Thus, the scientific data reported in the summary remain the responsibility of the contractor, the Agency being responsible for any additional observations. The reports of the following contracts are included: Research Contract No.2, The investigation of electrophysiological responses of biological systems, in particular of nerve cells, to irradiation with small doses of X-ray and other types of ionizing radiation, Research Contract No.3, Investigation on the mode of the protective action of certain sulfhydryl compounds against radiation effects on the synthesis of deoxyribonucleic acid, using tritium-labelled thymidine, Research Contract No.6, Investigation and development of a new method of monitoring and dosimetry for low fluxes of fast neutrons, involving the use of a bubble chamber, Research Contract No.13, Effects of incorporated radioisotopes upon the stability of genetic materials, Research Contract No.16, Interrelationship of root absorption and leaf absorption of radioisotopes in herbaceous plants, Research Contract No. 23, The uptake of radioactive wastes by lowland rice from contaminated soils due to irrigation water and its decontamination, Research Contract No.28, Comparison between mutation rates induced by acute and chronic gamma irradiation.

  15. US Army Medical Research and Development Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-10-01

    RI) US ARMY MEDICAL RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT. Colonel/John Jr DTIC JUL 1 5 1980; A USL &MY MEDICAL BIOENGINEERING RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT...pollutants in water or soil . Pollutant by-products and breakdown products in water, air or soil will be isolated, characterized, and quantified. Where...determination of selected low-level pollutants io soil and water. Degradation products and secondary pollutants arising from munitions manufacture or pest

  16. Meeting report: Global vaccine and immunization research forum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Andrew Q; Touchette, Nancy; Fenton Hall, B; Hwang, Angela; Hombach, Joachim

    2018-02-08

    Building on the success of the first Global Vaccine and Immunization Research Forum (GVIRF), the World Health Organization, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health in the United States of America, and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation convened the second GVIRF in March 2016. Leading scientists, vaccine developers, and public health officials from around the world discussed scientific advances and innovative technologies to design and deliver vaccines as well as novel tools and approaches to increase the uptake of vaccines throughout the world. This report summarizes the discussions and conclusions from the forum participants. Copyright © 2018.

  17. Privacy, security, and the public health researcher in the era of electronic health record research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Neal D; Sarwate, Anand D

    2016-01-01

    Health data derived from electronic health records are increasingly utilized in large-scale population health analyses. Going hand in hand with this increase in data is an increasing number of data breaches. Ensuring privacy and security of these data is a shared responsibility between the public health researcher, collaborators, and their institutions. In this article, we review the requirements of data privacy and security and discuss epidemiologic implications of emerging technologies from the computer science community that can be used for health data. In order to ensure that our needs as researchers are captured in these technologies, we must engage in the dialogue surrounding the development of these tools.

  18. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1990 to the DOE Office of Energy Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J.F.

    1991-06-01

    This report summarizes progress on OHER human health, biological, and general life sciences research programs conducted at PNL in FY 1990. The research develops the knowledge and scientific principles necessary to identify understand, and anticipate the long-term health consequences of energy-related radiation and chemicals. Our continuing emphasis is to decrease the uncertainty of health risk estimates from existing and developing energy-related technologies through an increased of understanding of how radiation and chemicals cause biological damage. The sequence of this report of PNL research reflects the OHER programmatic structure. The first section, on human health research, concerns epidemiological and statistical studies for assessing health risks. The next section contains reports of biological research in laboratory animals and in vitro cell systems, including research with radionuclides and chemicals. The general life sciences research section reports research conducted for the OHER human genome research program.

  19. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1990 to the DOE Office of Energy Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J.F.

    1991-06-01

    This report summarizes progress on OHER human health, biological, and general life sciences research programs conducted at PNL in FY 1990. The research develops the knowledge and scientific principles necessary to identify understand, and anticipate the long-term health consequences of energy-related radiation and chemicals. Our continuing emphasis is to decrease the uncertainty of health risk estimates from existing and developing energy-related technologies through an increased of understanding of how radiation and chemicals cause biological damage. The sequence of this report of PNL research reflects the OHER programmatic structure. The first section, on human health research, concerns epidemiological and statistical studies for assessing health risks. The next section contains reports of biological research in laboratory animals and in vitro cell systems, including research with radionuclides and chemicals. The general life sciences research section reports research conducted for the OHER human genome research program

  20. Exploring perceptions and experiences of Bolivian health researchers with research ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Sarah; Aalborg, Annette; Basagoitia, Armando; Cortes, Jacqueline; Lanza, Oscar; Schwind, Jessica S

    2015-04-01

    In Bolivia, there is increasing interest in incorporating research ethics into study procedures, but there have been inconsistent application of research ethics practices. Minimal data exist regarding the experiences of researchers concerning the ethical conduct of research. A cross-sectional study was administered to Bolivian health leaders with research experience (n = 82) to document their knowledge, perceptions, and experiences of research ethics committees and infrastructure support for research ethics. Results showed that 16% of respondents reported not using ethical guidelines to conduct their research and 66% indicated their institutions did not consistently require ethics approval for research. Barriers and facilitators to incorporate research ethics into practice were outlined. These findings will help inform a comprehensive rights-based research ethics education program in Bolivia. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Research Projects, Technical Reports and Publications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliger, Joseph

    1996-01-01

    The Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science (RIACS) was established by the Universities Space Research Association (USRA) at the NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) on June 6, 1983. RIACS is privately operated by USRA, a consortium of universities with research programs in the aerospace sciences, under contract with NASA. The primary mission of RIACS is to provide research and expertise in computer science and scientific computing to support the scientific missions of NASA ARC. The research carried out at RIACS must change its emphasis from year to year in response to NASA ARC's changing needs and technological opportunities. A flexible scientific staff is provided through a university faculty visitor program, a post doctoral program, and a student visitor program. Not only does this provide appropriate expertise but it also introduces scientists outside of NASA to NASA problems. A small group of core RIACS staff provides continuity and interacts with an ARC technical monitor and scientific advisory group to determine the RIACS mission. RIACS activities are reviewed and monitored by a USRA advisory council and ARC technical monitor. Research at RIACS is currently being done in the following areas: Advanced Methods for Scientific Computing High Performance Networks During this report pefiod Professor Antony Jameson of Princeton University, Professor Wei-Pai Tang of the University of Waterloo, Professor Marsha Berger of New York University, Professor Tony Chan of UCLA, Associate Professor David Zingg of University of Toronto, Canada and Assistant Professor Andrew Sohn of New Jersey Institute of Technology have been visiting RIACS. January 1, 1996 through September 30, 1996 RIACS had three staff scientists, four visiting scientists, one post-doctoral scientist, three consultants, two research associates and one research assistant. RIACS held a joint workshop with Code 1 29-30 July 1996. The workshop was held to discuss needs and opportunities in basic research in

  2. Scalable Combinatorial Tools for Health Disparities Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Langston

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite staggering investments made in unraveling the human genome, current estimates suggest that as much as 90% of the variance in cancer and chronic diseases can be attributed to factors outside an individual’s genetic endowment, particularly to environmental exposures experienced across his or her life course. New analytical approaches are clearly required as investigators turn to complicated systems theory and ecological, place-based and life-history perspectives in order to understand more clearly the relationships between social determinants, environmental exposures and health disparities. While traditional data analysis techniques remain foundational to health disparities research, they are easily overwhelmed by the ever-increasing size and heterogeneity of available data needed to illuminate latent gene x environment interactions. This has prompted the adaptation and application of scalable combinatorial methods, many from genome science research, to the study of population health. Most of these powerful tools are algorithmically sophisticated, highly automated and mathematically abstract. Their utility motivates the main theme of this paper, which is to describe real applications of innovative transdisciplinary models and analyses in an effort to help move the research community closer toward identifying the causal mechanisms and associated environmental contexts underlying health disparities. The public health exposome is used as a contemporary focus for addressing the complex nature of this subject.

  3. Analysis and implementation of a World Health Organization health report: methodological concepts and strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Groote, Per Maximilian; Giustini, Alessandro; Bickenbach, Jerome Edmond

    2014-01-01

    A long-standing scientific discourse on the use of health research evidence to inform policy has come to produce multiple implementation theories, frameworks, models, and strategies. It is from this extensive body of research that the authors extract and present essential components of an implementation process in the health domain, gaining valuable guidance on how to successfully meet the challenges of implementation. Furthermore, this article describes how implementation content can be analyzed and reorganized, with a special focus on implementation at different policy, systems and services, and individual levels using existing frameworks and tools. In doing so, the authors aim to contribute to the establishment and testing of an implementation framework for reports such as the World Health Organization World Report on Disability, the World Health Organization International Perspectives on Spinal Cord Injury, and other health policy reports or technical health guidelines.

  4. Designing and Conducting Health Systems Research Projects ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... and field testing (Part 1) and with data analysis and report writing (Part 2). ... New website will help record vital life events to improve access to services for all ... How are public health actors working with the food and drinks industry to ...

  5. European Nutrition and Health Report 2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmadfa, Ibrahim; Meyer, A.; Nowak, V.

    The general aim of the ENHR II project is to provide a comprehensive and up-to-date report on the nutrition and health situation in Europe that focuses on diet, physical activity, tobacco use and alcohol consumption. The European Nutrition and Health Report 2009 will contribute to the identificat......The general aim of the ENHR II project is to provide a comprehensive and up-to-date report on the nutrition and health situation in Europe that focuses on diet, physical activity, tobacco use and alcohol consumption. The European Nutrition and Health Report 2009 will contribute...... to the identification of major nutrition and health problems in the EU regions and to the monitoring and evaluation of food and nutrition policies already in place within the Member States. The method implies collecting and critically reviewing available data on the most common indicators used for the assessment...... of nutrition and health situation of 25 European countries. The European Nutrition and Health Report 2009 will provide information on dietary habits, diet related health indicators as well as established food and nutrition policies in European countries....

  6. Health systems research training enhances workplace research skills: a qualitative evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Jolene; Schaffer, Angela; Lewin, Simon; Zwarenstein, Merrick; van der Walt, Hester

    2003-01-01

    In-service education is a widely used means of enhancing the skills of health service providers, for example, in undertaking research. However, the transfer of skills acquired during an education course to the workplace is seldom evaluated. The objectives of this study were to assess learner, teacher, and health service manager perceptions of the usefulness, in the work setting, of skills taught on a health systems research education course in South Africa and to assess the extent to which the course stimulated awareness and development of health systems research in the work setting. The education course was evaluated using a qualitative approach. Respondents were selected for interview using purposive sampling. Interviews were conducted with 39 respondents, including all of the major stakeholders. The interviews lasted between 20 and 60 minutes and were conducted either face to face or over the telephone. Thematic analysis was applied to the data, and key themes were identified. The course demystified health systems research and stimulated interest in reading and applying research findings. The course also changed participants' attitudes to routine data collection and was reported to have facilitated the application of informal research or problem-solving methods to everyday work situations. However, inadequate support within the workplace was a significant obstacle to applying the skills learned. A 2-week intensive, experiential course in health systems research methods can provide a mechanism for introducing basic research skills to a wide range of learners. Qualitative evaluation is a useful approach for assessing the impacts of education courses.

  7. Health physics 1992 progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-04-01

    At Los Alamos National Laboratory, radiation protection services are provided by ESH-1, -4, and -12, and technical support is provided by ESH-6 to Laboratory groups that work with significant quantities of fissile material. The mission of all these groups is to protect Laboratory workers, the public, and the environment from radiation associated with Laboratory operations. In this report, 1992 radiation protection performance trends are presented. These data show that, in general, the collective external dose equivalent quantities from penetrating (gamma, x-ray, and neutron) radiation and from nonpenetrating (beta and low-energy photon) radiation showed a slight downward trend during 1992. The number of confirmed contaminations of skin and personal clothing decreased in 1992 when compared to the previous year. Finally, there was one reportable DOE 5000.3A internal contamination event in 1992. The 1992 radiation protection activities of the Laboratory, conducted at both the Nevada Test Site and at Los Alamos, are presented and discussed. These activities include external dosimetry, internal dosimetry, radiation-monitoring instrumentation, sample analysis, workplace radiological monitoring, nuclear criticality safety, hazardous materials response, radiological training, and radiological records. This report details routine activities, including any significant changes and improvements in 1992; additional activities, including special investigations, studies, and reviews; publications and presentations; and professional activities, including professional memberships, training received, and conferences attended

  8. Notions of quality and standards for qualitative research reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Alan; Jordan, Zoe; Lockwood, Craig; Aromataris, Ed

    2015-10-01

    The utility of qualitative research findings in the health sciences has been the subject of considerable debate, particularly with the advent of qualitative systematic reviews in recent years. There has been a significant investment in the production of guidance to improve the reporting of quantitative research; however, comparatively little time has been spent on developing the same for qualitative research reporting. This paper sets out to examine the possibility of developing a framework for refereed journals to utilize when guiding authors on how to report the results of qualitative studies in the hope that this will improve the quality of reports and subsequently their inclusion in qualitative syntheses and guidelines to inform practice at the point of care. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Where does good quality qualitative health care research get published?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Jane C; Liddle, Jennifer

    2017-09-01

    This short report aims to give some insight into current publication patterns for high-quality qualitative health research, using the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 database. We explored patterns of publication by range and type of journal, by date and by methodological focus. We also looked at variations between the publications submitted to different Units of Assessment, focussing particularly on the one most closely aligned with our own research area of primary care. Our brief analysis demonstrates that general medical/health journals with high impact factors are the dominant routes of publication, but there is variation according to the methodological approach adopted by articles. The number of qualitative health articles submitted to REF 2014 overall was small, and even more so for articles based on mixed methods research, qualitative methodology or reviews/syntheses that included qualitative articles.

  10. Laboratory directed research development annual report. Fiscal year 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    This document comprises Pacific Northwest National Laboratory`s report for Fiscal Year 1996 on research and development programs. The document contains 161 project summaries in 16 areas of research and development. The 16 areas of research and development reported on are: atmospheric sciences, biotechnology, chemical instrumentation and analysis, computer and information science, ecological science, electronics and sensors, health protection and dosimetry, hydrological and geologic sciences, marine sciences, materials science and engineering, molecular science, process science and engineering, risk and safety analysis, socio-technical systems analysis, statistics and applied mathematics, and thermal and energy systems. In addition, this report provides an overview of the research and development program, program management, program funding, and Fiscal Year 1997 projects.

  11. Synchrotron radiation research facility conceptual design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-06-01

    A report is presented to define, in general outline, the extent and proportions, the type of construction, the schedule for accomplishment, and the estimated cost for a new Synchrotron Radiation Facility, as proposed to the Energy Research and Development Administration by the Brookhaven National Laboratory. The report is concerned only indirectly with the scientific and technological justification for undertaking this project; the latter is addressed explicitly in separate documents. The report does consider user requirements, however, in order to establish a basis for design development. Preliminary drawings, outline specifications, estimated cost data, and other descriptive material are included as supporting documentation on the current status of the project in this preconstruction phase

  12. Designing and Conducting Health Systems Research Projects ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Home · Resources · Publications. Designing and Conducting Health Systems Research Projects Volume 1: Proposal Development and Fieldwork ... IDRC and the United Kingdom's Global AMR Innovation Fund—managed by the ... New website will help record vital life events to improve access to services for all.

  13. Technical specifications: Health Physics Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-02-01

    The technical specifications define the key limitations that must be observed for safe operation of the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) and an envelope of operation within which there is assurance that these limits will not be exceeded. The specifications were written to satisfy the requirements of the Department of Energy (DOE) Manual Chapter 0540, September 1, 1972

  14. Final Report: Performance Engineering Research Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mellor-Crummey, John [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-10-27

    This document is a final report about the work performed for cooperative agreement DE-FC02-06ER25764, the Rice University effort of Performance Engineering Research Institute (PERI). PERI was an Enabling Technologies Institute of the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC-2) program supported by the Department of Energy's Office of Science Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) program. The PERI effort at Rice University focused on (1) research and development of tools for measurement and analysis of application program performance, and (2) engagement with SciDAC-2 application teams.

  15. Wildfire smoke exposure and human health: Significant gaps in research for a growing public health issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Carolyn; Tesfaigzi, Yohannes; Bassein, Jed A; Miller, Lisa A

    2017-10-01

    Understanding the effect of wildfire smoke exposure on human health represents a unique interdisciplinary challenge to the scientific community. Population health studies indicate that wildfire smoke is a risk to human health and increases the healthcare burden of smoke-impacted areas. However, wildfire smoke composition is complex and dynamic, making characterization and modeling difficult. Furthermore, current efforts to study the effect of wildfire smoke are limited by availability of air quality measures and inconsistent air quality reporting among researchers. To help address these issues, we conducted a substantive review of wildfire smoke effects on population health, wildfire smoke exposure in occupational health, and experimental wood smoke exposure. Our goal was to evaluate the current literature on wildfire smoke and highlight important gaps in research. In particular we emphasize long-term health effects of wildfire smoke, recovery following wildfire smoke exposure, and health consequences of exposure in children. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. PSI nuclear energy research progress report 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alder, H.P.; Wiedemann, K.H.

    1989-07-01

    The progress report at hand deals with nuclear energy research at PSI. The collection of articles covers a large number of topics: different reactor systems, part of the fuel cycle, the behaviour of structural materials. Examples of the state of knowledege in different disciplines are given: reactor physics, thermal-hydraulics, heat transfer, fracture mechanics, instrumental analysis, mathematical modelling. The purpose of this collection is to give a fair account of nuclear energy research at PSI. It should demonstrate that nuclear energy research is a central activity also in the new institute, the scientific basis for the continuing exploitation of nuclear power in Switzerland is preserved, work has continued not only along established lines but also new research topics were tackled, the quality of work corresponds to international standards and in selected areas is in the forefront, the expertise acquired also finds applications in non-nuclear research tasks. (author) 92 figs., 18 tabs., 316 refs

  17. Environmental Research Program. 1994 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, N.J.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of the Environmental Research Program is to enhance the understanding of, and mitigate the effects of pollutants on health, ecological systems, global and regional climate, and air quality. The program is multi-disciplinary and includes fundamental research and development in efficient and environmentally-benign combustion, pollutant abatement and destruction, and novel methods of detection and analysis of criteria and non-criteria pollutants. This diverse group conducts investigations in combustion, atmospheric and marine processes, flue-gas chemistry, and ecological systems.

  18. Barriers to research utilisation among forensic mental health nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrion, Maria; Woods, Phil; Norman, Ian

    2004-08-01

    This study used a cross-sectional, descriptive design to identify barriers to research utilisation among forensic mental health nurses. A postal questionnaire was sent to the total population of 88 registered nurses working in a forensic mental health hospital in the UK. Forty-seven responded representing a response rate of 53%. Results showed that the greatest barriers to research utilisation were those related to the characteristics of the setting in which nurses work or the personal characteristics of nurses themselves, which seems to be consistent with previous studies undertaken in the area. However, the nurses reported it especially difficult to trust what research shows because they feel that it is not always possible to apply those findings to their particular work environment. The main implications for policy are a need for an increase in support from management, programmes of advanced education to provide nurses with research skills, an improvement in accessibility and availability of research reports and an increase in time available to read and implement research. The main suggestions for future research are that qualitative studies should be carried out to attain a better understanding of mental health nurses' attitudes towards research utilisation. Copyright 2004 Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Internet of Things Healthcare Market Research Report

    OpenAIRE

    Vijay

    2018-01-01

    The global IoT in healthcare market is growing at a significant rate, due to increasing demand for advanced healthcare information system, and growing prevalence of chronic and lifestyle associated diseases. In addition, the growing need for remote patient monitoring services, increasing demand of mHealth technologies, and increasing support from government organizations are also driving the growth of the global IoT in healthcare market. Explore Report with Detailed TOC at: https://www.ps...

  20. IAEA research contracts. Second annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1962-01-01

    During the period in which the Agency's research programme has been operative, nearly 150 research contracts have been placed with institutions in 35 Member States. While considerable emphasis was placed initially on research of a more fundamental nature - as reflected by the summaries presented herein of work under contracts awarded in the early stages of the programme - recent policy has shifted the major emphasis toward research of a practical nature, as the results of this type of research are likely to be of more immediate interest to Member States, and particularly to the developing nations. In every case, the summary of the contractor's final report has been prepared by that member of the Agency's scientific staff who has been closely connected with that particular subject of research. Thus, the scientific data reported in the summary remain the responsibility of the contractor, the Agency being responsible for any additional observations. The reports of the following contracts are included: Research Contract No. 1, Factors controlling the distribution of fission products in the biosphere; Research Contract No. 4, The development of a method of non-destructive analysis to determine the U-235 and Pu content of irradiated fuel elements that are in storage under water and that have been out of the reactor for periods of more than one month; Research Contract No. 5, Non-destructive method for evaluating the U-235 and Pu content of irradiated fuel elements; Research Contract No. 19, Studies of contamination in local marine resources, and more specifically the determination of horizontal and vertical diffusion rates in Suruga Bay; Research Contract No. 22, A study of the uptake, accumulation and loss of radioactive material by marine bacteria; Research Contract No. 26, (a) Red cell life span in patients with congenital or acquired haemolytic anaemia using Cr-51 and pie-operative spleen scanning; (b) The aeriology of tropical iron deficiency anaemia using Fe-59 in

  1. IAEA research contracts. Second annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1962-07-01

    During the period in which the Agency's research programme has been operative, nearly 150 research contracts have been placed with institutions in 35 Member States. While considerable emphasis was placed initially on research of a more fundamental nature - as reflected by the summaries presented herein of work under contracts awarded in the early stages of the programme - recent policy has shifted the major emphasis toward research of a practical nature, as the results of this type of research are likely to be of more immediate interest to Member States, and particularly to the developing nations. In every case, the summary of the contractor's final report has been prepared by that member of the Agency's scientific staff who has been closely connected with that particular subject of research. Thus, the scientific data reported in the summary remain the responsibility of the contractor, the Agency being responsible for any additional observations. The reports of the following contracts are included: Research Contract No. 1, Factors controlling the distribution of fission products in the biosphere; Research Contract No. 4, The development of a method of non-destructive analysis to determine the U-235 and Pu content of irradiated fuel elements that are in storage under water and that have been out of the reactor for periods of more than one month; Research Contract No. 5, Non-destructive method for evaluating the U-235 and Pu content of irradiated fuel elements; Research Contract No. 19, Studies of contamination in local marine resources, and more specifically the determination of horizontal and vertical diffusion rates in Suruga Bay; Research Contract No. 22, A study of the uptake, accumulation and loss of radioactive material by marine bacteria; Research Contract No. 26, (a) Red cell life span in patients with congenital or acquired haemolytic anaemia using Cr-51 and pie-operative spleen scanning; (b) The aeriology of tropical iron deficiency anaemia using Fe-59 in

  2. Upper Atmosphere Research Report Number 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1946-12-30

    as a whol,. The history of the program was given in some detail in the first report*. The part of the Naval Research Laboratory in upper atmosphere...5B and 6. The third gage was installed as a service to the spectroscopy program. The gago elements were simply 6 watt, 110 volt Mazda pilot *1 lamps

  3. Ethnicity and Politics. IRSS Research Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Mark

    This research report examines the role of ethnicity in politics. The concept of ethnicity encompasses at least four distinct dimensions: nationality identification, religious identification, old vs. new ethnic stock, and racial membership. In the national sample analyzed, several interesting patterns of ethnic differentiation emerged. First, none…

  4. PSI nuclear energy research progress report 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alder, H.P.; Wiedemann, K.H.

    1989-01-01

    This report gives on overview on the PSI's nuclear energy research in the field of reactor physics and systems, thermal-hydraulics, materials technology and nuclear processes, waste management program and LWR safety program. It contains also papers dealing with reactor safety, high temperature materials, decontamination, radioactive waste management and materials testing. 74 figs., 20 tabs., 256 refs

  5. Progress report on research and development 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Description of the main fields of work: Fast breeder project, separation nozzle process, fusion technology, reprocessing and waste treatment project, deep storage, nuclear safety project; nuclear safeguards, cryogenic technology; data processing and systems analysis; application of nuclear methods; fundamental research. Institutions in the field of science a technology. Publications and primary reports. (HP) [de

  6. Research in theoretical physics. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domokos, G.; Kovesi-Domokos, S.

    1998-06-01

    This report summarizes the research carried out under Grant DE-FG02-85ER40211. The main topics covered are: astroparticle physics at very high and ultrahigh energies; search for new physics by means of detectors of ultrahigh energy particles of extraterrestrial origin. Methods for searching in heavy quark decays for signatures of physics beyond the standard model are developed

  7. Research in theoretical physics. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domokos, G.; Kovesi-Domokos, S.

    1998-06-01

    This report summarizes the research carried out under Grant DE-FG02-85ER40211. The main topics covered are: astroparticle physics at very high and ultrahigh energies; search for new physics by means of detectors of ultrahigh energy particles of extraterrestrial origin. Methods for searching in heavy quark decays for signatures of physics beyond the standard model are developed.

  8. The politics of researching global health politics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushton, Simon

    2015-01-01

    In this comment, I build on Shiffman’s call for the global health community to more deeply investigate structural and productive power. I highlight two challenges we must grapple with as social scientists carrying out the types of investigation that Shiffman proposes: the politics of challenging the powerful; and the need to investigate types of expertise that have traditionally been thought of as ‘outside’ global health. In doing so, I argue that moving forward with the agenda Shiffman sets out requires social scientists interested in the global politics of health to be reflexive about our own exercise of structural and productive power and the fact that researching global health politics is itself a political undertaking. PMID:25905482

  9. Desegregating health statistics and health research in South Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. This article aims: (I) to re-examine the use and usefulness of categorisation based on 'race'. ethnicity and 'population group' membership in public heatth research; and (ii) to assess the consequences of using these categories for describing, analysing and redressing disparities in health within South Africa The ...

  10. National Institutes of Health, Office of Research on Women's Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... scientists performing preclinical research to approaches for considering sex as a biological variable. Read the article. Pinn Symposium Celebrates Women’s Contributions to Health Read article Watch video Read event summary (PDF - 293.5KB) ORWH Director ...

  11. Program nuclear safety research: report 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muehl, B.

    2001-09-01

    The reactor safety R and D work of forschungszentrum karlsruhe (FZK) had been part of the nuclear safety research project (PSF) since 1990. In 2000, a new organisational structure was introduced and the Nuclear Safety Research Project was transferred into the nuclear safety research programme (NUKLEAR). In addition to the three traditional main topics - Light Water Reactor safety, Innovative systems, Studies related to the transmutation of actinides -, the new Programme NUKLEAR also covers Safety research related to final waste storage and Immobilisation of HAW. These new topics, however, will only be dealt with in the next annual report. Some tasks related to the traditional topics have been concluded and do no longer appear in the annual report; other tasks are new and are described for the first time. Numerous institutes of the research centre contribute to the work programme, as well as several external partners. The tasks are coordinated in agreement with internal and external working groups. The contributions to this report, which are either written in German or in English, correspond to the status of early/mid 2001. (orig.)

  12. Health physics, 1991 progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahl, L.

    1992-12-01

    At Los Alamos National Laboratory, radiation protection services are provided by HS-1, -4, and -12, and technical support is provided to Laboratory groups that work with significant quantities of fissile material by HS-6. The mission of all these groups is to protect Laboratory workers, the public, and the environment from radiation associated with Laboratory operations. In this report, 1991 radiation protection performance trends are presented. These data show that, in general, the collective external dose equivalent quantities from penetrating (gamma, x-ray, and neutron) radiation and from nonpenetrating (beta and low-energy photon) radiation decreased over most of 199 1. In general, the number of confirmed contaminations of skin and personal clothing increased in the first quarter of 1991 but decreased markedly in subsequent quarters. Finally, there were no confirmed intakes (through ingestion or inhalation) of radioactive material at eight facilities in all of 1991. The 1991 radiation protection activities of the Laboratory, conducted at both the Nevada Test Site and at Los Alamos, are presented and discussed. These activities include extemal dosimetry, internal dosimetry, radiation-monitoring instrumentation, sample analyses, workplace monitoring, radioactive air emissions management, nuclear criticality safety, radiological emergency response, radiological training, radiological audits and investigations, and radiological records. This report details routine activities, including any significant changes and improvements in 1991; additional activities, including special investigations, studies, and reviews; publications and presentations; and professional activities, including professional memberships, training received, and conferences attended

  13. Revisiting the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results Cancer Registry and Medicare Health Outcomes Survey (SEER-MHOS) Linked Data Resource for Patient-Reported Outcomes Research in Older Adults with Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Erin E; Malinoff, Rochelle; Rozjabek, Heather M; Ambs, Anita; Clauser, Steven B; Topor, Marie A; Yuan, Gigi; Burroughs, James; Rodgers, Anne B; DeMichele, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    Researchers and clinicians are increasingly recognizing the value of patient-reported outcome (PRO) data to better characterize people's health and experiences with illness and care. Considering the rising prevalence of cancer in adults aged 65 and older, PRO data are particularly relevant for older adults with cancer, who often require complex cancer care and have additional comorbid conditions. A data linkage between the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) cancer registry and the Medicare Health Outcomes Survey (MHOS) was created through a partnership between the National Cancer Institute and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services that created the opportunity to examine PROs in Medicare Advantage enrollees with and without cancer. The December 2013 linkage of SEER-MHOS data included the linked data for 12 cohorts, bringing the number of individuals in the linked data set to 95,723 with cancer and 1,510,127 without. This article reviews the features of the resource and provides information on some descriptive characteristics of the individuals in the data set (health-related quality of life, body mass index, fall risk management, number of unhealthy days in the past month). Individuals without (n=258,108) and with (n=3,440) cancer (1,311 men with prostate cancer, 982 women with breast cancer, 689 with colorectal cancer, 458 with lung cancer) were included in the current descriptive analysis. Given increasing longevity, advances in effective therapies and earlier detection, and population growth, the number of individuals aged 65 and older with cancer is expected to reach more than 12 million by 2020. SEER-MHOS provides population-level, self-reported, cancer registry-linked data for person-centered surveillance research on this growing population. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  14. What research impacts do Australian primary health care researchers expect and achieve?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reed Richard L

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Funding for research is under pressure to be accountable in terms of benefits and translation of research findings into practice and policy. Primary health care research has considerable potential to improve health care in a wide range of settings, but little is known about the extent to which these impacts actually occur. This study examines the impact of individual primary health care research projects on policy and practice from the perspective of Chief Investigators (CIs. Methods The project used an online survey adapted from the Buxton and Hanney Payback Framework to collect information about the impacts that CIs expected and achieved from primary health care research projects funded by Australian national competitive grants. Results and Discussion Chief Investigators (CIs provided information about seventeen completed projects. While no CI expected their project to have an impact in every domain of the framework used in the survey, 76% achieved at least half the impacts they expected. Sixteen projects had published and/or presented their work, 10 projects included 11 doctorate awards in their research capacity domain. All CIs expected their research to lead to further research opportunities with 11 achieving this. Ten CIs achieved their expectation of providing information for policy making but only four reported their research had influenced policy making. However 11 CIs achieved their expectation of providing information for organizational decision making and eight reported their research had influenced organizational decision making. Conclusion CIs reported that nationally funded primary health care research projects made an impact on knowledge production, staff development and further research, areas within the realm of influence of the research team and within the scope of awareness of the CIs. Some also made an impact on policy and organizational decision-making, and on localized clinical practice and service

  15. Research program on regulatory safety research - Synthesis report 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mailaender, R

    2009-06-01

    This report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) summarises the program's main points of interest, work done in the year 2008 and the results obtained. The main points of the research program, which is co-ordinated by the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate ENSI, are discussed. Topics covered concern reactor safety as well as human, organisational and safety aspects. Work done in several areas concerning reactor safety and materials as well as interactions in severe accidents in light-water reactors is described. Radiation protection, the transport and disposal of radioactive wastes and safety culture are also looked at. Finally, national and international co-operation is briefly looked at and work to be done in 2009 is reviewed. The report is completed with a list of research and development projects co-ordinated by ENSI

  16. Research and Development Annual Report, 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Issued as a companion to Johnson Space Center's Research and Technology Annual Report, which reports JSC accomplishments under NASA Research and Technology Operating Plan (RTOP) funding, this report describes 42 additional JSC projects that are funded through sources other than the RTOP. Emerging technologies in four major disciplines are summarized: space systems technology, medical and life sciences, mission operations, and computer systems. Although these projects focus on support of human spacecraft design, development, and safety, most have wide civil and commercial applications in areas such as advanced materials, superconductors, advanced semiconductors, digital imaging, high density data storage, high performance computers, optoelectronics, artificial intelligence, robotics and automation, sensors, biotechnology, medical devices and diagnosis, and human factors engineering.

  17. CNRS researchers' popularization activities: a progress report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves Croissant

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available We have analyzed the popularization activities undertaken by ten thousand CNRS researchers by means of their annual reports for the years 2004, 2005 and 2006. This is the first time that such an extensive statistical study on science popularization practices is carried out. Our main findings are : - the majority of researchers is not involved in popularization (51% has not done any popularization over the three-year period, two thirds have been involved in no more than one popularization action. - popularization practices are extremely diverse, both at the individual level (we have identified three subpopulations that feature distinctive attitudes towards popularization, and at the level of scientific disciplines (researchers in Humanities are twice as active as the average, as well as in laboratories or geographical regions. - the number of actions reported in 2005 greatly increased compared to 2004 (+ 26%, while they slightly diminished in 2006.

  18. A systematic evaluation of payback of publicly funded health and health services research in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Doris SY

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Health and Health Services Research Fund (HHSRF is dedicated to support research related to all aspects of health and health services in Hong Kong. We evaluated the fund's outcomes and explored factors associated with the translation of research findings to changes in health policy and provider behaviour. Methods A locally suitable questionnaire was developed based on the "payback" evaluation framework and was sent to principal investigators of the completed research projects supported by the fund since 1993. Research "payback" in six outcome areas was surveyed, namely knowledge production, use of research in the research system, use of research project findings in health system policy/decision making, application of the research findings through changed behaviour, factors influencing the utilization of research, and health/health service/economic benefits. Results Principal investigators of 178 of 205 (87% completed research projects returned the questionnaire. Investigators reported research publications in 86.5% (mean = 5.4 publications per project, career advancement 34.3%, acquisition of higher qualifications 38.2%, use of results in policy making 35.4%, changed behaviour in light of findings 49.4%, evidence of health service benefit 42.1% and generated subsequent research in 44.9% of the projects. Payback outcomes were positively associated with the amount of funding awarded. Multivariate analysis found participation of investigators in policy committees and liaison with potential users were significantly associated with reported health service benefit (odds ratio [OR]participation = 2.86, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.28–6.40; ORliaison = 2.03, 95% CI 1.05–3.91, policy and decision-making (ORparticipation = 10.53, 95% CI 4.13–26.81; ORliaison = 2.52, 95% CI 1.20–5.28, and change in behavior (ORparticipation = 3.67, 95% CI 1.53–8.81. Conclusion The HHSRF has produced substantial outcomes and compared

  19. Translational Science Research: Towards Better Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emir Festic

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Even though it is considered a 21st century term, translational research has been present for much longer. Idea of translating experimental discovery to its’ clinical application and use is old as research itself. However, it is the understanding of missing links between the basic science research and clinical research that emerged in the past decade and mobilized scientific and clinical communities and organizations worldwide. Hence term, translational research, which represents an “enterprise of harnessing knowledge from basic sciences to produce new drugs, devices, and treatment options for patients” (1. It has been also characterized as “effective translation of the new knowledge, mechanisms, and techniques generated by advances in basic science research into new approaches for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disease, which is essential for improving health” (2.This translation is a complex process and involves more than one step for transfer of research knowledge. At least 3 such roadblocks have been identified (Figure 1 ; T1 translation: “The transfer of new understandings of disease mechanisms gained in the laboratory into the development of new methods for diagnosis, therapy, and prevention and their first testing in humans”, T2 translation: “The translation of results from clinical studies into everyday clinical practice and health decision making”, and T3 translation: “Practice-based research, which is often necessary before distilled knowledge (e.g., systematic reviews, guidelines can be implemented in practice” (3-5.The international research community rapidly recognized importance for promotion of translational research and made it their priority(5. In the USA, National Institutes of Health, (NIH expects to fund 60 translational research centers with a budget of $500 million per year by 2012 (6. Besides academic centers, foundations, industry, disease-related organizations, and individual hospitals and

  20. Research engagement of health sciences librarians: a survey of research-related activities and attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessick, Susan; Perryman, Carol; Billman, Brooke L; Alpi, Kristine M; De Groote, Sandra L; Babin, Ted D

    2016-04-01

    The extent to which health sciences librarians are engaged in research is a little-studied question. This study assesses the research activities and attitudes of Medical Library Association (MLA) members, including the influence of work affiliation. An online survey was designed using a combination of multiple-choice and open-ended questions and distributed to MLA members. Responses were analyzed using descriptive statistics, content analysis, and significance testing. The authors used statistical tools and categorized open-ended question topics by the constant comparative method, also applying the broad subject categories used in a prior study. Pearson's chi-square analysis was performed on responses to determine significant differences among respondents employed in three different institutional environments. Analysis showed that 79% of respondents read research articles at least once a month; 58% applied published research studies to practice; 44% had conducted research; 62% reported acting on research had enhanced their libraries; 38% had presented findings; and 34% had authored research articles. Hospital librarians were significantly less likely than academic librarians to have participated in research activities. Highly ranked research benefits, barriers, and competencies of health sciences librarians are described. Findings indicate that health sciences librarians are actively engaged in research activities. Practice implications for practitioners, publishers, and stakeholders are discussed. Results suggest that practitioners can use published research results and results from their own research to affect practice decisions and improve services. Future studies are needed to confirm and extend these findings, including the need for intervention studies to increase research and writing productivity.

  1. Systematic analysis of research underfunding in maternal and perinatal health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisk, N M; Atun, R

    2009-02-01

    Little published evidence supports the widely held contention that research in pregnancy is underfunded compared with other disease areas. To assess absolute and relative government and charitable funding for maternal and perinatal research in the UK and internationally. SEARCH STRATEGY, SELECTION CRITERIA, DATA COLLECTION, AND ANALYSIS: Major research funding bodies and alliances were identified from an Internet search and discussions with opinion leaders/senior investigators. Websites and annual reports were reviewed for details of strategy, research spend, grants awarded, and allocation to maternal and/or perinatal disease using generic and disease-specific search terms. Within the imprecision in the data sets, global philanthropy concentrated on service provision rather than research. Although research expenditure has been deemed as appropriate for 'reproductive health' disease burden in the UK, there are no data on the equity of maternal/perinatal research spend against disease burden, which globally may justify a manyfold increase. This systematic review of research expenditure and priorities from national and international funding bodies suggests relative underinvestment in maternal/perinatal health. Contributing factors include the low political priority given to women's health, the challenging nature of clinical research in pregnancy, and research capacity dearth as a consequence of chronic underinvestment.

  2. Health council report 'Antimicrobial growth promoters'.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goettsch, W; Degener, JE

    1999-01-01

    The Health Council of the Netherlands has issued a report on the risk of development of resistance among bacteria as result of the use of antibiotics as growth promotors in livestock farming. The committee appointed by the Health Council conclude that the use of antimicrobial growth promotors

  3. Armstrong Flight Research Center Research Technology and Engineering Report 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voracek, David F.

    2016-01-01

    I am honored to endorse the 2015 Neil A. Armstrong Flight Research Center’s Research, Technology, and Engineering Report. The talented researchers, engineers, and scientists at Armstrong are continuing a long, rich legacy of creating innovative approaches to solving some of the difficult problems and challenges facing NASA and the aerospace community.Projects at NASA Armstrong advance technologies that will improve aerodynamic efficiency, increase fuel economy, reduce emissions and aircraft noise, and enable the integration of unmanned aircraft into the national airspace. The work represented in this report highlights the Center’s agility to develop technologies supporting each of NASA’s core missions and, more importantly, technologies that are preparing us for the future of aviation and space exploration.We are excited about our role in NASA’s mission to develop transformative aviation capabilities and open new markets for industry. One of our key strengths is the ability to rapidly move emerging techniques and technologies into flight evaluation so that we can quickly identify their strengths, shortcomings, and potential applications.This report presents a brief summary of the technology work of the Center. It also contains contact information for the associated technologists responsible for the work. Don’t hesitate to contact them for more information or for collaboration ideas.

  4. Progress report, Health Sciences Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-11-01

    A re-designed automatic TLD reader has been constructed. The thermoluminescent material MgB 4 O 7 :Dy appears to be attractive for environmental gamma monitoring. The field prototype of a simple, light weight tritium monitor is being built, and field-tests of a pocket warning dosimeter have been completed. A computer program for the calculation of beta doses from point and plane sources has been used to calculate distributions for 90 nuclides. Research into the adsorption of 134 Cs, 60 Co and 90 Sr onto soil particles and processes associated with the release of these nuclides is continuing. Studies are being carried out into the culture of algae in municipal wastewater, heat and solute transfer in lakes, and groundwater seepage flow into lakes. Radiation biology work continues to deal with radiation damage of DNA and cellular repair mechanisms. A metabolic model for the tellurium-iodine decay chain has been completed. (LL)

  5. Increasing User Involvement in Health Care and Health Research Simultaneously

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Mette Kjer; Nielsen, Jesper Bo; Salkeld, Glenn

    2014-01-01

    of the effects of different actions and interventions on their health, including those implying contact with health care services. We see their research as primarily carried out in order to make better decisions for themselves, but they can offer to contribute the results to the wider population. We see...... at the point of decision need, when motivation is highest. Some basic distinctions, such as those between science and non-science, research and practice, community and individual, and lay and professional become somewhat blurred and may need to be rethought in light of this approach....... to increased user involvement, though somewhat more aligned with the former. METHODS: Our online decision support tools, delivered directly to the person in the community and openly accessible, are to be seen as research resources. They will take the form of interactive decision aids for a variety of specific...

  6. Health, safety and environment : annual report 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    A natural gas transmission and power services company, TransCanada Pipelines Limited operates approximately 38,000 kilometers of pipeline, thereby supplying the majority of natural gas production facilities in Western Canada. The company is also involved in the power generation industry by building, operating and owning interests in electric power plants. Located in Rhode Island, United States, the largest plant operated by TransCanada is a combined-cycle plant that generates in excess of 500 MW. TransCanada is committed to its health, safety and environment management system. The system is modeled after the elements of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 14001 which sets the standard for environmental management systems. Considerable efforts were expanded to implement programs and initiatives to protect the environment, such as the pipeline reclamation criteria, the hazardous materials and waste management, and proposed polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) regulations, which are currently under consideration by Environment Canada. TransCanada PipeLines Limited has also set up an environmental research program to enable management and workers to minimize the environmental impacts of the business. Its objectives are the enhancement of the health and safety of employees and their communities, the mitigation of effects on lands, air and water. The topics covered by the research are: vegetation and wildlife with several sub-categories. The company is concerned about the effects on climate change, and developed plans and strategies to manage the emissions of greenhouse gases. In the process, it was awarded several awards for its commitment, action and leadership on voluntary reduction program of greenhouse gases. Full-time resources are dedicated to illness prevention and health promotion, employee assistance programs, short and long term disability management and others. During the year 2000, TransCanada invested 4 million dollars in communities

  7. Transnational corporations and health: a research agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Frances Elaine; Margaret Anaf, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Transnational corporations (TNCs) are part of an economic system of global capitalism that operates under a neoliberal regime underpinned by strong support from international organisations such as the World Trade Organization, World Bank, and most nation states. Although TNCs have grown in power and influence and have had a significant impact on population health over the past three decades, public health has not developed an integrated research agenda to study them. This article outlines the shape of such an agenda and argues that it is vital that research into the public health impact of TNCs be pursued and funded as a matter of priority. The four areas of the agenda are: assessing the health and equity impacts of TNCs; evaluating the effectiveness of government regulation to mitigate health and equity impacts of TNCs; studying the work of activist groups and networks that highlight adverse impacts of TNCs; and considering how regulation of capitalism could better promote a healthier and more equitable corporate sector. © The Author(s) 2015 Reprints and permissions:]br]sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  8. Cocoa and health: a decade of research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Karen A; Donovan, Jennifer L; Waterhouse, Andrew L; Williamson, Gary

    2008-01-01

    It has been over 10 years since the first mention in a medical journal about cocoa and chocolate as potential sources of antioxidants for health. During this time, cocoa has been found to improve antioxidant status, reduce inflammation and correlate with reduced heart disease risk; with these results, and its popularity, it has received wide coverage in the press. However, after 10 years of research, what is known about the potential health benefits of cocoa and what are the important next steps in understanding this decadent source of antioxidants?

  9. An evaluation of rural health care research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, R; Dean, M; Solomon, M

    1979-05-01

    Reviews the state of the art of rural health research and evaluation in the U.S. with particular emphasis on the questions of access, health personnel, and financing. The current state of knowledge both in the published and unpublished literature in each area is summarized and a series of unresolved issues is proposed. A strategy for further research to include the various types of rural health care programs is described. Major findings suggest that, although rural populations do have somewhat less access to care than do urban populations, our ability to quantify precisely the extent and importance of this discrepancy is underdeveloped. Despite a substantial investment in a variety of rural health care programs there is inadequate information as to their effectiveness. Programs designed to increase the supply of health personnel to rural areas have met with mixed success. Sites staffed by National Health Service Corps personnel show consistently lower productivity than do sites under other sponsorship. Nonphysician personnel (physician assistants and nurse practitioners) offer a promising source of primary care for rural areas: recent legislation that reimburses such care should increase their utilization. A persistent problem is the expectation (often a mandate) incorporated into many rural health care demonstration efforts that the programs become financially self-sufficient in a finite period of time. Self-sufficiency is a function of utilization, productivity, and the ability to recover charges for services. In many instances stringent enforcement of the self-sufficiency requirement may mean those who need services most will be least likely to receive them.

  10. [Qualitative Research in Health Services Research - Discussion Paper, Part 3: Quality of Qualitative Research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamer, M; Güthlin, C; Holmberg, C; Karbach, U; Patzelt, C; Meyer, T

    2015-12-01

    The third and final discussion paper of the German Network of Health Services Research's (DNVF) "Qualitative Methods Working Group" demonstrates methods for the evaluation and quality of qualitative research in health services research. In this paper we discuss approaches described in evaluating qualitative studies, including: an orientation to the general principles of empirical research, an approach-specific course of action, as well as procedures based on the research-process and criteria-oriented approaches. Divided into general and specific aspects to be considered in a qualitative study quality evaluation, the central focus of the discussion paper undertakes an extensive examination of the process and criteria-oriented approaches. The general aspects include the participation of relevant groups in the research process as well as ethical aspects of the research and data protection issues. The more specific aspects in evaluating the quality of qualitative research include considerations about the research interest, research questions, and the selection of data collection methods and types of analyses. The formulated questions are intended to guide reviewers and researchers to evaluate and to develop qualitative research projects appropriately. The intention of this discussion paper is to ensure a transparent research culture, and to reflect on and discuss the methodological and research approach of qualitative studies in health services research. With this paper we aim to initiate a discussion on high quality evaluation of qualitative health services research. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Adult health study report, 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Hisao; Kodama, Kazunori; Shimizu, Yukiko; Kato, Hiroo.

    1987-02-01

    The AHS clinical examination is conducted biennially to determine disease (not limited to disease) prevalence rates. No inquiry is made about deaths occurring between the cycle examinations. Since there has been a remarkable difference in cancer mortality by radiation dose it must be stated that the effects of atomic bomb radiation cannot be adequately assessed through a comparison of cancer prevalence rates alone. Nonetheless, in this study, an association between the prevalence rates of various cancers and radiation has been demonstrated, particularly for cancers with a relatively low lethality rate. In this group are cancers of the thyroid and breast where the association is strong, particularly in the younger age-groups. An association continued to be observed for neoplasms of the lymphatic and hematopoietic tissues, and for all cancers excluding the foregoing, for which a demonstrable association to A-bomb exposure was made at an early stage. These are important findings. Further, analysis of benign tumors suggested an increase in prevalence associated with an increase in radiation dose, a finding which was not observed in the studies of autopsied cases. This finding raises a whole series of questions relating to radiation carcinogenesis. As for other diseases, strong association of increased prevalence with increased radiation dose was observed for various thyroid diseases, anemia, cataract, and calcification of the aorta. As for physical measurements and laboratory tests, relationships to radiation dose were observed concerning hemoglobin, hematocrit, erythrocyte sedimentatioin rate, and white blood cell count (WBC), in addition to growth and development retardation in the younger survivors as described in a previous report. In general, for many diseases and measurements, the association is stronger for those exposed at younger ages. Furthermore, some effects on the aging process are also suggested by the analysis. (author)

  12. Mobile mental health: a challenging research agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olff, Miranda

    2015-01-01

    The field of mobile health ("m-Health") is evolving rapidly and there is an explosive growth of psychological tools on the market. Exciting high-tech developments may identify symptoms, help individuals manage their own mental health, encourage help seeking, and provide both preventive and therapeutic interventions. This development has the potential to be an efficient cost-effective approach reducing waiting lists and serving a considerable portion of people globally ("g-Health"). However, few of the mobile applications (apps) have been rigorously evaluated. There is little information on how valid screening and assessment tools are, which of the mobile intervention apps are effective, or how well mobile apps compare to face-to-face treatments. But how feasible is rigorous scientific evaluation with the rising demands from policy makers, business partners, and users for their quick release? In this paper, developments in m-Health tools-targeting screening, assessment, prevention, and treatment-are reviewed with examples from the field of trauma and posttraumatic stress disorder. The academic challenges in developing and evaluating m-Health tools are being addressed. Evidence-based guidance is needed on appropriate research designs that may overcome some of the public and ethical challenges (e.g., equity, availability) and the market-driven wish to have mobile apps in the "App Store" yesterday rather than tomorrow.

  13. Environmental Systems Research FY-99 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.L.

    2000-01-01

    The Environmental Systems Research (ESR) Program, a part of the Environmental Systems Research and Analysis (ESRA) Program, was implemented to enhance and augment the technical capabilities of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The purpose for strengthening technical capabilities of the INEEL is to provide the technical base to serve effectively as the Environmental Management Laboratory for the Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management (EM). The original portfolio of research activities was assembled after an analysis of the EM technology development and science needs as gathered by the Site Technology Coordination Groups (STCGs) complex-wide. Current EM investments in science and technology throughout the research community were also included in this analysis to avoid duplication of efforts. This is a progress report for the second year of the ESR Program (Fiscal Year 99). A report of activities is presented for the five ESR research investment areas: (a) Transport Aspects of Selective Mass Transport Agents, (b) Chemistry of Environmental Surfaces, (c) Materials Dynamics, (d) Characterization Science, and (e) Computational Simulation of Mechanical and Chemical Systems. In addition to the five technical areas, activities in the Science and Technology Foundations element of the program, e.g., interfaces between ESR and the EM Science Program (EMSP) and the EM Focus Areas, are described

  14. Environmental Systems Research, FY-99 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, David Lynn

    2000-01-01

    The Environmental Systems Research (ESR) Program, a part of the Environmental Systems Research and Analysis (ESRA) Program, was implemented to enhance and augment the technical capabilities of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The purpose for strengthening technical capabilities of the INEEL is to provide the technical base to serve effectively as the Environmental Management Laboratory for the Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management (EM). The original portfolio of research activities was assembled after an analysis of the EM technology development and science needs as gathered by the Site Technology Coordination Groups (STCGs) complex-wide. Current EM investments in science and technology throughout the research community were also included in this analysis to avoid duplication of efforts. This is a progress report for the second year of the ESR Program (Fiscal Year 99). A report of activities is presented for the five ESR research investment areas: (a) Transport Aspects of Selective Mass Transport Agents, (b) Chemistry of Environmental Surfaces, (c) Materials Dynamics, (d) Characterization Science, and (e) Computational Simulation of Mechanical and Chemical Systems. In addition to the five technical areas, activities in the Science and Technology Foundations element of the program, e.g., interfaces between ESR and the EM Science Program (EMSP) and the EM Focus Areas, are described.

  15. Environmental Systems Research FY-99 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, D.L.

    2000-01-01

    The Environmental Systems Research (ESR) Program, a part of the Environmental Systems Research and Analysis (ESRA) Program, was implemented to enhance and augment the technical capabilities of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The purpose for strengthening technical capabilities of the INEEL is to provide the technical base to serve effectively as the Environmental Management Laboratory for the Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management (EM). The original portfolio of research activities was assembled after an analysis of the EM technology development and science needs as gathered by the Site Technology Coordination Groups (STCGs) complex-wide. Current EM investments in science and technology throughout the research community were also included in this analysis to avoid duplication of efforts. This is a progress report for the second year of the ESR Program (Fiscal Year 99). A report of activities is presented for the five ESR research investment areas: (a) Transport Aspects of Selective Mass Transport Agents, (b) Chemistry of Environmental Surfaces, (c) Materials Dynamics, (d) Characterization Science, and (e) Computational Simulation of Mechanical and Chemical Systems. In addition to the five technical areas, activities in the Science and Technology Foundations element of the program, e.g., interfaces between ESR and the EM Science Program (EMSP) and the EM Focus Areas, are described.

  16. Environmental Public Health Indicators Impact Report: Data and methods that support environmental public health decision-making by communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report presents the results of twenty competitively funded Science-To-Achieve-Results (STAR) grants in EPA's Environmental Public Health Indicators (EPHI) research program. The grantsdirectly supported health interventions, informed policy and decision-making, and improved t...

  17. 83-inch cyclotron research program. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkinson, W.C.

    1983-07-01

    In June of 1960 the US Atomic Energy Commission authorized the construction of a modern variable energy cyclotron facility at The University of Michigan to be used for research in nuclear spectroscopy. The Legislature of the State of Michigan made available funds for construction of a building to house the 83-inch cyclotron and auxiliary equipment as well as the University's remodeled 42-inch cyclotron. The research program centered around the 83-inch cyclotron was funded by the AEC and its successors, the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) and the Department of Energy (DOE), from September 1964 through March 1977. The program represented a continuation of the research effort using the 42-inch cyclotron facility which had been supported continuously by the AEC since February 1950. This final report to DOE briefly describes the research facility, the research program, and highlights the principal accomplishments of the effort. It begins with a historical note to place this effort within the context of nuclear physics research in the Department of Physics of the University of Michigan

  18. Research & Technology Report Goddard Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soffen, Gerald A. (Editor); Truszkowski, Walter (Editor); Ottenstein, Howard (Editor); Frost, Kenneth (Editor); Maran, Stephen (Editor); Walter, Lou (Editor); Brown, Mitch (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    The main theme of this edition of the annual Research and Technology Report is Mission Operations and Data Systems. Shifting from centralized to distributed mission operations, and from human interactive operations to highly automated operations is reported. The following aspects are addressed: Mission planning and operations; TDRSS, Positioning Systems, and orbit determination; hardware and software associated with Ground System and Networks; data processing and analysis; and World Wide Web. Flight projects are described along with the achievements in space sciences and earth sciences. Spacecraft subsystems, cryogenic developments, and new tools and capabilities are also discussed.

  19. RESEARCH ON ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH INTERVENTIONS: ETHICAL PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    RESNIK, DAVID B.; ZELDIN, DARRYL C.; SHARP, RICHARD R.

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews a variety of ethical issues one must consider when conducting research on environmental health interventions on human subjects. The paper uses the Kennedy Krieger Institute lead abatement study as well as a hypothetical asthma study to discuss questions concerning benefits and risks, risk minimization, safety monitoring, the duty to warn, the duty to report, the use of control groups, informed consent, equitable subject selection, privacy, conflicts of interest, and community consultation. Research on environmental health interventions can make an important contribution to our understanding of human health and disease prevention, provided it is conducted in a manner that meets prevailing scientific, ethical, and legal standards for research on human subjects. PMID:16220621

  20. ELSA for Children Legal Research Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ó Cathaoir, Katharina Eva

    In order to support the Council of Europe ONE in FIVE Campaign to stop sexual violence against children, to contribute to the protection of children’s rights in Europe and to increase the awareness of law students on the subject, ELSA created a network-wide Legal Research Group (LRG) called ‘ELSA...... for Children’. Throughout 2012, 250 students from 23 countries carried out research on the implementation of European and international instruments protecting children against violence and sexual abuse. The project resulted in a final report compiling national data on the different definitions and legal...