WorldWideScience

Sample records for health manpower training

  1. [Health manpower in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martuscelli, J

    1986-01-01

    Population increase, rural-to-urban migration, excessive population concentration side by side with scattered rural populations, and the economic crisis provide the primary framework for this analysis of health manpower in Mexico. The secondary frame of reference is the primary causes of mortality (in 1981): the leading cause, accidents and violence; the second, heart disease; the third, influenza and pneumonia; and the fourth, enteric diseases and diarrheas. Data are supplied on the number of new physicians graduating (this number rose from 2,493 in 1976 to 14,099 in 1983), and on the number of nurses (about 98,000, of which 40% are professionals). The growth pattern of the contingent of dentists is the same as that of physicians, namely, disproportionate and inefficient. The Federal Government is now trying to set up a National Health System that will fulfill the constitutional right of all Mexican citizens to health protection. On the basis of the disequilibrium apparent in every part of the health sector, the author recommends that educational and health institutions plan and coordinate the training of physicians so that the number of graduates may meet the country's needs, and the quality of their education may be improved.

  2. Nuclear manpower training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, In Suk; Lee, H. Y.; Joe, B. J.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, E. J.; Yoo, B. H.; Seo, K. W.; Lee, W. K.; Jun, H. I.; Yang, K. N.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, I. H.; Kim, M. Y.; Ju, Y. C.; Hyun, H. Y.; Choi, I. G.; Hong, C. S.; Won, J. Y.; Nam, J. Y.; Lee, H. J.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the annual results of training courses. the scope and contents are as follows: 1. Regional and interregional training courses 2. Training courses assisted by foreign experts 3. Training courses for nuclear industry personnel 4. Training courses for internal staff-members 5. Training courses under the law. This Nuclear Training Center executed the open-door training courses for 2,400 engineers/scientists from the regulatory body, nuclear industries, research institutes and other related organizations by means of offering 51 training courses during the fiscal year 1996. (author). 23 refs.

  3. Nuclear manpower training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, In Suk; Lee, H. Y.; Lee, E. J.; Yang, K. N.; Jun, H. R.; Seo, K. W.; Lee, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, I. H.; Joe, B. J.; Koh, Y. S.; Yoo, B. H.; Kim, M. Y.; Ju, Y. C.; Hyun, H. U.; Choi, I. K.; Hong, C. S.; Won, J. Y.; Nam, J. Y.; Lee, H. J

    1997-12-01

    This report describes the annual results of training courses. The scope and contents are as follows: 1. Education program development of nuclear field 2. International training courses for foreigners 3. Training courses for industry personnel 4. Training courses for R and D staff-members 5. Training courses under the law. The nuclear training center executed 65 training courses for 2,700 engineers/ scientists from the regulatory body, nuclear industries, research institutes and other related organizations during the fiscal year 1997. (author). 18 refs., 3 tabs.

  4. [Health manpower in the Americas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, R P; Brito, P

    1986-01-01

    The article summarizes the country studies on the development of the health manpower situation published in this issue of Educación médica y Salud, Vol. 20, No. 3, 1986. The countries covered are Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Cuba, Colombia, Mexico, and the United States of America. In these studies, the concept of disequilibrium or lack of balance and proportion was used to describe and examine some specific situations. However, no study took this concept as an object of further theoretical development, and in some it was preferred to replace it explicitly with the term "problem." The following categories of health personnel are considered: physicians, nurses and "other professions" (the latter very briefly). Professional training, the labor market, the relationship between supply and demand and the relationship with the geographic distribution of members of the health professions in the country are discussed. The studies summarized show that the situations and trends are similar in most of the countries, but that specific variations exist owing to structural and situational aspects in each. The most notable differences are seen between the characteristics of the manpower in the developed and in the developing countries. The variations in the English-speaking countries of the Caribbean are also brought out. Finally, there is a discussion of the occupational pyramid of the human resources in the health field, which consists of three horizontal segments. At the vertex are the university-trained categories; the middle is occupied by the technicians and auxiliary personnel, and at the base are the occupations requiring a low educational level.

  5. Manpower

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Valsangkar, A; Nath, B.N.; Sharma, R.

    The recruitment, training and deployment of manpower for scientific work during an oceanographic expedition is discussed. Fifty scientists and 50 technicians in various disciplines of oceanography were recruited. A training in oceanography...

  6. Evaluation of Cardiology Training and Manpower Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Forrest H., Ed.; Mendenhall, Robert C., Ed.

    Begun in June, 1971 and completed in October 1973, the study had the following specific goals: to define the cardiologist's role; to determine cardiology training program objectives; to determine manpower needs for cardiologists; and to determine the educational needs of cardiologists. The major information was sought from all active cardiologists…

  7. Health Manpower Planning in Turkish Development Plans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih ŞANTAŞ

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Health manpower planning is process that includes macro and micro planning, manpower supply and requirement, manpower distribution, personnel standards, job description, job requirements and establishing control structures related all these. Since being established the State Planning Organization has been applied nine five-year development plan. Plans in the 1960s can be said to outweigh direction of statism, in 1960-1980 mixed economy and in 1980-2000 liberal. In this study since 1963 applied objectives of the planning of health manpower in the nine development planning is evaluated.

  8. Department of Defense Military Manpower Training Report, FY 1997

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1996-01-01

    The Military Manpower Training Report (MMTR) describes the student loads requested in the President's Budget for each category of individual institutional training for each active and reserve component of the Armed Forces...

  9. Yellowstone County Health Manpower and Education Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callen, John; And Others

    The profile is a concise description of the demographic and economic characteristics, existing health manpower employed, and health education programs for the Yellowstone County area of Montana, one of seven surveyed in the Mountain States region (Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, and Nevada). The first section of the profile provides general population…

  10. Activities Carried Out Under the Veterans' Administration Medical School Assistance and Health Manpower Training Act of 1972 (Public Law 92-541), An Annual Report Prepared by the Veterans' Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Veterans' Affairs.

    The third annual report (fiscal year 1979) of the activities carried out under the Veterans' Administration Medical School Assistance and Health Manpower Training Act of 1972 (Public Law 92-541) is presented. Under this special authority grants have been made to assist in the establishment of new state medical schools, to existing medical schools,…

  11. The congress and health manpower: a legislative morass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimmel, B

    1975-07-10

    To correct deficiencies in physicians' services, chiefly related to geographic maldistribution and overspecialization, numerous bills have been introduced in both the House and the Senate. These bills would increase the annual number of medical graduates, would mandate service in areas defined as lacking in physicians, and would promote the training of primary-care physicians as opposed to more specialized training. The number of foreign medical graduates would also be restricted. Almost all this legislation potentially may diminish the quality of medical education without substantially affecting the provision of health service. Recently introduced legislation (HR 3279), however, seems to deal more rationally with the problems of health manpower.

  12. OPTIMAL TRAINING POLICY FOR PROMOTION - STOCHASTIC MODELS OF MANPOWER SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.S.S. Yadavalli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the optimal planning of manpower training programmes in a manpower system with two grades is discussed. The planning of manpower training within a given organization involves a trade-off between training costs and expected return. These planning problems are examined through models that reflect the random nature of manpower movement in two grades. To be specific, the system consists of two grades, grade 1 and grade 2. Any number of persons in grade 2 can be sent for training and after the completion of training, they will stay in grade 2 and will be given promotion as and when vacancies arise in grade 1. Vacancies arise in grade 1 only by wastage. A person in grade 1 can leave the system with probability p. Vacancies are filled with persons in grade 2 who have completed the training. It is assumed that there is a perfect passing rate and that the sizes of both grades are fixed. Assuming that the planning horizon is finite and is T, the underlying stochastic process is identified as a finite state Markov chain and using dynamic programming, a policy is evolved to determine how many persons should be sent for training at any time k so as to minimize the total expected cost for the entire planning period T.

  13. A systematic review of health manpower forecasting models.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martins-Coelho, G.; Greuningen, M. van; Barros, H.; Batenburg, R.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Health manpower planning (HMP) aims at matching health manpower (HM) supply to the population’s health requirements. To achieve this, HMP needs information on future HM supply and requirement (S&R). This is estimated by several different forecasting models (FMs). In this paper, we review

  14. Manpower, Personnel, and Training Assessment (MPTA) Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    developmental technologies and products and services determined through market analysis. For most systems, the analysis shall consider and baseline...2. Time required 3. Resources (ranges, test equipment) – TRADOC i. Is there a Training Effectiveness Analysis ( TEA ) or formal training...failed tasks of training gaps) from New Equipment Training for any User or Operational Testing. - Training Effectiveness Analysis ( TEA ) a. Is

  15. A Projection of Maryland's Health Manpower Needs Through the 1980's.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coggeshall, Lowell T.; And Others

    Recommendations for meeting health manpower and training facility needs in Maryland are made, based on the included Coggeshall report. Demand for health personnel is contrasted with estimated future supplies. A third medical school should be planned and dependence on foreign physicians reduced. Rural areas should improve their own health services.…

  16. An Analysis of the Navy Manpower, Personnel, Training and Education Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    THE NAVY MANPOWER, PERSONNEL, TRAINING AND EDUCATION ARCHITECTURE by Ronald F. Kolpak III March 2017 Thesis Advisor: William Hatch... ARCHITECTURE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Ronald F. Kolpak III 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Postgraduate School Monterey...Distribution is unlimited. AN ANALYSIS OF THE NAVY MANPOWER, PERSONNEL, TRAINING AND EDUCATION ARCHITECTURE Ronald F. Kolpak III Lieutenant, United

  17. CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY – ACTUAL DIRECTION IN GROUNDING OF HEALTH MANPOWER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.G. Kucherov

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available In 90-ies years of last century in our country happened the crash of the system of values with transition to the standards of capitalistic society, and it lead to the formation of chronicle psychosocial stress of high and medium levels. Medics of all directions started to face functional psychosomatic diseases. Raised the necessity in grounding of health manpower in discipline of clinical psychology, with the learning of psychophisiological bases of diseases and possibilities if their correction. This direction of development of soviet medical education and health service in general seems progressive and prospective.

  18. Health Manpower Statistics, Fiscal Year 1985.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    CLINICAL N 0 5 3 FORENSIC N 0 2...ADMINISTRATIVE / OTHER SPECIALTY MANAGEMENT NONPATIENT CARE TOTAL PERIODONTIST A 5 2 7 N 3 3 6 F 1 0 1 TOTAL 9 5 14 PREVENTIVE DENTISTRY /PUBiIC HEALTH A 1 2...147 162 141 EXECUTIVE DENTISTRY A 82 76 72 N 105 21 75 F 43 24 23 TOTAL 230 121 170 GENERAL DENTAL OFFICER A 492 411 346 N 759 1133 1139 F 1092 1015

  19. Health Manpower Source Book. Manpower Supply and Educational Statistics for Selected Health Occupations: 1968. Public Health Service Publication Number 263, Section 20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Institutes of Health (DHEW), Bethesda, MD. Bureau of Health Professions Education and Manpower Training.

    This publication is a compilation of statistics on supply and education of health manpower in medicine and osteopathy, dentistry, optometry, pharmacy, podiatry, veterinary medicine, nursing, public health, and eight selected allied health occupations. The material is organized by occupations and the following information is presented for each…

  20. The world economic crisis. Part 2. Health manpower out of balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel-Smith, B

    1986-12-01

    As outlined in the first part of this article in the last issue of the journal, many countries are facing severe constraints on health expenditure at the same time as they are trying to work towards Health for All by the Year 2000. Health manpower needs to be planned to secure maximum benefits from the limited resources available. Many medical schools train more doctors than are needed because quotas on medical places are either non-existent or set too high. Medical training may be oriented to high-technology, curative care and produce doctors ill equipped to fulfil the role demanded of them in the primary health care approach. Educational courses for paramedics and nurses are often insufficient and inappropriate. Countries which have previously lost trained doctors to attractive posts abroad now face the prospect of a flood of doctors looking for work in their home countries, now that opportunities for work abroad are being reduced. Such countries will find it difficult to reverse the bias in policy towards medical professionals, despite the waste caused by unemployment and inappropriate training among doctors. With limited budgets, there is a need for countries to plan ahead. To do this they must find ways of estimating future effective demand. The future balance of staff can then be planned on the basis of resources available and the relative costs of deploying various categories of health staff.

  1. The Role of Training Providers in Manpower Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Lynton

    1993-01-01

    Research in Nigeria and Thailand is used to demonstrate that, where vocational training is cost effective (graduates get appropriate jobs), links with employers are closer than in other labor markets. Techniques such as reverse tracer studies, labor market signaling, and skills analysis can be used to improve training effectiveness. (SK)

  2. Department of Defense Military Manpower Training Report, FY 1992

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1991-01-01

    ...). The Secretary of Defense is required to submit to Congress a written report each fiscal year, recommending student loads for each category of individual training for each active and reserve component...

  3. Department of Defense Military Manpower Training Report, FY 1993

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1992-01-01

    ...) of Title 10, United States Code. The Secretary of Defense is required to submit to Congress a written report each fiscal year recommending student loads for each category of individual institutional training for each active...

  4. Construction Grants for Educational Facilities. Fiscal Years 1965-76. Health Manpower References.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health Resources Administration (DHEW/PHS), Bethesda, MD. Bureau of Health Manpower.

    This publication provides information on construction assistance awarded during fiscal years 1965 through 1976 by the Bureau of Health Manpower (BHM) and its predecessors to schools of medicine, osteopathic medicine, dentistry, optometry, pharmacy, podiatric medicine, veterinary medicine, public health, and nursing. In addition, it provides data…

  5. Training of manpower resources at the National Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrosis de Libanati, N. (Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Dept. de Capacitacion y Evaluacion de Personal)

    The main factors that influenced the development of the manpower resources required by CNEA over its thirty years of life are discussed: a careful specialized training; basic and applied research groups as a basic support for the other activities; teams responsible for the applications and for the concrete realizations of increasing complexity carried out by CNEA, culminating with the nuclear power plants; CNEA's relations with the national educational system regarding nuclear specialization; CNEA's international interaction, either by the participation of foreigners in its internal courses, by the commissioning of Argentinians abroad, and by the cooperation with international agencies in organizing courses, seminars and conferences; the influence of the radiological protection and nuclear safety requirements on the training programs, on nuclear industry, and on the users of radioisotopes and radiations; the importance of feeding the results of each activity back into the system so as to obtain a dynamic programming adapted to the requirements at all times.

  6. Manpower allocation in a cellular manufacturing system considering the impact of learning, training and combination of learning and training in operator skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a manpower allocation and cell loading problem is studied, where demand is sto-chastic. The inter-cell and intra-cell movements are considered and attention is focused on as-signing operators with different skill levels to operations, because cell performance in addition to load cell is dependent on manpower. The purpose of this article is manpower allocation in cellu-lar manufacturing with consideration to learning and training policies. The manpower skill levels are determined in order to enhance production rate. The main contribution of this approach is the scenarios of training and learning in addition to the combination of training and learning being simulated. By using these three scenarios, the skill level of workers increase which reduces the processing time. In this regard cell layout is static where processing times and customer demand follow a normal distribution. As one of the significant costs of industrial unit is related to pro-duction cost, this study has attempted to reduce these costs by increasing the skill level of opera-tor which causes to reduce the processing time. Scenarios are evaluated by using a simulation method that finally attained results indicate this simulation provides better manpower assign-ments.

  7. Opportunities in Manpower Training Programs for the Forest Service and Its Cooperators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forest Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    Manpower programs in which the U.S. Forest Service can participate are identified in this booklet, and methods and procedures for initiating programs in the interest of meeting the needs of rural areas are explained. Major divisions of the document are Overall Planning, Program Sponsorship, The Program-Operation Mainstream, Manpower Development…

  8. Hospice Education Program for Nurses. Health Manpower References.

    Science.gov (United States)

    HCS, Inc., Potomac, MD.

    This publication contains a curriculum to prepare nurses for delivery of hospice care for the terminally ill. It provides training manuals for both participant and facilitator in a preservice or inservice Hospice Education Program. Each manual (participant and facilitator) includes nine modules: (1) Hospice Care Concept; (2) Communication Skills;…

  9. Manpower Policy and Programmes in Canada. Reviews of Manpower and Social Policies No. 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris (France).

    This report describes the Canadian labor force and economic climate, and the employment and manpower policies which comprise Canada's active manpower policy. Expanded programs for vocational and technical training are recommended, especially for unemployed youth. (BH)

  10. Love, Legislation, and OSHA [Occupational Safety and Health Act]: Highlights from the Manpower Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadnais, Arthur

    1974-01-01

    The conference of the Manpower Division of the American Vocational Association is summarized. Skill centers, relevant Federal legislation, student-instructor relationship, curriculum development, and organization business items were among the topics discussed. (AG)

  11. A Littoral Combat Ship Manpower Analysis Using The Fleet Response Training Plan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Williams-Robinson, Mckinnya J

    2007-01-01

    ...), scheduled to be commissioned in May 2007, introduces an advanced technological platform. It includes but is not limited to several new optimal manning and training concepts such as SHIPTRAIN and SMARTSHIP introduced by the U. S. Navy...

  12. Planning manual for energy resource development on Indian lands. Volume III. Manpower and training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-03-01

    This volume addresses ways to bridge the gap between existing tribal skill levels and the skill levels required for higher-paying jobs in energy resource development projects. It addresses opportunities for technical, skilled, and semiskilled employment as well as professional positions, because it is important to have tribal participation at all levels of an operation. Section II, ''Energy-Related Employment Opportunities,'' covers three areas: (1) identification of energy-resource occupations; (2) description of these occupations; and (3) identification of skill requirements by type of occupation. Section III, ''Description of Training Programs,'' also covers three areas: (a) concept of a training-program model; (b) description of various training methods; and (c) an assessment of the cost of training, utilizing different programs. Section IV concentrates on development of a training program for target occupations, skills, and populations. Again this section covers three areas: (i) overview of the development of a skills training program; (ii) identification of target occupations, skills, and populations; and (iii) energy careers for younger tribal members.

  13. Training Public Health Advisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Pamela A; Brusuelas, Kristin M; Baden, Daniel J; Duncan, Heather L

    2015-01-01

    Federal public health advisors provide guidance and assistance to health departments to improve public health program work. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) prepares them with specialized training in administering public health programs. This article describes the evolving training and is based on internal CDC documents and interviews. The first federal public health advisors worked in health departments to assist with controlling syphilis after World War II. Over time, more CDC prevention programs hired them. To meet emerging needs, 3 major changes occurred: the Public Health Prevention Service, a fellowship program, in 1999; the Public Health Associate Program in 2007; and integration of those programs. Key components of the updated training are competency-based training, field experience, supervision, recruitment and retention, and stakeholder support. The enduring strength of the training has been the experience in a public health agency developing practical skills for program implementation and management.

  14. Manpower Planning Criteria Manual, Construction Grants Section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas State Dept. of Water Resources, Austin.

    This document presents the material developed in conjunction with a project directed to test a methodology that a state water pollution control agency can use in determining its manpower and training needs. Included is a compilation of the manpower planning criteria used to relate numbers and types of personnel with deferred workloads. It also…

  15. AN/TTC-39 Program: A Case Study of Manpower, Personnel and Training Requirements Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    concepts. The Central Processor Group ( CPG ), used in the AN/TTC-39 and AN/TYC-39, is basically the same as that used in the TACFIRE and AN/TSO-73...Insertion Demonstration A Fault Insertion Demonstration ( FID ) was performed on two AN/TYC-39 Message Switches at FT Huachuca, AZ from 4 May to 21 July...criterion. However, the overall median repair time was 35 minutes which approaches the user established requirement. An assessment of training during the FID

  16. Manpower and portfolio of European ENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luxenberger, W; Lahousen, T; Mollenhauer, H; Freidl, W

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate highly variable ENT manpower among European countries. A descriptive study design is used. Manpower in medicine is highly variable among European countries. EU and associated countries are keeping officially appointed representatives to the European Union of medical specialists--otorhinolaryngology section (UEMS--ORL section). UEMS--ORL section is running a working group for manpower in ENT collecting data regarding demographics and ENT manpower in European countries. These ENT manpower data are presented in this paper and compared to available data concerning manpower in European medicine in general. To further evaluate these huge differences, representatives of the particular countries were also asked to fill out a questionnaire concerning specifics of ENT healthcare in their country. Furthermore, typical tasks of ENT doctors based on the official UEMS logbook for ENT training were listed and could be rated regarding their frequency, performed in everyday routine of an average ENT doctor of the country. Divergences in doctors/inhabitants ratios were remarkable within European countries, but disparities in ENT manpower were even more so. The ratio of ENT doctors/inhabitants was the lowest in Ireland (1:80,000) and Great Britain (1:65,000). Greece (1:10,000), Italy, Czech Republic, Lithuania, Poland and Slovakia (1:12,000) were--at the time of the study--the countries with the highest density of ENT doctors. The EU average for 2009 was (1:21,000). The presence of non-surgical working ENT doctors was significantly associated with higher densities of ENT doctors, whereas the necessity of being referred to an ENT doctor (gatekeeping or similar measures) was not. Estimated average waiting times for an appointment in non-urgent, chronic conditions, respectively, diseases were highly variable and predominantly showed a significant correlation to the ENT doctors/inhabitants ratio in the investigated countries. But also for acute

  17. Mental Health Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    stress in self and others; • Learn and apply skills to cope with stress; • Optimize mental fitness and resilience; • Decrease stigma toward and...Training, ensuring that service members have fundamental mental health coping skills just as they are also trained in fundamental combat skills. These...recruits found to be the most stressful, and coping strategies that they employed to manage those stressors. This effort required the development of

  18. Editorial: New manpower for family planning services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirey, A R

    1973-10-01

    In some isolated family planning services innovative uses of new professional manpower are being demonstrated. With specialized training, the paramedical personnel are performing full gynecological screening examinations under the supervision of physicians, serving as clinic administrators, and providing counseling and educative services. Currently not enough funds are being allocated to manpower development. In 1973 only 3% of federal funds for family planning services were earmarked for this endeavor. There also is an unwillingness of a large percentage of medical and health professionals to accept the potential roles of the new professionals as well as to come to grips with the concept of "consumer participation". This consumer involvement is necessary in developing a system that is responsive to the patient's needs. Training periods vary for the new professionals from a few weeks to 3 years to prepare Physicians' Assistants. In a 20 week course individuals have been trained to recognize and differentiate normal and abnormal breast and pelvic findings and to provide family planning and cancer screening services including full pelvic exams and insertion of the IUD. Over 100 new professionals who function as in-hospital family planning counselors and community education technicians in a New York City program were trained through the laboratory method approach. The key to the performance of the new professionals in the clinic is proper supervision and good communication between them and the traditionally trained professionals. Some of the dead-end restrictions which characterize so many of the new positions can be removed if efforts are made within each program to provide in-service training or released time for employees to attend seminars, workshops, of courses at suitable institutions to foster growth and mobility.

  19. Construction Grants for Educational Facilities, Fiscal Years 1965-77. Health Manpower References.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Bella U.; Rosenthal, Samuel

    This publication provides information on construction assistance awarded to schools of medicine, osteopathic medicine, dentistry, optometry, pharmacy, podiatric medicine, veterinary medicine, public health, and nursing. In addition it provides data on grants awarded to schools of allied health, medical libraries, and health research facilities.…

  20. Manpower Implications of Mechanization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cargill, B. F.

    The fruit and vegetable industry is on the road to total mechanization. The scientific and social communities need to collaborate as technological innovations influence manpower development and utilization. An awareness of the implications of technological advancement and manpower problems is required so that the U. S. fruit and vegetable grower…

  1. Prince Edward Island Newstarts' Comprehensive Manpower Development System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Thomas R.

    1971-01-01

    An approach to new methods of helping disadvantaged people gain employment taken by Prince Edward Island Newstart is outlined. This approach is a Comprehensive Manpower Development System. The major components of the system consist of: (1) variants of some standard manpower training programs, (2) innovative recruitment and assignment techniques,…

  2. [Clinical nursing manpower: development and future prospects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chiou-Fen; Kao, Ching-Chiu

    2014-04-01

    The significant changes in nursing manpower utilization in Taiwan over the past two decades are due in large part to the implementation of the National Health Insurance program and the rising need for long-term care. The changes have impacted clinical nursing manpower utilization in two important ways. Firstly, there has been a substantial increase in overall demand for nursing manpower. In particular, the need for clinical nurses has nearly quadrupled during this time period. Secondly, the level of difficulty involved in patient care has risen dramatically, with factors including increased disease severity and increased care quality expectations, among others. These changes, coupled with demands on nursing manpower imposed from other sectors, underpin and further exacerbate the problem of nursing manpower shortages throughout the healthcare system. To raise the quality of the nursing work environment, the Ministry of Health and Welfare (MOHW) brought together Taiwan's key professional nursing organizations to promote 10 care-reform strategies, establish the nursing-aid manpower system, and create the nursing classification system as an approach to effectively attract nurses to take positions in the medical system.

  3. Construction manpower management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    This report traces the development of and explains the operation of a Construction Manpower Management System (CMMS) developed for the Virginia Department of Transportation (VDOT). Initial direction for this project was received from the Construction...

  4. Manpower and Transportation Planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lai, S.W.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis studies three routing and scheduling problems arising in manpower and transportation planning. These problems are rooted in real applications, and carry interesting characteristics. By exploiting the structures of the problems, this thesis provides effective mathematical models and

  5. [Nursing manpower and solutions in Taiwan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Su-Wen

    2014-04-01

    The shortage of nursing manpower is a long-term problem worldwide that affects Taiwan despite this country's internationally admired achievements in terms of its healthcare and national health insurance systems. This article reviews discussions related to the nursing shortage issue published by the World Health Organization, International Council of Nurses, and Taiwan Ministry of Health and Welfare. Next, an overview is given of the nursing workforce profile, causal factors behind the nursing shortage, and demand for and supply of nursing manpower. Finally, problems, resolutions, and expected outcomes for the nursing shortage in Taiwan are analyzed.

  6. 77 FR 21788 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Notice...., Director, Division of Extramural Research and Training, Nat. Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences... Manpower Development in the Environmental Health Sciences; 93.113, Biological Response to Environmental...

  7. Anaesthesia manpower need in Nigeria | Onyekwulu | Orient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Aims: To compare the anaesthesia and surgical manpower in four tertiary hospitals in Nigeria and assess the anaesthesia work load in those institutions; to determine the per capita ... The ratio of resident doctors in training in anaesthesia to those of surgery was 1: 7.3 in UBTH, 1: 5.3 in UNTH: and 1:10.6 in JUTH.

  8. The Development of Information Manpower Resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farid, Mona

    This paper examines the training and education of information manpower in the formal educational institutions of Latin America, Africa, and the Middle East. The nature of the information, social, and economic infrastructures in developing countries is also examined. It is suggested that promotion of the supply side of the information…

  9. Manpower Projections, Recruitment Needs and Training Requirements for Commercial Airline Pilots in the United States 1968-1979.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Robert Marchand

    This study evaluated the reported airline pilot shortage in relation to certified air carriers; recruitment needs for qualified applicants; training requirements as recommended by air carriers, airline captains, and flight officers; and airline pilot supply and demand during 1968-79. A literature review on foreign and domestic pilot shortages was…

  10. Manpower management information system /MIS/

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravette, M. C.; King, W. L.

    1971-01-01

    System of programs capable of building and maintaining data bank provides all levels of management with regular manpower evaluation reports and data source for special management exercises on manpower.

  11. Manpower Planning for New Weapon Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-12-01

    through the same TRADOC training programs intended for equipment operators and raaintainers, providing them with the same technical manuals planned for...COMOPTEVFOR reviews the support plan, training plan, draft technical manuals , and project-manager-specified manning needs and collects data on system...of the new system with chose of che baseline operacional system, and che trade- offs to be conducted among manpower, design and logistic elemencs

  12. Health literacy training for health professions students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadden, Kristie B

    2015-07-01

    This pilot project assessed the effectiveness of training health professionals in (1) readability assessment of written health materials, (2) plain language editing, and (3) formatting materials so they are easy to understand and use. Over six semesters, five students participated in the project. Students were trained to assess document readability, confirm and interpret readability results and "stamp" the documents with results. Students then edited documents under supervision, via revised documents were re-assessed for readability and approved. Training was assessed through readability score comparison and exit interviews with students. Most original readability scores were 10th grade to college level. After editing, the average reading level of 73% was 6th grade or better. Students and supervisor rated skill levels as "proficient" at the end of the semester. To address the gap between document reading level and patients' reading ability, health documents should be assessed and edited for plain language. Working with patient documents from various health fields, our program effectively trained health professions students in these skills. Training health professions students in readability assessment and plain language editing can reduce literacy demands on patients and address the need for professionals with these skills. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Manpower Management Specification

    OpenAIRE

    Spurná, Hana

    2014-01-01

    TITLE: Manpower Management Specification AUTHOR: Hana Spurná DEPARTMENT: The School Management Center SUPERVISOR: Mgr.Irena Lhotková, PhD. Abstract: (angl.) The final thesis deals with the issue of leadership management by means of selected examples from literature, documents, internet, study of opinions and questions of both international and Czech experts in the field of leadership management and finally by means of analysis of the term leadership management with focus on development and ta...

  14. Regional manpower planning

    OpenAIRE

    G. Erens; P. Salamink; C.A. Van der Merwe CA

    2003-01-01

    Particular problems come to the fore when planning development at the regional level. These range from the complexities of the multifarious interactions between the sect oral and local components of the region to the necessity of achieving extensive participation of regional stakeholders in the planning process. In this paper a methodology for regional manpower planning is proposed. The methodology is designed to accommodate the full range of problems by applying a systems approach which is b...

  15. Operational health physics training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-06-01

    The initial four sections treat basic information concerning atomic structure and other useful physical quantities, natural radioactivity, the properties of {alpha}, {beta}, {gamma}, x rays and neutrons, and the concepts and units of radiation dosimetry (including SI units). Section 5 deals with biological effects and the risks associated with radiation exposure. Background radiation and man-made sources are discussed next. The basic recommendations of the ICRP concerning dose limitations: justification, optimization (ALARA concepts and applications) and dose limits are covered in Section seven. Section eight is an expanded version of shielding, and the internal dosimetry discussion has been extensively revised to reflect the concepts contained in the MIRD methodology and ICRP 30. The remaining sections discuss the operational health physics approach to monitoring radiation. Individual sections include radiation detection principles, instrument operation and counting statistics, health physics instruments and personnel monitoring devices. The last five sections deal with the nature of, operation principles of, health physics aspects of, and monitoring approaches to air sampling, reactors, nuclear safety, gloveboxes and hot cells, accelerators and x ray sources. Decontamination, waste disposal and transportation of radionuclides are added topics. Several appendices containing constants, symbols, selected mathematical topics, and the Chart of the Nuclides, and an index have been included.

  16. Regional manpower planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Erens

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Particular problems come to the fore when planning development at the regional level. These range from the complexities of the multifarious interactions between the sect oral and local components of the region to the necessity of achieving extensive participation of regional stakeholders in the planning process. In this paper a methodology for regional manpower planning is proposed. The methodology is designed to accommodate the full range of problems by applying a systems approach which is based on the disciplines of operations research and strategic planning.

  17. Breastfeeding. COTALMA: training health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanovas, M C

    1994-01-01

    The Comite Tecnico de Apoyo a la Lactancia Materna (COTALMA), the Technical Breastfeeding Support Committee, was founded in Bolivia in 1989. It is financed by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF). It is administered in coordination with the Ministry of Health (MOH). MOH and UNICEF choose the hospitals, who send teams that include a pediatrician, a gynecologist, a nurse, and a nutritionist. The first phase of the course (5.5 days) covers the scientific background of breastfeeding. A baseline study is then planned and conducted at each hospital. 2 to 3 months later, the second phase takes place during which data is presented and breast feeding programs are developed for each hospital. Communication, training, counseling, and planning and evaluation are covered. Practicums are conducted at hospitals. Trainers are usually members of COTALMA. The person in charge of maternal and child health services at MOH lectures on national health policies concerning mothers and children. Training includes use of the national health card, breastfeeding and child survival, and breastfeeding as a family planning method. Culturally appropriate course materials, which are in Spanish, are adapted from those developed by Wellstart International. Articles by COTALMA members and others are added. Participants are encouraged to train all staff at their institutions.

  18. 75 FR 28295 - Cummins Filtration, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Manpower and Spherion Staffing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-20

    ... Employment and Training Administration Cummins Filtration, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Manpower and... workers of Cummins Filtration, including on-site leased workers from Manpower, Lake Mills, Iowa. The... engaged in the production of oil and fuel filters, Stratpore media and other metal components for engines...

  19. Regulating Dental Assistants: Revisions of the Michigan Dental Practice Act. Health Manpower Policy Discussion Paper Series No.: C2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldstein, Paul J.; And Others

    This document investigates the regulation of dental assistants in Michigan. Emphasis is placed on increased dental productivity from increased use of auxiliaries, utilization of dental auxiliaries, and educational and training requirements for certification and licensure. Results of the investigation indicate: (1) support should be given for the…

  20. The Crisis of Qualified Manpower for Criminal Justice: An Analytic Assessment with Guidelines for New Policy. Volume 1, Probation/Parole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piven, Herman; Alcabes, Abraham

    This study analyzed data on manpower problems and solutions in criminal justice with special reference to probation and parole. It provides guidelines for the development of a national policy regarding probation and parole manpower and training, which were established through systematic assessment of manpower shortages and standards, and of…

  1. COMMUNITY DENTAL HEALTH SURVEY TRAINING TO DENTAL HEALTH PERSONNEL

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra Fikawati; Ita Yulita

    2015-01-01

    Dentist and dental nurse as dental health personnel in community health center are spearheads in community dental health service. The effectiveness and efficacy of community dental health service needs updated adequate dental health knowledge and skill. One effort to assure the fulfillment of those needs is by providing community dental health survey training. This training aims at improving the skill and capability of dental health personnel to conduct dental health survey. The training cons...

  2. Manpower Implications of New Legislation and New Federal Programs: Utilizing Persons with Engineering Backgrounds in the Health-Related Industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecht, Leonard A.; Cobern, Morris

    This study explored the feasibility of using unemployed persons with engineering backgrounds in industries contributing to health care. According to the researchers, nearly 15,000 jobs for persons with engineering backgrounds could be generated in the health field over the next three years if an active program of job development were initiated. In…

  3. Report on Health Manpower and Programs in Ohio: Part Two. Allied Health, Area Health Education Centers, Dentistry, Emergency Medical Services, Nursing, Optometry, Pharmacy, Podiatry, and Veterinary Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio Board of Regents, Columbus.

    Information on health occupations educational programs in Ohio and current and projected employment needs for health professionals are presented. The following health fields are examined: allied health, dentistry, emergency medical service, nursing, optometry, pharmacy, podiatry, and veterinary medicine. Issues and trends affecting each field are…

  4. Podiatry Manpower: Characteristics of Clinical Practice United States--1970. Vital and Health Statistics--Series 14, No. 11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center for Health Statistics (DHEW/PHS), Hyattsville, MD.

    The report on the clinical practice of podiatry is the product of a national survey of podiatrists conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics with the cooperation of the American Podiatry Association during the period January--March 1970. The survey was conducted by a self-administered questionnaire (a facsimile of which comprises an…

  5. Human resource development: the management, planning and training of health personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmonds, S

    1989-09-01

    The morale of health personnel is fast becoming the major factor affecting both the sustainability and the quality of health care world-wide. Low morale mirrors problems ranging from declining balance of payments allocation to GNP, and a lack of support for the health system from the very top down to the rigid application of national pay, grading and career structures, and the stress of not being able to do the job properly. While many of these and other problems have been voiced again and again in the press and in the academic literature, much of the work on health manpower development has focused on the planning and production of personnel. This has been with the aim of producing specific categories of better-trained health workers with relevant qualifications, resulting in a heavy emphasis on a quantitative output. In this paper it is argued that the management of health personnel, the qualitative aspect of staff development, has been relatively neglected. Unless and until the management of human resource development receives the attention it needs, seeds of discontent, disillusion and dissatisfaction will ultimately lead to national health services losing their competitiveness as employers. The sustainability and quality of health programmes will then be in even greater jeopardy than they are at present. The planning, production and management components of health manpower development have developed haphazardly as verticle activities. A new term such as 'human resource development; the management of health personnel' might help ensure the concept of an integrated process contingent on economic, political, organizational and other important circumstances.

  6. Existentially Oriented Training for Mental Health Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Carl

    1976-01-01

    The author presents an overview of the role of existentialism in the training of counselors and mental health practitioners. Exercises and skill development techniques are also presented for existentially oriented training of psychotherapists, using a workshop format. (HLM)

  7. Manpower Planning Model for Less Developed Countries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The need for manpower planning in underdeveloped countries is necessary to remove widespread unemployment and disguised unemployment in such economies. Models for predicting future manpower requirements are indispensable tools for planners and policy makers. A model which captures manpower demand and ...

  8. An Evaluation of Manpower Training Needs in the Hotel-Restaurant Industry on Kauai, 1968, with Recommendations on Programs, Sources of Students, Instructors, and Funds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Robert W.

    This report, requested and funded by a committee of community leaders, investigates the recruiting, training and employment of cooks, waitresses, maids, and small business managers needed on the island of Kauai through the year 1973. Projected increases in tourism and hotel construction indicate substantial need for well trained personnel. Courses…

  9. Estimating the Manpower, Personnel, and Training Requirements of the Army’s Corps Support Weapon System Using the HARDMAN Methodology. Appendices

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-01

    explanation of the MOS seleccion criteria. C2.2 SUMMARY OF MOS ASSIGNMENTS BY EQUIPM-N-i Table C2-2 contains all of the MOS required for the CSWS... person trained in one MDS in the space of a different MOS. * M-uch less opportunity than today for on-the-job training; much more need for school

  10. Respiratory care manpower issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Paul; Drumheller, Lois; Carlow, John J

    2006-03-01

    Although respiratory care is a relatively new profession, its practitioners are deeply involved in providing patient care in the critical care. In preparation for writing this article, we sought to explore the respiratory therapy manpower needs and activities designed to fulfill those needs in critical care practice. We began by delineating the historical development of respiratory care as a profession, the development of its education, and the professional credentialing system. We then conducted several literature reviews with few articles generated. We requested and received data from the American Association for Respiratory Care (AARC), The National Board for Respiratory Care (NBRC), and the Committee on Accreditation of Respiratory Care education (CoARC) relative to their membership, number of credentialed individuals, and educational program student and graduate data for 2000 through 2004. We then conducted two electronic surveys. Survey 1 was a six-item survey that examined the use of mandatory overtime in respiratory care departments. We used a convenience sample of 30 hospitals stratified by size (or=500 beds). Survey 2 was a five-item instrument distributed by blast E-mail to the Society of Critical Care Medicine's Respiratory Care Section members and members of the RC_World list serve. This survey elicited 51 usable and non-duplicative responses from geographically and size-varied institutions. We analyzed these data in several ways from distribution analysis to one-way analysis of variance procedure and appropriate post hoc analysis techniques. Where appropriate, a matched-pairs analysis was performed and these were compared across the variables intensive care unit (ICU) beds per actual number of respiratory care practitioners (RCPs) and ICU beds per preferred number of RCPs. The data gathered from the professional organizations indicated a relatively stable attrition rate (35.2%+/-1.7-3.1%), even in the face of varying enrollments (6,231 in 2004 vs. 4

  11. Training evaluation: a case study of training Iranian health managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Maye; Gerein, Nancy; Tarin, Ehsanullah; Butcher, Christopher; Pearson, Stephen; Heidari, Gholamreza

    2009-03-05

    The Ministry of Health and Medical Education in the Islamic Republic of Iran has undertaken a reform of its health system, in which-lower level managers are given new roles and responsibilities in a decentralized system. To support these efforts, a United Kingdom-based university was contracted by the World Health Organization to design a series of courses for health managers and trainers. This process was also intended to develop the capacity of the National Public Health Management Centre in Tabriz, Iran, to enable it to organize relevant short courses in health management on a continuing basis. A total of seven short training courses were implemented, three in the United Kingdom and four in Tabriz, with 35 participants. A detailed evaluation of the courses was undertaken to guide future development of the training programmes. The Kirkpatrick framework for evaluation of training was used to measure participants' reactions, learning, application to the job, and to a lesser extent, organizational impact. Particular emphasis was put on application of learning to the participants' job. A structured questionnaire was administered to 23 participants, out of 35, between one and 13 months after they had attended the courses. Respondents, like the training course participants, were predominantly from provincial universities, with both health system and academic responsibilities. Interviews with key informants and ex-trainees provided supplemental information, especially on organizational impact. Participants' preferred interactive methods for learning about health planning and management. They found the course content to be relevant, but with an overemphasis on theory compared to practical, locally-specific information. In terms of application of learning to their jobs, participants found specific information and skills to be most useful, such as health systems research and group work/problem solving. The least useful areas were those that dealt with training and

  12. Training evaluation: a case study of training Iranian health managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Butcher Christopher

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Ministry of Health and Medical Education in the Islamic Republic of Iran has undertaken a reform of its health system, in which-lower level managers are given new roles and responsibilities in a decentralized system. To support these efforts, a United Kingdom-based university was contracted by the World Health Organization to design a series of courses for health managers and trainers. This process was also intended to develop the capacity of the National Public Health Management Centre in Tabriz, Iran, to enable it to organize relevant short courses in health management on a continuing basis. A total of seven short training courses were implemented, three in the United Kingdom and four in Tabriz, with 35 participants. A detailed evaluation of the courses was undertaken to guide future development of the training programmes. Methods The Kirkpatrick framework for evaluation of training was used to measure participants' reactions, learning, application to the job, and to a lesser extent, organizational impact. Particular emphasis was put on application of learning to the participants' job. A structured questionnaire was administered to 23 participants, out of 35, between one and 13 months after they had attended the courses. Respondents, like the training course participants, were predominantly from provincial universities, with both health system and academic responsibilities. Interviews with key informants and ex-trainees provided supplemental information, especially on organizational impact. Results Participants' preferred interactive methods for learning about health planning and management. They found the course content to be relevant, but with an overemphasis on theory compared to practical, locally-specific information. In terms of application of learning to their jobs, participants found specific information and skills to be most useful, such as health systems research and group work/problem solving. The least

  13. Energy Manpower Study, 1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seward County Community Coll., Liberal, KS.

    A study was conducted in Kansas to determine the need for vocational education programs in solar energy technology in community colleges. After a literature search revealed a project need for trained solar energy technicians, Seward County Community College surveyed 100 Kansas heating, air conditioning, and plumbing companies to determine future…

  14. The Phelophepa Health Care Train: a pharmacoepidemiological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The Phelophepa Health Care Train is the only primary healthcare train in the world. Phelophepa is an innovative initiative that attempts to make a positive difference to primary healthcare in rural South Africa. The primary aim of this study was to determine the epidemiological and prescribing statistics for ...

  15. The Phelophepa Health Care Train: a pharmacoepidemiological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-11-19

    Nov 19, 2009 ... Background: The Phelophepa Health Care Train is the only primary healthcare train in the world. Phelophepa is an innovative initiative that attempts to make a positive difference to primary healthcare in rural South Africa. The primary aim of this study was to determine the epidemiological and prescribing ...

  16. Manpower development for the biomedical industry space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, James C H

    2013-01-01

    The Biomedical Sciences (BMS) Cluster is one of four key pillars of the Singapore economy. The Singapore Government has injected research funding for basic and translational research to attract companies to carry out their commercial R&D activities. To further intensify the R&D efforts, the National Research Foundation (NRF) was set up to coordinate the research activities of different agencies within the larger national framework and to fund strategic R&D initiatives. In recent years, funding agencies began to focus on support of translational and clinical research, particularly those with potential for commercialization. Translational research is beginning to have traction, in particular research funding for the development of innovation medical devices. Therefore, the Biomedical Sciences sector is projected to grow which means that there is a need to invest in human capital development to achieve sustainable growth. In support of this, education and training programs to strengthen the manpower capabilities for the Biomedical Sciences industry have been developed. In recent years, undergraduate and graduate degree courses in biomedical engineering/bioengineering have been developing at a rapid rate. The goal is to train students with skills to understand complex issues of biomedicine and to develop and implement of advanced technological applications to these problems. There are a variety of career opportunities open to graduates in biomedical engineering, however regardless of the type of career choices, students must not only focus on achieving good grades. They have to develop their marketability to employers through internships, overseas exchange programs, and involvement in leadership-type activities. Furthermore, curriculum has to be developed with biomedical innovation in mind and ensure relevance to the industry. The objective of this paper is to present the NUS Bioengineering undergraduate program in relation to manpower development for the biomedical

  17. Selected Manpower Statistics, FY-68

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969-04-15

    of basic manpower statis- tics <— active duty military, civilian, reserve components and retired. The purpose is to present totals for the...Aetlva boatUltlaa caaaad aa 13 Aufuat I896. but laUflaaUaaa of tba treaty of paaaa «ara aa« iiibaag’ babwaaa «ha Uhltad Matea aad tpala vatU U April

  18. Efficacy of training optimism on general health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojgan Behrad

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relation of optimism with mental health and the affectivity of optimism training on mental health and its components on Yazd University students. Materials and Methods: Fifty new students of the 2008-2009 academic years were randomly selected. The General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28 and the optimism scale were completed by them. Thirty persons of these students, who had the highest psychological problems based on the general health questionnaire, were divided into two case and control groups through random assignment. The case group was trained for one month, in two 90-minute sessions per week. Pre-tests and follow-up tests were performed in both groups.Results: The results of Pearson correlation coefficients showed that optimism had a negative and significant relationship with mental health, anxiety, social function, and depression scores (p0.005. Multivariate analysis of covariance showed that optimism training had significant impact on mental health and its components in the case group, compared with the control group (p< 0.0001.Conclusion: In general, the findings of this research suggest the relationship between optimism and mental health and the effectiveness of optimism training on mental health. This method can be used to treat and prevent mental health problems.

  19. Developing Community Health Worker Diabetes Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, W. J.; Lemay, C. A.; Hargraves, J. L.; Gorodetsky, T.; Calista, J.

    2012-01-01

    We designed, implemented and evaluated a 48-hour training program for community health workers (CHWs) deployed to diabetes care teams in community health centers (CHCs). The curriculum included core knowledge/skills with diabetes content to assist CHWs in developing patient self-management goals. Our qualitative evaluation included…

  20. Training health professionals in smoking cessation (Review)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carson, K.V.; Verbiest, M.E.; Crone, M.R.; Brinn, M.P.; Esterman, A.J.; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Smith, B.J.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cigarette smoking is one of the leading causes of preventable death world wide. There is good evidence that brief interventions from health professionals can increase smoking cessation attempts. A number of trials have examined whether skills training for health professionals can lead

  1. Training health professionals in smoking cessation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carson, K.V.; Verbiest, M.E.; Crone, M.R.; Brinn, M.P.; Esterman, A.J.; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Smith, B.J.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cigarette smoking is one of the leading causes of preventable death world wide. There is good evidence that brief interventions from health professionals can increase smoking cessation attempts. A number of trials have examined whether skills training for health professionals can lead

  2. Development Of Manpower System For Enhancement Of Industrial Output Using Mathematical Programming Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr Onuke Oscar Sunny

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The study dwelt on the problem of developing manpower supply for establishing new industries more especially an engineering program for generating the skills required for a refinery project. A mathematical programming model was developed for planning the establishment of a new manpower system such as Nigeria would be establishing in the next several decades. The manpower planning model developed here deals with the problem of how to optimize the process of developing new skills so that they are available as needed during the process of setting up new industries especially in the sector of developing economy. Many developmental projects in the public sector of Nigeria are now leveled up for lack of trained manpower. The method developed will also estimate the probable availability of skills required and plan to meet the shortfalls if any.

  3. Efficacy of training optimism on general health

    OpenAIRE

    Mojgan Behrad; Mehrdad Kalantari; Hossein Molavi

    2012-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relation of optimism with mental health and the affectivity of optimism training on mental health and its components on Yazd University students. Materials and Methods: Fifty new students of the 2008-2009 academic years were randomly selected. The General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28) and the optimism scale were completed by them. Thirty persons of these students, who had the highest psychological problems based on the general healt...

  4. Telehealth innovations in health education and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde, José G; De, Suvranu; Hall, Richard W; Johansen, Edward; Meglan, Dwight; Peng, Grace C Y

    2010-01-01

    Telehealth applications are increasingly important in many areas of health education and training. In addition, they will play a vital role in biomedical research and research training by facilitating remote collaborations and providing access to expensive/remote instrumentation. In order to fulfill their true potential to leverage education, training, and research activities, innovations in telehealth applications should be fostered across a range of technology fronts, including online, on-demand computational models for simulation; simplified interfaces for software and hardware; software frameworks for simulations; portable telepresence systems; artificial intelligence applications to be applied when simulated human patients are not options; and the development of more simulator applications. This article presents the results of discussion on potential areas of future development, barries to overcome, and suggestions to translate the promise of telehealth applications into a transformed environment of training, education, and research in the health sciences.

  5. COMMUNITY DENTAL HEALTH SURVEY TRAINING TO DENTAL HEALTH PERSONNEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Fikawati

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Dentist and dental nurse as dental health personnel in community health center are spearheads in community dental health service. The effectiveness and efficacy of community dental health service needs updated adequate dental health knowledge and skill. One effort to assure the fulfillment of those needs is by providing community dental health survey training. This training aims at improving the skill and capability of dental health personnel to conduct dental health survey. The training consisted of materials on community dental health survey, principles of survey implementation, and field survey activity as an integral part of the training. Survey was conducted among third grade students of Madrasah Ibtidaiyah (MI in Tangerang city. Targeting and sampling part of the survey was implemented by city health office. There were 224 students, 182 parents, and 16 teachers who were successfully examined and/or interviewed. The survey showed that the participant’s knowledge was significantly (p<0.05 improved. The survey also showed that only 34% of the students had good oral hygiene score. There were 46.9% of students who suffered M1 caries and 47.3% had caries on their permanent teeth. Parents’ knowledge and attitude regarding child dental health was quite good and teachers had implemented students dental care effort. In conclusion, the survey-training model was proved to be useful to refresh the community dental health science while simultaneously obtained important data through survey. This model had never been conducted before and new breakthrough in the community dental health science refreshing activity targeted to local dental health personnel.

  6. Manpower Development Programme In Kenneth Dike Library ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Manpower Development Programme In Kenneth Dike Library, University Of Ibadan. ... African Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology and Sport Facilitation ... The investigation revealed that the University of Ibadan has various manpower development programmes which are necessary to update the knowledge of the staff on ...

  7. Teaching Manpower: A Collection of Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorrin, Valerie, Ed.; Kushin, Frank, Ed.

    Forty-seven course outlines and reading lists about manpower development are presented. They reflect the diversity of academic programs which deal with manpower policies and programs in economics, sociology, industrial and labor relations, urban studies and urban planning, public administration, business and management, and social work. Courses…

  8. maintainability of manpower system with restricted recruitment

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JERRY

    led to other important results. KEY WORDS: Manpower structure, Maintainability, Factors of flow, Markov model Probability. INTRODUCTION. Maintainability is an aspect ... What is common in the above types of statistical manpower control is that only one factor of flow is controlled. ..... Journal of Mathematical Sciences, Vol.

  9. Training public health superheroes: five talents for public health leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Matthew; Shickle, Darren; Smith, Kevin; Zakariasen, Ken; Moskol, Jacob; Oliver, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    Public health leaders have been criticized for their policy stances, relationships with governments and failure to train the next generation. New approaches to the identification and training of public health leaders may be required. To inform these, lessons can be drawn from public health 'superheroes'; public health leaders perceived to be the most admired and effective by their peers. Members and Fellows of the UK Faculty of Public Health were contacted via e-newsletter and magazine and asked to nominate their 'Public Health Superhero'. Twenty-six responses were received, nominating 40 different people. Twelve semi-structured interviews were conducted. Thematic analysis, based on 'grounded theory', was conducted. Five leadership 'talents' for public health were identified: mentoring-nurturing, shaping-organizing, networking-connecting, knowing-interpreting and advocating-impacting. Talent-based approaches have been effective for leadership development in other sectors. These talents are the first specific to the practice of public health and align with some aspects of existing frameworks. An increased focus on identifying and developing talents during public health training, as opposed to 'competency'-based approaches, may be effective in strengthening public health leadership. Further research to understand the combination and intensity of talents across a larger sample of public health leaders is required. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Quality Assurance of Peer Health Education Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Billie J.; Saunders, Cynthia M.

    1999-01-01

    Investigated whether college level peer educators were adequately prepared to teach peers about sexual health, sexual assault, and substance abuse. They completed 20 hours of training on the issues and on public speaking, leadership, and presentation skills. Pretesting and posttesting indicated that the program increased students' factual…

  11. Kettlebell training for musculoskeletal and cardiovascular health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jay, Kenneth; Frisch, Dennis; Hansen, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this trial was to investigate the effectiveness of a worksite intervention using kettlebell training to improve musculoskeletal and cardiovascular health. METHODS: This single-blind randomized controlled trial involved 40 adults from occupations with a high prevalence...

  12. Exercise training for performance and health.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foster, C.; Porcari, J.P.; de Koning, J.J.; Bannwarth, E.; Casolino, E.; Condello, G.; Gamalback, K; Gibson, M.; Lueck, J.; Rodriguez-Marroyo, J.; Walraven, L.

    2012-01-01

    Exercise training is an important positive activity for both health and performance. A rich literature demonstrates, in a semi-quantitative way, the value of exercise. However, knowledge about how to improve the process of giving exercise advice is always important. This paper reviews recent studies

  13. Training program attracts work and health researchers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skakon, Janne

    2007-01-01

    to examining work disability prevention issues. An innovative program that attracts international students, the Work Disability Prevention Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Strategic Training Program, aims to build research capacity in young researchers and to create a strong network that examines...

  14. Substitution of academically trained by other manpower

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Tinbergen (Jan)

    1975-01-01

    textabstractSubstitution von Akademikern durch andere ArbeitskrÄfte. — Dieser Aufsatz berichtet über SchÄtzungen von verschiedenen Autoren über die SubstitutionselastizitÄt zwischen hochqualifizierten (meist akademisch ausgebildeten) und anderen ArbeitskrÄften und befaβt sich mit den möglichen

  15. A System Approach to Navy Medical Education and Training. Appendix 38. Competency Curriculum for Psychiatric Technician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-08-31

    assure that a documented patient record is kept for legal purposes KNOWLEDGES AND SKILLS Psychosexual development Patient’s basic hygienic and...Training Job Analysis Nurse Training Task Analysis f entist Training Curriculum Development A FISTP.ACr (Continu. on ,.een ade If necessary and...for all health care personnel. Clearly the first task was to develop a system of job analyses applicable to all system wide health care manpower tasks

  16. Technology and Manpower in the Textile Industry of the 1970's. Bulletin No. 1578.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Labor Statistics (DOL), Washington, DC.

    This bulletin describes changes in technology in the textile industry, one of the major industries of the economy, projects their impact on productivity, employment, and occupational requirements, and discusses methods of adjustment. It is designed to partially meet the requirement of the Manpower Development and Training Act that the Secretary of…

  17. 78 FR 54487 - Abbott Laboratories; Diagnostic-Hematology; Including On-Site Leased Workers From Manpower...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-04

    ... Employment and Training Administration Abbott Laboratories; Diagnostic--Hematology; Including On-Site Leased... Laboratories, Diagnostic--Hematology division, including on-site leased workers from Manpower Service Group... to the production of hematology reagents and instruments. The company reports that workers leased...

  18. Instability resistance training for health and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemková, Erika

    2017-04-01

    Recently, resistance exercises performed on an unstable surface have become part of athletic training and rehabilitation. Accordingly, their role in performance and health-oriented strength training has increasingly emerged as a matter of interest to researchers and conditioning specialists. A more pronounced activation of stabilizing muscles is assumed to be the main feature of instability resistance exercises. This assumption has been proven by EMG studies, which have highlighted significantly greater electromyographic activity of trunk-stabilizing muscles during exercises under unstable as compared to stable conditions. Intervention studies also demonstrated an enhanced improvement of trunk stability after training programs utilizing unstable devices as compared to floor exercises. Findings indicate that instability resistance training may facilitate the neural adaptation of trunk-stabilizing muscles, resulting in an improvement in trunk stability. However, both acute and long-term responses of primarily activated muscles to exercises performed on an unstable surface remain a matter of debate. It has been established that there is a significantly lower peak isometric force and rate of force development during resistance exercises under unstable as compared to stable conditions. In addition, the power output was compromised when exercises were performed on unstable surfaces. However, we have demonstrated that this effect depends on the type of exercise, instability device used, weight lifted, subject's training background, and so forth. Our findings on muscular power in the concentric phase of resistance exercises with different weights under stable and unstable conditions complement this review. Applications of instability resistance exercises for the improvement of neuromuscular functions in the physically active, plus for those following anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions, are also presented.

  19. Critical Review of Dual Diagnosis Training for Mental Health Professionals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinderup, Pernille; Thylstrup, Birgitte; Hesse, Morten

    2016-01-01

    To review evidence on the effects of training programs in dual diagnosis treatment for mental health professionals. Three databases were searched. Included studies were evaluated by an adapted version of Kirkpatrick’s Training Evaluation Model, which evaluates participant perception of training...... level showed mixed results. Training mental health professionals in dual diagnosis treatment may have a positive effect on professional competencies and clinical practice. Any conclusion regarding the overall training effect is premature due to limitations in study designs. Future studies on the effects...... of dual diagnosis training programs for mental health professionals should involve control groups, validated measures, follow-ups, and patient outcomes....

  20. Manpower planning using Markov Chain model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Syafawati Ab; Adnan, Farah Adibah; Ibrahim, Haslinda; Rahim, Rahela

    2014-07-01

    Manpower planning is a planning model which understands the flow of manpower based on the policies changes. For such purpose, numerous attempts have been made by researchers to develop a model to investigate the track of movements of lecturers for various universities. As huge number of lecturers in a university, it is difficult to track the movement of lecturers and also there is no quantitative way used in tracking the movement of lecturers. This research is aimed to determine the appropriate manpower model to understand the flow of lecturers in a university in Malaysia by determine the probability and mean time of lecturers remain in the same status rank. In addition, this research also intended to estimate the number of lecturers in different status rank (lecturer, senior lecturer and associate professor). From the previous studies, there are several methods applied in manpower planning model and appropriate method used in this research is Markov Chain model. Results obtained from this study indicate that the appropriate manpower planning model used is validated by compare to the actual data. The smaller margin of error gives a better result which means that the projection is closer to actual data. These results would give some suggestions for the university to plan the hiring lecturers and budgetary for university in future.

  1. The training of Family Health Doctors in the interior of Amazon on the problematic of alcohol abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Otávio Moretti-Pires

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To investigate the understanding of Family Health Doctors of the Region of Middle Solimões (Amazon on several aspects of the problematic of alcohol abuse. Methods: An observational, descriptive and qualitative study in an intentional sample of six Family Health Doctors. Data was collected by means of two focus groups, using a set of interviews. Data were assessed using thematic analysis from the references of the principles of Brazil´s Unified Health System (SUS and the training of health manpower. Results: Data indicate that the professionals have identified risk factors for the problem, showed knowledge about the consequences of this consumption for the individual and society and were able to describe the criteria used by the systems of classification of diseases; however, they did not know how to act on this issue within Primary Care. Conclusion: There is a need for mechanisms of continuing education for these professionals, addressing topics such as the problematic of alcohol abuse, its management and intervention in Primary Care.

  2. Impact of the special training of community health workers on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Impact of the special training of community health workers on breastfeeding counselling and support in KwaZulu-Natal. ... Mother-infant pairs (N = 95) visited by specially trained CHWs formed the intervention group and were compared with a control group of mother-infant pairs (N = 64) visited by normally trained CHWs.

  3. Developing Industrial and Technological Manpower via Technical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The need for continual production and replacement of industrial and technological manpower cannot be undermined, since it will enhance the sustainable industrial and technological advancement and security for national development. One important and indispensable programme that can produce demand-driven ...

  4. Indian manpower for mega nuclear project

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "India is supplying critical scientific manpower and high-tech components needed for building a Large Hadron Collider (LHC) - an accelerator used in particle physics research - a mega scientific project of the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) worth billions of dollars" (1/2 page).

  5. Maintainability of manpower system with restricted recruitment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The maintainability of a manpower system is studied under a Markov framework. The classical method of controlling only one factor of flow is extended to highlight the case in which two factors are under control simultaneously. One special case of this extension, where recruitment of units faces partial embargo, is given, ...

  6. Manpower Planning for Wastewater Treatment Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, J. Kenneth; And Others

    This document discusses the components necessary in the development of a forecasting process by which manpower needs can be determined and the development of action programs by which the projected needs may be satisfied. The primary focus of this manual is directed at that person in a state agency who has the responsibility for planning the…

  7. An effective manpower planning approach for maintenance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Also there is a short-fall in personnel requirement in both Electrical and Mechanical sections and it is recommended that additional 4 men be employed in respective sections. Key words: Maintenance Departments, Routine Jobs, Repetitive Jobs, Non-Repetitive Jobs and Effective Manpower. [Global Jnl Engineering Res.

  8. Sectoral job training as an intervention to improve health equity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Emma K

    2010-04-01

    A growing literature on the social determinants of health strongly suggests the value of examining social policy interventions for their potential links to health equity. I investigate how sectoral job training, an intervention favored by the Obama administration, might be conceptualized as an intervention to improve health equity. Sectoral job training programs ideally train workers, who are typically low income, for upwardly mobile job opportunities within specific industries. I first explore the relationships between resource redistribution and health equity. Next, I discuss how sectoral job training theoretically redistributes resources and the ways in which these resources might translate into improved health. Finally, I make recommendations for strengthening the link between sectoral job training and improved health equity.

  9. A framework for establishing integrated reproductive health training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro Buffington, S

    1995-12-01

    The challenge for the next decade will be to make quality family planning services accessible to all sexually active couples who want them. The key to fulfilling this goal is the need to rapidly increase the availability of quality voluntary family planning services globally. This paper presents a framework for integrated reproductive health training which provides a mechanism for ensuring a continuous sustainable supply of qualified trainers and service providers. The paper discusses the approach used by JHPIEGO, a Johns Hopkins University program for international education in reproductive health, to build up national training capacity through the development of integrated reproductive health training. This approach may be seen as a network of pathways linking the national system of higher education, the health care system, the political system and cultural norms to strengthen reproductive health policy, training and services. National integrated reproductive health training includes: updated national policies and service guidelines, pre-service training in health professional schools to prepare students to provide family planning services upon graduation; in-service training for practicing health professionals to improve family planning skills for immediate application on the job; and development of clinical training sites at service delivery points already providing family planning/reproductive health services.

  10. Effects of biofeedback training on physiological coherence, health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of love with special reference to its personal, familial, communal and general psychotherapeutic implications. Integrative findings attest to the value of this form of biofeedback training for meaningful, rapid health and performance benefits. Keywords: Biofeedback, workshop, physiological coherence, health, spirituality.

  11. Training providers: beyond the basics of electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredfeldt, Christine E; Awad, Elias Bruce; Joseph, Kenneth; Snyder, Mark H

    2013-12-02

    Training is a critical part of health information technology implementations, but little emphasis is placed on post-implementation training to support day-to-day activities. The goal of this study was to evaluate the impact of post-implementation training on key electronic health record activities. Based on feedback from providers and requests for technical support, we developed two classes designed to improve providers' effectiveness with the electronic health record. Training took place at Kaiser Permanente, Mid-Atlantic States. The classes focused on managing patient-level information using problem lists and medication lists, as well as efficient documentation and chart review. Both classes used the blended learning method, integrating concrete scenarios, hands-on exercises and take-home materials to reinforce class concepts. To evaluate training effectiveness, we used a case-control study with a 1:4 match on pre-training performance. We measured the usage rate of two key electronic health record functions (problem list and medication list management) for six months before and after training. Change scores were compared using the Wilcoxon sign rank test. 36 participants and 144 non-participants were included in the training evaluation. Training participants were more likely to manage both medication lists and problem lists after training. Class material is now being incorporated into an enterprise-wide multi-modal training program available to all providers at Kaiser Permanente in the Mid-Atlantic States. Ongoing information technology training is well-received by healthcare providers, who expressed a clear preference for additional training. Training improved use of two important electronic health record features that are included as part of the Meaningful Use criteria.

  12. The Manpower Surplus Myth Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Larry J.

    1983-01-01

    Contends that a continued increase in labor force requirements which previously was satisfied by a reduction of farm labor needs, increased workforce participation of women, and a cyclic baby boom, will result in a future labor shortage. Offers a rationale for training and providing support services for the unemployed. (DMM)

  13. Peer training of community health workers to improve heart health among African American women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josiah Willock, Robina; Mayberry, Robert M; Yan, Fengxia; Daniels, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    Training community health workers (CHWs) builds a workforce that is essential to addressing the chronic disease crisis. This article describes a highly replicable CHW training program that targets heart disease risk among African American women. African American women suffer disproportionately from heart disease mortality and morbidity. Well-trained CHWs are uniquely positioned to close this disparity gap. Method. We used a Learning Circle approach to train CHWs in heart health education. The curriculum blended web-based, self-directed learning and in-person peer coaching. CHWs learned through (a) peer-to-peer sharing, (b) problem solving and brainstorming, and (c) leadership and experiential activities. Training evaluation measures were CHWs' (a) self-confidence, (b) heart health knowledge, (c) satisfaction with training, (d) training retention, and (e) replication of training within 90 days after training. This training resulted in appreciable effects on four of five outcome measures. Heart health knowledge increased significantly among experienced CHWs (p = .011). CHWs were satisfied with training and retention was 100%. CHWs initiated and subsequently delivered 122 person hours of community heart health education and CHW training in their communities. CHW heart health training using Learning Circles is a practical and replicable method of training CHWs and holds significant potential for building capacity in resource-poor community organizations. © 2014 Society for Public Health Education.

  14. Health Policy Training: A Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry J. Heiman

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The context within which health care and public health systems operate is framed by health policies. There is growing consensus about the need for increased health policy leadership and a health professional workforce prepared to assume these leadership roles. At the same time, there is strong evidence supporting the need for a broader policy lens and the need to intentionally target health disparities. We reviewed the published literature between 1983 and 2013 regarding health policy training. From 5124 articles identified, 33 met inclusion criteria. Articles varied across common themes including target audience, goal(s, health policy definition, and core curricular content. The majority of articles were directed to medical or nursing audiences. Most articles framed health policy as health care policy and only a small number adopted a broader health in all policies definition. Few articles specifically addressed vulnerable populations or health disparities. The need for more rigorous research and evaluation to inform health policy training is compelling. Providing health professionals with the knowledge and skills to engage and take leadership roles in health policy will require training programs to move beyond their limited health care-oriented health policy framework to adopt a broader health and health equity in all policies approach.

  15. Health Policy Training: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiman, Harry J; Smith, L Lerissa; McKool, Marissa; Mitchell, Denise N; Roth Bayer, Carey

    2015-12-23

    The context within which health care and public health systems operate is framed by health policies. There is growing consensus about the need for increased health policy leadership and a health professional workforce prepared to assume these leadership roles. At the same time, there is strong evidence supporting the need for a broader policy lens and the need to intentionally target health disparities. We reviewed the published literature between 1983 and 2013 regarding health policy training. From 5124 articles identified, 33 met inclusion criteria. Articles varied across common themes including target audience, goal(s), health policy definition, and core curricular content. The majority of articles were directed to medical or nursing audiences. Most articles framed health policy as health care policy and only a small number adopted a broader health in all policies definition. Few articles specifically addressed vulnerable populations or health disparities. The need for more rigorous research and evaluation to inform health policy training is compelling. Providing health professionals with the knowledge and skills to engage and take leadership roles in health policy will require training programs to move beyond their limited health care-oriented health policy framework to adopt a broader health and health equity in all policies approach.

  16. Health Policy Training: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiman, Harry J.; Smith, L. Lerissa; McKool, Marissa; Mitchell, Denise N.; Roth Bayer, Carey

    2015-01-01

    The context within which health care and public health systems operate is framed by health policies. There is growing consensus about the need for increased health policy leadership and a health professional workforce prepared to assume these leadership roles. At the same time, there is strong evidence supporting the need for a broader policy lens and the need to intentionally target health disparities. We reviewed the published literature between 1983 and 2013 regarding health policy training. From 5124 articles identified, 33 met inclusion criteria. Articles varied across common themes including target audience, goal(s), health policy definition, and core curricular content. The majority of articles were directed to medical or nursing audiences. Most articles framed health policy as health care policy and only a small number adopted a broader health in all policies definition. Few articles specifically addressed vulnerable populations or health disparities. The need for more rigorous research and evaluation to inform health policy training is compelling. Providing health professionals with the knowledge and skills to engage and take leadership roles in health policy will require training programs to move beyond their limited health care-oriented health policy framework to adopt a broader health and health equity in all policies approach. PMID:26703657

  17. An international partnership interdisciplinary training programme on public health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andrioti, Despena; Charalambous, George; Skitsou, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    expertise in course content and audience needs. Given the financial constrains in the country national health system reforms in organization and management to provide efficient services is of the highest importance. Assessing perceived training needs of health professionals will help designing more......Background: Targeted training programmes are more efficient towards skills development. Literature on assessing training needs in order to formulate programmes through international partnerships is very limited. This study intended to identify perceived training needs in public health with an aim...... health (61%) as the highest priorities echoed current population needs. Conclusions: This international partnership training programme was the first of this type provided to a member state by WHO/EURO. It combined academic expertise in curriculum development and teaching technologies with practical...

  18. (Internship) Training in Nigerian Health Institutions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the maximum benefit of this phase of the medical training. This study revealed lack of proper examination of interns for competence, proficiency and morals. Excellent housemanship (internship) training can only be achieved by thorough monitoring and supervision by consultants in charge as well as active participation of ...

  19. Selected Manpower Statistics, FY-72

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    nfUct ekaato la «aflaltloa of ccmounf 10 «wartoe« «Ith tho «nod Porno ktoroo Act of 1968. Dopartaiot of DofaaM QMO (Ccwtnllor) BlrtototBt« for...Information Operations April 2, 1973 97 ACTIVE DUry BASIC TRAINING One of the methods for young men to discharge their military obligation has been to

  20. Selected Manpower Statistics, FY-56

    Science.gov (United States)

    1957-01-24

    Ouard V Air Pore« Raaorra 19*6 30 JUDO 19*7 30 JOM 1948 30 Juno 1949 30 JUM 19j0 30 JUM 31 Dao 1991 30 JOM 31 Doe 1952 30 JUM 31 Doe ff...aetltro duty for roeorro training purpoaoa. Includoi "InactlT»" national Guard. Army for 30 JUDO 1950 to dato Air Porco for 30 June 1951 through

  1. Bioinformatic training needs at a health sciences campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Jeffrey C

    2017-01-01

    Health sciences research is increasingly focusing on big data applications, such as genomic technologies and precision medicine, to address key issues in human health. These approaches rely on biological data repositories and bioinformatic analyses, both of which are growing rapidly in size and scope. Libraries play a key role in supporting researchers in navigating these and other information resources. With the goal of supporting bioinformatics research in the health sciences, the University of Arizona Health Sciences Library established a Bioinformation program. To shape the support provided by the library, I developed and administered a needs assessment survey to the University of Arizona Health Sciences campus in Tucson, Arizona. The survey was designed to identify the training topics of interest to health sciences researchers and the preferred modes of training. Survey respondents expressed an interest in a broad array of potential training topics, including "traditional" information seeking as well as interest in analytical training. Of particular interest were training in transcriptomic tools and the use of databases linking genotypes and phenotypes. Staff were most interested in bioinformatics training topics, while faculty were the least interested. Hands-on workshops were significantly preferred over any other mode of training. The University of Arizona Health Sciences Library is meeting those needs through internal programming and external partnerships. The results of the survey demonstrate a keen interest in a variety of bioinformatic resources; the challenge to the library is how to address those training needs. The mode of support depends largely on library staff expertise in the numerous subject-specific databases and tools. Librarian-led bioinformatic training sessions provide opportunities for engagement with researchers at multiple points of the research life cycle. When training needs exceed library capacity, partnering with intramural and

  2. Assessment of need for developing and implementing technical and skilled-worker training for the solar-energy industry. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orsak, C.G. Jr.

    1978-01-13

    A forecast for solar-trained manpower needs was produced based on projected demand for solar systems and manpower requirement for solar systems. A skills analysis was made to determine the types of training required to produce manpower capable of performing the tasks identified in the task analysis. (MHR)

  3. ON HEALTH PROTECTION AND HEALTH RELATED PHYSICAL CULTURE TRAININGS OF FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.G. Fotynyuk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to assess health protection and health related physical culture trainings of first year students. Material: in the research first year students (n=121; 86 boys and 35girls of age 16 - 19 years, participated. Results: components of students’ individual health were found. Situation with health related physical culture trainings, ensuring students’ sound health and optimal functional potentials of their organisms were determined. It was found that leading role shall be played by formation of health world vision values, knowledge about formation of practical skills in healthy life style. Motivation tendency for realization of intentions and practicing of health related physical culture trainings were found in students. Conclusions: the received results prove students’ tendency to pay insufficient attention to individual health. It was found that health related physical culture trainings require modern renewal of education’s content, forms and methods of physical education. The basis of such trainings shall be health related orientation.

  4. Can We Improve Training for Health Professionals to Sustain Local Health Development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Can we improve training for health professionals? We explore specific variables that need to be accounted for to achieve sustainable local health development through training. A problem-based approach with appreciation of the need for making changes is suggested as the only authentic basis for training. PMID:28090174

  5. Manpower Planning Models. 1. Basic Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-12-01

    introduces the notion of manpower flow between classifications. 3. Stocks, Flows, and the Timing Convention. This section presents definicions of...and finish period t in classification j. The variable f..(t) is called the flow from i to j in ij period t. The observation points t are not...over T time periods has T x (K+N) variables and 2 x T x N constraints. The flow network for the faculty system presented in example four is depicted

  6. Education and Training for Health Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Classroom Series is a collection of webinars that highlights topics that provide the educational content, tools, and resources necessary for health professionals, especially those working in public health, to address cancer as a public health problem.

  7. Toilet Training: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Use the Toilet (Zero to Three) Toilet Teaching Your Child (Nemours Foundation) Toilet Training Your Child (American Academy of Family Physicians) Also in Spanish Related Issues Cognitive and Verbal Skills Needed for ...

  8. 75 FR 41522 - Hewlett Packard, Technical Support Call Center, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Manpower...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-16

    ... Employment and Training Administration Hewlett Packard, Technical Support Call Center, Including On-Site... workers of Hewlett Packard, Technical Support Call Center, including on-site leased workers from Manpower..., Idaho location of Hewlett Packard, Technical Support Call Center. The Department has determined that...

  9. A Study of Career Ladders and Manpower Development for Non-Management Personnel in the Food Service Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    State Univ. of New York, Ithaca. School of Hotel Administration at Cornell Univ.

    Because of its failure to provide career ladders for non-management employees, the food service industry is facing increasingly severe manpower shortages and labor turnover. Unnecessary requirements bar entry workers from many jobs, and training opportunities leave much to be desired. This report identifies the problem areas and develops a model…

  10. Experimental Manpower Laboratory for Corrections Phase III. Final Report for the Period September, 1971 to February, 1973.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehabilitation Research Foundation, Elmore, AL.

    This report covers the objectives, procedures, and findings of four major projects directed by the Experimental Manpower Laboratory for Correction (EMLC): (1) Token Economy (Ecology) Project, (2) Correctional Officer Training Project, (3) Longitudinal Follow-Up Studies, and (4) Information Dissemination and Utilization Project. EMLC grew out of an…

  11. Effects of Oral Health Training on Dental Plaque Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M amiri

    2016-02-01

    3- oral health training (control group . Two weeks and two months after the intervention, plaque index was measured. Positive and negative changes were recorded over time, and then, the study data were analyzed using Chi-square (bonferroni adjustment, McNemar, Kruskal-Wallis  and Paired t-Test. Results: The study results revealed no significant differences between the  halitosis group and the traditional group, though both had a significant difference with the control group. Positive changes in halitosis group especially within girls were held to be more durable compared to the other groups. Conclusion: Oral health training accompanging training of oral malodor, tooth decay and periodontal disease seems to be more effective on health promotion of senior high school students in Yazd. Furthermore, oral malodor training produces more durable effects. As a result, this training style is recommended in regard with eductional programs of schools.

  12. Impact of Health Care Provider's Training on Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Comprehensive patient's health care provider's (HCP) communication usually increases patients' participation in their health management on childbirth. Objective: This is a quasi interventional study for assessing impact of health care providers (HCP) training on patient- provider's communication during ...

  13. Training on intellectual disability in health sciences: the European perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salvador-Carulla, L.; Martinez-Leal, R.; Heyler, C.; Alvarez-Galvez, J.; Veenstra, M.Y.; Garcia-Ibanez, J.; Carpenter, S.; Bertelli, M.; Munir, K.; Torr, J.; Schrojenstein Lantman, H.M.J. van

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intellectual disability (ID) has consequences at all stages of life, requires high service provision and leads to high health and societal costs. However, ID is largely disregarded as a health issue by national and international organisations, as are training in ID and in the health

  14. Distance learning approach to train health sciences students at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The University of Nairobi (UoN) College of Health Sciences (CHS) established Partnership for Innovative Medical Education in Kenya (PRIME-K) programmeme to enhance health outcomes in Kenya through extending the reach of medical training outside Nairobi to help health sciences students enhance their ...

  15. The modeling of factors that influence Coast Guard manpower requirements

    OpenAIRE

    Lavin, Kara M.

    2014-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited This research, conducted at the request of the United States Coast Guard Manpower Requirements Determination Division, determines the data requirements for partial automation of the manpower requirements determination process. The Division currently uses a manual process to determine manpower requirements; however, the research proposes that many of the tasks can be partially automated to provide greater efficiency as well as capabilit...

  16. Exercise training, creatine supplementation, and bone health in ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murai, I H; Roschel, H; Pabis, L V S; Takayama, L; de Oliveira, R B; Dos Santos Pereira, R T; Dantas, W S; Pereira, R M R; Jorgetti, V; Ballester, R Y; Gualano, B

    2015-04-01

    Evidence suggests that creatine may have some beneficial effects on bone. The study aimed to investigate the effects of exercise alone or combined with creatine on bone health in ovariectomized rats. Findings show that exercise, but not creatine, has an important role in improving bone health. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of exercise training alone or combined with creatine supplementation on bone health parameters in ovariectomized rats. Wistar rats were randomly allocated into one of five groups: (i) sham-operated, (ii) ovariectomized non-trained placebo-supplemented, (iii) ovariectomized non-trained creatine-supplemented, (iv) ovariectomized exercise-trained placebo-supplemented, and (v) ovariectomized exercise-trained creatine-supplemented. Downhill running training and/or creatine supplementation (300 mg/kg body weight) were administered for 12 weeks. Bone mineral content (BMC), bone mineral density (BMD), and biomechanical and histomorphometric parameters were assessed. No interaction effects were observed for BMC and BMD at whole body, femur, and lumbar spine (p > 0.05). Importantly, a main effect of training was detected for whole body BMC and BMD (p = 0.003 and p creatine supplementation. Main effects of training were also observed for maximal load (p  0.05). No main or interaction effects were observed for any of the histomorphometric parameters evaluated (p > 0.05). Exercise training, but not creatine supplementation, attenuated ovariectomy-induced bone loss in this rat model.

  17. Trained district health personnel and the performance of integrated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We developed indicators to assess the potential impact of their training on the timeliness and completeness of reporting, the data analysis of priority diseases at the district and health facility levels and supervision and feedback at the district level. Findings: Training approaches implemented included cascade, on-job, ...

  18. Revisiting the quality of Health Extension Workers' training: Case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admin

    Workers, in Technical and Vocational Education and Training Institutions (TVETI) since 2003. Objective:- To examine conditions that may affect the quality of health extension workers training in Ethiopia. Methods:- We conducted a qualitative case study interviewing 32 informants. This approach helped us get insight into.

  19. Development of the Manpower Demand Forecast Model of Nuclear Industry Using the System Dynamics Method - Operation Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yong Suk [Future and Challenges Inc., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Nam Sung [SolBridge International School of Business, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    Recently, the resource management of nuclear engineering manpower has become an important issue in Korean nuclear industry. The government's plan for increasing the number of domestic nuclear power plants and the recent success of nuclear power plant export to UAE (United Arab Emirates) will increase demand for nuclear engineers in Korea. Accordingly, the Korean government decided to supplement 2,246 engineers in the public sector of nuclear industry in the year 2010 to resolve the manpower shortage problem in the short term. However, the experienced engineers which are essentially important in the nuclear industry cannot be supplied in the short term. Therefore, development of the long term manpower demand forecast model of nuclear industry is needed. The system dynamics (SD) is useful method for forecasting nuclear manpower demand. It is because the time-delays which is important in constructing plants and in recruiting and training of engineers, and the feedback effect including the qualitative factor can be effectively considered in the SD method. Especially, the qualitative factor like 'Productivity' is very important concept in Human Resource Management (HRM) but it cannot be easily considered in the other methods. In this paper, the concepts of the nuclear manpower demand forecast model using the SD method are presented and the some simulation results are being discussed especially for the 'Operation Sector'

  20. Competency-based preparedness training for public health practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horney, Jennifer A; Sollecito, William; Alexander, Lorraine K

    2005-11-01

    The bioterrorism preparedness training needs of the public health workforce have been described in several studies, assessments, and surveys. To meet these needs, the North Carolina Center for Public Health Preparedness (NCCPHP) and the Public Health Leadership Program (PHLP) at the University of North Carolina School of Public Health developed a new distance learning course, Introduction to Public Health Preparedness for Disasters and Emergencies. After a review of assessment data to identify training needs, we conducted a literature review of methodology and concluded that a distance learning course would be the best approach. The course curriculum is based on the Bioterrorism and Emergency Readiness Competencies for All Public Health Workers. This paper describes the course development process and methods used to make this course an effective training tool.

  1. Efficacy of Environmental Health E-Training for Journalists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parin, Megan L; Yancey, Elissa; Beidler, Caroline; Haynes, Erin N

    2014-06-01

    Communities report a low level of trust in environmental health media coverage. In order to support risk communication objectives, the goals of the research study were to identify whether or not there is a gap in environmental reporting training for journalists, to outline journalists' methods for gathering environmental health news, to observe journalists' attitudes toward environmental health training and communication, and to determine if electronic training (online/e-training) can effectively train journalists in environmental health topics. The results indicated that environmental journalists have very little to no formal environmental journalism training. In addition, a significant percentage of journalists do not have any formal journalism education. Respondents most preferred to receive continuing environmental journalism training online. Online instruction was also perceived as effective in increasing knowledge and providing necessary reporting tools, even among participants adverse to online instructional methods. Our findings highlight the changing media climate's need for an increase in electronic journalism education opportunities to support environmental health journalism competencies among working professional journalists.

  2. Training on intellectual disability in health sciences: the European perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador-Carulla, Luis; Martínez-Leal, Rafael; Heyler, Carla; Alvarez-Galvez, Javier; Veenstra, Marja Y.; García-Ibáñez, Jose; Carpenter, Sylvia; Bertelli, Marco; Munir, Kerim; Torr, Jennifer; Van Schrojenstein Lantman-de Valk, Henny M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Intellectual disability (ID) has consequences at all stages of life, requires high service provision and leads to high health and societal costs. However, ID is largely disregarded as a health issue by national and international organisations, as are training in ID and in the health aspects of ID at every level of the education system. Specific aim This paper aims to (1) update the current information about availability of training and education in ID and related health issues in Europe with a particular focus in mental health; and (2) to identify opportunities arising from the initial process of educational harmonization in Europe to include ID contents in health sciences curricula and professional training. Method We carried out a systematic search of scientific databases and websites, as well as policy and research reports from the European Commission, European Council and WHO. Furthermore, we contacted key international organisations related to health education and/or ID in Europe, as well as other regional institutions. Results ID modules and contents are minimal in the revised health sciences curricula and publications on ID training in Europe are equally scarce. European countries report few undergraduate and graduate training modules in ID, even in key specialties such as paediatrics. Within the health sector, ID programmes focus mainly on psychiatry and psychology. Conclusion The poor availability of ID training in health sciences is a matter of concern. However, the current European policy on training provides an opportunity to promote ID in the curricula of programmes at all levels. This strategy should address all professionals working in ID and it should increase the focus on ID relative to other developmental disorders at all stages of life. PMID:25705375

  3. Health care leadership development and training: progress and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnino, Roberta E

    2016-01-01

    Formal training in the multifaceted components of leadership is now accepted as highly desirable for health care leaders. Despite natural leadership instincts, some core leadership competencies ("differentiating competencies") must be formally taught or refined. Leadership development may begin at an early career stage. Despite the recognized need, the number of comprehensive leadership development opportunities is still limited. Leadership training programs in health care were started primarily as internal institutional curricula, with a limited scope, for the development of faculty or practitioners. More comprehensive national leadership programs were developed in response to the needs of specific cohorts of individuals, such as programs for women, which are designed to increase the ranks of senior women leaders in the health sciences. As some programs reach their 20th year of existence, outcomes research has shown that health care leadership training is most effective when it takes place over time, is comprehensive and interdisciplinary, and incorporates individual/institutional projects allowing participants immediate practical application of their newly acquired skills. The training should envelop all the traditional health care domains of clinical practice, education, and research, so the leader may understand all the activities taking place under his/her leadership. Early career leadership training helps to develop a pipeline of leaders for the future, setting the foundation for further development of those who may chose to pursue significant leadership opportunities later in their career. A combination of early and mid-to-late career development may represent the optimal training for effective leaders. More training programs are needed to make comprehensive leadership development widely accessible to a greater number of potential health care leaders. This paper addresses the skills that health care leaders should develop, the optimal leadership development

  4. Health care leadership development and training: progress and pitfalls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnino, Roberta E

    2016-01-01

    Formal training in the multifaceted components of leadership is now accepted as highly desirable for health care leaders. Despite natural leadership instincts, some core leadership competencies (“differentiating competencies”) must be formally taught or refined. Leadership development may begin at an early career stage. Despite the recognized need, the number of comprehensive leadership development opportunities is still limited. Leadership training programs in health care were started primarily as internal institutional curricula, with a limited scope, for the development of faculty or practitioners. More comprehensive national leadership programs were developed in response to the needs of specific cohorts of individuals, such as programs for women, which are designed to increase the ranks of senior women leaders in the health sciences. As some programs reach their 20th year of existence, outcomes research has shown that health care leadership training is most effective when it takes place over time, is comprehensive and interdisciplinary, and incorporates individual/institutional projects allowing participants immediate practical application of their newly acquired skills. The training should envelop all the traditional health care domains of clinical practice, education, and research, so the leader may understand all the activities taking place under his/her leadership. Early career leadership training helps to develop a pipeline of leaders for the future, setting the foundation for further development of those who may chose to pursue significant leadership opportunities later in their career. A combination of early and mid-to-late career development may represent the optimal training for effective leaders. More training programs are needed to make comprehensive leadership development widely accessible to a greater number of potential health care leaders. This paper addresses the skills that health care leaders should develop, the optimal leadership

  5. The Role of Health Literacy in Professional Education and Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldoory, Linda

    2017-01-01

    This chapter marks the territory and leadership potential found in research, practice and policy related to the role of health literacy in higher education and professional training. There is limited published work that has summarized the role and scope of health literacy in higher education and professional training. This chapter will provide a review of the research in the area, a description of some of the educational practices in health literacy, and a case example of how policy might influence the role of health literacy in professional higher education.

  6. Federal Health Care Center: VA and DOD Need to Develop Better Information to Monitor Operations and Improve Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    and Budget, Capital Programming Guide, Supplement to Office of Management Budget Circular A-11, Planning, Budgeting, and Acquisition of Capital...the 2012 Institute of Medicine report (see Institute of Medicine, Evaluation of the Lovell Federal Health Care Center Merger : Findings, Conclusions...VA Teams Governance X Acquisition and Contracting X Manpower X Quality Assurancea X Budget X Education and Training X

  7. Mapping ?Occupational Health? courses in India: A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Zodpey, S. P.; Negandhi, Himanshu; Tiwari, R. R.

    2009-01-01

    The occupational health scenario is undergoing a paradigm shift in developing countries with rapid industrialization. Inadequate human resource is, however, a concern. The creation of Basic Occupational Health Services will demand a further increase in specialist manpower. The current training capacity of occupational health specialists has been mapped by a systematic review in India. Twenty-one institutes have been identified all across the country. They have an existing capacity for trainin...

  8. One Health training, research, and outreach in North America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl Stroud

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The One Health (OH concept, formerly referred to as ‘One Medicine’ in the later part of the 20th century, has gained exceptional popularity in the early 21st century, and numerous academic and non-academic institutions have developed One Health programs. Objectives: To summarize One Health training, research, and outreach activities originating in North America. Methods: We used data from extensive electronic records maintained by the One Health Commission (OHC (www.onehealthcommission.org/ and the One Health Initiative (www.onehealthinitiative.com/ and from web-based searches, combined with the corporate knowledge of the authors and their professional contacts. Finally, a call was released to members of the OHC's Global One Health Community listserv, asking that they populate a Google document with information on One Health training, research, and outreach activities in North American academic and non-academic institutions. Results: A current snapshot of North American One Health training, research, and outreach activities as of August 2016 has evolved. Conclusions: It is clear that the One Health concept has gained considerable recognition during the first decade of the 21st century, with numerous current training and research activities carried out among North American academic, non-academic, government, corporate, and non-profit entities.

  9. High Intensity Interval Training for Maximizing Health Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsen, Trine; Aamot, Inger-Lise; Haykowsky, Mark; Rognmo, Øivind

    Regular physical activity and exercise training are important actions to improve cardiorespiratory fitness and maintain health throughout life. There is solid evidence that exercise is an effective preventative strategy against at least 25 medical conditions, including cardiovascular disease, stroke, hypertension, colon and breast cancer, and type 2 diabetes. Traditionally, endurance exercise training (ET) to improve health related outcomes has consisted of low- to moderate ET intensity. However, a growing body of evidence suggests that higher exercise intensities may be superior to moderate intensity for maximizing health outcomes. The primary objective of this review is to discuss how aerobic high-intensity interval training (HIIT) as compared to moderate continuous training may maximize outcomes, and to provide practical advices for successful clinical and home-based HIIT. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Careers and training in tropical health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, I

    1994-09-19

    Tropical health is described as an academic discipline, as an institution, and in terms of professional practice. Poverty, and not climate, is the major determinant of the distribution of tropical disease. A recent World Bank Report analysed global disease and made recommendations about public funding of essential services; this approach emphasised "vertical" programs of disease control. An alternative approach, defined as "primary health care" in the Declaration of Alma Ata, emphasised community development and has had a major influence on health services in developing countries. Conflict between these approaches could be partly resolved by strengthening district health services. A strong technical background and a general understanding of factors affecting health and health care are prerequisites for Australians wishing to work in developing countries.

  11. Structural Issues in the Supply and Demand for Scientific Manpower: Implications for National Manpower Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weathersby, George B.

    This paper argues that, in addition to responding to surface manifestations of imbalance in scientific manpower supply and demand, we should examine and understand far better than we now do the nature and extent of the structural forces operative on the supply and demand of scientific talent. The author reviewed the literature and the parameters…

  12. Developing leaders vs training administrators in the health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legnini, M W

    1994-10-01

    In these difficult times, health care institutions need leaders, not simply managers. Leaders' breadth of skills and perspective come from understanding the values involved in health care delivery; managers know the right way to do things, but leaders know which are the right things to do. Schools of public health are moving away from their potential contribution to leadership development in health services administration. The result is a lack of accountability to the community. Leadership skills and an examination of values should be part of health services administration programs in schools of public health, which should see their mission as helping to identify and train leaders, not simply technical specialists in management.

  13. Health and Safety Legislation in Australia: Complexity for Training Remains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahn, Susanne; Barratt-Pugh, Llandis

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the findings from a study that examined the impact of the National Occupational Health and Safety Strategy 2002-2012 and the harmonisation of the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 on Australian training design, delivery and outcomes. There has been a comparative reduction in work related injuries, fatalities and disease, and…

  14. Effectiveness of an Oral Health Care Training Workshop for School ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    date knowledge to pupils and students. However, most teachers in developing countries like Nigeria have poor knowledge and motivation about oral health which may be due to inadequate training in the area of oral health. This might be one of ...

  15. effectiveness of an oral health care training workshop for school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a large number of children thereby play major role in the planning and implementation of oral health ... for the poor oral hygiene among them and their students. Objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness of an oral ... teachers who attended a two day oral health training workshop at. Eruwa, headquarters of Ibarapa East Local ...

  16. A study of Dental Manpower Demand and Supply in Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durkee, Frank M.

    This study attempted to examine dental manpower and variables related to it in Pennsylvania in the context of the national dental manpower. Findings include: (1) Optimum demand, based on dental care for all in the next decade, would require 2,495 additional dentists. (2) Women find a career in dentistry to be very satisfactory but only one-half…

  17. The Entropy Theoretic Measure for Manpower Systems in Perspective

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... propose the use of transition probabilities of the imbedded Markov chain for manpower systems as inputs in the entropy statistic. The proposal is illustrated by refining the basic Shannon entropy rate and implemented in Matlab computing environment. Keywords: entropy, manpower system, Markov chain, Matlab package.

  18. Markov chain: a predictive model for manpower planning | Ezugwu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The use of Mathematical models for manpower planning has increased in recent times for better manpower planning quantitatively. In respect of organizational management, numerous previous studies have applied Markov chain models in describing title or level promotions, demotions, recruitments, withdrawals, ...

  19. LP model for periodic recruitment and retrenchment of manpower in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper we have examined the manpower planning problem in which the maximum total number of employees to be recruited when the organization is in full operation is known. The manpower system has no initial employees at period n=0. The system also allows a periodic recruitment and retrenchment for a finite ...

  20. LP Model for Periodic Recruitment and Retrenchment of Manpower ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    ABSTRACT. In this paper we have examined the manpower planning problem in which the maximum total number of employees to be recruited when the organization is in full operation is known. The manpower system has no initial employees at period n=0. The system also allows a periodic recruitment and retrenchment ...

  1. Manpower Aspects of Recent Economic Developments in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Labour Office, Geneva (Switzerland).

    This book examined economic growth and manpower policy and developments in Europe. Chapter I presents statistical data on labor force growth, trends in unemployment, occupational structure, and technological change for 1950-65 and made projections for 1965-80. The second chapter is an analysis of the relationship of manpower policy to general…

  2. Methodological fundamentals of health-improving student youth training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tеtiana Loza

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to carry out a theoretical analysis of the problem of socio-pedagogical basis formation for effect of health training on the state of human health. Material & Methods: analysis and generalization of data from scientific and methodological literature. Results: factors are defined and systematized, and also their interrelation which determine possibility and reliability of achievement of the purpose – improvement of various groups of the population. Conclusion: obtained research results can be used as a basic basis for building health-training programs with different population groups, as well as for ensuring the effective solution of the problems of physical education in a higher educational institution.

  3. Partnership work between Public Health and Health Psychology: introduction to a novel training programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Public health services implement individual, community and population level interventions to change health behaviours, improve healthy life expectancy and reduce health inequalities. Understanding and changing health behaviour is complex. Integrating behaviour change theory and evidence into interventions has the potential to improve services. Methods Health Psychologists apply evidence and theories aimed at understanding and changing health behaviour. A Scottish programme is piloting the training of Health Psychologists within NHS contexts to address prominent public health challenges. Results This article outlines the details of this novel programme. Two projects are examined to illustrate the potential of partnership working between public health and health psychology. Conclusion In order to develop and improve behaviour change interventions and services, public health planners may want to consider developing and using the knowledge and skills of Health Psychologists. Supporting such training within public health contexts is a promising avenue to build critical NHS internal mass to tackle the major public health challenges ahead. PMID:21070643

  4. Health care leadership development and training: progress and pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonnino RE

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Roberta E Sonnino1,2 1Department of Surgery, Division of Pediatric Surgery, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, USA; 2RES Coaching LLC, Locust Hill, VA, USA Abstract: Formal training in the multifaceted components of leadership is now accepted as highly desirable for health care leaders. Despite natural leadership instincts, some core leadership competencies (“differentiating competencies” must be formally taught or refined. Leadership development may begin at an early career stage. Despite the recognized need, the number of comprehensive leadership development opportunities is still limited. Leadership training programs in health care were started primarily as internal institutional curricula, with a limited scope, for the development of faculty or practitioners. More comprehensive national leadership programs were developed in response to the needs of specific cohorts of individuals, such as programs for women, which are designed to increase the ranks of senior women leaders in the health sciences. As some programs reach their 20th year of existence, outcomes research has shown that health care leadership training is most effective when it takes place over time, is comprehensive and interdisciplinary, and incorporates individual/institutional projects allowing participants immediate practical application of their newly acquired skills. The training should envelop all the traditional health care domains of clinical practice, education, and research, so the leader may understand all the activities taking place under his/her leadership. Early career leadership training helps to develop a pipeline of leaders for the future, setting the foundation for further development of those who may chose to pursue significant leadership opportunities later in their career. A combination of early and mid-to-late career development may represent the optimal training for effective leaders. More training programs are needed to make

  5. Public health medicine training and the NHS changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, D P; Acquilla, S; Halpin, J; Hill, P; Watson, H; Watson, A

    1994-11-01

    The current round of mergers between Health Authorities and Family Health Service Authorities (FHSAs), when set in the competitive context of markets, has profound implications for training in Public Health Medicine. This paper considers the phases in the management of change and the costs, benefits and principles for trainers, trainees and organisations as mergers take place. Particular emphasis is placed on understanding the motives of and learning from the change that is taking place.

  6. Online training for health professionals in three regions of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussotti, Edna Aparecida; Leite, Maria Teresa Meireles; Alves, Adriana Cristina da Cunha; Cristensen, Kellen

    2016-01-01

    to describe online training experience aimed at professionals working in the public health service in 27 Neonatal and Pediatric Intensive Care Units, and to reflect concerning the training process and possible improvements in this process. this is an experience report study about the online training with multidisciplinary content, planned from the situational diagnosis of 27 institutions. The training target set was 10 participants per institution and per module, including the following topics: Indicators of Quality as a Management Tool, Hand Hygiene, Patient Safety, Intravenous Therapy and Patients' Chart Record. a total of 2,071 active students in the modules, with 1,046 approved. The mean of 76 students per module exceeded the target set. experience has shown that online training is comprehensive as a potential tool for the professional technical development and digital inclusion. The online learning system becomes weakened if participants are unaware of the technological resources.

  7. Effect of mechanization level on manpower needs in forestry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Błuszkowska Urszula

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available High work consumption in forest operations is above all the result of the character and task realization mode in works undertaken in forestry. Development of mechanization in forest management activities allows to considerably decrease manpower needs. In the present study, there were analyzed the possibilities of reduction of work consumption by improving the mechanization level of forest works. The method was developed to consider the following assessments: 1 variant W1 - basic option comprising factual work consumption values in works carried out on the area administered by the Regional Directorate of State Forests (RDLP; 2 W2 - showing the effect of 25% upgrade of works to a higher level of mechanization; 3 W3 - showing the effect of 50% upgrade of works to a higher level of mechanization; 4 W4 - comprising analogous calculations to those in variant W1 , but work consumption upgrading was 75%. Simulation calculations revealed considerable differences in needs for labor of different categories of forest workers. On the other hand, with increasing mechanization level, there increase the demands concerning worker qualifications, e.g. a harvester operator must be trained for about 2 years, and the training has to include both simulator exercises (first using software and next - harvester simulator and field work under supervision to gain sufficient experience. The introduction of higher levels of mechanization into forest operations, and hence considerable reduction of jobs for unqualified workers who are replaced by qualified employees, can help decreasing work consumption in forest operations.

  8. Public health ethics related training for public health workforce: an emerging need in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanekar, A; Bitto, A

    2012-01-01

    Ethics is a discipline, which primarily deals with what is moral and immoral behavior. Public Health Ethics is translation of ethical theories and concepts into practice to address complex multidimensional public health problems. The primary purpose of this paper was to conduct a narrative literature review-addressing role of ethics in developing curriculum in programs and schools of public health, ethics-related instruction in schools and programs of public health and the role of ethics in developing a competent public health workforce. An open search of various health databases including Google scholar and Ebscohost yielded 15 articles related to use of ethics in public health practice or public health training and the salient features were reported. Results indicated a variable amount of ethics' related training in schools and programs of public health along with public health practitioner training across the nation. Bioethics, medical ethics and public health ethics were found to be subspecialties' needing separate ethical frameworks to guide decision making. Ethics based curricular and non-curricular training for emerging public health professionals from schools and programs of public health in the United States is extremely essential. In the current age of public health challenges faced in the United States and globally, to have an ethically untrained public health force is arguably, immoral and unethical and jeopardizes population health. There is an urgent need to develop innovative ethic based curriculums in academia as well as finding effective means to translate these curricular competencies into public health practice.

  9. A model for training public health workers in health policy: the Nebraska Health Policy Academy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandert, Kathleen; McCarthy, Claudine; Grimm, Brandon; Svoboda, Colleen; Palm, David; Stimpson, Jim P

    2014-05-15

    There is growing recognition that health goals are more likely to be achieved and sustained if programs are complemented by appropriate changes in the policies, systems, and environments that shape their communities. However, the knowledge, skills, and abilities needed to create and implement policy are among the major needs identified by practitioners at both the state and local levels. This article describes the structure and content of the Nebraska Health Policy Academy (the Academy), a 9-month program developed to meet the demand for this training. The Academy is a competency-based training program that aims to increase the capacity of Nebraska's state and local public health staff and their community partners to use public health policy and law as a public health tool. Our initiative allows for participation across a large, sparsely populated state; is grounded in adult learning theory; introduces the key principles and practices of policy, systems, and environmental change; and is offered free of charge to the state's public health workforce. Challenges and lessons learned when offering workforce development on public health policy efforts are discussed.

  10. Formal training in forensic mental health: psychiatry and psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadoff, Robert L; Dattilio, Frank M

    2012-01-01

    The field of forensic mental health has grown exponentially in the past decades to include forensic psychiatrists and psychologists serving as the primary experts to the court systems. However, many colleagues have chosen to pursue the avenue of serving as forensic experts without obtaining formal training and experience. This article discusses the importance of formal education, training and experience for psychiatrists and psychologists working in forensic settings and the ethical implications that befall those who fail to obtain such credentials. Specific aspects of training and supervised experience are discussed in detail. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The quest for One Health: Human Resource training aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angwara Kiwara

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Appropriately trained Human Resources for Health (HRH are key inputs into One Health. ‘… more than 50% of all infectious diseases of humans originate from animals and that, of the emerging diseases about 75% could be traced back to animal origin’ (Rweyemamu et al. 2006. A comprehensive understanding of the social determinants of health, through an appropriate training model for HRH, is a key input. This study aimed to explore if human and veterinary medical schools were using such a model or providing time for this model in their curricula. Specific objectives were to: determine the time that human and veterinary medical schools’ curricula provide for subjects or courses related to the social determinants of health; analyse the curricula contents to establish how they relate to the social determinants of health; and explore how a bio-medical model may influence the graduates’ understanding and practice of One Health. A review of human and veterinary graduate-level medical schools’ curricula in East Africa was performed in April 2013 and May 2013. The findings were: in the curricula, SDH contents for knowledge enhancement about One Health are minimal and that teaching is Germ Theory model-driven and partisan. Out of the total training time for physicians and veterinarians, less than 10% was provided for the social determinants of health-related courses. In conclusion, the curricula and training times provided are inadequate for graduates to fully understand the social determinants of health and their role in One Health. Furthermore, the Germ Theory model that has been adopted addresses secondary causes and is inappropriate. There is a need for more in-depth model. This article suggests that a vicious cycle of ill-health model must be taught.

  12. Virtual reality training for health-care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantovani, Fabrizia; Castelnuovo, Gianluca; Gaggioli, Andrea; Riva, Giuseppe

    2003-08-01

    Emerging changes in health-care delivery are having a significant impact on the structure of health-care professionals' education. Today it is recognized that medical knowledge doubles every 6-8 years, with new medical procedures emerging everyday. While the half-life of medical information is so short, the average physician practices 30 years and the average nurse 40 years. Continuing education thus represents an important challenge to face. Recent advances in educational technology are offering an increasing number of innovative learning tools. Among these, Virtual Reality represents a promising area with high potential of enhancing the training of health-care professionals. Virtual Reality Training can provide a rich, interactive, engaging educational context, thus supporting experiential learning-by-doing; it can, in fact, contribute to raise interest and motivation in trainees and to effectively support skills acquisition and transfer, since the learning process can be settled within an experiential framework. Current virtual training applications for health-care differ a lot as to both their technological/multimedia sophistication and to the types of skills trained, varying for example from telesurgical applications to interactive simulations of human body and brain, to virtual worlds for emergency training. Other interesting applications include the development of immersive 3D environments for training psychiatrists and psychologists in the treatment of mental disorders. This paper has the main aim of discussing the rationale and main benefits for the use of virtual reality in health-care education and training. Significant research and projects carried out in this field will also be presented, followed by discussion on key issues concerning current limitations and future development directions.

  13. Multidisciplinary leadership training for undergraduate health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The leadership development programme (LDP) developed at Mbarara University of Science and Technology (MUST), Uganda is a key component of COBERS. Health science students at MUST are equipped by means of the LDP with leadership knowledge and skills, and a positive attitude towards leadership and rural ...

  14. Virtual training and coaching of health behavior: example from mindfulness meditation training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudlicka, Eva

    2013-08-01

    Computer-based virtual coaches are increasingly being explored for patient education, counseling, and health behavior training and coaching. The objective of this research was to develop and evaluate a Virtual Mindfulness Coach for training and coaching in mindfulness meditation. The coach was implemented as an embodied conversational character, providing mindfulness training and coaching via mixed initiative, text-based, natural language dialog with the student, and emphasizing affect-adaptive interaction. (The term 'mixed initiative dialog' refers to a human-machine dialog where either can initiate a conversation or a change in the conversation topic.) Findings from a pilot evaluation study indicate that the coach-based training is more effective in helping students establish a regular practice than self-administered training using written and audio materials. The coached group also appeared to be in more advanced stages of change in terms of the transtheoretical model, and have a higher sense of self-efficacy regarding establishment of a regular mindfulness practice. These results suggest that virtual coach-based training of mindfulness is both feasible, and potentially more effective, than a self-administered program. Of particular interest is the identification of the specific coach features that contribute to its effectiveness. Virtual coaches could provide easily accessible and cost-effective customized training for a range of health behaviors. The affect-adaptive aspect of these coaches is particularly relevant for helping patients establish long-term behavior changes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A comparison of how behavioral health organizations utilize training to prepare for health care reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanhope, Victoria; Choy-Brown, Mimi; Barrenger, Stacey; Manuel, Jennifer; Mercado, Micaela; McKay, Mary; Marcus, Steven C

    2017-02-14

    Under the Affordable Care Act, States have obtained Medicaid waivers to overhaul their behavioral health service systems to improve quality and reduce costs. Critical to implementation of broad service delivery reforms has been the preparation of organizations responsible for service delivery. This study focused on one large-scale initiative to overhaul its service system with the goal of improving service quality and reducing costs. The study examined the participation of behavioral health organizations in technical assistance efforts and the extent to which organizational factors related to their participation. This study matched two datasets to examine the organizational characteristics and training participation for 196 behavioral health organizations. Organizational characteristics were drawn from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration National Mental Health Services Survey (N-MHSS). Training variables were drawn from the Clinical Technical Assistance Center's master training database. Chi-square analyses and multivariate logistic regression models were used to examine the proportion of organizations that participated in training, the organizational characteristics (size, population served, service quality, infrastructure) that predicted participation in training, and for those who participated, the type (clinical or business) and intensity of training (webinar, learning collaborative, in-person) they received. Overall 142 (72. 4%) of the sample participated in training. Organizations who pursued training were more likely to be large in size (p = .02), serve children in addition to adults (p organizational readiness for health care reform initiatives among behavioral health organizations.

  16. Evaluating information skills training in health libraries: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brettle, Alison

    2007-12-01

    Systematic reviews have shown that there is limited evidence to demonstrate that the information literacy training health librarians provide is effective in improving clinicians' information skills or has an impact on patient care. Studies lack measures which demonstrate validity and reliability in evaluating the impact of training. To determine what measures have been used; the extent to which they are valid and reliable; to provide guidance for health librarians who wish to evaluate the impact of their information skills training. Systematic review methodology involved searching seven databases, and personal files. Studies were included if they were about information skills training, used an objective measure to assess outcomes, and occurred in a health setting. Fifty-four studies were included in the review. Most outcome measures used in the studies were not tested for the key criteria of validity and reliability. Three tested for validity and reliability are described in more detail. Selecting an appropriate measure to evaluate the impact of training is a key factor in carrying out any evaluation. This systematic review provides guidance to health librarians by highlighting measures used in various circumstances, and those that demonstrate validity and reliability.

  17. Strengthening health workforce capacity through work-based training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matovu, Joseph K B; Wanyenze, Rhoda K; Mawemuko, Susan; Okui, Olico; Bazeyo, William; Serwadda, David

    2013-01-24

    Although much attention has been given to increasing the number of health workers, less focus has been directed at developing models of training that address real-life workplace needs. Makerere University School of Public Health (MakSPH) with funding support from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) developed an eight-month modular, in-service work-based training program aimed at strengthening the capacity for monitoring and evaluation (M&E) and continuous quality improvement (CQI) in health service delivery. This capacity building program, initiated in 2008, is offered to in-service health professionals working in Uganda. The purpose of the training is to strengthen the capacity to provide quality health services through hands-on training that allows for skills building with minimum work disruptions while encouraging greater involvement of other institutional staff to enhance continuity and sustainability. The hands-on training uses practical gaps and challenges at the workplace through a highly participatory process. Trainees work with other staff to design and implement 'projects' meant to address work-related priority problems, working closely with mentors. Trainees' knowledge and skills are enhanced through short courses offered at specific intervals throughout the course. Overall, 143 trainees were admitted between 2008 and 2011. Of these, 120 (84%) from 66 institutions completed the training successfully. Of the trainees, 37% were Social Scientists, 34% were Medical/Nursing/Clinical Officers, 5.8% were Statisticians, while 23% belonged to other professions. Majority of the trainees (80%) were employed by Non-Government Organizations while 20% worked with the public health sector. Trainees implemented 66 projects which addressed issues such as improving access to health care services; reducing waiting time for patients; strengthening M&E systems; and improving data collection and reporting. The projects implemented aimed to improve trainees

  18. Strengthening health workforce capacity through work-based training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matovu Joseph KB

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although much attention has been given to increasing the number of health workers, less focus has been directed at developing models of training that address real-life workplace needs. Makerere University School of Public Health (MakSPH with funding support from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC developed an eight-month modular, in-service work-based training program aimed at strengthening the capacity for monitoring and evaluation (M&E and continuous quality improvement (CQI in health service delivery. Methods This capacity building program, initiated in 2008, is offered to in-service health professionals working in Uganda. The purpose of the training is to strengthen the capacity to provide quality health services through hands-on training that allows for skills building with minimum work disruptions while encouraging greater involvement of other institutional staff to enhance continuity and sustainability. The hands-on training uses practical gaps and challenges at the workplace through a highly participatory process. Trainees work with other staff to design and implement ‘projects’ meant to address work-related priority problems, working closely with mentors. Trainees’ knowledge and skills are enhanced through short courses offered at specific intervals throughout the course. Results Overall, 143 trainees were admitted between 2008 and 2011. Of these, 120 (84% from 66 institutions completed the training successfully. Of the trainees, 37% were Social Scientists, 34% were Medical/Nursing/Clinical Officers, 5.8% were Statisticians, while 23% belonged to other professions. Majority of the trainees (80% were employed by Non-Government Organizations while 20% worked with the public health sector. Trainees implemented 66 projects which addressed issues such as improving access to health care services; reducing waiting time for patients; strengthening M&E systems; and improving data collection and

  19. Model training of future specialists in human health to strengthen the use of health technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Mikheenko

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : develop a model of scientific and methodological training of future specialists in human health to strengthen the use of health technologies. Material : processed more than 100 literary sources. Results : analyzed the methodological, organizational and educational and training aspects of the training of future specialists in human health. On the basis of scientific modeling, the basic structural components of the model of professional training of future specialists, are characterized by their nature and relationship. Theoretical basis to ensure a high level of training future specialist is an integral concept of professionalization based on the theoretical and methodological basis of its essence. Conclusions : it is proved that the effectiveness of training future specialist determined holistic concept of professionalization and relevant scientific and methodological support of the educational process.

  20. Report on the Manpower Needs of the Law Offender in Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muth, Edmund H.

    The Law Offender's Planning Task Force of the Governor's Advisory Council on Manpower was established to develop a comprehensive manpower services plan for law offenders in Illinois. The report discusses what is needed in effective criminal justice manpower services and the problems peculiar to delivery of manpower services within the constraints…

  1. Leadership training in health care action teams: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenman, Elizabeth D; Shandro, Jamie R; Ilgen, Jonathan S; Harper, Amy L; Fernandez, Rosemarie

    2014-09-01

    To identify and describe the design, implementation, and evidence of effectiveness of leadership training interventions for health care action (HCA) teams, defined as interdisciplinary teams whose members coordinate their actions in time-pressured, unstable situations. The authors conducted a systematic search of the PubMed/MEDLINE, CINAHL, ERIC, EMBASE, PsycINFO, and Web of Science databases, key journals, and review articles published through March 2012. They identified peer-reviewed English-language articles describing leadership training interventions targeting HCA teams, at all levels of training and across all health care professions. Reviewers, working in duplicate, abstracted training characteristics and outcome data. Methodological quality was evaluated using the Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument (MERSQI). Of the 52 included studies, 5 (10%) focused primarily on leadership training, whereas the remainder included leadership training as part of a larger teamwork curriculum. Few studies reported using a team leadership model (2; 4%) or a theoretical framework (9; 17%) to support their curricular design. Only 15 studies (29%) specified the leadership behaviors targeted by training. Forty-five studies (87%) reported an assessment component; of those, 31 (69%) provided objective outcome measures including assessment of knowledge or skills (21; 47%), behavior change (8; 18%), and patient- or system-level metrics (8; 18%). The mean MERSQI score was 11.4 (SD 2.9). Leadership training targeting HCA teams has become more prevalent. Determining best practices in leadership training is confounded by variability in leadership definitions, absence of supporting frameworks, and a paucity of robust assessments.

  2. Occupational safety and health training in Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hild, C M

    1992-01-01

    We have eleven years of experience delivering a wide variety of worker education programs in cross-cultural settings to reduce the levels of occupational fatalities and injuries in Alaska. We published an instructional manual and informational poster for workers, on Alaska's "Right-To-Know" law regarding chemical and physical hazards. The "Job Hazard Recognition Program" curriculum for high school students has received national acclaim for being proactive in dealing with worker safety education before the student becomes a member of the work force. Adult educational programs and materials have been designed to include less lecture and formal presentation, and more practical "hands on" and on-the-job experience for specific trades and hazards. New industry specific manuals deal with hazardous waste reduction as a method to reduce harm to the employee. Difficulty in getting instructors and training equipment to rural locations is dealt with by becoming creative in scheduling classes, using locally available equipment, and finding regional contacts who support the overall program. Alternative approaches to funding sources include building on regional long-term plans and establishing complementary program objectives.

  3. Influence of hiking trainings on 13 years old adolescents’ health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulyk K.V.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: determination of influence of hiking trainings on adolescents’ health. Material: the research covered adolescents, who train hiking for one year in hiking circles (20 boys and 16 girls and adolescents, who do not practice hiking trainings (18 boys and 20 girls. Age of participants was 13 years. The following indices were determined” Ketle -2 index, Robinson’s index, indices of Skibinskiy, Shapovalova, Ruffiet. Results: positive influence of hiking trainings on general health condition of adolescents was determined. It has been recommended to practice hiking at days off, summer holidays and during academic year. It was found that general health of group 2 adolescents (who did not practice hiking corresponds to level below middle (10-13 points. Adolescents of group 1 (who practice hiking level of general health reaches middle level (14-18 points. Conclusions: it is recommended to assess schoolchildren’s health in points. Besides, it is necessary to consider points of every separate index; it will permit to find weak points of adolescents organism’s functioning.

  4. The University-Public Health Partnership for Public Health Research Training in Quebec, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradis, Gilles; Hamelin, Anne-Marie; Malowany, Maureen; Levy, Joseph; Rossignol, Michel; Bergeron, Pierre; Kishchuk, Natalie

    2017-01-01

    Enhancing effective preventive interventions to address contemporary public health problems requires improved capacity for applied public health research. A particular need has been recognized for capacity development in population health intervention research to address the complex multidisciplinary challenges of developing, implementing, and evaluating public health practices, intervention programs, and policies. Research training programs need to adapt to these new realities. We have presented an example of a 2003 to 2015 training program in transdisciplinary research on public health interventions that embedded doctoral and postdoctoral trainees in public health organizations in Quebec, Canada. This university-public health partnership for research training is an example of how to link science and practice to meet emerging needs in public health.

  5. Surgical Safety Training of World Health Organization Initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Christopher R; Bates, Anthony S; Toll, Edward C; Cole, Matthew; Smith, Frank C T; Stark, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Undergraduate training in surgical safety is essential to maximize patient safety. This national review quantified undergraduate surgical safety training. Training of 2 international safety initiatives was quantified: (1) World Health Organization (WHO) "Guidelines for Safe Surgery" and (2) Department of Health (DoH) "Principles of the Productive Operating Theatre." Also, 13 additional safety skills were quantified. Data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U tests. In all, 23 universities entered the study (71.9% response). Safety skills from WHO and DoH documents were formally taught in 4 UK medical schools (17.4%). Individual components of the documents were taught more frequently (47.6%). Half (50.9%) of the additional safety skills identified were taught. Surgical societies supplemented safety training, although the total amount of training provided was less than that in university curricula (P < .0001). Surgical safety training is inadequate in UK medical schools. To protect patients and maximize safety, a national undergraduate safety curriculum is recommended. © 2013 by the American College of Medical Quality.

  6. Heavy Construction Equipment Mechanic; A Suggested Guide for a Training Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Division of Manpower Development and Training. , BAVT.

    Prepared by a technical writer for the Division of Manpower Development and Training, this guide is intended to aid instructors, supervisors, and administrators of vocational education and manpower training programs in establishing training programs for mechanics and technicians entering the occupation of servicing heavy construction equipment.…

  7. The model of manpower management influence on mining business effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriama Hakelová

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Manpower management is one of the documents in a business firm which reflects the philosophy of human resources work, sets the priorities and procedures for the capacity of personal processes. The article describes the theoretical model considering the manpower management aspects which are related to adopting the competency model in mining business respecting the triad of capacity management namely by assessing the work capacity, remuneration, education and employees ? growth. The motivation of employees, their efficiency and the work productivity will increase by the impact of the manpower management aspects which will provide the increase of mining business effectiveness.

  8. Which competences and what managerial training for the health professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianino, M M; Siliquini, R; Russo, R; Renga, G

    2006-06-01

    The process of passage to be e-profit and loss organization following the reform of the Italian health system, especially in a context of fiscal federalism and administered competition among the public and private producers, causes implications on the competences of whom develops his/her own professional activity. The aim of the paper is to give some inputs for discussion about the training of manager: starting from the meaning of the word 'management' and using the model elaborated by Mintzberg and Simon with the purpose to identify who is involved in such training, trying to make explicit that the analysis of the organizational positions and the profile of the resource that will go to occupy it is a forced passage for building the training package and to make clear characteristics and contents of the training offer.

  9. Manpower analysis in transportation safety. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, C.S.; Bowden, H.M.; Colford, C.A.; DeFilipps, P.J.; Dennis, J.D.; Ehlert, A.K.; Popkin, H.A.; Schrader, G.F.; Smith, Q.N.

    1977-05-01

    The project described provides a manpower review of national, state and local needs for safety skills, and projects future manning levels for transportation safety personnel in both the public and private sectors. Survey information revealed that there are currently approximately 121,000 persons employed directly in transportation safety occupations within the air carrier, highway and traffic safety, motor carrier, pipeline, rail carrier, and marine carrier transportation industry groups. The projected need for 1980 is over 145,000 of which over 80 percent will be in highway safety. An analysis of transportation tasks is included, and shows ten general categories about which the majority of safety activities are focused. A skills analysis shows a generally high level of educational background and several years of experience are required for most transportation safety jobs. An overall review of safety programs in the transportation industry is included, together with chapters on the individual transportation modes.

  10. The 10-20-30 training concept improves performance and health profile in moderately trained runners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunnarsson, Thomas Gunnar Petursson; Bangsbo, Jens

    2012-01-01

    )(.)min(-1)) (means±SE) were divided into a high intensity training (10-20-30; 3 females and 7 males) and a control (CON; 3 females and 5 males) group. For a 7-week intervention period the 10-20-30 replaced all training sessions with 10-20-30 training consisting of low, moderate and high speed running [90......The effect of an alteration from regular endurance to interval (10-20-30) training on the health profile, muscular adaptations, maximum oxygen uptake (VO(2)-max) and performance of runners was examined. Eighteen moderately trained individuals (6 females and 12 males; VO(2)-max: 52.2±1.5 ml(.)kg(-1......% of maximal intensity] for 30, 20 and 10 s, respectively, in 3-4 5-min intervals interspersed by 2 min of recovery, reducing training volume by 54% (14±0.9 vs. 30.4±2.3 km(.)week(-1)) while CON continued the normal training. After the intervention period VO(2)-max in 10-20-30 was 4% higher, and performance...

  11. Refresher Training on Maternal and Child Health for Urban ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Refresher training is given to the health volunteers/workers for updating and upgrading the knowledge & skills to deliver comprehensive and integrated services and to increase female involvement in the healthcare delivery system and also to develop selfhelp mechanisms at the community & family level. This study was ...

  12. Training primary health care workers to foster community participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoo, R

    1991-01-01

    A low level of community participation was identified as one of the weaknesses of the health sector in the United Republic of Tanzania. In order to remedy this situation, a systematic process of training trainers and students was established with full involvement of village people. Twenty-five themes were put forward as starting points for discussions between students and villagers. The students were encouraged to learn from the villagers by listening to them and asking them questions. They also participated in community activities and lived with villagers so as to obtain a good understanding of rural living conditions. In this way, problems were identified and solutions were jointly formulated. A workbook was developed during a series of workshops with students, trainers, village communities, and planners. At least two teachers were trained from each health training school; all schools were supplied with workbooks. The approach has been adopted by most health training schools in Tanzania, and the Ministry of Health is now committed to it. Both students and trainers find this to be a valuable learning experience.

  13. Effect of training intervention on primary health care workers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Design: A quasi experimental design, used multi stage sampling technique to select participants. Self-administered ... Conclusion: Training of PHC workers is an effective strategy of improving the level of knowledge and the quality of primary healthcare delivery services in Nigeria. Keywords: Primary healthcare, Oral health, ...

  14. Training and Health. Leonardo da Vinci Series: Good Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commission of the European Communities, Brussels (Belgium). Directorate-General for Education and Culture.

    This document profiles programs in the fields of health and medicine that are offered through the European Commission's Leonardo da Vinci program. The following programs are profiled: (1) CYTOTRAIN (a transnational vocational training program in cervical cancer screening); (2) Apollo (a program of open and distance learning for paramedical…

  15. Knowledge, experiences and training needs of health professionals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Over the past decade, the magnitude and intensity of disasters have been vividly rising globally due to the forces of nature or man. This study aimed at assessing the perceived knowledge, experiences and training needs of health professionals regarding disasters, their prevention and management in Jimma ...

  16. Mental Health Assessment in Professors' Training in Two Chilean Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossa, Carlos J.; Quintana, Ingrid M.; Rodriguez, Felipe F.

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzed the evaluation of professors of pedagogy and directors programs, about the importance of mental health in vocational training, and factors that might influence this valuation. The methodology includes participation of 17 academicians (professors and belonging to the managerial staff) of two universities in southern Chile. A…

  17. Training of Community Health Agents in health hearing children: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Taís Teixeira de Oliveira; Zucki, Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    To characterize the training of Community Health Workers in the field of child hearing health. A systematic literature review on Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde (BVS) and Biblioteca Digital de Teses e Dissertações of USP databases was performed. The search strategy was oriented by the specific question: "How have the Community Health Workers been trained to work in the field of child hearing health?" The study selection criteria involved consistency with the proposed theme, belonging to the category of scientific papers, dissertation or thesis, and publication in Brazilian Portuguese. A total of 2,687 studies were found. After analyzing the title and abstract, eight studies were chosen for full reading, however, only four of them met the proposed criteria and were included in the review. The studies indicated live and virtual classes with the use of video conferencing or CD-ROM as training strategies for Community Health Workers. Trainings were effective. Only one questionnaire about hearing and language monitoring was described. Different possibilities for the activities of Community Health Workers were identified. Different learning methodologies have been used for training the Community Health Worker in the field of child hearing health, and all of have proven effective for knowledge acquisition. Community Health Workers play an important role in promoting and monitoring child hearing health.

  18. Prescription of resistance training for health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigenbaum, M S; Pollock, M L

    1999-01-01

    When prescribed appropriately, resistance training is effective for developing fitness, health, and for the prevention and rehabilitation of orthopedic injuries. Because resistance training is an integral component in the comprehensive health program promoted by the major health organizations (e.g., American College of Sports Medicine, American Heart Association, American Association of Cardiovascular and Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation, Surgeon General's Office), population-specific guidelines have recently been published. The current research indicates that, for healthy persons of all ages and many patients with chronic diseases, single set programs of up to 15 repetitions performed a minimum of 2 d x wk(-1) are recommended. Each workout session should consist of 8-10 different exercises that train the major muscle groups. Single set programs are less time consuming and more cost efficient, which generally translates into improved program compliance. Further, single set programs are recommended for the above-mentioned populations because they produce most of the health and fitness benefits of multiple set programs. The goal of this type of program is to develop and maintain a significant amount of muscle mass, endurance, and strength to contribute to overall fitness and health. Patients with chronic diseases (e.g., arthritis) may have to limit range of motion for some exercises and use lighter weights with more repetitions.

  19. The Pan American Health Organization and international health: a history of training, conceptualization, and collective development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, Annella; Guerrero Espinel, Juan Eduardo

    2011-08-01

    A constantly changing and increasingly complex global environment requires leaders with special competencies to respond effectively to this scenario. Within this context, the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) goes beyond traditional leadership training models both in terms of its design as well as its conceptual approach to international health. As an intergovernmental, centenary organization in health, PAHO allows participants a unique vantage point from which to conceptualize, share experiences and develop projects relevant to international health. Derived from over two decades of experience (1985-2006) training professionals through its predessor Training Program in International Health, the Leaders in International Health Program "Edmundo Granda Ugalde" (LIHP) utilizes an innovative design, virtual and practical learning activities, and a problem-based approach to analyze the main concepts, theories, actors, forces, and processes relevant to international health. In collaboration with PAHO/WHO Representative Offices and national institutions, participants develop country projects based on priority health issues, many of which are integrated into the Organization's technical cooperation and/or implemented by relevant ministries and other entities in their respective countries/subregions. A total of 185 participants representing 31 countries have participated in the LIHP since its inception in 2008, building upon the 187 trained through its predecessor. These initiatives have contributed to the development of health professionals in the Region of the Americas devoted to international health, as well as provided important input towards a conceptual understanding of international health by fostering debate on this issue.

  20. Health economics education in undergraduate medical training: introducing the health economics education (HEe) website

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    In the UK, the General Medical Council clearly stipulates that upon completion of training, medical students should be able to discuss the principles underlying the development of health and health service policy, including issues relating to health economics. In response, researchers from the UK and other countries have called for a need to incorporate health economics training into the undergraduate medical curricula. The Health Economics education website was developed to encourage and support teaching and learning in health economics for medical students. It was designed to function both as a forum for teachers of health economics to communicate and to share resources and also to provide instantaneous access to supporting literature and teaching materials on health economics. The website provides a range of free online material that can be used by both health economists and non-health economists to teach the basic principles of the discipline. The Health Economics education website is the only online education resource that exists for teaching health economics to medical undergraduate students and it provides teachers of health economics with a range of comprehensive basic and advanced teaching materials that are freely available. This article presents the website as a tool to encourage the incorporation of health economics training into the undergraduate medical curricula. PMID:24034906

  1. Health economics education in undergraduate medical training: introducing the health economics education (HEe) website.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppong, Raymond; Mistry, Hema; Frew, Emma

    2013-09-13

    In the UK, the General Medical Council clearly stipulates that upon completion of training, medical students should be able to discuss the principles underlying the development of health and health service policy, including issues relating to health economics. In response, researchers from the UK and other countries have called for a need to incorporate health economics training into the undergraduate medical curricula. The Health Economics education website was developed to encourage and support teaching and learning in health economics for medical students. It was designed to function both as a forum for teachers of health economics to communicate and to share resources and also to provide instantaneous access to supporting literature and teaching materials on health economics. The website provides a range of free online material that can be used by both health economists and non-health economists to teach the basic principles of the discipline. The Health Economics education website is the only online education resource that exists for teaching health economics to medical undergraduate students and it provides teachers of health economics with a range of comprehensive basic and advanced teaching materials that are freely available. This article presents the website as a tool to encourage the incorporation of health economics training into the undergraduate medical curricula.

  2. Front-line training: a health care imperative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umiker, W

    2000-06-01

    Training departments in health care institutions are faced with the problem of providing increased services despite reduced budgets. The increased educational needs are the result of organizational reengineering, mergers and acquisitions, technical advances, and the increasing reliance on less qualified employees. One solution to this dilemma is to make better use of managers and experienced workers as trainers. Keys to success include the ability to convince managers that they will benefit from their expanded roles, and to motivate workers to share their knowledge and skill with their team-mates in a cross-training endeavor.

  3. Education and Manpower development for Cleaner Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard

    1996-01-01

    An overview of the needs for education and training for dissemination and implementation of cleaner production. Expericne from training in companies and training of officials from public authorities and from integration into engineering, business and management and social science curricula...

  4. One Health training and research activities in Western Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reina Sikkema

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The increase in emerging human infectious diseases that have a zoonotic origin and the increasing resistance of microorganisms to antimicrobial drugs have shown the need for collaborations between the human, animal and environmental health sectors. The One Health concept increasingly receives recognition from policy makers and researchers all over the world. This overview compiled research and education activities in the area of One Health in Western Europe (Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, Iceland, Ireland, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Monaco, the Netherlands, Portugal, Scandinavia, Spain, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom (UK, with a focus on infectious diseases. It can serve as a starting point for future initiatives and collaborations. Material and methods: A literature search for ‘One Health’ was performed using National Center for Biotechnology Information and Google. Moreover, information from global and European policy documents was collected and a questionnaire was designed to gather current One Health research and training activities in Western Europe. Results: This overview shows that there is considerable recognition for One Health in Europe, although most educational initiatives are recent. In Europe, the One Health approach is currently mainly advocated in relation to antimicrobial resistance (AMR. Many countries have incorporated the One Health approach in their policy to fight AMR, and funding possibilities for AMR research increased significantly. The number of national and international multidisciplinary research networks in the area of zoonotic diseases and One Health is increasing. Discussion: Although One Health has gained recognition in Europe, often a One Health approach to research and education in the area of zoonotic diseases and AMR is not implemented. In many countries, collaboration between sectors is still lacking, and One Health activities are predominantly initiated by the veterinary

  5. Mental health care training priorities in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerwick, S; Jones, R; Mann, A; Goldberg, D

    1997-04-01

    Mental health problems constitute a large part of general practitioners' (GPs') work, for which they may have received little training beyond their undergraduate education. They continue to find themselves criticized in the literature over inadequate recognition and management of these problems. While there is concern about the effectiveness of continuing medical education (CME), educational needs assessment can improve the outcome of CME programmes. To assess GPs' perceived educational needs regarding mental health problems. A questionnaire was developed, piloted and posted to GPs (n = 380) in the Lambeth, Southwark and Lewisham Family Health Services Authority (FHSA) area in south-east Thames. In addition to demographic data, the questionnaire asked practitioners to select from a list of 26 mental health topics those in which they would like further training, their preferred educational formats and timetabling, and willingness to attend for training. Two postal reminders were sent to non-respondents. Data were analysed using SPSS. Altogether, 62% (237/380) of the GPs responded. The range for the number of topics selected was from zero to 26 and the mode was 5. Most frequently selected topics were psychiatric emergencies, somatization, counselling skills, 'heartsink' patients, psychosexual problems and stress management, each of which was chosen by at least 40%. Small group work alone, and allied to a lecture, was rated as the most useful educational format. In all, 74% (175/237) indicated that they would be interested in attending a half-day training course. These results suggest that GPs working in the inner city recognize the importance of improving their skills in the care of mental health problems, and indicate which topics are regarded as the most important and suitable for educational interventions. A needs-led approach to continuing medical education of this kind will help to plan CME programmes relevant to GPs' needs.

  6. Mental health care training priorities in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerwick, S; Jones, R; Mann, A; Goldberg, D

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mental health problems constitute a large part of general practitioners' (GPs') work, for which they may have received little training beyond their undergraduate education. They continue to find themselves criticized in the literature over inadequate recognition and management of these problems. While there is concern about the effectiveness of continuing medical education (CME), educational needs assessment can improve the outcome of CME programmes. AIM: To assess GPs' perceived educational needs regarding mental health problems. METHODS: A questionnaire was developed, piloted and posted to GPs (n = 380) in the Lambeth, Southwark and Lewisham Family Health Services Authority (FHSA) area in south-east Thames. In addition to demographic data, the questionnaire asked practitioners to select from a list of 26 mental health topics those in which they would like further training, their preferred educational formats and timetabling, and willingness to attend for training. Two postal reminders were sent to non-respondents. Data were analysed using SPSS. RESULTS: Altogether, 62% (237/380) of the GPs responded. The range for the number of topics selected was from zero to 26 and the mode was 5. Most frequently selected topics were psychiatric emergencies, somatization, counselling skills, 'heartsink' patients, psychosexual problems and stress management, each of which was chosen by at least 40%. Small group work alone, and allied to a lecture, was rated as the most useful educational format. In all, 74% (175/237) indicated that they would be interested in attending a half-day training course. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that GPs working in the inner city recognize the importance of improving their skills in the care of mental health problems, and indicate which topics are regarded as the most important and suitable for educational interventions. A needs-led approach to continuing medical education of this kind will help to plan CME programmes relevant to

  7. Evaluating community-based public health leadership training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceraso, Marion; Gruebling, Kirsten; Layde, Peter; Remington, Patrick; Hill, Barbara; Morzinski, Jeffrey; Ore, Peggy

    2011-01-01

    Addressing the nation's increasingly complex public health challenges will require more effective multisector collaboration and stronger public health leadership. In 2005, the Healthy Wisconsin Leadership Institute launched an annual, year-long intensive "community teams" program. The goal of this program is to develop collaborative leadership and public health skills among Wisconsin-based multisectoral teams mobilizing their communities to improve public health. To measure the scope of participation and program impacts on individual learning and practice, including application of new knowledge and collective achievements of teams on coalition and short-term community outcomes. End-of-year participant program evaluations and follow-up telephone interviews with participants 20 months after program completion. Community-based public health leadership training program. Sixty-eight participants in the Community Teams Program during the years 2006 to 2007 and 2007 to 2008. Professional diversity of program participants; individual learning and practice, including application of new knowledge; and collective achievements of teams, including coalition and short-term community outcomes. Participants in the Community Teams Program represent a diversity of sectors, including nonprofit, governmental, academic, business, and local public health. Participation increased knowledge across all public health and leadership competency areas covered in the program. Participating teams reported outcomes, including increased engagement of community leadership, expansion of preventive services, increased media coverage, strengthened community coalitions, and increased grant funding. Evaluation of this community-based approach to public health leadership training has shown it to be a promising model for building collaborative and public health leadership skills and initiating sustained community change for health improvement.

  8. Experience in training of health personnel for response to radiological and nuclear accidents; Experiencia na capacitacao de profissionais de saude para a resposta a acidentes radiologicos e nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurmo, Alexandre M., E-mail: ammaurmo@gmail.com [Fundacao Eletronuclear de Assistencia Medica (CMRI/CTNV/FEAM), Praia Brava, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Medicina das Radiacoes Ionizantes. Centro de Treinamento Prof. Nelson Valverde; Leite, Teresa C.S.B., E-mail: feam@feam-etn.org.br [Fundacao Eletronuclear de Assistencia Medica (CIRA/FEAM), Praia Brava, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Informacoes em Radioepidemiologia

    2013-07-01

    Eletronuclear Healthcare Foundation is the Institution responsible for the actions of health response involving ionizing radiation in the area of Nuclear Power Plant Almirante Alvaro Alberto in Angra dos Reis. Because of their specific assignments and references for being in training health manpower in the field of ionizing radiation developed a range of Training Courses for Professionals Area Health to prepare them for Response to Radiological and Nuclear Accidents. Modules are proposed specifically for the professional response of the Technical Level and Higher Level, the level Pre-hospital and hospital. These modules are further divided into specific levels or modules, Basic or Introductory, Intermediate and Advanced. Are applied pretests and post tests to monitor the content of fixing, maintaining a historical series of reviews. Your content is theoretical and practical applications developed in 30 to 48 hours, with simulations (drills) and distribution of educational materials. We already have more than 80 applications training, focusing on internal staff and external to the institution, developing interesting partner with the Armed Forces and Civil Defense. It still maintained a link on the institution seeking access and download over 400 titles on the subject and exchange of information and experiences. For improving the teaching material, the authors launched in 2011 the first manual in Portuguese on the subject with new revised edition in 2013: 'Manual of Medical Actions In Radiological Emergencies'. The results indicate increased knowledge and appropriateness of the themes and the strategy proposed for this activity, demonstrating yet passed that information can be multiplied and meets the growing demand of the country that has hosted and will host international events relevant at QBNRE risk. (author)

  9. The Organization and Management of Company Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Barry T.

    This document outlines the need for manpower training and discusses the components of adequate training as provided by the Industrial Training Act of March, 1964, in order to set guidelines and standards for industries involved in the training revolution in England. Besides training and what it entails, the document presents the philosophy of…

  10. Cost Implications of Hardware Manpower Balance. Phase II - Unit Sustainment Manpower cost Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-01

    developing the BCE, _-11hou(3, 6,chei n- lytical groups may actually develop the cr±ai. .r of the Comptroller of the Army COCA ), Cost An,,.ysc~ .crcoa...costs in Section IV since they are applicable only to a limited number of positions or are geographic-dependent (e.g., COLA ). Once all of the above...costs (CE, CSR B ) on the tables. The tables display the data used to produce a total annual unit manpower cost (TCo) for each occupation listed. The

  11. Global health diplomacy training for military medical researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Rebecca; Blazes, David; Bae, Jennifer; Puntambekar, Nisha; Perdue, Christopher L; Fischer, Julie

    2014-04-01

    Given the unprecedented growth of global health initiatives in the past decade, informal diplomacy between technical partners plays an increasingly important role in shaping opportunities and outcomes. This article describes a course developed and executed specifically to equip U.S. military health professionals with core skills in practical diplomacy critical to help them successfully plan and implement public health surveillance, research, and capacity building programs with partner nation governments and organizations. We identified core competencies in practical diplomacy for laboratory and public health researchers, catalogued and evaluated existing training programs, and then developed a pilot course in global health diplomacy for military medical researchers. The pilot course was held in June 2012, and focused on analyzing contemporary issues related to global health diplomacy through the framework of actors, drivers, and policies that affect public health research and capacity-building, beginning at the level of global health governance and cooperation and moving progressively to regional (supranational), national, and institutional perspective. This course represents an approach geared toward meeting the needs specific to U.S. military public health personnel and researchers working in international settings. Reprint & Copyright © 2014 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  12. [Research on professional health training in the MERCOSUR: a contribution to regional integration policies for training health technicians].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Marise

    2007-01-01

    Progress with regional economic integration in the Southern Cone raises the problem of workers' circulation, requiring reciprocal recognition of curricula and mechanisms for professional certification. The Escola Politécnica de Saúde Joaquim Venâncio (Joaquim Venâncio Polytechnic Health School) of the Fundação Oswaldo Cruz (Oswaldo Cruz Foundation), as a WHO Collaborating Center for Technical Education in Health, has focused on this issue by conducting studies and standardizations for the integration of training policies for health technicians within the MERCOSUR. An important challenge is to identify and systematize the quantitative and qualitative supply of technical education in health in the MERCOSUR member countries, to help establish commonalities between prevailing curricular regulations, titles, diplomas, and professional work codes in the respective countries. The purpose of the current article is to situate this challenge vis-à-vis the relationship between work, education, and health.

  13. Measuring outcomes of communication partner training of health care professionals:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isaksen, Jytte; Jensen, Lise Randrup

    Background: People with aphasia have greater risks of experiencing adverse events or medical errors in health care settings [1, 2]. Furthermore, people with aphasia often depend crucially on health care professionals’ ability to support their participation in information sharing, decisions about...... settings with frequent contact to people with aphasia [4, 5]. In Denmark, for example, the method of Supported Conversation of Adults with Aphasia (SCATM) is in the process of being implemented in more than five hospitals [6, 7]. This raises the question of how the outcomes of training and implementation...

  14. Building a Pediatric Oral Health Training Curriculum for Community Health Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Molly; Frese, William; Lumsden, Christie; Sandoval, Anna

    2017-06-16

    Community health workers (CHWs) are a promising approach to oral health promotion in high-risk populations. This article describes the process of creating a pediatric oral health CHW training curriculum. Existing curricula were identified through outreach efforts to experts in the oral health and CHW fields, as well as PubMed and Google searches. After coding basic information, curricula were mapped to define oral health domains. Then group discussion was employed to determine final curriculum contents. United States. Curricula were included if they addressed oral health, were in English or Spanish, involved US populations, did not target dental clinicians, and whether sufficient data could be obtained. Curricula were evaluated for delivery format, number of hours, target audience, inclusion of CHWs, completeness, and oral health content. Eighteen unique curricula were identified; 14 (78%) were CHW specific. Pathologic factors, caries formation, toothbrushing basics, flossing, nutrition, sugar-sweetened beverages, oral health recommendations, baby bottle tooth decay, fluoride treatments, and fluoride were covered to some extent in 75% of curricula. More than half did not mention types of teeth, oral health during pregnancy, antifluoride, cultural humility, and special needs populations. After comparing CHW curricula with non-CHW curricula, the original 26 oral health domains were condensed into 10 CHW training domains. Using existing evidence and expert insight, an oral health CHW training curriculum outline was created that emphasizes behaviors, social support, and navigation assistance to promote preventive oral health behaviors in families of young children. This has implications beyond oral health. CHW programs are expanding to address the social determinants of health. The process of creating this curriculum and its basic elements can be applied to other disease areas. Clearly defined trainings that are made publicly available, such as this one, support

  15. The Effect of Adolescent Training Program on Risky Health Behaviours and Health Perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meltem KÜRTÜNCÜ

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the risky health behaviors and to raise the awareness of adolescents (attending high school education about prevention of risky behaviors and solutions by the effect of module-based training courses (about reproductive health and birth control, sexually transmitted infections, harmful habits, psychosocial behavior. Being planned as cross-sectional, this study was performed between September 2013-June 2014 in three states and a private high school in Zonguldak and conducted with a group of students aged between 14 and 19.926 students have participated before the training and 534 students have participated after training. It was seen that the mean scores of ‘The Adolescent Risk-Taking Questionnaire', ‘The Adolescent's Attitudes Towards Violence Scale' and ‘taking risk about social status', ‘traffic', ‘subtance use' subscales have decreased after the risk prevention trainings. The means scores of ‘Adolescent Coping with Problems Scale', ‘Nutrition Behaviour Scale' and ‘Nutrition Attitude Scale' have raised. Hence, the scores of domains reflecting adolescent health perception such as hygiene, sleep and exercise have raised while the scores of somatic symptoms domain, such as abdominal pain, headache, and fatigue have been failed. Consequently, it was determined that the training courses about risky health behaviours were effective in preventing risky health behaviors and creating positive health perceptions of adolescents.

  16. Counseling Health Psychology: Assessing Health Psychology Training within Counseling Psychology Doctoral Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raque-Bogdan, Trisha L.; Torrey, Carrie L.; Lewis, Brian L.; Borges, Nicole J.

    2013-01-01

    Training directors of American Psychological Association-approved counseling psychology doctoral programs completed a questionnaire assessing (a) student and faculty involvement in health-related research, practice, and teaching; (b) health-related research conducted by students and faculty; and (c) programs' expectations and ability to…

  17. Good governance competencies in public health to train public health physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoncello, Chiara; Buja, Alessandra; Silenzi, Andrea; Specchia, Maria Lucia; Franchino, Giuseppe; Lazzari, Agnese; Baldo, Vincenzo; Ricciardi, Walter; Damiani, Gianfranco

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed at assessing public health residents' perceived health system governance (HSG) training needs and to define a competency framework for "good governance" to improve Public Health physicians' curricula. A questionnaire was administered to all Italian medical residents on postgraduate courses in Hygiene and Preventive medicine. Twenty-five (78.1%) of the 32 Italian Schools of Public Health and 299/535 residents (55.9%) took part in this survey. The public health governance competency framework was developed from roles and responsibility at different levels of governance in the Italian Health System context. The questionnaire revealed that residents felt the need for more training on all the proposed HSG-related topics. Different governance functions, strategic planning, operational planning, and operational programming were considered when defining roles and responsibilities. More efforts should be made to provide organic training plans tailored to the needs of local and national health system. The competencies framework for good governance could be useful for planning professional training in both the academic and the health system settings.

  18. EQUIP training the trainers: an evaluation of a training programme for service users and carers involved in training mental health professionals in user-involved care planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, C; Grundy, A; Meade, O; Callaghan, P; Lovell, K

    2017-08-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: UK NHS policy highlights the importance of user and carer involvement in health professional training. We know little about service user and carer motivations and experiences of accessing training courses for delivering training to health professionals and how well such courses prepare them for delivering training to healthcare professionals. 'Involvement' in training has often been tokenistic and too narrowly focused on preregistration courses. There is limited data on how best to prepare and support potential service user and carer trainers. WHAT DOES THIS PAPER ADD TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: This study adds to the international literature by highlighting service user and carer motivations for accessing a training course for delivering training to health professionals. Service users and carers wanted to gain new skills and confidence in presentation/facilitation as well as to make a difference to healthcare practice. We also learned that service users desired different levels of involvement in training facilitation - some wanted to take a more active role than others. A one-size-fits-all approach is not always appropriate. Encountering resistance from staff in training was a previously unidentified challenge to service user and carers' experience of delivering training in practice and is a key challenge for trainers to address in future. Professional training involvement can be enhanced via specialist training such as the EQUIP training the trainers programme evaluated here. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: When training service users and carers to deliver training to mental health professionals, it is important that service users are equipped to deal with resistance from staff. It is important that service user and carer roles are negotiated and agreed prior to delivering training to healthcare professionals to accommodate individual preferences and allay anxieties. Training for service users and carers must be offered

  19. Public Health and Social Work: Training Dual Professionals for the Contemporary Workplace

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Betty J. Ruth; Sarah Sisco; Jamie Wyatt; Christina Bethke; Sara S. Bachman; Tinka Markham Piper

    2008-01-01

    .... Academic institutions are vital to improving the public health infrastructure. Collaborative and transdisciplinary practice competencies are increasingly viewed as key components of public health training...

  20. 29 CFR 1960.56 - Training of safety and health specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) BASIC PROGRAM ELEMENTS FOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Training § 1960.56 Training of safety and health specialists. (a) Each agency... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Training of safety and health specialists. 1960.56 Section...

  1. 29 CFR 1960.58 - Training of collateral duty safety and health personnel and committee members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) BASIC PROGRAM ELEMENTS FOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Training § 1960.58 Training of... training shall include: The agency occupational safety and health program; section 19 of the Act; Executive...

  2. 29 CFR 1960.57 - Training of safety and health inspectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) BASIC PROGRAM ELEMENTS FOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Training § 1960.57 Training of safety and health inspectors. Each agency shall... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Training of safety and health inspectors. 1960.57 Section...

  3. Humanitarian and civic assistance health care training and cultural awareness promoting health care pluralism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchini, Rose E

    2013-05-01

    Integration between traditional and contemporary health care in a host nation can be beneficial to nation- and capacity-building and, subsequently, to the overall health of the society. "Traditional" health care in this sense refers to the indigenous health care system in the host nation, which includes characteristic religious or cultural practices, whereas "contemporary" health care is also known as "conventional" or "Westernized"; integration is a synchronization of these two health care forms. However, the choice of integration depends on the political and cultural situation of the nation in which the Department of Defense health care personnel are intervening. Thus, cultural awareness training is essential to ensure the success of missions related to global health and in promoting a health care system that is most beneficial to the society. The present study attempts to show the benefits of both cultural training and health care integration, and how adequately evaluating their efficacy has been problematic. The author proposes that determinants of this efficacy are better documentation collection, extensive predeployment cultural awareness and sensitivity training, and extensive after-action reports for future development. Reprint & Copyright © 2013 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  4. Training highly qualified health research personnel: the pain in Child Health consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Baeyer, Carl L; Stevens, Bonnie J; Chambers, Christine T; Craig, Kenneth D; Finley, G Allen; Grunau, Ruth E; Johnston, C Celeste; Pillai Riddell, Rebecca; Stinson, Jennifer N; Dol, Justine; Campbell-Yeo, Marsha; McGrath, Patrick J

    2014-01-01

    Pain in Child Health (PICH) is a transdisciplinary, international research training consortium. PICH has been funded since 2002 as a Strategic Training Initiative in Health Research of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, with contributions from other funding partners and the founding participation of five Canadian universities. The goal of PICH has been to create a community of scholars in pediatric pain to improve child health outcomes. Quantitative analyses enumerated PICH faculty, trainees, training activities and scientific outputs. Interviews with PICH stakeholders were analyzed using qualitative methods capturing perceptions of the program's strengths, limitations, and opportunities for development and sustainability. PICH has supported 218 trainee members from 2002 through 2013, from 14 countries and more than 16 disciplines. The faculty at the end of 2013 comprised nine co-principal investigators, 14 Canadian coinvestigators, and 28 Canadian and international collaborators. Trainee members published 697 peer-reviewed journal articles on pediatric pain through 2013, among other research dissemination activities including conference presentations and webinars. Networks have been established between new and established researchers across Canada and in 13 other countries. Perceptions from stakeholders commended PICH for its positive impact on the development of pediatric pain researchers. Stakeholders emphasized skills and abilities gained through PICH, the perceived impact of PICH training on this research field, and considerations for future training in developing researchers in pediatric pain. PICH has been successfully developing highly qualified health research personnel within a Canadian and international community of pediatric pain scholarship.

  5. Big Data: Are Biomedical and Health Informatics Training Programs Ready?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersh, W.; Ganesh, A. U. Jai

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives The growing volume and diversity of health and biomedical data indicate that the era of Big Data has arrived for healthcare. This has many implications for informatics, not only in terms of implementing and evaluating information systems, but also for the work and training of informatics researchers and professionals. This article addresses the question: What do biomedical and health informaticians working in analytics and Big Data need to know? Methods We hypothesize a set of skills that we hope will be discussed among academic and other informaticians. Results The set of skills includes: Programming - especially with data-oriented tools, such as SQL and statistical programming languages; Statistics - working knowledge to apply tools and techniques; Domain knowledge - depending on one’s area of work, bioscience or health care; and Communication - being able to understand needs of people and organizations, and articulate results back to them. Conclusions Biomedical and health informatics educational programs must introduce concepts of analytics, Big Data, and the underlying skills to use and apply them into their curricula. The development of new coursework should focus on those who will become experts, with training aiming to provide skills in “deep analytical talent” as well as those who need knowledge to support such individuals. PMID:25123740

  6. Research Directory for Manpower, Personnel, Training, and Human Factors, 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-11-01

    Survey Systems (R) Mr Charley McPeters 703-614-6860 DSN:224-6860 (P) Mr E P Somer 619-553-9248 DSN:553-9248 New Recruit Survey (NRS) (R) Mr E Bres 703...Gail Dr Northwestern Univ 49 McMillan, G Dr Armstrong Lab 65 Crew Systems Directorate McPeters, Charley Mr Deputy Chief of Naval Operations 26 Chief...Engineering Moore, H L Ms Helen L Moore 19 Moore, T J Dr Armstrong Lab 47 Crew Systems Directorate Moran, A W CAPT Army Medical Research and Development

  7. Effect of manpower training and development on organisational ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study adopted cross-sectional survey research design using quantitative research approach. Convenience sampling approach was used as sampling technique and collected data were analysed using simple percentages, correlation and regression analyses. Findings of the study reveal significant positive relationship ...

  8. Research and Studies Directory for Manpower, Personnel, and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-01

    139 Accession For NTIS GRAI DTIC T*PQ Unanmour,ed 0 Just ificat io Clstr’but ion / Avallatbilt- Codes... BIOMAGNETICS TECHNOLOGIES INC 619-453-6300 MAGNETOENCEPHALOGRAPHY BY LEAD FIELD SYNTHESIS SKELLY J ARMSTRONG AEROSPACE MEDICAL RESEARCH LAB 513-255-7555 TEMPORAL...CHURCHILL R* AMERICAN RESEARCH CORP OF VIRGINIA 703-731-0655 BIOMAGNETIC LASER SENSOR (II) CODY W* SEARCH TECHNOLOGY INC 404-441-1457 AUTOMATED DATA

  9. Using Systems Thinking to train future leaders in global health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, Anne; Frost, Laura J

    2017-07-09

    Systems Thinking provides a useful set of concepts and tools that can be used to train students to be effective and innovative global health leaders in an ever-changing and often chaotic world. This paper describes an experiential, multi-disciplinary curriculum that uses Systems Thinking to frame and analyse global health policies and practices. The curriculum uses case studies and hands-on activities to deepen students' understanding of the following concepts: complex adaptive systems, dynamic complexity, inter-relationships, feedback loops, policy resistance, mental models, boundary critique, leverage points, and multi-disciplinary, multi-sectoral, and multi-stakeholder thinking and action. A sample of Systems Thinking tools for analysing global health policies and practices are also introduced.

  10. The future of health care: students' perceptions, education, and training in aging and health in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amenda; Johnson, Shanthi; Kamalanabhan, T J

    2012-11-01

    This study examined the students' perceptions on the care of the older persons and their education and training in geriatrics and gerontology in India. Students (n = 229) from medicine, nursing, and social work programs completed a survey. Three key findings emerged: (a) strong family ties and filial piety in aging care, (b) acknowledging the importance of social, economic, and religious factors in the care of the older persons while not recognizing the age-related health needs, and (c) although participants described their education and training as being adequate, lack of awareness of aging policies highlight the need for formalized educational and training opportunities.

  11. University Extension of Elderly Health and Potency for Medical Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerle Dayana Tavares de Lucena

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To present the potential of university extension for medical training, based on the perception of extension workers. Method: This is an exploratory descriptive study, with a qualitative approach, carried out with medical students, former students of the university extension project of the elderly health. Wheels of conversations were made to base empirical production on a semi-structured interview script. The analysis was performed using Fiorin's speech analysis technique. Results: It was possible to verify, in this research, the power of the university extension in the medical training, the impact generated in the accompanied elderly people and the importance of the production of bond. It was also verified the importance of providing students with more projects that can give a return to society and foster in students the need not to stop only the pathology, but mainly to awaken the motivation for a humanized and integral care. Conclusion: The university extension provides an approximation with the community, through the bond and accountability between the academic and the elderly. In addition, it allows to contribute to improve and implant the sense of citizenship in the life of individuals. Key words: Health of the institutionalized elderly, Medicine, Collective Health.

  12. Integrating cultural humility into health care professional education and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, E-shien; Simon, Melissa; Dong, XinQi

    2012-05-01

    As US populations become increasing diverse, healthcare professionals are facing a heightened challenge to provide cross-cultural care. To date, medical education around the world has developed specific curricula on cultural competence training in acknowledgement of the importance of culturally sensitive and grounded services. This article proposes to move forward by integrating the concept of cultural humility into current trainings, in which we believe, is vital in complementing the current model, and better prepare future professionals to address health challenges with culturally appropriate care. Based on the works of Chinese philosophers, cultural values and the contemporary Chinese immigrants' experience, we hereby present the QIAN (Humbleness) curriculum: the importance of self-Questioning and critique, bi-directional cultural Immersion, mutually Active-listening, and the flexibility of Negotiation. The principles of the QIAN curriculum reside not only between the patient and the healthcare professional dyad, but also elicit the necessary support of family, health care system as well as the community at large. The QIAN curriculum could improve practice and enhance the exploration, comprehension and appreciation of the cultural orientations between healthcare professionals and patients which ultimately could improve patient satisfaction, patient-healthcare professional relationship, medical adherence and the reduction of health disparities. QIAN model is highly adaptable to other cultural and ethnic groups in multicultural societies around the globe. Incorporating its framework into the current medical education may enhance cross-cultural clinical encounters.

  13. Health promotion training in dental and oral health degrees: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracksley-O'Grady, Stacey A; Dickson-Swift, Virginia A; Anderson, Karen S; Gussy, Mark G

    2015-05-01

    Dental diseases are a major burden on health; however, they are largely preventable. Dental treatment alone will not eradicate dental disease with a shift to prevention required. Prevention of dental diseases is a role of dental professionals, with most countries having formalized health promotion competencies for dental and oral health graduates. In spite of this, there may be minimal health promotion being undertaken in clinical practice. Therefore, the aim of this study was to conduct a scoping review to identify some published studies on health promotion training in dental and oral health degrees. Key search terms were developed and used to search selected databases, which identified 84 articles. Four articles met the inclusion/exclusion criteria and were included in the review. Of these studies, the type of oral health promotion tasks and instructions received before the tasks varied. However, for all studies the health promotion content was focused on health education. In terms of evaluation of outcomes, only two studies evaluated the health promotion content using student reflections. More good-quality information on health promotions training is needed to inform practice.

  14. Transdisciplinary cardiovascular and cancer health disparities training: experiences of the centers for population health and health disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Sherita Hill; Ferketich, Amy; Boyington, Josephine; Dugan, Sheila; Garroutte, Eva; Kaufmann, Peter G; Krok, Jessica; Kuo, Alice; Ortega, Alexander N; Purnell, Tanjala; Srinivasan, Shobha

    2015-07-01

    The Centers for Population Health and Health Disparities program promotes multilevel and multifactorial health equity research and the building of research teams that are transdisciplinary. We summarized 5 areas of scientific training for empowering the next generation of health disparities investigators with research methods and skills that are needed to solve disparities and inequalities in cancer and cardiovascular disease. These areas include social epidemiology, multilevel modeling, health care systems or health care delivery, community-based participatory research, and implementation science. We reviewed the acquisition of the skill sets described in the training components; these skill sets will position trainees to become leaders capable of effecting significant change because they provide tools that can be used to address the complexities of issues that promote health disparities.

  15. Lessons learnt from comprehensive evaluation of community-based education in Uganda: a proposal for an ideal model community-based education for health professional training institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atuyambe Lynn

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Community-based education (CBE can provide contextual learning that addresses manpower scarcity by enabling trainees acquire requisite experiences, competence, confidence and values. In Uganda, many health professional training institutions conduct some form of community-based education (CBE. However, there is scanty information on the nature of the training: whether a curriculum exists (objectives, intended outcomes, content, implementation strategy, administration and constraints faced. The objective was to make a comprehensive assessment of CBE as implemented by Ugandan health professional training institutions to document the nature of CBE conducted and propose an ideal model with minimum requirements for health professional training institutions in Uganda. Methods We employed several methods: documentary review of curricula of 22 institutions, so as to assess the nature, purpose, outcomes, and methods of instruction and assessment; site visits to these institutions and their CBE sites, to assess the learning environment (infrastructure and resources; in-depth interviews with key people involved in running CBE at the institutions and community, to evaluate CBE implementation, challenges experienced and perceived solutions. Results CBE was perceived differently ranging from a subject, a course, a program or a project. Despite having similar curricula, institutions differ in the administration, implementation and assessment of CBE. Objectives of CBE, the curricula content and implementation strategies differ in similar institutions. On collaborative and social learning, most trainees do not reside in the community, though they work on group projects and write group reports. Lectures and skills demonstrations were the main instruction methods. Assessment involved mainly continuous assessment, oral or written reports and summative examination. Conclusion This assessment identified deficiencies in the design and implementation

  16. Do black lives matter in public health research and training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Molly; Ranapurwala, Shabbar I; Townes, Ashley; Bengtson, Angela M

    2017-01-01

    To examine whether investments made in public health research align with the health burdens experienced by white and black Americans. In this cross-sectional study of all deaths in the United States in 2015, we compared the distribution of potential years of life lost (PYLL) across 39 causes of death by race and identified key differences. We examined the relationship between cause-of-death-specific PYLL and key indicators of public health investment (federal funding and number of publications) by race using linear spline models. We also compared the number of courses available at the top schools of public health relevant to the top causes of death contributor to PYLL for black and white Americans. Homicide was the number one contributor to PYLL among black Americans, while ischemic heart disease was the number one contributor to PYLL among white Americans. Firearm-related violence accounted for 88% of black PYLL attributed to homicide and 71% of white PYLL attributed to homicide. Despite the high burden of PYLL, homicide research was the focus of few federal grants or publications. In comparison, ischemic heart disease garnered 341 grants and 594 publications. The number of public health courses available relevant to homicide (n = 9) was similar to those relevant to ischemic heart disease (n = 10). Black Americans are disproportionately affected by homicide, compared to white Americans. For both black and white Americans, the majority of PYLL due to homicide are firearm-related. Yet, homicide research is dramatically underrepresented in public health research investments in terms of grant funding and publications, despite available public health training opportunities. If left unchecked, the observed disproportionate distribution of investments in public health resources threatens to perpetuate a system that disadvantages black Americans.

  17. Mental health training programmes for non-mental health trained professionals coming into contact with people with mental ill health: a systematic review of effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Alison; Scantlebury, Arabella; Hughes-Morley, Adwoa; Mitchell, Natasha; Wright, Kath; Scott, William; McDaid, Catriona

    2017-05-25

    The police and others in occupations where they come into close contact with people experiencing/with mental ill health, often have to manage difficult and complex situations. Training is needed to equip them to recognise and assist when someone has a mental health issue or learning/intellectual disability. We undertook a systematic review of the effectiveness of training programmes aimed at increasing knowledge, changing behaviour and/or attitudes of the trainees with regard to mental ill health, mental vulnerability, and learning disabilities. Databases searched from 1995 onwards included: ASSIA, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Clinical Trials (CENTRAL), Criminal Justice Abstracts, Embase, ERIC, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Social Science Citation Index. Courses, training, or learning packages aimed at helping police officers and others who interact with the public in a similar way to deal with people with mental health problems were included. Primary outcomes were change in practice and change in outcomes for the groups of people the trainees come into contact with. Systematic reviews, randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and non- randomised controlled trials (non-RCTs) were included and quality assessed. In addition non-comparative evaluations of training for police in England were included. From 8578 search results, 19 studies met the inclusion criteria: one systematic review, 12 RCTs, three prospective non-RCTs, and three non-comparative studies. The training interventions identified included broad mental health awareness training and packages addressing a variety of specific mental health issues or conditions. Trainees included police officers, teachers and other public sector workers. Some short term positive changes in behaviour were identified for trainees, but for the people the trainees came into contact with there was little or no evidence of benefit. A variety of training programmes exist for non-mental health professionals who come into contact with

  18. Effectiveness of Mental Health First Aid training in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kamilla B.; Morthorst, Britt Reuter; Vendsborg, Per B.

    2016-01-01

    and ability to recognize mental illness and improved positive attitudes towards people suffering from mental health problems. METHOD: Study design was a randomized trial with a waitlist control group. The intervention group was compared with the control group at 6-month follow-up. Both groups completed...... at baseline and at 6-month follow-up. RESULTS: A significant difference was found between employees trained in the intervention group compared to the control group at 6-month follow-up on the items of confidence in making contact to (Cohen's d 0.17), talking to (Cohen's d 0.18) and providing help to (Cohen......PURPOSE: To examine the effect of the Australian educational intervention Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) in a Danish context. Primary outcome was improvement concerning confidence in help-giving behavior towards people suffering from mental illness. Secondary outcomes were increased knowledge...

  19. Training Future Leaders of Academic Medicine: Internal Programs at Three Academic Health Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morahan, Page S.; Kasperbauer, Dwight; McDade, Sharon A.; Aschenbrener, Carol A.; Triolo, Pamela K.; Monteleone, Patricia L.; Counte, Michael; Meyer, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    Reviews need for internal leadership training programs at academic health centers and describes three programs. Elements common to the programs include small classes, participants from many areas of academic medicine and health care, building on prior experience and training, training conducted away from the institution, short sessions, faculty…

  20. Concept Attainment Teaching Methodology (CATM)--An Effective Approach for Training Workers on Chemicals Health Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleiman, Abdulqadir Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Workers handling chemicals need to understand the risk to health involved in their work, and this requires training. In this study effectivity of concept attainment teaching methodology (CATM) as training strategy for cleaning workers was assessed. CATM was used to train workers on chemicals information and health hazards. Pictures, illustrations,…

  1. The impact of the global budget system on dynamics of dental manpower and utilization of dental services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Laura Yueh-Guey; Huang, Boyen

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate dentists' supply and practice patterns following the implementation of the global budget system in Taiwan. Data of reimbursement claims, municipal socioeconomic status and dental manpower were collected from the National Health Insurance administration, the Ministry of Internal Affair, and the Ministry of Health and Welfare, respectively. A multivariate linear regression method was used for data analysis. A municipality that reported a higher percentage of tertiary educated population (t = 3.718, P dental manpower in Taiwan. A relationship between HHI and dentists' move-out rate has been found. The relationship between municipal socioeconomic status and the density of dentists has also been confirmed. In addition, reduced utilization of amalgam restorations was accompanied by increased utilization of tooth-colored material restorations. Further investigations are indicated.

  2. The Effect of Adolescent Training Program on Risky Health Behaviours and Health Perception

    OpenAIRE

    Meltem KÜRTÜNCÜ; Uzun, Müge; Ferruh Niyazi AYOĞLU

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the risky health behaviors and to raise the awareness of adolescents (attending high school education) about prevention of risky behaviors and solutions by the effect of module-based training courses (about reproductive health and birth control, sexually transmitted infections, harmful habits, psychosocial behavior). Being planned as cross-sectional, this study was performed between September 2013-June 2014 in three states and a private high school in Zo...

  3. Intercultural Competency in Public Health: A Call for Action to Incorporate Training into Public Health Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleckman, Julia M; Dal Corso, Mark; Ramirez, Shokufeh; Begalieva, Maya; Johnson, Carolyn C

    2015-01-01

    Due to increasing national diversity, programs addressing cultural competence have multiplied in U.S. medical training institutions. Although these programs share common goals for improving clinical care for patients and reducing health disparities, there is little standardization across programs. Furthermore, little progress has been made to translate cultural competency training from the clinical setting into the public health setting where the focus is on population-based health, preventative programming, and epidemiological and behavioral research. The need for culturally relevant public health programming and culturally sensitive public health research is more critical than ever. Awareness of differing cultures needs to be included in all processes of planning, implementation and evaluation. By focusing on community-based health program planning and research, cultural competence implies that it is possible for public health professionals to completely know another culture, whereas intercultural competence implies it is a dual-sided process. Public health professionals need a commitment toward intercultural competence and skills that demonstrate flexibility, openness, and self-reflection so that cultural learning is possible. In this article, the authors recommend a number of elements to develop, adapt, and strengthen intercultural competence education in public health educational institutions.

  4. Intercultural Competency in Public Health: A Call for Action to Incorporate Training into Public Health Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleckman, Julia M.; Dal Corso, Mark; Ramirez, Shokufeh; Begalieva, Maya; Johnson, Carolyn C.

    2015-01-01

    Due to increasing national diversity, programs addressing cultural competence have multiplied in U.S. medical training institutions. Although these programs share common goals for improving clinical care for patients and reducing health disparities, there is little standardization across programs. Furthermore, little progress has been made to translate cultural competency training from the clinical setting into the public health setting where the focus is on population-based health, preventative programming, and epidemiological and behavioral research. The need for culturally relevant public health programming and culturally sensitive public health research is more critical than ever. Awareness of differing cultures needs to be included in all processes of planning, implementation and evaluation. By focusing on community-based health program planning and research, cultural competence implies that it is possible for public health professionals to completely know another culture, whereas intercultural competence implies it is a dual-sided process. Public health professionals need a commitment toward intercultural competence and skills that demonstrate flexibility, openness, and self-reflection so that cultural learning is possible. In this article, the authors recommend a number of elements to develop, adapt, and strengthen intercultural competence education in public health educational institutions. PMID:26389109

  5. Leadership, collaboration, and effective training principles and practices from a decade of training by a center for public health preparedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, William Michael; Brown, Lisa M; Landis, Danielle C

    2014-01-01

    To review a decade's experience of a Centers for Disease Control and Preparedness (CDC) funded Center for Public Health Preparedness (hereafter referred to as the Center) and to identify interventions that led to surmounting serious obstacles to achieving the Center's CDC-mandated goals and objectives. The Center's purpose was to train the public health workforce to protect the population from bioterrorism, infectious diseases, and emerging public health threats. This case study used the concepts of the judgment process as developed by Noel Tichy and Warren Bennis to describe the experiences and actions of the Center's leaders. Center staff used public health principles of collaboration, the use of relevant science, and professional training principles in developing and delivering training in epidemiology, behavioral health, crisis leadership, and other fields through distance learning and on-site methods. The study's primary focus was on training in Florida, although the program's reach was national and international. Preparedness training was provided to approximately 10,000 public health officials, primarily drawn from Florida. This is a descriptive study of the Center's activities. The interventions were the steps taken by Center leadership to accomplish the federal and state goals of the program, despite meeting major challenges. The outcome measures were degrees of success, as measured by federal and state officials and other indicators, in delivering high quality training that met CDC and state goals. The Center delivered trainings in fields determined to be needed in Florida and nationally. Participant and observer evaluations were strongly positive. Nationally published papers and presentations contributed to the training evidence base. The Florida Department of Health incorporated the trainings into Florida's mandatory training for Incident Command strike teams. The leaders of the Center and the Florida Department of Health developed a formal statement of

  6. Work Program. Fiscal Year 1969 for The Department of the Army. Research and Development in Training, Motivation, and Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969-01-01

    9 REALISTIC Determin ni of Reainq, Listening, and Arithmetic Skils Required for Moior Milituiy Occupational Specialties ......... 13 V SKILLCON...job requiremeits in these skills, and (2) developing technique.; for improving literacy skills through training. In addition, manpower pools for a given...job requirements in these skills, and (2) developing techniques for improving literacy skills through training. In addition, manpower pools for a

  7. Training the Next Generation of Latino Health Researchers: A Multilevel, Transdisciplinary, Community-Engaged Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Kuo, Alice A.; Sharif, Mienah Z.; Prelip, Michael L.; Glik, Deborah C.; Albert, Stephanie L.; Belin, Thomas; McCarthy, William J.; Roberts, Christian K.; Garcia, Rosa Elena; Ortega, Alexander N.

    2016-01-01

    Reducing health disparities is a national public health priority. Latinos represent the largest racial/ethnic minority group in the United States and suffer disproportionately from poor health outcomes, including cardiovascular disease risk. Academic training programs are an opportunity for reducing health disparities, in part by increasing the diversity of the public health workforce and by incorporating training designed to develop a skill set to address health disparities. This article des...

  8. Training healthcare professionals for the future: internationalism and effective inclusion of global health training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Deborah Murdoch; Redmond, Anthony; Bax, Nigel

    2011-01-01

    There has been a continuing rise in recent years of the number of medical schools in the developed world offering 'global health' teaching to its students. Yet, the term itself is used in a number of contexts and as yet no clear consensus on what constitutes an appropriate or successful global health education programme has been reached. Approaches to sustainable internationalisation of medical curricula include the expansion of not only opportunities for training in specific global health topics, but also the development of broader generic graduate attributes including global citizenship and ethical, cultural and social responsibility. Key components for successful implementation of such an educational framework includes a breadth of educational approach to effect truly integrated and effective curricular internationalisation. That such programmes can offer benefits is appreciated by both faculty and students alike, but there is also a burgeoning concern about potential negative effects of socially and culturally insensitive programmes. We explore three potential pedagogic approaches to the subject; Model A: an 'additive' or contributory model of global health content (the commonest current approach), Model B: an 'integrated' approach and Model C: the more challenging 'transformative' approach requiring institutional as well as programme flexibility.

  9. Intercultural competency in public health: a call for action to incorporate training into public health education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia eFleckman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to increasing national diversity, programs addressing cultural competence have multiplied in U.S. medical training institutions. Little progress has been made to translate cultural competency training from the clinical setting into the public health setting where the focus is on population-based health, preventative programming, and epidemiological and behavioral research. The need for culturally relevant public health programming and culturally sensitive public health research is more critical than ever. Awareness of differing cultural roles needs to be included in all processes of planning, implementation and evaluation. In focusing on community-based health program planning and research, cultural competence implies that it is possible for public health professionals to completely know another culture, whereas intercultural competence implies it is a dual-sided process. Public health professionals need a commitment toward intercultural competence and skills that demonstrate flexibility, openness and self-reflection so that cultural learning is possible. In this article, the authors recommend a number of elements to develop, adapt and strengthen intercultural competence education in public health educational institutions.

  10. Emergency preparedness training preferences and perceived barriers to training among various healthcare providers and public health practitioners in Massachusetts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broach, John; Smith, Mary-Elise

    2017-01-01

    Emergency preparedness training is vital to a wide range of healthcare and public health disciplines. Although agencies may try to tailor their training efforts based on perceived need, the topics and methods of instruction may be misguided, resulting in wasted effort and poor participation in training events. The objective of this study was to understand in a rigorous way, the training preferences and barriers to training among practitioners in Massachusetts. In August 2013, the Massachusetts Department of Public Health distributed an online survey to health professionals in Massachusetts regarding their emergency preparedness training topic preferences and any perceived barriers and challenges associated with obtaining this training. A total of 796 healthcare and public health professionals responded to the survey and answered some or all of the questions asked. The results of the survey identified important differences in preference for some topics based on a provider's practice location and discipline. However, Community Recovery and Community Preparedness were seen as desirable by all disciplines with more than 80 percent of respondents rating each of these issues as being highly important. Barriers to training were also assessed. Time spent away from work was the most commonly identified barrier (77.41 percent). Travel distance and financial constraints were also rated highly with scores of 65.48 and 63.71 percent, respectively. This study demonstrates important areas of agreement with respect to desired training topics and points out areas where providers in different disciplines and from different geographic areas may have differing educational preferences. Even within the limitation of this investigation, we expect that this study will be a valuable tool for those attempting to effectively target emergency preparedness training and structure course offerings in ways that minimize the impact of barriers to training.

  11. High-intensity training versus traditional exercise interventions for promoting health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, Lars; Sundstrup, Emil; Jakobsen, Markus D

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of brief intense interval training as exercise intervention for promoting health and to evaluate potential benefits about common interventions, that is, prolonged exercise and strength training.......The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of brief intense interval training as exercise intervention for promoting health and to evaluate potential benefits about common interventions, that is, prolonged exercise and strength training....

  12. Markov Chain: A Predictive Model for Manpower Planning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    MATERIALS AND METHODS. Description of Study Area: In this paper, the academic staff manpower system of university of. Uyo is modeled using Markov chain predictive model. The objective of the study is to determine the proportion of staff promoted, withdrawn, and recruited into the various grades, and to predict the.

  13. Markov Chain: A Predictive Model for Manpower Planning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    numerous previous studies have applied Markov chain models in describing title or level promotions .... secondary data related to workforce movement selected ... leave. Babu and Rao, (2013) carried out studies on two graded manpower model with bulk recruitment in both grades. They assumed that the organization is.

  14. Manpower Development in Toxicology. EURO Reports and Studies, No. 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

    This report addresses the widely held view that currently available literature in toxicology is inadequate in that there is a need to identify manpower deficiencies in this field and to suggest means to correct these deficiencies. It contains a list of specific recommendations including the organization of a working group, sponsored by the World…

  15. Solving a manpower scheduling problem for airline catering using metaheuristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ho, Sin C.; Leung, Janny M. Y.

    2010-01-01

    We study a manpower scheduling problem with job time-windows and job-skills compatibility constraints. This problem is motivated by airline catering operations, whereby airline meals and other supplies are delivered to aircrafts on the tarmac just before the flights take-off.  Jobs (flights) must...

  16. Plan for developing a comprehensive energy manpower information system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, Lawrence G.

    1979-09-01

    The report is designed to make a beginning in broadening the scope of the comprehensive manpower information system for energy research, development, and demonstration, so that it could cover all manpower related to energy. It develops a plan for this extension, including determining which taxonomies require change, specifying the subsequent stages involved in expanding CEMIS to all energy manpower, and providing the basis for cost estimates for this work. The report is organized as follows: The analytical rationale is described in Chapter II. Chapter III reviews the status of manpower data in a number of energy sectors, notes limitations and gaps in the data, and discusses improvements and additions that should be made. The scope and structure of CEMIS are laid out in Chapter IV, with particular reference to the development of analytical processes, and of analytical linking functions between bodies of data, and a description of their application in anticipating the employment impact of energy changes. The appropriate steps recommended for the further development of CEMIS are described in Chapter V.

  17. Manpower Issues Involving Visit, Board, Search, and Seizure (VBSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Destroyer (DDG) platforms are best equipped/manned to support the growing mission of Maritime Interdictions Operations. Manpower and working...Operation Capabilities (ROC) and Projected Operational Environments (POE) accomplish these missions by platform . In the 2012 Highlights of the...outlined on their website includes, Boarding Officer Course, Boarding Officer Practical, BO eLearning , Ports waterways coastal security, Boarding

  18. The future of global health education: training for equity in global health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Lisa V; Wagner, Claire M; Nutt, Cameron T; Binagwaho, Agnes

    2016-11-21

    Among academic institutions in the United States, interest in global health has grown substantially: by the number of students seeking global health opportunities at all stages of training, and by the increase in institutional partnerships and newly established centers, institutes, and initiatives to house global health programs at undergraduate, public health and medical schools. Witnessing this remarkable growth should compel health educators to question whether the training and guidance that we provide to students today is appropriate, and whether it will be applicable in the next decade and beyond. Given that "global health" did not exist as an academic discipline in the United States 20 years ago, what can we expect it will look like 20 years from now and how can we prepare for that future? Most clinicians and trainees today recognize the importance of true partnership and capacity building in both directions for successful international collaborations. The challenge is in the execution of these practices. There are projects around the world where this is occurring and equitable partnerships have been established. Based on our experience and observations of the current landscape of academic global health, we share a perspective on principles of engagement, highlighting instances where partnerships have thrived, and examples of where we, as a global community, have fallen short. As the world moves beyond the charity model of global health (and its colonial roots), it is evident that the issue underlying ethical global health practice is partnership and the pursuit of health equity. Thus, achieving equity in global health education and practice ought to be central to our mission as educators and advisors when preparing trainees for careers in this field. Seeking to eliminate health inequities wherever they are ingrained will reveal the injustices around the globe and in our own cities and towns.

  19. Comparison of lifestyle and mental health among physical training teachers and other teachers in Birjand city

    OpenAIRE

    Masoud Siyami; Atefeh Salari; Hadi Samadieh

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: This study aimed to compare the lifestyle and mental health of male and female physical training and non-physical training teachers in Birjand city. Materials and Methods: This is a causal-comparative study. The statistical population consisted of all physical training and the other teachers of Birjand city in the academic year of 2014-2015. So, 198 cases (99 physical training teachers and 99 non-physical training teachers) were selected by randomized cluster sampling. They r...

  20. A competencies-based mental health training model for health professionals in low and middle income countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    KUTCHER, STAN; CHEHIL, SONIA; CASH, COLLEEN; MILLAR, JIM

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a competencies-based training model specifically created to teach needed mental health skills to health professionals in low and middle income countries (LMICs). The model combines a mental health training needs assessment with the delivery of mental health training modules aligned with national/regional mental health priorities and designed to be used by all health professionals at various levels of the health care system. The model also defines a sustainability framework that involves the creation of a multidisciplinary training team embedded in the national/regional health system. The training program consists of a number of modules, each one designed to enhance specific mental health competencies for a variety of health care workers. These modules are linked to a number of clinically useful tools that facilitate knowledge transfer into clinical care while concurrently addressing health equity issues. This model may provide an efficient and cost-effective alternative to traditional profession-based mental health training approaches, which have to date not been successful at meeting mental health delivery needs and mental health service priorities in LMICs. PMID:16633545

  1. Optimal manpower allocation in aircraft line maintenance (Case in GMF AeroAsia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puteri, V. E.; Yuniaristanto, Hisjam, M.

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents a mathematical modeling to find the optimal manpower allocation in an aircraft line maintenance. This research focuses on assigning the number and type of manpower that allocated to each service. This study considers the licenced worker or Aircraft Maintenance Engineer Licence (AMEL) and non licenced worker or Aircraft Maintenance Technician (AMT). In this paper, we also consider the relationship of each station in terms of the possibility to transfer the manpower among them. The optimization model considers the number of manpowers needed for each service and the requirement of AMEL worker. This paper aims to determine the optimal manpower allocation using the mathematical modeling. The objective function of the model is to find the minimum employee expenses. The model was solved using the ILOG CPLEX software. The results show that the manpower allocation can meet the manpower need and the all load can be served.

  2. Health care managers learning by listening to subordinates' dialogue training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grill, C; Ahlborg, G; Wikström, E

    2014-01-01

    Middle managers in health care today are expected to continuously and efficiently decide and act in administration, finance, care quality, and work environment, and strategic communication has become paramount. Since dialogical communication is considered to promote a healthy work environment, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the ways in which health care managers experienced observing subordinates' dialogue training. A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews and documents from eight middle managers in a dialogue programme intervention conducted by dialogue trainers. Focus was on fostering and assisting workplace dialogue. Conventional qualitative content analysis was used. Managers' experiences were both enriching and demanding, and consisted of becoming aware of communication, meaning perceiving interaction between subordinates as well as own silent interaction with subordinates and trainer; Discovering communicative actions for leadership, by gaining self-knowledge and recognizing relational leadership models from trainers--such as acting democratically and pedagogically--and converting theory into practice, signifying practising dialogue-promoting conversation behaviour with subordinates, peers, and superiors. Only eight managers participated in the intervention, but data afforded a basis for further research. Findings stressed the importance of listening, and of support from superiors, for well-functioning leadership communication at work. Studies focusing on health care managers' communication and dialogue are few. This study contributes to knowledge about these activities in managerial leadership.

  3. Assessing Outcomes of Online Training in Public Health: Changes in Individual and Organizational Knowledge and Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W. Wallace

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The need for a well-prepared public health workforce to prepare for and respond to threats of terrorism, infectious diseases, and other public health emergencies is well documented, as is the reality that the public health workforce in the United States is under-trained and unprepared to handle public health emergencies. The impact of training on the public health workforce is often measured by the volume of training completed and post-course evaluation data. A survey of current, high-volume users (n = 759 of the University of North Carolina Center for Public Health Preparedness Training Web Site, defined as individuals who had completed 12 or more training modules was conducted in order to determine if measurable changes in preparedness and response knowledge and capacity were brought about by the trainings. Two-hundred and seventy respondents completed the survey (response rate = 36%, with 52% reporting employment in governmental public health. Individual changes reported as a result of training included increased personal satisfaction (71%, increased job satisfaction (38%, and recognition by supervisors for training completion (23%; Organizational changes included updates to training plans (19%, making trainings mandatory (19%, and revising standard operating procedures (13%. Results from this survey indicate that the knowledge learned from completing online trainings led to changes in individuals and, to a lesser extent, changes in organizations.

  4. Perceptions of the incorporation of health literacy in pharmacy training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmer, Robert S; Ray, Shaunta' M; Byrd, Debbie C

    2013-01-01

    To assess pharmacy residents' perceptions regarding the incorporation of health literacy in pharmacy school and pharmacy residency training and to assess confidence while interacting with patients of limited health literacy. Prospective cross-sectional study. United States from March to May 2012. Postgraduate year (PGY)1 and -2 pharmacy residents and pharmacy residency program directors. Online survey. PGY1 and -2 resident perceptions of health literacy incorporation into pharmacy school and residency training. 939 surveys were completed. Residents agreed that their pharmacy school training encouraged the development of health literacy skills ( P training compared with during or following PGY1 residency training ( P training essential to encountering patients of limited health literacy. Future studies should assess whether these perceptions reflect true health literacy awareness and management among pharmacy residents.

  5. [Impact of the Core Training Law on preventive medicine and public health training and other common medical specialties].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latasa, Pello; Gil-Borrelli, Christian; Aguilera, José Antonio; Reques, Laura; Barreales, Saúl; Ojeda, Elena; Alemán, Guadalupe; Iniesta, Carlos; Gullón, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the Core Training Law (CTL) is to amend specialised medical training to include 24 months of common training. The aim of this study is to assess its potential impact on the Preventive Medicine and Public Health (PM&PH) training programme and other medical specialties. The programmes of the 21 common medical specialties were analysed and the recommended training periods for each specialty collected, before the information was agreed upon by three observers. The training impact was calculated as the percentage of months that should be amended per specialty to adapt to the common training schedule. The Preventive Medicine and Public Health training programme is the specialty most affected by the Core Training Law (100%, 24 months). Intensive medicine (0%, 0 months) and medical oncology (17%, 4 months) is the least affected. The CTL affects the common medical specialties in different ways and requires a complete reorganisation of the activities and competencies of PM&PH professionals. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Developing and pilot testing a comprehensive health literacy communication training for health professionals in three European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaper, Marise S; Sixsmith, Jane; Koot, Jaap A R; Meijering, Louise B; van Twillert, Sacha; Giammarchi, Cinzia; Bevilacqua, Roberta; Barry, Margaret M; Doyle, Priscilla; Reijneveld, Sijmen A; de Winter, Andrea F

    2018-01-01

    Skills to address different health literacy problems are lacking among health professionals. We sought to develop and pilot test a comprehensive health literacy communication training for various health professionals in Ireland, Italy and the Netherlands. Thirty health professionals participated in the study. A literature review focused on evidence-informed training-components. Focus group discussions (FGDs) explored perspectives from seventeen professionals on a prototype-program, and feedback from thirteen professionals following pilot-training. Pre-post questionnaires assessed self-rated health literacy communication skills. The literature review yielded five training-components to address functional, interactive and critical health literacy: health literacy education, gathering and providing information, shared decision-making, enabling self-management, and supporting behaviour change. In FGDs, professionals endorsed the prototype-program and reported that the pilot-training increased knowledge and patient-centred communication skills in addressing health literacy, as shown by self-rated pre-post questionnaires. A comprehensive training for health professionals in three European countries enhances perceived skills to address functional, interactive and critical health literacy. This training has potential for wider application in education and practice in Europe. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Training the child athlete: physical fitness, health and injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Cordelia W; Micheli, Lyle J

    2011-09-01

    The number of children and adolescents participating in organised athletic activities worldwide is increasing. However, physical fitness levels among youth are lower today than in previous decades. The combination of increased exposure and decreased preparedness for sports participation has led to an epidemic of both acute and chronic sports-related injuries in this population. Poor physical fitness, in addition to having negative health consequences, seems to be a risk factor for sports-related injury. Accurate injury surveillance data are required to better define the magnitude of the problem of injury in youth sports, as well as to identify specific risk factors for injury. From these data, targeted intervention strategies incorporating fitness training may be developed with the goal of preventing sports-related injury. Preliminary experience with several specific injury patterns--anterior cruciate ligament injuries and ankle sprains--has demonstrated the efficacy of such targeted prevention strategies.

  8. Training trainers in health and human rights: implementing curriculum change in South African health sciences institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewert, Elena G; Baldwin-Ragaven, Laurel; London, Leslie

    2011-07-25

    The complicity of the South African health sector in apartheid and the international relevance of human rights as a professional obligation prompted moves to include human rights competencies in the curricula of health professionals in South Africa. A Train-the-Trainers course in Health and Human Rights was established in 1998 to equip faculty members from health sciences institutions nationwide with the necessary skills, attitudes and knowledge to teach human rights to their students. This study followed up participants to determine the extent of curriculum implementation, support needed as well as barriers encountered in integrating human rights into health sciences teaching and learning. A survey including both quantitative and qualitative components was distributed in 2007 to past course participants from 1998-2006 via telephone, fax and electronic communication. Out of 162 past participants, 46 (28%) completed the survey, the majority of whom were still employed in academic settings (67%). Twenty-two respondents (48%) implemented a total of 33 formal human rights courses into the curricula at their institutions. Respondents were nine times more likely (relative risk 9.26; 95% CI 5.14-16.66) to implement human rights education after completing the training. Seventy-two extracurricular activities were offered by 21 respondents, many of whom had successfully implemented formal curricula. Enabling factors for implementation included: prior teaching experience in human rights, general institutional support and the presence of allies - most commonly coworkers as well as deans. Frequently cited barriers to implementation included: budget restrictions, time constraints and perceived apathy of colleagues or students. Overall, respondents noted personal enrichment and optimism in teaching human rights. This Train-the-Trainer course provides the historical context, educational tools, and collective motivation to incorporate human rights educational initiatives at health

  9. Training Trainers in health and human rights: Implementing curriculum change in South African health sciences institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baldwin-Ragaven Laurel

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The complicity of the South African health sector in apartheid and the international relevance of human rights as a professional obligation prompted moves to include human rights competencies in the curricula of health professionals in South Africa. A Train-the-Trainers course in Health and Human Rights was established in 1998 to equip faculty members from health sciences institutions nationwide with the necessary skills, attitudes and knowledge to teach human rights to their students. This study followed up participants to determine the extent of curriculum implementation, support needed as well as barriers encountered in integrating human rights into health sciences teaching and learning. Methods A survey including both quantitative and qualitative components was distributed in 2007 to past course participants from 1998-2006 via telephone, fax and electronic communication. Results Out of 162 past participants, 46 (28% completed the survey, the majority of whom were still employed in academic settings (67%. Twenty-two respondents (48% implemented a total of 33 formal human rights courses into the curricula at their institutions. Respondents were nine times more likely (relative risk 9.26; 95% CI 5.14-16.66 to implement human rights education after completing the training. Seventy-two extracurricular activities were offered by 21 respondents, many of whom had successfully implemented formal curricula. Enabling factors for implementation included: prior teaching experience in human rights, general institutional support and the presence of allies - most commonly coworkers as well as deans. Frequently cited barriers to implementation included: budget restrictions, time constraints and perceived apathy of colleagues or students. Overall, respondents noted personal enrichment and optimism in teaching human rights. Conclusion This Train-the-Trainer course provides the historical context, educational tools, and collective motivation

  10. MANPOWER RESEARCH PROJECTS SPONSORED BY THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR, MANPOWER ADMINISTRATION, THROUGH JUNE 30, 1967.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manpower Administration (DOL), Washington, DC.

    THE FIFTH ANNUAL CATALOG OF CONTRACT AND GRANT RESEARCH UNDER THE MANPOWER ADMINISTRATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR DESCRIBES PROJECTS CONCERNED WITH THE IMPACT OF TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGE, ADEQUACY OF JOB PREPARATION, UNEMPLOYMENT OF THE YOUNG, THE NON-WHITE, AND OTHER SPECIAL GROUPS, AND THE WASTE OF HUMAN RESOURCES IN RURAL AREAS. THE…

  11. Acceptability of Mental Health Stigma-Reduction Training and Initial Effects on Awareness Among Military Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-13

    Hurtado et al. SpringerPlus (2015) 4:606 DOI 10.1186/s40064-015-1402-z RESEARCH Acceptability of  mental health stigma -reduction training and...purpose of this paper is to report on the development of a mental health stigma reduction toolkit and training, and the acceptability and level of stigma ...the usefulness and helpfulness of the training among other factors, and stigma awareness was measured with 10 items about mental health stigma . The

  12. Developing cognitive behaviour therapy training in India: Using the Kolb learning cycle to address challenges in applying transcultural models of mental health and mental health training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Andrew; Virudhagirinathan, B S; Santosham, Sangita; Begum, Faiz Jahan

    2014-10-01

    Although mental health workers in India across all major professional groups have identified an unmet need for training in cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT), the uncritical export of models of mental health, therapy provision and training to low- and middle-income countries is a problematic process. This paper describes the context for the first stand-alone CBT training programme in India, based in Chennai. This paper includes an evaluation of the first phase of the training and information from trainees regarding the quality and applicability of the training to their working context. The paper provides an overview of some of the critiques that are pertinent to this process and considers the way that the Kolb learning cycle can be used as a framework within training to go some way to addressing these difficulties.

  13. Alumni survey of Masters of Public Health (MPH training at the Hanoi School of Public Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Ha

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 1 To elicit the opinions of the Public Health alumni of the MPH program; 2 To assess the applicability of the knowledge and skills acquired; 3 To identify the frequency of the public health competencies that the alumni performed. Methods We requested 187 graduates to complete a self-administered questionnaire and conducted in-depth interviews with 8 alumni as well as a focus group discussion with 14 alumni. Results In total 79.1% (148 of the MPH graduates completed and returned the questionnaire. Most alumni (91% agreed that the MPH curriculum corresponded with the working requirements of public health professionals; and nearly all were satisfied with what they have learnt (96%. Most respondents said that the MPH program enabled them to develop relevant professional skills (95% and that they were satisfied with the curriculum (90%. Notably fewer respondents (73% felt that the MPH program structure was balanced and well designed. Most alumni (64.3% were satisfied with Hanoi School of Public Health (HSPH full-time lecturers; but even more (83% were satisfied with visiting lecturers. The most commonly selected of the 34 pre-identified public health competencies were: applying computer skills (66.4%, planning and managing health programs (47.9%, communicating with the community and/or mobilizing the community to participate in health care (43.2%. Overall, the MPH alumni felt that HSPH emphasized research methods at the expense of some management and operational competencies. The most important challenges at work identified by the alumni were insufficient skills in: data analysis, decision making, inter-sectoral cooperation development, English language and training. Conclusion The training program should be reviewed and revised to meet the needs of its graduates who enter diverse situations and positions. English language skills were identified as top priority for further emphasis. The training program should comply with a more

  14. Impact of "+Contigo" training on the knowledge and attitudes of health care professionals about suicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Santos

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: to evaluate the results of "+Contigo" training, developed by nurses and directed at 66 health professionals of integrated school health teams in Primary Health Care.METHOD: quantitative with data collection through the Suicide Behavior Attitude Questionnaire, administered before and after the training.RESULTS: significant increases were observed in suicide prevention knowledge and in changing attitudes of health professionals towards individuals with suicidal behavior.CONCLUSION: these results allow us to affirm that nurses hold scientific and pedagogical knowledge that grant them a privileged position in the health teams, to develop training aimed at health professionals involved in suicide prevention.

  15. Preparing promotoras to deliver health programs for Hispanic communities: training processes and curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskan, Alexis M; Friedman, Daniela B; Brandt, Heather M; Walsemann, Katrina M; Messias, DeAnne K H

    2013-05-01

    Training is an essential component of health programs that incorporate promotoras de salud (the Spanish term for community health workers) in the delivery of health education and behavioral interventions to Hispanics. During training sessions, promotoras are exposed to information and skill-building activities they need to implement the health programs. This analysis was one component of a broader study which explored program planners' approaches to recruiting and training promotoras to deliver and sustain health promotion programs for Hispanic women. The purpose of this study was to examine promotora-curriculum and training processes used to prepare promotoras to deliver health programs. The authors examined transcripts of 12 in-depth interviews with program planners and conducted a content analysis of seven different training materials used in their respective promotora programs. Interview themes and narratives included program planners' varying conceptualizations of promotora-training, including their personal definitions of "training the trainer," the practice of training a cadre of promotoras before selecting those best fit for the program, and the importance of providing goal-directed, in-depth training and supervision for promotoras. The content analysis revealed a variety of strategies used to make the training materials interactive and culturally competent. Study implications describe the importance of planners' provision of ongoing, goal-directed, and supervised training using both appropriate language and interactive methods to engage and teach promotoras.

  16. Training the Next Generation of Latino Health Researchers: A Multilevel, Transdisciplinary, Community-Engaged Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Alice A; Sharif, Mienah Z; Prelip, Michael L; Glik, Deborah C; Albert, Stephanie L; Belin, Thomas; McCarthy, William J; Roberts, Christian K; Garcia, Rosa Elena; Ortega, Alexander N

    2017-07-01

    Reducing health disparities is a national public health priority. Latinos represent the largest racial/ethnic minority group in the United States and suffer disproportionately from poor health outcomes, including cardiovascular disease risk. Academic training programs are an opportunity for reducing health disparities, in part by increasing the diversity of the public health workforce and by incorporating training designed to develop a skill set to address health disparities. This article describes the Training and Career Development Program at the UCLA Center for Population Health and Health Disparities: a multilevel, transdisciplinary training program that uses a community-engaged approach to reduce cardiovascular disease risk in two urban Mexican American communities. Results suggest that this program is effective in enhancing the skill sets of traditionally underrepresented students to become health disparities researchers and practitioners.

  17. South Carolina Area Health Education Consortium Disaster Preparedness and Response Training Network: an emerging partner in preparedness training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Beth; Carson, Deborah Stier; Garr, David

    2009-03-01

    The South Carolina Area Health Education Consortium (SC AHEC) was funded in 2003 to train healthcare professionals in disaster preparedness and response. During the 5 years of funding, its Disaster Preparedness and Response Training Network evolved from disaster awareness training to competency-based instruction and performance assessment. With funding from the assistant secretary for preparedness and response (ASPR), a project with implications for national dissemination was developed to evaluate 2 aspects of preparedness training for community-based healthcare professionals. The SC AHEC designed disaster preparedness curricula and lesson plans, using a consensus-building technique, and then (1) distributed sample curricula and resources through the national Area Health Education Center system to assess an approach for providing preparedness training and (2) delivered a standardized preparedness curriculum to key influential thought leaders from 4 states to evaluate the effectiveness and acceptability of the curriculum. As a result of this project, the SC AHEC recommends that preparedness training for community-based practitioners needs to be concise and professionally relevant. It should be integrated into existing healthcare professions education programs and continuing education offerings. The project also demonstrated that although AHECs may be interested and well suited to incorporate preparedness training as part of their mission, more work needs to be done if they are to assume a prominent role in disaster preparedness training.

  18. The Real Crunch in Managerial Manpower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, John B.

    1974-01-01

    Claims that the chief cause of the predicted dearth in managerial talent is "no will to manage." Explores a number of remedial actions that companies can take, such as more selective recruitment, more vigorous weeding out, and more participative management. So far, the most promising approach is formal training to shape managerial motivation.…

  19. Planning for Recall of Maintenance Manpower

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    part of the resource requirements. Within the United States Air Force, military technicians supplement essential maintenance and logistics support for...and the availability of administrative and logistics support, such as availability of spare parts , support equipment and trained personnel. To...and logistics operations, a range of resources are required which includes hardware such as system spare parts ( spares ), support and test equipment

  20. Effects of Stigma and Discrimination Reduction Trainings Conducted Under the California Mental Health Services Authority: An Evaluation of Disability Rights California and Mental Health America of California Trainings

    OpenAIRE

    Cerully, Jennifer L.; Collins, Rebecca L.; Wong, Eunice C.; Roth, Elizabeth; Marks, Joyce; Yu, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Describes the methods and results of a RAND evaluation of stigma and discrimination reduction trainings delivered by two program partners, Disability Rights California and Mental Health America of California.

  1. The effect of floorball training on health status, psychological health and social capital in older men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wikman, Johan Michael; Nistrup, Anne; Vorup Petersen, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    This article presents the results of a multidisciplinary study which investigated the effects of a period with floorball training on health status, psychological health and social capital of older men. Thirty-nine untrained men aged 69.9 ± 0.6 (range: 65–76) were randomized into a group playing...... by many of the men as the main reason for their participation throughout the 12-week period. The statistical results and the interview findings suggest that participation in a ball game such as floorball has several benefits regarding health status, psychological health and social capital and in addition...... that playing floorball is experienced as enjoyable amongst older men. Thus, it can be concluded that floorball is an activity that benefits older men and should be provided in relevant contexts, such as e.g. sport clubs or centres for seniors....

  2. The Effect of Floorball Training on Health Status, Psychological Health and Social Capital in Older Men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorup, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    This article presents the results of a multidisciplinary study which investigated the effects of a period with floorball training on health status, psychological health and social capital of older men. Thirty-nine untrained men aged 69.9 ± 0.6 (range: 65–76) years were randomized into a group...... were mentioned by many of the men as the main reason for their participation throughout the 12-week period. The statistical results and the interview findings suggest that participation in a ball game such as floorball has several benefits regarding health status, psychological health and social...... capital and in addition that playing floorball is experienced as enjoyable amongst older men. Thus, it can be concluded that floorball is an activity that benefits older men and should be provided in relevant contexts, such as e.g. sport clubs or centres for seniors....

  3. Mobile emergency simulation training for rural health providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Douglas; Bekiaris, Brent; Hansen, Gregory

    2017-01-01

    Mobile emergency simulation offers innovative continuing medical educational support to regions that may lack access to such opportunities. Furthermore, satisfaction is a critical element for active learning. Together, the authors evaluated Canadian rural healthcare providers' satisfaction from high fidelity emergency simulation training using a modified motorhome as a mobile education unit (MEU). Over a 5-month period, data was collected during 14 educational sessions in nine different southern Manitoban communities. Groups of up to five rural healthcare providers managed emergency simulation cases including polytrauma, severe sepsis, and inferior myocardial infarction with right ventricular involvement, followed by a debrief. Participants anonymously completed a feedback form that contained 11 questions on a five-point Likert scale and six short-answer questions. Data from 131 respondents were analyzed, for a response rate of 75.6%. Respondents included nurses (27.5%), medical residents (26.7%), medical first responders (16.0%), and physicians (12.2%). The median response was 5 for overall quality of learning, development of clinical reasoning skills and decision-making ability, recognition of patient deterioration, and self-reflection. The post-simulation debrief median response was also 5 for summarizing important issues, constructive criticism, and feedback to learn. Respondents also reported that the MEU provided a believable working environment (87.0%, n=114), they had limited or no previous access to high fidelity mannequins (82.7%, n=107), and they had no specific training in crisis resource management or were unfamiliar with the term (92%, n=118). A high level of satisfaction was reported in rural health providers with mobile emergency simulation. Access to and experience with high fidelity mannequins was limited, suggesting areas for potential educational growth.

  4. Management training in global health education: a Health Innovation Fellowship training program to bring healthcare to low-income communities in Central America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Andrea M; Pearson, Andy A; Bertelsen, Nathan S

    2018-01-01

    Interprofessional education is increasingly recognized as essential for health education worldwide. Although effective management, innovation, and entrepreneurship are necessary to improve health systems, business schools have been underrepresented in global health education. Central America needs more health professionals trained in health management and innovation to respond to health disparities, especially in rural communities. This paper explores the impact of the Health Innovation Fellowship (HIF), a new training program for practicing health professionals offered jointly by the Central American Healthcare Initiative and INCAE Business School, Costa Rica. Launched in 2014, HIF's goal is to create a network of highly trained interdisciplinary health professionals in competencies to improve health of Central American communities through better health management. The program's fellows carried out innovative healthcare projects in their local regions. The first three annual cohorts (total of 43 fellows) represented all health-related professions and sectors (private, public, and civil society) from six Central American countries. All fellows attended four 1-week, on-site modular training sessions, received ongoing mentorship, and stayed connected through formal and informal networks and webinars through which they exchange knowledge and support each other. CAHI stakeholders supported HIF financially. Impact evaluation of the three-year pilot training program is positive: fellows improved their health management skills and more than 50% of the projects found either financial or political support for their implementation. HIF's strengths include that both program leaders and trainees come from the Global South, and that HIF offers a platform to collaborate with partners in the Global North. By focusing on promoting innovation and management at a top business school in the region, HIF constitutes a novel capacity-building effort within global health education. HIF

  5. A good training based on insufficiency: Work in health care as an ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casetto, Sidnei J; Henz, Alexandre O; Garcia, Maurício L; Aguiar, Fernanda B; Montenegro, Julia T; Unzueta, Leandro B; Capozzolo, Angela A

    2016-03-01

    The article discusses psychology training in health care at the Federal University of São Paulo. It places curriculum guidelines in a changing movement of training for health professions, proposing Work in Health Care as one of its common axes. In the Baixada Santista campus, the course is based on learning by experience, public health services and multidisciplinary team work. Three vectors derived from the experience in this project and its assessment are discussed: a common clinic, work in health care as an ethics and the idea of good training by insufficiency. © The Author(s) 2016.

  6. Training Mental Health Professionals on Violence against Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Rebecca; Raja, Sheela; Grining, Patricia

    1999-01-01

    Counselors, social workers, and psychologists in Illinois reported their training regarding female victims of violence. Results show 56% had training on sexual assault, 59% on domestic violence, 36% on sexual harassment, and 78% on childhood sexual abuse/incest. The ways in which training was obtained are discussed. Recommendations for future…

  7. Revisiting the quality of Health Extension Workers' training: Case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results:- The study showed that the curriculum for the training had not been revised since it was developed. Shortage of teaching facilities and on-the-job training of teachers were also identified as constraints. Conclusion:- The curriculum should be revised and more time allotted for practicum and improved training facilities ...

  8. History and Content of Public Health Specialization Training and Employment Policies in the World and Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Bulent Kilic; Ceyda sahan; Hande Bahadir

    2014-01-01

    Public health was accepted as a specialty in the mid-19th century in United Kingdom and Germany and, the beginning of 20th century in USA and Russia. In Turkey, public health specialization training started at Refik Saydam Hifzissihha Institute in 1958, at Hacettepe University in 1965 and at Ataturk University in 1967. While sanitation, communicable diseases and immunization subjects had priority in public health specialization training programs in the 1800s, health care management and epidem...

  9. A rational approach to estimating the surgical demand elasticity needed to guide manpower reallocation during contagious outbreaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Hsiao-Mei; Sun, Ying-Chou; Liou, Der-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Emerging infectious diseases continue to pose serious threats to global public health. So far, however, few published study has addressed the need for manpower reallocation needed in hospitals when such a serious contagious outbreak occurs. To quantify the demand elasticity of the major surgery types in order to guide future manpower reallocation during contagious outbreaks. Based on a nationwide research database in Taiwan, we extracted the monthly volumes of major surgery types for the period 1998-2003, which covered the SARS period, in order to carry out a time series analysis. The demand elasticity of each surgery type was then estimated by autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) analysis. During the study period, the surgical volumes of most selected surgery types either increased or remained steady. We categorized these surgery types into low-, moderate- and high-elastic groups according to their demand elasticity. Appendectomy, 'open reduction of fracture with internal fixation' and 'free skin graft' were in the low demand elasticity group. Transurethral prostatectomy and extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) were in the high demand elasticity group. The manpower of the departments carrying out the surgeries with low demand elasticity should be maintained during outbreaks. In contrast, departments in charge of surgeries mainly with high demand elasticity, like urology departments, may be in a position to have part of their staff reallocated. Taking advantage of the demand variation during the SARS period in 2003, we adopted the concept of demand elasticity and used a time series approach to figure out an effective index of demand elasticity for various types of surgery that could be used as a rational reference to carry out manpower reallocation during contagious outbreak situations.

  10. Efficient greedy algorithms for economic manpower shift planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nearchou, A. C.; Giannikos, I. C.; Lagodimos, A. G.

    2015-01-01

    Consideration is given to the economic manpower shift planning (EMSP) problem, an NP-hard capacity planning problem appearing in various industrial settings including the packing stage of production in process industries and maintenance operations. EMSP aims to determine the manpower needed in each available workday shift of a given planning horizon so as to complete a set of independent jobs at minimum cost. Three greedy heuristics are presented for the EMSP solution. These practically constitute adaptations of an existing algorithm for a simplified version of EMSP which had shown excellent performance in terms of solution quality and speed. Experimentation shows that the new algorithms perform very well in comparison to the results obtained by both the CPLEX optimizer and an existing metaheuristic. Statistical analysis is deployed to rank the algorithms in terms of their solution quality and to identify the effects that critical planning factors may have on their relative efficiency.

  11. Assessing the Education and Training Needs of Nebraska?s Public Health Workforce

    OpenAIRE

    Grimm, Brandon L.; Johansson, Patrik; Nayar, Preethy; Apenteng, Bettye A.; Opoku, Samuel; Nguyen, Anh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In 2012, the Great Plains Public Health Training Center (Grant #UB6HP22821) conducted an online survey of state and local health departments and the American Indian (tribal clinics, tribal health departments, and urban Indian clinic) public health workforce across three professional levels. The objectives of the needs assessment were to determine the competency levels of the state’s public health workforce, assess gaps in public health competencies, identify public health trai...

  12. Assessing the Education and Training Needs of Nebraska's Public Health Workforce

    OpenAIRE

    Grimm, Brandon L.; Patrik eJohansson; Preethy eNayar; Betty eApenteng; Samuel eOpoku; Anh eNguyen

    2015-01-01

    IntroductionIn 2012, the Great Plains Public Health Training Center (Grant #UB6HP22821) conducted an online survey of state and local health departments and the American Indian (tribal clinics, tribal health departments and urban Indian clinic) public health workforce across three professional levels. The objectives of the needs assessment were to, determine the competency levels of the state’s public health workforce, assess gaps in public health competencies, identify public health trainin...

  13. Kettlebell training for musculoskeletal and cardiovascular health: a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jay, Kenneth; Frisch, Dennis; Hansen, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this trial was to investigate the effectiveness of a worksite intervention using kettlebell training to improve musculoskeletal and cardiovascular health.......The aim of this trial was to investigate the effectiveness of a worksite intervention using kettlebell training to improve musculoskeletal and cardiovascular health....

  14. Management and Evaluation of a Pan-Canadian Graduate Training Program in Health Informatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Marilynne; Lau, Francis

    2010-01-01

    Eight Canadian universities partnered to establish a Collaborative Health Informatics PhD/Postdoc Strategic Training Program (CHPSTP). The 6-year goal was to increase research capacity in health informatics in Canada. Three cohorts of 20 trainees participated in the training, which included online Research Learning Experiences, annual face-to-face…

  15. Cholera Prevention Training Materials for Community Health Workers, Haiti, 2010–2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Anna; O’Reilly, Ciara; Sholtes, Kari; Schilling, Katie; Hough, Catherine; Brunkard, Joan; Domercant, Jean Wysler; Lerebours, Gerald; Cadet, Jean; Quick, Robert; Person, Bobbie

    2011-01-01

    Stopping the spread of the cholera epidemic in Haiti required engaging community health workers (CHWs) in prevention and treatment activities. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention collaborated with the Haitian Ministry of Public Health and Population to develop CHW educational materials, train >1,100 CHWs, and evaluate training efforts. PMID:22204034

  16. University Vocal Training and Vocal Health of Music Educators and Music Therapists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Vicki D.; Cohen, Nicki

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the university vocal training and vocal health of music educators and music therapists. The participants (N = 426), music educators (n = 351) and music therapists (n = 75), completed a survey addressing demographics, vocal training, voice usage, and vocal health. Both groups reported singing at least 50%…

  17. Evaluation of Multidisciplinary Tobacco Cessation Training Program in a Large Health Care System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Timothy C.; Hamlett-Berry, Kim W.; Watanabe, Jonathan H.; Bounthavong, Mark; Zillich, Alan J.; Christofferson, Dana E.; Myers, Mark G.; Himstreet, Julianne E.; Belperio, Pamela S.; Hudmon, Karen Suchanek

    2015-01-01

    Background: Health care professionals can have a dramatic impact by assisting patients with tobacco cessation but most have limited training. Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of a 4-hour tobacco cessation training program. Methods: A team of multidisciplinary health care professionals created a veteran-specific tailored version of the Rx for…

  18. Health Science Students' Perception about Research Training Programs Offered in Saudi Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Kuwaiti, Ahmed; Subbarayalu, Arun Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper was to examine the perceptions of students of health sciences on research training programs offered at Saudi universities. Design/methodology/approach: A cross-sectional survey design was adopted to capture the perceptions of health science students about research training programs offered at selected Saudi…

  19. An Evaluation of a Competency-Based Public Health Training Program for Public Health Professionals in Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kyrah K; Maryman, JʼVonnah; Collins, Tracie

    Less than one-third of the US public health workforce has formal training in public health. Academic-public health agency partnerships aimed at addressing the nation's workforce challenges have shown great promise. To evaluate the effectiveness of a piloted competency-based public health training program formed out of an academic-public health agency partnership. Mixed-methods design using pre- and postworkshop surveys and quizzes, open-ended questions, and document review. Large, urban local health department located in south central Kansas. Participant satisfaction with training, knowledge change, self-report application of new knowledge, and organizational change. Participants reported high satisfaction with the training program and valued the hands-on, practical approach used. Participation increased knowledge and confidence in public health competency areas covered in the program. At 3-month follow-up, 90% of participants reported applying new knowledge and skills in their primary job duties. At the organizational level, 3 major policy changes aimed at sustaining the program were implemented following its launch. Incorporating tailored, theory-driven approaches to trainings and collaborating with health department leadership to identify policy opportunities that help sustain the training program within the agency is recommended. Findings from this evaluation demonstrate the success of an academic-agency partnership's effort to develop and implement at a large, urban local health department.

  20. Forecasting the manpower demand for quantity surveyors in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul H K Ho

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently, there has been a massive infrastructure development and an increasing demand for public and private housing, resulting in a shortage of qualified quantity surveyors. This study aims to forecast the demand for qualified quantity surveyors in Hong Kong from 2013 to 2015. Literature review indicates that the demand for quantity surveyors is a function of the gross values of building, civil engineering and maintenance works. The proposed forecasting method consists of two steps. The first step is to estimate the gross values of building, civil engineering and maintenance works by time series methods and the second step is to forecast the manpower demand for quantity surveyors by causal methods. The data for quantity surveyors and construction outputs are based on the ‘manpower survey reports of the building and civil engineering industry’ and the ‘gross value of construction works performed by main contractors’ respectively. The forecasted manpower demand for quantity surveyors in 2013, 2014 and 2015 are 2,480, 2,632 and 2,804 respectively. Due to the low passing rate of the assessment of professional competence (APC and the increasing number of retired qualified members, there will be a serious shortage of qualified quantity surveyors in the coming three years.

  1. Medical training and nurses of Family Health strategy on worker health aspect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érika Chediak Mori

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Considering the worker’s health one of the Unified Health System (SUS tasks, the Primary Health Care (PHC and the Family Health Strategy (FHS play an important role in the development of health actions in the field health-work. In Brazil, where the number of informal and domiciled jobs is high, the FHS becomes a reference in the workers’ health actions. Therefore, if the FHS is not attentive to the relation between professional occupation and disease, several diseases that affect workers can overload the system without obtaining a cure. The aim of this study is to evaluate doctors and nurses recognition of the Family Health Strategy on occupational diseases in Aparecida de Goiânia. This is a qualitative descriptive study and the data analysis was done by content analysis. The setting for this study contemplates FHS units in the municipality of Aparecida de Goiânia, Goiás. There were 8 Basic Health Units and 16 health professionals were interviewed. The data was collected in the participants of the interview workplaces, from February through April, 2013, after being approved by the Ethics and Research Committee. The discourses were analyzed according to Minayo (2007, using thematic analysis. The interviews were recorded and later transcribed for analysis. Among the 16 professionals interviewed we observed that only 3 (18.75% received professional training on occupational health in their Institution, however the aim of the courses were towards situations of biological hazards and not about workers care. Practitioners reported lack of knowledge in the occupational health area, and also observed that the area is still undervalued and underexplored in the academic and professional fields, and even by the Municipality health management. Evaluating the academic education it is possible to observe the inadequacy of the subject workload, where professionals reported the lack of knowledge in the area and the low workload of the subject in the

  2. Specialized Veterinary Manpower Needs through 1990,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    responded. The present and future supply of and demand for veterinarians in each sector were assessed. To estimate demand, A. D. Little analyzed social ...Drug Administration 74 National Institutes of Health 61 Alcohol , Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Administration 2 Communicable Disease Center 22...5~iac~loy~Toi~olgYJ athology n opr ative Pahlg nMdcl ad Veternry Mdia chools No. for No. Projected DiscilineFY 1982 for F 198 Proected Change

  3. Diversity and cultural competence training in health care organizations: hallmarks of success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Ellen Foster; Dreachslin, Janice L; Sinioris, Marie

    2007-01-01

    The authors reviewed recent literature on diversity training interventions and identified effective practices for health care organizations. Self-reported satisfaction was especially likely to be found as a result of training, whereas attitude change measured by standardized instruments was mixed. Although those responsible for diversity training in the workplace agree that behavioral change is key, awareness building and associated attitude change remain the focus of most diversity training in the workplace. Consequently, the authors recommend a systems approach to diversity training interventions wherein training is a key component of a health care organization's strategic approach to organizational performance, and diversity training is linked to the organizations' strategic goals for improved quality of care. The systems approach requires these steps: determine diversity and cultural competence goals in the context of strategy, measure current performance against needs, design training to address the gap, implement the training, assess training effectiveness, and strive for continuous improvement. Higher level evaluations measuring whether employees have transferred learning from training to their jobs are paramount to the systems approach to diversity training interventions. Measuring other positive changes in a "return on investment" format can be used to convince stakeholders of training's value.

  4. Mental health first aid training for high school teachers: a cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorm, Anthony F; Kitchener, Betty A; Sawyer, Michael G; Scales, Helen; Cvetkovski, Stefan

    2010-06-24

    Mental disorders often have their first onset during adolescence. For this reason, high school teachers are in a good position to provide initial assistance to students who are developing mental health problems. To improve the skills of teachers in this area, a Mental Health First Aid training course was modified to be suitable for high school teachers and evaluated in a cluster randomized trial. The trial was carried out with teachers in South Australian high schools. Teachers at 7 schools received training and those at another 7 were wait-listed for future training. The effects of the training on teachers were evaluated using questionnaires pre- and post-training and at 6 months follow-up. The questionnaires assessed mental health knowledge, stigmatizing attitudes, confidence in providing help to others, help actually provided, school policy and procedures, and teacher mental health. The indirect effects on students were evaluated using questionnaires at pre-training and at follow-up which assessed any mental health help and information received from school staff, and also the mental health of the student. The training increased teachers' knowledge, changed beliefs about treatment to be more like those of mental health professionals, reduced some aspects of stigma, and increased confidence in providing help to students and colleagues. There was an indirect effect on students, who reported receiving more mental health information from school staff. Most of the changes found were sustained 6 months after training. However, no effects were found on teachers' individual support towards students with mental health problems or on student mental health. Mental Health First Aid training has positive effects on teachers' mental health knowledge, attitudes, confidence and some aspects of their behaviour. ACTRN12608000561381.

  5. Mental health first aid training for high school teachers: a cluster randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorm Anthony F

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mental disorders often have their first onset during adolescence. For this reason, high school teachers are in a good position to provide initial assistance to students who are developing mental health problems. To improve the skills of teachers in this area, a Mental Health First Aid training course was modified to be suitable for high school teachers and evaluated in a cluster randomized trial. Methods The trial was carried out with teachers in South Australian high schools. Teachers at 7 schools received training and those at another 7 were wait-listed for future training. The effects of the training on teachers were evaluated using questionnaires pre- and post-training and at 6 months follow-up. The questionnaires assessed mental health knowledge, stigmatizing attitudes, confidence in providing help to others, help actually provided, school policy and procedures, and teacher mental health. The indirect effects on students were evaluated using questionnaires at pre-training and at follow-up which assessed any mental health help and information received from school staff, and also the mental health of the student. Results The training increased teachers' knowledge, changed beliefs about treatment to be more like those of mental health professionals, reduced some aspects of stigma, and increased confidence in providing help to students and colleagues. There was an indirect effect on students, who reported receiving more mental health information from school staff. Most of the changes found were sustained 6 months after training. However, no effects were found on teachers' individual support towards students with mental health problems or on student mental health. Conclusions Mental Health First Aid training has positive effects on teachers' mental health knowledge, attitudes, confidence and some aspects of their behaviour. Trial registration ACTRN12608000561381

  6. The experience of community health workers training in Iran: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javanparast, Sara; Baum, Fran; Labonte, Ronald; Sanders, David; Rajabi, Zohreh; Heidari, Gholamreza

    2012-08-31

    The role of Community Health Workers (CHWs) in improving access to basic healthcare services, and mobilising community actions on health is broadly recognised. The Primary Health Care (PHC) approach, identified in the Alma Ata conference in 1978, stressed the role of CHWs in addressing community health needs. Training of CHWs is one of the key aspects that generally seeks to develop new knowledge and skills related to specific tasks and to increase CHWs' capacity to communicate with and serve local people. This study aimed to analyse the CHW training process in Iran and how different components of training have impacted on CHW performance and satisfaction. Data were collected from both primary and secondary sources. Training policies were reviewed using available policy documents, training materials and other relevant documents at national and provincial levels. Documentary analysis was supplemented by individual interviews with ninety-one Iranian CHWs from 18 provinces representing a broad range of age, work experience and educational levels, both male and female. Recognition of the CHW program and their training in the national health planning and financing facilitates the implementation and sustainability of the program. The existence of specialised training centres managed by district health network provides an appropriate training environment that delivers comprehensive training and increases CHWs' knowledge, skills and motivation to serve local communities. Changes in training content over time reflect an increasing number of programs integrated into PHC, complicating the work expected of CHWs. In-service training courses need to address better local needs. Although CHW programs vary by country and context, the CHW training program in Iran offers transferable lessons for countries intending to improve training as one of the key elements in their CHW program.

  7. Developing European guidelines for training care professionals in mental health promotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greacen Tim

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although mental health promotion is a priority mental health action area for all European countries, high level training resources and high quality skills acquisition in mental health promotion are still relatively rare. The aim of the current paper is to present the results of the DG SANCO-funded PROMISE project concerning the development of European guidelines for training social and health care professionals in mental health promotion. Methods The PROMISE project brought together a multidisciplinary scientific committee from eight European sites representing a variety of institutions including universities, mental health service providers and public health organisations. The committee used thematic content analysis to filter and analyse European and international policy documents, scientific literature reviews on mental health promotion and existing mental health promotion programmes with regard to identifying quality criteria for training care professionals on this subject. The resulting PROMISE Guidelines quality criteria were then subjected to an iterative feedback procedure with local steering groups and training professionals at all sites with the aim of developing resource kits and evaluation tools for using the PROMISE Guidelines. Scientific committees also collected information from European, national and local stakeholder groups and professional organisations on existing training programmes, policies and projects. Results The process identified ten quality criteria for training care professionals in mental health promotion: embracing the principle of positive mental health; empowering community stakeholders; adopting an interdisciplinary and intersectoral approach; including people with mental health problems; advocating; consulting the knowledge base; adapting interventions to local contexts; identifying and evaluating risks; using the media; evaluating training, implementation processes and outcomes. The

  8. Evaluation of Breast Cancer Knowledge Among Health Promoters in Mexico Before and After Focused Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Nancy L.; Kouri, Elena M.; Ornelas, Héctor Arreola; Méndez, Oscar; Valladares, Laura Magaña

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Breast cancer is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Mexico. We assessed the effectiveness of a train-the-trainer program in two Mexican states in improving knowledge among professional and nonprofessional community health workers. Materials and Methods. We worked with local organizations to develop and implement a train-the-trainer program to improve breast cancer knowledge among community health workers, including professional health promoters (PHPs) who were trained and then trained nonprofessional community health promoters (CHPs). We surveyed participants before and after training that included in-person and online classes and again approximately 3 months later. We used paired t tests and chi-square tests to compare survey responses at the different times. We also used logistic regression to assess whether promoter characteristics were associated with greater improvements in breast cancer knowledge after training. Results. Overall, 169 PHPs (mean age, 36 years) completed training and provided a 10-hour training course to 2,651 CHPs, who also completed the pre- and post-training survey. For both PHPs and CHPs, post-training surveys demonstrated increases in an understanding of breast cancer as a problem; an understanding of screening, treatment, and insurance coverage issues; and knowledge of breast cancer risk factors, symptoms, and what constitutes a family history of breast cancer (all p < .05). These improvements were maintained 3 to 6 months after training. Conclusion. Train-the-trainer programs hold promise for leveraging community health workers, who far outnumber other health professionals in many low- and middle-income countries, to engage in health promotion activities for cancer and other noncommunicable diseases. PMID:25232041

  9. Evaluation of breast cancer knowledge among health promoters in Mexico before and after focused training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Nancy L; Kouri, Elena M; Ornelas, Héctor Arreola; Méndez, Oscar; Valladares, Laura Magaña; Knaul, Felicia Marie

    2014-10-01

    Breast cancer is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Mexico. We assessed the effectiveness of a train-the-trainer program in two Mexican states in improving knowledge among professional and nonprofessional community health workers. We worked with local organizations to develop and implement a train-the-trainer program to improve breast cancer knowledge among community health workers, including professional health promoters (PHPs) who were trained and then trained nonprofessional community health promoters (CHPs). We surveyed participants before and after training that included in-person and online classes and again approximately 3 months later. We used paired t tests and chi-square tests to compare survey responses at the different times. We also used logistic regression to assess whether promoter characteristics were associated with greater improvements in breast cancer knowledge after training. Overall, 169 PHPs (mean age, 36 years) completed training and provided a 10-hour training course to 2,651 CHPs, who also completed the pre- and post-training survey. For both PHPs and CHPs, post-training surveys demonstrated increases in an understanding of breast cancer as a problem; an understanding of screening, treatment, and insurance coverage issues; and knowledge of breast cancer risk factors, symptoms, and what constitutes a family history of breast cancer (all p < .05). These improvements were maintained 3 to 6 months after training. Train-the-trainer programs hold promise for leveraging community health workers, who far outnumber other health professionals in many low- and middle-income countries, to engage in health promotion activities for cancer and other noncommunicable diseases. ©AlphaMed Press.

  10. Two decades of post-graduate training in Applied Public Health: The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this work is to describe the experience of the Uganda Public Health School Without Walls (PHSWOW) in training public health professionals at post-graduate level to offer leadership in planning, delivery of health services and research within a decentralized health system. As one of the constituents of the ...

  11. Does occupational health nursing exist in India?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Rajnarayan R; Sharma, Anjali; Zodpey, Sanjay P; Khandare, Shobha M

    2014-01-01

    Occupational health services are important to develop healthy and productive work forces, which should be delivered through occupational health team. Occupational health nurse (OHN) is an important member of this team and is required to apply nursing principles in conserving the health of workers in occupational settings. This article attempts to map the occupational health nursing courses in India and design competencies and curriculum for such a course. Information through the Internet, printed journals, and perspectives of the key stakeholders were the principal sources of data. In India, there is a need to initiate a course on occupational health nursing to provide occupational health services for the organized and unorganized sector workforce. A certificate course for occupational health nursing for 3-4 months duration offered through contact session mode can be an opportune beginning. However, to cater employed nurses an online course can be another effective alternative. The theoretical part should essentially include modules on occupational diseases, industrial hygiene, and occupational health legislation, whereas the modules on practical aspects can include visits to industries. Taking into account the existing norms of Indian Factories Act for hazardous units of organized sector an estimated 1,34,640 OHNs are required. There is a need-supply gap in the number of occupational health nursing manpower in India, which can be attributed to the absence of any course to train such manpower.

  12. Multimedia for occupational safety and health training: a pilot study examining a multimedia learning theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallen, Erik S; Mulloy, Karen B

    2006-10-01

    Occupational diseases are a significant problem affecting public health. Safety training is an important method of preventing occupational illness. Training is increasingly being delivered by computer although theories of learning from computer-based multimedia have been tested almost entirely on college students. This study was designed to determine whether these theories might also be applied to safety training applications for working adults. Participants viewed either computer-based multimedia respirator use training with concurrent narration, narration prior to the animation, or unrelated safety training. Participants then took a five-item transfer test which measured their ability to use their knowledge in new and creative ways. Participants who viewed the computer-based multimedia trainings both did significantly better than the control group on the transfer test. The results of this pilot study suggest that design guidelines developed for younger learners may be effective for training workers in occupational safety and health although more investigation is needed.

  13. Culturally Appropriate Training for Remote Australian Aboriginal Health Workers: Evaluation of an Early Child Development Training Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DʼAprano, Anita; Silburn, Sven; Johnston, Vanessa; Oberklaid, Frank; Tayler, Collette

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to design, implement, and evaluate training in early childhood development (ECD) and in the use of a culturally adapted developmental screening tool, for remote Australian Aboriginal Health Workers (AHWs) and other remote health practitioners. A case-study evaluation framework was adopted. Two remote Australian Aboriginal health services were selected as case-study sites. Materials review, semistructured interviews, posttraining feedback surveys, and workplace observations contributed to the evaluation, guided by Guskey's 5-level education evaluation model. Remote health practitioners (including AHWs and Remote Area Nurses) and early childhood staff from the sites participated in a customized 2½ day training workshop focusing on the principles of ECD and the use of the culturally adapted Ages and Stages Questionnaire, third edition. Consistent with adult learning theories and recommendations from the literature regarding culturally appropriate professional development methods in this context, the workshop comprised interactive classroom training, role-plays, and practice coaching in the workplace, including booster training. The qualitative findings demonstrated that mode of delivery was effective and valued by participants. The workshop improved practitioners' skills, knowledge, competence, and confidence to identify and manage developmental difficulties and promote child development, evidenced on self-report and workplace clinical observation. The findings suggest that the practical, culturally appropriate training led to positive learning outcomes in developmental practice for AHWs and other remote health practitioners. This is an important finding that has implications in other Indigenous contexts, as effective training is a critical component of any practice improvement intervention. Further research examining factors influencing practice change is required.

  14. Global health training among U.S. residency specialties: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hau, Duncan K; Smart, Luke R; DiPace, Jennifer I; Peck, Robert N

    2017-01-01

    Interest in global health training during residency is increasing. Global health knowledge is also becoming essential for health-care delivery today. Many U.S. residency programs have been incorporating global health training opportunities for their residents. We performed a systematic literature review to evaluate global health training opportunities and challenges among U.S. residency specialties. We searched PubMed from its earliest dates until October 2015. Articles included were survey results of U.S. program directors on global health training opportunities, and web-based searches of U.S. residency program websites on global health training opportunities. Data extracted included percentage of residency programs offering global health training within a specialty and challenges encountered. Studies were found for twelve U.S. residency specialties. Of the survey based studies, the specialties with the highest percentage of their residency programs offering global health training were preventive medicine (83%), emergency medicine (74%), and surgery (71%); and the lowest were orthopaedic surgery (26%), obstetrics and gynecology (28%), and plastic surgery (41%). Of the web-based studies, the specialties with the highest percentage of their residency programs offering global health training were emergency medicine (41%), pediatrics (33%), and family medicine (22%); and the lowest were psychiatry (9%), obstetrics and gynecology (17%), and surgery (18%). The most common challenges were lack of funding, lack of international partnerships, lack of supervision, and scheduling. Among U.S. residency specialties, there are wide disparities for global health training. In general, there are few opportunities in psychiatry and surgical residency specialties, and greater opportunities among medical residency specialties. Further emphasis should be made to scale-up opportunities for psychiatry and surgical residency specialties.

  15. Does inhibitory control training improve health behaviour? A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allom, Vanessa; Mullan, Barbara; Hagger, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Inhibitory control training has been hypothesised as a technique that will improve an individual's ability to overrule impulsive reactions in order to regulate behaviour consistent with long-term goals. A meta-analysis of 19 studies of inhibitory control training and health behaviours was conducted to determine the effect of inhibitory control training on reducing harmful behaviours. Theoretically driven moderation analyses were also conducted to determine whether extraneous variables account for heterogeneity in the effect; in order to facilitate the development of effective intervention strategies. Moderators included type of training task, behaviour targeted, measurement of behaviour and training duration. A small but homogeneous effect of training on behaviour was found, d(+)  = 0.378, CI95 = [0.258, 0.498]. Moderation analyses revealed that the training paradigm adopted, and measurement type influenced the size of the effect such that larger effects were found for studies that employed go/no-go (GNG) training paradigms rather than stop-signal task paradigms, and objective outcome measures that were administered immediately yielded the largest and most consistent effects on behaviour. Results suggest that GNG inhibitory control training paradigms can influence health behaviour, but perhaps only in the short-term. Future research is required to systematically examine the influence of training duration, and the longevity of the training effect. Determining these factors could provide the basis for cost-effective and efficacious health-promoting interventions.

  16. Physical health care for people with mental illness: training needs for nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happell, Brenda; Platania-Phung, Chris; Scott, David

    2013-04-01

    People diagnosed with serious mental illness have higher rates of physical morbidity and decreased longevity, yet these people are not adequately served by health care systems. Nurses may provide improved physical health support to consumers with serious mental illness but this is partly dependent on nurses having necessary skills and interest in training opportunities for this component of their work. This survey investigated Australian nurses' interest in training across areas of physical health care including lifestyle factors, cardiovascular disease, and identifying health risks. A nation-wide online survey of nurse members of the Australian College of Mental Health Nurses. The survey included an adapted version of a sub-section of the Physical Health Attitudes Scale. Participants were asked to indicate their interest in various aspects of physical health care training. Most (91.6%) participants viewed educating nurses in physical health care as of moderate or significant value in improving the physical health of people with serious mental illness. Interest in training in all areas of physical health care was over 60% across the health care settings investigated (e.g. public, private, primary care). Forty-two percent sought training in all nine areas of physical health care, from supporting people with diabetes, to assisting consumers with sexually-related and lifestyle issues. The findings suggest that nurses in mental health services in Australia acknowledge the importance of training to improve physical health care of consumers with serious mental illness. Training programs and learning opportunities for nurses are necessary to reduce inequalities in health of people with serious mental illness. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. [Efficacy of an oral health training programme for visually impaired individuals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scardina, Giuseppe Alessandro; Buonamente, Adriana; Messina, Pietro

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of an oral health training programme for visually impaired individuals and their families or caretakers. The training programme was based on reliance on the other senses. The study was performed at an institute for the blind in Palermo (Italy). Oral hygiene and health status of 30 visually impaired subjects aged 15-60 years were evaluated by interview and use of the Decayed Missing Filled (DMF) and Simplified Oral Hygiene by Green-Vermillion (OHI-S) indices. Subjects underwent an oral health training programme at the end of which their oral hygiene and health status was once again evaluated. Participants were found to have poor oral hygiene at the beginning of the study. Subsequent evaluations to measure improvements after the training programme revealed no changes in oral health status. These results underscore the enormous difficulties encountered by staff and families in applying preventive oral health programmes.

  18. Strength training improves fatigue resistance and self-rated health in workers with chronic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundstrup, Emil; Jakobsen, Markus Due; Brandt, Mikkel

    2016-01-01

    of a randomized controlled trial investigates the effect of strength training on muscular fatigue resistance and self-rated health among workers with chronic pain. Sixty-six slaughterhouse workers with chronic upper limb pain and work disability were randomly allocated to 10 weeks of strength training or usual......-rated health and pain. Time to fatigue, muscle strength, hand/wrist pain, and self-rated health improved significantly more following strength training than usual care (all P strength training and this change was correlated to the reduction in fear avoidance...... (Spearman's rho = -0.40; P = 0.01). In conclusion, specific strength training improves muscular fatigue resistance and self-rated health and reduces pain of the hand/wrist in manual workers with chronic upper limb pain. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01671267....

  19. Model Guided Design and Development Process for an Electronic Health Record Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ze; Marquard, Jenna; Henneman, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Effective user training is important to ensure electronic health record (EHR) implementation success. Though many previous studies report best practice principles and success and failure stories, current EHR training is largely empirically-based and often lacks theoretical guidance. In addition, the process of training development is underemphasized and underreported. A white paper by the American Medical Informatics Association called for models of user training for clinical information system implementation; existing instructional development models from learning theory provide a basis to meet this call. We describe in this paper our experiences and lessons learned as we adapted several instructional development models to guide our development of EHR user training. Specifically, we focus on two key aspects of this training development: training content and training process.

  20. Nutrition Training Improves Health Workers’ Nutrition Knowledge and Competence to Manage Child Undernutrition: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunguya, Bruno F.; Poudel, Krishna C.; Mlunde, Linda B.; Urassa, David P.; Yasuoka, Junko; Jimba, Masamine

    2013-01-01

    Background: Medical and nursing education lack adequate practical nutrition training to fit the clinical reality that health workers face in their practices. Such a deficit creates health workers with poor nutrition knowledge and child undernutrition management practices. In-service nutrition training can help to fill this gap. However, no systematic review has examined its collective effectiveness. We thus conducted this study to examine the effectiveness of in-service nutrition training on health workers’ nutrition knowledge, counseling skills, and child undernutrition management practices. Methods: We conducted a literature search on nutrition interventions from PubMed/MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, ISI Web of Knowledge, and World Health Organization regional databases. The outcome variables were nutrition knowledge, nutrition-counseling skills, and undernutrition management practices of health workers. Due to heterogeneity, we conducted only descriptive analyses. Results: Out of 3910 retrieved articles, 25 were selected as eligible for the final analysis. A total of 18 studies evaluated health workers’ nutrition knowledge and showed improvement after training. A total of 12 studies with nutrition counseling as the outcome variable also showed improvement among the trained health workers. Sixteen studies evaluated health workers’ child undernutrition management practices. In all such studies, child undernutrition management practices and competence of health workers improved after the nutrition training intervention. Conclusion: In-service nutrition training improves quality of health workers by rendering them more knowledge and competence to manage nutrition-related conditions, especially child undernutrition. In-service nutrition training interventions can help to fill the gap created by the lack of adequate nutrition training in the existing medical and nursing education system. In this way, steps can be taken toward improving the overall nutritional status

  1. Nutrition training improves health workers' nutrition knowledge and competence to manage child undernutrition: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunguya, Bruno F; Poudel, Krishna C; Mlunde, Linda B; Urassa, David P; Yasuoka, Junko; Jimba, Masamine

    2013-09-24

    Medical and nursing education lack adequate practical nutrition training to fit the clinical reality that health workers face in their practices. Such a deficit creates health workers with poor nutrition knowledge and child undernutrition management practices. In-service nutrition training can help to fill this gap. However, no systematic review has examined its collective effectiveness. We thus conducted this study to examine the effectiveness of in-service nutrition training on health workers' nutrition knowledge, counseling skills, and child undernutrition management practices. We conducted a literature search on nutrition interventions from PubMed/MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, ISI Web of Knowledge, and World Health Organization regional databases. The outcome variables were nutrition knowledge, nutrition-counseling skills, and undernutrition management practices of health workers. Due to heterogeneity, we conducted only descriptive analyses. Out of 3910 retrieved articles, 25 were selected as eligible for the final analysis. A total of 18 studies evaluated health workers' nutrition knowledge and showed improvement after training. A total of 12 studies with nutrition counseling as the outcome variable also showed improvement among the trained health workers. Sixteen studies evaluated health workers' child undernutrition management practices. In all such studies, child undernutrition management practices and competence of health workers improved after the nutrition training intervention. In-service nutrition training improves quality of health workers by rendering them more knowledge and competence to manage nutrition-related conditions, especially child undernutrition. In-service nutrition training interventions can help to fill the gap created by the lack of adequate nutrition training in the existing medical and nursing education system. In this way, steps can be taken toward improving the overall nutritional status of the child population.

  2. Training load and health problems in freshman rowers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijsterveldt, Anne-Marie van; de Jong, Mark; Lemmink, Koen; Stubbe, Janine

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Rowing is a popular sport for students in the Netherlands. First-year students have to deal with a substantial increase of training exposure during their rowing season. The aim of this study was to investigate the training characteristics and the occurrence of injuries and

  3. Training load and health problems in freshman rowers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijsterveldt, A.M. van; Jong, M. de; Lemmink, K.; Stubbe, J.H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Rowing is a popular sport for students in the Netherlands. First-year students have to deal with a substantial increase of training exposure during their rowing season. The aim of this study was to investigate the training characteristics and the occurrence of injuries and illnesses in

  4. Training providers on issues of race and racism improve health care equity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Stephen C; Prasad, Shailendra; Hackman, Heather W

    2015-05-01

    Race is an independent factor in health disparity. We developed a training module to address race, racism, and health care. A group of 19 physicians participated in our training module. Anonymous survey results before and after the training were compared using a two-sample t-test. The awareness of racism and its impact on care increased in all participants. White participants showed a decrease in self-efficacy in caring for patients of color when compared to white patients. This training was successful in deconstructing white providers' previously held beliefs about race and racism. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. A Vision for Doctoral Research Training in Health Behavior: A Position Paper from the American Academy of Health Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Journal of Health Behavior, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To establish and disseminate the position of the American Academy of Health Behavior (The Academy) on doctoral research training. Methods: A collaborative process involving the Work Group on Doctoral Research Training with input from The Academy membership led to the development of the guidelines described herein. Results: A set of…

  6. Adherence and perceptions regarding simulation training in undergraduate health Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Perpétuo Elias

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Simulation techniques are spreading rapidly in medicine. Suc h resources are increasingly concentrated in Simulation Laboratories. The MSRP-USP is structuring such a laboratory and is interested in the prevalence of individual initiatives that could be centralized there. The MSRP-USP currently has five full-curriculum courses in the health sciences: Medicine, Speech Therapy, Physical Therapy, Nutrition, and Occupational Therapy, all consisting of core disciplines. GOAL: To determine the prevalence of simulation techniques in the regular courses at MSRP-USP. METHODS: Coordinators of disciplines in the various courses were interviewed using a specifically designed semi-structured questionnaire, and all the collected data were stored in a dedicated database. The disciplines were grouped according to whether they used (GI or did not use (GII simulation resources. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: 256 disciplines were analyzed, of which only 18.3% used simulation techniques, varying according to course: Medicine (24.7.3%, Occupational Therapy (23.0%, Nutrition (15.9%, Physical Therapy (9.8%, and Speech Therapy (9.1%. Computer simulation programs predominated (42.5% in all five courses. The resources were provided mainly by MSRP-USP (56.3%, with additional funding coming from other sources based on individual initiatives. The same pattern was observed for maintenance. There was great interest in centralizing the resources in the new Simulation Laboratory in order to facilitate maintenance, but there was concern about training and access to the material. CONCLUSIONS: 1 The MSRP-USP simulation resources show low complexity and are mainly limited to computer programs; 2 Use of simulation varies according to course, and is most prevalent in Medicine; 3 Resources are scattered across several locations, and their acquisition and maintenance depend on individual initiatives rather than central coordination or curricular guidelines

  7. Safety Training Parks – Cooperative Contribution to Safety and Health Trainings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiman, Arto; Pedersen, Louise Møller; Väyrynen, Seppo

    2017-01-01

    Recent debate regarding the possibility for decreasing the risk of accidents within the construction industry has emphasized the need for innovative training methods. Training should combine behavior- and culture-based approaches, simulate real-life situations, and involve multiple methods. The c...... commitment, a long-term perspective, and a strong safety climate are identified as preconditions for the STP concept to work....

  8. Formative evaluation of a teledentistry training programme for oral health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, K K; Nayar, P; Chandak, A; Gupta, N

    2017-03-15

    The objective of this study was to conduct a formative evaluation of a teledentistry (TD) programme that was developed for a predominantly rural state in the Midwestern United States. Formative evaluation data were collected on programme activities from the TD programme records. In addition, the effectiveness of the TD training programme was evaluated using a self-administered paper-based survey administered to the participants, immediately following completion of the training activity. Ninety-three dental students, oral health and other health professionals participated in the TD training programme. Overall, the trainees rated the TD training programme highly, with regard to the content, format and skills improvement. The evaluation also demonstrated a positive change in all trainees' attitudes following the training sessions, with most trainees acknowledging a positive impact of the training on their knowledge and competency. We identified challenges in the development of the TD programme and in expanding access to oral health care for rural communities. Challenges included reimbursement and a limited interest amongst established dental offices. Dental schools can play an important role in preparing both dental health professionals and other health professionals in the use of TD by providing training and oral health expertise. The use of TD by non-dental providers for consultation, referral and disease management has the potential to improve oral health outcomes, particularly for rural and underserved populations. Evaluation data provide critical feedback to programme planners and administrators. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. The Evolution of Public Health Education and Training in the United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie Cole

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The United Kingdom has a long and evolving history of public health education. From the initiation of formal standardised training for Medical Officers for Health in the early 1900s, to the current national public health training programme, public health education has adapted to the changing contexts of public health practice. Whilst the profession was originally only a medical specialty, subsequent re­­cognition of the skills and contribution of the wider public health workforce has led to changes in professional specialist training for public health, which is now open to non-medical applicants. This well-established professional training scheme allows the formal accreditation of competence in a broad range of public health skills. The academic component of public health training is provided by a rapidly growing number of postgraduate courses. Once confined to the UK’s first school of public health, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and a handful of British Universities, the current 60 or so courses across the country are found in diverse university settings. Quality and standards in higher education are monitored by the Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education but there are no other professional accreditation schemes for postgraduate courses in public health nationally. Public health education and training continues to face challenges in the UK, notably the current government plans for major restructuring of the National Health Service (NHS which threatens the loss of traditional NHS training placements and has created uncertainty around how professional training might be structured in the future. Whilst the long established tradition of public health education and more recent adoption of competency-based approaches to training gives some flexibility to meet these challenges, insight and innovative responses are required to ensure that public health education and training are not destabilised by these challenges

  10. Developing Sustainable Cancer Education Programs: Training Public Health Students to Deliver Cancer 101 in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Y M; Moreno, L; Briant, K J; Vélez, H; Jiménez, J C; Torres, J; Vadaparampil, S T; Muñoz-Antonia, T; Quinn, G P

    2018-02-01

    The use of promotores to educate Hispanic communities about different health topics has been proven successful, albeit with limitations in program sustainability. The goal of this study was to develop a sustainable train-the-trainer model to train graduate public health (PH) students to disseminate cancer education among communities in Puerto Rico (PR). Graduate students (n = 32) from Ponce Health Sciences University's (PHSU) PH program participated in a 2-day Cáncer 101 training, where they learned how to deliver nine cancer modules to the community. Cancer knowledge was assessed before and after the training via 54 items measuring discussed concepts. Participants also assessed the training's effectiveness by completing a training evaluation informed by social cognitive theory (SCT) constructs of self-efficacy, outcome expectations, facilitation, and observational learning. Participants were mainly female (78.1 %), 26.7 ± 3.9 years old, and enrolled in a Masters-level program (81.3 %). Participants reported an average 11.38-point increase in cancer knowledge after attending the training [t(31) = 14.88, p reporting satisfactory comments in the open-ended responses and high scores on measured SCT constructs. The Cáncer 101 training program effectively prepared students to deliver cancer education to local communities. Training graduate PH students to educate communities about health issues is an innovative, and potentially sustainable, way to reach underserved populations.

  11. An instructional design model for culturally competent community health worker training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uriarte, Jessica A; Cummings, Angela D L; Lloyd, Linda E

    2014-03-01

    The Texas Public Health Training Center (TPHTC) provides quality training and education for the full spectrum of public health workers. As part of this mission, the TPHTC creates continuing education modules for nontraditional public health workers, such as community health workers (CHWs), through a culturally competent curriculum development process. CHWs, like many public health workers, must be certified by the state of Texas to practice within its borders, and continuing education is required to maintain certification. By involving CHWs and community members in its curriculum development process, the TPHTC is able to produce training modules that are more suitable for this unique and important segment of the public health workforce. The iterative curriculum development process is described here, along with a state-approved curriculum resulting from this method. As the value of the nontraditional public health workforce gains more recognition, sound curriculum design will be increasingly important to support and strengthen these nontraditional professions.

  12. Overcoming language and literacy barriers in safety and health training of agricultural workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcury, Thomas A; Estrada, Jorge M; Quandt, Sara A

    2010-07-01

    The workforce in all areas of United States agriculture and forestry is becoming increasingly diverse in language, culture, and education. Many agricultural workers are immigrants who have limited English language skills and limited educational attainment. Providing safety and health training to this large, diverse, dispersed, and often transient population of workers is challenging. This review, prepared for the 2010 Agricultural Safety and Health Council of America/National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health conference, "Be Safe, Be Profitable: Protecting Workers in Agriculture," is divided into five sections. First, we describe the occupational and demographic characteristics of agricultural workers in the United States to highlight their safety and health training needs. Second, we summarize current research on the social and cultural attributes of agricultural workers and agricultural employers that affect the provision of safety and health training. Worker and employer attributes include language, literacy, financial limitations, work beliefs, and health beliefs. Third, we review current initiatives addressing safety and health training for agricultural workers that consider worker language and literacy. These initiatives are limited to a few specific topics (e.g., pesticides, heat stress); they do not provide general programs of safety training that would help establish a culture of workplace safety. However, several innovative approaches to health and safety training are being implemented, including the use of community-based participatory approaches and lay health promoter programs. Fourth, the limited industry response for safety training with this linguistically diverse and educationally limited workforce is summarized. Finally, gaps in knowledge and practice are summarized and recommendations to develop educationally, culturally, and linguistically appropriate safety and health training are presented.

  13. Effects of self-paced interval and continuous training on health markers in women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connolly, Luke J; Bailey, Stephen J; Krustrup, Peter

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare the effects of self-paced high-intensity interval and continuous cycle training on health markers in premenopausal women. METHODS: Forty-five inactive females were randomised to a high-intensity interval training (HIIT; n = 15), continuous training (CT; n = 15) or an inactive...... control (CON; n = 15) group. HIIT performed 5 × 5 min sets comprising repetitions of 30-s low-, 20-s moderate- and 10-s high-intensity cycling with 2 min rest between sets. CT completed 50 min of continuous cycling. Training was completed self-paced, 3 times weekly for 12 weeks. RESULTS: Peak oxygen......, whereas blood pressure, submaximal HR, well-being and body mass adaptations were training-type-specific. Both training methods improved established health markers, but the adaptations to HIIT were evoked for a lower time commitment....

  14. Workplace safety and health improvements through a labor/management training and collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, Bruce; Morawetz, John; Ruttenberg, Ruth; Workman, Rick

    2013-01-01

    Seven hundred thirty-nine workers at Merck's Stonewall plant in Elkton, Virginia, have a safer and healthier workplace because four of them were enthusiastic about health and safety training they received from the union's training center in Cincinnati, Ohio. What emerged was not only that all 739 plant employees received OSHA 10-hour General Industry training, but that it was delivered by "OSHA-authorized" members of the International Chemical Workers Union Council who worked at the plant. Merck created a new full-time position in its Learning and Development Department and filled it with one of the four workers who had received the initial training. Strong plant leadership promoted discussions both during the training, in evaluation, and in newly energized joint labor-management meetings following the training. These discussions identified safety and health issues needing attention. Then, in a new spirit of trust and collaboration, major improvements occurred.

  15. Assessing the Education and Training Needs of Nebraska's Public Health Workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Brandon L; Johansson, Patrik; Nayar, Preethy; Apenteng, Bettye A; Opoku, Samuel; Nguyen, Anh

    2015-01-01

    In 2012, the Great Plains Public Health Training Center (Grant #UB6HP22821) conducted an online survey of state and local health departments and the American Indian (tribal clinics, tribal health departments, and urban Indian clinic) public health workforce across three professional levels. The objectives of the needs assessment were to determine the competency levels of the state's public health workforce, assess gaps in public health competencies, identify public health training interests, needs, and preferences, and to determine the barriers and motivators to participate in public health training. The assessment was developed using the Council on Linkages Between Academia and Public Health Practice, Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals survey (1). The final assessment was created and piloted by numerous individuals representing practice and academia. Respondents identified cultural competency and communication skills as the two most important public health competency domains. Although the public health professionals perceived that they were least proficient in the area of policy development and program planning, participants identified the greatest needs for training in financial planning and management skills and analytical/assessment skills. In general, respondents preferred instructor-led interactive training sessions offered as onsite multi-day workshops or computer-based courses. Respondents identified obesity, health disparities, physical activity, chronic diseases, and diabetes as the top five public health topical areas. These priorities align with State and National public health plans. The findings of the needs assessment were used to tailor educational opportunities to build the capacity of Nebraska's public health system. Additionally, the results were used to develop workforce development plans for numerous local health departments throughout Nebraska.

  16. Assessing the Education and Training Needs of Nebraska's Public Health Workforce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon L Grimm

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionIn 2012, the Great Plains Public Health Training Center (Grant #UB6HP22821 conducted an online survey of state and local health departments and the American Indian (tribal clinics, tribal health departments and urban Indian clinic public health workforce across three professional levels. The objectives of the needs assessment were to, determine the competency levels of the state’s public health workforce, assess gaps in public health competencies, identify public health training interests, needs and preferences and, determine the barriers and motivators to participating in public health training.MethodsThe assessment was developed using the Council on Linkages Between Academia and Public Health Practice, Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals survey (Council of Linkages, 2010. The final assessment was created and piloted by numerous individuals representing practice and academia. ResultsRespondents identified cultural competency and communication skills as the two most important public health competency domains. Although the public health professionals perceived that they were least proficient in the area of policy development and program planning, participants identified the greatest needs for training in financial planning & management skills and analytical/assessment skills. In general, respondents preferred instructor-led interactive training sessions offered as onsite multi-day workshops or computer-based courses. Respondents identified obesity, health disparities, physical activity, chronic diseases and diabetes as the top five public health topical areas. ConclusionThese priorities align with State and National public health plans. The findings of the needs assessment were used to tailor educational opportunities to build the capacity of Nebraska’s public health system. Additionally, the results were used to develop workforce development plans for numerous local health departments throughout Nebraska.

  17. Health policy and systems research training: global status and recommendations for action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tancred, Tara M; Schleiff, Meike; Peters, David H; Balabanova, Dina

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the characteristics of health policy and systems research training globally and to identify recommendations for improvement and expansion. We identified institutions offering health policy and systems research training worldwide. In 2014, we recruited participants from identified institutions for an online survey on the characteristics of the institutions and the courses given. Survey findings were explored during in-depth interviews with selected key informants. The study identified several important gaps in health policy and systems research training. There were few courses in central and eastern Europe, the Middle East, North Africa or Latin America. Most (116/152) courses were instructed in English. Institutional support for courses was often lacking and many institutions lacked the critical mass of trained individuals needed to support doctoral and postdoctoral students. There was little consistency between institutions in definitions of the competencies required for health policy and systems research. Collaboration across disciplines to provide the range of methodological perspectives the subject requires was insufficient. Moreover, the lack of alternatives to on-site teaching may preclude certain student audiences such as policy-makers. Training in health policy and systems research is important to improve local capacity to conduct quality research in this field. We provide six recommendations to improve the content, accessibility and reach of training. First, create a repository of information on courses. Second, establish networks to support training. Third, define competencies in health policy and systems research. Fourth, encourage multidisciplinary collaboration. Fifth, expand the geographical and language coverage of courses. Finally, consider alternative teaching formats.

  18. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Mental Health First Aid Training among Student Affairs Staff at a Canadian University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Jennifer; Brooks, Meghan; Burrow, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates the effectiveness of providing the Mental Health First Aid training program to student affairs staff. The objective of the training was to increase knowledge of mental health, enhance sensitivity, and raise confidence to intervene and assist individuals experiencing a mental health issue. We found the training successfully met…

  19. Training load and health problems in freshman rowers

    OpenAIRE

    van Beijsterveldt, Anne-Marie; de Jong, Mark; Lemmink, Koen; Stubbe, Janine

    2015-01-01

    Background Rowing is a popular sport for students in the Netherlands. First-year students have to deal with a substantial increase of training exposure during their rowing season. The aim of this study was to investigate the training characteristics and the occurrence of injuries and illnesses in the freshman rowers. Methods Novice rowers of 5 Dutch student rowing clubs were prospectively followed during the season 2013-2014. Prior to the start of the season, all participants filled in a base...

  20. REPORT ON MDTA INSTITUTIONAL TRAINING PROGRAM DEVELOPMENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Employment Security (DOL), Washington, DC.

    THE DATA ON MANPOWER DEVELOPMENT TRAINING ACT (MDTA) PROGRAM ACCOMPLISHMENTS DURING 1964 AND 1965 REFLECT THE INCREASING EMPHASIS ON ASSISTING DISADVANTAGED TRAINEES SUCH AS JOBLESS TEENAGERS, NONWHITES, AND PERSONS OF LIMITED EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT. ALMOST HALF OF THE 321,456 ENROLLEES RECEIVED TRAINING IN THE SKILLED AND SEMI-SKILLED CATEGORIES,…

  1. Training, Development and Organisational Performance | Aigbepue ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Manpower training and development are based on the premise that skills need to be improved for organization to grow. Physical, social, intellectual and mental training is very essential in facilitating the level of productivity and development of personnel in an organization. Absence of these programmes result to ...

  2. Cancer education and training in primary health care--a national audit of training providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAvoy, Brian Ramsay; Fletcher, Jane M; Elwood, Mark

    2007-11-01

    Primary care professionals play a critical role in cancer care but relatively little is known about their education and training. This article presents the results of a national audit of education and training providers in relation to primary care and cancer. A semistructured telephone questionnaire. The response rate was very high (96%) with 210 organisations participating. Forty-two percent provided cancer education and training. Evidence of good adult education practice was demonstrated, and 95% of organisations ran accredited programs. Although pharmaceutical industry support was not favoured, the majority (78%) described this as their main source of funding. There is optimism and strong commitment among primary care cancer education and training providers. Their content seems appropriate and their approach is consistent with good adult learning principles and multidisciplinary care, but this could be enhanced with increased funding and improved collaboration and communication between organisations.

  3. Impact of Physical Fitness Training on Selected Health Related Fitness Variables

    OpenAIRE

    Alemayehu Ayalew

    2017-01-01

    The study was aimed to investigate the impact of physical fitness training on selected health related fitness variables. It was hypothesized that there would be a significant changes on the body composition, muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility, and cardiovascular efficiency of trainees after five months of training due to different intensities, frequencies, and time of physical fitness training. To achieve the purpose of the study there were 85 total populations of gym trainees...

  4. An Evaluation of Participation in a Schools-Based Youth Mental Health Peer Education Training Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Aileen; Barry, James; Neary, Marie-Louise; Lane, Sabrina; O'Keeffe, Lynsey

    2016-01-01

    The use of peer education has been well documented within the discipline of health promotion, but not within the youth mental health domain. This paper describes an evaluation of an innovative schools-based peer education training programme that involved preparing young people to deliver a mental health workshop to their peers. Participants…

  5. Florida Public Health Training Center: Evidence-Based Online Mentor Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frahm, Kathryn A.; Alsac-Seitz, Biray; Mescia, Nadine; Brown, Lisa M.; Hyer, Kathy; Liburd, Desiree; Rogoff, David P.; Troutman, Adewale

    2013-01-01

    This article describes an Online Mentor Program (OMP) designed to support and facilitate mentorships among and between Florida Department of Health (FDOH) employees and USF College of Public Health students using a Web-based portal. The Florida Public Health Training Center (FPHTC) at the University of South Florida (USF) College of Public Health…

  6. The Effect of Floorball Training on Health Status, Psychological Health and Social Capital in Older Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan M. Wikman

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of a multidisciplinary study which investigated the effects of a period with floorball training on health status, psychological health and social capital of older men. Thirty-nine untrained men aged 69.9 ± 0.6 (range: 65–76 were randomized into a group playing floorball (n = 22 or a group playing petanque (n = 17 one hour twice a week for 12 weeks. Both groups filled out the Health Survey Short Form (SF-12 and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS before and after the 12-week intervention. Linear regression analyses with bootstrapping showed that the men in the floorball group improved in the SF-12 composite score for mental health, as well as the HADS subscales anxiety and depression, compared to the men in the petanque group. In addition, 21 interviews were conducted with a sample of the men engaged in floorball. According to the statements in the interviews, the men in the floorball group experienced a high degree of solidarity and group cohesion which seemed to have increased their social capital during the intervention. In particular, the fun and joyful experiences of playing led to a high degree of social connectedness, which were mentioned by many of the men as the main reason for their participation throughout the 12-week period. The statistical results and the interview findings suggest that participation in a ball game such as floorball has several benefits regarding health status, psychological health and social capital and in addition that playing floorball is experienced as enjoyable amongst older men. Thus, it can be concluded that floorball is an activity that benefits older men and should be provided in relevant contexts, such as e.g. sport clubs or centres for seniors.

  7. Analysis of Health Manpower Behavior: Physicians and Dentists

    OpenAIRE

    Kraft, Aleli D.

    1995-01-01

    This study analyzes the factors affecting physician and dentist’s productivity and the fees they charge for their clinic services, their willingness to participate in financing schemes and their career decisions. This paper also estimates their average consultation fees and average consultation time using three–stage least squares regression.

  8. Regional cross national networks for education and training in health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøhr, Christian; Bygholm, Ann; Hejlesen, Ole

    The paper argues that the education activities in health informatics should be established in net-works covering regions with comparable health care systems involving one or more comparable countries.......The paper argues that the education activities in health informatics should be established in net-works covering regions with comparable health care systems involving one or more comparable countries....

  9. Endurance training per se increases metabolic health in young, moderately overweight men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordby, Pernille; Auerbach, Pernille L; Rosenkilde, Mads

    2012-01-01

    Health benefits of physical activity may depend on a concomitant weight loss. In a randomized, controlled trial, we compared the effects of endurance training with or without weight loss to the effect of weight loss induced by an energy-reduced diet in 48 sedentary, moderately overweight men who...... completed a 12-week intervention program of training (T), energy-reduced diet (D), training and increased diet (T-iD), or control (C). An energy deficit of 600 kcal/day was induced by endurance training or diet in T and D and a similar training regimen plus an increased dietary intake of 600 kcal...... clearance and suppression of plasma nonesterified fatty acids (NEFAs) were increased only in the two training groups. Thus, loss of fat mass (diet or training induced) improves hepatic insulin sensitivity, whereas peripheral insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue is increased by endurance...

  10. What are the critical success factors for team training in health care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Eduardo; Almeida, Sandra A; Salisbury, Mary; King, Heidi; Lazzara, Elizabeth H; Lyons, Rebecca; Wilson, Katherine A; Almeida, Paula A; McQuillan, Robert

    2009-08-01

    Ineffective communication among medical teams is a leading cause of preventable patient harm throughout the health care system. A growing body of literature indicates that medical teamwork improves the quality, safety, and cost-effectiveness of health care delivery, and expectations for teamwork in health care have increased. Yet few health care professions' curricula include teamwork training, and few medical practices integrate teamwork principles. Because of this knowledge gap, growing numbers of health care systems are requiring staff to participate in formal teamwork training programs. Seven evidence-based, practical, systematic success factors for preparing, implementing, and sustaining a team training and performance improvement initiative were identified. Each success factor is accompanied by tips for deployment and a real-world example of application. (1) Align team training objectives and safety aims with organizational goals, (2) provide organizational support for the team training initiative, (3) get frontline care leaders on board, (4) prepare the environment and trainees for team training, (5) determine required resources and time commitment and ensure their availability, (6) facilitate application of trained teamwork skills on the job; and (7) measure the effectiveness of the team training program. Although decades of research in other high-risk organizations have clearly demonstrated that properly designed team training programs can improve team performance, success is highly dependent on organizational factors such as leadership support, learning climate, and commitment to data-driven change. Before engaging in a teamwork training initiative, health care organizations should have a clear understanding of these factors and the strategies for their establishment.

  11. Measuring the impact of information skills training: a survey of health libraries in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayre, Stephen; Barbrook, John; Engel, Colin; Lacey, Patricia; Phul, Anita; Stevenson, Paul; Toft, Suzanne

    2015-03-01

    The lack of robust research measuring the impact of NHS based information skills training prompted the West Midlands Regional Trainers' Forum to conduct a post-training survey. This is a multi-centred study which collected data from over 60 separate organisations. Survey questionnaires were completed by learners a few weeks after the training event. Five hundred and thirty-four responses were received. 82% of information skills training recipients indicated that they had implemented learning or changed practice as a result of the training. 70% of recipients indicated there had been an impact on patient care. The beneficial results from information skills training manifest in a multitude of ways. The results of this study indicate that the learning from information skills training is being used to reduce problems and address the key issues in modern health care. The results clearly demonstrate the value of information skills training and its beneficial impact on patient care, lifelong learning and other key NHS functions. This study shows information skills training as an important activity which supports the information literacy agenda, and has a positive impact across the four key functions of library and knowledge services within the NHS. © 2014 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2014 Health Libraries Journal.

  12. Training of occupational therapists for Primary Health Care (PHC: contributions to the debate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Maris Nicolau

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Herein presented are the topics debated at the research group meeting on Training of OccupationalTherapists for Primary Health Care (PHC that took place during the First National Seminar on OccupationalTherapy in PHC, at the XII Brazilian Congress and IX Latin American Congress of Occupational Therapy inOctober 2011 in Sao Paulo, Brazil. In addition, the field of vocational training for PHC is situated within the context of the Unified Health System (UHS and its importance for the training of occupational therapists. Wepresent relevant aspects of specific National Curriculum Guidelines suggested for the professional training atthis level of care, which have also been addressed by the Reorientation of Vocational Training in Health Policy(PRO Health. Experiences gained by the authors’ educational institutions when training at this level of care arealso presented. It was possible to conclude that undergraduate studies at this level of care enables students andteachers to come into close contact with health demands and needs, health-disease process and its determinants,within a scenario closer to the everyday life of the people being cared and the service they receive. The teachingof Occupational Therapy (OT at PHC further allows the debate of its contributions in promoting health andpreventing disease, early diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation, which may facilitate the access to populationspreviously not considered priority by the PHC. This seminar was important for discussing the challenges oflinking the OT profession to the UHS.

  13. BUILDING A WORKFORCE COMPETENCY-BASED TRAINING PROGRAM IN INFANT/EARLY CHILDHOOD MENTAL HEALTH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priddis, Lynn E; Matacz, Rochelle; Weatherston, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    This article describes findings from a project conducted in Western Australia (Mental Health Commission WA, 2015) that investigated the education and training needs of the Infant/Early Childhood Mental Health (I/ECMH) workforce. We examined international training programs and models of delivery in infant mental health, including a review of the current training available in Australia. Data collected from over 60 interviews were analyzed, and a staged delivery model for I/ECMH training and supervision that aligned with the Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health (2014) Competency Guidelines was recommended. These findings led to the purchase of the Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health (2014) for use in Western Australia. In a very short time, use of the Michigan Competency Framework by the Australian Association for Infant Mental Health West Australian Branch Incorporated has begun to change the training and education opportunities for upskilling the infant and early childhood workforce in Western Australia. It has resulted in a map to guide and develop training in the I/ECMH field for individual practitioners and professionals as well as for workplaces that will ultimately benefit Western Australian infants, young children, and their families during the perinatal period and in the early years. © 2015 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  14. The Efficacy of Machine Learning Programs for Navy Manpower Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-03-01

    Machine Learning Programs for Navy Manpower Analysis 12 Personal Author(s) Dennis E. Pytel, Jr. 13a Type of Report 13b Time Covered 14 Date of Report...NPJT C-* -OUBLE- Source:AI IAker1 Meul p. 2-14 Figure 1: Four Input, Three Layer Polynomial Network. AIM uses seven types of nodes. The algebraic form of...I II iii short dark. blue: - tall red. bhe: + taN L d ak, blue: - 4 b w tall duot brown: - sh"d, blond, blue: + tol blod , br• n: - tall. bland. blue

  15. Strategies Used by Interdisciplinary Rural Health Training Programs To Assure Community Responsiveness and Recruit Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, Marion K.; Cummings, Doyle M.; Borrego, Matthew E.; Fuller, Kathi; Cook, Sherrie

    2002-01-01

    Describes strategies used by five U.S. rural interdisciplinary training grant programs (mainly based in academic institutions) to respond to local needs and promote recruitment in rural communities. Programs provide training to 17 health care disciplines and serve diverse disadvantaged populations. Services are provided through individual clinical…

  16. The Relationship between Training and Mental Health among Caregivers of Individuals with Polytrauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lillian Flores Stevens

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This was a hypothesis-generating exploration of relationships between caregiver training during TBI/polytrauma rehabilitation and caregiver mental health. In this cross-sectional study, 507 informal caregivers to US service members with TBI who received inpatient rehabilitation care in a Veterans Affairs’ Polytrauma Rehabilitation Center from 2001 to 2009 completed a retrospective, self-report survey. Embedded in the survey were measures of caregiver mental health, including the National Institutes of Health’s Patient Reported Outcome Measurement Information System (PROMIS Anxiety and Depression Short Forms, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem scale, and the Zarit Burden Short Form. Though no groups endorsed clinical levels, mental health symptoms varied by caregiver training category (Trained, Not Trained, and Did Not Need Training. Caregivers who did not receive training on how to navigate healthcare systems endorsed higher depression and burden and lower self-esteem than those who did. Caregivers who did not receive training in supporting their care recipients’ emotions endorsed higher anxiety, depression, and burden and lower self-esteem than those who did. Analyses also suggested a different association between training and mental health based on caregivers’ relationship to the care recipient and the intensity of care recipient needs. Potential hypotheses for testing in future studies raised by these findings are discussed.

  17. National Strength and Conditioning Association Position Statement: Health Aspects of Resistance Exercise and Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Michael S.; Rozenek, Ralph

    2001-01-01

    Resistance training may enhance cardiovascular health, improve body composition, increase bone mineral density, reduce anxiety and depression, reduce the risk of injury during other sports, and increase muscular strength and endurance. The paper describes the effects of resistance training on: the cardiovascular system, energy expenditure and body…

  18. [Training of managers and politicians in ethics of science and ethics of public health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudry, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    First of all, I will identify the various possible objectives of training in ethics of science and health. I will then examine the institutional context in which managers and politicians act in the light of what is done in Quebec. This analysis will lead me to defend the thesis that in Quebec at least such training is necessary.

  19. The Naval Enlisted Aviation Maintenance Manpower System: Advancing Readiness Through Improved Utilization of Intellectual Capital

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    sound system components that employ vital intellectual capital considerations. When dealing with manpower, there are always two perspectives that must...thesis examines present intellectual capital theory, and evaluates current enlisted aviation manpower system elements in terms of this theory. The

  20. On the dynamics of workforce-mix in a manpower system

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. This paper focuses on a manpower system with a fixed number of jobs that uses both per- manent and temporary staff. The dynamics of workforce-mix in such a system is modelled as an optimal control problem. The objective is to find the most economical workforce-mix for the manpower system, subject to the ...

  1. On the dynamics of workforce-mix in a manpower system ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper focuses on a manpower system with a xed number of jobs that uses both per- manent and temporary sta. The dynamics of workforce-mix in such a system is modelled as an optimal control problem. The objective is to nd the most economical workforce-mix for the manpower system, subject to the uctuations in ...

  2. Health literacy training for public health nurses in fukushima: a case-study of program adaptation, implementation and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Aya; Rudd, Rima E; Lai, Alden Yuanhong; Yoshida-Komiya, Hiromi

    2014-05-01

    Health literacy comprises not only an individual's ability to gain access to, understand and use health information, but also health care providers' ability to make health information accessible and usable. The Fukushima nuclear accident has posed challenges related to the communication of radiation-related health information. Public health nurses are gatekeepers of community health in Japan, and have primary responsibility for communicating this complex information about science and risk to lay members of the community. A health literacy training program was designed to augment communication skills of participating nurses with two primary goals: changing communication practices and norms among public health nurses, and improving access to information for community residents. Training content incorporated an overview of health literacy skills (including numeracy), processes for assessing written materials and visual displays, as well as guidelines for text improvement. The workshop was spread across two days with two-hour sessions each day. A proximal post-training evaluation survey was conducted, followed by a more distal one-month follow-up evaluation to assess the application of learned skills in practice. Twenty-six nurses in Fukushima City attended the first trial. Post-training evaluations were highly positive, with agreement from 85-100% of participants on the appropriateness and usefulness of the workshop. During a one-month follow-up, the nurses reported applying new knowledge and skills to develop written materials. However, they faced difficulties sharing their new skills with colleagues and challenges changing work norms. Participants also encountered difficulties using graphics and explaining risks in practice. This paper highlights the importance of providing health literacy training opportunities for professionals to strengthen health system's ability to accessible information and services. This program also serves as important reference for future

  3. Value of training on motivation among health workers in Narok County, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momanyi, George Osoro; Adoyo, Maureen Atieno; Mwangi, Eunice Muthoni; Mokua, Dennis Okari

    2016-01-01

    Training, as an additive human resources intervention is decisive to organizational performance. Employees require constant update of formal and informal knowledge alongside positive attitudes that have been defined as necessary in motivation leading to effectiveness in performance hence workplace training is tied to achieving organizational aims and objectives. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of training on motivation among health workers in Narok County, Kenya. A cross-sectional study utilizing a self administered questionnaire, targeting 237 health workers and 21 health managers was used. Data analysis was done using SPSS version 21 using descriptive statistics. Factor analysis was done on the training perception in relation to motivation. Majority of the respondents rated their motivation between 7 and 9 in the current health facility (35.4%), Sub-county (33.8%) and County (32.9%) with the median motivation level of 5. Majority of health workers 194 (81.9%) had received a form of training, of whom 191 (98.5%) indicated that on-job training was relevant to their tasks and that it motivated 192 (99.0%) of them to perform better due to coining skills to motivation. Training significantly predicted general motivation (p-value = 0.013), job satisfaction (p-value = .001), intrinsic job satisfaction (p-value = .001) and organisational commitment (p-value motivated health workforce in Narok County and recommended strengthening of current training initiatives by ensuring trainings are more regular and involvement of health workers in discussing their career development prospects.

  4. Educating teenagers about hearing health by training them to educate children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, David; Reddy, Ravi; Hand, Jennifer; Devine, Irina May

    2016-09-01

    We investigated the change in hearing-health behaviour amongst teenagers trained to deliver the Dangerous Decibels programme to younger children. The Dangerous Decibels programme uses a two-stage process to train 8-12 year-old children to protect their hearing from noise: (1) a team of experts train 'Educators' who (2) give classroom training to children in schools. Training teenagers as Educators may add a second level of benefit if teenagers internalize the hearing-health messages that they present and thus protect their own hearing better. They were assessed before training, immediately after, and three months later (after all had presented the classroom training) using a questionnaire. In addition, a focus group was conducted with a subgroup of the Educators to assess their subjective experience. We trained 44 Educators aged 14-17 years. Results were generally positive: there were significant and sustained improvements in knowledge, self-reported behaviour, and perceived supports towards protecting hearing, and trends but not significant changes in attitudes or perceived barriers to hearing protection. Providing training to teenagers had benefits beyond the delivery of training to younger children, but improvements in the delivery model may increase the uptake and impact on the teenagers.

  5. Adoption of clinical and business trainings by child mental health clinics in New York State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chor, Ka Ho Brian; Olin, Su-Chin Serene; Weaver, Jamie; Cleek, Andrew F; McKay, Mary M; Hoagwood, Kimberly E; Horwitz, Sarah M

    2014-12-01

    This study prospectively examined the naturalistic adoption of clinical and business evidence-informed training by all 346 outpatient mental health clinics licensed to treat children, adolescents, and their families in New York State. The study used attendance data (September 2011-August 2013) from the Clinic Technical Assistance Center, a training, consultation, and educational center funded by the state Office of Mental Health, to classify the clinics' adoption of 33 trainings. Adoption behavior was classified by number, type, and intensity of trainings. The clinics were classified into four adopter groups reflecting the highest training intensity in which they participated (low, medium, and high adopters and "super-adopters"). A total of 268 clinics adopted trainings (median=5); business and clinical trainings were about equally accessed (82% versus 78%). Participation was highest for hour-long Webinars (96%) followed by learning collaboratives, which take six to 18 months to complete (34%). Most (73%-94%) adopters of business learning collaboratives and all adopters of clinical learning collaboratives had previously sampled a Webinar, although maintaining participation in learning collaboratives was a challenge. The adopter groups captured meaningful adopter profiles: 41% of clinics were low adopters that selected fewer trainings and participated only in Webinars, and 34% were high or super-adopters that accessed more trainings and participated in at least one learning collaborative. More nuanced definitions of adoption behavior can improve the understanding of clinic adoption of training and hence promote the development of efficient rollout strategies by state systems.

  6. Acceptability of mental health stigma-reduction training and initial effects on awareness among military personnel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hurtado, Suzanne L; Simon-Arndt, Cynthia M; McAnany, Jennifer; Crain, Jenny A

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report on the development of a mental health stigma reduction toolkit and training, and the acceptability and level of stigma awareness following the stigma-reduction...

  7. Mental health recovery: evaluation of a recovery-oriented training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilrycx, G K M L; Croon, M A; van den Broek, A H S; van Nieuwenhuizen, Ch

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the effectiveness of a recovery-oriented training program on knowledge and attitudes of mental health care professionals towards recovery of people with serious mental illness. Using data from a longitudinal study of recovery, changes in knowledge and attitudes of 210 mental health care professionals towards recovery were explored using the Recovery Attitude Questionnaire and the Recovery Knowledge Inventory. The study uses a two-group multiple intervention interrupted time-series design which is a variant of the stepped-wedge trial design. A total of six measurements occasions took place. This study shows that professionals' attitudes towards recovery from mental illness can improve with training. After two intensive recovery-oriented training sessions, mental health care professionals have a more positive attitude towards recovery in clinical practice. A recovery-oriented training program can change attitudes of mental health care professionals towards recovery of serious mental illness.

  8. Short- and midterm effects of emotional intelligence training on adolescent mental health

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ruiz-Aranda, Desireé; Castillo, Ruth; Salguero, José Martín; Cabello, Rosario; Fernández-Berrocal, Pablo; Balluerka, Nekane

    2012-01-01

    To analyze the effects that an emotional intelligence (EI) educational program based on the EI ability model had on adolescent mental health immediately and 6 months after completion of the training...

  9. Second Survey of Library and Information Manpower Needs in the Caribbean, Volume I. The Survey and Its Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Gloria; Robb, Reive

    The main concerns of this manpower survey were to examine and, where possible, modify and expand on the manpower planning model generated in the 1982 pilot study, and to use the model to assist with the forecasting of manpower requirements for library and information systems in the Caribbean region. Libraries and information systems in this area…

  10. Training mid-level health cadres to improve health service delivery in rural Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawal, Lal B; Mahmud, Kawkab; Islam, Sheikh Md S; Mahumud, Rashidul A; Nuruzaman, Md; Ahmed, Syed M

    2016-09-01

    Introduction In recent years, the government of Bangladesh has encouraged private sector involvement in producing mid-level health cadres including Medical Assistants (MAs). The number of MAs produced has increased significantly. We assessed students' characteristics, educational services, competencies and perceived attitudes towards health service delivery in rural areas. We used a mixed method approach using quantitative (questionnaire survey) and qualitative (key informant interviews and roundtable discussion) methods. Altogether, five public schools with 238 students and 30 private schools with 732 students were included. Statistical analyses were performed using STATA v-12. Qualitative data were analyzed thematically. Findings The majority of the students in both public (66%) and private medical assistant training schools (MATS) (61%) were from rural backgrounds. They spent the majority of their time in classroom learning (public 45% versus private 42%) and the written essay exam was the common form of a students' performance assessment. Compared with students of public MATS, students of private MATS were more confident in different aspects of educational areas, including managing emerging health needs (PStudents were aware of not having adequate facilities in rural areas (public 71%, private 65%), but they perceived working in rural areas will offer several benefits, including use of learnt skills; friendly rural people; and opportunities for real-life problem solving, etc. This study provides a current picture of MATS students' characteristics, educational services, competencies and perception towards working in rural areas. The MA students in both private and public sectors showed a greater level of willingness to serve in rural health facilities. The results are promising to improve health service delivery, particularly in rural and hard-to-reach areas of Bangladesh.

  11. Unmet needs in health training among nurses in rural Chinese township health centers: a cross-sectional hospital based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Yan; Hu, Guijie; Yi, Yanhua; Ying, Yanping; Huang, Huiqiao; Huang, Zhongxian; Lin, Jiafeng

    2017-10-04

    Maintaining a sufficient and competent rural nursing workforce is important in Chinese health delivery system. However, few studies have involved in the health training status and needs assessment of rural Chinese nurses in great transformations of health policy. This study is to explore the current health training status and to ascertain needs perceived by nurses working in rural Chinese township health centers (THCs). A cross-sectional survey using a self-administered structured questionnaire was conducted to 240 THC nurses in Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous region, China from March 2014 to August 2014. Survey questionnaire was adopted from the Second Chinese Survey of Demographic Data and Training Demand for Health Professionals in THCs by the Ministry of Education. The nurses in THCs were young with low educational background. The perceived needs in health training included further clinical study in city level hospitals to improve skills and theory study in medical universities in emergency medicine and general practice. There are 71.9% of the nurses with secondary technical school background and 68.5% of nurses with junior college education expected to take junior college or bachelor degree study, respectively. A decentralized program with theory study in medical universities and practice study in county hospitals were regarded as feasible by 66.9% of total respondents. There is a need to improve health-training programs for nurses in Chinese township health centers in coverage, delivery mode, and contents. A decentralized degree-linked training program collaborated with medical universities and city hospitals would be an appropriate mode.

  12. Evaluation of an online training program in eating disorders for health professionals in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownlow, Rachel S; Maguire, Sarah; O'Dell, Adrienne; Dias-da-Costa, Catia; Touyz, Stephen; Russell, Janice

    2015-01-01

    Early detection and treatment of eating disorders is instrumental in positive health outcomes for this serious public health concern. As such, workforce development in screening, diagnosis and early treatment of eating disorders is needed. Research has demonstrated both high rates of failure to accurately diagnose and treat cases early and low levels of perceived access to training in eating disorders by health professionals-representing an urgent need for clinician training in this area. However, significant barriers to the access of evidence-based training programs exist, including availability, cost and time, particularly when large geographic distances are involved. Online learning presents a solution to workforce challenges, as it can be delivered anywhere, at a fraction of the cost of traditional training, timing is user controlled, and a growing body of research is demonstrating it as effective as face-to-face training. The Centre for Eating and Dieting Disorders in Australia has developed an Online Training Program In Eating Disorders, to educate health professionals in the nature, identification, assessment and management of eating disorders. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the ability of this online learning course to improve clinician levels of knowledge, skill and confidence to treat eating disorders. As well as its effect on stigmatised beliefs about eating disorders known to effect treatment delivery. One-hundred-eighty-seven health professionals participated in the program. A pre training questionnaire and a post training evaluation examined participants' levels of knowledge, skill and confidence to treat eating disorders, as well attitudes and beliefs about people with eating disorders. Significant improvements in knowledge, skill, and confidence to treat eating disorders was found between pre and post program assessment in health professionals who completed the course, along with a significant decrease in stigmatised beliefs about

  13. Training needs for research in health inequities among health and demographic researchers from eight African and Asian countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haafkens, J.; Blomstedt, Y.; Eriksson, M.; Becher, H.; Ramroth, H.; Kinsman, J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Health equity is a global policy priority. To support this policy in low and middle income countries, more evidence and analysis of the social determinants of health inequalities is needed. This requires specific know how among researchers. The INDEPTH Training and Research Centres of

  14. Testing an empirically derived mental health training model featuring small groups, distributed practice and patient discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrihy, Rachael C; Byrne, Mitchell K; Gonsalvez, Craig J

    2009-02-01

    Internationally, family doctors seeking to enhance their skills in evidence-based mental health treatment are attending brief training workshops, despite clear evidence in the literature that short-term, massed formats are not likely to improve skills in this complex area. Reviews of the educational literature suggest that an optimal model of training would incorporate distributed practice techniques; repeated practice over a lengthy time period, small-group interactive learning, mentoring relationships, skills-based training and an ongoing discussion of actual patients. This study investigates the potential role of group-based training incorporating multiple aspects of good pedagogy for training doctors in basic competencies in brief cognitive behaviour therapy (BCBT). Six groups of family doctors (n = 32) completed eight 2-hour sessions of BCBT group training over a 6-month period. A baseline control design was utilised with pre- and post-training measures of doctors' BCBT skills, knowledge and engagement in BCBT treatment. Family doctors' knowledge, skills in and actual use of BCBT with patients improved significantly over the course of training compared with the control period. This research demonstrates preliminary support for the efficacy of an empirically derived group training model for family doctors. Brief CBT group-based training could prove to be an effective and viable model for future doctor training.

  15. Similar health benefits of endurance and high-intensity interval training in obese children

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Carolina Corte de Araujo; Hamilton Roschel; Andreia Rossi Picanço; Danilo Marcelo Leite do Prado; Sandra Mara Ferreira Villares; Ana Lúcia de Sá Pinto; Bruno Gualano

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To compare two modalities of exercise training (i.e., Endurance Training [ET] and High-Intensity Interval Training [HIT]) on health-related parameters in obese children aged between 8 and 12 years. Methods: Thirty obese children were randomly allocated into either the ET or HIT group. The ET group performed a 30 to 60-minute continuous exercise at 80% of the peak heart rate (HR). The HIT group training performed 3 to 6 sets of 60-s sprint at 100% of the peak velocity interspersed by ...

  16. Virtual reality simulation training for health professions trainees in gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Catharine M; Sherlock, Mary E; Ling, Simon C; Carnahan, Heather

    2012-06-13

    Traditionally, training in gastrointestinal endoscopy has been based upon an apprenticeship model, with novice endoscopists learning basic skills under the supervision of experienced preceptors in the clinical setting. Over the last two decades, however, the growing awareness of the need for patient safety has brought the issue of simulation-based training to the forefront. While the use of simulation-based training may have important educational and societal advantages, the effectiveness of virtual reality gastrointestinal endoscopy simulators has yet to be clearly demonstrated. To determine whether virtual reality simulation training can supplement and/or replace early conventional endoscopy training (apprenticeship model) in diagnostic oesophagogastroduodenoscopy, colonoscopy and/or sigmoidoscopy for health professions trainees with limited or no prior endoscopic experience. Health professions, educational and computer databases were searched until November 2011 including The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus, Web of Science, Biosis Previews, CINAHL, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database, ERIC, Education Full Text, CBCA Education, Career and Technical Education @ Scholars Portal, Education Abstracts @ Scholars Portal, Expanded Academic ASAP @ Scholars Portal, ACM Digital Library, IEEE Xplore, Abstracts in New Technologies and Engineering and Computer & Information Systems Abstracts. The grey literature until November 2011 was also searched. Randomised and quasi-randomised clinical trials comparing virtual reality endoscopy (oesophagogastroduodenoscopy, colonoscopy and sigmoidoscopy) simulation training versus any other method of endoscopy training including conventional patient-based training, in-job training, training using another form of endoscopy simulation (e.g. low-fidelity simulator), or no training (however defined by authors) were included.  Trials comparing one method of virtual reality training versus

  17. Modeling Manpower and Equipment Productivity in Tall Building Construction Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudumbai Krishnaswamy, Parthasarathy; Rajiah, Murugasan; Vasan, Ramya

    2017-12-01

    Tall building construction projects involve two critical resources of manpower and equipment. Their usage, however, widely varies due to several factors affecting their productivity. Currently, no systematic study for estimating and increasing their productivity is available. What is prevalent is the use of empirical data, experience of similar projects and assumptions. As tall building projects are here to stay and increase, to meet the emerging demands in ever shrinking urban spaces, it is imperative to explore ways and means of scientific productivity models for basic construction activities: concrete, reinforcement, formwork, block work and plastering for the input of specific resources in a mixed environment of manpower and equipment usage. Data pertaining to 72 tall building projects in India were collected and analyzed. Then, suitable productivity estimation models were developed using multiple linear regression analysis and validated using independent field data. It is hoped that the models developed in the study will be useful for quantity surveyors, cost engineers and project managers to estimate productivity of resources in tall building projects.

  18. Shifting the Culture Around Public Health Advocacy: Training Future Public Health Professionals to Be Effective Agents of Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blenner, Sarah R; Lang, Cathy M; Prelip, Michael L

    2017-11-01

    There is a critical need to build the capacity of our current and future public health workforce and the communities we serve to engage in public health advocacy. Advocacy should be an integral piece of our intervention strategies and public health discourse. Incorporating public health advocacy into public health training, practice, and research serves as a long-term investment for the public's health. Advocacy can achieve systemic change by addressing the social determinants of health. We developed an advocacy training program that embeds students in community-based organizations (CBOs) for 9 months, providing students with experiential education through the application of advocacy skills and CBOs with opportunities to expand and broaden their advocacy efforts. We have three priority populations: graduate students, CBOs serving Los Angeles County, and the broader Los Angeles County community, focusing on vulnerable populations. Our multifaceted approach addresses the necessity of public health advocacy among the health professions. Through changing how we train students and how communities and universities collaborate, we can strengthen the public health workforce and build healthier communities.

  19. Can Mobile Health Training Meet the Challenge of "Measuring Better"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Niall; Oliver, Martin; Langer, Laurenz

    2017-01-01

    Mobile learning has seen a large uptake in use in low- and middle-income countries. This is driven by rhetorics of easy scaling, reaching the hard-to-reach and the potential for generating analytics from the applications used by learners. Healthcare training has seen a proliferation of apps aimed at improving accountability through tracking and…

  20. Workplace Violence Training Programs for Health Care Workers: An Analysis of Program Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbury, Sheila; Hodgson, Michael; Zankowski, Donna; Lipscomb, Jane

    2017-06-01

    Commercial workplace violence (WPV) prevention training programs differ in their approach to violence prevention and the content they present. This study reviews 12 such programs using criteria developed from training topics in the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) Guidelines for Preventing Workplace Violence for Healthcare and Social Service Workers and a review of the WPV literature. None of the training programs addressed all the review criteria. The most significant gap in content was the lack of attention to facility-specific risk assessment and policies. To fill this gap, health care facilities should supplement purchased training programs with specific training in organizational policies and procedures, emergency action plans, communication, facility risk assessment, and employee post-incident debriefing and monitoring. Critical to success is a dedicated program manager who understands risk assessment, facility clinical operations, and program management and evaluation.

  1. Dissemination of behavioural activation for depression to mental health nurses: training evaluation and benchmarked clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekers, D M; Dawson, M S; Bailey, E

    2013-03-01

    Depression causes significant distress, disability and cost within the UK. Behavioural activation (BA) is an effective single-strand psychological approach which may lend itself to brief training programmes for a wide range of clinical staff. No previous research has directly examined outcomes of such dissemination. A 5-day training course for 10 primary care mental health workers aiming to increase knowledge and clinical skills in BA was evaluated using the Training Acceptability Rating Scale. Depression symptom level data collected in a randomized controlled trial using trainees were then compared to results from meta-analysis of studies using experienced therapists. BA training was highly acceptable to trainees (94.4%, SD 6%). The combined effect size of BA was unchanged by the addition of the results of this evaluation to those of studies using specialist therapists. BA offers a promising psychological intervention for depression that appears suitable for delivery by mental health nurses following brief training. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing.

  2. Cross-cultural training in mental health care--challenges and experiences from Sweden and Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäärnhielm, S; Mösko, M

    2012-06-01

    Globalization and cultural diversity challenge mental health care in Europe. Sensitivity to culture in mental health care benefits effective delivery of care to the individual patient and can be a contribution to the larger project of building a tolerant multicultural society. Pivotal for improving cultural sensitivity in mental health care is knowledge in cross-cultural psychiatry, psychology, nursing and related fields among professionals and accordingly training of students and mental health professionals. This paper will give an overview, and a critical examination, of current conceptualisation of cross-cultural mental health training. From German and Swedish experiences the need for crosscultural training and clinical research on evaluation will be presented. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Win/win: creating collaborative training opportunities for behavioral health providers within family medicine residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddy, Nancy Breen; Borresen, Dorothy; Myerholtz, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Integrating behavioral health into primary healthcare offers multiple advantages for patients and health professionals. This model requires a new skill set for all healthcare professionals that is not emphasized in current educational models. The new skills include interprofessional team-based care competencies and expanded patient care competencies. Health professionals must learn new ways to efficiently and effectively address health behavior change, and manage behavioral health issues such as depression and anxiety. Learning environments that co-train mental health and primary care professionals facilitate acquisition of both teamwork and patient care competencies for mental health and primary care professional trainees. Family Medicine Residency programs provide an excellent opportunity for co-training. This article serves as a "how to" guide for residency programs interested in developing a co-training program. Necessary steps to establish and maintain a program are reviewed, as well as goals and objectives for a co-training curriculum and strategies to overcome barriers and challenges in co-training models.

  4. Fostering Health Equity: Clinical and Research Training Strategies from Nursing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deatrick, Janet A.; Lipman, Terri H.; Gennaro, Susan; Sommers, Marilyn; de Leon Siantz, Mary Lou; Mooney-Doyle, Kim; Hollis, Genevieve; Jemmott, Loretta S.

    2015-01-01

    Racism, ethnocentrism, segregation, stereotyping, and classism are tightly linked to health equity and social determinants of health. They lead to lack of power, money, resources, and education which may result in poor health care access and outcomes. Health profession faculties must address the complex relationships that exist between individual, interpersonal, institutional, social and political factors that influence health outcomes in both clinical and research training. Thus, the purposes of this paper are to provide examples of training strategies from nursing education that foster cultural sensitivity. First, assumptions about health equity, culture, ethnicity and race are explored. Second, clinical training within an undergraduate and graduate context are explored, including an undergraduate cancer case study and in a graduate pediatric nursing program are described to demonstrate how cultural models can be used to integrate the biomedical and psychosocial content in a course. Third, research training for summer scholars and doctoral and post doctoral fellows (short and long term) is described to demonstrate how to increase the number and quality of scholars prepared to conduct research with vulnerable populations. Research training strategies include a summer research institute, policy fellowship, and a scholars “pipeline” program. A unique perspective is presented through collaboration between a nursing school and a center for health disparities research. PMID:19717366

  5. Wanted: interdisciplinary, multidisciplinary, and knowledge translation and exchange training for students of public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Lipi; Banerjee, Ananya T; MacLennan, Mary E; Gorczynski, Paul F; Zinszer, Kate A

    2011-01-01

    Students vocalized their concern with public health training programs in Canada at the 2010 CPHA Centennial Conference. Given these concerns, we reviewed the objectives and curricula of public health graduate (master's) programs in Canada. Our objective was to understand to what extent public and population health graduate programs in Canada support interdisciplinary, multidisciplinary and knowledge translation and exchange (KTE) training. This was achieved through a review of all public and population health master's programs in Canada identified from the public health graduate programs listed on the Public Health Agency of Canada website (n = 33) plus an additional four programs that were not originally captured on the list. Of the 37 programs reviewed, 28 (76%) stated that interdisciplinary, multidisciplinary or cross-disciplinary training opportunities are of value to their program, with 12 programs (32%) providing multidisciplinary or interdisciplinary training opportunities in their curriculum. Only 14 (38%) of the 37 programs provided value statements of KTE activities in their program goals or course objectives, with 10 (27%) programs offering KTE training in their curriculum. This review provides a glimpse into how public health programs in Canada value and support interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary collaboration as well as KTE activities.

  6. Fostering Health Equity: Clinical and Research Training Strategies from Nursing Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet A. Deatrick

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Racism, ethnocentrism, segregation, stereotyping, and classism are tightly linked to health equity and social determinants of health. They lead to lack of power, money, resources, and education which may result in poor health care access and outcomes. Health profession faculties must address the complex relationships that exist between individual, interpersonal, institutional, social and political factors that influence health outcomes in both clinical and research training. Thus, the purposes of this paper are to provide examples of training strategies from nursing education that foster cultural sensitivity. First, assumptions about health equity, culture, ethnicity and race are explored. Second, clinical training within an undergraduate and graduate context are explored, including an undergraduate cancer case study and in a graduate pediatric nursing program are described to demonstrate how cultural models can be used to integrate the biomedical and psychosocial content in a course. Third, research training for summer scholars and doctoral and post doctoral fellows (short and long term is described to demonstrate how to increase the number and quality of scholars prepared to conduct research with vulnerable populations. Research training strategies include a summer research institute, policy fellowship, and a scholars “pipeline” program. A unique perspective is presented through collaboration between a nursing school and a center for health disparities research.

  7. The Effectiveness of Emotional Intelligence Training on the Mental Health of Male Deaf Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourmohamadreza-Tajrishi, Masoume; Ashori, Mohammad; Jalilabkenar, Seyede Somaye

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Deafness is a common neural-sensory impairment which leads to lower life quality, withdrawal, social activities reduction, and rejection feeling. So, it is important to plan suitable training programs for mental health promotion of deaf children. Emotional intelligence training is one of these programs. The present study was aimed to determine the effectiveness of emotional intelligence training on the mental health of deaf students. Methods In this semi-experimental study with pretest and posttest design, General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) was completed in 40 randomly selected boy deaf students with mean age of (12.48) years old before and after the intervention. The aim of the questionnaire was obtaining information of somatic symptoms, anxiety, social dysfunction, and depression as well as general health. The students were assigned in experimental and control group randomly and in equal. Experimental group participated in 12 sessions (each session lasts for 50 minutes; twice a week) and were trained by emotional intelligence program, but control group did not. Multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) was used for analyzing the data. Results There was a significant difference (P<0.001) between experimental and control group according to somatic symptoms, anxiety, social dysfunction, depression and general health as a whole after participation in intervention sessions. Conclusion There was a significant decrease in somatic symptoms, anxiety, social dysfunction, depression and increase in general health of experimental group. Our findings showed that emotional intelligence training program led to promote of general health of boy deaf students. PMID:26060627

  8. High-intensity training vs. traditional exercise interventions for promoting health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, Lars; Sundstrup, Emil; Jakobsen, Markus D.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE:: to determine the effectiveness of brief intense interval training as exercise intervention for promoting health and evaluate potential benefits with reference to common interventions; i.e. prolonged exercise and strength training. METHODS:: 36 untrained men were divided into groups...... that completed 12 weeks of intense interval running (INT; total training time 40 min a week), prolonged running ( approximately 150 min/week), strength training ( approximately 150 min/week) or continued their habitual life-style without participation in physical training. RESULTS:: The improvement...... in cardiorespiratory fitness was superior in INT (14+/-2% increase in VO2max) compared to the other two exercise interventions (7+/-2% and 3+/-2% increases). The blood glucose concentration 2 hours following oral ingestion of 75 g of glucose was lowered to a similar extent following training in the INT (from 6...

  9. Cessation support for smokers with mental health problems: a survey of resources and training needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonavicius, Erikas; Robson, Debbie; McEwen, Andy; Brose, Leonie S

    2017-09-01

    Around thirty percent of smokers have a mental health problem. Smoking cessation has been associated with mental health benefits, but smoking prevalence remains high in populations with mental health problems. This study aimed to assess mental health related knowledge, practice, and training needs of practitioners supporting smoking cessation. UK stop smoking practitioners (n=717) recruited via a database of a national provider of smoking cessation training in June 2016 sufficiently completed an online survey about available resources, knowledge, confidence, and training needs related to smoking cessation and mental health. Responses were described and compared between practitioners with a mental health lead and those without such a lead in their service using chi-square statistics and t-tests. A considerable proportion agreed (37%) or were undecided (28.9%) that smoking helped people with mental health problems feel better and agreed (17.2%) or were undecided (30.2%) that cessation would exacerbate mental health symptoms. Only 11.6% said their service had designated funding for smokers with mental health problems and 26.5% were or had a staff member who was a dedicated lead practitioner for mental health work. Practitioners from services that had a dedicated mental health lead were more confident in supporting smokers with different mental health problems and using different pharmacotherapies (all plack of resources. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Mental health first aid for eating disorders: pilot evaluation of a training program for the public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Laura M; Jorm, Anthony F; Paxton, Susan J

    2012-08-02

    Eating disorders cause significant burden that may be reduced by early and appropriate help-seeking. However, despite the availability of effective treatments, very few individuals with eating disorders seek treatment. Training in mental health first aid is known to be effective in increasing mental health literacy and supportive behaviours, in the social networks of individuals with mental health problems. Increases in these domains are thought to improve the likelihood that effective help is sought. However, the efficacy of mental health first aid for eating disorders has not been evaluated. The aim of this research was to examine whether specific training in mental health first aid for eating disorders was effective in changing knowledge, attitudes and behaviours towards people with eating disorders. A repeated measures, uncontrolled trial was conducted to establish proof of concept and provide guidance on the future design of a randomised controlled trial. Self-report questionnaires, administered at baseline, post-training and 6-month follow-up, assessed the effectiveness of the 4-hour, single session, mental health first aid training. 73 participants completed the training and all questionnaires. The training intervention was associated with statistically significant increases in problem recognition and knowledge of appropriate mental health first aid strategies, which were maintained at 6-month follow-up. Sustained significant changes in attitudes and behaviours were less clear. 20 participants reported providing assistance to someone with a suspected eating disorder, seven of whom sought professional help as a result of the first aid interaction. Results provided no evidence of a negative impact on participants or the individuals they provided assistance to. This research provides preliminary evidence for the use of training in mental health first aid as a suitable intervention for increasing community knowledge of and support for people with eating

  11. Mental health first aid for eating disorders: pilot evaluation of a training program for the public

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hart Laura M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eating disorders cause significant burden that may be reduced by early and appropriate help-seeking. However, despite the availability of effective treatments, very few individuals with eating disorders seek treatment. Training in mental health first aid is known to be effective in increasing mental health literacy and supportive behaviours, in the social networks of individuals with mental health problems. Increases in these domains are thought to improve the likelihood that effective help is sought. However, the efficacy of mental health first aid for eating disorders has not been evaluated. The aim of this research was to examine whether specific training in mental health first aid for eating disorders was effective in changing knowledge, attitudes and behaviours towards people with eating disorders. Methods A repeated measures, uncontrolled trial was conducted to establish proof of concept and provide guidance on the future design of a randomised controlled trial. Self-report questionnaires, administered at baseline, post-training and 6-month follow-up, assessed the effectiveness of the 4-hour, single session, mental health first aid training. Results 73 participants completed the training and all questionnaires. The training intervention was associated with statistically significant increases in problem recognition and knowledge of appropriate mental health first aid strategies, which were maintained at 6-month follow-up. Sustained significant changes in attitudes and behaviours were less clear. 20 participants reported providing assistance to someone with a suspected eating disorder, seven of whom sought professional help as a result of the first aid interaction. Results provided no evidence of a negative impact on participants or the individuals they provided assistance to. Conclusions This research provides preliminary evidence for the use of training in mental health first aid as a suitable intervention for

  12. Investigating Informatics Activity, Control, and Training Needs in Large, Medium, and Small Health Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakota, Eric; Arnold, Ryan; Yang, Biru

    2016-01-01

    A recent National Association of City & County Health Officials survey shed light on informatics workforce development needs. Local health departments (LHDs) of various jurisdictional sizes and control over informatics may differ on training needs and activity. Understanding the precise nature of this variation will allow stakeholders to appropriately develop workforce development tools to advance the field. To understand the informatics training needs for LHDs of different jurisdictional sizes. Survey responses were analyzed by comparing training needs and LHD population size. Larger health departments consistently reported having greater informatics-related capacity and informatics-related training needs. Quantitative data analysis was identified as a primary need for large LHDs. In addition, LHDs that report higher control of informatics/information technology were able to engage in more informatics activities. Smaller LHDs need additional resources to improve informatics-related capacity and engagement with the field.

  13. The impact of initial oral health training on teacher’s knowledge, attitudes, and actions change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Agustina Suwargiani

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Formal education is the main place for children to improve their knowledge. Teachers are the sources of information which is easily received by children, so the teacher’s role in children’s education is very important. Oral health training able to improve the skills and information resource in a community. Teachers, as the trainee, can play a role in improving the access to information regarding oral health. The objective of this research was to assess the knowledge, attitude and practice of the teachers before and after the performance of initial training on oral health care. Methods: Questionnaires, with the research variables were knowledge, attitude, and practice of oral health care. The study population was Arraffi Elementary School teachers. The sampling technique was total sampling. The data collecting was done by distributing questionnaires and self-report before and after training. Results: Wilcoxon test shown that P-value pretest and posttest of knowledge was 0.675, attitude was 0.354, and practice was 0.129. Knowledge regarding oral care showed an increasing in achievement percentage. Posttest results of attitude showed the increase in the percentage of positive and negative statements. Posttest results on practice showed some behavior having an increasing percentage, but one behavior remain unchanged. There was no significant difference of knowledge, attitude and practice before and after initial training. Conclusions: There was no impact of initial oral health training on teacher’s knowledge, attitudes, and actions change. Keywords: Knowledge, Attitude, Practice, Teacher, Training

  14. The Value of Pharmacy Residency Training for Health Systems: An Annotated Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, Joshua T; Giouroukakis, Mary; Shank, Brandon R; Crona, Daniel J; Berger, Karen; Wombwell, Eric

    2014-08-01

    Identify and summarize articles that describe the value that pharmacy residency training offers to sponsoring health systems. There is a tremendous gap between the number of resident applicants and the number of pharmacy residencies available. Informing health-system administration executives about the proven value of residency training is key to expanding the number of available positions. To address this disparity, a comprehensive and systematic literature search to identify publications highlighting the value that pharmacy residency training provides to the sponsor hospital or health system was conducted. Articles were identified through query of PubMed and SciVerse SCOPUS and through review of bibliographies from relevant articles. Twenty articles were identified and summarized in this annotated bibliography that demonstrate perceived and quantitative value of pharmacy residency training for health systems that sponsor residency training. Pharmacy residency training programs are essential for pharmacists that will primarily engage in direct patient care activities. This annotated bibliography includes key publications that provide evidence of the value that pharmacy residents provide to the sponsoring health system. This manuscript will aid prospective residency directors interested in developing new residency positions at new institutions or for residency program directors interested in expanding the total number of resident positions available at the existing sites. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Nursing children and young people: what mental health training is required?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Leah

    2017-02-23

    The aim of this research was to investigate the views of children and young people's nurses on the mental health training they had received and what recommendations they would make for future staff training. Nine such nurses who had experience of nursing young people following self-harm or a suicide attempt were recruited. Data were collected using individual 45-minute semi-structured interviews and analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. The findings of this study indicate that children and young people's nurses may benefit from some empathy and attitudes-based training. Participants clearly indicated that they do not feel that they have adequate expertise in mental health nursing. Participants requested training on a variety of mental health topics. The results indicate that children and young people's nurses feel that their current mental health training is inadequate. Individualised training packages for different work areas could be delivered collaboratively by Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) and specialist children and young people's nurses, using face-to-face teaching methods.

  16. The shifting sands for applicants to maternal and child health training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Karen M; McDermott, Robert J; DeJoy, Sharon Bernecki

    2003-12-01

    Anecdotal evidence suggests that fewer students today than in decades past are applying to maternal and child health (MCH) graduate training programs with previous clinical degrees. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which applicants accepted to an MCH training program demonstrated a shift away from the tradition of having a prior health professional degree and discuss options needed to provide responsive training. Twenty years of demographic face sheet data (1983 through 2002) for admitted applicants to the MCH training program at the University of South Florida College of Public Health were examined. Quantitative analysis of admission records confirmed the anecdotal data. Today's applicants are more likely to possess undergraduate nonclinical backgrounds rather than clinical health professional training. Statistically significant differences were found between the students with clinical and without clinical degrees for ethnicity, GRE score, GPA, and the length of time needed to complete the MPH degree. Adjustments in MCH curricula may be necessary to be responsive to the "shifting sands" of clinical and public health work experience among program applicants. However, curriculum modifications need to be ones that maintain the zeal of the new generation of MCH students without diluting the rigor of traditional professional preparation. Some possible responses of training programs are suggested.

  17. Work history of nurses trained in natal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.R. Uys

    1991-09-01

    Full Text Available In a recent survey it was found that although Natal/KwaZulu has 25.1% of the South African population, it has only 20,9% of the country’s registered nurses (Muller and Coetzee, 1990. This means that Natal has the worst population to registered nurse ratio of the three large urban areas (Natal 551:1, Western Cape 324:1; Pretoria/Witwatersrand 319:1. The same report showed that, although, Natal/KwaZulu has 25,1% of the population, it only trains 9,2% of the current nursing students (Ibid. These figures paint a worrying picture of the region’s ability to supply the health manpower needs of its people.

  18. The South Dakota Model: Health Care Professions Student Disaster Preparedness and Deployment Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Matt P; Buffington, Cheri; Frost, Michael P; Waldner, Randall J

    2017-10-26

    The Association of American Medical Colleges recommended an increase in medical education for public health emergencies, bioterrorism, and weapons of mass destruction in 2003. The University of South Dakota Sanford School of Medicine (USD SSOM) implemented a 1-day training event to provide disaster preparedness training and deployment organization for health professions students called Disaster Training Day (DTD). Hospital staff and emergency medical services personnel provided the lecture portion of DTD using Core Disaster Life Support (CDLS; National Disaster Life Support Foundation) as the framework. Pre-test and post-test analyses were presented to the students. Small group activities covered leadership, anaphylaxis, mass fatality, points of dispensing deployment training, psychological first aid, triage, and personal protective equipment. Students were given the option to sign up for statewide deployment through the South Dakota Statewide Emergency Registry of Volunteers (SERV SD). DTD data and student satisfaction surveys from 2009 to 2016 were reviewed. Since 2004, DTD has provided disaster preparedness training to 2246 students across 13 health professions. Significant improvement was shown on CDLS post-test performance with a t-score of -14.24 and a resulting P value of high levels of satisfaction on a 5-level Likert scale with overall training, small group sessions, and perceived self-competency relating to disaster response. SERV SD registration increased in 2015, and 77.5% of the participants registered in 2016. DTD at the USD SSOM provides for an effective 1-day disaster training course for health professions students. Resources from around the state were coordinated to provide training, liability coverage, and deployment organization for hundreds of students representing multiple health professions. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2017; page 1 of 6).

  19. Improving health services in developing countries with new types of public and allied health personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blayney, K D; Trulove, J W

    1982-10-01

    Allied health manpower in developing countries should be able to serve the specific needs of these countries in solving malnutrition, diarrheal disease, and other health problems. Disease patterns tend to evolve in stages with each stage requiring a special type of health manpower: 1) the 1st stage where infectious diseases are linked to poverty, malnutrition, and poor personal hygiene for which personnel trained to improve health through providing safe water supplies, improving sanitation, and immunizing the population are needed; 2) in the 2nd stages, diseases such as cancer, arthritis, and cardiac diseases exist, requiring extensive technology such as is available in the US; and 3) the 3rd stage relates to an awareness of health hazards (caused by the environment, by the lifestyle dysfunctions of the society, and an emphasis on health promotion) and implies a responsibility for one's own health by the individual; this is a difficult stage to apply to developing countries since the ability to bring about change assumes literacy on the part of the population which is not always the case. Since most developing countries need to cause change in the 1st stage, more public health personnel such as sanitarians and generalist workers are needed. Training of these personnel should include on-the-job education; traditionally trained US allied health professionals are not always equipped to deal with health problems in developing countries. Health educators should look to the lessons learned by the US in the allied health movement: 1) the system of control that national membership organizations have over schooling and the job environment has contributed to an increased cost of health care delivery, unnecessary prolonged curricula, overspecialization, extreme protectionism for membership, and inappropriate fractionalization of health care delivery; 2) the emphasis on prolonged curricula sometimes causes the student to lose sight of the supposed direct relationship between

  20. Evaluating the Mental Health Training Needs of Community-based Organizations Serving Refugees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Anne Simmelink

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This exploratory study examines the mental health knowledge and training needs of refugee-serving community based organizations in a Midwestern state. A survey was administered to 31 staff members at 27 community based organizations (CBOs to assess the ability of staff to recognize and screen for mental health symptoms that may interfere with successful resettlement. Of the 31 respondents 93.5% (n=29 see refugees with mental health issues and 48.4% (n=15 assess refugees for mental health symptoms – primarily through informal assessment. Mainstream organizations were more likely than ethnic organizations to have received training related to the mental health needs of refugees. Results indicate that while refugee led CBOs recognize mental health symptoms of refugees they may be less likely to assess mental health symptoms and refer for treatment. Policy recommendations for improving CBO services to refugees are offered.

  1. [Community health nursing: essential education elements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching-Min

    2013-06-01

    Community health nursing has undergone significant reform over recent decades in response to ongoing advances in medical technology and increasing national living standards. Taiwan's nursing manpower projections indicate a strong and growing demand for nurses working in primary and tertiary settings. Can our nurses address social trends and face the new challenges of the 21st century? The baccalaureate nursing degree is the minimum preparation for entry-level professionals working in community health nursing in most advanced countries. Significant improvements are necessary in this degree track to improve the quality and quantity of community health nurses. This article introduces the Essentials of Baccalaureate Nursing Education for Entry Level Community / Public Health Nursing proposed by the Association of Community Health Nursing Educators (ACHNE). It is hoped that nursing schools and community health nurses responsible for professional training in Taiwan will reference the ACHNE proposal and develop appropriate domestic curricula that will form an effective professional development consensus and further advance community care.

  2. The future of health promotion in schools goes through the strengthening of teacher training at a global level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourdan, Didier; Samdal, Oddrun; Diagne, Fatou; Carvalho, Graça S

    2008-09-01

    Schools are considered to be settings for both health education and health promotion. But the core business of schools is actually focused on educational outcomes, not reducing health problems. In most countries, schools give low priority to health promotion, and school staffs, mainly teachers, are not aware of their role in health promotion. Studies show that teachers who have received health promotion training tend to be involved more frequently in health promotion projects and have a more comprehensive approach to health education. Pre-service and in-service staff training is then a main challenge. This is the reason why we have launched an initiative to join international forces to strengthen and advocate for teacher training in health promotion. The main goals are to develop research, affirm and reinforce the work done in teacher training in health promotion, support the institutes/colleges/universities in the provision of pre-service and in-service teacher training and stimulate international partnership work.

  3. Improving adolescent and young adult health - training the next generation of physician scientists in transdisciplinary research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emans, S Jean; Austin, S Bryn; Goodman, Elizabeth; Orr, Donald P; Freeman, Robert; Stoff, David; Litt, Iris F; Schuster, Mark A; Haggerty, Robert; Granger, Robert; Irwin, Charles E

    2010-02-01

    To address the critical shortage of physician scientists in the field of adolescent medicine, a conference of academic leaders and representatives from foundations, National Institutes of Health, Maternal and Child Health Bureau, and the American Board of Pediatrics was convened to discuss training in transdisciplinary research, facilitators and barriers of successful career trajectories, models of training, and mentorship. The following eight recommendations were made to improve training and career development: incorporate more teaching and mentoring on adolescent health research in medical schools; explore opportunities and electives to enhance clinical and research training of residents in adolescent health; broaden educational goals for Adolescent Medicine fellowship research training and develop an intensive transdisciplinary research track; redesign the career pathway for the development of faculty physician scientists transitioning from fellowship to faculty positions; expand formal collaborations between Leadership Education in Adolescent Health/other Adolescent Medicine Fellowship Programs and federal, foundation, and institutional programs; develop research forums at national meetings and opportunities for critical feedback and mentoring across programs; educate Institutional Review Boards about special requirements for high quality adolescent health research; and address the trainee and faculty career development issues specific to women and minorities to enhance opportunities for academic success. Copyright 2010 Society for Adolescent Medicine. All rights reserved.

  4. Using innovative instructional technology to meet training needs in public health: a design process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millery, Mari; Hall, Michelle; Eisman, Joanna; Murrman, Marita

    2014-03-01

    Technology and distance learning can potentially enhance the efficient and effective delivery of continuing education to the public health workforce. Public Health Training Centers collaborate with instructional technology designers to develop innovative, competency-based online learning experiences that meet pressing training needs and promote best practices. We describe one Public Health Training Center's online learning module design process, which consists of five steps: (1) identify training needs and priority competencies; (2) define learning objectives and identify educational challenges; (3) pose hypotheses and explore innovative, technology-based solutions; (4) develop and deploy the educational experience; and (5) evaluate feedback and outcomes to inform continued cycles of revision and improvement. Examples illustrate the model's application. These steps are discussed within the context of design practices in the fields of education, engineering, and public health. They incorporate key strategies from across these fields, including principles of programmatic design familiar to public health professionals, such as backward design. The instructional technology design process we describe provides a structure for the creativity, collaboration, and systematic strategies needed to develop online learning products that address critical training needs for the public health workforce.

  5. Building interdisciplinary leadership skills among health practitioners in the 21st century: an innovative training model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti eNegandhi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Transformational learning is the focus of 21st century global educational reforms. In India there is a need to amalgamate the skills and knowledge of medical, nursing and public health practitioners and to develop robust leadership competencies among them. This initiative proposed to identify interdisciplinary leadership competencies among Indian health practitioners, and to develop a training program for interdisciplinary leadership skills through an Innovation Collaborative. Medical, nursing and public health institutions partnered in this endeavour. An exhaustive literature search was undertaken to identify leadership competencies in these three professions. Published evidence was utilized in searching for the need for interdisciplinary training of health practitioners, including current scenarios in inter-professional health education and the key competencies required. The interdisciplinary leadership competencies identified were: self-awareness, vision, self-regulation, motivation, decisiveness, integrity, interpersonal communication skills, strategic planning, team-building, innovation and being an effective change agent. Subsequently, a training program was developed and three training sessions were piloted with 66 participants. Each cohort comprised of a mix of participants from different disciplines. The pilot training guided the development of a training model for building interdisciplinary leadership skills and organizing interdisciplinary leadership workshops. The need for interdisciplinary leadership competencies is recognized. The long-term objective of the training model is integration into the regular medical, nursing and public health curricula, with the aim of developing interdisciplinary leadership skills among them. Although challenging, formal incorporation of leadership skills into health professional education is possible within the interdisciplinary classroom setting using principles of transformative learning.

  6. Women’s Health Training in Gastroenterology Fellowship: A National Survey of Fellows and Program Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberson, Erica; Richie, Kelly; Lindstrom, Mary J.; Esposti, Silvia Degli; Wald, Arnold

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims The Gastroenterology Core Curriculum requires training in women’s digestive disorders; however, requirements do not necessarily produce knowledge and competence. Our study goals were: (1) to compare perceptions of education, fellow-reported levels of competence, and attitudes towards training in women’s gastrointestinal (GI) health issues during fellowship between gastroenterology fellows and program directors, and (2) to determine the barriers for meeting training requirements. Methods A national survey assessing four domains of training was conducted. All GI program directors in the United States (n = 153) and a random sample of gastroenterology fellows (n = 769) were mailed surveys. Mixed effects linear modeling was used to estimate all mean scores and to assess differences between the groups. Cronbach’s alpha was used to assess the consistency of the measures which make up the means. Results Responses were received from 61% of program directors and 31% of fellows. Mean scores in perceived didactic education, clinical experiences, and competence in women’s GI health were low and significantly differed between the groups (P < 0.0001). Fellows’ attitudes towards women’s GI health issues were more positive compared to program directors’ (P = 0.004). Barriers to training were: continuity clinic at a Veteran’s Administration hospital, low number of pregnant patients treated, low number of referrals from obstetrics and gynecology, and lack of faculty interest in women’s health. Conclusions (1) Fellows more so than program directors perceive training in women’s GI health issues to be low. (2) Program directors more so than fellows rate fellows to be competent in women’s GI health. (3) Multiple barriers to women’s health training exist. PMID:21267780

  7. [Training, the key to improving eHealth literacy of upper secondary school students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Rabanal, Carme; Vall, Aurora; Boter, Clara

    To explore whether training on strategies to identify and assess health-related information online has a positive impact on students' perception of their own eHealth literacy. The validated eHealth Literacy Scale (eHEALS) was administered to a sample of upper secondary school students, aged 15-18. One week later, they attended a training session on how to search and identify reliable health-related information and resources online. The eHEALS was administered again at the end of this session. Information about gender and school year was collected in both sessions. Perceived eHealth literacy was assessed by comparing the scores obtained before and after the session. Bivariate and multiple linear regressions were completed. Of the 298 students enrolled in upper secondary school (Bachillerato), 285 were included in the study. Approximately 52.28% (149) were female, and 47.72% (136) were male. The mean eHEALS score before the session was 24.19 (range: 8-40), and was 28.54 after it. The training was associated with higher perceived eHealth literacy scores (p <0,0001). Health literacy was positively associated with the usefulness and importance students give the Internet. Attendance at a training session on strategies to identify and assess health-related resources online is associated with higher levels of perceived eHealth literacy. Implementing specific training sessions on eHealth literacy in upper secondary school is a promising approach for enhancing students' eHealth literacy. Copyright © 2017 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Training of Professionals from the Family Health Strategy for Psychosocial Care for the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verônica Lourdes Lima Batista Maia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mental disorders of the elderly constitute a public health problem due to their high prevalence, shortage of specialized services offered in Brazil, difficulties of access by the population and deficiency in the training of professionals of the Family Health Strategy for the identification, receptiveness and psychosocial assistance to the elderly. Objectives: To analyze the training of professionals of the Family Health Strategy on psychosocial care for the elderly in the context of the Psychosocial Care Network – RAPS (Rede de Atenção Psicossocial, and to discuss how professional training influences the care provided to the elderly. Methodology: Descriptive, qualitative study carried out with 31 professionals, 13 physicians and 18 nurses, who work at the Family Health Strategy of the city of Picos, Piauí, Brazil. The data were collected in January 2016, through a semi-structured interview guide, processed by the IRAMUTEQ software and analyzed by means of the Descending Hierarchical Classification. Results: The results were presented in three segments, namely: 1. The practice of professionals from the Family Health Strategy in psychosocial care in the family context; 2. Training of specialized professionals, in the attention to the elderly, in the Family Health Strategy; 3. The Psychosocial Attention Network in the care of elderly users of alcohol and other drugs; Conclusion: Health professionals have difficulties in dealing with the elderly with mental disorders in basic care. In order to facilitate access to specialized health services and to develop actions for social reintegration, prevention and harm reduction, it is necessary to implement a policy of ongoing training and education for health professionals to improve care for the elderly. Keywords: Aging; Mental Health; Mental disorders; Family Health Strategy.

  9. Communication Skills Training Increases Self-Efficacy of Health Care Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norgaard, Birgitte; Ammentorp, Jette; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Kofoed, Poul-Erik

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Despite the knowledge of good communication as a precondition for optimal care and treatment in health care, serious communication problems are still experienced by patients as well as by health care professionals. An orthopedic surgery department initiated a 3-day communication skills training course for all staff members expecting…

  10. Essential Elements of a Collaborative Mental Health Training Program for Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Lisa L; Martini, D Richard

    2017-10-01

    Mental health integration in primary care is based on creating an environment that encourages collaboration and supports appropriate care for patients and families while offering a full range of services. Training programs for primary care practitioners should include sessions on how to build and maintain such a practice along with information on basic mental health competencies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The Influence of Suicide Prevention Gatekeeper Training on Resident Assistants' Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Martin A. Swanbrow; Drum, David J.

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the mental health influence on resident assistants associated with their training in suicide prevention and their subsequent role as campus mental health gatekeepers. Despite considerable prior personal experience with their own suicidal thinking as well as with others who have thoughts of suicide, a multiple regression…

  12. Training Program Efficacy in Developing Health Life Skills among Sample Selected from Kindergarten Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Mohtadi, Reham Mohammad; Al Zboon, Habis Sa'ad

    2017-01-01

    This study drove at identifying the training program efficacy in developing the health life skills among sample selected from Kindergarten children. Study sample consisted of 60 children of both genders, ages of which are ranged from 5-6 years old. We have applied herein the pre and post dimension of health life skills scale; consisting of 28…

  13. Environmental Scan of Weight Bias Exposure in Primary Health Care Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell-Mayhew, Shelly; Nutter, Sarah; Alberga, Angela; Jelinski, Susan; Ball, Geoff D. C.; Edwards, Alun; Oddie, Scott; Sharma, Arya M.; Pickering, Barbara; Forhan, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Negative attitudes and beliefs about individuals with obesity (also known as weight bias) have negative consequences for physical and mental health for individuals with obesity and impact the quality of care provided by health professionals. A preliminary environmental scan of college and university training programs was conducted consisting of 67…

  14. Advocacy 201: Incorporating Advocacy Training in Health Education Professional Preparation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Amy; Kerr, Dianne; Dowling, Jamie; Wagner, Laurie

    2012-01-01

    Involvement in advocacy is a responsibility of health educators, as identified by the National Commission on Health Education Credentialing. Of all the professional responsibilities, participation in advocacy-related activity is often neglected. This lack of participation may be due to the absence of advocacy and policy skills training in health…

  15. Exploring the Theory-Practice Gap: Applications to Health Information Management/Technology Education and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Zakevia Denise

    2013-01-01

    Although research on the theory-practice gap is available across multiple disciplines, similar studies focusing on the profession of health information management/technology (HIM/T) are not yet available. The projected number of qualified HIM/T needed with advanced skills and training suggests that skillful use of electronic health records (EHR)…

  16. Disseminating educational innovations in health care practice : Training versus social networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jippes, Erik; Achterkamp, Marjolein C.; Brand, Paul L. P.; Kiewiet, Derk Jan; Pols, Jan; van Engelen, Jo M. L.

    Improvements and innovation in health service organization and delivery have become more and more important due to the gap between knowledge and practice, rising costs, medical errors, and the organization of health care systems. Since training and education is widely used to convey and distribute

  17. Global health and primary care: increasing burden of chronic diseases and need for integrated training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truglio, Joseph; Graziano, Michelle; Vedanthan, Rajesh; Hahn, Sigrid; Rios, Carlos; Hendel-Paterson, Brett; Ripp, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Noncommunicable diseases, including cardiovascular disease, chronic respiratory disease, diabetes, cancer, and mental illness, are the leading causes of death and disability worldwide. These diseases are chronic and often mediated predominantly by social determinants of health. Currently there exists a global-health workforce crisis and a subsequent disparity in the distribution of providers able to manage chronic noncommunicable diseases. Clinical competency in global health and primary care could provide practitioners with the knowledge and skills needed to address the global rise of noncommunicable diseases through an emphasis on these social determinants. The past decade has seen substantial growth in the number and quality of US global-health and primary-care training programs, in both undergraduate and graduate medical education. Despite their overlapping competencies, these 2 complementary fields are most often presented as distinct disciplines. Furthermore, many global-health training programs suffer from a lack of a formalized curriculum. At present, there are only a few examples of well-integrated US global-health and primary-care training programs. We call for universal acceptance of global health as a core component of medical education and greater integration of global-health and primary-care training programs in order to improve the quality of each and increase a global workforce prepared to manage noncommunicable diseases and their social mediators. © 2012 Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

  18. Training and calibration of interviewers for oral health literacy using the BREALD-30 in epidemiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilella, Karina Duarte; Assunção, Luciana Reichert da Silva; Junkes, Mônica Carmem; Menezes, José Vitor Nogara Borges de; Fraiz, Fabian Calixto; Ferreira, Fernanda de Morais

    2016-08-22

    The objective of this study was to describe an interviewer training and calibration method to evaluate oral health literacy using the Brazilian Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Dentistry (BREALD-30) in epidemiological studies. An experienced researcher (gold standard) conducted all training sessions. The interviewer training and calibration sessions included three different phases: theoretical training, practical training, and calibration. In the calibration phase, six interviewers (dentists) independently assessed 15 videos of individuals who had different levels of oral health literacy. Accuracy and reproducibility were evaluated using the kappa coefficient and the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The percentage of agreement for each word in the instrument was also calculated. After training, the kappa values were higher than 0.911 and 0.893 for intra- and inter-rater agreement, respectively. When the results were analyzed separately for the different levels of literacy, the lowest agreement rate was found when evaluating the videos of individuals with low literacy (K = 0.871), but still within the range considered to be near-perfect agreement. The ICC values were higher than 0.990 and 0.975 for intra- and inter-rater agreement, respectively. The lowest percentage of agreement was 86.6% for the word "hipoplasia" (hypoplasia). This interviewer training and calibration method proved to be feasible and effective. Therefore, it can be used as a methodological tool in studies assessing oral health literacy using the BREALD-30.

  19. Learning Together; part 2: training costs and health gain - a cost analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Katherine; Riches, Wendy; Macaulay, Chloe; Spicer, John

    2017-01-01

    Learning Together is a complex educational intervention aimed at improving health outcomes for children and young people. There is an additional cost as two doctors are seeing patients together for a longer appointment than a standard general practice (GP) appointment. Our approach combines the impact of the training clinics on activity in South London in 2014-15 with health gain, using NICE guidance and standards to allow comparison of training options. Activity data was collected from Training Practices hosting Learning Together. A computer based model was developed to analyse the costs of the Learning Together intervention compared to usual training in a partial economic evaluation. The results of the model were used to value the health gain required to make the intervention cost effective. Data were returned for 363 patients booked into 61 clinics across 16 Training Practices. Learning Together clinics resulted in an increase in costs of £37 per clinic. Threshold analysis illustrated one child with a common illness like constipation needs to be well for two weeks, in one Practice hosting four training clinics for the clinics to be considered cost effective. Learning Together is of minimal training cost. Our threshold analysis produced a rubric that can be used locally to test cost effectiveness at a Practice or Programme level.

  20. Montessori-based training makes a difference for home health workers & their clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorzelle, Gregg J; Kaiser, Kathy; Camp, Cameron J

    2003-01-01

    Home care visits can last several hours. Home care workers are often at a loss on how to fill time spent in homes of clients. The challenge is how to use this time in ways that are productive and engaging for both clients and home health workers. The authors trained home health aides to implement Montessori-based activities while interacting with clients who have dementia. The results were amazing. Among other positive results, the authors found a statistically significant increase in the amount of pleasure displayed by clients after health workers received training.

  1. Effect of postgraduate training on job and career satisfaction among health-system pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padiyara, Rosalyn S; Komperda, Kathy E

    2010-07-01

    The effect of postgraduate training on job and career satisfaction among health-system pharmacists was evaluated. A mail-based questionnaire was sent to a random sample of pharmacist members of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. Previously validated questions for job and career satisfaction among pharmacists were utilized. The questionnaire was designed to obtain information regarding general employment, work environment, job satisfaction, career satisfaction, postgraduate training, and demographic characteristics. Pharmacists who had completed either a pharmacy residency or fellowship were classified as having postgraduate training. Questionnaires returned within two months of the original mailing date were included in the analysis. Responses from pharmacists who were retired, employed in a nonpharmacy career, or unemployed were excluded. Data were analyzed using SPSS software. Of the 2499 questionnaires mailed, 36 were undeliverable; 1058 were completed, yielding a response rate of 43%. Of these, 48 were excluded, resulting in 1010 questionnaires suitable for analysis. Approximately 37% of respondents indicated completion of postgraduate training. The most common practice setting was a community, not-for-profit hospital (40.9%). Overall, 90.7% of respondents indicated they were either satisfied or highly satisfied with their current employment. Approximately 45% of pharmacists with postgraduate training indicated they were highly satisfied with their employment, compared with 32.7% of pharmacists without postgraduate training (p training were more satisfied with their job than those who did not complete such training.

  2. Does training frequency and supervision affect compliance, performance and muscular health? A cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalager, Tina; Bredahl, Thomas G V; Pedersen, Mogens T; Boyle, Eleanor; Andersen, Lars L; Sjøgaard, Gisela

    2015-10-01

    The aim was to determine the effect of one weekly hour of specific strength training within working hours, performed with the same total training volume but with different training frequencies and durations, or with different levels of supervision, on compliance, muscle health and performance, behavior and work performance. In total, 573 office workers were cluster-randomized to: 1 WS: one 60-min supervised session/week, 3 WS: three 20-min supervised sessions/week, 9 WS: nine 7-min supervised sessions/week, 3 MS: three 20-min sessions/week with minimal supervision, or REF: a reference group without training. Outcomes were diary-based compliance, total training volume, muscle performance and questionnaire-based health, behavior and work performance. Comparisons were made among the WS training groups and between 3 WS and 3 MS. If no difference, training groups were collapsed (TG) and compared with REF. Results demonstrated similar degrees of compliance, mean(range) of 39(33-44)%, and total training volume, 13.266(11.977-15.096)kg. Musculoskeletal pain in neck and shoulders were reduced with approx. 50% in TG, which was significant compared with REF. Only the training groups improved significantly their muscle strength 8(4-13)% and endurance 27(12-37)%, both being significant compared with REF. No change in workability, productivity or self-rated health was demonstrated. Secondary analysis showed exercise self-efficacy to be a significant predictor of compliance. Regardless of training schedule and supervision, similar degrees of compliance were shown together with reduced musculoskeletal pain and improved muscle performance. These findings provide evidence that a great degree of flexibility is legitimate for companies in planning future implementation of physical exercise programs at the workplace. ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01027390. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Cross-national comparison of human resources for health in the Netherlands and Portugal.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martins-Coelho, G.; Batenburg, R.

    2010-01-01

    CONTEXT: Manpower is critical for health care systems. It is, however, one of the least strategically planned resources, resulting in mismatches on the health care labour market. There are several approaches available for health manpower planning. Yet little is known about which (if any) is applied

  4. Trauma training course: innovative teaching models and methods for training health workers in active conflict zones of Eastern Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Charles H; Tyler, Francis J; Davis, Julia; Shapiro, Douglas R; Richards, Adam; Richard, Matthew; Lee, Thomas J; Colton, Taryn L; Berk, Louis; Rauch, Loren; Shwe Oo, Eh Kalu; Hahn, Richard; Stock, Lawrence M

    2014-01-01

    Myanmar has struggled through decades of internal conflict, which has negatively impacted the country's health outcomes. Recent government changes have brought hope and reduced conflict. The ethnic minority groups have suffered the brunt of the health consequences and reside in regions that lack health infrastructure, resources, and providers. Due to the chronic lack of healthcare providers within conflict areas, health workers (HWs) have been trained in an effort to fill the void. Research has shown that these non-physician clinicians positively impact health outcomes in developing countries. These HWs are supported by community-based organizations in collaboration with foreign non-governmental organizations. Started in 2000, the trauma training course was developed to meet the educational needs of these HWs. Essential procedures for HWs in conflict zones were identified, and teaching methods were adapted to develop models that were simple, reproducible, cost effective, and able to facilitate effective learning within the limitations of these challenging environments. This paper presents simulation models developed to teach trauma injury evaluation and management in resource-limited settings to HWs. Material and construction of the models described include breathing, chest, cricothyroidotomy, circulation, wound repair, fracture/dislocation, splinting, fasciotomy/amputation, and an animal model. In 2013, a pre/post test and post-training evaluation were completed, which demonstrated an increase in understanding of the material and satisfaction with the training. The simulation models described engage the HWs in clinical skills practice specific to injury management, which builds upon the HWs existing knowledge and facilitates an increased understanding of life-saving procedures. Through observation of the HW performance and HW feedback, these simulation models have increased the understanding of trauma management. Limitations include lack of a graduated learning

  5. Comparison of Three Internship Training Sites for an Undergraduate Health Information Management Program in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bah, Sulaiman; Alanzi, Turki

    2017-07-01

    While internship training is well established for medical records and for healthcare quality improvement, it is not quite so for training related to IT/health informatics. A comparison was made on the hospital-based IT/health informatics internship training received by students completing their training at the Imam AbdulRahman Bin Faisal University (IAU) in the Eastern province of Saudi Arabia. The three hospitals studied all have the Joint Commission International accreditation and advanced Electronic Health Record (EHR) systems. Over the period from 2011 to 2015, interns from the IAU prepared 120 reports based on their training at these three hospitals. Data abstraction was done on the internship reports, and the results were summarized and interpreted. The study found wide differences in the training received at these hospitals. The main reason for the differences is whether or not the EHR system used in the hospital was a commercial one or developed in-house. The hospital that had developed its own EHR system made more use of health information management interns during their IT rotation in comparison to hospitals which had adopted commercial EHR systems. Recommendations are made of both local relevance and of international relevance.

  6. Training patterns and negative health outcomes in triathlon: longitudinal observations across a full competitive season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Main, L C; Landers, G J; Grove, J R; Dawson, B; Goodman, C

    2010-12-01

    Despite heavy training requirements, triathlon is a sport that is rapidly increasing in popularity. Yet, there is limited research detailing the relationship between training, the incidence of injuries and illness, psychological stress, overtraining and athlete burnout amongst triathletes. Six hypotheses relating inter-individual differences to training factors were generated to evaluate change in self-reported measures of these negative health outcomes over a training year. Thirty, well-trained, triathletes (males n=20: age=27.1±9.1 years and females n=10: age=27.4±6.6 years) from a local triathlon club participated in this study. The study commenced during pre-season training, and involved weekly monitoring of each athlete until the end of the competitive season 45 weeks later. Linear Mixed Modelling was used for the analysis. Signs and symptoms of injury and illness (SAS) were significantly associated with increases in training factors (P≤0.05); however, greatest impact on SAS was produced by psychological stressors (P≤0.001). Common symptoms of overtraining were significantly affected by increases in exposure to both training and psychological stressors (P≤0.05). Mood disturbance was not significantly affected by training factors (P>0.05) but rather increases in psychological stressors (P≤0.001). Finally, each of the three athlete burnout subscales were significantly affected by both psychological (P≤0.001) stressors as well as varying combinations of training factors (P≤0.05). Exposure to stressors (either training or psychological) had significant effects on all negative health outcomes assessed.

  7. Effects of concurrent training on health aspects of elderly women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Leandro Peres Campos

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2013v15n4p437 Training programs that include aerobics and strength exercises, either at the same session or alternate days are defined as concurrent training (CT. The objective of this study was to verify the effects of a CT program on biochemical parameters,cardiovascular fitness, body composition and neuromuscular aspects. Twenty two elderly women physically active were randomly allocated to one of the five groups: AS (aerobic exercises followed by strength training; n=5, SA (strength activities followed by aerobics exercises; n=5, AG (aerobics exercise only;n=5, SG (strength activities only; n=4, CG (control group; n=3. The program lasted 12 weeks. Tests of dynamic and static strength, flexibility, aerobic power, body composition and biochemical parameters were conducted. In the aerobics power test, AS and SA groups showed differences in the post-test compared to the CG. In dynamic strength test of upper limbs, the groups S, SA, AS showed statistical differences from the CG in the post-test (p=0.009, 0.006 and 0.002 respectively. Only the AS group presented some difference from the pre to post-tests (P=003. AG, SG, SA, AS showed differences in the post-test inrelation to the CG for the lower limbs strength test (p<0.001. From pre to post-test within the same group, the groups SG, SA and AS showed differences (p=0.001, 0.03, 0.02. Stretching, static strength, biochemical factors and body composition showed no association with any of the groups. We concluded that CT was equivalent to the strength and aerobics exercises performed exclusively.

  8. Effects of concurrent training on health aspects of elderly women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Leandro Peres Campos

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Training programs that include aerobics and strength exercises, either at the same session or alternate days are defined as concurrent training (CT. The objective of this study was to verify the effects of a CT program on biochemical parameters,cardiovascular fitness, body composition and neuromuscular aspects. Twenty two elderly women physically active were randomly allocated to one of the five groups: AS (aerobic exercises followed by strength training; n=5, SA (strength activities followed by aerobics exercises; n=5, AG (aerobics exercise only;n=5, SG (strength activities only; n=4, CG (control group; n=3. The program lasted 12 weeks. Tests of dynamic and static strength, flexibility, aerobic power, body composition and biochemical parameters were conducted. In the aerobics power test, AS and SA groups showed differences in the post-test compared to the CG. In dynamic strength test of upper limbs, the groups S, SA, AS showed statistical differences from the CG in the post-test (p=0.009, 0.006 and 0.002 respectively. Only the AS group presented some difference from the pre to post-tests (P=003. AG, SG, SA, AS showed differences in the post-test inrelation to the CG for the lower limbs strength test (p<0.001. From pre to post-test within the same group, the groups SG, SA and AS showed differences (p=0.001, 0.03, 0.02. Stretching, static strength, biochemical factors and body composition showed no association with any of the groups. We concluded that CT was equivalent to the strength and aerobics exercises performed exclusively.

  9. Medical training and nurses of Family Health strategy on worker health aspect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Érika Chediak; Naghettini, Alessandra Vitorino

    2016-06-01

    Considering the worker's health one of the Unified Health System (SUS) tasks, the Primary Health Care (PHC) and the Family Health Strategy (FHS) play an important role in the development of health actions in the field health-work. In Brazil, where the number of informal and domiciled jobs is high, the FHS becomes a reference in the workers' health actions. Therefore, if the FHS is not attentive to the relation between professional occupation and disease, several diseases that affect workers can overload the system without obtaining a cure. The aim of this study is to evaluate doctors and nurses recognition of the Family Health Strategy on occupational diseases in Aparecida de Goiânia. This is a qualitative descriptive study and the data analysis was done by content analysis. The setting for this study contemplates FHS units in the municipality of Aparecida de Goiânia, Goiás. There were 8 Basic Health Units and 16 health professionals were interviewed. The data was collected in the participants of the interview workplaces, from February through April, 2013, after being approved by the Ethics and Research Committee. The discourses were analyzed according to Minayo (2007), using thematic analysis. The interviews were recorded and later transcribed for analysis. Among the 16 professionals interviewed we observed that only 3 (18.75%) received professional training on occupational health in their Institution, however the aim of the courses were towards situations of biological hazards and not about workers care. Practitioners reported lack of knowledge in the occupational health area, and also observed that the area is still undervalued and underexplored in the academic and professional fields, and even by the Municipality health management. Evaluating the academic education it is possible to observe the inadequacy of the subject workload, where professionals reported the lack of knowledge in the area and the low workload of the subject in the academic field. There is

  10. Global Health: A Successful Context for Precollege Training and Advocacy

    OpenAIRE

    Ana L. Gervassi; Collins, Laura J.; Britschgi, Theresa B.

    2010-01-01

    Despite a flourishing biomedical and global health industry [1] too few of Washington state's precollege students are aware of this growing sector and emerging ideas on bacteria, fungi, parasites and viruses. Against the backdrop of numerous reports regarding declining precollege student interest in science [2], a precollege program was envisioned at Seattle Biomedical Research Institute (as of 2010, Seattle BioMed) to increase youth engagement in biomedical research and global health, increa...

  11. Cutting-edge technology for public health workforce training in comparative effectiveness research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas-Miranda, Abraham A; Nash, Michelle C; Salemi, Jason L; Mbah, Alfred K; Salihu, Hamisu M

    2013-06-01

    A critical mass of public health practitioners with expertise in analytic techniques and best practices in comparative effectiveness research is needed to fuel informed decisions and improve the quality of health care. The purpose of this case study is to describe the development and formative evaluation of a technology-enhanced comparative effectiveness research learning curriculum and to assess its potential utility to improve core comparative effectiveness research competencies among the public health workforce. Selected public health experts formed a multidisciplinary research collaborative and participated in the development and evaluation of a blended 15-week comprehensive e-comparative effectiveness research training program, which incorporated an array of health informatics technologies. Results indicate that research-based organizations can use a systematic, flexible, and rapid means of instructing their workforce using technology-enhanced authoring tools, learning management systems, survey research software, online communities of practice, and mobile communication for effective and creative comparative effectiveness research training of the public health workforce.

  12. Promoting public health workforce training for developing and transitional countries: fifty-year experience of the Braun School of Public Health and Community Medicine, Jerusalem, Israel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Neumark, Yehuda; Manor, Orly; Berry, Elliot M

    2011-01-01

    ...) program, PhD training, and short-term training workshops in Israel and abroad--has built a network of public health scholars in low-, transition- and high-income countries who benefit from academic...

  13. Survey to child/adolescent psychiatry and developmental/behavioral pediatric training directors to expand psychiatric-mental health training to nurse practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Richard H; O'Laughlen, Mary C; Kim, Joshua

    2017-06-01

    There is an ongoing shortage of child mental health professionals. Nurse practitioners (NPs) who completed behavioral and mental health training have proven that they can diagnose and manage many pediatric problems. To ask the training directors of both child/adolescent psychiatry (CAP) and developmental/behavioral pediatric (DBP) programs about their receptivity and willingness to give additional training for NPs who provide care to children with behavioral and mental health issues and examine the main obstacles to the development of such programs. A survey was sent to 151 CAP and DBP training directors in the United States. The return rate was 67% (N = 101). Only 12% expressed objection to the concept of additional NP training in CAP or DBP, but only 53% of training directors currently reported having sufficient faculty to do so. Some training directors reported already having advanced behavioral and mental health training programs for NPs (31%) and most (82%) would consider expanding, if funded. There is support for advanced training for NPs, but funding is needed to make this a reality. Expansion of such programs might rapidly improve accessibility and reduce waiting time of mental health providers for children and adolescents. ©2017 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  14. [Health-related strength and power training in seniors: Purpose and recommendations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donath, Lars; Faude, Oliver; Bopp, Micha; Zahner, Lukas

    2015-05-01

    The proportion of older people in western societies rapidly increases. Aging-induced disease conditions accompanied with declines in cardiocirculatory and neuromuscular performance constitute a major individual and economic health burden. Besides decreasing vascular and cardiac function during the process of aging, a loss of skeletal muscle mass, muscle structure and function seem to mainly account for decreasing maximal strength, strength development and strength endurance. These findings adversely interfer with static and dynamic postural control and may lead to an increased risk of falling with impairments of autonomy and quality of life. Traditional strength training recommendations basing on health-related exercise prescriptions for elderly people have been proven to counteract or at least attenuate aging-induced declines of neuromuscular muscular function. Multimodal and combined strength and balance training deliver additional improvements of neuromuscular capacity. Recent evidence additionally underpin the need of trunk muscle training and claimed for regimes considering explosive and high-velocity strength training in seniors. High quality RCTs revealed notable strength training effects on mobility, autonomy, quality of life and the reduction of the risk of falling (up to 50%). Available evidence also indicates that various strength training regimes elicit preventive and therapeutic effects on osteoporosis, diabetes type 2 and other chronic diseases, with effect sizes comparable to medication intake. Thus, health care providers, health insurances, Employers' Liability Insurance Associations and politicians should promote infrastructural developments that enable feasible and cost-effective access to health-related fitness centers or other sport facilities (e. g. sport clubs). These environmental requirements should be embedded in multi-centric education programs and campaigns that might enable regularly conducted strength and endurance training perceived as

  15. The education and training needs of health librarians - the generalist versus specialist dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrinic, Tatjana; Urquhart, Christine

    2007-09-01

    The aims of the study were to examine whether and how librarians with a generalist background can transfer to roles demanding more expert knowledge in the health sector. The objectives were (i) to compare the education and training needs of health librarians with science degrees with the education and training needs of health librarians with arts and humanities degrees; (ii) to compare the education and training needs of librarians working in the National Health Service (NHS) sector with the education and training needs of librarians working for the health sector but within higher education. Face-to-face interviews with 16 librarians, a convenience sample of librarians working in the Thames Valley NHS region. The main findings confirmed that structured continuing professional development (CPD) is required to meet the rapidly changing needs in the health sector. The emphasis ought to be on teaching skills, outreach work, marketing and promotion, research skills and methods, subject knowledge and terminology, and management skills. Library school curricula do not appear to meet the demands of medical library posts. A first degree in scientific subjects is advantageous in the early stages of a career but diminishes with continuing training and experience. There is no evidence of a significant difference in training needs and provision between the librarians in NHS posts as opposed to those in higher education (HE) posts. The conclusions suggest that library schools need to update their programmes to include teaching skills, advanced search skills, project management skills, research methods, with more practical exercises. Particular attention should be given to librarians with a first degree in non-scientific subjects in terms of time allocated for CPD, quality of training and access to reliable mentorship.

  16. An evaluation of training in motivational interviewing for nurses in child health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohman, Benjamin; Forsberg, Lars; Ghaderi, Ata; Rasmussen, Finn

    2013-05-01

    Acquiring proficiency in motivational interviewing (MI) may be more difficult than generally believed, and training research suggests that the standard one-time workshop format may be insufficient. Although nurses represent one of the professions that have received most training in MI, training in this group has rarely been systematically evaluated using objective behavioral measures. To evaluate an enhanced MI training program, comprising a 3.5-day workshop, systematic feedback on MI performance, and four sessions of supervision on practice samples. Nurses (n = 36) in Swedish child health services were trained in MI. Skillfulness in MI was assessed using the Motivational Interviewing Treatment Integrity (MITI) Code. Effects of training were compared to beginning proficiency thresholds. Participants did not reach beginning proficiency thresholds on any of the indicators of proficiency and effect sizes were small. The present study adds to a growing body of literature suggesting that the current standard MI training format may not provide practitioners with enough skillfulness. Moreover, the results indicate that even enhanced training, including systematic feedback and supervision, may not be sufficient. Suggestions for improved MI training are made.

  17. Skill shortages in health: innovative solutions using vocational education and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, S I; Johns, S S; Millar, P; Le, Q; Routley, G

    2007-01-01

    This article reports findings of a project funded by the Australian National Council for Vocational Education Research. The project explores solutions to current and projected skills shortages within the health and community services sector, from a vocational education and training perspective. Its purpose is to locate, analyse and disseminate information about innovative models of health training and service delivery that have been developed in response to skill shortages. The article begins with a brief overview of Australian statistics and literature on the structure of the national health workforce and perceived skill shortages. The impact of location (state and rurality), demographics of the workforce, and other relevant factors, on health skill shortages is examined. Drawing on a synthesis of the Australian and international literature on innovative and effective models for addressing health skill shortages and nominations by key stakeholders within the health sector, over 70 models were identified. The models represent a mixture of innovative service delivery models and training solutions from Australia, as well as international examples that could be transposed to the Australian context. They include the skill ecosystem approach facilitated by the Australian National Training Authority Skill Ecosystem Project. Models were selected to represent diversity in terms of the nature of skill shortage addressed, barriers overcome in development of the model, healthcare specialisations, and different customer groups. Key barriers to the development of innovative solutions to skills shortages identified were: policy that is not sufficiently flexible to accommodate changing workplace needs; unwillingness to risk take in order to develop new models; delays in gaining endorsement/accreditation; current vocational education and training (VET) monitoring and reporting systems; issues related to working in partnership, including different cultures, ways of operating

  18. Preparing mental health professionals for new directions in mental health practice: Evaluating the sensory approaches e-learning training package.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Pamela; Yeates, Harriet; Greaves, Amanda; Taylor, Michelle; Slattery, Maddy; Charters, Michelle; Hill, Melissa

    2018-02-01

    The application of sensory modulation approaches in mental health settings is growing in recognition internationally. However, a number of barriers have been identified as limiting the implementation of the approach, including workplace culture and a lack of accessible and effective sensory approaches training. The aim of this project was to investigate the efficacy of providing this training through a custom-designed e-learning package. Participants in the present study were predominately nurses and occupational therapists working in mental health settings in Queensland, Australia. Data were collected from 121 participants using an online survey. Significant improvements were found between pre- and post-training in participants' real and perceived levels of knowledge, their perceived levels of confidence, and their attitudes towards using sensory modulation approaches in mental health settings. The findings of the study suggest that the custom-designed sensory approaches e-learning package is an effective, accessible, acceptable, and usable method to train health professionals in sensory modulation approaches. As this study is the first to analyse the efficacy of an e-learning sensory approaches package, the results are considered preliminary, and further investigation is required. © 2017 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  19. Public Library Staff as Community Health Partners: Training Program Design and Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Anna U; D'Alonzo, Bernadette A; Dupuis, Roxanne; Whiteman, Eliza D; Kallem, Stacey; McClintock, Autumn; Fein, Joel A; Klusaritz, Heather; Cannuscio, Carolyn C

    2017-10-01

    Public libraries are free and open to all-and accessed at high rates by vulnerable populations-which positions them to be key public health allies. However, library staff themselves often feel ill-equipped to address the health and social concerns of their patrons. To fill this gap, we developed a case-based training curriculum to help library staff recognize, engage, and refer vulnerable patrons to appropriate resources. Topics addressed in the training, including homelessness, mental health and substance use disorders, immigration, and trauma, were selected based on findings from a prior community needs assessment. Using a modified measure of self-efficacy, participants ( n = 33) were surveyed before and after each session. Several participants ( n = 7) were also interviewed 4 months after the training was completed. Overall, staff reported significant increases in comfort, confidence, and preparedness in assisting vulnerable patrons across all topic areas. Qualitative findings reflected positive perceived impact and value of the trainings. Staff felt training resources should be made more readily accessible. Improving library staff capacity to address the health and social needs of their patrons can further establish public libraries as partners in improving population health.

  20. [Experience in training in emergencies, Division of Special Projects in Health, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Vega, Felipe; Loría-Castellanos, Jorge; Hernández-Olivas, Irma Patricia; Franco-Bey, Rubén; Ochoa-Avila, César; Sánchez-Badillo, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    There has been interest in the Division of Special Projects in Health to offer the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social personnel resources for training and quality thereby respond to potential contingencies. Presented here is their experience in this field. To describe and analyse the productivity in different training programs in emergencies and disasters developed by the Division of Special Projects in Health, Mexican Social Security Institute (IMSS). Observational study in which different training activities conducted by the Division of Special Projects in Health between 1989 and 2014 are described. Descriptive statistics were used. In these 25 years have trained 20,674 participants; 19.451 IMSS and 1,223 other health institutions. The most productive courses were life support (BLS/ACLS) (47.17%), distance courses "Hospital medical evacuation plans and units" (14.17%), the workshop-run "Evacuation of hospital units with an emphasis on critical areas" (5.93%) and course "Programme Evaluators of Hospital Insurance" (8.43%). Although the Special Projects Division Health has primarily operational functions, it nevertheless has neglected its responsibility to maintain constantly trained and updated institute staff that every day is in a position to face any type of emergency and disaster. This increases the chance that the answer to any contingency is more organised and of higher quality, always to the benefit of the population. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  1. Training rehabilitation teams in sexual health care: A description and evaluation of a multidisciplinary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieters, Riet; Kedde, Harald; Bender, Jim

    2017-01-09

    Sexual health problems are more prevalent among people with a chronic illness or physical disability than among the general population. Although sexual health care in the rehabilitation setting in the Netherlands is a growing field of interest, integrating sexual health in the overall care for rehabilitation patients has proven to be a challenge. This article describes a training designed for rehabilitation professionals working in operational multidisciplinary teams. The main objective of this training is to help create a professional environment in which sexual health problems can be discussed, if possible prevented and when needed treated. A pretest-posttest design was used to measure the impact of this educational program given to six teams in the Netherlands. The results demonstrated that the staff's knowledge, comfort levels and approach levels significantly increased. Team members were more active concerning sexual health and patient care. These findings clearly indicate that rehabilitation workers can benefit from a custom fit design team training on sexual health care. Strategically working with the modus operandi of a multidisciplinary team, such as task definition, determining pro- and reactive roles and formal agreements, appears to be of importance in integrating sexual health in the overall care for patients. Implications for Rehabilitation Sexuality and intimacy are important aspects of quality of life and difficult to integrate in rehabilitation treatment. A multidisciplinary Team Training Sexual Health Care (TTSHC) has been developed with core themes: talking about sex, using a biopsychosocial approach, identifying and understanding sexual health issues, applying the existing expertise of the MDT for sexual health care. After the TTSHC all the participants of the MDTs show significantly more active behavior concerning sexual health and patient care. Defining roles and responsibilities in the MDT is important for integrating sexual health care in

  2. Training US health care professionals on human trafficking: where do we go from here?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Clydette; Dickins, Kirsten; Stoklosa, Hanni

    2017-01-01

    Some 21 million adults and children are labor-trafficked or sex-trafficked through force, fraud, or coercion. In recognition of the interface between trafficking victims and the healthcare setting, over the last 10 years there has been a notable increase in training of health care professionals (HCPs) on human trafficking (HT) and its health implications. Many organizations have developed curricula and offered training in various clinical settings. However, methods and content of this education on trafficking vary widely, and there is little evaluation of the impact of the training. The goal of this study was to assess the gaps and strengths in HT education of HCPs in the US. This mixed-method study had two components. The first component consisted of structured interviews with experts in human trafficking HCP education. The second portion of the study involved an analysis of data from HCP calls to the National Human Trafficking Resource Center (NHTRC). The interviews captured trainer-specific data on types of HT training, duration and frequency, key content areas, presence of evaluation approaches and indicators, as well as an assessment of barriers and strengths in HT training for HCP. NHTRC call database analysis demonstrated increasing trends since 2008 in calls by HCPs. Overall findings revealed the need for standardization of HT training content to assure correct information, trauma-informed and patient-centered care, and consistent messaging for HCPs. Evaluation metrics for HT training need to be developed to demonstrate behavior change and impact on service delivery and patient-centered outcomes for HT victims, according to our proposed adapted Kirkpatrick's Pyramid model. HT training and evaluation would benefit from an agency or institution at the national level to provide consistency and standardization of HT training content as well as to guide a process that would develop metrics for evaluation and the building of an evidence base. AAP: American

  3. Standards for manpower in militarized mine rescue departments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krokhalev, B.G. (SPO Metallurgbezopasnost' (Russian Federation))

    1992-11-01

    Discusses the organization, duties and role of militarized mine rescue departments in the mining industry of the Russian Federation. In 1991, militarized mine rescue personnel was summoned 191 times, saving the lives of 27 workers and providing first aid to 51 injured persons. Militarized mine rescue departments ensure rapid response to a distress call, with two detachments of rescuers dispatched to the disaster site within 1-3 minutes. According to the Code of militarized mine rescue units, mines are classified into two categories with respect to safety: category one is prone to rock bumps, sudden outbursts, spontaneous combustion and dust explosions. Two techniques for calculating the required manpower of militarized mine rescue sections are described. It is pointed out that a major criterion for consideration in manning and deploying such units is a coordinated and approved plan for emergency clearing at each particular mine.

  4. NATO Conference on Manpower Planning and Organization Design

    CERN Document Server

    Niehaus, Richard

    1978-01-01

    This volume is the proceedings of the conference entitled "Manpower Planning and Organization Design" which was held in Stresa, Italy, 20-24 June 1977. The Conference was sponsored by the NATO Scientific Affairs Division and organized jointly through the Special Programs Panels on Human Factors and on Systems Science. Two Conference Directors were appointed with overall responsibilities for the programme and for policy, and they were assisted in their tasks by a small advisory panel consisting of Professor A. Charnes (University of Texas), Professor W.W. Cooper (Carnegie Mellon University, now at Harvard University) and Dr. F.A. Heller (TavistQck Institute of Human Relations). Professor R. Florio of Bergamo kindly agreed to become Administrative Director and, as such, was responsible for all the local arrangements. The Conference Directors were further assisted by "national points of contact" appointed from each of the member countries of NATO. These national representatives played a substantial part in the s...

  5. Training in male sexual and reproductive health for a primary care physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaiful, Bi

    2008-01-01

    In 2006, I was awarded a scholarship from Universiti Sains Malaysia for Fellowship training at Monash University (MU) for one year. The objective of the training programme was to develop knowledge and skills in several areas, including androgen deficiency, male infertility, prostate disease, testicular tumours, sexual dysfunction and sexually transmitted diseases. The training programme consisted of attachments with clinical specialists, completion of a course work module and a research project. After completion of the training programme, I believe that Primary Care Physicians (PCPs) will benefit from undertaking the training programme that I had completed. It will enable PCPs to assume leadership roles in this multidisciplinary area. The ability of PCPs in handling sexual and reproductive health issues in men will definitely be a more cost effective form of care for patients, particularly as the number of specialists is limited, and even more importantly, it will be satisfying for the patient and the physician.

  6. TRAINING IN MALE SEXUAL AND REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH FOR A PRIMARY CARE PHYSICIAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHAIFUL BI

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2006, I was awarded a scholarship from Universiti Sains Malaysia for Fellowship training at Monash University (MU for one year. The objective of the training programme was to develop knowledge and skills in several areas, including androgen deficiency, male infertility, prostate disease, testicular tumours, sexual dysfunction and sexually transmitted diseases. The training programme consisted of attachments with clinical specialists, completion of a course work module and a research project. After completion of the training programme, I believe that Primary Care Physicians (PCPs will benefit from undertaking the training programme that I had completed. It will enable PCPs to assume leadership roles in this multidisciplinary area. The ability of PCPs in handling sexual and reproductive health issues in men will definitely be a more cost effective form of care for patients, particularly as the number of specialists is limited, and even more importantly, it will be satisfying for the patient and the physician.

  7. Cultural Respect Encompassing Simulation Training: Being Heard About Health Through Broadband.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min-Yu Lau, Phyllis; Woodward-Kron, Robyn; Livesay, Karen; Elliott, Kristine; Nicholson, Patricia

    2016-04-26

    Cultural Respect Encompassing Simulation Training (CREST) is a learning program that uses simulation to provide health professional students and practitioners with strategies to communicate sensitively with culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) patients. It consists of training modules with a cultural competency evaluation framework and CALD simulated patients to interact with trainees in immersive simulation scenarios. The aim of this study was to test the feasibility of expanding the delivery of CREST to rural Australia using live video streaming; and to investigate the fidelity of cultural sensitivity - defined within the process of cultural competency which includes awareness, knowledge, skills, encounters and desire - of the streamed simulations. In this mixed-methods evaluative study, health professional trainees were recruited at three rural academic campuses and one rural hospital to pilot CREST sessions via live video streaming and simulation from the city campus in 2014. Cultural competency, teaching and learning evaluations were conducted. Forty-five participants rated 26 reliable items before and after each session and reported statistically significant improvement in 4 of 5 cultural competency domains, particularly in cultural skills (Pcommunication training and the quality of the simulation training provided remotely by CREST. Cultural sensitivity education using live video-streaming and simulation can contribute to health professionals' learning and is effective in improving cultural competency. CREST has the potential to be embedded within health professional curricula across Australian universities to address issues of health inequalities arising from a lack of cultural sensitivity training. Significance for public healthThere are significant health inequalities for migrant populations. They commonly have poorer access to health services and poorer health outcomes than the Australian-born population. The factors are multiple, complex and

  8. Effectiveness of seminars in training rural health workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Roosmalen, J; van Roosmalen-Wiebenga, M W

    1986-04-01

    In Tanzania, rural medical aides (RMA), mother and child health aides (MCHA) and health auxiliaries (HA) care for mothers of childbearing age and children under age 5. This paper presents data obtained at 2 district seminars on mother and child health held in June 1981 and June 1983 at which knowledge and skills of MCH staff could be assessed. The main topics of the seminars were administration of MCH services, programs of immunization, primary health care, prevention and management of malnutrition, treatment of measles, oral rehydration therapy, antenatal care, family planning, tuberculosis and leprosy management. Seminars were evaluated by pre- and post-testing, with all health workers showing considerable improvement at the post-test. Problems detected during pre-testing included insufficient knowledge about contraindications to immunization, and selection of antenatal at-risk cases. Pre-test performance was, in general, poor, but marked improvement occurred after the 3-day seminars suggesting that lack of supervision was a factor. A solution may be to hold more frequent refresher courses if funding could be obtained.

  9. Innovative partnerships to advance public health training in community-based academic residency programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lo JC

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Joan C Lo,1–3 Thomas E Baudendistel,2,3 Abhay Dandekar,3,4 Phuoc V Le,5 Stanton Siu,2,3 Bruce Blumberg6 1Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, CA, USA; 2Department of Medicine, Kaiser Permanente Oakland Medical Center, Oakland, CA, USA; 3Graduate Medical Education, Kaiser Permanente East Bay, Oakland, CA, USA; 4Department of Pediatrics, Kaiser Permanente Oakland Medical Center, Oakland, CA, USA; 5School of Public Health, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, USA; 6Graduate Medical Education, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, CA, USA Abstract: Collaborative partnerships between community-based academic residency ­training programs and schools of public health, represent an innovative approach to training future physician leaders in population management and public health. In Kaiser Permanente Northern California, development of residency-Masters in Public Health (MPH tracks in the Internal Medicine Residency and the Pediatrics Residency programs, with MPH graduate studies completed at the University of California Berkeley School of Public Health, enables physicians to integrate clinical training with formal education in epidemiology, biostatistics, health policy, and disease prevention. These residency-MPH programs draw on more than 50 years of clinical education, public health training, and health services research – creating an environment that sparks inquiry and added value by developing skills in patient-centered care through the lens of population-based outcomes. Keywords: graduate medical education, public health, master’s degree, internal medicine, pediatrics, residency training

  10. Resident Assistant Training Program for Increasing Alcohol, Other Drug, and Mental Health First-Aid Efforts

    OpenAIRE

    Thombs, Dennis L.; Gonzalez, Jennifer M. Reingle; Osborn, Cynthia J.; Rossheim, Matthew E.; Suzuki, Sumihiro

    2015-01-01

    In college and university residence halls, resident assistants (RAs) are expected to serve as first-aid providers to students who may have alcohol, other drug, mental health, and academic problems. Despite this responsibility, evidence-based, first-aid programs have not been developed and tested for the RA workforce. The current study examined effects of an investigational first-aid program designed specifically for RAs. The online Peer Hero Training program is a novel approach to RA training...

  11. Resident assistant training program for increasing alcohol, other drug, and mental health first-aid efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thombs, Dennis L; Gonzalez, Jennifer M Reingle; Osborn, Cynthia J; Rossheim, Matthew E; Suzuki, Sumihiro

    2015-05-01

    In college and university residence halls, resident assistants (RAs) are expected to serve as first-aid providers to students who may have alcohol, other drug, mental health, and academic problems. Despite this responsibility, evidence-based, first-aid programs have not been developed and tested for the RA workforce. The current study examined effects of an investigational first-aid program designed specifically for RAs. The online Peer Hero Training program is a novel approach to RA training in its use of interactive video dramatizations of incidents involving substance-using or distressed residents. A 9-month randomized trial conducted on eight US campuses compared RAs who participated in the Peer Hero Training program to RAs who received training-as-usual. Participation in the Peer Hero Training program significantly increased RA first-aid efforts for residential students who may have had alcohol, other drug, mental health, or academic problems 6 months after baseline. Compared with those in the training-as-usual condition, RAs in the Peer Hero Training program made more than 10 times as many first-aid efforts for possible alcohol problems, almost 14 times the number of first-aid efforts for possible drug use, almost 3 times the number of first-aid efforts for possible mental health problems, and 3 times the number of first-aid efforts for academic problems. There was no evidence that measured RA attitudes mediated the effects of the intervention. Results of this preliminary evaluation trial suggest that online training using interactive video dramatizations is a viable approach to strengthening RAs' ability to provide alcohol, other drugs, and mental health first-aid to undergraduates.

  12. Advancing adolescent health and health services in Saudi Arabia: exploring health-care providers' training, interest, and perceptions of the health-care needs of young people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AlBuhairan FS

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Fadia S AlBuhairan,1–3 Tina M Olsson3,4 1Department of Pediatrics, King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 2King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 3King Abdullah International Medical Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 4School of Social Work, Lund University, Lund, Sweden Background: Adolescent health is regarded as central to global health goals. Investments made in adolescent health and health services protect the improvements witnessed in child health. Though Saudi Arabia has a large adolescent population, adolescent health-care only began to emerge in recent years, yet widespread uptake has been very limited. Health-care providers are key in addressing and providing the necessary health-care services for adolescents, and so this study was conducted with the aim of identifying opportunities for the advancement of knowledge transfer for adolescent health services in Saudi Arabia. Methods: This Web-based, cross-sectional study was carried out at four hospitals in Saudi Arabia. Physicians and nurses were invited to participate in an online survey addressing their contact with adolescent patients, and training, knowledge, and attitudes towards adolescent health-care. Results: A total of 232 professionals participated. The majority (82.3% reported sometimes or always coming into contact with adolescent patients. Less than half (44%, however, had received any sort of training on adolescent health during their undergraduate or postgraduate education, and only 53.9% reported having adequate knowledge about the health-care needs of adolescents. Nurses perceived themselves as having more knowledge in the health-care needs of adolescents and reported feeling more comfortable in communicating with adolescents as compared with physicians. The majority of participants were interested in gaining further skills and knowledge in adolescent health-care and agreed or strongly agreed that adolescents have

  13. Global health: a successful context for precollege training and advocacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervassi, Ana L; Collins, Laura J; Britschgi, Theresa B

    2010-11-03

    Despite a flourishing biomedical and global health industry too few of Washington state's precollege students are aware of this growing sector and emerging ideas on bacteria, fungi, parasites and viruses. Against the backdrop of numerous reports regarding declining precollege student interest in science, a precollege program was envisioned at Seattle Biomedical Research Institute (as of 2010, Seattle BioMed) to increase youth engagement in biomedical research and global health, increase community interest in infectious diseases and mobilize a future biomedical workforce. Since 2005, 169 rising high school juniors have participated in the BioQuest Academy precollege immersion program at Seattle BioMed. Assembling in groups of 12, students conduct laboratory experiments (e.g., anopheline mosquito dissection, gene expression informed tuberculosis drug design and optimizing HIV immunization strategies) related to global health alongside practicing scientific mentors, all within the footprint the institute. Laudable short-term impacts of the program include positive influences on student interest in global health (as seen in the students' subsequent school projects and their participation in Seattle BioMed community events), biomedical careers and graduate school (e.g., 16.9% of teens departing 2008-2009 Academy report revised goals of attaining a doctorate rather than a baccalaureate diploma). Long-term, 97% of alumni (2005-2008) are attending postsecondary schools throughout North America; eight graduates have already published scientific articles in peer-reviewed journals and/or presented their scientific data at national and international meetings, and 26 have been retained by Seattle BioMed researchers as compensated technicians and interns. Providing precollege students with structured access to practicing scientists and authentic research environments within the context of advancing global health has been a robust means of both building a future pool of talented

  14. Global health: a successful context for precollege training and advocacy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana L Gervassi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite a flourishing biomedical and global health industry too few of Washington state's precollege students are aware of this growing sector and emerging ideas on bacteria, fungi, parasites and viruses. Against the backdrop of numerous reports regarding declining precollege student interest in science, a precollege program was envisioned at Seattle Biomedical Research Institute (as of 2010, Seattle BioMed to increase youth engagement in biomedical research and global health, increase community interest in infectious diseases and mobilize a future biomedical workforce. Since 2005, 169 rising high school juniors have participated in the BioQuest Academy precollege immersion program at Seattle BioMed. Assembling in groups of 12, students conduct laboratory experiments (e.g., anopheline mosquito dissection, gene expression informed tuberculosis drug design and optimizing HIV immunization strategies related to global health alongside practicing scientific mentors, all within the footprint the institute. Laudable short-term impacts of the program include positive influences on student interest in global health (as seen in the students' subsequent school projects and their participation in Seattle BioMed community events, biomedical careers and graduate school (e.g., 16.9% of teens departing 2008-2009 Academy report revised goals of attaining a doctorate rather than a baccalaureate diploma. Long-term, 97% of alumni (2005-2008 are attending postsecondary schools throughout North America; eight graduates have already published scientific articles in peer-reviewed journals and/or presented their scientific data at national and international meetings, and 26 have been retained by Seattle BioMed researchers as compensated technicians and interns. Providing precollege students with structured access to practicing scientists and authentic research environments within the context of advancing global health has been a robust means of both building a future

  15. Affect-regulated exercise intensity: does training at an intensity that feels 'good' improve physical health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfitt, Gaynor; Alrumh, Amnah; Rowlands, Alex V

    2012-11-01

    Affect-regulated exercise to feel 'good' can be used to control exercise intensity amongst both active and sedentary individuals and should support exercise adherence. It is not known, however, whether affect-regulated exercise training can lead to physical health gains. The aim of this study was to examine if affect-regulated exercise to feel 'good' leads to improved fitness over the course of an 8-week training programme. A repeated measures design (pretest-posttest) with independent groups (training and control). 20 sedentary females completed a submaximal graded exercise test and were then allocated to either a training group or control group. The training group completed two supervised sessions and one unsupervised session per week for 8 weeks. Exercise intensity was affect-regulated to feel 'good'. Following the 8 weeks of training, both groups completed a second submaximal graded exercise test. Repeated measures analyses of variance indicated a significant increase in the time to reach ventilatory threshold in the training group (318 ± 23.7s) compared to control (248 ± 16.9s). Overall compliance to training was high (>92%). Participants in the training group exercised at intensities that would be classified as being in the lower range of the recommended guidelines (≈ 50% V˙O(2) max) for cardiovascular health. Affect-regulated exercise to feel 'good' can be used in a training programme to regulate exercise intensity. This approach led to a 19% increase in time to reach ventilatory threshold, which is indicative of improved fitness. Copyright © 2012 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Investigating the feasibility and acceptability of health psychology-informed obesity training for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm, Anna; Hart, Jo; Mann, Karen; Perry, Mark; Duthie, Harriet; Rezvani, Leila; Peters, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Health psychologists have succeeded in identifying theory-congruent behaviour change techniques (BCTs) to prevent and reduce lifestyle-related illnesses, such as cardiovascular disease, cancers and diabetes. Obesity management discussions between doctors and patients can be challenging and are often avoided. Despite a clear training need, it is unknown how best to tailor BCT research findings to inform obesity-management training for future healthcare professionals. The primary objective of this descriptive study was to gather information on the feasibility and acceptability of delivering and evaluating health psychology-informed obesity training to UK medical students. Medical students (n = 41) attended an obesity management session delivered by GP tutors. Sessions were audio-recorded to enable fidelity checks. Acceptability of training was explored qualitatively. Tutors consistently delivered training according to the intervention protocol; and students and tutors found the training highly acceptable. This psychology-informed training can be delivered successfully by GP tutors and further research is warranted to explore its efficacy.

  17. Improving Counselling Skills about Reproductive Health among Students by Using Peer Counselor Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ririn Harini

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nowadays, the goal of MDGs to improve maternal health is one of the priorities of many countries. Indonesian Government, by the National Family Planning Board (BKKBN, has followed up by monitoring and evaluating programs which is realized by providing technical guidance resilience in young people through Generation Planning program and developing Information and Consultation Center for Students Reproductive Health (PIK-KRM. In order to improve the role of peer counselors, a training should be done to increase their knowledge, attitudes, and skills. The objective of this research was to determine the effects of training on peer counselor’s knowledge, attitudes, and skills at PIK-KRM. Methods: The study was used quasy experiment pre-test and post-test nonequivalent control group design. Population were the committee of PIK-KRM at Faculty of Health, University of Muhammadiyah Malang, 80 students were included. Independent variable was training, while dependent variables were peer counselor’s knowledge, attitude, and skills. Data were collected by using questionnaire and observation form. Data were then analyzed by using paired t–test, independent sample t-test, simple linear regression. Results: The results of linear regression had showed that training have significant effect on peer counselor’s knowledge (p=0.000; R square=0.254, attitude (p=0.000; R square=0.432, and skills (p=0.000; R square=0.191. Discussion: Training can improve peer counselor’s knowledge, attitude, and skills at PIK-KRM board in giving information and counseling about reproductive health (sexuality, HIV/AIDS, and drugs. Nurses should provide continous training regularly, so their ability can be more better. Keywords: training, peer counselors, knowledge, attitudes, skills, PIK-KRM board, students reproductive health

  18. Implementing school health promotion in Austria: experiences from a pilot training course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaschberger, Edith; Nitsch, Martina; Waldherr, Karin

    2012-05-01

    A pilot training course on school health promotion in Austria focused on supporting teachers and school heads during the implementation of the health-promoting school (HPS) concept. The participants talked about their experiences during the implementation phase in focus groups held in a feedback seminar at the end of the training course. The focus groups were analyzed by using an inductive approach. A coding method for thematic analysis was applied. Compatibility of the training course with the school setting was examined and supporting and hindering structures and processes pertaining to the schools and the training course are described. The results can be displayed in a model showing connections between the themes. Internal and external collaboration structures were identified as central aspects in the implementation phase. Particularly collaboration within the faculty is shown to be of importance when implementing the HPS approach. Voluntary cooperation especially of teachers, which is often connected with work in their spare time, is another aspect influencing the sustainability and therefore also the compatibility of the training course with the school setting. For future designs of teacher training courses in health promotion, the aspects of collaboration, teamwork, and collective commitment have to be taken into consideration.

  19. ‘Making every contact count’: evaluation of the impact of an intervention to train health and social care practitioners in skills to support health behaviour change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Christina; Tinati, Tannaze; Cradock, Sue; Begum, Rufia; Jarman, Megan; Pease, Anna; Margetts, Barrie; Davies, Jenny; Inskip, Hazel; Cooper, Cyrus; Baird, Janis; Barker, Mary

    2015-01-01

    A total of 148 health and social care practitioners were trained in skills to support behaviour change: creating opportunities to discuss health behaviours, using open discovery questions, listening, reflecting and goal-setting. At three time points post-training, use of the skills was evaluated and compared with use of skills by untrained practitioners. Trained practitioners demonstrated significantly greater use of these client-centred skills to support behaviour change compared to their untrained peers up to one year post-training. Because it uses existing services to deliver support for behaviour change, this training intervention has the potential to improve public health at relatively low cost. PMID:24713156

  20. Contributions of training to the promotion of health in State Health Services: comparative analysis in eight states in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Elizabeth Alcalde-Rabanal

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the results of the training provided by the National Public Health Institute (INSP per its abbreviation in Spanish in health promotion to institutional staff of local health services during 2007 and 2008. Materials and methods. A non-experimental evaluative research with comparison group was conducted, in which quantitative and qualitative methods were used. Results. In states intervened a better conceptualization of health promotion, social  participation and components of the Health Promotion Operating Model was observed; participatory action research was the basic strategy to work in the community and management showed a tendency to be more participatory and inclusive. Conclusion. A better conceptualization of health promotion has allowed health personnel develop more sustainable work processes in the community and has driven the search for consent and participatory management.

  1. A Healthy Investment: Building the Facilities to Train the Next Generation of Nursing and Allied Health Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Bob

    2013-01-01

    A growing number of community colleges are investing in new facilities and programs to train health care workers in a variety of professions, including nursing, radiology, health information technology, physical therapy, dentistry, and surgical technology. Community colleges have historically offered job training programs in health care, but with…

  2. Context counts: training health workers in and for rural and remote areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Roger; Neusy, Andre-Jacques

    2010-10-01

    Access to well trained and motivated health workers is the major rural health issue. Without local access, it is unlikely that people in rural and remote communities will be able to achieve the Millennium Development Goals. Studies in many countries have shown that the three factors most strongly associated with entering rural practice are: (i) a rural background; (ii) positive clinical and educational experiences in rural settings as part of undergraduate medical education; and (iii) targeted training for rural practice at the postgraduate level. This paper presents evidence for policy initiatives involving the training of medical students from, in and for rural and remote areas. We give examples of medical schools in different regions of the world that are using an evidence-based and context-driven educational approach to producing skilled and motivated health workers. We demonstrate how context influences the design and implementation of different rural education programmes. Successful programmes have overcome major obstacles including negative assumptions and attitudes, and limitations of human, physical, educational and financial resources. Training rural health workers in the rural setting is likely to result in greatly improved recruitment and retention of skilled health-care providers in rural underserved areas with consequent improvement in access to health care for the local communities.

  3. The concept of structure and content of health related trainings for higher educational establishments’ students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kopylov Yu.A.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: analysis of modern directions of physical culture education scientific and practical problems’ solution in higher educational establishment of health related orientation. Material: analysis of publications in scientific journals. Results: we have shown significance of student’s physical functioning as the basis of his motor, coordination and mental qualities’ development. Main difficulties of existing physical education practice have been cleared up. It has been found that prevailing training of physical qualities at physical culture classes does not solve the problem of students’ health strengthening. Ways to application of additional health related physical culture trainings have been shown. Transition to such trainings opens opportunities for creation a new concept, permits to effectively and relatively quickly implement its main ideas and principles in practice of HEE education. Conclusions: content of additional (health related physical culture training envisages prevailing orientation on health related, general developing and sport-recreational tasks. With it first attention shall be paid to formation of physical, psychic and social-moral health as well as to personality-oriented approach in system of individual choice of physical culture means.

  4. National Training and Education Standards for Health and Wellness Coaching: The Path to National Certification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolever, Ruth Q.; Lawson, Karen; Moore, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is twofold: (1) to announce the findings of the job task analysis as well as national training and education standards for health and wellness coaching (HWC) that have been developed by the large-scale, collaborative efforts of the National Consortium for Credentialing Health and Wellness Coaches (NCCHWC) and (2) to invite commentary from the public. The rapid proliferation of individuals and organizations using the terms of health and/or wellness coaches and the propagation of private industry and academic coach training and education programs endeavoring to prepare these coaches has created an urgent and pressing need for national standards for use of the term health and wellness coach, as well as minimal requirements for training, education, and certification. Professionalizing the field with national standards brings a clear and consistent definition of health and wellness coaching and accepted practice standards that are uniform across the field. In addition, clear standards allow for uniform curricular criteria to ensure a minimal benchmark for education, training, and skills and knowledge evaluation of professional health and wellness coaches. PMID:25984418

  5. Prostate Cancer Research Training in Health Disparities for Minority Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    described. Culture and Health: An Ethnographic and Qualitative Approach: Briefly examine the roles of race and racism as powerful cultural...chartered member of the Nashville chapter of the National Negro Council for Women, Student Ambassador, held the position of Miss Big Apple Club , and

  6. A Mental Health Training Format for Adult Education Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, Fiona; Specht, Jacqueline; Rodger, Susan

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigated the needs of adult education staff pertaining to adult students' mental health issues within a local school board. The study utilized mixed-methods design and was divided into progression of three separate studies. An initial focus group was conducted to identify the 12 participants' concerns and provide a direction…

  7. The National Health Insurance, the decentralised clinical training ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Health” for all sections of the people of the Union of. South Africa'.[8,9] In 1940, the concept of primary healthcare (PHC) and community health centres (CHCs) was pioneered by Drs Sidney and Emily Kark at Pholela in rural Natal, and was ...

  8. Health Impact Assessment Training Bijelo Polje Community Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    The main objective of the session is to develop capacity on this decision-making tool during a mini-workshop on the Health Impact Assessment (HIA) in Bijelo Polje, Montenegro. The HIA is a combination of procedures, methods and tools that systematically judges the potential, and ...

  9. Training Mixtec promotores to assess health concerns in their community: a CBPR pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Annette E; Young, Sandra; Rabelo Vega, Roena; Herrmann, Alison K; See, Cha; Glenn, Beth A; Mistry, Ritesh; Bastani, Roshan

    2014-04-01

    An academic institution and a community organization partnered for one of the first studies assessing health needs of Mixtecs, indigenous immigrants from Southern Mexico, residing in Ventura County, California. Ten bilingual Spanish- and Mixteco-speaking promotores received a 1-day focus group training, participated in a focus group themselves and conducted 5 focus groups with 42 Mixtec community members. The focus group training is described. Health concerns discussed in the focus groups include outdoor exercise among women viewed as flirtatious; reluctance to ask for governmental assistance due to fear that children will have to pay back later; soda consumption perceived as a symbol of socio-economic status; and unwillingness to obtain mammograms or pap smears because private body parts are to be touched by husbands only. Training promotores to conduct focus groups can increase organizational capacity to identify pressing health needs in under-represented and hard-to-reach population groups.

  10. Training School Mental Health Providers to Deliver Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beidas, Rinad S; Mychailyszyn, Matthew P; Edmunds, Julie M; Khanna, Muniya S; Downey, Margaret Mary; Kendall, Philip C

    2012-12-01

    Anxiety disorders are among the most prevalent mental health difficulties experienced by youth. A well-established literature has identified cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) as the gold-standard psychosocial treatment for youth anxiety disorders. Access to CBT in community clinics is limited, but a potential venue for the provision of CBT for child anxiety disorders is the school setting. The present study examined a subset of data from a larger study in which therapists from a variety of settings, including schools, were trained in CBT for child anxiety (N = 17). The study investigated the relationship between provider- and organizational-level variables associated with training and implementation among school mental health providers. The present findings indicate a positive relationship between provider attitudes and adherence to CBT. Self-reported barriers to implementation were also identified. Integrating CBT into school mental health providers' repertoires through training and consultation is a critical step for dissemination and implementation of empirically supported psychosocial treatments.

  11. Training Pediatric Psychologists for Perinatal Behavioral Health Services in a Pediatric Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Rhonda C; Scharko, Alexander M; Cole, Joanna C M; Patterson, Chavis A; Benton, Tami D; Power, Thomas J

    2016-06-01

    Although pediatric hospitals specialize in providing care to children and adolescents, at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP), our team has been providing behavioral health services for two unique parent populations-parents with a child in the Newborn Infant Intensive Care Unit and pregnant women carrying fetuses with specific birth defects and receiving prenatal care in the Center for Fetal Diagnosis and Treatment. A new training program was developed to expand the scope of pediatric psychologists' practice to include perinatal behavioral health services, specifically for these two unique parent populations served at CHOP. The program includes direct service provision for adult mental health concerns, as well as education and support to help families cope with the existing medical conditions. This article describes the training program and its implementation as a model of training for other pediatric hospitals. The roles of psychologists embedded in these units and hospital privileges are discussed.

  12. Improving responses to depression and related disorders: evaluation of a innovative, general, mental health care workers training program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Annette L

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Australian General Practitioners have been beneficiaries of extensive training in mental health care delivery over the last few years but less so other workers who support those with mental illness. Training is needed as it is widely recognised that the most effective interventions to prevent and treat mental disorders are often not readily available. The Mental Health Aptitudes into Practice (MAP training package is a broad, innovative, interdisciplinary, general mental health training aimed at improving responses to individuals with depression and related disorders. The modular structure of this training program meant that such training could be targeted at those with varied backgrounds. Two hundred and seventy one days of free MAP training was delivered across Victoria in 2004/2005. The evaluation reported here assessed whether changes occurred in the trainees' confidence, mental health literacy, attitudes towards effective treatments, mental health knowledge and skills and community mental health ideology following training. Methods These elements were assessed using pen and paper tests prior, immediately following, 6 months after and then 12 months after the training. Trainees' confidence, mental health literacy and social distance were measured using scales that have been used in evaluations of Mental Health First Aid Training. Community mental health ideology was measured using a sub-scale of the Community Attitudes to the Mentally Ill (CAMI scale. The trainees' knowledge and skills were accessed using instrumentation specifically designed for this evaluation. Results Following training, participants had more confidence in their ability to work with those who have mental health issues and less desire for social distance from them. Participants' knowledge and skills in relation to the treatment of mental disorders increased. These changes were observed immediately after training. The limited existing evidence suggests

  13. Improving responses to depression and related disorders: evaluation of a innovative, general, mental health care workers training program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Australian General Practitioners have been beneficiaries of extensive training in mental health care delivery over the last few years but less so other workers who support those with mental illness. Training is needed as it is widely recognised that the most effective interventions to prevent and treat mental disorders are often not readily available. The Mental Health Aptitudes into Practice (MAP) training package is a broad, innovative, interdisciplinary, general mental health training aimed at improving responses to individuals with depression and related disorders. The modular structure of this training program meant that such training could be targeted at those with varied backgrounds. Two hundred and seventy one days of free MAP training was delivered across Victoria in 2004/2005. The evaluation reported here assessed whether changes occurred in the trainees' confidence, mental health literacy, attitudes towards effective treatments, mental health knowledge and skills and community mental health ideology following training. Methods These elements were assessed using pen and paper tests prior, immediately following, 6 months after and then 12 months after the training. Trainees' confidence, mental health literacy and social distance were measured using scales that have been used in evaluations of Mental Health First Aid Training. Community mental health ideology was measured using a sub-scale of the Community Attitudes to the Mentally Ill (CAMI) scale. The trainees' knowledge and skills were accessed using instrumentation specifically designed for this evaluation. Results Following training, participants had more confidence in their ability to work with those who have mental health issues and less desire for social distance from them. Participants' knowledge and skills in relation to the treatment of mental disorders increased. These changes were observed immediately after training. The limited existing evidence suggests these changes were sustained

  14. Final report for LDRD project 11-0783 : directed robots for increased military manpower effectiveness.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrer, Brandon Robinson; Rothganger, Fredrick H.; Wagner, John S.; Xavier, Patrick Gordon; Morrow, James Dan

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this LDRD is to develop technology allowing warfighters to provide high-level commands to their unmanned assets, freeing them to command a group of them or commit the bulk of their attention elsewhere. To this end, a brain-emulating cognition and control architecture (BECCA) was developed, incorporating novel and uniquely capable feature creation and reinforcement learning algorithms. BECCA was demonstrated on both a mobile manipulator platform and on a seven degree of freedom serial link robot arm. Existing military ground robots are almost universally teleoperated and occupy the complete attention of an operator. They may remove a soldier from harm's way, but they do not necessarily reduce manpower requirements. Current research efforts to solve the problem of autonomous operation in an unstructured, dynamic environment fall short of the desired performance. In order to increase the effectiveness of unmanned vehicle (UV) operators, we proposed to develop robots that can be 'directed' rather than remote-controlled. They are instructed and trained by human operators, rather than driven. The technical approach is modeled closely on psychological and neuroscientific models of human learning. Two Sandia-developed models are utilized in this effort: the Sandia Cognitive Framework (SCF), a cognitive psychology-based model of human processes, and BECCA, a psychophysical-based model of learning, motor control, and conceptualization. Together, these models span the functional space from perceptuo-motor abilities, to high-level motivational and attentional processes.

  15. Resource approach in providing health-saving process of future teachers training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykytiuk S.A.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The article reveals the mechanisms of resource approach realization in the organization of pedagogical education. There were defined the ways of providing health-saving teacher training, namely: assessment criteria of adjustment of social order and personal professional development needs, means of implementing the tasks of pedagogical education concept according to the resource approach. In this article the author concretized methods of preserving and strengthening the spiritual health of future teachers in the process of professional training. On the basis of analysis of editions of the home and foreign authors sanctified to the problems of health of young people, it is exposed, that the problem of health of student young people can be considered in the context of exposure of values of health in the field of thinking of students, and also descriptions of their life in the modern terms of maintenance of human capitals.

  16. The globalization of training in adolescent health and medicine: one size does not fit all.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Karen

    2016-08-01

    Adolescent medicine across the globe is practiced within a variety of healthcare models, with the shared vision of the promotion of optimal health outcomes for adolescents. In the past decade, there has been a call for transformation in how health professionals are trained, with recommendations that there be adoption of a global outlook, a multiprofessional perspective and a systems approach that considers the connections between education and health systems. Many individuals and groups are now examining how best to accomplish this educational reform. There are tensions between the call for globally accepted standards of education models and practice (a one-size fits all approach) and the need to promote the ability for education practices to be interpreted and transformed to best suit local contexts. This paper discusses some of the key considerations for 'importing' training program models for adolescent health and medicine, including the importance of cultural alignment and the utilization of best evidence and practice in health professions education.

  17. Perceived needs of health tutors in rural and urban health training institutions in Ghana: Implications for health sector staff internal migration control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Kaba Alhassan

    Full Text Available The population of Ghana is increasingly becoming urbanized with about 70% of the estimated 27 million people living in urban and peri-urban areas. Nonetheless, eight out of the ten regions in Ghana remain predominantly rural where only 32% of the national health sector workforce works. Moreover, the rural-urban disparities in the density of health tutors (staff responsible for pre-service training of health professionals are enormous. This paper explores perceived needs of health tutors in rural and urban health training institutions in Ghana.This is a descriptive qualitative study conducted in the Greater Accra and Northern regions of Ghana. The Study used the deductive thematic and sub-thematic analysis approaches. Five health training institutions were randomly sampled, and 72 tutors engaged in separate focus group discussions with an average size of 14 participants per group in each training institution.Perceived rural-urban disparities among health tutors were found in the payment of extra duty allowances; school infrastructure including libraries and internet connectivity; staff accommodation; and opportunities for scholarships and higher education. Health tutors in rural areas generally expressed more frustration with these work conditions than those in urban areas.There is the need to initiate and sustain work incentives that promote motivation of rural health tutors to control ongoing rural-urban migration of qualified staff. It is recommended the following incentives be prioritized to promote retention of qualified health tutors in rural health training schools: payment of research, book and rural allowances; early promotion of rural staff; prioritizing rural tutors for scholarships, and introduction of national best health tutor awards.

  18. Perceived needs of health tutors in rural and urban health training institutions in Ghana: Implications for health sector staff internal migration control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyere, Christopher B.; Nketiah-Amponsah, Edward; Mwini-Nyaledzigbor, Prudence P.

    2017-01-01

    Background The population of Ghana is increasingly becoming urbanized with about 70% of the estimated 27 million people living in urban and peri-urban areas. Nonetheless, eight out of the ten regions in Ghana remain predominantly rural where only 32% of the national health sector workforce works. Moreover, the rural-urban disparities in the density of health tutors (staff responsible for pre-service training of health professionals) are enormous. This paper explores perceived needs of health tutors in rural and urban health training institutions in Ghana. Methods This is a descriptive qualitative study conducted in the Greater Accra and Northern regions of Ghana. The Study used the deductive thematic and sub-thematic analysis approaches. Five health training institutions were randomly sampled, and 72 tutors engaged in separate focus group discussions with an average size of 14 participants per group in each training institution. Results Perceived rural-urban disparities among health tutors were found in the payment of extra duty allowances; school infrastructure including libraries and internet connectivity; staff accommodation; and opportunities for scholarships and higher education. Health tutors in rural areas generally expressed more frustration with these work conditions than those in urban areas. Conclusions There is the need to initiate and sustain work incentives that promote motivation of rural health tutors to control ongoing rural-urban migration of qualified staff. It is recommended the following incentives be prioritized to promote retention of qualified health tutors in rural health training schools: payment of research, book and rural allowances; early promotion of rural staff; prioritizing rural tutors for scholarships, and introduction of national best health tutor awards. PMID:28982194

  19. Effects of a mental health training program for manufacturing company managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegami, Kazunori; Tahara, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Tatsuji; Mafune, Kosuke; Hiro, Hisanori; Nagata, Shoji

    2010-06-01

    We practiced interventional approaches for the promotion of occupational mental health in a manufacturing company with approximately 2,000 workers, between 2005 and 2007. We investigated the long-term effects of our mental health training program--including Active Listening (AL) training for managers--on perceived job stressors, stress reactions and social supports of workers, and mental sick leave. We conducted the mental health training program with AL training for all managers in order to improve their communication skills and support for workers. The investigation was conducted using the Brief Job Stress Questionnaire (BJSQ). In addition, we surveyed the number of workers taking sick leave due to mental problems from 2003 to 2007. Among the categories of "job stressors" in the BJSQ, the scores for "quantitative workload," "qualitative workload" and "physical demands" improved significantly after our interventional approaches. The number of workers taking sick leave had been increasing gradually from 2003 to 2005, but this decreased by approximately half in 2006 and 2007. Our mental health training programs for managers were successful in decreasing some job stressors, stress reactions, and workers' sick leave due to mental problems.

  20. Evaluation of Reproductive Health Training of Soldiers at the First Army of Turkish Armed Forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilal Bakir

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The study has aimed to evaluate results of reproductive health training in the First army as a part the Reproductive Health Program of Turkish Armed Forces (TAF. Hard copies of training results from the a sample of 9 reproductive health classrooms between November 2006 and February 2007 have been collected and analyzed after entering in a SPSS file. A Pre-test and a post-test included the same 25 questions on RH issues were given to the soldiers. Total mean scores and scores for 5 modules of Sexual Health, Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs, Contraceptives, Safe Motherhood, and Gender, were estimated. By deciding 60 as cutting point, achievement of soldiers was also evaluated. Total Pre and posttest mean scores were compared between groups according to the achievement, hometown, and region of residency, educational level, and marital status. Furthermore, Relative efficiency, Efficiency attributed to training course and Efficiency Ratio has been also calculated. The mean pre-test score of soldiers is 60.4 ± 21.0 and it has been significantly increased up to 82.8 ± 14.5 after the training course (p<0.05. This significant increase was also found for each of sub dimensions similar to total score (p<0.05. While 52.5 % of soldiers have been successful on pretest, this percent has been rise up to 93.1% for the post test (p<0.05.. The relative efficiency of intervention as 6.9, efficiency attributed to training as 40.6%, and efficiency ratio as 85.5% have been estimated. Involving in reproductive health training has improved soldiers� awareness particularly on women�s health. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2012; 11(1.000: 41-48

  1. Examining the importance of incorporating emergency preparedness and disaster training core competencies into allied health curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Tammy

    2015-01-01

    Preparation for responding to emergency events that does not warrant outside help beyond the local community resources or responding to disaster events that is beyond the capabilities of the local community both require first responders and healthcare professionals to have interdisciplinary skills needed to function as a team for saving lives. To date, there is no core emergency preparedness and disaster planning competencies that have been standardized at all levels across the various allied health curricula disciplines. To identify if emergency preparedness and disaster training content are currently being taught in allied health program courses, to identify possible gaps within allied health curricula, and to explore the perceptions of allied health college educators for implementing emergency preparedness and disaster training core competencies into their existing curricula, if not already included. A quantitative Internet-based survey was conducted in 2013. Convenient sample. Fifty-one allied health college educators completed the survey. Descriptive statistics indicated that the majority of allied health college instructors do not currently teach emergency preparedness and disaster training core competency content within their current allied health discipline; however, their perceived level of importance for inclusion of the competencies was high. The results of this study supported the need for developing and establishing a basic national set of standardized core emergency preparedness and disaster planning competencies at all levels across various allied health curricula disciplines to ensure victims receive the best patient care and have the best possible chance of survival.

  2. Effectiveness of a Voice Training Program for Student Teachers on Vocal Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Bernhard; Nusseck, Manfred; Spahn, Claudia; Echternach, Matthias

    2016-07-01

    The effectiveness of a preventive training program on vocal health for German student teachers was investigated on specific vocal parameters. The voice quality as described by the Dysphonia Severity Index of 204 student teachers (training group: n = 123; control group: n = 81) was measured at the beginning and at the end of the student teachers training period (duration 1.5 years). Additionally, for investigating the voice-carrying capacity, a vocal loading test (VLT) was performed. Finally, participants had to provide a subjective judgment of a possible Voice Handicap Index. The training program improved the voice quality of the trained group compared with that of the control group, whose voice quality declined. The trained group was also able to better sustain their voice quality across the VLT than the control group. Both groups, however, reported a similar increase in subjective vocal strain. The presented training program clearly showed a positive impact on the voice quality and the vocal capacity. The results maintain the importance of such a training program to be integrated in the education and occupational routine of teachers. Copyright © 2016 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Building capacity for Health Impact Assessment: Training outcomes from the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuchter, Joseph [Berkeley, CA (United States); Rutt, Candace, E-mail: awr8@cdc.gov [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity, 4770 Buford Highway MS/F-77, Atlanta, GA 30341 (United States); Satariano, William A. [University of California Berkeley, School of Public Health, Division of Community Health and Human Development, Berkeley, CA (United States); Seto, Edmund [University of Washington, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Background: Despite the continued growth of Health Impact Assessment (HIA) in the US, there is little research on HIA capacity-building. A comprehensive study of longer-term training outcomes may reveal opportunities for improving capacity building activities and HIA practice. Methods: We conducted in-depth interviews with HIA trainees in the United States to assess their outcomes and needs. Using a training evaluation framework, we measured outcomes across a spectrum of reaction, learning, behavior and results. Results: From 2006 to 2012, four organizations trained over 2200 people in at least 75 in-person HIA trainings in 29 states. We interviewed 48 trainees, selected both randomly and purposefully. The mean duration between training and interview was 3.4 years. Trainees reported that their training objectives were met, especially when relevant case-studies were used. They established new collaborations at the trainings and maintained them. Training appeared to catalyze more holistic thinking and practice, including a range of HIA-related activities. Many trainees disseminated what they learned and engaged in components of HIA, even without dedicated funding. Going forward, trainees need assistance with quantitative methods, project management, community engagement, framing recommendations, and evaluation. Conclusions: The research revealed opportunities for a range of HIA stakeholders to refine and coordinate training resources, apply a competency framework and leverage complimentary workforce development efforts, and sensitize and build the capacity of communities. - Highlights: • We interviewed HIA trainees in the United States to assess longer-term outcomes. • Training appeared to catalyze a range of beneficial partnerships and activities. • Trainees reported outstanding needs for specific skills and competencies. • There are various opportunities to improve training and capacity-building.

  4. Reaching consensus: a review on sexual health training modules for professional capacity building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Karimian

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Professional capacity building (PCB is the focus point in health-related subjects.The present study was conducted to systematically review the existing sexual health training modules for health care providers.Methods: The following keywords were used to search: training, education, professional capacity, practitioner, sexual health, skill education, module, course, package and curriculum.The term MESH is referred to Medical Subject Headings and the following databases were investigated: MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL, The Cochrane Library and Web of Science, Scopus, Google Scholar, SID,Magiran, and Iranmedex. All articles from 1980 to 2015 were extracted. Online modules were excluded. Considering that lesson plan was the basis of instruction, the modules were selected based on the characteristics of the lesson plans.Results: A total number of 38 published training modules in the field of sexuality we redetermined. In total, more than half of the modules (58% were designed for medical doctor sand allied health professionals and the remaining (42% were for nurses and midwives. Almost all the modules (97% were introduced and utilized in developed countries, and only 3% were disseminated in developing countries.Conclusion: There are invaluable modules to build professional capacity in the field of sexual health. As a number of modules have been designed for nurses and midwifes, as the first-line health care providers, the use of these groups in sexual counseling and empowerment for sexual health is essential. No sexual health training program was designed in Iran. Therefore, designing such modules according to Iranian culture is strongly recommended.

  5. The reasonable legal nursing manpower-staffing by using the system dynamics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Kyoung Ja; Kim, Moon Sil; Kim, Jung A

    2006-01-01

    The Purpose of the study is to lay foundation for reasonable legal nursing manpower staffing by building the nursing manpower-staffing model. The System dynamics approach was adapted to build a simulation model. The model was built up on Vensim 5.0b DSS. In terms of economic efficiency on tertiary hospitals, the ratio of bed to nurse for the best reasonable legal nursing manpower-staffing is 3.0: 1(2.6:1 if calculating in terms of the ratio of patient to nurse) In terms of economic efficiency on secondary hospitals, the ratio of bed to nurse for the best reasonable legal nursing manpower-staffing is 3.5: 1(3.0:1 if calculating in terms of the ratio of patient to nurse).

  6. Job Analysis Techniques for Restructuring Health Manpower Education and Training in the Navy Medical Department. Attachment 4. Clinic QPCB Task Sort for Clinical Physician Assistants--Dermatology, ENT, Opththalmology, Orthopedics, and Urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technomics, Inc., McLean, VA.

    This publication is Attachment 4 of a set of 16 computer listed QPCB task sorts, by career level, for the entire Hospital Corps and Dental Technician fields. Statistical data are presented in tabular form for a detailed listing of job duties for clinical physician assistants. (BT)

  7. The effect of physical fitness and physical exercise training on work productivity among health care workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongstad, Malte Bue; Christensen, Jeanette Reffstrup; Sjøgaard, Gisela

    THE EFFECT OF PHYSICAL FITNESS AND PHYSICAL EXERCISE TRAINING ON WORK PRODUCTIVITY AMONG HEALTH CARE WORKERS Kongstad, M. 1, Sjøgaard, G. 1, Søgaard, K. 1, Christensen, JR. 1 1: SDU (Odense, Denmark) Introduction Workplace health promotion involving physical exercise training may negate lifestyle...... diseases and improve work productivity (WP) mediated by physiological variables such as BMI, cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), and maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). The aim of this paper was to examine 1) the relationship between WP and the physiological variables BMI, CRF, and MVC in a cross...

  8. Communication skills training increases self-efficacy of health care professionals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Birgitte; Ammentorp, Jette; Ohm Kyvik, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    Despite the knowledge of good communication as a precondition for optimal care and treatment in health care, serious communication problems are still experienced by patients as well as by health care professionals. An orthopedic surgery department initiated a 3-day communication skills training...... course for all staff members expecting an increase in patient-centeredness in communication and more respectful intercollegial communication. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of this training course on participants' self-efficacy with a focus on communication with both colleagues...

  9. Learning by doing. Training health care professionals to become facilitator of moral case deliberation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolper, Margreet; Molewijk, Bert; Widdershoven, Guy

    2015-03-01

    Moral case deliberation (MCD) is a dialogue among health care professionals about moral issues in practice. A trained facilitator moderates the dialogue, using a conversation method. Often, the facilitator is an ethicist. However, because of the growing interest in MCD and the need to connect MCD to practice, healthcare professionals should also become facilitators themselves. In order to transfer the facilitating expertise to health care professionals, a training program has been developed. This program enables professionals in health care institutions to acquire expertise in dealing with moral questions independent of the expertise of an (external) ethicist. Over the past 10 years, we developed a training program with a specific mix of theory and practice, aiming to foster the right attitude, skills and knowledge of the trainee. The content and the didactics of the training developed in line with the philosophy of MCD: pragmatic hermeneutics, dialogical ethics and Socratic epistemology. Central principles are: 'learning by doing', 'reflection instead of ready made knowledge', and 'dialogue on dialogue'. This paper describes the theoretical background and the didactic content of the current training. Furthermore, we present didactic tools which we developed for stimulating active learning. We also go into lessons we learned in developing the training. Next, we provide some preliminary data from evaluation research of the training program by participants. The discussion highlights crucial aspects of educating professionals to become facilitators of MCD. The paper ends with concluding remarks and a plea for more evaluative evidence of the effectiveness and meaning of this training program for doing MCD in institutions.

  10. Skills for Psychological Recovery: Evaluation of a post-disaster mental health training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Darryl; Crompton, David; Howard, Alexandra; Stevens, Naomi; Metcalf, Olivia; Brymer, Melissa; Ruzek, Josef; Watson, Patricia; Bryant, Richard; Forbes, David

    2014-01-01

    Skills for Psychological Recovery (SPR) is a brief skills-based approach to assist community members to better cope after a disaster or other tragedy. This paper reports on an evaluation of a large SPR training and support program following floods and cyclones in Queensland, Australia. The program sought to recruit, train and support competent SPR trainers; provide systematic high-quality training in SPR skills for practitioners; improve the confidence of a large number of practitioners to use SPR; and encourage practitioners' use of SPR with community members. Trainers recruited to the program facilitated 49 training sessions for 788 practitioners across Queensland. Trainers were assessed by practitioners to have high-level competencies to run training sessions. Practitioners reported improved confidence to use each SPR intervention following training and at 6 months post-training. Based on available data, more than 6 out of 10 practitioners used an SPR intervention during the follow up period, with each intervention used by over half of the practitioners at both 3 and 6 months. The most frequently reported barrier to using SPR was not having seen a community member with problems requiring SPR. For trainers, a psychology background and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) orientation were unrelated to their competencies to facilitate practitioner training sessions. For practitioners, a psychology background and to some extent a CBT orientation were related to confidence to use SPR interventions. In summary, this study provides details of an evaluation of a large-scale mental health training and support program to enhance response to meet the mental health needs of those affected by disaster.

  11. Evaluation of Computer-Based Training for Health Workers in Echocardiography for RHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelman, Daniel; Okello, Emmy; Beaton, Andrea; Selnow, Gary; Remenyi, Bo; Watson, Caroline; Longenecker, Chris T; Sable, Craig; Steer, Andrew C

    2017-03-01

    The implementation of screening for rheumatic heart disease at a population-scale would require a considerable increase in human resources. Training nonexpert staff in echocardiography requires appropriate methods and materials. This pre/post study aims to measure the change in the knowledge and confidence of a group of health workers after a computer-assisted training intervention in basic echocardiography for rheumatic heart disease. A syllabus of self-guided, computer-based modules to train nonexpert health workers in basic echocardiography for rheumatic heart disease was developed. Thirty-eight health workers from Uganda participated in the training. Using a pre/post design, identical test instruments were administered before and after the training intervention, assessing the knowledge (using multiple-choice questions) and confidence (using Likert scale questions) in clinical science and echocardiography. The mean total score on knowledge tests rose from 44.8% to 85.4% (mean difference: 40.6%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 35.4% to 45.8%), with strong evidence for an increase in scores across all knowledge theme areas (p < 0.001). Increased confidence with each key aspect was reported, and there was strong evidence for an increase in the mean score for confidence scales in clinical science (difference: 7.1, 95% CI: 6.2 to 8.0; p < 0.001) and echocardiography (difference: 18.3, 95% CI: 16.6 to 20.0; p < 0.001). The training program was effective at increasing knowledge and confidence for basic echocardiography in nonexpert health workers. Use of computer-assisted learning may reduce the human resource requirements for training staff in echocardiography. Copyright © 2016 World Heart Federation (Geneva). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Training needs for research in health inequities among health and demographic researchers from eight African and Asian countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haafkens, Joke; Blomstedt, Yulia; Eriksson, Malin; Becher, Heiko; Ramroth, Heribert; Kinsman, John

    2014-12-10

    To support equity focussed public health policy in low and middle income countries, more evidence and analysis of the social determinants of health inequalities is needed. This requires specific know how among researchers. The INDEPTH Training and Research Centres of Excellence (INTREC) collaboration will develop and provide training on the social determinants of health approach for health researchers from the International Network for the Demographic Evaluation of Populations and Their Health in Low- and Middle-Income Countries (INDEPTH) in Africa and Asia. To identify learning needs among the potential target group, this qualitative study explored what INDEPTH researchers from Ghana, Tanzania, South Africa, Kenya, Indonesia, India, Vietnam, and Bangladesh feel that they want to learn to be able to conduct research on the causes of health inequalities in their country. Using an inductive method, online concept-mapping, participants were asked to generate statements in response to the question what background knowledge they would need to conduct research on the causes of health inequalities in their country, to sort those statements into thematic groups, and to rate them in terms of how important it would be for the INTREC program to offer instruction on each of the statements. Statistical techniques were used to structure statements into a thematic cluster map and average importance ratings of statements/clusters were calculated. Of the 150 invited researchers, 82 participated in the study: 54 from Africa; 28 from Asia. Participants generated 59 statements and sorted them into 6 broader thematic clusters: "assessing health inequalities"; "research design and methods"; "research and policy"; "demography and health inequalities"; "social determinants of health" and "interventions". African participants assigned the highest importance to further training on methods for assessing health inequalities. Asian participants assigned the highest importance to training on

  13. Sustaining the Drone Enterprise: How Manpower Analysis Engendered Policy Reform in the United States Air Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-17

    Sustaining the Drone Enterprise How Manpower Analysis Engendered Policy Reform in the United States Air Force Major Kiel M. Martin, Ph.D...CT 06510 Abstract The Remotely Piloted Aircraft (RPA), colloquially labeled the “ drone ,” has become iconic of American military campaigns this...Sustaining the Drone Enterprise: How Manpower Analysis Engendered Policy Reform in the United States Air Force’ informed policy decisions by the Office of

  14. Theoretical orientation and practice scenarios on occupational therapists training in primary health care: professors perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Alves dos Santos Silva

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This article aimed to describe and analyze the theoretical guidance and practical scenarios in the training of occupational therapists in Primary Health Care (PHC. Method: This is a qualitative research, which presents the perspectives of 17 teachers from nine occupational therapy courses in the state of São Paulo. Results:We categorized subjects associated to the study objective and present two categories: theoretical orientation - which includes the study of the referential Alma Ata (1978; Health Reform; critical understanding of the Unified Health System, the PHC and the profession specificity in this field involving understanding of the devices used by the teams occupational therapist and their working tools, social vulnerability understanding, everyday life and institutional context involving services and their management. The Practice Scenarios has been identified a plurality of services and drawings management where theoretical activities practices are developed, pointed out the difficulty of conducting training for this professional field. Moreover, the absence of workers on PHC hinders health care and also impairs the students training from different professional areas. Conclusion: The professional category must value since training, the learning of new care technologies compatible with their knowledge and occupational therapeutic resources towards the population’s access to different practices for comprehensive health care, including the care of occupational therapy in PHC.

  15. Training Primary Health Professionals in Breast Cancer Prevention: Evidence and Experience from Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaña-Valladares, Laura; González-Robledo, María Cecilia; Rosas-Magallanes, Cynthia; Mejía-Arias, Miguel Ángel; Arreola-Ornelas, Héctor; Knaul, Felicia M

    2018-02-01

    To analyze the key successful factors of a national educational strategy for early breast cancer detection developed in Mexico for primary health care personnel from 2008 to 2014, an educational strategy to train physicians, nurses, health promoters, and medical students from local ministries of health with a competency-based approach was developed and implemented using diverse educational modalities, face-to-face, blended, and a massive open online course (MOOC). Formative and summative evaluations were used during the implementation of the course. A total of 19,563 health professionals were trained from 2008 to 2014. The graduation rate, an average of all educational modalities, was 91 %, much higher than those previously reported in the literature. The factors that might have influenced this success were (1) the training strategy, which was designed according to the characteristics and specific needs of the target groups; (2) the political will and commitment of the country's health authorities; (3) the technological and educational models used; and (4) the punctual follow-up of participants. This study shows that carefully designed educational interventions can improve service professionals' competencies and that regardless of the modality, face-to-face, blended learning, or MOOC, high graduation rates can be achieved. Further evaluation is required to demonstrate that the competencies remained in all target groups after 6 months of the intervention and that the women served by the trained personnel were provided accurate information and timely diagnoses of breast cancer.

  16. Needs assessment of Wisconsin primary care residents and faculty regarding interest in global health training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanders James

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The primary objectives of this study were to assess Wisconsin's primary care residents' attitudes toward international health training, the interest among faculty to provide IH training, and the preferred modality of IH training. Methods Surveys were administered using 505 residents and 413 medical faculty in primary care residencies in Wisconsin. Results from 128 residents and 118 medical school faculty members were collected during the spring of 2007 and analyzed. Results In total, 25% of residents (128/505 and 28% of faculty (118/413 responded to the survey. A majority of residents (58% and faculty (63% were interested in global health issues. Among residents, 63% planned on spending professional time working abroad. Few residents (9% and faculty (11% assess their residencies as preparing residents well to address topics relating to international health. The survey indicates that adequate faculty in Wisconsin could provide mentorship in international health as 47% (55 of faculty had experience working as a physician internationally, 49% (58 of faculty spend more than 25% clinical time caring for patient from underserved communities and 39% (46 would be willing to be involved with developing curriculum, lecturing and/or mentoring residents in international health. Conclusion Overall, the majority of the respondents expressed high interest in IH and few felt prepared to address IH issues indicating a need for increased training in this area. The findings of this survey are likely relevant as a prototype for other primary care residencies.

  17. Analysis of trauma care education in the South Sudan community health worker training curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunniyi, Adedamola; Clark, Melissa; Donaldson, Ross

    2015-04-01

    Trauma is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, with the majority occurring in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Allied health workers are often on the front lines of caring for trauma patients; this is the case in South Sudan, where a system of community health workers (CHWs) and clinical officers (COs) form an essential part of the health care structure. However, curricula for these workers vary, and it is unclear how much these training programs include trauma education. HYPOTHESIS/METHODS: The CHW training curriculum in South Sudan was reviewed to evaluate the degree to which it incorporates trauma education, according to established guidelines from the World Health Organization (WHO). To the authors' knowledge, this is the first formal comparison of a CHW curriculum with established WHO trauma guidelines. The curriculum incorporated a number of essential components of the WHO guidelines; however, the concepts taught were limited in scope. The curriculum only covered about 50% of the content required for basic providers, with major deficiencies being in the management of head and spinal injuries, safety protocols for health care personnel, and in the management of pediatric patients. The CHW training curriculum lacks the requisite content to provide adequately a basic level of trauma care and requires amending to ensure that all South Sudan citizens receive appropriate treatment. It is recommended that other LMICs review their existing training curricula in order to improve their ability to provide adequate trauma care and to ensure they meet the basic WHO guidelines.

  18. 76 FR 26311 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special Emphasis... Manpower Development in the Environmental Health Sciences; 93.113, Biological Response to Environmental...

  19. Assessment of a national network: the case of the French teacher training colleges' health education network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guével, Marie-Renée; Jourdan, Didier

    2009-06-01

    The French teacher training colleges' health education (HE) network was set up in 2005 to encourage the inclusion of HE in courses for primary and secondary school teachers. A systematic process of monitoring the activity and the impact of this initiative was implemented. This analysis was systematically compared with the perceptions of teaching staff involved in the network. This paper assesses the network after 2 years using documents produced and interviews with 24 coordinators. Twenty-nine teacher training colleges out of a total of 31 are involved in the network. The network has helped to create links between teacher training colleges, extend HE training and encourage partnerships with other public health organizations. By 2007, HE was included in courses offered by 19 teacher training colleges as opposed to only 3 in 2005. This study not only showed the positive impact of the network but also revealed issues in its management and presented new challenges to ensure the effectiveness of the network. The network has succeeded in attracting and training trainers who were already providing or were interested in HE. Reaching other trainers who are not familiar with HE remains a challenge for the future.

  20. Health and fitness benefits of a resistance training intervention performed in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavanela, Plinio M; Crewther, Blair T; Lodo, Leandro; Florindo, Alex A; Miyabara, Elen H; Aoki, Marcelo S

    2012-03-01

    This study examined the effects of a workplace-based resistance training intervention on different health-, fitness-, and work-related measures in untrained men (bus drivers). The subjects were recruited from a bus company and divided into a training (n = 48) and control (n = 48) groups after initial prescreening. The training group performed a 24-week resistance training program, whereas the control group maintained their normal daily activities. Each group was assessed for body composition, blood pressure (BP), pain incidence, muscular endurance, and flexibility before and after the 24-week period. Work absenteeism was also recorded during this period and after a 12-week follow-up phase. In general, no body composition changes were identified in either group. In the training group, a significant reduction in BP and pain incidence, along with improvements in muscle endurance and flexibility were seen after 24 weeks (p workplace improved different aspects of health and fitness in untrained men, thereby potentially providing other work-related benefits. Thus, both employers and employees may benefit from the setup, promotion, and support of a work-based physical activity program involving resistance training.