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Sample records for health preparing residents

  1. The Health Professions Education Pathway: Preparing Students, Residents, and Fellows to Become Future Educators.

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    Chen, H Carrie; Wamsley, Maria A; Azzam, Amin; Julian, Katherine; Irby, David M; O'Sullivan, Patricia S

    2017-01-01

    Training the next generation of health professionals requires leaders, innovators, and scholars in education. Although many medical schools and residencies offer education electives or tracks focused on developing teaching skills, these programs often omit educational innovation, scholarship, and leadership and are narrowly targeted to one level of learner. The University of California San Francisco created the Health Professions Education Pathway for medical students, residents, and fellows as well as learners from other health professional schools. The Pathway applies the theoretical framework of communities of practice in its curricular design to promote learner identity formation as future health professions educators. It employs the strategies of engagement, imagination, and alignment for identity formation. Through course requirements, learners engage and work with members of the educator community of practice to develop the knowledge and skills required to participate in the community. Pathway instructors are faculty members who model a breadth of educator careers to help learners imagine personal trajectories. Last, learners complete mentored education projects, adopting scholarly methods and ethics to align with the broader educator community of practice. From 2009 to 2014, 117 learners participated in the Pathway. Program evaluations, graduate surveys, and web-based searches revealed positive impacts on learner career development. Learners gained knowledge and skills for continued engagement with the educator community of practice, confirmed their career aspirations (imagination), joined an educator-in-training community (engagement/imagination), and disseminated via scholarly meetings and peer-reviewed publications (alignment). Learners identified engagement with the learner community as the most powerful aspect of the Pathway; it provided peer support for imagining and navigating the development of their dual identities in the clinician and educator

  2. Providing culturally competent care: residents in HRSA Title VII funded residency programs feel better prepared.

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    Green, Alexander R; Betancourt, Joseph R; Park, Elyse R; Greer, Joseph A; Donahue, Elizabeth J; Weissman, Joel S

    2008-11-01

    The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) funds primary care residency programs through its Title VII training grants, with a goal of ensuring a well-prepared, culturally competent physician workforce. The authors sought to determine whether primary care residents in Title VII-funded training programs feel better prepared than those in nonfunded programs to provide care to culturally diverse patients. The authors analyzed data from a national mailed survey of senior resident physicians conducted in 2003-2004. Of 1,467 randomly selected family medicine, internal medicine, and pediatrics residents, 866 responded--403 in Title VII-funded programs and 463 in nonfunded programs (response rate = 59%). The survey included 28 Likert-response questions about residents' preparedness and perceived skills to provide cross-cultural care, sociodemographics, and residency characteristics. Residents in Title VII-funded programs were more likely than others to report being prepared to provide cross-cultural care across all 8 measures (odds ratio [OR] = 1.54-2.61, P experience related to cross-cultural care (e.g., role models, cross-cultural training, and attitudes of attending physicians) accounted for many of the differences in self-reported preparedness and skills. Senior residents in HRSA Title VII-funded primary care residency training programs feel better prepared than others to provide culturally competent care. This may be partially explained by better cross-cultural training experiences in HRSA Title VII-funded programs.This article is part of a theme issue of Academic Medicine on the Title VII health professions training programs.

  3. Student Preparation for PGY1 Residency Training by US Colleges of Pharmacy: Survey of the Residency Program Director Perspective.

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    Mutz, Alyssa B; Beyer, Jacob; Dickson, Whitney L; Gutman, Irina; Yucebay, Filiz; Lepkowsky, Marcie; Chan, Juliana; Carter, Kristen; Shaffer, Christopher L; Fuller, Patrick D

    2017-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate current residents' level of preparation by US colleges of pharmacy for postgraduate year 1 (PGY1) residency training from the perspective of residency program directors (RPDs). Methods: RPDs were asked in an electronic survey questionnaire to rate PGY1 pharmacy residents' abilities in 4 domains: communication, clinical knowledge, interpersonal/time-management skills, and professionalism/leadership. Results: One hundred ninety-seven RPDs of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP)-accredited PGY1 programs completed the survey. The majority of RPDs strongly agreed or agreed that residents were prepared as students to effectively communicate both verbally and nonverbally, were able to appropriately respond to drug inquiries using drug resources and literature searches, and consistently displayed professionalism. Respondents were more likely to disagree or give a neutral response when asked about residents' understanding of biostatistics and their ability to provide enteral and parenteral nutritional support for patients. Conclusion: Overall, RPDs agreed that residents were prepared to perform the majority of the tasks of each of the 4 domains assessed in this survey relating to PGY1 training. RPDs may use the results of this survey to provide additional support for their residents in the areas in which residents lack adequate preparation, while colleges of pharmacy may focus on incorporating more time in their curriculum for certain areas to better prepare their students for residency training.

  4. Ambulatory Care Skills: Do Residents Feel Prepared?

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    Denise Bonds

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine resident comfort and skill in performing ambulatory care skills. Methods: Descriptive survey of common ambulatory care skills administered to internal medicine faculty and residents at one academic medical center. Respondents were asked to rate their ability to perform 12 physical exam skills and 6 procedures, and their comfort in performing 7 types of counseling, and obtaining 6 types of patient history (4 point Likert scale for each. Self-rated ability or comfort was compared by gender, status (year of residency, faculty, and future predicted frequency of use of the skill. Results: Residents reported high ability levels for physical exam skills common to both the ambulatory and hospital setting. Fewer felt able to perform musculoskeletal, neurologic or eye exams easily alone. Procedures generally received low ability ratings. Similarly, residents’ comfort in performing common outpatient counseling was also low. More residents reported feeling very comfortable in obtaining history from patients. We found little variation by gender, year of training, or predicted frequency of use. Conclusion: Self-reported ability and comfort for many common ambulatory care skills is low. Further evaluation of this finding in other training programs is warranted.

  5. Preparing Psychiatric Residents for the "Real World": A Practice Management Curriculum

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    Wichman, Christina L.; Netzel, Pamela J.; Menaker, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe a course designed for residents to develop the knowledge and skills necessary to collaborate and successfully compete in today's complex health care environment and to achieve competency in systems-based practice. Methods: Postgraduation surveys demonstrated a need for improvement in preparing residents for practice…

  6. Resident and Residency Characteristics Associated With Self-reported Preparedness for Population Health Management.

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    Schuster, Erica K; Peterson, Lars E

    2017-11-01

    Population health management (PHM) is an important function of primary care with potential to improve outcomes and decrease costs, but is also among the most difficult strategies to implement in both practices and residency training. Our objective was to determine resident and residency program characteristics associated with graduates' reported preparation to perform PHM. We used data from the American Board of Family Medicine (ABFM) Certification Examination registration questionnaire in 2014 and 2015 and ABFM administrative data. Resident PHM preparedness was assessed via a single, self-reported question. Bivariate analysis and logistic multilevel regression were performed to determine independent associations between characteristics and reported PHM preparedness. Odds ratios were converted to risk ratios given the high prevalence of the outcome. Our sample included 6,135 residents from 442 family medicine residencies. Sixty-nine percent (n=4,240) reported being extremely or moderately prepared to perform PHM. No residency program characteristics showed an association with reported PHM preparedness. Resident characteristics independently associated with reported preparedness included being an international medical graduate (IMG) (RR=1.21 [1.07-1.35]) and of Hispanic ethnicity. Reporting greater preparedness to use health information tools, to lead quality improvement projects, and to provide care in different settings were also associated with reported PHM preparedness. Similar to a study of practicing physicians, we found that IMGs are more likely to report preparedness to perform PHM. This suggests that elements of international medical education may better inculcate PHM principles, and that these elements could be used to produce physicians better prepared to manage population health.

  7. Personal health care of internal medicine residents.

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    Palabindala, Venkataraman; Foster, Paul; Kanduri, Swetha; Doppalapudi, Avanthi; Pamarthy, Amaleswari; Kovvuru, Karthik

    2011-01-01

    Medical residents, as part of their job to balance the demands of their work with caring for themselves so as to be mentally, emotionally, and physically sound to stay clinically competent. While regulatory and legislative attempts at limiting medical resident work hours have materialized but have yet to attain passage, there are fairly little data looking into how residents cope up with their demands and yet attend to their own personal health. Anonymous mailed survey. Three hundred and thirty-seven residents from all internal medicine residency programs within United States. We conducted a survey in the form of a questionnaire that was sent by e-mail to the program directors of various internal medicine residency programs within the United States, and responses were collected between May 19 and June 21, 2009. Response was well appreciated with total number of participants of 337 with even demographical distribution in gender, residency year, AMG/IMG, age group. Seventy-one percent of the residents felt that they would prefer getting admitted to their own hospital for any acute medical or surgical condition. Of the 216 residents who have had received health care in the past, almost half of them chose their own hospital because of the proximity, while 45% did not choose their own hospital despite proximity. Two out of three residents missed their doctors appointments or cancelled them due to demands of medical training. Only half of the residents have a primary care physician and almost 80% of them did not have their yearly health checkup. Close to 30% held back information regarding their social and sexual history from their provider because of privacy and confidentiality concerns. Eighty percent of residents never received information about barriers that physicians may face in obtaining care for their socially embarrassing conditions. Seventy percent felt that their performance then was suboptimal because of that health condition and also felt sick but did not

  8. Preparing students for clerkship: a resident shadowing program.

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    Turner, Simon R; White, Jonathan; Poth, Cheryl; Rogers, W Todd

    2012-09-01

    The preparation of medical students for clerkship has been criticized, in terms of both students understanding of their new role as clinical trainees and their ability to carry out that role. To begin to address this gap, the authors report the development, implementation, and assessment of a novel program in which first-year medical students shadow first-year residents during their clinical duties. The program matches each student to a single resident, whom they shadow for several hours, once per month, for eight months. In the programs inaugural year (2009-10), 83 student-resident pairs participated; over 70% responded to pre- and post-intervention questionnaires, which included an 18-item preparedness scale. The authors used those responses to evaluate the program. Compared to students in a control group, the students in the program assessed themselves as better prepared to learn in a clinical setting. The low-cost student-resident shadowing program described in this article provided an early and structured introduction to the clinical environment, which may help prepare students for the transition into clerkship.

  9. Teaching immigrant and refugee health to residents: domestic global health.

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    Asgary, Ramin; Smith, Clyde Lanford; Sckell, Blanca; Paccione, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    Half a million immigrants enter the United States annually. Clinical providers generally lack training in immigrant health. We developed a curriculum with didactic, clinical, and analytic components to advance residents' skills in immigrant and travel health. The curriculum focused on patients and their countries of origin and encompassed (a) societal, cultural, economical, and human rights profiles; (b) health system/ policies/resources/statistics, and environmental health; and (c) clinical manifestations, tropical and travel health. Residents evaluated sociocultural health beliefs and human rights abuses; performed history and physical examinations while precepted by faculty; developed specific care plans; and discussed patients in a dedicated immigrant health morning report. We assessed resident satisfaction using questionnaires and focus groups. Residents (n=20) found clinical, sociocultural, and epidemiological components the most helpful. Morning reports reinforced peer education. The immigrant health curriculum was useful for residents. Multiple teaching modules, collaboration with grassroot organizations, and an ongoing clinical component were key features.

  10. Personal health care of internal medicine residents

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    Venkataraman Palabindala

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Medical residents, as part of their job to balance the demands of their work with caring for themselves so as to be mentally, emotionally, and physically sound to stay clinically competent. While regulatory and legislative attempts at limiting medical resident work hours have materialized but have yet to attain passage, there are fairly little data looking into how residents cope up with their demands and yet attend to their own personal health.Anonymous mailed survey.Three hundred and thirty-seven residents from all internal medicine residency programs within United States.We conducted a survey in the form of a questionnaire that was sent by e-mail to the program directors of various internal medicine residency programs within the United States, and responses were collected between May 19 and June 21, 2009. Response was well appreciated with total number of participants of 337 with even demographical distribution in gender, residency year, AMG/IMG, age group. Seventy-one percent of the residents felt that they would prefer getting admitted to their own hospital for any acute medical or surgical condition. Of the 216 residents who have had received health care in the past, almost half of them chose their own hospital because of the proximity, while 45% did not choose their own hospital despite proximity. Two out of three residents missed their doctors appointments or cancelled them due to demands of medical training. Only half of the residents have a primary care physician and almost 80% of them did not have their yearly health checkup. Close to 30% held back information regarding their social and sexual history from their provider because of privacy and confidentiality concerns. Eighty percent of residents never received information about barriers that physicians may face in obtaining care for their socially embarrassing conditions. Seventy percent felt that their performance then was suboptimal because of that health condition and also felt

  11. [A clinical teaching course for residents improves self-perception about preparation to teach].

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    Reyes, Carlos; Florenzano, Pablo; Contreras, Alvaro; González, Alejandro; Beltrán, Daniela; Aravena, Carlos; Grassi, Bruno

    2012-11-01

    Medical doctors need to be competent to teach patients, their families, students, and the health care team. In a previous study we determined that although the residents attach great importance to have teaching skills, they do not feel prepared to meet this role. To assess self-perception of learning in a formal course of training how to teach for residents. In 2004 we implemented the course "Residents as Clinical Teachers", based on the Stanford Faculty Development Center for Medical Teachers Model (SFDC), for residents of a Medical School. Residents of all the post graduate programs were invited to take the course as an elective during the period 2004-2011. At the end of the course each resident completed the pre/post Seminar Series Housestaff/student Questionnaire; assessing perceptions of learning, expressed in a Likert scale from 1-5. The implementation of the course in 111 residents significantly improved self-perception of general preparation for teaching and improved self-perception of preparedness in each educational category. The personal goals most commonly established by participants were on feedback (52,2%), control of session (44%) and communication of goals (40%). Barriers for teaching most frequently identified were lack of time to do clinical teaching (51,3%) and environmental limitations (16,2%). The main impact of the course reported by residents were acquisition of teaching skills or tools for teaching (39,6%), enhancing of motivation (14%), and a richer understanding of teaching principles (14%). A clinical teaching course for residents improves their self-perception of preparation to teach and enhances motivation for clinical teaching.

  12. Use of simulation training to prepare pharmacy residents for medical emergencies.

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    Thompson Bastin, Melissa L; Cook, Aaron M; Flannery, Alexander H

    2017-03-15

    The use of high-fidelity simulation training for preparing pharmacy residents for various high-stress and high-impact medical emergencies and the impact of this training on pharmacy residents' perception of preparedness are described. During the 2015-16 residency year at the University of Kentucky Medical Center, simulation training, in addition to lecture-based orientation training, was chosen as a method to reinforce skills and knowledge learned throughout the orientation, before residents began working on-call shifts. Three different simulation exercises were developed to cover five selected topics over the course of 3 different days: sepsis as its own session, a surgical-themed session combining bleeding reversal and malignant hyperthermia, and a neurologic-themed session combining stroke and status epilepticus. Postgraduate year 2 (PGY2) specialty residents in critical care and emergency medicine helped facilitate the cases. The specialty residents played the role of the physician or nurse for the case and were allowed to answer questions asked of the pharmacy residents, appropriate to their respective roles. Following completion of the simulation exercise, a survey tool was sent to pharmacy residents to rate their perception of preparedness before and after the training for each scenario and again at 6 months after the simulation training to assess sustainability of the training. Participants generally responded that the simulations met their expectations and that the PGY2 residents facilitated the simulations fairly well (scores of 68.5-80 on a scale of 0-100). The resident-reported that beneficial effects of simulation training persisted at 6 months following the simulation exercises. Simulation training increased pharmacy residents' self-reported preparedness for high-stress, high-impact clinical scenarios and medical emergencies. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Needs assessment of Wisconsin primary care residents and faculty regarding interest in global health training

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    Sanders James

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The primary objectives of this study were to assess Wisconsin's primary care residents' attitudes toward international health training, the interest among faculty to provide IH training, and the preferred modality of IH training. Methods Surveys were administered using 505 residents and 413 medical faculty in primary care residencies in Wisconsin. Results from 128 residents and 118 medical school faculty members were collected during the spring of 2007 and analyzed. Results In total, 25% of residents (128/505 and 28% of faculty (118/413 responded to the survey. A majority of residents (58% and faculty (63% were interested in global health issues. Among residents, 63% planned on spending professional time working abroad. Few residents (9% and faculty (11% assess their residencies as preparing residents well to address topics relating to international health. The survey indicates that adequate faculty in Wisconsin could provide mentorship in international health as 47% (55 of faculty had experience working as a physician internationally, 49% (58 of faculty spend more than 25% clinical time caring for patient from underserved communities and 39% (46 would be willing to be involved with developing curriculum, lecturing and/or mentoring residents in international health. Conclusion Overall, the majority of the respondents expressed high interest in IH and few felt prepared to address IH issues indicating a need for increased training in this area. The findings of this survey are likely relevant as a prototype for other primary care residencies.

  14. Preparing Residents for Teaching Careers: The Faculty for Tomorrow Resident Workshop.

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    Lin, Steven; Gordon, Paul

    2017-03-01

    Progress toward growing the primary care workforce is at risk of being derailed by an emerging crisis: a critical shortage of family medicine faculty. In response to the faculty shortage, the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine (STFM) launched a 2-year initiative called "Faculty for Tomorrow" (F4T). The F4T Task Force created a workshop designed to increase residents' interest in, and prepare them for, careers in academic family medicine. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of this workshop. Participants were family medicine residents who preregistered for and attended the F4T Resident Workshop at the 2016 STFM Annual Spring Conference. The intervention was a full-day, 9-hour preconference workshop delivered by a multi-institutional faculty team. Participants were asked to complete a questionnaire before and immediately after the workshop. Data collected included demographics, residency program characteristics, future career plans, self-reported confidence in skills, and general knowledge relevant to becoming faculty. A total of 75 participants attended the workshop. The proportion of those who were "extremely likely" to pursue a career in academic family medicine increased from 58% to 72%. Participants reported statistically significant improvements in their confidence in clinical teaching, providing feedback to learners, writing an effective CV, knowledge about the structure of academic family medicine, and knowledge about applying for a faculty position. The STFM F4T Resident Workshop was effective at increasing participants' interest in academic careers, as well as self-reported confidence in skills and knowledge relevant to becoming faculty. The data collected from participants regarding their career plans may inform future interventions.

  15. Reentry to Pediatric Residency After Global Health Experiences.

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    Balmer, Dorene F; Marton, Stephanie; Gillespie, Susan L; Schutze, Gordon E; Gill, Anne

    2015-10-01

    Although nonphysician reentry transitions have been characterized in literature, little is known about the reentry physicians in general, or residents in particular. We conducted a qualitative study to explore pediatric residents' reentry, using reverse culture shock as a conceptual framework. Eighteen pediatric residents who completed global health experiences in Africa (9 categorical residents with 1-month elective, 9 global child health residents with 12-month training) participated in interviews that included a card-sort to solicit emotional responses consistent with the conceptual framework. Data in the form of interview transcripts were coded and analyzed according to principles of grounded theory. All pediatric residents, despite variable time abroad, reported a range of emotional responses on reentry to residency. Global child health residents felt disconnection and frustration more intensely than categorical residents, whereas categorical residents felt invigoration more intensely than global child health residents. Although residents met with program leadership after their return, no resident described these meetings as a formal debriefing, and few described a deliberate strategy for processing emotions on reentry. Consistent with reverse culture shock, pediatric residents felt a range of emotions as they move toward a steady state of acculturating back into their residency program. Residency programs might consider creating safety nets to help cultivate support for residents when they reenter training. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  16. Teaching home environmental health to resident physicians.

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    Zickafoose, Joseph S; Greenberg, Stuart; Dearborn, Dorr G

    2011-01-01

    Healthy Homes programs seek to integrate the evaluation and management of a multitude of health and safety risks in households. The education of physicians in the identification, evaluation, and management of these home health and safety issues continues to be deficient. Healthy Homes programs represent a unique opportunity to educate physicians in the home environment and stimulate ongoing, specific patient-physician discussions and more general learning about home environmental health. The Case Healthy Homes and Patients Program addresses these deficiencies in physician training while providing direct services to high-risk households. Pediatric and family practice resident physicians participate in healthy home inspections and interventions for their primary care patients and follow up on identified risks during health maintenance and acute illness visits.

  17. Professional Preparation in Health Promotion.

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    Hill, Charles E.; Fisher, Shirley P.

    1992-01-01

    Colleges and universities must develop curricula to prepare health promotion specialists to work with persons of all ages. Program core should include self-care, consumer awareness, nutrition, weight control, stress management, and substance abuse. Health and physical educators should learn to facilitate change of negative health behaviors into…

  18. Resident Perception of Technical Skills Education and Preparation for Independent Practice.

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    Odell, David D; Macke, Ryan A; Tchantchaleishvili, Vakhtang; Loor, Gabriel; Nelson, Jennifer S; LaPar, Damien J; LaZar, John F; Wei, Benjamin; DeNino, Walter F; Berfield, Kathleen; Stein, William; Youssef, Samuel J; Nguyen, Tom C

    2015-12-01

    Surgical skills are traditionally taught and practiced in the operating room. However, changes in health care policy and outcome-based evaluation have decreased trainee operative autonomy. We examined cardiothoracic residents' perceptions of operative experience and the role of simulation. The In-Training Examination (ITE) is taken each year by all residents. Completion of a 30-question preexamination survey is mandatory, ensuring a 100% response rate. Survey data related to operative experience, career preparedness, and surgical simulation were analyzed. Opinion questions were asked on a 5-point Likert scale. Respondents were grouped into three cohorts by training paradigm (2-year versus 3-year traditional programs and 6-year integrated programs). In all, 314 respondents (122 2-year, 96 3-year, and 96 6-year integrated) completed the survey. Of the three groups, residents in 3-year programs had the highest levels of satisfaction. Advanced training was most common among residents in 6-year integrated programs (66%, versus 49% for 2-year and 26% for 3-year programs; p = 0.63). Desire to specialize drove further training (97%), with 2% stating further training was needed owing to inadequacy and 1% owing to a poor job market. In all assessed categories, the majority of residents believed that simulation did not completely replicate the educational value of an operative case. Cardiothoracic residents largely feel well prepared for the transition to practice under the current educational paradigm. Although many residents seek advanced training, it seems driven by the desire for specialization. Residents view simulation as an adjunct to traditional intraoperative education, but not as a viable replacement. Further study is necessary to better understand how best to integrate simulation with operative experience. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Simulation Use for Global Away Rotations (SUGAR): preparing residents for emotional challenges abroad--a multicenter study.

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    Butteris, Sabrina M; Gladding, Sophia P; Eppich, Walter; Hagen, Scott A; Pitt, Michael B

    2014-01-01

    Preparation for residents participating in global health (GH) experiences is critical. Active preparatory curricula allowing residents to experience and debrief emotional challenges they may encounter abroad are generally lacking. We sought to evaluate a novel simulation curriculum designed to prepare residents for emotions they may experience in response to challenges abroad. Pediatric GH educators from 7 institutions developed case vignettes incorporating common challenges residents experience abroad. Residents participating in a GH training track or planning to participate in a GH rotation from the 7 institutions were eligible to participate in the simulation curriculum. Participants and trained facilitators completed postsimulation evaluations that were analyzed using descriptive statistics and thematic analysis of written comments to assess the utility of the curriculum, emotions evoked, and changes residents anticipated making to their GH rotation preparation. Fifty-one residents and 16 facilitators completed 160 and 52 evaluations, respectively. Overall, respondents found the simulations useful (mean [SD] resident score 4.49 [0.82] and facilitator score 4.85 [0.36] on a 5-point scale [1 = completely useless, 5 = very useful]). Residents reported strong emotions in 153 (98%) of 156 comments. After the sessions, 131 (96%) of 137 comments reflected anticipated changes to GH rotation preparation plans. Active preparation for GH rotations using simulated cases appears to be a useful tool that can be implemented across a variety of sites with minimal facilitator training or simulation experience. The curriculum successfully elicited powerful emotions in residents and provided an opportunity to debrief these experiences before encountering them abroad. Copyright © 2014 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Are Graduating Residents Trained and Prepared to Engage in Medical Home Activities in Practice?

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    Bright, Dana; Frintner, Mary Pat; Narayan, Aditee; Turchi, Renee M

    2018-02-01

    A national, random sample of 1000 graduating pediatric residents was surveyed in 2014 on receipt of training in medical home activities and preparedness to engage in same in practice. Of 602 survey respondents (60% response), 71.8% reported being very/fairly knowledgeable about medical homes. Most residents (70.0% to 91.3%) reported they received training in 6 medical home activities; more than one fourth wished for more training in 4 of 6 activities. The majority (62.5% to 77.3%) reported very good/excellent perceived preparedness. Residents with continuity clinic experiences at 2 or more sites and with continuity clinic experience at a community health center were more likely to report very good/excellent preparedness in multiple medical home activities. Overall, residents feel knowledgeable, trained, and prepared to engage in medical home activities as they are leaving residency. Opportunities exist to further explore the influence of additional training in specific activities and the number and type of training site experiences on perceived preparedness.

  1. Global Health Education in US Pediatric Residency Programs.

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    Butteris, Sabrina M; Schubert, Charles J; Batra, Maneesh; Coller, Ryan J; Garfunkel, Lynn C; Monticalvo, David; Moore, Molly; Arora, Gitanjli; Moore, Melissa A; Condurache, Tania; Sweet, Leigh R; Hoyos, Catalina; Suchdev, Parminder S

    2015-09-01

    Despite the growing importance of global health (GH) training for pediatric residents, few mechanisms have cataloged GH educational opportunities offered by US pediatric residency programs. We sought to characterize GH education opportunities across pediatric residency programs and identify program characteristics associated with key GH education elements. Data on program and GH training characteristics were sought from program directors or their delegates of all US pediatric residency programs during 2013 to 2014. These data were used to compare programs with and without a GH track as well as across small, medium, and large programs. Program characteristics associated with the presence of key educational elements were identified by using bivariate logistic regression. Data were collected from 198 of 199 active US pediatric residency programs (99.5%). Seven percent of pediatric trainees went abroad during 2013 to 2014. Forty-nine programs (24.7%) reported having a GH track, 66.1% had a faculty lead, 58.1% offered international field experiences, and 48.5% offered domestic field experiences. Forty-two percent of programs reported international partnerships across 153 countries. Larger programs, those with lead faculty, GH tracks, or partnerships had significantly increased odds of having each GH educational element, including pretravel preparation. The number of pediatric residency programs offering GH training opportunities continues to rise. However, smaller programs and those without tracks, lead faculty, or formal partnerships lag behind with organized GH curricula. As GH becomes an integral component of pediatric training, a heightened commitment is needed to ensure consistency of training experiences that encompass best practices in all programs. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  2. Obstetrics and Gynecology Resident Interest and Participation in Global Health.

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    Stagg, Amy R; Blanchard, May Hsieh; Carson, Sandra A; Peterson, Herbert B; Flynn, Erica B; Ogburn, Tony

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate obstetrics and gynecology resident interest and participation in global health experiences and elucidate factors associated with resident expectation for involvement. A voluntary, anonymous survey was administered to U.S. obstetrics and gynecology residents before the 2015 Council on Resident Education in Obstetrics and Gynecology in-training examination. The 23-item survey gathered demographic data and queried resident interest and participation in global health. Factors associated with resident expectation for participation in global health were analyzed by Pearson χ tests. Of the 5,005 eligible examinees administered the survey, 4,929 completed at least a portion of the survey for a response rate of 98.5%. Global health was rated as "somewhat important" or "very important" by 96.3% (3,761/3,904) of residents. "Educational opportunity" (69.2%) and "humanitarian effort" (17.7%) were cited as the two most important aspects of a global health experience. Residents with prior global health experience rated the importance of global health more highly and had an increased expectation for future participation. Global health electives were arranged by residency programs for 18.0% (747/4,155) of respondents, by residents themselves as an elective for 44.0% (1,828/4,155), and as a noncredit experience during vacation time for 36.4% (1,514/4,155) of respondents. Female gender, nonpartnered status, no children, prior global health experience, and intention to incorporate global health in future practice were associated with expectations for a global health experience. Most obstetrics and gynecology residents rate a global health experience as somewhat or very important, and participation before or during residency increases the perceived importance of global health and the likelihood of expectation for future participation. A majority of residents report arranging their own elective or using vacation time to participate, suggesting that residency programs have

  3. Effectiveness of resident as teacher curriculum in preparing emergency medicine residents for their teaching role.

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    Hosein Nejad, Hooman; Bagherabadi, Mehdi; Sistani, Alireza; Dargahi, Helen

    2017-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, recognizing the need and importance of training residents in teaching skills has resulted in several resident-as-teacher programs. The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of this teaching initiative and investigate the improvement in residents' teaching skills through evaluating their satisfaction and perceived effectiveness as well as assessing medical students' perception of the residents' teaching quality. This research is a quasi-experimental study with pre- and post-tests, continuing from Dec 2010 to May 2011 in Imam Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences. In this survey, Emergency Medicine Residents (n=32) participated in an 8-hour workshop. The program evaluation was performed based on Kirkpatrick's model by evaluation of residents in two aspects: self-assessment and evaluation by interns who were trained by these residents. Content validity of the questionnaires was judged by experts and reliability was carried out by test re-test. The questionnaires were completed before and after the intervention. Paired sample t-test was applied to analyze the effect of RAT curriculum and workshop on the improvement of residents' teaching skills based on their self-evaluation and Mann-Whitney U test was used to identify significant differences between the two evaluator groups before and after the workshop. The results indicated that residents' attitude towards their teaching ability was improved significantly after participating in the workshop (pTeacher for emergency medicine residents resulted in favorable outcomes in the second evaluated level of Kirkpatrick's model, i.e. it showed measurable positive changes in the self-assessments of medical residents about different aspects of teaching ability and performance. However, implementing training sessions for resident physicians, although effective in improving their confidence and self-assessment of their teaching skills, seems to cause no positive change in the third

  4. Self-directed Learning in Otolaryngology Residents' Preparation for Surgical Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbour, Jad; Bakeman, Anna; Robey, Thomas; Jabbour, Noel

    2017-04-01

    To characterize the nature of surgical preparation among otolaryngology residents nationwide, determine the self-rated effectiveness and efficiency of case preparation practices, and identify potential means for educational improvement. A survey examining the study objectives was developed and distributed to otolaryngology residents nationwide. Survey response data were submitted to descriptive analysis and comparative analyses between junior and senior residents. Literature regarding case preparation among otolaryngology residents was reviewed. Among 108 resident respondents, the most commonly used resources included textbooks (86.1%), surgical education websites (74.1%), and surgical atlases (66.7%). Time was the primary limitation (cited by 84.3%) and convenience the predominant factor influencing resource selection (92.5%). On a 5-point Likert scale, mean scores regarding effectiveness and efficiency of case preparation were 3.53 ± 0.68 and 3.19 ± 0.88, respectively. Senior residents compared to junior residents were more likely to rate their preparation as effective (3.75 ± 0.54 vs 3.40 ± 0.72, P = .008) and efficient (3.45 ± 0.85 vs 3.03 ± 0.86, P = .02). Otolaryngology residents do not consistently rate their case preparation as effective or efficient. While there appears to be progress in self-directed learning throughout residency, room for improvement remains, with potential avenues for such improvement explored here.

  5. Use of a policy debate to teach residents about health care reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Vu Q C; Hirsch, Mark A

    2011-09-01

    Resident education involves didactics and pedagogic strategies using a variety of tools and technologies in order to improve critical thinking skills. Debating is used in educational settings to improve critical thinking skills, but there have been no reports of its use in residency education. The present paper describes the use of debate to teach resident physicians about health care reform. We aimed to describe the method of using a debate in graduate medical education. Second-year through fourth-year physical medicine and rehabilitation residents participated in a moderated policy debate in which they deliberated whether the United States has one of the "best health care system(s) in the world." Following the debate, the participants completed an unvalidated open-ended questionnaire about health care reform. Although residents expressed initial concerns about participating in a public debate on health care reform, all faculty and residents expressed that the debate was robust, animated, and enjoyed by all. Components of holding a successful debate on health care reform were noted to be: (1) getting "buy-in" from the resident physicians; (2) preparing the debate; and (3) follow-up. The debate facilitated the study of a large, complex topic like health care reform. It created an active learning process. It encouraged learners to keenly attend to an opposing perspective while enthusiastically defending their position. We conclude that the use of debates as a teaching tool in resident education is valuable and should be explored further.

  6. A resident’s perspective on why global health work should be incorporated into family medicine residency training

    OpenAIRE

    Sarah Sweeney

    2016-01-01

    Family physicians are well prepared to address global health issues. In this perspective a family medicine resident reflects on her experience working on a global health project in Guatemala and why this type of experience should be incorporated into family medicine residency training.

  7. Emergency medicine residents' attitudes and opinions of in-training exam preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eastin TR

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Travis R Eastin, Aaron W BernardDepartment of Emergency Medicine, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH, USAPurpose: Emergency Medicine (EM residents take the American Board of Emergency Medicine (ABEM in-training exam, and performance on this exam has been shown to correlate to performance on the ABEM qualifying exam. Though many residencies have in-training exam preparation activities, there is little data on the effectiveness of these efforts. This study aimed to elicit resident perspectives about the exam and exam preparation in order to generate hypotheses and better inform future preparation efforts.Methods: Second- and third-year EM residents at a single institution were interviewed using a semi-structured format. Qualitative methodology was used to analyze the data.Results: Thirteen EM residents participated in the study. Eight major themes and 18 sub-themes were identified. These were further characterized as relating to the exam itself or to exam preparation. Residents generally value the in-training exam. Sixty-nine percent noted that it provided an assessment of their current knowledge and deficiencies. Thirty-eight percent noted that it improved familiarity with the qualifying exam. Regarding exam preparation, residents stated that a question format was preferred, especially when accompanying explanations were of high quality. Additionally, practical considerations, such as portability, impacted resident selection of study tools.Conclusion: Residents value the in-training exam as a marker of their academic progress and for their ability to gain familiarity with the qualifying exam. They prefer question-based preparation over text-based learning, as long as there is a detailed explanation of each answer. Educators creating structured in-training review may want to focus on question-based material with detailed explanations.Keywords: examination preparation, graduate medical education, in-training examination

  8. Does rural residence limit access to mental health services?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Cindy L; Kelly, Karen D; Voaklander, Don

    2011-01-01

    Rural residence may reduce access to specialized mental health services. The objective of this study was to examine the role of rural residence in relation to service utilization. Using Canadian data collected in 2002, service use was examined as a function of the presence of anxiety or mood disorders and rural/urban residence. Use of four different types of professional mental health services was examined in relation to rural residence and additional demographic, social, and health status factors known to predict use of services. Data were obtained from Statistics Canada's Canadian Mental Health Survey Cycle 1.2. Rural residence was defined as living in a rural community with a population of 1000 or less. For all participants, associations between the presence of anxiety or mood disorders, rural/urban residence, and any service use or use of specialized mental health services (psychiatry and psychology) were examined. For participants who had used professional services, associations were examined between 17 predictor variables, including location of residence, and the use of four types of service providers (family doctor or GP; nurse, social worker, counsellor, or psychotherapist; psychiatrist; or psychologist). Predictors included demographic, social, and health status variables. Cross-tabulated counts and adjusted odds ratios with 99% confidence intervals based on bootstrapped variance estimates were used to evaluate predictors. Among the total sample (n = 35 140), 7.9% had used professional mental health services in the previous year. Among people who were likely to have had anxiety or mood disorders, rural or urban residence was not differentially related to past-year use of any professional services or specialized mental health services. Multivariate logistic regression was used to model factors predicting past year use of four different types of professional services. Location of residence was not a significant predictor of service utilization. Age, sex

  9. Emergency medicine residents' attitudes and opinions of in-training exam preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastin, Travis R; Bernard, Aaron W

    2013-01-01

    Emergency Medicine (EM) residents take the American Board of Emergency Medicine (ABEM) in-training exam, and performance on this exam has been shown to correlate to performance on the ABEM qualifying exam. Though many residencies have in-training exam preparation activities, there is little data on the effectiveness of these efforts. This study aimed to elicit resident perspectives about the exam and exam preparation in order to generate hypotheses and better inform future preparation efforts. Second- and third-year EM residents at a single institution were interviewed using a semi-structured format. Qualitative methodology was used to analyze the data. Thirteen EM residents participated in the study. Eight major themes and 18 sub-themes were identified. These were further characterized as relating to the exam itself or to exam preparation. Residents generally value the in-training exam. Sixty-nine percent noted that it provided an assessment of their current knowledge and deficiencies. Thirty-eight percent noted that it improved familiarity with the qualifying exam. Regarding exam preparation, residents stated that a question format was preferred, especially when accompanying explanations were of high quality. Additionally, practical considerations, such as portability, impacted resident selection of study tools. Residents value the in-training exam as a marker of their academic progress and for their ability to gain familiarity with the qualifying exam. They prefer question-based preparation over text-based learning, as long as there is a detailed explanation of each answer. Educators creating structured in-training review may want to focus on question-based material with detailed explanations.

  10. Preparing residents for family practice: role of an integrated “Triple C” curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Lee

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is limited understanding of the impact of Triple C competency-based curriculums on the preparation of residents for family practice. This paper describes a competency-based curriculum within an integrated longitudinal block design and presents preliminary evaluation data on the impact of this curriculum on preparedness for family practice. Methods: First and second year family medicine residents were surveyed as a component of a year-end program evaluation to assess the extent to which the residency program is preparing them to engage in a variety of practice domains, the likelihood that they would engage in these domains, and the extent to which this residency program is comprehensive, relevant to their development as a family physician, and promotes interprofessional practice. Results: Residents perceived themselves as prepared to engage in most practice areas and their intentions to engage in various practice domains were positively correlated to their ratings of preparedness. Ratings reflected that residents perceived this program as comprehensive and relevant to their development as a family physician and they perceived a high degree of encouragement for interprofessional practice. Conclusions: This study provides some preliminary evidence that an integrated competency-based curriculum, with an emphasis on interprofessional practice has the potential to effectively prepare residents for practice in family medicine.

  11. Pediatric Residents as Health Educators: The Reactions of Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Joel L.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    The Department of Pediatrics at the Framingham Union Hospital, in conjunction with the Boston University Department of Pediatrics, requires pediatric residents to participate in a school health experience. Two such activities and their effects on children are described. (CJ)

  12. Improving Ambulatory Care Resident Training: Preparing for Opportunities to Treat Mental Illness in the Primary Care Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhat, Nada M; Bostwick, Jolene R; Rockafellow, Stuart D

    2017-01-01

    The development of an outpatient psychiatry clinical practice learning experience for PGY2 ambulatory care pharmacy residents in preparation for the treatment of psychiatric disorders in the primary care setting is described. With the increased prevalence of psychiatric disorders, significant mortality, and limited access to care, integration of mental health treatment into the primary care setting is necessary to improve patient outcomes. Given the majority of mental health treatment occurs in the primary care setting, pharmacists in patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs) are in a unique position with direct access to patients to effectively manage these illnesses. However, the increased need for pharmacist education and training in psychiatry has prompted a large, Midwestern academic health system to develop an outpatient psychiatry learning experience for PGY2 (Postgraduate Year 2) ambulatory care pharmacy residents in 2015. The goal of this learning experience is to introduce the PGY2 ambulatory care residents to the role and impact of psychiatric clinical pharmacists and to orient the residents to the basics of psychiatric pharmacotherapy to be applied to their future practice in the primary care setting. The development of an outpatient psychiatry learning experience for PGY2 ambulatory care pharmacy residents will allow for more integrated and comprehensive care for patients with psychiatric conditions, many of whom are treated and managed in the PCMH setting.

  13. Challenges to neurology residency education in today's health care environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bega, Danny; Krainc, Dimitri

    2016-09-01

    Residency training has had to adapt to higher patient volumes, increased complexity of medical care, and the commercialized system of health care. These changes have led to a concerning culture shift in neurology. We review the relationship between the emerging health care delivery system and residency training, highlighting issues related to duty hours and work-life balance, the changing technological landscape, high patient volumes, and complex service obligations. We propose that the current challenges in health care delivery offer the opportunity to improve neurology residency through faculty development programs, bringing teaching back to the bedside, increasing resident autonomy, utilizing near-peer teaching, and rewarding educators who facilitate an environment of inquiry and scholarship, with the ultimate goal of better alignment between education and patient care. Ann Neurol 2016;80:315-320. © 2016 American Neurological Association.

  14. Improving Educational Preparation for Transcultural Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Var, Rita M. H.

    1998-01-01

    Nurses and health care professionals must be prepared for transcultural health care because society is becoming increasingly multicultural and current health services are not meeting the needs of minority ethnic groups in Britain. (SK)

  15. Education Research: Neurology resident education: Trending skills, confidence, and professional preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Justin T; Mayans, David; Schneider, Logan; Adams, Nellie; Khawaja, Ayaz M; Engstrom, John

    2016-03-15

    To survey US-trained graduating neurology residents who are American Academy of Neurology members, in an effort to trend perceived quality and completeness of graduate neurology education. An electronic survey was sent to all American Academy of Neurology members graduating from US neurology residency programs in the Spring of 2014. Of 805 eligible respondents, 24% completed the survey. Ninety-three percent of adult neurology residents and 56% of child neurology residents reported plans to pursue fellowship training after residency. Respondents reported a desire for additional training in neurocritical care, neuro-oncology, neuromuscular diseases, botulinum toxin injection, and nerve blocks. There remains a clear deficit in business training of neurology residents, although there was notable improvement in knowledge of coding and office management compared to previous surveys. Although there are still areas of perceived weakness in neurology training, graduating neurology residents feel generally well prepared for their chosen careers. However, most still pursue fellowship training for reasons that are little understood. In addition to certain subspecialties and procedures, practice management remains deficient in neurology training and is a point of future insecurity for most residents. Future curriculum changes should consider resident-reported gaps in knowledge, with careful consideration of improving business training. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  16. Emergency medicine residents? attitudes and opinions of in-training exam preparation

    OpenAIRE

    Eastin, Travis R; Bernard, Aaron W

    2013-01-01

    Travis R Eastin, Aaron W BernardDepartment of Emergency Medicine, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH, USAPurpose: Emergency Medicine (EM) residents take the American Board of Emergency Medicine (ABEM) in-training exam, and performance on this exam has been shown to correlate to performance on the ABEM qualifying exam. Though many residencies have in-training exam preparation activities, there is little data on the effectiveness of these efforts. This study aimed to el...

  17. Teaching Home Environmental Health to Resident Physicians

    OpenAIRE

    Zickafoose, Joseph S.; Greenberg, Stuart; Dearborn, Dorr G.

    2011-01-01

    Healthy Homes programs seek to integrate the evaluation and management of a multitude of health and safety risks in households. The education of physicians in the identification, evaluation, and management of these home health and safety issues continues to be deficient. Healthy Homes programs represent a unique opportunity to educate physicians in the home environment and stimulate ongoing, specific patient-physician discussions and more general learning about home environmental health. The ...

  18. Oral health educational interventions for nursing home staff and residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Martina; Kupfer, Ramona; Reissmann, Daniel R; Mühlhauser, Ingrid; Köpke, Sascha

    2016-09-30

    Associations between nursing home residents' oral health status and quality of life, respiratory tract infections, and nutritional status have been reported. Educational interventions for nurses or residents, or both, focusing on knowledge and skills related to oral health management may have the potential to improve residents' oral health. To assess the effects of oral health educational interventions for nursing home staff or residents, or both, to maintain or improve the oral health of nursing home residents. We searched the Cochrane Oral Health Trials Register (to 18 January 2016), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (the Cochrane Library, 2015, Issue 12), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 18 January 2016), Embase Ovid (1980 to 18 January 2016), CINAHL EBSCO (1937 to 18 January 2016), and Web of Science Conference Proceedings (1990 to 18 January 2016). We searched ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials to 18 January 2016. In addition, we searched reference lists of identified articles and contacted experts in the field. We placed no restrictions on language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and cluster-RCTs comparing oral health educational programmes for nursing staff or residents, or both with usual care or any other oral healthcare intervention. Two review authors independently screened articles retrieved from the searches for relevance, extracted data from included studies, assessed risk of bias for each included study, and evaluated the overall quality of the evidence. We retrieved data about the development and evaluation processes of complex interventions on the basis of the Criteria for Reporting the Development and Evaluation of Complex Interventions in healthcare: revised guideline (CReDECI 2). We contacted authors of relevant studies for additional information. We included nine RCTs involving

  19. Preparing Residents Effectively in Emergency Skills Training With a Serious Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dankbaar, Mary E.W.; Roozeboom, Maartje Bakhuys; Oprins, Esther A.P. B.; Rutten, Frans; van Merrienboer, Jeroen J.G.; van Saase, Jan L.C.M.; Schuit, Stephanie C.E.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Training emergency care skills is critical for patient safety but cost intensive. Serious games have been proposed as an engaging self-directed learning tool for complex skills. The objective of this study was to compare the cognitive skills and motivation of medical residents who only used a course manual as preparation for classroom training on emergency care with residents who used an additional serious game. Methods This was a quasi-experimental study with residents preparing for a rotation in the emergency department. The “reading” group received a course manual before classroom training; the “reading and game” group received this manual plus the game as preparation for the same training. Emergency skills were assessed before training (with residents who agreed to participate in an extra pretraining assessment), using validated competency scales and a global performance scale. We also measured motivation. Results All groups had comparable important characteristics (eg, experience with acute care). Before training, the reading and game group felt motivated to play the game and spent more self-study time (+2.5 hours) than the reading group. Game-playing residents showed higher scores on objectively measured and self-assessed clinical competencies but equal scores on the global performance scale and were equally motivated for training, compared with the reading group. After the 2-week training, no differences between groups existed. Conclusions After preparing training with an additional serious game, residents showed improved clinical competencies, compared with residents who only studied course material. After a 2-week training, this advantage disappeared. Future research should study the retention of game effects in blended designs. PMID:27764018

  20. Socio-economic Factors and Residents' Health in Nigeria Urban ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    among the low, medium and high income earners in Osogbo, Osun. State, Nigeria. It also assessed the ... used to measure socio-economic status of residents in relation to their health status determinants in this country. ... there exist differences in health status among socio-economic groups. It was equally demonstrated that ...

  1. Physical Restraint Initiation in Nursing Homes and Subsequent Resident Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engberg, John; Castle, Nicholas G.; McCaffrey, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: It is widely believed that physical restraint use causes mental and physical health decline in nursing home residents. Yet few studies exist showing an association between restraint initiation and health decline. In this research, we examined whether physical restraint initiation is associated with subsequent lower physical or mental…

  2. Does general surgery residency prepare surgeons for community practice in British Columbia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hamish

    2009-06-01

    Preparing surgeons for clinical practice is a challenging task for postgraduate training programs across Canada. The purpose of this study was to examine whether a single surgeon entering practice was adequately prepared by comparing the type and volume of surgical procedures experienced in the last 3 years of training with that in the first year of clinical practice. During the last 3 years of general surgery training, I logged all procedures. In practice, the Medical Services Plan (MSP) of British Columbia tracks all procedures. Using MSP remittance reports, I compiled the procedures performed in my first year of practice. I totaled the number of procedures and broke them down into categories (general, colorectal, laparoscopic, endoscopic, hepatobiliary, oncologic, pediatric, thoracic, vascular and other). I then compared residency training with community practice. I logged a total of 1170 procedures in the last 3 years of residency. Of these, 452 were performed during community rotations. The procedures during residency could be broken down as follows: 392 general, 18 colorectal, 242 laparoscopic, 103 endoscopic, 85 hepatobiliary, 142 oncologic, 1 pediatric, 78 thoracic, 92 vascular and 17 other. I performed a total of 1440 procedures in the first year of practice. In practice the break down was 398 general, 15 colorectal, 101 laparoscopic, 654 endoscopic, 2 hepatobiliary, 77 oncologic, 10 pediatric, 0 thoracic, 70 vascular and 113 other. On the whole, residency provided excellent preparation for clinical practice based on my experience. Areas of potential improvement included endoscopy, pediatric surgery and "other," which comprised mostly hand surgery.

  3. A Descriptive Survey of Anesthesiology Residency Simulation Programs: How Are Programs Preparing Residents for the New American Board of Anesthesiology APPLIED Certification Examination?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaak, Robert S; Chen, Fei; Arora, Harendra; Martinelli, Susan M; Zvara, David A; Stiegler, Marjorie P

    2017-09-01

    Anesthesiology residency programs may need new simulation-based programs to prepare residents for the new Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) component of the American Board of Anesthesiology (ABA) Primary Certification process. The design of such programs may require significant resources, including faculty time, expertise, and funding, as are currently needed for structured oral examination (SOE) preparation. This survey analyzed the current state of US-based anesthesiology residency programs regarding simulation-based educational programming for SOE and OSCE preparation. An online survey was distributed to every anesthesiology residency program director in the United States. The survey included 15 to 46 questions, depending on each respondent's answers. The survey queried current practices and future plans regarding resident preparation specifically for the ABA APPLIED examination, with emphasis on the OSCE. Descriptive statistics were summarized. χ and Fisher exact tests were used to test the differences in proportions across groups. Spearman rank correlation was used to examine the association between ordinal variables. The responding 66 programs (49%) were a representative sample of all anesthesiology residencies (N = 136) in terms of geographical location (χ P = .58). There was a low response rate from small programs that have 12 or fewer clinical anesthesia residents. Ninety-one percent (95% confidence interval [CI], 84%-95%) of responders agreed that it is the responsibility of the program to specifically prepare residents for primary certification, and most agreed that it is important to practice SOEs (94%; 95% CI, 88%-97%) and OSCEs (89%; 95% CI, 83%-94%). While 100% of respondents reported providing mock SOEs, only 31% (95% CI, 24%-40%) of respondents provided mock OSCE experiences. Of those without an OSCE program, 75% (95% CI, 64%-83%) reported plans to start one. The most common reasons for not having an OSCE program already in place

  4. Socio-economic Factors and Residents' Health in Nigeria Urban ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    Abstract. This paper examined the various socio-economic attributes (average income, educational attainment, occupation and household size) among the low, medium and high income earners in Osogbo, Osun. State, Nigeria. It also assessed the effects of these socio-economic attributes on the health of residents with a ...

  5. Global health training in US obstetrics and gynaecology residency programmes: perspectives of students, residents and programme directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Lisa M; Banks, Erika H; Conroy, Erin M; McGinn, Aileen P; Ghartey, Jeny P; Wagner, Sarah A; Merkatz, Irwin R

    2015-12-01

    Benefits of exposure to global health training during medical education are well documented and residents' demand for this training is increasing. Despite this, it is offered by few US obstetrics and gynaecology (OBGYN) residency training programmes. To evaluate interest, perceived importance, predictors of global health interest and barriers to offering global health training among prospective OBGYN residents, current OBGYN residents and US OGBYN residency directors. We designed two questionnaires using Likert scale questions to assess perceived importance of global health training. The first was distributed to current and prospective OBGYN residents interviewing at a US residency programme during 2012-2013. The second questionnaire distributed to US OBGYN programme directors assessed for existing global health programmes and global health training barriers. A composite Global Health Interest/Importance score was tabulated from the Likert scores. Multivariable linear regression was performed to assess for predictors of Global Health Interest/Importance. A total of 159 trainees (77%; 129 prospective OBGYN residents and 30 residents) and 69 (28%) programme directors completed the questionnaires. Median Global Health Interest/Importance score was 7 (IQR 4-9). Prior volunteer experience was predictive of a 5-point increase in Global Health Interest/Importance score (95% CI -0.19 to 9.85; p=0.02). The most commonly cited barriers were cost and time. Interest and perceived importance of global health training in US OBGYN residency programmes is evident among trainees and programme directors; however, significant financial and time barriers prevent many programmes from offering opportunities to their trainees. Prior volunteer experience predicts global health interest. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  6. Well-being in residency training: a survey examining resident physician satisfaction both within and outside of residency training and mental health in Alberta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patten Scott

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the critical importance of well-being during residency training, only a few Canadian studies have examined stress in residency and none have examined well-being resources. No recent studies have reported any significant concerns with respect to perceived stress levels in residency. We investigated the level of perceived stress, mental health and understanding and need for well-being resources among resident physicians in training programs in Alberta, Canada. Methods A mail questionnaire was distributed to the entire resident membership of PARA during 2003 academic year. PARA represents each of the two medical schools in the province of Alberta. Results In total 415 (51 % residents participated in the study. Thirty-four percent of residents who responded to the survey reported their life as being stressful. Females reported stress more frequently than males (40% vs. 27%, p Residents highly valued their colleagues (67%, program directors (60% and external psychiatrist/psychologist (49% as well-being resources. Over one third of residents wished to have a career counselor (39% and financial counselor (38%. Conclusion Many Albertan residents experience significant stressors and emotional and mental health problems. Some of which differ among genders. This study can serve as a basis for future resource application, research and advocacy for overall improvements to well-being during residency training.

  7. Anxiety and depression levels among multidisciplinary health residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Salvagni Rotta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to assess symptoms of anxiety and depression of professionals of Multidisciplinary Health Residence Programs. Methods: this is a cross-sectional study, performed with fifty professionals, using three instruments: one for socioeconomic and demographic data, and the Beck’s Anxiety and Depression Scale. Results: predominance of females (92.0%, average age 26 years old, single (88.0%, family income from two to five salaries (56.0% satisfied with the work (82.0% and thought about quitting the program (56.0% showed anxiety (50.0% and depression (28.0%. Conclusion: there was an association between anxiety and depression in multidisciplinary residents, which points to the need for rethinking strategies for identifying these symptoms and control of stress factors for the promotion of mental health.

  8. Does general surgery residency prepare surgeons for community practice in British Columbia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hamish

    2009-01-01

    Background Preparing surgeons for clinical practice is a challenging task for postgraduate training programs across Canada. The purpose of this study was to examine whether a single surgeon entering practice was adequately prepared by comparing the type and volume of surgical procedures experienced in the last 3 years of training with that in the first year of clinical practice. Methods During the last 3 years of general surgery training, I logged all procedures. In practice, the Medical Services Plan (MSP) of British Columbia tracks all procedures. Using MSP remittance reports, I compiled the procedures performed in my first year of practice. I totaled the number of procedures and broke them down into categories (general, colorectal, laparoscopic, endoscopic, hepatobiliary, oncologic, pediatric, thoracic, vascular and other). I then compared residency training with community practice. Results I logged a total of 1170 procedures in the last 3 years of residency. Of these, 452 were performed during community rotations. The procedures during residency could be broken down as follows: 392 general, 18 colorectal, 242 laparoscopic, 103 endoscopic, 85 hepatobiliary, 142 oncologic, 1 pediatric, 78 thoracic, 92 vascular and 17 other. I performed a total of 1440 procedures in the first year of practice. In practice the break down was 398 general, 15 colorectal, 101 laparoscopic, 654 endoscopic, 2 hepatobiliary, 77 oncologic, 10 pediatric, 0 thoracic, 70 vascular and 113 other. Conclusion On the whole, residency provided excellent preparation for clinical practice based on my experience. Areas of potential improvement included endoscopy, pediatric surgery and “other,” which comprised mostly hand surgery. PMID:19503663

  9. Improving educational preparation for transcultural health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Var, R M

    1998-10-01

    There is increasing evidence that the health care needs of people from black and ethnic minority groups in England are not being met. A growing number of initiatives are being undertaken to remedy the situation. Many of them are focused on health care delivery at local and national levels. However, unless the preparation of health care professionals in the area of multi-cultural health care is appropriate and effective, a great deal of corrective action will continue to have to be taken. Despite 1997 having been the European Year Against Racism, it is still necessary to consider what educational preparation should be like. The article draws on identified inadequacies in health care provision as well as examples of initiatives taken to improve care provision. The author identifies deficiencies in educational preparation and proposes a range of actions to be taken. The article is focused on nursing, midwifery and health visiting education in England, but is deemed to be relevant to all health care professionals not only in Europe but other continents, as they become increasingly international and multi-ethnic.

  10. Well-being in residency training: a survey examining resident physician satisfaction both within and outside of residency training and mental health in Alberta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jordan S; Patten, Scott

    2005-06-22

    Despite the critical importance of well-being during residency training, only a few Canadian studies have examined stress in residency and none have examined well-being resources. No recent studies have reported any significant concerns with respect to perceived stress levels in residency. We investigated the level of perceived stress, mental health and understanding and need for well-being resources among resident physicians in training programs in Alberta, Canada. A mail questionnaire was distributed to the entire resident membership of PARA during 2003 academic year. PARA represents each of the two medical schools in the province of Alberta. In total 415 (51 %) residents participated in the study. Thirty-four percent of residents who responded to the survey reported their life as being stressful. Females reported stress more frequently than males (40% vs. 27%, p stressors and emotional and mental health problems. Some of which differ among genders. This study can serve as a basis for future resource application, research and advocacy for overall improvements to well-being during residency training.

  11. Pharmacist-based intervention to prepare residents of assisted-living facilities for emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feret, Brett; Bratberg, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    To assess views of disaster preparation and readiness of assisted-living residents after a comprehensive program developed and presented by pharmacists on the importance of preparing for an emergency, specifically regarding organizing of medical information. Four assisted-living facilities were identified throughout Rhode Island to participate in a 30-minute program conducted by two pharmacists who were involved in disaster preparedness on both a national and state level. A survey assessed the participants' possession of a disaster kit, medical form, and personal plan, as well as their knowledge of their facilities' possession of a kit, form, and plan. Participants were also surveyed on their attitudes regarding current preparedness and on the disasters (e.g, hurricanes, bioterrorism, avian influenza, floods, fire) about which they were most concerned before the program began. Student pharmacists and faculty assisted residents in the completion of the survey. At the conclusion of the program, all participants were asked to retake the survey to assess the impact of the program. 58 preprogram and 42 postprogram surveys were returned anonymously. A statistically significant change in preparedness was observed for hurricane, avian influenza, bioterrorism, and flood, and a statistically significant change in concern was seen for avian influenza and bioterrorism. Elderly assisted-living residents are at increased risk of adverse effects in disasters; however, this growing population lacks baseline preparedness items such as a simple emergency preparedness kit. Educational programs by pharmacists can increase levels of preparedness for and defuse concerns about disasters in this population. Pharmacists also can educate elderly patients about preparedness for potential disasters specific to their location.

  12. [A study on health information literacy among urban and suburban residents in six provinces in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Xueqiong; Li, Yinghua; Li, Li; Huang, Xianggang

    2014-07-01

    To understand the status and its influencing factors of health information literacy among urban and suburban residents in China, and to explore the method for improving the health information literacy. From March to May in 2013, residents aged 18-60 years in six provinces in China were investigated with Questionnaire of Health Literacy of Diabetes Mellitus of the Public in China about self-reported health information literacy. The results of the survey were standardized by the 6th national census data. Logistic regression analysis was used to explore influencing factors of health information literacy. A total of 4 416 residents were surveyed, and 4 282 (97.0%) valid questionnaires were collected. After weight adjustments, 30.1% of the residents aged 18-60 years had adequate health information literacy in China, and the 95%CI of the rate was 28.5% - 31.6%. Totally, 70.8% of the residents ever actively searched for health information, 43.7% of the residents could easily retrieve the health information, 49.1% of the residents could easily understand the health information, 41.8% of the residents could confidently differentiate the quality of the health information and 51.1% of the residents ever searched health information on the internet. The results of multi-logistic regression showed that the rural residents, the males, those with lower levels of education, those with poor health had a lower health information literacy. The most trusted health information source was from doctors, and the trust rate reached 97.0%, followed by family members, friends or colleagues. The residents trusted the interpersonal communication more than the mass media and the new media. The level of health information literacy of the residents was generally low in China. To improve the health information literacy, high-quality health information services should be delivered to the residents, and the health education on the internet provided by the medical professionals should also be explored.

  13. Educating residents in behavioral health care and collaboration: integrated clinical training of pediatric residents and psychology fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisani, Anthony R; leRoux, Pieter; Siegel, David M

    2011-02-01

    Pediatric residency practices face the challenge of providing both behavioral health (BH) training for pediatricians and psychosocial care for children. The University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry and Rochester General Hospital developed a joint training program and continuity clinic infrastructure in which pediatric residents and postdoctoral psychology fellows train and practice together. The integrated program provides children access to BH care in a primary care setting and gives trainees the opportunity to integrate collaborative BH care into their regular practice routines. During 1998-2008, 48 pediatric residents and 8 psychology fellows trained in this integrated clinical environment. The program's accomplishments include longevity, faculty and fiscal stability, sustained support from pediatric leadership and community payers, the development in residents and faculty of greater comfort in addressing BH problems and collaborating with BH specialists, and replication of the model in two other primary care settings. In addition to quantitative program outcomes data, the authors present a case example that illustrates how the integrated program works and achieves its goals. They propose that educating residents and psychology trainees side by side in collaborative BH care is clinically and educationally valuable and potentially applicable to other settings. A companion report published in this issue provides results from a study comparing the perceptions of pediatric residents whose primary care continuity clinic took place in this integrated setting with those of residents from the same pediatric residency who had their continuity clinic training in a nonintegrated setting.

  14. The Value of Pharmacy Residency Training for Health Systems: An Annotated Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, Joshua T; Giouroukakis, Mary; Shank, Brandon R; Crona, Daniel J; Berger, Karen; Wombwell, Eric

    2014-08-01

    Identify and summarize articles that describe the value that pharmacy residency training offers to sponsoring health systems. There is a tremendous gap between the number of resident applicants and the number of pharmacy residencies available. Informing health-system administration executives about the proven value of residency training is key to expanding the number of available positions. To address this disparity, a comprehensive and systematic literature search to identify publications highlighting the value that pharmacy residency training provides to the sponsor hospital or health system was conducted. Articles were identified through query of PubMed and SciVerse SCOPUS and through review of bibliographies from relevant articles. Twenty articles were identified and summarized in this annotated bibliography that demonstrate perceived and quantitative value of pharmacy residency training for health systems that sponsor residency training. Pharmacy residency training programs are essential for pharmacists that will primarily engage in direct patient care activities. This annotated bibliography includes key publications that provide evidence of the value that pharmacy residents provide to the sponsoring health system. This manuscript will aid prospective residency directors interested in developing new residency positions at new institutions or for residency program directors interested in expanding the total number of resident positions available at the existing sites. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Accessing doctors at times of need-measuring the distance tolerance of rural residents for health-related travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrail, Matthew Richard; Humphreys, John Stirling; Ward, Bernadette

    2015-05-29

    Poor access to doctors at times of need remains a significant impediment to achieving good health for many rural residents. The two-step floating catchment area (2SFCA) method has emerged as a key tool for measuring healthcare access in rural areas. However, the choice of catchment size, a key component of the 2SFCA method, is problematic because little is known about the distance tolerance of rural residents for health-related travel. Our study sought new evidence to test the hypothesis that residents of sparsely settled rural areas are prepared to travel further than residents of closely settled rural areas when accessing primary health care at times of need. A questionnaire survey of residents in five small rural communities of Victoria and New South Wales in Australia was used. The two outcome measures were current travel time to visit their usual doctor and maximum time prepared to travel to visit a doctor, both for non-emergency care. Kaplan-Meier charts were used to compare the association between increased distance and decreased travel propensity for closely-settled and sparsely-settled areas, and ordinal multivariate regression models tested significance after controlling for health-related travel moderating factors and town clustering. A total of 1079 questionnaires were completed with 363 from residents in closely-settled locations and 716 from residents in sparsely-settled areas. Residents of sparsely-settled communities travel, on average, 10 min further than residents of closely-settled communities (26.3 vs 16.9 min, p time prepared to travel (54.1 vs 31.9 min, p time remained significant after controlling for demographic and other constraints to access, such as transport availability or difficulties getting doctor appointments, as well as after controlling for town clustering and current travel times. Improved geographical access remains a key issue underpinning health policies designed to improve the provision of rural primary health care

  16. High Disparity Between Orthopedic Resident Interest and Participation in International Health Electives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Steven; Shultz, Paul; Daniels, Alan; Ackelman, Edward; Kamal, Robin N

    2016-07-01

    Few orthopedic surgical residency programs offer international health electives (IHEs). Efforts to expand these programs have been increasing across medical disciplines. Whether orthopedic residents will participate remains unknown. This study quantified and characterized orthopedic resident interest and barriers to IHEs in US residency programs. A web-based survey was administered to residents from 154 US orthopedic residency programs accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education 2014 to 2015. Questions assessed demographics and program background, previous medical experience abroad, barriers to participation, and level of interest in participating in an international health elective during their training and beyond. Twenty-seven (17.5%) residency programs responded. Chi-square analysis showed that residents who expressed interest in participating were significantly more likely to have experience abroad compared with those who expressed no interest (Porthopedic residencies (POrthopedics. 2016; 39(4):e680-e686.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Quality of discharge summaries prepared by first year internal medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legault, Kimberly; Ostro, Jacqueline; Khalid, Zahira; Wasi, Parveen; You, John J

    2012-08-15

    Patients are particularly susceptible to medical error during transitions from inpatient to outpatient care. We evaluated discharge summaries produced by incoming postgraduate year 1 (PGY-1) internal medicine residents for their completeness, accuracy, and relevance to family physicians. Consecutive discharge summaries prepared by PGY-1 residents for patients discharged from internal medicine wards were retrospectively evaluated by two independent reviewers for presence and accuracy of essential domains described by the Joint Commission for Hospital Accreditation. Family physicians rated the relevance of a separate sample of discharge summaries on domains that family physicians deemed important in previous studies. Ninety discharge summaries were assessed for completeness and accuracy. Most items were completely reported with a given item missing in 5% of summaries or fewer, with the exception of the reason for medication changes, which was missing in 15.9% of summaries. Discharge medication lists, medication changes, and the reason for medication changes--when present--were inaccurate in 35.7%, 29.5%, and 37.7% of summaries, respectively. Twenty-one family physicians reviewed 68 discharge summaries. Communication of follow-up plans for further investigations was the most frequently identified area for improvement with 27.7% of summaries rated as insufficient. This study found that medication details were frequently omitted or inaccurate, and that family physicians identified lack of clarity about follow-up plans regarding further investigations and visits to other consultants as the areas requiring the most improvement. Our findings will aid in the development of educational interventions for residents.

  18. Smoking cessation counseling by surgical and nonsurgical residents: opportunities for health promotion education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Simon R; Lai, Hollis; Bédard, Eric L R

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is the leading cause of preventable death in North America and a major contributor to surgically treated diseases and operative complications. Counseling by residents can be an effective means of helping patients to quit smoking, and with the introduction of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and CanMEDS competency frameworks, health promotion is a required component of residency training. However, past studies have found that smoking cessation counseling by residents, and in particular surgical residents, is lacking. In light of the introduction of health promotion as a core competency in residency training, this study was designed to examine the attitudes and practices of residents at our institution regarding smoking cessation counseling, comparing surgical and nonsurgical residents and seeking to identify barriers to resident counseling. An internet-based questionnaire was distributed to all residents at the University of Alberta in the fall of 2012. Items examined residents׳ attitudes and practices related to smoking cessation counseling and barriers to counseling. Although almost all residents believed that smoking cessation was important and that counseling was part of their job as a resident, far fewer routinely practiced the counseling behaviors examined. Surgical residents were less likely to perform counseling and more likely to think that counseling was not part of their job. Surgical residents were also more likely to identify obstacles to counseling such as a lack of time and formal training. Residents, and surgical residents in particular, are missing opportunities to help their patients quit smoking and improve their health. Given their positive attitudes toward counseling, it may be possible to improve their counseling practices through simple means. By identifying obstacles to counseling and tools that may increase residents׳ tendency to perform counseling, this study can help to guide training programs

  19. Global health training among U.S. residency specialties: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hau, Duncan K; Smart, Luke R; DiPace, Jennifer I; Peck, Robert N

    2017-01-01

    Interest in global health training during residency is increasing. Global health knowledge is also becoming essential for health-care delivery today. Many U.S. residency programs have been incorporating global health training opportunities for their residents. We performed a systematic literature review to evaluate global health training opportunities and challenges among U.S. residency specialties. We searched PubMed from its earliest dates until October 2015. Articles included were survey results of U.S. program directors on global health training opportunities, and web-based searches of U.S. residency program websites on global health training opportunities. Data extracted included percentage of residency programs offering global health training within a specialty and challenges encountered. Studies were found for twelve U.S. residency specialties. Of the survey based studies, the specialties with the highest percentage of their residency programs offering global health training were preventive medicine (83%), emergency medicine (74%), and surgery (71%); and the lowest were orthopaedic surgery (26%), obstetrics and gynecology (28%), and plastic surgery (41%). Of the web-based studies, the specialties with the highest percentage of their residency programs offering global health training were emergency medicine (41%), pediatrics (33%), and family medicine (22%); and the lowest were psychiatry (9%), obstetrics and gynecology (17%), and surgery (18%). The most common challenges were lack of funding, lack of international partnerships, lack of supervision, and scheduling. Among U.S. residency specialties, there are wide disparities for global health training. In general, there are few opportunities in psychiatry and surgical residency specialties, and greater opportunities among medical residency specialties. Further emphasis should be made to scale-up opportunities for psychiatry and surgical residency specialties.

  20. [Suffering and pleasure in the process of forming multidisciplinary health residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Fernandes, Marcelo Nunes; Beck, Carmem Lúcia Colomé; Weiller, Teresinha Heck; Viero, Viviani; Freitas, Paula Hubner; Prestes, Francine Cassol

    2015-12-01

    to identify situations of pleasure and suffering in the process of training multidisciplinary health resident. qualitative research, developed in the Multiprofessional Residence Program in Health at a university from the south of Brazil. Data was collected in 2013 through focus groups with nine residents, and analyzed according to a thematic analysis. The situations of suffering were stimulated by negative situations undergone by the health workers such as difficulties in participating in other professional training activities, excessive number of activities the residents commit to as health workers, lack of knowledge and hindered integration in the areas of Residency. The situations of pleasure were a result of the multiprofessional activities developed and the resident's larning possibility. The situations of pleasure and suffering identified can help in the planning of institutional actions that contribute to a professional training process and the overall wellbeing of the residents.

  1. Health care reform: preparing the psychology workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozensky, Ronald H

    2012-03-01

    This article is based on the opening presentation by the author to the Association of Psychologists in Academic Health Centers' 5th National Conference, "Preparing Psychologists for a Rapidly Changing Healthcare Environment" held in March, 2011. Reviewing the patient protection and affordable care act (ACA), that presentation was designed to set the stage for several days of symposia and discussions anticipating upcoming changes to the healthcare system. This article reviews the ACA; general trends that have impacted healthcare reform; the implications of the Act for psychology's workforce including the growing focus on interprofessional education, training, and practice, challenges to address in order to prepare for psychology's future; and recommendations for advocating for psychology's future as a healthcare profession.

  2. [Knowledge of health care ethics in paediatric residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández González, A; Rodríguez Núñez, A; Cambra Lasaosa, F J; Quintero Otero, S; Ramil Fraga, C; García Palacios, M V; Hernández Rastrollo, R; Ruiz Extremera, M A

    2014-02-01

    Bioethics has been recently incorporated in to the educational programs of both medical students and medical residents as part of their curriculum. However, its training based on clinical practice is not well structured. To evaluate the knowledge of bioethics in Spanish paediatric residents, and to analyse how this relates to the medical education during graduate and post-graduate training. A questionnaire with 20 multiple choice questions was designed to evaluate the knowledge in basic ethics with potential implications in clinical practice. We evaluated the education received during graduate and post-graduate training, and the main ethical conflicts faced. A total of 210 completed questionnaires were received from medical residents in paediatrics from 20 different Spanish hospitals, of whom 47 of these were first year residents (R1), 49 were second year residents (R2), 57 were third year residents (R3), and the remaining 57 were final year residents (R4). The mean number of correct answers was 16.8 out of 20. No differences were found between residents in different years of training, nor were there any differences between the group that had received specific training in bioethics versus those who had not. Residents were more likely to give wrong answers related with informed consent, the law on the freedom of the patient, principles of quality of life, the case analysis system, and the dimension of distributive justice. Limitation of therapeutic efforts was identified as the main ethical problem faced in clinical practice by Spanish residents in paediatrics. Most of the knowledge of bioethics is acquired during graduate training, and improved very little throughout the period of medical residence. Our results suggest that efforts are required in organising and structuring the education in bioethics during the training of residents in paediatrics. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Formal and Informal Neighborhood Social Organization: Which Promotes Better Resident Health?

    OpenAIRE

    Gilster, Megan E.; Meier, Cristian L.

    2016-01-01

    Neighborhood social organization captures how neighborhood residents differently organize to exert social control and enact their vision of their community. Whereas structural aspects of neighborhoods have been found to predict the health of neighborhood residents, we know less about whether neighborhood social characteristics, like social organization, matter for resident health. In their study, authors tested whether two types of social organization—formal and informal—were more predictive ...

  4. Attitude of Lithuanian residents to confidentiality of adolescent sexual and reproductive health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaruseviciene, Lina; Lazarus, Jeff; Zaborskis, Apolinaras

    2011-01-01

    To assess the attitudes of Lithuanian residents towards the protection of confidentiality in the sexual and reproductive health care of adolescents.......To assess the attitudes of Lithuanian residents towards the protection of confidentiality in the sexual and reproductive health care of adolescents....

  5. Debates, dialectic, and rhetoric: an approach to teaching radiology residents health economics, policy, and advocacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Saurabh

    2013-06-01

    Arguing is an art and essential to the functioning of our political and legal system. Moderated debates between residents are a useful educational vehicle to teach residents health economics and health policy. Articulating the opposing arguments leads to greater mutual understanding, an appreciation of the limits of knowledge and improved advocacy. Copyright © 2013 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Portuguese migrants in Switzerland: healthcare and health status compared to Portuguese residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Luís; Azevedo, Ana; Barros, Henrique; Paccaud, Fred; Marques-Vidal, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Most migrant studies have compared health characteristics between migrants and nationals of the host country. We aimed at comparing health characteristics of migrants with nationals from their home country. Portuguese national health survey (2005-6; 30,173 participants aged 18-75 years) and four national health surveys conducted in Switzerland (2002, 2004, 2007 and 2011, totalling 1,170 Portuguese migrants of the same age range). Self-reported data on length of stay, cardiovascular risk factors, healthcare use and health status were collected. Resident Portuguese were significantly older and more educated than migrants. Resident Portuguese had a higher mean BMI and prevalence of obesity than migrants. Resident Portuguese also reported more frequently being hypertensive and having their blood pressure screened within the last year. On the contrary, migrant Portuguese were more frequently smokers, had a medical visit in the previous year more frequently and self-rated their health higher than resident Portuguese. After adjustment for age, gender, marital status and education, migrants had a higher likelihood of smoking, of having a medical visit the previous year, and of self-rating their current health as good or very good than resident Portuguese. Compared to Portuguese residents, cholesterol screening in the previous year was more common only among migrants living in Switzerland for more than 17 years. Portuguese migrants in Switzerland do not differ substantially from resident Portuguese regarding most cardiovascular risk factors. Migrants consider themselves healthier than Portuguese residents and more often had a recent medical visit.

  7. Experience of health-system pharmacy administration residents in a longitudinal human resource management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amerine, Lindsey B Poppe; Granko, Robert P; Savage, Scott W; Daniels, Rowell; Eckel, Stephen F

    2014-12-15

    The experience of health-system pharmacy administration (HSPA) residents in a longitudinal human resource (HR) management program is described. The subsequent benefits to the residents, department, and profession are also discussed. Postgraduate year 2 HSPA residents at an academic medical center desired more responsibility for managing an operational area. To this end, a program was created in which these residents directly manage a small group of pharmacy technicians and report to a clinical manager or assistant director with oversight responsibility. These "resident managers" are responsible, under the direction of the area's clinical manager, for the personnel, schedule, time and attendance, and HR activities of the area. Resident managers have led and sustained operational improvement projects in their areas. In addition to providing learning experiences to residents, the HSPA residency program has also improved the operations of the areas in which these residents work. Benefits to the residents include conducting annual performance evaluations for employees with whom they have a relationship as it is a task every administrator completes. Resident managers at UNC have consistently stated that this longitudinal HR experience is one of the most rewarding and most challenging experiences offered in the two-year HSPA residency. The involvement of HSPA residents in longitudinal management responsibilities furthers residents' leadership success by providing trained managers who are ready to immerse themselves into practice postresidency, having employee engagement and HR skills as well as experiences with leading operational improvements. A longitudinal HR management experience was successfully incorporated into an HSPA residency combined Master of Science degree program. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Differential Experience With Men's and Women's Health Care Visits Between Male and Female Family Medicine Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Gregory M; Gentile, Natalie; Lai, Benjamin; Angstman, Kurt B; Bonacci, Robert

    2016-07-01

    Few studies have addressed whether male family medicine residents have more exposure to men's health issues than their female colleagues. Additionally, the association between panel demographics or continuity of care and the differential experience with gender-specific health care is unclear. Between July 1, 2011, and June 30, 2014, all residents in the family medicine program had their gender, the number of women's and men's health care visits, the total number of male and female visits, and the number of visits with patients assigned to their primary care panel recorded each academic year. To determine which visits pertained to men's or women's health care, Clinical Classification Software developed by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) was used to map ICD9 billing codes into a useful ontology. Female residents had significantly more women's health visits (229 versus 123) while male residents had significantly more men's health visits (89 versus 49) than colleagues of the opposite gender. There were no significant differences in continuity, the gender distribution of panels, nor the mean age of panels. However, female residents saw a greater percentage of female visits overall (60.6% versus 53.3%). Both male and female resident physicians acquire more experience with same-gender health care visits during training. Panel demographics and continuity do not explain the differential experience. Patient preferences and/or biased scheduling selection may explain why residents accumulate same-gender health care visits at twice the rate of opposite-gender health care visits.

  9. Use of mental health services by nursing home residents after hurricanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lisa M; Hyer, Kathryn; Schinka, John A; Mando, Ahed; Frazier, Darvis; Polivka-West, Lumarie

    2010-01-01

    A growing body of research supports the value of mental health intervention to treat people affected by disasters. This study used a mixed-methods approach to evaluate pre- and posthurricane mental health service use in Florida nursing homes. A questionnaire was administered to 258 directors of nursing, administrators, and owners of nursing homes, representing two-thirds of Florida's counties, to identify residents' mental health needs and service use. In four subsequent focus group meetings with 22 nursing home administrators, underlying factors influencing residents' use of services were evaluated. Although most nursing homes provided some type of mental health care during normal operations, disaster-related mental health services were not routinely provided to residents. Receiving facilities were more likely than evacuating facilities to provide treatment to evacuated residents. Nursing home staff should be trained to deliver disaster-related mental health intervention and in procedures for making referrals for follow-up evaluation and formal intervention.

  10. Preparing International Medical Graduates for Psychiatry Residency: A Multi-Site Needs Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sockalingam, Sanjeev; Hawa, Raed; Al-Battran, Mazin; Abbey, Susan E.; Zaretsky, Ari

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Despite the growing number of international medical graduates (IMGs) training in medicine in Canada and the United States, IMG-specific challenges early in psychiatry residency have not been fully explored. Therefore, the authors conducted a needs-assessment survey to determine the needs of IMGs transitioning into psychiatry residency.…

  11. Teaching health policy to residents--three-year experience with a multi-specialty curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greysen, S Ryan; Wassermann, Travis; Payne, Perry; Mullan, Fitzhugh

    2009-12-01

    Most residents have limited education or exposure to health policy during residency. We developed a course to (1) educate residents on health policy topics applicable to daily physician practice; (2) expose residents to health policy careers through visits with policy makers and analysts; (3) promote personal engagement in health policy. Residents registered for a 3-week elective offered twice annually through the George Washington University Department of Health Policy. The course format includes: daily required readings and small-group seminars with policy experts, interactive on-site visits with policy makers, and final team presentations to senior faculty on topical health policy issues. One hundred thirty residents from 14 specialties have completed the course to date. Seventy completed our post-course survey. Most participants [59 (84%)] felt the course was very or extremely helpful. Participant self-ratings increased from pre- to post-course in overall knowledge of health policy [2 (3%) good or excellent before, 58 (83%) after], likelihood of teaching policy concepts to peers [20 (25%) vs. 62 (86%)], and likelihood of pursuing further health policy training [28 (37%) vs. 56 (82%)]. This 3-week elective in health policy improves self-reported knowledge and interest in health policy research, advocacy, and teaching.

  12. Mental health literacy as a function of remoteness of residence: an Australian national study

    OpenAIRE

    Jorm Anthony F; Christensen Helen; Griffiths Kathleen M

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Although there have been many population studies of mental health literacy, little is known about the mental health literacy of people who reside in rural areas. This study sought to determine the impact of remoteness on public knowledge of depression and schizophrenia. Methods The mental health literacy of residents of major cities, inner regional, and outer-remote (including outer regional, remote, and very remote) regions were compared using data from a 2003–04 Australi...

  13. Behavioral health assessments and interventions of residents and psychology trainees during dual interviewing: a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcerelli, John H; Fowler, Shannon L; Klassen, Brian; Murdoch, William; Thakur, Elyse R; Wright, Brandy E; Morris, Pierre

    2013-06-01

    Family medicine residents increasingly work collaboratively with psychology trainees. One type of collaborative experience involves dual interviewing of clinic patients. The goal of this observational study was to provide an initial description of what occurs during dual interviews as it relates to behavioral health assessments and interventions. Psychology trainees provided detailed descriptions of 550 collaborative patient encounters involving 348 patients from the Wayne State University/Crittenton Family Medicine Residency clinic. Psychology trainees coded the frequency of behavioral health assessments and interventions by the resident, psychology trainee, or both. Eighty percent of the encounters contained a behavioral health assessment, and 29% contained a behavioral health intervention. Most of these clinical activities were collaboratively done. Interestingly, residents and psychology trainees tended to provide different behavioral health interventions. Moreover, residents provided different behavioral health interventions in repeat dual interviews (n=202) as opposed to first-time visits (n=348), while psychology trainees did not. Little is known about the process of dual interviewing, and this study is an important first step in describing how residents and psychology trainees actually interact during these encounters. More research is needed about the impact of dual interviewing on residents' behavior.

  14. Emergency medicine residents' attitudes and opinions of in-training exam preparation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eastin, Travis R; Bernard, Aaron W

    2013-01-01

    Emergency Medicine (EM) residents take the American Board of Emergency Medicine (ABEM) in-training exam, and performance on this exam has been shown to correlate to performance on the ABEM qualifying exam...

  15. Preparing Emergency Medicine Residents to Disclose Medical Error Using Standardized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalding, Carmen N; Rudinsky, Sherri L

    2018-01-01

    Emergency Medicine (EM) is a unique clinical learning environment. The American College of Graduate Medical Education Clinical Learning Environment Review Pathways to Excellence calls for "hands-on training" of disclosure of medical error (DME) during residency. Training and practicing key elements of DME using standardized patients (SP) may enhance preparedness among EM residents in performing this crucial skill in a clinical setting. This training was developed to improve resident preparedness in DME in the clinical setting. Objectives included the following: the residents will be able to define a medical error; discuss ethical and professional standards of DME; recognize common barriers to DME; describe key elements in effective DME to patients and families; and apply key elements during a SP encounter. The four-hour course included didactic and experiential learning methods, and was created collaboratively by core EM faculty and subject matter experts in conflict resolution and healthcare simulation. Educational media included lecture, video exemplars of DME communication with discussion, small group case-study discussion, and SP encounters. We administered a survey assessing for preparedness in DME pre-and post-training. A critical action checklist was administered to assess individual performance of key elements of DME during the evaluated SP case. A total of 15 postgraduate-year 1 and 2 EM residents completed the training. After the course, residents reported increased comfort with and preparedness in performing several key elements in DME. They were able to demonstrate these elements in a simulated setting using SP. Residents valued the training, rating the didactic, SP sessions, and overall educational experience very high. Experiential learning using SP is effective in improving resident knowledge of and preparedness in performing medical error disclosure. This educational module can be adapted to other clinical learning environments through creation of

  16. A nationwide, resident-led teaching programme for medical students in Singapore: SingHealth Student Internship Programme Bootcamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Daniel Sw; Lee, Jill Cs; Loo, Benny Kg; Baisa, Katherine; Koo, Wen Hsin; Cook, Sandy; Lim, Boon Leng

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to describe the planning, development and evaluation of the success of the first nationwide, resident-led, large-group teaching programme for medical students - the Singapore Health Services Student Internship Programme (SIP) Bootcamp. This was an initial feasibility study evaluating a half-day teaching boot camp initiated, developed and conducted by the resident educators. A three-month preparation period was required to set up an education subcommittee, liaise with medical student leaders, recruit resident educators, meet all the stakeholders and conduct the boot camp. During the SIP Bootcamp, resident educators conducted clinical case presentations using a question-and-answer format. Audience participation was strongly encouraged. A 15-item questionnaire was distributed to assess the participants' learning experience and the resident educators' teaching performance using a five-point Likert scale. Overall, 94.8% (n = 110) of the 116 respondents agreed that the teaching sessions were of high quality and content was relevant to their training. The resident educators appeared well-informed (96.6%, n = 112) and enthusiastic about their respective topics (98.3%, n = 114). However, a few students (9.5%, n = 11) felt that the audio-visual aids and handouts could be improved to better aid their learning process. This teaching boot camp for medical students was the first of its kind in Singapore and feedback from medical students showed that it was well-received. Further research using different teaching methods, including small-group discussions and surgical practical sessions by resident educators from different specialties, would be of great value to students. Copyright: © Singapore Medical Association.

  17. Food Safety When Preparing Holiday Meals

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Home Department of Public Health Current: Remember Food Safety when Preparing Holiday Meals Services and Programs Regulation & ... of Public Health (DPH) reminds Connecticut residents that food safety is especially important as they prepare holiday meals. ...

  18. Oral health problems and needs of nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyak, H A; Grayston, M N; Crinean, C L

    1993-02-01

    The problem of dental neglect and high levels of unmet dental needs among elderly residents of long term care facilities has been widely documented in literature. A survey was conducted of 1063 residents in 31 nursing homes throughout Washington (representing 11% of all facilities in the state). The greatest single need among dentate elderly was for routine oral hygiene (72%), while for denture wearers adjustment of loose dentures was the primary need (46.4%). Periodontal problems were slightly more prevalent than root caries (43% and 36% respectively) among dentate elderly. Dry mouth was found in 10% of residents. Oral conditions were worse in larger facilities located in rural and moderate size communities, and those under a proprietary corporation. These results suggest that daily oral hygiene and regular check-ups by a dental professional are most needed by frail elderly, especially in large, proprietary homes in rural and moderate size communities. Education of nursing home staff and the elderly themselves in the importance and methods of home care are also critical needs.

  19. Living environment matters : Relationships between neighborhood characteristics and health of the residents in a Dutch municipality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putrik, P.; de Vries, N.K.; Mujakovic, S.; van Amelsvoort, L.; Kant, IJ.; Kunst, A.E.; van Oers, J.A.M.; Jansen, M.

    2015-01-01

    Characteristics of an individual alone cannot exhaustively explain all the causes of poor health, and neighborhood of residence have been suggested to be one of the factors that contribute to health. However, knowledge about aspects of the neighborhood that are most important to health is limited.

  20. Living environment matters: relationships between neighborhood characteristics and health of the residents in a Dutch municipality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putrik, Polina; de Vries, Nanne K.; Mujakovic, Suhreta; van Amelsvoort, Ludovic; Kant, Ijmert; Kunst, Anton E.; van Oers, Hans; Jansen, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Characteristics of an individual alone cannot exhaustively explain all the causes of poor health, and neighborhood of residence have been suggested to be one of the factors that contribute to health. However, knowledge about aspects of the neighborhood that are most important to health is limited.

  1. [The guideline Oral Health Care for dependent residents in long term care facilities, 2007: dire necessity!

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putten, GJ van der; Visschere, L De; Obbergen, J. van; Schols, J.G.J.H.; Baat, C. de

    2008-01-01

    The oral health status of residents in Dutch nursing homes is rather poor, especially of those depending on caregivers for their oral health care. Moreover, when care dependency is rising, the provision of good oral health care becomes more difficult. With more elderly people still having (parts of)

  2. The happy docs study: a Canadian Association of Internes and Residents well-being survey examining resident physician health and satisfaction within and outside of residency training in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramchandar Kevin

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few Canadian studies have examined stress in residency and none have included a large sample of resident physicians. Previous studies have also not examined well-being resources nor found significant concerns with perceived stress levels in residency. The goal of "The Happy Docs Study" was to increase knowledge of current stressors affecting the health of residents and to gather information regarding the well-being resources available to them. Findings A questionnaire was distributed to all residents attending all medical schools in Canada outside of Quebec through the Canadian Association of Internes and Residents (CAIR during the 2004–2005 academic years. In total 1999 resident physicians responded to the survey (35%, N = 5784 residents. One third of residents reported their life as "quite a bit" to "extremely" stressful (33%, N = 656. Time pressure was the most significant factor associated with stress (49%, N = 978. Intimidation and harassment was experienced by more than half of all residents (52%, N = 1050 with training status (30%, N = 599 and gender (18%, N = 364 being the main perceived sources. Eighteen percent of residents (N = 356 reported their mental health as either "fair" or "poor". The top two resources that residents wished to have available were career counseling (39%, N = 777 and financial counseling (37%, N = 741. Conclusion Although many Canadian resident physicians have a positive outlook on their well-being, residents experience significant stressors during their training and a significant portion are at risk for emotional and mental health problems. This study can serve as a basis for future research, advocacy and resource application for overall improvements to well-being during residency.

  3. Using the health-care matrix to teach and improve patient safety culture in an OB/GYN residency training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rad, Steve; Ogunyemi, Dotun

    2012-12-01

    To assess the utility of health-care matrix in teaching patient safety in terms of the Institute of Medicine Aims for health-care improvement and Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education competencies. As part of residency education, health-care matrix conference is held monthly. A multidisciplinary team is invited. Residents choose cases and develop a draft matrix under faculty supervision. The matrix is presented, and consensus action plan is generated after discussion. Approximately 2 years after initiation of the program, residents completed an anonymous 15-item survey. The study included 26 health-care matrix conferences from 2007 to 2009. Main reasons for residents' selection of cases were management issues (42%), bleeding complications (35%), and medication errors (23%). Major contributors to patient safety concerns by Institute of Medicine Aims were timeliness (65%), and those by Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education competencies were system issues (77%), medical knowledge (69%), and communication issues (66%).Residents agreed that the program was useful. No resident thought that the program should be cancelled. Only 39% feel their communication skills were improved, 48% felt that preparation was time consuming, and 29% felt awkward presenting errors of superiors. Review of action plans developed after each matrix showed that implementation of recommendations was initiated in 92% of the cases. The health-care matrix curriculum can be used to teach patient safety culture, assess system processes, and improve patient care. This report highlights the importance of system issues, timeliness, medical knowledge, and communication for patient safety concerns.

  4. Assessment of medical resident's attention to the health literacy level of newly admitted patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecile Karsenty

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The objective of this study was to assess communication at the bedside in the emergency room between residents and their patients in order to identify common communication gaps. We also intended to evaluate whether residents for whom English is a second language (ESL residents communicate less effectively. Methods: A scorable checklist was developed in order to assess and identify communication gaps between the residents and their patients. Medical students observed the internal medicine and family medicine residents while they admitted patients to the medical service in the Emergency Room. Before this, medical students were trained for two weeks with a senior internist. The role of the medical student was not revealed; rather they were self-described as observers of the admission process. Results: Over an 8 week period, 71 observations were made of 27 medicine residents. 71 patient intakes were observed, evaluating 27 residents. In 52.1% of these interactions, the residents used medical acronyms when communicating with the patients. During 66.2% of interactions, technical medical terms or expressions were used during the history taking and in only 27.6% of those cases were the terms explained at least partially. Teach back technique was not observed in any of the interactions evaluated. Data was also analyzed based on whether the doctors were ESL residents or native English speakers. ESL residents tended to use significantly more technical language than the native English speakers, but the native English speakers tended to use more acronyms. Conclusions: How much patients understand of what their doctor says is called “health literacy.” Resident physicians often overestimate their patients’ health literacy, and this leads to communication gaps which have the potential to result in poorer health outcomes for the patients. The checklist developed for this pilot study assessed how well residents tailor their communication to

  5. The Preparation of New Teachers for the Profession: Ohio's Resident Educator Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillham, John C.; Evans, Lesley Anne; Williams, Nicole V.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to learn if teachers believe their experience with the Resident Educator Program improved their ability to meet the Ohio Standards for the Teaching Profession and increased support and retention. The 189 participants completed a 33 question Likert-based survey and provided more than 406 comments. The findings indicate…

  6. Quality of Mental Health Care for Nursing Home Residents: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, David C.; Aschbrenner, Kelly A.; Rome, Vincent F.; Bartels, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Because of the high proportion of nursing home residents with a mental illness other than dementia, the quality of mental health care in nursing homes is a major clinical and policy issue. The authors apply Donabedian's framework for assessing quality of care based on the triad of structure, process, and outcome-based measures in reviewing the literature on the quality of mental health care in nursing homes. Quality measures used within the literature include mental health consultations and hospitalizations, inappropriate use of medications, and mental health survey deficiencies. Factors related to the resident's welfare (nurse staffing), provider norms (locality), and financial factors (payer mix) were associated with the quality of mental health care. Although future research is necessary, the extant literature suggests that persons with mental illness are frequently admitted to nursing homes and their care is often of poor quality and related to a series of resident and facility factors. PMID:20223943

  7. Benefits of comprehensive reproductive health education in family medicine residency

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nothnagle, Melissa; Prine, Linda; Goodman, Susan

    2008-01-01

    .... Comprehensive reproductive health education for family physicians could benefit patients by improving access to safe care for unintended pregnancy and early pregnancy loss and by improving continuity...

  8. Living environment matters: relationships between neighborhood characteristics and health of the residents in a Dutch municipality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putrik, Polina; de Vries, Nanne K; Mujakovic, Suhreta; van Amelsvoort, Ludovic; Kant, Ijmert; Kunst, Anton E; van Oers, Hans; Jansen, Maria

    2015-02-01

    Characteristics of an individual alone cannot exhaustively explain all the causes of poor health, and neighborhood of residence have been suggested to be one of the factors that contribute to health. However, knowledge about aspects of the neighborhood that are most important to health is limited. The main objective of this study was to explore associations between certain features of neighborhood environment and self-rated health and depressive symptoms in Maastricht (The Netherlands). A large amount of routinely collected neighborhood data were aggregated by means of factor analysis to 18 characteristics of neighborhood social and physical environment. Associations between these characteristics and self-rated health and presence of depressive symptoms were further explored in multilevel logistic regression models adjusted for individual demographic and socio-economic factors. The study sample consisted of 9,879 residents (mean age 55 years, 48 % male). Residents of unsafe communities were less likely to report good health (OR 0.88 95 % CI 0.80-0.97) and depressive symptoms (OR 0.81 95 % CI 0.69-0.97), and less cohesive environment was related to worse self-rated health (OR 0.81 95 % CI 0.72-0.92). Residents of neighborhoods with more car traffic nuisance and more disturbance from railway noise reported worse mental health (OR 0.79 95 % CI 0.68-0.92 and 0.85 95 % CI 0.73-0.99, respectively). We did not observe any association between health and quality of parking and shopping facilities, facilities for public or private transport, neighborhood aesthetics, green space, industrial nuisance, sewerage, neighbor nuisance or satisfaction with police performance. Our findings can be used to support development of integrated health policies targeting broader determinants of health. Improving safety, social cohesion and decreasing traffic nuisance in disadvantaged neighborhoods might be a promising way to improve the health of residents and reduce health inequalities.

  9. Perceptions, attitudes, and satisfaction concerning resident participation in health care among dermatology outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlGhamdi, Khalid M; Almohanna, Hind M; Alkeraye, Salim S; Alsaif, Fahad M; Alrasheed, Saleh K

    2014-01-01

    A limited number of published studies have discussed patient attitudes toward resident physicians' participation in dermatology clinics. A literature search failed to identify any such study in the Middle East. The aim of this study was to explore patient perceptions and attitudes toward resident participation in dermatology outpatient clinics. A self-administered questionnaire focused on patient attitudes toward dermatology resident participation was distributed randomly to all adult outpatients attending dermatology clinics at a university hospital in Saudi Arabia between July and September 2010. The questionnaire was returned by 742 of 900 patients, for an 82% response rate. The mean patient age was 30.58 ± 11.67 years. Forty-two percent (311 of 742) of the respondents were male. The major reason for visiting the hospital was a medical dermatology consultation (80.4%). Only 35% of the patients self-reported an accurate understanding of the "resident" designation. In total, 86.4% of patients were satisfied with the residents' behavior. Furthermore, 98.4% of the patients were satisfied with the medical care provided by the residents. The patients agreed with resident participation in their health care. The majority of the patients expressed their willingness to provide a medical history and receive counseling from residents (87.6% and 86.3%, respectively). There was no gender-associated effect on the understanding of the resident position or the decision to receive a physical examination by a resident. Dermatology outpatients are satisfied and have positive perceptions and attitudes toward resident participation in the dermatology clinic.

  10. Store and Restaurant Advertising and Health of Public Housing Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Katie M.; Li, Dongmei; Regan, Gail R.; Howard, Hugh H.; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S.; Lee, Rebecca E.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To determine relationships between food and beverage signs and health. Methods: In 12 public housing neighborhoods, food and alcohol signs were counted for stores and restaurants. Health and demographic data were from 373 adults. Results: Multilevel modeling showed higher BMI was related to more store and restaurant alcohol signs,…

  11. Innovative partnerships to advance public health training in community-based academic residency programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lo JC

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Joan C Lo,1–3 Thomas E Baudendistel,2,3 Abhay Dandekar,3,4 Phuoc V Le,5 Stanton Siu,2,3 Bruce Blumberg6 1Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, CA, USA; 2Department of Medicine, Kaiser Permanente Oakland Medical Center, Oakland, CA, USA; 3Graduate Medical Education, Kaiser Permanente East Bay, Oakland, CA, USA; 4Department of Pediatrics, Kaiser Permanente Oakland Medical Center, Oakland, CA, USA; 5School of Public Health, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, USA; 6Graduate Medical Education, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, CA, USA Abstract: Collaborative partnerships between community-based academic residency ­training programs and schools of public health, represent an innovative approach to training future physician leaders in population management and public health. In Kaiser Permanente Northern California, development of residency-Masters in Public Health (MPH tracks in the Internal Medicine Residency and the Pediatrics Residency programs, with MPH graduate studies completed at the University of California Berkeley School of Public Health, enables physicians to integrate clinical training with formal education in epidemiology, biostatistics, health policy, and disease prevention. These residency-MPH programs draw on more than 50 years of clinical education, public health training, and health services research – creating an environment that sparks inquiry and added value by developing skills in patient-centered care through the lens of population-based outcomes. Keywords: graduate medical education, public health, master’s degree, internal medicine, pediatrics, residency training

  12. Generational status and duration of residence predict diabetes prevalence among Latinos: the California Men's Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ameena T; Quinn, Virginia P; Caan, Bette; Sternfeld, Barbara; Haque, Reina; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K

    2009-10-19

    Diabetes disproportionately affects Latinos. However, examining Latinos as one group obscures important intra-group differences. This study examined how generational status, duration of US residence, and language preference are associated with diabetes prevalence and to what extent these explain the higher prevalence among Latinos. We determined nativity, duration of US residence, language preference, and diabetes prevalence among 11 817 Latino, 6109 black, and 52 184 white participants in the California Men's Health Study. We combined generational status and residence duration into a single migration status variable with levels: > or = third generation; second generation; and immigrant living in the US for > 25, 16-25, 11-15, or Generational status and residence duration were associated with diabetes prevalence among middle-aged Latino men in California. As the Latino population grows, the burden of diabetes-associated disease is likely to increase and demands public health attention.

  13. Reflections of the Veterans Administration Puget Sound Health Care System Regional Nurse Practitioner Residency Forum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kameka; Poppe, Anne; Kaminetzky, Catherine P; Wipf, Joyce A; Woods, Nancy Fugate

    2016-01-01

    There is a proliferation of advanced practice residency programs. However, there is no uniform model of developing and evaluating program success. An information forum was convened by Veterans Health Administration Puget Sound Health Care System's Center for Primary Care Education on September 17, 2013, in Seattle, Washington, to explore critical aspects of residency models. The three objectives of this forum were to develop a shared understanding of key elements needed to support nurse practitioner residencies; define the unique needs of nurse practitioner trainees who are interested in applying for a residency; and examine the viability of designing a replicable nurse practitioner residency model benchmarking stakeholder best practices. This article describes the organization of the forum and summarizes the presentations during the program. The companion article explores key recommendations from the forum related to future development of residency "toolkits" to aid in future evaluation and accreditation. As nurse practitioner residencies continue to develop and evolve, more is needed in the area of structure and alignment. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  14. Health status among urban residents living in proximity to petroleum coke storage: a first examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendryx, Michael; Entwhistle, Jennifer; Kenny, Emily; Illyn, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We conducted an in-person survey in neighborhoods in south Chicago to examine whether residence near outdoor petroleum coke storage piles was associated with poorer health status and illness symptoms. A total of 223 adults (≥18) completed the surveys in English or Spanish, including 136 from a neighborhood exposed to the petroleum coke and 87 from a nearby comparison neighborhood. Exposure was defined based on prevailing winds and distance. We conducted a propensity score regression analysis, and found that residents in the exposed neighborhood were significantly more likely to report poor self-rated health, more unhealthy physical and mental health days, more illness symptoms including in particular respiratory and neurological symptoms, and worse perceived environmental conditions. The survey is limited by the small sample and the self-report nature of the data, but provides initial quantitative evidence that residence near outdoor petroleum coke storage piles may pose a public health risk.

  15. Permanent health education based on research with professionals of a multidisciplinary residency program: case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Trivisiol da Silva

    Full Text Available This research aims to identify the perception of professional members of a multi-professional residency program on Permanent Health Education. It is a case study research using a qualitative approach, with sixteen members of a multi-professional residency program. The data were collected from January to May 2012, through semi-structured interviews, document analysis and systematic observation, and analyzed according to Thematic Content Analysis. Two categories were identified: Permanent Health Education establishing collective spaces of reflection of practices and Permanent Health Education that promotes integration between disciplines. The members of the multiprofessional residency team were found to be aware that permanent education permeates their training and enables reflection on their clinical practices and multidisciplinary action as producers of health actions.

  16. The relationship between mental health and social solidarity among apartment residents in shahrekord, iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganji, Forouzan; Nekooee, Afsaneh; Safdari, Faranak; Parvin, Neda; Shafei, Akbar; Ganji, Hanife

    2012-01-01

    To examine the relationship between psychological well-being and social solidarity of apartment residents in Shahrekord, Iran. A sample of 200 apartment dwellers was selected randomly. Fessler Social Solidarity Inventory and General Health Questionnaire were used to gather data. Using partial correlation test and having controlled the effect of age, sex and education, we found significant relationship between mental health and social solidarity (r = 0.47; p= 0.023). After controlling education and marital status, it was also revealed that women were in a better solidarity situation compared to men (psolidarity of apartment residents in Sharekord. Good mental health accompanied with better social solidarity.

  17. Resident Assistant Training Program for Increasing Alcohol, Other Drug, and Mental Health First-Aid Efforts

    OpenAIRE

    Thombs, Dennis L.; Gonzalez, Jennifer M. Reingle; Osborn, Cynthia J.; Rossheim, Matthew E.; Suzuki, Sumihiro

    2015-01-01

    In college and university residence halls, resident assistants (RAs) are expected to serve as first-aid providers to students who may have alcohol, other drug, mental health, and academic problems. Despite this responsibility, evidence-based, first-aid programs have not been developed and tested for the RA workforce. The current study examined effects of an investigational first-aid program designed specifically for RAs. The online Peer Hero Training program is a novel approach to RA training...

  18. Using Objective Structured Teaching Encounters (OSTEs) to prepare chief residents to be emotionally intelligent leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerrone, Sara Ann; Adelman, Patti; Akbar, Salaahuddin; Yacht, Andrew C.; Fornari, Alice

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Chief Residents must lead, manage and mentor a diverse and often large group of residents, however there is a lack of formal leadership training throughout graduate medical education. Objective: Development of a 3-part Chief Resident (CR) Program focused on leading, managing and mentoring. Design: Each participant completes an Emotional Intelligence (EI) Inventory prior to the day-long event. Participants receive their EI scores at the beginning of the program, which features interactive sessions on leadership, management, and feedback skills. The program then reinforces the application of their new knowledge about EI through a four station OSTE (Observed Structured Teaching Encounter). CRs practice feedback and coaching skills in a simulated environment where they need to provide the context of formative feedback to a standardized resident. Results: The aggregated mean pre-session EI score for all participants was 76.9 (an ideal score is >85). An independent-samples t-test compared the CRs’ leadership and feedback performance on their first and second OSTE performance within a single afternoon session. There was a significant difference between the first OSTE performance (M = 47.92, SD = 7.8) and the second OSTE performance (M = 51.22, SD = 6.9); t (68) = 1.99, p = 0.006. These results suggest that participating in multiple OSTEs positively reinforces the core interpersonal and communication skills discussed in the didactic and practiced in the interactive portions of the program. Conclusion: The low mean pre-session EI score achieved by our participants supports the idea that CRs enter their new roles with a level of EI that can be enhanced. CRs had an overall positive reaction to EI and its application to the core skills addressed in the program, highlighting the fact that similar programs could be used to train early career physicians to be more skilled and comfortable with leading, managing and mentoring. Abbreviations: CR

  19. Using Objective Structured Teaching Encounters (OSTEs) to prepare chief residents to be emotionally intelligent leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerrone, Sara Ann; Adelman, Patti; Akbar, Salaahuddin; Yacht, Andrew C; Fornari, Alice

    2017-01-01

    Chief Residents must lead, manage and mentor a diverse and often large group of residents, however there is a lack of formal leadership training throughout graduate medical education. Development of a 3-part Chief Resident (CR) Program focused on leading, managing and mentoring. Each participant completes an Emotional Intelligence (EI) Inventory prior to the day-long event. Participants receive their EI scores at the beginning of the program, which features interactive sessions on leadership, management, and feedback skills. The program then reinforces the application of their new knowledge about EI through a four station OSTE (Observed Structured Teaching Encounter). CRs practice feedback and coaching skills in a simulated environment where they need to provide the context of formative feedback to a standardized resident. The aggregated mean pre-session EI score for all participants was 76.9 (an ideal score is >85). An independent-samples t-test compared the CRs' leadership and feedback performance on their first and second OSTE performance within a single afternoon session. There was a significant difference between the first OSTE performance (M = 47.92, SD = 7.8) and the second OSTE performance (M = 51.22, SD = 6.9); t (68) = 1.99, p = 0.006. These results suggest that participating in multiple OSTEs positively reinforces the core interpersonal and communication skills discussed in the didactic and practiced in the interactive portions of the program. The low mean pre-session EI score achieved by our participants supports the idea that CRs enter their new roles with a level of EI that can be enhanced. CRs had an overall positive reaction to EI and its application to the core skills addressed in the program, highlighting the fact that similar programs could be used to train early career physicians to be more skilled and comfortable with leading, managing and mentoring. CR: Chief resident; EI: Emotional intelligence; GME: Graduate medical education

  20. Preparation for practice in internal medicine. A study of ten years of residency graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, J H; Rich, E C; Luxenberg, M G; Spilane, M T; Kern, D C; Parrino, T A

    1988-04-01

    To evaluate the adequacy of preparation for medical practice, we surveyed 320 internal medicine program graduates. The 210 respondents gave their perceptions regarding preparation in training and importance in practice of eight clinical practice skills and 27 clinical procedure skills. The skills with highest preparation scores were venipuncture, intravenous line placement, and arterial puncture for blood gases. The skills rated as the most important in practice were history taking, physical examination, and selection of diagnostic tests. For 13 of the 27 clinical procedure skills, mean preparation scores were significantly higher than mean importance scores, suggesting "overpreparation." In contrast, seven of the eight clinical practice skills had mean preparation scores significantly lower than mean importance scores, suggesting "underpreparation." Furthermore, greater preparation during training was reported by more recent graduates for five of the overprepared skills. We concluded that skills emphasized in internal medicine training are not necessarily those important for practice and that recent changes in the training and practice environments may be increasing these discrepancies.

  1. The Influence of Suicide Prevention Gatekeeper Training on Resident Assistants' Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Martin A. Swanbrow; Drum, David J.

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the mental health influence on resident assistants associated with their training in suicide prevention and their subsequent role as campus mental health gatekeepers. Despite considerable prior personal experience with their own suicidal thinking as well as with others who have thoughts of suicide, a multiple regression…

  2. Noise monitoring and adverse health effects in residents in different functional areas of Luzhou, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhi-Xia; Lei, Zhang-Heng; Zhang, Chun-Lian; Xiong, Wei; Gan, Zhong-Lin; Hu, Ping; Zhang, Qing-Bi

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the noise pollution situation and the resulting adverse effect on residents' health in Luzhou, China, to provide data for noise pollution prevention policies and interventions. Four different functional areas (commercial, construction, residential, and transportation hub areas) were chosen to monitor noise level for 3 months. The survey was performed by questionnaire on the spot on randomly selected individuals; it collected data on the impact of noise on residents' health (quality of sleep, high blood pressure, subjective feeling of nervous system damage, and attention) as well as the knowledge of noise-induced health damage, the degree of adaptation to noise, and their solutions. The noise levels of residential, commercial, transportation, and construction areas exceeded the national standards (P health hazards associated with noise; 64.57% of residents have adapted to the current noise environment. Most of them have to close the doors and windows to reduce noise. The noise pollution situation in Luzhou, China, is serious, especially the traffic noise pollution. Residents pay less attention to it and adopt single measures to reduce the noise. We should work toward the prevention and control of traffic noise and improve the residents' awareness to reduce the adverse health effects of noise. © 2014 APJPH.

  3. [Health habits and vaccination status of Lebanese residents: are future doctors applying the rules of prevention?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hage, Claudine Nasr; Sayegh, Josiane; Rizk, Grace Abi

    2010-01-01

    There has never been a nationally representative survey of medical students' personal health-related practices, although they are inherently of interest and may affect patient-counseling practices. This study evaluated the health practices and the vaccination status of first year residents working at the academic hospital Hôtel-Dieu de France. The medical files of all medicine and surgery residents in their first year of specialization between the years 2005 and 2008 were reviewed. These residents were required to go through a preventive medical visit at the University Center of Family and Community Health. One hundred and nine residents (109) were included in the study; 68 (6239%) were male and 41 (37.61%) were female with a mean age of 26 years. Only 6 residents (5.50%) practiced physical activity according to international guidelines (more than three times a week for more than 30 minutes each time). Most residents (n = 76 ; 69.73%) used to skip one or two meals especially breakfast and as a consequence 30 male (44.11%) and 4 female (9.75%) students were overweight, with a statistical difference between the two sexes (Fisher test, p-value = 0.001). Twenty-eight residents (25.69%) were smokers with a male predominance. Fourteen residents of both genders (12.84%) drank alcohol regularly (> 3 times a week) and 71 (65.14%) had a drink occasionally (once a month or less). Only 25 residents (23%) of the cohort had a complete and up-to-date immunization status. The immunization gap was basically against measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) and diphtheria, tetanus, poliomyelitis (dT Polio). Ninety-nine residents (90.83%) had full immunization against hepatitis B with an adequate response in 78 residents (71.56%). This study showed that our residents did not always have a healthy lifestyle especially when it comes to physical activity and eating habits. They also lacked an adequate vaccination. Interventions should take place in order to promote healthy life style and to

  4. Health Effects of PCBs in Residences and Schools (HESPERUS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner, Elvira; Andersen, Zorana Jovanovic; Frederiksen, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Polychlorinated-biphenyls (PCBs) were introduced in the late 1920s and used until the 1970s when they were banned in most countries due to evidence of environmental build-up and possible adverse health effects. However they still persist in the environment, indoors and in humans. Indoor air...... in contaminated buildings may confer airborne exposure markedly above background regional PCB levels. To date, no epidemiological studies have assessed the health effects from exposure to semi-volatile PCBs in the indoor environment. Indoor air PCBs are generally less chlorinated than PCBs that are absorbed via...... the diet, or via past occupational exposure; therefore their health effects require separate risk assessment. Two separate cohorts of individuals who have either attended schools (n = 66,769; 26% exposed) or lived in apartment buildings (n = 37,185; 19% exposed), where indoor air PCB concentrations have...

  5. Development of a curriculum and training program in Woman Veterans Health for Internal Medical Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceylony, Manju; Porhomayon, Jahan; Pourafkari, Leili; Nader, Nader D

    2017-09-26

    Internal Medicine residents must develop competency as Primary Care Providers, but a gap exists in their curriculum and training with regard to women's reproductive health. With increasing need in VA due to new influx of women veterans it poses problems in recruitment of competent physicians trained in Women's health. An intensive, one-month women's reproductive health curriculum with hands on experience for Internal Medicine residents was provided. Curriculum was taught to the residents who rotated at the Women's Health Clinic for one month. Pre-test and post-test exams were administered. Increase in knowledge of residents in providing gender specific evaluations and management was objectively assessed by changes in post-test scores. Data were analyzed for statistically significant improvement in written tests scores. Total of 47 Internal Medicine residents rotated through Women's Health Center during the evaluation period. All residents completed both pre-test and post-test exams. The average time to complete the pre-test was 20.5 ± 5.4 min and 19.5 ± 4.8 min for post-test. There was no correlation between the time to complete the pre-test exam and the post-test exam. The total score was significantly improved from 8.5 ± 1.6 to 13.2 ± 1.8 (p training with information on women's health that enables them to provide safe and gender appropriate care in primary care settings. This practice will reduce the need for frequent referrals for specialized care and thus provide cost saving for patient and health care on the whole.

  6. Laparoscopic skills suffer on the first shift of sequential night shifts: program directors beware and residents prepare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leff, Daniel R; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Rana, Mariam; Nakhjavani, Batool; Purkayastha, Sanjay; Khullar, Vik; Darzi, Ara W

    2008-03-01

    Research evaluating fatigue-induced skills decline has focused on acute sleep deprivation rather than the effects of circadian desynchronization associated with multiple shifts. As a result, the number of consecutive night shifts that residents can safely be on duty without detrimental effects to their technical skills remains unknown. A prospective observational cohort study was conducted to assess the impact of 7 successive night shifts on the technical surgical performance of junior residents. The interventional strategy included training 21 residents from surgery and allied disciplines on a virtual reality surgical simulator, towards the achievement of preset benchmark scores, followed by 294 technical skills assessments conducted over 1764 manpower night shift hours. Primary outcomes comprised serial technical skills assessments on 2 tasks of a virtual reality surgical simulator. Secondary outcomes included assessments of introspective fatigue, duration of sleep, and prospective recordings of activity (number of "calls" received, steps walked, and patients evaluated). Maximal deterioration in performance was observed following the first night shift. Residents took significantly longer to complete the first (P = 0.002) and second tasks (P = 0.005) compared with baseline. They also committed significantly greater numbers of errors (P = 0.025) on the first task assessed. Improved performance was observed across subsequent shifts towards baseline levels. Newly acquired technical surgical skills deteriorate maximally after the first night shift, emphasizing the importance of adequate preparation for night rotas. Performance improvements across successive shifts may be due to ongoing learning or adaptation to chronic fatigue. Further research should focus on assessments of both technical procedural skills and cognitive abilities to determine the rotas that best minimize errors and maximize patient safety.

  7. Mental health in medical residents: relationship with personal, work-related, and sociodemographic variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira-Lima, Karina; Loureiro, Sonia R; Crippa, José A

    2016-01-01

    To examine association of sociodemographic characteristics, personality traits, social skills, and work variables with anxiety, depression, and alcohol dependence in medical residents. A total of 270 medical residents completed the following self-report instruments: sociodemographic and work questionnaire, Patient Health Questionnaire-4 (PHQ-4), Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test-3 (AUDIT-3), Revised NEO-Five Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI-R), and Social Skills Inventory (SSI-Del-Prette). Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Multivariate analysis showed an association of neuroticism (odds ratio [OR] 2.60, p mental health problems in medical residents, in addition to providing data that may assist in the design of preventive measures to protect the mental health of this group.

  8. Oral health status and physical, mental and cognitive disabilities among nursing home residents in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almomani, Fidaa; Hamasha, Abed Al-Hadi; Williams, Karen B; Almomani, Murad

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe physical, mental and cognitive disabilities and periodontal status as indicated by periodontal health, edentulism and use of dentures among nursing home residents in Jordan. A sample of 221 subjects with a mean age of 62.4 years (121 males and 100 females) from nursing home residents in Jordan were recruited to participate in this study. Oral health status, mini mental state examination (MMSE), Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), Tinetti Assessment Battery for gait and balance (TAB) and disability of arm, shoulder and hand test (DASH) were assessed for all subjects. The response rate was about 88%. The multivariate analysis showed that the degree of upper limb disabilities, as measured by DASH, and reporting not brushing of teeth were the main risk indicators for severity of periodontal disease. Residents with dentures were found to have significantly higher cognitive abilities scores (MMSE), better upper arm abilities (DASH) and gait and balance score (TAB) in comparison with edentulous adults without dentures. Edentulous residents were found to suffer more from cognitive impairment (MMSE) than dentate residents. There was no predilection of upper limb (DASH) and lower limb (TAB) disabilities or depressive symptoms (GDS) for edentulous over dentate subjects. Results suggest that nursing home residents with a variety of physical, cognitive and psychological disabilities are at increased risk of deterioration of their oral health. All those associated with the health of residents need to be aware of this issue and take preventive and therapeutic measures as needed. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Relationships among sense of coherence, resources, and mental health in urban and rural residents in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuno Yoko Sumikawa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The salutogenic model states that coping resources are defined within sociocultural and historical contexts and that various social and historical factors influence the availability of such resources. Though previous studies have suggested the need for an interregional comparison of psychological and social resources, few studies have undertaken such an investigation. The aim of this study is to investigate the associations among coping resources, sense of coherence (SOC, and health status in a comparison of urban and rural residents. Methods General residents (aged 30–69 years in two areas were targeted for the current study. Through a random sampling selection, 1,000 residents from each area were picked, and an anonymous questionnaire was mailed to each resident. Ultimately, 269 and 363 valid responses from the urban and rural areas, respectively, were analyzed. SOC, both social and psychological resources, and mental health were assessed. To examine relationships between SOC and resources associated with mental health, mental health was defined as a dependent variable. Hierarchical multiple regression was conducted with variables entered from sociodemographic characteristics, social and psychological resources, and SOC. Results Regarding regional characteristics, social capital and participation in community activities were significantly greater in the rural area than in the urban area. Urban residents reported significantly higher self-esteem and optimism than rural residents. SOC showed the most significant association with mental health in both areas. Mental health was significantly associated with physical activity limitations and life stressors in both areas. However, the associations were weakened when social and psychological resources and SOC were added, which demonstrated their buffering effect on the negative influence of life stressors on health. When SOC was added, the association of self-esteem with mental

  10. Do I need training in public health ethics? A survey on Italian residents' beliefs, knowledge and curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colucci, Massimiliano; Chellini, Martina; Anello, Paola; Arru, Benedetto; Tettamanti, Glenda; Marcon, Elena

    2017-01-01

    Ethics is needed to support the decision-making process in public health and to face moral issues during practice. However, professionals are often not adequately trained. In 2015, the National Conference of Public Health Medical Residents of the Italian Society of Public Health started the "Public Health Ethics" workgroup to evaluate how the Italian Schools of Public Health train their residents in ethics, and which are residents' beliefs, knowledge and attitudes about public health ethics. A survey was built and emailed to the Italian public health residents. Residents are interested in ethics/bioethics (83.2%) and are aware of its importance for professional practice (97.2%). However, few of them (19.6%) evaluated their competence above a satisfactory level. They believe that a training in ethics should be offered during residency (92.1%). Nonetheless, in Italy only two schools required a course on bioethics, and one a course in public health ethics. According to residents, a public health ethics trainer should be a public health professional (23.2%) or a social scientist (22.8%). In Italy, Schools of Public Health do not train future professionals in ethics or public health ethics during residency. Training should be implemented in curricula, and trainers should have a strong competence in both public health and ethics.

  11. A baseline study of the health status of the residents in Kalapana, Hawaii, January--June 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, David B.; Arbeit, William, R.

    1988-08-01

    A community health survey was conducted during the first five months of 1987 in Kalapana, Hawaii. Some 676 residents were interviewed during the study, which represents some 82% of all households in the community. The goal was to obtain base-line data on the health status of all community residents and ambient air quality, in order to evaluate any changes in health status of residents after geothermal development in the area.

  12. Application of Kern's Six-step approach to curriculum development by global health residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Leigh R; Palazzi, Debra L

    2015-01-01

    Global health practitioners have a responsibility to deliver appropriate and effective health education to patients and families. We demonstrate how residents in a global health elective can utilize Kern's six-step approach to develop educational products for patients and their families. Residents completed a pre-curricular survey of knowledge, skills and attitudes regarding curriculum development. Kern's six-steps were introduced through a series of lectures; workshop exercises highlighted the application of each step: (i) Problem identification and general needs assessment, (ii) targeted needs assessment, (iii) goals and objectives, (iv) educational strategies, (v) implementation and (vi) evaluation and feedback. Residents used the six-steps to develop health education projects they subsequently implemented locally and abroad. Reflective exercises were conducted after utilization of each of the six steps. Residents also completed a post-curricular assessment of knowledge, skills and attitudes regarding curriculum development. Mean scores on pre- and post-curricular self-assessment of knowledge were 18 and 26.5 (out of 28); skills 19.8 and 33.5 (out of 35); and attitudes 13.3 and 19.8 (out of 21), respectively. Reflective exercises highlighted resident sentiment that the six steps enabled them to be more thoughtful of the interventions they were undertaking in communities locally and abroad. They were impressed how the model allowed them to ensure their goals were aligned with those of patients and their families, fully engage their audience and effectively implement the curricula. Kern's six-step approach to curriculum development is an effective method for global health residents to develop educational products for patients and families.

  13. [Characteristics of smoking, nicotine dependence and motivation for change in specialists training in health sciences (residents) in Andalusia (Spain)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez-Jiménez, M V; Valverde-Bolívar, F J; Pérez-Milena, A; Moreno-Corredor, A

    2015-09-01

    As there are few studies on the smoking habits of specialists training in health sciences (residents), it is of interest to determine the prevalence of smoking, nicotine dependence and motivation for change, and their relationship with other variables (personal, work and consumption of other drugs). A multicentre, cross-sectional study using a questionnaire was conducted in 2012. All the residents who were studying in Teaching Health Centres in Andalusia (Spain) completed a questionnaire, which was sent by e-mail, collecting: age, sex, specialty, country of origin, qualitative-quantitative consumption of tobacco, age of onset/cessation, Fagerström test and stage of change (Proschaka). A total of 2667 residents (63% of total) completed the questionnaire. The mean age was 29.1 years (± 5.2), 69% female, 89% Spanish, and 86% physicians. Of the 17% who smoked (daily pattern-47%, intermittently-41%, related to leisure-3%), starting at 17.4 years (±3.5) and mean of 7.5 cigarettes per day (±7.1), higher medical specialties (P=.067 ANOVA), and in men (P=.074, Student-t). More than three-quarters (82%) had a low nicotine dependence, being higher in hospital medical specialties (P=.078 χ(2)). Of the total, 7% were former smokers, and 48% wanted to quit smoking (contemplation 38%, preparation 10%). In the multivariate analysis there was a link between smoking and alcohol consumption (OR 2.84) and illegal drugs (OR 3.57). There were no differences by age or country. The consumption of tobacco in residents is less than the general population, with a low dependence and better willingness to change. The period of specialised training is a good time to offer tobacco interventions. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Community partnered projects: residents engaging with community health centers to improve care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moushey, Erin; Shomo, Anisa; Elder, Nancy; O'Dea, Christy; Rahner, David

    2014-10-01

    Important residency curricular elements, including scholarship, quality improvement (QI), and community health, often exist as independent components. We developed a curriculum to train residents to become community-responsive physicians that included longitudinal care at a community health center (CHC) with a unique community-partnered project (CPP). We evaluated outcomes of one CPP and delineated challenges in implementing the curriculum. After performing a needs assessment, the resident-CHC team designed a QI intervention to improve documentation of smoking status and cessation counseling. A chart review of 100 random patients assessed pre- and post-intervention documentation. Patient focus groups were held to guide the development of the final intervention, which included medical assistant (MA) education, appropriate patient education materials, and a visual communication system for MAs and providers. Curriculum evaluation via interviews with residency and community partners was done periodically throughout the 2-year process. Focus group participants saw clinicians as a resource for quitting but did not want to talk about quitting at every visit. We reviewed 317 patient visits pre-QI intervention and 191 post-QI intervention. There were no significant changes in the percent of visits where smoking status was documented (82% versus 79%); however, smoking cessation counseling during office visits increased significantly (19% to 54%). Key challenges included academic-community communication and resident scheduling and availability. In this CPP curriculum, residents made a difference in practice outcomes, and ongoing attention to challenges assisted with the project's success, possibly enhancing residents' likelihood of incorporating QI and principles of community health into their future careers.

  15. Bipolarization of Risk Perception about the Health Effects of Radiation in Residents after the Accident at Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orita, Makiko; Hayashida, Naomi; Nakayama, Yumi; Shinkawa, Tetsuko; Urata, Hideko; Fukushima, Yoshiko; Endo, Yuuko; Yamashita, Shunichi; Takamura, Noboru

    2015-01-01

    The late health effects of low-dose rate radiation exposure are still a serious public concern in the Fukushima area even four years after the accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP). To clarify the factors associated with residents' risk perception of radiation exposure and consequent health effects, we conducted a survey among residents of Kawauchi village in May and June 2014, which is located within 30 km of FNPP. 85 of 285 residents (29.8%) answered that acute radiation syndrome might develop in residents after the accident, 154 (54.0%) residents responded that they had anxieties about the health effects of radiation on children, and 140 (49.1%) residents indicated that they had anxieties about the health effects of radiation on offspring. Furthermore, 107 (37.5%) residents answered that they had concerns about health effects that would appear in the general population simply by living in an environment with a 0.23 μSv per hour ambient dose for one year, 149 (52.2%) residents reported that they were reluctant to eat locally produced foods, and 164 (57.5%) residents believed that adverse health effects would occur in the general population by eating 100 Bq per kg of mushrooms every day for one year. The present study shows that a marked bipolarization of the risk perception about the health effects of radiation among residents could have a major impact on social well-being after the accident at FNPP.

  16. Bipolarization of Risk Perception about the Health Effects of Radiation in Residents after the Accident at Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makiko Orita

    Full Text Available The late health effects of low-dose rate radiation exposure are still a serious public concern in the Fukushima area even four years after the accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP. To clarify the factors associated with residents' risk perception of radiation exposure and consequent health effects, we conducted a survey among residents of Kawauchi village in May and June 2014, which is located within 30 km of FNPP. 85 of 285 residents (29.8% answered that acute radiation syndrome might develop in residents after the accident, 154 (54.0% residents responded that they had anxieties about the health effects of radiation on children, and 140 (49.1% residents indicated that they had anxieties about the health effects of radiation on offspring. Furthermore, 107 (37.5% residents answered that they had concerns about health effects that would appear in the general population simply by living in an environment with a 0.23 μSv per hour ambient dose for one year, 149 (52.2% residents reported that they were reluctant to eat locally produced foods, and 164 (57.5% residents believed that adverse health effects would occur in the general population by eating 100 Bq per kg of mushrooms every day for one year. The present study shows that a marked bipolarization of the risk perception about the health effects of radiation among residents could have a major impact on social well-being after the accident at FNPP.

  17. General health status of residents of the Selebi Phikwe Ni-Cu mine area, Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekosse, Georges

    2005-10-01

    Residents of the Selebi Phikwe area, Botswana where nickel-copper (Ni-Cu) is being exploited often exhibit symptoms of varied degrees of ailments, sicknesses and diseases. A need to investigate their general health status was therefore eminent. Primary data was obtained by means of a questionnaire and structured interviews conducted with individuals, health service providers, business enterprises and educational Institutions. The generated data revealed common ailments, sicknesses and diseases in the area with the four most frequent health complaints being frequent coughing headaches, influenza/common colds and rampant chest pains. Research findings indicated that residents had respiratory tract-related problems, suspected to be linked to the effects of air pollution caused by the emission of sulphur dioxide (SO2) from mining and smelting activities. Residents were frequently in contact with SO2 and related gases and fumes, mineral and silica dust generated from the mining processes. No clearly demarcating differences were noticed in the health status of residents living in the control site from those in the main study area. However, sites most affected were those close to where Ni-Cu is exploited. Environmental factors resulting from mining and smelting activities, among others, could be contributory to the negative health effects occurring at Selebi Phikwe.

  18. Pre-travel health preparation for malaria prevention among Hong Kong travellers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Kevin K C; Lin, Agatha K Y; Cheng, Calvin K Y; Chan, Emily Y Y; Graham, Colin A

    2015-03-01

    Malaria remains a significant cause of travel-related mortality and morbidity. Asians are known to have higher risks because they are less careful in pre-travel health preparations. This study reports on a cohort of travellers to malaria-prone regions examined in a previous study, which explored general levels of pre-travel health preparation. To describe the preparations taken by travellers at Hong Kong International Airport going to destinations with significant malaria risks according to the WHO. A cross-sectional survey was conducted by personal interviews at the boarding gates of flights in April 2013. The flights were chosen from those to malaria-prone regions (type I or above) from the 2012 WHO International Travel and Health Country List. 403 respondents (75.6% Chinese ethnicity) were travelling to malaria-prone regions. 95.3% were travelling to developing countries including China, Thailand, Malaysia and India. 55.1% of respondents had taken at least one mosquito prevention measure and 8.9% of respondents had malaria chemoprophylaxis. Stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that female gender (OR=2.21, 95% CI 1.23 to 3.97), residence outside Hong Kong (OR=2.71, 95% CI 1.46 to 5.04) and travel including rural areas (OR=5.67, 95% CI 3.11 to 10.34) were predictors of optimum pre-travel health preparations. Underestimation of malaria risks was a major barrier to adequate pre-travel health preparations. Targeted health education and information about risk is necessary to improve levels of travel health preparedness. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  19. Interdisciplinary curriculum to train internal medicine and obstetrics-gynecology residents in ambulatory women's health: adapting problem-based learning to residency education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Abby L; McNeil, Melissa

    2009-09-01

    Although residents in internal medicine (IM) and obstetrics-gynecology (OG) must provide primary care for women, studies indicate that both groups require more skills and training in women's health. Our goals were to assess the needs of residents at our academic medical center and to design an interdisciplinary curriculum that addresses these needs utilizing a modified problem-based learning (PBL) format. The aim of this article is to report on the development, logistics, and successful implementation of our innovative curriculum. Based on results from a targeted needs-assessment, we designed a curriculum for both IM and OG residents to address curricular deficiencies in an efficient and effective manner. Procurement of support was achieved by reviewing overlapping competency requirements and results of the needs-assessment with the program directors. The curriculum consists of six ambulatory clinical cases which lead residents through a discussion of screening, diagnosis, prevention, and management within a modified PBL format. Residents select one learning objective each week which allows them to serve as content experts during case discussions, applying what they learned from their literature review to guide the group as they decide upon the next step for the case. This format helps accommodate different experience levels of learners, encourages discussion from less-vocal residents, and utilizes theories of adult learning. Sixty-five residents have participated in the curriculum since it was successfully implemented. IM residents report that the cases were their first opportunity to discuss the health concerns of younger women; OG residents felt similarly about cases related to older women. Implementation challenges included resident accountability. Residents identified the timing of the sessions and clinical coverage requirements as barriers to conference attendance. Interdisciplinary modified PBL conferences focusing on shared curricular needs in ambulatory

  20. Preparing Health Care Processes for IT Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walley, Paul; Laursen, Martin Lindgård

    2005-01-01

    Many health care supply chains are now attempting to achieve greater IT integration, between primary and secondary care, as well as internal integration within hospital systems. Conventional theory suggests that these types of initiative should coincide with extensive process reengineering...... to ensure that the IT fits with organisational processes and the full benefits of the technology are captured as part of the change. However, process reengineering or process redesign within healthcare has not been universally successful for a variety of reasons. In particular, it is widely accepted...

  1. Mental health literacy as a function of remoteness of residence: an Australian national study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Kathleen M; Christensen, Helen; Jorm, Anthony F

    2009-03-27

    Although there have been many population studies of mental health literacy, little is known about the mental health literacy of people who reside in rural areas. This study sought to determine the impact of remoteness on public knowledge of depression and schizophrenia. The mental health literacy of residents of major cities, inner regional, and outer-remote (including outer regional, remote, and very remote) regions were compared using data from a 2003-04 Australian national survey of the mental health literacy of 3998 adults. Measures included the perceived helpfulness of a range of professionals, non-professionals and interventions, and the causes, prognosis, and outcomes after treatment for four case vignettes describing depression, depression with suicidal ideation, early schizophrenia and chronic schizophrenia. Participant awareness of Australia's national depression initiative and depression in the media, their symptoms of depression and exposure to the conditions depicted in the vignettes were also compared. Mental health literacy was similar across remoteness categories. However, inner regional residents showed superior identification of the disorders depicted in the suicidal ideation and chronic schizophrenia vignettes. They were also more likely to report having heard of Australia's national depression health promotion campaign. Conversely, they were less likely than major city residents to rate the evidence-based treatment of psychotherapy helpful for depression. Both inner regional and outer-remote residents were less likely to rate psychologists as helpful for depression alone. The rural groups were more likely to rate the non-evidence based interventions of drinking and painkillers as helpful for a depression vignette. In addition, outer-remote residents were more likely to identify the evidence based treatment of antipsychotics as harmful for early schizophrenia and less likely to endorse psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers and general

  2. Mental health literacy as a function of remoteness of residence: an Australian national study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorm Anthony F

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although there have been many population studies of mental health literacy, little is known about the mental health literacy of people who reside in rural areas. This study sought to determine the impact of remoteness on public knowledge of depression and schizophrenia. Methods The mental health literacy of residents of major cities, inner regional, and outer-remote (including outer regional, remote, and very remote regions were compared using data from a 2003–04 Australian national survey of the mental health literacy of 3998 adults. Measures included the perceived helpfulness of a range of professionals, non-professionals and interventions, and the causes, prognosis, and outcomes after treatment for four case vignettes describing depression, depression with suicidal ideation, early schizophrenia and chronic schizophrenia. Participant awareness of Australia's national depression initiative and depression in the media, their symptoms of depression and exposure to the conditions depicted in the vignettes were also compared. Results Mental health literacy was similar across remoteness categories. However, inner regional residents showed superior identification of the disorders depicted in the suicidal ideation and chronic schizophrenia vignettes. They were also more likely to report having heard of Australia's national depression health promotion campaign. Conversely, they were less likely than major city residents to rate the evidence-based treatment of psychotherapy helpful for depression. Both inner regional and outer-remote residents were less likely to rate psychologists as helpful for depression alone. The rural groups were more likely to rate the non-evidence based interventions of drinking and painkillers as helpful for a depression vignette. In addition, outer-remote residents were more likely to identify the evidence based treatment of antipsychotics as harmful for early schizophrenia and less likely to endorse

  3. Health risks from indoor formaldehyde exposures in northwest weatherized residences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mellinger, P.J.; Sever, L.E.

    1986-10-01

    Conflicting opinions on the potential hazards associated with formaldehyde exposure triggered a national workshop to address the toxicological questions concerning the health effects of formaldehyde. Since quantitative human data are not available to derive a dose-response curve for formaldehyde risk assessment, nonhuman data are used. In the case of formaldehyde, data from animals exposed to high concentrations are used to estimate human risk at much lower concentrations. This study presents the several steps that make up a risk assessment and examines any additional data that might alter significantly the risk estimates presented in the 1984 EIS. Rat inhalation chronic bioassay data from a study sponsored by the Chemical Industry Institute of Toxicology (CIIT) have been used to develop a risk equation that was subsequently used by BPA in its EIS. The CIIT data base remains the only acceptable animal data that can support the estimation of a dose-response curve. The development of mathematical models continues with a great deal of energy, and the use of different models is largely responsible for the great variability of the formaldehyde risk estimates. While one can calculate different values for carcinogenic risk associated with formaldehyde exposure than were presented earlier in the BPA EIS, they are not likely to be any better.

  4. Computer Based Assessment (CBA): Perception of residents at Dow University of Health Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawaid, Masood; Moosa, Foad Ali; Jaleel, Farhat; Ashraf, Junaid

    2014-07-01

    Background and objective : During the past few years, Computer-based assessment (CBA) has gained popularkity as a testing modality. This assessment offers several advantages over paper based assessment (PBA) testing. The objective of this study was to find out residents' perception of this method of assessment. Methods : The post graduate residents of Dow University of Health Sciences in the field of Surgery, Medicine, Gynecology and Obstetrics experienced their first formative Computer-based assessment (CBA) in year 2013.Immediately after formative CBA, an anonymous paper based questionnaire was distributed amongst the residents and response was sought for their self-perceived computer usage competence before starting residency, perceptions regarding CBA method and to determine their preference for PBA or CBA in future assessment preferences. Total 173 residents completed the questionnaire. More than half of residents, 56.1% had no prior experience of CBA. Three fourth, 76.4% of the residents were less than confident before sitting in CBA, while after completing CBA, 64.8% were either confident or extremely confident for CBA. Most common problem encountered by students was logging in 28.9%. More students (53.2%) believed that paper assessment took longer to complete than CBA. Majority of the students (61.8%) rated CBA as better than PBA despite experiencing it for the first time. Resident's perception for CBA is good and they recommend its use in future assessment as well. However, to take maximal advantage of this technology, faculty should be trained to develop questions not only with text and pictures but with audio and video support.

  5. Social Relations and Resident Health in Assisted Living: An Application of the Convoy Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Molly M.; Ball, Mary M.; Kemp, Candace L.; Hollingsworth, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This article, based on analysis of data from a mixed methods study, builds on a growing body of assisted living (AL) research focusing on the link between residents' social relationships and health. A key aim of this analysis, which uses the social convoy model as a conceptual and methodological framework, was to examine the relative…

  6. Properly Interpreting the Epidemiologic Evidence about the Health Effects of Industrial Wind Turbines on Nearby Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Carl V.

    2011-01-01

    There is overwhelming evidence that wind turbines cause serious health problems in nearby residents, usually stress-disorder-type diseases, at a nontrivial rate. The bulk of the evidence takes the form of thousands of adverse event reports. There is also a small amount of systematically gathered data. The adverse event reports provide compelling…

  7. The relationship between weight status and the need for health care assistance in nursing home residents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Anne Marie

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between underweight status and weight loss events on the need for health care assistance among a sample of Danish nursing home residents over 12-months. Design: Longitudinal, repeated measures design with three data collection...

  8. Family Support in Nursing Homes Serving Residents with a Mental Health History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frahm, Kathryn; Gammonley, Denise; Zhang, Ning Jackie; Paek, Seung Chun

    2010-01-01

    Using 2003 nursing home data from the Minimum Data Set (MDS) database, this study investigated the role of family support among nursing homes serving residents with a mental health history. Exploratory factor analysis was used to create and test a conceptual model of family support using indicators located within the MDS database. Families were…

  9. Health financing and integration of urban and rural residents' basic medical insurance systems in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Kun; Zhang, Luying; Yuan, Shasha; Zhang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zhiruo

    2017-11-07

    China is in the process of integrating the new cooperative medical scheme (NCMS) and the urban residents' basic medical insurance system (URBMI) into the urban and rural residents' basic medical insurance system (URRBMI). However, how to integrate the financing policies of NCMS and URBMI has not been described in detail. This paper attempts to illustrate the differences between the financing mechanisms of NCMS and URBMI, to analyze financing inequity between urban and rural residents and to identify financing mechanisms for integrating urban and rural residents' medical insurance systems. Financing data for NCMS and URBMI (from 2008 to 2015) was collected from the China health statistics yearbook, the China health and family planning statistics yearbook, the National Handbook of NCMS Information, the China human resources and social security statistics yearbook, and the China social security yearbook. "Ability to pay" was introduced to measure inequity in health financing. Individual contributions to NCMS and URBMI as a function of per capita disposable income was used to analyze equity in health financing between rural and urban residents. URBMI had a financing mechanism that was similar to that used by NCMS in that public finance accounted for more than three quarters of the pooling funds. The scale of financing for NCMS was less than 5% of the per capita net income of rural residents and less than 2% of the per capita disposable income of urban residents for URBMI. Individual contributions to the NCMS and URBMI funds were less than 1% of their disposable and net incomes. Inequity in health financing between urban and rural residents in China was not improved as expected with the introduction of NCMS and URBMI. The role of the central government and local governments in financing NCMS and URBMI was oscillating in the past decade. The scale of financing for URRBMI is insufficient for the increasing demands for medical services from the insured. The pooling fund

  10. Global Health in Family Medicine Summer Primer: Course for residents and faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouleau, Katherine; Janakiram, Praseedha; Nicolle, Eileen; Godoy-Ruiz, Paula; Pakes, Barry N

    2015-07-01

    Despite the rapid emergence of global health training across North American universities, there remains a gap in educational programs focusing on the unique role of family medicine and primary care in global health. The objective of the Global Health in Family Medicine Summer Primer, developed in 2013 by the Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of Toronto in Ontario, is to strengthen global health competencies among family medicine residents and faculty. The course covers the meaning of global health; global health ethics; the place of family medicine, primary care, and primary health care in the global health context; epidemiology; infectious diseases; the social determinants of health; and care of vulnerable populations locally and globally. The course is delivered in an intensive 5-day format with didactic lectures, group discussions, interactive workshops, and lived-experience panels. The Global Health in Family Medicine Summer Primer has proven to be a successful educational initiative and provides valuable lessons learned for other academic science centres in developing global health training programs for family medicine residents and faculty.

  11. LIVED EXPERIENCES OF HEALTH PROBLEMS OF ELDERLY RESIDING IN URBAN AREAS, KATHMANDU: PILOT STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Bista Archana, Joshi Sarala

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Globally, number of old age population is increasing with advancement of biomedical technology. Old age is the time associated with biological, psychological and social changes which situate elderly to acquire different health related problems. Objectives: To find out lived experiences of elderly regarding their health problems residing in homes of Kathmandu city. Methods: Qualitative hermeneutic phenomenology approach was adopted. Researcher selected purposively four elderly r...

  12. The Scope of Global Health Training in U.S. Obstetrics and Gynecology Residency Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Kristin J.; Tsai, Alexander C.; Johnson, Timothy R.B.; MD, MPH, Rochelle P.; Bangsberg, David R.; Kerry, Vanessa B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To enumerate global health training activities in U.S. obstetrics and gynecology residency programs, and to examine the worldwide distribution of programmatic activity relative to the maternal and perinatal disease burden. Methods Using a systematic, Web-based protocol, we searched for global health training opportunities at all U.S. obstetrics and gynecology residency programs. Country-level data on disability-adjusted life years due to maternal and perinatal conditions were obtained from the Global Burden of Disease study. We calculated Spearman’s rank correlation coefficients to estimate the cross-country association between programmatic activity and disease burden. Results Of the 243 accredited U.S. obstetrics and gynecology residency programs, we identified 41 (17%) with one of several possible predefined categories of programmatic activity. Thirty-three residency programs offered their residents opportunities to participate in one or more elective-based rotations, eight offered extended field-based training, and 18 offered research activities. A total of 128 programmatic activities were dispersed across 64 different countries. At the country level, the number of programmatic activities had a statistically significant association with the total disease burden due to maternal (Spearman’s ρ=0.37; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.14-0.57) and perinatal conditions (ρ=0.34; 95% CI, 0.10-0.54) but not gynecologic cancers (ρ=−0.24; 95% CI, −0.46 to 0.01). Conclusions There are few global health training opportunities for U.S. obstetrics and gynecology residents. These activities are disproportionately distributed among countries with greater burdens of disease. PMID:24104785

  13. Describing a residency program developed for newly graduated nurse practitioners employed in retail health settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thabault, Paulette; Mylott, Laura; Patterson, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Retail health clinics are an expanding health care delivery model and an emerging new practice site for nurse practitioners (NPs). Critical thinking skills, clinical competence, interprofessional collaboration, and business savvy are necessary for successful practice in this highly independent and autonomous setting. This article describes a pilot residency partnership program aimed at supporting new graduate NP transition to practice, reducing NP turnover, and promoting academic progression. Eight new graduate NPs were recruited to the pilot and paired with experienced clinical NP preceptors for a 12-month program that focused on increasing clinical and business competence in the retail health setting. The residency program utilized technology to facilitate case conferences and targeted Webinars to enhance learning and peer-to-peer sharing and support. An on-line doctoral-level academic course that focused on interprofessional collaboration in health care, population health, and business concepts was offered. Both NPs and preceptors were highly satisfied with the academic-service residency program between MinuteClinic and Northeastern University School of Nursing in Boston, MA. New NPs particularly valued the preceptor model, the clinical case conferences, and business Webinars. Because their priority was in gaining clinical experience and learning the business acumen relevant to managing the processes of care, they did not feel ready for the doctoral course and would have preferred to take later in their practice. The preceptors valued the academic course and felt that it enhanced their precepting and leadership skills. At the time of this article, 6 months post completion of the residency program, there has been no turnover. Our experience supports the benefits for residency programs for newly graduated NPs in retail settings. The model of partnering with academia by offering a course within a service organization's educational programs can enable academic

  14. A Comparison of Health-Risk Behaviors of Rural Migrants with Rural Residents and Urban Residents in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinguang; Stanton, Bonita; Li, Xiaoming; Fang, Xiaoyi; Lin, Danhua; Xiong, Qing

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether rural-to-urban migrants in China are more likely than rural and urban residents to engage in risk behaviors. Methods: Comparative analysis of survey data between migrants and rural and urban residents using age standardized rate and multiple logistic regression. Results: The prevalence and frequency of tobacco…

  15. Failing to Prepare Is Preparing to Fail: A Single-Blinded, Randomized Controlled Trial to Determine the Impact of a Preoperative Instructional Video on the Ability of Residents to Perform Laparoscopic Right Colectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawshaw, Benjamin P; Steele, Scott R; Lee, Edward C; Delaney, Conor P; Mustain, W Conan; Russ, Andrew J; Shanmugan, Skandan; Champagne, Bradley J

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic colorectal resection is an index case for advanced skills training, yet many residents struggle to reach proficiency by graduation. Current methods to reduce the learning curve for residents remain expensive, time consuming, and poorly validated. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of the addition of a preprocedural instructional video to improve the ability of a general surgery resident to perform laparoscopic right colectomy when compared with standard preparation. This was a single-blinded, randomized control study. Four university-affiliated teaching hospitals were included in the study. General surgery residents in postgraduation years 2 through 5 participated. Residents were randomly assigned to preparation with a narrated instructional video versus standard preparation. Resident performance, scored by a previously validated global assessment scale, was measured. Fifty-four residents were included. Half (n = 27) were randomly assigned to view the training video and half (n = 27) to standard preparation. There were no differences between groups in terms of training level or previous operative experience or in patient demographics (all p > 0.05). Groups were similar in the percentage of the case completed by residents (p = 0.39) and operative time (p = 0.74). Residents in the video group scored significantly higher in total score (mean: 46.8 vs 42.3; p = 0.002), as well as subsections directly measuring laparoscopic skill (vascular control mean: 11.3 vs 9.7, p instructional video before surgery may improve the learning curve of trainees and ultimately improve safety.

  16. Mental health in medical residents: relationship with personal, work-related, and sociodemographic variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Pereira-Lima

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To examine association of sociodemographic characteristics, personality traits, social skills, and work variables with anxiety, depression, and alcohol dependence in medical residents. Methods: A total of 270 medical residents completed the following self-report instruments: sociodemographic and work questionnaire, Patient Health Questionnaire-4 (PHQ-4, Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test-3 (AUDIT-3, Revised NEO-Five Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI-R, and Social Skills Inventory (SSI-Del-Prette. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results: Multivariate analysis showed an association of neuroticism (odds ratio [OR] 2.60, p < 0.001, social skills (OR 0.41, p < 0.01, and number of shifts (OR 1.91, p = 0.03 with anxiety or depression, and of male sex (OR 3.14, p = 0.01, surgical residency (OR 4.40, p = 0.001, extraversion (OR 1.80, p < 0.01, and number of shifts (OR 2.32, p = 0.04 with alcohol dependence. Conclusion: The findings support a multidetermined nature of mental health problems in medical residents, in addition to providing data that may assist in the design of preventive measures to protect the mental health of this group.

  17. Preparing Dental Students and Residents to Overcome Internal and External Barriers to Evidence-Based Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Brandon G; Johnson, Thomas M; Erley, Kenneth J; Topolski, Richard; Rethman, Michael; Lancaster, Douglas D

    2016-10-01

    In recent years, evidence-based dentistry has become the ideal for research, academia, and clinical practice. However, barriers to implementation are many, including the complexity of interpreting conflicting evidence as well as difficulties in accessing it. Furthermore, many proponents of evidence-based care seem to assume that good evidence consistently exists and that clinicians can and will objectively evaluate data so as to apply the best evidence to individual patients' needs. The authors argue that these shortcomings may mislead many clinicians and that students should be adequately prepared to cope with some of the more complex issues surrounding evidence-based practice. Cognitive biases and heuristics shape every aspect of our lives, including our professional behavior. This article reviews literature from medicine, psychology, and behavioral economics to explore the barriers to implementing evidence-based dentistry. Internal factors include biases that affect clinical decision making: hindsight bias, optimism bias, survivor bias, and blind-spot bias. External factors include publication bias, corporate bias, and lack of transparency that may skew the available evidence in the peer-reviewed literature. Raising awareness of how these biases exert subtle influence on decision making and patient care can lead to a more nuanced discussion of addressing and overcoming barriers to evidence-based practice.

  18. Main Educational Stressors and theirs Relationship with General Health of Medical Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Khajehmougahi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the age of information and technology application, troublesome regulations and traditional  procedures for medical education may cause serious stresses and be a threat to the general health (GH of the students of medicine.Purpose: To determine the relationship between educational stressors and the general health of residents studying at the Ahwaz Jundishapour  University of Medical Sciences (Alums.Method: In this cross sectional study, the study group was consisted  of  ll4 cooperative residents (69% of all residents in the hospital, who were being trained in a variety of different specialties.  The instruments used were the Educational Stressors Questionnaire, including 45 four-choice items and a General  Health Questionnaire. When the questionnaires were completed, the results were analyzed through Pierson Correlation Coefficient using the SPSS.Results: The residents mentioned their educational stressors as follows: lack of an arranged curriculum, troublesome educational regulations, deficient educational instruments, and inadequate clinical instruction. of all the subjects, 43 ( 37.6% appeared to have problems in GH,and significantly positive correlation (phealth, medical residents, medical  education

  19. Graduate survey of the South Carolina Area Health Education Consortium family practice residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carek, P J; Abercrombie, S; Baughman, O; Buehler, J; Goforth, G; Hester, W; Lammie, J; Snape, P

    2001-06-01

    The results of this study demonstrate several interesting characteristics of the graduates of the SC AHEC associated family medicine residency programs: 45 percent practice in South Carolina, 63 percent live further than 120 miles from their residency program, 96 percent are satisfied with their specialty choice, and 56 percent are involved in teaching medical students and residents. Furthermore, these graduates have the following tendencies: to practice in the traditional solo or group practice; to practice in a suburban community, town or rural community and a setting size less than a population of 100,000 persons; to care for the aging adult and geriatric population; to provide nursing home care; and to utilize house calls to provide patient care). As the current health care system continues to be redesigned, this information will be essential for assessment and planning purposes.

  20. Challenges and barriers to health care and overall health in older residents of Alaska: evidence from a national survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia D. Foutz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: From 1970 to 2010, the Alaskan population increased from 302,583 to 698,473. During that time, the growth rate of Alaskan seniors (65+ was 4 times higher than their national counterparts. Ageing in Alaska requires confronting unique environmental, sociodemographic and infrastructural challenges, including an extreme climate, geographical isolation and less developed health care infrastructure compared to the continental US. Objective: The objective of this analysis is to compare the health needs of Alaskan seniors to those in the continental US. Design: We abstracted 315,161 records of individuals age 65+ from the 2013 and 2014 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, of which 1,852 were residents of Alaska. To compare residents of Alaska to residents of the 48 contiguous states we used generalized linear models which allowed us to adjust for demographic differences and survey weighting procedures. We examined 3 primary outcomes – general health status, health care coverage status and length of time since last routine check-up. Results: Alaskan seniors were 59% less likely to have had a routine check-up in the past year and 12% less likely to report excellent health status than comparable seniors in the contiguous US. Conclusions: Given the growth rate of Alaskan seniors and inherent health care challenges this vulnerable population faces, future research should examine the specific pathways through which these disparities occur and inform policies to ensure that all US seniors, regardless of geographical location, have access to high-quality health services.

  1. Effects of Perceived Discrimination and Length of Residency on the Health of Foreign-Born Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlisle, Shauna K; Stone, Andrea L

    2015-12-01

    This study explores the relationship between chronic conditions, perceived discrimination, and length of residency among three racial groups of foreign-born respondents: Afro-Caribbean, Asian, and Latino Americans. Analysis utilized Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiology Surveys (CPES) merged data from the National Latino and Asian American Study (NLAAS) and the National Survey of American Life (NSAL). Afro-Caribbean subgroups were more likely than Asian and Latino American subgroups to report perceived discrimination. Logistic regression analysis was conducted to determine which groups within the model were more likely to report chronic health conditions. Perceived discrimination was found to vary by race and was inversely associated with chronic respiratory conditions for Afro-Caribbeans. In general, years of US residency were associated with health across all chronic conditions where those in the USA longer were more likely to experience health-related problems. Perceived discrimination revealed mixed results.

  2. Rural health in Jamaica: examining and refining the predictive factors of good health status of rural residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, Paul A; McGrowder, Donovan A

    2009-01-01

    Poverty is mainly concentrated in rural areas. Rural populations also generally experience excessive deficiencies in healthcare access, social services, and other goods and services needed for healthy living. This study investigated the health status and determining factors of Jamaican rural residents in order to provide healthcare practitioners and policy makers with research findings to assist in effectively addressing health in rural Jamaica. The current research used a sub-sample of 15 260 respondents. The sub-sample was taken from a national cross-sectional study of 25 018 respondents from the 14 parishes of the island. The survey from which the present study is drawn used a stratified random probability sampling technique to draw the 25 018 respondents. Descriptive statistics were used to provide background information on the demographic characteristics of the sub-sample population. The model will be established using logistic regression using statistically significant (p health (n = 2554), 82.8% (n = 12 285) reported good health and 5.9% (n = 873) reported private health insurance coverage. The model used had statistically significant predictive power (model chi2 = 15939.9, p goodness of fit, chi2 = 14.46, p = 0.71). It was found that 85.1% (n = 4738) of the data were correctly classified. Of those with good health, 97.2% (n = 4387) were correctly classified, while of those with poor health, 38.6% (n = 451) were correctly classified. Some 12 factors can be used to predict the health status of rural residents in Jamaica with chi2(28) = 1595.03, p health status. An examination of the predictors revealed that the six most influential in descending order were: health insurance coverage (Wald statistic = 492.556; OR = 0.044, 95% CI: 0.033-0.058, p good health, and the 12 factors accounted for 38% of the variability in good health. Of the 12 factors, ownership of health insurance was the most significant and this is negatively associated with good health status

  3. Adolescents with mental health challenges residents of rural areas: perceptions about family, school and neighborhood context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fernanda Barboza Cid

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to identify the perceptions of adolescents residents in a rural area, linked to a Family Health Unit due mental health challenges, about their relationships with family and friends, school, situations of stress and support experience, as well about the region where they live, and compare them with the perceptions of adolescents also residents in a rural area who don’t have mental health challenges. Method: The study included 10 adolescents residents in a rural area of a city in São Paulo state, divided in two groups, A e B (with and without mental health challenges. Data were collected from questionnaire identification and a semi-structured interview and analyzed using analysis of contents. Results: The results indicated that, in view of the participants, the family is considered the main source of support, and in the group of adolescents with mental health challenges it is indicated also as an important source of stress. The school is seen, generally, as a socialization space for teens. About neighborhood context, perceptions are predominantly positive, and one of the reported negative aspects refers to the lack of leisure facilities. Conclusion: We observed few differences in the perception of both groups on the issues addressed. The neighborhood context, although it is appointed as restricted in terms of activities possibilities, seems to guarantee membership in groups and environments, which may have a protective role in coping with psychological suffering.

  4. Program for suicidal prevention, mental disorder treatment, and mental health development for resident doctors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Jiménez López

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High demand of care and the academic burden of courses of specialization in medicine affect the mental health of medical residents with events ranging from simple emotional discomfort to development of affective disorders in susceptible individuals. The suicide of physicians has produced programs for their attention in some countries. We present the first mental health clinic for residents of a high specialty hospital in Mexico, focused on the prevention of suicide and depression, treatment of mental disorders and mental health promotion. Unlike the reports of other countries, we get participation of more than 95%, we provide appropriate treatment and follow-up to residents with mental disorder, and there has not been a consummate suicide. We assume that the use of different strategies (scrutiny, adapting models of prevention of suicide as a peer and gatekeeper training, informative sessions of mental health promotion and stigma, interventions targeted at individuals and groups with conflicts has been useful against barriers that do not allow doctors to identify the risk of suicide warning signs, seek help for mental disorder, and seek to improve their mental health.

  5. Training Internal Medicine Residents in Social Medicine and Research-Based Health Advocacy: A Novel, In-Depth Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Gaurab; Pels, Richard J; Stark, Rachel L; Jain, Priyank; Bor, David H; McCormick, Danny

    2017-04-01

    Health disparities are pervasive worldwide. Physicians have a unique vantage point from which they can observe the ways social, economic, and political factors impact health outcomes and can be effective advocates for enhanced health outcomes and health equity. However, social medicine and health advocacy curricula are uncommon in postgraduate medical education. In academic year (AY) 2012, the Cambridge Health Alliance internal medicine residency program transformed an elective into a required social medicine and research-based health advocacy curriculum. The course has three major innovations: it has a yearlong longitudinal curriculum, it is required for all residents, and all residents complete a group research-based health advocacy project within the curricular year. The authors describe the structure, content, and goals of this curriculum. Over the last four years (AYs 2012-2015), residents (17/32; 53%) have rated the overall quality of the course highly (mean = 5.2, where 6 = outstanding; standard deviation = 0.64). In each year since the new course has been implemented, all scholarly work from the course has been presented at conferences by 31 resident presenters and/or coauthors. The course seems to enhance the residency program's capacity to recruit high-caliber residents and faculty members. The authors are collecting qualitative and quantitative data on the impact of the course. They will use their findings to advocate for a national health advocacy competency framework. Recommendations about how to initiate or further develop social medicine and health advocacy curricula are offered.

  6. Health-risk behaviour among residents in deprived neighbourhoods compared with those of the general population in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst Algren, Maria; Ekholm, Ola; van Lenthe, Frank

    2017-01-01

    This study compares health-risk behaviours (including the co-occurrence of health-risk behaviours) of residents in the deprived neighbourhoods with those of the general population of Denmark. It also examines associations between sociodemographic and socioeconomic characteristics and health......-risk behaviours in deprived neighbourhoods in Denmark. Even after adjustment for socioeconomic characteristics there were large differences in health-risk behaviours between residents in deprived neighbourhoods and the general population. In the deprived neighbourhoods large sociodemographic and socioeconomic...

  7. The effect of electronic health record software design on resident documentation and compliance with evidence-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez Torres, Yasaira; Huang, Jordan; Mihlstin, Melanie; Juzych, Mark S; Kromrei, Heidi; Hwang, Frank S

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the role of electronic health record software in resident education by evaluating documentation of 30 elements extracted from the American Academy of Ophthalmology Dry Eye Syndrome Preferred Practice Pattern. The Kresge Eye Institute transitioned to using electronic health record software in June 2013. We evaluated the charts of 331 patients examined in the resident ophthalmology clinic between September 1, 2011, and March 31, 2014, for an initial evaluation for dry eye syndrome. We compared documentation rates for the 30 evidence-based elements between electronic health record chart note templates among the ophthalmology residents. Overall, significant changes in documentation occurred when transitioning to a new version of the electronic health record software with average compliance ranging from 67.4% to 73.6% (p 90%) in 13 elements while Electronic Health Record B had high compliance (>90%) in 11 elements. The presence of dialog boxes was responsible for significant changes in documentation of adnexa, puncta, proptosis, skin examination, contact lens wear, and smoking exposure. Significant differences in documentation were correlated with electronic health record template design rather than individual resident or residents' year in training. Our results show that electronic health record template design influences documentation across all resident years. Decreased documentation likely results from "mouse click fatigue" as residents had to access multiple dialog boxes to complete documentation. These findings highlight the importance of EHR template design to improve resident documentation and integration of evidence-based medicine into their clinical notes.

  8. The effect of electronic health record software design on resident documentation and compliance with evidence-based medicine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasaira Rodriguez Torres

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the role of electronic health record software in resident education by evaluating documentation of 30 elements extracted from the American Academy of Ophthalmology Dry Eye Syndrome Preferred Practice Pattern. The Kresge Eye Institute transitioned to using electronic health record software in June 2013. We evaluated the charts of 331 patients examined in the resident ophthalmology clinic between September 1, 2011, and March 31, 2014, for an initial evaluation for dry eye syndrome. We compared documentation rates for the 30 evidence-based elements between electronic health record chart note templates among the ophthalmology residents. Overall, significant changes in documentation occurred when transitioning to a new version of the electronic health record software with average compliance ranging from 67.4% to 73.6% (p 90% in 13 elements while Electronic Health Record B had high compliance (>90% in 11 elements. The presence of dialog boxes was responsible for significant changes in documentation of adnexa, puncta, proptosis, skin examination, contact lens wear, and smoking exposure. Significant differences in documentation were correlated with electronic health record template design rather than individual resident or residents' year in training. Our results show that electronic health record template design influences documentation across all resident years. Decreased documentation likely results from "mouse click fatigue" as residents had to access multiple dialog boxes to complete documentation. These findings highlight the importance of EHR template design to improve resident documentation and integration of evidence-based medicine into their clinical notes.

  9. Globalization, migration health, and educational preparation for transnational medical encounters

    OpenAIRE

    Koehn Peter H

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Unprecedented migration, a core dimension of contemporary globalization, challenges population health. In a world of increasing human mobility, many health outcomes are shaped by transnational interactions among care providers and care recipients who meet in settings where nationality/ethnic match is not an option. This review article explores the value of transnational competence (TC) education as preparation for ethnically and socially discordant clinical encounters. The relevance ...

  10. Addiction treatment centers' progress in preparing for health care reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molfenter, Todd D

    2014-02-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) is expected to significantly alter addiction treatment service delivery. Researchers designed the Health Reform Readiness Index (HRRI) for addiction treatment organizations to assess their readiness for the PPACA. Four-hundred twenty-seven organizations completed the HRRI throughout a 3-year period, using a four-point scale to rank their readiness on 13 conditions. HRRI results completed during two different time periods (between 10/1/2010-6/30/2011 and 9/1/2011-9/30/2012) were analyzed and compared. Most respondents self-assessed as being in the early stages of preparation for 9 of the 13 conditions. Survey results showed that organizations with annual budgets $5 million (n=132). The HRRI results suggest that the addiction field, and in particular smaller organizations, is not preparing adequately for health care reform; organizations that are making preparations are making only modest gains. © 2013.

  11. Measuring Tijuana residents' choice of Mexican or U.S. health care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guendelman, S; Jasis, M

    1990-01-01

    There is growing concern that the indigent health care burden in the southwestern United States may be caused partly by Mexican residents who cross the border to use U.S. health services. This article describes the first attempt to measure the extent of this use by border residents. It also compares factors associated with their use of health care services in both the United States and Mexico. Data were obtained from a household survey conducted in Tijuana, Mexico, near the California border, using a random, stratified analytic sample of 660 households that included a total of 2,954 persons. The dependent variables--extent and volume of contacts with health professionals--were examined according to sociodemographic characteristics, insurance coverage, payment modality, type of visit, and health care setting. The results indicate that 40.3 percent of the Tijuana population used health services exclusively in Mexico during a 6-month period, compared with only 2.5 percent who used services in the United States. Of the Mexican users of U.S. services, the largest proportion appeared to be older people, lawful permanent residents or citizens of the United States who are living in Mexico, and persons from high- or middle-income sectors. In addition to the low level of use of U.S. health services, the findings show that more than 84 percent of the visits were to providers in the private sector and, for 59 percent of the visits, a fee for services was implied. Overall, this border population does not seem to be a drain on the U.S. public health system.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2124358

  12. Trends and Predictors of National Institutes of Health Funding to Plastic Surgery Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jason; Abbatematteo, Joseph M; Chang, Benjamin; Serletti, Joseph M

    2017-12-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated low levels of National Institutes of Health funding for surgical research. The authors compared the funding in plastic surgery with the funding for other surgical specialties. A query of National Institutes of Health grants awarded to departments of surgical specialties was performed using the National Institutes of Health RePORTER database (2008 to 2016). Trends in funding were compared by specialty and adjusted for the number of active physicians in each specialty. Plastic surgery residency program characteristics were correlated with funding procurement. Eight hundred eighty-nine faculty at 94 plastic surgery residency programs were queried. Forty-eight investigators (5.4 percent) at 23 programs (24.4 percent) had National Institutes of Health funding. From 2008 to 2016, a total of $84,142,138 was awarded through 81 grants. Funding supported translational (44.6 percent), clinical (26.4 percent), basic science (27.2 percent), and educational (1.7 percent) research. In 2016, plastic surgery received the least amount of National Institutes of Health funding per active physician ($1,530) relative to orthopedic surgery ($3124), obstetrics and gynecology ($3885), urology ($5943), otolaryngology ($9999), general surgery ($11,649), ophthalmology ($11,933), and neurologic surgery ($20,874). Plastic surgery residency program characteristics associated with National Institutes of Health funding were high ranking and had more than 10 clinical faculty (p Plastic surgery receives the least National Institutes of Health funding among the surgical specialties. Departments and divisions of plastic surgery should support investigators applying for research grants to increase future National Institutes of Health funding.

  13. Win/win: creating collaborative training opportunities for behavioral health providers within family medicine residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddy, Nancy Breen; Borresen, Dorothy; Myerholtz, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Integrating behavioral health into primary healthcare offers multiple advantages for patients and health professionals. This model requires a new skill set for all healthcare professionals that is not emphasized in current educational models. The new skills include interprofessional team-based care competencies and expanded patient care competencies. Health professionals must learn new ways to efficiently and effectively address health behavior change, and manage behavioral health issues such as depression and anxiety. Learning environments that co-train mental health and primary care professionals facilitate acquisition of both teamwork and patient care competencies for mental health and primary care professional trainees. Family Medicine Residency programs provide an excellent opportunity for co-training. This article serves as a "how to" guide for residency programs interested in developing a co-training program. Necessary steps to establish and maintain a program are reviewed, as well as goals and objectives for a co-training curriculum and strategies to overcome barriers and challenges in co-training models.

  14. [Construction of abridged life table for health evaluation of local resident using Excel program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qingsha; Wang, Feng; Li, Xiaozhen; Yang, Jian; Yu, Shouyi; Hu, Jun

    2012-05-01

    To provide an easy computational tool for evaluating the health condition of local residents. An abridged life table was programmed by applying mathematical functions and formula in Excel program and tested with the real study data to evaluate the results computed. The Excel was capable of computing group death probability of age in the life table ((n)q(x)), number of survivors (l(x)), number of death ((n)d(x)), survival per person-year ((n)L(x)), survival total per person-year (T(x)) and life expectancy (e(x)). The calculated results were consistent with those by SAS. The abridged life table constructed using Microsoft Excel can conveniently and accurately calculate the relevant indices for evaluating the health condition of the residents.

  15. Health of the elderly: multidisciplinary residence as an instrument for the care improvement Saúde do idoso: residência multiprofissional como instrumento transformador do cuidado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana Klaesener

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe the actions taken by the team of the Health Aging Program Multidisciplinary Residency in Health (PREMUS / PUCRS. Description of the experience: In the primary care, the residents participated in home assistance, outpatient services and developed actions of health popular education in aged groups. The team was also inserted in a University hospital, assisting in the fields of outpatient and hospitalization units. Conclusion: The Multidisciplinary Residency Program in Health, with emphasis on the health of the elderly, has proposed a dynamic care based on the concepts of interdisciplinarity, integration and humanized care, as well as guided by the guidelines of the Unified Health System (SUS.Objetivo: Relatar as ações realizadas pela equipe Saúde do Idoso do Programa de Residência Multiprofissional em Saúde (PREMUS/PUCRS. Descrição da experiência: Na atenção básica, os residentes participaram na assistência domiciliar, ambulatorial e desenvolveram ações de educação popular em saúde em um grupo de idosos. A equipe também atuou em um hospital universitário, prestando assistência nos âmbitos ambulatorial e unidades de internação. Conclusão: O Programa de Residência Multiprofissional em Saúde, com ênfase na saúde do idoso, proporcionou aos residentes uma dinâmica assistencial fundamentada nos conceitos da interdisciplinaridade, integralidade e humanização do cuidado, tal como orientado pelas diretrizes do Sistema Único de Saúde (SUS.

  16. Women's Health Curriculum for Internal Medicine Residents: Development, Implementation, and Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davisson, Laura; Nuss, Michelle; Cottrell, Scott

    2010-09-01

    Women's health knowledge and skills are important for physicians, but training is often inadequate. The objective of this project was to develop, implement, and evaluate a women's health curriculum for an internal medicine residency program. After assessing institutional factors, we developed a curriculum for a multidisciplinary clinical rotation with a web-based tutorial. We recruited faculty from several specialties relevant to the care of women to precept for the rotation and/or to provide teaching materials for the tutorial. The curriculum for the 1-month rotation covered most of the recommended women's health topics. Internal medicine residents worked in a variety of clinical settings and were assigned to a web-based tutorial and a pretest and posttest. A statistically significant increase was seen in participants' mean posttest (71.7%) versus pretest (61.1%) scores (difference, 10.7%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.7-16.6; P  =  .0009). No difference was seen in controls' mean posttest (56.5%) versus pretest (57.2%) scores (difference, -0.7%; 95% CI: -12.1-10.7; P  =  .9). Mean rotation evaluation responses ranged from 7.09 to 7.45 on a 9-point scale. The majority (93%) of survey respondents agreed that the rotation increased their skills in caring for women, and all agreed the program was well organized and that it increased their awareness of women's health issues. A women's health curriculum using a web-based tutorial with a multidisciplinary clinical rotation can be successfully implemented in an internal medicine residency. The curriculum satisfied women's health training requirements, was associated with improvements in learning outcomes, and may be a model for women's health education.

  17. Influence of lifestyle on oral health behavior among rural residents of Udaipur district, India

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Santhosh; Nigam, Anshika; Choudhary, Alka; Tadakamadla, Jyothi; Tibdewal, Harish; Duraiswamy, Prabu; Kulkarni,Suhas

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the relation of life style with dental health behavior such as tooth brushing frequency, use of extra cleansing devices and regular visits to dentist among rural residents of Udaipur district, India. Study design: The study population comprised of 1001 rural population between the ages 18 to 69 years selected by multi stage stratified cluster sampling procedure. Personal interviews were conducted by three trained interviewers who collected information on socio-demogra...

  18. Globalization, migration health, and educational preparation for transnational medical encounters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koehn Peter H

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Unprecedented migration, a core dimension of contemporary globalization, challenges population health. In a world of increasing human mobility, many health outcomes are shaped by transnational interactions among care providers and care recipients who meet in settings where nationality/ethnic match is not an option. This review article explores the value of transnational competence (TC education as preparation for ethnically and socially discordant clinical encounters. The relevance of TC's five core skill domains (analytic, emotional, creative, communicative, and functional for migration health and the medical-school curriculum is elaborated. A pedagogical approach that prepares for the transnational health-care consultation is presented, with a focus on clinical-clerkship learning experiences. Educational preparation for contemporary medical encounters needs to include a comprehensive set of patient-focused interpersonal skills, be adaptable to a wide variety of service users and global practice sites, and possess utility in addressing both the quality of patient care and socio-political constraints on migration health.

  19. [Interadministrative collaboration for public health management in municipalities with less than 10,000 residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabert López, Marc; Arbussà Reixach, Anna; Sáez Zafra, Marc

    This study analyses which administrative body local councils use to carry out their basic public health responsibilities. The study sample includes data from municipalities with less than 10,000 residents, which we believe is a first for studies published in academic journals in Spain. The data used was obtained by means of a survey administered by trained personnel. 93.7% of all the municipalities in the province of Girona, the area under study, responded to the survey. The analysis shows that there is a statistically significant difference between municipalities with more and less than 10,000 residents with regards to which administrative body local councils use for managing public health responsibilities. The results of this study suggest that in the ongoing debate over the streamlining of local government, the current situation regarding public health responsibilities in municipalities with less than 10,000 residents needs to be taken into account. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Use of health services by residents at a seniors-only living facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elen Ferraz Teston

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to compare the use of medical and dental services by seniors residing at a seniors-only living facility and in the general community. It was a quantitative study, among 50 residents of the living facility and 173 in the general community. The data were collected between November 2011 and February 2012 through a questionnaire, and subjected to statistical analysis. Performance of clinical exams and satisfaction with health services was greater among seniors living in the general community; however, physical therapy treatment was more common among those living in the facility. The use of medical and dental services showed a statistically significant difference. The seniors in both groups need oral health monitoring and those living in the facility also require coverage by the Family Health Strategy. The presence of professionals with the right profile to adequately serve residents and the network of available services are determining factors for the success of this new housing policy.

  1. Farm residence and lymphohematopoietic cancers in the Iowa Women's Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rena R; Yu, Chu-Ling; Nuckols, John R; Cerhan, James R; Airola, Matthew; Ross, Julie A; Robien, Kim; Ward, Mary H

    2014-08-01

    Cancer incidence in male farmers has been studied extensively; however, less is known about risk among women residing on farms or in agricultural areas, who may be exposed to pesticides by their proximity to crop fields. We extended a previous follow-up of the Iowa Women's Health Study cohort to examine farm residence and the incidence of lymphohematopoietic cancers. Further, we investigated crop acreage within 750 m of residences, which has been associated with higher herbicide levels in Iowa homes. We analyzed data for a cohort of 37,099 Iowa women aged 55-69 years who reported their residence location (farm, rural (not a farm), town size based on population) at enrollment in 1986. We identified incident lymphohematopoietic cancers (1986-2009) by linkage with the Iowa Cancer Registry. Using a geographic information system, we geocoded addresses and calculated acreage of pasture and row crops within 750 m of homes using the 1992 National Land Cover Database. Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) in multivariate analyses of cancer risk in relation to both residence location and crop acreage. As found in an earlier analysis of residence location, risk of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) was higher among women living on farms (HR=2.23, 95%CI: 1.25-3.99) or rural areas (but not on a farm) (HR=1.95, 95%CI: 0.89-4.29) compared with women living in towns of >10,000 population. We observed no association between farm or rural residence and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL; overall or for major subtypes) or multiple myeloma. In analyses of crop acreage, we observed no association between pasture or row crop acreage within 750 m of homes and risk of leukemia overall or for the AML subtype. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL)/small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL) risk was nonsignificantly elevated among women with pasture acreage within 750 m of their home (HRs for increasing tertiles=1.8, 1.8 and 1.5) and with row crop acreage within 750 m

  2. Lifestyle medicine course for family medicine residents: preliminary assessment of the impact on knowledge, attitudes, self-efficacy and personal health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malatskey, Lilach; Bar Zeev, Yael; Tzuk-Onn, Adva; Polak, Rani

    2017-09-01

    The WHO estimates that by 2020 two-thirds of the diseases worldwide will be the result of unhealthy lifestyle habits. Less than half of primary care physician graduates feel prepared to give lifestyle behaviour counselling. Our objective was to evaluate the impact of lifestyle medicine (LM) course on self-reported knowledge, attitudes, self-efficacy and health behaviour of family medicine residents. Based on the Israeli syllabus for the study of LM, we delivered five face to face 20 H courses. Pre/post data were collected by knowledge, attitudes, self-efficacy and personal health survey: RESULTS: A total of 112 family medicine residents participated in one of the five courses, of which 91 (81.3%) filled both pre and post surveys. Participates showed an improvement in self-reported knowledge and capacity to manage patients in regard to smoking, weight management and physical activity. An improvement was noted in personal health behaviour of overweight participant's in regard to self-reported physical activity. A comprehensive LM syllabus based course has a positive impact on family medicine residents LM counselling abilities. We suggest that LM course should be considered as a potential permanent addition to the family medicine residency programme. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  3. Women's access to health care in Ghana: effects of education, residence, lineage and self-determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boateng, John; Flanagan, Constance

    2008-01-01

    Women's physical and psychological access to health care was analyzed using the 2003 Ghana Demographic and Health Survey (GDHS), a nationally representative study for monitoring population and health in Ghana. Female respondents from the 2133 cases in the couple's data set were used in this study. Women's level of education was positively related to physical but not to psychological access to health care. Residing in an urban area was positively related to both types of access. Matriliny consistently showed positive effects on physical access. In addition to these demographic factors, both physical and psychological access were positively related to women's self-determination, i.e., women's right and ability to make real choices about their lives including their health, fertility, sexuality, childcare and all areas where women are denied autonomy and dignity in their identities as women. Self-determination factors both mediated the effects of background factors on access and added explanatory power to the models.

  4. An innovative capstone health care informatics clinical residency: Interprofessional team collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custis, Laura M; Hawkins, Shelley Y; Thomason, Tanna R

    2017-03-01

    Integrated information systems and wireless technology have been increasingly incorporated into health care organizations with the premise that information technology will promote safe, high-quality, cost-effective patient care. With the advancement of technology, the level of expertise necessary to assume health care information technology roles has escalated. The purpose of this article is to describe a clinical residency project whereby students in a graduate degree health care informatics program successfully fulfilled program competencies through a faculty-lead research project focused on the use of home telehealth with a group of heart failure patients. Through the use of Donabedian's framework of structure, process, and outcomes, the health care informatics students completed essential learning activities deemed essential for transition into the role of an informatics specialist. Health care informatics educational leaders are encouraged to adapt this template of applied learning into their practices.

  5. IOP Elevation After Cataract Surgery: Results for Residents and Senior Staff at Henry Ford Health System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfersy, Adrian J; Prinzi, Robert A; Peracha, Zuhair H; Kim, Daniel D; Crandall, David A; Darnley-Fisch, Deborah A; Imami, Nauman R

    2016-10-01

    To determine the incidence of intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation on postoperative day 1 (POD1) after cataract surgery performed by resident surgeons compared with attending surgeons and to examine the influence of associated variables on the incidence of postoperative IOP elevation. Retrospective review of 2472 consecutive 2.2 to 2.8 mm temporal clear corneal cataract extractions by phacoemulsification performed by either residents or attending surgeons at Henry Ford Health System. Fellow eyes were excluded, resulting in 1847 eyes. IOP measurements of >40, >30, and >23 mm Hg were noted along with incremental IOP elevations of ≥10 and 20 mm Hg over preoperative/baseline IOP. Associated variables included: age, sex, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, glaucoma, glaucoma suspect, uveitis, prior ocular trauma, and vitreous loss at surgery. Resident-performed cataract surgery was associated with statistically significant higher rates of IOP elevation in all categories and in all clinical situations known to be associated with postoperative IOP spike, that is, vitreous loss at surgery, prior ocular trauma, and preexisting glaucoma. The incidence of postoperative day 1 IOP elevation after phacoemulsification performed by resident surgeons was 2 to 5 times that of experienced cataract surgeons. Variables including vitreous loss at surgery, prior ocular trauma, preexisting glaucoma, glaucoma suspect status, and male sex were significant contributors. Consideration for prophylactic IOP lowering is advised in high-risk patients.

  6. Opportunities and barriers in global women's health training during obstetrics and gynecology residencies in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichelberger, Kacey Y; Morse, Jessica E; Connolly, AnnaMarie; Autry, Meg

    2015-02-01

    To systematically measure the scope and breadth of global women's health (GWH) training opportunities during obstetrics and gynecology residencies in the USA, as described by program directors (PDs). In a questionnaire-based study, PDs were asked to complete a web-based survey between January 1 and March 15, 2013. Information about the residency program and GWH opportunities was obtained. Among 236 PDs contacted, 105 (44.5%) responded. Overall, 82 (78.1%) reported that at least one resident had participated in a GWH rotation during the past 5 years, 36 (34.3%) offered formal didactics, and 29 (27.6%) offered a formal rotation in GWH. Among all respondents, 43 (42.2%) reported having at least one faculty member for whom GWH is a dedicated part of their practice. Programs with dedicated GWH faculty were more likely to offer formal GWH didactics (relative risk [RR] 1.84; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.07-3.14; P=0.03), but were not significantly more likely to offer a formal GWH rotation (RR 1.91; 95% CI 0.97-3.70; P=0.06). Many residency programs provide opportunities for GWH training, but few offer formal didactics or a formal rotation. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The effect of education on health among US residents in relation to country of birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Bosu; Senauer, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    This research explores the impact of education on health in relation to an individual's country of birth using the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys for 2001-2004. We analyze health equations that relate health to education and other variables. Health is measured in terms of self-reported overall health, an index of biological risk factors, and body mass index. The primary hypothesis tested is whether education has a greater impact on immigrants' productive and allocative efficiency, because of their need to learn about how to remain healthy and access appropriate health care in a new environment. The empirical results indicate that for US residents, who were foreign-born, education is associated with a greater beneficial effect on every health outcome compared to those born in the United States. More education is related to an even greater positive effect on health for immigrants from Mexico, the origin of most immigrants, than from other countries. These results provide additional support for the portions of the 2007 Immigration Reform Act rejected by the US Congress, which placed a higher priority on education and job skills than current law. Since increased education and improved health are associated, such policy reform would help reduce the demands on the US health-care system. 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Generational status and duration of residence predict diabetes prevalence among Latinos: the California Men's Health Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sternfeld Barbara

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes disproportionately affects Latinos. However, examining Latinos as one group obscures important intra-group differences. This study examined how generational status, duration of US residence, and language preference are associated with diabetes prevalence and to what extent these explain the higher prevalence among Latinos. Methods We determined nativity, duration of US residence, language preference, and diabetes prevalence among 11 817 Latino, 6109 black, and 52 184 white participants in the California Men's Health Study. We combined generational status and residence duration into a single migration status variable with levels: ≥ third generation; second generation; and immigrant living in the US for > 25, 16-25, 11-15, or ≤ 10 years. Language preference was defined as language in which the participant took the survey. Logistic regression models were specified to assess the associations of dependent variables with prevalent diabetes. Results Diabetes prevalence was 22%, 23%, and 11% among Latinos, blacks, and whites, respectively. In age-adjusted models, we observed a gradient of risk of diabetes by migration status among Latinos. Further adjustment for socioeconomic status, obesity and health behaviors only partially attenuated this gradient. Language preference was a weak predictor of prevalent diabetes in some models and not significant in others. In multivariate models, we found that odds of diabetes were higher among US-born Latinos than US-born blacks. Conclusion Generational status and residence duration were associated with diabetes prevalence among middle-aged Latino men in California. As the Latino population grows, the burden of diabetes-associated disease is likely to increase and demands public health attention.

  9. Association between Weight Change, Health Outcomes, and Mortality in Older Residents in Long-Term Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Kozikowski, Andrzej; Pekmezaris, Renee; Lolis, James; Tommasulo, Barbara; Fishbein, Joanna; Wolf-Klein, Gisele

    2017-07-01

    Despite the numerous health risks associated with being overweight, the effect of weight loss on health and longevity remains controversial, particularly in older adults. We explored the association among weight changes, health outcomes, and mortality in older residents of a skilled nursing facility. A 6-year retrospective chart review of residents of a long-term care facility was conducted, collecting monthly weights in addition to the clinical and demographic data of all residents for at least 1 year. Weight changes of 5% from baseline month 1 through month 12 were classified as stable, loss, or gain. Demographics, body mass index (BMI), comorbidities, number of hospitalizations, and mortality were analyzed. The association between weight change (and other demographic and clinical variables) and mortality outcomes, as well as number of hospitalizations, was assessed using the χ2 test, the Fisher exact test, Poisson regression, or negative binomial regression, as appropriate. A total of 116 residents fit inclusion criteria; the median age was 84 years, with 71.6% being women and 88.7% white. The median length of stay was 877.5 days. Median body weight at baseline was 137.3 lb with a BMI of 23.5. More than one-third (36.2%) of residents had stable weight, 37.9% gained weight, and 25.9% lost weight during their stay. Neither weight change category nor baseline BMI was significantly associated with mortality (P = 0.056 and P = 0.518, respectively). Multivariable models showed that receiving supplementation (P = 0.04) and having hypertension (P = 0.04) were significant predictors of mortality after adjusting for the other factors. Losing >5% body weight (compared with maintaining stable weight; P = 0.0097), being a man (P = 0.0104), receiving a supplement (P = 0.0171), and being fed by tube (P = 0.0004) were associated with an increased number of hospitalizations after covariate adjustment. Weight fluctuation and baseline BMI do not appear to be associated with

  10. The design and implementation of a multidisciplinary global health residency track at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandaraja, Natasha; Hahn, Sigrid; Hennig, Nils; Murphy, Ramon; Ripp, Jonathan

    2008-10-01

    The Mount Sinai Global Health Center established a new multidisciplinary Global Health Residency Track (GHRT) in 2006. The goal of the GHRT is to provide participants with a foundation in global health issues and population-based health care, a chance to develop basic research and public health skills in the field, and guidance for career development. The authors describe how the GHRT was created, present its structure, and discuss their experience implementing this new program. Other selected global health residency training programs are also reviewed. The Mount Sinai GHRT is a two-year program that comprises a didactic curriculum, with participants required to take selected classes in the Master of Public Health Program of the Mount Sinai School of Medicine of New York University, and "field experience," which consists of a public health project that is implemented during a two-month elective period during the second year. Core competencies include (1) epidemiology and research skills, (2) health disparities, human rights, and cultural competency, (3) needs assessment and project development, (4) tropical medicine and infectious disease, and (5) reproductive, maternal, and child health. Nine residents were selected from four Mount Sinai residency programs to participate in the GHRT in its first year, and, during the winter of 2007, senior residents conducted public health projects in the Dominican Republic, India, Kenya, and East Harlem. All components of the track performed well in evaluations. An outcomes survey is ongoing to track career choices among graduates and to identify barriers to continuing involvement in global health.

  11. Fomenting Sickness: Nocebo Priming of Residents about Expected Wind Turbine Health Harms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Simon; Joshi, Ketan; Fry, Luke

    2014-01-01

    A nocebo effect hypothesis has been proposed to explain variations in where small minorities of exposed residents complain about noise and health effects said to be caused by wind farm turbines. The hypothesis requires that those complaining have been exposed to negative, potentially frightening information about the impact of proposed wind farms on nearby residents, and that this information conditions both expectations about future health impacts or the etiology of current health problems where wind farms are already operational. This hypothesis has been confirmed experimentally under laboratory conditions, but case studies of how this process can operate in local communities are lacking. In this paper, we present a case study of the apparent impact of an anti-wind farm public meeting on the generation of negative news media and the subsequent expression of concerns about anticipated health and noise impacts to a planning authority approval hearing in Victoria, Australia. We present a content analysis of the negative claims disseminated about health and noise in the news media and available on the internet prior to the hearing, and another content analysis of all submissions made to the planning authority by those opposing the development application.

  12. Fomenting sickness: nocebo priming of residents about expected wind turbine health harms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon eChapman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A nocebo effect hypothesis has been proposed to explain the varying spatio-temporal distribution of reported complaints by small minorities of exposed residents about noise and health effects said to be caused by wind farm turbines. The hypothesis requires that those complaining have been exposed to negative, potentially frightening information about the impact of proposed wind farms on nearby residents, and that this information conditions both expectations about future health impacts or the aetiology of current health problems where wind farms are already operational. This hypothesis has been demonstrated experimentally under laboratory conditions, but case studies of how this process can operate in local communities are lacking.In this paper we present a case study of the apparent impact of an anti wind farm public meeting on the generation of negative news media and the subsequent expression of concerns about anticipated health and noise to a planning authority approval hearing in Victoria, Australia. We present a content analysis of the negative claims disseminated about health and noise in the news media and available on the internet prior to the hearing, and another content analysis of all submissions made to the planning authority by those opposing the development application.

  13. Poverty, disability and self-reported health amongst residents and migrants in Gauteng, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, George T H; de Wet, Thea

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the relative importance of individual- and household-level indicators of poverty to the self-reported health of residents and recent migrants in South Africa's most urbanised province (Gauteng). Univariate and multivariable statistical analyses were undertaken on data from the 2014 Quality of Life household survey undertaken by the Gauteng City Regional Observatory. The survey generated data on a representative sample of n = 27 490 respondents. At the individual-level the odds for disability or health-limiting work/social activities was significantly lower amongst younger, better educated and employed respondents, and amongst both transnational and internal migrants. At the household-level, the absence of some basic services and household assets (particularly mains electricity, telecommunications and a television) were significantly associated with a lower odds of health-limiting work/social activities. Variation in sociodemographic and economic predictors of self-reported health at the individual- and household-level partly explain the lower odds of disability and health-limiting work/social activities of migrants, since migrants were less likely to be disabled and tended to be younger, with higher educational attainment and better employment status than residents, yet were also more likely to be living in households with fewer services and assets.

  14. Impact of Postmigration Living Difficulties on the Mental Health of Afghan Migrants Residing in Istanbul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qais Alemi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The sociopolitical situation in Afghanistan continually pushes Afghans to seek safety and better socioeconomic prospects in neighboring and foreign countries. In this paper we examine the mental health of Afghan migrants residing in Istanbul, Turkey, an understudied population at high risk of psychopathology. Methods. We surveyed 158 Afghan migrants to assess psychological distress using a culturally grounded measure of mental health, the Afghan Symptom Checklist [ASCL], and used hierarchical regression analysis to examine the impact of postmigration living difficulties (PMLDs on mental health. Results. We found that depressive, somatoform, anxiety-like symptoms occurred often, as did a number of culturally salient idioms of distress. Regression analyses showed that while socioeconomic variables and poor physical health status significantly predicted psychological distress, PMLDs exerted the strongest negative effect. The most pressing PMLDs for Afghans in Turkey are poverty, unemployment, lack of treatment for health problems, fears of being deported and related legal challenges, and family-related stressors. Conclusion. Our results point to the importance of the critical need to create culturally sensitive interventions to remediate high levels of psychological distress by addressing related PMLD stressors in a highly vulnerable Afghan migrant population residing in Turkey.

  15. Work-related health complaints in surgical residents and the influence of social support and job-related autonomy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerjan, M.; Bluyssen, S.J.; Bleichrodt, R.P.; Weel-Baumgarten, E.M. van; Goor, H. van

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the influence of job-related autonomy and social support provided by consultants and colleagues on the stress-related health complaints of surgical residents in the Netherlands. METHODS: All (n = 400) Dutch residents in training in

  16. The UCLA Health Resident Informaticist Program - A Novel Clinical Informatics Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Jennifer S; Cheng, Eric M; Baldwin, Kevin; Pfeffer, Michael A

    2017-07-01

    Few opportunities exist for physician trainees to gain exposure to, and training in, the field of clinical informatics, an Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited, recently board-certified specialty. Currently, 21 approved programs exist nationwide for the formal training of fellows interested in pursuing careers in this discipline. Residents and fellows training in medical and surgical fields, however, have few avenues available to gain experience in clinical informatics. An early introduction to clinical informatics brings an opportunity to generate interest for future career trajectories. At University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) Health, we have developed a novel, successful, and sustainable program, the Resident Informaticist Program, with the goals of exposing physician trainees to the field of clinical informatics and its academic nature and providing opportunities to expand the clinical informatics workforce. Herein, we provide an overview of the development, implementation, and current state of the UCLA Health Resident Informaticist Program, with a blueprint for development of similar programs. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. The Fukushima Health Management Survey: estimation of external doses to residents in Fukushima Prefecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Yasumura, Seiji; Ozasa, Kotaro; Kobashi, Gen; Yasuda, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Makoto; Akahane, Keiichi; Yonai, Shunsuke; Ohtsuru, Akira; Sakai, Akira; Sakata, Ritsu; Kamiya, Kenji; Abe, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    The Fukushima Health Management Survey (including the Basic Survey for external dose estimation and four detailed surveys) was launched after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. The Basic Survey consists of a questionnaire that asks Fukushima Prefecture residents about their behavior in the first four months after the accident; and responses to the questionnaire have been returned from many residents. The individual external doses are estimated by using digitized behavior data and a computer program that included daily gamma ray dose rate maps drawn after the accident. The individual external doses of 421,394 residents for the first four months (excluding radiation workers) had a distribution as follows: 62.0%, <1 mSv; 94.0%, <2 mSv; 99.4%, <3 mSv. The arithmetic mean and maximum for the individual external doses were 0.8 and 25 mSv, respectively. While most dose estimation studies were based on typical scenarios of evacuation and time spent inside/outside, the Basic Survey estimated doses considering individually different personal behaviors. Thus, doses for some individuals who did not follow typical scenarios could be revealed. Even considering such extreme cases, the estimated external doses were generally low and no discernible increased incidence of radiation-related health effects is expected. PMID:26239643

  18. Health risk assessment for residents exposed to atmospheric diesel exhaust particles in southern region of Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chio, Chia-Pin; Liao, Chung-Min; Tsai, Ying-I.; Cheng, Man-Ting; Chou, Wei-Chun

    2014-03-01

    Evidence shows a strong association among air pollution, oxidative stress (OS), deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage, and diseases. Recent studies indicated that the aging, human neurodegenerative diseases and cancers resulted from mitochondrial dysfunction and OS. The purpose of this study is to provide a probabilistic risk assessment model to quantify the atmospheric diesel exhaust particles (DEP)-induced pre-cancer biomarker response and cancer incidence risk for residents in south Taiwan. We conducted entirely monthly particulate matter sampling data at five sites in Kaohsiung of south Taiwan in the period 2002-2003. Three findings were found: (i) the DEP dose estimates and cancer risk quantification had heterogeneously spatiotemporal difference in south Taiwan, (ii) the pre-cancer DNA damage biomarker and cancer incidence estimates had a positive yet insignificant association, and (iii) all the estimates of cancer incidence in south Taiwan populations fell within and slight lower than the values from previous cancer epidemiological investigations. In this study, we successfully assessed the tumor incidence for residents posed by DEP exposure in south Taiwan compared with the epidemiological approach. Our approach provides a unique way for assessing human health risk for residences exposed to atmospheric DEP depending on specific combinations of local and regional conditions. Our work implicates the importance of incorporating both environmental and health risk impacts into models of air pollution exposure to guide adaptive mitigation strategies.

  19. Partnering with public schools: a resident-driven reproductive health education initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Kelly; Zhu, Tao Y; Raidoo, Shandhini; Zhao, Lulu X; Sammarco, Anne; Ashby, Karen

    2014-02-01

    To assess the impact of a resident-driven sexual health educational initiative in an inner-city Cleveland middle school. 10 resident physicians and 57 students in 7(th) and 8(th) grade participated in this prospective cohort study. Residents taught 3 sessions on the topics of basic anatomy and physiology, pregnancy, sexually transmitted infections (STI), contraception, and safe relationships. Outcome measures included the percentages of students able to name at least 3 different STIs and contraceptive methods; to name potential complications of STIs; and to correctly identify condoms and abstinence as the only contraceptive methods also protective against STI transmission. Significant improvements were noted in students' baseline knowledge of human anatomy, contraception, and safe sex practices after completion of the curriculum. The percentage of students able to name at least 3 forms of birth control increased from 1.7% to 70.7% (P schools. The socioeconomic burden of teen pregnancy justifies comprehensive efforts to improve reproductive health education. Copyright © 2014 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Assessing integration of clinical and public health skills in preventive medicine residencies: using competency mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Eden V; Sarigiannis, Amy N; Boulton, Matthew L

    2012-06-01

    We evaluated the utility of a competency mapping process for assessing the integration of clinical and public health skills in a newly developed Community Health Center (CHC) rotation at the University of Michigan School of Public Health Preventive Medicine residency. Learning objectives for the CHC rotation were derived from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core clinical preventive medicine competencies. CHC learning objectives were mapped to clinical preventive medicine competencies specific to the specialty of public health and general preventive medicine. Objectives were also mapped to The Council on Linkages Between Academia and Public Health Practice's tier 2 Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals. CHC learning objectives mapped to all 4 (100%) of the public health and general preventive medicine clinical preventive medicine competencies. CHC population-level learning objectives mapped to 32 (94%) of 34 competencies for public health professionals. Utilizing competency mapping to assess clinical-public health integration in a new CHC rotation proved to be feasible and useful. Clinical preventive medicine learning objectives for a CHC rotation can also address public health competencies.

  1. Cancer-related health behaviours and health service use among Inuit and other residents of Canada's north.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, James Ted; Trenholm, Ryan

    2010-05-01

    This article identifies the extent to which demographic, socio-economic and geographic factors account for differences between Inuit and other Northern Canadian residents in health-related behaviours and health service use related to cancer incidence and diagnosis. The study population includes Inuit, Métis, First Nation and non-Aboriginal residents aged 21-65 who live in Nunavut, Northwest Territories, Labrador, Nunavik and Jamésie in northern Quebec, and the northern regions of Saskatchewan and Manitoba. Data are drawn from confidential versions of the 2000-2001 and 2004-2005 Canadian Community Health Surveys and the 2001 Aboriginal People's Survey produced by Statistics Canada. Multivariate Logistic regression analysis is applied to a set of health-related behaviours including cigarette smoking, binge drinking and obesity, and a set of basic health service use measures including consultation with a physician, consultation with a nurse, Pap smear testing and mammography. We found that significantly higher smoking and binge drinking rates and lower rates of female cancer screening among Inuit are found not to be accounted for by differences in observable demographic and socio-economic characteristics, location of residence or distance from a hospital. As such we conclude that health-related behaviours leading to increased cancer risk and to a lower utilization of diagnostic cancer screening appear to be due to unobserved factors specific to Inuit and their unique social-cultural context. Policy interventions to address these problems may need to be targeted specifically to Inuit Canadians and should not be considered in isolation of their broader health, economic and social environment. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Benefit distribution of social health insurance: evidence from china's urban resident basic medical insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jay; Tian, Sen; Zhou, Qin; Han, Wei

    2016-09-01

    Equity is one of the essential objectives of the social health insurance. This article evaluates the benefit distribution of the China's Urban Residents' Basic Medical Insurance (URBMI), covering 300 million urban populations. Using the URBMI Household Survey data fielded between 2007 and 2011, we estimate the benefit distribution by the two-part model, and find that the URBMI beneficiaries from lower income groups benefited less than that of higher income groups. In other words, government subsidy that was supposed to promote the universal coverage of health care flew more to the rich. Our study provides new evidence on China's health insurance system reform, and it bears meaningful policy implication for other developing countries facing similar challenges on the way to universal coverage of health insurance. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Addressing the Health and Wellness Needs of Vulnerable Rockaway Residents in the Wake of Hurricane Sandy: Findings From a Health Coaching and Community Health Worker Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, David; Oberlink, Mia R; Shah, Shivani; Evans, Lauren; Bassuk, Karen

    To describe the design and participants of a program that employed health coaches and community health workers to address the social, health, and long-term disaster recovery needs of Rockaway residents roughly 2 years after Hurricane Sandy made landfall. Baseline and exit questionnaires, containing demographic, health, and health care utilization measures, were administered to participants at the start and end of the program. Enrollment and encounter information was captured in program administrative records. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize participant characteristics, personal goals, referrals to local organizations and agencies, and outcomes. Qualitative analyses were used to identify recurring themes in challenges faced by participants and barriers to health and wellness. The program served 732 community residents, of whom 455 (62%) completed baseline and exit questionnaires. Participants were directly and/or indirectly impacted by Hurricane Sandy through property damage, closures of health care facilities, limited employment opportunities, and trouble securing affordable housing. Furthermore, many participants faced considerable adversities and struggled to manage chronic health conditions. Personal goals set by participants included locating health care and other resources (44%), weight management and healthy eating (35%), and self-management of chronic conditions (24%). Health coaches and community health workers engaged participants an average of 4 times-providing counseling and referrals to local organizations and services, including medical and dental services (29%), city-issued identification cards (27%), and health insurance and other entitlements (23%). Comparisons of baseline and exit surveys indicated significant improvements in self-reported health, health care utilization, and confidence managing health issues. No significant improvement was observed in the use of preventive health care services. The program represents a model for

  4. Biomass power plants and health problems among nearby residents: A case study in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chudchawal Juntarawijit

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Electricity generation from biomass has become a boom business. However, currently, concerns over their environmental and health impact have emerged. This study aimed to explore these health problems by studying two small biomass power plants in Thailand. Materials and Methods: Data concerning chronic diseases and health symptoms was collected from 392 people by trained interviewers by the use of a questionnaire. Results: Residents living within 1 km from the power plants had a higher prevalence of allergies (Odds ratio = 2.4, 95% CI: 1.5-4.0, asthma (OR = 2.1, 95% CI: 1.0-4.4 and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD (OR = 2.7, 95% CI: 1.0-8.4. The risks of other symptoms, itching/rash, eye irritation, cough, stuffy nose, allergic symptoms, sore throat, and difficulty breathing among those living within 0.5 km from the power plants (OR = 2.5-8.5 were even more marked. Conclusions: It has been concluded that without a proper control, pollution from the biomass power plants can cause significant health problems to the nearby residents.

  5. Resident assistant training program for increasing alcohol, other drug, and mental health first-aid efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thombs, Dennis L; Gonzalez, Jennifer M Reingle; Osborn, Cynthia J; Rossheim, Matthew E; Suzuki, Sumihiro

    2015-05-01

    In college and university residence halls, resident assistants (RAs) are expected to serve as first-aid providers to students who may have alcohol, other drug, mental health, and academic problems. Despite this responsibility, evidence-based, first-aid programs have not been developed and tested for the RA workforce. The current study examined effects of an investigational first-aid program designed specifically for RAs. The online Peer Hero Training program is a novel approach to RA training in its use of interactive video dramatizations of incidents involving substance-using or distressed residents. A 9-month randomized trial conducted on eight US campuses compared RAs who participated in the Peer Hero Training program to RAs who received training-as-usual. Participation in the Peer Hero Training program significantly increased RA first-aid efforts for residential students who may have had alcohol, other drug, mental health, or academic problems 6 months after baseline. Compared with those in the training-as-usual condition, RAs in the Peer Hero Training program made more than 10 times as many first-aid efforts for possible alcohol problems, almost 14 times the number of first-aid efforts for possible drug use, almost 3 times the number of first-aid efforts for possible mental health problems, and 3 times the number of first-aid efforts for academic problems. There was no evidence that measured RA attitudes mediated the effects of the intervention. Results of this preliminary evaluation trial suggest that online training using interactive video dramatizations is a viable approach to strengthening RAs' ability to provide alcohol, other drugs, and mental health first-aid to undergraduates.

  6. Training Family Medicine Residents in Effective Communication Skills While Utilizing Promotoras as Standardized Patients in OSCEs: A Health Literacy Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagels, Patti; Kindratt, Tiffany; Arnold, Danielle; Brandt, Jeffrey; Woodfin, Grant; Gimpel, Nora

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Future health care providers need to be trained in the knowledge and skills to effectively communicate with their patients with limited health literacy. The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a curriculum designed to increase residents' health literacy knowledge, improve communication skills, and work with an interpreter. Materials and Methods. Family Medicine residents (N = 25) participated in a health literacy training which included didactic lectures and an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). Community promotoras acted as standardized patients and evaluated the residents' ability to measure their patients' health literacy, communicate effectively using the teach-back and Ask Me 3 methods, and appropriately use an interpreter. Pre- and postknowledge, attitudes, and postdidactic feedback were obtained. We compared OSCE scores from the group that received training (didactic group) and previous graduates. Residents reported the skills they used in practice three months later. Results. Family Medicine residents showed an increase in health literacy knowledge (p = 0.001) and scored in the adequately to expertly performed range in the OSCE. Residents reported using the teach-back method (77.8%) and a translator more effectively (77.8%) three months later. Conclusions. Our innovative health literacy OSCE can be replicated for medical learners at all levels of training.

  7. Determinants of Medical and Health Care Expenditure Growth for Urban Residents in China: A Systematic Review Article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Cai, Qiong; Wang, Jin; Liu, Yun

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, medical and health care consumption has risen, making health risk an important determinant of household spending and welfare. We aimed to examine the determinants of medical and health care expenditure to help policy-makers in the improvement of China's health care system, benefiting the country, society and every household. This paper employs panel data from China's provinces from 2001 to 2011 with all possible economic variations and studies the determinants of medical and healthcare expenditure for urban residents. CPI (consumer price index) of medical services and the resident consumption level of urban residents have positive influence on medical and health care expenditures for urban residents, while the local medical budget, the number of health institutions, the incidence of infectious diseases, the year-end population and the savings of urban residents will not have effect on medical and health care expenditure for urban residents. This paper proposed three relevant policy suggestions for Chinese governments based on the findings of the research.

  8. The service-education linkage: implications for family practice residency programs and community and migrant health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, P R; Hale, F

    1993-05-01

    Access to quality primary health care for our country's underserved populations is a challenge for both the government and physicians. The Division of Medicine, through funding priorities and other initiatives, is encouraging family practice educators to train residents and students for work in community and migrant health centers (C/MHCs) in underserved areas. The objective of this research was to study linkages between family practice residency programs and C/MHCs and determine the reasons for affiliation, disadvantages and advantages, predictors of successful linkages, and common errors in the linkage agreement. We conducted in-depth telephone interviews with the directors of 13 of the 19 family practice residency programs identified as having linkages with C/MHCs. All interviewees at residency programs indicated that their programs had a mission to serve underserved patients. The most commonly cited constraining factor cited by both residency programs and C/MHCs was financial support for residents, on-site faculty, and support staff. Many programs reported that residents training at the C/MHC were able to gain a community health perspective and practice community-oriented primary care. Finally, financing the relationship involved many different approaches, ranging from the residency paying all of the salaries, to a sharing of salaries by the residency, state, and/or hospital, to C/MHC paying the salaries either through its own funds or through grant support. These data provide an assessment of the current issues that family practice residencies must address to implement service-education linkages. They provide an empirical basis to outline the steps involved in forming a linkage between a residency and a C/MHC.

  9. Mental Health Status among Married Working Women Residing in Bhubaneswar City, India: A Psychosocial Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ansuman Panigrahi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mental health is a major public health concern worldwide. This study aimed to assess the mental health status and its correlates among married working women residing in Bhubaneswar city of Odisha, India. A cross-sectional study was undertaken in 240 households involving 240 married working women following a multistage cluster random sampling design. Using the predesigned, pretested interview schedule and self-reporting questionnaire, all relevant information was collected. Our study revealed that 32.9% of study respondents had poor mental health and only about 10% of these women had sought any kind of mental health services. Logistic regression analysis showed that 3 predictors such as favourable attitude of colleagues, sharing their own problems with husband, and spending time for yoga/meditation/exercise had significant positive impact on the mental health status of married working women. A preventive program regarding various aspects of mental health for married working women at workplace as well as community level could be a useful strategy in reducing this public health problem.

  10. Health care facility preparation for weapons of mass destruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, R N

    2000-01-01

    Weapons of mass destruction (WMD) are a threat that all health care facilities must be prepared for. Every health care facility is a vital part of the community response system and must be ready to respond. A terrorist attack using WMD can occur in any location, urban or rural. Private vehicles or buses may transport the majority of patients, with only a small percentage arriving by emergency medical services. Most will go to the hospitals closest to the incident, even if this results in overcrowding. Others will go directly to their private physicians' offices or primary hospitals, even if these facilities are not part of the local disaster plan. Most of these victims will not be decontaminated before arrival. If a hospital allows any of these patients in, the staff may become ill from the toxic exposure and the facility may require closure for decontamination. Since the risk is universal, all health care facilities must plan for the care of victims of a WMD incident. They must plan for communications that allow local government to transmit alerts regarding the emergency. Health care facilities must also communicate their status and emergency needs to local officials during the emergency. They must be prepared to establish a single entry control point and attempt to secure all other entrances. They must be able to establish a patient decontamination team from on-duty staff with only a few minutes' notice at any time of the day or night.

  11. The Association between Residence Floor Level and Cardiovascular Disease: The Health and Environment in Oslo Study

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    Mads K. Rohde

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Increasingly more people live in tall buildings and on higher floor levels. Factors relating to floor level may protect against or cause cardiovascular disease (CVD. Only one previous study has investigated the association between floor level and CVD. Methods. We studied associations between floor of bedroom and self-reported history of stroke, venous thromboembolism (VTE, and intermittent claudication (IC among 12.525 inhabitants in Oslo, Norway. We fitted multivariate logistic regression models and adjusted for sociodemographic variables, socioeconomic status (SES, and health behaviors. Additionally, we investigated block apartment residents (N=5.374 separately. Results. Trend analyses showed that disease prevalence increased by floor level, for all three outcomes. When we investigated block apartment residents alone, the trends disappeared, but one association remained: higher odds of VTE history on 6th floor or higher, compared to basement and 1st floor (OR: 1.504; 95% CI: 1.007–2.247. Conclusion. Floor level is positively associated with CVD, in Oslo. The best-supported explanation may be residual confounding by building height and SES. Another explanation, about the impact of atmospheric electricity, is also presented. The results underline a need to better understand the associations between residence floor level and CVD and multistory housing and CVD.

  12. The Association between Residence Floor Level and Cardiovascular Disease: The Health and Environment in Oslo Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, Mads K; Aamodt, Geir

    2016-01-01

    Background. Increasingly more people live in tall buildings and on higher floor levels. Factors relating to floor level may protect against or cause cardiovascular disease (CVD). Only one previous study has investigated the association between floor level and CVD. Methods. We studied associations between floor of bedroom and self-reported history of stroke, venous thromboembolism (VTE), and intermittent claudication (IC) among 12.525 inhabitants in Oslo, Norway. We fitted multivariate logistic regression models and adjusted for sociodemographic variables, socioeconomic status (SES), and health behaviors. Additionally, we investigated block apartment residents (N = 5.374) separately. Results. Trend analyses showed that disease prevalence increased by floor level, for all three outcomes. When we investigated block apartment residents alone, the trends disappeared, but one association remained: higher odds of VTE history on 6th floor or higher, compared to basement and 1st floor (OR: 1.504; 95% CI: 1.007-2.247). Conclusion. Floor level is positively associated with CVD, in Oslo. The best-supported explanation may be residual confounding by building height and SES. Another explanation, about the impact of atmospheric electricity, is also presented. The results underline a need to better understand the associations between residence floor level and CVD and multistory housing and CVD.

  13. Attaining Meaningful Use of Health Information Technology in a Residency Program: Challenges and Rewards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The US Federal Government has offered financial incentives to physicians and hospitals for using health care technology in ways that may improve the quality of patient care, via the use of an electronic health record. Although many barriers exist to achieving the health care technology requirements necessary to capture these incentives, several strategies were employed by the University of Hawai‘i Family Medicine Residency Program at the Physician Center at Mililani to overcome these barriers, in order to register and attest for these financial rewards. The rewards are substantial, and may total up to $44,000/eligible provider over 5 years, and $63,750/eligible provider over 6 years, for Medicare and Medicaid respectively. Both programs have different incentive payment schedules for hospital facilities. This article intends to outline the process and challenges involved in meeting the specific requirements necessary to qualify for this funding, and to assist others in this endeavor, particularly (but not limited to) residency training programs, which face a unique set of challenges. PMID:23115749

  14. LIVED EXPERIENCES OF HEALTH PROBLEMS OF ELDERLY RESIDING IN URBAN AREAS, KATHMANDU: PILOT STUDY

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    Bista Archana, Joshi Sarala

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Globally, number of old age population is increasing with advancement of biomedical technology. Old age is the time associated with biological, psychological and social changes which situate elderly to acquire different health related problems. Objectives: To find out lived experiences of elderly regarding their health problems residing in homes of Kathmandu city. Methods: Qualitative hermeneutic phenomenology approach was adopted. Researcher selected purposively four elderly residing in an urban area of Kathmandu Valley as the study participants. In-depth interview was conducted by using in-depth interview guideline, as well as medical records, field notes and observation clues were recorded. Interview was conducted in Nepali Language and was audio taped. The recording was transcribed by the researcher herself, and the data were analyzed thematically. Finally, different sources of data were triangulated. Results: The four main themes identified were physical health problems, impaired functional abilities, psychological and social problems. Experienced physical health problems were joint pain, hearing and vision deficit, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, gastritis and fall injury. Impaired Functional abilities in performing activities of daily living was commonly experienced problems. Loneliness and decreased recent memory power were the psychological problems. Being neglected by family members, financial constraints for treatment and improper care during illness were the discerned social problems. Conclusion: Elderly are suffering from different physical health problems, impaired functional abilities, as well as various psycho-social problems. Thus, health promotional activities need to be promoted for decreasing morbidity of elderly. Family members need to be focused in the care of elderly through national policy.

  15. Reported health conditions in animals residing near natural gas wells in southwestern Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slizovskiy, I B; Conti, L A; Trufan, S J; Reif, J S; Lamers, V T; Stowe, M H; Dziura, J; Rabinowitz, P M

    2015-01-01

    Natural gas extraction activities, including the use of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing, may pose potential health risks to both human and animal populations in close proximity to sites of extraction activity. Because animals may have increased exposure to contaminated water and air as well as increased susceptibility to contaminant exposures compared to nearby humans, animal disease events in communities living near natural gas extraction may provide "sentinel" information useful for human health risk assessment. Community health evaluations as well as health impact assessments (HIAs) of natural gas exploration should therefore consider the inclusion of animal health metrics in their assessment process. We report on a community environmental health survey conducted in an area of active natural gas drilling, which included the collection of health data on 2452 companion and backyard animals residing in 157 randomly-selected households of Washington County, Pennsylvania (USA). There were a total of 127 reported health conditions, most commonly among dogs. When reports from all animals were considered, there were no significant associations between reported health condition and household proximity to natural gas wells. When dogs were analyzed separately, we found an elevated risk of 'any' reported health condition in households less than 1km from the nearest gas well (OR = 3.2, 95% CI 1.07-9.7), with dermal conditions being the most common of canine disorders. While these results should be considered hypothesis generating and preliminary, they suggest value in ongoing assessments of pet dogs as well as other animals to better elucidate the health impacts of natural gas extraction on nearby communities.

  16. Gamified Twitter Microblogging to Support Resident Preparation for the American Board of Surgery In-Service Training Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Laura C; DiFiori, Monica M; Jayaraman, Vijay; Shames, Brian D; Feeney, James M

    We sought to determine if a daily gamified microblogging project improves American Board of Surgery In-Service Training Examination (ABSITE) scores for participants. In July 2016, we instituted a gamified microblogging project using Twitter as the platform and modified questions from one of several available question banks. A question of the day was posted at 7-o׳clock each morning, Monday through Friday. Respondents were awarded points for speed, accuracy, and contribution to discussion topics. The moderator challenged respondents by asking additional questions and prompted them to find evidence for their claims to fuel further discussion. Since 4 months into the microblogging program, a survey was administered to all residents. Responses were collected and analyzed. After 6 months of tweeting, residents took the ABSITE examination. We compared participating residents׳ ABSITE percentile rank to those of their nonparticipating peers. We also compared residents׳ percentile rank from 2016 to those in 2017 after their participation in the microblogging project. The University of Connecticut general surgery residency is an integrated program that is decentralized across 5 hospitals in the central Connecticut region, including Saint Francis Hospital and Medical Center, located in Hartford. We advertised our account to the University of Connecticut general surgery residents. Out of 45 residents, 11 participated in Twitter microblogging (24.4%) and 17 responded to the questionnaire (37.8%). In all, 100% of the residents who were participating in Twitter reported that daily microblogging prompted them to engage in academic reading. Twitter participants significantly increased their ABSITE percentile rank from 2016 to 2017 by an average of 13.7% (±14.1%) while nonparticipants on average decreased their ABSITE percentile rank by 10.0% (±16.6) (p = 0.003). Microblogging via Twitter with gamification is a feasible strategy to facilitate improving performance on the ABSITE

  17. Do place of residence and ethnicity affect health services utilization? evidence from greece

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    Pappa Evelina

    2011-04-01

    individuals visited more the private practitioners. Immigrants had a higher likelihood of visiting emergency departments. Conclusions Although health care needs were the main determinant of health services utilization in both the urban and rural population, socio-economic and ethnic differences also seem to contribute to the inequities observed in some types of health services use, favouring the better-off. Such findings provide important information to policy makers, which attempt to reduce inequalities in health care according to place of residence and ethnicity.

  18. A comparison of health access between permanent residents, undocumented immigrants and refugee claimants in Toronto, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Ruth M; Klei, A G; Hodges, Brian D; Fisman, David; Kitto, Simon

    2014-02-01

    Understanding the immigrant experience accessing healthcare is essential to improving their health. This qualitative study reports on experiences seeking healthcare for three groups of immigrants in Toronto, Canada: permanent residents, refugee claimants and undocumented immigrants. Undocumented immigrants who are on the Canadian Border Services Agency deportation list are understudied in Canada due to their precarious status. This study will examine the vulnerabilities of this particular subcategory of immigrant and contrast their experiences seeking healthcare with refugee claimants and permanent residents. Twenty-one semi-structured, one-on-one qualitative interviews were conducted with immigrants to identify barriers and facilitators to accessing healthcare. The open structure of the interviews enabled the participants to share their experiences seeking healthcare and other factors that were an integral part of their health. This study utilized a community-based participatory research framework. The study identifies seven sections of results. Among them, immigration status was the single most important factor affecting both an individual's ability to seek out healthcare and her experiences when trying to access healthcare. The healthcare seeking behaviour of undocumented immigrants was radically distinct from refugee claimants or immigrants with permanent resident status, with undocumented immigrants being at a greater disadvantage than permanent residents and refugee claimants. Language barriers are also noted as an impediment to healthcare access. An individual's immigration status further complicates their ability to establish relationships with family doctors, access prescriptions and medications and seek out emergency room care. Fear of authorities and the complications caused by the above factors can lead to the most disadvantaged to seek out informal or black market sources of healthcare. This study reaffirmed previous findings that fear of deportation

  19. Disparities in mental health outcomes among lung cancer survivors associated with ruralness of residence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrykowski, Michael A; Steffens, Rachel F; Bush, Heather M; Tucker, Thomas C

    2014-04-01

    Healthy People 2020 identifies elimination of health disparities as a key aim. Rural residence is associated with disparities in cancer screening, physical morbidity, and survival. The present study aimed to identify potential disparities in mental health (MH) outcomes (e.g., anxiety and depression symptoms, distress) in lung cancer (LC) survivors associated with ruralness of residence. Lung cancer survivors (LC group; n = 193; mean age = 63.1 years; mean time since diagnosis = 15.6 months) were recruited from the population-based SEER Kentucky Cancer Registry. LC survivors completed a telephone interview and questionnaire assessing MH outcomes. U.S. Department of Agriculture Rural-Urban Continuum Codes were used to identify Rural (n = 117) and Urban (n = 76) LC survivors. A healthy comparison (HC) group was recruited (n = 152) and completed a questionnaire assessing MH outcomes. Across six MH indices, Rural LC survivors reported poorer MH relative to Urban LC survivors with a mean effect size (ES) of 0.43 SD in unadjusted analyses and 0.29 SD in analyses adjusted for education and physical comorbidity. Comparison of the LC and HC groups revealed significant Ruralness × Group interactions for five of six MH indices. The Rural LC group reported poorer MH than the Rural HC group with a mean ES of 0.51 SD. The MH of Urban LC and HC groups did not differ (mean ES = 0.00 SD). Rural residence is a risk factor for poorer MH outcomes for LC survivors. The MH of Rural LC survivors may be more negatively impacted by cancer diagnosis and treatment than the MH of Urban LC survivors. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Farm residence and lymphohematopoietic cancers in the Iowa Women’s Health Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rena R.; Yu, Chu-Ling; Nuckols, John R.; Cerhan, James R.; Airola, Matthew; Ross, Julie A.; Robien, Kim; Ward, Mary H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cancer incidence in male farmers has been studied extensively; however, less is known about risk among women residing on farms or in agricultural areas, who may be exposed to pesticides by their proximity to crop fields. We extended a previous follow-up of the Iowa Women’s Health Study cohort to examine farm residence and the incidence of lymphohematopoietic cancers. Further, we investigated crop acreage within 750 m of residences, which has been associated with higher herbicide levels in Iowa homes. Methods We analyzed data for a cohort of 37,099 Iowa women aged 55–69 years who reported their residence location (farm, rural (not a farm), town size based on population) at enrollment in 1986. We identified incident lymphohematopoietic cancers (1986–2009) by linkage with the Iowa Cancer Registry. Using a geographic information system, we geocoded addresses and calculated acreage of pasture and row crops within 750 m of homes using the 1992 National Land Cover Database. Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) in multivariate analyses of cancer risk in relation to both residence location and crop acreage. Results As found in an earlier analysis of residence location, risk of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) was higher among women living on farms (HR= 2.23, 95%CI: 1.25–3.99) or rural areas (but not on a farm) (HR= 1.95, 95%CI: 0.89–4.29) compared with women living in towns of > 10,000 population. We observed no association between farm or rural residence and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL; overall or for major subtypes) or multiple myeloma. In analyses of crop acreage, we observed no association between pasture or row crop acreage within 750 m of homes and risk of leukemia overall or for the AML subtype. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL)/small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL) risk was nonsignificantly elevated among women with pasture acreage within 750 m of their home (HRs for increasing tertiles= 1.8, 1.8 and 1

  1. Costs and clinical quality among Medicare beneficiaries: associations with health center penetration of low-income residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ravi; Lebrun-Harris, Lydie A; Ngo-Metzger, Quyen

    2014-01-01

    Determine the association between access to primary care by the underserved and Medicare spending and clinical quality across hospital referral regions (HRRs). Data on elderly fee-for-service beneficiaries across 306 HRRs came from CMS' Geographic Variation in Medicare Spending and Utilization database (2010). We merged data on number of health center patients (HRSA's Uniform Data System) and number of low-income residents (American Community Survey). We estimated access to primary care in each HRR by "health center penetration" (health center patients as a proportion of low-income residents). We calculated total Medicare spending (adjusted for population size, local input prices, and health risk). We assessed clinical quality by preventable hospital admissions, hospital readmissions, and emergency department visits. We sorted HRRs by health center penetration rate and compared spending and quality measures between the high- and low-penetration deciles. We also employed linear regressions to estimate spending and quality measures as a function of health center penetration. The high-penetration decile had 9.7% lower Medicare spending ($926 per capita, p=0.01) than the low-penetration decile, and no different clinical quality outcomes. Compared with elderly fee-for-service beneficiaries residing in areas with low-penetration of health center patients among low-income residents, those residing in high-penetration areas may accrue Medicare cost savings. Limited evidence suggests that these savings do not compromise clinical quality.

  2. Work or place? Assessing the concurrent effects of workplace exploitation and area-of-residence economic inequality on individual health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntaner, Carles; Li, Yong; Ng, Edwin; Benach, Joan; Chung, Haejoo

    2011-01-01

    Building on previous multilevel studies in social epidemiology, this cross-sectional study examines, simultaneously, the contextual effects of workplace exploitation and area-of-residence economic inequality on social inequalities in health among low-income nursing assistants. A total of 868 nursing assistants recruited from 55 nursing homes in Kentucky, Ohio, and West Virginia were surveyed between 1999 and 2001. Using a cross-classified multilevel design, the authors tested the effects of area-of-residence (income inequality and racial segregation), workplace (type of nursing home ownership and managerial pressure), and individual-level (age, gender, race/ethnicity, health insurance, length of employment, social support, type of nursing unit, preexisting psychopathology, physical health, education, and income) variables on health (self-reported health and activity limitations) and behavioral outcomes (alcohol use and caffeine consumption). Findings reveal that overall health was associated with both workplace exploitation and area-of-residence income inequality; area of residence was associated with activity limitations and binge drinking; and workplace exploitation was associated with caffeine consumption. This study explicitly accounts for the multiple contextual structure and effects of economic inequality on health. More work is necessary to replicate the current findings and establish robust conclusions on workplace and area of residence that might help inform interventions.

  3. The Colorado Humanitarian Surgical Skills Workshop: A Cadaver-Based Workshop to Prepare Residents for Surgery in Austere Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yihan; Mukhopadhyay, Swagoto; Meguid, Robert A; Kuwayama, David P

    2017-08-29

    Interest in humanitarian surgery is high among surgical and obstetric residents. The Colorado Humanitarian Surgical Skills Workshop is an annual 2-day course exposing senior residents to surgical techniques essential in low- and middle-income countries but not traditionally taught in US residencies. We evaluated the course's ability to foster resident comfort, knowledge, and competence in these skills. The cohort of course participants was studied prospectively. Participants attended didactic sessions followed by skills sessions using cadavers. Sample areas of focus included general surgery (mesh-free hernia repair), orthopedics (powerless external fixation), and neurosurgery (powerless craniotomy). Before and after the course, participants answered a questionnaire assessing confidence with taught skills; took a knowledge-based test composed of multiple choice and open-ended questions; and participated in a manual skills test of tibial external fixation. The Center for Surgical Innovation, University of Colorado School of Medicine. A total of 12 residents (11 general surgical and 1 obstetric) from ten US institutions. After the course, participants perceived increased confidence in performing all 27 taught procedures and ability to practice in low- and middle-income countries. In knowledge-based testing, 10 of 12 residents demonstrated improvement on multiple choice questioning and 9 of 12 residents demonstrated improvement on open-ended questioning with structured scoring. In manual skills testing, all external fixator constructs demonstrated objective improvement on structured scoring and subjective improvement on stability assessment. For senior residents interested in humanitarian surgery, a combination of skills-focused teaching and manual practice led to self-perceived and objective improvement in relevant surgical knowledge and skills. The Colorado Humanitarian Surgical Skills Workshop represents an effective model for transmitting essential surgical

  4. The health status of children without resident permit consulting the Children's Hospital of Lausanne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depallens, Sarah Depallens; Puelma, Marie-Jo; Krähenbühl, Jean-Daniel; Gehri, Mario

    2010-07-15

    To assess social, economic and medical data concerning children without a resident permit taken into care by the Children's Hospital of Lausanne (HEL) in order to evaluate their specific needs. Prospective exploratory study by a questionnaire including the socio-demographic, medical and education data of 103 children without a resident permit, who consulted the HEL for the first time between August 2003 and March 2006. These children were then recalled for a second check-up one year later in order to allow a regular monitoring. Eighty-seven percent of the children were native of Latin America, 36% being less than two years old. This population of children lived in precarious conditions with a family income lower than the poverty level (89% of the families with less than 3100 CHF/month). Forty-five percent of the children had a health insurance. The main reasons for consultation were infectious diseases, a check-up requested by the school or a check-up concerning newborn children. Most of them were in good health and the others were affected by illnesses similar to those found in other children of the same age. At least 13% of the children were obese and 27% were overweight. All children who were of educational age went to school during the year after the first check-up and 48% were affiliated to a health insurance. The majority of the children from Latin America lived in very precarious conditions. Their general health status was good and most of them could benefit from regular check-ups. Prevention, focused on a healthier life style, was particularly important among this population characterised by a high incidence of overweight and obesity.

  5. Medication Use and Its Potential Impact on the Oral Health Status of Nursing Home Residents in Flanders (Belgium).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssens, Barbara; Petrovic, Mirko; Jacquet, Wolfgang; Schols, Jos M G A; Vanobbergen, Jacques; De Visschere, Luc

    2017-09-01

    Polypharmacy is considered the most important etiologic factor of hyposalivation, which in turn can initiate oral health problems. To describe the medication use of nursing home residents, to identify the medications related to hyposalivation and to find possible associations between the different classes of medication, the number of medications, and the oral health status of the residents. A cross-sectional study. The study population consisted of the residents of a nonrandom sample of 23 nursing homes from 2 Belgian provinces, belonging to the oral health care network Gerodent. All residents of the sample visited the Gerodent mobile dental clinic between October 2010 and April 2012. For each resident, oral health data, demographic data, and an overview of the total medication intake were collected. The study sample consisted of 1226 nursing home residents with a mean age of 83.9 years [standard deviation (SD) 8.5]. The mean number of medications per person was 9.0 (SD 3.6, range 0-23, median 9.0). Of all prescribed medication, 49.6% had a potential hyposalivatory effect with a mean number per person of 4.5 (SD 2.2, range 0-15, median 4.0). In the bivariate analyses, associations were found between medication use and oral health of residents with natural teeth: the higher the number of medications (with risk of dry mouth) and the overall risk of medication-related dry mouth, the lower the number of natural teeth (P = .022, P = .005, and P = .017, respectively). In contrast, the total treatment need tended to decrease with rising medication intake, resulting in a clear increase of the treatment index with rising medication intake (P = .003, P oral status of the residents. Copyright © 2017 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Linking social and built environmental factors to the health of public housing residents: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Erin; Ibe, Chidinma; Young, Jeffery Hunter; Potti, Karthya; Jones, Paul; Pollack, Craig Evan; Gudzune, Kimberly A

    2015-04-10

    Public housing residents have a high risk of chronic disease, which may be related to neighborhood environmental factors. Our objective was to understand how public housing residents perceive that the social and built environments might influence their health and wellbeing. We conducted focus groups of residents from a low-income public housing community in Baltimore, MD to assess their perceptions of health and neighborhood attributes, resources, and social structure. Focus groups were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Two investigators independently coded transcripts for thematic content using editing style analysis technique. Twenty-eight residents participated in six focus groups. All were African American and the majority were women. Most had lived in public housing for more than 5 years. We identified four themes: public housing's unhealthy physical environment limits health and wellbeing, the city environment limits opportunities for healthy lifestyle choices, lack of trust in relationships contributes to social isolation, and increased neighborhood social capital could improve wellbeing. Changes in housing and city policies might lead to improved environmental health conditions for public housing residents. Policymakers and researchers may consider promoting community cohesiveness to attempt to empower residents in facilitating neighborhood change.

  7. Can the introduction of a full-service supermarket in a food desert improve residents' economic status and health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Andrea S; Ghosh-Dastidar, Madhumita; Beckman, Robin; Flórez, Karen R; DeSantis, Amy; Collins, Rebecca L; Dubowitz, Tamara

    2017-12-01

    To estimate the impacts of a new supermarket in a low-income desert, on residents' economic status and health. We surveyed a randomly selected cohort in two low-income Pittsburgh neighborhoods before and about 1 year following the opening of a supermarket. We used difference-in-difference approach to test changes across the two neighborhoods in residents' food security, United States Department of Agriculture Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program and Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women Infant and Children participation, employment, income, and self-reported health/chronic disease diagnoses. We observed declines in food insecurity (-11.8%, P supermarket relative to residents of the comparison neighborhood. We also found suggestive evidence that residents' incomes increased more ($1550, P = .09) and prevalence of diabetes increased less in the neighborhood with the supermarket than in the comparison neighborhood (-3.6%, P = .10). Locating a new supermarket in a low-income neighborhood may improve residents' economic well-being and health. Policymakers should consider broad impacts of neighborhood investment that could translate into improved health for residents of underserved neighborhoods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Health in the Tenderloin: A resident-guided study of substance use, treatment, and housing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jamie Suki

    2017-03-01

    Substance use researchers recognize that environments - our homes, streets, communities, and neighborhoods - set the stage for substance use and treatment experiences by framing interactions, health options, and decision-making. The role of environment is particularly salient in places deemed disadvantaged or risky, such as parts of the Tenderloin neighborhood of San Francisco. Since risk is historically, socially, and structurally situated, an individual's social position in a neighborhood shapes how risk environments are experienced. The purpose of this study was to explore how the environment shapes substance use and treatment experiences, described from the perspective of Tenderloin residents. I conducted docent method interviews with formerly homeless women living in supportive housing in San Francisco (N = 20). The docent method is a three-stage, participant-led, audiotaped, and photographed walking interview. As they guided me through target "sites of interest" (homes, streets, treatment programs, and safe spaces), participants discussed their experiences with substance use and treatment in the environment. First, they described that the risks of a broader drug market are concentrated in the Tenderloin, exposing residents to elevated and disproportionate risk. Second, for structural, economic, social, and physical reasons, participants described a sense of geographic or neighborhood stratification. Third, multiple levels of policing and surveillance were persistent, even in participants' homes. Fourth, despite all the challenges, participants found security and support in the Tenderloin, and considered it their home. In the discussion, I offer that the Tenderloin environment provided residents many advantages, but forms of structural and everyday violence largely defined their experiences in the neighborhood. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. NANDA-NIC-NOC methodology for the mental health resident nurse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Cámara Conde

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available As residents of the mental health specialty, we take great care plan with methodology NANDA-NOC-NIC (NNN in each of our rotations. Because of that there is still no consensus on how to use this methodology; we made this poster with our proposal. To do this, we propose a practical and standardized to carry out the care plans to guide future resident nurse of mental health in their care plans.Taking into account the review of various models of existing ratings of nursing at present, as well as taxonomy NNN, we carried out the development of a poster in which we show a practical example of how our proposed structure of a care plan:Evaluation: through functional patterns of M. Gordon Diagnosis: respecting the PES format: - (P Problem: Using with the NANDA taxonomy - (E Etiology: related factors- (S Signs and symptoms: definitorial characteristics Planning: depending on the diagnosis set forth, the NOCs will agree. Performance indicators are also defined, specifying the current state, as well as the level to maintain /achieve and the time to be assessed. Lastly proposed interventions (NIC and developed activities to be carried out to achieve the expected results. Implementation: implementation of interventions and activities Evaluation: we review the performance indicators, assessing the level reached in light of the current situation of the patient, and proposing corrective measures if necessary. As discussion could conclude that we used in our rotations this structure, so that we standardized "way we do." In turn, we have disseminated this structure in the National Congress of Mental Health Nursing.

  10. Influence of Internet Accessibility and Demographic factors on utilization of Web-based Health Information Resources by Resident Doctors in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajuwon, GA; Popoola, SO

    2015-01-01

    Background The internet is a huge library with avalanche of information resources including healthcare information. There are numerous studies on use of electronic resources by healthcare providers including medical practitioners however, there is a dearth of information on the patterns of use of web-based health information resource by resident doctors in Nigeria. This study therefore investigates the influence of internet accessibility and demographic factors on utilization of web-based health information resources by resident doctors in tertiary healthcare institutions in Nigeria. Methods Descriptive survey design was adopted for this study. The population of study consisted of medical doctors undergoing residency training in 13 tertiary healthcare institutions in South-West Nigeria. The tertiary healthcare institutions were Federal Medical Centres, University Teaching Hospitals and Specialist Hospitals (Neuropsychiatric and Orthopaedic). A pre-tested, self-administered questionnaire was used for data collection. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) was used for data analysis. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Pearson Product Moment correlation and multiple regression analysis. Results The mean age of the respondents was 34 years and males were in the majority (69.0%). A total of 96.1% respondents had access to the Internet. E-mail (X̄=5.40, SD=0.91), Google (X̄=5.26, SD=1.38), Yahoo (X̄=5.15, SD=4.44) were used weekly by the respondents. Preparation for Seminar/Grand Round presentation (X̄=8.4, SD=1.92), research (X̄=7.8, SD=2.70) and communication (X̄=7.6, SD=2.60) were ranked high as purposes for use of web-based information resources. There is a strong, positive and significant relationship between internet accessibility and utilization of web-based health information resources (r=0.628, pInternet accessibility (B=0.911) and demographic factors: gender (B=−2.027), designation (B=−0.343) educational qualification (B

  11. Are we adequately preparing the next generation of physicians to prescribe exercise as prevention and treatment? Residents express the desire for more training in exercise prescription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solmundson, Kara; Koehle, Michael; McKenzie, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Background Physical activity (PA) is a key intervention for chronic disease, yet few physicians provide exercise prescription (EP). EP is an important component in larger strategies of reducing non-communicable disease (NCD). Our objective was to assess Family Medicine Residents (FMR) knowledge, competence, and perspectives of EP to help inform future curriculum development. Methods A 49-item cross-sectional survey was administered to 396 University of British Columbia FMR. Residents’ EP knowledge, competence, attitudes/beliefs, current practices, personal physical activity levels, and perspectives of training were assessed using, primarily, a 7-point Likert scale. Results The response rate was 80.6% (319/396). After eliminating 25 that failed to meet the inclusion criteria, 294 were included in the final analysis. The majority 95.6% of FMR reported EP as important in their future practice, despite having low knowledge of the Canadian PA Guidelines (mean score 1.77/4), low self-reported competence prescribing exercise as prevention (mean score 13.35/21), and rating themselves “somewhat incompetent” prescribing exercise to patients with chronic disease (mean score 11.26/21). FMR believe PA is integral to their patients’ health (98.0%), sedentary behaviour is harmful (97.9%), and feel a responsibility to discuss PA with patients (99.7%). Few FMR (14.9%) perceived their training in EP as adequate and 91.0% desire more. Conclusions FMR report EP is important, yet do not perceive they are sufficiently prepared to provide EP. In future curricular development, medical educators should consider residents’ low knowledge, competence, perceived program support, and their expressed desire for more training in exercise prescription. PMID:28344695

  12. Perceptions of environmental health risks among residents in the “Toxic Doughnut”: Opportunities for risk screening and community mobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surrounded by landfills, and toxic and hazardous facilities, Altgeld Gardens is located in a “toxic doughnut.” With high rates of environmentally-related conditions, residents have called for a community-based environmental health assessment to improve overall health in their com...

  13. Knowledge levels and training needs of disaster medicine among health professionals, medical students, and local residents in Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Tong; Han, Xue; Chen, Fei; Du, Yan; Zhang, Hongwei; Yin, Jianhua; Tan, Xiaojie; Chang, Wenjun; Ding, Yibo; Han, Yifang; Cao, Guangwen

    2013-01-01

    Disaster is a serious public health issue. Health professionals and community residents are main players in disaster responses but their knowledge levels of disaster medicine are not readily available. This study aimed to evaluate knowledge levels and training needs of disaster medicine among potential disaster responders and presented a necessity to popularize disaster medicine education. A self-reporting questionnaire survey on knowledge level and training needs of disaster medicine was conducted in Shanghai, China, in 2012. A total of randomly selected 547 health professionals, 456 medical students, and 1,526 local residents provided intact information. The total response rate was 93.7%. Overall, 1.3% of these participants have received systematic disaster medicine training. News media (87.1%) was the most common channel to acquire disaster medicine knowledge. Although health professionals were more knowledgeable than community residents, their knowledge structure of disaster medicine was not intact. Medical teachers were more knowledgeable than medical practitioners and health administrators (p = 0.002). Clinicians performed better than public health physicians (pstudents performed better than clinical medical students (pTraining needs of disaster medicine were generally high among the surveyed. 'Lecture' and 'practical training' were preferred teaching methods. The selected key and interested contents on disaster medicine training were similar between health professionals and medical students, while the priorities chosen by local residents were quite different from health professionals and medical students (ptraining needs into consideration.

  14. Responder safety and health: preparing for future disasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reissman, Dori B; Howard, John

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews lessons learned about managing the safety and health of workers who were involved in disaster response, recovery, and cleanup after the 2001 World Trade Center (WTC) disaster. The first two sections review ongoing responder health burdens and the tragic toll of this disaster from a worker safety and health perspective. The remaining sections address changes in federal infrastructure, response planning, and resources for protection of response and recovery personnel. Proper preparation includes pre-event and "just-in-time" disaster-worker training on likely hazards, organizational assets for hazard monitoring, and hands-on instruction in the use of assigned protective equipment. Good planning includes predeployment medical review to ensure "fitness for duty" and considers the following: (1) personal risk factors, (2) hazards likely to be associated with particular field locations, and (3) risks involved with assigned tasks (eg, workload and pace, work/rest cycles, available resources, and team/supervisory dynamics). Planning also should address worker health surveillance, medical monitoring, and availability of medical care (including mental health services). Disaster safety managers should anticipate likely hazards within planning scenarios and prepare asset inventories to facilitate making timely safety decisions. Disaster safety management begins immediately and provides ongoing real-time guidance to incident leadership at all levels of government. Robust standards must be met to reliably protect workers/responders. An integrated and measurable multiagency safety management function must be built into the incident command system before an incident occurs. This function delineates roles and responsibilities for rapid exposure assessments, ensuring cross-agency consistency in data interpretation, and timely, effective communication of information and control strategies. The ability to perform this safety management function should be tested and

  15. Memory performance, health literacy, and instrumental activities of daily living of community residing older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, Graham J; Mackert, Michael; Becker, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Health literacy is associated with cognitive function across multiple domains in older adults, and these older adults may face special memory and cognitive challenges that can limit their health literacy and, in turn, their ability to live independently. The aim of this study was to evaluate if an association existed among health literacy, memory performance, and performance-based functional ability in community-residing older adults. Forty-five adults participated in this study. Designed to reflect everyday memory, the Rivermead Behavioral Memory Test (RBMT) bridges laboratory-based measures of memory and assessments obtained by self-report and observation. The RBMT classifies individuals into four categories of memory performance: normal, poor, mildly impaired, and severely impaired. The participants were recruited in the two categories of normal (≥22) or impaired (≤16) category on the RBMT. The sample consisted of 14 who were in the impaired category and 31 in the normal group. Their average age was 77.11 years, and their average number of years of education was 15.33 years. Health literacy scores measured with the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine. Health literacy scores were high (M = 65.09, SD = 2.80). Thirty-four participants or 76% of the sample scored a 66 out of a possible score of 80. Pearson correlations were calculated for the study variables. Health literacy scores with education and cognition (.30), memory performance groups (normal vs. poor; .25), and performance-based instrumental activities (.50) were associated significantly. The development of a broader assortment of health literacy instruments would improve the ability of researchers to both compare studies and build on the knowledge and results of others.

  16. Racism as a Unique Social Determinant of Mental Health: Development of a Didactic Curriculum for Psychiatry Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medlock, Morgan; Weissman, Anna; Wong, Shane Shucheng; Carlo, Andrew; Zeng, Mary; Borba, Christina; Curry, Michael; Shtasel, Derri

    2017-01-01

    Mental health disparities based on minority racial status are well characterized, including inequities in access, symptom severity, diagnosis, and treatment. For African Americans, racism may affect mental health through factors such as poverty and segregation, which have operated since slavery. While the need to address racism in medical training has been recognized, there are few examples of formal didactic curricula in the psychiatric literature. Antiracism didactics during psychiatry residency provide a unique opportunity to equip physicians to address bias and racism in mental health care. With advocacy by residents in the Massachusetts General Hospital/McLean Psychiatry residency program, the Division of Public and Community Psychiatry developed a curriculum addressing racial inequities in mental health, particularly those experienced by African Americans. Four 50-minute interactive didactic lectures were integrated into the required didactic curriculum (one lecture per postgraduate training class) during the 2015-2016 academic year. Of residents who attended lectures and provided anonymous feedback, 97% agreed that discussing racism in formal didactics was at least "somewhat" positive, and 92% agreed that it should "probably" or "definitely" remain in the curriculum. Qualitative feedback centered on a need for more time to discuss racism as well as a desire to learn more about minority mental health advocacy in general. Teaching about racism as part of required training conveys the explicit message that this is core curricular material and critical knowledge for all physicians. These lectures can serve as a springboard for dissemination and provide scaffolding for similar curriculum development in medical residency programs.

  17. Influence of lifestyle on oral health behavior among rural residents of Udaipur district, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Santhosh; Nigam, Anshika; Choudhary, Alka; Tadakamadla, Jyothi; Tibdewal, Harish; Duraiswamy, Prabu; Kulkarni, Suhas

    2011-09-01

    To determine the relation of life style with dental health behavior such as tooth brushing frequency, use of extra cleansing devices and regular visits to dentist among rural residents of Udaipur district, India. The study population comprised of 1001 rural population between the ages 18 to 69 years selected by multi stage stratified cluster sampling procedure. Personal interviews were conducted by three trained interviewers who collected information on socio-demographic and lifestyle factors in addition to some aspects of dental health behavior including tooth brushing frequency, use of extra cleaning devices like dental floss and regular visits to dentist. Majority of the population (63.3%) brushed their teeth once a day and only a few subjects (19.8%) brushed twice a day whereas 8.6 % never brushed their teeth. Logistic regression analysis revealed that females were more apt in every aspect of dental health behavior. House wives were more regular in brushing their teeth (OR=1.51) and using extra cleansing devices as compared to other occupation groups. Subjects who suffered from systemic disease showed negative association with use of extra cleansing devices but showed positive association with regular visits to dentist. The results indicate that dental health behavior is related with life style factors as well as socio-demographic variables.

  18. Dietary exposure to aluminium and health risk assessment in the residents of Shenzhen, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mei; Jiang, Lixin; Huang, Huiping; Zeng, Shengbo; Qiu, Fen; Yu, Miao; Li, Xiaorong; Wei, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Although there are great changes of dietary in the past few decades in China, few are known about the aluminium exposure in Chinese diet. The aim of this study is to systematically evaluate the dietary aluminium intake level in residents of Shenzhen, China. A total of 853 persons from 244 household were investigated their diet by three days food records. Finally, 149 kinds of foods in 17 food groups were selected to be the most consumed foods. From them, 1399 food samples were collected from market to test aluminium concentration. High aluminium levels were found in jellyfish (median, 527.5 mg/kg), fried twisted cruller (median, 466.0 mg/kg), shell (median, 107.1 mg/kg). The Shenzhen residents' average dietary aluminium exposure was estimated at 1.263 mg/kg bw/week which is lower than the PTWI (provisional tolerable weekly intake). But 0-2 and 3-13 age groups have the highest aluminium intake exceeding the PTWI (3.356 mg/kg bw/week and 3.248 mg/kg bw/week) than other age groups. And the main dietary aluminium exposure sources are fried twisted cruller, leaf vegetables and bean products. Our study suggested that even three decades rapid economy development, children in Shenzhen still have high dietary aluminium exposure risk. How to control high dietary aluminium exposure still is a great public health challenge in Shenzhen, China.

  19. Dietary exposure to aluminium and health risk assessment in the residents of Shenzhen, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Yang

    Full Text Available Although there are great changes of dietary in the past few decades in China, few are known about the aluminium exposure in Chinese diet. The aim of this study is to systematically evaluate the dietary aluminium intake level in residents of Shenzhen, China. A total of 853 persons from 244 household were investigated their diet by three days food records. Finally, 149 kinds of foods in 17 food groups were selected to be the most consumed foods. From them, 1399 food samples were collected from market to test aluminium concentration. High aluminium levels were found in jellyfish (median, 527.5 mg/kg, fried twisted cruller (median, 466.0 mg/kg, shell (median, 107.1 mg/kg. The Shenzhen residents' average dietary aluminium exposure was estimated at 1.263 mg/kg bw/week which is lower than the PTWI (provisional tolerable weekly intake. But 0-2 and 3-13 age groups have the highest aluminium intake exceeding the PTWI (3.356 mg/kg bw/week and 3.248 mg/kg bw/week than other age groups. And the main dietary aluminium exposure sources are fried twisted cruller, leaf vegetables and bean products. Our study suggested that even three decades rapid economy development, children in Shenzhen still have high dietary aluminium exposure risk. How to control high dietary aluminium exposure still is a great public health challenge in Shenzhen, China.

  20. Rural health service managers' perspectives on preparing rural health services for climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Rachael; McGirr, Joe

    2017-08-17

    To determine health service managers' (HSMs) recommendations on strengthening the health service response to climate change. Self-administered survey in paper or electronic format. Rural south-west of New South Wales. Health service managers working in rural remote metropolitan areas 3-7. Proportion of respondents identifying preferred strategies for preparation of rural health services for climate change. There were 43 participants (53% response rate). Most respondents agreed that there is scepticism regarding climate change among health professionals (70%, n = 30) and community members (72%, n = 31). Over 90% thought that climate change would impact the health of rural populations in the future with regard to heat-related illnesses, mental health, skin cancer and water security. Health professionals and government were identified as having key leadership roles on climate change and health in rural communities. Over 90% of the respondents believed that staff and community in local health districts (LHDs) should be educated about the health impacts of climate change. Public health education facilitated by State or Federal Government was the preferred method of educating community members, and education facilitated by the LHD was the preferred method for educating health professionals. Health service managers hold important health leadership roles within rural communities and their health services. The study highlights the scepticism towards climate change among health professionals and community members in rural Australia. It identifies the important role of rural health services in education and advocacy on the health impacts of climate change and identifies recommended methods of public health education for community members and health professionals. © 2017 National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  1. Mental Health Disparities Among Low-Income US Hispanic Residents of a US-Mexico Border Colonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez-Velarde, Guadalupe; Grineski, Sara; Staudt, Kathleen

    2015-12-01

    Unregulated residential settlements along the US side of the US-Mexico border, often called "colonias", are mainly populated by low-income Mexican-origin Hispanics. Colonia residents face numerous social, environmental, economic and public health challenges. Despite this, the mental health of individuals living in colonias has remained largely understudied. Drawing from a survey (N = 98) conducted through a community-based participatory research project in one colonia suffering from numerous environmental and social challenges, this study analyzes residents' mental health outcomes and access to mental health care with a focus on intra-ethnic disparities based on environmental concerns, nativity, language acculturation, comorbidity, gender, health insurance, and stressful life events. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, correlation, and regression. More than one third of the residents have been diagnosed with a mental health condition and over half reported stress and excess worry. In terms of mental health care, 77 % of individuals diagnosed with a mental health problem have sought additional help mainly through a primary care provider despite the high levels of uninsured individuals. Comorbidity, being female, recent negative life events, and high levels of environmental concerns were significant predictors of negative mental health outcomes. This study contributes to the understanding of the complex health dynamics of the US Hispanic population. It also highlights the need for additional research and resources devoted to the mental health of low-income minorities in isolated communities.

  2. Dental health of Chatham Islanders: an investigation of the oral health of Chatham Islands residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, Lisa M; Thomson, W Murray

    2003-12-01

    To examine the self-reported and clinical oral health of Chatham Islanders. A cross-sectional oral health survey. The Chatham Islands community. The investigation involved completion of dental self-report questionnaires by children who attended Chatham Islands schools, and adults who responded to a dental flyer. Eighty-seven children and 189 adults took part, all of whom had oral health examinations. Among the children, the prevalence of dental caries in the deciduous dentition was 67.8 percent, and the mean dfs, mean DFS and mean number of missing deciduous teeth due to caries were 5.9 (sd, 6.2), 0.5 (sd, 1.1) and 0.3 (sd, 0.8) respectively. Caries severity was higher in children who were episodic dental attenders, who had irregular brushing habits or whose dental experiences had had a negative impact on their lives. In adults, the prevalence of caries was 81.5 percent. The mean DFS and mean number of missing permanent teeth due to caries were 37.9 (sd, 13.1) and 4.7 (sd, 3.8) respectively. On average, caries severity was higher among infrequent and episodic dental attenders, irregular brushers and those for whom dental problems had had a negative life impact. While the oral health of Chatham Islands children is comparable with that of children in New Zealand, Chatham Islands adults may be dentally disadvantaged due to limited access to dental resources. The findings have important implications for the planning of dental health services for this remote area, and may provide a useful framework from which further investigations of remote community-dwellers' oral health may be developed.

  3. Training Family Medicine Residents in Effective Communication Skills While Utilizing Promotoras as Standardized Patients in OSCEs: A Health Literacy Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patti Pagels

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Future health care providers need to be trained in the knowledge and skills to effectively communicate with their patients with limited health literacy. The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a curriculum designed to increase residents’ health literacy knowledge, improve communication skills, and work with an interpreter. Materials and Methods. Family Medicine residents N=25 participated in a health literacy training which included didactic lectures and an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE. Community promotoras acted as standardized patients and evaluated the residents’ ability to measure their patients’ health literacy, communicate effectively using the teach-back and Ask Me 3 methods, and appropriately use an interpreter. Pre- and postknowledge, attitudes, and postdidactic feedback were obtained. We compared OSCE scores from the group that received training (didactic group and previous graduates. Residents reported the skills they used in practice three months later. Results. Family Medicine residents showed an increase in health literacy knowledge p=0.001 and scored in the adequately to expertly performed range in the OSCE. Residents reported using the teach-back method (77.8% and a translator more effectively (77.8% three months later. Conclusions. Our innovative health literacy OSCE can be replicated for medical learners at all levels of training.

  4. Perceptions of environmental health risks among residents in the "Toxic Doughnut": opportunities for risk screening and community mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Brandi M; Hall, Eric S

    2015-12-10

    Surrounded by landfills, and toxic and hazardous facilities, Altgeld Gardens is located in a "toxic doughnut". With high rates of environmentally-related conditions, residents have called for a community-based environmental health assessment to improve overall health in their community. The purpose of this study was to investigate the attitudes and beliefs of environmental health risks of Altgeld's residents which would assist community organizing efforts and provide the groundwork for a community-based environmental health assessment. A questionnaire was designed and administered to 42 Altgeld residents who also participated in focus groups to assess their perceptions of environmental health risks. All participants were Altgeld residents for at least two years and were fairly representative of the broader community. Physical and social hazards were primarily identified as posing risks to participants' family and the broader community. Physical hazards included the dumping of hazardous waste and landfills; social hazards were crime and drugs. These findings have been useful in community organizing efforts and in program planning for local community-based organizations and public health agencies. The results have also been used to prioritize health and environmental risk issues impacting the community.

  5. [Cosmetologists preparation in the field of health promotion and health education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowska, Bozena; Fraczek, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    Cosmetology is a very important and advantageous branch, because it indulges essential health and cultural human necessities. The specialization focuses on those aspects of prevention that can extend youth and efficiency which is helpful for health retaining. The thesis shows the ways of preparation of the new skeleton crew for health promotion and education reflecting presented teaching program for cosmetologists on bachelor level. As it results from an analysis of particular subject and didactic items presented during the studies, the cosmetologist can be a leader of health promoters in surrounding because of acquiring all necessary references in the matter.

  6. Understanding Digital Technology Access and Use Among New York State Residents to Enhance Dissemination of Health Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manganello, Jennifer A; Gerstner, Gena; Pergolino, Kristen; Graham, Yvonne; Strogatz, David

    2016-01-01

    Many state and local health departments, as well as community organizations, have been using new technologies to disseminate health information to targeted populations. Yet little data exist that show access and use patterns, as well as preferences for receiving health information, at the state level. This study was designed to obtain information about media and technology use, and health information seeking patterns, from a sample of New York State (NYS) residents. A cross-sectional telephone survey (with mobile phones and landlines) was developed to assess media and technology access, use patterns, and preferences for receiving health information among a sample of 1350 residents in NYS. The survey used random digit dialing methodology. A weighted analysis was conducted utilizing Stata/SE software. Data suggest that NYS residents have a high level of computer and Internet use; 82% have at least one working computer at home, and 85% use the Internet at least sometimes. Mobile phone use is also high; 90% indicated having a mobile phone, and of those 63% have a smartphone. When asked about preferences for receiving health information from an organization, many people preferred websites (49%); preferences for other sources varied by demographic characteristics. Findings suggest that the Internet and other technologies are viable ways to reach NYS residents, but agencies and organizations should still consider using traditional methods of communication in some cases, and determine appropriate channels based on the population of interest.

  7. Mental health and morbidity of caregivers and co-residents of individuals with dementia: a quasi-experimental design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Aideen; Rosato, Michael; O'Reilly, Dermot

    2017-10-01

    To determine if providing informal care to a co-resident with dementia symptoms places an additional risk on the likelihood of poor mental health or mortality compared with co-resident non-caregivers. A quasi-experimental design of caregiving and non-caregiving co-residents of individuals with dementia symptoms provides a natural comparator for the additive effects of caregiving on top of living with an individual with dementia symptoms. Census records, providing information on household structure, intensity of caregiving, presence of dementia symptoms and self-reported mental health were linked to mortality records over the following 33 months. Multi-level regression models were constructed to determine the risk of poor mental health and death in co-resident caregivers of individuals with dementia symptoms compared with co-resident non-caregivers, adjusting for the clustering of individuals within households. The cohort consisted of 10 982 co-residents (55.1% caregivers), with 12.1% of non-caregivers reporting poor mental health compared with 8.4% of intense caregivers (>20 h of care per week). During follow-up, the cohort experienced 560 deaths (245 to caregivers). Overall, caregiving co-residents were at no greater risk of poor mental health but had lower mortality risk than non-caregiving co-residents (adjusted odds ratio (ORadj) = 0.93, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.79, 1.10 and ORadj = 0.67, 95% CI 0.56, 0.81, respectively); this lower mortality risk was also seen amongst the most intensive caregivers (ORadj = 0.65, 95% CI 0.53, 0.79). Caregiving poses no additional risk to mental health over and above the risk associated with merely living with someone with dementia and is associated with a lower mortality risk compared with non-caregiving co-residents. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Improving the oral health of residents with intellectual and developmental disabilities: an oral health strategy and pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binkley, Catherine J; Johnson, Knowlton W; Abadi, Melissa; Thompson, Kirsten; Shamblen, Stephen R; Young, Linda; Zaksek, Brigit

    2014-12-01

    This article presents an oral health (OH) strategy and pilot study focusing on individuals with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities (IDD) living in group homes. The strategy consists of four components: (1) planned action in the form of the behavioral contract and caregiver OH action planning; (2) capacity building through didactic and observation learning training; (3) environmental adaptations consisting of additional oral heath devices and strategies to create a calm atmosphere; and (4) reinforcement by post-training coaching. A pilot study was conducted consisting of pre- and post-assessment data collected 1 week before and 1 week after implementing a 1-month OH strategy. The study sample comprised 11 group homes with 21 caregivers and 25 residents with IDD from one service organization in a Midwestern city. A process evaluation found high-quality implementation of the OH strategy as measured by dosage, fidelity, and caregiver reactions to implementing the strategy. Using repeated cross-sectional and repeated measures analyses, we found statistically significant positive changes in OH status and oral hygiene practices of residents. Caregiver self-efficacy as a mechanism of change was not adequately evaluated; however, positive change was found in some but not all types of caregiver OH support that were assessed. Lessons learned from implementing the pilot study intervention and evaluation are discussed, as are the next steps in conducting an efficacy study of the OH strategy. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Toxic element contamination of natural health products and pharmaceutical preparations.

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    Stephen J Genuis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Concern has recently emerged regarding the safety of natural health products (NHPs-therapies that are increasingly recommended by various health providers, including conventional physicians. Recognizing that most individuals in the Western world now consume vitamins and many take herbal agents, this study endeavored to determine levels of toxic element contamination within a range of NHPs. METHODS: Toxic element testing was performed on 121 NHPs (including Ayurvedic, traditional Chinese, and various marine-source products as well as 49 routinely prescribed pharmaceutical preparations. Testing was also performed on several batches of one prenatal supplement, with multiple samples tested within each batch. Results were compared to existing toxicant regulatory limits. RESULTS: Toxic element contamination was found in many supplements and pharmaceuticals; levels exceeding established limits were only found in a small percentage of the NHPs tested and none of the drugs tested. Some NHPs demonstrated contamination levels above preferred daily endpoints for mercury, cadmium, lead, arsenic or aluminum. NHPs manufactured in China generally had higher levels of mercury and aluminum. CONCLUSIONS: Exposure to toxic elements is occurring regularly as a result of some contaminated NHPs. Best practices for quality control-developed and implemented by the NHP industry with government oversight-is recommended to guard the safety of unsuspecting consumers.

  10. Specialist mental health consultation for depression in Australian aged care residents with dementia: a cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSweeney, Kate; Jeffreys, Aimee; Griffith, Joanne; Plakiotis, Chris; Kharsas, Renee; O'Connor, Daniel W

    2012-11-01

    This cluster randomized controlled trial sought to determine whether multidisciplinary specialist mental health consultation was more effective than care as usual in treating the depression of aged care residents with dementia. Three hundred and eighty nine aged care residents were screened for dementia and major depression. Forty four were ultimately included in the intervention sample, selected from 20 aged care facilities located in Melbourne, Australia. Facilities were randomly allocated to an intervention condition involving the provision of multidisciplinary specialist consultation regarding the best-practice management of depression in dementia, or to a care as usual condition. Consultations involved individually tailored medical and psychosocial recommendations provided to care staff and general practitioners. All residents participated in a comprehensive pre-intervention diagnostic assessment, including the administration of the Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia. This assessment was repeated approximately 15 weeks post-intervention by a rater blind to study condition. Multidisciplinary specialist mental health consultation was significantly more effective than care as usual in treating the clinical depression of aged care residents with dementia (p Depression in Dementia score for the intervention group was 9.47, compared with 14.23 for the control group. In addition, 77% of the intervention group no longer met criteria for major depression. The results of this study suggest that the psychosocial and medical management of depressed aged care residents can be improved by increasing access to specialist mental health consultation. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Preparing and conducting objective structured clinical examination for oman medical specialty board r1-r4 residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Sinawi, Hamed; Al Sharbati, Marwan; Obaid, Yousif; Viernes, Nonna

    2012-05-01

    The Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) has been a common tool of assessment in both undergraduate and postgraduate medicine, and has been reported to have both higher reliability and validity over the oral exam. In addition, another advantage is that it reduces luck by standardizing both examiners and patients. This article describes our experience in organizing and conducting an OSCE for Oman Medical Specialty Board residents in Psychiatry.

  12. Preparing and Conducting Objective Structured Clinical Examination for Oman Medical Specialty Board R1-R4 Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Al Sinawi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE has been a common tool of assessment in both undergraduate and postgraduate medicine, and has been reported to have both higher reliability and validity over the oral exam. In addition, another advantage is that it reduces luck by standardizing both examiners and patients. This article describes our experience in organizing and conducting an OSCE for Oman Medical Specialty Board residents in Psychiatry.

  13. Adapting residency training. Training adaptable residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, J L

    1998-05-01

    Graduate medical education has been criticized for failing to adequately prepare young physicians to enter the workforce upon completion of their training. In addressing this criticism, the author makes arguments both for and against this assertion. Broad qualitative changes (graduate medical education training position allocation, subspecialists' role in health care delivery, educational quality, faculty development, and faculty promotion) that graduate medical education has undergone and is undergoing are discussed. Population health management, clinical resource management, teamwork, continuous quality improvement, ethics, and evidence-based medicine are addressed as important curricular elements for residency training. Innovations in graduate medical education that are being introduced as well as those that should be tried are discussed. Finally, the author asserts that although residency education should not be vocationally driven by the needs of managed care organizations, a powerful opportunity exists for collaborative educational research between academic medicine and managed care organizations. In a health care environment undergoing rapid changes, the primary goals of graduate medical education have not significantly changed: to produce compassionate physicians with a passion for lifelong learning who have leadership skills, are critical thinkers, skilled at self-assessment, and able to adapt to the needs of the health care marketplace.

  14. Acute health effects of the Tasman Spirit oil spill on residents of Karachi, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najam-ul-Hassan

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background On July 27 2003, a ship carrying crude oil run aground near Karachi and after two weeks released 37,000 tons of its cargo into the sea. Oil on the coastal areas and fumes in air raised health concerns among people. We assessed the immediate health impact of oil spill from the tanker Tasman Spirit on residents of the affected coastline in Karachi, Pakistan. Methods We conducted a study consisting of an exposed group including adults living in houses on the affected shoreline and two control groups (A and B who lived at the distance of 2 km and 20 km away from the sea, respectively. We selected households through systematic sampling and interviewed an adult male and female in each household about symptoms relating to eyes, respiratory tract, skin and nervous system, smoking, allergies, beliefs about the effect on their health and anxiety about the health effects. We used logistic regression procedures to model each symptom as an outcome and the exposure status as an independent variable while adjusting for confounders. We also used linear regression procedure to assess the relationship exposure status with symptoms score; calculated by summation of all symptoms. Results Overall 400 subjects were interviewed (exposed, n = 216; group A, n = 83; and group B, n = 101. The exposed group reported a higher occurrence of one or more symptoms compared to either of the control groups (exposed, 96% vs. group A, 70%, group B 85%; P P Conclusion Results suggest that the occurrence of increased symptoms among the exposed group is more likely to be due to exposure to the crude oil spill.

  15. Connectedness to nature and public (skin) health perspectives: results of a representative, population-based survey among Austrian residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haluza, Daniela; Simic, Stana; Höltge, Jan; Cervinka, Renate; Moshammer, Hanns

    2014-01-20

    Connectedness to nature (CN) influences motivation to have contact with outdoor natural environments. Spending leisure time in natural environments is beneficial for human health and well-being. Besides these positive effects, health risks of open-air activities are mainly related to unprotected sun light exposure-associated acute and chronic skin hazards. Thus, we conducted a cross-sectional, representative telephone survey among Austrian residents to study the association of perceived CN level with sun-exposure knowledge, tanning habits, and sun protective behaviour. In total, 1,500 study subjects (50.5% females) participated in this questionnaire survey. Although knowledge about tanning and motives to tan were similar among genders, females performed more photoprotective measures and were more connected to nature (all p nature connectedness and skin health-relevant recreational habits of Austrian residents. The findings suggest to integrate hitherto neglected gender-specific Public (Skin) Health promotion when counselling on the manifold health advantages of outdoor activities.

  16. Health Risk Assessment of Natural Background Radiation in Residents of Khorramabad, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Ghorbanipour

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Radioactive materials naturally exist in the world. Indeed, approximately 82% of human-absorbed radiation doses, which are out of human control, arise from natural sources of radiation including cosmic, terrestrial, and exposure through inhalation or ingestion. Thus, the aim of the present study was to estimate health risk, as well as the effective and organ doses from naturally occurring background radiation in residents living in the vicinity of Khorramabad, Iran. Materials and Methods This cross-sectional study was carried out in Khorramabad, Iran. The measurements were performed using Geiger-Muller detector (RDS-110 during daylight from April to June, 2015. The natural gamma radiation measurements were made both indoor and outdoor across five regions of Khorramabad (north, south, west, east, and center. Results The estimated mean absorbed dose rate in outdoor and indoor zones were 0.09±0.024 and 0.117±0.032 mSvy-1, respectively. Additionally, the mean annual effective dose was calculated as 0.69±0.19 mSvy-1, while the estimated health risk probability was 0.0345%. Conclusion The average annual effective dose arising from gamma background radiation was higher than global values. Therefore, more studies are required to examine the relationship between radiation-induced effects and the natural background radiation level in Khorramabad.

  17. VOC characteristics and inhalation health risks in newly renovated residences in Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Haixia; Jing, Shengao; Wang, Hongli; Ma, Yingge; Li, Li; Song, Weimin; Kan, Haidong

    2017-01-15

    Exposure to indoor VOCs is expected to link to a variety of negative health outcome. The popularity of decorations and refurbishment in homes in China has given rise to indoor elevated VOC levels, potentially posing health threats to residents. In this study, concentrations of 101 VOC compounds and associated health risks were investigated in newly renovated homes in Shanghai. The potential excess inhalation health risks from home exposure of 17 health-related VOCs were estimated by the Inhalation Unit Risk (IUR) and Reference Concentration (RfC) proposed by US EPA. Monte Carlo simulation and sensitivity analysis were used to assess the uncertainty associated with the estimates of health risks. The dominant groups by mass concentration were oxygenated VOCs (o-VOCs), aromatics, alkanes and halogenated VOCs (x-VOCs) .12 VOCs with IARC's confirmed or probable carcinogens ratings were detected with a >60% detection frequency in the total samples. The mean concentrations of BTEX (benzene, toluene, m/p-xylene, o-xylene, ethylbenzene) were 2.32μg/m3, 200.13μg/m3, 39.56μg/m3, 32.59μg/m3 and 26.33μg/m3 respectively, generally higher than those in older homes reported in previous studies except benzene. The mean concentration of methylene chloride (47.43μg/m3) and 1,2-dichloroethane (33.83μg/m3) were noticeably higher than the levels reported in previous studies in Hong Kong, Japan and Canada. Whereas the mean concentration of 1,4-dichlorobenzene (5.53μg/m3) were similar to the results of Canadian national survey but lower than those in Japan. The concentrations of 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,4-dichlorobenzene, and methylene chloride, ethylbenzene presented a mean cancer risk at 7.39×10-6, 1.95×10-6, 1.62×10-6, 1.04×10-6 respectively, above the US EPA proposed acceptable risk level of 1×10-6. Sensitivity analyses indicated that the VOC exposure concentration have a greater impact than the IUR values on the risk assessment. This study highlights the characteristics of

  18. What Is Health Anyway? Perceptions and Experiences of Health and Health Care from Socio-Economically Disadvantaged Rural Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Julaine; Ball, Patrick; Alston, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    The divide between rich and poor in Australia is starkly apparent in health status statistics; the poorest Australians have the poorest health, and many live in rural Australia. However, little is known about financially deprived rural citizen's perceptions of their own health and their expectations of health care services. As a result,…

  19. Pediatric Resident Academic Projects While on Global Health Electives: Ten Years of Experience at the University of Minnesota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, Michael B; Slusher, Tina M; Howard, Cynthia R; Cole, Valerie B; Gladding, Sophia P

    2017-07-01

    Many residency programs require residents to complete an academic project as part of a global health (GH) elective. However, there has been little description of the range of projects residents have pursued during GH electives or the extent to which these projects are consistent with proposed best practices. The authors conducted a document review of 67 written summaries or copies of presentations of academic projects (hereafter, summaries) completed by pediatric and medicine-pediatric residents at the University of Minnesota while on GH electives from 2005 to 2015. Two authors independently coded each summary for the type of project completed; when the project idea was generated; explicit mention of a mentor from the home institution, host institution, or both; whether a needs assessment was conducted; and whether there were plans for sustainability. Most of the 67 projects were categorized into one of three project types: quality/process improvement (28 [42%]), education (18 [27%]), or clinical research (14 [21%]). Most summaries explicitly mentioned a mentor (45 [67%]), reported conducting a needs assessment (38 [57%]), and indicated sustainability plans (45 [67%]). Of the 42 summaries that indicated the timing of idea generation, 30 (71%) indicated the idea was developed after arriving at the host site. Residents undertook a wide range of academic projects during GH electives, most commonly quality/process improvement and education projects. The projects were largely aligned with best practices, with most summaries indicating the resident worked with a mentor, conducted a needs assessment, and made plans for sustainability.

  20. Evaluating the Effects of Air Pollution from a Plastic Recycling Facility on the Health of Nearby Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Zhao; Tsuda, Toshihide; Doi, Hiroyuki

    2017-06-01

    We evaluated how exposure to airborne volatile organic compounds emitted from a plastic recycling facility affected nearby residents, in a cross-sectional study. Individuals>10 years old were randomly sampled from 50 households at five sites and given questionnaires to complete. We categorized the subjects by distance from the recycling facility and used this as a proxy measure for pollutant exposure. We sought to improve on a preceding study by generating new findings, improving methods for questionnaire distribution and collection, and refining site selection. We calculated the odds of residents living 500 or 900 m away from the facility reporting mucocutaneous and respiratory symptoms using a reference group of residents 2,800 m away. Self-reported nasal congestion (odds ratio=3.0, 95% confidence interval=1.02-8.8), eczema (5.1, 1.1-22.9), and sore throat (3.9, 1.1-14.1) were significantly higher among residents 500 m from the facility. Those 900 m away were also considerably more likely to report experiencing eczema (4.6, 1.4-14.9). Air pollution was found responsible for significantly increased reports of mucocutaneous and respiratory symptoms among nearby residents. Our findings confirm the effects of pollutants emitted from recycling facilities on residents' health and clarify that study design differences did not affect the results.

  1. Health economic analyses of domiciliary dental care and care at fixed clinics for elderly nursing home residents in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundqvist, M; Davidson, T; Ordell, S; Sjöström, O; Zimmerman, M; Sjögren, P

    2015-03-01

    Dental care for elderly nursing home residents is traditionally provided at fixed dental clinics, but domiciliary dental care is an emerging alternative. Longer life expectancy accompanied with increased morbidity, and hospitalisation or dependence on the care of others will contribute to a risk for rapid deterioration of oral health so alternative methods for delivering oral health care to vulnerable individuals for whom access to fixed dental clinics is an obstacle should be considered. The aim was to analyse health economic consequences of domiciliary dental care for elderly nursing home residents in Sweden, compared to dentistry at a fixed clinic. A review of relevant literature was undertaken complemented by interviews with nursing home staff, officials at county councils, and academic experts in geriatric dentistry. Domiciliary dental care and fixed clinic care were compared in cost analyses and cost-effectiveness analyses. The mean societal cost of domiciliary dental care for elderly nursing home residents was lower than dental care at a fixed clinic, and it was also considered cost-effective. Lower cost of dental care at a fixed dental clinic was only achieved in a scenario where dental care could not be completed in a domiciliary setting. Domiciliary dental care for elderly nursing home residents has a lower societal cost and is cost-effective compared to dental care at fixed clinics. To meet current and predicted need for oral health care in the ageing population alternative methods to deliver dental care should be available.

  2. Provision and perceived quality of mental health services for older care home residents in England: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Karen; Hargreaves, Claire; Jasper, Rowan; Challis, David; Tucker, Sue; Wilberforce, Mark

    2017-06-22

    This study examined the nature, extent and perceived quality of the support provided by community mental health teams for older people (CMHTsOP) to care home residents. A postal survey was sent to all CMHTsOP in England. Information was collected about teams' staffing and their involvement in case finding, assessment, medication reviews, care planning and training as well as team managers' rating of the perceived quality of the service they provided for care home residents. Data were analysed using chi-squared tests of association and ordinal regression. Responses were received from 225 (54%) CMHTsOP. Only 18 per cent of these teams contained staff with allocated time for care home work. Services for care home residents varied considerably between teams. Two-fifths of teams provided formal training to care home staff. Team managers were more likely to perceive the quality of their service to care homes as good if they had a systematic process in place for reviewing antipsychotic drugs or routine mental health reviews, including contact with a GP. The findings suggested that more evidence is needed on the best approach for supporting care home residents with mental health needs. Areas to consider are the potential benefits of training to care home staff and regular mental health reviews, utilising links between GPs and CMHTsOP. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. [State of health of populations residing in geothermal areas of Tuscany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minichilli, Fabrizio; Nuvolone, Daniela; Bustaffa, Elisa; Cipriani, Francesco; Vigotti, Maria Angela; Bianchi, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    The limited scientific knowledge on relationship between exposure and health effects in relation to geothermal activity motivated an epidemiologic investigation in Tuscan geothermal area. The study aims to describe the health status of populations living in Tuscany municipalities where concessions for exploitation of geothermal resources were granted. This is an ecological study, so it is not useful to produce evidence to sustain a judgment on the cause-effect link. The major limits of this type of study are the use of the residence at municipal level as a proxy of exposure to both environmental and socioeconomic factors and the use of aggregated data of health outcomes that can lead to the well-known ecological fallacy. Sixteen municipalities were included in the study area: eight are part of the so-called "traditional" geothermal area, defined as Northern Geothermal Area (NGA) and eight located in the Amiata Mountain defined as Southern Geothermal Area (SGA). In 2000-2006, the average resident population in the overall area was approximately 43,000 inhabitants. Thirty-one geothermal power plants were active, with a production capacity of 811 MW, 5 of them with 88 MW located in the SGA. Statistical analyses on the entire geothermal area, NGA and SGA subareas, and the sixteen municipalities were performed. Mortality data were obtained from Tuscany Regional Mortality Registry for the 1971-2006 period, analysing 60 causes of death, of interest for population health status or consistent with "Project SENTIERI" criteria. Hospital discharge records of residents in Tuscany Region in 2004-2006, anywhere admitted to hospital, were analyzed considering only the main diagnosis, excluding repeated admissions for the same cause. The causes taken into account are the same analysed for mortality were considered. Age-standardized mortality rates (TSDM) and the temporal trends of TSDM for four periods (1971-1979, 1980-1989, 1990-1999, 2000-2006) were computed. Age

  4. Critical care rotation impact on pediatric resident mental health and burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Katie K; Unti, Sharon M

    2017-10-05

    Burnout and depression are common among medical trainees and intensive care unit providers, negatively impacting both providers and patients. We hypothesized that at the end of the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) rotation, there would be an increased prevalence of depression and burnout in pediatric residents when compared to the beginning. Pediatric residents were assessed prior to and following their PICU rotation using the Maslach Burnout Inventory, the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Screen and a survey assessing positive and negative aspects of the rotation. Sixty residents were eligible to participate and initial response rate was 40%. The prevalence of positive depression screen increased from 4% to 41% during the PICU rotation. Regarding burnout, the prevalence of residents meeting criteria for emotional exhaustion increased from 41% to 59% and depersonalization increased from 41% to 53%. Fewer residents had low personal accomplishment scores at the end of the rotation, 13% to 0%. Autonomy, procedural opportunities, and interactions with non-trainee PICU providers were commonly cited negative aspects of the rotation. Resident education, patient acuity, and nursing-integrated rounding were consistently rated positively. Compared to the beginning, at the end of the PICU rotation there is a significantly higher prevalence of depression, emotional exhaustion, and depersonalization among pediatric residents. Pediatric residents may have a more favorable PICU experience if they feel involved in procedural aspects of patient care, are allowed more autonomy in decision making, and there is a continued focus on resident education and team-based care.

  5. Preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Dardir

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Some hexanamide-mono and di-linoleniate esters were prepared by the reaction of linolenic acid and hexanamide (derived from the reaction of hexanoic acid and diethanolamine. The chemical structure for the newly prepared hexanamide-mono and di-linoleniate esters were elucidated using elemental analysis, (FTIR, H 1NMR and chemical ionization mass spectra (CI/Ms spectroscopic techniques. The results of the spectroscopic analysis indicated that they were prepared through the right method and they have high purity. The new prepared esters have high biodegradability and lower toxicity (environmentally friendly so they were evaluated as a synthetic-based mud (ester-based mud for oil-well drilling fluids. The evaluation included study of the rheological properties, filtration and thermal properties of the ester based-muds formulated with the newly prepared esters compared to the reference commercial synthetic-based mud.

  6. The Potential in Preparing Community Health Workers to Address Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Daisey; Adamovich, Stephanie; Ingram, Maia; Harris, Frances P; de Zapien, Jill; Sánchez, Adriana; Colina, Sonia; Marrone, Nicole

    2017-06-01

    In underserved areas, it is crucial to investigate ways of increasing access to hearing health care. The community health worker (CHW) is a model that has been applied to increase access in various health arenas. This article proposes further investigation into the application of this model to audiology. To assess the feasibility of training CHWs about hearing loss as a possible approach to increase accessibility of hearing health support services in an underserved area. A specialized three-phase training process for CHWs was developed, implemented, and evaluated by audiologists and public health researchers. The training process included (1) focus groups with CHWs and residents from the community to raise awareness of hearing loss among CHWs and the community; (2) a 3-hr workshop training to introduce basic topics to prepare CHWs to identify signs of hearing loss among community members and use effective communication strategies; and (3) a 24-hr multisession, interactive training >6 weeks for CHWs who would become facilitators of educational and peer-support groups for individuals with hearing loss and family members. Twelve Spanish-speaking local CHWs employed by a federally qualified health center participated in a focus group, twelve received the general training, and four individuals with prior experience as health educators received further in-person training as facilitators of peer-education groups on hearing loss and communication. Data was collected from each step of the three-phase training process. Thematic analysis was completed for the focus group data. Pre- and posttraining assessments and case study discussions were used to analyze results for the general workshop and the in-depth training sessions. CHWs increased their knowledge base and confidence in effective communication strategies and developed skills in facilitating hearing education and peer-support groups. Through case study practice, CHWs demonstrated competencies and applied their learning

  7. Connectedness to Nature and Public (Skin) Health Perspectives: Results of a Representative, Population-Based Survey among Austrian Residents

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela Haluza; Stana Simic; Jan Höltge; Renate Cervinka; Hanns Moshammer

    2014-01-01

    Connectedness to nature (CN) influences motivation to have contact with outdoor natural environments. Spending leisure time in natural environments is beneficial for human health and well-being. Besides these positive effects, health risks of open-air activities are mainly related to unprotected sun light exposure-associated acute and chronic skin hazards. Thus, we conducted a cross-sectional, representative telephone survey among Austrian residents to study the association of perceived CN le...

  8. Intensive hog farming operations and self-reported health among nearby rural residents in Ottawa, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villeneuve, Paul J; Ali, Amira; Challacombe, Laurel; Hebert, Sophie

    2009-09-10

    In 2004, hog farming operations were introduced in the village of Sarsfield in the eastern part of Ottawa, Canada. This study evaluates the health-related quality of life (HRQOL), and the prevalence of respiratory conditions among adults and children who lived in proximity to this farm. A cross-sectional survey was administered to a random sample of residents from seven rural communities in the eastern part of Ottawa, Canada. We analyzed self-reported questionnaire data obtained from 723 adults and 285 children/adolescents. HRQOL was assessed using the SF-36 survey instrument, while data were also collected for sociodemographic characteristics, the prevalence of selected health conditions, and lifestyle related behaviours (e.g., smoking) of participants. Variations in self-reported health according to the residential distance to the hog farm were evaluated using logistic regression and analysis of variance methods. For the most part, the prevalence of selected health conditions among adults and children was not associated with how far they lived from the farm. No associations were observed with migraines, respiratory conditions (asthma, rhinitis, sinusitis, and chronic bronchitis), and allergies. However, a higher prevalence of depression was noted among those who lived within 3 km of the farm relative to those who lived more than 9 km away (odds ratio = 2.01, 95% CI = 1.11, 3.65). Furthermore, individuals who lived closer to the IHF were more likely to worry about environmental issues such as water quality, outdoor and indoor smells, and air pollution. This level of worry also contributed to lower HRQOL scores for individuals who lived closer to the farm. It was also observed that the prevalence of depression was much higher among those who indicated a concern about environmental issues (18.2%) when compared to those who did not (8.0%). While our findings suggest that living in close proximity to an IHF may adversely affect HRQOL these should be interpreted

  9. The New Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Next Accreditation System Milestones Evaluation System: What Is Expected and How Are Plastic Surgery Residency Programs Preparing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillah, Nyama M; Ibrahim, Ahmed M S; Lau, Frank H; Shah, Jinesh; Medin, Caroline; Lee, Bernard T; Lin, Samuel J

    2015-07-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Next Accreditation System milestones were implemented for plastic surgery programs in July of 2014. Forward progress through the milestones is an indicator of trainee-appropriate development, whereas regression or stalling may indicate the need for concentrated, targeted training. Online software at www.surveymonkey.com was used to create a survey about the program's approaches to milestones and was distributed to program directors and administrators of 96 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-approved plastic surgery programs. The authors had a 63.5 percent response rate (61 of 96 plastic surgery programs). Most programs report some level of readiness, only 22 percent feel completely prepared for the Next Accreditation System milestones, and only 23 percent are completely satisfied with their planned approach for compliance. Seventy-five percent of programs claim to be using some form of electronic tracking system. Programs plan to use multiple tools to capture and report milestone data. Most programs (44.4 percent) plan to administer evaluations at the end of each rotation. Over 70 percent of respondents believe that the milestones approach would improve the quality of resident training. However, programs were less than confident that their current compliance systems would live up to their full potential. The Next Accreditation System has been implemented nationwide for plastic surgery training programs. Milestone-based resident training is a new paradigm for residency training evaluation; programs are in the process of making this transition to find ways to make milestone data meaningful for faculty and residents.

  10. Preparedness of Entering Pediatric Dentistry Residents: Advanced Pediatric Program Directors' and First-Year Residents' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkauskas, John; Seale, N Sue; Casamassimo, Paul; Rutkauskas, John S

    2015-11-01

    For children to receive needed oral health care, adequate training at both the predoctoral and postdoctoral levels of dental education is required, but previous studies have found inadequacies in predoctoral education that lead to general dentists' unwillingness to treat certain young populations. As another way of assessing predoctoral preparation, the aim of this study was to determine the perspectives of first-year residents and pediatric program directors about residents' preparedness to enter advanced education programs in pediatric dentistry. Surveys were sent to all 74 U.S. program directors and 360 first-year residents. The survey focused on procedures related to prevention, behavior management, restorative procedures, pulp therapy, sedation, and surgery, as well as treating patients funded by Medicaid and with special health care needs. Among the first-year residents, 173 surveys were returned for a 48% response rate; 61 directors returned surveys for an 82% response rate. Only half of the residents (55%) reported feeling adequately prepared for their first year in residency; less than half cited adequate preparation to place stainless steel crowns (SSCs) (42%) and perform pulpotomies (45%). Far fewer felt adequately prepared to provide treatment for children six months to three years of age, including examinations (29%), infant oral exams (27%), and children with severe caries (37%). The program directors were even less positive about the adequacy of residents' preparation. Only 17% deemed them adequately prepared to place SSCs and 13% to perform pulpotomies. Approximately half reported their first-year residents were inadequately prepared to treat very young children and children with severe caries (55% each). This study found that the perceived inadequacy of predoctoral education in pediatric dentistry was consistent at both the learner and educator levels, supporting previous studies identifying inadequacies in this area.

  11. [Burnout syndrome of health workers in an assisted residence for the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Sánchez, Angel Santiago; Espinosa Muñoz, Estrella del Carmen; Jiménez Jiménez, María del Carmen; González Galán, Ma Belén; Soto Ayuso, Paloma María; Rodríguez-Barbero, Ana María Prado

    2012-10-01

    to estimate the prevalence of Burnout Syndrome and the sleep patterns alterations experienced by health workers who work in an Assisted Residence for the Elderly. descriptive and cross-sectional research using the Maslach Burnout Inventory and the Sleepiness Epworth scales in a self questionnaire that was aimed to 150 employees at the institution. We used descriptive and inferential statistics with a 95% confidence interval. The relationship between categorical variables was carried out using the non-parametric Mann-Whitney test. response rate of 92% (138) on the total respondents (150). The burnout prevalence rate is located at 21.7% with a high percentage of workers with low personal fulfillment (64.1%). There is also a slight tendency to suffer from daytime sleepiness in general. It is worth highlighting musculoskeletal problems as the main physiological conditions in relation to the type of work (70.3%), being coffee as the most consumed substance of those polled. High level prevalence of burnout syndrome in the population studied, especially among the nursing staff and the need to develop interventions to reduce them.

  12. Medical residents' perceptions of their competencies and training needs in health care management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berkenbosch, Lizanne; Schoenmaker, Suzanne Gerdien; Ahern, Susannah

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has shown that Dutch medical residents feel inadequate in certain management areas: 85% had a need for management training and reported preferences on the format of such training. Our objective was to explore if the perceived deficiencies and needs among Dutch residents were...

  13. The Effects of Abortion Training on Family Medicine Residents' Clinical Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summit, Aleza K; Gold, Marji

    2017-01-01

    RHEDI, Reproductive Health Education in Family Medicine, offers technical assistance and funding to family medicine residency programs to support integrated opt-out abortion and reproductive health training for residents. This study assessed the impact of this enhanced training on residents' reproductive health experience. Investigator-developed pre- and post-surveys were administered online to 214 residents at 12 family medicine residency programs before and after their RHEDI training experience. Surveys addressed experience in contraception and abortion, attitudes around abortion provision, and post-residency intentions. Descriptive statistics were generated, and statistical tests were performed to assess changes after training. Surveys had a 90% response rate. After the RHEDI enhanced reproductive health rotation, residents reported increased experience in contraception provision, early pregnancy ultrasound, aspiration and medication abortion, and miscarriage management. After training, residents with experience in IUD insertion increased from 85% to 99%, and contraceptive implant insertion experience rose from 60% to 85%. Residents who had performed any abortions increased from 15% to 79%, and self-rated competency in abortion increased. Finally, almost all residents agreed that early abortion was within the scope of family medicine, and training confirmed residents' intentions to provide reproductive health services after residency. Integrated training in reproductive health, with an emphasis on abortion, increases residents' experience and underscores their understanding of the role of these services in family medicine. Increasing the number of family medicine residency programs that offer this training could help prepare family physicians to meet their patients' needs for reproductive health services.

  14. Housing type, location of residence and health status in Australian baby boomers: results from the Australian Baby Boomer (ABBA) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Deborah Ann; Wilson, Leigh Ann; O'Loughlin, Kate; Noone, Jack; Kendig, Hal; Butcher, Jennifer

    2015-03-01

    Baby Boomers are working and living longer than their pre-war counterparts, and are more likely to live in high density urban housing. This paper examines the relationship between housing type, working status and location of residence on health status in Baby Boomers. We investigated location of residence and housing type in 1009 participants of the Ageing Baby Boomers in Australia (ABBA) Study to identify any predictors of, or correlations between, these variables and health status. Current workers were less likely to report depression than retirees. We found a significantly higher rate of diabetes, obesity and hypertension in retirees than in current workers however rates of obesity, diabetes and hypertension were higher than predicted in current workers. The rates of chronic disease are higher than previous estimates and provide evidence to inform health promotion programs designed to increase physical activity and improve eating habits in baby boomers. © 2013 ACOTA.

  15. Differences in Access to and Use of Electronic Personal Health Information Between Rural and Urban Residents in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Alexandra J; Haney, Danielle; Blake, Kelly D; Moser, Richard P; Hesse, Bradford W

    2017-01-11

    The increase in use of health information technologies (HIT) presents new opportunities for patient engagement and self-management. Patients in rural areas stand to benefit especially from increased access to health care tools and electronic communication with providers. We assessed the adoption of 4 HIT tools over time by rural or urban residency. Analyses were conducted using data from 7 iterations of the National Cancer Institute's Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS; 2003-2014). Rural/urban residency was based on the USDA's 2003 Rural-Urban Continuum Codes. Outcomes of interest included managing personal health information online; whether providers maintain electronic health records (EHRs); e-mailing health care providers; and purchasing medicine online. Bivariate analyses and logistic regression were used to assess relationships between geography and outcomes, controlling for sociodemographic characteristics. In total, 6,043 (17.6%, weighted) of the 33,749 respondents across the 7 administrations of HINTS lived in rural areas. Rural participants were less likely to report regular access to Internet (OR = 0.70, 95% CI = 0.61-0.80). Rural respondents were neither more nor less likely to report that their health care providers maintained EHRs than were urban respondents; however, they had decreased odds of managing personal health information online (OR = 0.59, 95% CI = 0.40-0.78) and e-mailing health care providers (OR = 0.62, 95% CI = 0.49-0.77). The digital divide between rural and urban residents extends to HIT. Additional investigation is needed to determine whether the decreased use of HIT may be due to lack of Internet connectivity or awareness of these tools. © 2016 National Rural Health Association.

  16. Permanent resident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F. Fisher

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The training of physicians in the past century was based primarily on responsibility and the chain-of-command. Those with the bulk of that responsibility in the fields of pediatrics and internal medicine were residents. Residents trained the medical students and supervised them carefully in caring for patients. Most attending physicians supervised their teams at arm's length, primarily serving as teachers of the finer points of diagnosis and treatment during set periods of the day or week with a perfunctory signature on write-ups or progress notes. Residents endeavored to protect the attending physician from being heavily involved unless they were unsure about a clinical problem. Before contacting the attending physician, a more senior resident would be called. Responsibility was the ultimate teacher. The introduction of diagnosis-related groups by the federal government dramatically changed the health care delivery system, placing greater emphasis on attending physician visibility in the medical record, ultimately resulting in more attending physician involvement in day-to-day care of patients in academic institutions. Without specified content in attending notes, hospital revenues would decline. Although always in charge technically, attending physicians increasingly have assumed the role once dominated by the resident. Using biographical experiences of more than 40 years, the author acknowledges and praises the educational role of responsibility in his own training and laments its declining role in today's students and house staff.

  17. A comparison of how behavioral health organizations utilize training to prepare for health care reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanhope, Victoria; Choy-Brown, Mimi; Barrenger, Stacey; Manuel, Jennifer; Mercado, Micaela; McKay, Mary; Marcus, Steven C

    2017-02-14

    Under the Affordable Care Act, States have obtained Medicaid waivers to overhaul their behavioral health service systems to improve quality and reduce costs. Critical to implementation of broad service delivery reforms has been the preparation of organizations responsible for service delivery. This study focused on one large-scale initiative to overhaul its service system with the goal of improving service quality and reducing costs. The study examined the participation of behavioral health organizations in technical assistance efforts and the extent to which organizational factors related to their participation. This study matched two datasets to examine the organizational characteristics and training participation for 196 behavioral health organizations. Organizational characteristics were drawn from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration National Mental Health Services Survey (N-MHSS). Training variables were drawn from the Clinical Technical Assistance Center's master training database. Chi-square analyses and multivariate logistic regression models were used to examine the proportion of organizations that participated in training, the organizational characteristics (size, population served, service quality, infrastructure) that predicted participation in training, and for those who participated, the type (clinical or business) and intensity of training (webinar, learning collaborative, in-person) they received. Overall 142 (72. 4%) of the sample participated in training. Organizations who pursued training were more likely to be large in size (p = .02), serve children in addition to adults (p organizational readiness for health care reform initiatives among behavioral health organizations.

  18. [Life quality parameters in prenosologic evaluation of health state in residents of protective measures area near objects of storage and destruction of chemical weapons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, V L; Nechaeva, E N

    2014-01-01

    The article presents results of life quality assessment and subjective evaluation data on health state, used for prenosologic evaluation of health state in residents of protective measures area near objects of storage and destruction of chemical weapons. Considering specific features of residence near potentially dangerous objects, the authors conducted qualitative evaluation of satisfaction with various life facets, with taking into account the objects specificity, established correlation between life quality and self-evaluation of health with factors influencing public health state.

  19. Use of coolant for high-speed tooth preparation: a survey of pediatric dentistry residency program directors in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupietzky, Ari; Vargas, Karen G; Waggoner, William F; Fuks, Anna B

    2010-01-01

    To determine current teaching policies regarding the use of coolant type during tooth preparation with high-speed hand-pieces in pediatric dental residency programs in the US. A 17-question survey was electronically mailed to 63 program directors with one follow-up. Multiple-choice questions asked about school and program teaching of cavity preparation with or without water coolant, including hypothetical clinical situations. Fifty-two (83%) program directors returned the survey. Fifty-two percent taught both dry and water coolant methods, 6% taught dry cutting exclusively, and 42% did not teach the dry method and always used water coolant. Dry techniques were used primarily for special needs patients with poor swallow reflexes (50%) and for young children undergoing sedation (41%). Air coolant was taught more frequently in programs in the Midwest (77%) and South (85%) vs. the Northeast (32%) and West (50%) (P<.01). Forty-four percent of combined programs and 60% of hospital programs taught water spray use exclusively, while all university programs taught the dry cutting technique (P<.01). A majority of program directors teach the use of air coolant alone for high-speed preparation of teeth. University and combined programs were more likely to teach the method compared with hospital based ones.

  20. Medication Refusal: Resident Rights, Administration Dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskins, Danielle R; Wick, Jeannette Y

    2017-12-01

    Occasionally, residents actively or passively refuse to take medications. Residents may refuse medication for a number of reasons, including religious beliefs, dietary restrictions, misunderstandings, cognitive impairment, desire to self-harm, or simple inconvenience. This action creates a unique situation for pharmacists and long-term facility staff, especially if patients have dementia. Residents have the legal right to refuse medications, and long-term care facilities need to employ a process to resolve disagreement between the health care team that recommends the medication and the resident who refuses it. In some cases, simple interventions like selecting a different medication or scheduling medications in a different time can address and resolve the resident's objection. If the medical team and the resident cannot resolve their disagreement, often an ethics consultation is helpful. Documenting the resident's refusal to take any or all medications, the health care team's actions and any other outcomes are important. Residents' beliefs may change over time, and the health care team needs to be prepared to revisit the issue as necessary.

  1. Saúde e qualidade de vida de médicos residentes Health and quality of life of medical residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Garcia Lourenção

    2010-01-01

    this search were the Virtual Health Library (VHL, by BIREME (Centro Latino-American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information, the Electronic databases Medline (Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System On-Line Lilacs (Literatura Latino-American and Caribbean Health Sciences, SciELO (Scientific Electronic Library Online and the email address scholar.google.com.br. Descriptors used were: Quality of life, Burnout, Internship and Residency. Planning and analysis of scientific literature, was performed to evaluate and discuss issues presented in the studies related to the subject, considering the distribution of publications according to country of origin, date of publication, source and title, focus of study and main conclusions. RESULTS: Studies published point to high rates of burnout, stress, depression, fatigue and insomnia among medical residents; moreover a lack of coping strategies, the relationship between workload and quality of life, require a change of medical legislation regarding work-based learning. CONCLUSION: Studies have shown that an adequate training program is needed not only to increase professional qualification and personal quality of life, but also to provide safety during patient treatment. It is known that residency training is stressful; it is nevertheless a process required to prepare for a solid career and personal growth of the young medical staff.

  2. Pediatric Dental Resident's Education on Children with Special Health Care Needs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Suher; Thomas, Marc

    2017-09-15

    To describe pediatric dental residents education as it pertains to children with special healthcare needs (CSHCN). A web-based survey was administered to 80 program directors of pediatric dental residencies recognized by the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD). The survey identified demographic data and education and training methods pertaining to CSHCN. Forty surveys (50 percent) were received from programs in all six AAPD regions. Programs that treated 4,500 patients or less/year were statistically less likely to require a specific assessment and were less likely to use written tests to assess competency treating CSHCN. A specific special needs didactic course (88 percent) and journal articles (85 percent) were the most common didactic training methods. The majority of the programs (69 percent) offered more than 20 hours of didactic education. On average 36.3 percent of the patients treated in residencies reported to be CSHCN and each resident clinically treated and average of 13 CSHCN/week. One-third of the respondents planned to increase CSHCN education in the next three years. Almost 70 percent of respondents supported the standardization of a national curriculum regarding CSHCN. A wide disparity exists among residencies regarding education related to CSHCN. Most pediatric dental residency directors support the national standardization of CSHCN education.

  3. New curricular design in biostatistics to prepare residents for an evidence-based practice and lifelong learning education: a pilot approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, A; Peters, O A; Broyles, I L

    2017-10-01

    To develop, implement and evaluate an innovative curriculum in biostatistics in response to the need to foster critical thinking in graduate healthcare education for evidence-based practice and lifelong learning education. The curriculum was designed for first-year residents in a postgraduate endodontic programme using a six-step approach to curriculum development to provide sufficient understanding to critically evaluate biomedical publications, to design the best research strategy to address a specific problem and to analyse data by appropriate statistical test selection. Multiple learner-centred instructional methods and formative and summative assessments (written tasks, simulation exercises, portfolios and pre-post knowledge tests) were used to accomplish the learning outcomes. The analysis of the achievement of the group of students and a satisfaction survey for further feedback provided to the residents at the end of the curriculum were used for curriculum evaluation. All residents demonstrated competency at the end of the curriculum. The correct answer rate changed from 36.9% in the pre-test to 79.8% in the post-test. No common errors were detected in the rest of the assessment activities. All participants completed the questionnaire demonstrating high satisfaction for each independent category and with the overall educational programme, instruction and course in general. The curriculum was validated by the assessment of students' performance and a satisfaction survey, offering an example of a practical approach to the teaching of statistics to prepare students for a successful evidence-based endodontic practice and lifelong learning education as practicing clinicians. © 2016 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Be Prepared (A Cup of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-09-21

    Eighty percent of Americans live in counties that have been hit with a weather-related disaster since 2007. Part of the preparation is understanding the kinds of disasters you’re likely to face. In this podcast, Dr. Dan Sosin discusses the importance of preparing for emergencies and disasters.  Created: 9/21/2017 by MMWR.   Date Released: 9/21/2017.

  5. Psycho-social impact of visual impairment on health-related quality of life among nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dev, Mahesh Kumar; Paudel, Nabin; Joshi, Niraj Dev; Shah, Dev Narayan; Subba, Shishir

    2014-08-15

    Visual impairment (VI) affects physical, psychological, and emotional well-being, and social life as well. The purpose of this exploratory study was to assess the psycho-social impact of VI on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among nursing home residents. This cross-sectional study involved 272 residents of 60 years or older residing in seven nursing homes of the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal. Comprehensive ocular examinations, including near and distance vision assessment and refractions were carried out. VI was defined as visual acuity (VA) less than 6/18 in the better eye. Residents were divided into two groups: one group did not have VI (in whom VA was greater than or equal to 6/18 in the better eye), and the other had VI (in whom VA was worse than 6/18 in the better eye).Face-to-face interviews were conducted filling out a 36-item The Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form (SF-36) questionnaire. The SF-36 questionnaire was scored according to the scoring algorithm SF-36 subscales. The mean age of residents was 74.68 ± 8.19 years (range, 60-99 years) and the majority were female (78.68%). The mean composite score of SF-36 was 46.98 ± 13.08. VI detrimentally affected scores of both the physical and the mental components, but the impact of VI was slightly greater for the physical component than that for the mental component. There was a trend towards a lower composite score as well as each subscale score of the SF-36 in participants with VI than in those without VI. VI has a negative effect on HRQoL. HRQoL is reduced among nursing home residents and the reduction in the HRQoL bears a positive association with VI.

  6. The correlation between global health experiences in low-income countries on choice of primary care residencies for graduates of an urban US medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Denise Marie; Imperato, Pascal James; Szarek, Michael

    2014-04-01

    This study sought to determine whether medical students who participate in a global health elective in a low-income country select residencies in primary care at higher rates compared with their classmates and US medical graduates in general. Given the projected increase in demand for primary care physicians, particularly in underserved areas, understanding possible factors that encourage training in primary care or enhance interest in the care of underserved populations may identify opportunities in medical school training. The authors used data from the Office of Student Affairs, SUNY Downstate College of Medicine and the National Residency Matching Program to compare rates of primary care residency selection from 2004 to 2012. Residency selections for students who participated in the SUNY Downstate School of Public Health Global Health Elective were compared with those of their classmates and with residency match data for US seniors. In 7 of the 8 years reviewed, students who participated in the SUNY Downstate School of Public Health Global Health Elective selected primary care residencies at rates higher than their classmates. Across years, 57% of the students who completed the elective matched to primary care residences, which was significantly higher than the 44% for the remainder of Downstate's medical student class (p = 0.0023). In 6 of the 8 years, Downstate students who participated in the Global Health Elective selected primary care residencies at rates higher than US medical school seniors in general; rates were the same for both Downstate Global Health Elective students and US medical school seniors in 2009. Students who participated in a global health experience in a low-income country selected primary care residencies at higher rates than their classmates and US medical school graduates in general. Understanding how these experiences correlate with residency selection requires further investigation; areas of future study are discussed.

  7. The relationship between professional preparation and class structure on health instruction in the secondary classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammig, Bart; Ogletree, Roberta; Wycoff-Horn, Marcie R

    2011-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the impact of professional preparation and class structure on health content delivery and time spent delivering content among required health education classes in the United States. Data from the classroom-level file of the 2006 School Health Policies and Programs Study were utilized. A series of multivariable logistic regression models were employed to determine if instruction of content was dependent on professional preparation and/or class structure. Years of teaching health topics and size of the school district were included as covariates in the multivariable logistic models. We also conducted a multivariable logistic regression model to examine if time spent teaching each topic area was dependent upon professional preparation and/or class structure. Findings indicated that professionally prepared teachers were significantly more likely to deliver content in 6 of 12 health topic areas when compared to untrained teachers. Class structure was also an important predictor of content delivery among many topic areas. Teachers who taught classes that were devoted to health instruction were significantly more likely to deliver content in the following topic areas: alcohol/drug prevention, tobacco prevention, sexuality, pregnancy, human immuno virus and sexually transmitted disease prevention, emotional/mental health and suicide, and violence prevention. Research concerning the relationship between professional preparation and teaching outcomes is scant. The present study indicates that health content coverage and time spent on instruction are associated with both professional preparation and class structure for many health content areas. © 2011, American School Health Association.

  8. Locus of health control as a predictor of diet in pregnant women residing in a small town and rural setting in Małopolska district.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gacek, Maria

    2013-01-01

    The locus of health control is one of the individual characteristics determining the diet of an individual. The aim of this study was to analyse the consumption frequency of selected food products depending on the locus of health control in a group of pregnant women residing in a small town and rural setting in Małopolska district. The study was conducted in a group of 300 pregnant women from Małopolska region, who were between 20 and 40 years of age (29.02 +/- 6.33). The consumption frequency of food products was examined with a prepared questionnaire, in a 7-item scale (from 7 points--several times a day to 1 point--never). The locus of health control was determined with the MHLC scale developed by K.A. Wallston et al., and adapted by Z. Juczyński. The relationship between the MHLC scale and the frequency of consumption of various products was estimated on the basis of Spearman's coefficients of rank correlation and the Mann-Whitney U test, using Statistica 10.0 software. Higher level of internal control (MHLC-I) was associated with significant increase in the consumption frequency of orange and red vegetables (p locus of health control (MHLC-C) was associated with significantly reduced frequency of consuming whole grains (p control made more rational nutritional choices significantly more frequently than those with the external control.

  9. Preparing States in India for Universal Health Coverage | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Given India's population, geographical diversity, and health inequities, the path to universal health coverage is likely to vary widely across states. Using research evidence, policymakers will need to ensure a balance between prioritizing primary health care and expanding access to insurance for secondary and tertiary care.

  10. Professional Preparation in Mental Health/Illness Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maylath, Nancy S.; Ubbes, Valerie A.

    1996-01-01

    Reports a study that examined the extent and nature of mental health/illness education in American undergraduate higher education. Surveys of 93 program chairpersons and directors indicated that 56% of responding programs required a course emphasizing mental health or mental illness for students with a major or minor in health education. (SM)

  11. Health-Seeking Behaviour of Port Harcourt City Residents: A Comparison between the Upper and Lower Socio-Economic Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaja, Promise Tamunoipiriala

    2013-06-25

    This study aimed at establishing the determinants and distribution of the health-seeking behaviours of Port Harcourt residents, and comparing them between the upper and lower socio-economic classes. A descriptive cross-sectional study using 204 respondents was carried out. The socio-economic classification used occupation and average monthly income. Multi-staged sampling technique was used; stage one being by stratified sampling using socio-economic classes for stratification; stage two involved clustered sampling; following which five-sectioned structured questionnaires were administered. Differences (P0.05) as both classes mostly go for treatment or medical check-ups. Health facility preference was mostly for good treatment outcome and accessibility; cost also, for the lower class. Commonly and last used health-care giver differed (Phealth-seeking behaviours because they use more competent Health facilities and health-care givers.

  12. New perspectives on health professions students' e-learning: Looking through the lens of the "visitor and resident" model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druce, Maralyn; Howden, Stella

    2017-07-01

    The growth of e-learning in health professional education reflects expansion of personal use of online resources. Understanding the user perspective in a fast-changing digital world is essential to maintain the currency of our approach. Mixed methods were used to investigate a cohort of postgraduate, e-learning healthcare students' perspectives on their use of online resources for personal and/or professional roles, via questionnaire and student-constructed diagrams, capturing use of online resources (underpinned by White's model of "resident" and "visitor" online engagement). Semistructured interviews explored the use and value of resources afforded via the online environment. The 45 study participants described a range of prior experiences with online resources in personal and professional capacities, but overall students tended to use online "tools" ("visitor" mode) rather than highly collaborative networks ("resident" mode). In relation to e-learning, the dominant interview theme was valuing knowledge transfer from the tutor and using "visitor" behaviors to maximize knowledge acquisition. Peer-learning opportunities were less valued and barriers to collaborative "resident" modes were identified. These findings help to inform e-learning course design to promote engagement. The results enable recommendations for use of the "Visitor and Residents" model and for planning activities that learners might utilize effectively.

  13. Effectiveness of professional oral health care intervention on the oral health of residents with dementia in residential aged care facilities: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi Mohammadi, Joanna Jin; Franks, Kay; Hines, Sonia

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this review is to critically appraise and synthesize evidence on the effectiveness of professional oral health care intervention on the oral health of aged care residents with dementia.More specifically the objectives are to identify the efficacy of professional oral health care interventions on general oral health, the presence of plaque and the number of decayed or missing teeth. Dementia poses a significant challenge for health and social policy in Australia. The quality of life of individuals, their families and friends is impacted by dementia. Older people with dementia often have other health comorbidities resulting in the need for a higher level of care. From 2009 to 2010, 53% of permanent residents in Residential Aged Care Facilities (RACFs) had dementia on admission. Older Australians are retaining more of their natural teeth, therefore residents entering RACFs will have more of their natural teeth and require complex dental work than they did in previous generations. Data from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare showed that more than half the residents in RACFs are now partially dentate with an average of 12 teeth each. Furthermore, coronal and root caries are significant problems, especially in older Australians who are cognitively impaired.Residents in aged care facilities frequently have poor oral health and hygiene with moderate to high levels of oral disease and overall dental neglect. This is reinforced by aged care staff who acknowledge that the demands of feeding, toileting and behavioral issues amongst residents often take precedence over oral health care regimens. Current literature shows that there is a general reluctance on the part of aged care staff to prioritize oral care due to limited knowledge as well as existing psychological barriers to working on another person's mouth. Although staff routinely deal with residents' urinary and faecal incontinence, deep psychological barriers exist when working on someone

  14. Exam preparation course in obstetrics and gynecology for the German Medical State Examination: proof of concept and implications for the recruitment of future residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Fabian; Fremd, Carlo; Tabatabai, Patrik; Smetanay, Katharina; Doster, Anne; Heil, Joerg; Schuetz, Florian; Sohn, Christof; Hennigs, André

    2016-11-01

    Today´s written part of the medical state examination requires students to retrieve a comprehensive amount of knowledge in a limited period of time. Therefore, the main study objectives were to implement and to evaluate a two-day exam preparation course for the German Medical State Examination in obstetrics and gynecology. The project evaluation focused on acceptability, satisfaction and the gain of knowledge for the participants of such a face-to-face course. The two-day intensive training for senior medical students offered a review of the entire exam-relevant content in the field of obstetrics and gynecology in combination with interactive discussions along selected exam questions. Skill gains were assessed using pre- and post-course multiple choice tests. In addition, a qualitative questionnaire assessed attitudes and satisfaction of course participants. A total of 101 fifth year senior medical students from Heidelberg University Medical School participated in the two pilot courses (summer 2014 and winter 2015). Pre- and post-course tests showed a significant skill-gain from 14.9 to 18.0 points [of a maximum of 20; pre-post difference 95 % CI (2.21; 3.98), t test: p medical students preparing for the Second German Medical State Examination. It further suggests surplus value for academic clinical departments to recruit future residents. Methods and tools presented in this paper are intended to inspire and guide clinical colleagues in implementing the format at their respective universities.

  15. Business of radiology 101: the state of radiology business practice and health care policy curricula at US radiology residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medverd, Jonathan R; Dicks, Demetrius L; Tang, Joseph; Kohr, Jennifer R; Stratil, Peter G; Cinelli, Christina M; Monroe, Eric J

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence, content, and perceptions of curricula focused on radiology business practice and health care policy at US radiology residency training programs. The desired survey population was trainees and faculty members of radiology residency programs in the United States. Three anonymous survey instruments were distributed, including an e-mail survey to the membership of the ACR RFS, a paper survey to ACR RFS delegates attending the 2010 AMCLC, and an e-mail survey to the membership of the Association of Program Directors in Radiology (APDR). Response rates for the surveys were 12%, 25%, and 21%, respectively. Members of the APDR and RFS agreed that understanding and competency in business practice and health care policy topics are important to the future careers of residents (total favorable sentiment >86% for APDR members and >96% for RFS members). Most survey respondents' home institutions offer some form of a noninterpretive curriculum (91% of APDR respondents, 74% of RFS respondents), but the breadth of topics addressed and educational time devoted to these curricula were quite variable. Subjective effectiveness of curricula was infrequently rated as very effective by 12% of APDR respondents and 6% of RFS respondents. Despite the perceived importance of radiology business practice and health care policy education, and residency training requirements in competencies related to these subjects that have been in place for more than a decade, curricula addressing these items still seem to be in a stage of acceptance and development. Further commitment to and innovation within these curricula are requisite in educating our future radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Be Prepared (A Minute of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-09-21

    Being ready for emergencies is a good policy to live by because disasters can occur at any time. This podcast discusses the importance of preparing for emergencies and disasters.  Created: 9/21/2017 by MMWR.   Date Released: 9/21/2017.

  17. Connectedness to Nature and Public (Skin Health Perspectives: Results of a Representative, Population-Based Survey among Austrian Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Haluza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Connectedness to nature (CN influences motivation to have contact with outdoor natural environments. Spending leisure time in natural environments is beneficial for human health and well-being. Besides these positive effects, health risks of open-air activities are mainly related to unprotected sun light exposure-associated acute and chronic skin hazards. Thus, we conducted a cross-sectional, representative telephone survey among Austrian residents to study the association of perceived CN level with sun-exposure knowledge, tanning habits, and sun protective behaviour. In total, 1,500 study subjects (50.5% females participated in this questionnaire survey. Although knowledge about tanning and motives to tan were similar among genders, females performed more photoprotective measures and were more connected to nature (all p < 0.001 compared to males. Older age and outdoor sport were significant gender-independent predictor variables influencing perceived CN level. Additionally, level of education was relevant in male CN, whereas non-smoking and higher knowledge were predictive of female CN. This survey provides so far unreported empirical data on the relationship between nature connectedness and skin health-relevant recreational habits of Austrian residents. The findings suggest to integrate hitherto neglected gender-specific Public (Skin Health promotion when counselling on the manifold health advantages of outdoor activities.

  18. Teaching and assessing systems-based practice: a pilot course in health care policy, finance, and law for radiation oncology residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, James D; Parhar, Preeti; Narayana, Ashwatha

    2010-09-01

    Under the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Outcome Project, residency programs are required to provide data on educational outcomes and evidence for how this information is used to improve resident education. To teach and assess systems-based practice through a course in health care policy, finance, and law for radiation oncology residents, and to determine its efficacy. We designed a pilot course in health care policy, finance, and law related to radiation oncology. Invited experts gave lectures on policy issues important to radiation oncology and half of the participants attended the American Society for Therapeutic Radiation and Oncology (ASTRO) Advocacy Day. Participants completed pre- and postcourse tests to assess their knowledge of health policy. Six radiation oncology residents participated, with 5 (84%) completing all components. For the 5 residents completing all assessments, the mean precourse score was 64% and the mean postcourse score was 84% (P  =  .05). Improvement was noted in all 3 sections of health policy, finance, and medical law. At the end of the course, 5 of 6 residents were motivated to learn about health policy, and 4 of 6 agreed it was important for physicians to be involved in policy matters. Teaching radiation oncology residents systems-based practice through a course on health policy, finance, and law is feasible and was well received. Such a course can help teaching programs comply with the ACGME Outcome Project and would also be applicable to trainees in other specialties.

  19. The forest as a classroom: Preparing for mental health practice

    OpenAIRE

    Eklund, Marthe Lyngås; Ruud, Ireen; Grov, Ellen Karine

    2016-01-01

    Background Positive effects of physical activity, health promotion and disease prevention, in treatment of mental illnesses are well documented. Mental health practice for nursing students highlights the important connection between physical activities and mental health. This study aims to examine the outcome from nursing students’ participation using The forest as a classroom. Students’ collaboration by problem solving, theoretical discussions and performance of activities in the forest serv...

  20. Potential Influences of Residencies' Health Risk Policies on Their Rankings by Ohio Applicants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Albert F.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A survey of 341 fourth-year Ohio medical students investigated attitudes regarding residencies' policies on drug screening, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing, and smoke-free workplaces. Substantial subsets indicated they would rank lower, or not at all, programs requiring preresidency drug screening or HIV testing but would rank schools…

  1. Meeting the Challenge of Preparing Social Workers for Integrated Health Practice: Evidence from Two MSW Cohorts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rishel, Carrie W.; Hartnett, Helen P.

    2017-01-01

    Changes in health care policy have led to an expansion of integrated care models that rely on collaboration among interprofessional health teams. Recent federal funding has encouraged the development of innovative training models to prepare social workers for integrated health practice. This article presents evidence from the first two MSW cohorts…

  2. Accreditation of Professional Preparation Programs for School Health Educators: The Changing Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taub, Alyson; Goekler, Susan; Auld, M. Elaine; Birch, David A.; Muller, Susan; Wengert, Deitra; Allegrante, John P.

    2014-01-01

    The health education profession is committed to maintaining the highest standards of quality assurance, including accreditation of professional preparation programs in both school and community/public health education. Since 2001, the Society for Public Health Education (SOPHE) has increased attention to strengthening accreditation processes for…

  3. [Self-rated health in adults: influence of poverty and income inequality in the area of residence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caicedo, Beatriz; Berbesi Fernández, Dedsy

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of income inequality and poverty in the towns of Bogotá, Colombia, on poor self-rated health among their residents. The study was based on a multipurpose survey applied in Bogotá-Colombia. A hierarchical data structure (individuals=level1, locations=level 2) was used to define a logit-type multilevel logistic model. The dependent variable was self-perceived poor health, and local variables were income inequality and poverty. All analyses were controlled for socio-demographic variables and stratified by sex. The prevalence of self-reported fair or poor health in the study population was 23.2%. Women showed a greater risk of ill health, as well as men and women with a low educational level, older persons, those without work in the last week and persons affiliated to the subsidized health system. The highest levels of poverty in the city increased the risk of poor health. Cross-level interactions showed that young women and men with a low education level were the most affected by income inequality in the locality. In Bogotá, there are geographical differences in the perception of health. Higher rates of poverty and income inequality were associated with an increased risk of self-perceived poor health. Notable findings were the large health inequalities at the individual and local levels. Copyright © 2014 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. Health Risk Assessment Research on Heavy Metals Ingestion Through Groundwater Drinking Pathway for the Residents in Baotou, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Liping; Wang, Yeyao; Guo, Yongli; Zhou, Youya; Liu, Li; Yan, Zengguang; Li, Fasheng; Xie, Xuefeng

    2016-01-01

    Drinking groundwater is a significant pathway for human exposure to heavy metals. To evaluate the health effect of some heavy metals ingestion through the groundwater drinking pathway, the authors collected 35 groundwater samples from the drinking water wells of local residents and the exploitation wells of waterworks in Baotou, China. The monitoring results indicate that the groundwater had been polluted by heavy metals in some regions of the study area. A health risk assessment model derived from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency was used to determine the noncarcinogenic and carcinogenic effects to residents who drink groundwater. All the respondents in the study area were at potential risk of carcinogenic health effects from arsenic when using the lowest safe standard for carcinogenic risk (1E-06). The hazard quotient values for noncarcinogenic health risk of arsenic exceeded 1 in 14.3% of the sampling wells in the study area. The research results could provide baseline data for groundwater utilization and supervision in the Baotou plain area.

  5. Residents' Perspectives on Rewards and Challenges of Caring for Ambulatory Care Patients Living With Chronic Illness: Findings From Three Academic Health Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, David C; Kessler, Chad; Sachdev, Namita; Fromme, H Barrett; Schwartz, Alan; Harris, Ilene

    2015-12-01

    To elicit residents' perspectives on rewards and challenges of caring for ambulatory patients with chronic illness and ways to improve their education in caring for these patients. The authors conducted a qualitative study with internal medicine residents during ambulatory medicine block rotations at three academic health centers from October 2011 through February 2012. Focus group questions covered rewards and challenges of caring for patients with chronic illness and strengths and weaknesses of residency education therein, and the Chronic Care Model provided a framework for interpretation. Qualitative analysis was used to identify themes. Five focus groups were conducted with 28 residents. Discussions yielded 224 comments, which were categorized into 5 domains and 36 themes. Twelve themes related to perceptions of challenges in providing care, and 3 themes related to perceptions of rewards in providing care. Eight themes focused on strategies to improve the patient experience. Strengths of the residency program were identified in 7 themes. Six themes related to ways for improving learning about caring for patients with chronic disease in the ambulatory setting. Residents perceived rewards, challenges, and barriers in caring for patients with chronic illness in the ambulatory setting, from providers' and patients' perspectives. They have developed strategies to provide effective patient care. Residents identified best practices in their residency for resident education and patient care and also made suggestions for improvement. Findings have significant implications for residency education and practice redesign in the 21st century for care of patients with chronic illness.

  6. Health-related quality of life and physical, mental, and cognitive disabilities among nursing home residents in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almomani, Fidaa Mohammad; McDowd, Joan M; Bani-Issa, Wegdan; Almomani, Murad

    2014-02-01

    To describe the physical, cognitive, psychological, and medical status of nursing home residents in Jordan. We also investigated the perceived health-related quality of life of this population. A sample of 221 nursing home residents in Jordan was recruited to participate in this study. Demographic variables and medical history were collected. In addition, all participants were assessed using health-related quality of life items (HRQOL), mini-mental state examination (MMSE), Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), Tinetti assessment battery for gait and balance (TAB), and disability of arm, shoulder, and hand assessment (DASH). TAB and DASH scores were related to the following HRQOL items: self-reported general health status, the need for personal care, the need for help from others in handling routine needs, the number of days of pain, feeling sad, depressed, worried, and not getting enough sleep, and the number of days feeling very healthy and full of energy. MMSE scores were related to self-reported need for personal care, the need for help from others in handling daily routine needs, and the number of days feeling pain, sad, worried, and depressed. GDS scores were related to self-reported general health status, the need for personal care, the need for help from others for handling daily routine needs, the number of pain, sad, worried, and not getting enough sleep days, and the number of days feeling healthy and full of energy. This study revealed a substantial impact of physical, cognitive, and psychological disabilities on HRQOL of nursing home residents in Jordan.

  7. The basic data for residents aged 16 years or older who received a comprehensive health check examinations in 2011-2012 as a part of the Fukushima Health Management Survey after the great East Japan earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Yukihiko; Hosoya, Mitsuaki; Yasumura, Seiji; Ohira, Tetsuya; Satoh, Hiroaki; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Sakai, Akira; Ohtsuru, Akira; Takahashi, Atsushi; Ozasa, Kotaro; Kobashi, Gen; Kamiya, Kenji; Yamashita, Shunichi; Abe, Masafumi

    2014-01-01

    To assist in the long-term health management of residents and evaluate health impacts after the Tokyo Electric Power Company's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in Fukushima Prefecture, the Fukushima prefectural government decided to conduct the Fukushima Health Management Survey. This report describes the results for residents aged 16 years or older who received the health check examinations and evaluates the data obtained from 2011 and 2012. The target group consisted of residents aged 16 years or older who had lived in the evacuation zone. The health check examinations were performed on receipt of an application for a health check examination from any of the residents. The examinations, including measurements of height, weight, abdominal circumference/body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, biochemical laboratory findings, and peripheral blood findings, were performed as required. 1) A total of 56,399 (30.9%) and 47,009 (25.4%) residents aged 16 years or older received health checks in 2011 and 2012, respectively. 2) In both years, a number of male and female residents in the 16-39 year age group were found to suffer obesity, hyperlipidemia, hyperuricemia, or liver dysfunction, and the prevalence of obesity and hyperlipidemia among residents increased with age. Furthermore, the proportion of residents with hypertension, glucose metabolic abnormalities or renal dysfunction was higher in those aged 40 years or older. 3) The frequencies of obesity, hypertension and hyperlipidemia among residents in 2012 were lower than those in 2011. However, the prevalence of liver dysfunction, hyperuricemia, glucose metabolic abnormalities and renal dysfunction among residents was higher in 2012 than in 2011. These results suggested the number of residents who had lived in the evacuation zone with obesity, hyperlipidemia, hyperuricemia, liver dysfunction, hypertension, glucose metabolic abnormalities, or renal dysfunction increased with age in all age groups

  8. Serendipitous findings from a pilot project on preparation of health preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, P L

    1984-01-01

    Thirty-four healthy preschoolers were pretested and posttested as part of a pilot project on preparation programming. Variables associated with their knowledge about medical equipment were identified. The results of this small pilot project are used to present suggestions for future research evaluating the effects of preparation programs for health young children.

  9. A population-based study on health-related quality of life among urban community residents in Shenyang, Northeast of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Tian; Ding, Yan-wei; Sun, Yan; He, Yi-Ni; Qi, Dian-Jun; Wu, Ying; Wu, Bin; Lang, Lang; Yu, Kai; Zhao, Xin; Zhu, Liang-liang; Wang, Shuang; Yu, Xiao-Song

    2015-09-19

    Due to the rising standard of living environment and advances in public health and medical care in China, it has been a tendency in recent years that health-related quality of life (HRQoL) has been increasingly acknowledged in community health management. However, large-scale population-based study on evaluating HQRoL in northeast of China was not conducted. This article aims to investigate the HRQoL in community residents in Northeast China and explore the associated factors. Stratified multiple-stage sampling method was used in the cross-sectional survey to investigate HRQoL of community residents in northeast of China. Univariate analysis and multiple linear regressions were used to analyze the factors associated to HRQoL of the community residents. The results were confirmed that HRQoL in general population was well performed for the first time in northeast of China in a large scale population. Community residents had better mental health than physical health. The factors influencing HRQoL included gender, age, educational level, marital status, ethnic group, chronic disease status, having breakfast frequency weekly and sleep quality. However, drinking and smoking habits did not affect residents' HRQoL. In this study, the result of the large-scale survey was satisfactory in northeast of China, providing HRQoL status of community residents. Policies on specific health management in community public health would emphasize on lifestyle behaviors especially eating habits in order to improving HRQoL.

  10. The forest as a classroom: preparing for mental health practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, Marthe Lyngås; Ruud, Ireen; Grov, Ellen Karine

    2016-01-01

    Positive effects of physical activity, health promotion and disease prevention, in treatment of mental illnesses are well documented. Mental health practice for nursing students highlights the important connection between physical activities and mental health. This study aims to examine the outcome from nursing students' participation using The forest as a classroom. Students' collaboration by problem solving, theoretical discussions and performance of activities in the forest serves as a repertoire of non-medical treatment strategies in mental health. The forest as a classroom was evaluated by means of an ad-hoc questionnaire including both standardized and open-ended questions. Data was analyzed by means of descriptive statistics and content analysis. The results indicated enhanced knowledge about physical activity and its impact on mental health. However, the nursing students' experience challenge preserving theoretical exercises outdoor because sensory stimulation took attention away from learning. For nursing students it is essential to build a repertoire of treatment activities to care for patients having mental health problems. This kind of approach is supported by the students' learning in the forest. The pilot study highlights the importance of multiple methods of learning in nursing education.

  11. Occupational Therapy in health care contexts: possibilities and challenges of multidisciplinary residency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Maria de Araujo Mitre

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This article is the result of a presentation at the Symposium of Occupational Therapy in HospitalSettings on the subject of graduate studies in the process of training and research in occupational therapy in hospitalsettings. The multi-professional residency was the main focus of this research. As it is a new experience in terms ofoccupational therapy, the impact it can have not only on the training of new professionals, but also in the practice ofexperienced ones was considered. While it broadens opportunities on the one hand, on the other hand, it challengesand makes us reflect about what we want: reproduce existing models of practice or consider new ones? To this end,two instruments used with residents to promote reflection on practice were questioned: the reflective journal and thecase study. They have allowed for further reflection on existing practices and the possibility of building an extendedclinic. It is believed that multidisciplinary residency can provide an important opportunity to consolidate the roleof OT in hospital settings; not only for the chance to educate and train new professionals to the market, but also toreview our practices and contribute to a more comprehensive model of care. However, no method or instrument isable to promote changes on its own; it depends on how it is used. This is not set up, though; it must be built.

  12. Linking health states to subjective well-being: an empirical study of 5854 rural residents in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X; Jia, X; Zhu, M; Chen, J

    2015-06-01

    Despite a maturing literature on the association between subjective well-being (SWB) and health status of the general population in Western countries, little is known regarding the happiness-health relation in China, and rural populations in particular. This study was aimed to explore the correlation between SWB and health states of China's rural residents. Cross-sectional survey. Data derived from a household survey conducted in 2010 with 5854 rural residents included. The single-item self-reported happiness measure used in the World Values Survey was employed to measure SWB. EQ-5D dimensions and visual analogue scale (VAS) were applied to measure subjective health status. The number of chronic diseases was used as proxy of objective health status. OLS regressions were performed to estimate the variation in SWB by health status and β coefficients were employed as effect size measures. Among EQ-5D dimensions, anxiety/depression had the strongest negative effect on SWB. Having severe anxiety/depression problems could reduce SWB by 1.65 on a scale 1-4. Reporting severe problems in pain/discomfort could also reduce SWB by 0.41, while the impact of other dimensions was insignificant. The coefficient on VAS implied a difference in SWB of 1.60 between the worst health state and the best health state. And suffering from three chronic diseases could reduce SWB by 0.62, but the effect turned insignificant when all measures of subjective health status were entered in the regression. The results from this study verify the strongly negative effect of the mental health dimension on SWB in the context of rural China. And suffering from chronic diseases has substantial negative effect on SWB even after subjective health status is controlled for. But the impact of chronic diseases on SWB could be fully captured when all measures of subjective health status are taken into account. Copyright © 2015 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The influence of social capital and socio-economic conditions on self-rated health among residents of an economically and health-deprived South African township

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cramm Jane M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surprisingly few studies have investigated the interplay of multiple factors affecting self-rated health outcomes and the role of social capital on health in developing countries, a prerequisite to strengthening our understanding of the influence of social and economic conditions on health and the most effective aid. Our study aimed to identify social and economic conditions for health among residents of an economically and health-deprived community. Methods Data were gathered through a survey administered to respondents from 1,020 households in Grahamstown a suburb in the Eastern Cape, South Africa (response rate 97.9%. We investigated the influence of social and economic conditions (education, employment, income, social capital, housing quality and neighborhood quality on self-rated health. We used ordinal logistic regression analyses to identify the relationship of these conditions and self-rated health. Results Our study found that education and social capital positively correlated with health; unemployment, poor educational level and advanced age negatively correlated. We found no significant correlations between self-rated health and housing quality, neighbourhood quality, income, gender, or marital status. Conclusion We highlight the possible impacts of social capital, employment, and education on health, and suggest that health outcomes may be improved through interventions beyond the health system: creating job opportunities, strengthening social capital, bettering educational systems, and promoting educational access. Policymakers should consider the benefits of such programmes when addressing health outcomes in financially distressed districts.

  14. Preparing psychologists to link systems of care in managing and preventing children's health problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Thomas J; Shapiro, Edward S; DuPaul, George J

    2003-03-01

    To describe the need for innovations in training to link health, educational, and family systems and to illustrate how this can be accomplished through child-oriented psychology training programs. We describe multiple pathways for the preparation of child-oriented psychologists to link health, educational, and family systems, in keeping with the National Institute of Mental Health guidelines for preparing professionals in child and adolescent psychology. These pathways include training embedded in graduate programs specializing in clinical child, pediatric, school, community, and family psychology. This article highlights a training initiative for preparing child-oriented psychologists based in a school psychology program. A partnership between Lehigh University and The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia has been developed to prepare school psychologists to coordinate community-based systems of care to promote positive educational and health outcomes for children. This program emphasizes both intervention and prevention and provides a set of integrated experiences in both health care and educational settings. We highlight components of this program relevant to the preparation of pediatric psychologists. We identify and discuss potential challenges in establishing training programs for the preparation of professionals to link health, school, and family systems.

  15. The Mental Health of Adolescents Residing in Court-Ordered Foster Care: Findings from a Population Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarren-Sweeney, Michael

    2017-10-12

    The mental health of a representative sample of 230 adolescents residing in foster care in New South Wales, Australia, was estimated in a state-wide epidemiological survey from carer-report responses on the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) and the Assessment Checklist for Adolescents (ACA). Rates of CBCL total problems, externalizing and internalizing scores above the borderline range cut-points were 49, 44 and 29% respectively, representing a relative risk of 3.8, 3.7 and 2.7 respectively in comparison to Australian children at large. These rates are 10-14% lower than that previously estimated for pre-adolescent Australian children in foster care. Whereas older age is associated with poorer mental health among pre-adolescent children in foster care, the present study findings suggest that this effect does not extend into adolescence. Around half of adolescents residing in foster care have mental health difficulties requiring referral to treatment services, including attachment- and trauma-related difficulties that are uncommon among clinic-referred children at large.

  16. The Impact of Including Immigrants without Permanent Residence Status in the Public Health Insurance System in the Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tepperová Jana

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Whether an individual can or cannot participate in the Czech public health insurance system depends on several characteristics, one of which is whether he/she has permanent residence status in the Czech Republic, and a second whether he/she is employed. This means that those without permanent residence status, including self-employed migrants from third countries, their dependent relatives, and the dependent relatives of third country employees in the Czech Republic, cannot participate in the public health insurance system. Some argue that such migrants should be included in the system, since commercial health insurance is disadvantageous and the contributions they would pay into the public health insurance system would increase the public health insurance agencies’ income. We estimate the value of the contributions to public health insurance that would be paid by third country self-employed and non-working immigrants, if they were insured based on data from 2011 to 2013, and compare this to the assumed costs of their medical care. To calculate the contributions for self-employed migrants we use data on the distribution of the tax base for self-employed persons from personal income tax returns. Our estimation results in an overall negative balance of 22 million CZK on the data for 2012 and 2013. In the current system this deficit would be covered by the state, which would pay contributions to the system for certain (state insured persons amounting to 97 million CZK; overall therefore the inclusion of these immigrants would result in a positive balance of 75 million CZK.

  17. Preparing States in India for Universal Health Coverage | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    India scores poorly on many health indicators. It has the highest number of malnourished children, the highest infant mortality rate, and one of the highest rates of maternal deaths in the world. This is concerning given that India's stellar economic growth in the last two decades, growth which is likely to continue. In recognition ...

  18. Air pollution from biodegradable wastes and non-specific health symptoms among residents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanes-Vidal, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    have relied on distances to waste sites to assign exposure status, and have not investigated whether the exposure-symptoms associations are direct or mediated by odor annoyance. In this study, individual-level exposures to a proxy indicator of biodegradable waste pollution (ammonia, NH3) in non-urban...... residences (n=454) during 2005-2010 were characterized by data from emission-dispersion validated models. Logistic regression and mediating analyses were used to examine associations between exposures and questionnaire-based data on annoyance and non-specific symptoms, after adjusting by person...

  19. Global health intervention from North to South: (Academic) preparation of students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singla, Rashmi; Rasmussen, Louise Mubanda

    2018-01-01

    Global health intervention from North to South: (Academic) preparation of students By Rashmi Singla & Louise Mubanda Rasmussen, Roskilde University, Denmark This chapter discusses how to conduct before- intervention preparation of students based on a pioneer course collaboration between the subje......Global health intervention from North to South: (Academic) preparation of students By Rashmi Singla & Louise Mubanda Rasmussen, Roskilde University, Denmark This chapter discusses how to conduct before- intervention preparation of students based on a pioneer course collaboration between......’ interactive participation is central to opening up a space where issues of power and identity in the encounter of global health interventions can be critically examined and reflected upon. We conclude the chapter by critically discussing the potential of analytic generalisation from the experience of running...

  20. Preparation and in vitro-in vivo evaluation of none gastric resident dipyridamole (DIP) sustained-release pellets with enhanced bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lishuang; Luo, Yanfei; Feng, Jia; Xu, Ming; Tao, Xiaoguang; He, Haibing; Tang, Xing

    2012-01-17

    The objective of this study was to develop none gastric resident sustained-release pellets loaded with dipyridamole with a high bioavailability. Two different kinds of core pellets, one containing citric acid as a pH-modifier (CAP) and, the other without pH-modifier (NCAP) were prepared by extrusion-spheronization and then coated with mixtures of enteric soluble and insoluble polymers (referred to as CAP(1) and NCAP(1)) or insoluble polymer alone (referred to as CAP(2) and NCAP(2)). The relative bioavailability of the sustained-release pellets was studied in fasted beagle dogs after oral administration using a commercially available immediate release tablet (IRT) as a reference. The in vitro release, in vivo absorption and in vitro-in vivo correlation were also evaluated. Results revealed that the plasma drug concentrations after administration of CAP(2), NCAP(1) and NCAP(2) were undetectable, indicating that the drug release was almost zero from the preparations throughout the gastro-intestinal tract. The C(max), T(max) and AUC((0→24)) of CAP(1) were 0.78 ± 0.23 (μg/ml), 3.80 ± 0.30 (h), and 6.74 ± 0.47 (μg/mlh), respectively. While the corresponding values were 2.23 ± 0.32 (μg/ml), 3.00 ± 0.44 (h) and 9.42 ± 0.69 (μg/mlh) for IRT. The relative bioavailability of CAP(1) was 71.55% compared with IRT. By combined incorporation of a pH-modifier into the core of pellets to modify the inner micro-environment and employing mixtures of enteric soluble and insoluble polymers as a retarding layer, drugs with high solubility in stomach and limited solubility in small intestine, such as DIP, could be successfully formulated as sustained release preparations with no pH-dependence in drug release and enhanced bioavailability. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Concepts and trends in the preparation of health educators in the US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamburg, M V

    1980-01-01

    Traditionally, health educators in the United States were categorized as either school or community-based and were prepared separately in two kinds of institutions: schools of education and schools of public health. The standards for the two kinds of health education preparation were established by two separate agencies: State Education Departments and the American Public Health Association. In the past decade, schools of education have begun to offer training for community health educators as well as for teachers of health. Where this has occurred, programmes have many similarities, but the field work differs. Also a new type of health education specialist has emerged: one who works with patients. The field work for this category of health educator is usually in a health care institution. This situation has made it important to develop standards for professional preparation and practice that can be applied to all types of health educators. A group of professionals have reached agreement that a common core curriculum should be established for the entry level, and guidelines developed for specialized preparation at the advanced levels. A national study is underway to delineate roles of health educators. The future will probably bring competency-based curricula with unified standards for the profession as a whole. There will be more institutions of higher education offering community health education programmes and they can be expected to develop concentrations on special topics such as occupational health or patient education according to their resources. A viable accrediting system can be expected to be developed and widely used. However, the number of students will remain stable until the job market for health educators expands.

  2. A survey of resident perspectives on surgical case minimums and the impact on milestones, graduation, credentialing, and preparation for practice: AOA critical issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeray, Kyle J; Frick, Steven L

    2014-12-03

    Residency education continues to evolve. Several major changes have occurred in the past several years, including emphasis on core competencies, duty-hour restrictions, and call. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Next Accreditation System (NAS) implemented educational milestones in orthopaedic surgery in July 2013. Additionally, the Residency Review Committee for orthopaedic surgery published suggested surgical case minimums in 2012, which overlap with several of the milestones.We conducted a survey to assess the opinions of orthopaedic residents regarding the ACGME-suggested surgical case minimums and the effects that these may have on resident education and potential future privileges in hospitals. The survey was sent via e-mail to all of the residents participating in the American Orthopaedic Association (AOA) Resident Leadership Forum for both 2011 and 2012. Participants in the Resident Leadership Forum are in either postgraduate year 4 or postgraduate year 5, are selected by the program directors as resident leaders, and represent 80% of the orthopaedic residency programs in the United States. The survey was completed by 157 of the 314 participants. Sixty-nine percent of the participants believed that case logs with minimum numbers of surgical procedures were an effective way to monitor the work but were not necessarily the only way to monitor the educational progress of the residents. Thirty-two percent believed that the minimums should not be required. Overwhelmingly, there was agreement that important cases were missing from the currently proposed sixteen core surgical minimums. Specifically, the residents believed that a minimum number of cases are necessary for distal radial fracture fixation and proximal humeral fracture fixation and possibly have a milestone to reflect the progress of the residents for each fixation.Most residents thought that surgical case minimums are an effective tool in monitoring the progress of

  3. Cross-sectional and longitudinal effects of racism on mental health among residents of Black neighborhoods in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwate, Naa Oyo A; Goodman, Melody S

    2015-04-01

    We investigated the impact of reported racism on the mental health of African Americans at cross-sectional time points and longitudinally, over the course of 1 year. The Black Linking Inequality, Feelings, and the Environment (LIFE) Study recruited Black residents (n = 144) from a probability sample of 2 predominantly Black New York City neighborhoods during December 2011 to June 2013. Respondents completed self-report surveys, including multiple measures of racism. We conducted assessments at baseline, 2-month follow-up, and 1-year follow-up. Weighted multivariate linear regression models assessed changes in racism and health over time. Cross-sectional results varied by time point and by outcome, with only some measures associated with distress, and effects were stronger for poor mental health days than for depression. Individuals who denied thinking about their race fared worst. Longitudinally, increasing frequencies of racism predicted worse mental health across all 3 outcomes. These results support theories of racism as a health-defeating stressor and are among the few that show temporal associations with health.

  4. 78 FR 21607 - Stakeholder Listening Session in Preparation for the 66th World Health Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-11

    ...'s Office of Global Affairs prepare for the World Health Assembly by taking full advantage of the... discussed at the 66th World Health Assembly http://apps.who.int/gb/ebwha/pdf_files/WHA66/A66_1-en.pdf . RSVP...

  5. Water systems, sanitation, and public health risks in remote communities: Inuit resident perspectives from the Canadian Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Kiley; Castleden, Heather; Jamieson, Rob; Furgal, Chris; Ell, Lorna

    2015-06-01

    Safe drinking water and wastewater sanitation are universally recognized as critical components of public health. It is well documented that a lack of access to these basic services results in millions of preventable deaths each year among vulnerable populations. Water and wastewater technologies and management practices are frequently tailored to local environmental conditions. Also important, but often overlooked in water management planning, are the social, cultural and economic contexts in which services are provided. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to identify and understand residents' perceptions of the functionality of current water and wastewater sanitation systems in one vulnerable context, that of a remote Arctic Aboriginal community (Coral Harbour, Nunavut), and to identify potential future water related health risks. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 28 Inuit residents and 9 key informants in 2011 and 2012. Findings indicate that the population's rapid transition from a semi-nomadic hunting and gathering lifestyle to permanent settlements with municipally provided utilities is influencing present-day water usage patterns, public health perceptions, and the level of priority decision-makers place on water and wastewater management issues. Simultaneously environmental, social and cultural conditions conducive to increased human exposure to waterborne health risks were also found to exist and may be increasing in the settlements. While water and wastewater system design decisions are often based on best practices proven suitable in similar environmental conditions, this study reinforces the argument for inclusion of social, cultural, and economic variables in such decisions, particularly in remote and economically challenged contexts in Canada or elsewhere around the world. The results also indicate that the addition of qualitative data about water and wastewater systems users' behaviours to technical knowledge of systems and

  6. [Concentrations of selected bioelements and toxic metals and their influence on health status of children and youth residing in Szczecin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedzierska, Elzbieta

    2003-01-01

    This study was performed in 174 children (59 boys and 115 girls) residing in Szczecin. The objective was to measure the concentrations of heavy metals--lead and cadmium--and some bioelements--magnesium, zinc, copper, calcium, and iron--and to establish relationships between concentrations of elements in serum, erythrocytes, and hair. Mean concentrations of lead in serum and erythrocytes were 0.003 micromol/L (0.07 microg/dL) and 0.96 micromol/L (2.0 microg/dL), respectively (Table 1). Mean concentrations of cadmium in serum and erythrocytes were 0.006 micromol/L (0.07 microg/dL) and 0.02 micromol/L (0.21 microg/dL), respectively (Table 4). In both cases, the maximum allowable concentrations were not exceeded. In hair, the concentrations exceeded the maximum allowable concentration, reaching 0.006 micromol/g dry mass (1.2 microg/g d.m.) for lead and 0.0008 micromol/g d.m. (0.1 microg/g d.m.) for cadmium (Table 3). A positive correlation was found between the concentration of lead in erythrocytes and hair (r = 0.37, p < 0.000001). Concentrations of magnesium in serum and erythrocytes were below the normal range, but were within norm in hair. Mean concentrations of total magnesium in serum, erythrocytes, and hair were 0.69 mmol/L (1.7 mg/dL), 1.6 mmol/L (3.9 mg/dL), and 0.9 micromol/g d.m. (21.5 microg/g d.m.(, respectively (Table 4). 35 children with hypomagnesemia and elevated concentrations of lead and cadmium were placed on magnesium supplementation with Laktomag B6 preparation. This led to significant reduction in the concentrations of lead and cadmium in erythrocytes and hair. Mean concentration of lead diminished from 0.28 micromol/L (5.8 microg/dL) to 0.17 micromol/L (3.6 microg/dL) (p < 0.03) in erythrocytes and from 0.014 micromol/g d.m. (2.9 microg/g d.m.) to 0.007 micromol/g d.m. (1.5 microg/g d.m.) (p < 0.001) (table 5). Mean concentration of cadmium diminished from 0.02 micromol/L (0.23 microg/dL) to 0.015 micromol/L (0.17 microg/dL) in erythrocytes (p

  7. Preparing Air Force Nurses to Deliver Health Care in a Unique Operational Environment: Detainee Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Dr. Josephna Campinha-Bacote’s, President and Founder of Transcultural C.A.R.E. Associates, model of cultural competence in health care delivery...AU/ACSC/DOLIHITE/AY10 AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY PREPARING AIR FORCE NURSES TO DELIVER HEALTH CARE IN A...provided in areas of battlefield nursing and the combat health care system. Specifically, nursing care is taught to be delivered at the Air Force

  8. The relationships between urban parks, residents' physical activity, and mental health benefits: A case study from Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongxiao; Li, Feng; Li, Juanyong; Zhang, Yuyang

    2017-04-01

    The role of urban parks in improving public health has been analyzed in the context of urban design in developed countries, but has seldom been considered in developing countries such as China. Previous studies have found positive correlations between parks and residents' physical activity and mental health status. In this study, we conducted a questionnaire survey to investigate respondents' physical activity status and its relationship with urban parks. The impact of different activities engaged in during park use on positive mental health was examined. The average physical activity level of the sample was 92.7 min of moderate to vigorous physical activity per day. Park users were more active in all forms of physical activity, except transport walking, than non-users. The presence of a park within 500 m from home and park use were significantly associated with total physical activity. Physical activity in parks significantly restored visitors' moods and energy levels, and interaction with nature brought mental health benefits in terms of relaxation and self-perceived confidence. Overall, this study found a positive correlation of urban parks with public physical activity and positive mental health benefits. However, further research is needed to improve the understanding of this relationship in the context of China. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Oral health-related quality of life and prosthetic status of nursing home residents with or without dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klotz AL

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Anna-Luisa Klotz,1 Alexander Jochen Hassel,1 Johannes Schröder,2,3 Peter Rammelsberg,1 Andreas Zenthöfer1 1Department of Prosthodontics, Dental School, 2Institute of Gerontology, 3Section of Geriatric Psychiatry, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany Purpose: The objective of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the effect of prosthetic status on the oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL of nursing home residents with or without dementia.Methods: The study was performed in 14 nursing homes across the federal state of Baden-Württemberg, Germany. All eligible participants were included, and general and medical information and information about their dental and prosthetic statuses were collected. The Geriatric Oral Health Assessment Index (GOHAI was administered to evaluate OHRQoL. The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE served to classify participants into living or not living with dementia according to the established cutoff value for dementia (MMSE <24. Parametric bivariate statistics and logistic regression models were used to analyze data at P<0.05.Results: A total of 169 participants were included in this study. The mean age of the participants was 82.9 years. A total of some 70% of the sample was living with dementia. The mean GOHAI score along the sample was 49.1 (8.3, and 41% of the sample reported substantially compromised OHRQoL (GOHAI <50. OHRQoL was statistically similar for people with or without dementia (P=0.234; objective oral health was also similar in both groups (P>0.05. The number of teeth (odds ratio [OR]: 2.0, the type of prosthetic status (OR: 6.5, and denture-related treatment needs (OR: 2.4 were the major factors significantly affecting OHRQoL (P<0.05.Conclusion: The OHRQoL of elderly nursing home residents is substantially compromised. Several prosthetic treatment needs for residents living with or without dementia were identified. Edentulism without tooth replacement and having <5 teeth resulted

  10. Does enhancing personal care assistants' own oral health influence their attitudes and practices towards oral care for residents - a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knevel, Rjm; Foley, J; Gussy, M; Karimi, L

    2016-11-01

    To investigate whether, within a residential care facility, increasing personal care assistants' (PCAs) awareness of their own oral health status and self-care skills would alter existing attitudes and behavioural intentions related to the oral health care of residents. PCAs (n = 15) in the dementia care unit of a residential care facility in Melbourne, Australia, were invited to participate in a small research project that appeared to test the effectiveness of a work-place oral health educational programme in enhancing their own oral health whilst masking the actual outcome of interest, namely its effect on PCAs oral healthcare attitudes and practices towards the residents. Post-intervention, the self-reported confidence of the PCAs to identify their personal risk for oral health problems, identifying common oral health conditions and determining the factors contributing to their personal oral health was increased significantly (P personal care assistants' (PCAs) awareness of their own oral health status and self-care skills increased the confidence of the carers to identify oral health risks in the residents, as well as increasing their self-reported confidence in providing oral care to residents. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. How do Ontario family medicine residents perform on global health competencies? A multi-institutional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirella Veras

    2013-09-01

    Results: The response rate ranged from 29% to 66% across the five universities. Self-perceived knowledge scores revealed that 34.3% of the respondents were very confident, 51.9% were somewhat confident, and 13.8% were not at all confident about their global health knowledge. Participants' confidence scores were lower in relation to knowledge of access to health care for low income nations (44.3%, and were better on their global health skills related to working in a team (70.9% and listening actively to patients' concerns (64.6%. Conclusions: The global health competency scale has identified key areas of strengths and weaknesses of family medicine programs in global health education. This can be used to evaluate and analyze progress over time.

  12. [Awareness of health co-benefits of carbon emissions reduction in urban residents in Beijing: a cross-sectional survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, J H; Zhang, Y; Wang, J; Chen, H J; Zhang, G B; Liu, X B; Wu, H X; Li, J; Li, J; Liu, Q Y

    2017-05-10

    Objective: To understand the awareness of the health co-benefits of carbon emission reduction in urban residents in Beijing and the influencing factors, and provide information for policy decision on carbon emission reduction and health education campaigns. Methods: Four communities were selected randomly from Fangshan, Haidian, Huairou and Dongcheng districts of Beijing, respectively. The sample size was estimated by using Kish-Leslie formula for descriptive analysis. 90 participants were recruited from each community. χ(2) test was conducted to examine the associations between socio-demographic variables and individuals' awareness of the health co-benefits of carbon emission reduction. Ordinal logistic regression analysis was performed to investigate the factors influencing the awareness about the health co-benefits. Results: In 369 participants surveyed, 12.7% reported they knew the health co-benefits of carbon emission reduction. The final logistic regression analysis revealed that age (OR=0.98), attitude to climate warming (OR=0.72) and air pollution (OR=1.59), family monthly average income (OR=1.27), and low carbon lifestyle (OR=2.36) were important factors influencing their awareness of the health co-benefits of carbon emission reduction. Conclusion: The awareness of the health co-benefits of carbon emissions reduction were influenced by people' socio-demographic characteristics (age and family income), concerns about air pollution and climate warming, and low carbon lifestyle. It is necessary to take these factors into consideration in future development and implementation of carbon emission reduction policies and related health education campaigns.

  13. Can care staff accurately assess health-related quality of life of care home residents? A secondary analysis of data from the OPERA trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Ben; Petrou, Stavros; Underwood, Martin; Madan, Jason

    2017-04-27

    To compare assessments of health-related quality of life outcomes of care home residents reported by residents and care staff acting as proxies. Linear regression and bivariate modelling of paired assessments from care home residents and care staff. 78 care homes in 2 regions in England. 556 care home residents aged 65 years or older and care staff. EQ-5D utility scores and responses to individual EQ-5D dimensions. The depression status, cognitive function, physical function, activities of daily living, social engagement, pain and dementia diagnosis of care home residents all predicted discrepancies in EQ-5D reporting. For residents with no depressive symptoms, care staff underestimated residents' mean EQ-5D utility score by 0.134 (95% CI 0.097 to 0.171) and for those with severe depressive symptoms they overstated mean utility scores by 0.222 (95% CI 0.104 to 0.339). With increasing levels of pain in residents the care staff progressively estimated EQ-5D utilities above self-reported values; by 0.236 (95% CI 0.003 to 0.469) in those with the second highest pain scores. For those with no cognitive impairment, proxies overstated mean utility scores by 0.097 (95% CI 0.049 to 0.146), while for those with severe cognitive impairment they underestimated mean utility scores by 0.192 (95% CI 0.143 to 0.241). Care home residents and staff appear to differ fundamentally in their assessment of the health-related quality of life, as measured by the EQ-5D, of residents with different levels of depression, pain and/or cognitive impairment. This could lead to interventions evaluated using proxy-based quality-adjusted life year estimates being wrongly rejected on cost-effectiveness grounds and may also make it difficult for carers to act as advocates with health and social care professionals for certain groups of residents. A more resident-focussed approach to assessment of health-related quality of life is needed. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission

  14. Factors associated with self-rated health among North Korean defectors residing in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo-Ram; Yu, Shieun; Noh, Jin-Won; Kwon, Young Dae

    2014-09-26

    The number of North Korean refugees entering South Korea has increased recently. The health status of refugees is a significant factor in determining their success in resettlement; therefore, this study examined both the self-rated health status of North Korean defectors who have settled in South Korea and the factors associated with their self-rated health status. This study utilized data gained from face-to-face interviews with 500 North Korean defectors who arrived in South Korea in 2007. The interviews were structured and conducted by 'Yonsei University Research Team for North Korean defectors'. A stepwise multivariable linear regression was performed to determine the factors associated with their self-rated health status. North Korean defectors who were female, elderly, or had low annual household income, disability or chronic diseases reported lower health status. However, self-rated health status was higher among those who had settled in South Korea for 18 months or more, who were satisfied with government support or their current life, and who had experienced more traumatic events in North Korea. Government policies and refugee assistance programs should consider and reflect the factors relevant to the health status of North Korean defectors.

  15. Systematic review: association of shift length, protected sleep time, and night float with patient care, residents' health, and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Darcy A; Fletcher, Kathlyn E; Arora, Vineet M

    2010-12-21

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's new duty-hour standards limit interns' shifts to 16 hours and night float to 6 consecutive nights. Protected sleep time (that is, "nap") is strongly encouraged. As duty-hour reforms are implemented, examination of the quality and outcomes of the relevant literature is important. To systematically review the literature examining shift length, protected sleep time, and night float. MEDLINE, PREMEDLINE, and EMBASE from January 1989 through May 2010. Studies examined the associations of shift length, protected sleep time, or night float with patient care, resident health, and education outcomes among residents in practice settings. Study quality was measured by using the validated Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument and the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force criteria. Two investigators independently rated study quality, and interrater agreement was calculated. Sixty-four studies met inclusion criteria. Most studies used single-group cross-sectional (19 studies [29.7%]) or pre-post (41 studies [64.1%]) designs, and 4 (6.3%) were randomized, controlled trials. Five studies (7.8%) were multi-institutional. Twenty-four of 33 (72.7%) studies examining shift length reported that shorter shifts were associated with decreased medical errors, motor vehicle crashes, and percutaneous injuries. Only 2 studies assessed protected sleep time and reported that residents' adherence to naps was poor. Night floats described in 33 studies involved 5 to 7 consecutive nights. Most studies used single-institution, observational designs. Publication bias is likely but difficult to assess in this methodologically weak and heterogeneous body of evidence. For the limited outcomes measured, most studies supported reducing shift length but did not adequately address the optimal shift duration. Studies had numerous methodological limitations and unclear generalizability for most outcomes. Specific recommendations about

  16. The role of staff in health promotion in community residences for people with intellectual disabilities: variation in views among managers and caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergström, Helena; Wihlman, Ulla

    2011-09-01

    Managers and caregivers in community residences for people with intellectual disabilities are expected both to promote residents' health and to support their autonomy. The aim of this article was to explore variation in views among managers and caregivers on the role of staff in health promotion. A qualitative study was conducted using semi-structured interviews with six managers and six caregivers. The analysis used a phenomenographic approach to categorize variation in views. We identified five qualitatively different main categories of roles staff play in health promotion: the parent, the manipulator, the coach, the educator and the libertarian. In addition lifestyle-related risk factors for ill-health and barriers to a healthy lifestyle were analysed and described using qualitative content analysis. The results highlight the ethical conflict that faces staff trying to support a healthy lifestyle as well as the autonomy of the residents.

  17. Housing as a Social Determinant of Health: Exploring the Relationship between Rent Burden and Risk Behaviors for Single Room Occupancy Building Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Elizabeth A; Mitchell, Christopher G

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of health determinants research recognizes that housing and health are intimately linked. This study explores the relationship between rent burden (the ratio of rent to income) and health risk behaviors among a sample of single room occupancy (SRO) building residents. Cross-sectional data were gathered from a sample of 162 residents living in privately owned, for-profit SROs in Chicago. Findings indicated that participants who had full rental subsidies and thus were designated in a no-rent-burden category were more likely to engage in risk behaviors including illicit drug use, having multiple sexual partners, and having sex without a condom, in comparison to participants with moderate or high-rent burdens. These findings suggest that interventions to increase housing stability and affordability and bolster reliable income sources (in addition to rental subsidies) may be key in reducing risk behaviors and improving health for vulnerably housed populations such as SRO residents.

  18. Increasing access to healthful foods: a qualitative study with residents of low-income communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Alexandra; Banks, Karen; Jennings, Rose; Nehme, Eileen; Nemec, Cori; Sharma, Shreela; Hussaini, Aliya; Yaroch, Amy

    2015-07-27

    Inadequate access to healthful foods has been identified as a significant barrier to healthful dietary behaviors among individuals who live in low-income communities. The purpose of this study was to gather low-income community members' opinions about their food purchasing choices and their perceptions of the most effective ways to increase access to healthful foods in their communities. Spanish and English focus groups were conducted in low-income, ethnically-diverse communities. Participants were asked about their knowledge, factors influencing their food purchasing decisions, and their perceptions regarding solutions to increase access to healthful foods. A total of 148 people participated in 13 focus groups. The majority of participants were female and ethnically diverse (63% Hispanic, 17% African American, 16% Caucasian, and 4% “other”). More than 75% of the participants reported making less than $1999 USD per month. Participants reported high levels of knowledge and preference for healthful foods. The most important barriers influencing healthful shopping behaviors included high price of healthful food, inadequate geographical access to healthful food, poor quality of available healthful food, and lack of overall quality of the proximate retail stores. Suggested solutions to inadequate access included placement of new chain supermarkets in their communities. Strategies implemented in convenience stores were not seen as effective. Farmers’ markets, with specific stipulations, and community gardens were regarded as beneficial supplementary solutions. The results from the focus groups provide important input from a needs assessment perspective from the community, identify gaps in access, and offer potential effective solutions to provide direction for the future.

  19. MRSA Prevalence and Risk Factors among Health Personnel and Residents in Nursing Homes in Hamburg, Germany – A Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Claudia; Dulon, Madeleine; Kleinmüller, Olaf; Nienhaus, Albert; Schablon, Anja

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The increase of multidrug-resistant organisms in hospitals causes problems in nursing homes. Staff in geriatric nursing homes are at greater risk of MRSA colonisation. The aim of the study was to describe the occupational exposure to MRSA among health personnel in geriatric nursing. Methods A point prevalence survey was conducted among health personnel and residents of geriatric nursing homes within the greater Hamburg district. Nasal swabs and, where relevant, wound swabs were collected for the screening survey. Risk factors for MRSA colonisation were identified by means of a questionnaire and using the files held on the residents. Where tests on nursing staff were positive, a control swab was taken; when the results were confirmed positive, decolonisation was performed. The responsible general practitioners were notified of positive MRSA findings among residents. A molecular biological examination of the MRSA samples was performed. Results A total of 19 institutions participated in the study. Nasal swabs were taken from 759 nursing staff and 422 residents. Prevalence of MRSA was 1.6% among staff and 5.5% among residents. MRSA colonisation among health personnel indicated a correlation with male gender (OR 4.5, 95% CI 1.4–14.1). Among the residents, chronic skin diseases (OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.0–10.3) and indwelling devices (OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.2–8.1) were identified as risk factors. No link between MRSA in residents and in health personnel could be established. Conclusion The number of MRSA colonisations among nursing staff and residents of geriatric nursing homes in Hamburg was rather low at 1.6% and 5.5% respectively and equates to the results of other surveys in non-outbreak scenarios. PMID:28068356

  20. MRSA Prevalence and Risk Factors among Health Personnel and Residents in Nursing Homes in Hamburg, Germany - A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Claudia; Dulon, Madeleine; Kleinmüller, Olaf; Nienhaus, Albert; Schablon, Anja

    2017-01-01

    The increase of multidrug-resistant organisms in hospitals causes problems in nursing homes. Staff in geriatric nursing homes are at greater risk of MRSA colonisation. The aim of the study was to describe the occupational exposure to MRSA among health personnel in geriatric nursing. A point prevalence survey was conducted among health personnel and residents of geriatric nursing homes within the greater Hamburg district. Nasal swabs and, where relevant, wound swabs were collected for the screening survey. Risk factors for MRSA colonisation were identified by means of a questionnaire and using the files held on the residents. Where tests on nursing staff were positive, a control swab was taken; when the results were confirmed positive, decolonisation was performed. The responsible general practitioners were notified of positive MRSA findings among residents. A molecular biological examination of the MRSA samples was performed. A total of 19 institutions participated in the study. Nasal swabs were taken from 759 nursing staff and 422 residents. Prevalence of MRSA was 1.6% among staff and 5.5% among residents. MRSA colonisation among health personnel indicated a correlation with male gender (OR 4.5, 95% CI 1.4-14.1). Among the residents, chronic skin diseases (OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.0-10.3) and indwelling devices (OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.2-8.1) were identified as risk factors. No link between MRSA in residents and in health personnel could be established. The number of MRSA colonisations among nursing staff and residents of geriatric nursing homes in Hamburg was rather low at 1.6% and 5.5% respectively and equates to the results of other surveys in non-outbreak scenarios.

  1. Dietary Behaviors of Elderly People Residing in Central Iran: A Preliminary Report of Yazd Health Study (YAHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davood Bahrami

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Food habits play important roles in maintaining physical and mental health and preventing chronic illnesses in the elderly. The aim of the present study was to investigate dietary behaviors of elderly people residing in Yazd city which is located in central Iran. Methods: The present analysis was conducted on 1684 participants entered to Yazd Health Study (YAHS aged over 60 years during 2014-2015. Demographic characteristics, health status, physical activity, economic status, education and dietary behaviors were collected by using a validated questionnaire. Results: Our analysis revealed that only 1.2% of the elderly consumed more than two servings of dairy per day. Furthermore only 3 and 9.8 percent of elders consumed more than three servings/day of vegetables and fruits, respectively. The study also showed that 22.9% ate more than five servings of sugar per day, 22.5% took more than four units of legumes weekly, 56.1% ate two to three servings of poultry per week, 77% reported eating fast foods for at least once a week, 47.8% consumed canned foods less than once a week of and 86.3% reported taking breakfast for at least five times a week. For cooking 18.9% of elderly still use hydrogenated vegetable oils, 52.8% of the elderly did not separate visible fats from red meat before cooking, 65.8% chose high-fat dairy and  24% of older people reported using frying and grilling as their primary cooking method. Our findings also suggest that dietary behavior is different between elder men and women. Conclusion: Unhealthy dietary habits, including low vegetables, fruits and dairy products intake, are highly prevalent among elderly people residing in Yazd. Community based interventions targeting this age group, in order to improve their dietary intake, are highly recommended.

  2. Religious involvement, social engagement, and subjective health status of older residents of informal neighborhoods of Nairobi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodzi, Ivy Abla; Obeng Gyimah, Stephen; Emina, Jacques; Chika Ezeh, Alex

    2011-06-01

    Although past research has extensively documented the effects of religious involvement and social integration on the health outcomes of older people, relatively little research has examined the relationship among older Africans. In this article, we examined the effects of religious affiliation and participation as well as forms of social engagement, including social support, sociability, and community participation on self-reported health. The study used data from a sample of older men and women (50 years and above) from two informal settlements in Nairobi Kenya. Differences in religious groups were statistically significant. Frequency of religious attendance was negatively associated with health, while the number of close friends, social support, and frequency of community participation were positively and independently related to self-reported health.

  3. Knowledge and uptake of community-based health insurance scheme among residents of Olowora, Lagos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O A Ibukun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: The informal sector population in developing nations has low health coverage from Community Based Health Insurance (CBHI and problems such as limited awareness about the potential impact of prepayment health financing and the limited resources to finance health care can impede success. This study assessed the community based health insurance scheme uptake and determinants in Olowora, Lagos State. Methods: This was a descriptive cross sectional study carried out in July 2010 in all households of 12 out of 41 streets in Olowora,by multistage sampling. Four hundred and sixteen interviewer-administered questionnaires were completed and returned. Analysis was by Epi- info version 3.5.1 software. Results: Although 75.5% of respondents were aware of the Community Health Insurance scheme at Olowora, just about half (49.5% of them had good knowledge of the scheme. A substantial proportion (44.2% of respondents did not believe in contributing money for illness yet to come, and majority (72.3% of such respondents prefers payment for health care when ill. While about half (53% of respondentshad enrolled into the community health insurance scheme, 45.6% of those who had not enrolled were not aware of the scheme. Lack of money was the main reason (51.5% why some enrollees had defaulted. Conclusion: The study identified information gaps and poor understanding of the scheme as well as poverty as factors that have negatively affected uptake. The scheme management has to re-evaluate its sensitization programmes, and also strengthen marketing strategies with special emphasis on the poor.

  4. Religious Involvement, Social Engagement, and Subjective Health Status of Older Residents of Informal Neighborhoods of Nairobi

    OpenAIRE

    Kodzi, Ivy Abla; Obeng Gyimah, Stephen; Emina, Jacques; Chika Ezeh, Alex

    2010-01-01

    Although past research has extensively documented the effects of religious involvement and social integration on the health outcomes of older people, relatively little research has examined the relationship among older Africans. In this article, we examined the effects of religious affiliation and participation as well as forms of social engagement, including social support, sociability, and community participation on self-reported health. The study used data from a sample of older men and wo...

  5. Program for developing leadership in pharmacy residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Patrick D

    2012-07-15

    An innovative, structured approach to incorporating leadership development activities into pharmacy residency training is described. The American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) has called for increased efforts to make leadership development an integral component of the training of pharmacy students and new practitioners. In 2007, The Nebraska Medical Center (TNMC) took action to systematize leadership training in its pharmacy residency programs by launching a new Leadership Development Series. Throughout the residency year, trainees at TNMC participate in a variety of activities: (1) focused group discussions of selected articles on leadership concepts written by noted leaders of the past and present, (2) a two-day offsite retreat featuring trust-building exercises and physical challenges, (3) a self-assessment designed to help residents identify and use their untapped personal strengths, (4) training on the effective application of different styles of communication and conflict resolution, and (5) education on the history and evolution of health-system pharmacy, including a review and discussion of lectures by recipients of ASHP's Harvey A. K. Whitney Award. Feedback from residents who have completed the series has been positive, with many residents indicating that it has stimulated their professional growth and helped prepared them for leadership roles. A structured Leadership Development Series exposes pharmacy residents to various leadership philosophies and principles and, through the study of Harvey A. K. Whitney Award lectures, to the thoughts of past and present pharmacy leaders. Residents develop an increased self-awareness through a resident fall retreat, a StrengthsFinder assessment, and communication and conflict-mode assessment tools.

  6. Support infrastructure available to Canadian residents completing post-graduate global health electives: current state and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumaran, Lojan; Ayinde, Tasha; Hamadini, Fadi; Meterissian, Sarkis; Razek, Tarek; Puckrin, Robert; Munoz, Johanna; O’Hearn, Shawna; Deckelbaum, Dan L

    2016-01-01

    Background Global health electives offer medical trainees the opportunity to broaden their clinical horizons. Canadian universities have been encouraged by regulatory bodies to offer institutional support to medical students going abroad; however, the extent to which such support is available to residents has not been extensively studied. Methods We conducted a survey study of Canadian universities examining the institutional support available to post-graduate medical trainees before, during, and after global health electives. Results Responses were received from 8 of 17 (47%) Canadian institutions. Results show that trainees are being sent to diverse locations around the world with more support than recommended by post-graduate regulatory bodies. However, we found that the content of the support infrastructure varies amongst universities and that certain components—pre-departure training, best practices, risk management, and post-return debriefing—could be more thoroughly addressed. Conclusion Canadian universities are encouraged to continue to send their trainees on global health electives. To address the gaps in infrastructure reported in this study, the authors suggest the development of comprehensive standardized guidelines by post-graduate regulatory/advocacy bodies to better ensure patient and participant safety. We also encourage the centralization of infrastructure management to the universities’ global health departments to aid in resource management. PMID:28344708

  7. Traffic density in area of residence is associated with health-related quality of life in women, the community-based Hordaland Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundersen, Hilde; Magerøy, Nils; Moen, Bente E; Bråtveit, Magne

    2013-01-01

    Vehicle traffic is increasing worldwide, and this is a major concern because traffic-related air pollution and noise may influence health. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is associated with vehicle traffic density in area of residence. A total of 16,410 individuals, 40 to 45 years old, were asked to participate in this study (response rate: 55% for men, 66% for women). Using the 12-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-12) questionnaire, both physical and mental HRQoL were investigated. Multiple linear regression analyses showed that women living in areas with high traffic density had significantly poorer physical HRQoL than women living in areas with moderate or low vehicle traffic density. There were no similar findings among men. Mental HRQoL was not associated with vehicle traffic density in the area of residence, neither for women nor for men. There is an association between high vehicle traffic density in residential area and reduced HRQoL in women.

  8. The Relationship between Health Promoting Behaviors and Quality of Life in Nursing Home Residents in Kayseri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesile Şenol

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims. Healthy lifestyle behaviors are the major determinant of both prevention health and health related quality of life. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between health-promoting behaviors and quality of life of elderly individuals living in nursing homes. Methods. The study was performed between October 2008 and 2009, in the city of Kayseri in Turkey, upon 136 individuals, aged 65 and above, living in the Gazioglu Nursing Home. A sociodemographic questionnaire, Standardized Mini Mental Test, Health Promoting Lifestyle Behaviors Profile (HPLP, and WHOQOL-OLD module were used for the gathering of data. Results. The overall HPLP and quality of life (QoL scores were 118.06±20.54 and 43.45±10.30, respectively. More than half of the participants have higher points than the mean QoL scores. The HPLP scores of these subjects were significantly higher compared to those with lower points than mean QoL scores. There was a positive relationship between the overall HPLP and WHOQOL-OLD mean scores, except for the autonomy and sensorial function domains. Conclusions. The study result showed that health-promoting behaviors are positively associated with better quality of life scores in the elderly subjects living in a nursing home.

  9. Assessment of Noise Pollution and Its Effect on Residents Health in Ahvaz, Iran in 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Reza Yari

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims of the Study: Among the environmental pollutions, noise pollution, due to the potential physiological and psychological effects on humans, is of a particular importance. Exposure to noise can result in hearing loss in citizens. Health risks from noise associated with road traffic. Noise health effects are the health consequences of elevated sound levels. This study was conducted to evaluate the noise pollution and health effects due to near roadway in Ahvaz, Iran. Materials & Methods: In this descriptive-cross sectional study, Equivalent sound pressure level was measured by sound level meters in 75 points in 4 roadways, which have high density of traffic in Ahvaz city during daytime. In them, at measuring stations, on 4 days of week, at three times totally 1038 measurements were recorded that including 6 parameters of traffic noise and each measurement was recorded for 30 minutes. SPSS software’s were applied for statistical analysis. Results: According to the research findings, the equivalent sound pressure levels in all stations were equal to 72.36±2.87 dB. Based on result of this study the highest noise health effects were the nervousness and sleep quality. Conclusions: Based on the results of this study, increasing trends of traffic load there is an increasing need for proper consideration plans organizations.

  10. The potential impact of geological environment on health status of residents of the Slovak Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapant, S; Cvečková, V; Dietzová, Z; Fajčíková, K; Hiller, E; Finkelman, R B; Škultétyová, S

    2014-06-01

    In order to assess the potential impact of the geological environment on the health of the population of the Slovak Republic, the geological environment was divided into eight major units: Paleozoic, Crystalline, Carbonatic Mesozoic and basal Paleogene, Carbonatic-silicate Mesozoic and Paleogene, Paleogene Flysch, Neovolcanics, Neogene and Quaternary sediments. Based on these geological units, the databases of environmental indicators (chemical elements/parameters in groundwater and soils) and health indicators (concerning health status and demographic development of the population) were compiled. The geological environment of the Neogene volcanics (andesites and basalts) has been clearly documented as having the least favourable impact on the health of Slovak population, while Paleogene Flysch geological environment (sandstones, shales, claystones) has the most favourable impact. The most significant differences between these two geological environments were observed, especially for the following health indicators: SMRI6364 (cerebral infarction and strokes) more than 70 %, SMRK (digestive system) 55 %, REI (circulatory system) and REE (endocrine and metabolic system) almost 40 % and REC (malignant neoplasms) more than 30 %. These results can likely be associated with deficit contents of Ca and Mg in groundwater from the Neogene volcanics that are only about half the level of Ca and Mg in groundwater of the Paleogene sediments.

  11. Willingness to pay for preventive travel health measures among Hong Kong Chinese residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Raymond; Abdullah, Abu Saleh M; McGhee, Sarah M; Hedley, Anthony J

    2005-01-01

    The effectiveness of preventive measures in combating travel-related illnesses is well recognized. However, there is a lack of information on the economic value of any travel-associated preventive measures in the literature. The purpose of this article is to report the values of willingness to pay (WTP) to prevent travel health problems in Hong Kong's travelers. A cross-sectional telephone survey for a sample of Hong Kong population was conducted in 1998 using a random digit dialing technique. The sample WTP values were elicited using an open-ended question. Logistic regression was performed to identify predictors of WTP. Mean WTP was estimated using Heckman's sample selection model on log-WTP. Of the subjects interviewed, 77% (285/369) offered positive values of WTP to prevent travel health problems. The observable WTP (zero excluded) had a higher mean (447 Hong Kong dollars) than did the zero-inclusive data (351 Hong Kong dollars). The median values were 200 Hong Kong dollars in both cases because there were a large number of protest responses. Age, travel frequency, ability to assess travel health risk, precautionary behavior, and previous exposure to health protection materials explained one's willingness to pay a positive amount for preventing travel health problems. Age, education level, and precautionary behavior were predictors of the WTP levels. The findings of this study suggest that Chinese travelers are willing to pay for the prevention of travel-related illnesses. The predictors of WTP identified could be used to suggest policy changes. However, future studies are needed to explore further the relationship between the experience of travel illnesses, the magnitude of travel health risks, and WTP.

  12. Exposure to electromagnetic waves in the urban environment and their negative influence on the health of urban residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chekhovskiy Aleksandr Vladimirovich

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the works by several authors has proven that buildings of urban areas are sources of electromagnetic fields; their intensity is the source of the permanent structure field in the terrestrial space, and if a building density is high, the intensity of electromagnetic fields may accrue due to the overlapping of sources of hazard in a specific area. GIS technologies may be employed to identify the boundaries of exposure to the sources of hazard in particular areas. The authors have also considered the pattern of distribution and influence of electromagnetic fields in the urban environment; in particular, the authors have analyzed the influence produced on the health of local residents by industrial electromagnetic fields. The authors also provide findings of the ecological monitoring performed in the extensive territory of the M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University.

  13. Postgraduate internal medicine residents' roles at patient discharge - do their perceived roles and perceptions by other health care providers correlate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Card, Sharon Elizabeth; Ward, Heather A; Chipperfield, Dylan; Sheppard, M Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Knowing one's own role is a key collaboration competency for postgraduate trainees in the Canadian competency framework (CanMEDS®). To explore methods to teach collaborative competency to internal medicine postgraduate trainees, baseline role knowledge of the trainees was explored. The perceptions of roles (self and others) at patient discharge from an acute care internal medicine teaching unit amongst 69 participants, 34 physicians (25 internal medicine postgraduate trainees and 9 faculty physicians) and 35 health care professionals from different professions were assessed using an adapted previously validated survey (Jenkins et al., 2001). Internal medicine postgraduate trainees agreed on 8/13 (62%) discharge roles, but for 5/13 (38%), there was a substantial disagreement. Other professions had similar lack of clarity about the postgraduate internal medicine residents' roles at discharge. The lack of interprofessional and intraprofessional clarity about roles needs to be explored to develop methods to enhance collaborative competence in internal medicine postgraduate trainees.

  14. Assessment of exposure to heavy metals and health risks among residents near Tonglushan mine in Hubei, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Li-Mei; Xu, Zhen-Cheng; Qi, Jian-Ying; Feng, Zhi-Zhou; Xiang, Ting-Sheng

    2015-05-01

    Heavy metal contamination due to mining activity is a global major concern because of its potential health risks to local inhabitants. In the present study, we investigated the levels of Cd, Cu, Pb and As in soil, crop, well water and fish samples collected from the vicinity of the Tonglushan mine in Hubei, China, and evaluated potential health risks among local residents. Results indicate that soils near the mine were heavily contaminated with Cd (2.59 mg kg(-1)), Cu (386 mg kg(-1)), Pb (120 mg kg(-1)) and As (35.4 mg kg(-1)), and exceeded the soil quality standard values of Cd and Cu contamination. The concentrations of Cd, Cu, Pb and As in crop samples grown in mine-affected soils were significantly higher than those of the reference soils. The concentrations of Cd and As in most vegetables grown in mine-affected soils exceeded the maximum allowable level (MAL). The Cd, Pb and As concentration in rice grain collected from mine-affected soils were 2.95, 1.85 and 2.07-fold higher than the MAL, respectively. The concentrations of Cd and As in fish muscle from the mine-affected area were above national MAL in 61% and 34% of analyzed samples, respectively. All measured heavy metals except Pb were significantly greater in well water in the mine-affected area than those in the reference areas. The average estimated daily intakes of Cd and As were beyond the provisional tolerable daily intake, respectively. The intake of rice was identified as a major contributor (⩾72%) to the estimated daily intake among the residents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Financial Hardship and Self-Rated Health among Low-Income Housing Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker-Seeley, Reginald D.; Harley, Amy E.; Stoddard, Anne M.; Sorensen, Glorian G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Self-rated health (SRH) has been shown to be predictive of morbidity and mortality. Evidence also shows that SRH is socioeconomically patterned, although this association differs depending on the indicator of socioeconomic status used. The purpose of this study was to determine the association between SRH and financial hardship among…

  16. Barriers and facilitators in providing oral health care to nursing home residents, from the perspective of care aides-a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoben, Matthias; Hu, Huimin; Xiong, Tianyuan; Kent, Angelle; Kobagi, Nadia; Yoon, Minn N

    2016-04-07

    Unregulated care aides provide up to 80 % of direct resident care in nursing homes. They have little formal training, manage high workloads, frequently experience responsive behaviours from residents, and are at high risk for burnout. This affects quality of resident care, including quality of oral health care. Poor quality of oral health care in nursing homes has severe consequences for residents and the health care system. Improving quality of oral health care requires tailoring interventions to identified barriers and facilitators if these interventions are to be effective. Identifying barriers and facilitators from the care aide's perspective is crucial. We will systematically search the databases MEDLINE, Embase, Evidence Based Reviews-Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CINAHL, and Web of Science. We will include qualitative and quantitative research studies and systematic reviews published in English that assess barriers and facilitators, as perceived by care aides, to providing oral health care to nursing home residents. Two reviewers will independently screen studies for eligibility. We will also search by hand the contents of key journals, publications of key authors, and reference lists of all the studies included. Two reviewers will independently assess the methodological quality of the studies included using four validated checklists appropriate for different research designs. Discrepancies at any stage of review will be resolved by consensus. We will conduct a thematic analysis of barriers and facilitators using all studies included. If quantitative studies are sufficiently homogeneous, we will conduct random-effects meta-analyses of the associations of barriers and facilitators with each other, with care aide practices in resident oral health care, and with residents' oral health. If quantitative study results cannot be pooled, we will present a narrative synthesis of the results. Finally, we will compare quantitative findings to

  17. A European union and Canadian review of public health nursing preparation and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemingway, Ann; Aarts, Clara; Koskinen, Liisa; Campbell, Barbara; Chassé, France

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the preparation and role of the public health nurse (PHN) across European Union (EU) countries (Finland, Sweden, and the United Kingdom) and Canadian provinces (Alberta, New Brunswick, and Prince Edward Island). A literature review including relevant peer reviewed articles from 2000 on, in conjunction, with critical debate was undertaken. The results were considered in relation to the three essential areas of PHN practice, outlined in the World Health Organization (Moving on from Munich: A reference guide to the implementation of the declaration on nurses and midwives: A force for health, 2001b) recommendations, family oriented care, public health action, and policy making. The major challenge the review revealed across a variety of international education and practice environments was the lack of consistent preparation for and engagement with leadership and policy making in practice. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Exploring the Relationship between Health Insurance, Social Connectedness, and Subjective Social Status among Residents of O'ahu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Lisa M; Murray, Kate A; Jarvis, Sarah; Scarr, Ellen

    2016-11-01

    Relative position in a social hierarchy, or subjective social status, has been associated with indicators of socioeconomic status and may be influenced by social connectedness. The primary purpose of this study is to explore the relationship between health insurance status and subjective social status, using the MacArthur Scale of Subjective Social Status (SSS, community version), in the state of Hawai'i with its highly insured population. The secondary purpose is to examine other social determinants that influence social status, including social connectedness. Data were drawn from a convenience sample of 728 O'ahu residents in 2011-12. Social connectedness was measured if participants stated that family, friends, or community were strengths that could address their social and health concerns. In the final adjusted linear regression model, those with Medicaid/Quest insurance (β -0.40; Pstrong community and family ties as one of Hawai'i's greatest strengths. However, these strengths were not found to be statistically associated with subjective social status in our sample. Future studies should assess whether reinforcing social connectedness through public health and educational interventions improves subjective social status among low-income and ethnically diverse communities in Hawai'i.

  19. Does where you live matter to your health? Investigating factors that influence the self-rated health of urban and rural Chinese residents: evidence drawn from Chinese General Social Survey data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongsheng; Liu, Ye; Zhu, Zhenjun; Li, Zhigang

    2017-04-21

    China's rapid urbanization over the past decades has exacerbated the problems of environmental degradation and health disparities. However, few studies have analysed the differences between urban and rural residents in relation to how environmental quality impacts health outcomes. This study examines the associations between Chinese people's perceptions of environmental quality and their self-rated health, particularly focusing on differences between rural and urban residents in environment-health relationships. Using a logistic regression model and data from the 2013 Chinese General Social Survey (CGSS), a representative sample of data for 3,402 urban residents (46 ± 16 years) and 2,439 rural residents (48 ± 15 years) was analysed. The dependent variable used for the logistic regressions was whether or not respondents reported being healthy. Independent variables included respondents' evaluations of the living environment, and how frequently they participated in physical activities. Interaction terms were employed to measure the moderating effects of physical exercise on the relationship between perceived environmental quality and health. The percentage of healthy urban residents was significantly larger than that of healthy rural respondents (70.87% versus 62.87%). Urban respondents living in areas with sufficient green space were more likely to report good health (OR = 0.749, CI = [0.628, 0.895]), while rural respondents without reliable access to fresh water were more likely to report poor health (OR = 0.762, CI = [0.612, 0.949]). Urban respondents who were exposed to green spaces and exercised frequently were 21.6 per cent more likely to report good health than those who exercised infrequently (OR = 1.216, CI = [1.047, 1.413]). Those who lived in areas with insufficient green space and exercised frequently were 19.1 per cent less likely to report good health than those who exercised infrequently (OR = 0.805, CI = [0

  20. Challenges of preparing allied health professionals for interdisciplinary practice in rural areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fertman, Carl I; Dotson, Suzanna; Mazzocco, Gail O; Reitz, S Maggie

    2005-01-01

    Meeting the health needs of individuals in rural communities involves addressing the challenges of complex multifaceted health problems, limited local health resources and services, isolation, and distance. Interdisciplinary collaboration can create solutions to health care problems that transcend conventional, discipline-specific methods, procedures, and techniques. This paper reports on the four-pronged approach of the Western Maryland Area Health Education Center used to prepare allied health students to be interdisciplinary team members in rural areas. It describes the development of four interdisciplinary instructional team member training venues (in-class instruction, Web-based modules, service-learning programs, and faculty development workshops) that integrate opportunities to develop and practice interdisciplinary health promotion skills in rural communities. Challenges to implementing the model are described, including developing faculty and student training participation, integrating training venues into existing programs at participating institutions, and designing a unified program evaluation.

  1. Social Relations and Resident Health in Assisted Living: An Application of the Convoy Model

    OpenAIRE

    Perkins, Molly M.; Ball, Mary M.; Kemp, Candace L.; Hollingsworth, Carole

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This article, based on analysis of data from a mixed methods study, builds on a growing body of assisted living (AL) research focusing on the link between residents’ social relationships and health. A key aim of this analysis, which uses the social convoy model as a conceptual and methodological framework, was to examine the relative importance of coresident relationships and other network ties to residents’ subjective well-being. Design and Methods: We analyzed data from structured ...

  2. Work-related health problems among resident immigrant workers in Italy and Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Rosano

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Background: in both Spain and Italy the number of immigrants has strongly increased in the last 20 years, currently representing more than the 10% of workforce in each country. The segregation of immigrants into unskilled or risky jobs brings negative consequences for their health. The objective of this study is to compare prevalence of work-related health problems between immigrants and native workers in Italy and Spain.

    Methods: data come from the Italian Labour Force Survey (n=65 779 and Spanish Working Conditions Survey (n=11 019, both conducted in 2007. We analyzed merged datasets to evaluate whether interviewees, both natives and migrants, judge their health being affected by their work conditions and, if so, which specific diseases. For migrants, we considered those coming from countries with a value of the Human Development Index lower than 0.85. Logistic regression models were used, including gender, age, and education as adjusting factors.

    Results: migrants reported skin diseases (Mantel-Haenszel pooled OR=1.49; 95%CI: 0.59-3.74 and musculoskeletal problems among those employed in agricultural sector (Mantel-Haenszel pooled OR=1.16; 95%CI: 0.69-1.96 more frequently than natives; country-specific analysis showed higher risks of musculoskeletal problems among migrants compared to the non-migrant population in Italy (OR=1.17; 95% CI: 0.48-1.59 and of respiratory problems in Spain (OR=2.02; 95%CI: 1.02-4.0. In both countries the risk of psychological stress was predominant among national workers.

    Conclusions: this collaborative study allows to strength the evidence concerning the health of migrant workers in Southern European countries.

  3. African American Women's Preparation for Childbirth From the Perspective of African American Health-Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbyad, Christine; Robertson, Trina Reed

    2011-01-01

    Preparation for birthing has focused primarily on Caucasian women. No studies have explored African American women's birth preparation. From the perceptions of 12 African American maternity health-care providers, this study elicited perceptions of the ways in which pregnant African American women prepare for childbirth. Focus group participants answered seven semistructured questions. Four themes emerged: connecting with nurturers, traversing an unresponsive system, the need to be strong, and childbirth classes not a priority. Recommendations for nurses and childbirth educators include: (a) self-awareness of attitudes toward African Americans, (b) empowering of clients for birthing, (c) recognition of the role that pregnant women's mothers play, (d) tailoring of childbirth classes for African American women, and (e) research on how racism influences pregnant African American women's preparation for birthing.

  4. Lifetime segmented assimilation trajectories and health outcomes in Latino and other community residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Felipe González; Marsiglia, Flavio F; Kulis, Stephen; Kellison, Joshua G

    2010-04-01

    Under an ecodevelopmental framework, we examined lifetime segmented assimilation trajectories (diverging assimilation pathways influenced by prior life conditions) and related them to quality-of-life indicators in a diverse sample of 258 men in the Phoenix, AZ, metropolitan area. We used a growth mixture model analysis of lifetime changes in socioeconomic status, and used acculturation to identify distinct lifetime segmented assimilation trajectory groups, which we compared on life satisfaction, exercise, and dietary behaviors. We hypothesized that lifetime assimilation change toward mainstream American culture (upward assimilation) would be associated with favorable health outcomes, and downward assimilation change with unfavorable health outcomes. A growth mixture model latent class analysis identified 4 distinct assimilation trajectory groups. In partial support of the study hypotheses, the extreme upward assimilation trajectory group (the most successful of the assimilation pathways) exhibited the highest life satisfaction and the lowest frequency of unhealthy food consumption. Upward segmented assimilation is associated in adulthood with certain positive health outcomes. This may be the first study to model upward and downward lifetime segmented assimilation trajectories, and to associate these with life satisfaction, exercise, and dietary behaviors.

  5. Health risk to residents and stimulation to inherent bacteria of various heavy metals in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Juan; Wang, Li-Hong; Yang, Jun-Cheng; Liu, Hui; Dai, Jiu-Lan

    2015-03-01

    The toxicities and effects of various metals and metalloids would be misunderstood by health risks based on their concentrations, when their effects on bacterial and ecological functions in soil are disregarded. This study investigated the concentrations and health risks of heavy metals, soil properties, and bacterial 16S rRNA gene in soil around the largest fresh water lake in North China. The health risks posed by Mn and As were higher than those of other heavy metals and metalloids. Mn, As, and C were significantly correlated with the bacterial species richness indices. According to canonical correspondence analysis, species richness was mainly affected by Mn, Pb, As, and organic matter, while species evenness was mainly affected by Mn, pH, N, C, Cd, and Pb. Covariable analysis confirmed that most effects of metals on bacterial diversity were attributed to the combined effects of metals and soil properties rather than single metals. Most bacteria detected in (almost) all soil were identified as Gammaproteobacteria. Specific bacteria belonging to Proteobacteria (Gamma, Alpha, Epsilon, and Beta), Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Cyanobacterium, Nitrospirae, and Fusobacterium were only identified in soil with high concentrations of Mn, Pb, and As, indicating their remediation potency. Bacterial abilities and mechanisms in pollutant resistance and element cycling in the region were also discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Pediatric residents' knowledge, perceptions, and attitudes towards homosexually oriented youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lena, Suji M; Wiebe, Tannis; Ingram, Sara; Jabbour, Mona

    2002-10-01

    Pediatric residents must have clinical exposure and specific training to meet the health-care needs of gay, lesbian, and bisexual adolescents. Homosexually oriented youths have medical and psychosocial needs that these future pediatricians must fulfil. This study investigated the knowledge and attitudes of pediatric residents in the management of gay, lesbian, and bisexual youth and related health-care issues. Twenty-nine pediatric residents at the University of Ottawa were sent a survey questionnaire. Many respondents indicated that they experience difficulties in discussing issues of sexual orientation, and feel inadequately prepared to address the health-care needs of homosexual youth. Furthermore, respondents showed a lack of awareness regarding resources available to gay, lesbian, and bisexual youth in the community. While knowledge is limited, residents' attitudes towards homosexual youth are generally positive. Also, most respondents indicate an interest in continuing education, and in gaining more information to better serve their homosexually oriented adolescent patients.

  7. Saúde do idoso: residência multiprofissional como instrumento transformador do cuidado = Health of the elderly: multidisciplinary residence as an instrument for the care improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerlack, Letícia Farias

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Relatar as ações realizadas pela equipe Saúde do Idoso do Programa de Residência Multiprofissional em Saúde (PREMUS/PUCRS. Descrição da experiência: Na atenção básica, os residentes participaram na assistência domiciliar, ambulatorial e desenvolveram ações de educação popular em saúde em um grupo de idosos. A equipe também atuou em um hospital universitário, prestando assistência nos âmbitos ambulatorial e unidades de internação. Conclusão: O Programa de Residência Multiprofissional em Saúde, com ênfase na saúde do idoso, proporcionou aos residentes uma dinâmica assistencial fundamentada nos conceitos da interdisciplinaridade, integralidade e humanização do cuidado, tal como orientado pelas diretrizes do Sistema Único de Saúde (SUS

  8. Home-based preparation approaches altered the availability of health beneficial components from carrots and blueberries

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study investigated the effects of different home food preparation methods on the availability of the total phenolic contents (TPC) and radical scavenging components, as well as the selected health beneficial compounds from fresh blueberries and carrots. High performance liquid chromatography (...

  9. A Systematic Review of Public Health-Aligned Recommendations for Preparing Physical Education Teacher Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Collin A.; Webster, Liana; Russ, Laura; Molina, Sergio; Lee, Heesu; Cribbs, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Since Sallis and McKenzie's seminal article in 1991 outlining physical education's role in public health, increased attention has been given to promoting youth physical activity in schools. The present study systematically reviewed the literature from 1991 to 2013 to identify recommendations for the preparation of physical…

  10. Five Key Leadership Actions Needed to Redesign Family Medicine Residencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozakowski, Stanley M; Eiff, M Patrice; Green, Larry A; Pugno, Perry A; Waller, Elaine; Jones, Samuel M; Fetter, Gerald; Carney, Patricia A

    2015-06-01

    New skills are needed to properly prepare the next generation of physicians and health professionals to practice in medical homes. Transforming residency training to address these new skills requires strong leadership. We sought to increase the understanding of leadership skills useful in residency programs that plan to undertake meaningful change. The Preparing the Personal Physician for Practice (P4) project (2007-2014) was a comparative case study of 14 family medicine residencies that engaged in innovative training redesign, including altering the scope, content, sequence, length, and location of training to align resident education with requirements of the patient-centered medical home. In 2012, each P4 residency team submitted a final summary report of innovations implemented, overall insights, and dissemination activities during the study. Six investigators conducted independent narrative analyses of these reports. A consensus meeting held in September 2012 was used to identify key leadership actions associated with successful educational redesign. Five leadership actions were associated with successful implementation of innovations and residency transformation: (1) manage change; (2) develop financial acumen; (3) adapt best evidence educational strategies to the local environment; (4) create and sustain a vision that engages stakeholders; and (5) demonstrate courage and resilience. Residency programs are expected to change to better prepare their graduates for a changing delivery system. Insights about effective leadership skills can provide guidance for faculty to develop the skills needed to face practical realities while guiding transformation.

  11. Assessment of differences in psychosocial resources and state of health of rural and urban residents – based on studies carried out on students during examination stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danuta Zarzycka

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available [b]introduction[/b]. Civilization changes of the environment shaping the psychosocial resources from rural to urban influence human health. [b]aim.[/b] The study aimed to identify the differences due to the place of residence (rural, urban as far as health resources are concerned (social support, sense of coherence, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate concentration in plasma and health in examination stress situations. The study also determined the concentration of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (health resource and cortisol (stress indicator. [b]material and methods.[/b] The psychosocial variables were assessed using the scales: ISEL-48v. Coll., SOC-29, SF-36v.2™ o and analogue scale (perception of examination stress. The study included, based on a stratified sampling (year of study and purposive sampling (written examination, major, 731 students representing the six universities in Lublin, south-east Poland. Among the respondents, 130 students were rural residents. [b]results.[/b] Health resources of students living in rural and urban areas generally differ statistically significantly in social support and the subscales of availability of tangible support, availability of appreciative support, the availability of cognitive-evaluative support and a sense of resourcefulness. The study recorded a sstatistically significantly larger network of family ties among students living in rural areas. The demonstrated diversity of resources did not substantially affect the perceived health, with the exception of pain sensation. Examination stress assessed by subjective opinion of the respondents and plasma cortisol levels vary relative to the place of residence. Students residing in rural areas showed significantly lower cortisol levels values, but subjectively perceived the situation of examation as more stressful. [b]conclusions[/b]. Differences in health resources and their mechanism of impact on health, to a limited extent, were conditioned by the place

  12. Characterization of urinary cotinine in non-smoking residents in smoke-free homes in the Korean National Environmental Health Survey (KoNEHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeonghoon Kim

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objectives of this study were to determine urinary cotinine concentrations in non-smoking residents of smoke-free homes and to establish the relationship of urinary cotinine with housing type and other socio-demographic and secondhand smoke (SHS exposure factors. Methods We used data from the Korean National Environmental Health Survey I (2009–2011. The study included 814 non-smoking adult residents living in apartments, attached, and detached housing. Residents who lived with smokers were excluded. Urinary cotinine concentration was used as a biomarker for SHS exposure. The factors associated with urinary cotinine levels in non-smoking residents were determined using multivariate regression analysis. Results Urinary cotinine was detected in 88 % of the 814 non-smoking residents of smoke-free homes. The urinary cotinine concentrations of residents living in attached [1.18 ng/mg creatinine (Cr] and detached housing (1.23 ng/mg Cr were significantly higher than those of residents who lived in apartments (0.69 ng/mg Cr. Urinary cotinine concentrations were significantly higher in residents who were men, those with a household income ≤1000 USD/month, those who were former smokers with >1 year and ≤1 year of not smoking, and those who experienced SHS odor every day. In the multivariate regression analysis, housing type, sex, former smoking status, and frequency of experiencing SHS odor were associated with urinary cotinine concentrations (R 2 = 0.14. Conclusions The majority of non-smoking residents of smoke-free homes had detectable urinary cotinine. Housing type, sex, former smoking status, and frequency of experiencing SHS odor were predictors for urinary cotinine concentrations in the study participants.

  13. Self rating of health is associated with stressful life events, social support and residency in East and West Berlin shortly after the fall of the wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillen, T; Schaub, R; Hiestermann, A; Kirschner, W; Robra, B P

    2000-08-01

    To compare the health status and factors influencing the health of populations that had previously lived under different political systems. Cross sectional health and social survey using postal interviews. The relation between self reported health and psychosocial factors (stressful life events, social support, education, health promoting life style and health endangering behaviour) was investigated. To determine East-West differences a logistic regression model including interaction terms was fitted. East and West Berlin shortly after reunification 1991. Representative sample of 4430 Berlin residents aged 18 years and over (response rate 63%). Of all respondents, 15.4% rated their health as unsatisfactory. Residents of East Berlin rated their health more frequently as unsatisfactory than residents of West Berlin (Or(age adjusted)= 1.29, 95%CI 1.08, 1.52), these differences occurred predominantly in the over 60 years age group. Logistic regression showed significant independent effects of stressful life events, social support, education, and health promoting life style on self rated health. The effects of education and health promoting life style were observed to be more pronounced in the western part of Berlin. Old age and female sex showed a stronger association with unsatisfactory health status in the eastern part of Berlin. For subjects aged over 60 years there was evidence that living in the former East Berlin had an adverse effect on health compared with West Berlin. The impact of education and a health promoting lifestyle on self rated health seemed to be weaker in a former socialist society compared with that of a Western democracy. This study supports an "additive model" rather than a "buffering model" in explaining the effects of psychosocial factors on health.

  14. Length of Residence in the United States is Associated With a Higher Prevalence of Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Immigrants: A Contemporary Analysis of the National Health Interview Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commodore-Mensah, Yvonne; Ukonu, Nwakaego; Obisesan, Olawunmi; Aboagye, Jonathan Kumi; Agyemang, Charles; Reilly, Carolyn M; Dunbar, Sandra B; Okosun, Ike S

    2016-11-04

    Cardiometabolic risk (CMR) factors including hypertension, overweight/obesity, diabetes mellitus, and hyperlipidemia are high among United States ethnic minorities, and the immigrant population continues to burgeon. Hypothesizing that acculturation (length of residence) would be associated with a higher prevalence of CMR factors, the authors analyzed data on 54, 984 US immigrants in the 2010-2014 National Health Interview Surveys. The main predictor was length of residence. The outcomes were hypertension, overweight/obesity, diabetes mellitus, and hyperlipidemia. The authors used multivariable logistic regression to examine the association between length of US residence and these CMR factors.The mean (SE) age of the patients was 43 (0.12) years and half were women. Participants residing in the United States for ≥10 years were more likely to have health insurance than those with diabetic (OR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.17-1.73), and hypertensive (OR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.05-1.32) than those residing in the United States for acculturation was associated with CMR factors. Culturally tailored public health strategies should be developed in US immigrant populations to reduce CMR. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  15. Minimum Data Set Active Resident Information Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The MDS Active Resident Report summarizes information for residents currently in nursing homes. The source of these counts is the residents MDS assessment record....

  16. The social stratification of older adults' preparations for end-of-life health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Deborah

    2012-09-01

    I use data from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study (n = 4,971) to evaluate the extent to which socioeconomic status affects three health-related (living will, durable power of attorney for health care, and discussions) and one financial (will) component of end-of-life planning. Net worth is positively associated with all four types of planning, after demographic, health, and psychological characteristics are controlled. Low rates of health-related planning among persons with low or negative assets are largely accounted for by the fact that they are less likely to execute a will, an action that triggers health-related preparations. Rates of health-related planning alone are higher among recently hospitalized persons, whereas financial planning only is more commonly done by homeowners and those with richer assets. The results suggest that economically advantaged persons engage in end-of-life planning as a two-pronged strategy entailing financial and health-related preparations. Implications for health policy, practice, and theory are discussed.

  17. Does the care dependency of nursing home residents influence their health-related quality of life?-A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabali, Manuela; Ostermann, Thomas; Jeschke, Elke; Dassen, Theo; Heinze, Cornelia

    2013-03-11

    Studies on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) are missing for nursing home residents independent from their health conditions or interventions after admission. Our aim was to analyse if the care dependency of nursing home residents influence their HRQOL and to describe HRQOL of nursing home residents at the time of admission. Eleven German nursing homes were randomly selected for a cross-sectional multicentre study from April 2008 until December 2009. HRQOL was measured with the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) in the six domains "Physical Mobility", "Energy", "Pain", "Social Isolation", "Emotional Reaction" and "Sleep". Domain scores range from zero (good subjective health status) to 100 (poor subjective health status). Care dependency was evaluated using the Care Dependency Scale, age, sex, cognitive status and diseases were documented by the research assistants. Multivariate regression analysis was performed to quantify the influence of care dependency on HRQOL. 120 residents were included in total. HRQOL was mostly reduced in the domains "Physical Mobility" and "Energy" (mean scores >43.0), while impairment differences in the domains "Pain", "Social Isolation", "Emotional Reaction" and "Sleep" were only moderate (≤25.0). HRQOL was not influenced by the age. Women (n = 85) had a significantly poorer HRQOL in the domain "Pain" than men (mean score women: 29.5 ± 31.5; males: 14.9 ± 17.2; p = 0.011). Care dependency had an influence on the domain "Sleep" (ß = -0.195, p = 0.031), while the other domains were not influenced by care dependency. Residents with a low care dependency scored significantly lower (better HRQOL) in the domain "Sleep" than residents with a high care dependency (mean score 15.3; SD ± 19.0 versus mean score 32.8 SD ± 33.2; p dependency has no influence on the HRQOL from the nursing home residents' perspective apart from the domain "Sleep". High care dependency residents have a lower HRQOL in the

  18. Cross-border purchase of medications and health care in a sample of residents of El Paso, Texas, and Ciudad Juarez, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, José O; Ortiz, Melchor; Cardenas, Victor

    2009-02-01

    We examined data from a US-Mexico bi-national survey conducted among adult residents of El Paso, Texas, and Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, to assess frequency of purchase of medications and use of health care services across the border. We analyzed questionnaire data from face-to-face interviews of 1000 randomly selected adults on both sides of the border to assess prevalence and prevalence ratios using log binomial logistic regression analysis. One-third of adult residents of El Paso and 5% of those in Ciudad Juarez reported crossing the border to purchase medications (P < .001). Lack of health insurance in the United States was associated with crossing the border to purchase medications. Nine percent and 7% of US residents traveled to Mexico seeking dental and medical care, respectively. Mexican nationals traveling to the United States to purchase medications or health care services were more likely to be uninsured and more-educated men. US residents of areas along the border in close proximity to Mexico often travel south to purchase medications. Other health care services are also utilized, although at lower rates. These patterns may be attributed to a number of barriers to health care in the United States.

  19. Periodontal health status among permanent residents of low, optimum and high fluoride areas in Kolar District, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megalamanegowdru, Jayachandra; Ankola, Anil V; Vathar, Jagadishchandra; Vishwakarma, Prashanthkumar; Dhanappa, Kirankumar B; Balappanavar, Aswini Y

    2012-01-01

    To assess and compare the periodontal health status among permanent residents of low, optimum and high fluoride areas in Kolar District, India. A house-to-house survey was conducted in a population consisting of 925 permanent residents aged 35 to 44 years in three villages having different levels of fluoride concentrations in the drinking water. The fluoride concentrations in selected villages were 0.48 ppm (low), 1.03 ppm (optimum) and 3.21 ppm (high). The ion selective electrode method was used to estimate the fluoride concentration in the drinking water. Periodontal status was assessed using the Community Periodontal Index (CPI) and loss of attachment (LOA). Results were analysed using the chi-square test and logistic regression. The chi-square test was used to find the group differences and logistic regression to find association between the variables. The overall prevalence of periodontitis was 72.9%; specifically, prevalences were 95.4%, 76.3% and 45.7% in low, optimum and high fluoride areas, respectively. The number of sextants with shallow or deep pockets decreased (shallow pockets: 525, 438, 217; deep pockets: 183, 81, 34) from low to high fluoride areas (odds ratio: 71.3). The low fluoride area had a 7.9-fold higher risk of periodontitis than the optimum fluoride area and a 30-fold higher risk than the high fluoride area, which was highly significant (χ2 = 53.5, P periodontal disease is inversely associated with the fluoride concentrations in drinking water. This relation can provide an approach to fluoride treatments to reduce the prevalence or incidence of this disease.

  20. Contamination of the Conchos River in Mexico: Does It Pose a Health Risk to Local Residents?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector Rubio-Arias

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Presently, water contamination issues are of great concern worldwide. Mexico has not escaped this environmental problem, which negatively affects aquifers, water bodies and biodiversity; but most of all, public health. The objective was to determine the level of water contamination in six tributaries of the Conchos River and to relate their levels to human health risks. Bimonthly samples were obtained from each location during 2005 and 2006. Physical-chemical variables (temperature, pH, electrical conductivity (EC, Total solids and total nitrogen as well as heavy metals (As, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, V, Zn, and Li were determined. The statistical analysis considered yearly, monthly, and location effects, and their interactions. Temperatures differed only as a function of the sampling month (P < 0.001 and the pH was different for years (P = 0.006, months (P < 0.001 and the interaction years x months (P = 0.018. The EC was different for each location (P < 0.001, total solids did not change and total nitrogen was different for years (P < 0.001, months (P < 0.001 and the interaction years x months (P < 0.001. The As concentration was different for months (P = 0.008 and the highest concentration was detected in February samples with 0.11 mg L-1. The Cr was different for months (P < 0.001 and the interaction years x months (P < 0.001, noting the highest value of 0.25 mg L-1. The Cu, Fe, Mn, Va and Zn were different for years, months, and their interaction. The highest value of Cu was 2.50 mg L-1; forFe, it was 16.36 mg L-1; forMn it was 1.66 mg L-1; V was 0.55 mg L-1; and Zn was 0.53 mg L-1. For Ni, there were differences for years (P = 0.030, months (P < 0.001, and locations (P = 0.050, with the highest Ni value being 0.47 mg L-1. The Li level was the same for sampling month (P < 0.001. This information can help prevent potential health risks in the communities established along the river watershed who use this natural resource for swimming and fishing

  1. Preparation of European Public Health Professionals in the Twenty-first Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjegovic-Mikanovic, Vesna; Otok, Robert

    2017-01-01

    The public health profession in Europe has a leadership role for ensuring European's health in the twenty-first century and therefore must assume responsibility for advancing education for research and practice. Three fundamental questions are explored: (1) What are the main public health problems facing public health professionals; (2) What are their existing competencies after training; and (3) What competencies do European employers expect? The European Schools of Public Health assessed their best success to be in the field of health promotion, followed by disease prevention including identification of priority health problems, and elimination of health hazards in the community. Conversely, they see the least success in dealing with preparedness and planning for public health emergencies. From an employer's perspective, significant gaps between current and desired levels of performance at the job exist for all Essential Public Health Operations of World Health Organization. Based on prior research and recent European surveys of Schools and Departments of Public Health, the following recommendations are made, which emphasize the leadership role of the European public health community: (1) the preparation of public health professionals requires an interface between public health functions, competencies, and performance; (2) competence-based education is important and allows debates on the scope of the required education; (3) governments have to realize that the present lack of infrastructure and capacity is detrimental to the people's health; (4) as public health challenges are increasingly global, educational institutions have to look beyond the national boundaries and participate in European and global networks for education, research, and practice.

  2. Indoor air quality, ventilation and respiratory health in elderly residents living in nursing homes in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentayeb, Malek; Norback, Dan; Bednarek, Micha

    2015-01-01

    cough. Elderly subjects aged ≥80 years were at higher risk. Pollutant effects were more pronounced in the case of poor ventilation. Even at low levels, indoor air quality affected respiratory health in elderly people permanently living in nursing homes, with frailty increasing with age. The effects were......Few data exist on respiratory effects of indoor air quality and comfort parameters in the elderly. In the context of the GERIE study, we investigated for the first time the relationships of these factors to respiratory morbidity among elderly people permanently living in nursing homes in seven...... European countries. 600 elderly people from 50 nursing homes underwent a medical examination and completed a standardised questionnaire. Air quality and comfort parameters were objectively assessed in situ in the nursing home. Mean concentrations of air pollutants did not exceed the existing standards...

  3. Preparing currently employed public health nurses for changes in the health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebbie, K M; Hwang, I

    2000-05-01

    This article describes a core public health nursing curriculum, part of a larger project designed to identify the skills needed by practicing public health workers if they are to successfully fill roles in the current and emerging public health system. Two focus groups of key informants, representing state and local public health nursing practice, public health nursing education, organizations interested in public health and nursing education, federal agencies, and academia, synthesized material from multiple sources and outlined the key content for a continuing education curriculum appropriate to the current public health nursing workforce. The skills identified as most needed were those required for analyzing data, practicing epidemiology, measuring health status and organizational change, connecting people to organizations, bringing about change in organizations, building strength in diversity, conducting population-based intervention, building coalitions, strengthening environmental health, developing interdisciplinary teams, developing and advocating policy, evaluating programs, and devising approaches to quality improvement. Collaboration between public health nursing practice and education and partnerships with other public health agencies will be essential for public health nurses to achieve the required skills to enhance public health infrastructure.

  4. Health symptoms in residents living near shale gas activity: A retrospective record review from the Environmental Health Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberger, Beth; Greiner, Lydia H; Walleigh, Leslie; Brown, David

    2017-12-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrates an association between health symptoms and exposure to unconventional natural gas development (UNGD). The purpose of this study is to describe the health of adults in communities with intense UNGD who presented for evaluation of symptoms. Records of 135 structured health assessments conducted between February 2012 and October 2015 were reviewed retrospectively. Publicly available data were used to determine proximity to gas wells. Analysis was restricted to records of adults who lived within 1 km of a well in Pennsylvania and denied employment in the gas industry (n = 51). Symptoms in each record were reviewed by a physician. Symptoms that could be explained by pre-existing or concurrent conditions or social history and those that began or worsened prior to exposure were excluded. Exposure was calculated using date of well drilling within 1 km. The number of symptoms/participant ranged from 0 to 19 (mean = 6.2; SD = 5.1). Symptoms most commonly reported were: sleep disruption, headache, throat irritation, stress or anxiety, cough, shortness of breath, sinus problems, fatigue, nausea, and wheezing. These results are consistent with findings of prior studies using self-report without physician review. In comparison, our results are strengthened by the collection of health data by a health care provider, critical review of symptoms for possible alternative causes, and confirmation of timing of exposure to unconventional natural gas well relative to symptom onset or exacerbation. Our findings confirm earlier studies and add to the growing body of evidence of the association between symptoms and exposure to UNGD.

  5. Health symptoms in residents living near shale gas activity: A retrospective record review from the Environmental Health Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth Weinberger

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence demonstrates an association between health symptoms and exposure to unconventional natural gas development (UNGD. The purpose of this study is to describe the health of adults in communities with intense UNGD who presented for evaluation of symptoms. Records of 135 structured health assessments conducted between February 2012 and October 2015 were reviewed retrospectively. Publicly available data were used to determine proximity to gas wells. Analysis was restricted to records of adults who lived within 1 km of a well in Pennsylvania and denied employment in the gas industry (n = 51. Symptoms in each record were reviewed by a physician. Symptoms that could be explained by pre-existing or concurrent conditions or social history and those that began or worsened prior to exposure were excluded. Exposure was calculated using date of well drilling within 1 km. The number of symptoms/participant ranged from 0 to 19 (mean = 6.2; SD = 5.1. Symptoms most commonly reported were: sleep disruption, headache, throat irritation, stress or anxiety, cough, shortness of breath, sinus problems, fatigue, nausea, and wheezing. These results are consistent with findings of prior studies using self-report without physician review. In comparison, our results are strengthened by the collection of health data by a health care provider, critical review of symptoms for possible alternative causes, and confirmation of timing of exposure to unconventional natural gas well relative to symptom onset or exacerbation. Our findings confirm earlier studies and add to the growing body of evidence of the association between symptoms and exposure to UNGD.

  6. Pre-conception preparation at the antiphospholipid syndrome as way to improve reproductive health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulyash Tanysheva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Reproductive health is characterized by the condition of the woman in association with the course of pregnancy and childbirth. In this case, the absence of disease plays a fundamental role. Unfortunately, conditions that can negatively impact reproductive health and cause deterioration of pregnancy and delivery outcomes are frequent in women of reproductive age. Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS is one of the leading conditions that can negatively affect reproductive health and lead to various complications in pregnancy including fetal loss. Materials and methods: We assessed the effectiveness of pre-conception preparing, including traditional therapy of APS in conjunction with system enzyme therapy (SET and plasmapheresis sessions. We conducted a study in two groups: women with APS and pre-conception preparing (n = 49 and the control group were women without pre-conception preparing (n = 46. Results: The effect of pre-conception preparing in women with APS was assessed by the course and outcome of pregnancy. The total number of women with complications of pregnancy were 39.1% lower in the study group compared to the control group. Risk of miscarriage in the basic group observed 68.7 % less frequently compared to the  control group. The frequency of pre-eclampsia was 63.5 % less in the study group compared to the control group. We observed significantly lower rates of placental insufficiency in the study group and the difference in this parameter reached 65.2%. The risk of pre-term birth was 59.4 % lower in the study group compared to the control group. Conclusion: We concluded that pre-conception preparing in women with APS increases the possibility of physiological course pregnancy. Pre-conception preparing reduces the incidence of miscarriage, pre-term labor, and the development of pre-eclampsia, and placental insufficiency.

  7. [Subjective theories on quality of life and health in old age : An explorative study with nursing home residents and their nursing personnel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kada, Olivia; Hedenik, Marina; Griesser, Anna; Mark, Anna-Theresa; Trost, Julia

    2017-01-25

    The terms "quality of life" and "health" are often used interchangeably even though there are indications to suggest that they are distinct constructs. Nevertheless, studies which would help to understand the difference between these constructs on the level of subjective theories of nursing home residents are lacking. Because nursing personnel can essentially contribute to the quality of life of residents, the comparison of subjective theories from residents and from nursing personnel can help to detect and understand potential discrepancies. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 31 pairs of residents and their nursing personnel. Based on the approach of Fliege and Filipp (2000) one half of the respondents answered the questions using the term "quality of life" and the other half using the term "health". In addition, quality of life and health had to be rated on a visual analogue scale (VAS), whereby residents rated themselves and nurses rated the corresponding resident. Data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis in a team-based approach. Following a mixed methods approach the deductively developed main categories and the inductively developed subcategories were quantified and statistically analyzed together with the VAS ratings. Quality of life was more strongly associated with psychological, social and environmental aspects, whereas health more strongly evoked thoughts on physical functioning. This effect was stronger in nursing personnel, which can be explained by their role concept. In future scientific studies the terms should be used accurately, as they elicit different associations. The term "quality of life" seems to be more suitable to adequately reflect the adaptability of elderly people.

  8. Pattern, awareness and perceptions of health hazards associated with self medication among adult residents of kano metropolis, northwestern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umar M Lawan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Kano State is the most populous state, and one of those states pronounced with the highest prevalence of drug abuse in Nigeria. However, there is lack of documented data to back the assertion. Objective: We determined the pattern, awareness and perceptions of the adult residents of Kano metropolis about self medication. Materials and Methods: We used a descriptive cross-sectional design to study a random sample of 380 adult in Kano metropolis. Data was collected using semi-structured questionnaires that were pretested outside the study area. Data analysis was with Epi Info® 3.5.1. Results: The mean age of the subjects was 35.43 ± 15.10 years, majority were males (66.32%, singles (47.11% and had at least secondary education (67.63%. About three-quarter (78.95% admitted using drug (s in the past without prescription. Drugs commonly consumed were antimalarials (42.10%, analgesics (40.56%, antibiotics (29.41%, and cough mixtures (13.31%. Common sources of drugs were patent medicine stores (62.54% and the market (19.81%. Common reasons for self medication were long queues in the hospitals (38.39%, and in-accessibility to doctors (25.08%. About two-thirds (65.00% correctly perceived that self medication could be hazardous; and half (51.58% were aware of at least one hazard of self medication. Conclusion/Recommendations: Irrational drug use is a growing challenge to public health in Kano, Nigeria. Thus, drug regulatory agencies in Nigeria should work together to ensure that all drug retail outlets and drug sellers are registered, controlled drugs are dispensed only on prescription of the physicians; and the laws safeguarding drug use are duly enforced. Health authorities should also strengthen efforts towards health educating the public.

  9. Disability and physical and communication-related barriers to health care related services among Florida residents: A brief report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Sarah E; Schumacher, Jessica R; Hall, Allyson; Marlow, Nicole M; Friedel, Claudia; Scheer, Danielle; Redmon, Susan

    2016-07-01

    Research has not fully characterized barriers to health care faced by persons with disabilities (PWD) which constitutes a critical gap given the increased risk of chronic illness faced by PWD. To understand the current barriers to seeking health care-related services for PWD in Florida. The study was based on a random-digit-dial telephone interview survey of respondents aged 18 and over (n = 1429). Multivariable logistic regression assessed the relationship between disability and physical and communication barriers. One thousand four hundred and twenty-nine Florida residents participated in the survey. Thirty-three percent of respondents (n = 471) reported having a disability. PWD were significantly older (mean age 68 vs. 61) and had lower levels of income and education than persons without disabilities (PWOD) (p barrier (Odds Ratio [OR] = 16.6 95% CI: 7.9, 34.9), a clinical experience barrier (OR = 13.9 95% CI: 6.9, 27.9) a communication and knowledge barrier (OR = 6.7 95% CI: 4.0, 11.3) and a barrier coordinating care (OR = 5.7 95% CI: 3.4, 9.6) compared to persons without disabilities (PWOD). PWD disproportionately face health care access difficulties that can impede the receipt of high quality care within and between provider visits. Efforts to reduce physical barriers and improve communication between providers and PWD may improve functional status and quality of life for these patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Health changes of refugees from Afghanistan, Iran and Somalia: the role of residence status and experienced living difficulties in the resettlement process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamkaddem, Majda; Essink-Bot, Marie-Louise; Devillé, Walter; Gerritsen, Annette; Stronks, Karien

    2015-12-01

    Worldwide, refugees show a poorer mental and physical health than the populations among which they resettle. Little is known about the factors influencing health after resettlement. We examined the development of mental and physical health of refugees. As experienced living difficulties might decrease with obtaining a residence permit, we expected this to play a central role in health improvement after resettlement. A two-wave study conducted in the Netherlands among a cohort of 172 recent (n = 68) and longstanding (n = 104) permit holders from Afghanistan, Iran and Somalia between 2003 and 2011. Multivariate mediation analyses were conducted for the effect of changes in living difficulties on the association between change in status and changes in health. Health outcomes were self-reported general health, number of chronic conditions, PTSD and anxiety/depression. Recent permit holders had larger decreases in PTSD score (-0.402, CI -0.612; -0.192) and anxiety/depression score (-0.298, CI -0.464; -0.132), and larger improvements in self-rated general health between T1 and T2 (0.566, CI 0.183; 0.949) than longstanding permit holders. This association was not significant for changes in number of chronic conditions. Mediation analyses showed that the effect of getting a residence permit on health improvements transited through an improvement in living conditions, in particular employment and the presence of family/social support. These results suggest that change in residence permit is beneficial for health mainly because of the change in living difficulties. These results add up to the evidence on the role of social circumstances for refugees upon resettlement, and point at labour participation and social support as key mechanisms for health improvements. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  11. Chefs' attitudes toward healthful food preparation are more positive than their food science knowledge and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichler, G; Dalton, S

    1998-02-01

    To determine if chefs' and student chefs' attitudes, knowledge, and practices regarding healthful food preparation are consistent with the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. An analytical survey questionnaire was distributed to 4 chef groups. Sections 1 and 2 of the survey measured chefs' food science knowledge (13 questions) and likelihood of using food preparation practices (15 questions) necessary to meet the 1990 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Section 3 (22 questions) measured chefs' attitudes toward nutrition in general, toward the importance of healthful food preparation practices, and toward the US Dietary Guidelines. Of 512 surveys distributed by mail, at culinary meetings, and in classes at 2 culinary schools, 447 (86%) were returned (158 from practicing chefs and 289 from student chefs). Practicing chefs included chef educators, foodservice chefs from a national corporation, and independent chef members of the American Culinary Federation of New York City. Descriptive statistics included frequencies, means, and standard deviations of survey items and of individual survey sections. Reliability and validity were determined using alpha coefficients and principal components analysis. Analysis of variance was used to examine differences in practice, attitudes, and knowledge among chef groups. Both practicing chefs and student chefs answered more than 70% of the food science questions correctly; independent chefs scored significantly lower than educator and corporate chefs. More than two thirds of the chefs and student chefs correctly responded to questions about the nutrient composition of food and how cooking affects the nutrient content of food. All chef groups were confused about fat and cholesterol in food and in the body. Few healthful food preparation practices were likely to be used by any chef group more than two thirds of the time, although the subscale of the attitude toward the importance of these practices was very positive. The majority of

  12. Beyond Visas and Vaccines: Preparing Students for Domestic and Global Health Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Lisa V; Sosin, Anne N

    At campuses across the United States, scores of students are embarking on global health experiences in low- and middle-income countries. The desire to improve the health of poor communities while preparing for future health careers is often the main driver. The spotlight on domestic health issues also has fueled a resurgence of interest in underserved communities in the United States. Regardless of the destination, rigorous preparation is needed to ensure that the students' presence benefits the communities they aim to serve. Development of mutually beneficial programs with host communities coupled with thoughtful preparation of students is essential to the future of these university programs but, more importantly, to achieve the goal of shared learning and capacity building across borders. US program leaders may not fully consider the potential risks that can occur to their programs from involving poorly prepared students, or these risks may appear largely theoretical. However, many experienced practitioners and their international collaborators can relate examples of damaged partnerships, adverse consequences on community structures, dangers to patient safety, and harmed professional reputations and credibility. Domestic health experiences do not require a visa or vaccines but bring students in contact with many of the same ethical, professional, and cross-cultural challenges as overseas endeavors. Fortunately, best practices for preparing students to confront these challenges have emerged from years of experience in domestic and global contexts alike. It all begins with establishing institutional partnerships built on principles of reciprocity and respect. Through careful program design, universities can align missions, goals, and expectations to best serve all invested parties: local partners, students, faculty, staff, and the communities where they will be working. A second critical component is appropriate student selection. Matching student skills with

  13. Parental immigration status is associated with children's health care utilization: findings from the 2003 new immigrant survey of US legal permanent residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Katherine; Fuentes-Afflick, Elena; Curry, Leslie A; Krumholz, Harlan M; Desai, Mayur M

    2013-12-01

    Our objective was to examine the association between parental immigration status and child health and health care utilization. Using data from a national sample of immigrant adults who had recently become legal permanent residents (LPR), children (n = 2,170) were categorized according to their parents' immigration status prior to LPR: legalized, mixed-status, refugee, temporary resident, or undocumented. Logistic regression with generalized estimating equations was used to compare child health and health care utilization by parental immigration status over the prior 12 months. Nearly all children in the sample were reported to be in good to excellent health. Children whose parents had been undocumented were least likely to have had an illness that was reported to have required medical attention (5.4 %). Children whose parents had been either undocumented or temporary residents were most likely to have a delayed preventive annual exam (18.2 and 18.7 %, respectively). Delayed dental care was most common among children whose parents had come to the US as refugees (29.1 %). Differences in the preventive annual exam remained significant after adjusting for socioeconomic characteristics. Parental immigration status before LPR was not associated with large differences in reported child health status. Parental immigration status before LPR was associated with the use of preventive annual exams and dental services. However, no group of children was consistently disadvantaged with respect to all measures.

  14. Health risks, travel preparation, and illness among public health professionals during international travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaban, Victor; Warnock, Eli; Ramana Dhara, V; Jean-Louis, Lee Ann; Sotir, Mark J; Kozarsky, Phyllis

    2014-01-01

    Few data currently exist on health risks faced by public health professionals (PHP) during international travel. We conducted pre- and post-travel health surveys to assess knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP), and illnesses among PHP international travelers. Anonymous surveys were completed by PHP from a large American public health agency who sought a pre-travel medical consult from September 1, 2009, to September 30, 2010. Surveys were completed by 122 participants; travelers went to 163 countries. Of the 122 respondents, 97 (80%) reported at least one planned health risk activity (visiting rural areas, handling animals, contact with blood or body fluids, visiting malarious areas), and 50 (41%) reported exposure to unanticipated health risks. Of the 62 travelers who visited malarious areas, 14 (23%) reported inconsistent or no use of malaria prophylaxis. Illness during travel was reported by 33 (27%) respondents. Most of the PHP travelers in our study reported at least one planned health risk activity, and almost half reported exposure to unanticipated health risks, and one-quarter of travelers to malarious areas reported inconsistent or no use of malaria chemoprophylaxis. Our findings highlight that communication and education outreach for PHP to prevent travel-associated illnesses can be improved. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Strategies to Build Trust and Recruit African American and Latino Community Residents for Health Research: A Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaré, Ibrahima C.; Bross, Rachelle; Brown, Arleen F.; del Pino, Homero E.; Jones, Loretta F.; Morris, D'Ann M.; Porter, Courtney; Lucas‐Wright, Aziza; Vargas, Roberto; Forge, Nell; Norris, Keith C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background This study used Community Partnered Participatory Research (CPPR) to address low participation of racial and ethnic minorities in medical research and the lack of trust between underrepresented communities and researchers. Methods Using a community and academic partnership in July 2012, residents of a South Los Angeles neighborhood were exposed to research recruitment strategies: referral by word‐of‐mouth, community agencies, direct marketing, and extant study participants. Results Among 258 community members exposed to recruitment strategies, 79.8% completed the study. Exposed individuals identified their most important method for learning about the study as referral by study participants (39.8%), community agencies (30.6%), word‐of‐mouth (17.5%), or direct marketing promotion (12.1%). Study completion rates varied by recruitment method: referral by community agencies (88.7%), referral by participants (80.4%), direct marketing promotion (86.2%), word of mouth (64.3%). Conclusions Although African American and Latino communities are often described as difficult to engage in research, we found high levels of research participation and completion when recruitment strategies emerged from the community itself. This suggests recruitment strategies based on CPPR principles represent an important opportunity for addressing health disparities and our high rates of research completion should provide optimism and a road map for next steps. PMID:26094679

  16. Seroprevalence of Antibodies against Anisakis simplex Larvae among Health-Examined Residents in Three Hospitals of Southern Parts of Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung; Jo, Jin Ok; Choi, Seon Hee; Cho, Min Kyoung; Yu, Hak Sun; Cha, Hee Jae

    2011-01-01

    The present study was performed to estimate the seroprevalence of larval Anisakis simplex infection among the residents health-examined in 3 hospitals in southern parts of Korea. A total of 498 serum samples (1 serum per person) were collected in 3 hospitals in Busan Metropolitan city, Masan city, and Geoje city in Gyeongsangnam-do (Province) and were examined by IgE-ELISA and IgE-western blotting with larval A. simplex crude extract and excretory-secretory products (ESP). The prevalence of antibody positivity was 5.0% and 6.6% with ELISA against crude extracts and ESP, respectively. It was also revealed that infection occurred throughout all age groups and higher in females than in males. A specific protein band of 130 kDa was detected from 10 patients with western blot analysis against crude extract and ESP among those who showed positive results by ELISA. Our study showed for the first time the seroprevalence of anisakiasis in Korea. The allergen of 130 kDa can be a candidate for serologic diagnosis of anisakiasis. PMID:21738269

  17. Associations Among Health Care Workplace Safety, Resident Satisfaction, and Quality of Care in Long-Term Care Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boakye-Dankwa, Ernest; Teeple, Erin; Gore, Rebecca; Punnett, Laura

    2017-11-01

    We performed an integrated cross-sectional analysis of relationships between long-term care work environments, employee and resident satisfaction, and quality of patient care. Facility-level data came from a network of 203 skilled nursing facilities in 13 states in the eastern United States owned or managed by one company. K-means cluster analysis was applied to investigate clustered associations between safe resident handling program (SRHP) performance, resident care outcomes, employee satisfaction, rates of workers' compensation claims, and resident satisfaction. Facilities in the better-performing cluster were found to have better patient care outcomes and resident satisfaction; lower rates of workers compensation claims; better SRHP performance; higher employee retention; and greater worker job satisfaction and engagement. The observed clustered relationships support the utility of integrated performance assessment in long-term care facilities.

  18. Strategy of health information seeking among physicians, medical residents, and students after introducing digital library and information technology in teaching hospitals of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    kahouei, Mehdi; Alaei, Safollah; Shariat Panahi, Sohaila Sadat Ghazavi; Zadeh, Jamileh Mahdi

    2015-05-01

    It is important for physicians, medical students and health care organizations of developing countries to use reliable clinical information in order to deliver the best practice. Therefore, health sector of Iran endeavored to encourage physicians and medical students to integrate research findings into practice since 2005. Several educational interventions in the areas of information technology and databases were performed. Digital library was introduced in the teaching hospitals. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether these interventions increased the use of evidence-based health information resources among physicians, medical residents and students. This descriptive study involved 315 physicians, assistants and medical students in affiliated hospitals of Semnan University of medical sciences in 2013. A total 52.9% of physicians and 79.5% of medical residents and students always used patient data. 81.3% of physicians and 67.1% of medical residents and students reported using their own experiences, 26.5% of physicians and 16.9% of medical residents and students always used databases such as PubMed and MEDLINE for patient care. Our results revealed that in spite of providing educational and technical infrastructures for accomplishment of research utilization in medical education, the study subjects often identified and used what they regarded as reliable and relevant information from sources that do not truly represent the best evidence that is available. © 2015 Chinese Cochrane Center, West China Hospital of Sichuan University and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. Dental health service utilisation by resident doctors/medical officers in the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opeodu, O I; Dosumu, E B; Arowojolu, M O

    2012-09-01

    Dental disease is still a serious health problem universally possibly because dental health awareness and dental service utilization is still very low. The reported prevalence of dental diseases, especially periodontal disease, is higher among the black race while their rate of dental service utilization is lower in comparison to Caucasians. The aim of this study was to assess the rate of dental service utilization and identify the factors influencing such utilization by medical doctors and dentists in the University College Hospital, Ibadan. Two hundred 26-item questionnaires were distributed among the resident doctors/medical officers in the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Oyo state. The questionnaire sought to know if there is any previous dental visits, the reason for such visits and any other follow-up visits afterward. One hundred and ninety of the doctors returned the filled questionnaires giving a response rate of 95%. Data analysis was done using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 14.0. Level of statistical significance was set at p dental visit but only 25.3% was within the last one year of the study. Among those that had visited a dentist before, 59.7% did so for the symptomatic treatment of one ailment or the other and only 13.7% of them went back for the follow-up appointment after the resolution of their symptoms. There was a statistically significant difference between the rate of dental service utilization and the gender of the respondents (p dental service utilization and age of the respondents. The study showed that the rate of dental service utilization is low when compared with that of developed countries. Some factors identified as contributing to the lack of dental service utilization among the participants include prolonged and repeated dental appointments and the demand of their work.

  20. Preparing a Health Care White Paper: Providing Structure to the Writing Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotarius, Timothy; Rotarius, Velmarie

    2016-01-01

    Health care leaders operate in a very complex and turbulent business environment. Both government regulations and market forces are very active in the industry. Thus, health care managers have many multifaceted and, sometimes, contradictory expectations placed upon them and their organizations. To ensure professional accountability, health care executives often join professional associations and strive for licenses and certifications that are intended to place the professional above the rest. One important avenue to achieve various licensing and certification accomplishments involves writing a white paper about a specific topic of interest to the industry and organization. Presented herein are structural processes that facilitate the creation and preparation of a health care white paper. Both conceptual and empirical structures of white papers are presented, with the similarities and the differences between conceptual and empirical papers highlighted.

  1. Scientific and technical guidance for the preparation and presentation of a health claim application (Revision 2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjödin, Anders Mikael

    2017-01-01

    EFSA asked the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) to update the scientific and technical guidance for the preparation and presentation of an application for authorisation of a health claim published in 2011. Since then, the NDA Panel has gained considerable experience...... in the evaluation of health claims. Lessons learnt from these experiences have been translated into a new General scientific guidance for stakeholders on health claim applications (published in January 2016). In this context, it is noted the need to adapt the existing guidance to the new scientific and technical...... the information and scientific data which must be included in the application, the hierarchy of different types of data and study designs, and the key issues which should be addressed in the application to substantiate the health claim....

  2. A systematic review of public health-aligned recommendations for preparing physical education teacher candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Collin A; Webster, Liana; Russ, Laura; Molina, Sergio; Lee, Heesu; Cribbs, Jason

    2015-03-01

    Since Sallis and McKenzie's seminal article in 1991 outlining physical education's role in public health, increased attention has been given to promoting youth physical activity in schools. The present study systematically reviewed the literature from 1991 to 2013 to identify recommendations for the preparation of physical education teacher candidates (PETCs) from a public health perspective. Eight online databases (e.g., Educational Resources Information Center, Google Scholar) served as data sources for the study. Multiple combinations of key terms (e.g., physical education teacher education [PETE], public health, health-oriented) were used to identify relevant literature meeting search criteria. A content analysis was used to identify 47 distinct recommendations from 25 included articles and to synthesize these recommendations into major areas of focus. Three major areas of focus were identified: (a) candidate profile (e.g., PETCs should be physically active and fit role models), (b) candidate knowledge (e.g., PETCs should know about behavior change theories), and (c) candidate skills (e.g., PETCs should be able to advocate for school-based physical activity). This review can serve as a blueprint for PETE programs seeking to align professional preparation with public health goals.

  3. Are universities preparing nurses to meet the challenges posed by the Australian mental health care system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynaden, D; Orb, A; McGowan, S; Downie, J

    2000-09-01

    The preparedness of comprehensive nurses to work with the mentally ill is of concern to many mental health professionals. Discussion as to whether current undergraduate nursing programs in Australia prepare a graduate to work as a beginning practitioner in the mental health area has been the centre of debate for most of the 1990s. This, along with the apparent lack of interest and motivation of these nurses to work in the mental health area following graduation, remains a major problem for mental health care providers. With one in five Australians now experiencing the burden of a major mental illness, the preparation of a nurse who is competent to work with the mentally ill would appear to be a priority. The purpose of the present study was to determine third year undergraduate nursing students' perceived level of preparedness to work with mentally ill clients. The results suggested significant differences in students' perceived level of confidence, knowledge and skills prior to and following theoretical and clinical exposure to the mental health area. Pre-testing of students before entering their third year indicated that the philosophy of comprehensive nursing: integration, although aspired to in principle, does not appear to occur in reality.

  4. Procedural Skills Training During Emergency Medicine Residency: Are We Teaching the Right Things?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Druck, Jeffrey

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The Residency Review Committee training requirements for emergency medicine residents (EM are defined by consensus panels, with specific topics abstracted from lists of patient complaints and diagnostic codes. The relevance of specific curricular topics to actual practice has not been studied. We compared residency graduates’ self-assessed preparation during training to importance in practice for a variety of EM procedural skills.Methods: We distributed a web-based survey to all graduates of the Denver Health Residency Program in EM over the past 10 years. The survey addressed: practice type and patient census; years of experience; additional procedural training beyond residency; and confidence, preparation, and importance in practice for 12 procedures (extensor tendon repair, transvenous pacing, lumbar puncture, applanation tonometry, arterial line placement, anoscopy, CT scan interpretation, diagnostic peritoneal lavage, slit lamp usage, ultrasonography, compartment pressure measurement and procedural sedation. For each skill, preparation and importance were measured on four-point Likert scales. We compared mean preparation and importance scores using paired sample t-tests, to identify areas of under- or over-preparation.Results: Seventy-four residency graduates (59% of those eligible completed the survey. There were significant discrepancies between importance in practice and preparation during residency for eight of the 12 skills. Under-preparation was significant for transvenous pacing, CT scan interpretation, slit lamp examinations and procedural sedation. Over-preparation was significant for extensor tendon repair, arterial line placement, peritoneal lavage and ultrasonography. There were strong correlations (r>0.3 between preparation during residency and confidence for 10 of the 12 procedural skills, suggesting a high degree of internal consistency for the survey.Conclusions: Practicing emergency physicians may be uniquely

  5. Procedural skills training during emergency medicine residency: are we teaching the right things?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druck, Jeffrey; Valley, Morgan A; Lowenstein, Steven R

    2009-08-01

    The Residency Review Committee training requirements for emergency medicine residents (EM) are defined by consensus panels, with specific topics abstracted from lists of patient complaints and diagnostic codes. The relevance of specific curricular topics to actual practice has not been studied. We compared residency graduates' self-assessed preparation during training to importance in practice for a variety of EM procedural skills. We distributed a web-based survey to all graduates of the Denver Health Residency Program in EM over the past 10 years. The survey addressed: practice type and patient census; years of experience; additional procedural training beyond residency; and confidence, preparation, and importance in practice for 12 procedures (extensor tendon repair, transvenous pacing, lumbar puncture, applanation tonometry, arterial line placement, anoscopy, CT scan interpretation, diagnostic peritoneal lavage, slit lamp usage, ultrasonography, compartment pressure measurement and procedural sedation). For each skill, preparation and importance were measured on four-point Likert scales. We compared mean preparation and importance scores using paired sample t-tests, to identify areas of under- or over-preparation. Seventy-four residency graduates (59% of those eligible) completed the survey. There were significant discrepancies between importance in practice and preparation during residency for eight of the 12 skills. Under-preparation was significant for transvenous pacing, CT scan interpretation, slit lamp examinations and procedural sedation. Over-preparation was significant for extensor tendon repair, arterial line placement, peritoneal lavage and ultrasonography. There were strong correlations (r>0.3) between preparation during residency and confidence for 10 of the 12 procedural skills, suggesting a high degree of internal consistency for the survey. Practicing emergency physicians may be uniquely qualified to identify areas of under- and over-preparation

  6. Willingness to pay for community-based health insurance in Nigeria: do economic status and place of residence matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onwujekwe, Obinna; Okereke, Ekechi; Onoka, Chima; Uzochukwu, Benjamin; Kirigia, Joses; Petu, Amos

    2010-03-01

    We examine socio-economic status (SES) and geographic differences in willingness of respondents to pay for community-based health insurance (CBHI). The study took place in Anambra and Enugu states, south-east Nigeria. It involved a rural, an urban and a semi-urban community in each of the two states. A pre-tested interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to collect information from a total of 3070 households selected by simple random sampling. Contingent valuation was used to elicit willingness to pay (WTP) using the bidding game format. Data were examined for correlation between SES and geographic locations with WTP. Log ordinary least squares (OLS) was used to examine the construct validity of elicited WTP. Generally, less than 40% of the respondents were willing to pay for CBHI membership for themselves or other household members. The proportions of people who were willing to pay were much lower in the rural communities, at less than 7%. The average that respondents were willing to pay as a monthly premium for themselves ranged from 250 Naira (US$1.7) in a rural community to 343 Naira (US$2.9) in an urban community. The higher the SES group, the higher the stated WTP amount. Similarly, the urbanites stated higher WTP compared with peri-urban and rural dwellers. Males and people with more education stated higher WTP values than females and those with less education. Log OLS also showed that previously paying out-of-pocket for health care was negatively related to WTP. Previously paying for health care using any health insurance mechanism was positively related to WTP. Economic status and place of residence amongst other factors matter in peoples' WTP for CBHI membership. Consumer awareness has to be created about the benefits of CBHI, especially in rural areas, and the amount to be paid has to be augmented with other means of financing (e.g. government and/or donor subsidies) to ensure success and sustainability of CBHI schemes.

  7. Practices and health perception of preparation of Brassica vegetables: translating survey data to technological and nutritional implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugrahedi, Probo Y; Hantoro, Inneke; Verkerk, Ruud; Dekker, Matthijs; Steenbekkers, Bea

    2015-01-01

    Food preparation practices are known to have large nutritional implications on the final product. This article describes survey data on preparation practices of Brassica vegetables and the translation of these data into technological and nutritional implications using knowledge on the mechanisms of changes in the content of phytochemicals. The survey on preparation practices was performed with food service establishments (n = 123) and households (n = 477) in Semarang, Indonesia, and assessed the food handlers' perception of the health benefits of these vegetables. Boiling and stir-frying are the most frequently applied techniques to prepare Brassicas. The respondents perceive that steaming, boiling, and stir-frying result in vegetables with a high health benefit. White cabbage and choysum are the most frequently prepared Brassicas. However, broccoli is perceived as the healthiest. The consequences of the various applied preparation techniques on the content of alleged health promoting phytochemicals (glucosinolates) in dishes containing Brassica vegetables are discussed.

  8. Preparing rural general practitioners and health services for climate change and extreme weather.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Rachael; McGirr, Joe

    2014-02-01

    To determine the knowledge and recommendations of rural general practitioners (GPs) in regard to climate change and the preparedness of rural health services for its health impacts. A quantitative descriptive survey distributed in paper-based or electronic form. Rural Southwest of New South Wales. GPs and GP registrars working in Rural Remote Metropolitan Areas (RRMA) 3-7. Questionnaire responses analysed with descriptive statistics and inferential tests. While the majority of respondents agreed with statements supporting climate science and the impact of climate change on health, between 24% and 34% of respondents were unsure or did not agree. Furthermore, between 33% and 44% of GP respondents working in RRMA 5-7 were unsure or did not agree that their health service had the capacity to provide an initial response to an extreme weather event (P = 0.01). Strengthening health service acute disaster capacity response was a preferred adaptation strategy for improving health service preparedness of 61% of participants. A greater proportion of GPs were supportive of their role as advocates on general health issues (80%) compared with extreme weather events (60%) or climate change and health (63.5%) (P ≤ 0.01). For professional development and education, 71% preferred a locally based workshop or seminar. The study highlights the need to consider closely the views of GPs when preparing rural communities for the possible health effects of climate change. Findings indicate concern for health service preparedness, particularly in smaller rural communities. Further development of disaster response planning and communication is needed. © 2014 The Authors. Australian Journal of Rural Health © National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  9. Preparing E-Health Ready Graduates: A Qualitative Focus Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Deborah; Keep, Melanie; Brunner, Melissa; Janssen, Anna; Quinn, Deleana; Avery, Jennifer; Togher, Leanne; Shaw, Tim

    2017-01-01

    Well documented demand for an e-health ready workforce is placing increasing pressure on universities to deliver essential e-health education. We aimed to explore stakeholders' perceptions of e-health knowledge and skills anticipated of workforce-ready tertiary graduates from clinical health degree programs. A qualitative research study of a purposively selected sample of 23 key informants with expertise and/or experience in e-health education, practice and/or policy was conducted. Data collection involved focus group interviews that were recorded, transcribed verbatim and underwent thematic analysis. Three primary themes about e-health education and preparation of health graduates emerged from the analyses: 1) Reinforce fundamental competencies, 2) Acknowledge and adapt existing competencies, and 3) Introduce and provide opportunities for new learning. This study will inform the articulation of a consensus driven set of core competencies for a cross-faculty e-health curriculum that aligns with workforce expectations. There is also potential for vertical integration of findings into workforce development programs.

  10. Transmission of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus to health care worker gowns and gloves during care of residents in Veterans Affairs nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineles, Lisa; Morgan, Daniel J; Lydecker, Alison; Johnson, J Kristie; Sorkin, John D; Langenberg, Patricia; Blanco, Natalia; Lesse, Alan; Sellick, John; Gupta, Kalpana; Leykum, Luci; Cadena, Jose; Lepcha, Nickie; Roghmann, Mary-Claire

    2017-09-01

    This was an observational study designed to estimate the frequency of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) transmission to gowns and gloves worn by health care workers (HCWs) interacting with Veterans Affairs Community Living Center (VA nursing home) residents to inform MRSA prevention policies. Participants included residents and HCWs from 7 VA nursing homes in 4 states and Washington, DC. Residents were cultured for MRSA at the anterior nares, perianal skin, and wound (if present). HCWs wore gowns and gloves during usual care activities. After each activity, a research coordinator swabbed the HCW's gown and gloves. Swabs were cultured for MRSA. There were 200 residents enrolled; 94 (46%) were MRSA colonized. Glove contamination was higher than gown contamination (20% vs 11%, respectively; P  1.0, P < .05) for gown contamination included changing dressings (eg, wound), dressing, providing hygiene (eg, brushing teeth), and bathing. Low-risk care activities (OR < 1.0, P < .05 or no transmission) for gown contamination included glucose monitoring, giving medications, and feeding. MRSA transmission from colonized residents to gloves was higher than transmission to gowns. Transmission to gloves varies by type of care, but all care had a risk of contamination, demonstrating the importance of hand hygiene after all care. Transmission to gowns was significantly higher with certain types of care. Optimizing gown and glove use by targeting high-risk care activities could improve resident-centered care for MRSA-colonized residents by promoting a home-like environment. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Greater Independence in Activities of Daily Living is Associated with Higher Health-Related Quality of Life Scores in Nursing Home Residents with Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charice S. Chan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Health-related quality of life (HRQL for nursing home residents is important, however, the concept of quality of life is broad, encompasses many domains and is difficult to assess in people with dementia. Basic activities of daily living (ADL are measured routinely in nursing homes using the Resident Assessment Instrument-Minimum Data Set Version 2.0 (RAI-MDS and Functional Independence Measure (FIM instrument. We examined the relationship between HRQL and ADL to assess the future possibility of ADL dependency level serving as a surrogate measure of HRQL in residents with dementia. To assess ADL, measures derived from the RAI-MDS and FIM data were gathered for 111 residents at the beginning of our study and at 6-month follow-up. Higher scores for independence in ADL were correlated with higher scores for a disease-specific HRQL measure, the Quality of Life—Alzheimer’s Disease Scale. Preliminary evidence suggests that FIM-assessed ADL is associated with HRQL for these residents. The associations of the dressing and toileting items with HRQL were particularly strong. This finding suggests the importance of ADL function in HRQL. The RAI-MDS ADL scales should be used with caution to evaluate HRQL.

  12. Crosswalking public health and health education competencies: implications for professional preparation and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhouse, Lynn D; Auld, M Elaine; Miner, Kathleen; Alley, Kelly Bishop; Lysoby, Linda; Livingood, William C

    2010-01-01

    This article highlights similarities and differences between the public health competencies recently developed by the Association of Schools of Public Health (ASPH) and one public health specialty, health education (HE), which has used competencies in its quality assurance systems for more than 20 years. Based on a crosswalk methodology developed for this analysis, some 50 percent to 61 percent of the HE and ASPH competencies had similarities of varying degrees; 18 percent were deemed matches due to sameness in skill or content. Most similarities were found between the ASPH social and behavioral sciences competencies and the HE competencies. Significant domains of "no match" were found between the HE and ASPH competencies in the areas of Systems Thinking, Leadership, and Public Health Biology. The study results have implications for academic programs related to curricula review and revision, continuing education providers who are developing training agendas for the workforce, employers anticipating competencies in new job hires, and prospective students and practitioners who are considering a form of certification. Qualitative insights from the study related to professional culture, purpose, age, and consistency of the scope or depth of the two competency sets, as well as the crosswalk methodology itself, may be useful to those comparing other competency sets.

  13. Optimizing Patient Preparation and Surgical Experience Using eHealth Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Amy; Forshaw, Kristy; Carey, Mariko; Robinson, Sancha; Kerridge, Ross; Proietto, Anthony; Sanson-Fisher, Rob

    2015-09-01

    With population growth and aging, it is expected that the demand for surgical services will increase. However, increased complexity of procedures, time pressures on staff, and the demand for a patient-centered approach continue to challenge a system characterized by finite health care resources. Suboptimal care is reported in each phase of surgical care, from the time of consent to discharge and long-term follow-up. Novel strategies are thus needed to address these challenges to produce effective and sustainable improvements in surgical care across the care pathway. The eHealth programs represent a potential strategy for improving the quality of care delivered across various phases of care, thereby improving patient outcomes. This discussion paper describes (1) the key functions of eHealth programs including information gathering, transfer, and exchange; (2) examples of eHealth programs in overcoming challenges to optimal surgical care across the care pathway; and (3) the potential challenges and future directions for implementing eHealth programs in this setting. The eHealth programs are a promising alternative for collecting patient-reported outcome data, providing access to credible health information and strategies to enable patients to take an active role in their own health care, and promote efficient communication between patients and health care providers. However, additional rigorous intervention studies examining the needs of potential role of eHealth programs in augmenting patients' preparation and recovery from surgery, and subsequent impact on patient outcomes and processes of care are needed to advance the field. Furthermore, evidence for the benefits of eHealth programs in supporting carers and strategies to maximize engagement from end users are needed.

  14. Nursing in an imperfect world: Storytelling as preparation for mental health nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treloar, Anna; McMillan, Margaret; Stone, Teresa

    2017-06-01

    Storytelling is a valuable adjunctive method of preparing undergraduate mental health nursing students for practice. To explore the possibilities of this method of teaching, 100 stories were collected from experienced nurses working in mental health and analysed using a case study methodology. The aim was to explore the purpose of clinical anecdotes told by experienced nurses working in mental health settings to undergraduates and new recruits, with an ancillary purpose of looking at the implications of these anecdotes for the exploration of contemporary mental health practice and education. A framework for student discussion of stories is provided. The insights gained illuminate not only the history of mental health nursing and the daily activities of nurses working in mental health, but also some of the deep-level skills developed and used by these nurses as they work in the complexity and ambiguity of an imperfect world where the job requires managing the unexpected every shift, and where there might not always be a textbook-perfect solution to clinical situations. © 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  15. THE BASIC DATA FOR RESIDENTS AGED 15 YEARS OR YOUNGER WHO RECEIVED A COMPREHENSIVE HEALTH CHECK IN 2011-2012 AS A PART OF THE FUKUSHIMA HEALTH MANAGEMENT SURVEY AFTER THE GREAT EAST JAPAN EARTHQUAKE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Yukihiko; Hosoya, Mitsuaki; Yasumura, Seiji; Ohira, Tetsuya; Satoh, Hiroaki; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Sakai, Akira; Ohtsuru, Akira; Takahashi, Atsushi; Ozasa, Kotaro; Kobashi, Gen; Kamiya, Kenji; Yamashita, Shunichi; Abe, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    To assist in the long-term health management of residents and evaluate the health impacts after the Tokyo Electric Power Company's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in Fukushima Prefecture, the Fukushima prefectural government decided to implement the Fukushima Health Management Survey. This report describes the results for residents aged 15 years or younger who received health checks and evaluates the data obtained from 2011 and 2012. The target group consisted of residents aged 15 years or younger who had lived in the evacuation zone. The health checks were performed on receipt of an application from any of the residents. The checks, which included the measurements of height, weight, blood pressure, biochemical laboratory findings, and peripheral blood findings, were performed as required. 1) A total of 17,934 (64.5%) and 11,780 (43.5%) residents aged 15 years or younger received health checks in 2011 and 2012, respectively. 2) In both years, a number of male and female residents in the 7-15 year age group were found to suffer from obesity, hyperlipidemia, hyperuricemia, or liver dysfunction. Furthermore, pediatric aged 15 years or younger were commonly observed to suffer from hypertension or glucose metabolic abnormalities. 3) A comparison of data from 2012 and 2011 demonstrated that both males and females frequently showed increased body height and decreased body weight in 2012. The prevalence of hypertension, glucose metabolic abnormalities, or high γ-GTP values in males and females in the 7-15 year age group in 2012 was lower than that in 2011. However, the prevalence of hyperuricemia among residents in the 7-15 year age group was higher in 2012 than in 2011. These results suggested that some residents aged 15 years or under who had lived in the evacuation zone had developed obesity, hyperlipidemia, hyperuricemia, liver dysfunction, hypertension, or glucose metabolic abnormalities. Therefore, we think that it is necessary to continue the health

  16. Is health care payment reform impacting nurses' work settings, roles, and education preparation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Mary Val; Rambur, Betty; Hart, Vicki

    This study explores nurses' work settings and educational preparation in the five years before passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and five years after ACA passage, with the aim of identifying areas for nurse educators' attention. The study setting was one small state undergoing rapid transition away from fee-for-service service and thus provided the ideal laboratory to assess the impact of health reform on the nursing workforce. A secondary analysis of data gathered during relicensure compared the nursing workforce at an interval of one decade, with surveys in 2005 (n=4075; 65% response rate) and in 2015 (n=6723; 97% response rate). Findings demonstrated an increase in the proportion of nurses who reported working in ambulatory care and community settings (p=0.001). However, there was no associated decrease in the proportion of nurses who reported working in hospitals. Among respondents who reported employment in the ambulatory care/community settings in 2005, 34.3% had a BSN or higher, a proportion that increased to 41.2% in 2015 (p=0.010); nevertheless, the greatest proportional increase was among AD prepared nurses (34% to 48%). Although new nursing roles emerging as a result of health reform offer baccalaureate nurses the opportunity use the full complement of their knowledge and skills, these data suggest that BS prepared nurses are not fully accessing these opportunities. Implications for nursing education and further research are detailed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Differences in Health Symptoms among Residents Living Near Illegal Dump Sites in Los Laureles Canyon, Tijuana, Mexico: A Cross Sectional Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wael K. Al-Delaimy

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Living near landfills is a known health hazard prompting recognition of environmental injustice. The study aim was to compare self-reported symptoms of ill health among residents of four neighborhoods, living in haphazardly constructed settlements surrounded by illegal dumpsites in Tijuana, Mexico. One adult from each of 388 households located in Los Laureles Canyon were interviewed about demographics, health status, and symptoms. Distance from each residence to both the nearest dumpsite and the canyon bottom was assessed. The neighborhoods were selected from locations within the canyon, and varied with respect to proximity to dump sites. Residents of San Bernardo reported significantly higher frequencies of ill-health symptoms than the other neighborhoods, including extreme fatigue (OR 3.01 (95% CI 1.6–5.5, skin problems/irritations (OR 2.73 (95% CI 1.3–5.9, stomach discomfort (OR 2.47 (1.3–4.8, eye irritation/tears (OR 2.02 (1.2–3.6, and confusion/difficulty concentrating (OR 2.39 (1.2–4.8. Proximity to dumpsites did not explain these results, that varied only slightly when adjusted for distance to nearest dumpsite or distance to the canyon bottom. Because San Bernardo has no paved roads, we hypothesize that dust and the toxicants it carries is a possible explanation for this difference. Studies are needed to further document this association and sources of toxicants.

  18. Differences in health symptoms among residents living near illegal dump sites in Los Laureles Canyon, Tijuana, Mexico: a cross sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Delaimy, Wael K; Larsen, Catherine Wood; Pezzoli, Keith

    2014-09-15

    Living near landfills is a known health hazard prompting recognition of environmental injustice. The study aim was to compare self-reported symptoms of ill health among residents of four neighborhoods, living in haphazardly constructed settlements surrounded by illegal dumpsites in Tijuana, Mexico. One adult from each of 388 households located in Los Laureles Canyon were interviewed about demographics, health status, and symptoms. Distance from each residence to both the nearest dumpsite and the canyon bottom was assessed. The neighborhoods were selected from locations within the canyon, and varied with respect to proximity to dump sites. Residents of San Bernardo reported significantly higher frequencies of ill-health symptoms than the other neighborhoods, including extreme fatigue (OR 3.01 (95% CI 1.6-5.5)), skin problems/irritations (OR 2.73 (95% CI 1.3-5.9)), stomach discomfort (OR 2.47 (1.3-4.8)), eye irritation/tears (OR 2.02 (1.2-3.6)), and confusion/difficulty concentrating (OR 2.39 (1.2-4.8)). Proximity to dumpsites did not explain these results, that varied only slightly when adjusted for distance to nearest dumpsite or distance to the canyon bottom. Because San Bernardo has no paved roads, we hypothesize that dust and the toxicants it carries is a possible explanation for this difference. Studies are needed to further document this association and sources of toxicants.

  19. Early learners as health coaches for older adults preparing for surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Jennifer A; Brinson, Zabecca; Hofer, Rebecca; O'Sullivan, Patricia; Chang, Anna; Horvath, Helen; Chang, George J; Finlayson, Emily

    2017-03-01

    Few opportunities exist for early learners to engage in authentic roles on health care teams. In a geriatric optimization clinic for frail high-risk surgical patients, first-year medical and nurse practitioner students were integrated into an interprofessional team as health coaches. Frail surgical patients with planned operations were referred to a new preoperative optimization clinic to see a geriatrician, occupational, and physical therapists and a nutritionist. A curriculum for health coaching by early learners was developed, implemented, and evaluated in this clinic. Students attended the clinic visit with their patient, reviewed the interdisciplinary care plan, and called patients twice weekly preoperatively and weekly in the first month after discharge. Students logged all calls, completed patient satisfaction surveys 1 wk before surgery and participated in feedback sessions with team members and medical school faculty. Call success rate was calculated, and team communications were recorded and analyzed. Median call success rate was 69.2% and was lowest among medical students (P = 0.004). Students and research assistants contacted or facilitated patient contact with their medical team 84 times. Overall, patients were extremely satisfied with the health coach experience, felt better prepared for surgery, and would recommend the program to others. Early medical and nurse practitioner students can serve the important function of health coaches for frail patients preparing for surgery. Motivated students benefited from a unique longitudinal experience and gained skills in communication and care coordination. Not all students demonstrated capacity to engage in health coaching this early in their education. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Personal and household hygiene, environmental contamination, and health in undergraduate residence halls in New York City, 2011.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin A Miko

    Full Text Available While several studies have documented the importance of hand washing in the university setting, the added role of environmental hygiene remains poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to characterize the personal and environmental hygiene habits of college students, define the determinants of hygiene in this population, and assess the relationship between reported hygiene behaviors, environmental contamination, and health status.501 undergraduate students completed a previously validated survey assessing baseline demographics, hygiene habits, determinants of hygiene, and health status. Sixty survey respondents had microbiological samples taken from eight standardized surfaces in their dormitory environment. Bacterial contamination was assessed using standard quantitative bacterial culture techniques. Additional culturing for coagulase-positive Staphylococcus and coliforms was performed using selective agar.While the vast majority of study participants (n = 461, 92% believed that hand washing was important for infection prevention, there was a large amount of variation in reported personal hygiene practices. More women than men reported consistent hand washing before preparing food (p = .002 and after using the toilet (p = .001. Environmental hygiene showed similar variability although 73.3% (n = 367 of subjects reported dormitory cleaning at least once per month. Contamination of certain surfaces was common, with at least one third of all bookshelves, desks, refrigerator handles, toilet handles, and bathroom door handles positive for >10 CFU of bacteria per 4 cm(2 area. Coagulase-positive Staphylococcus was detected in three participants' rooms (5% and coliforms were present in six students' rooms (10%. Surface contamination with any bacteria did not vary by frequency of cleaning or frequency of illness (p>.05.Our results suggest that surface contamination, while prevalent, is unrelated to reported hygiene or health in the university

  1. Preparing promotoras to deliver health programs for Hispanic communities: training processes and curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskan, Alexis M; Friedman, Daniela B; Brandt, Heather M; Walsemann, Katrina M; Messias, DeAnne K H

    2013-05-01

    Training is an essential component of health programs that incorporate promotoras de salud (the Spanish term for community health workers) in the delivery of health education and behavioral interventions to Hispanics. During training sessions, promotoras are exposed to information and skill-building activities they need to implement the health programs. This analysis was one component of a broader study which explored program planners' approaches to recruiting and training promotoras to deliver and sustain health promotion programs for Hispanic women. The purpose of this study was to examine promotora-curriculum and training processes used to prepare promotoras to deliver health programs. The authors examined transcripts of 12 in-depth interviews with program planners and conducted a content analysis of seven different training materials used in their respective promotora programs. Interview themes and narratives included program planners' varying conceptualizations of promotora-training, including their personal definitions of "training the trainer," the practice of training a cadre of promotoras before selecting those best fit for the program, and the importance of providing goal-directed, in-depth training and supervision for promotoras. The content analysis revealed a variety of strategies used to make the training materials interactive and culturally competent. Study implications describe the importance of planners' provision of ongoing, goal-directed, and supervised training using both appropriate language and interactive methods to engage and teach promotoras.

  2. PRE-CONCEPTIONAL PREPARATION OF WOMEN AND ITS INFLUENCE TO THE FETUS AND CHILD HEALTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.L. Nisevich

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors presented the results of the medical history, monitoring of the pregnancy and outcome of the delivery among 260 women with obstetric gynecologic anamnesis record and high risk of the fetus contamination split into 3 groups. 106 women (group I underwent the pre con ceptional preparation 2 to 4 months prior to pregnancy and received both conventional therapy and metabolic medications prior to and during pregnancy. 82 women (group II were observed from 2nd to 3rd trimester of pregnancy and also received metabolic medications. 72 women (group III were observed from the first weeks of pregnancy and received only conventional therapy during their pregnancy. The researchers discovered that all the women had different chronic diseases. The laboratory examination proved there was a high rate of contamination by different viruses and agents of sexually transmitted diseases. They also found out that the metabolic therapy during the pre con ceptional preparation and pregnancy leads to a drastic drop of different complications during pregnancy, delivery and down lying period, improves placenta function and optimizes the fetus development conditions, sizably reduces any chances of the fetus and newborn intrauterine infection, enhances the newborn adaptation and leads to reductions in the perinatal and infant mortality. Ever deteriorating health of women and various complications during pregnancy and delivery registered among the women, who underwent pre con ceptional preparation by metabolic correction, clearly show the necessity to take steps to prevent the women's diseases and keep their reproductive health from adolescence on.Key words: pre-conceptional preparation, metabolic medications, pregnancy, act of delivery, newborns, fetal infection, perinatal death.

  3. The mental health status of refugees and asylum seekers attending a refugee health clinic including comparisons with a matched sample of Australian-born residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawyer, Frances; Enticott, Joanne C; Block, Andrew A; Cheng, I-Hao; Meadows, Graham N

    2017-02-21

    The aim of this study was to survey refugees and asylum-seekers attending a Refugee Health Service in Melbourne, Australia to estimate the prevalence of psychiatric disorders based on screening measures and with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) specifically highlighted. A secondary aim was to compare the prevalence findings with Australian-born matched comparators from the 2007 National Survey of Mental Health and Well-Being. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 135 refugees and asylum-seeker participants using instruments including Kessler-10 (K10) and PTSD-8 to obtain estimates of the prevalence of mental disorders. We also performed a comparative analysis using matched sets of one participant and four Australian-born residents, comparing prevalence results with conditional Poisson regression estimated risk ratios (RR). The prevalence of mental illness as measured by K10 was 50.4%, while 22.9% and 31.3% of participants screened positive for PTSD symptoms in the previous month and lifetime, respectively. The matched analysis yielded a risk ratio of 3.16 [95% confidence interval (CI): 2.30, 4.34] for abnormal K10, 2.25 (95% CI: 1.53, 3.29) for PTSD-lifetime and 4.44 (95% CI: 2.64, 7.48) for PTSD-month. This information on high absolute and relative risk of mental illness substantiate the increased need for mental health screening and care in this and potentially other refugee clinics and should be considered in relation to service planning. While the results cannot be generalised outside this setting, the method may be more broadly applicable, enabling the rapid collection of key information to support service planning for new waves of refugees and asylum-seekers. Matching data with existing national surveys is a useful way to estimate differences between groups at no additional cost, especially when the target group is comparatively small within a population.

  4. "Caring as if it were my family": health care aides' perspectives about expert care of the dying resident in a personal care home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClement, Susan; Wowchuk, Suzanne; Klaasen, Kathleen

    2009-12-01

    A qualitative pilot study was conducted to identify and describe expert behaviors in care of the dying resident in a personal care home setting from the perspective of health care aides (N = 5) nominated by their peers as demonstrating excellence in end-of-life care. Data was collected through audio-taped semi-structured interview, and transcribed verbatim using constant-comparative analysis procedures. The over-arching theme emerging from the data was "caring as if it were my family." Subsumed within this main theme included the sub-themes of: (1) care of the resident; (2) tending to the environment; (3) care of the family; (4) going to bat; and (5) processing loss. The findings from this pilot study provide preliminary empirical evidence that could inform educational programs for and performance evaluation of, health care aides providing end-of-life care in personal care home environments.

  5. High pressure air jet in the endoscopic preparation room: risk of noise exposure on occupational health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, King-Wah; Lu, Lung-Sheng; Wu, Cheng-Kun

    2015-01-01

    After high-level disinfection of gastrointestinal endoscopes, they are hung to dry in order to prevent residual water droplets impact on patient health. To allow for quick drying and clinical reuse, some endoscopic units use a high pressure air jet (HPAJ) to remove the water droplets on the endoscopes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the excessive noise exposure with the use of HPAJ in endoscopic preparation room and to investigate the risk to occupational health. Noise assessment was taken during 7 automatic endoscopic reprocessors (AERs) and combined with/without HPAJ use over an 8-hour time-weighted average (TWA). Analytical procedures of the NIOSH and the ISO for noise-induced hearing loss were estimated to develop analytic models. The peak of the noise spectrum of combined HPAJ and 7 AERs was significantly higher than that of the 7 AERs alone (108.3 ± 1.36 versus 69.3 ± 3.93 dBA, P  2.5 dB) was 2.15% at 90 dBA, 11.6% at 95 dBA, and 51.3% at 100 dBA. The odds ratio was 49.1 (95% CI: 11.9 to 203.6). The noise generated by the HPAJ to work over TWA seriously affected the occupational health and safety of those working in an endoscopic preparation room.

  6. Residents' Satisfaction With the PRITE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, K L; Ticknor, C B

    1989-09-01

    Examinations are an integral part of resident and program evaluation, but they are considered particularly stressful on residents. The department of psychiatry of the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio administered the Psychiatry Resident-in-Training Examination (PRTTE) every other year to minimize stress and anxiety among residents. When questioned about their satisfaction with the PRTTE and its administration, the residents reported high levels of satisfaction and a desire to take the examination yearly. Dissatisfaction was limited to the physical environment in which the exam was administered.

  7. Psychological distress of residents in Kawauchi village, Fukushima Prefecture after the accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station: the Fukushima Health Management Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Koji; Shinkawa, Tetsuko; Urata, Hideko; Nakashima, Kanami; Orita, Makiko; Yasui, Kiyotaka; Kumagai, Atsushi; Ohtsuru, Akira; Yabe, Hirooki; Maeda, Masaharu; Hayashida, Naomi; Kudo, Takashi; Yamashita, Shunichi; Takamura, Noboru

    2016-01-01

    To shed light on the mental health of evacuees after the accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FDNPS), we evaluate the results of the Fukushima Health Management Survey (FHMS) of the residents at Kawauchi village in Fukushima, which is located less than 30 km from the FDNPS. We conducted the cross-sectional study within the framework of the FHMS. Exposure values were "anorexia," "subjective feelings about health," "feelings about sleep satisfaction," and "bereavement caused by the disaster," confounding variables were "age" and "sex," and outcome variables were "K6 points." We collected data from the FHMS, and employed the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K6) and the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) Checklist Stressor-Specific Version (PCL-S) to carry out the research. A total of 13 or greater was the cut-off for identifying serious mental illness using the K6 scale. The study subjects included residents (n = 542) of over 30 years of age from Kawauchi village, and data were used from the period of January 1, 2012 to October 31, 2012. A total of 474 residents (87.5%) scored less than 13 points in the K6 and 68 (12.6%) scored 13 points or more. The proportion of elderly residents (over 65 years old) among people with K6 score above the cut-off was higher than that among people with K6 score below the cut-off (44.1 vs 31.0%, p Fukushima, there is a need to continue providing them with physical and mental support, as well as communication regarding the health risks of radiation.

  8. Length of Residence in the United States is Associated With a Higher Prevalence of Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Immigrants: A Contemporary Analysis of the National Health Interview Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Commodore?Mensah, Yvonne; Ukonu, Nwakaego; Obisesan, Olawunmi; Aboagye, Jonathan Kumi; Agyemang, Charles; Reilly, Carolyn M.; Dunbar, Sandra B.; Okosun, Ike S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiometabolic risk (CMR) factors including hypertension, overweight/obesity, diabetes mellitus, and hyperlipidemia are high among United States ethnic minorities, and the immigrant population continues to burgeon. Methods and Results Hypothesizing that acculturation (length of residence) would be associated with a higher prevalence of CMR factors, the authors analyzed data on 54, 984 US immigrants in the 2010?2014 National Health Interview Surveys. The main predictor was length o...

  9. Prospective monitoring of health problems among recreational runners preparing for a half marathon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollander, Karsten; Baumann, Antje; Zech, Astrid; Verhagen, Evert

    2018-01-01

    While the health benefits of running are legitimately advocated, participation in running can also lead to health problems. There is a high range of reported prevalence rates especially of running-related overuse injuries in high-level athletes and during competition. Little consensus exists for acute injuries and illnesses especially in recreational runners. Therefore, the aim of this study was to record the prevalence of health problems in recreational long-distance runners preparing for an event. Recreational runners aged 18-65 years who were registered 13 weeks prior to a half-marathon running event were invited to take part in this study. Participants were prospectively monitored weekly over 13 weeks by applying a standardised surveillance system for injuries and illnesses (Oslo Sports Trauma Research Center questionnaire). From this, prevalence and severity of acute and overuse injuries, as well as illnesses, were calculated. We received 3213 fully answered questionnaires from 327 participants (40.7% female, 40.9±11.7 years of age, 31.5±21.1 km weekly mileage, 8.3±7.8 years of running experience). At any point in time over the preparation phase, 37.3% of the participants had health problems. Overuse injuries were the major burden (18%). They were followed by illnesses (14.1%) and acute injuries (7.9%). The median weekly severity score was 56.5 (IQR 37.0-58.0). The high prevalence of health problems in our cohort suggests that future efforts are needed to further specify the underlying mechanism and develop adequate prevention strategies for recreational runners.

  10. Bioterrorism--a health emergency: do physicians believe there is a threat and are they prepared for it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switala, Claudia A; Coren, Joshua; Filipetto, Frank A; Gaughan, John P; Ciervo, Carman A

    2011-01-01

    To determine whether bioterrorism training provided increased awareness and understanding of bioterrorism and to assess physicians' beliefs about the threat of bioterrorism and how it impacts on preparedness. This is a retrospective review of data obtained from a bioterrorism training grant. Data were obtained from a postevaluation form completed by trainees with an 80 percent return rate. The Institutional Review Board approved this study. Informed consent was not required as data were deidentified and demographic information regarding study subjects was not used. The Department of Family Medicine within the University of Medicine and and Dentistry of New Jersey, School of Osteopathic Medicine in Stratford, NJ, conducted the training and follow-up study. The bioterrorism preparedness training was targeted to physicians, residents, and third- and fourth-year medical students in New Jersey. There were 578 trainees; however, responses to each question were varied. Trainees were asked to complete an evaluation form. Specific questions were selected from the form. Frequency statistics were used to describe responses to the questions. Ninety-four percent of the respondents agreed that the bioterrorism training increased their awareness and/or understanding of bioterrorism; however, only 49 percent believe there is a high probability that a bioterrorism event or other health emergency will occur in the near future in New Jersey, and 42 percent considered themselves prepared to respond as a healthcare professional to a bioterrorism event. Physicians in New Jersey increased their awareness and understanding of bioterrorism through training. However, concerns remain that a physician's belief in a low threat of bioterrorism translates into a low need for bioterrorism preparedness training.

  11. Studying consumer behaviour related to the quality of food: A case on vegetable preparation affecting sensory and health attributes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongoni, R.; Steenbekkers, L.P.A.; Verkerk, R.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.; Dekker, M.

    2013-01-01

    The domestic preparation of vegetables induces a significant change in their sensory and health attributes. The preparation of vegetables by consumers is likely to be controlled by assessing perceivable (sensory) quality attributes such as colour and texture because other quality attributes,

  12. Preparing Physical and Health Education Teacher Candidates to Create a Culture of Wellness in Schools: New Curriculum, New Message

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Hannah J.; Nichols, Randall; Leight, Joanne M.; Clark, Gary E.

    2017-01-01

    We live in a dynamic educational world. Physical and health education teacher preparation programs must examine what society needs and consider a new model for teacher preparation that is based on inspiring youth to build healthy behaviors that last a lifetime. One university created a new School Wellness Education (SWE) program that prepares…

  13. Potential health risk for residents around a typical e-waste recycling zone via inhalation of size-fractionated particle-bound heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chun-Li; Bao, Lian-Jun; Luo, Pei; Wang, Zhao-Yi; Li, Shao-Meng; Zeng, Eddy Y

    2016-11-05

    Health risk of residents dwelling around e-waste recycling zones has been a global concern, but has not been adequately examined. The present study was intended to evaluate the potential health risk of residents through inhalation exposure to size-fractionated particle-bound heavy metals in a typical e-waste recycling zone, South China. Anthropogenic metals (Zn, Se, Pb, Sb, As, and Cd) were predominantly enriched in fine particles (Dp1.8μm). Although the daily inhalation intakes of the target metals were significantly lower than those through food consumption and ingestion of house dust, the hazard quotients of total metals for adults (95% CI: 1.0-5.5) and children (95% CI: 3.0-17) were greater than 1. Moreover, the incremental lifetime cancer risks of five carcinogenic metals (Cr, Co, Ni, As, and Cd) for adults and children were 1.3×10(-3) (95% CI: 4.1×10(-4)-3.0×10(-3)) and 3.9×10(-3) (95% CI: 1.3×10(-3)-8.6×10(-3)), respectively, substantially higher than the acceptable cancer risk range of 10(-6)-10(-4). All these findings suggested that health risks were high for local residents dwelling around the e-waste recycling zone through inhalation exposure to particle-bound heavy metals, for both adults and children. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. "Everyone was looking at you smiling": East London residents' experiences of the 2012 Olympics and its legacy on the social determinants of health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, C; Lewis, D J; Greenhalgh, T; Smith, N R; Fahy, A E; Cummins, S

    2015-11-01

    Mega-sporting event regeneration, as a specific approach to urban renewal, uses impending host-city status as a catalyst for revitalisation and has the potential to improve health both through addressing deprivation and by promoting increased sport and physical activity among the host-city's population. This qualitative study explored how hosting of the London 2012 Games impacted upon the way East London residents perceived and experienced the social determinants of health in their local neighbourhood. We conducted narrative family interviews, go-along interviews and video focus group workshops with 66 Newham residents, aged 12-55 years, immediately after the Games. A narrative analytic approach examined accounts of health and wellbeing experiences in terms of neighbourhood change and the spectacle of the Games. Participants of this qualitative study generally welcomed the respite and the unexpected chance to live in a cleaner, safer and more unified environment. However, this positivity was underscored by an acute awareness that this was a very temporary situation and one that was intended to support the event rather than residents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [Healthcare utilisation of those affected by the shooting incident in Alphen aan den Rijn, the Netherlands; health of affected and non-affected neighbouring residents 1 year afterwards].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Christel E; van der Sman-de Beer, Femke; Tielen, J T Hanneke; van der Velden, Peter G; IJzermans, C Joris

    2014-01-01

    To examine the effects of the mass shooting in the city of Alphen aan den Rijn, the Netherlands, on 9 April 2011 on the health and healthcare utilisation of those affected, compared with a reference group of neighbouring residents. Observational longitudinal study. Those affected by the shooting incident and a reference group of neighbouring residents were identified using patient and health care data from various care providers (Dutch Victim Support (SHN), Dutch Association of Mental Health and Addiction Care, social work), in which the request for assistance was documented. The health and healthcare process of 161 affected persons and 115 local residents in the year before and the year after the mass shooting could be followed with data extracted from the electronic medical records of general practices. The effects of the mass shooting on health and healthcare utilisation were analysed with logistic and Poisson multilevel regression analyses for repeated measurements. After the mass shooting, the prevalence of psychological and social problems presented to the GP increased for affected persons (OR: 2.99; 95% CI: 1.75-5.12) compared with the year before the shooting incident, and differed from the reference group (OR: 2.68; 95% CI: 0.93-7.72). In particular, there was a sharp increase in the prevalence of anxiety and stress reactions (OR: 4.07; 95% CI: 1.86-8.92) and the prescription of hypnotics and sedatives (OR: 2.32; 95% CI: 1.08-4.98) and benzodiazepines (OR: 187; 95% CI: 1.07-3.26). However, these problems declined significantly after the first quarter. A small group of people was treated by mental health care for a post-traumatic stress disorder while half of those affected had registered with SHN. For a limited period of time, the mass shooting had a negative impact on the psychological well-being and healthcare utilisation of those affected.

  16. Health status of residents in Chongqing and its influencing factors%重庆市居民健康状况及其影响因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭涛; 钟晓妮

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the health status of residents in Chongqing and the factors affecting health intervention strategies. Methods In this study, two weeks prevalence, chronic disease and disability were regarded as the main indicators of health of residents. We used logistic regression analysis to analyze the gender, age, culture, income, marriage, career and other causes of the health of residents. Results Sex, age, culture, income, marriage and career had certain influence on the health of residents. Women, the elderly population, low income groups, lower educated groups and unemployed people were in relatively poor health status. Conclusions Rural area is the focus of public health. Women, the elderly population, low income groups, lower educated groups and unemployed people have the priority of health interventions.%目的 了解重庆市居民健康状况及其影响因素,提出重点与优先健康干预策略,为制定健康促进策略提供参考依据.方法 以两周患病、慢性病患病及残障作为衡量居民健康水平的主要指标,采用Logistic回归模型,分析性别、年龄、文化、居民收入、婚姻和职业等原因变量对居民健康的影响程度.结果 性别、年龄、文化、居民收入、婚姻和职业对居民健康具有一定的影响,女性、老年人群、经济收入较低人群、文化层次较低人群和失业人群健康状况相对较差.结论 农村是卫生工作的重点,健康干预应以女性、老年人群、经济收入较低人群、文化层次较低人群和失业人群为优先.

  17. Psychological distress of residents in Kawauchi village, Fukushima Prefecture after the accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station: the Fukushima Health Management Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Yoshida

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background To shed light on the mental health of evacuees after the accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FDNPS, we evaluate the results of the Fukushima Health Management Survey (FHMS of the residents at Kawauchi village in Fukushima, which is located less than 30 km from the FDNPS. Methods We conducted the cross-sectional study within the framework of the FHMS. Exposure values were “anorexia,” “subjective feelings about health,” “feelings about sleep satisfaction,” and “bereavement caused by the disaster,” confounding variables were “age” and “sex,” and outcome variables were “K6 points.” We collected data from the FHMS, and employed the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K6 and the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD Checklist Stressor-Specific Version (PCL-S to carry out the research. A total of 13 or greater was the cut-off for identifying serious mental illness using the K6 scale. The study subjects included residents (n = 542 of over 30 years of age from Kawauchi village, and data were used from the period of January 1, 2012 to October 31, 2012. Results A total of 474 residents (87.5% scored less than 13 points in the K6 and 68 (12.6% scored 13 points or more. The proportion of elderly residents (over 65 years old among people with K6 score above the cut-off was higher than that among people with K6 score below the cut-off (44.1 vs 31.0%, p < 0.05. In addition, the proportion of residents with anorexia and mental illness among people with K6 score above the cut-off was higher than among people with K6 score below the cut-off (p < 0.001 and p < 0.05, respectively. The amount of residents who scored 44 points or more in the PCL-S among people with K6 score above the cut-off was also considerably higher than among people with K6 score below the cut-off (79.4 vs 12.9%, p < 0.001. Interestingly, the proportion of residents who scored more than among people with K6 score above the cut-off and the

  18. Hurricane Public Health Research Center at Louisiana State University a Case of Academia Being Prepared

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heerden, I. L.

    2006-12-01

    Recent floods along the Atlantic and Gulf seaboards and elsewhere in the world before Katrina had demonstrated the complexity of public health impacts including trauma; fires; chemical, sewerage, and corpse contamination of air and water; and diseases. We realized that Louisiana's vulnerability was exacerbated because forty percent of the state is coastal zone in which 70% of the population resides. Ninety percent of this zone is near or below sea level and protected by man-made hurricane-protection levees. New Orleans ranked among the highest in the nation with respect to potential societal, mortality, and economic impacts. Recognizing that emergency responders had in the past been unprepared for the extent of the public health impacts of these complex flooding disasters, we created a multi-disciplinary, multi-campus research center to address these issues for New Orleans. The Louisiana Board of Regents, through its millennium Health Excellence Fund, awarded a 5-year contract to the Center in 2001. The research team combined the resources of natural scientists, social scientists, engineers, and the mental health and medical communities. We met annually with a Board of Advisors, made up of federal, state, local government, and non-governmental agency officials, first responders and emergency managers. Their advice was invaluable in acquiring various datasets and directing aspects of the various research efforts. Our center developed detailed models for assessment and amelioration of public health impacts due to hurricanes and major floods. Initial research had showed that a Category 3 storm would cause levee overtopping, and that most levee systems were unprotected from the impacts of storm-induced wave erosion. Sections of levees with distinct sags suggested the beginnings of foundation and subsidence problems. We recognized that a slow moving Cat 3 could flood up to the eaves of houses and would have residence times of weeks. The resultant mix of sewage, corpses

  19. A Study to Assess Knowledge and Attitude Regarding Hand Hygiene amongst Residents and Nursing Staff in a Tertiary Health Care Setting of Bhopal City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Veena; Kaore, Navin Chandra M; Ramnani, Vijay Kumar; Gupta, Sanjay Kumar; Borle, Amod; Kaushal, Rituja

    2014-08-01

    Infection due to hospital-acquired microbes is an evolving problem worldwide, and horizontal transmission of bacterial organism continues to cause a high nosocomial infection rate in health care settings. Most nosocomial infections are thought to be transmitted by the hands of health care workers.The application of hand hygiene is effective in reducing infection rates. To assess the level of knowledge and attitude regarding hand hygiene practices amongst the health care professionals and to identify areas of gaps in their knowledge and attitude. A cross-sectional study. A total 160 respondents were studied about their knowledge and attitude towards hand hygiene practices and significant difference with a p-value of 0.0025 was observed regarding most frequent source of germs responsible for health care associated infections among resident and nurses. A significant difference with p-value of 0.0001 & 0.04 was observed in colonization due to jewellery and artificial nail among the study groups. The attitude regarding correct hand hygiene practices to be followed at all times was found to be better among nurses (62.5%) as compared to residents (21.3%) which was found to be highly significant with p-value hygiene practices among the health care workers to provide the current knowledge in the area with a behavioral change in attitudes and practices leading to reduction of nosocomial infections.

  20. Cognitive-Motivational Determinants of Residents' Civic Engagement and Health (Inequities) in the Context of Noise Action Planning: A Conceptual Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Natalie; van Kamp, Irene; Köckler, Heike; Scheiner, Joachim; Loerbroks, Adrian; Claßen, Thomas; Bolte, Gabriele

    2017-05-30

    The Environmental Noise Directive expects residents to be actively involved in localising and selecting noise abatement interventions during the noise action planning process. Its intervention impact is meant to be homogeneous across population groups. Against the background of social heterogeneity and environmental disparities, however, the impact of noise action planning on exposure to traffic-related noise and its health effects is unlikely to follow homogenous distributions. Until now, there has been no study evaluating the impact of noise action measures on the social distribution of traffic-related noise exposure and health outcomes. We develop a conceptual (logic) model on cognitive-motivational determinants of residents' civic engagement and health (inequities) by integrating arguments from the Model on household's Vulnerability to the local Environment, the learned helplessness model in environmental psychology, the Cognitive Activation Theory of Stress, and the reserve capacity model. Specifically, we derive four hypothetical patterns of cognitive-motivational determinants yielding different levels of sustained physiological activation and expectancies of civic engagement. These patterns may help us understand why health inequities arise in the context of noise action planning and learn how to transform noise action planning into an instrument conducive to health equity. While building on existing frameworks, our conceptual model will be tested empirically in the next stage of our research process.

  1. The Functional Foods Dossier: Building Solid Health Claims. How to prepare the scientific dossier for health claims of European functional food. Practical Industrial guide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    dr. Korver, O.; Kühn, M.C.; Richardson, D.P.

    2004-01-01

    This practical book explains to the industry manager all the special aspects related to the preparation of the scientific dossier for health claims of European functional foods (science, legislation, communication, product development).

  2. Accessibility to health care facilities in Montreal Island: an application of relative accessibility indicators from the perspective of senior and non-senior residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paez, Antonio; Mercado, Ruben G; Farber, Steven; Morency, Catherine; Roorda, Matthew

    2010-10-25

    Geographical access to health care facilities is known to influence health services usage. As societies age, accessibility to health care becomes an increasingly acute public health concern. It is known that seniors tend to have lower mobility levels, and it is possible that this may negatively affect their ability to reach facilities and services. Therefore, it becomes important to examine the mobility situation of seniors vis-a-vis the spatial distribution of health care facilities, to identify areas where accessibility is low and interventions may be required. Accessibility is implemented using a cumulative opportunities measure. Instead of assuming a fixed bandwidth (i.e. a distance threshold) for measuring accessibility, in this paper the bandwidth is defined using model-based estimates of average trip length. Average trip length is an all-purpose indicator of individual mobility and geographical reach. Adoption of a spatial modelling approach allows us to tailor these estimates of travel behaviour to specific locations and person profiles. Replacing a fixed bandwidth with these estimates permits us to calculate customized location- and person-based accessibility measures that allow inter-personal as well as geographical comparisons. The case study is Montreal Island. Geo-coded travel behaviour data, specifically average trip length, and relevant traveller's attributes are obtained from the Montreal Household Travel Survey. These data are complemented with information from the Census. Health care facilities, also geo-coded, are extracted from a comprehensive business point database. Health care facilities are selected based on Standard Industrial Classification codes 8011-21 (Medical Doctors and Dentists). Model-based estimates of average trip length show that travel behaviour varies widely across space. With the exception of seniors in the downtown area, older residents of Montreal Island tend to be significantly less mobile than people of other age cohorts

  3. Awareness and knowledge of schistosomiasis infection and prevention in the "Three Gorges Dam" reservoir area: a cross-sectional study on local residents and health personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Huan; Yang, Xiaowei; Meng, Siying; Wang, Hong; Tang, Xiaojun; Tang, Wenge; Zeng, Shu; Jeschke, Sandra; Wang, Yang

    2011-12-01

    Schistosomiasis is a severe public health problem in China. It has been predicted that the ecological changes caused by the "Three Gorges Dam", the world's largest hydropower project, could potentially aggravate the spread of schistosomiasis in the area. This study focused on investigating (a) local residents' knowledge on the potential risks of schistosomiasis and (b) the capability of local health personnel in preventing schistosomiasis. A quantitative survey combined with qualitative interviews was conducted in three counties of the reservoir area during November and December 2008. A total of 1386 inhabitants and 180 local health personals participated in questionnaire survey; 18 inhabitants, 21 health professionals, and 8 local government officials were interviewed. Of the surveyed inhabitants, 66.3% had no access to safe drinking water; 47.9% had water-contact regularly through farming or swimming; 58.7% did not have hygienic toilets; and only 13.7% used methane for energy. Besides, only 3.8% of the inhabitants had knowledge scores higher than 6 points within the range 0-10. Educational level, occupation and income were significant predictors of knowledge score (P<0.05). Only about 5% of the inhabitants had some knowledge on schistosomiasis. Among health professionals surveyed, 6.7% had college or higher education; 26.7% had prior schistosomiasis control experience; 75.6% did not receive any relevant training in the past year; and only 52.2% had basic knowledge of schistosomiasis. The logistic regression analysis identified occupation and time at work as significant factors to their knowledge level (P<0.05). Moreover, the surveillance work was often severely hindered by a shortage of funding, and challenged by monitoring of migrant population. There were very limited training opportunities for the health workers, and almost no health education for inhabitants, if any, neither efficient nor effective. Although there were multiple risks for potential Schistosoma

  4. Accessibility to health care facilities in Montreal Island: an application of relative accessibility indicators from the perspective of senior and non-senior residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morency Catherine

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Geographical access to health care facilities is known to influence health services usage. As societies age, accessibility to health care becomes an increasingly acute public health concern. It is known that seniors tend to have lower mobility levels, and it is possible that this may negatively affect their ability to reach facilities and services. Therefore, it becomes important to examine the mobility situation of seniors vis-a-vis the spatial distribution of health care facilities, to identify areas where accessibility is low and interventions may be required. Methods Accessibility is implemented using a cumulative opportunities measure. Instead of assuming a fixed bandwidth (i.e. a distance threshold for measuring accessibility, in this paper the bandwidth is defined using model-based estimates of average trip length. Average trip length is an all-purpose indicator of individual mobility and geographical reach. Adoption of a spatial modelling approach allows us to tailor these estimates of travel behaviour to specific locations and person profiles. Replacing a fixed bandwidth with these estimates permits us to calculate customized location- and person-based accessibility measures that allow inter-personal as well as geographical comparisons. Data The case study is Montreal Island. Geo-coded travel behaviour data, specifically average trip length, and relevant traveller's attributes are obtained from the Montreal Household Travel Survey. These data are complemented with information from the Census. Health care facilities, also geo-coded, are extracted from a comprehensive business point database. Health care facilities are selected based on Standard Industrial Classification codes 8011-21 (Medical Doctors and Dentists. Results Model-based estimates of average trip length show that travel behaviour varies widely across space. With the exception of seniors in the downtown area, older residents of Montreal Island tend to be

  5. Perspectives of Australian nursing directors regarding educational preparation for mental health nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happell, Brenda; McAllister, Margaret

    2014-11-01

    There is an ongoing global shortage of mental health nurses. Within Australia, the principal strategy of offering a postgraduate education programme with various incentives to encourage nurses back to study has not been successful. This has led to the consideration of radical alternatives, including the return to pre-registration specialisation in mental health. The successful introduction of this strategy would require the full support of industry partners. To date, the voice of industry has not been heard in relation to this issue. The aim of this paper is to present the views of an Australian sample of mental health nursing directors regarding the resources and other factors required, should undergraduate specialist programmes in mental health be developed, to ensure they are relevant and likely to be successful. A qualitative exploratory research project was undertaken to explore the perspectives and opinions of industry partners. In-depth interviews were conducted with nursing directors (n = 12) in Queensland Australia. Five main themes were identified: relationships with universities; clinical placement preparation and support; workplace culture; facilitators and preceptors; and practical student learning. Genuine collaboration between the two organisations was considered crucial for delivering a quality programme and providing the required support for students. Transformative leadership could inform this collaboration by promoting acknowledgement of and respect for differences.

  6. Urban-rural differences in social capital in relation to self-rated health and subjective well-being in older residents of six regions in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobiasz-Adamczyk, Beata; Zawisza, Katarzyna

    2017-06-12

    The aim of the study was to assess the differences between rural and urban areas as regards the role of social capital and its effect on self-rated health and subjective well-being among older people in Poland. The sample was selected on the basis of multi-stage clustered design from the non-institutionalized adult population. Analysis was based on 1,299 elderly people aged 65 and over from the general Polish population who participated in the COURAGE in Europe project. Six regions of Poland were distinguished according to first level of Nomenclature of Units for Territorial Statistics (NUTS) classification . As an indicator of social capital, the COURAGE Social Network Index, the OSLO-3 Social Support Scale, and the three item UCLA Loneliness scale were used, as well as social participation and trust was assessed. Self-rated health (SRH) was measured by WHO-Europe recommended version (ranging from 'very good' to 'very bad'). Well-being was assessed by the Day Reconstruction Method. Results: The results showed that in urban areas, social network and social participation supported positive self-rated health; in rural, older residents the number of years of education and social support played the same role, while self-rated health decreased with an increasing level of loneliness. Self-rated health decreased in both groups of older people with a growing number of diseases. The multivariate linear regression model of predictors of well-being in older age also confirmed differences between urban and rural elderly residents. In rural residents, subjective well-being significantly increased with the positive effect of the social network. In both urban and rural areas, poor assessment of subjective well-being in older age increased with a higher level of loneliness and growing number of chronic diseases.

  7. The Impact of a Health Campaign on Hand Hygiene and Upper Respiratory Illness among College Students Living in Residence Halls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Cindy; Kolble, Robin; Carlson, Rebecca; Lipson, Natasha

    2005-01-01

    Hand hygiene is a key element in preventing the transmission of cold and flu viruses. The authors conducted an experimental-control design study in 4 campus residence halls to determine whether a message campaign about hand hygiene and the availability of gel hand sanitizer could decrease cold and flu illness and school and work absenteeism. Their…

  8. An Intervention to Improve the Oral Health of Residents in an Aged Care Facility Led by Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinkhorn, F. A.; Weingarten, L.; Boivin, L.; Plain, J.; Kay, M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The growing population of elderly people is impacting on overstretched dental services in many countries, as many individuals are retaining natural teeth and may have dentures or implants, all of which influence the way in which the oral cavity must be cared for. A major difficulty for older residents is their decreasing level of…

  9. Perceptions of Health Co-Benefits in Relation to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reductions: A Survey among Urban Residents in Three Chinese Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinghong Gao

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Limited information is available on the perceptions of stakeholders concerning the health co-benefits of greenhouse gas (GHG emission reductions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the perceptions of urban residents on the health co-benefits involving GHG abatement and related influencing factors in three cities in China. Beijing, Ningbo and Guangzhou were selected for this survey. Participants were recruited from randomly chosen committees, following quotas for gender and age in proportion to the respective population shares. Chi-square or Fisher’s exact tests were employed to examine the associations between socio-demographic variables and individuals’ perceptions of the health co-benefits related to GHG mitigation. Unconditional logistic regression analysis was performed to investigate the influencing factors of respondents’ awareness about the health co-benefits. A total of 1159 participants were included in the final analysis, of which 15.9% reported that they were familiar with the health co-benefits of GHG emission reductions. Those who were younger, more educated, with higher family income, and with registered urban residence, were more likely to be aware of health co-benefits. Age, attitudes toward air pollution and governmental efforts to improve air quality, suffering from respiratory diseases, and following low carbon lifestyles are significant predictors of respondents’ perceptions on the health co-benefits. These findings may not only provide information to policy-makers to develop and implement public welcome policies of GHG mitigation, but also help to bridge the gap between GHG mitigation measures and public engagement as well as willingness to change health-related behaviors.

  10. Pathways between acculturation and health behaviors among residents of low-income housing: the mediating role of social and contextual factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jennifer Dacey; Caspi, Caitlin; Yang, May; Leyva, Bryan; Stoddard, Anne M; Tamers, Sara; Tucker-Seeley, Reginald D; Sorensen, Glorian C

    2014-12-01

    Acculturation may influence health behaviors, yet mechanisms underlying its effect are not well understood. In this study, we describe relationships between acculturation and health behaviors among low-income housing residents, and examine whether these relationships are mediated by social and contextual factors. Residents of 20 low-income housing sites in the Boston metropolitan area completed surveys that assessed acculturative characteristics, social/contextual factors, and health behaviors. A composite acculturation scale was developed using latent class analysis, resulting in four distinct acculturative groups. Path analysis was used to examine interrelationships between acculturation, health behaviors, and social/contextual factors, specifically self-reported social ties, social support, stress, material hardship, and discrimination. Of the 828 respondents, 69% were born outside of the U.S. Less acculturated groups exhibited healthier dietary practices and were less likely to smoke than more acculturated groups. Acculturation had a direct effect on diet and smoking, but not physical activity. Acculturation also showed an indirect effect on diet through its relationship with material hardship. Our finding that material hardship mediated the relationship between acculturation and diet suggests the need to explicate the significant role of financial resources in interventions seeking to promote healthy diets among low-income immigrant groups. Future research should examine these social and contextual mediators using larger, population-based samples, preferably with longitudinal data. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Adolescent medicine: attitudes, training, and experience of pediatric, family medicine, and obstetric-gynecology residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kershnar, Rebecca; Hooper, Charlene; Gold, Marji; Norwitz, Errol R; Illuzzi, Jessica L

    2009-12-01

    Several studies have documented a deficiency in the delivery of preventive services to adolescents during physician visits in the United States. This study sought to assess and compare pediatric, family medicine (FM), and obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN) resident perceptions of their responsibility, training, and experience with providing comprehensive health care services to adolescents. A 57-item, close-ended survey was designed and administered to assess resident perceptions of the scope of their practice, training, and experience with providing adolescent health care across a series of health care categories. Of the 87 respondents (31 OB/GYN, 29 FM, and 27 pediatric), most residents from all three fields felt that the full range of adolescent preventive and clinical services represented in the survey fell under their scope of practice. Residents from all three fields need more training and experience with mental health issues, referring teenagers to substance abuse treatment programs, and addressing physical and sexual abuse. In addition, OB-GYN residents reported deficiencies in training and experience regarding several preventive counseling and general health services, while pediatric residents reported deficiencies in training and experience regarding sexual health services. Our results indicate that at this time, residents from these three specialties are not optimally prepared to provide the full range of recommended preventive and clinical services to adolescents.

  12. Adolescent Medicine: Attitudes, Training, and Experience Of Pediatric, Family Medicine, and Obstetric-Gynecology Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kershnar, Rebecca; Hooper, Charlene; Gold, Marji; Norwitz, Errol R.; Illuzzi, Jessica L.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Several studies have documented a deficiency in the delivery of preventive services to adolescents during physician visits in the United States. This study sought to assess and compare pediatric, family medicine (FM), and obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN) resident perceptions of their responsibility, training, and experience with providing comprehensive health care services to adolescents. Methods: A 57-item, close-ended survey was designed and administered to assess resident perceptions of the scope of their practice, training, and experience with providing adolescent health care across a series of health care categories. Results: Of the 87 respondents (31 OB/GYN, 29 FM, and 27 pediatric), most residents from all three fields felt that the full range of adolescent preventive and clinical services represented in the survey fell under their scope of practice. Residents from all three fields need more training and experience with mental health issues, referring teenagers to substance abuse treatment programs, and addressing physical and sexual abuse. In addition, OB-GYN residents reported deficiencies in training and experience regarding several preventive counseling and general health services, while pediatric residents reported deficiencies in training and experience regarding sexual health services. Conclusions: Our results indicate that at this time, residents from these three specialties are not optimally prepared to provide the full range of recommended preventive and clinical services to adolescents. PMID:20027278

  13. Teaching evidence-based practice principles to prepare health professions students for an interprofessional learning experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronoff, Nell; Stellrecht, Elizabeth; Lyons, Amy G; Zafron, Michelle L; Glogowski, Maryruth; Grabowski, Jeremiah; Ohtake, Patricia J

    2017-10-01

    The research assessed online learning modules designed to teach health professions students evidence-based practice (EBP) principles in an interprofessional context across two institutions. Students from nine health professions at two institutions were recruited to participate in this pilot project consisting of two online learning modules designed to prepare students for an in-person case-based interprofessional activity. Librarians and an instructional designer created two EBP modules. Students' competence in EBP was assessed before and after the modules as well as after the in-person activity. Students evaluated the online learning modules and their impact on the students' learning after the in-person session. A total of 39 students from 8 health professions programs participated in the project. Average quiz scores for online EBP module 1 and module 2 were 83% and 76%, respectively. Following completion of the learning modules, adapted Fresno test of competence in EBP scores increased ( p =0.001), indicating that the modules improved EBP skill competence. Student evaluations of the learning modules were positive. Students indicated that they acquired new information skills that contributed to their ability to develop a patient care plan and that they would use these information skills in their future clinical practice. Online EBP learning modules were effective in developing EBP knowledge and skills for health professions students. Using the same modules ensured that students from different health professions at different stages of their professional programs had consistent knowledge and enabled each student to fully engage in an interprofessional evidence-based activity. Student feedback indicated the modules were valued and beneficial.

  14. Influence of biological aerosol from wastewater treatment plants on workers and the local residents health – literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Michalak

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Bioaerosol forms microbes, their toxins and fragments of microorganisms suspended as small droplets or solid particles. The group particularly exposed are workers of sewage treatment plants and local residents. Literature reports stress the role of the fecal bacteria from the Enterobacteriaceae family and yeasts, which create a real risk of air pollution near the waste water treatment plants Emission of pathogenic microbes prevails in the neighbourhood of of sedimentation tanks, sludge drying beds. Research shows that the extent of bioaerosol influence reaches the distance of 3 km away from any waster water treatment plant.. The most frequent symptoms reported by workers from waste water treatment plants and local residents are respiratory disorders. There are also gastrointestinal and skin problems and general disorders, that can be explained by exposure to endotoxins in bioaerosol.

  15. Education Research: Neurology resident education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayans, David; Schneider, Logan; Adams, Nellie; Khawaja, Ayaz M.; Engstrom, John

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To survey US-trained graduating neurology residents who are American Academy of Neurology members, in an effort to trend perceived quality and completeness of graduate neurology education. Methods: An electronic survey was sent to all American Academy of Neurology members graduating from US neurology residency programs in the Spring of 2014. Results: Of 805 eligible respondents, 24% completed the survey. Ninety-three percent of adult neurology residents and 56% of child neurology residents reported plans to pursue fellowship training after residency. Respondents reported a desire for additional training in neurocritical care, neuro-oncology, neuromuscular diseases, botulinum toxin injection, and nerve blocks. There remains a clear deficit in business training of neurology residents, although there was notable improvement in knowledge of coding and office management compared to previous surveys. Discussion: Although there are still areas of perceived weakness in neurology training, graduating neurology residents feel generally well prepared for their chosen careers. However, most still pursue fellowship training for reasons that are little understood. In addition to certain subspecialties and procedures, practice management remains deficient in neurology training and is a point of future insecurity for most residents. Future curriculum changes should consider resident-reported gaps in knowledge, with careful consideration of improving business training. PMID:26976522

  16. Mentoring in psychiatric residency programs: a survey of chief residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lis, Lea DeFrancisci; Wood, William C; Petkova, Eva; Shatkin, Jess

    2009-01-01

    Mentorship is an important component of graduate education. This study assessed the perceptions of general psychiatry chief residents regarding the adequacy of mentorship provided during training. The authors surveyed 229 chief residents participating in the APA National Chief Residents Leadership Program in 2004 and 2005. The survey assessed domains such as work hours, didactics, home and family life, and mentorship. Of the chief psychiatric residents surveyed, 49% reported that they did not have a clearly defined career development mentor, and 39% reported that they did not feel adequately mentored. Gender, race/ethnicity, marital status, moonlighting, medical school (American versus international), and type of residency program (academic versus community based) did not show significant association with either "having a clearly defined mentor" or "feeling adequately mentored," based on chi-squared tests for independence. Chief residents who had authored peer-reviewed publications were significantly more likely to report having a clearly defined mentor and to feel adequately mentored than those who did not author publications. Logistic regression analysis showed that having a clearly defined mentor was associated with twice the odds for feeling well prepared to practice psychiatry upon graduation compared with those who did not have a clearly defined mentor, even after controlling for gender, race, medical school, and residency program type. Half of the psychiatric chief residents surveyed reported the lack of a clearly defined career development mentor. In addition, a chief resident's response of lacking a clear mentor was associated with the perception of being less prepared to practice psychiatry upon graduation. Psychiatric residency training programs may benefit from further clarification and implementation of effective mentorship programs.

  17. The Spillover of US Immigration Policy on Citizens and Permanent Residents of Mexican Descent: How Internalizing ‘Illegality’ Impacts Public Health in the Borderlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha eSabo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The militarization of the U.S.-Mexico border region exacerbates the process of ‘Othering’ Latino immigrants—as illegal aliens. The internalization of ‘illegality’ can manifest as a sense of undeservingness of legal protection in the population and be detrimental on a biopsychological level. Objective: We explore the impacts of ‘illegality’ among a population of US citizen and permanent resident farmworkers of Mexican descent. We do so through the lens of immigration enforcement-related stress and the ability to file formal complaints of discrimination and mistreatment perpetrated by local immigration enforcement agents, including local police authorized to enforce immigration law. Methods: Drawing from cross-sectional data gathered through the National Institute of Occupation Safety and Health, Challenges to Farmworker Health at the US-Mexico Border study, a community-based participatory research project conducted at the Arizona-Sonora border, we compared Arizona resident farmworkers (N=349 to Mexico-based farmworkers (N=140 or Transnational farmworkers who cross the US-Mexico border daily or weekly to work in US agriculture. Results: Both samples of farmworkers experience significant levels of stress in anticipation of encounters with immigration officials. Fear was cited as the greatest factor preventing individuals from reporting immigration abuses. The groups varied slightly in the relative weight attributed to different types of fear. Conclusion: The militarization of the border has consequences for individuals who are not the target of immigration enforcement. These spillover effects cause harm to farmworkers in multiple ways. Multi institutional and community-centered systems for reporting immigration related victimization is required. Applied participatory research with affected communities can mitigate the public health effects of state-sponsored immigration discrimination and violence among US citizen and

  18. Health Risks to Children and Adults Residing in Riverine Environments where Surficial Sediments Contain Metals Generated by Active Gold Mining in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armah, Frederick Ato; Gyeabour, Elvis Kyere

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the current status of metal pollution in the sediment from rivers, lakes, and streams in active gold mining districts in Ghana. Two hundred and fifty surface sediment samples from 99 locations were collected and analyzed for concentrations of As, Hg, Cr, Co, Cu, Fe, Zn, Pb, Cd, Ni, and Mn using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). Metal concentrations were then used to assess the human health risks to resident children and adults in central tendency exposure (CTE) and reasonable maximum exposure (RME) scenarios. The concentrations of Pb, Cd, and As were almost twice the threshold values established by the Hong Kong Interim Sediment Quality Guidelines (ISQG). Hg, Cu, and Cr concentrations in sediment were 14, 20, and 26 times higher than the Canadian Freshwater Sediment Guidelines for these elements. Also, the concentrations of Pb, Cu, Cr, and Hg were 3, 11, 12, and 16 times more than the Australian and New Zealand Environment and Conservation Council (ANZECC) sediment guideline values. The results of the human health risk assessment indicate that for ingestion of sediment under the central tendency exposure (CTE) scenario, the cancer risks for child and adult residents from exposure to As were 4.18 × 10(-6) and 1.84 × 10(-7), respectively. This suggests that up to 4 children out of one million equally exposed children would contract cancer if exposed continuously to As over 70 years (the assumed lifetime). The hazard index for child residents following exposure to Cr(VI) in the RME scenario was 4.2. This is greater than the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) threshold of 1, indicating that adverse health effects to children from exposure to Cr(VI) are possible. This study demonstrates the urgent need to control industrial emissions and the severe heavy metal pollution in gold mining environments.

  19. The Spillover of US Immigration Policy on Citizens and Permanent Residents of Mexican Descent: How Internalizing "Illegality" Impacts Public Health in the Borderlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabo, Samantha; Lee, Alison Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The militarization of the US-Mexico border region exacerbates the process of "Othering" Latino immigrants - as "illegal aliens." The inter