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Sample records for health management ecsrhm

  1. Pervasive health knowledge management

    CERN Document Server

    Bali, Rajeev; Goldberg, Steve

    2014-01-01

    This book explains how mobile technologies and knowledge management (KM) can streamline health systems by removing time and place limitations, reducing costs, and giving patients a more proactive part in managing their conditions.

  2. Health care operations management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carter, M.W.; Hans, Elias W.; Kolisch, R.

    2012-01-01

    Health care operations management has become a major topic for health care service providers and society. Operations research already has and further will make considerable contributions for the effective and efficient delivery of health care services. This special issue collects seven carefully

  3. Integrated Health Management Definitions

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Joint Army Navy NASA Air Force Modeling and Simulation Subcommittee's Integrated Health Management panel was started about 6 years ago to help foster...

  4. Integrated Building Health Management

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Abstract: Building health management is an important part in running an efficient and cost-effective building. Many problems in a building’s system can go undetected...

  5. Health care marketing management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, P D

    1979-01-01

    Health Care Marketing Management is the process of understanding the needs and the wats of a target market. Its purpose is to provide a viewpoint from which to integrate the analysis, planning, implementation (or organization) and control of the health care delivery system.

  6. Health supply chain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Rolf; Gallagher, Pat

    2010-01-01

    This chapter gives an educational overview of: * The actual application of supply chain practice and disciplines required for service delivery improvement within the current health environment. * A rationale for the application of Supply Chain Management (SCM) approaches to the Health sector. * The tools and methods available for supply chain analysis and benchmarking. * Key supply chain success factors.

  7. Managed health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtiss, F R

    1989-04-01

    The fundamental components of managed-care plans are described; the development of managed-care programs is discussed; and the impact of managed care on pharmacy services and the price, quality, and accessibility of health care are reviewed. Health care can be considered to be managed when at least one of the following fundamental components is present: prospective pricing, "UCR" (usual, customary, and reasonable) pricing of services, peer review, mandatory use review, benefit redesign, capitation payments, channeling, quality criteria, and health promotion. The managed-care industry consists of health maintenance organizations (HMOs), preferred provider organizations (PPOs), and managed fee-for-service plans. Managed-care reimbursement principles involve transferring some or all of the impetus for controlling use of services to the health-care provider. Means by which this is done include prospective pricing, services bundling, price discounts and negotiated fees, and capitation financing and reimbursement. Financial risk-sharing arrangements with providers--including hospitals, physicians, pharmacies, and home-care companies--are necessary for any managed-care plan to attain true control over its service costs. Use-review and use-management services are also fundamental to containing health-care spending. These include retrospective, concurrent, and prospective reviews of the necessity and appropriateness of medical services. Use management, like services bundling and prospective pricing, has been more effective in reducing costs of hospital inpatient services than costs associated with ambulatory care. Per case payments and services bundling have made individual charges for items irrelevant to hospital revenue. This has forced hospital pharmacy managers to become more sensitive to cost management. Drug formularies, improved productivity, and use of prescribing protocols are means by which hospital pharmacies have controlled costs. However, since shorter hospital

  8. Intelligent Vehicle Health Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Deidre E.; Trevino, Luis; Watson, Michael D.

    2005-01-01

    As a part of the overall goal of developing Integrated Vehicle Health Management systems for aerospace vehicles, the NASA Faculty Fellowship Program (NFFP) at Marshall Space Flight Center has performed a pilot study on IVHM principals which integrates researched IVHM technologies in support of Integrated Intelligent Vehicle Management (IIVM). IVHM is the process of assessing, preserving, and restoring system functionality across flight and ground systems (NASA NGLT 2004). The framework presented in this paper integrates advanced computational techniques with sensor and communication technologies for spacecraft that can generate responses through detection, diagnosis, reasoning, and adapt to system faults in support of INM. These real-time responses allow the IIVM to modify the affected vehicle subsystem(s) prior to a catastrophic event. Furthermore, the objective of this pilot program is to develop and integrate technologies which can provide a continuous, intelligent, and adaptive health state of a vehicle and use this information to improve safety and reduce costs of operations. Recent investments in avionics, health management, and controls have been directed towards IIVM. As this concept has matured, it has become clear the INM requires the same sensors and processing capabilities as the real-time avionics functions to support diagnosis of subsystem problems. New sensors have been proposed, in addition, to augment the avionics sensors to support better system monitoring and diagnostics. As the designs have been considered, a synergy has been realized where the real-time avionics can utilize sensors proposed for diagnostics and prognostics to make better real-time decisions in response to detected failures. IIVM provides for a single system allowing modularity of functions and hardware across the vehicle. The framework that supports IIVM consists of 11 major on-board functions necessary to fully manage a space vehicle maintaining crew safety and mission

  9. Health Applications for Corporate Health Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steigner, Guido; Doarn, Charles R; Schütte, Michael; Matusiewicz, David; Thielscher, Christian

    2017-05-01

    Many corporate organizations around the world are looking at new ways to improve the health and well-being of their employees. Many have begun to use m-health approaches and unique applications (apps) to provide assistance. In Germany, both m-health and occupational health management (OHM) are growing quickly. Therefore, we hypothesized that the combination-apps usage in OHM-is growing as well. We studied the usage of health apps in large corporations for health management of employed individuals. To understand the environment in Germany, a two-part study was conducted. First, an extensive literature search was done and second, interviews were conducted with 12 of the 20 biggest companies' health management representatives. Using key search terms, 5,445 peer-reviewed journal articles traced with German databases and on PubMed were reviewed. Interestingly and somewhat surprising to the authors, none of them covered our specific topic. Interviews were conducted with 60% of the companies indicated. Only 3 out of 12 companies use apps. Four companies are piloting apps. With one exception, apps cover well-known areas such as food coaching, physical motion, smoking cessation, stress prevention, and other health-related subjects. One app used sensors in work clothing to prevent unhealthy motion. With a few exceptions, there has been no evaluation of the utility and utilization of apps. Current app usage in corporate health management in Germany is surprisingly low. Apps need to be better evaluated. Main obstacles-which could be resolved in the future-are legal restrictions (especially on data security), the lack of company-owned smart phones, misfit of apps and corporate health strategy, a lack of app evaluation, and high app prices.

  10. Health policy and case management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, D D

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to analyze the performance of and support for case management using a policy framework in order to increase case managers' awareness of policy making and facilitate successful planning for future policy initiatives. Feldstein's (1996) theory of opposing legislative outcomes indicates that legislation can be viewed on a continuum, ranging from legislation that meets the needs of the public to legislation considered to be in the self-interest of the participants and legislators. The current health care system requires that case managers working for publicly funded health care organizations balance the need for stewardship of U.S. tax dollars and the health care needs of consumers. It is apparent from the literature that case managers are successfully achieving this balance. However, certain conditions should exist that allow for case manager decision-making that promotes effective and efficient utilization of health care resources. Case managers must work within the context of the health care policy environment. Realizing that it is more likely that the conflicts between stewardship and the provision of health care services will continue, case managers' knowledge and influence regarding policy making becomes imperative in order to ensure that these conflicting goals do not become mutually exclusive.

  11. Integrated Structural Health Management Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cornerstone Research Group Inc. (CRG) proposes to advance the state of the art in composite health management through refinement of an existing technology developed...

  12. Medical and Health Services Managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact & Help Economic Releases Latest Releases » Major Economic Indicators » Schedules for news Releases » By Month By News ... business-related courses with courses in medical terminology, hospital organization, ... often includes courses in health services management, accounting ...

  13. Managed consumerism in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, James C

    2005-01-01

    The future of market-oriented health policy and practice lies in "managed consumerism," a blend of the patient-centric focus of consumer-driven health care and the provider-centric focus of managed competition. The optimal locus of incentives will vary among health services according to the nature of the illness, the clinical technology, and the extent of discretion in utilization. A competitive market will manifest a variety of comprehensive and limited benefit designs, broad and narrow contractual networks, and single-and multispecialty provider organizations.

  14. Gamification and geospatial health management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortley, David

    2014-06-01

    Sensor and Measurement technologies are rapidly developing for many consumer applications which have the potential to make a major impact on business and society. One of the most important areas for building a sustainable future is in health management. This opportunity arises because of the growing popularity of lifestyle monitoring devices such as the Jawbone UP bracelet, Nike Fuelband and Samsung Galaxy GEAR. These devices measure physical activity and calorie consumption and, when visualised on mobile and portable devices, enable users to take more responsibility for their personal health. This presentation looks at how the process of gamification can be applied to develop important geospatial health management applications that could not only improve the health of nations but also significantly address some of the issues in global health such as the ageing society and obesity.

  15. Managing to enhance soil health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy soils are critical for meeting current and future societal demands. Management strategies that protect the soil against erosion, build soil organic matter and promote nutrient cycling are ways to enhance soil health. Keeping soils covered and judicious use of agrochemicals are akin to us “hu...

  16. X-33/RLV System Health Management/Vehicle Health Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouyos, William; Wangu, Srimal

    1998-01-01

    To reduce operations costs, Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLVS) must include highly reliable robust subsystems which are designed for simple repair access with a simplified servicing infrastructure, and which incorporate expedited decision-making about faults and anomalies. A key component for the Single Stage To Orbit (SSTO) RLV system used to meet these objectives is System Health Management (SHM). SHM incorporates Vehicle Health Management (VHM), ground processing associated with the vehicle fleet (GVHM), and Ground Infrastructure Health Management (GIHM). The primary objective of SHM is to provide an automated and paperless health decision, maintenance, and logistics system. Sanders, a Lockheed Martin Company, is leading the design, development, and integration of the SHM system for RLV and for X-33 (a sub-scale, sub-orbit Advanced Technology Demonstrator). Many critical technologies are necessary to make SHM (and more specifically VHM) practical, reliable, and cost effective. This paper will present the X-33 SHM design which forms the baseline for the RLV SHM, and it will discuss applications of advanced technologies to future RLVs. In addition, this paper will describe a Virtual Design Environment (VDE) which is being developed for RLV. This VDE will allow for system design engineering, as well as program management teams, to accurately and efficiently evaluate system designs, analyze the behavior of current systems, and predict the feasibility of making smooth and cost-efficient transitions from older technologies to newer ones. The RLV SHM design methodology will reduce program costs, decrease total program life-cycle time, and ultimately increase mission success.

  17. Prevention through health risk management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, G M

    1992-08-01

    Risk can lead to catastrophe. Risk-management systems are highly effective in preventing the catastrophes of fire, earthquakes, and work-site injuries. No such effective systems are present to prevent health and social problems. A practical, cost-effective system to manage risk in children is being developed by the nonprofit Arizona Health Evaluation and Longevity Planning (HELP) Foundation. Information regarding such risk is collected in the school setting. This voluntary information comes from the administration, the school nurse, physical fitness testing, blood testing by the local hospital, self-esteem instruments, and parent, teacher, and child questionnaires. The HELP Foundation then develops an individual child and class risk profile that is presented to the teacher, school nurse, principal, and parent. Those involved with each child then prioritize, plan, and implement programs and activities to manage the identified risk(s). Risks is tracked throughout the child's school career by periodic reassessment. Evaluation of change in problem outcome will be a natural extension of the process.

  18. Managing complex systems: performance management in public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrum, Laura B; Baker, Stacy L

    2004-01-01

    The complexity of mobilizing and managing systems-wide public health responses has prompted Turning Point's Performance Management National Excellence Collaborative, funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, to develop a conceptual framework for performance management in public health. The framework has four integrated parts: (1) performance standards, (2) performance measures, (3) reporting of progress, and (4) a quality improvement process. The Collaborative based its framework on evidence gathered through a survey of current state performance management practices, a literature review, and its investigation of current practice models. This balanced and cohesive management model can be constructively used by public health programs, organizations, and community and state public health systems.

  19. Strategic management of health care information systems: nurse managers' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammintakanen, Johanna; Kivinen, Tuula; Saranto, Kaija; Kinnunen, Juha

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe nurse managers' perceptions of the strategic management of information systems in health care. Lack of strategic thinking is a typical feature in health care and this may also concern information systems. The data for this study was collected by eight focus group interviews including altogether 48 nurse managers from primary and specialised health care. Five main categories described the strategic management of information systems in health care; IT as an emphasis of strategy; lack of strategic management of information systems; the importance of management; problems in privacy protection; and costs of IT. Although IT was emphasised in the strategies of many health care organisations, a typical feature was a lack of strategic management of information systems. This was seen both as an underutilisation of IT opportunities in health care organisations and as increased workload from nurse managers' perspective. Furthermore, the nurse managers reported that implementation of IT strengthened their managerial roles but also required stronger management. In conclusion, strategic management of information systems needs to be strengthened in health care and nurse managers should be more involved in this process.

  20. Spirulina in health care management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulshreshtha, Archana; Zacharia, Anish J; Jarouliya, Urmila; Bhadauriya, Pratiksha; Prasad, G B K S; Bisen, P S

    2008-10-01

    Spirulina is a photosynthetic, filamentous, spiral-shaped and multicellular edible microbe. It is the nature's richest and most complete source of nutrition. Spirulina has a unique blend of nutrients that no single source can offer. The alga contains a wide spectrum of prophylactic and therapeutic nutrients that include B-complex vitamins, minerals, proteins, gamma-linolenic acid and the super anti-oxidants such as beta-carotene, vitamin E, trace elements and a number of unexplored bioactive compounds. Because of its apparent ability to stimulate whole human physiology, Spirulina exhibits therapeutic functions such as antioxidant, anti-bacterial, antiviral, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, anti-allergic and anti-diabetic and plethora of beneficial functions. Spirulina consumption appears to promote the growth of intestinal micro flora as well. The review discusses the potential of Spirulina in health care management.

  1. QUALITY IN HEALTH SERVICES MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DORU CÎRNU

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The service sector plays an increasingly large modern market economies. By being unable to provide customers a tangible product in the hands of service providers makes the situation more difficult. Their success depends on customer satisfaction, which expect a certain benefit for the money paid, on quality, on mutual trust and many other attributes. What is very interesting is that they may differ from client to client, and there is no guarantee satisfaction to all customers, even if the service provided is the same. This shows the complex nature of services and efforts on service providers would have to be made permanent in order to attract more customers. This paper addresses the issues of continuous quality improvement of health services as an important part of the services sector. Until recently, these services in Romania although under strict control of the state, had a large number of patients who are given very little attention, which is why quality improvement acestoraa was compulsory. Opening and changing economic environment, increasing customer demands, forced hospitals that serve as a nodal point between these services and their applicants to adopt modern management methods and techniques to become competitive and to give patients the quality service expected. Modern society has always sought to provide the means to ensure good health closer to the needs of modern man. These have become more complex and more expensive and naturally requires financial resources increasingly mari.Este why, every time, all the failures alleging lack of money and resources in general. Is it true? Sometimes yes, often, no! The truth is that human and material resources are not used in an optimal way. The answer lies mainly in quality management. We will see what should be done in this regard.

  2. Education review: diversity and opportunity in health management systems and health information management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begler, K H

    1995-05-01

    Innovative methods for managing health care information are critical to solving the problems posed by our nation's health care system. The Department of Health Information Sciences at the John G. Rangos, Sr. School of Health Sciences at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh has created baccalaureate and master's degree programs in health management systems that respond to a need for the redesign and management of the cultural and technologic infrastructure necessary to create more efficient, highly effective, and better informed health care organizations.

  3. The employer's case for health management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulter, Christopher H

    2006-01-01

    Employers' past solutions to rising health benefit costs--adopting managed care strategies, cost shifting to employees and reducing benefits-are no longer effectively controlling costs and are depressing the value of health benefits for employee recruitment and retention. An alternative strategy is to implement health management approaches that improve the health status of employees. These programs reduce medical costs and have a documented positive impact on workers' compensation, disability costs, absenteeism and productivity. Further, this approach is complementary to health care consumerism as a strategy for health improvement and benefit cost reduction and results in improved employee health, outlook and satisfaction.

  4. Blogging and the health care manager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malvey, Donna; Alderman, Barbara; Todd, Andrew D

    2009-01-01

    The use of blogs in the workplace has emerged as a communication tool that can rapidly and simultaneously connect managers with their employees, customers, their peers, and other key stakeholders. Nowhere is this connection more critical than in health care, especially because of the uncertainty surrounding health care reform and the need for managers to have access to timely and authentic information. However, most health care managers have been slow to join the blogging bandwagon. This article examines the phenomenon of blogging and offers a list of blogs that every health care manager should read and why. This article also presents a simplified step-by-step process to set up a blog.

  5. A DISTRIBUTED PROGNOSTIC HEALTH MANAGEMENT ARCHITECTURE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This paper introduces a generic distributed prognostic health management (PHM) architecture with specific application to the electrical power systems domain. Current...

  6. A multilingual population health management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Edison W; Wang, Grace; Zahler, Abbie; Simoyan, Olapeju M; White, Mark V; Mckee, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Many small- and medium-sized physician practices have developed specific programs and models toward becoming a successful patient-centered medical home. This article reports on a case-control quality improvement study of a multilingual population health management program for chronic disease management at International Community Health Services. In its first 2.5 years of operation, the International Community Health Services Population Health Management program for patients with hypertension and diabetes is associated with significant improvements in key health outcome measures for blood pressure and hemoglobin A1c control. This has significant implications for similar practices.

  7. Future developments in health care performance management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crema M

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Maria Crema, Chiara Verbano Department of Management and Engineering, University of Padova, Vicenza, Italy Abstract: This paper highlights the challenges of performance management in health care, wherein multiple different objectives have to be pursued. The literature suggests starting with quality performance, following the sand cone theory, but considering a multidimensional concept of health care quality. Moreover, new managerial approaches coming from an industrial context and adapted to health care, such as lean management and risk management, can contribute to improving quality performance. Therefore, the opportunity to analyze them arises from studying their overlaps and links in order to identify possible synergies and to investigate the opportunity to develop an integrated methodology enabling improved performance. Keywords: health care, lean management, clinical risk management, quality, health care processes

  8. Team management in community mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuinness, M

    2000-02-01

    The community mental health team is now the established model for mental health service delivery in the community. Managing CMHTs requires a diverse range of managerial skills, role clarity and authority. More research needs to be undertaken on the role and effectiveness of the CMHT manager.

  9. From industrial safety to corporate health management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, K J

    2005-04-15

    Occupational health and safety is one of the most important topics of ergonomics. In many countries the practical issues are addressed in worker protection laws or rules and most companies have some sort of occupational health and safety system. As with many other ergonomics approaches, such activities are often necessary because of legal requirements. Such efforts are often viewed by management as primarily cost intensive. To change this image, it would be helpful to have a more positive, management-oriented approach. Corporate health management as a module of an integrated management system can fulfil this goal.

  10. Conceptualizing ORGANIZATIONAL HEALTH - Public health management and leadership perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orvik, Arne

    The thesis introduces a new conceptual model of organizational health and discusses its implications for public health management and leadership. It is developed with reference to organizational theories and ideologies, including New Public Management, the use of which has coincided with increasing...... workplace health problems in health care organizations. The model is based on empirical research and theories in the fields of public health, health care organization and management, and institutional theory. It includes five dimensions and defines organizational health in terms of how an organization...... is able to cope with the tensions associated with diverse values and competing institutional logics. This definition calls for an understanding of the tensions between values associated with quality, efficiency and integrity, and a dialectical perspective when attempting to assess the integration as well...

  11. Medication therapy disease management: Geisinger's approach to population health management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Laney K; Greskovic, Gerard; Grassi, Dante M; Graham, Jove; Sun, Haiyan; Gionfriddo, Michael R; Murray, Michael F; Manickam, Kandamurugu; Nathanson, Douglas C; Wright, Eric A; Evans, Michael A

    2017-09-15

    Pharmacists' involvement in a population health initiative focused on chronic disease management is described. Geisinger Health System has cultivated a culture of innovation in population health management, as highlighted by its ambulatory care pharmacy program, the Medication Therapy Disease Management (MTDM) program. Initiated in 1996, the MTDM program leverages pharmacists' pharmacotherapy expertise to optimize care and improve outcomes. MTDM program pharmacists are trained and credentialed to manage over 16 conditions, including atrial fibrillation (AF) and multiple sclerosis (MS). Over a 15-year period, Geisinger Health Plan (GHP)-insured patients with AF whose warfarin therapy was managed by the MTDM program had, on average, 18% fewer emergency department (ED) visits and 18% fewer hospitalizations per year than GHP enrollees with AF who did not receive MTDM services, with 23% lower annual total care costs. Over a 2-year period, GHP-insured patients with MS whose pharmacotherapy was managed by pharmacists averaged 28% fewer annual ED visits than non-pharmacist-managed patients; however, the mean annual total care cost was 21% higher among MTDM clinic patients. The Geisinger MTDM program has evolved over 20 years from a single pharmacist-run anticoagulation clinic into a large program focused on managing the health of an ever-growing population. Initial challenges in integrating pharmacists into the Geisinger patient care framework as clinical experts were overcome by demonstrating the MTDM program's positive impact on patient outcomes. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Understanding and managing organizational change: implications for public health management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jon M

    2010-01-01

    Managing organizational change has become a significant responsibility of managers. Managing the change process within public health organizations is important because appropriately and systematically managing change is linked to improved organizational performance. However, change is difficult and the change process poses formidable challenges for managers. Managers themselves face increased pressure to respond to environmental influences and provide the necessary leadership to their organizations in the change process. In fact, managing organizational change has become a key competency for healthcare managers. This article addresses the important topic of organizational change in public health organizations. It provides a conceptual foundation for understanding organizational change and its relationship to healthcare organizational performance, and then discusses the types and nature of change, using some examples and evidence from those organizations that have successfully managed change. A framework for guiding public health managers in the change management process is provided. The article concludes with suggested management competencies to establish a change-oriented organization with the culture and capacity for change.

  13. Health ecology and environmental management in Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Andrew E

    2002-12-01

    A health ecology approach to infectious disease incidence recognises that the weighting and interconnectivity of influences on health vary in terms of nature and context, from place to place and over time. It helps explain inherent limitations in the prediction and management of major infectious disease events and consequently why victims of ill health and policy often lack appropriate strategies for disease avoidance and health disaster mitigation. With reference to ongoing research in Mozambique, the paper uses the approach for assessment of health insecurity and to provide a realistic framework for management of complex disease hazards.

  14. Persuasive Reminders for Health Self-Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Leary, Katie; Liu, Leslie; McClure, Jennifer B.; Ralston, James; Pratt, Wanda

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Health reminders are integral to self-managing chronic illness. However, to act on these health reminders, patients face many challenges, such as lack of motivation and ability to perform health tasks. As a result, patients experience negative consequences for their health. To investigate the design of health reminders that persuade patients to take action, we conducted six participatory design sessions with two cohorts: mothers of children with asthma, and older adults with type 2 diabetes. Participants used collages, storyboards, and photos to express design ideas for future health reminder systems. From their design artifacts, we identified four types of persuasive reminders for health self-management: introspective, socially supportive, adaptive, and symbolic. We contribute insights into desired features for persuasive reminder systems from the perspectives of patients and informal caregivers, including features that support users to understand why and how to complete health tasks ahead of time, and affordances for intra-familial and patient-provider collaboration. PMID:28269896

  15. Future developments in health care performance management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crema, Maria; Verbano, Chiara

    2013-01-01

    This paper highlights the challenges of performance management in health care, wherein multiple different objectives have to be pursued. The literature suggests starting with quality performance, following the sand cone theory, but considering a multidimensional concept of health care quality. Moreover, new managerial approaches coming from an industrial context and adapted to health care, such as lean management and risk management, can contribute to improving quality performance. Therefore, the opportunity to analyze them arises from studying their overlaps and links in order to identify possible synergies and to investigate the opportunity to develop an integrated methodology enabling improved performance.

  16. Concept Development for Software Health Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riecks, Jung; Storm, Walter; Hollingsworth, Mark

    2011-01-01

    This report documents the work performed by Lockheed Martin Aeronautics (LM Aero) under NASA contract NNL06AA08B, delivery order NNL07AB06T. The Concept Development for Software Health Management (CDSHM) program was a NASA funded effort sponsored by the Integrated Vehicle Health Management Project, one of the four pillars of the NASA Aviation Safety Program. The CD-SHM program focused on defining a structured approach to software health management (SHM) through the development of a comprehensive failure taxonomy that is used to characterize the fundamental failure modes of safety-critical software.

  17. eHealth Terminology Management in Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seerainer, Carina; Sabutsch, Stefan W

    2016-01-01

    When it comes to establishing and operating a nationwide personal health record (PHR), effective and efficient terminology management including the development, administration, maintenance and publishing of terminologies is a precondition for semantic interoperability. In the Austrian national patient health record "ELGA" all relevant terminologies are provided and distributed by means of a CTS2-conformant terminology server. In the following article, issues and lessons learned from terminology management in a large-scale eHealth project are presented. Experience has proved the necessity of a national authority for medical terminology management in Austria.

  18. [Evaluation model for municipal health planning management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berretta, Isabel Quint; Lacerda, Josimari Telino de; Calvo, Maria Cristina Marino

    2011-11-01

    This article presents an evaluation model for municipal health planning management. The basis was a methodological study using the health planning theoretical framework to construct the evaluation matrix, in addition to an understanding of the organization and functioning designed by the Planning System of the Unified National Health System (PlanejaSUS) and definition of responsibilities for the municipal level under the Health Management Pact. The indicators and measures were validated using the consensus technique with specialists in planning and evaluation. The applicability was tested in 271 municipalities (counties) in the State of Santa Catarina, Brazil, based on population size. The proposed model features two evaluative dimensions which reflect the municipal health administrator's commitment to planning: the guarantee of resources and the internal and external relations needed for developing the activities. The data were analyzed using indicators, sub-dimensions, and dimensions. The study concludes that the model is feasible and appropriate for evaluating municipal performance in health planning management.

  19. Assessment of time management attitudes among health managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarp, Nilgun; Yarpuzlu, Aysegul Akbay; Mostame, Fariba

    2005-01-01

    These days, working people are finding it difficult to manage their time, get more done at work, and find some balance in their work and personal lives. Successful time management is often suggested to be a product of organizing skills, however, what works for one person may not work for others. Context current competence assessment formats for physicians, health professionals, and managers during their training years reliably test core knowledge and basic skills. However, they may underemphasize some important domains of professional medical practice. Thus, in addition to assessments of basic skills, new formats that assess clinical reasoning, expert judgment, management of ambiguity, professionalism, time management, learning strategies, and teamwork to promise a multidimensional assessment while maintaining adequate reliability and validity in classic health education and health care institutional settings are needed to be worked on. It should be kept in mind that institutional support, reflection, and mentoring must accompany the development of assessment programs. This study was designed to describe the main factors that consume time, effective hours of work, time management opportunities, and attitudes and behaviors of health professionals and managers on time management concept through assessment by the assessment tool Time Management Inquiry Form (TMIQ-F). The study was conducted at the State Hospital, Social Security Hospital, and University Hospital at Kirikkale, Turkey between October 1999 and January 2000, including 143 subjects defined as medical managers and medical specialists. According to the results, a manager should give priority to the concept of planning, which may be counted among the efficient time management techniques, and educate him/herself on time management.

  20. Participative management in health care services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Muller

    1995-05-01

    Full Text Available The need and demand for the highest-quality management of all health care delivery activities requires a participative management approach. The purpose with this article is to explore the process of participative management, to generate and describe a model for such management, focusing mainly on the process of participative management, and to formulate guidelines for operationalisation of the procedure. An exploratory, descriptive and theory-generating research design is pursued. After a brief literature review, inductive reasoning is mainly employed to identify and define central concepts, followed by the formulation of a few applicable statements and guidelines. Participative management is viewed as a process of that constitutes the elements of dynamic interactive decision-making and problem-solving, shared governance, empowerment, organisational transformation, and dynamic communication within the health care organisation. The scientific method of assessment, planning, implementation and evaluation is utilised throughout the process of participative management.

  1. Leadership and management in mental health nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blegen, Nina Elisabeth; Severinsson, Elisabeth

    2011-05-01

    Mental health nurses are agents of change, and their leadership, management role and characteristics exist at many levels in health care. Previous research presents a picture of mental health nurses as subordinate and passive recipients of the leader's influence and regard leadership and management as distinct from the nurses' practical work. The aim was to provide a synthesis of the studies conducted and to discuss the relationship between nursing leadership and nursing management in the context of mental health nursing. A literature search was conducted using EBSCO-host, Academic Search Premier, Science Direct, CINAHL and PubMed for the period January 1995-July 2010. Leadership and management in the context of mental health nursing are human activities that imply entering into mutual relationships. Mental health nurses' leadership, management and transformational leadership are positively related in terms of effectiveness and nurses' skills. It is important to consider mental health nurses' management as a form of leadership similar to or as a natural consequence of transformational leadership (TL) and that ethical concerns must be constantly prioritized throughout every level of the organization. © 2011 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Managed care in four managed competition OECD health systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmueli, Amir; Stam, Piet; Wasem, Jürgen; Trottmann, Maria

    2015-07-01

    Managed care emerged in the American health system in the 1980s as a way to manage suppliers' induced demand and to contain insurers' costs. While in Israel the health insurers have always been managed care organizations, owning health care facilities, employing medical personnel or contracting selectively with independent providers, European insurers have been much more passive, submitting themselves to collective agreements between insurers' and providers' associations, accompanied by extensive government regulation of prices, quantities, and budgets. With the 1990s reforms, and the introduction of risk-adjusted "managed competition", a growing pressure to allow the European insurers to manage their own care - including selective contracting with providers - has emerged, with varying speed of the introduction of policy changes across the individual countries. This paper compares experiences with managed care in Israel, The Netherlands, Germany and Switzerland since the 1990s. After a brief description of the health insurance markets in the four countries, we focus comparatively on the emergence of managed care in the markets for ambulatory care and inpatient market care. We conclude with an evaluation of the current situation and a discussion of selected health policy issues. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. DATUM for Health: Research data management training for health studies

    OpenAIRE

    McLeod, Julie

    2011-01-01

    This collaborative project sought to promote research data management skills of postgraduate research students in the health studies discipline through a specially-developed training programme which focuses on qualitative, unstructured research data. The project aimed to: design and pilot a training programme on research data management for postgraduate research students in health studies as an integral part of a doctoral training programme evaluate the usefulness and effectiveness of the tra...

  4. A Population Health Management Approach to Oral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, Jeff; Phillips, Kathryn E

    2016-03-01

    Clinical outcomes have been shown to be better, and total costs lower, when patients with chronic illness such as diabetes are managed using a population health strategy in a primary care setting that includes structured coordination of care with specialty services. This "population health management approach" offers a promising new vision for addressing oral disease as a chronic illness through a collaborative partnership between primary care teams and dental professionals.

  5. Electronic Prognostics for Vehicle Health Management Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — All electronic systems are prone to wear-out and eventual failure and this has direct implications for Vehicle Health Management for NASA with its long space...

  6. Shared Calendars for Home Health Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschler, Jordan; Kendall, Logan; O'Leary, Katie; Vizer, Lisa M; Lozano, Paula; McClure, Jennifer B; Pratt, Wanda; Ralston, James D

    2015-03-01

    What is the role of shared calendars for home health management? Utilizing a maximum variation sampling method, we interviewed 20 adult individuals with diabetes and 20 mothers of children with asthma to understand calendar use in the context of chronic disease home health management. In comparing the experiences of these two groups, we explore participants' use of tools for organizing tasks and appointments, their strategies for capturing health and non-health events in the family calendar system, the ecology of artifacts that intersect with their scheduling tools, and the failures they experienced while managing their calendar systems. Through this work, we offer a context-specific perspective of schedule management strategies for individuals and families who must integrate their handling of chronic illnesses with everyday living.

  7. Architecture for Integrated System Health Management Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Managing the health of vehicle, crew, and habitat systems is a primary function of flight controllers today. We propose to develop an architecture for automating...

  8. The Case for Software Health Management

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Software Health Management (SWHM) is a new field that is concerned with the development of tools and technologies to enable automated detection, diagnosis,...

  9. Requirements Flowdown for Prognostics and Health Management

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Prognostics and Health Management (PHM) principles have considerable promise to change the game of lifecycle cost of engineering systems at high safety levels by...

  10. Battery Health Management System for Electric UAVs

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In summary, this paper lays out a novel battery health management technique for application onboard an electric UAV. This technique is also applicable to other...

  11. Future developments in health care performance management

    OpenAIRE

    Crema M; Verbano C

    2013-01-01

    Maria Crema, Chiara Verbano Department of Management and Engineering, University of Padova, Vicenza, Italy Abstract: This paper highlights the challenges of performance management in health care, wherein multiple different objectives have to be pursued. The literature suggests starting with quality performance, following the sand cone theory, but considering a multidimensional concept of health care quality. Moreover, new managerial approaches coming from an industrial context and adapted to...

  12. Crisis management teams in health organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canyon, Deon V

    2012-01-01

    Crisis management teams (CMT) are necessary to ensure adequate and appropriate crisis management planning and response to unforeseen, adverse events. This study investigated the existence of CMTs, the membership of CMTs, and the degree of training received by CMTs in Australian health and allied health organisations. This cross-sectional study draws on data provided by executive decision makers in a broad selection of health and allied health organisations. Crisis management teams were found in 44.2 per cent of the health-related organisations surveyed, which is ten per cent lower than the figure for business organisations. Membership of these CMTs was not ideal and did not conform to standard CMT membership profiles. Similarly, the extent of crisis management training in health-related organisations is 20 per cent lower than the figure for business organisations. If organisations do not become pro-active in their crisis management practices, the onus is on government to improve the situation through regulation and the provision of more physical, monetary and skill resources to ensure that the health services of Australia are sufficiently prepared to respond to adverse events.

  13. American Health Information Management Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Government Corporate & Government Training Signature Partners Sponsorship Exhibitors Advertise With AHIMA Copyright & Permissions RSS LinkedIn Facebook Twitter YouTube Copyright © 2017 by The American Health ...

  14. Management of mutual health organizations in Ghana.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baltussen, R.M.P.M.; Bruce, E.; Rhodes, G.; Narh-Bana, S.A.; Agyepong, I.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Mutual Health Organizations (MHO) emerged in Ghana in the mid-1990s. The organizational structure and financial management of private and public MHO hold important lessons for the development of national health insurance in Ghana, but there is little evidence to date on their features. Th

  15. Total quality management in behavioral health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluyter, G V

    1998-01-01

    The literature on total quality management or continuous quality improvement in the behavioral health care field is just beginning to emerge. Although most of the evidence on its effectiveness remains anecdotal, it seems clear that it can work in behavioral health care organizations with strong leadership support and a long-term commitment.

  16. Management of mutual health organizations in Ghana.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baltussen, R.M.P.M.; Bruce, E.; Rhodes, G.; Narh-Bana, S.A.; Agyepong, I.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Mutual Health Organizations (MHO) emerged in Ghana in the mid-1990s. The organizational structure and financial management of private and public MHO hold important lessons for the development of national health insurance in Ghana, but there is little evidence to date on their features.

  17. Management of mutual health organizations in Ghana.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baltussen, R.M.P.M.; Bruce, E.; Rhodes, G.; Narh-Bana, S.A.; Agyepong, I.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Mutual Health Organizations (MHO) emerged in Ghana in the mid-1990s. The organizational structure and financial management of private and public MHO hold important lessons for the development of national health insurance in Ghana, but there is little evidence to date on their features. Th

  18. Job redesign and the health care manager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layman, Elizabeth J

    2007-01-01

    Health care supervisors and managers are often asked to redesign jobs in their departments. Frequently, little information accompanies the directive. This article lists sources of change in work and defines key terms. Also reviewed are factors that supervisors and managers can weigh in their redesigns. The article suggests actions aligned to common problems in the work environment. Finally, guidelines for a practical, step-by-step approach are provided. For health care supervisors and managers, the key to a successful job redesign is to achieve the unique balance of factors that matches the situation.

  19. [Demographic changes and health management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calero, Juan del Rey

    2006-01-01

    Since our Constitution declaration in 1978 and General Law for Health in 1986, to date, the Spanish society has undergorne marked social changes. Socio-economic and health indicators in Spain have also improved as to an increased life expectancy, important reduction in infant mortality, and favourable changes reported in the national Health Survey. Risk factors influence the main causes of death, thus it is said that "man does not die but it kills himself". Healthy health practices are specified, and there is empirical evidence of greater disability-adjusted life years, a better adherence to Mediterranean diet, no smoking, moderate consumption of alcohol, enough time of sleeping, weight control, avoiding obsity and overweight, and increased physical activity, all the above practices achieving a healthier life. At a global scale in the world we live, famine has no frontiers, and fighting against this plague can not await longer. Overall, health and poverty are correlated and it must be overcome for reasons of human dignity, universal rights (even in ius gentium), and ethical dimension as normative of new socio-economic structures. Present must be transformed to recover hope in ou global world, still hungry, and in need of justice, enlightenment and solidarity.

  20. Simulation modeling for the health care manager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Michael H

    2009-01-01

    This article addresses the use of simulation software to solve administrative problems faced by health care managers. Spreadsheet add-ins, process simulation software, and discrete event simulation software are available at a range of costs and complexity. All use the Monte Carlo method to realistically integrate probability distributions into models of the health care environment. Problems typically addressed by health care simulation modeling are facility planning, resource allocation, staffing, patient flow and wait time, routing and transportation, supply chain management, and process improvement.

  1. Managing for soil health can suppress pests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Hodson

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A “healthy” soil can be thought of as one that functions well, both agronomically and ecologically, and one in which soil biodiversity and crop management work in synergy to suppress pests and diseases. UC researchers have pioneered many ways of managing soil biology for pest management, including strategies such as soil solarization, steam treatment and anaerobic soil disinfestation, as well as improvements on traditional methods, such as reducing tillage, amending soil with organic materials, and cover cropping. As managing for soil health becomes more of an explicit focus due to restrictions on the use of soil fumigants, integrated soil health tests will be needed that are validated for use in California. Other research needs include breeding crops for disease resistance and pest suppressive microbial communities as well as knowledge of how beneficial organisms influence plant health.

  2. Improving diabetes management with mobile health technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieverdes, John C; Treiber, Frank; Jenkins, Carolyn

    2013-04-01

    Diabetes affects 25.8 million persons in the United States, and these persons make more than 35 million ambulatory care visits annually. Yet, less than half of persons with diabetes meet the recommended levels of A1C, blood pressure and lipid control. One innovative approach is to use mobile health technologies to help patients better manage their diabetes and related conditions, and 85% to 90% of patients have access to mobile health technology. A brief review of the guidelines for diabetes care and mobile health technology that can support the guidelines are reported related to (1) glycemic control and self-monitoring of blood glucose, (2) pharmacological approaches and medication management, (3) medical nutrition therapy, (4) physical activity and resistance training, (5) weight loss, (6) diabetes self-management education and (7) blood pressure control and hypertension. The patient and provider are encouraged to explore possibilities for mobile health technologies that can support behavior change.

  3. Women as managers in the health services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jocelyne Kane Berman

    1989-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite their numerical superiority women do not occupy positions o f power and authority in the health services generally. This is perceived as being due to a variety of factors which prevent women from realising their ful l potential as managers. In other parts of the world, as well as in South Africa, middle class white males have dominated health services, since medicine became a form al science, usurping the traditional role of women healers. Some research indicates that women are inclined to practice “feminine " management styles. It is suggested that the femine I masculine dichotomy is artificial and that qualities which ensure effective management should not be regarded as genderlinked. Leaders in the health services should strive for interdisciplinary, mixed-gender education and training at all levels. Identification and development of management potential in women health-care professionals, role-modelling and sponsor-mentor relationships should be encouraged to allow women to acquire the full range of management skills and to achieve positions of power and authority in the health services.

  4. Assessment of Knowledge and Skills of Health Staff and Managers About Health Infoprmation Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Farah Bakhsh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives : The goal of health information system is to provide necessary data for decision-making in all levels of health system. For proper use of data, the managers and other staff must have sufficient knowledge and skills about analysis and using data. This study was designed and carried out to assess health staff knowledge and skills about health data management. Material and Methods : This study was performed as a descriptive and cross sectional survey in East Azerbaijan province in 2006. Three groups of managers and district health centers experts, physicians and primary health care providers and district health centers information experts were selected for studying their knowledge and skills in health information management. Data were gathered with self-administered questionnaire. A total number of 32 managers, 260 district staff and 346 primary health care providers were assessed. The staff were selected with multistage sampling. Data were analyzed with SPSS software. Results : According to the results, 41% of descriptive statistics questions and 52% of health indicators calculation questions were answered correctly by managers. These figures were 34% and 43% in health experts group, respectively. None of the health centers staff knew descriptive statistics and 22% of them could calculate health indicators correctly. Results indicated that 73% and 71% of data experts had enough knowledge about descriptive statistics and health indicators, respectively. Conclusion : For using information in daily decision-making, having enough skills about data management such as; sampling, analysis, data distribution methods, knowledge management and evidence-based decisions is necessary.

  5. Managing the myths of health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintzberg, Henry

    2012-01-01

    Myths impede the effective management of health care, for example that the system is failing (indeed, that is a system), and can be fixed by detached social engineering and heroic leadership, or treating it more like a business. This field needs to reframe its management, as distributed beyond the "top"; its strategy as venturing, not planning; its organizing as collaboration beyond control, and especially itself, as a system beyond its parts.

  6. Managing diversity in the health care workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidhizar, R; Dowd, S; Newman Giger, J

    1999-03-01

    Cultural diversity is increasing in the United States as increasing numbers of minorities enter the United States from abroad, and cultural diversity is especially prevalent in the health care workplace. In fact, the health care professions are particularly interested in the presence of minorities among caregivers because this often enhances the cultural competence of care delivery. Nevertheless, subtle discrimination can still be found, and managers must be alert that such behavior is not tolerated. Use of the Giger-Davidhizar Cultural Assessment Model can provide managers with information needed to respond to diversity among staff appropriately.

  7. Organizational change management in mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaly, Tom; Arya, Dinesh

    2005-06-01

    To discuss change management as applicable to mental health. As mental health care grows increasingly complex, and the network of accountability widens, change is both inevitable and necessary. Strategies to introduce change effectively are essential. Resistance by medical staff to change often has a sound basis and must be acknowledged and explored. Change in clinical systems and practice is facilitated by careful planning and preparation, and by engaging clinicians in all phases of the change process; change will fail if this is not achieved. A number of management models facilitate the understanding and process of change.

  8. [Health services waste management: a biosafety issue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Leila Posenato; Zanetti-Ramos, Betina Giehl

    2004-01-01

    The subject of "health services waste" is controversial and widely discussed. Biosafety, the principles of which include safeguarding occupational health, community health, and environmental safety, is directly involved in the issue of medical waste management. There are controversies as to the risks posed by medical waste, as evidenced by diverging opinions among authors: some advocate severe approaches on the basis that medical waste is hazardous, while others contend that the potential for infection from medical waste is nonexistent. The Brazilian National Health Surveillance Agency (ANVISA) has published resolution RDC 33/2003 to standardize medical waste management nationwide. There is an evident need to implement biosafety procedures in this area, including heath care workers' training and provision of information to the general population.

  9. Total quality management in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, S C

    1994-01-01

    Total quality management (TQM), continuous quality improvement (CQI) and quality control are terms that are becoming very familiar to workers in the health care environment. The purpose of this article is to discuss these terms and the concepts they describe. The origins of TQM and the keen interest in its application to the health care environment today are addressed. In other environments, TQM has shown significant increases in productivity while increasing effectiveness. Its application to the health care environment is the provision of the best possible care through continuously improving service to meet or exceed the needs and expectations of the customer. The customer in the health care environment could be the patient, staff, physician and community serviced by the hospital. Characteristics of the new organizational structure are reviewed. Established techniques and processes are commonly used to identify process-improvement opportunities to assist the manager in continuously evaluating quality trends.

  10. Prognostics and health management of power electronics

    OpenAIRE

    Alghassi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Prognostics and health management (PHM) is a major tool enabling systems to evaluate their reliability in real-time operation. Despite ground-breaking advances in most engineering and scientific disciplines during the past decades, reliability engineering has not seen significant breakthroughs or noticeable advances. Therefore, self-awareness of the embedded system is also often required in the sense that the system should be able to assess its own health state and failure records, and those ...

  11. Management of behavioral health provider networks in private health plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnick, Deborah W; Horgan, Constance M; Reif, Sharon; Merrick, Elizabeth L; Hodgkin, Dominic

    2008-01-01

    We explored the techniques used by private health plans or by their contracted managed behavioral healthcare organizations (MBHOs) to maintain networks of behavioral health providers. In particular, we focused on differences by health plans' product types (health maintenance organization, point-of-service plan, or preferred provider organization) and contracting arrangements (MBHO contracts, comprehensive contracts, or no contracts). More than 94% of products selected providers using credentialing standards, particular specialists, or geographic coverage. To retain providers viewed as high quality, 54% offer reduced administrative burden and 44% higher fees. Only 16% reported steerage to a core group of highest-quality providers and few reported an annual bonus or guaranteed volume of referrals. Some standard activities are common, but some health plans are adopting other approaches to retain higher-quality providers.

  12. Learning, changing and managing in mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, J

    2001-11-01

    This paper draws on research which considers the implications for practitioners and managers of implementing new ideas for practice gained from learning and education in mental health in the UK. Using a questionnaire survey followed by eight semi-structured interviews, the research set out to identify the issues facing workers trying to implement change in the workplace as a result of new learning gained from study of an Open University mental health course. The paper argues that much management literature on change within organisations is problematic in this specific context. This is largely because it takes insufficient account of the complexities surrounding work within social care (particularly mental health). Findings show that workers who have undertaken learning in mental health often feel disempowered and isolated when attempting to introduce new ideas for practice into the workplace. The first line manager operates at the intersection of practice and learning and has a key role in enabling and supporting staff through practice as well as service change and professional development. This paper locates the distance learning experience within a wider framework of student/practitioner support, and explores the role of the first line manager in supporting and enabling staff.

  13. Integrated Systems Health Management for Intelligent Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Fernando; Melcher, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    The implementation of an integrated system health management (ISHM) capability is fundamentally linked to the management of data, information, and knowledge (DIaK) with the purposeful objective of determining the health of a system. It is akin to having a team of experts who are all individually and collectively observing and analyzing a complex system, and communicating effectively with each other in order to arrive at an accurate and reliable assessment of its health. In this paper, concepts, procedures, and approaches are presented as a foundation for implementing an intelligent systems ]relevant ISHM capability. The capability stresses integration of DIaK from all elements of a system. Both ground-based (remote) and on-board ISHM capabilities are compared and contrasted. The information presented is the result of many years of research, development, and maturation of technologies, and of prototype implementations in operational systems.

  14. Software Health Management with Bayesian Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengshoel, Ole; Schumann, JOhann

    2011-01-01

    Most modern aircraft as well as other complex machinery is equipped with diagnostics systems for its major subsystems. During operation, sensors provide important information about the subsystem (e.g., the engine) and that information is used to detect and diagnose faults. Most of these systems focus on the monitoring of a mechanical, hydraulic, or electromechanical subsystem of the vehicle or machinery. Only recently, health management systems that monitor software have been developed. In this paper, we will discuss our approach of using Bayesian networks for Software Health Management (SWHM). We will discuss SWHM requirements, which make advanced reasoning capabilities for the detection and diagnosis important. Then we will present our approach to using Bayesian networks for the construction of health models that dynamically monitor a software system and is capable of detecting and diagnosing faults.

  15. Creating and managing a paperless health information management department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Zelda B

    2002-08-01

    Over the last 10 to 15 years, the health care industry has experienced dramatic changes in health care delivery, consumer needs, and demands. The medical record, a recapitulation of the care patients receive, continues to be one of the most vital components of the health care delivery system. It serves as a crucial administrative, clinical, financial, and research tool. Health information managers, striving to meet ever-changing requirements, have turned to electronic record processing to meet these changes. The following article describes one hospital's journey from a cumbersome paper environment to an electronic environment that not only resulted in improved customer service but also provided employees with renewed job satisfaction and increased skill levels.

  16. Conflict management styles in the health professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sportsman, Susan; Hamilton, Patti

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine prevalent conflict management styles chosen by students in nursing and to contrast these styles with those chosen by students in allied health professions. The associations among the level of professional health care education and the style chosen were also determined. A convenience sample of 126 students in a comprehensive university completed the Thomas-Kilmann Conflict Mode Instrument (TKI), which requires respondents to choose behaviors most characteristic of their response to conflict and classifies these behaviors as one of five styles. There was no significant difference between the prevalent conflict management styles chosen by graduate and undergraduate nursing students and those in allied health. Some of the students were already licensed in their discipline; others had not yet taken a licensing exam. Licensure and educational level were not associated with choice of styles. Women and men had similar preferences. The prevalent style for nursing students was compromise, followed by avoidance. In contrast, avoidance, followed by compromise and accommodation, was the prevalent style for allied health students. When compared to the TKI norms, slightly more than one half of all participants chose two or more conflict management styles, commonly avoidance and accommodation at the 75th percentile or above. Only 9.8% of the participants chose collaboration at that level. Implications for nurse educators, researchers, and administrators are discussed.

  17. Innovation in health service management: Adoption of project management offices to support major health care transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Aubry, Monique; Cyr, Guylaine; Richer, Marie-Claire; Fortin-Verreault, Jean-François; Fortin, Claude; Marchionni, Caroline

    2017-09-10

    To explore the characteristics that influence project management offices acceptance and adoption in healthcare sector. The creation of project management offices has been suggested as a promising avenue to promote successful organisational change and facilitate evidence-based practice. However, little is known about the characteristics that promote their initial adoption and acceptance in health care sector. This knowledge is important in the context where many organisations are considering implementing project management offices with nurse managers as leaders. A descriptive multiple case study design was used. The unit of analysis was the project management offices. The study was conducted in three university-affiliated teaching hospitals in 2013-14 (Canada). Individual interviews (n = 34) were conducted with senior managers. Results reveal that project management offices dedicated to project and change management constitute an innovation and an added value that addresses tangible needs in the field. Project management offices are an innovation highly compatible with health care managers and their approach has parallels to the process of clinical problem solving and reasoning well-known to adopters. This knowledge is important in a context where many nurses hold various roles in project management offices, such as Director, project manager, clinical expert and knowledge broker. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Health and Stress Management and Mental-health Disability Claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Alain; Haines, Victor Y; Harvey, Steve; Dextras-Gauthier, Julie; Durand, Pierre

    2016-12-01

    This study examines the associations between health and stress management (HSM) practices and mental-health disability claims. Data from the Salveo study was collected during 2009-2012 within 60 workplaces nested in 37 companies located in Canada (Quebec) and insured by a large insurance company. In each company, 1 h interviews were conducted with human resources managers in order to obtain data on 63 HSM practices. Companies and workplaces were sorted into the low-claims and high-claims groups according to the median rate of the population of the insurer's corporate clients. Logistic regression adjusted for design effect and multidimensional scaling was used to analyse the data. After controlling for company size and economic sector, task design, demands control, gratifications, physical activity and work-family balance were associated with low mental-health disability claims rates. Further analyses revealed three company profiles that were qualified as laissez-faire, integrated and partially integrated approaches to HSM. Of the three, the integrated profile was associated with low mental-health disability claims rates. The results of this study provide evidence-based guidance for a better control of mental-health disability claims. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. On Management Matters: Why We Must Improve Public Health Management Through Action: Comment on "Management Matters: A Leverage Point for Health Systems Strengthening in Global Health".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willacy, Erika; Bratton, Shelly

    2015-09-30

    Public health management is a pillar of public health practice. Only through effective management can research, theory, and scientific innovation be translated into successful public health action. With this in mind, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has developed an innovative program called Improving Public Health Management for Action (IMPACT) which aims to address this critical need by building an effective cadre of public health managers to work alongside scientists to prepare for and respond to disease threats and to effectively implement public health programs. IMPACT is a 2-year, experiential learning program that provides fellows with the management tools and opportunities to apply their new knowledge in the field, all while continuing to serve the Ministry of Health (MoH). IMPACT will launch in 2016 in 2 countries with the intent of expanding to additional countries in future years resulting in a well-trained cadre of public health managers around the world.

  20. FAILSAFE Health Management for Embedded Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Gregory A.; Wagner, David A.; Wen, Hui Ying; Barry, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    The FAILSAFE project is developing concepts and prototype implementations for software health management in mission- critical, real-time embedded systems. The project unites features of the industry-standard ARINC 653 Avionics Application Software Standard Interface and JPL s Mission Data System (MDS) technology (see figure). The ARINC 653 standard establishes requirements for the services provided by partitioned, real-time operating systems. The MDS technology provides a state analysis method, canonical architecture, and software framework that facilitates the design and implementation of software-intensive complex systems. The MDS technology has been used to provide the health management function for an ARINC 653 application implementation. In particular, the focus is on showing how this combination enables reasoning about, and recovering from, application software problems.

  1. Training evaluation: a case study of training Iranian health managers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Omar, Maye; Gerein, Nancy; Tarin, Ehsanullah; Butcher, Christopher; Pearson, Stephen; Heidari, Gholamreza

    2009-01-01

    .... This process was also intended to develop the capacity of the National Public Health Management Centre in Tabriz, Iran, to enable it to organize relevant short courses in health management on a continuing basis...

  2. local perspectives and preferences of animal health management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TAYO BABALOBI

    understand local preferences for animal health management practices and observe if there is any ... (CBAHW ) in rural livestock health and production management. Sheep and goats ..... The principles, practices and privatisation of the CBAH ...

  3. Should health care managers adopt Theory Z?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safranski, S R; Kwon, I W; Walker, W R; Unger, M

    1986-04-01

    Health care administrators should carefully consider the situations in which they apply management methods used in industry, since such methods may not be effective in motivating certain groups of hospital employees. Physicians, for example, may display little loyalty to the health care organization, even though as a group they exert significant influence on policies, standards, and administration. As a result, management styles such as Theory Z that focus on holistic concern, individual decision-making responsibility, and long-term employment guarantees may fail to interest them. Nurses also may be reluctant to commit themselves to an organization because of the high rate of turnover in their profession in recent years. Support staff, however, probably would be receptive to management techniques that offer security through long-term employment guarantees. Other factors necessary for the effective use of Theory Z industrial management techniques are a clear hierarchy with well-defined reporting relationships, moderately specialized career paths, and trust among employees that the organization's concern for their welfare is genuine. The key consideration, however, in applying any theory is that only those aspects which best serve the organization's needs should be adopted.

  4. The Implications of Death for Health: A Terror Management Health Model for Behavioral Health Promotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, Jamie L.; Arndt, Jamie

    2008-01-01

    This article introduces a terror management health model (TMHM). The model integrates disparate health and social psychology literatures to elucidate how the conscious and nonconscious awareness of death can influence the motivational orientation that is most operative in the context of health decisions. Three formal propositions are presented.…

  5. [Community health in primary health care teams: a management objective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebot Adell, Carme; Pasarin Rua, Maribel; Canela Soler, Jaume; Sala Alvarez, Clara; Escosa Farga, Alex

    2016-12-01

    To describe the process of development of community health in a territory where the Primary Health Care board decided to include it in its roadmap as a strategic line. Evaluative research using qualitative techniques, including SWOT analysis on community health. Two-steps study. Primary care teams (PCT) of the Catalan Health Institute in Barcelona city. The 24 PCT belonging to the Muntanya-Dreta Primary Care Service in Barcelona city, with 904 professionals serving 557,430 inhabitants. Application of qualitative methodology using SWOT analysis in two steps (two-step study). Step 1: Setting up a core group consisting of local PCT professionals; collecting the community projects across the territory; SWOT analysis. Step 2: From the needs identified in the previous phase, a plan was developed, including a set of training activities in community health: basic, advanced, and a workshop to exchange experiences from the PCTs. A total of 80 team professionals received specific training in the 4 workshops held, one of them an advanced level. Two workshops were held to exchange experiences with 165 representatives from the local teams, and 22 PCTs presenting their practices. In 2013, 6 out of 24 PCTs have had a community diagnosis performed. Community health has achieved a good level of development in some areas, but this is not the general situation in the health care system. Its progression depends on the management support they have, the local community dynamics, and the scope of the Primary Health Care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. ISWHM: Tools and Techniques for Software and System Health Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Johann; Mengshoel, Ole J.; Darwiche, Adnan

    2010-01-01

    This presentation presents status and results of research on Software Health Management done within the NRA "ISWHM: Tools and Techniques for Software and System Health Management." Topics include: Ingredients of a Guidance, Navigation, and Control System (GN and C); Selected GN and C Testbed example; Health Management of major ingredients; ISWHM testbed architecture; and Conclusions and next Steps.

  7. Clinical and Management Requirements for Computerized Mental Health Information Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Levinton, Paula H.; Dunning, Tessa F.E.

    1980-01-01

    Information requirements of mental health providers are sufficiently different from those of other health care managers to warrant a different approach to the development of management information systems (MIS). Advances in computer technology and increased demands for fiscal accountability have led to developing integrated mental health information systems (MHIS) that support clinical and management requirements.

  8. An Assessment of Integrated Health Management Frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lybeck, Nancy; Coble, Jamie B.; Tawfik, Magdy; Bond, Leonard J.

    2012-05-18

    In order to meet the ever increasing demand for energy, the United States nuclear industry is turning to life extension of existing nuclear power plants (NPPs). Economically ensuring the safe, secure, and reliable operation of aging NPPs presents many challenges. The 2009 Light Water Reactor Sustainability Workshop identified online monitoring of active and structural components as essential to better understanding and management of the challenges posed by aging NPPs. Additionally, there is increasing adoption of condition-based maintenance (CBM) for active components in NPPs. These techniques provide a foundation upon which a variety of advanced online surveillance, diagnostic, and prognostic techniques can be deployed to continuously monitor and assess the health of NPP systems and components. The next step in the development of advanced online monitoring is to move beyond CBM to estimating the remaining useful life of active components using prognostic tools. Deployment of prognostic health management (PHM) on the scale of an NPP requires the use of an integrated health management (IHM) framework - a software product (or suite of products) used to manage the necessary elements needed for a complete implementation of online monitoring and prognostics. This paper provides a thoughtful look at the desirable functions and features of IHM architectures. A full PHM system involves several modules, including data acquisition, system modeling, fault detection, fault diagnostics, system prognostics, and advisory generation (operations and maintenance planning). The standards applicable to PHM applications are indentified and summarized. A list of evaluation criteria for PHM software products, developed to ensure scalability of the toolset to an environment with the complexity of an NPP, is presented. Fourteen commercially available PHM software products are identified and classified into four groups: research tools, PHM system development tools, deployable architectures

  9. Health and poverty: health management by the woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvarez Maria de la Luz

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal this follow-up study was to relate the mother's marital satisfaction to family health status in a low SES. The random sample was made up of 30 families with children under 7 years old: 15 considered as sick (Group A and 15 as healthy (Group B. Both group had similar demographic characteristics (age of father and mother, persons per family group and age of children and SES. Results showed that mothers were those mainly in charge of their family groups. Mothers of Group A were significantly less understanding and more dissatisfied than those of Group B ( p < .05 and p < .01. Mothers of Group A had significantly more arguments with their partners than those of Group B (p < .006. Health care was learned less from the child's own mother in group A than in B (p < .05. Health was considered by mothers of Group A as something that "must be taken care of" more than by those of Group B (p < .01. The behaviours of mothers in choosing one of the health systems was similar in both groups. Dissatisfied mothers were associated more with sick family members during the 6 month follow-up. It is suggested that the satisfaction of the mother is a factor that needs further investigation because health is managed by mothers is the large majority of families.

  10. Health and poverty: health management by the woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de la Luz Alvarez

    1992-04-01

    Full Text Available The goal this follow-up study was to relate the mother's marital satisfaction to family health status in a low SES. The random sample was made up of 30 families with children under 7 years old: 15 considered as sick (Group A and 15 as healthy (Group B. Both group had similar demographic characteristics (age of father and mother, persons per family group and age of children and SES. Results showed that mothers were those mainly in charge of their family groups. Mothers of Group A were significantly less understanding and more dissatisfied than those of Group B ( p < .05 and p < .01. Mothers of Group A had significantly more arguments with their partners than those of Group B (p < .006. Health care was learned less from the child's own mother in group A than in B (p < .05. Health was considered by mothers of Group A as something that "must be taken care of" more than by those of Group B (p < .01. The behaviours of mothers in choosing one of the health systems was similar in both groups. Dissatisfied mothers were associated more with sick family members during the 6 month follow-up. It is suggested that the satisfaction of the mother is a factor that needs further investigation because health is managed by mothers is the large majority of families.

  11. Change management with the electronic health record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmucker, DeeAnn

    2009-01-01

    Many medical organizations have already changed to, are implementing, or are contemplating implementing an electronic health record (EHR) system. As in all change, some people accept the switch from paper to EHRs much easier and with more enthuiasm than others. It is common for organizations to overlook the importance of including change management properties as they create the overall plan for the change from paper to paperless. Often the result of this is anger, frustration, and lack of cooperation or even sabotage from physicians and office staff who are the recipients of the training on the EHR system. This article examines the steps for, opportunities for, and positive results from incorporating change management principles from the very beginning, and the benefits accrued by understanding and utilizing the concepts of good choices, relationships, planning, and feedback.

  12. Outage management and health physics issue, 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

    2006-05-15

    The focus of the May-June issue is on outage management and health physics. Major articles/reports in this issue include: A design with experience for the U.S., by Michael J. Wallace, Constellation Generation Group; Hope to be among the first, by Randy Hutchinson, Entergy Nuclear; Plans to file COLs in 2008, by Garry Miller, Progress Energy; Evolution of ICRP's recommendations, by Lars-Erik Holm, ICRP; European network on education and training in radiological protection, by Michele Coeck, SCK-CEN, Belgium; Outage managment: an important tool for improving nuclear power plant performance, by Thomas Mazour and Jiri Mandula, IAEA, Austria; and Plant profile: Exploring new paths to excellence, by Anne Thomas, Exelon Nuclear.

  13. Outage managment and health physics issue, 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

    2008-05-15

    The focus of the May-June issue is on outage management and health physics. Major articles include: Outage optimization initiatives, by George B. Beam, AREVA NP, Inc.; New plant based on excellent track records, by Jim Scarola, Progress Energy; Meeting customer needs and providing environmental benefits, by Peter S. Hastings, Duke Energy; Plants with 3-D design, by Jack A. Bailey, Tennessee Valley Authority; and Highest quality with exceptional planning, by Jason A. Walls, Duke Energy. Industry innovation articles include: Integrated exposure reduction plan, by Ed Wolfe, Exelon; Performance-based radiation worker training, by Joe Giuffre and Timothy Vriezerma, American Electric Power.

  14. Investigation of Integrated Vehicle Health Management Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Deidre

    2005-01-01

    This report is to present the work that was performed during the summer in the Advance Computing Application office. The NFFP (NASA Faculty Fellow Program) had ten summer faculty members working on IVHM (Integrated Vehicle Health Management) technologies. The objective of this project was two-fold: 1) to become familiar with IVHM concepts and key demonstrated IVHM technologies; and 2) to integrate the research that has been performed by IVHM faculty members into the MASTLAB (Marshall Avionic Software Test Lab). IVHM is a NASA-wide effort to coordinate, integrate and apply advanced software, sensors and design technologies to increase the level of intelligence, autonomy, and health state of future vehicles. IVHM is an important concept because it is consistent with the current plan for NASA to go to the moon, mars, and beyond. In order for NASA to become more involved in deep exploration, avionic systems will need to be highly adaptable and autonomous.

  15. Status of total quality management in Australian public health organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, R; Hartley, R

    1998-01-01

    Research suggests that there is some confusion among quality improvement managers about the differences between quality management and traditional quality assurance. This lack of understanding would appear to be the same among rural and urban health staff, although there is a higher percentage of staff engaged in multidisciplinary activities in the rural health services. Education of staff and commitment from top management would seem to be the factors inhibiting the health industry from incorporating quality management into their cultures.

  16. Health leadership and management competencies: a systemic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holder, Reynaldo; Ramagem, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    The achievement of national and international health goals requires better-performing health systems. Strengthening leadership and management of health systems thus becomes essential for achieving greater efficiency and responsiveness, ultimately improving health outcomes. Building a global framework of core competencies for leadership and management needs to be approached with systems thinking and methodologies akin to complexity science that takes into account all components and levels of the health system and the possible interactions between them that influence outcomes. The results will have important policy implications for national health authorities seeking to strengthen management capacity and building transformational leadership in health systems.

  17. Managing the health of the elite athlete: a new integrated performance health management and coaching model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, H Paul; Pollock, N; Chakraverty, R; Alonso, J M

    2014-01-01

    Elite athletes endeavour to train and compete even when ill or injured. Their motivation may be intrinsic or due to coach and team pressures. The sports medicine physician plays an important role to risk-manage the health of the competing athlete in partnership with the coach and other members of the support team. The sports medicine physician needs to strike the right ethical and operational balance between health management and optimising performance. It is necessary to revisit the popular delivery model of sports medicine and science services to elite athletes based on the current reductionist multispecialist system lacking in practice an integrated approach and effective communication. Athlete and coach in isolation or with a member of the multidisciplinary support team, often not qualified or experienced to do so, decide on the utilisation of services and how to apply the recommendations. We propose a new Integrated Performance Health Management and Coaching model based on the UK Athletics experience in preparation for the London Olympic and Paralympic Games. The Medical and Coaching Teams are managed by qualified and experienced individuals operating in synergy towards a common performance goal, accountable to a Performance Director and ultimately to the Board of Directors. We describe the systems, processes and implementation strategies to assist the athlete, coach and support teams to continuously monitor and manage athlete health and performance. These systems facilitate a balanced approach to training and competing decisions, especially while the athlete is ill or injured. They take into account the best medical advice and athlete preference. This Integrated Performance Health Management and Coaching model underpinned the Track and Field Gold Medal performances at the London Olympic and Paralympic Games. PMID:24620040

  18. Managing the health of the elite athlete: a new integrated performance health management and coaching model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, H Paul; Pollock, N; Chakraverty, R; Alonso, J M

    2014-04-01

    Elite athletes endeavour to train and compete even when ill or injured. Their motivation may be intrinsic or due to coach and team pressures. The sports medicine physician plays an important role to risk-manage the health of the competing athlete in partnership with the coach and other members of the support team. The sports medicine physician needs to strike the right ethical and operational balance between health management and optimising performance. It is necessary to revisit the popular delivery model of sports medicine and science services to elite athletes based on the current reductionist multispecialist system lacking in practice an integrated approach and effective communication. Athlete and coach in isolation or with a member of the multidisciplinary support team, often not qualified or experienced to do so, decide on the utilisation of services and how to apply the recommendations. We propose a new Integrated Performance Health Management and Coaching model based on the UK Athletics experience in preparation for the London Olympic and Paralympic Games. The Medical and Coaching Teams are managed by qualified and experienced individuals operating in synergy towards a common performance goal, accountable to a Performance Director and ultimately to the Board of Directors. We describe the systems, processes and implementation strategies to assist the athlete, coach and support teams to continuously monitor and manage athlete health and performance. These systems facilitate a balanced approach to training and competing decisions, especially while the athlete is ill or injured. They take into account the best medical advice and athlete preference. This Integrated Performance Health Management and Coaching model underpinned the Track and Field Gold Medal performances at the London Olympic and Paralympic Games.

  19. Enabling medication management through health information technology (Health IT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKibbon, K Ann; Lokker, Cynthia; Handler, Steve M; Dolovich, Lisa R; Holbrook, Anne M; O'Reilly, Daria; Tamblyn, Robyn; J Hemens, Brian; Basu, Runki; Troyan, Sue; Roshanov, Pavel S; Archer, Norman P; Raina, Parminder

    2011-04-01

    The objective of the report was to review the evidence on the impact of health information technology (IT) on all phases of the medication management process (prescribing and ordering, order communication, dispensing, administration and monitoring as well as education and reconciliation), to identify the gaps in the literature and to make recommendations for future research. We searched peer-reviewed electronic databases, grey literature, and performed hand searches. Databases searched included MEDLINE®, Embase, CINAHL (Cumulated Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature), Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, Compendex, Inspec (which includes IEEE Xplore), Library and Information Science Abstracts, E-Prints in Library and Information Science, PsycINFO, Sociological Abstracts, and Business Source Complete. Grey literature searching involved Internet searching, reviewing relevant Web sites, and searching electronic databases of grey literatures. AHRQ also provided all references in their e-Prescribing, bar coding, and CPOE knowledge libraries. Paired reviewers looked at citations to identify studies on a range of health IT used to assist in the medication management process (MMIT) during multiple levels of screening (titles and abstracts, full text and final review for assignment of questions and data abstrction). Randomized controlled trials and cohort, case-control, and case series studies were independently assessed for quality. All data were abstracted by one reviewer and examined by one of two different reviewers with content and methods expertise. 40,582 articles were retrieved. After duplicates were removed, 32,785 articles were screened at the title and abstract phase. 4,578 full text articles were assessed and 789 articles were included in the final report. Of these, 361 met only content criteria and were listed without further abstraction. The final report included data from 428 articles across the seven key

  20. Requirements Flowdown for Prognostics and Health Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Kai; Saxena, Abhinav; Roychoudhury, Indranil; Celaya, Jose R.; Saha, Bhaskar; Saha, Sankalita

    2012-01-01

    Prognostics and Health Management (PHM) principles have considerable promise to change the game of lifecycle cost of engineering systems at high safety levels by providing a reliable estimate of future system states. This estimate is a key for planning and decision making in an operational setting. While technology solutions have made considerable advances, the tie-in into the systems engineering process is lagging behind, which delays fielding of PHM-enabled systems. The derivation of specifications from high level requirements for algorithm performance to ensure quality predictions is not well developed. From an engineering perspective some key parameters driving the requirements for prognostics performance include: (1) maximum allowable Probability of Failure (PoF) of the prognostic system to bound the risk of losing an asset, (2) tolerable limits on proactive maintenance to minimize missed opportunity of asset usage, (3) lead time to specify the amount of advanced warning needed for actionable decisions, and (4) required confidence to specify when prognosis is sufficiently good to be used. This paper takes a systems engineering view towards the requirements specification process and presents a method for the flowdown process. A case study based on an electric Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (e-UAV) scenario demonstrates how top level requirements for performance, cost, and safety flow down to the health management level and specify quantitative requirements for prognostic algorithm performance.

  1. Managing conscientious objection in health care institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicclair, Mark R

    2014-09-01

    It is argued that the primary aim of institutional management is to protect the moral integrity of health professionals without significantly compromising other important values and interests. Institutional policies are recommended as a means to promote fair, consistent, and transparent management of conscience-based refusals. It is further recommended that those policies include the following four requirements: (1) Conscience-based refusals will be accommodated only if a requested accommodation will not impede a patient's/surrogate's timely access to information, counseling, and referral. (2) Conscience-based refusals will be accommodated only if a requested accommodation will not impede a patient's timely access to health care services offered within the institution. (3) Conscience-based refusals will be accommodated only if the accommodation will not impose excessive burdens on colleagues, supervisors, department heads, other administrators, or the institution. (4) Whenever feasible, health professionals should provide advance notification to department heads or supervisors. Formal review may not be required in all cases, but when it is appropriate, several recommendations are offered about standards and the review process. A key recommendation is that when reviewing an objector's reasons, contrary to what some have proposed, it is not appropriate to adopt an adversarial approach modelled on military review boards' assessments of requests for conscientious objector status. According to the approach recommended, the primary function of reviews of objectors' reasons is to engage them in a process of reflecting on the nature and depth of their objections, with the objective of facilitating moral clarity on the part of objectors rather than enabling department heads, supervisors, or ethics committees to determine whether conscientious objections are sufficiently genuine.

  2. Health Management of Breast Cancer Survivors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Li; Juan Chen; Zhendong Chen

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer is defined as a chronic disease.Increasing amounts of attention have been paid to the health management of breast cancer survivors. An important issue is how to find the most appropriate method of follow-up in order to detect long-term complications of treatment, local recurrence and distant metastasis and to administer appropriate treatment to the survivors with recurrence in a timely fashion. Different oncology organizations have published guidelines for following up breast cancer survivors. However, there are few articles on this issue in China. Using the published follow-up guidelines,we analyzed their main limitations and discussed the content,follow-up interval and economic benefits of following up breast cancer survivors in an effort to provide suggestions to physicians.Based on a large number of clinical trials, we discussed the role of physical examination, mammography, liver echograph, chest radiography, bone scan and so on. We evaluated the effects of the above factors on detection of distant disease, survival time,improvement in quality of life and time to diagnosis of recurrence.The results of follow-up carried out by oncologists and primary health care physicians were compared. We also analyzed the correlation factors for the cost of such follow-up. It appears that follow-up for breast cancer survivors can be carried out effectively by trained primary health care physicians. If anything unusual arises, the patients should be transferred to specialists.

  3. Ineffective programme management on the delivery of health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ineffective programme management on the delivery of health infrastructure ... health facility project has to integrate the components of construction management and ... and knowledge for the identification of the critical success factors relevant for ... Keywords: Programme management, critical success factors, functional silos,

  4. Aspects regarding implementation of quality management in health system

    OpenAIRE

    Mãdãlina ALBU

    2013-01-01

    Services offered by Romanian health system must be managed both quantitatively and qualitatively. This can be initiated and maintained by implementing quality management systems to ensure the provision of quality health services. Nationally, a number of hospitals are certified under ISO 9001. This paper presents how it was implemented quality management system in Emergency Hospital of Ploieºti.

  5. Information Support for Health Management in Regional Sri Lanka: Health Managers' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranasinghe, Kaduruwane Indika; Chan, Taizan; Yaralagadda, Prasad

    2012-10-01

    Good management, supported by accurate, timely and reliable health information, is vital for increasing the effectiveness of Health Information Systems (HIS). When it comes to managing the under-resourced health systems of developing countries, information-based decision making is particularly important. This paper reports findings of a self-report survey that investigated perceptions of local health managers (HMs) of their own regional HIS in Sri Lanka. Data were collected through a validated, pre-tested postal questionnaire, and distributed among a selected group of HMs to elicit their perceptions of the current HIS in relation to information generation, acquisition and use, required reforms to the information system and application of information and communication technology (ICT). Results based on descriptive statistics indicated that the regional HIS was poorly organised and in need of reform; that management support for the system was unsatisfactory in terms of relevance, accuracy, timeliness and accessibility; that political pressure and community and donor requests took precedence over vital health information when management decisions were made; and use of ICT was unsatisfactory. HIS strengths included user-friendly paper formats, a centralised planning system and an efficient disease notification system; weaknesses were lack of comprehensiveness, inaccuracy, and lack of a feedback system. Responses of participants indicated that HIS would be improved by adopting an internationally accepted framework and introducing ICT applications. Perceived barriers to such improvements were high initial cost of educating staff to improve computer literacy, introduction of ICTS, and HIS restructure. We concluded that the regional HIS of Central Province, Sri Lanka had failed to provide much-needed information support to HMS. These findings are consistent with similar research in other developing countries and reinforce the need for further research to verify causes of

  6. Information support for health information management in regional Sri Lanka: health managers' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranasinghe, Kaduruwane Indika; Chan, Taizan; Yaralagadda, Prasad

    2012-01-01

    Good management, supported by accurate, timely and reliable health information, is vital for increasing the effectiveness of Health Information Systems (HIS). When it comes to managing the under-resourced health systems of developing countries, information-based decision making is particularly important. This paper reports findings of a self-report survey that investigated perceptions of local health managers (HMs) of their own regional HIS in Sri Lanka. Data were collected through a validated, pre-tested postal questionnaire, and distributed among a selected group of HMs to elicit their perceptions of the current HIS in relation to information generation, acquisition and use, required reforms to the information system and application of information and communication technology (ICT). Results based on descriptive statistics indicated that the regional HIS was poorly organised and in need of reform; that management support for the system was unsatisfactory in terms of relevance, accuracy, timeliness and accessibility; that political pressure and community and donor requests took precedence over vital health information when management decisions were made; and use of ICT was unsatisfactory. HIS strengths included user-friendly paper formats, a centralised planning system and an efficient disease notification system; weaknesses were lack of comprehensiveness, inaccuracy, and lack of a feedback system. Responses of participants indicated that HIS would be improved by adopting an internationally accepted framework and introducing ICT applications. Perceived barriers to such improvements were high initial cost of educating staff to improve computer literacy, introduction of ICTs, and HIS restructure. We concluded that the regional HIS of Central Province, Sri Lanka had failed to provide much-needed information support to HMs. These findings are consistent with similar research in other developing countries and reinforce the need for further research to verify causes of

  7. Health Management Applications for International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alena, Richard; Duncavage, Dan

    2005-01-01

    Traditional mission and vehicle management involves teams of highly trained specialists monitoring vehicle status and crew activities, responding rapidly to any anomalies encountered during operations. These teams work from the Mission Control Center and have access to engineering support teams with specialized expertise in International Space Station (ISS) subsystems. Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) applications can significantly augment these capabilities by providing enhanced monitoring, prognostic and diagnostic tools for critical decision support and mission management. The Intelligent Systems Division of NASA Ames Research Center is developing many prototype applications using model-based reasoning, data mining and simulation, working with Mission Control through the ISHM Testbed and Prototypes Project. This paper will briefly describe information technology that supports current mission management practice, and will extend this to a vision for future mission control workflow incorporating new ISHM applications. It will describe ISHM applications currently under development at NASA and will define technical approaches for implementing our vision of future human exploration mission management incorporating artificial intelligence and distributed web service architectures using specific examples. Several prototypes are under development, each highlighting a different computational approach. The ISStrider application allows in-depth analysis of Caution and Warning (C&W) events by correlating real-time telemetry with the logical fault trees used to define off-nominal events. The application uses live telemetry data and the Livingstone diagnostic inference engine to display the specific parameters and fault trees that generated the C&W event, allowing a flight controller to identify the root cause of the event from thousands of possibilities by simply navigating animated fault tree models on their workstation. SimStation models the functional power flow

  8. Soil health paradigms and implications for disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Robert P

    2015-01-01

    Soil health has been defined as the capacity of soil to function as a vital living system to sustain biological productivity, maintain environmental quality, and promote plant, animal, and human health. Building and maintaining soil health are essential to agricultural sustainability and ecosystem function. Management practices that promote soil health, including the use of crop rotations, cover crops and green manures, organic amendments, and conservation tillage, also have generally positive effects on the management of soilborne diseases through a number of potential mechanisms, including increasing soil microbial biomass, activity, and diversity, resulting in greater biological suppression of pathogens and diseases. However, there also may be particular disease issues associated with some soil health management practices. In this review, research and progress made over the past twenty years regarding soil health, sustainability, and soil health management practices, with an emphasis on their implications for and effects on plant disease and disease management strategies, are summarized.

  9. Managing Primary Health Care in the South - South Geo Political ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . ... and challenges of leadership which affect the performance of health managers. ... and best practices in the management of human resources in sub – Saharan Africa ... In the case of Human Resource for PHC in Nigeria, data is not easily

  10. Management of gestational diabetes mellitus at secondary health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Management of gestational diabetes mellitus at secondary health care level: a survey of ... It is amenable to risk reduction measures and if properly managed, ... the Medical Doctors and Nurses have poor knowledge and practice concerning ...

  11. Using TQM to improve management of home health aides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dansky, K H; Brannon, D

    1996-12-01

    Home health aides are at the front line of the home health industry, raising quality of care issues and human resource (HR) management challenges. Total quality management (TQM) provides a framework to help meet those challenges. The authors investigated the relationship between TQM and HR effectiveness in home health agencies. Results suggest that TQM practices are related to HR effectiveness. Suggestions are offered to make human resource management consistent with a TQM culture.

  12. National survey of occupational therapy managers in mental health

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    This study, part of the College of Occupational Therapists' Mental Health Project, surveyed occupational therapy managers in mental health to gather data about them, the services they managed and their opinions on current and future issues of importance. A questionnaire was sent to the 184 managers who it was believed worked in mental health and it achieved a 65.2% response rate. The majority of the 120 respondents were female, with Head II therapists between the ages of 31 and 40 forming...

  13. Herd health and management of dairy cow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ćaǧlayan, Alper; Yüca, Songül

    2016-04-01

    Herd management requires multidisciplinary practices including animal feeding, gynecology, artificial insemination, immunology, and similar topics. Animal feeding is the most delicate subject as the fodder expense is 70% of the farm cost and as nearly all of the metabolic diseases arising out as health problem are because of misfeeding. However, a business organization's being able to maintain making profit will be possible by taking a healthy calf from breeding herd every year. For this reason, precision registrations of birth and artificial insemination, following-up pregnant state of animals, and making the other animals pregnant as soon as possible should be primary aim. It should not be forgotten that diarrhea and pneumonia in calves are among the most frequently witnessed infection related health problems. Mastitis, metritis and foot diseases take an important place in mature cows. These diseases can be minimized by vaccinations that are done properly and in suitable time, in-service training of staffs, making shelters suitable for animals welfare, and improving the hygienic conditions.

  14. Perceptions of health information management educational and practice experiences

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bates, Mari; Black, Clarence; Blair, Franchesica; Davis, Laquanda; Ingram, Steven; Lane, DaQuandra; McElderry, Alicia; Peagler, Bianca; Pickett, Jamie; Plettenberg, Cheryl; Hart-Hester, Susan

    2014-01-01

    ... information infrastructure. Therefore, studies to evaluate variance in outcome assessment methods and perceived adequacy of educational curricula used by health information management (HIM) programs are vital...

  15. Distributed Prognostic Health Management with Gaussian Process Regression

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Distributed prognostics architecture design is an enabling step for efficient implementation of health management systems. A major challenge encountered in such...

  16. Disease and health management in Asian aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondad-Reantaso, Melba G; Subasinghe, Rohana P; Arthur, J Richard; Ogawa, Kazuo; Chinabut, Supranee; Adlard, Robert; Tan, Zilong; Shariff, Mohamed

    2005-09-30

    Asia contributes more than 90% to the world's aquaculture production. Like other farming systems, aquaculture is plagued with disease problems resulting from its intensification and commercialization. This paper describes the various factors, providing specific examples, which have contributed to the current disease problems faced by what is now the fastest growing food-producing sector globally. These include increased globalization of trade and markets; the intensification of fish-farming practices through the movement of broodstock, postlarvae, fry and fingerlings; the introduction of new species for aquaculture development; the expansion of the ornamental fish trade; the enhancement of marine and coastal areas through the stocking of aquatic animals raised in hatcheries; the unanticipated interactions between cultured and wild populations of aquatic animals; poor or lack of effective biosecurity measures; slow awareness on emerging diseases; the misunderstanding and misuse of specific pathogen free (SPF) stocks; climate change; other human-mediated movements of aquaculture commodities. Data on the socio-economic impacts of aquatic animal diseases are also presented, including estimates of losses in production, direct and indirect income and employment, market access or share of investment, and consumer confidence; food availability; industry failures. Examples of costs of investment in aquatic animal health-related activities, including national strategies, research, surveillance, control and other health management programmes are also provided. Finally, the strategies currently being implemented in the Asian region to deal with transboundary diseases affecting the aquaculture sector are highlighted. These include compliance with international codes, and development and implementation of regional guidelines and national aquatic animal health strategies; new diagnostic and therapeutic techniques and new information technology; new biosecurity measures including

  17. The Role of Council Health Management Team in the Improvement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Role of Council Health Management Team in the Improvement of Health ... services included the shortage of human resources, poor working equipment, lack ... adequate resources for participatory organs to execute their functions as well ...

  18. Decision-making process and health management councils: theoretical approaches

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wendhausen, Agueda; Cardoso, Sandra de Mello

    2007-01-01

    With the institutionalization of participation in health, through conferences and management councils at national, state, municipal and local levels, a process of democratization is initiated in the health area...

  19. Sensor Area Network for Integrated Systems Health Management Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The term Integrated Systems Health Management (ISHM) is used to describe a capability that focuses on determining the condition (health) of every element in a...

  20. Consumer choice of social health insurance in managed competition.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerssens, J.J.; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To promote managed competition in Dutch health insurance, the insured are now able to change health insurers. They can choose a health insurer with a low flat-rate premium, the best supplementary insurance and/or the best service. As we do not know why people prefer one health insurer to

  1. Consumer choice of social health insurance in managed competition.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerssens, J.J.; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To promote managed competition in Dutch health insurance, the insured are now able to change health insurers. They can choose a health insurer with a low flat-rate premium, the best supplementary insurance and/or the best service. As we do not know why people prefer one health insurer to

  2. The adoption of mobile health management services: an empirical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ming-Chien; Jen, Wen-Yuan

    2012-06-01

    As their populations age, many countries are facing the increasing economic pressure of providing healthcare to their people. In Taiwan, this problem is exacerbated by an increasing rate of obesity and obesity-related conditions. Encouraging the adoption of personal health management services is one way to maintain current levels of personal health and to efficiently manage the distribution of healthcare resources. This study introduces Mobile Health Management Services (MHMS) and employs the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) to explore the intention of students in Executive Master of Business Management programs to adopt mobile health management technology. Partial least squares (PLS) was used to analyze the collected data, and the results revealed that "perceived usefulness" and "attitude" significantly affected the behavioral intention of adopting MHMS. Both "perceived ease of use" and "perceived usefulness," significantly affected "attitude," and "perceived ease of use" significantly affected "perceived usefulness" as well. The results also show that the determinants of intention toward MHMS differed with age; young adults had higher intention to adopt MHMS to manage their personal health. Therefore, relevant governmental agencies may profitably promote the management of personal health among this population. Successful promotion of personal health management will contribute to increases in both the level of general health and the efficient management of healthcare resources.

  3. Understanding the role of health literacy in self-management and health behaviors among older adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geboers, Bas

    2017-01-01

    Older adults with low health literacy can improve their health if they learn to self-manage their well-being and improve their physical activity and their dietary pattern. One of the major challenges in health care is the problem of low health literacy. Especially older adults often have low health

  4. Sustainable waste management in the UK: the public health role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, R; Spiby, J; Leonardi, G S; Robins, A; Jefferis, S

    2006-10-01

    This paper discusses waste management in the UK and its relationship with health. It aims to outline the role of health professionals in the promotion of waste management, and argues for a change in their role in waste management regulation to help make the process more sustainable. The most common definition of sustainable development is that by the Brundtland commission, i.e. "development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs". Managing waste sites in a manner that minimises toxic impacts on the current and future generations is obviously a crucial part of this. Although the management of waste facilities is extremely complex, the Integrated Pollution Prevention and Control regime, which requires the input of public health professionals on the regulation of such sites, means that all waste management installations should now be operating in a fashion that minimises any toxicological risks to human health. However, the impacts upon climate change, resource use and health inequalities, as well as the effects of waste transportation, are currently not considered to be part of public health professionals' responsibilities when dealing with these sites. There is also no requirement for public health professionals to become involved in waste management planning issues. The fact that public health professionals are not involved in any of these issues makes it unlikely that the potential impacts upon health are being considered fully, and even more unlikely that waste management will become more sustainable. This paper aims to show that by only considering direct toxicological impacts, public health professionals are not fully addressing all the health issues and are not contributing towards sustainability. There is a need for a change in the way that health professionals deal with waste management issues.

  5. [The prospective model of human resources' management in health institution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastorgueva, T I; Shchepin, V O

    2009-01-01

    The article postulates the actuality of developing the concept of the psychological aspects of institution management as projected into health care area where the medical personnel is working in the conditions of higher responsibility, emotional and intellectual overloads under permanent nervous psychological stress. This contingent of medical institutions stuff very often ignore the positive psychological interventions both due to the poor labor management and the corresponding knowledge lacking. The topicality of this research vector is determined by the deficiency of the human resources' management studies in the public health field. The need in searching the investigation prospective directions is ascertained by the unexploredness of personnel management in national health care.

  6. Public health genomics Relevance of genomics for individual health information management, health policy development and effective health services.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Brand

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare delivery systems are facing fundamental challenges. New ways of organising theses systems based on the different needs of stakeholders’ are required to meet these challenges. While medicine is currently undergoing remarkable developments from its morphological and phenotype orientation to a molecular and genotype orientation, promoting the importance of prognosis and prediction, the discussion about the relevance of genome-based information and technologies for the health care system as a whole and especially for public health is still in its infancy. The following article discusses the relevance of genome-based information and technologies for individual health information management, health policy development and effective health services.

  7. On Management Matters: Why We Must Improve Public Health Management Through Action; Comment on “Management Matters: A Leverage Point for Health Systems Strengthening in Global Health”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Willacy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Public health management is a pillar of public health practice. Only through effective management can research, theory, and scientific innovation be translated into successful public health action. With this in mind, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC has developed an innovative program called Improving Public Health Management for Action (IMPACT which aims to address this critical need by building an effective cadre of public health managers to work alongside scientists to prepare for and respond to disease threats and to effectively implement public health programs. IMPACT is a 2-year, experiential learning program that provides fellows with the management tools and opportunities to apply their new knowledge in the field, all while continuing to serve the Ministry of Health (MoH. IMPACT will launch in 2016 in 2 countries with the intent of expanding to additional countries in future years resulting in a well-trained cadre of public health managers around the world.

  8. Performance evaluation: discussing technology for planning and managing health worforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierantoni, Celia Regina; França, Tania; Ney, Marcia Silveira; Monteiro, Valéria Oliveira; Varella, Thereza Christina; Santos, Maria Ruth Dos; Nascimento, Dayane

    2011-12-01

    This essay presents the outcome of reflections and analyses from examining the conceptual options inherent to the methodologies of employee performance appraisal (PA) and its possible application in the health area. It sets a conceptual discussion of the area, associating and integrating knowledge from different fields - health and public administration. It promotes an intersection between public health work management and personnel management strategies. It has the purpose to generate new analyses and studies that would allow for a new approach of the management practices for performance appraisals used in companies, adapting them to meet the specificities of the health sector.

  9. Cassia fistula Linn: Potential candidate in the health management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arshad H Rahmani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cassia fistula Linn is known as Golden shower has therapeutics importance in health care since ancient times. Research findings over the last two decade have confirmed the therapeutics consequence of C. fistula in the health management via modulation of biological activities due to the rich source of antioxidant. Several findings based on the animal model have confirmed the pharmacologically safety and efficacy and have opened a new window for human health management. This review reveals additional information about C. fistula in the health management via in vivo and in vitro study which will be beneficial toward diseases control.

  10. Health information technology: transforming chronic disease management and care transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Shaline; Brammer, Craig; McKethan, Aaron; Buntin, Melinda B

    2012-06-01

    Adoption of health information technology (HIT) is a key effort in improving care delivery, reducing costs of health care, and improving the quality of health care. Evidence from electronic health record (EHR) use suggests that HIT will play a significant role in transforming primary care practices and chronic disease management. This article shows that EHRs and HIT can be used effectively to manage chronic diseases, that HIT can facilitate communication and reduce efforts related to transitions in care, and that HIT can improve patient safety by increasing the information available to providers and patients, improving disease management and safety. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. NETWORKS OF HEALTH CARE: A CHALLENGE TO SUS MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Dubow

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The article proposes a critical reflection, based on national law, scholarly, scientific, on the current development of Networks of Health Care, as a strategy for strengthening the Single Health System (SUS. Are weighted inefficiency of traditional ways of organizing care and management, the challenge of Network Health Care for comprehensive care and management mechanisms used in this process. The work provides subsidies for the care practices and health management are reflected, pointing strategies that result in disruptions of paradigms through a refocusing of attention in existing models. For networks of health care can be consolidated, is fundamental to political sensitivity of health managers with a commitment to build a new model of care, through the struggle to consolidate the SUS and the realization of the principles of universality, comprehensiveness and equity.

  12. Applications of Health Management Using Android and RFID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Long Chen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Health management has become increasingly important in personal health care in modern life. The system we have designed provides a method to help facilitate health management through an associated smart phone with Radio Frequency Identification (RFID, which is a new type of application. This system consists of medical knowledge and health management. In the application of medical knowledge, we use the human model as well as the operation of RFID to obtain medical knowledge concerning human organs. The two main functions of the health management system are medication reminders and drug identification. The feature of medication reminders allows users to set the time for taking medication so that patients do not miss taking their medication. The feature of drug identification allows the operators to identify the drugs and can let the users know who needs to take drugs. In addition, we have designed a web page that allows users to understand their health status.

  13. A model of health education and management for osteoporosis prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Liang; Xu, Xiaowen; Hao, Hongxia; Chen, Liying; Su, Tianjiao; Zhang, Yan; Ma, Weifeng; XIE, YUANYUAN; Wang, Tiantian; Yang, Fan; He, Li; Wang, Wenjiao; Fu, Xuemei; Ma, Yuanzheng

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis, a chronic disease with no therapeutic cure, affects a growing number of people as the aging population in China rapidly increases. Therefore, developing an evidence-based model of health education and management for osteoporosis prevention is required. In the present study, an osteoporosis club was established, which is a novel model of health education and management for osteoporosis prevention. A unified management of membership was used based on a digitized database. A total ...

  14. 75 FR 54804 - Safety and Health Management Programs for Mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-09

    ..., Occupational Health and Safety Management Systems; The International Standards Organization's (ISO's) ISO 9001:2008 (E), Quality management systems--Requirements; and The British Standards Institution's (BSI's) BS... management systems--Requirements. The Guidelines reveal that the components of effective safety and...

  15. [Managing health risks of workers in business trip].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevorkian, E V

    2014-01-01

    The article presents data of prospective observation over the risk management system concerning health of international oil and gas company workers in business trips. The management system included training and screening of workers under risk, specific prophylaxis and other measures. The authors described problems of the risk management system implementation, suggested recommendations to control risks connected with business trips.

  16. Management Education in Public Health: Further Considerations Comment on "Management Matters: A Leverage Point for Health Systems Strengthening in Global Health".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darr, Kurt J

    2015-08-25

    Knowing and applying the basic management functions of planning, organizing, staffing, directing, and controlling, as well as their permutations and combinations, are vital to effective delivery of public health services. Presently, graduate programs that prepare public health professionals neither emphasize teaching management theory, nor its application. This deficit puts those who become managers in public health and those they serve at a distinct disadvantage. This deficit can be remedied by enhanced teaching of management subjects. © 2015 by Kerman University of Medical Sciences.

  17. Analysis of Workplace Health Education Performed by Occupational Health Managers in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeon-Ha; Jung, Moon-Hee

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate workplace health education as practiced by occupational health managers based on standardized job tasks and suggest priority tasks and areas to be trained. The study was conducted between November 10, 2013 and April 30, 2014. The tool used in this study was standardized job tasks of workplace health education for occupational health managers which was developed through methodological steps. It was evaluated by 233 worksite occupational health managers. Data were analyzed using SPSS 21.0. Predicting variables of workplace health education performance were the "analysis and planning" factor, type of enterprise, and form of management. Healthcare professionals and occupational health managers who managed the nonmanufacturing industry showed high importance and low performance level in "analysis and planning" factor. "Analysis and planning" skill is priority training area for healthcare professionals and occupational health managers who managed nonmanufacturing industry. It is necessary to develop a training curriculum for occupational health managers that include improving analysis of worksites and plans for a health education program. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Practices Internship and Professional Orientation in Health Management

    OpenAIRE

    Ertaş, Abdulaziz

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was designed to demonstrate the importance of compulsory training course implementation and make developing suggestions. The study population included the students who attended the compulsory training course and internship implementation organized by Health Institutions Management Department of Afyon Health College in Afyon Kocatepe University. There has been an effort to increase university students', who are prospective health managers, professional manners by...

  19. Health care units and human resources management trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Adriana Maria; Ciampone, Maria Helena Trench; Santelle, Odete

    2013-02-01

    To identify factors producing new trends in basic health care unit management and changes in management models. This was a prospective study with ten health care unit managers and ten specialists in the field of Health in São Paulo, Southeastern Brazil, in 2010. The Delphi methodology was adopted. There were four stages of data collection, three quantitative and the fourth qualitative. The first three rounds dealt with changing trends in management models, manager profiles and required competencies, and the Mann-Whitney test was used in the analysis. The fourth round took the form of a panel of those involved, using thematic analysis. The main factors which are driving change in basic health care units were identified, as were changes in management models. There was consensus that this process is influenced by the difficulties in managing teams and by politics. The managers were found to be up-to-date with trends in the wider context, with the arrival of social health organizations, but they are not yet anticipating these within the institutions. Not only the content, but the professional development aspect of training courses in this area should be reviewed. Selection and recruitment, training and assessment of these professionals should be guided by these competencies aligned to the health service mission, vision, values and management models.

  20. Consumer choice of social health insurance in managed competition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerssens, Jan J.; Groenewegen, Peter P.

    2003-01-01

    Objective To promote managed competition in Dutch health insurance, the insured are now able to change heaith insurers. They can choose a health insurer with a low flat-rate premium, the best supplementary insurance and/or the best service. As we do not know why people prefer one health insurer to

  1. Environmental Management of Pediatric Asthma: Guidelines for Health Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, James R.; McCurdy, Leyla Erk

    2005-01-01

    These guidelines are the product of a new Pediatric Asthma Initiative aimed at integrating environmental management of asthma into pediatric health care. This document outlines competencies in environmental health relevant to pediatric asthma that should be mastered by primary health care providers, and outlines the environmental interventions…

  2. Consumer choice of social health insurance in managed competition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerssens, Jan J.; Groenewegen, Peter P.

    2003-01-01

    Objective To promote managed competition in Dutch health insurance, the insured are now able to change heaith insurers. They can choose a health insurer with a low flat-rate premium, the best supplementary insurance and/or the best service. As we do not know why people prefer one health insurer to a

  3. Management Matters: A Leverage Point for Health Systems Strengthening in Global Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Elizabeth H; Taylor, Lauren A; Cuellar, Carlos J

    2015-05-20

    Despite a renewed focus in the field of global health on strengthening health systems, inadequate attention has been directed to a key ingredient of high-performing health systems: management. We aimed to develop the argument that management - defined here as the process of achieving predetermined objectives through human, financial, and technical resources - is a cross-cutting function necessary for success in all World Health Organization (WHO) building blocks of health systems strengthening. Management within health systems is particularly critical in low-income settings where the efficient use of scarce resources is paramount to attaining health goals. More generally, investments in management capacity may be viewed as a key leverage point in grand strategy, as strong management enables the achievement of large ends with limited means. We also sought to delineate a set of core competencies and identify key roles to be targeted for management capacity building efforts. Several effective examples of management interventions have been described in the research literature. Together, the existing evidence underscores the importance of country ownership of management capacity building efforts, which often challenge the status quo and thus need country leadership to sustain despite inevitable friction. The literature also recognizes that management capacity efforts, as a key ingredient of effective systems change, take time to embed, as new protocols and ways of working become habitual and integrated as standard operating procedures. Despite these challenges, the field of health management as part of global health system strengthening efforts holds promise as a fundamental leverage point for achieving health system performance goals with existing human, technical, and financial resources. The evidence base consistently supports the role of management in performance improvement but would benefit from additional research with improved methodological rigor and longer

  4. Management Matters: A Leverage Point for Health Systems Strengthening in Global Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth H. Bradley

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite a renewed focus in the field of global health on strengthening health systems, inadequate attention has been directed to a key ingredient of high-performing health systems: management. We aimed to develop the argument that management – defined here as the process of achieving predetermined objectives through human, financial, and technical resources – is a cross-cutting function necessary for success in all World Health Organization (WHO building blocks of health systems strengthening. Management within health systems is particularly critical in low-income settings where the efficient use of scarce resources is paramount to attaining health goals. More generally, investments in management capacity may be viewed as a key leverage point in grand strategy, as strong management enables the achievement of large ends with limited means. We also sought to delineate a set of core competencies and identify key roles to be targeted for management capacity building efforts. Several effective examples of management interventions have been described in the research literature. Together, the existing evidence underscores the importance of country ownership of management capacity building efforts, which often challenge the status quo and thus need country leadership to sustain despite inevitable friction. The literature also recognizes that management capacity efforts, as a key ingredient of effective systems change, take time to embed, as new protocols and ways of working become habitual and integrated as standard operating procedures. Despite these challenges, the field of health management as part of global health system strengthening efforts holds promise as a fundamental leverage point for achieving health system performance goals with existing human, technical, and financial resources. The evidence base consistently supports the role of management in performance improvement but would benefit from additional research with improved

  5. Care management actions in the Family Health Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Costa Fernandes

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to identify, from nurses’ speeches, the actions that enable care management in the Family Health Strategy.Methods: descriptive study with a qualitative approach conducted with 32 nurses of primary care. It was used a semistructuredinterview as the data collection technique. The methodological process of the collective subject discourse wasused to organize the data Results: from the nurses’ speeches one identified the categories: complementary relationshipbetween care and management; meeting with community health agents, a care management strategy in nurses’ work;health education activities such as a care management action and a health information system as an essential tool forcare Conclusion: it was possible to observe that nurses understood the importance of coordination and complementaritybetween the activities of the working process of care and management.

  6. Public health response to striking solid waste management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murti, Michelle; Ayre, Reg; Shapiro, Howard; de Burger, Ron

    2011-10-01

    In 2009, the City of Toronto, Ontario, Canada, experienced a six-week labor disruption involving 24,000 city workers that included solid waste and public health employees. In an attempt to control illegal dumping and to manage garbage storage across the city during this period, 24 temporary garbage storage sites were established by the city (mostly in local parks) for residents to dispose of their household waste. No other municipality in North America has attempted to operate this many temporary sites for this long a period. Management and nonunion staff from Healthy Environments in Toronto Public Health performed daily inspections, responded to community questions, issued public health orders, and worked closely with Solid Waste Management and the Ministry of the Environment to actively manage the public health concerns associated with these sites. This intensive oversight mitigated public health risks to the community and facilitated an effective, safe solution to the temporary garbage storage problem.

  7. Application of coal mine dynamic safety management and occupational health and safety management system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hua; WANG Chun-qiu; CAO Qing-gui; LIU Ye-jiao; LIN Xiao-fei

    2007-01-01

    A method system was put forward based on the occupational health and safety management system to develop the dynamic safety management of coal mine. It aimed at the problems in the mining safety management and was put in practice in Lingxin coal mine of Ningxia Coal Industry Group Co., Ltd.. And good effect was obtained in safety work. It developed the mining dynamic safety management based on the building of occupational health and safety management system of mining enterprise and its main contents are as follows: timely identification and dynamic control of accident risk, persistent improvement of safety management performance according to the "PDCA" circle.

  8. Evaluation of computerized health management information system for primary health care in rural India

    OpenAIRE

    Singh Satyavir; Yadav Kapil; Nongkynrih Baridalyne; Krishnan Anand; Gupta Vivek

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The Comprehensive Rural Health Services Project Ballabgarh, run by All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), New Delhi has a computerized Health Management Information System (HMIS) since 1988. The HMIS at Ballabgarh has undergone evolution and is currently in its third version which uses generic and open source software. This study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of a computerized Health Management Information System in rural health system in India. Met...

  9. The interplay of management accounting research and NPM health initiatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmmose, Margit

    This paper investigates the development of management accounting research in the context of New Public Management (NPM) initiatives in health care. Drawing on concepts from diffusion theory and earlier literature reviews, the paper examines the interplay between management accounting research...... and health care reforms in relation to country of origin, development, theoretical approach, research method and topic. The study thus establishes a different focus; namely the interrelationship between the development of management accounting research and practical socio-political NPM innovations. The study...... shows that management accounting techniques are increasingly adopted in governmental health reforms and diffused across nations, themes and initiatives through time with the result that wider social practices become more and more integrated in management accounting research themes...

  10. The interplay of management accounting research and NPM health initiatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmmose, Margit

    This paper investigates the development of management accounting research in the context of New Public Management (NPM) initiatives in health care. Drawing on concepts from diffusion theory and earlier literature reviews, the paper examines the interplay between management accounting research...... and health care reforms in relation to country of origin, development, theoretical approach, research method and topic. The study thus establishes a different focus; namely the interrelationship between the development of management accounting research and practical socio-political NPM innovations. The study...... shows that management accounting techniques are increasingly adopted in governmental health reforms and diffused across nations, themes and initiatives through time with the result that wider social practices become more and more integrated in management accounting research themes...

  11. HEALTH COMMUNICATION AND HEALTH MANAGEMENT IN TRADITIONAL MEDICINE : A CHALLENGE, A RESPONSE !

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundari, K.

    1986-01-01

    Health communication in health management process contributes to the overall efficiency of the health-care delivery systems. For this the individual health worker should be able to co-ordinate, integrate and adopt his functions. This is basically required which is minutely discussed in this paper by the author PMID:22557543

  12. The performance measurement-management divide in public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Robert; Deber, Raisa

    2016-03-01

    What happens when performance measurement and management (PMM) is applied to public health systems? This review of the experiences of high-income jurisdictions reveals considerable challenges, some familiar from the general public management literature and some more unique to public health. To aid understanding, the PMM ladder, a framework for evaluating PMM systems is developed and applied to 55 public health measurement systems from Australia, Canada, EU, New Zealand, UK and US. Results indicate that: considerable measurement is occurring for informational purposes; measurement focuses more on clinical than on population health measures; and there is relatively little use of measurement results for improving management. Results demonstrate that much public health performance measurement is restricted to population health outcomes and fails to include more proximate activity and output measures that would be more useful for managing public health organizations. There are early signs of the emergence of a new breed of public health performance measurement that attempts to do just this. The PMM ladder proved useful for assessing efforts across a range of jurisdictions. It allows policymakers and managers to easily compare their PMM efforts with others and assists researchers in assessing what happens when PMM is applied to public health.

  13. No health for all without better trained management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, D K

    1997-01-01

    This article notes that existing health professionals and managers constitute the first 'generation' working in a world where Health for All is a practical possibility because, if founded on community-based public and primary health care with hospitals in support and good intersectoral help, we now have the appropriate technology, access to finance and adequate numbers of health workers. What we still lack are sufficient health professionals, at all levels, with the managerial skills and experience to apply the technology, generate the funding and motivate the staff; making full use of community involvement, the co-operation of other sectors and good relationships with local and central government. Management can be learned both at the workplace and in the training room, and from the managers a few of them will emerge as leaders, with the vision to secure the willing support of others in reaching worthwhile health goals. A very useful publication is the Training Manual on Management of Human Resources for Health, WHO/EDUC/93.201 from World Health Organisation, Geneva, Switzerland. The paper closes with examples illustrating four principles for health management development: finding key points of entry; reaching large numbers; accelerating national self-sufficiency; and international.

  14. Health and Hospital Management Education in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavya Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Public health has been of national and international concern as in the process of assuring the health standards of any nation, it involves mobilizing and engaging local, state, national and international resources. Since the health problems and issues vary from country to country, the health policies and reforms addressing these should also be customized. To effectively implement and practice these developments, it is necessary to scientifically derive the lessons learnt and relate them to adequately trained and adroit health workforce. Winslow in his definition of Public Health stated, “Public Health is the science and art of preventing disease, prolonging life and promoting health and efficiency through organized community efforts for the sanitation of environment, the control of community infections, the education of individuals in principles of hygiene, the organization of medical and nursing services for the early diagnosis and preventive treatment of disease and the development of social machinery which will ensure to every individual in the community a standard of living adequate for maintenance of health, so organizing these benefits as to enable every citizen to realize his birth right of health and longevity(1. To effectively comply with the multidisciplinary dimensions reflected in Winslow’s definition, it is necessary to explore the different domains of public health and provide sufficient capacity building initiatives to work upon the existing situations related to each of these domains. Public health education and competencies at various levels needed to translate evidence into policies, and to design, implement and evaluate programs(2. The reach of public health has now burgeoned from studying infectious and tropical diseases to understanding the health systems and workforce at large.........

  15. Leadership and globalization: research in health management education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Daniel J; Ramirez, Bernardo; Filerman, Gary

    2012-01-01

    The impact of globalization on graduate health care management education is evident, yet challenging to quantify. The Commission on Healthcare Management Education (CAHME) recently authorized two research studies to gather specific information and answer important questions about accredited graduate programs in the USA and Canada. Two surveys provided the most comprehensive data impacting international health management education efforts by 70 programs. An inventory was made of 22 countries; information was compiled on 21 accrediting or quality improvement organizations. Observations on leadership and the demand for qualified health care professionals is discussed in terms of accreditation, certification, competency models, outcome assessment, improving quality, and the impact of globalization on higher education.

  16. Reducing Health Cost: Health Informatics and Knowledge Management as a Business and Communication Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyampoh-Vidogah, Regina; Moreton, Robert; Sallah, David

    Health informatics has the potential to improve the quality and provision of care while reducing the cost of health care delivery. However, health informatics is often falsely regarded as synonymous with information management (IM). This chapter (i) provides a clear definition and characteristic benefits of health informatics and information management in the context of health care delivery, (ii) identifies and explains the difference between health informatics (HI) and managing knowledge (KM) in relation to informatics business strategy and (iii) elaborates the role of information communication technology (ICT) KM environment. This Chapter further examines how KM can be used to improve health service informatics costs, and identifies the factors that could affect its implementation and explains some of the reasons driving the development of electronic health record systems. This will assist in avoiding higher costs and errors, while promoting the continued industrialisation of KM delivery across health care communities.

  17. Patient privacy, consent, and identity management in health information exchange

    CERN Document Server

    Hosek, Susan D

    2013-01-01

    As a step toward improving its health information technology (IT) interoperability, the Military Health System is seeking to develop a research roadmap to better coordinate health IT research efforts, address IT capability gaps, and reduce programmatic risk for its enterprise projects. This report identifies gaps in research, policy, and practice involving patient privacy, consent, and identity management that need to be addressed to improve the quality and efficiency of care through health information exchange.

  18. Financial coping strategies of mental health consumers: managing social benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Mary Ager

    2014-05-01

    Mental health consumers depend on social benefits in the forms of supplemental security income and social security disability insurance for their livelihood. Although these programs pay meager benefits, little research has been undertaken into how this population makes ends meet. Using a qualitative approach, this study asks what are the financial coping strategies of mental health consumers? Seven approaches were identified: subsidies, cost-effective shopping, budgeting, prioritizing, technology, debt management, and saving money. Results illustrate the resourcefulness of mental health consumers in managing meager social benefits and highlight the need to strengthen community mental health efforts with financial capabilities education.

  19. Program management of telemental health care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darkins, A

    2001-01-01

    Telemedicine is a new adjunct to the delivery of health care services that has been applied to a range of health care specialties, including mental health. When prospective telemedicine programs are planned, telemedicine is often envisaged as simply a question of introducing new technology. The development of a robust, sustainable telemental health program involves clinical, technical, and managerial considerations. The major barriers to making this happen are usually how practitioners and patients adapt successfully to the technology and not in the physical installation of telecommunications bandwidth and the associated hardware necessary for teleconsultation. This article outlines the requirements for establishing a viable telemental health service, one that is based on clinical need, practitioner acceptance, technical reliability, and revenue generation. It concludes that the major challenge associated with the implementation of telemental health does not lie in having the idea or in taking the idea to the project stage needed for proof of concept. The major challenge to the widespread adoption of telemental health is paying sufficient attention to the myriad of details needed to integrate models of remote health care delivery into the wider health care system.

  20. Solving a Health Information Management Problem. An international success story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Terry J

    2015-01-01

    The management of health care delivery requires the availability of effective 'information management' tools based on e-technologies [eHealth]. In developed economies many of these 'tools' are readily available whereas in Low and Middle Income Countries (LMIC) there is limited access to eHealth technologies and this has been defined as the "digital divide". This paper provides a short introduction to the fundamental understanding of what is meant by information management in health care and how it applies to all social economies. The core of the paper describes the successful implementation of appropriate information management tools in a resource poor environment to manage the HIV/AIDS epidemic and other disease states, in sub-Saharan Africa and how the system has evolved to become the largest open source eHealth project in the world and become the health information infrastructure for several national eHealth economies. The system is known as Open MRS [www.openmrs.org). The continuing successful evolution of the OpenMRS project has permitted its key implementers to define core factors that are the foundations for successful eHealth projects.

  1. The "Battle" of Managing Language Barriers in Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Emma M; Valenzuela-Araujo, Doris; Zickafoose, Joseph S; Kieffer, Edith; DeCamp, Lisa Ross

    2016-02-18

    Providing safe and high-quality health care for children whose parents have limited English proficiency (LEP) remains challenging. Reports of parent perspectives on navigating language discordance in health care are limited. We analyzed portions of 48 interviews focused on language barriers from 2 qualitative interview studies of the pediatric health care experiences of LEP Latina mothers in 2 urban US cities. We found mothers experienced frustration with health care and reported suboptimal accommodation for language barriers. Six themes emerged relevant to health care across settings: the "battle" of managing language barriers, preference for bilingual providers, negative bias toward interpreted encounters, "getting by" with limited language skills, fear of being a burden, and stigma and discrimination experienced by LEP families. Parents' insights highlight reasons why effective language accommodation in health care remains challenging. Partnering with families to address the management of language barriers is needed to improve health care quality and safety for LEP patients and families.

  2. Power Management for A Distributed Wireless Health Management Architecture

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Distributed wireless architectures for prognostics is an important enabling step in prognostic research in order to achieve feasible real-time system health...

  3. Sensor Area Network for Integrated Systems Health Management Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The term Integrated Systems Health Management (ISHM) is used to describe a capability that focuses on determining the condition of every element in a complex System...

  4. The operation criteria of a health management information system ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The operation criteria of a health management information system. ... Subjects: Forty (40) healthcare workers who were involved in the ... in KNH was performance 17 (53.1%), Other indicators that were commonly applied in HMIS evaluation in ...

  5. A Structural Model Decomposition Framework for Systems Health Management

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Systems health management (SHM) is an impor- tant set of technologies aimed at increasing system safety and reliability by detecting, isolating, and identifying...

  6. All-Fiber-Optic Ultrasonic Health Management System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Health management of composite airframe components is essential for safety and reliability of future aircrafts. It reduces the risk of catastrophic failures and...

  7. Health Management Information System in Private Clinics in Ilorin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Health Management Information System in Private Clinics in Ilorin, Nigeria. ... Journal Home > Vol 46, No 5 (2004) > ... private clinics located in Ilorin, Kwara State, Nigeria to determine the awareness and level of involvement ... Article Metrics.

  8. Priority issues in tropical animal health management | Etuk | Animal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Priority issues in tropical animal health management. ... based systems and ethno veterinary medical practices in solving their problems almost successfully. ... issues in the tropics must therefore take cognizance of these indigenous strategies.

  9. Management system of organizational and economic changes in health services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya Vasilyevna Krivenko

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In the article, the definitions of the concept organizational and economic changes in institution problems of changes in public health service, the purpose and issues of the management system of organizational and economic changes in the field are considered. The combined strategy of development and innovative changes in management is offered. The need of resource-saving technologies implementation is shown. Expediency of use of marketing tools in a management system of organizational and economic changes is considered the mechanism of improvement of planning and pricing in public health service is offered. The author’s model of management of organizational and economic changes in health services supporting achievement of medical, social, economic efficiency in Yekaterinburg's trauma care is presented. Strategy of traumatism prevention is determined on the basis of interdepartmental approach and territorial segmentation of health care market

  10. Integrated Health Management for Space Flight Digital Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal addresses the need for a real-time Prognostics and Health Management (PHM) system to identify anomalous states in digital electronic systems used in...

  11. Exploring the Model Design Space for Battery Health Management

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Battery Health Management (BHM) is a core enabling technology for the success and widespread adoption of the emerging electric vehicles of today. Although battery...

  12. Sensors and Rotordynamics Health Management Research for Aircraft Turbine Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekki, J.; Abdul-Aziz, A.; Adamovsky, G.; Berger, D.; Fralick, G.; Gyekenyesi, A.; Hunter, G.; Tokars, R.; Venti, M.; Woike, M.; Wrbanek, J.; Wrbanek, S.

    2011-01-01

    Develop Advanced Sensor Technology and rotordynamic structural diagnostics to address existing Aviation Safety Propulsion Health Management needs as well as proactively begin to address anticipated safety issues for new technologies.

  13. Knowledge management in health: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Elyrose Sousa Brito; Nagliate, Patricia; Furlan, Claudia Elisangela Bis; Rocha, Kerson; Trevizan, Maria Auxiliadora; Mendes, Isabel Amélia Costa

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge has been used as a resource for intelligent and effective action planning in organizations. Interest in research on knowledge management processes has intensified in different areas. A systematic literature review was accomplished, based on the question: what are the contributions of Brazilian and international journal publications on knowledge management in health? The sample totaled 32 items that complied with the inclusion criteria. The results showed that 78% of journals that published on the theme are international, 77% of researchers work in higher education and 65% have a Ph.D. The texts gave rise to five thematic categories, mainly: development of knowledge management systems in health (37.5%), discussion of knowledge management application in health (28.1%) and nurses' function in knowledge management (18.7%).

  14. Corporate social responsibility and the future health care manager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sandra K

    2010-01-01

    The decisions and actions of health care managers are oftentimes heavily scrutinized by the public. Given the current economic climate, managers may feel intense pressure to produce higher results with fewer resources. This could inadvertently test their moral fortitude and their social consciousness. A study was conducted to determine what corporate social responsibility orientation and viewpoint future health care managers may hold. The results of the study indicate that future health care managers may hold patient care in high regard as opposed to profit maximization. However, the results of the study also show that future managers within the industry may continue to need rules, laws, regulations, and legal sanctions to guide their actions and behavior.

  15. Guidelines for Management Information Systems in Canadian Health Care Facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Larry E.

    1987-01-01

    The MIS Guidelines are a comprehensive set of standards for health care facilities for the recording of staffing, financial, workload, patient care and other management information. The Guidelines enable health care facilities to develop management information systems which identify resources, costs and products to more effectively forecast and control costs and utilize resources to their maximum potential as well as provide improved comparability of operations.

  16. Management of Labor Conflicts in Public Health Organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Adriana Elena Belu; Elena Alexandra Ilinca

    2012-01-01

    The work “Management of labor conflicts in public health organizations” treats a very importantissue, of the present, with extensive and multiple implications for public health. The work can be consideredas an interdisciplinary study justified by two arguments: first, it is essential to applied research step, theknowledge and use of enshrined informational content in management literature, especially of models andmechanisms of managerial activity on the administration of human resources, mana...

  17. UPMC MyHealth: managing the health and costs of U.S. healthcare workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Michael D; Peele, Pamela B; Keyser, Donna J; Liu, Yushu; Doyle, Stephen

    2014-10-01

    Workplace wellness programs hold promise for managing the health and costs of the U.S. workforce. These programs have not been rigorously tested in healthcare worksites. To evaluate the impact of MyHealth on the health and costs of UPMC healthcare workers. Five-year observational study conducted in 2013 with subgroup analyses and propensity-matched pair comparisons to more accurately interpret program effects. UPMC, an integrated health care delivery and financing system headquartered in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Participants included 13,627 UPMC employees who were continuously enrolled in UPMC-sponsored health insurance during the study period and demonstrated participation in MyHealth by completing a Health Risk Assessment in both 2007 and 2011, as well as 4,448 other healthcare workers employed outside of UPMC who did not participate in the program. A comprehensive wellness, prevention, and chronic disease management program that ties achievement of health and wellness requirements to receipt of an annual credit on participants' health insurance deductible. Health-risk levels, medical, pharmacy, and total healthcare costs, and Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set performance rates for prevention and chronic disease management. Significant improvements in health-risk status and increases in use of preventive and chronic disease management services were observed in the intervention group. Although total healthcare costs increased significantly, reductions in costs were significant for those who moved from higher- to the lowest-risk levels. The contrast differences in costs between reduced- and maintained-risk groups was also significant. Matched pair comparisons provided further evidence of program effects on observed reductions in costs and improvements in prevention, but not improvements in chronic disease management. Incorporating incentivized health management strategies in employer-sponsored health insurance benefit designs can serve as a useful

  18. Audit Trail Management System in Community Health Care Information Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Naoki; Nakayama, Masaharu; Nakaya, Jun; Tominaga, Teiji; Suganuma, Takuo; Shiratori, Norio

    2015-01-01

    After the Great East Japan Earthquake we constructed a community health care information network system. Focusing on the authentication server and portal server capable of SAML&ID-WSF, we proposed an audit trail management system to look over audit events in a comprehensive manner. Through implementation and experimentation, we verified the effectiveness of our proposed audit trail management system.

  19. Design for sustainable development : environmental management and safety and health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwetsloot, G.; Bos, J.

    1998-01-01

    This is a report on the EU's environmental management and audit scheme and its interaction with the management of safety and health. The focus is on the interactions at company and at policy level. To illustrate the relevance of the interactions at company level, the Annex includes five case studies

  20. Integrating health sciences library resources into course management systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blevins, Amy E; Inman, Megan B

    2014-01-01

    As distance education and blended learning grows, so does the need for health sciences librarians to become involved with course management systems. This article will provide some information on how to become involved with course management systems and will also provide information on a few of the more popular systems available.

  1. Rural health service managers' perspectives on preparing rural health services for climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Rachael; McGirr, Joe

    2017-08-17

    To determine health service managers' (HSMs) recommendations on strengthening the health service response to climate change. Self-administered survey in paper or electronic format. Rural south-west of New South Wales. Health service managers working in rural remote metropolitan areas 3-7. Proportion of respondents identifying preferred strategies for preparation of rural health services for climate change. There were 43 participants (53% response rate). Most respondents agreed that there is scepticism regarding climate change among health professionals (70%, n = 30) and community members (72%, n = 31). Over 90% thought that climate change would impact the health of rural populations in the future with regard to heat-related illnesses, mental health, skin cancer and water security. Health professionals and government were identified as having key leadership roles on climate change and health in rural communities. Over 90% of the respondents believed that staff and community in local health districts (LHDs) should be educated about the health impacts of climate change. Public health education facilitated by State or Federal Government was the preferred method of educating community members, and education facilitated by the LHD was the preferred method for educating health professionals. Health service managers hold important health leadership roles within rural communities and their health services. The study highlights the scepticism towards climate change among health professionals and community members in rural Australia. It identifies the important role of rural health services in education and advocacy on the health impacts of climate change and identifies recommended methods of public health education for community members and health professionals. © 2017 National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  2. Health literacy in health systems: perspectives on patient self-management in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin-Zamir, D; Peterburg, Y

    2001-03-01

    Health systems will face new challenges in this millennium. Striking the balance between the best quality of care and optimal use of dwindling resources will challenge health policy makers, managers and practitioners. Increasingly, improvements in the outcomes of interventions for both acute and chronic patients will depend on partnerships between health service providers, the individual and their family. Patient education that incorporates self-management and empowerment has proven to be cost-effective. It is essential that health care providers promote informed decision making, and facilitate actions designed to improve personal capacity to exert control over factors that determine health and improve health outcomes. It is for these reasons that promoting health literacy is a central strategy for improving self-management in health. The different types of health literacy--functional, interactive and critical health literacy--are considered. The potential to improve health literacy at each of these levels has been demonstrated in practice among diabetics and other chronic disease patients in Clalit Health Services (CHS) in Israel is used as an example to demonstrate possibilities. The application of all three types of health literacy is expressed in: (i) developing appropriate health information tools for the public to be applied in primary, secondary and tertiary care settings, and in online and media information accessibility and appropriateness using culturally relevant participatory methods; (ii) training of health professionals at all levels, including undergraduate and in-service training; and (iii) developing and applying appropriate assessment and monitoring tools which include public/patient participatory methods. Health care providers need to consider where their patients are getting information on disease and self-management, whether or not that information is reliable, and inform their patients of the best sources of information and its use. The

  3. Management system of organizational and economic changes in health services

    OpenAIRE

    Natalya Vasilyevna Krivenko

    2013-01-01

    In the article, the definitions of the concept organizational and economic changes in institution problems of changes in public health service, the purpose and issues of the management system of organizational and economic changes in the field are considered. The combined strategy of development and innovative changes in management is offered. The need of resource-saving technologies implementation is shown. Expediency of use of marketing tools in a management system of organizationa...

  4. Management behaviour of one community health nurse supervisor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, P A; Larsen, J

    1989-03-01

    Mintzberg's theoretical framework of management, which examines the roles and functions of a manager in relation to effective communication, is used to analyse observational data of managerial conflict within a community health setting. In this setting the manager failed to establish sound interpersonal relations with her peers or with the clinic nurses. This led to a poor information base from which she could make decisions. The result was that the group became stressed and developed signs of disintegration.

  5. Health Insurance and Managed Care in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    main categories, healthcare infrastructure and healthcare ... sum (benefit) on the occurrence of a specified event. The basis for ... Every Insurance scheme or HMO providing health cover ... The NHIS idea was resurrected again in. 1988 by ...

  6. Public and private roles in plant health management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Lansink, A.G.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    World-wide, government institutions play an important role in the management of plant health. This paper develops a conceptual framework in which suppliers and demanders jointly determine the optimal level of plant health in a hypothetical market. Next this paper argues that this market falls short

  7. An Examination of Health Information Management by the Deaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karras, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about how Deaf people perceive, access, and utilize interpersonal and media sources for health information. In light of the scarcity of research on health information management among this group, a two-phase study was conducted that included eight focus groups (N=39) and survey data (N=366) with Deaf participants to determine the…

  8. Evaluation of two communication strategies to improve udder health management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, J.; Renes, R.J.; Lam, T.J.G.M.

    2010-01-01

    Worldwide, programs to improve udder health are implemented using communication tools and methods that inform and persuade dairy farmers. This study evaluated 2 communication strategies used in a mastitis control program in the Netherlands. To improve farmers’ udder health management, tools such as

  9. Evaluation of two communication strategies to improve udder health management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, J.; Renes, R.J.; Lam, T.J.G.M.

    2010-01-01

    Worldwide, programs to improve udder health are implemented using communication tools and methods that inform and persuade dairy farmers. This study evaluated 2 communication strategies used in a mastitis control program in the Netherlands. To improve farmers’ udder health management, tools such as

  10. Managing Food Allergies at School: School Mental Health Professionals

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-01-20

    This podcast highlights the role of school mental health professionals in the management of food allergies in schools. It also identifies CDC food allergy resources for schools.  Created: 1/20/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 1/20/2015.

  11. Knowledge management, health information technology and nurses' work engagement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, P.H.J.; Ligthart, P.E.M.; Schouteten, R.L.J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Knowledge management (KM) extends the health information technology (HIT) literature by addressing its impact on creating knowledge by sharing and using the knowledge of health care professionals in hospitals. PURPOSE: The aim of the study was to provide insight into how HIT affects

  12. Financial aspects of veterinary herd health management programmes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ifende, V.I.; Derks, M.; Hooijer, G.A.; Hogeveen, H.

    2014-01-01

    Veterinary herd health management (VHHM) programmes are meant to support herd health and farmers’ income (Brand and Guard 1996). They were introduced in the Netherlands in the 1970s (Sol and Renkema 1984) and at present many veterinarians provide them to farmers. VHHM comprises a basic structure of

  13. Knowledge management, health information technology and nurses' work engagement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, P.H.J.; Ligthart, P.E.M.; Schouteten, R.L.J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Knowledge management (KM) extends the health information technology (HIT) literature by addressing its impact on creating knowledge by sharing and using the knowledge of health care professionals in hospitals. PURPOSE: The aim of the study was to provide insight into how HIT affects

  14. An Examination of Health Information Management by the Deaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karras, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about how Deaf people perceive, access, and utilize interpersonal and media sources for health information. In light of the scarcity of research on health information management among this group, a two-phase study was conducted that included eight focus groups (N=39) and survey data (N=366) with Deaf participants to determine the…

  15. What health care managers do: applying Mintzberg's structured observation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arman, Rebecka; Dellve, Lotta; Wikström, Ewa; Törnström, Linda

    2009-09-01

    Aim The aim of the present study was to explore and describe what characterizes first- and second-line health care managers' use of time. Background Many Swedish health care managers experience difficulties managing their time. Methods Structured and unstructured observations were used. Ten first- and second-line managers in different health care settings were studied in detail from 3.5 and 4 days each. Duration and frequency of different types of work activities were analysed. Results The individual variation was considerable. The managers' days consisted to a large degree of short activities (<9 minutes). On average, nearly half of the managers' time was spent in meetings. Most of the managers' time was spent with subordinates and <1% was spent alone with their superiors. Sixteen per cent of their time was spent on administration and only a small fraction on explicit strategic work. Conclusions The individual variations in time use patterns suggest the possibility of interventions to support changes in time use patterns. Implications for nursing management A reliable description of what managers do paves the way for analyses of what they should do to be effective.

  16. An Application of Business Process Management to Health Care Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Mohsen M D

    The purpose of this article is to help health care facility managers and personnel identify significant elements of their facilities to address, and steps and actions to follow, when applying business process management to them. The ABPMP (Association of Business Process Management Professionals) life-cycle model of business process management is adopted, and steps from Lean, business process reengineering, and Six Sigma, and actions from operations management are presented to implement it. Managers of health care facilities can find in business process management a more comprehensive approach to improving their facilities than Lean, Six Sigma, business process reengineering, and ad hoc approaches that does not conflict with them because many of their elements can be included under its umbrella. Furthermore, the suggested application of business process management can guide and relieve them from selecting among these approaches, as well as provide them with specific steps and actions that they can follow. This article fills a gap in the literature by presenting a much needed comprehensive application of business process management to health care facilities that has specific steps and actions for implementation.

  17. Health Management Mentoring for Health Systems Strengthening: A Response to Recent Commentaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troy D. Moon

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We would like to thank Lapão 1 and Schwarcz et al 2 for their thoughtful additions related to our article “Implementation of a health management mentoring program: Year-1 evaluation of its impact on health system strengthening in Zambézia Province, Mozambique,” 3 and for sharing their practical lessons and insights into the state of health system strengthening activities. In our article, we described a health management mentoring strategy and suggested results in district health system functioning after its first year of implementation.

  18. Problematizing health coaching for chronic illness self-management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Lisa M; Ceci, Christine

    2013-09-01

    To address the growing costs associated with chronic illness care, many countries, both developed and developing, identify increased patient self-management or self-care as a focus of healthcare reform. Health coaching, an implementation strategy to support the shift to self-management, encourages patients to make lifestyle changes to improve the management of chronic illness. This practice differs from traditional models of health education because of the interactional dynamics between nurse and patient, and an orientation to care that ostensibly centres and empowers patients. The theoretical underpinnings of coaching reflect these differences, however in its application, the practices arranged around health coaching for chronic illness self-management reveal the social regulation and professional management of everyday life. This becomes especially problematic in contexts defined by economic constraint and government withdrawal from activities related to the 'care' of citizens. In this paper, we trace the development of health coaching as part of nursing practice and consider the implications of this practice as an emerging element of chronic illness self-management. Our purpose is to highlight health coaching as an approach intended to support patients with chronic illness and at the same time, problematize the tensions contained in (and by) this practice.

  19. [Management committees in health services: an empirical study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecilio, Luiz Carlos de Oliveira

    2010-03-01

    The aim of the article, based on field data collected from a continuing education program for primary health clinic administrators, was to analyze the functioning of a health service management strategy called "management committees". Different meanings and operational modalities emerged in the committees. Various antimonies appeared in the way the committees operate (autonomy versus heteronomy, reproduction of "instituted" versus "instituting" processes, and communicative versus instrumental reasoning), thus reflecting the level of complexity in this management mechanism. Healthcare provision per se by the clinics only appeared occasionally on the committees' agenda, which mainly focused on administrative issues. The article suggests that further research is needed on the coordinator's involvement in the field of forces constituting the management committee, besides developing pedagogical strategies to support the clinic coordinators and health teams in building the committees. The primary data were submitted to an epistemological discussion anchored in the idea of double hermeneutics, multiple validation of research results, and the relationship between theory and practice.

  20. [Organization of health services and tuberculosis care management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrêto, Anne Jaquelyne Roque; de Sá, Lenilde Duarte; Nogueira, Jordana de Almeida; Palha, Pedro Fredemir; Pinheiro, Patrícia Geórgia de Oliveira Diniz; de Farias, Nilma Maria Porto; Rodrigues, Débora Cezar de Souza; Villa, Tereza Cristina Scatena

    2012-07-01

    The scope of this study was to analyze the discourse of managers regarding the relationship between the organization of the health services and tuberculosis care management in a city in the metropolitan region of João Pessoa, State of Pernambuco. Using qualitative research in the analytical field of the French line of Discourse Analysis, 16 health workers who worked as members of the management teams took part in the study. The transcribed testimonials were organized using Atlas.ti version 6.0 software. After detailed reading of the empirical material, an attempt was made to identify the paraphrasic, polyssemic and metaphoric processes in the discourses, which enabled identification of the following discourse formation: Organization of the health services and the relation with TB care management: theory and practice. In the discourse of the managers the fragmentation of the actions of control of tuberculosis, the lack of articulation between the services and sectors, the compliance of the specific activities for TB, as well as the lack of strategic planning for management of care of the disease are clearly revealed. In this respect, for the organization of the health services to be effective, it is necessary that tuberculosis be considered a priority and acknowledged as a social problem in the management agenda.

  1. Occupational health and safety management in micro and small enterprises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasle, Peter

    2015-01-01

    . However, OHS is always managed in one way or the other, and the important point is to learn how the owner-manager focus on the core business can be integrated with improvement of the work environment. It is therefore crucial to understand the thinking of owner-managers and their social relations...... with the employees in order to develop support programmes for micro and small enterprises which successfully improves conditions for owner-managers as well as their employees.......Occupational health and safety management (OHSM) in micro and small enterprises may look like an odd ex-pression. Most owner-managers do not think of OHSM as something to give priority. They are occupied with management of the core business which in many cases constitute a simple fight for survival...

  2. The evolution of Banner health's case management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutz, Linda

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of case management programs continues as health care systems adapt to the requirements and provisions under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. One such provision establishes a new category of health care provider-the accountable care organization. These organizations provide a form of coordinated health care delivery. The successful integration of an accountable care organization, along with a better coordinated, higher quality case management care model, will provide better access to health care, improved care transitions and safety for the patients, and lower costs to the health system. Acute-care hospitals; ambulatory care centers; and primary care physician practices. A successful implementation of this type of case management model requires systematic changes to technological and organizational structures. The stewards of the case management model must be proactive in garnering and maintaining executive and financial support. y designing an electronic documentation system with one work flow and a standard set of data definitions, health systems will be able to provide standardization and reduce variations of care. This type of standardization creates a central database for easy reporting and decision making.• Achieved successes, associated with improved clinical outcomes, can translate into considerable reductions in the controllable expenses for a health system.

  3. Public health laboratory quality management in a developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangkahat, Khwanjai; Nookhai, Somboon; Pobkeeree, Vallerut

    2012-01-01

    The article aims to give an overview of the system of public health laboratory quality management in Thailand and to produce a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) analysis that is relevant to public health laboratories in the country. The systems for managing laboratory quality that are currently employed were described in the first component. The second component was a SWOT analysis, which used the opinions of laboratory professionals to identify any areas that could be improved to meet quality management systems. Various quality management systems were identified and the number of laboratories that met both international and national quality management requirements was different. The SWOT analysis found the opportunities and strengths factors offered the best chance to improve laboratory quality management in the country. The results are based on observations and brainstorming with medical laboratory professionals who can assist laboratories in accomplishing quality management. The factors derived from the analysis can help improve laboratory quality management in the country. This paper provides viewpoints and evidence-based approaches for the development of best possible practice of services in public health laboratories.

  4. Managing equality and cultural diversity in the health workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Beverley

    2007-12-01

    This article offers practical strategies to managers and others for supporting overseas trained nurses and managing cultural diversity in the health workforce. Widespread nursing shortages have led managers to recruit nurses from overseas, mainly from developing countries. This paper draws on evidence from the Researching Equal Opportunities for Internationally Recruited Nurses and Other Health Professionals study reported elsewhere in this issue, which indicates that overseas trained nurses encountered widespread discriminatory practices including an overuse of complaints and grievances against them. The researchers also found that the overseas trained nurses responded to their experiences by using various personal strategies to resist or re-negotiate and overcome such discriminatory practices. A research workshop was held in June 2005 at the midpoint of the Researching Equal Opportunities for Internationally Recruited Nurses and Other Health Professionals study. Twenty-five participants attended the workshop. They were the Researching Equal Opportunities for Internationally Recruited Nurses and Other Health Professionals study researchers, advisory group members, including the author of this paper and other researchers in the field of migration. The overall aim of the workshop was to share emerging research data from the Researching Equal Opportunities for Internationally Recruited Nurses and Other Health Professionals and related studies. The final session of the workshop on which this paper is based, was facilitated by the author, with the specific aim of asking the participants to discuss and determine the challenges to managers when managing a culturally diverse workforce. The discussion yielded four main themes collated by the author from which a framework of strategies to facilitate equality and cultural diversity management of the healthcare workers may be developed. The four themes are: assumptions and expectations; education and training to include

  5. Designing and developing management systems for environmental, health and safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holdsworth, Rodger D.; Franklyn-Alderman, Christy [Risk, Reliability and Safety Engineering, Houston, TX (United States)

    2000-07-01

    The introduction of Quality, Risk, Safety and Environmental management philosophies has significantly changed industry view of company organization and controlling processes entering the new millennium. Quality, Risk, Health and Environmental programs and systems, such as ISO/Q S 9000, ISO 14000, Process Safety, risk management are impacting the way industry meet the challenges of safety and environmental risks and the needs of the customer. A wealth of knowledge can be extracted from practical application, which might otherwise be unobtainable without years of management systems experience related to management systems design, development, implementation and control. (author)

  6. Assessment, authorization and access to medicaid managed mental health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masland, Mary C; Snowden, Lonnie R; Wallace, Neal T

    2007-11-01

    Examined were effects on access of managed care assessment and authorization processes in California's 57 county mental health plans. Primary data on managed care implementation were collected from surveys of county plan administrators; secondary data were from Medicaid claims and enrollment files. Using multivariate fixed effects regression, we found that following implementation of managed care, greater access occurred in county plans where assessments and treatment were performed by the same clinician, and where service authorizations were made more rapidly. Lower access occurred in county plans where treating clinicians authorized services themselves. Results confirm the significant effects of managed care processes on outcomes and highlight the importance of system capacity.

  7. Occupational health management system: A study of expatriate construction professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, I Y S; Leung, M Y; Liu, A M M

    2016-08-01

    Due to its direct impact on the safety and function of organizations, occupational health has been a concern of the construction industry for many years. The inherent complexity of occupational health management presents challenges that make a systems approach essential. From a systems perspective, health is conceptualized as an emergent property of a system in which processes operating at the individual and organizational level are inextricably connected. Based on the fundamental behavior-to-performance-to-outcome (B-P-O) theory of industrial/organizational psychology, this study presents the development of an I-CB-HP-O (Input-Coping Behaviors-Health Performance-Outcomes) health management systems model spanning individual and organizational boundaries. The model is based on a survey of Hong Kong expatriate construction professionals working in Mainland China. Such professionals tend to be under considerable stress due not only to an adverse work environment with dynamic tasks, but also the need to confront the cross-cultural issues arising from expatriation. A questionnaire was designed based on 6 focus groups involving 44 participants, and followed by a pilot study. Of the 500 questionnaires distributed in the main study, 137 valid returns were received, giving a response rate of 27.4%. The data were analyzed using statistical techniques such as factor analysis, reliability testing, Pearson correlation analysis, multiple regression modeling, and structural equation modeling. Theories of coping behaviors and health performance tend to focus on the isolated causal effects of single factors and/or posits the model at single, individual level; while industrial practices on health management tend to focus on organizational policy and training. By developing the I-CB-HP-O health management system, incorporating individual, interpersonal, and organizational perspectives, this study bridges the gap between theory and practice while providing empirical support for a

  8. Health Emergency and Disaster Risk Management (Health-EDRM): Developing the Research Field within the Sendai Framework Paradigm

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sharon Tsoon Ting Lo; Emily Ying Yang Chan; Gloria Kwong Wai Chan; Virginia Murray; Jonathan Abrahams; Ali Ardalan; Ryoma Kayano; Johnny Chung Wai Yau

    2017-01-01

    .... Health Emergency and Disaster Risk Management (Health-EDRM) has emerged as an umbrella field that encompasses emergency and disaster medicine, DRR, humanitarian response, community health resilience, and health systems resilience...

  9. Health Information Management System for Elderly Health Sector: A Qualitative Study in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadoughi, Farahnaz; Shahi, Mehraban; Ahmadi, Maryam; Davaridolatabadi, Nasrin

    2016-01-01

    Background: There are increasing change and development of information in healthcare systems. Given the increase in aging population, managers are in need of true and timely information when making decision. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the current status of the health information management system for the elderly health sector in Iran. Materials and Methods: This qualitative study was conducted in two steps. In the first step, required documents for administrative managers were collected using the data gathering form and observed and reviewed by the researcher. In the second step, using an interview guide, the required information was gathered through interviewing experts and faculty members. The convenience, purposeful and snowball sampling methods were applied to select interviewees and the sampling continued until reaching the data saturation point. Finally, notes and interviews were transcribed and content analysis was used to analyze them. Results: The results of the study showed that there was a health information management system for the elderly health sector in Iran. However, in all primary health care centers the documentation of data was done manually; the data flow was not automated; and the analysis and reporting of data are also manually. Eventually, decision makers are provided with delayed information. Conclusions: It is suggested that the steward of health in Iran, the ministry of health, develops an appropriate infrastructure and finally puts a high priority on the implementation of the health information management system for elderly health sector in Iran. PMID:27186383

  10. Facilities Management and Health Care at Home

    OpenAIRE

    Lundberg, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    The topic of this thesis is the new requirements that will be put upon the facilities management when the elderly are living longer in their own homes, in spite of illness, impairment and old age. For many reasons, especially demographic ones, this issue has come to the fore and since it has substantial political impact and considerably affects our living conditions, it will most certainly appear on the agenda of most Swedish housing companies in the near future. The growing number of inhabit...

  11. ORGANIZATIONAL PHILOSOPHY IN THE MANAGEMENT OF HEALTH IN MISIONES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Beatriz, Orzuza

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The passage of time brings us new knowledge, science advances in all its aspects, which translates to all areas of the organization, of management.Health care is undergoing marked changes, the welfare model, which serves as a function of demand is gradually adapting to the actions recommended by the sanitary model that acts more intensely with the communities and the environment, promoting health and preventing disease.The aim of this paper is to reflect the change that occurred in the organizational philosophy of the health system of Misiones. To this end, we first know the concepts of Newtonian and quantum organizations, focused from its philosophical origins. Second, we will refer to the legal framework of the management expenses of the Province government. Third, we analyze the socioeconomic status of the population of Misiones. Fourth, we will refer to the new health paradigm. To finish off highlighting the definitive implementation of a holistic approach, in the health system.

  12. How Do Private Health Plans Manage Specialty Behavioral Health Treatment Entry and Continuing Care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Amity E; Reif, Sharon; Merrick, Elizabeth L; Horgan, Constance M; Garnick, Deborah W; Stewart, Maureen T

    2017-09-01

    This study examined private health plans' arrangements for accessing and continuing specialty behavioral health treatment in 2010 as federal health reforms were being implemented. These management practices have historically been stricter in behavioral health care than in general medical care; however, the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act of 2010 required parity in management policies. The data source was a nationally representative survey of private health plans' behavioral health treatment management approaches in 2010. Health plan executives were asked about activities for their plan's three products with highest enrollment (weighted N=8,427, 88% response rate). Prior authorization for outpatient behavioral health care was rarely required (4.7% of products), but 75% of products required authorization for ongoing care and over 90% required prior authorization for other levels of care. The most common medical necessity criteria were self-developed and American Society of Addiction Medicine criteria. Nearly all products had formal standards to limit waiting time for routine and urgent treatment, but almost 30% lacked such standards for detoxification services. A range of wait time-monitoring approaches was used. Health plans used a variety of methods to influence behavioral health treatment entry and continuing care. Few relied on prior authorization for outpatient care, but the use of other approaches to influence, manage, or facilitate access was common. Results provide a baseline for understanding the current management environment for specialty behavioral health care. Tracking health plans' approaches over time will be important to ensure that access to behavioral health care is not prohibitively restrictive.

  13. One Health in NSW: coordination of human and animal health sector management of zoonoses of public health significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Sheena; Marich, Andrew; Roth, Ian

    2011-07-01

    Zoonoses of public health significance may occur in wildlife, livestock or companion animals, and may be detected by the human or animal health sectors. Of particular public health interest are foodborne, arboviral and emerging zoonoses (known/unknown, endemic/exotic). A coordinated One Health approach to the management of zoonoses in NSW uses measures including: mutually agreed intersectoral procedures for detection and response; surveillance and notification systems for defined endemic and exotic diseases; joint meetings and exercises to ensure currency of response plans; and intersectoral communication during a response. This One Health approach is effective and ensures the interests of both the human health and animal health sectors are addressed.

  14. Governance in managing public health resources in Brazilian municipalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avelino, George; Barberia, Lorena G; Biderman, Ciro

    2014-09-01

    This study contributes to the health governance discussion by presenting a new data set that allows for comparisons of the management of health resources among Brazilian municipalities. Research on Brazil is particularly important as the provision of health services was decentralized in 1988 and since then municipalities have been given greater responsibilities for the management of fiscal resources for public health service provision. Based on detailed information on corruption practices (such as over-invoicing, illegal procurement and fake receipts) from audit reports of health programmes in 980 randomly selected Brazilian municipalities, this study deepens understanding of the relationship between health governance institutions and the incidence of corruption at the local level by exploring the extent to which horizontal and vertical accountabilities contribute to reducing the propensity of municipal government officials to divert public health resources for private gain. The results of our multiple regression analysis suggest that the experience of health municipal councils is correlated with reductions in the incidence of corruption in public health programmes. This impact is significant over time, with each additional year of health council experience reducing corruption incidence levels by 2.1% from baseline values. The findings reported in this study do not rely on the subjectivity of corruption measures which usually conflate the actual incidence of corruption with its perception by informants. Based on our results, we provide recommendations that can assist policy makers to reduce corruption.

  15. Innovative Approaches to Management Health Needed to Make Ecosanogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolae Ipate

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study we analysed the field of ecosanogenesis in correlation the health workplace, the health of consumers, and the health of the environment. Concerns of this vast area are primarily related to the implications of technology and various health products, because their effects are far more extensive and more generalized. This concept involves man to major issues, human actions and their results, nature and society, material and spiritual culture in a global relational context. If health depends on the relation human - product - nature, and promote better health will depend on optimal functionality of this relationship. Innovation as a result of research and inventions, in the service ecosanogenesis, offers a balance and sustainable development progress for sure, we could call it positive progress.Health classic resources financing, general taxes or health insurance contributions, are becoming increasingly inadequate, regardless of the type of health system, national health system or health insurance system. From increasingly many factors adversely affect the health of the population impersonal, that are not the result of human action or inaction in terms of his daily activities eg: environmental pollution, deforestation, use of non-biodegradable products etc. In conclusion we descript the innovative approaches to management health in context of ecosanogensis.

  16. Integrated Systems Health Management (ISHM) Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, Meera; Kapadia, Ravi; Walker, Mark; Wilkins, Kim

    2013-01-01

    A framework of software components has been implemented to facilitate the development of ISHM systems according to a methodology based on Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM). This framework is collectively referred to as the Toolkit and was developed using General Atomics' Health MAP (TM) technology. The toolkit is intended to provide assistance to software developers of mission-critical system health monitoring applications in the specification, implementation, configuration, and deployment of such applications. In addition to software tools designed to facilitate these objectives, the toolkit also provides direction to software developers in accordance with an ISHM specification and development methodology. The development tools are based on an RCM approach for the development of ISHM systems. This approach focuses on defining, detecting, and predicting the likelihood of system functional failures and their undesirable consequences.

  17. Managing US-Mexico "border health": an organizational field approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins-Dogrul, Julie

    2006-12-01

    During World War II Mexican and US health professionals and organizations constructed a transnational organizational field to manage the border's public health problems. Despite barriers to inter-organizational cooperation, including disparate administrative structures and North-South stratification, the field's transnational approach to health on the border has continued for 60 years. Using archival data to track changes in the number and types of organizations, this article argues that the field practitioners call "border health" reconfigured during the North American Free Trade Association (NAFTA) decade from an era of loosely organized professionals to a specialized bureaucracies era. This change brought new vitality to border health, with transnational ties increasing and diversifying, but has not weakened entrenched cross-border inequalities. The organizational history of the US-Mexico border health field demonstrates how macro-politics and inter-organizational stratification shape transnational public health problems.

  18. Time based management in health care system: The chosen aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Kobza

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Time-based management (TBM is the key element of the whole management process. For many years in health care systems of highly developed countries modern and effective methods of time-based management have been implemented in both primary health care and hospitals (emergency departments and operating rooms. Over the past two decades a systematic review of Polish literature (since 1990 and peer reviewed articles published in international journals based on PubMed/Medline (2001–2011 have been carried out. The collected results indicate that the demographic and health changes in the populations are one of the main challenges facing general practitioners in the nearest future. Time-based management needs new and effective tools and skills, i.e., identification of priorities, well designed planning, delegation of the tasks, proper coordination, and creation of primary care teams that include additional members and human resources management. Proper reimbursement of health services, development of IT in health care system, better collection, storage, processing, analysis and exchange of information and research findings will also be needed. The use of innovative technologies, like telemedicine consultations, provides the possibility of reducing waiting time for diagnosis and treatment and in some cases could be applied in terms of secondary care. To improve the efficiency of operating rooms it is necessary to introduce different solutions, such as operating room coordinator involvement, application of automation to guide decision-making or use of robotic tools to assist surgical procedures. Overcrowded emergency departments have a major detrimental effect on the quality of hospital functions, therefore, efforts should be made to reduce them. Time-based management training among physicians and health care management in Poland, as well as the implementation of practice-based solutions still applied in highly developed countries seem to be necessary

  19. [Time based management in health care system: the chosen aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobza, Joanna; Syrkiewicz-Świtała, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    Time-based management (TBM) is the key element of the whole management process. For many years in health care systems of highly developed countries modern and effective methods of time-based management have been implemented in both primary health care and hospitals (emergency departments and operating rooms). Over the past two decades a systematic review of Polish literature (since 1990) and peer reviewed articles published in international journals based on PubMed/Medline (2001-2011) have been carried out. The collected results indicate that the demographic and health changes in the populations are one of the main challenges facing general practitioners in the nearest future. Time-based management needs new and effective tools and skills, i.e., identification of priorities, well designed planning, delegation of the tasks, proper coordination, and creation of primary care teams that include additional members and human resources management. Proper reimbursement of health services, development of IT in health care system, better collection, storage, processing, analysis and exchange of information and research findings will also be needed. The use of innovative technologies, like telemedicine consultations, provides the possibility of reducing waiting time for diagnosis and treatment and in some cases could be applied in terms of secondary care. To improve the efficiency of operating rooms it is necessary to introduce different solutions, such as operating room coordinator involvement, application of automation to guide decision-making or use of robotic tools to assist surgical procedures. Overcrowded emergency departments have a major detrimental effect on the quality of hospital functions, therefore, efforts should be made to reduce them. Time-based management training among physicians and health care management in Poland, as well as the implementation of practice-based solutions still applied in highly developed countries seem to be necessary.

  20. Cold chain management practices of health care workers in primary health care facilities in Southern Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogboghodo, Esohe Olivia; Omuemu, Vivian Ossaidiom; Odijie, Oisedebame; Odaman, Ofure Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Vaccination has caused a dramatic reduction in the threat of diseases that were once widespread and often times fatal. The efficient practice of cold chain management is therefore key to ensuring that the benefits of vaccination are sustained. The objective of this study is to assess the practice of cold chain management among health workers in primary health care facilities in Benin City, Edo State. Methods A descriptive cross-sectional study design was employed in this study. The study population consisted of registered nurses, auxiliary nurses and community health extension workers in primary health care facilities in Benin City, Edo State. The tool for data collection was pre-tested, structured self-administered questionnaire. Bivariate analysis between socio-demographic variables and practice of cold chain management was done. Binary logistic regression was also done to determine significant predictors of practice of cold chain management. The level of significance was set at p cold chain management. Significant determinants of practice of cold chain management were cold chain management training (p = 0.004), presence of functional refrigerators (p = 0.016), NPI supervision (p cold chain management among respondents was fair. All stakeholders should ensure they work collectively towards ensuring that favorable environments which would improve the practice among health workers are put in place. PMID:28761610

  1. Retention of health workers in Malawi: perspectives of health workers and district management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacLachlan Malcolm

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shortage of human resources is a major problem facing Malawi, where more than 50% of the population lives in rural areas. Most of the district health services are provided by clinical health officers specially trained to provide services that would normally be provided by fully qualified doctors or specialists. As this cadre and the cadre of enrolled nurses are the mainstay of the Malawian health service at the district level, it is important that they are supported and motivated to deliver a good standard of service to the population. This study explores how these cadres are managed and motivated and the impact this has on their performance. Methods A quantitative survey measured health workers' job satisfaction, perceptions of the work environment and sense of justice in the workplace, and was reported elsewhere. It emerged that health workers were particularly dissatisfied with what they perceived as unfair access to continuous education and career advancement opportunities, as well as inadequate supervision. These issues and their contribution to demotivation, from the perspective of both management and health workers, were further explored by means of qualitative techniques. Focus group discussions were held with health workers, and key-informant interviews were conducted with members of district health management teams and human resource officers in the Ministry of Health. The focus groups used convenience sampling that included all the different cadres of health workers available and willing to participate on the day the research team visited the health facility. The interviews targeted district health management teams in three districts and the human resources personnel in the Ministry of Health, also sampling those who were available and agreed to participate. Results The results showed that health workers consider continuous education and career progression strategies to be inadequate. Standard human resource

  2. The Oral Health Care Manager in a Patient-Centered Health Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theile, Cheryl Westphal; Strauss, Shiela M; Northridge, Mary Evelyn; Birenz, Shirley

    2016-06-01

    The dental hygienist team member has an opportunity to coordinate care within an interprofessional practice as an oral health care manager. Although dental hygienists are currently practicing within interprofessional teams in settings such as pediatric offices, hospitals, nursing homes, schools, and federally qualified health centers, they often still assume traditional responsibilities rather than practicing to the full extent of their training and licenses. This article explains the opportunity for the dental hygiene professional to embrace patient-centered care as an oral health care manager who can facilitate integration of oral and primary care in a variety of health care settings. Based on an innovative model of collaboration between a college of dentistry and a college of nursing, an idea emerged among several faculty members for a new management method for realizing continuity and coordination of comprehensive patient care. Involved faculty members began working on the development of an approach to interprofessional practice with the dental hygienist serving as an oral health care manager who would address both oral health care and a patient's related primary care issues through appropriate referrals and follow-up. This approach is explained in this article, along with the results of several pilot studies that begin to evaluate the feasibility of a dental hygienist as an oral health care manager. A health care provider with management skills and leadership qualities is required to coordinate the interprofessional provision of comprehensive health care. The dental hygienist has the opportunity to lead closer integration of oral and primary care as an oral health care manager, by coordinating the team of providers needed to implement comprehensive, patient-centered care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Economic Techniques of Occupational Health and Safety Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorov, Aleksandr I.; Beregovaya, Irina B.; Khanzhina, Olga A.

    2016-10-01

    The article deals with the issues on economic techniques of occupational health and safety management. Authors’ definition of safety management is given. It is represented as a task-oriented process to identify, establish and maintain such a state of work environment in which there are no possible effects of hazardous and harmful factors, or their influence does not go beyond certain limits. It was noted that management techniques that are the part of the control mechanism, are divided into administrative, organizational and administrative, social and psychological and economic. The economic management techniques are proposed to be classified depending on the management subject, management object, in relation to an enterprise environment, depending on a control action. Technoeconomic study, feasibility study, planning, financial incentives, preferential crediting of enterprises, pricing, profit sharing and equity, preferential tax treatment for enterprises, economic regulations and standards setting have been distinguished as economic techniques.

  4. Quality of management in the health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgenhammar, E

    1990-01-01

    Quality of management is a necessary, yet not sufficient, prerequisite in quality of care. There are two main approaches to improved quality. One is the individualist approach, where the role of the manager is emphasized. The other is the contextual approach. Focus is on managerial prerequisites such as organizational structure, culture, participation in decision making, and use of management time. Individualist as well as contextualist approaches are presented. Each decade during the 20th century has had its own "pet theory" regarding what problems the manager should allocate time on. A study of 41 Nordic public health researchers illustrates that cost-benefit analysis is the best known of ten theories. Management ethics, with the manager as ideologist, is seen as particularly demanding on managerial creativity.

  5. Holistic approach to fraud management in health insurance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Štefan Furlan

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Fraud present an immense problem for health insurance companies and the only way to fight fraud is by using specialized fraud management systems. The current research community focussed great efforts on different fraud detection techniques while neglecting other also important activities of fraud management. We propose a holistic approach that focuses on all 6 activities of fraud management, namely, (1 deterrence, (2 prevention, (3 detection, (4 investigation, (5 sanction and redress, and (6 monitoring. The main contribution of the paper are 15 key characteristics of a fraud management system, which enable construction of a fraud management system that provides effective and efficient support to all fraud management activities. We base our research on literature review, interviews with experts from different fields, and a case study. The case study provides additional confirmation to expert opinions, as it puts our holistic framework into practice.

  6. The health-care manager's guide to managing change in challenging times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, D N

    1996-01-01

    Fifteen years ago, Bill Gates was a college dropout working for a four-member, fledgling company in New Mexico. Today, he is the richest man in America and the head of perhaps the most powerful company in recent corporate history. Ten years ago, managed health care was merely a concept discussed in academic and industry observer circles. Now it is a norm in almost every health-care organization nationally. Five years ago, health-care professionals in every discipline believed the maxim that, ¿as long as people get sick, health-care professionals will have jobs.¿ In 1995, health-care executives have alternately referred to the widescale process of laying off employees as reengineering, rightsizing, downsizing, or RIF (reduction in force). With this massive amount of change, both societally and professionally, health-care managers have been contending with the change management process. Although a breadth of concepts borrowed from other industries and a plethora of conceptual practicums have entered the health-care educational realm, a straightforward, immediately useful approach to managing change is probably more beneficial, as the need to manage change quickly and effectively becomes the paramount criterion for health-care management success in the second half of this decade of change. In this article we will explore the four areas where mistakes are made most frequently by leaders in the change process, and we will provide specific strategies to not only avoid these mistakes but moreover reduce resistance to change, activate positive action, and ultimately improve performance through optimum staff contribution. The four critical areas we will explore are the reasons for resistance to change, the management of the proactive phase of change, creating staff interdependence, and key leadership roles for change management.

  7. Roles of managers in academic health centers: strategies for the managed care environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kristina L

    2002-03-01

    This article addresses survival strategies of academic health centers (AHCs) in responding to market pressures and government reforms. Using six case studies of AHCs, the study links strategic changes in structure and management to managerial role performance. Utilizing Mintzberg's classification of work roles, the roles of liaison, monitor, entrepreneur, and resource allocator were found to be used by top-level managers as they implement strategies to enhance the viability of their AHCs. Based on these new roles, the study recommends improving management practices through education and training as well as changing organizational culture to support management decision making and foster the continued growth of managers and their AHCs.

  8. Regional governance: strategies and disputes in health region management

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Adriano Maia; Giovanella, Ligia

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the regional governance of the health systemin relation to management strategies and disputes. METHODOLOGICAL PROCEDURES A qualitative study with health managers from 19 municipalities in the health region of Bahia, Northeastern Brazil. Data were drawn from 17 semi-structured interviews of state, regional, and municipal health policymakers and managers; a focus group; observations of the regional interagency committee; and documents in 2012. The political-institutional and the organizational components were analyzed in the light of dialectical hermeneutics. RESULTS The regional interagency committee is the chief regional governance strategy/component and functions as a strategic tool for strengthening governance. It brings together a diversity of members responsible for decision making in the healthcare territories, who need to negotiate the allocation of funding and the distribution of facilities for common use in the region. The high turnover of health secretaries, their lack of autonomy from the local executive decisions, inadequate technical training to exercise their function, and the influence of party politics on decision making stand as obstacles to the regional interagency committee’s permeability to social demands. Funding is insufficient to enable the fulfillment of the officially integrated agreed-upon program or to boost public supply by the system, requiring that public managers procure services from the private market at values higher than the national health service price schedule (Brazilian Unified Health System Table). The study determined that “facilitators” under contract to health departments accelerated access to specialized (diagnostic, therapeutic and/or surgical) services in other municipalities by direct payment to physicians for procedure costs already covered by the Brazilian Unified Health System. CONCLUSIONS The characteristics identified a regionalized system with a conflictive pattern of governance and

  9. Regional governance: strategies and disputes in health region management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Maia dos Santos

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To analyze the regional governance of the health systemin relation to management strategies and disputes. METHODOLOGICAL PROCEDURES A qualitative study with health managers from 19 municipalities in the health region of Bahia, Northeastern Brazil. Data were drawn from 17 semi-structured interviews of state, regional, and municipal health policymakers and managers; a focus group; observations of the regional interagency committee; and documents in 2012. The political-institutional and the organizational components were analyzed in the light of dialectical hermeneutics. RESULTS The regional interagency committee is the chief regional governance strategy/component and functions as a strategic tool for strengthening governance. It brings together a diversity of members responsible for decision making in the healthcare territories, who need to negotiate the allocation of funding and the distribution of facilities for common use in the region. The high turnover of health secretaries, their lack of autonomy from the local executive decisions, inadequate technical training to exercise their function, and the influence of party politics on decision making stand as obstacles to the regional interagency committee’s permeability to social demands. Funding is insufficient to enable the fulfillment of the officially integrated agreed-upon program or to boost public supply by the system, requiring that public managers procure services from the private market at values higher than the national health service price schedule (Brazilian Unified Health System Table. The study determined that “facilitators” under contract to health departments accelerated access to specialized (diagnostic, therapeutic and/or surgical services in other municipalities by direct payment to physicians for procedure costs already covered by the Brazilian Unified Health System. CONCLUSIONS The characteristics identified a regionalized system with a conflictive pattern of

  10. Managing organizational change: strategies for the female health care supervisor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, G

    1990-07-01

    In responding to resistance to change in the current health care organization, the new female supervisor can learn to support her staff in encountering and accepting these changes. The strategies and skills discussed above are characteristic of a supervisory style that may naturally occur for women, but also can be incorporated into the leadership style of men in health care management today. Health care leaders of tomorrow must work from an androgynous framework in which the behavior patterns and responses of each gender are learned and used appropriately by both men and women. Sargent suggests that the best managers are androgynous and that this is the inevitable wave of the future. Whether man or woman, a supervisor should learn, accept, and use methods that are characteristic of both sexes to be successful in managing people. Women and men must learn from each other's strengths and share these diverse skills. Given that women now outnumber men in health care management positions and organizations are changing to a more nurturing environment, the androgynous supervisor will be the successful leader of the future. Finally, women in health care supervisory positions have the potential to bring change where it is badly needed. Women in these roles often have a system wide view of health care policy issues that recognizes less federal commitment to social programs. Many women in health care positions believe that the issues of children, women, the elderly, the poor, and the homeless need focused attention. The growing number of women in health care supervisory and leadership roles is an important factor in changing national health policy for the benefit of these groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Regional governance: strategies and disputes in health region management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Adriano Maia dos; Giovanella, Ligia

    2014-08-01

    To analyze the regional governance of the health systemin relation to management strategies and disputes. A qualitative study with health managers from 19 municipalities in the health region of Bahia, Northeastern Brazil. Data were drawn from 17 semi-structured interviews of state, regional, and municipal health policymakers and managers; a focus group; observations of the regional interagency committee; and documents in 2012. The political-institutional and the organizational components were analyzed in the light of dialectical hermeneutics. The regional interagency committee is the chief regional governance strategy/component and functions as a strategic tool for strengthening governance. It brings together a diversity of members responsible for decision making in the healthcare territories, who need to negotiate the allocation of funding and the distribution of facilities for common use in the region. The high turnover of health secretaries, their lack of autonomy from the local executive decisions, inadequate technical training to exercise their function, and the influence of party politics on decision making stand as obstacles to the regional interagency committee's permeability to social demands. Funding is insufficient to enable the fulfillment of the officially integrated agreed-upon program or to boost public supply by the system, requiring that public managers procure services from the private market at values higher than the national health service price schedule (Brazilian Unified Health System Table). The study determined that "facilitators" under contract to health departments accelerated access to specialized (diagnostic, therapeutic and/or surgical) services in other municipalities by direct payment to physicians for procedure costs already covered by the Brazilian Unified Health System. The characteristics identified a regionalized system with a conflictive pattern of governance and intermediate institutionalism. The regional interagency committee

  12. Neglected organization and management issues in mental health systems development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenley, J R

    1992-10-01

    Fragmented and often uncoordinated public services for the more severely mentally ill are often characteristic of the current U.S. mental health system. The creation of local mental health authorities has been promoted as part of a solution, as has happened in Wisconsin at the county level and is championed in the ongoing Robert Wood Johnson Foundation funded innovative service sites for severely mentally ill adults. There are indications that these innovative mental health authorities will fall short of fulfilling their promise. Basic principles from the management and organizations literature are used to identify several organization and management issues that may have been neglected. These include resource management, attention to system goals, monitoring and feedback, and the promotion of desirable interorganizational cultures.

  13. Fundamental Technology Development for Gas-Turbine Engine Health Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Carolyn R.; Simon, Donald L.; Hunter, Gary W.; Arnold, Steven M.; Reveley, Mary S.; Anderson, Lynn M.

    2007-01-01

    Integrated vehicle health management technologies promise to dramatically improve the safety of commercial aircraft by reducing system and component failures as causal and contributing factors in aircraft accidents. To realize this promise, fundamental technology development is needed to produce reliable health management components. These components include diagnostic and prognostic algorithms, physics-based and data-driven lifing and failure models, sensors, and a sensor infrastructure including wireless communications, power scavenging, and electronics. In addition, system assessment methods are needed to effectively prioritize development efforts. Development work is needed throughout the vehicle, but particular challenges are presented by the hot, rotating environment of the propulsion system. This presentation describes current work in the field of health management technologies for propulsion systems for commercial aviation.

  14. Supporting cancer patients’ unanchored health information management with mobile technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klasnja, Predrag; Hartzler, Andrea; Powell, Christopher; Pratt, Wanda

    2011-01-01

    Cancer patients often need to manage care-related information when they are away from home, when they are experiencing pain or treatment side effects, or when their abilities to deal with information effectively are otherwise impaired. In this paper, we describe the results from a four-week evaluation of HealthWeaver Mobile, a mobile phone application that we developed to support such “unanchored” patient information activities. Based on experiences from nine cancer patients, our results indicate that HealthWeaver Mobile can help patients to access care-related information from anywhere, to capture information whenever a need arises, and to share information with clinicians during clinic visits. The enhanced ability to manage information, in turn, helps patients to manage their care and to feel more confident in their ability to stay in control of their information and their health. PMID:22195130

  15. Supporting cancer patients' unanchored health information management with mobile technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klasnja, Predrag; Hartzler, Andrea; Powell, Christopher; Pratt, Wanda

    2011-01-01

    Cancer patients often need to manage care-related information when they are away from home, when they are experiencing pain or treatment side effects, or when their abilities to deal with information effectively are otherwise impaired. In this paper, we describe the results from a four-week evaluation of HealthWeaver Mobile, a mobile phone application that we developed to support such "unanchored" patient information activities. Based on experiences from nine cancer patients, our results indicate that HealthWeaver Mobile can help patients to access care-related information from anywhere, to capture information whenever a need arises, and to share information with clinicians during clinic visits. The enhanced ability to manage information, in turn, helps patients to manage their care and to feel more confident in their ability to stay in control of their information and their health.

  16. The effects of occupational health and safety management on work environment and health: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torp, S; Moen, B E

    2006-11-01

    According to Norway's Internal Control Regulation, all companies are required to have an occupational health and safety (H&S) management system. This study investigated the effects of implementing or improving occupational H&S management on the work environment, H&S-related behaviour and musculoskeletal health of workers in small and medium-sized companies. A one-year prospective cohort study, using self-administered questionnaires, was performed among the managers and blue-collar workers in 226 motor vehicle repair garages. Out of 1559 workers that responded at baseline 721 workers could be identified at follow-up. These 721 workers were included in the study. The workers in companies with improved H&S management from baseline to follow-up reported increased satisfaction with the H&S activities at the garage; improved support from management and colleagues; improved health-related support and control; and increased participation in H&S activities.

  17. Community control of health services. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Health Center's community management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichy, N M; Taylor, J I

    1976-01-01

    This article presents the case of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Health Center's unique community management system in which neighborhood workers have been developed to assume managerial responsibilities and are directing the Center. The Martin Luther King Center experience is instructive because the Center was able to achieve significant community control by focusing primarily on the internal dimension of control, namely, management, without experiencing destructive conflicts and the deterioration of health services.

  18. Important bioindicators for health management in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barliba I.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Performance measurement is a coherent, robust, integrated, purposeful, comprehensive, efficient and transparent system. The evaluation of healthcare performance in Romania is based on four categories of bioindicators: human resources, use of services, economic and financial aspects, as well as quality. In this work, we were mainly interested in analyzing and describing these parameters. In order to illustrate the applicability of the hospital performance indicators, we considered the results obtained for these indices from the managers of three hospitals of the same level from Romania, the “Filişanilor” Hospital from Filiaşi, the Rovinari City Hospital and the Şegarcea City Hospital, and herein present them.

  19. On Methodological and Technological Challenges for Proactive Health Management in Smart Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Klaus-Hendrik; Dehling, Tobias; Haux, Reinhold; Sick, Bernhard; Sunyaev, Ali; Tomforde, Sven

    2017-01-01

    Health management in smart homes has advanced during the last years. With proactive health management in such environments further progress for health prevention and care is to be expected. Challenges for proactive health management in three areas are summarized and briefly discussed: pattern recognition and machine learning, information privacy and user-oriented design, and sensor-enhanced health information systems architectures.

  20. Reference frameworks for the health management of measles, breast cancer and diabetes (type II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Helmut; Schröder, Peter; Davies, John K; Escamilla, Ixhel; Hall, Caroline; Hickey, Kieran; Jelastopulu, Eleni; Mechtler, Reli; Yared, Wendy Tse; Volf, Jaroslav; Weihrauch, Birgit

    2006-03-01

    This paper presents reference frameworks which order effective and feasible policies and interventions for the health management of measles, breast cancer and diabetes (type II). These reference frameworks can be used to rapidly appraise regional health policy documents and existing health management systems. Furthermore, the reference frameworks can serve health policy makers for the planning of health management measures.

  1. SSFF Health Management Analysis Report. Part 2: Proof of Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, L.; Spruill, J.; Hong, Y.

    1995-01-01

    In this Proof of Concept analysis on SSFF Health Management the following area was described: the Gas Distribution Subsystem (GDS) was studied and evaluated utilizing the PDR Configuration and with respect to the design features encompassing Health Management (HM) aspects outlined in the Generic Handbook. From the results of this study, it was found that there is a definite need for coordinating measurements within and between the subsystems that will ensure that Functional Failures are properly revealed and substantiated as valid by other measurements, even those from other interfacing subsystems.

  2. Obesity, weight management, and health care costs: a primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, Keith H

    2007-06-01

    Rational decision-making regarding health care spending for weight management requires an understanding of the cost of care provided to obese patients and the potential cost-effectiveness or cost savings of interventions. The purpose of this review is to assist health plans and disease management leaders in making informed decisions for weight management services. Among the review's findings, obesity and severe obesity are strongly and consistently associated with increased health care costs. The cost-effectiveness of obesity-related interventions is highly dependent on the risk status of the treated population, as well as the length, cost, and effectiveness of the intervention. Bariatric surgery offers high initial costs and uncertain long-term cost savings. From the perspective of a payor, obesity management services are as cost-effective as other commonly offered health services, though not likely to offer cost savings. Behavioral health promotion interventions in the worksite setting provide cost savings from the employer's perspective, if decreased rates of absenteeism are included in the analysis.

  3. Health Management, Let the Youth Go with Health! – Interpretation of research progress on the health management from the perspective of humanities & social science (Summary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Xiaojuan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The social development is human-centered, while human development is health-oriented. With the continuous development of the society, people’s desire for health and pursuit of health has become an inevitable trend of the development of times. The health problems are always practical problems that the youths in various countries generally confront with. A good health condition of the youth is not only a basis of economic and social development, but also a goal of economic and social development. Health management will become an important part to improve the quality of life. The research has already become a hot topic and a leading edge of the academic research. Due to a large population, intensified population aging, increasing morbidity of chronic diseases and other reasons, there is an urgent need for China to accept the concept of health management and explore its principle. Attaching importance to practice and application of health management mode in China is a gorgeous turning point to completely realize “the preventive treatment of disease rather than the treatment of disease” in the medical service industry. This paper is used to explore the research progress and current situation of the health management based on reading a large number of relevant literature, explore the basic mode of the health management, consider the feasibility and potential access to include the health management into the physical and psychological health education of the contemporary youths, and look forward to providing more advanced insights on concept for health promotion and comprehensive development of the contemporary youths through this research, so as to dedicate to the healthy growth of the future motherland successors.

  4. Health care managers learning by listening to subordinates' dialogue training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grill, C; Ahlborg, G; Wikström, E

    2014-01-01

    Middle managers in health care today are expected to continuously and efficiently decide and act in administration, finance, care quality, and work environment, and strategic communication has become paramount. Since dialogical communication is considered to promote a healthy work environment, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the ways in which health care managers experienced observing subordinates' dialogue training. A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews and documents from eight middle managers in a dialogue programme intervention conducted by dialogue trainers. Focus was on fostering and assisting workplace dialogue. Conventional qualitative content analysis was used. Managers' experiences were both enriching and demanding, and consisted of becoming aware of communication, meaning perceiving interaction between subordinates as well as own silent interaction with subordinates and trainer; Discovering communicative actions for leadership, by gaining self-knowledge and recognizing relational leadership models from trainers--such as acting democratically and pedagogically--and converting theory into practice, signifying practising dialogue-promoting conversation behaviour with subordinates, peers, and superiors. Only eight managers participated in the intervention, but data afforded a basis for further research. Findings stressed the importance of listening, and of support from superiors, for well-functioning leadership communication at work. Studies focusing on health care managers' communication and dialogue are few. This study contributes to knowledge about these activities in managerial leadership.

  5. A SUSTAINABLE HEALTH CARE SYSTEM REQUIRES MANAGEMENT TRANSFORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanellopoulos Dimitros

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to be the health care system sustainable , management transformations must be based on very precise diagnostic analysis that includes complete and current information. It is necessary to implement an information system that collects information in real time, that watches the parameters that significantly influence the sustainability of the system. Such an information system should point out a radiography(a scan of the system at some time under following aspects:: 1. An overview of system; 2 An overview of the economic situation; 3 A technical presentation ;4. A legal overview; 5. A social overview ; 6. A management overview .Based on these Xrays of the health system, it outlines a series of conclusions and recommendations together with a SWOT analysis that highlights the potential internal (strengths and weaknesses and external potential (opportunities and threats. Based on this analysis and recommendations, the management is going to redesign the system in order to be adapted to the changing environmental requirements. Management transformation is recommended to be by following steps. :1. The development of a new management system that would make a positive change in the health care system 2. Implementation of the new management system 3. Assessment of the changes

  6. Information security risk management for computerized health information systems in hospitals: a case study of Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Zarei J; Sadoughi F

    2016-01-01

    Javad Zarei,1 Farahnaz Sadoughi2 1Health Information Management, Health Management and Economics Research Center, School of Health Management and Information Science, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran, 2Health Information Management Department, School of Health Management and Information Science, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran Background: In recent years, hospitals in Iran – similar to those in other...

  7. Permanent education and co-management: experience of a health managing group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Faria Corrêa da Costa

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the experience lived by a group of workers of the Regional Center for Action on Health of the 4th. Regional Health State Department of Health of Rio Grande do Sul in Santa Maria. The paper presents an experience of reorganization of the work process in order to tackle the historical fragmentation of activities in the field of health management, and trigger a learning process for institutional support to carry thirty-two municipalities in the area of administrative scope of this coordinating body . To do so, it relies upon the co-management strategies and continuing health education as tools to trigger processes of change and inventing other ways of designing and conducting health work. With this experience, we can dislodge established places, inventing new forms of teamwork and interdisciplinary manner in order to strengthen this group of workers and their practices.

  8. Health systems in developing countries: public sector managers and the management of contradictions and change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Andrew; Collins, Charles

    2003-01-01

    Health sector reform in the past decade has tended to focus on remodelling institutional relations and changing methods of health system financing. Little attention has been paid to human resources. This paper focuses on one category of health sector staff, health managers and planners, and the tensions they face in carrying out their roles. An understanding of these tensions has been neglected in the policy-making process. The paper is divided into two parts. Firstly, it will set out the nature of three tensions that public sector health managers and planners face: changes in the health care system; the contradictions between public interest and private gain; and changes in the forms of accountability. Secondly, it will suggest ways forward in relation to these problems, paying particular attention to the role of international agencies.

  9. Alternative futures for health economics: implications for nursing management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannion, Russell; Small, Neil; Thompson, Carl

    2005-09-01

    As nursing has been subject to successive waves of 'managerialism' there has been a drive on the part of government and elements within the profession to enhance the science base and promote cost-effective health care interventions. This has generated new interest in the 'economics of nursing' as efficiency and 'value for money' are viewed as necessary precondition for the provision of a high quality nursing service. As an academic subject health economics has brought an elegant set of theories to bear on the topic of health and health care. However, mainstream health economics is premised on a series of simplifying assumptions that, if applied uncritically, can induce a range of unintended and adverse consequences. This paper asks how ideas developed in one sphere (health economics) can be become influential in another (nursing management and practice) and it seeks explanations in the theories of Michel Foucault, specifically in his exploration of the reciprocal relationship between power and knowledge. How are our assumptions about what is possible and desirable shaped, how far do mechanisms of surveillance and self-subjugation extend? A range of alternative economic approaches have been developed which challenge many mainstream health economics assumptions. Some of these are better suited to the complex social environment present within health care. Nurses, nurse managers and researchers should question the assumptions of dominant economic models and explore a range of economic frameworks when planning services and evaluating their practice.

  10. How Health Relationship Management Services (HRMS Benefits the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Meckl-Sloan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Remote health monitoring and Health Relationship Management Services (HRMS can provide health care solutions for the elderly, the fastest-growing segment of the U.S. population. The year 2030 Problem questions whether enough resources and an operative service system will be available fourteen years from now when the elderly population will be greater than what it is today. One solution for reducing elder health care costs is home care, which is a preferable alternative to institutionalization. Many elderly have access to health services or outreach medical care, but do not use them due to lack of accessibility to safe transportation. The elderly often have problems with medication misuse stemming from the aging process, such as loss of memory, poor vision, and fixed-incomes. Seniors have dietary problems that weaken immune systems, leading to dehydration and other health issues. They also experience depression and loneliness from living alone or even with family members. The elderly who experience these problems can benefit from Health Relationship Management Services (HRMS, a new healthcare paradigm using remote health monitoring in the home.

  11. Recent advances in wearable sensors for animal health management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Neethirajan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Biosensors, as an application for animal health management, are an emerging market that is quickly gaining recognition in the global market. Globally, a number of sensors being produced for animal health management are at various stages of commercialization. Some technologies for producing an accurate health status and disease diagnosis are applicable only for humans, with few modifications or testing in animal models. Now, these innovative technologies are being considered for their future use in livestock development and welfare. Precision livestock farming techniques, which include a wide span of technologies, are being applied, along with advanced technologies like microfluidics, sound analyzers, image-detection techniques, sweat and salivary sensing, serodiagnosis, and others. However, there is a need to integrate all the available sensors and create an efficient online monitoring system so that animal health status can be monitored in real time, without delay. This review paper discusses the scope of different wearable technologies for animals, nano biosensors and advanced molecular biology diagnostic techniques for the detection of various infectious diseases of cattle, along with the efforts to enlist and compare these technologies with respect to their drawbacks and advantages in the domain of animal health management. The paper considers all recent developments in the field of biosensors and their applications for animal health to provide insight regarding the appropriate approach to be used in the future of enhanced animal welfare.

  12. The transfer of a health insurance/managed care business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavin, John N; Goodman, George; Goroff, David B

    2007-01-01

    The owners of a health insurance/managed care business may want to sell that business for a variety of reasons. Health care provider systems may want to exit that business due to operating losses, difficulty in complying with regulations, the inherent conflict in operating that business as part of a provider system, or the desire to focus on being a health care provider. Health insurers/HMOs may want to sell all or a portion of their business due to operating losses, difficulty in servicing a particular market, or a desire to focus on other markets. No matter what reason prompts a seller to undertake a sale, a sale of health insurance/managed care business can be a complicated transaction involving a multitude of issues. This article will focus first on the ways in which such a sale may be structured. The article will then discuss some transactional issues that may arise in the negotiations for the sale of a health insurance/managed care business. The article will then focus on some particular legal issues that arise in each sale-e.g., antitrust, HIPAA, regulatory approvals, and charitable issues. Finally, this article will provide an overview of tax structuring considerations.

  13. Commercial Aircraft Integrated Vehicle Health Management Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reveley, Mary S.; Briggs, Jeffrey L.; Evans, Joni K.; Jones, Sharon Monica; Kurtoglu, Tolga; Leone, Karen M.; Sandifer, Carl E.; Thomas, Megan A.

    2010-01-01

    Statistical data and literature from academia, industry, and other government agencies were reviewed and analyzed to establish requirements for fixture work in detection, diagnosis, prognosis, and mitigation for IVHM related hardware and software. Around 15 to 20 percent of commercial aircraft accidents between 1988 and 2003 involved inalftfnctions or failures of some aircraft system or component. Engine and landing gear failures/malfunctions dominate both accidents and incidents. The IVI vl Project research technologies were found to map to the Joint Planning and Development Office's National Research and Development Plan (RDP) as well as the Safety Working Group's National Aviation Safety Strategic. Plan (NASSP). Future directions in Aviation Technology as related to IVHlvl were identified by reviewing papers from three conferences across a five year time span. A total of twenty-one trend groups in propulsion, aeronautics and aircraft categories were compiled. Current and ftiture directions of IVHM related technologies were gathered and classified according to eight categories: measurement and inspection, sensors, sensor management, detection, component and subsystem monitoring, diagnosis, prognosis, and mitigation.

  14. Management of health, safety and environment in process industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duijm, Nijs Jan; Fiévez, C.; Gerbec, M.

    2008-01-01

    The present status of industrial HSE management in a number of EU member states is reviewed, with a focus on the integration of health, safety and environment in single management systems. The review provides insight into the standards and paradigms adopted by industry, and it identifies trends...... and needs for improvement. It appears that most industries consider goal-based HSE management programs to be a success and believe them to contribute to the profitability of the industry. We conclude that HSE management would benefit greatly from guidance on how to use existing management systems...... efficiently and also from the further development of meaningful safety performance indicators that identify the conditions prior to accidents and incidents. (C) 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  15. Managing mechanistic and organic structure in health care organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olden, Peter C

    2012-01-01

    Managers at all levels in a health care organization must organize work to achieve the organization's mission and goals. This requires managers to decide the organization structure, which involves dividing the work among jobs and departments and then coordinating them all toward the common purpose. Organization structure, which is reflected in an organization chart, may range on a continuum from very mechanistic to very organic. Managers must decide how mechanistic versus how organic to make the entire organization and each of its departments. To do this, managers should carefully consider 5 factors for the organization and for each individual department: external environment, goals, work production, size, and culture. Some factors may push toward more mechanistic structure, whereas others may push in the opposite direction toward more organic structure. Practical advice can help managers at all levels design appropriate structure for their departments and organization.

  16. Continuity in health care: lessons from supply chain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijboom, Bert R; Bakx, Saskia J W G C; Westert, Gert P

    2010-01-01

    In health care, multidisciplinary collaboration is both indispensable and complicated. We discuss organizational problems that occur in situations where multiple health care providers are required to cooperate for patients with complex needs. Four problem categories, labelled as communication, patient safety, waiting times and integration are distinguished. Then we develop a supply chain perspective on these problems in the sense of discussing remedies according to supply chain management (SCM) literature. This perspective implies a business focus on inter-organizational conditions and requirements necessary for delivering health care and cure across organizational borders. We conclude by presenting some strategic and policy recommendations.

  17. Specialty pharmaceuticals care management in an integrated health care delivery system with electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, C Douglas; Chin, Karen Y

    2013-05-01

    The specialty pharmaceuticals market is expanding more rapidly than the traditional pharmaceuticals market. Specialty pharmacy operations have evolved to deliver selected medications and associated clinical services. The growing role of specialty drugs requires new approaches to managing the use of these drugs. The focus, expectations, and emphasis in specialty drug management in an integrated health care delivery system such as Kaiser Permanente (KP) can vary as compared with more conventional health care systems. The KP Specialty Pharmacy (KP-SP) serves KP members across the United States. This descriptive account addresses the impetus for specialty drug management within KP, the use of tools such as an electronic health record (EHR) system and process management software, the KP-SP approach for specialty pharmacy services, and the emphasis on quality measurement of services provided. Kaiser Permanente's integrated system enables KP-SP pharmacists to coordinate the provision of specialty drugs while monitoring laboratory values, physician visits, and most other relevant elements of the patient's therapy. Process management software facilitates the counseling of patients, promotion of adherence, and interventions to resolve clinical, logistic, or pharmacy benefit issues. The integrated EHR affords KP-SP pharmacists advantages for care management that should become available to more health care systems with broadened adoption of EHRs. The KP-SP experience may help to establish models for clinical pharmacy services as health care systems and information systems become more integrated.

  18. Where Health and Death Intersect: Insights from a Terror Management Health Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Jamie; Goldenberg, Jamie L

    2017-01-01

    This paper offers an integrative understanding of the intersection between "health" and "death" from the perspective of the terror management health model. After highlighting the potential for health-related situations to elicit concerns about mortality, we turn to the question, how do thoughts of death influence health decision-making? Across varied health domains, the answer depends on whether these cognitions are in conscious awareness or not. When mortality concerns are conscious, people engage in healthy intentions and behavior if efficacy and coping resources are present. In contrast, when contending with accessible but non-conscious thoughts of death, health relevant decisions are guided more by esteem implications of the behavior. Lastly, we present research suggesting how these processes can be leveraged to facilitate health promotion and reduce health risk.

  19. Evaluation of computerized health management information system for primary health care in rural India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Satyavir

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Comprehensive Rural Health Services Project Ballabgarh, run by All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS, New Delhi has a computerized Health Management Information System (HMIS since 1988. The HMIS at Ballabgarh has undergone evolution and is currently in its third version which uses generic and open source software. This study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of a computerized Health Management Information System in rural health system in India. Methods The data for evaluation were collected by in-depth interviews of the stakeholders i.e. program managers (authors and health workers. Health Workers from AIIMS and Non-AIIMS Primary Health Centers were interviewed to compare the manual with computerized HMIS. A cost comparison between the two methods was carried out based on market costs. The resource utilization for both manual and computerized HMIS was identified based on workers' interviews. Results There have been no major hardware problems in use of computerized HMIS. More than 95% of data was found to be accurate. Health workers acknowledge the usefulness of HMIS in service delivery, data storage, generation of workplans and reports. For program managers, it provides a better tool for monitoring and supervision and data management. The initial cost incurred in computerization of two Primary Health Centers was estimated to be Indian National Rupee (INR 1674,217 (USD 35,622. Equivalent annual incremental cost of capital items was estimated as INR 198,017 (USD 4213. The annual savings is around INR 894,283 (USD 11,924. Conclusion The major advantage of computerization has been in saving of time of health workers in record keeping and report generation. The initial capital costs of computerization can be recovered within two years of implementation if the system is fully operational. Computerization has enabled implementation of a good system for service delivery, monitoring and supervision.

  20. Evaluation of computerized health management information system for primary health care in rural India

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background The Comprehensive Rural Health Services Project Ballabgarh, run by All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), New Delhi has a computerized Health Management Information System (HMIS) since 1988. The HMIS at Ballabgarh has undergone evolution and is currently in its third version which uses generic and open source software. This study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of a computerized Health Management Information System in rural health system in India. Methods The data for evaluation were collected by in-depth interviews of the stakeholders i.e. program managers (authors) and health workers. Health Workers from AIIMS and Non-AIIMS Primary Health Centers were interviewed to compare the manual with computerized HMIS. A cost comparison between the two methods was carried out based on market costs. The resource utilization for both manual and computerized HMIS was identified based on workers' interviews. Results There have been no major hardware problems in use of computerized HMIS. More than 95% of data was found to be accurate. Health workers acknowledge the usefulness of HMIS in service delivery, data storage, generation of workplans and reports. For program managers, it provides a better tool for monitoring and supervision and data management. The initial cost incurred in computerization of two Primary Health Centers was estimated to be Indian National Rupee (INR) 1674,217 (USD 35,622). Equivalent annual incremental cost of capital items was estimated as INR 198,017 (USD 4213). The annual savings is around INR 894,283 (USD 11,924). Conclusion The major advantage of computerization has been in saving of time of health workers in record keeping and report generation. The initial capital costs of computerization can be recovered within two years of implementation if the system is fully operational. Computerization has enabled implementation of a good system for service delivery, monitoring and supervision. PMID:21078203

  1. Managing workplace health promotion in municipal organizations: The perspective of senior managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Robert; Åkerlind, Ingemar; Sandmark, Hélène

    2015-01-01

    Previous research indicates that companies manage workplace health in various ways, but more in-depth empirical knowledge of how workplace health promotion (WHP) is managed in public sector organizations is needed. The aim of this study was to explore how WHP is managed and incorporated into the general management system in two large Swedish municipal organizations. A qualitative descriptive approach was used. Fourteen senior managers were purposefully selected and interviewed using semi-structured interviews. Documents were used as supplementary data. All data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The management of WHP was described as a set of components that together contribute to the organization's capacity for WHP. The informants described WHP as dominated by fitness programmes and as following a problem-solving cycle, in which the annual employee survey emerged as an important managerial tool. Achieving feasible WHP measures and appropriate follow-ups were described as challenges. The provision of leadership competence for WHP and use of supportive resources were described as additional components. The WHP management approach needs to be broadened to include work environment and organizational factors. Further integration with occupational health and safety and the general management system in the organizations is also needed.

  2. Training evaluation: a case study of training Iranian health managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Butcher Christopher

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Ministry of Health and Medical Education in the Islamic Republic of Iran has undertaken a reform of its health system, in which-lower level managers are given new roles and responsibilities in a decentralized system. To support these efforts, a United Kingdom-based university was contracted by the World Health Organization to design a series of courses for health managers and trainers. This process was also intended to develop the capacity of the National Public Health Management Centre in Tabriz, Iran, to enable it to organize relevant short courses in health management on a continuing basis. A total of seven short training courses were implemented, three in the United Kingdom and four in Tabriz, with 35 participants. A detailed evaluation of the courses was undertaken to guide future development of the training programmes. Methods The Kirkpatrick framework for evaluation of training was used to measure participants' reactions, learning, application to the job, and to a lesser extent, organizational impact. Particular emphasis was put on application of learning to the participants' job. A structured questionnaire was administered to 23 participants, out of 35, between one and 13 months after they had attended the courses. Respondents, like the training course participants, were predominantly from provincial universities, with both health system and academic responsibilities. Interviews with key informants and ex-trainees provided supplemental information, especially on organizational impact. Results Participants' preferred interactive methods for learning about health planning and management. They found the course content to be relevant, but with an overemphasis on theory compared to practical, locally-specific information. In terms of application of learning to their jobs, participants found specific information and skills to be most useful, such as health systems research and group work/problem solving. The least

  3. Financial planning and management of health programmes in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handa, K L

    1981-01-01

    In this paper, the author deals with the financial planning and control of health programmes in India. The techniques of cost-effectiveness analysis and of performance budgeting are highly useful aids to management for implementation of monitoring and review of performance of the programmes are also essential for gauging the progress.

  4. Electronic records management in the public health sector of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ngulup

    The study discovered that records management negatively affected timely and effec- tive health care .... government should consider the records media‟s instability, obsolete hardware, hardware incom- ...... Fundamentals of social research methods: an African perspective. .... Lombard: InforMedix Marketing Research, Inc.

  5. Outcomes Assessment in Accredited Health Information Management Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Dorine

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the use and perceived usefulness of outcomes assessment methods in health information management programs. Additional characteristics of the outcomes assessment practices were recognized. The findings were evaluated for significant differences in results based on age of the program, type of institution,…

  6. Supply chain management in health services : an overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, J.; Huijsman, R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose - This paper seeks to concentrate on the question whether any parallels can be found between the industrial sector and health care services with respect to the developments that have taken place in the area of Supply Chain Management. Starting from an analysis of existing literature, it is i

  7. Occupational safety and health management and risk governance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkman, A.; Terwoert, J.

    2014-01-01

    The advancement in new technologies, substances and new ways of working make it necessary to look beyond traditional methods of risk management. General drivers to emerging occupational safety and health (OSH) risks are: globalisation; demographic changes; technical innovations; changes in risk perc

  8. Teaching Classroom Management-- A Potential Public Health Intervention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlow, Ruth; Hansford, Lorraine; Edwards, Vanessa; Ukoumunne, Obioha C; Norman, Shelley; Ingarfield, Sara; Sharkey, Siobhan; Logan, Stuart; Ford, Tamsin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the feasibility of a classroom management course as a public health intervention. Improved socio-emotional skills may boost children's developmental and academic trajectory, while the costs of behaviour problems are enormous for schools with considerable impact on others' well-being.…

  9. [Health agencies and the every day management of bioethics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byk, Christian

    2014-06-01

    Taking into account their acquired experience, would not health agencies become the place where biomedical practices will be managed on an every day basis? Would in a near future these agencies have the role to interprete the principles of the bioethics law to adapt them to concrete issues?

  10. Financial aspects of veterinary herd health management programmes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ifende, V.I.; Derks, M.; Hooijer, G.A.; Hogeveen, H.

    2014-01-01

    Veterinary herd health management (VHHM) programmes have been shown to be economically effective in the past. However, no current information is available on costs and benefits of these programmes. This study compared economics and farm performance between participants and non-participants in VHHM p

  11. Supply chain management in health services : an overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, J.; Huijsman, R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose - This paper seeks to concentrate on the question whether any parallels can be found between the industrial sector and health care services with respect to the developments that have taken place in the area of Supply Chain Management. Starting from an analysis of existing literature, it is

  12. Outcomes Assessment in Accredited Health Information Management Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Dorine

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the use and perceived usefulness of outcomes assessment methods in health information management programs. Additional characteristics of the outcomes assessment practices were recognized. The findings were evaluated for significant differences in results based on age of the program, type of institution,…

  13. Influences on the career commitment of health-care managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrtle, Robert C; Chen, Duan-Rung; Liu, Caroline; Fahey, Daniel

    2008-11-01

    The health-care field is undergoing rapid and significant transformation. This transformation has led to the breakdown of traditional career paths for managers in the patient care segment of the industry. To our knowledge, there has not been a systematic examination of how these changes have impacted on the career commitment of managers in this segment of the industry. Building on previous research, we examine the effects of employment-related conditions and career experiences on the career commitment of these managers while controlling for the influence of individual characteristics. Specifically we assess the relationship between employment-related conditions, such as job security, position tenure, industry segment, management level and the extent to which their current position meets their career expectations, and their career experiences, including moving from a non-health-care management position, moving from a different health-care sector, their career stage, career patterns and their satisfaction with their career progression. We found that measures associated with the different employment-related experiences had a more significant influence on career commitment than those measures associated with different career experiences.

  14. Health insurance in India: need for managed care expertise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Thomas K

    2011-02-01

    Health insurers in India currently face many challenges, including poor consumer awareness, strict regulations, and inefficient business practices. They operate under a combination of stifling administrative costs and high medical expense ratios which have ensured that insurers operate under steep losses. External factors (eg, onerous regulations, lack of standards, high claims payouts) and internal factors (eg, high administrative costs, dependence on indemnity models that cover inpatient treatment costs only) have forced the health insurance industry into a regressive spiral. To overcome these challenges, health insurers need to innovate in their product offerings and tighten their existing processes and cost structures. But as a long-term strategy, it is imperative that health insurers deploy managed care concepts, which will go a long way toward addressing the systemic issues in the current operational models of health plans.

  15. Family planning and sexual health organizations: management lessons for health system reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambegaokar, Maia; Lush, Louisiana

    2004-10-01

    Advocates of health system reform are calling for, among other things, decentralized, autonomous managerial and financial control, use of contracting and incentives, and a greater reliance on market mechanisms in the delivery of health services. The family planning and sexual health (FP&SH) sector already has experience of these. In this paper, we set forth three typical means of service provision within the FP&SH sector since the mid-1900s: independent not-for-profit providers, vertical government programmes and social marketing programmes. In each case, we present the context within which the service delivery mechanism evolved, the management techniques that characterize it and the lessons learned in FP&SH that are applicable to the wider debate about improving health sector management. We conclude that the FP&SH sector can provide both positive and negative lessons in the areas of autonomous management, use of incentives to providers and acceptors, balancing of centralization against decentralization, and employing private sector marketing and distribution techniques for delivering health services. This experience has not been adequately acknowledged in the debates about how to improve the quality and quantity of health services for the poor in developing countries. Health sector reform advocates and FP&SH advocates should collaborate within countries and regions to apply these management lessons.

  16. Health-related behaviour among managers of Slovenian hospitals and institutes of public health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerneja Farkas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Behavioural risk factors have a significant impact on health. We aimed to assess health-related behaviour, health status, and use of healthcare services among managers of Slovenian hospitals and institutes of public health. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study which included management (directors, scientific directors, directors’ deputies of Slovenian hospitals and institutes of public health (63 respondents; 57% women; overall mean age: 51±7 years; response rate: 74%. Data were obtained using an anonymous self-administered questionnaire. Results: About 35% of respondents were directors. More than half of the respondents were overweight or obese (52%, the majority were not sufficiently physically active (59% and overloaded with stress (87%. Hypercholesterolemia (36%, spinal disease (17%, and arterial hypertension (16% were most common chronic diseases. Whilst only few participants visited their general practitioner due their health complaints, blood pressure (76%, cholesterol (51%, and glucose (54% were measured within last year in most of the respondents. Conclusion: Our findings point to a high prevalence of overweight and obesity as well as workplace-related stress among Slovenian public health managers. Therefore, effective preventive strategies should be focused on stress management along with promotion of healthy behavioural patterns.

  17. Management of Labor Conflicts in Public Health Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Elena Belu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The work “Management of labor conflicts in public health organizations” treats a very importantissue, of the present, with extensive and multiple implications for public health. The work can be consideredas an interdisciplinary study justified by two arguments: first, it is essential to applied research step, theknowledge and use of enshrined informational content in management literature, especially of models andmechanisms of managerial activity on the administration of human resources, managerial style, mobilizationcapacities, communication, coordination or decision ones and, not least the mechanisms characteristic tocollective relations established between managers and employees; second, it is required for theimplementation phase of research findings, capitalization of an informational sphere of law field, specifically,labor law, because labor conflicts are based both on specific regulations of labor law and on a juridicalliterature, of great interest and of strict use for a concrete optimization of labor social relations.

  18. [Operational units for health risk management (patient safety)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo Hernández, A; Claveria Fontán, A; García Urbaneja, M; López Barba, J

    2008-12-01

    In 1995 INSALUD began to develop performance measures in the field of risk management, and following transfer of powers to the regions, these led to the development of operational units in individual healthcare centres. These units, which consist of a group of health professionals, including managers, aim to identify, evaluate, analyse and deal with health risks, to enhance patient safety. Their organisational structure can vary in accordance with the needs, resources and philosophy of each individual organisation. This paper presents the experience of the risk management units developed in four Spanish regions: Madrid, the Basque Country, Galicia and INGESA (Ceuta and Melilla). It also includes reflections on assessment of their impact and on their future role in improving safety in healthcare services.

  19. [THE GLOBAL AND ECONOMIC CRISIS. AND HEALTH MANAGEMENT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Rey Calero, Juan

    2014-01-01

    The Global and economic crisis and Health Management The Health care process discussed are 4 steps: assessment, planing, intervention and evaluation. The identify association between social factors linked to social vulnerability (socio economic status, unemployed, poverty) and objective health relate quality of life. The poverty rate is 24.2%, unemployed 26.26%, youth unemployed 56.13%.ratio worker/retired 2.29. Debts 100% GDP The health inequality influence on health related quality of life. The Health System efficiency index. according Bloomber rate (2,013) Spain is 5 degrees in the world, points 68.3 on 100, for the life expectancy 82.3 years, the personal cost of health care 2,271€. Health care 10% GDP (public 7%,private 3%), SS protected population 92.4%, retired person cost 9.2% GDP, p. capita GDP 23,737€. Cost of Care: Hospital/specialist 54%, P. Care 15%, Pharmaceutical 19.8%, P. Health 3.1%.

  20. [Ongoing Health Education in Brazil:education or ongoing management?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Cristiane Lopes Simão

    2016-03-01

    The scope of this study was to analyze the concept and principles of Ongoing Health Education (OHE) - the Brazilian acronym is PNEPS. The methodology was based on the analysis of documents from the Ministry of Health and related scientific articles. It was revealed that the concept of OHE transcends its pedagogical significance and is undergoing a service restructuring process in the face of the new demands of the model. Precisely at the time in which jobs are increasingly unstable and precarious, the Ministry of Health engages in discourse regarding innovative management, focusing on the issue of OHE. The idea is not one of ongoing education, but of ongoing management. Rather than being an instrument for radical transformation, OHE becomes an attractive ideology due to its appearance as a pedagogical novelty.

  1. Critical systems for public health management of floods, North Dakota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedrich, Tim W; Sickler, Juli L; Vossler, Brenda L; Pickard, Stephen P

    2013-01-01

    Availability of emergency preparedness funding between 2002 and 2009 allowed the North Dakota Department of Health to build public health response capabilities. Five of the 15 public health preparedness capability areas identified by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 2011 have been thoroughly tested by responses to flooding in North Dakota in 2009, 2010, and 2011; those capability areas are information sharing, emergency operations coordination, medical surge, material management and distribution, and volunteer management. Increasing response effectiveness has depended on planning, implementation of new information technology, changes to command and control procedures, containerized response materials, and rapid contract procedures. Continued improvement in response and maintenance of response capabilities is dependent on ongoing funding.

  2. Managing information technology human resources in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahesh, Sathiadev; Crow, Stephen M

    2012-01-01

    The health care sector has seen a major increase in the use of information technology (IT). The increasing permeation of IT into the enterprise has resulted in many non-IT employees acquiring IT-related skills and becoming an essential part of the IT-enabled enterprise. Health care IT employees work in a continually changing environment dealing with new specializations that are often unfamiliar to other personnel. The widespread use of outsourcing and offshoring in IT has introduced a third layer of complexity in the traditional hierarchy and its approach to managing human resources. This article studies 3 major issues in managing these human resources in an IT-enabled health care enterprise and recommends solutions to the problem.

  3. [The hospital perspective: disease management and integrated health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrappe, Matthias

    2003-06-01

    Disease Management is a transsectoral, population-based form of health care, which addresses groups of patients with particular clinical entities and risk factors. It refers both to an evidence-based knowledge base and corresponding guidelines, evaluates outcome as a continuous quality improvement process and usually includes active participation of patients. In Germany, the implementation of disease management is associated with financial transactions for risk adjustment between health care assurances [para. 137 f, Book V of Social Code (SGB V)] and represents the second kind of transsectoral care, besides a program designed as integrated health care according to para. 140 a ff f of Book V of Social Code. While in the USA and other countries disease management programs are made available by several institutions involved in health care, in Germany these programs are offered by health care insurers. Assessment of disease management from the hospital perspective will have to consider three questions: How large is the risk to compensate inadequate quality in outpatient care? Are there synergies in internal organisational development? Can the risk of inadequate funding of the global "integrated" budget be tolerated? Transsectoral quality assurance by valid performance indicators and implementation of a quality improvement process are essential. Internal organisational changes can be supported, particularly in the case of DRG introduction. The economic risk and financial output depends on the kind of disease being focussed by the disease management program. In assessing the underlying scientific evidence of their cost effectiveness, societal costs will have to be precisely differentiated from hospital-associated costs.

  4. Knowledge Management System in Health & Social Care: Review on 20 Practiced Knowledge Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Saiful Ridhwan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The importance of managing medical information has become very critical in the healthcare delivery system. Medical information nowadays are optimized towards serving different areas such as; diagnosing of diseases, planning and administration, treatment and monitoring of patient outcomes, services and costs. This article provides a review into various Health and Social Care systems which encompasses the Knowledge Management value. For analysis, more than 30 systems that are related to Health and Social Care were gathered via Internet research, only 20 of these systems were finally selected based on recent system development and popularity of the system.Keywords: Health Care, Knowledge, Knowledge Management, Social Care, systemdoi:10.12695/ajtm.2013.6.2.4 How to cite this article:Ridhwan, M.S., and Oyefolahan, I.O. (2013. Knowledge Management System in Health & Social Care: Review on 20 Practiced Knowledge Management. The Asian Journal of Technology Management 6 (2: 92-101. Print ISSN: 1978-6956; Online ISSN: 2089-791X. doi:10.12695/ajtm.2013.6.2.4

  5. Community health needs assessments: filling data gaps for population health research and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberti, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Community health needs assessments (CHNA) are completed to meet varied regulatory and statutory requirements for local public health departments, tax-exempt 501(c)(3) hospitals, and Federally Qualified Health Centers. Although compliance is a motivating factor, these entities are committed to understanding the communities they serve and to developing strategies to address health needs and inequities in health and health care. CHNAs have the potential to improve the health of communities and populations by giving crucial qualitative and quantitative context to hospital and patient data, thereby enhancing opportunities for health services and clinical outcomes researchers. Filling in these data gaps can help to improve population health by highlighting community-and social determinant-related dynamics relevant to the improved health of the community. Successful models exist that that have used CHNAs and the resulting data to improve population health management and reduce inequities, as do health systems that have used the EHR and community-based performance measurement data to achieve population health goals.

  6. Toward a national health risk management approach in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Carol

    2002-01-01

    There has been increasing international consensus about the importance of competition for achieving national growth and community well-being. The Australian government accordingly has introduced policies to promote such competition. Major legislative review and many public inquiries have assisted implementation of national competition policy and the development of national goals and standards related to international agreements to promote health and sustainable development. Since the 1980s, Australia has had legislation that requires the identification and control of health risks arising at work. The management structures necessary for coordinated delivery of national programs designed for effective identification and control of health risks arising in communities to achieve national health and development goals are still being developed, however. Major difficulties related to this development are discussed. National health development programs should be approached primarily through establishment of regional partnerships between bodies responsible for managing community health, local government, and employment placement, in consultation with other relevant organizations and the community. Related research and evaluation programs are required.

  7. Petroleum and Health Care: Evaluating and Managing Health Care's Vulnerability to Petroleum Supply Shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarz, Daniel; Bae, Jaeyong; Pierce, Jessica

    2011-01-01

    Petroleum is used widely in health care—primarily as a transport fuel and feedstock for pharmaceuticals, plastics, and medical supplies—and few substitutes for it are available. This dependence theoretically makes health care vulnerable to petroleum supply shifts, but this vulnerability has not been empirically assessed. We quantify key aspects of petroleum use in health care and explore historical associations between petroleum supply shocks and health care prices. These analyses confirm that petroleum products are intrinsic to modern health care and that petroleum supply shifts can affect health care prices. In anticipation of future supply contractions lasting longer than previous shifts and potentially disrupting health care delivery, we propose an adaptive management approach and outline its application to the example of emergency medical services. PMID:21778473

  8. How Health Relationship Management Services (HRMS Benefits Corporate Wellness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nik Tehrani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The typical worker spends about 47 hours a week commuting sitting in cars, trains, buses, or sitting at their desks. These statistics show that maintaining a healthy work and life balance has become progressively important. Workplace wellness and health promotion are of central importance for any organization in today's world. People are becoming highly conscious about their health and seek to ensure that they are provided with best medical services and facilities in case of any health issue. Organizations have switched to proactive strategies for the healthcare of their employees. Billions of dollars are spent on the workforce only after illnesses or injuries have occurred. Over the past several decades, healthcare services have drastically changed, altering the manner in which healthcare was previously managed. Technological advancements in medical systems have revolutionized the healthcare industry, and digital health tracking has been quite successful in monitoring patients’ health. Since patients are continuously monitored, no matter where they are, these systems can indicate patients’ adherence to medical protocols and act as a warning sign for such diseases as heart problems, Alzheimer’s disease, and many others. Health Relationship Management Services (HRMS is a new paradigm which defines comprehensive healthcare for an individual. HRMS is a complete health ecosystem suitable for the workplace, which enables healthcare providers to collect personal health data from various sources, analyze it for positive outcomes, and take action to preserve an employee’s good health to reduce absenteeism or turnover. HRMS can act as a preventative sentinel for corporate well-being as well.

  9. Management Education in Public Health: Further Considerations; Comment on “Management Matters: A Leverage Point for Health Systems Strengthening in Global Health”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt J. Darr

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Knowing and applying the basic management functions of planning, organizing, staffing, directing, and controlling, as well as their permutations and combinations, are vital to effective delivery of public health services. Presently, graduate programs that prepare public health professionals neither emphasize teaching management theory, nor its application. This deficit puts those who become managers in public health and those they serve at a distinct disadvantage. This deficit can be remedied by enhanced teaching of management subjects.

  10. Improving the Health Industry with Stock Management Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Henrique Machado Cequeira

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Considering that the health industry has changed radically along the years, the efficient professional management of entities connected to this segment is fundamental. Modern techniques, such as demand forecast and stock management, contribute to a better management of scarce and critical resources which might put human lives at risk. The present study describes the use of quantitative techniques for supply forecast and stock management of a blood bank from a given hospital. The demonstration of the viability of these techniques broke paradigms. Furthermore, it has fomented new studies with emphasis on improving procedures and rationalization. It has also brought an improvement in terms of the institution operations, increasing the level of efficiency.

  11. Management of health-care waste in Izmir, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Soysal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate health-care waste in the 18 districts of metropolitan municipality of the third biggest city in Turkey. This cross-sectional study was carried out with 825 health institutions established in the 18 districts of Izmir metropolitan municipality, in 2007. The total amount of health-care waste collected was 4841 tons and 621 kilograms per patient's bed in 2007. Most of the medical wastes were collected from Konak, Karsiyaka and Bornova districts and were 2308, 272 and 1020 tons, respectively. Regarding to overpopulation, the number of health institutions in these districts are more than the number of health institutions in the other administrative districts. There was a statistically significant, positive correlation between the amount of health-care waste collected and population of the 18 districts (r = 0.79, p < 0.001, and number of beds/patients (r = 0.83, p < 0.001. To provide a safe health-care waste management metropolitan municipality must provide hazardous waste separation in health institutions, establish sterilization units for infectious waste, and provide the last storage of medical waste in completely different, safe and special areas apart from the municipal waste storage areas.

  12. Health management practices and reproductive performance of ducks in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oguntunji Abel O.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available At present, duck production is in its infancy stage in Nigeria. Ducks are mostly reared extensively and concentrated in the hands of small-holder farmers. A survey on health management practices and reproductive performance of ducks was conducted in three south-west (Oyo, Osun and Lagos and one north central (Niger states in Nigeria. Primary data were obtained through structured questionnaires administered to 400(100 per state duck farmers and were analysed with descriptive statistics (percentage. Results on management of health-related challenges showed that 51.5% of respondents were practicing self-medication and majority in this category used ethno-veterinary medicines. Other measures adopted were neglect (12.25%, consumption of sick animals (10.50%, veterinary service (10.25%, among others. Reproductive performance estimates showed that about half (52.50% of the respondents indicated 5‒6 (24.75% and 7−8 (27.50% months as sexual maturity age of female ducks while the highest proportion (41.25% indicated 16−20 eggs as clutch size. Hatchability rate was very high; 52% of duck farmers indicated that hatching rate was above 80%. Adoption of improved management systems by duck farmers will be of immense contribution to the health management and reproductive performance of ducks in Nigeria.

  13. Open source electronic health records and chronic disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldwater, Jason C; Kwon, Nancy J; Nathanson, Ashley; Muckle, Alison E; Brown, Alexa; Cornejo, Kerri

    2014-02-01

    To study and report on the use of open source electronic health records (EHR) to assist with chronic care management within safety net medical settings, such as community health centers (CHC). The study was conducted by NORC at the University of Chicago from April to September 2010. The NORC team undertook a comprehensive environmental scan, including a literature review, a dozen key informant interviews using a semistructured protocol, and a series of site visits to CHC that currently use an open source EHR. Two of the sites chosen by NORC were actively using an open source EHR to assist in the redesign of their care delivery system to support more effective chronic disease management. This included incorporating the chronic care model into an CHC and using the EHR to help facilitate its elements, such as care teams for patients, in addition to maintaining health records on indigent populations, such as tuberculosis status on homeless patients. The ability to modify the open-source EHR to adapt to the CHC environment and leverage the ecosystem of providers and users to assist in this process provided significant advantages in chronic care management. Improvements in diabetes management, controlled hypertension and increases in tuberculosis vaccinations were assisted through the use of these open source systems. The flexibility and adaptability of open source EHR demonstrated its utility and viability in the provision of necessary and needed chronic disease care among populations served by CHC.

  14. [Health locus of control of patients in disease management programmes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnee, M; Grikscheit, F

    2013-06-01

    Health locus of control beliefs plays a major role in improving self-management skills of the chronically ill - a main goal in disease management programmes (DMP). This study aims at characterising participants in disease management regarding their health locus of control. Data are based on 4 cross-sectional postal surveys between spring and autumn of 2006 and 2007 within the Health Care Monitor of the Bertelsmann Foundation. Among the 6 285 respondents, 1 266 are chronically ill and not enrolled in a DMP and 327 are participating in a DMP. A high internal locus of control (HLC) occurs significantly less often in DMP patients than in normal chronically ill patients (and healthy people) controlling for age, gender and social class. With increasing age, a high internal locus of control is also significantly less likely. When comparing healthy people, the chronically ill and the DMP participants a social gradient of a high internal locus of control belief can be observed. The weaker internal and higher doctor-related external locus of control of DMP participants should be carefully observed by the physician when trying to strengthen the patients' self-management skills. Evaluators of DMP should take into account the different baselines of DMP patients and relevant control groups and incorporate these differences into the evaluation.

  15. Performance scorecard for occupational safety and health management systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernâni Veloso Neto

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The pro-active and systematic search for best performances should be the two assumptions of any management system, so safety and health management in organizations must also be guided by these same precepts. However, the scientific production evidences that the performance evaluation processes in safety and health continue to be guided, in their essence, by intermittency, reactivity and negativity, which are not consistent with the assumptions referenced above. Therefore, it is essential that health and safety at work management systems (HSW MS are structured from an active and positive viewpoint, focusing on continuous improvement. This implies considering performance evaluation processes that incorporate, on the one hand, monitoring, measuring and verification procedures, and on the other hand, structured matrixes of results that capture the key factors of success, by mobilizing both reactive and proactive indicators. One of the instruments that can fulfill these precepts of health and safety performance evaluation is the SafetyCard, a performance scorecard for HSW MS that we developed and will seek to outline and demonstrate over this paper.

  16. Polarity management: the key challenge for integrated health systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, L R

    1999-01-01

    Integrated health systems are confronted with numerous dilemmas that must be managed. Many of these dilemmas are an inherent part of the system's structure, given that multiple competing hospitals, medical groups, and (sometimes) health plans are often under one organizational roof. This article presents an analysis of these dilemmas--referred to in the management literature as polarities--as they are found in six integrated health systems in Illinois. The nine polarities that must be managed include (1) hospital systems that want to be organizations of physicians; (2) system expansion by growing the physician component; (3) system centralization and physician decentralization; (4) centripetal and centrifugal forces involving physicians; (5) system objectives and physician interests; (6) system centralization and hospital decentralization; (7) primary care physicians and specialists; (8) physician autonomy via collectivization; and (9) vertical and virtual integration. The article identifies some of the solutions to the polarities that have been enacted by systems. In general, executives and physicians in integrated health systems must attend to the processes of integration as much as or more than the structures of integration.

  17. Managing the physics of the economics of integrated health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zismer, Daniel K; Werner, Mark J

    2012-01-01

    The physics metaphor, as applied to the economics (and financial performance) of the integrated health system, seems appropriate when considered together with the nine principles of management framework provided. The nature of the integrated design enhances leaders' management potential as they consider organizational operations and strategy in the markets ahead. One question begged by this argument for the integrated design is the durability, efficiency and ultimate long-term survivability of the more "traditional" community health care delivery models, which, by design, are fragmented, internally competitive and less capital efficient. They also cannot exploit the leverage of teams, optimal access management or the pursuit of revenues made available in many forms. For those who wish to move from the traditional to the more integrated community health system designs (especially those who have not yet started the journey), the path requires: * Sufficient balance sheet capacity to fund the integration process-especially as the model requires physician practice acquisitions and electronic health record implementations * A well-prepared board13, 14 * A functional, durable and sustainable physician services enterprise design * A redesigned organizational and governance structure * Favorable internal financial incentives alignment design * Effective accountable physician leadership * Awareness that the system is not solely a funding strategy for acquired physicians, rather a fully -.. committed clinical and business model, one in which patient-centered integrated care is the core service (and not acute care hospital-based services) A willingness to create and exploit the implied and inherent potential of an integrated design and unified brand Last, it's important to remember that an integrated health system is a tool that creates a "new potential" (a physics metaphor reference, one last time). The design doesn't operate itself. Application of the management principles

  18. Salutogenesis and Ayurveda: indications for public health management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandi, Antonio; Tosto, Carmen; Roberti di Sarsina, Paolo; Dalla Libera, Dacia

    2011-12-01

    Ayurveda, the ancient traditional medicine of India, defines health as a state of complete physical, mental and spiritual well-being. The focus of Ayurveda is on a predictive, preventive and personalized medicine. This is obtained through a low-cost personalized counseling about lifestyle measures (diet, activities, etc.), trying to involve the patient directly in the process of healing, increasing his self-awareness and good relationships with other people and nature. The approach of Ayurveda toward positive health shares its features with that of salutogenesis as described by Antonovsky. Prevention strategies pragmatically suggested by Ayurveda - including factors such as promotion of health education, individual awareness, integration of spirituality and ethics in healthcare system- may be applied in public health management, in order to improve perceived and objective life quality, promote healthy aging, limit drugs use (avoiding expensive side-effects) and reduce chronic diseases social costs. Ayurveda has a universal-coverage, being person-centered and consequently intercultural.

  19. Self-Management Skills in Chronic Disease Management: What Role Does Health Literacy Have?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Laura M; Doody, Catherine; Werner, Erik L; Fullen, Brona

    2016-08-01

    Self-management-based interventions can lead to improved health outcomes in people with chronic diseases, and multiple patient characteristics are associated with the development of self-management behaviors. Low health literacy (HL) has been implicated in poorer self-management behaviors and increased costs to health services. However, the mechanisms behind this relationship remain unclear. Therefore, the aim of the current review is to assess the association between HL and patient characteristics related to self-management behaviors (i.e., disease-related knowledge, beliefs, and self-efficacy). The review comprised 3 phases: 1) database searches, 2) eligibility screening, and 3) study quality assessment and strength of evidence. Inclusion criteria specified that a valid HL screening tool was used, that at least one self-management behavior was assessed, and that patients had a chronic condition. An initial search generated a total of 712 articles, of which 31 studies fulfilled the eligibility criteria. A consistent association was found between low HL and poorer disease-related knowledge in respiratory diseases, diabetes, and multiple disease categories. A significant association between low HL and poorer self-efficacy was reported in cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, human immunodeficiency virus, and multiple disease categories. HL was significantly associated with poorer beliefs in respiratory, musculoskeletal, and cardiovascular diseases. The findings from the current review suggest that low HL may affect behaviors necessary for the development of self-management skills. Given that self-management strategies are core components for effective treatment of a range of chronic diseases, low HL poses a considerable health concern. Further research is needed to understand the mediating influence of HL on disease-related knowledge, self-efficacy, and beliefs. From this, HL-sensitive, self-management interventions ought to be devised and implemented. © The Author

  20. THE PLACE OF OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM IN THE INTEGRATED MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Kafel

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to analyze the place of occupational health and safety management system (OHSMS within the integrated management system. Implementation aspects of management systems are discussed, namely the different management system standards used for registration, for example ISO 14001, ISO 9001, OHSAS 18001, ISO 27001, the order in which they were implemented, the time required for each implementation, as well as the scope of integration of these management system standards into a single Integrated Management System and the level of integration. In order to do so, some of the results of a survey carried out in 81 organizations registered to at least two management systems selected from popular international standards, e.g.: ISO 9001, ISO 14001, OHSAS 18001, ISO/IEC 27001, ISO 22000 were used. OHSMS is not the system that is implemented as a first one. Usually it is implemented after or simultaneously with ISO 9001 and ISO 14001 standards. Time of implementation of MSSs in second and further round of implementation is shorter than during the implementation of first standards. There is a higher level of integration of implemented management standards in organizations where one of the standards in OHSMS, than in a companies without OHSMS. The paper analyses those sequences of management systems implementation of safety management systems with other system, that allow organizations to achieve higher levels of integration and presents a possible pattern for the companies initiating the integration process.

  1. Oceans and Human Health: Linking Ocean, Organism, and Human Health for Sustainable Management of Coastal Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandifer, P. A.; Trtanj, J.; Collier, T. K.

    2012-12-01

    Scientists and policy-makers are increasingly recognizing that sustainable coastal communities depend on healthy and resilient economies, ecosystems, and people, and that the condition or "health" of the coastal ocean and humans are intimately and inextricably connected. A wealth of ecosystem services provided by ocean and coastal environments are crucial for human survival and well being. Nonetheless, the health of coastal communities, their economies, connected ecosystems and ecosystem services, and people are under increasing threats from health risks associated with environmental degradation, climate change, and unwise land use practices, all of which contribute to growing burdens of naturally-occurring and introduced pathogens, noxious algae, and chemical contaminants. The occurrence, frequency, intensity, geographic range, and number and kinds of ocean health threats are increasing, with concomitant health and economic effects and eroding public confidence in the safety and wholesomeness of coastal environments and resources. Concerns in the research and public health communities, many summarized in the seminal 1999 NRC Report, From Monsoons to Microbes and the 2004 final report of the US Commission on Ocean Policy, resulted in establishment of a new "meta-discipline" known as Oceans and Human Health (OHH). OHH brings together practitioners in oceanography, marine biology, ecology, biomedical science, medicine, economics and other social sciences, epidemiology, environmental management, and public health to focus on water- and food-borne causes of human and animal illnesses associated with ocean and coastal systems and on health benefits of seafood and other marine products. It integrates information across multiple disciplines to increase knowledge of ocean health risks and benefits and communicate such information to enhance public safety. Recognizing the need for a comprehensive approach to ocean health threats and benefits, Congress passed the Oceans and

  2. Public health emergencies and the public health/managed care challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Sara; Skivington, Skip; Praeger, Sandra

    2002-01-01

    The relationship between insurance and public health is an enduring topic in public health policy and practice. Insurers share certain attributes with public health. But public health agencies operate in relation to the entire community that they are empowered by public law to serve and without regard to the insurance status of community residents; on the other hand, insurers (whether managed care or otherwise) are risk-bearing entities whose obligations are contractually defined and limited to enrolled members and sponsors. Public insurers such as Medicare and Medicaid operate under similar constraints. The fundamental characteristics that distinguish managed care-style insurance and public health become particularly evident during periods of public health emergency, when a public health agency's basic obligations to act with speed and flexibility may come face to face with the constraints on available financing that are inherent in the structure of insurance. Because more than 70% of all personal health care in the United States is financed through insurance, public health agencies effectively depend on insurers to finance necessary care and provide essential patient-level data to the public health system. Critical issues of state and federal policy arise in the context of the public health/insurance relations during public health emergencies. These issues focus on coverage and the power to make coverage decisions, as well as the power to define service networks and classify certain data as exempt from public reporting. The extent to which a formal regulatory approach may become necessary is significantly affected by the extent to which private entities themselves respond to the problem with active efforts to redesign their services and operations to include capabilities and accountability in the realm of public health emergency response.

  3. An agile enterprise regulation architecture for health information security management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Pei; Hsieh, Sung-Huai; Cheng, Po-Hsun; Chien, Tsan-Nan; Chen, Heng-Shuen; Luh, Jer-Junn; Lai, Jin-Shin; Lai, Feipei; Chen, Sao-Jie

    2010-09-01

    Information security management for healthcare enterprises is complex as well as mission critical. Information technology requests from clinical users are of such urgency that the information office should do its best to achieve as many user requests as possible at a high service level using swift security policies. This research proposes the Agile Enterprise Regulation Architecture (AERA) of information security management for healthcare enterprises to implement as part of the electronic health record process. Survey outcomes and evidential experiences from a sample of medical center users proved that AERA encourages the information officials and enterprise administrators to overcome the challenges faced within an electronically equipped hospital.

  4. An Agile Enterprise Regulation Architecture for Health Information Security Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Pei; Hsieh, Sung-Huai; Chien, Tsan-Nan; Chen, Heng-Shuen; Luh, Jer-Junn; Lai, Jin-Shin; Lai, Feipei; Chen, Sao-Jie

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Information security management for healthcare enterprises is complex as well as mission critical. Information technology requests from clinical users are of such urgency that the information office should do its best to achieve as many user requests as possible at a high service level using swift security policies. This research proposes the Agile Enterprise Regulation Architecture (AERA) of information security management for healthcare enterprises to implement as part of the electronic health record process. Survey outcomes and evidential experiences from a sample of medical center users proved that AERA encourages the information officials and enterprise administrators to overcome the challenges faced within an electronically equipped hospital. PMID:20815748

  5. Understanding human resource management practices in Botswana's public health sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitio-Kgokgwe, Onalenna Stannie; Gauld, Robin; Hill, Philip C; Barnett, Pauline

    2016-11-21

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to assess the management of the public sector health workforce in Botswana. Using institutional frameworks it aims to document and analyse human resource management (HRM) practices, and make recommendations to improve employee and health system outcomes. Design/methodology/approach The paper draws from a large study that used a mixed methods approach to assess performance of Botswana's Ministry of Health (MOH). It uses data collected through document analysis and in-depth interviews of 54 key informants comprising policy makers, senior staff of the MOH and its stakeholder organizations. Findings Public health sector HRM in Botswana has experienced inadequate planning, poor deployment and underutilization of staff. Lack of comprehensive retention strategies and poor working conditions contributed to the failure to attract and retain skilled personnel. Relationships with both formal and informal environments affected HRM performance. Research limitations/implications While document review was a major source of data for this paper, the weaknesses in the human resource information system limited availability of data. Practical implications This paper presents an argument for the need for consideration of formal and informal environments in developing effective HRM strategies. Originality/value This research provides a rare system-wide approach to health HRM in a Sub-Saharan African country. It contributes to the literature and evidence needed to guide HRM policy decisions and practices.

  6. HEALTH NETWORKS. STRUCTURE AND MANAGEMENT. IMPLICATIONS FOR SOCIAL ECONOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doru Botezat

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This article starts from a systematic analysis of specialized literature on the subject of health care services and networks integration, trying to offer relevant explanations to better understand the organization system of services within the network.To begin with, the article brings forward the institutional and spatial dynamics that leads to the network type configurations. Then, there is an analysis of the processes and measures which can serve as planning instruments available to the policies,shaping some principles for the management of networks within the health area.Finally, the article presents some configuration models of the health networks,recorded by the specialized literature and discusses the link between the natural evolution towards these new management organization forms and the new principles of social economy as a systematic evolution of the state`s organization. From the methodology point of view, the article has resulted from searching, selecting,evaluating and summarizing some works focused on the health systems economy and policies within the area of health.

  7. Management of health care expenditure by soft computing methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimović, Goran; Jović, Srđan; Jovanović, Radomir; Aničić, Obrad

    2017-01-01

    In this study was managed the health care expenditure by soft computing methodology. The main goal was to predict the gross domestic product (GDP) according to several factors of health care expenditure. Soft computing methodologies were applied since GDP prediction is very complex task. The performances of the proposed predictors were confirmed with the simulation results. According to the results, support vector regression (SVR) has better prediction accuracy compared to other soft computing methodologies. The soft computing methods benefit from the soft computing capabilities of global optimization in order to avoid local minimum issues.

  8. Low level communication management for e-health systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Guillermo; Zerbini, Carlos; Voos, Javier; Centeno, Carlos; González, Eduardo

    2011-12-01

    The heterogeneity of e-health systems encourages the use of standards such as Health Level 7 (HL7v3) to ensure interoperability. Many actual implementations address this problem by unoptimized high level programming of top-range portable computing platforms. However, this approach could pose excessive demands on battery-powered mid-range terminals. In this work, we propose low-level support for portable HL7v3-compatible embedded systems in order to better exploit their limited processing and communications capabilities. In particular, we present our experience in mobile communication management through two different approaches, which proves the feasibility of this proposal.

  9. Managing workplace depression: an untapped opportunity for occupational health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Kelly; McKibbin, Laura

    2004-03-01

    Depression is one of the most prevalent and costly health issues affecting the American work force. Despite well established research demonstrating the association between employee depression and reduced on-the-job productivity, increased absenteeism, and higher health care use, most employers remain largely unresponsive to the need for company based depression initiatives. Organizational and individual barriers can prevent companies from effectively managing employee depression. Organizational barriers include information gaps, lack of data to justify increased investment in employee mental health programs, and employers' ambiguous roles in addressing depression. Individual barriers such as an inability to recognize signs and symptoms; stigma; confidentiality and privacy concerns; and unavailability of easily accessible, quality resources can keep employees who are depressed from seeking treatment. Many occupational health professionals may feel ill prepared or uncomfortable taking the lead in creating more aggressive worksite responses to depression, but they are, perhaps, in the best of all possible positions within an organization to succeed. Occupational health professionals have the credentials, credibility, training, and experience necessary to build a strong case for business leaders for why investing in workplace depression programs is so important. Occupational health professionals are the most qualified to design and deliver destigmatized, customer friendly programs and services for employees to access for help with depression, and to integrate their services with other departments such as benefits, health promotion, EAP, and human resources, to create an effective, organization-wide depression initiative.

  10. Public health financial management needs: report of a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costich, Julia F; Honoré, Peggy A; Scutchfield, F Douglas

    2009-01-01

    The work reported here builds on the identification of public health financial management practice competencies by a national expert panel. The next logical step was to provide a validity check for the competencies and identify priority areas for educational programming. We developed a survey for local public health finance officers based on the public health finance competencies and field tested it with a convenience sample of officials. We asked respondents to indicate the importance of each competency area and the need for training to improve performance; we also requested information regarding respondent education, jurisdiction size, and additional comments. Our local agency survey sample drew on the respondent list from the National Association of County and City Health Officials 2005 local health department survey, stratified by agency size and limited to jurisdiction populations of 25,000 to 1,000,000. Identifying appropriate respondents was a major challenge. The survey was fielded electronically, yielding 112 responses from 30 states. The areas identified as most important and needing most additional training were knowledge of budget activities, financial data interpretation and communication, and ability to assess and correct the organization's financial status. The majority of respondents had some postbaccalaureate education. Many provided additional comments and recommendations. Health department finance officers demonstrated a high level of general agreement regarding the importance of finance competencies in public health and the need for training. The findings point to a critical need for additional training opportunities that are accessible, cost-effective, and targeted to individual needs.

  11. A ride in the time machine: information management capabilities health departments will need

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Foldy, Seth; Grannis, Shaun; Ross, David; Smith, Torney

    2014-01-01

    .... Developments in electronic health records, interoperability and information exchange, public information sharing, decision support, and cloud technologies can support information management if health...

  12. Managing patients with high-deductible health plans and health savings accounts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Catherine M

    2009-01-01

    High-deductible health plans and health savings accounts have many patients and providers mutually mystified. It is very important for providers and their staff to understand and manage these emerging products. If the current growth rate of enrollment in these plans continues, 25% of your patients will be presenting with this coverage in fewer than six years. Mishandling these products can cause unnecessary cash flow issues, but a little proactivity, education, and training now, will go a long way.

  13. Web based Health Education, E-learning, for weight management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heetebry, Irene; Hatcher, Myron; Tabriziani, Hossein

    2005-12-01

    Obesity is a major health problem across the United States and becoming a progressive world wide problem. An overweight person could access the weight management program and develop a personalized weight reduction plan. The customer enters specific data to personalize the program and in the future an artificial intelligence program can evaluate customer behavior and adjust accordingly. This is an on-line program with class room support, offered as back up when desired by the patient.

  14. A knowledge management tool for public health: health-evidence.ca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobbins Maureen

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ultimate goal of knowledge translation and exchange (KTE activities is to facilitate incorporation of research knowledge into program and policy development decision making. Evidence-informed decision making involves translation of the best available evidence from a systematically collected, appraised, and analyzed body of knowledge. Knowledge management (KM is emerging as a key factor contributing to the realization of evidence-informed public health decision making. The goal of health-evidence.ca is to promote evidence-informed public health decision making through facilitation of decision maker access to, retrieval, and use of the best available synthesized research evidence evaluating the effectiveness of public health interventions. Methods The systematic reviews that populate health evidence.ca are identified through an extensive search (1985-present of 7 electronic databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Sociological Abstracts, BIOSIS, and SportDiscus; handsearching of over 20 journals; and reference list searches of all relevant reviews. Reviews are assessed for relevance and quality by two independent reviewers. Commonly-used public health terms are used to assign key words to each review, and project staff members compose short summaries highlighting results and implications for policy and practice. Results As of June 2010, there are 1913 reviews in the health-evidence.ca registry in 21 public health and health promotion topic areas. Of these, 78% have been assessed as being of strong or moderate methodological quality. Health-evidence.ca receives approximately 35,000 visits per year, 20,596 of which are unique visitors, representing approximately 100 visits per day. Just under half of all visitors return to the site, with the average user spending six minutes and visiting seven pages per visit. Public health nurses, program managers, health promotion workers, researchers, and program coordinators are

  15. A knowledge management tool for public health: health-evidence.ca

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background The ultimate goal of knowledge translation and exchange (KTE) activities is to facilitate incorporation of research knowledge into program and policy development decision making. Evidence-informed decision making involves translation of the best available evidence from a systematically collected, appraised, and analyzed body of knowledge. Knowledge management (KM) is emerging as a key factor contributing to the realization of evidence-informed public health decision making. The goal of health-evidence.ca is to promote evidence-informed public health decision making through facilitation of decision maker access to, retrieval, and use of the best available synthesized research evidence evaluating the effectiveness of public health interventions. Methods The systematic reviews that populate health evidence.ca are identified through an extensive search (1985-present) of 7 electronic databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Sociological Abstracts, BIOSIS, and SportDiscus; handsearching of over 20 journals; and reference list searches of all relevant reviews. Reviews are assessed for relevance and quality by two independent reviewers. Commonly-used public health terms are used to assign key words to each review, and project staff members compose short summaries highlighting results and implications for policy and practice. Results As of June 2010, there are 1913 reviews in the health-evidence.ca registry in 21 public health and health promotion topic areas. Of these, 78% have been assessed as being of strong or moderate methodological quality. Health-evidence.ca receives approximately 35,000 visits per year, 20,596 of which are unique visitors, representing approximately 100 visits per day. Just under half of all visitors return to the site, with the average user spending six minutes and visiting seven pages per visit. Public health nurses, program managers, health promotion workers, researchers, and program coordinators are among the largest groups of

  16. Ground Operations Autonomous Control and Integrated Health Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, James

    2014-01-01

    The Ground Operations Autonomous Control and Integrated Health Management plays a key role for future ground operations at NASA. The software that is integrated into this system is called G2 2011 Gensym. The purpose of this report is to describe the Ground Operations Autonomous Control and Integrated Health Management with the use of the G2 Gensym software and the G2 NASA toolkit for Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) which is a Computer Software Configuration Item (CSCI). The decision rationale for the use of the G2 platform is to develop a modular capability for ISHM and AC. Toolkit modules include knowledge bases that are generic and can be applied in any application domain module. That way, there's a maximization of reusability, maintainability, and systematic evolution, portability, and scalability. Engine modules are generic, while application modules represent the domain model of a specific application. Furthermore, the NASA toolkit, developed since 2006 (a set of modules), makes it possible to create application domain models quickly, using pre-defined objects that include sensors and components libraries for typical fluid, electrical, and mechanical systems.

  17. Integrated yoga therapy for improving mental health in managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tikhe Sham Ganpat

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Managers′ lives have become a never-ending race against time, technology, and targets. This race creates tension, which leads to dissatisfaction and frustration and eventually manifests itself as psychological and physiological stress with mental and emotional drain. This modern lifestyle intensifies the stress leading to "Excessive Tension" and consequent deterioration in "Executive Efficiency." Objective: To assess mental health in managers undergoing yoga-based Self-Management of Excessive Tension (SMET program. Materials and Methods: 72 managers with 48.75±3.86 years of mean age were participated in this study of single group pre-post design. The General Health Questionnaire data were taken on the first and sixth day of 5 days SMET program. Results: The data analysis showed 68.25% decrease (P<0.001 in somatic symptoms, 66.29% decrease (P<0.001 in anxiety and insomnia, 65.00% decrease (P<0.001 in social dysfunction, 87.08% decrease (P<0.001 in severe depression, and 71.47% decrease (P<0.001 in all medical complaints. Conclusion: These results suggest that participation in a SMET program was associated with improvement in mental health and may have implications for "Executive Efficiency."

  18. [Development of a Crisis Management Manual for Occupational Health Experts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Juri; Tateishi, Seiichiro; Igarashi, Yu; Ide, Hiroshi; Miyamoto, Toshiaki; Hara, Tatsuhiko; Kobashi, Masaki; Inoue, Megumi; Kawashima, Megumi; Okada, Takeo; Mori, Koji

    2015-12-01

    When crises such as natural disasters or industrial accidents occur in workplaces, not only the workers who are injured, but also those who engage in emergency or recovery work may be exposed to various health hazards. We developed a manual to enable occupational health (OH) experts to prevent health hazards. The manual includes detailed explanations of the characteristics and necessary actions for each need in the list of "OH Needs During Crisis Management" developed after an analysis of eight cases in our previous research. We changed the endings of explanatory sentences so that users could learn how often each need occurred in these eight cases. We evaluated the validity of the manual using two processes: 1) Providing the manual to OH physicians during an industrial accident; 2) Asking crisis management experts to review the manual. We made improvements based on their feedback and completed the manual. The manual includes explanations about 99 OH needs, and users can learn how and what to do for each need during various crisis cases. Because additional OH needs may occur in other crises, it is necessary to collect information about new cases and to improve the comprehensiveness of the manual continuously. It is critical that this crisis management manual be available when a crisis occurs. We need to inform potential users of the manual through various media, as well as by posting it on our website.

  19. Managing corporate governance risks in a nonprofit health care organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyer, Glenn T; Brashear, Andrea D; Green, Kelly J

    2005-01-01

    Triggered by corporate scandals, there is increased oversight by governmental bodies and in part by the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. Corporations are developing corporate governance compliance initiatives to respond to the scrutiny of regulators, legislators, the general public and constituency groups such as investors. Due to state attorney general initiatives, new legislation and heightened oversight from the Internal Revenue Service, nonprofit entities are starting to share the media spotlight with their for-profit counterparts. These developments are changing nonprofit health care organizations as well as the traditional role of the risk manager. No longer is the risk manager focused solely on patients' welfare and safe passage through a complex delivery system. The risk manager must be aware of corporate practices within the organization that could allow the personal objectives of a few individuals to override the greater good of the community in which the nonprofit organization serves.

  20. Rational use of electronic health records for diabetes population management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggleston, Emma M; Klompas, Michael

    2014-04-01

    Population management is increasingly invoked as an approach to improve the quality and value of diabetes care. Recent emphasis is driven by increased focus on both costs and measures of care as the US moves from fee for service to payment models in which providers are responsible for costs incurred, and outcomes achieved, for their entire patient population. The capacity of electronic health records (EHRs) to create patient registries, apply analytic tools, and facilitate provider- and patient-level interventions has allowed rapid evolution in the scope of population management initiatives. However, findings on the efficacy of these efforts for diabetes are mixed, and work remains to achieve the full potential of an-EHR based population approach. Here we seek to clarify definitions and key domains, provide an overview of evidence for EHR-based diabetes population management, and recommend future directions for applying the considerable power of EHRs to diabetes care and prevention.

  1. Risk management assessment of Health Maintenance Organisations participating in the National Health Insurance Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Princess Christina; Korie, Patrick Chukwuemeka; Nnaji, Feziechukwu Collins

    2014-01-01

    Background: The National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS), operated majorly in Nigeria by health maintenance organisations (HMOs), took off formally in June 2005. In view of the inherent risks in the operation of any social health insurance, it is necessary to efficiently manage these risks for sustainability of the scheme. Consequently the risk-management strategies deployed by HMOs need regular assessment. This study assessed the risk management in the Nigeria social health insurance scheme among HMOs. Materials and Methods: Cross-sectional survey of 33 HMOs participating in the NHIS. Results: Utilisation of standard risk-management strategies by the HMOs was 11 (52.6%). The other risk-management strategies not utilised in the NHIS 10 (47.4%) were risk equalisation and reinsurance. As high as 11 (52.4%) of participating HMOs had a weak enrollee base (less than 30,000 and poor monthly premium and these impacted negatively on the HMOs such that a large percentage 12 (54.1%) were unable to meet up with their financial obligations. Most of the HMOs 15 (71.4%) participated in the Millennium development goal (MDG) maternal and child health insurance programme. Conclusions: Weak enrollee base and poor monthly premium predisposed the HMOs to financial risk which impacted negatively on the overall performance in service delivery in the NHIS, further worsened by the non-utilisation of risk equalisation and reinsurance as risk-management strategies in the NHIS. There is need to make the scheme compulsory and introduce risk equalisation and reinsurance. PMID:25298605

  2. Risk management assessment of Health Maintenance Organisations participating in the National Health Insurance Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Princess Christina Campbell

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS, operated majorly in Nigeria by health maintenance organisations (HMOs, took off formally in June 2005. In view of the inherent risks in the operation of any social health insurance, it is necessary to efficiently manage these risks for sustainability of the scheme. Consequently the risk-management strategies deployed by HMOs need regular assessment. This study assessed the risk management in the Nigeria social health insurance scheme among HMOs. Materials and Methods: Cross-sectional survey of 33 HMOs participating in the NHIS. Results: Utilisation of standard risk-management strategies by the HMOs was 11 (52.6%. The other risk-management strategies not utilised in the NHIS 10 (47.4% were risk equalisation and reinsurance. As high as 11 (52.4% of participating HMOs had a weak enrollee base (less than 30,000 and poor monthly premium and these impacted negatively on the HMOs such that a large percentage 12 (54.1% were unable to meet up with their financial obligations. Most of the HMOs 15 (71.4% participated in the Millennium development goal (MDG maternal and child health insurance programme. Conclusions: Weak enrollee base and poor monthly premium predisposed the HMOs to financial risk which impacted negatively on the overall performance in service delivery in the NHIS, further worsened by the non-utilisation of risk equalisation and reinsurance as risk-management strategies in the NHIS. There is need to make the scheme compulsory and introduce risk equalisation and reinsurance.

  3. Prognostics and Health Management of Wind Turbines: Current Status and Future Opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, Shuangwen

    2016-10-04

    This presentation was given at the 2016 Annual Conference of the Prognostics and Health Management Society. It covers the current status and challenges and opportunities of prognostics and health management of wind turbines.

  4. Multiproject interdependencies in health systems management: a longitudinal qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaulding, Aaron; Gamm, Larry; Kim, Jungyeon; Menser, Terri

    2014-01-01

    A health care organization often engages in the simultaneous implementation of multiple organization change initiatives. However, the degree to which these initiatives are implemented and can be enhanced based on their interdependencies is an open question. How organizations and the change initiatives they pursue might benefit from more careful examination of potential interdependencies among projects was explored in this article. The aim of this study was to introduce a multiproject management conceptualization that stresses project interdependencies and suggests synergies can be found to enhance overall project and organizational performance. It examines this conceptualization in the context of a health system pursuing several major initiatives to capture insights into the nature of such interdependencies. Longitudinal qualitative analysis of interviews conducted with hospital leaders attempting to manage multiple initiatives being implemented by the system's leadership team was used in this study. The implementation of an electronic medical record (EMR) is empirically identified as the most central among multiple projects based on other projects dependencies on the EMR. Furthermore, concerns for data are identified most frequently as success factors across all projects. This reinforces the depiction of the EMR as a central organizational focus. A unique perspective on multiproject management in hospitals and on EMR projects is presented. In addition, the interdependency conceptualization and its application and results provide insights into multiproject management that can help ensure that benefits of individual projects are more fully optimized or exploited in leveraging the effectiveness of other project initiatives.

  5. An innovative national health care waste management system in Kyrgyzstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toktobaev, Nurjan; Emmanuel, Jorge; Djumalieva, Gulmira; Kravtsov, Alexei; Schüth, Tobias

    2015-02-01

    A novel low-cost health care waste management system was implemented in all rural hospitals in Kyrgyzstan. The components of the Kyrgyz model include mechanical needle removers, segregation using autoclavable containers, safe transport and storage, autoclave treatment, documentation, recycling of sterilized plastic and metal parts, cement pits for anatomical waste, composting of garden wastes, training, equipment maintenance, and management by safety and quality committees. The gravity-displacement autoclaves were fitted with filters to remove pathogens from the air exhaust. Operating parameters for the autoclaves were determined by thermal and biological tests. A hospital survey showed an average 33% annual cost savings compared to previous costs for waste management. All general hospitals with >25 beds except in the capital Bishkek use the new system, corresponding to 67.3% of all hospital beds. The investment amounted to US$0.61 per capita covered. Acceptance of the new system by the staff, cost savings, revenues from recycled materials, documented improvements in occupational safety, capacity building, and institutionalization enhance the sustainability of the Kyrgyz health care waste management system. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Environment and Health: view from the prespective of public health management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José María Martín Moreno

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The impact of the environment on health is an area of primary interest for Public Health. Operationally speaking, the Ministry of Health and Consumer Affairs’ environmental health competencies fall within the framework of the action incumbent upon the Directorate General of Public Health (DGSP. This article contains a summarised review of some of the main environmental hazards and their effect on health, with reference to the role of the DGSP in these respects. The discussion covers aspects such as air pollution, chemical safety, sanitary control of water, radiological protection for patients, very low frequency magnetic fields, exposure to radio frequencies (mobile telephony and the crises caused by recent environment-related events. Environmental health policies at the European and international scale and institutional co-ordination in Spain in this regard are also briefly analysed. Subjects concerning hazard management and the precautionary principle are likewise explored. Finally, certain lines of the “Public Health co-operation and harmonisation plan in Spain”, intended to articulate action taken by the various levels of government in this area, are previewed. This plan is designed to seek ways to co-ordinate epidemiological, disease prevention and health protection information systems, taking a comprehensive approach to Public Health in close co-ordination not only with regional and local governments, but also with social agents, scientific societies and professional associations.

  7. Managing patients with high-deductible health plans and health savings accounts: part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Catherine M

    2009-01-01

    High-deductible health plans and health savings accounts have many patients and providers mutually mystified. It is very important for providers and their staff to understand and manage these emerging products that are becoming more common. This article examines a case study of a family of four with these products. The case study shows the reader the number of moving parts as well as how quickly the patient liability can increase faster than the funds in the health savings account. Mishandling these products can cause unnecessary cash flow issues, but a little pro-activity, education, and training now will go a long way.

  8. Mobile Health Based System for Managing and Maintaining Health Data in Classroom: Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalibor Serafimovski

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available It is necessary for young people to get appropriate medical education so that they can learn how to properly take care of their health from an early age. In this paper we are presenting a study that enables practical implementation of a mobile system for monitoring students’ health using mobile devices and managing medical data in the classroom. About 600 students were engaged for the purpose of this study. The study results suggest that the application of these technologies leads to an increased concern about students’ health and their proper medical education.

  9. Body Management and the quest for performative health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thualagant, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    The task of this article is to theorize on the matter of bodywork in relation to health and thereby propose a theoretical framework that can enlighten our understanding of bodywork in a ‘health society’. With the ambition of understanding bodywork in a (hyper)modern era, characterized by a strong...... interviews, it is stressed in this article that bodywork evolves around a general will to more health. This rationale can be identified as body management where the gym goers act in order to ensure a performative health.......The task of this article is to theorize on the matter of bodywork in relation to health and thereby propose a theoretical framework that can enlighten our understanding of bodywork in a ‘health society’. With the ambition of understanding bodywork in a (hyper)modern era, characterized by a strong...... individualism and the search for performance, the body is here conceived as a capital. The body as a site of investment can be improved, worked upon and has an impact on how the individual distinguishes him/herself in social space. Finding inspiration in the sociology of the body and the anthropologist Le...

  10. Code of ethics and ethical dilemmas' management in health professions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Triadafyllidou

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available As the main interest of health professionals is for the well-being of patients/clients, ethical decision making is one of the prominent elements of his/her professionalism. Aim: The present study aims to illustrate the role of ethical judgment and the so-called "moral imagination" in health professions. Method and material: Review of theoretical and research literature, including both classic and recent sources about ethical dilemmas that health professionals may anticipate, as well as the suggested ways to manage these dilemmas. Results: Health professionals often have to act in complicated situations. Review of relevant literature indicates that the professionals' ethical decisions are structured not only through the codes of ethics, but also through other collective practices, such as organizational culture and cultural schemas about the role of health professional. Resorting to schematic thinking may temporarily release the professional from his/her concerns, but in the long run, it may devoid him/her of the sense of satisfaction from work and of the ability to offer clients the optimal care. The development of the so-called "moral imagination" permits the professional to advance from the typical application of the rules to actual ethical judgment. Conclusions: Ethical decision making presupposes not only a thorough knowledge of ethical guidelines, but also the development of the ability to openly reflect upon the ethical dimensions of an issue (moral imagination that allows health professionals to overcome schematic thinking and investigate comprehensive solutions to ethical dilemmas.

  11. Social enterprise in health organisation and management: hybridity or homogeneity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, Ross

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to reflect on social enterprise as an organisational form in health organisation and management. The paper presents a critique of the underlying assumptions associated with social enterprise in the context of English health and social care. The rise of social enterprise models of service provision reflects increasingly hybrid organisational forms and functions entering the health and social care market. Whilst at one level this hybridity increases the diversity of service providers promoting innovative and responsive services, the paper argues that further inspection of the assumptions associated with social enterprise reveal an organisational form that is symbolic of isomorphic processes pushing healthcare organisations toward greater levels of homogeneity, based on market-based standardisation and practices. Social enterprise forms part of isomorphic processes moving healthcare organisation and management towards market norms". In line with the aim of the "New Perspectives section", the paper aims to present a provocative perspective about developments in health and social care, as a spur to further debate and research in this area.

  12. Role of Ayurveda in management of oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torwane, Nilesh Arjun; Hongal, Sudhir; Goel, Pankaj; Chandrashekar, B R

    2014-01-01

    Oral diseases continue to be a major health problem world-wide. Oral health is integral to general well-being and relates to the quality-of-life that extends beyond the functions of the craniofacial complex. The standard Western medicine has had only limited success in the prevention of periodontal disease and in the treatment of a variety of oral diseases. Hence, the search for alternative products continues and natural phytochemicals isolated from plants used in traditional medicine are considered to be good alternatives to synthetic chemicals. The botanicals in the Ayurvedic material medica have been proven to be safe and effective, through several hundred to several thousand years of use. The exploration of botanicals used in traditional medicine may lead to the development of novel preventive or therapeutic strategies for oral health. The present scientific evidence based review is focused on the possible role of Ayurveda in the management of various orofacial disorders.

  13. Role of Ayurveda in management of oral health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilesh Arjun Torwane

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral diseases continue to be a major health problem world-wide. Oral health is integral to general well-being and relates to the quality-of-life that extends beyond the functions of the craniofacial complex. The standard Western medicine has had only limited success in the prevention of periodontal disease and in the treatment of a variety of oral diseases. Hence, the search for alternative products continues and natural phytochemicals isolated from plants used in traditional medicine are considered to be good alternatives to synthetic chemicals. The botanicals in the Ayurvedic material medica have been proven to be safe and effective, through several hundred to several thousand years of use. The exploration of botanicals used in traditional medicine may lead to the development of novel preventive or therapeutic strategies for oral health. The present scientific evidence based review is focused on the possible role of Ayurveda in the management of various orofacial disorders.

  14. Integrating Structural Health Management with Contingency Control for Wind Turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Goebel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Maximizing turbine up-time and reducing maintenance costs are key technology drivers for wind turbine operators. Components within wind turbines are subject to considerable stresses due to unpredictable environmental conditions resulting from rapidly changing local dynamics. In that context, systems health management has the aim to assess the state-of-health of components within a wind turbine, to estimate remaining life, and to aid in autonomous decision-making to minimize damage to the turbine. Advanced contingency control is one way to enable autonomous decision-making by providing the mechanism to enable safe and efficient turbine operation. The work reported herein explores the integration of condition monitoring of wind turbine blades with contingency control to balance the trade-offs between maintaining system health and energy capture. Results are demonstrated using a high fidelity simulator of a utility-scale wind turbine.

  15. Logbook: experience of teaching-learning management and management in nursing and health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luís Guedes dos Santos

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The article aimed at reporting an experience of a group of post-graduate students in teaching on the stage of implementation active teaching-learning methodologies in the discipline of Management in Nursing and Health. The experience happened in three different admission units of a federal hospital in the southern region of the country, in the second semester of 2010. We used a logbook for students to register the journey to deepen the reflections on the experiences of the actions of management. At the end of the internship, the students were asked the logbook so that experiences, feelings, anxieties generated in the course of the journey to knowledge could be identified. The students report that the curricular internship of Management in Nursing and Health is a process of construction that gradually allows to have a sense of what awaits them when they are professionals, thus contributing to a critical and reflective formation.

  16. Health information management using optical storage technology: case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, D

    1992-05-01

    All the health care facilities examined in the case studies addressed several important organizational issues before and during the installation of their systems. All the facilities examined employee commitment. The prudent managers considered how easily their employees adapt to changes in their jobs and work environment. They considered how enthusiastic cooperation can be fostered in the creation of a liberated and reengineered office. This was determined not only by each individual's reaction to change, but also by the health care facility's track record with other system installations. For example, document image, diagnostic image, and coded data processing systems allow the integration of divergent health care information systems within complex institutions. Unfortunately, many institutions are currently struggling with how to create an information management architecture that will integrate their mature systems, such as their patient care and financial systems. Information managers must realize that if optical storage technology-based systems are used in a strategic and planned fashion, these systems can act as focal points for systems integration, not as promises to further confuse the issue. Another issue that needed attention in all the examples was the work environment. The managers considered how the work environment was going to affect the ability to integrate optical image and data systems into the institution. For example, many of these medical centers have created alliances with clinics, HMOs, and large corporate users of medical services. This created a demand for all or part of the health information outside the confines of the original institution. Since the work environment is composed of a handful of factors such as merged medical services, as many work environment factors as possible were addressed before application of the optical storage technology solution in the institutions. And finally, the third critical issue was the organization of work

  17. Exploring Healthcare Consumer Acceptance of Personal Health Information Management Technology through Personal Health Record Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huijuan

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare technologies are evolving from a practitioner-centric model to a patient-centric model due to the increasing need for technology that directly serves healthcare consumers, including healthy people and patients. Personal health information management (PHIM) technology is one of the technologies designed to enhance an individual's ability…

  18. Exploring Healthcare Consumer Acceptance of Personal Health Information Management Technology through Personal Health Record Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huijuan

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare technologies are evolving from a practitioner-centric model to a patient-centric model due to the increasing need for technology that directly serves healthcare consumers, including healthy people and patients. Personal health information management (PHIM) technology is one of the technologies designed to enhance an individual's ability…

  19. Using Smartphones and Health Apps to Change and Manage Health Behaviors: A Population-Based Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernsting, Clemens; Dombrowski, Stephan U; Oedekoven, Monika; O Sullivan, Julie L; Kanzler, Melanie; Kuhlmey, Adelheid; Gellert, Paul

    2017-04-05

    Chronic conditions are an increasing challenge for individuals and the health care system. Smartphones and health apps are potentially promising tools to change health-related behaviors and manage chronic conditions. The aim of this study was to explore (1) the extent of smartphone and health app use, (2) sociodemographic, medical, and behavioral correlates of smartphone and health app use, and (3) associations of the use of apps and app characteristics with actual health behaviors. A population-based survey (N=4144) among Germans, aged 35 years and older, was conducted. Sociodemographics, presence of chronic conditions, health behaviors, quality of life, and health literacy, as well as the use of the Internet, smartphone, and health apps were assessed by questionnaire at home visit. Binary logistic regression models were applied. It was found that 61.25% (2538/4144) of participants used a smartphone. Compared with nonusers, smartphone users were younger, did more research on the Internet, were more likely to work full-time and more likely to have a university degree, engaged more in physical activity, and less in low fat diet, and had a higher health-related quality of life and health literacy. Among smartphone users, 20.53% (521/2538) used health apps. App users were younger, less likely to be native German speakers, did more research on the Internet, were more likely to report chronic conditions, engaged more in physical activity, and low fat diet, and were more health literate compared with nonusers who had a smartphone. Health apps focused on smoking cessation (232/521, 44.5%), healthy diet (201/521, 38.6%), and weight loss (121/521, 23.2%). The most common app characteristics were planning (264/521, 50.7%), reminding (188/521, 36.1%), prompting motivation (179/521 34.4%), and the provision of information (175/521, 33.6%). Significant associations were found between planning and the health behavior physical activity, between feedback or monitoring and physical

  20. Using Smartphones and Health Apps to Change and Manage Health Behaviors: A Population-Based Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombrowski, Stephan U; Oedekoven, Monika; O´Sullivan, Julie L; Kanzler, Melanie; Kuhlmey, Adelheid; Gellert, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Background Chronic conditions are an increasing challenge for individuals and the health care system. Smartphones and health apps are potentially promising tools to change health-related behaviors and manage chronic conditions. Objective The aim of this study was to explore (1) the extent of smartphone and health app use, (2) sociodemographic, medical, and behavioral correlates of smartphone and health app use, and (3) associations of the use of apps and app characteristics with actual health behaviors. Methods A population-based survey (N=4144) among Germans, aged 35 years and older, was conducted. Sociodemographics, presence of chronic conditions, health behaviors, quality of life, and health literacy, as well as the use of the Internet, smartphone, and health apps were assessed by questionnaire at home visit. Binary logistic regression models were applied. Results It was found that 61.25% (2538/4144) of participants used a smartphone. Compared with nonusers, smartphone users were younger, did more research on the Internet, were more likely to work full-time and more likely to have a university degree, engaged more in physical activity, and less in low fat diet, and had a higher health-related quality of life and health literacy. Among smartphone users, 20.53% (521/2538) used health apps. App users were younger, less likely to be native German speakers, did more research on the Internet, were more likely to report chronic conditions, engaged more in physical activity, and low fat diet, and were more health literate compared with nonusers who had a smartphone. Health apps focused on smoking cessation (232/521, 44.5%), healthy diet (201/521, 38.6%), and weight loss (121/521, 23.2%). The most common app characteristics were planning (264/521, 50.7%), reminding (188/521, 36.1%), prompting motivation (179/521 34.4%), and the provision of information (175/521, 33.6%). Significant associations were found between planning and the health behavior physical activity

  1. Issues in Business and Medical Education: Brief Literature Review on Strategic Management of Health Care Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alan D.

    The literature on the use of strategic management principles by health care organizations is reviewed. After considering basic concepts of strategic management and managerial problems in nonprofit organizations, strategic planning and management of health care organizations are covered. Attention is directed to the health care environment,…

  2. Local communities and health disaster management in the mining sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freek Cronjé

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mining activities throughout the Southern African Development Community (SADC have impacted on the health and safety of mining communities for many decades. Despite the economic contribution of mining to surrounding communities, a huge amount of social and environmental harm is associated with the industry. In this regard, mining companies have, on the one hand, contributed toward improved social development by providing jobs, paying taxes and earning foreign exchange. On the other hand, they have been linked publicly to poor labour conditions, corruption, pollution incidents, health and safety failings, as well as disrespect of human rights. The objectives of this study are to give an overview of social and natural factors relating to health disasters in selected communities in the mining environment. Regarding the findings, this paper focuses on the social and natural factors involved in the creation of health disasters. The social factors include poverty, unemployment, poor housing and infrastructure, prostitution and a high influx of unaccompanied migrant labour. Major health issues in this regard, which will be highlighted, are the extraordinary high incidence rate of HIV and STIs (sexually transmitted infections, addiction and mental illness. The environmental (natural threats to health that will be discussed in the study are harmful particles in the air and water, excessive noise and overcrowded and unhygienic living conditions. In conclusion, the paper also finds that communities need to be ‘fenced in’ in terms of health disaster management instead of being excluded. Specific recommendations to mining companies to reduce health and safety disasters will be made to conclude the paper.

  3. Clinical-outcome-based demand management in health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogan, C; Lawrence, D; Mayhew, L

    2008-01-01

    THE PROBLEM OF MANAGING DEMAND: Most healthcare systems have 'third-party payers' who face the problem of keeping within budgets despite pressures to increase resources due to the ageing population, new technologies and patient demands to lower thresholds for care. This paper uses the UK National Health Service as a case study to suggest techniques for system-based demand management, which aims to control demand and costs whilst maintaining the cost-effectiveness of the system. The technique for managing demand in primary, elective and urgent care consists of managing treatment thresholds for appropriate care, using a whole-systems approach and costing the care elements in the system. It is important to analyse activity in relation to capacity and demand. Examples of using these techniques in practice are given. The practical effects of using such techniques need evaluation. If these techniques are not used, managing demand and limiting healthcare expenditure will be at the expense of clinical outcomes and unmet need, which will perpetuate financial crises.

  4. Agricultural Pesticide Management in Thailand: Situation and Population Health Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panuwet, Parinya; Siriwong, Wattasit; Prapamontol, Tippawan; Ryan, P Barry; Fiedler, Nancy; Robson, Mark G; Barr, Dana Boyd

    2012-03-01

    As an agricultural country and one of the world's major food exporters, Thailand relies heavily on the use of pesticides to protect crops and increase yields. During the past decade, the Kingdom of Thailand has experienced an approximate four-fold increase in pesticide use. This increase presents a challenge for the Royal Thai Government in effectively managing and controlling pesticide use based upon the current policies and legal infrastructure. We have reviewed several key components for managing agricultural pesticides in Thailand. One of the main obstacles to effective pesticide regulation in Thailand is the lack of a consolidated, uniform system designed specifically for pesticide management. This deficit has weakened the enforcement of existing regulations, resulting in misuse/overuse of pesticides, and consequently, increased environmental contamination and human exposure. This article provides a systematic review of how agricultural pesticides are regulated in Thailand. In addition, we provide our perspectives on the current state of pesticide management, the potential health effects of widespread, largely uncontrolled use of pesticides on the Thai people and ways to improve pesticide management in Thailand.

  5. An Assessment of Integrated Health Management (IHM) Frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N. Lybeck; M. Tawfik; L. Bond; J. Coble

    2012-05-01

    In order to meet the ever increasing demand for energy, the United States nuclear industry is turning to life extension of existing nuclear power plants (NPPs). Economically ensuring the safe, secure, and reliable operation of aging nuclear power plants presents many challenges. The 2009 Light Water Reactor Sustainability Workshop identified online monitoring of active and structural components as essential to the better understanding and management of the challenges posed by aging nuclear power plants. Additionally, there is increasing adoption of condition-based maintenance (CBM) for active components in NPPs. These techniques provide a foundation upon which a variety of advanced online surveillance, diagnostic, and prognostic techniques can be deployed to continuously monitor and assess the health of NPP systems and components. The next step in the development of advanced online monitoring is to move beyond CBM to estimating the remaining useful life of active components using prognostic tools. Deployment of prognostic health management (PHM) on the scale of a NPP requires the use of an integrated health management (IHM) framework - a software product (or suite of products) used to manage the necessary elements needed for a complete implementation of online monitoring and prognostics. This paper provides a thoughtful look at the desirable functions and features of IHM architectures. A full PHM system involves several modules, including data acquisition, system modeling, fault detection, fault diagnostics, system prognostics, and advisory generation (operations and maintenance planning). The standards applicable to PHM applications are indentified and summarized. A list of evaluation criteria for PHM software products, developed to ensure scalability of the toolset to an environment with the complexity of a NPP, is presented. Fourteen commercially available PHM software products are identified and classified into four groups: research tools, PHM system

  6. Evaluation in health: participatory methodology and involvement of municipal managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Cristiane Andrea Locatelli; Tanaka, Oswaldo Yoshimi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To analyze scopes and limits of the use of participatory methodology of evaluation with municipal health managers and administrators. METHODS Qualitative research with health policymakers and managers of the Comissão Intergestores Regional (CIR – Regional Interagency Commission) of a health region of the state of Sao Paulo in Brazil. Representatives from seven member cities participated in seven workshops facilitated by the researchers, with the aim of assessing a specific problem of the care line, which would be used as a tracer of the system integrality. The analysis of the collected empirical material was based on the hermeneutic-dialectic methodology and aimed at the evaluation of the applied participatory methodology, according to its capacity of promoting a process of assessment capable to be used as a support for municipal management. RESULTS With the participatory approach of evaluation, we were able to promote in-depth discussions with the group, especially related to the construction of integral care and to the inclusion of the user’s perspective in decision-making, linked to the search for solution to concrete problems of managers. By joint exploration, the possibility of using data from electronic information systems was opened, as well as information coming directly from the users of the services, to enhance discussions and negotiations between partners. The participants were disbelievers of the replication potential of this type of evaluation without the direct monitoring of the academy, given the difficulty of organizing the process in everyday life, already taken by emergency and political issues. CONCLUSIONS Evaluations of programs and services carried out within the Regional Interagency Commission, starting from the local interest and facilitating the involvement of its members by the use of participatory methodologies, can contribute to the construction of integral care. To the extent that the act of evaluating stay

  7. MANAGEMENT OF INNOVATION IN HEALTH CARE AT THE REGIONAL LEVEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. G. Totskaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews topical issues of organization and management of innovative activity in the regional health care system.Objective. Development and scientific substantiation of a conceptual model of managing innovation in the regional health care system, introduction of institutional mechanisms for its implementation, and evaluation of their efficacy in using diagnosis and treatment technologies. Objectives of the study included reviewing the organization status and problems hampering the development, identification of prospects, and justification for appropriate changes in innovation in healthcare system and medical science at the regional level.Material and methods. To conduct a comprehensive assessment of the status and meet challenges of innovation promotion, a methodology for social-hygienic research was worked out including bibliographic and analytical methods, situational analysis, sociological and economic methods, expert assessment, methods for quality management system audit in accordance with ISO 19011:2002, IDEFO function modeling (RD IDEF0-2000, and organizational modeling. The study was based on the analysis of foreign and domestic literature, statistics, methods for managerial modeling, as well as management experience (including innovative methodological approaches gained by Novosibirsk Research Institute of Traumatology and Orthopedics named after Ya.L. Tsivyan which meets the requirements for a platform for research and innovative product reproduction, including research, clinical, organizational, and managerial aspects. Other facilities were considered in conjunction with the leading innovative platform.Results. The paper presents a scientifically based model of innovative medical environment with its elements as subjects, each with a set of functions. Conceptual model for management includes structuring (resource, processes, and quality management; application of international standards and strategic management mechanisms

  8. Managing costs, managing benefits: employer decisions in local health care markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christianson, Jon B; Trude, Sally

    2003-02-01

    To better understand employer health benefit decision making, how employer health benefits strategies evolve over time, and the impact of employer decisions on local health care systems. Data were collected as part of the Community Tracking Study (CTS), a longitudinal analysis of health system change in 12 randomly selected communities. This is an observational study with data collection over a six-year period. The study used semistructured interviews with local respondents, combined with monitoring of local media, to track changes in health care systems over time and their impact on community residents. Interviewing began in 1996 and was carried out at two-year intervals, with a total of approximately 2,200 interviews. The interviews provided a variety of perspectives on employer decision making concerning health benefits; these perspectives were triangulated to reach conclusions. The tight labor market during the study period was the dominant consideration in employer decision making regarding health benefits. Employers, in managing employee compensation, made independent decisions in pursuit of individual goals, but these decisions were shaped by similar labor market conditions. As a result, within and across our study sites, employer decisions in aggregate had an important impact on local health care systems, although employers' more highly visible public efforts to bring about health system change often met with disappointing results. General economic conditions in the 1990s had an important impact on the configuration of local health systems through their effect on employer decision making regarding health benefits offered to employees, and the responses of health plans and providers to those decisions.

  9. Health economics of weight management: evidence and cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouris-Blazos, Antigone; Wahlqvist, Mark L

    2007-01-01

    is too much reliance on health workers to treat the problem, especially doctors, who have not been given additional resources to manage obesity outside a typical doctor's consultation. Gross has recommended that further changes should be made to Medicare, private health insurance, and workplace and tax legislation to give people financial incentives to change their behaviour because obesity should not just be treated by governments as a public health problem but also as a barrier to productivity and a drain on resources. A Special Report of the WMCACA (Weight Management Code Administration Council of Australia) (www.weightcouncil.org) on the "Health Economics of Weight Management" has been published in the Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition in September 2006. This report explores the cost benefit analysis of weight management in greater detail.

  10. Implications of Big Data Analytics on Population Health Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Paul S

    2013-09-01

    As healthcare providers transition to outcome-based reimbursements, it is imperative that they make the transition to population health management to stay viable. Providers already have big data assets in the form of electronic health records and financial billing system. Integrating these disparate sources together in patient-centered datasets provides the foundation for probabilistic modeling of their patient populations. These models are the core technology to compute and track the health and financial risk status of the patient population being served. We show how the probabilistic formulation allows for straightforward, early identification of a change in health and risk status. Knowing when a patient is likely to shift to a less healthy, higher risk category allows the provider to intervene to avert or delay the shift. These automated, proactive alerts are critical in maintaining and improving the health of a population of patients. We discuss results of leveraging these models with an urban healthcare provider to track and monitor type 2 diabetes patients. When intervention outcome data are available, data mining and predictive modeling technology are primed to recommend the best type of intervention (prescriptions, physical therapy, discharge protocols, etc.) with the best likely outcome.

  11. Digital health system for personalised COPD long-term management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velardo, Carmelo; Shah, Syed Ahmar; Gibson, Oliver; Clifford, Gari; Heneghan, Carl; Rutter, Heather; Farmer, Andrew; Tarassenko, Lionel

    2017-02-20

    Recent telehealth studies have demonstrated minor impact on patients affected by long-term conditions. The use of technology does not guarantee the compliance required for sustained collection of high-quality symptom and physiological data. Remote monitoring alone is not sufficient for successful disease management. A patient-centred design approach is needed in order to allow the personalisation of interventions and encourage the completion of daily self-management tasks. A digital health system was designed to support patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in self-managing their condition. The system includes a mobile application running on a consumer tablet personal computer and a secure backend server accessible to the health professionals in charge of patient management. The patient daily routine included the completion of an adaptive, electronic symptom diary on the tablet, and the measurement of oxygen saturation via a wireless pulse oximeter. The design of the system was based on a patient-centred design approach, informed by patient workshops. One hundred and ten patients in the intervention arm of a randomised controlled trial were subsequently given the tablet computer and pulse oximeter for a 12-month period. Patients were encouraged, but not mandated, to use the digital health system daily. The average used was 6.0 times a week by all those who participated in the full trial. Three months after enrolment, patients were able to complete their symptom diary and oxygen saturation measurement in less than 1 m 40s (96% of symptom diaries). Custom algorithms, based on the self-monitoring data collected during the first 50 days of use, were developed to personalise alert thresholds. Strategies and tools aimed at refining a digital health intervention require iterative use to enable convergence on an optimal, usable design. 'Continuous improvement' allowed feedback from users to have an immediate impact on the design of the system (e

  12. Exploring the Model Design Space for Battery Health Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Bhaskar; Quach, Cuong Chi; Goebel, Kai Frank

    2011-01-01

    Battery Health Management (BHM) is a core enabling technology for the success and widespread adoption of the emerging electric vehicles of today. Although battery chemistries have been studied in detail in literature, an accurate run-time battery life prediction algorithm has eluded us. Current reliability-based techniques are insufficient to manage the use of such batteries when they are an active power source with frequently varying loads in uncertain environments. The amount of usable charge of a battery for a given discharge profile is not only dependent on the starting state-of-charge (SOC), but also other factors like battery health and the discharge or load profile imposed. This paper presents a Particle Filter (PF) based BHM framework with plug-and-play modules for battery models and uncertainty management. The batteries are modeled at three different levels of granularity with associated uncertainty distributions, encoding the basic electrochemical processes of a Lithium-polymer battery. The effects of different choices in the model design space are explored in the context of prediction performance in an electric unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) application with emulated flight profiles.

  13. [Occupational health service management--the concept and application of lean management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobczak, Alicja; Rydlewska-Liszkowska, Izabela

    2012-01-01

    One of the most effective management systems is the so-called lean management (LM) aimed at loss minimization of institutions' activities while maximizing value and satisfaction to the clients. The system implementation comprises not only typical business areas but also health care sectors. The aim of the article is to present the concept and opportunity of improving the management of occupational health units. Due to its multi-profile nature of tasks and diverse relations with the environment occupational health could be a good institutional example of LM implementation. Operational perspective consists of five guidelines: describing values expected by final clients, setting value flow eliminating needless elements, creating the integrated, coherent and smooth sequence of valuable activities, offering the values to clients, and aiming at continuing improvement. LM could be implemented in occupational health units in the following areas: timing and tasks coordination, leaning some tasks and expanding others in order to maximize clients' value, cost rationalizing, improving the quality of services by eliminating mistakes, avoiding repetition of activities.

  14. Stress management standards: a warning indicator for employee health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazi, A; Haslam, C O

    2013-07-01

    Psychological stress is a major cause of lost working days in the UK. The Health & Safety Executive (HSE) has developed management standards (MS) to help organizations to assess work-related stress. To investigate the relationships between the MS indicator tool and employee health, job attitudes, work performance and environmental outcomes. The first phase involved a survey employing the MS indicator tool, General Health Questionnaire-12 (GHQ-12), job attitudes, work performance and environmental measures in a call centre from a large utility company. The second phase comprised six focus groups to investigate what employees believed contributed to their perceived stress. Three hundred and four call centre employees responded with a response rate of 85%. Significant negative correlations were found between GHQ-12 and two MS dimensions; demands (Rho = -0.211, P stress were associated with reduced job performance, job motivation and increased intention to quit but low stress levels were associated with reduced job satisfaction. Lack of management support, recognition and development opportunities were identified as sources of stress. The findings support the utility of the MS as a measure of employee attitudes and performance.

  15. Management of health in the construction and assembly of land pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richa, Newton M.M.; Ruella, Nildemar C. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The objectives of this study are: describe the main aspects of a health management experience in a work of construction and assembly of land pipeline, highlighting the positive impacts on safety and productivity; demonstrate that the general objective of the health function is to provide technical support to companies, information and services for leaders, managers, supervisors, workers and families in the management of multiple interfaces of health, especially the health-work interface; and demonstrate that the appropriate management of health may contribute significantly to the overall management of undertakings. (author)

  16. Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) Site-Specific Health and Safety Plan, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flynn, N.C. Bechtel Jacobs

    2008-04-21

    The Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) policy is to provide a safe and healthy workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The implementation of this policy requires that operations of the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF), located one-half mile west of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex, be guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to environment, safety and health (ES&H) issues. The BJC governing document for worker safety and health, BJC/OR-1745, 'Worker Safety and Health Program', describes the key elements of the BJC Safety and Industrial Hygiene (IH) programs, which includes the requirement for development and implementation of a site-specific Health and Safety Plan (HASP) where required by regulation (refer also to BJC-EH-1012, 'Development and Approval of Safety and Health Plans'). BJC/OR-1745, 'Worker Safety and Health Program', implements the requirements for worker protection contained in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 851. The EMWMF site-specific HASP requirements identifies safe operating procedures, work controls, personal protective equipment, roles and responsibilities, potential site hazards and control measures, site access requirements, frequency and types of monitoring, site work areas, decontamination procedures, and outlines emergency response actions. This HASP will be available on site for use by all workers, management and supervisors, oversight personnel and visitors. All EMWMF assigned personnel will be briefed on the contents of this HASP and will be required to follow the procedures and protocols as specified. The policies and procedures referenced in this HASP apply to all EMWMF operations activities. In addition the HASP establishes ES&H criteria for the day-to-day activities to prevent or minimize any adverse effect on the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable

  17. Managing health and welfare plans instead of letting them manage you.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havlin, L; Laspisa, E K

    1997-01-01

    The explosive growth and change in the health care provider industry is presenting a considerable challenge to employers that manage these benefits for their employees. Corporate mergers, supportive federal and state legislation expanding benefit availability and access to new consumer markets are a few of the forces changing the shape of the industry. Furthermore, participants are more knowledgeable about their benefit plans and are more vocal about their needs. The authors discuss these challenges and possible solutions for the employer that is attempting to determine how plan delivery and management needs can be served in a way that supports business environment and strategy.

  18. School Health Connection Goes Electronic: Developing a Health Information Management System for New Orleans' School-Based Health Centers. Program Results Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastorfer, Darl

    2011-01-01

    From February 2008 through April 2011, School Health Connection, a program of the Louisiana Public Health Institute, developed an electronic health information management system for newly established school-based health centers in Greater New Orleans. School Health Connection was established as part of a broader effort to restore community health…

  19. Dental health and management for children with congenital heart disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    FitzGerald, Kirsten

    2012-02-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is one of the most common developmental anomalies. Children with CHD are at increased risk of developing oral disease, and are at increased risk from the systemic effects of oral disease. Recent changes in guidelines related to prophylaxis against infective endocarditis have highlighted the importance of establishing and maintaining oral health for this group of patients. The management of children with CHD can be complex and, unfortunately, many of these children do not receive the care they require. The challenges that these children pose are discussed, and suggestions are made for the appropriate management of these patients and the key role that all those working in primary dental care have to play.

  20. Statistical tools for prognostics and health management of complex systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, David H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Huzurbazar, Aparna V [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Anderson - Cook, Christine M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Prognostics and Health Management (PHM) is increasingly important for understanding and managing today's complex systems. These systems are typically mission- or safety-critical, expensive to replace, and operate in environments where reliability and cost-effectiveness are a priority. We present background on PHM and a suite of applicable statistical tools and methods. Our primary focus is on predicting future states of the system (e.g., the probability of being operational at a future time, or the expected remaining system life) using heterogeneous data from a variety of sources. We discuss component reliability models incorporating physical understanding, condition measurements from sensors, and environmental covariates; system reliability models that allow prediction of system failure time distributions from component failure models; and the use of Bayesian techniques to incorporate expert judgments into component and system models.

  1. Small grant management in health and behavioral sciences: Lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakraida, Teresa J; D'Amico, Jessica; Thibault, Erica

    2010-08-01

    This article describes considerations in health and behavioral sciences small grant management and describes lessons learned during post-award implementation. Using the components by W. Sahlman [Sahlman, W. (1997). How to write a great business plan. Harvard Business Review, 75(4), 98-108] as a business framework, a plan was developed that included (a) building relationships with people in the research program and with external parties providing key resources, (b) establishing a perspective of opportunity for research advancement, (c) identifying the larger context of scientific culture and regulatory environment, and (d) anticipating problems with a flexible response and rewarding teamwork. Small grant management included developing a day-to-day system, building a grant/study program development plan, and initiating a marketing plan.

  2. Dental health and management for children with congenital heart disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    FitzGerald, Kirsten

    2010-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is one of the most common developmental anomalies. Children with CHD are at increased risk of developing oral disease, and are at increased risk from the systemic effects of oral disease. Recent changes in guidelines related to prophylaxis against infective endocarditis have highlighted the importance of establishing and maintaining oral health for this group of patients. The management of children with CHD can be complex and, unfortunately, many of these children do not receive the care they require. The challenges that these children pose are discussed, and suggestions are made for the appropriate management of these patients and the key role that all those working in primary dental care have to play.

  3. Future prospects of health management systems using cellular phones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hun-Sung; Hwang, Yunji; Lee, Jae-Ho; Oh, Hye Young; Kim, Yi-Jun; Kwon, Hyeon Yoon; Kang, Hyoseung; Kim, Hyunah; Park, Rae Woong; Kim, Ju Han

    2014-06-01

    Cellular phones enable communication between healthcare providers and patients for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases. However, few studies have examined the user-friendliness or effectiveness of cellular phone-based medical informatics (CPBMI) for healthcare. This study investigated the use of CPBMI to identify its current status within the medical field, advantages and disadvantages, practicability, clinical effectiveness, costs, and cost-saving potential. CPBMI was validated in terms of practicality and provision of medical benefits. It is critical to use CPBMI in accordance with the different features of each disease and condition. Use of CPBMI is expected to be especially useful for patients with chronic disease. We discussed the current status of the clinical use, benefits, and risks of CPBMI. CPBMI and information technology-based health management tools are anticipated to become useful and effective components of healthcare management in the future.

  4. RECALMIN: The association between management of Spanish National Health Service Internal Medical Units and health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapatero-Gaviria, Antonio; Javier Elola-Somoza, Francisco; Casariego-Vales, Emilio; Fernandez-Perez, Cristina; Gomez-Huelgas, Ricardo; Bernal, José Luis; Barba-Martín, Raquel

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the association between management of Internal Medical Units (IMUs) with outcomes (mortality and length of stay) within the Spanish National Health Service. Data on management were obtained from a descriptive transversal study performed among IMUs of the acute hospitals. Outcome indicators were taken from an administrative database of all hospital discharges from the IMUs. Spanish National Health Service. One hundred and twenty-four acute general hospitals with available data of management and outcomes (401 424 discharges). IMU risk standardized mortality rates were calculated using a multilevel model adjusted by Charlson Index. Risk standardized myocardial infarction and heart failure mortality rates were calculated using specific multilevel models. Length of stay was adjusted by complexity. Greater hospital complexity was associated with longer average length of stays (r: 0.42; P hospital mortality rates were higher at larger hospitals, but no significant differences were found when mortality was risk adjusted. There was an association between nurse workload with mortality rate for selected conditions (r: 0.25; P = 0.009). Safety committee and multidisciplinary ward rounds were also associated with outcomes. We have not found any association between complexity and intra-hospital mortality. There is an association between some management indicators with intra-hospital mortality and the length of stay. Better disease-specific outcomes adjustments and a larger number of IMUs in the sample may provide more insights about the association between management of IMUs with healthcare outcomes.

  5. A health management system for marine cell group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Qingfu; Ruan, Mingzhi; Zi, Yiluo

    2017-06-01

    Storage battery plays an important role in the submarine. However, mechanism of its performance deterioration is so complex for the crew to master. A health management system for marine storage batteries is presented in the paper, so that scientific maintenance can be adopted to assure the working reliability of the battery. The system consists of an on-line monitoring subsystem and a performance prediction subsystem. In order to complete the key task of performance prediction, an intelligent forecasting model based on support vector machine is built, which can automatically find out the rule of performance deterioration from historical monitoring data. Validity of the performance prediction has been proved by testing results.

  6. Improving chronic disease management with mobile health platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Do-Youn; Bae, Sungchul; Song, Joon Hyun; Yi, Byoung-Kee; Kim, Il Kon

    2013-01-01

    In modern society, aging and chronic disease is becoming common phenomenon due to the increasing numbers of elderly patients. To best treat this growing segment of the population, medical care should be based on constant vital sign monitoring. In this study, we propose a mobile vital sign measurement and data collection system for chronic disease management.. And we implemented a middle ware using Multi-Agent platform in SOS (Self-Organizing System) platform that transmits patient clinical data for services. We also implemented a HL7 messaging interface for interoperability of clinical data exchange. We propose health services on a self-organized software platform.

  7. Vehicle health management for guidance, navigation and control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radke, Kathleen; Frazzini, Ron; Bursch, Paul; Wald, Jerry; Brown, Don

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the program was to architect a vehicle health management (VHM) system for space systems avionics that assures system readiness for launch vehicles and for space-based dormant vehicles. The platforms which were studied and considered for application of VHM for guidance, navigation and control (GN&C) included the Advanced Manned Launch System (AMLS), the Horizontal Landing-20/Personnel Launch System (HL-20/PLS), the Assured Crew Return Vehicle (ACRV) and the Extended Duration Orbiter (EDO). This set was selected because dormancy and/or availability requirements are driving the designs of these future systems.

  8. Integrated System Health Management: Foundational Concepts, Approach, and Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Fernando; Schmalzel, John; Walker, Mark; Venkatesh, Meera; Kapadia, Ravi; Morris, Jon; Turowski, Mark; Smith, Harvey

    2009-01-01

    Implementation of integrated system health management (ISHM) capability is fundamentally linked to the management of data, information, and knowledge (DIaK) with the purposeful objective of determining the health of a system. It is akin to having a team of experts who are all individually and collectively observing and analyzing a complex system, and communicating effectively with each other in order to arrive to an accurate and reliable assessment of its health. We present concepts, procedures, and a specific approach as a foundation for implementing a credible ISHM capability. The capability stresses integration of DIaK from all elements of a system. The intent is also to make possible implementation of on-board ISHM capability, in contrast to a remote capability. The information presented is the result of many years of research, development, and maturation of technologies, and of prototype implementations in operational systems (rocket engine test facilities). The paper will address the following topics: 1. ISHM Model of a system 2. Detection of anomaly indicators. 3. Determination and confirmation of anomalies. 4. Diagnostic of causes and determination of effects. 5. Consistency checking cycle. 6. Management of health information 7. User Interfaces 8. Example implementation ISHM has been defined from many perspectives. We define it as a capability that might be achieved by various approaches. We describe a specific approach that has been matured throughout many years of development, and pilot implementations. ISHM is a capability that is achieved by integrating data, information, and knowledge (DIaK) that might be distributed throughout the system elements (which inherently implies capability to manage DIaK associated with distributed sub-systems). DIaK must be available to any element of a system at the right time and in accordance with a meaningful context. ISHM Functional Capability Level (FCL) is measured by how well a system performs the following

  9. A computer science approach to managing security in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asirelli, P; Braccini, G; Caramella, D; Coco, A; Fabbrini, F

    2002-09-01

    The security of electronic medical information is very important for health care organisations, which have to ensure confidentiality, integrity and availability of the information provided. This paper will briefly outline the legal measures adopted by the European Community, Italy and the United States to regulate the use and disclosure of medical records. It will then go on to highlight how information technology can help to address these issues with special reference to the management of organisation policies. To this end, we will present a modelling example for the security policy of a radiological department.

  10. Total quality management and the Army health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffer, E K

    1991-10-01

    Total quality management (TQM) is the newest in a long line of magic formulas which have been touted as saviors for American industry and medicine. The author discusses the basic concepts of TQM and notes that much of it resembles philosophical beliefs long held by the medical community. TQM does offer many opportunities to refine old concepts and further those goals of quality care to which health care providers have always aspired. If, however, it becomes simply another codified bureaucracy, then a great deal of time and money will be invested for very little gain.

  11. Managing smarter: a decision support system for mental health providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, L; Muse, L; McInerney, C

    1998-11-01

    Financing of mental health care has changed radically, especially with managed care. Shrinking revenues have forced providers to look for creative ways in which to provide quality services at less expense. Delivery of quality services depends largely on the productive use of the provider's prime resource--the clinicians. Productivity was the focus of the PC-based decision support system developed for mental health providers in New York State. It enables administrators to track key indicators of productivity such as face-to-face time and non-face-to-face time against goals. Unmet goals can be pinpointed quickly, and clinicians' caseloads can be reviewed to determine the underlying causes. A key feature of the system is the conversion of raw data into actionable information to help in problem finding and problem solving. The system has been implemented in Ulster County, the pilot site for the project. The software can be customized easily to suit the data of other providers.

  12. Changes in the pharmaceutical industry in Brazil and health management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Pappini Júnior

    2013-09-01

    Transformations in the technological basis of industry and in the production of drugs and vaccines, in the purchase of medications and access to health that started in 2000 are transforming the pharmaceutical business in Brazil. From the relationship between industry and consumers mediated by the doctor (known as B2C, we are faced with the organization of relations between industry and other organizations, mainly public (so-called B2B. Among the consequences of the transformation, there are the redesign of the strategies of pharmaceutical companies, the participation of other professionals (other than physicians in the decision of indication of medicines and the need of specific skills in the area of Pharmacoeconomics and project management for professionals involved with health.

  13. Prognostics and health management of engineering systems an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Nam-Ho; Choi, Joo-Ho

    2017-01-01

    This book introduces the methods for predicting the future behavior of a system’s health and the remaining useful life to determine an appropriate maintenance schedule. The authors introduce the history, industrial applications, algorithms, and benefits and challenges of PHM (Prognostics and Health Management) to help readers understand this highly interdisciplinary engineering approach that incorporates sensing technologies, physics of failure, machine learning, modern statistics, and reliability engineering. It is ideal for beginners because it introduces various prognostics algorithms and explains their attributes, pros and cons in terms of model definition, model parameter estimation, and ability to handle noise and bias in data, allowing readers to select the appropriate methods for their fields of application. Among the many topics discussed in-depth are: • Prognostics tutorials using least-squares • Bayesian inference and parameter estimation • Physics-based prognostics algorithms including non...

  14. Health promotion and partnerships: collaboration of a community health management center, county health bureau, and university nursing program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chih-Ling

    2002-06-01

    Effective partnerships were established between a community health management center, a county health bureau and a university nursing program. A health fair was undertaken to heighten public health awareness through the collaboration of these various agencies. In this research, formative, process, and summative evaluations were conducted to determine the benefits of partnerships. Elements evaluated included the planning process, health fair relevancy, integration of community resources, participants satisfaction and knowledge acquisition, and partnership satisfaction. The samples of this study included (1) 529 adult participants who completed the on-site evaluation questionnaires; (2) 1,090 child participants who returned gift-reward cards; (3) 114 partners who gave written feedback on their satisfaction; and (4) 57 third-year and 16 fourth-year undergraduate nursing student participants. Data was collected from the evidence report of the Department of Health, the project proposal, activity protocols, meeting records, the project final report, students term papers, and questionnaires. The chief administrator of the County Health Bureau was very impressed with the creative exhibits in the fair and, therefore, invited a coalition to continue further workshops. Seventeen educational exhibits, two dance programs and two drama programs related to health issues were demonstrated in the fair. Resources from community organizations were successfully integrated and allocated. Community participants expressed satisfaction with the fair and anticipated similar activities in the future. Participants revealed more than 80% accuracy in health knowledge quizzes. The senior nursing students highlighted their interaction with the community, community health nurses, and health volunteers. Community-based health promotion and nursing education can be successfully connected when various disciplines and sectors form effective partnerships.

  15. Animal health surveillance applications: The interaction of science and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willeberg, Preben

    2012-08-01

    Animal health surveillance is an ever-evolving activity, since health- and risk-related policy and management decisions need to be backed by the best available scientific evidence and methodology. International organizations, trade partners, politicians, media and the public expect fast, understandable, up-to-date presentation and valid interpretation of animal disease data to support and document proper animal health management - in crises as well as in routine control applications. The delivery and application of surveillance information need to be further developed and optimized, and epidemiologists, risk managers, administrators and policy makers need to work together in order to secure progress. Promising new developments in areas such as risk-based surveillance, spatial presentation and analysis, and genomic epidemiology will be mentioned. Limitations and areas in need of further progress will be underlined, such as the general lack of a wide and open exchange of international animal disease surveillance data. During my more than 30 year career as a professor of Veterinary Epidemiology I had the good fortune of working in challenging environments with different eminent colleagues in different countries on a variety of animal health surveillance issues. My career change from professor to Chief Veterinary Officer (CVO) - "from science to application" - was caused by my desire to see for myself if and how well epidemiology would actually work to solve real-life problems as I had been telling my students for years that it would. Fortunately it worked for me! The job of a CVO is not that different from that of a professor of Veterinary Epidemiology; the underlying professional principles are the same. Every day I had to work from science, and base decisions and discussions on documented evidence - although sometimes the evidence was incomplete or data were simply lacking. A basic understanding of surveillance methodology is very useful for a CVO, since it provides

  16. The management of health care service quality. A physician perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobocea, L; Gheorghe, I R; Spiridon, St; Gheorghe, C M; Purcarea, V L

    2016-01-01

    Applying marketing in health care services is presently an essential element for every manager or policy maker. In order to be successful, a health care organization has to identify an accurate measurement scale for defining service quality due to competitive pressure and cost values. The most widely employed scale in the services sector is SERVQUAL scale. In spite of being successfully adopted in fields such as brokerage and banking, experts concluded that the SERVQUAL scale should be modified depending on the specific context. Moreover, the SERVQUAL scale focused on the consumer's perspective regarding service quality. While service quality was measured with the help of SERVQUAL scale, other experts identified a structure-process-outcome design, which, they thought, would be more suitable for health care services. This approach highlights a different perspective on investigating the service quality, namely, the physician's perspective. Further, we believe that the Seven Prong Model for Improving Service Quality has been adopted in order to effectively measure the health care service in a Romanian context from a physician's perspective.

  17. Examining the Role of Anxiety and Apathy in Health Consumers' Intentions to Use Patient Health Portals for Personal Health Information Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Carlos A.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated college students' attitudes toward and intentions to use personal health portals (PHPs) for managing their personal health information using a survey method. The study also aimed to examine the roles electronic Personal Health Information Management (PHIM) anxiety and apathy play in influencing students' attitudes toward…

  18. Examining the Role of Anxiety and Apathy in Health Consumers' Intentions to Use Patient Health Portals for Personal Health Information Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Carlos A.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated college students' attitudes toward and intentions to use personal health portals (PHPs) for managing their personal health information using a survey method. The study also aimed to examine the roles electronic Personal Health Information Management (PHIM) anxiety and apathy play in influencing students' attitudes toward…

  19. The effect of community-based health management on the health of the elderly: a randomized controlled trial from China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Jianqian

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An aging population poses significant challenges to health care in China. Health management has been implemented to reduce the costs of care, raise health service utilization, increase health knowledge and improve quality of life. Several studies have tried to verify the effectiveness of health management in achieving these goals worldwide. However, there have been insufficient randomized control trials (RCTs to draw reliable conclusions. The few small-scale studies conducted in China include mostly the general population rather than the elderly. Our study is designed to evaluate the impact of community-based health management on the health of the elderly through an RCT in Nanjing, China. Methods Two thousand four hundred participants, aged 60 or older and who gave informed consent, were randomly allocated 1:1 into management and control groups, the randomization schedule was concealed from community health service center staff until allocation. Community-based health management was applied in the former while the latter was only given usual care. After 18 months, three categories of variables (subjective grading health indices, objective health indices and health service utilization were measured based on a questionnaire, clinical monitoring and diagnostic measurements. Differences between the two groups were assessed before and after the intervention and analyzed with t-test, χ2-test, and multiple regression analysis. Results Compared with the control group, the management group demonstrated improvement on the following variables (P Conclusion Community-based health management improved both subjective grading health indices, objective health indices and decreased the number of outpatient clinic visits, demonstrating effectiveness in improving elderly health. Trial registration ChiCTR-OCH-11001716

  20. Developing a Total Quality Management Model for Health Care Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AM Mosadegh Rad

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Total quality management (TQM is a managerial practice to improve the effectiveness, efficiency, flexibility, and competitiveness of a business as a whole. However, in practice, these TQM benefits are not easy to achieve. Despite its theoretical promise and the enthusiastic response to TQM, recent evidence suggests that attempts to implement it are often unsuccessful. Many of these TQM programmes have been cancelled, or are in the process of being cancelled, as a result of the negative impact on profits. Therefore, there is a pressing need for a clinical approach to establishing TQM. Method: The aim of this article is therefore: “To identify the strengths and weakness of TQM, the logical steps towards TQM, and to develop a model so that health care organizations aiming at using TQM to achieve excellence can follow through easily”. Based on the research questions proposed in this study, the research strategies of a literature review, a questionnaire survey, semi-structured interviews, and a participatory action research were adopted in this study. For determining the success and barriers of TQM in health care organizations, a questionnaire survey has done in 90 health acre organizations in Isfahan Province, which implement TQM. The results of this survey were used for introducing a new model of TQM. This model will be developed via a semi-structured interview with at minimum 10 health care and quality managers. Then, through a participatory action research, this model will be implemented in 3 sites. At this time, the questionnaire survey has done and the model is introduced. Therefore, developing the model and its implementation will be done later. Results: In this survey, the mean score of TQM success was 3.48±0.68 (medium from 5 credits. Implementation of TQM was very low, low, medium, high and very high successful respectively in 3.6, 10.9, 21.8, 56.4 and 7.3 percent of health care organizations. TQM had the most effect on

  1. The importance of human resources management in health care: a global context

    OpenAIRE

    Soriano Mark A; Howard John M; Orchard Carole; Kabene Stefane M; Leduc Raymond

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background This paper addresses the health care system from a global perspective and the importance of human resources management (HRM) in improving overall patient health outcomes and delivery of health care services. Methods We explored the published literature and collected data through secondary sources. Results Various key success factors emerge that clearly affect health care practices and human resources management. This paper will reveal how human resources management is esse...

  2. An evaluation of the Well at Dell health management program: health risk change and financial return on investment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musich, Shirley; McCalister, Tre'; Wang, Sara; Hawkins, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of the Well at Dell comprehensive health management program in delivering health care and productivity cost savings relative to program investment (i.e., return on investment). A quasi-experimental design was used to quantify the financial impact of the program and nonexperimental pre-post design to evaluate change in health risks. Ongoing worksite health management program implemented across multiple U.S. locations. Subjects were 24,651 employees with continuous medical enrollment in 2010-2011 who were eligible for 2011 health management programming. Incentive-driven, outcomes-based multicomponent corporate health management program including health risk appraisal (HRA)/wellness, lifestyle management, and disease management coaching programs. Medical, pharmacy, and short-term disability pre/post expenditure trends adjusted for demographics, health status, and baseline costs. Self-reported health risks from repeat HRA completers. Analysis: Propensity score-weighted and multivariate regression-adjusted comparison of baseline to post trends in health care expenditures and productivity costs for program participants and nonparticipants (i.e., difference in difference) relative to programmatic investment. The Well at Dell program achieved an overall return on investment of 2.48 in 2011. Most of the savings were realized from the HRA/wellness component of the program. Cost savings were supported with high participation and significant health risk improvement. An incentive-driven, well-managed comprehensive corporate health management program can continue to achieve significant health improvement while promoting health care and productivity cost savings in an employee population.

  3. Environmental health risk assessment and management for global climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, P.

    2014-12-01

    This environmental health risk assessment and management approach for atmospheric greenhouse gas (GHG) pollution is based almost entirely on IPCC AR5 (2014) content, but the IPCC does not make recommendations. Large climate model uncertainties may be large environmental health risks. In accordance with environmental health risk management, we use the standard (IPCC-endorsed) formula of risk as the product of magnitude times probability, with an extremely high standard of precaution. Atmospheric GHG pollution, causing global warming, climate change and ocean acidification, is increasing as fast as ever. Time is of the essence to inform and make recommendations to governments and the public. While the 2ºC target is the only formally agreed-upon policy limit, for the most vulnerable nations, a 1.5ºC limit is being considered by the UNFCCC Secretariat. The Climate Action Network International (2014), representing civil society, recommends that the 1.5ºC limit be kept open and that emissions decline from 2015. James Hansen et al (2013) have argued that 1ºC is the danger limit. Taking into account committed global warming, its millennial duration, multiple large sources of amplifying climate feedbacks and multiple adverse impacts of global warming and climate change on crops, and population health impacts, all the IPCC AR5 scenarios carry extreme environmental health risks to large human populations and to the future of humanity as a whole. Our risk consideration finds that 2ºC carries high risks of many catastrophic impacts, that 1.5ºC carries high risks of many disastrous impacts, and that 1ºC is the danger limit. IPCC AR4 (2007) showed that emissions must be reversed by 2015 for a 2ºC warming limit. For the IPCC AR5 only the best-case scenario RCP2.6, is projected to stay under 2ºC by 2100 but the upper range is just above 2ºC. It calls for emissions to decline by 2020. We recommend that for catastrophic environmental health risk aversion, emissions decline

  4. Health concerns and management of select veterinary drug residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baynes, Ronald E; Dedonder, Keith; Kissell, Lindsey; Mzyk, Danielle; Marmulak, Tara; Smith, Geof; Tell, Lisa; Gehring, Ronette; Davis, Jennifer; Riviere, Jim E

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this manuscript is to review the potential adverse health effects in humans if exposed to residues of selected veterinary drugs used in food-producing animals. Our other objectives are to briefly inform the reader of why many of these drugs are or were approved for use in livestock production and how drug residues can be mitigated for these drugs. The selected drugs include several antimicrobials, beta agonists, and phenylbutazone. The antimicrobials continue to be of regulatory concern not only because of their acute adverse effects but also because their use as growth promoters have been linked to antimicrobial resistance. Furthermore, nitroimidazoles and arsenicals are no longer approved for use in food animals in most jurisdictions. In recent years, the risk assessment and risk management of beta agonists, have been the focus of national and international agencies and this manuscript attempts to review the pharmacology of these drugs and regulatory challenges. Several of the drugs selected for this review can cause noncancer effects (e.g., penicillins) and others are potential carcinogens (e.g., nitroimidazoles). This review also focuses on how regulatory and independent organizations manage the risk of these veterinary drugs based on data from human health risk assessments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Forest Health Management and Detection of Invasive Forest Insects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaelyn Finley

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this review paper are to provide an overview of issues related to forest health and forest entomology, explain existing methods for forest insect pest detection, and provide background information on a case study of emerald ash borer. Early detection of potentially invasive insect species is a key aspect of preventing these species from causing damage. Invasion management efforts are typically more feasible and efficient if they are applied as early as possible. Two proposed approaches for detection are highlighted and include dendroentomology and near infrared spectroscopy (NIR. Dendroentomology utilizes tree ring principles to identify the years of outbreak and the dynamics of past insect herbivory on trees. NIR has been successfully used for assessing various forest health concerns (primarily hyperspectral imaging and decay in trees. Emerald ash borer (EAB (Agrilus planipennis, is a non-native beetle responsible for widespread mortality of several North American ash species (Fraxinus sp.. Current non-destructive methods for early detection of EAB in specific trees are limited, which restricts the effectiveness of management efforts. Ongoing research efforts are focused on developing methods for early detection of emerald ash borer.

  6. [Hazardous medical waste management as a public health issue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinković, Natalija; Vitale, Ksenija; Afrić, Ivo; Janev Holcer, Natasa

    2005-03-01

    The amount of waste produced is connected with the degree of a country's economic development; more developed countries produce more waste. This paper reviews the quantities, manipulation and treatment methods of medical waste in Croatia, as well as hazardous potentials of medical waste for human health. Medical waste must be collected and sorted in containers suitable for its characteristics, amount, means of transportation and treatment method in order to prevent contact with environment and to protect people who are working with waste. Hazardous medical waste in Croatia is largely produced by hospitals. Even though only one hospital has a licence to incinerate infectious medical waste, many other hospitals incinerate their hazardous waste in inappropriate facilities. Healthcare institutions also store great amounts of old medical waste, mostly pharmaceutical, anti-infectious, and cytostatic drugs and chemical waste. Data on waste treatment effects on human health are scarce, while environmental problems are covered better. Croatian medical waste legislation is not being implemented. It is very important to establish a medical waste management system that would implement the existing legislation in all waste management cycles from waste production to treatment and final disposal.

  7. Managing evidence-based health care: a diagnostic framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, K; Pyne, T; Cowling, A

    1998-01-01

    This paper proposes a diagnostic framework useful to Trust managers who are faced with the task of devising and implementing strategies for improvements in clinical effectiveness, and is based on a recent study incorporating clinicians, managers, and professional staff in four NHS Trusts in the North Thames Region. The gap framework is inspired by the gap model developed by Zeithaml, Parasuraman and Berry from their research into service quality and incorporates Dave Sackett's schema as well as a personal competency profile needed for the practice of evidence based health-care (EBHC). The paper highlights the four organisational and personal failures (gaps) which contribute to the fifth gap, namely the discrepancy between clinically relevant research evidence and its implementation in health care. To close the gaps, Trusts need to set the goal and tackle the cultural, organisational, attitudinal and more material aspects such as investment in the information infrastructure, education and training of doctors. Doctors need to go through a process from awareness to action facilitated through a combination of personal and organisational incentives and rewards as well as training in the requisite skills. Researchers should take steps to improve the quality of the evidence and its accessibility and purchasers should reinforce the use of EBHC by withdrawing funding for care which has proved to be ineffective, inappropriate or inferior.

  8. Rocket Engine Health Management: Early Definition of Critical Flight Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, Rick L.; Nelson, Michael A.; Butas, John P.

    2003-01-01

    The NASA led Space Launch Initiative (SLI) program has established key requirements related to safety, reliability, launch availability and operations cost to be met by the next generation of reusable launch vehicles. Key to meeting these requirements will be an integrated vehicle health management ( M) system that includes sensors, harnesses, software, memory, and processors. Such a system must be integrated across all the vehicle subsystems and meet component, subsystem, and system requirements relative to fault detection, fault isolation, and false alarm rate. The purpose of this activity is to evolve techniques for defining critical flight engine system measurements-early within the definition of an engine health management system (EHMS). Two approaches, performance-based and failure mode-based, are integrated to provide a proposed set of measurements to be collected. This integrated approach is applied to MSFC s MC-1 engine. Early identification of measurements supports early identification of candidate sensor systems whose design and impacts to the engine components must be considered in engine design.

  9. Integrated System Health Management: Foundational Concepts, Approach, and Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Fernando

    2009-01-01

    A sound basis to guide the community in the conception and implementation of ISHM (Integrated System Health Management) capability in operational systems was provided. The concept of "ISHM Model of a System" and a related architecture defined as a unique Data, Information, and Knowledge (DIaK) architecture were described. The ISHM architecture is independent of the typical system architecture, which is based on grouping physical elements that are assembled to make up a subsystem, and subsystems combine to form systems, etc. It was emphasized that ISHM capability needs to be implemented first at a low functional capability level (FCL), or limited ability to detect anomalies, diagnose, determine consequences, etc. As algorithms and tools to augment or improve the FCL are identified, they should be incorporated into the system. This means that the architecture, DIaK management, and software, must be modular and standards-based, in order to enable systematic augmentation of FCL (no ad-hoc modifications). A set of technologies (and tools) needed to implement ISHM were described. One essential tool is a software environment to create the ISHM Model. The software environment encapsulates DIaK, and an infrastructure to focus DIaK on determining health (detect anomalies, determine causes, determine effects, and provide integrated awareness of the system to the operator). The environment includes gateways to communicate in accordance to standards, specially the IEEE 1451.1 Standard for Smart Sensors and Actuators.

  10. Is "disease management" the answer to our problems? No! Population health management and (disease) prevention require "management of overall well-being"

    OpenAIRE

    Cramm, Jane; Nieboer, Anna

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Disease management programs based on the chronic care model have achieved successful and long-term improvement in the quality of chronic care delivery and patients' health behaviors and physical quality of life. However, such programs have not been able to maintain or improve broader self-management abilities or social well-being, which decline over time in chronically ill patients. Disease management efforts, population health management initiatives and innovative pri...

  11. Structural health and prognostics management for offshore wind turbines :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, Daniel; Resor, Brian Ray; White, Jonathan Randall; Paquette, Joshua A.; Yoder, Nathanael C.

    2012-12-01

    Operations and maintenance costs for offshore wind plants are expected to be significantly higher than the current costs for onshore plants. One way in which these costs may be able to be reduced is through the use of a structural health and prognostic management system as part of a condition based maintenance paradigm with smart load management. To facilitate the creation of such a system a multiscale modeling approach has been developed to identify how the underlying physics of the system are affected by the presence of damage and how these changes manifest themselves in the operational response of a full turbine. The developed methodology was used to investigate the effects of a candidate blade damage feature, a trailing edge disbond, on a 5-MW offshore wind turbine and the measurements that demonstrated the highest sensitivity to the damage were the local pitching moments around the disbond. The multiscale method demonstrated that these changes were caused by a local decrease in the blades torsional stiffness due to the disbond, which also resulted in changes in the blades local strain field. Full turbine simulations were also used to demonstrate that derating the turbine power by as little as 5% could extend the fatigue life of a blade by as much as a factor of 3. The integration of the health monitoring information, conceptual repair cost versus damage size information, and this load management methodology provides an initial roadmap for reducing operations and maintenance costs for offshore wind farms while increasing turbine availability and overall profit.

  12. Improving the effectiveness of health care innovation implementation: middle managers as change agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birken, Sarah A; Lee, Shoou-Yih Daniel; Weiner, Bryan J; Chin, Marshall H; Schaefer, Cynthia T

    2013-02-01

    The rate of successful health care innovation implementation is dismal. Middle managers have a potentially important yet poorly understood role in health care innovation implementation. This study used self-administered surveys and interviews of middle managers in health centers that implemented an innovation to reduce health disparities to address the questions: Does middle managers' commitment to health care innovation implementation influence implementation effectiveness? If so, in what ways does their commitment influence implementation effectiveness? Although quantitative survey data analysis results suggest a weak relationship, qualitative interview data analysis results indicate that middle managers' commitment influences implementation effectiveness when middle managers are proactive. Scholars should account for middle managers' influence in implementation research, and health care executives may promote implementation effectiveness by hiring proactive middle managers and creating climates in which proactivity is rewarded, supported, and expected.

  13. Attributes of effective managers and implications for health care management education in the Asia-Pacific region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, S C; Boldy, D; Chen, G

    1994-01-01

    This paper explores the perceptions of managers and students from 11 countries in the Asia-Pacific region regarding the attributes needed for becoming effective managers and the broad implications of these findings for health care management education. The study forms part of a wider international project aimed at exploring the role of national culture in managerial behavior and effectiveness.

  14. Traditional vs. Contemporary Management Control Practices for Developing Public Health Policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo-Gil, David; Sánchez-Expósito, María Jesús; Gómez-Ruiz, Laura

    2016-07-14

    Public health policies must address multiple goals and complex community health needs. Recently, management control practices have emerged to provide a broader type of information for evaluating the effectiveness of healthcare policies, and relate activities and processes to multiple strategic outcomes. This study compares the effect of traditional and contemporary management control practices on the achievement of public health policies. It is also analyzed how two different uses of such practices (enabling vs. coercive) facilitate the achievement of public health policies. Relationships are explored using data collected from managers from public health agencies and public hospitals in Spain. The findings show that contemporary management control practices are more suitable than traditional practices to achieve public health policies. Furthermore, results show that public health policies are better achieved when managers use management control practices in an enabling way rather than in a coercive way.

  15. Traditional vs. Contemporary Management Control Practices for Developing Public Health Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo-Gil, David; Sánchez-Expósito, María Jesús; Gómez-Ruiz, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Public health policies must address multiple goals and complex community health needs. Recently, management control practices have emerged to provide a broader type of information for evaluating the effectiveness of healthcare policies, and relate activities and processes to multiple strategic outcomes. This study compares the effect of traditional and contemporary management control practices on the achievement of public health policies. It is also analyzed how two different uses of such practices (enabling vs. coercive) facilitate the achievement of public health policies. Relationships are explored using data collected from managers from public health agencies and public hospitals in Spain. The findings show that contemporary management control practices are more suitable than traditional practices to achieve public health policies. Furthermore, results show that public health policies are better achieved when managers use management control practices in an enabling way rather than in a coercive way. PMID:27428985

  16. Smartloss: A Personalized Mobile Health Intervention for Weight Management and Health Promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Corby K; Gilmore, L Anne; Apolzan, John W; Myers, Candice A; Thomas, Diana M; Redman, Leanne M

    2016-03-16

    Synonymous with increased use of mobile phones has been the development of mobile health (mHealth) technology for improving health, including weight management. Behavior change theory (eg, the theory of planned behavior) can be effectively encapsulated into mobile phone-based health improvement programs, which is fostered by the ability of mobile phones and related devices to collect and transmit objective data in near real time and for health care or research professionals and clients to communicate easily. To describe SmartLoss, a semiautomated mHealth platform for weight loss. We developed and validated a dynamic energy balance model that determines the amount of weight an individual will lose over time if they are adherent to an energy intake prescription. This model was incorporated into computer code that enables adherence to a prescribed caloric prescription determined from the change in body weight of the individual. Data from the individual are then used to guide personalized recommendations regarding weight loss and behavior change via a semiautomated mHealth platform called SmartLoss, which consists of 2 elements: (1) a clinician dashboard and (2) a mobile phone app. SmartLoss includes and interfaces with a network-connected bathroom scale and a Bluetooth-connected accelerometer, which enables automated collection of client information (eg, body weight change and physical activity patterns), as well as the systematic delivery of preplanned health materials and automated feedback that is based on client data and is designed to foster prolonged adherence with body weight, diet, and exercise goals. The clinician dashboard allows for efficient remote monitoring of all clients simultaneously, which may further increase adherence, personalization of treatment, treatment fidelity, and efficacy. Evidence of the efficacy of the SmartLoss approach has been reported previously. The present report provides a thorough description of the SmartLoss Virtual Weight

  17. The Effect of Managers Genders on Workers Mental and Physical Health: An Application in Banking Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmut Özdevecioğlu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this research it is evaluated the workers physical and mental health differences in which their managers gender is man or woman. To find out the differences a research is handled in banking sector. According to the results of the research, workers in which working with the male manager; there are difference between male and female workers according to physical health and there are not difference between male and female workers according to mental health. There are differences between male and female workers in which working with woman manager according to physical and mental health. The physical and mental health of woman workers, working with woman managers, looks like worse.

  18. Financial performance of health plans in Medicaid managed care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCue, Mike

    2012-01-01

    This study assesses the financial performance of health plans that enroll Medicaid members across the key plan traits, specifically Medicaid dominant, publicly traded, and provider-sponsored. National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) financial data, coupled with selected state financial data, were analyzed for 170 Medicaid health plans for 2009. A mean test compared the mean values for medical loss, administrative cost, and operating margin ratios across these plan traits. Medicaid dominant plans are plans with 75 percent of their total enrollment in the Medicaid line of business. Plans that are Medicaid dominant and publicly traded incurred a lower medical loss ratio and higher administrative cost ratio than multi-product and non-publicly traded plans. Medicaid dominant plans also earned a higher operating profit margin. Plans offering commercial and Medicare products are operating at a loss for their Medicaid line of business. Health plans that do not specialize in Medicaid are losing money. Higher medical cost rather than administrative cost is the underlying reason for this financial loss. Since Medicaid enrollees do not account for their primary book of business, these plans may not have invested in the medical management programs to reduce inappropriate emergency room use and avoid costly hospitalization.

  19. Health economic analyses of psoriasis management: a systematic literature search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutknecht, Mandy; Krensel, Magdalene; Augustin, Matthias

    2016-11-01

    In the course of the chronic skin disease psoriasis, where a variety of treatment interventions is available, a strong growth of health economic studies comparing treatment costs and benefits can be noticed. The objective was to identify health economic evaluations of psoriasis treatments that have been published to date. Of particular interest were the mostly used analysis and outcome parameters, the compared treatments, and the question, if available health economic studies may be used to perform a meta-analysis of qualitative findings. A systematic literature search using PubMed Medline, Ovid Medline, and Cochrane Library was performed for articles, published and available until mid of January 2016. Among the key words were the terms "psoriasis" and "cost-effectiveness". The search resulted in 318 articles without duplicates. Thereof 60 health economic analyses in psoriasis management were identified. Most of these are cost-effectiveness evaluations (45). The clinical parameter PASI (Psoriasis Area Severity Index) is the most often used cost-effectiveness outcome (33) followed by the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) (6). In case of cost-utility analyses, QALYs (quality-adjusted life-years) were mostly generated with the help of EuroQol five dimensions questionnaire (EQ-5D) (12), which was partly based on PASI and DLQI values. The majority of health economic studies is focusing on the direct medical and non-medical costs without consideration of productivity losses. Almost 70 % of 60 publications were conducted in Europe. Overall, most considered systemic treatments were the biological agents etanercept (36), adalimumab (27), and infliximab (26) followed by ustekinumab (17) and phototherapy (incl. UV-B, PUVA/psoralen combined with UV-A) (14). Comparisons including only topical treatments mostly focused on vitamin D treatment (14), corticosteroids (13), and coal tar products (6) followed by dithranol (5) and tazarotene (4). Given the setting, compared

  20. Health and safety management system audit reliability pilot project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyjack, D T; Redinger, C F; Ridge, R S

    2003-01-01

    This pilot study assessed occupational health and safety (OHS) management system audit finding reliability using a modified test-retest method. Two industrial hygienists with similar training and education conducted four, 1-day management system audits in four dissimilar organizational environments. The researchers examined four auditable sections (employee participation, training, controls, and communications) contained in a publicly available OHS management system assessment instrument. At each site, 102 auditable clauses were evaluated using a progressive 6-point scale. The team examined both the consistency of and agreement between the scores of the two auditors. Consistency was evaluated by calculating the Pearson r correlations for the two auditors' scores at each site and for each section within each site. Pearson correlations comparing overall scores for each site were all very low, ranging from 0.206 to 0.543. Training and communication system assessments correlated the highest, whereas employee participation and control system scores correlated the least. To measure agreement, t-tests were first calculated to determine whether the differences were statistically significant. Aggregate mean scores for two of the four sites were significantly different. Of the 16 total sections evaluated (i.e., 4 sections per site), seven scores were significantly different. Finally, the agreement of the scores between the two auditors for the four sites was evaluated by calculating two types of intraclass correlation coefficients, all of which failed to meet the minimum requirement for agreement. These findings suggest that opportunities for improving the reliability of the instrument and the audit process exist. Future research should include governmental and commercial OHS program assessments and related environmental management systems and their attendant audit protocols.

  1. Veterans Health Administration: Management Attention Is Needed to Address Systemic, Long standing Human Capital Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    required by the Choice Act: the Independent Assessment of the Health Care Delivery Systems and Management Processes of the Department of Veterans...VETERANS HEALTH ADMINISTRATION Management Attention Is Needed to Address Systemic, Long-standing Human Capital...Government Accountability Office Highlights of GAO-17-30, a report to congressional requesters December 2016 VETERANS HEALTH ADMINISTRATION

  2. BioHealth--the need for security and identity management standards in eHealth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Claudia; Pharow, Peter; Engelbrecht, Rolf; Blobel, Bernd; Savastano, Mario; Hovsto, Asbjorn

    2006-01-01

    The experience gained in these last years and the several lesson learned have clearly shown that eHealth is more than just a simple change from paper records to electronic records. It necessitates a change of paradigms, on the one hand and the use of new technologies and introduction of new procedures on the other. Interoperability becomes a crucial issue. Security and confidentiality are vital for the acceptance of the new approaches and for the support of eHealth. Shared care and across-border interactions require a reliable and stable normative framework based on the application of standardized solutions, which are often not yet sufficiently known, diffused and implemented. Feeling this gap, a group of international experts in the medical area proposed to the EC the BioHealth project whose main aim is to create awareness about standardization in eHealth and to facilitate its practical implementation. The project will address all the stakeholders concerning their respective domain. It will evaluate the socio-economic and cultural aspects concerning eHealth with particular reference to the growing introduction of emerging technologies such as health cards, biometrics, RFID (radio-frequency identification) and NFC (Near field communication) tags. By providing information and expert advice on standardization and best practices it will raise the acceptance on standardization. Furthermore, the project will deeply approach the ethical and accessibility issues connected to identity management in eHealth, which -together with privacy- represent probably the most significant obstacles for the wide diffusion of eHealth procedures.

  3. Distributed Prognostics and Health Management with a Wireless Network Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Kai; Saha, Sankalita; Sha, Bhaskar

    2013-01-01

    A heterogeneous set of system components monitored by a varied suite of sensors and a particle-filtering (PF) framework, with the power and the flexibility to adapt to the different diagnostic and prognostic needs, has been developed. Both the diagnostic and prognostic tasks are formulated as a particle-filtering problem in order to explicitly represent and manage uncertainties in state estimation and remaining life estimation. Current state-of-the-art prognostic health management (PHM) systems are mostly centralized in nature, where all the processing is reliant on a single processor. This can lead to a loss in functionality in case of a crash of the central processor or monitor. Furthermore, with increases in the volume of sensor data as well as the complexity of algorithms, traditional centralized systems become for a number of reasons somewhat ungainly for successful deployment, and efficient distributed architectures can be more beneficial. The distributed health management architecture is comprised of a network of smart sensor devices. These devices monitor the health of various subsystems or modules. They perform diagnostics operations and trigger prognostics operations based on user-defined thresholds and rules. The sensor devices, called computing elements (CEs), consist of a sensor, or set of sensors, and a communication device (i.e., a wireless transceiver beside an embedded processing element). The CE runs in either a diagnostic or prognostic operating mode. The diagnostic mode is the default mode where a CE monitors a given subsystem or component through a low-weight diagnostic algorithm. If a CE detects a critical condition during monitoring, it raises a flag. Depending on availability of resources, a networked local cluster of CEs is formed that then carries out prognostics and fault mitigation by efficient distribution of the tasks. It should be noted that the CEs are expected not to suspend their previous tasks in the prognostic mode. When the

  4. Use of Health Information and Communication Technologies to Promote Health and Manage Behavioral Risk Factors Associated with Chronic Disease: Applications in the Field of Health Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellefson, Michael; Alber, Julia M.; Wang, Min Qi; Eddy, James M.; Chaney, Beth H.; Chaney, J. Don

    2015-01-01

    This special issue provides real-world examples of the diverse methods health education researchers are using to expand existing applications of information and communication technologies (ICTs) for health promotion and chronic disease management. The original and review articles presented in this special issue investigate eHealth, mHealth, and…

  5. Use of Health Information and Communication Technologies to Promote Health and Manage Behavioral Risk Factors Associated with Chronic Disease: Applications in the Field of Health Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellefson, Michael; Alber, Julia M.; Wang, Min Qi; Eddy, James M.; Chaney, Beth H.; Chaney, J. Don

    2015-01-01

    This special issue provides real-world examples of the diverse methods health education researchers are using to expand existing applications of information and communication technologies (ICTs) for health promotion and chronic disease management. The original and review articles presented in this special issue investigate eHealth, mHealth, and…

  6. Vehicle Health Management Communications Requirements for AeroMACS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Clements, Donna J.; Apaza, Rafael D.

    2012-01-01

    As the development of standards for the aeronautical mobile airport communications system (AeroMACS) progresses, the process of identifying and quantifying appropriate uses for the system is progressing. In addition to defining important elements of AeroMACS standards, indentifying the systems uses impacts AeroMACS bandwidth requirements. Although an initial 59 MHz spectrum allocation for AeroMACS was established in 2007, the allocation may be inadequate; studies have indicated that 100 MHz or more of spectrum may be required to support airport surface communications. Hence additional spectrum allocations have been proposed. Vehicle health management (VHM) systems, which can produce large volumes of vehicle health data, were not considered in the original bandwidth requirements analyses, and are therefore of interest in supporting proposals for additional AeroMACS spectrum. VHM systems are an emerging development in air vehicle safety, and preliminary estimates of the amount of data that will be produced and transmitted off an aircraft, both in flight and on the ground, have been prepared based on estimates of data produced by on-board vehicle health sensors and initial concepts of data processing approaches. This allowed an initial estimate of VHM data transmission requirements for the airport surface. More recently, vehicle-level systems designed to process and analyze VHM data and draw conclusions on the current state of vehicle health have been undergoing testing and evaluation. These systems make use of vehicle system data that is mostly different from VHM data considered previously for airport surface transmission, and produce processed system outputs that will be also need to be archived, thus generating additional data load for AeroMACS. This paper provides an analysis of airport surface data transmission requirements resulting from the vehicle level reasoning systems, within the context of overall VHM data requirements.

  7. Population Health Research: Early Description of the Organizational Shift Toward Population Health Management and Defining a Vision for Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldararo, Kristi L; Nash, David B

    2017-03-06

    As health care delivery systems adapt to the changing marketplace, many struggle to define a clear strategy that will prove successful in managing the health of entire populations. The federal government continues to put increasing pressure on organizations to shift away from the traditional way of delivering episodic care and move toward managing populations as a whole-before, during, and after a patient presents in a health care facility. Private payers have begun to follow suit as risk-based payer contracts and bundled payment models become increasingly popular. For organizations to adequately influence the health outcomes of a population, they must be responsible for more than just a patient's medical care. They must partner with the community to create a strategy that encompasses the psychosocial and environmental factors that contribute to one's health. Although health care leaders know this industry transformation is imminent, there is minimal research that shares best practices in regard to designing and implementing a successful population health management strategy. Interviews were conducted with leadership from 10 organizations in order to understand the strategic approach taken by delivery systems and health care institutions that view population health as a key aspect of their overall mission. Responses were recorded and outlined in a detailed response grid. The objective is to provide a qualitative overview of how industry leaders are currently responding to population health. Additionally, common themes and recommendations are presented to serve as guidance for other health care organizations that are at the start of their journey toward population health management.

  8. An education management information system with simultaneous monitoring of stress stimulators for students Mental Health management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manimaran, S; Jayakumar, S; Lakshmi, K Bhagya

    2016-11-14

    Education Management Information System (EMIS) is a widely acceptable and developing technology within the Information Technology field. The advancement in technology in this century is being collaborated with scientific invention or explorer and information strengthening or development. This paper presents the results and experiences gained from applying students oriented EMIS for monitoring and managing mental health. The Mental Health of students depends on the acquiring adequate knowledge on basic concepts within a time period or academic schedule. It's obviously significance to evaluate and appraise the stress stimulators as a challenge or threat. The theoretical framework for the study was designed for analyzing the stress stimulators, academic performance and EMIS accessibility. The sample examined in this study was stratified random sample from 75 students specifically all engineering college in Dindigul District of Tamilnadu. The primary factor is the academic stress stimulators that form one module of EMIS for each of the key variable such as curriculum & instruction related stressors, placement related, teamwork related and assessment related. The Mental Health related stress stimulators namely curriculum & syllabus, placement related, assessment related and team work related have a significant influence on academic performance by students in various institution. The important factor leading to the EMIS application in monitoring stress stimulators is curriculum & syllabus related and assessment related.

  9. Distributed Prognostic Health Management with Gaussian Process Regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Sankalita; Saha, Bhaskar; Saxena, Abhinav; Goebel, Kai Frank

    2010-01-01

    Distributed prognostics architecture design is an enabling step for efficient implementation of health management systems. A major challenge encountered in such design is formulation of optimal distributed prognostics algorithms. In this paper. we present a distributed GPR based prognostics algorithm whose target platform is a wireless sensor network. In addition to challenges encountered in a distributed implementation, a wireless network poses constraints on communication patterns, thereby making the problem more challenging. The prognostics application that was used to demonstrate our new algorithms is battery prognostics. In order to present trade-offs within different prognostic approaches, we present comparison with the distributed implementation of a particle filter based prognostics for the same battery data.

  10. Oral health management of a patient with 47,XYY syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Altaf Hussain; Manjunatha, B S; Bindayel, Naif A; Khounganian, Rita

    2013-12-05

    The 47,XYY syndrome is an aneuploidy (abnormal number) of sex chromosomes, where a human male receives an extra Y chromosome, making 47 chromosomes instead of the usual 46. Individuals with 47,XYY are usually physically normal and tend to be tall and thin. They are not at increased risk of mental retardation and cardiovascular diseases. They may have speech delay, hyperactivity and normal/decreased IQ level. Behavioural problems are not common in 47,XYY individuals. There have been reports that suggest the tooth-size increase in 47,XYY males is due to a direct genetic effect. The patient presented with multiple over-retained deciduous, unerupted permanent teeth and increased incidence of carious lesions may be attributed to decreased oral hygiene maintenance. The present article describes the medical and dental history along with the clinical management of oral health issues in an 18-year-old male patient with 47,XYY syndrome having normal physical structure and development.

  11. Oral health management of a patient with 47,XYY syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Altaf Hussain; Manjunatha, B S; Bindayel, Naif A; Khounganian, Rita

    2013-01-01

    The 47,XYY syndrome is an aneuploidy (abnormal number) of sex chromosomes, where a human male receives an extra Y chromosome, making 47 chromosomes instead of the usual 46. Individuals with 47,XYY are usually physically normal and tend to be tall and thin. They are not at increased risk of mental retardation and cardiovascular diseases. They may have speech delay, hyperactivity and normal/decreased IQ level. Behavioural problems are not common in 47,XYY individuals. There have been reports that suggest the tooth-size increase in 47,XYY males is due to a direct genetic effect. The patient presented with multiple over-retained deciduous, unerupted permanent teeth and increased incidence of carious lesions may be attributed to decreased oral hygiene maintenance. The present article describes the medical and dental history along with the clinical management of oral health issues in an 18-year-old male patient with 47,XYY syndrome having normal physical structure and development. PMID:24311410

  12. Obesity, periodontal and general health: Relationship and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parveen Dahiya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a multifaceted subject. It has increased at an alarming rate in recent years. Being overweight increases the likelihood of a patient having associated health and social problems which may affect dental services and dental management. A review of the literature on obesity and periodontal disease suggested that they both confound each other and obesity itself has been recognized as a major risk factor for periodontal disease. It has been found that adverse effects of obesity on the periodontium may be mediated through pro-inflammatory cytokines and various other bioactive substances. This article tries to focus on the possible role of obesity and obesity-related diseases like diabetes and coronary heart diseases (CHD, as a potential contributor to periodontal disease and vice versa. The meanings of these associations can be useful for various diagnostic and treatment planning purposes.

  13. The importance of human resources management in health care: a global context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabene, Stefane M; Orchard, Carole; Howard, John M; Soriano, Mark A; Leduc, Raymond

    2006-07-27

    This paper addresses the health care system from a global perspective and the importance of human resources management (HRM) in improving overall patient health outcomes and delivery of health care services. We explored the published literature and collected data through secondary sources. Various key success factors emerge that clearly affect health care practices and human resources management. This paper will reveal how human resources management is essential to any health care system and how it can improve health care models. Challenges in the health care systems in Canada, the United States of America and various developing countries are examined, with suggestions for ways to overcome these problems through the proper implementation of human resources management practices. Comparing and contrasting selected countries allowed a deeper understanding of the practical and crucial role of human resources management in health care. Proper management of human resources is critical in providing a high quality of health care. A refocus on human resources management in health care and more research are needed to develop new policies. Effective human resources management strategies are greatly needed to achieve better outcomes from and access to health care around the world.

  14. The importance of human resources management in health care: a global context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soriano Mark A

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper addresses the health care system from a global perspective and the importance of human resources management (HRM in improving overall patient health outcomes and delivery of health care services. Methods We explored the published literature and collected data through secondary sources. Results Various key success factors emerge that clearly affect health care practices and human resources management. This paper will reveal how human resources management is essential to any health care system and how it can improve health care models. Challenges in the health care systems in Canada, the United States of America and various developing countries are examined, with suggestions for ways to overcome these problems through the proper implementation of human resources management practices. Comparing and contrasting selected countries allowed a deeper understanding of the practical and crucial role of human resources management in health care. Conclusion Proper management of human resources is critical in providing a high quality of health care. A refocus on human resources management in health care and more research are needed to develop new policies. Effective human resources management strategies are greatly needed to achieve better outcomes from and access to health care around the world.

  15. Excel 2013 for health services management statistics a guide to solving practical problems

    CERN Document Server

    Quirk, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    This book shows the capabilities of Microsoft Excel to teach health services management statistics effectively. Similar to the previously published Excel 2010 for Health Services Management Statistics, this book is a step-by-step exercise-driven guide for students and practitioners who need to master Excel to solve practical health services management problems. If understanding statistics isn’t your strongest suit, you are not especially mathematically-inclined, or if you are wary of computers, this is the right book for you. Excel, a widely available computer program for students and managers, is also an effective teaching and learning tool for quantitative analyses in health services management courses. Its powerful computational ability and graphical functions make learning statistics much easier than in years past. However, Excel 2013 for Health Services Management Statistics: A Guide to Solving Practical Problems is the first book to capitalize on these improvements by teaching students and managers ho...

  16. Advanced Health Management System for the Space Shuttle Main Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Matt; Stephens, John

    2004-01-01

    Boeing-Canoga Park (BCP) and NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center (NASA-MSFC) are developing an Advanced Health Management System (AHMS) for use on the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) that will improve Shuttle safety by reducing the probability of catastrophic engine failures during the powered ascent phase of a Shuttle mission. This is a phased approach that consists of an upgrade to the current Space Shuttle Main Engine Controller (SSMEC) to add turbomachinery synchronous vibration protection and addition of a separate Health Management Computer (HMC) that will utilize advanced algorithms to detect and mitigate predefined engine anomalies. The purpose of the Shuttle AHMS is twofold; one is to increase the probability of successfully placing the Orbiter into the intended orbit, and the other is to increase the probability of being able to safely execute an abort of a Space Transportation System (STS) launch. Both objectives are achieved by increasing the useful work envelope of a Space Shuttle Main Engine after it has developed anomalous performance during launch and the ascent phase of the mission. This increase in work envelope will be the result of two new anomaly mitigation options, in addition to existing engine shutdown, that were previously unavailable. The added anomaly mitigation options include engine throttle-down and performance correction (adjustment of engine oxidizer to fuel ratio), as well as enhanced sensor disqualification capability. The HMC is intended to provide the computing power necessary to diagnose selected anomalous engine behaviors and for making recommendations to the engine controller for anomaly mitigation. Independent auditors have assessed the reduction in Shuttle ascent risk to be on the order of 40% with the combined system and a three times improvement in mission success.

  17. New models of integrated health care management in nephrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Rosa; Molina, Manolo

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is becoming a worldwide major public health problem that is rapidly approaching epidemic proportions due to its high prevalence, as well as the associated increase of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in these patients. Early detection and prevention may have an impact on both slowing the progression of CKD and reducing cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. CKD prevention programmes can be more cost-efficient over time without negative impacts on quality of care. Until now, reimbursement in CKD has been segmented and usually focused on the end of the process (dialysis) when cost is higher, whereas new models focused on provider integration, while balancing quality and costs, are needed to respond to today’s challenges. Traditionally, “pay for services” has been used in state-assisted dialysis centres, but this model has the risk of inducing an increase in demand. Integrated management would respond to this challenge with comprehensive solutions that manage kidney disease at all levels of health care risk. It is based on a comprehensive model that typically includes several products and services, often including pharmacological treatments. The rate of reimbursement directly depends on the achievement of previously defined quality control parameters. The third model is based on a “capitation” model that consists of the provider receiving a set amount of resources per population for a particular time regardless of the volume of services provided. The complexity and the progressive nature of CKD along with the associated morbidity rates in these patients force us to consider a global approach rather than a sum of different services. In our opinion, the first method of reimbursement in CKD that should be considered is a bundle rate, and when this model has been consolidated, tending toward a global capitation model.

  18. [Management of adult secondary insomnia in primary health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavadas, Luís Filipe; Ribeiro, Lúcia

    2011-01-01

    Insomnia is the most common sleep disorder in adults, with secondary insomnia being the most prevalent. This sleep disorder is associated with important medical and social consequences. The General Practitioner (GP) plays a key role in the diagnosis of insomnia, which may affect about 69% of their patients in the PHC (Primary Health Care). Recognize the differential diagnosis of secondary insomnia in adults, evaluate and manage these patients in the PHC, appropriately use the treatments available and meet the criteria for referral. Bibliographic search in MEDLINE databases, and evidence based review databases, using the MeSH terms: Primary Health Care, Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, for articles published since January 2000 until July 2009, in English, Portuguese, French and Spanish. Index de Revistas Médicas Portuguesas and scientific societies dedicated to sleep disorders were searched. Mood and anxiety disorders are the main co-morbidities associated with secondary insomnia, being present in 30% to 50% of patients with insomnia. The medical pathology and substance abuse are present respectively in 10% of patients. It is essential a proper clinical history, with a history of sleep, sleep diary and the partner information. There is evidence that the combination of specific pharmacological treatments (benzodiazepines and the benzodiazepine receptor agonists) with the nonpharmacological (cognitive-behavioral therapy) may be useful in secondary insomnia, as co-adjuvant treatment of the underlying disease. There are several treatment options with their indications and adverse effects. The criteria for referral should be defined according to the availability of human resources. Due to the high prevalence and the serious consequences of secondary insomnia in adults, it must be systematically managed by the GP. It is important to know and to use non-pharmacological therapy in GP consultation, because this therapy was shown to be important in treating this type of insomnia

  19. Structural health and prognostics management for offshore wind turbines :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myrent, Noah J.; Kusnick, Joshua F.; Barrett, Natalie C.; Adams, Douglas E.; Griffith, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    Operations and maintenance costs for offshore wind plants are significantly higher than the current costs for land-based (onshore) wind plants. One way to reduce these costs would be to implement a structural health and prognostic management (SHPM) system as part of a condition based maintenance paradigm with smart load management and utilize a state-based cost model to assess the economics associated with use of the SHPM system. To facilitate the development of such a system a multi-scale modeling approach developed in prior work is used to identify how the underlying physics of the system are affected by the presence of damage and faults, and how these changes manifest themselves in the operational response of a full turbine. This methodology was used to investigate two case studies: (1) the effects of rotor imbalance due to pitch error (aerodynamic imbalance) and mass imbalance and (2) disbond of the shear web; both on a 5-MW offshore wind turbine in the present report. Based on simulations of damage in the turbine model, the operational measurements that demonstrated the highest sensitivity to the damage/faults were the blade tip accelerations and local pitching moments for both imbalance and shear web disbond. The initial cost model provided a great deal of insight into the estimated savings in operations and maintenance costs due to the implementation of an effective SHPM system. The integration of the health monitoring information and O&M cost versus damage/fault severity information provides the initial steps to identify processes to reduce operations and maintenance costs for an offshore wind farm while increasing turbine availability, revenue, and overall profit.

  20. Health information as an aid to effective hospital management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogli, G D

    2003-03-01

    No institution can be efficiently organized and managed unless one makes a critical analysis of organizational needs and takes appropriate action to develop the way one wishes it to be. It is, in fact, more true with hospital organization, usually the new hospital starts as a simple and small organization and with-in the space of few years, however, it evolves into a complex body governed by precise laws and regulations, especially as regards finances, facilities and organizations. In order to maintain any organization especially the hospital administration efficiently it is necessary to develop management tools that would reflect the true operation of the hospital and enable resources (personnel, equipment and buildings) to be fully utilized and adapted to the needs of the population serviced. These indicators of true hospital operation would then serve as a basis for determining hospital activity at any given time, in relation to the number and characteristics of the patients, as well as for evaluation hospital activity in terms of progress made towards good utilization of resources. A record of activities, related to the individual patient, would provide a valid basis for establishing a relationship with the morbidity observed in the hospital and would be a first step towards an evaluation of the services "rendered" by the hospital, or its impact on the demand for care in its own particular area. Thus, in its aims of establishing a hospital to adjusting supply to demand in the field of health care. The author had stressed too much emphasis on health information collection and interpretation because of valid reasons. Correct and timely administrative and clinical information which is a barometer of hospital efficiency could indicate whether the quality is balanced with expenditure or whether leading into financial crisis. So, whatever may be the motive behind establishing a hospital whether for profit making, or public-service, it is necessary the investors

  1. [Inefficient management of personal health in oral anticoagulation. Home nursing care in primary health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Castañón, Lorena

    2012-01-01

    This case report describes an 83 year-old immobilised patient with multiple diseases and on polypharmacy. Nursing care is developed at home. The patient is included in patient care programs for the anticoagulated and polymedicated patient. Nursing assessments were made using the Marjory Gordon functional health patterns, by which we identified, among others, problems related to non-compliance with the pharmacological treatment. The Nurse's Diagnosis was: Ineffective Management of own health. With the support of NANDA, NOC and NIC taxonomy we determined the nursing objectives and interventions. The expected results of the Care Plan were achieved. Polypharmacy in the elderly can lead to treatment problems, increasing hospital admissions, morbidity and mortality and health expenditure Nursing care at home is a continuous development process and is increasing due to aging of the population, the prevalence of chronic diseases, as well as the increased life expectancy. It is estimated that in 2030, 24% of the Spanish population will be over 64 years. The physical, sensory, cognitive and chronic disabilities of aging make this type of care necessary. It is a major element in the comprehensive care of these patients, by checking the correct use of medication, symptom control, helping them to be autonomous in managing their disease and establishing a fluid relationship between the patients and their family.

  2. Investigating the connections between health lean management and clinical risk management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crema, Maria; Verbano, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate connections and overlaps between health lean management (HLM) and clinical risk management (CRM) understanding whether and how these two approaches can be combined together to pursue efficiency and patient safety improvements simultaneously. A systematic literature review has been carried out. Searching in academic databases, papers that focus not only on HLM, but also on clinical errors and risk reduction, were included. The general characteristics of the selected papers were analysed and a content analysis was conducted. In most of the papers, pursing objectives of HLM and CRM and adopting tools and practices of both approaches, results of quality and, particularly, of safety improvements were obtained. A two-way arrow between HLM and CRM emerged but so far, none of the studies has been focused on the relationship between HLM and CRM. Results highlight an emerging research stream, with many useful theoretical and practical implications and opportunities for further research.

  3. Management knowledge and skills required in the health care system of the Federation bosnia and herzegovina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slipicevic, Osman; Masic, Izet

    2012-01-01

    Extremely complex health care organizations, by their structure and organization, operate in a constantly changing business environment, and such situation implies and requires complex and demanding health management. Therefore, in order to manage health organizations in a competent manner, health managers must possess various managerial skills and be familiar with problems in health care. Research, identification, analysis, and assessment of health management education and training needs are basic preconditions for the development and implementation of adequate programs to meet those needs. Along with other specific activities, this research helped to determine the nature, profile, and level of top-priority needs for education. The need for knowledge of certain areas in health management, as well as the need for mastering concrete managerial competencies has been recognized as top-priorities requiring additional improvement and upgrading.

  4. What would it take? Stakeholders' views and preferences for implementing a health care manager program in community mental health clinics under health care reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabassa, Leopoldo J; Gomes, Arminda P; Lewis-Fernández, Roberto

    2015-02-01

    Health care manager interventions can improve the physical health of people with serious mental illness (SMI). In this study, we used concepts from the theory of diffusion of innovations, the consolidated framework for implementation research and a taxonomy of implementation strategies to examine stakeholders' recommendations for implementing a health care manager intervention in public mental health clinics serving Hispanics with SMI. A purposive sample of 20 stakeholders was recruited from mental health agencies, primary care clinics, and consumer advocacy organizations. We presented participants a vignette describing a health care manager intervention and used semistructured qualitative interviews to examine their views and recommendations for implementing this program. Interviews were recorded, professionally transcribed, and content analyzed. We found that a blend of implementation strategies that demonstrates local relative advantage, addresses cost concerns, and enhances compatibility to organizations and the client population is critical for moving health care manager interventions into practice.

  5. What are occupational safety and health management systems and why do companies implement them?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwetsloot, G.I.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    In company practice and in governmental legislation, it is increasingly acknowledged that occupational safety and health (OSH) management should be performed systematically and continually. Implementing an OSH Management System (OSH MS) is the major strategy to achieve this.

  6. Utilizing a Health Impact Assessment (HIA) to Connect Natural Resource Management and Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrying scientific and health research with natural resource management should be a straightforward process. However, differences in purpose, goals, language, levels of detail and implementation authority between the scientists who conduct research and resource managers who plan...

  7. Utilizing a Health Impact Assessment (HIA) to Connect Natural Resource Management and Community(presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrying scientific and health research with natural resource management should be a straightforward process. However, differences in purpose, goals, language, levels of detail and implementation authority between the scientists who conduct research and resource managers who plan...

  8. What are occupational safety and health management systems and why do companies implement them?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwetsloot, G.I.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    In company practice and in governmental legislation, it is increasingly acknowledged that occupational safety and health (OSH) management should be performed systematically and continually. Implementing an OSH Management System (OSH MS) is the major strategy to achieve this.

  9. Prognostics Health Management for Advanced Small Modular Reactor Passive Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Coble, Jamie B.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Wootan, David W.; Hirt, Evelyn H.; Berglin, Eric J.; Bond, Leonard J.; Henager, Charles H.

    2013-10-18

    In the United States, sustainable nuclear power to promote energy security is a key national energy priority. Advanced small modular reactors (AdvSMR), which are based on modularization of advanced reactor concepts using non-light-water reactor (LWR) coolants such as liquid metal, helium, or liquid salt may provide a longer-term alternative to more conventional LWR-based concepts. The economics of AdvSMRs will be impacted by the reduced economy-of-scale savings when compared to traditional LWRs and the controllable day-to-day costs of AdvSMRs are expected to be dominated by operations and maintenance costs. Therefore, achieving the full benefits of AdvSMR deployment requires a new paradigm for plant design and management. In this context, prognostic health management of passive components in AdvSMRs can play a key role in enabling the economic deployment of AdvSMRs. In this paper, the background of AdvSMRs is discussed from which requirements for PHM systems are derived. The particle filter technique is proposed as a prognostics framework for AdvSMR passive components and the suitability of the particle filter technique is illustrated by using it to forecast thermal creep degradation using a physics-of-failure model and based on a combination of types of measurements conceived for passive AdvSMR components.

  10. Financial aspects of veterinary herd health management programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifende, V I; Derks, M; Hooijer, G A; Hogeveen, H

    2014-09-01

    Veterinary herd health management (VHHM) programmes have been shown to be economically effective in the past. However, no current information is available on costs and benefits of these programmes. This study compared economics and farm performance between participants and non-participants in VHHM programmes in 1013 dairy farms with over 40 cows. Milk Production Registration (MPR) data and a questionnaire concerning VHHM were used. Based on the level of participation in VHHM (as indicated in the questionnaire), costs of the programmes were calculated using a normative model. The economic value of the production effects was similarly calculated using normative modelling based on MPR data. Participants in VHHM had a better performance with regard to production, but not with regard to reproduction. Over 90 per cent of the VHHM participants were visited at least once every six weeks and most participants discussed at least three topics. In most farms, the veterinarian did the pregnancy checks as part of the VHHM programmes. There was a benefit to cost ratio of about five per cow per year for VHHM participants, and a mean difference in net returns of €30 per cow per year after adjusting for the cost of the programme. This portrays that participation in a VHHM programme is cost-efficient. There is, however, much unexplained variation in the net returns, possibly due to diverse approaches by veterinarians towards VHHM or by other factors not included in this analysis, like nutritional quality or management abilities of the farmer.

  11. A ride in the time machine: information management capabilities health departments will need.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foldy, Seth; Grannis, Shaun; Ross, David; Smith, Torney

    2014-09-01

    We have proposed needed information management capabilities for future US health departments predicated on trends in health care reform and health information technology. Regardless of whether health departments provide direct clinical services (and many will), they will manage unprecedented quantities of sensitive information for the public health core functions of assurance and assessment, including population-level health surveillance and metrics. Absent improved capabilities, health departments risk vestigial status, with consequences for vulnerable populations. Developments in electronic health records, interoperability and information exchange, public information sharing, decision support, and cloud technologies can support information management if health departments have appropriate capabilities. The need for national engagement in and consensus on these capabilities and their importance to health department sustainability make them appropriate for consideration in the context of accreditation.

  12. Managing health care decisions and improvement through simulation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, Helena Hvitfeldt; Aronsson, Håkan; Keller, Christina; Lindblad, Staffan

    2011-01-01

    Simulation modeling is a way to test changes in a computerized environment to give ideas for improvements before implementation. This article reviews research literature on simulation modeling as support for health care decision making. The aim is to investigate the experience and potential value of such decision support and quality of articles retrieved. A literature search was conducted, and the selection criteria yielded 59 articles derived from diverse applications and methods. Most met the stated research-quality criteria. This review identified how simulation can facilitate decision making and that it may induce learning. Furthermore, simulation offers immediate feedback about proposed changes, allows analysis of scenarios, and promotes communication on building a shared system view and understanding of how a complex system works. However, only 14 of the 59 articles reported on implementation experiences, including how decision making was supported. On the basis of these articles, we proposed steps essential for the success of simulation projects, not just in the computer, but also in clinical reality. We also presented a novel concept combining simulation modeling with the established plan-do-study-act cycle for improvement. Future scientific inquiries concerning implementation, impact, and the value for health care management are needed to realize the full potential of simulation modeling.

  13. Lay and health care professional understandings of self-management: A systematic review and narrative synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Euan Sadler; Charles DA Wolfe; Christopher McKevitt

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Self-management is widely promoted but evidence of effectiveness is limited. Policy encourages health care professionals to support people with long-term conditions to learn self-management skills, yet little is known about the extent to which both parties share a common understanding of self-management. Thus, we compared health care professional and lay understandings of self-management of long-term conditions.Methods: Systematic review and narrative synthesis of qualitative stud...

  14. The impact of the Citibank, NA, health management program on changes in employee health risks over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozminkowski, R J; Goetzel, R Z; Smith, M W; Cantor, R I; Shaughnessy, A; Harrison, M

    2000-05-01

    This study estimated the impact of the Citibank Health Management Program on changes in health risks among Citibank employees. McNemar chi-squared tests compared the probability of being at high risk for poor health when the first and last health-risk appraisal surveys were taken. Logistic regression controlled for baseline differences in subsequent analyses when those who participated in more intensive program features were compared with those who participated in less intensive features. Declines in risk were noted for 8 of 10 risk categories. Most changes were small, except those related to exercise habits, seatbelt use, and stress levels. For nine health risk categories, those who participated in more intensive program services were significantly more likely than others to reduce their health risks. Thus, the Citibank Health Management Program was associated with significant reductions in health risk.

  15. Mental Health Management in a Small Municipality in the State of Rio de Janeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia Cristine Rodrigues da Silva

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses mental health management in a small municipality in the State of Rio de Janeiro based on Law No. 10,216 / 2001. The study is guided by the Brazilian Psychiatric Reform, and the concepts of Humanization and Public Management. It is a study case with qualitative approach and bibliographic review  supported by open-ended interviews with the health manager, the director of the Psychosocial Care Center, and one of the authors. Results show the need for greater interaction between the health manager and the area of mental health, so that Humanization is consolidated in this public sphere.

  16. Mental Health Management in a Small Municipality in the State of Rio de Janeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia Cristine Rodrigues da Silva

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses mental health management in a small municipality in the State of Rio de Janeiro based on Law No. 10,216 / 2001. The study is guided by the Brazilian Psychiatric Reform, and the concepts of Humanization and Public Management. It is a study case with qualitative approach and bibliographic review supported by open-ended interviews with the health manager, the director of the Psychosocial Care Center, and one of the authors. Results show the need for greater interaction between the health manager and the area of mental health, so that Humanization is consolidated in this public sphere.

  17. Algorithm development for Prognostics and Health Management (PHM).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swiler, Laura Painton; Campbell, James E.; Doser, Adele Beatrice; Lowder, Kelly S.

    2003-10-01

    This report summarizes the results of a three-year LDRD project on prognostics and health management. System failure over some future time interval (an alternative definition is the capability to predict the remaining useful life of a system). Prognostics are integrated with health monitoring (through inspections, sensors, etc.) to provide an overall PHM capability that optimizes maintenance actions and results in higher availability at a lower cost. Our goal in this research was to develop PHM tools that could be applied to a wide variety of equipment (repairable, non-repairable, manufacturing, weapons, battlefield equipment, etc.) and require minimal customization to move from one system to the next. Thus, our approach was to develop a toolkit of reusable software objects/components and architecture for their use. We have developed two software tools: an Evidence Engine and a Consequence Engine. The Evidence Engine integrates information from a variety of sources in order to take into account all the evidence that impacts a prognosis for system health. The Evidence Engine has the capability for feature extraction, trend detection, information fusion through Bayesian Belief Networks (BBN), and estimation of remaining useful life. The Consequence Engine involves algorithms to analyze the consequences of various maintenance actions. The Consequence Engine takes as input a maintenance and use schedule, spares information, and time-to-failure data on components, then generates maintenance and failure events, and evaluates performance measures such as equipment availability, mission capable rate, time to failure, and cost. This report summarizes the capabilities we have developed, describes the approach and architecture of the two engines, and provides examples of their use. 'Prognostics' refers to the capability to predict the probability of

  18. eHealth in the future of medications management: personalisation, monitoring and adherence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Car, J.; Tan, W.S.; Huang, Z.; Sloot, P.; Franklin, B.D.

    2017-01-01

    Background Globally, healthcare systems face major challenges with medicines management and medication adherence. Medication adherence determines medication effectiveness and can be the single most effective intervention for improving health outcomes. In anticipation of growth in eHealth interventio

  19. eHealth in the future of medications management: personalisation, monitoring and adherence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Car, J.; Tan, W.S.; Huang, Z.; Sloot, P.; Franklin, B.D.

    2017-01-01

    Background Globally, healthcare systems face major challenges with medicines management and medication adherence. Medication adherence determines medication effectiveness and can be the single most effective intervention for improving health outcomes. In anticipation of growth in eHealth

  20. Integrating air-related health surveillance into air quality management: perceptions and practicalities

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wright, C

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Health surveillance is presently not an integral part of air quality management in South Africa, although ambient air pollution standards are derived from health effects of personal exposure. In a survey to air quality officials and environmental...

  1. Work-related stress management between workplace and occupational health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnunen-Amoroso, Maritta; Liira, Juha

    2016-06-13

    Work-related stress has been evaluated as one of the most important health risks in Europe. Prevention of work related stress and interventions to reduce risk factors for stress in the workplace are conducted together by the enterprise and occupational health services. The aim of the study was to examine the experiences of Finnish occupational physicians on the stress management with enterprises. From the Finnish Association of Occupational Health Physicians membership list 207 physicians responded to self-administered anonymous questionnaire. The data were analysed using SPSS 17.0. The client enterprises contacted occupational health services frequently about work-related stress. Collaboration between occupational health and enterprises was strongest in companies' own occupational health services and generally with most experienced physicians. Occupational health services and enterprises shared responsibility for managing work-related stress. Professional experience and close contact with organisation management favours successful stress management between occupational health and enterprises.

  2. Building trust: The influence of mentoring behaviors on perceptions of health care managers' trustworthiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleig-Palmer, Michelle M; Rathert, Cheryl; Porter, Tracy H

    2016-10-25

    In health care organizations, trust is critical for effective workplace relationships that ensure patient-centered outcomes. Although research has focused on trust in the relationship between patients and clinicians, less is known about what influences workers to trust their managers. An understanding is needed of the specific behaviors that influence health care workers' evaluations of their managers' trustworthiness. Mentoring research focuses on the developmental assistance that a more experienced worker provides to a less experienced worker. Building upon Kram's (1988) seminal research on mentoring functions, we argue that health care managers can build trust by providing informational (career-related) and interpersonal (psychosocial) support. The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of health care managers' informational and interpersonal mentoring behaviors on workers' perceptions of their managers' trustworthiness and the mediating role of trustworthiness on trust in the managers. Surveys were completed during work hours by 315 health care workers at an acute care hospital and associated clinics in the Midwest. Results showed that managers' mentoring behaviors influenced worker perceptions of their managers' trustworthiness, in terms of ability, integrity, and benevolence. Ability partially mediated the relationship between informational mentoring and trust in managers, whereas integrity and benevolence partially mediated the relationship between interpersonal mentoring and trust in managers. Health care managers can actively build trust through mentoring behaviors that inspire positive assessments of managers' ability, integrity, and benevolence.

  3. Health promotion through primary care: enhancing self-management with activity prescription and mHealth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Emily; Stuckey, Melanie I; Petrella, Robert J

    2014-09-01

    It is well established in the literature that regular participation in physical activity is effective for chronic disease management and prevention. Remote monitoring technologies (ie, mHealth) hold promise for engaging patients in self-management of many chronic diseases. The purpose of this study was to test the effectiveness of an mHealth study with tailored physical activity prescription targeting changes in various intensities of physical activity (eg, exercise, sedentary behavior, or both) for improving physiological and behavioral markers of lifestyle-related disease risk. Forty-five older adults (aged 55-75 years; mean age 63 ± 5 years) were randomly assigned to receive a personal activity program targeting changes to either daily exercise, sedentary behavior, or both. All participants received an mHealth technology kit including smartphone, blood pressure monitor, glucometer, and pedometer. Participants engaged in physical activity programming at home during the 12-week intervention period and submitted physical activity (steps/day), blood pressure (mm Hg), body weight (kg), and blood glucose (mmol/L) measures remotely using study-provided devices. There were no differences between groups at baseline (P > 0.05). The intervention had a significant effect (F(10 488) = 2.947, P = 0.001, ηP² = 0.057), with similar changes across all groups for physical activity, body weight, and blood pressure (P > 0.05). Changes in blood glucose were significantly different between groups, with groups prescribed high-intensity activity (ie, exercise) demonstrating greater reductions in blood glucose than the group prescribed changes to sedentary behavior alone (P mHealth technologies with activity prescription for prevention of lifestyle-related chronic diseases among an at-risk group of older men and women. RESULTS support the novel approach of prescribing changes to sedentary behaviors (alone, and in conjunction with exercise) to reduce risk of developing lifestyle

  4. A study of project management knowledge and sustainable outcomes in Thailand’s reproductive health projects

    OpenAIRE

    Jantanee Dumrak; Bassam Barroudi; Stephen Pullen

    2015-01-01

    In Thailand, numerous reproductive health projects funded by both national and international agencies have been established in an attempt to mitigate reproductive health problems. Solving problems on reproductive health projects that only have temporary funding requires effective project management that hopefully leads to better long-term desired outcomes. This paper identifies the association between collaborative reproductive health (CRH) project management and sustainable outcomes. The Gui...

  5. Testing the Electronic Personal Health Record Acceptance Model by Nurses for Managing Their Own Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinkoff, A.M.; Storr, C.L.; Wilson, M.L.; Gurses, A.P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background To our knowledge, no evidence is available on health care professionals’ use of electronic personal health records (ePHRs) for their health management. We therefore focused on nurses’ personal use of ePHRs using a modified technology acceptance model. Objectives To examine (1) the psychometric properties of the ePHR acceptance model, (2) the associations of perceived usefulness, ease of use, data privacy and security protection, and perception of self as health-promoting role models to nurses’ own ePHR use, and (3) the moderating influences of age, chronic illness and medication use, and providers’ use of electronic health record (EHRs) on the associations between the ePHR acceptance constructs and ePHR use. Methods A convenience sample of registered nurses, those working in one of 12 hospitals in the Maryland and Washington, DC areas and members of the nursing informatics community (AMIA and HIMSS), were invited to respond to an anonymous online survey; 847 responded. Multiple logistic regression identified associations between the model constructs and ePHR use, and the moderating effect. Results Overall, ePHRs were used by 47%. Sufficient reliability for all scales was found. Three constructs were significantly related to nurses’ own ePHR use after adjusting for covariates: usefulness, data privacy and security protection, and health-promoting role model. Nurses with providers that used EHRs who perceived a higher level of data privacy and security protection had greater odds of ePHR use than those whose providers did not use EHRs. Older nurses with a higher self-perception as health-promoting role models had greater odds of ePHR use than younger nurses. Conclusions Nurses who use ePHRs for their personal health might promote adoption by the general public by serving as health-promoting role models. They can contribute to improvements in patient education and ePHR design, and serve as crucial resources when working with their

  6. Project management educational curriculum for public health professionals: development and evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Sabapathy

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Successful completion of public health projects is critical to achieving population health objectives. However project execution can be challenging due to scarce time and resources, rapidly changing environments and complex stakeholder requirements. To address these challenges physicians and other professionals working in public health need to learn the practical skills of project management. However curricula tailored to project management skill development for public health professionals is not widely available. A one-week curriculum on project management for public health professionals has been developed enabling participants to independently lead small-scale public health projects. This course adapts a private-sector curriculum for use in public health practice and incorporates a unique skill-building teaching method. Evaluation of the initial curriculum delivery at the Weill-Bugando University, Tanzania indicated the majority of students intended to use project management upon return to their positions in public health. Students indicated a lack of a critical mass of public health professionals with required knowledge and skills represents the greatest barrier to integration of project management into public health practice. A unique one-week curriculum in project management has been developed and is being made publicly available. The course will enable physicians and other professionals working in public health to rapidly learn and apply the methodology to the front lines of public health.

  7. Excel 2016 for health services management statistics a guide to solving problems

    CERN Document Server

    Quirk, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    This book shows the capabilities of Microsoft Excel in teaching health services management statistics effectively. Similar to the previously published Excel 2013 for Health Services Management Statistics, this book is a step-by-step exercise-driven guide for students and practitioners who need to master Excel to solve practical health service management problems. If understanding statistics isn’t your strongest suit, you are not especially mathematically-inclined, or if you are wary of computers, this is the right book for you. Excel, a widely available computer program for students and managers, is also an effective teaching and learning tool for quantitative analyses in health service courses. Its powerful computational ability and graphical functions make learning statistics much easier than in years past. However, Excel 2016 for Health Services Management Statistics: A Guide to Solving Practical Problems is the first book to capitalize on these improvements by teaching students and managers how to apply...

  8. Does Management Really Matter? And If so, to Who?: Comment on "Management Matters: A Leverage Point for Health Systems Strengthening in Global Health".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovlo, Delanyo

    2015-12-03

    The editorial is commendable and I agree with many of the points raised. Management is an important aspect of health system strengthening which is often overlooked. In order to build the capacity of management, we need to consider other factors such as, the environment within which managers work, their numbers, support systems and distribution. Effective leadership is an issue which cannot be overemphasized as part of management capacity in resource deprived settings as difficult settings require leadership skills in order to achieve managerial success. A primary issue of importance highlighted in the editorial is country ownership of management effectiveness initiatives, which may be very difficult when the health sector is dependent on support and funding from donors and influential partners, who drive change often without a good understanding of the context. How partners finance health programmes is another dilemma as it can distract from locally determined priorities. Further research should help us to understand better what works and under different settings.

  9. Information management. Computer resources for the occupational and environmental health nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amann, M C

    1999-12-01

    Occupational and environmental health nurses are responsible for the management of large amounts of very complex information, ranging from individual employee health records to reports that insure corporate compliance. There are four primary tools available to the occupational health nurse to facilitate efficient management and use of health information--occupational health information systems, office support programs, communication systems, and the Internet and intranets. Selection and implementation of an integrated health information system requires the involvement of any organization that uses data processed by the system. A project management approach to implementation and maintenance of a system insures adherence to time lines and attention to details. The internet provides access to a vast amount of information useful to both the occupational health professional and the employee. Intranets are internal systems that may facilitate distribution of health information to employees, maintenance of current health related policies, and more efficient reporting procedures.

  10. TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT IN THE PUBLIC HEALTH SECTOR: PROFESSIONAL VIEW FROM EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE EXPERTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.O. Kachieng’a

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available South Africa has tried various strategies to improve access, quality and cost-efficiency in the health care delivery systems. However it is clear that the optimal approach has yet to be found. It has been recognised that health technology is an important element of this transformation, and will continue to play a vital role.
    It is almost evident that the way health technology is managed in health care institutions directly affects the quality of treatment patients receive. Although strategic importance of technology in health care has been documented widely in scientific literature; technology planning, procurement and management have not received the attention they deserve in the transformation of health care services in the country.
    The survey discussed in this paper investigated health care equipment maintenance problems and associated technological constraints from point of view of health technology managers, biomedical and clinical engineers. It also provides recommendations for competitive utilisation of technology in the public health sector.

  11. A framework design for the mHealth system for self-management promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Guifeng; Yang, Pan; Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Hengyi; Lin, Chengyu; Chen, Jin; Cai, Guolong; Yan, Jing; Ning, Gangmin

    2015-01-01

    Mobile health (mHealth) technology has been proposed to alleviate the lack of sufficient medical resources for personal healthcare. However, usage difficulties and compliance issues relating to this technology restrict the effect of mHealth system-supported self-management. In this study, an mHealth framework is introduced to overcome these drawbacks and improve the outcome of self-management. We implemented a set of ease of use principles in the mHealth design and employed the quantitative Fogg Behavior Model to enhance users' execution ability. The framework was realized in a prototype design for the mHealth system, which consists of medical apparatuses, mobile applications and a health management server. The system is able to monitor the physiological status in an unconstrained manner with simplified operations, while supervising the healthcare plan. The results suggest that the present framework design is accessible for ordinary users and effective in improving users' execution ability in self-management.

  12. Use of Mobile Health Technology in the Prevention and Management of Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartz, Jacob; Yingling, Leah; Powell-Wiley, Tiffany M

    2016-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality globally, with diabetes being an independent risk factor. Adequate diabetes management has proven to be resource-intensive, requiring frequent lab work, primary care and specialist visits, and time-consuming record-keeping by the patient and care team. New mobile health (mHealth) technologies have enhanced how diabetes is managed and care is delivered. While more recent work has investigated mHealth devices as complementary tools in behavioral interventions for diabetes prevention and management, little is still known about the effectiveness of mHealth technology as stand-alone intervention tools for reducing diabetes risk. In addition, more work is needed to identify the role of mHealth technology in treating vulnerable populations to ameliorate cardiovascular health disparities. With advances in mobile health technology development for diabetes prevention and management, these modalities will likely play an increasingly prominent role in reducing cardiometabolic risk for the US population.

  13. [The operational role of the occupational health physician in the assessment and management of health risks related to night risks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucci, Nicola; Giorgi, Gabriele; Gonnelli, Irene Margherita; Garbarino, Sergio; Cupelli, Vincenzo; Arcangelil, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    The operational role of the occupational health physician in the assessment and management of health risks related to night work. Night work, in the last 30-40 years, has been extended to almost all areas of employment. The potential effects on workers' health--related to the disruption of circadian rhythms--are now well defined and studied in the Literature. All issues about the protection of safety and health for night workers are governed by the Italian Legislative Decree no. 66/2003 and subsequent amendments. The management of night work hasn't been included into the main Law on Occupational Safety and Health (Italian Legislative Decree no. 81/2008 and subsequent amendments) and a coordination between the two disciplines is desirable. The occupational health physician, as a global consultant for the protection of all health issues into a company, has to evaluate the potential effects of night work on health, both individually and as a group of workers. In this way, the physician may use either traditional tools (history, physical examination, blood tests) or innovative tools (questionnaires, health promotion programs, interventions on shift schedules). In the management of night work is useful to employ schedules that respect both psychophysical integrity and social welfare of workers and the needs of the production. The occupational health physician plays a significant role in information and training of workers, both individually and as a group of workers, and in the organization of health promotion programs (whit a voluntary participation by the workers).

  14. Developing confidence in mental health students to recognise and manage physical health problems using a learning intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Angelina Lilja; Withnell, Neil

    2016-07-01

    Globally, there is increased recognition of a higher prevalence of physical ill health and mortality in individuals with mental health problems. A review of the literature highlighted the need to address deterioration in physical health of those with mental health problems through better recognition and management on the part of mental health nurses. However, mental health nurses have been found to lack confidence and be unsure of their role within this area. The aim of the project was to develop pre-registration mental health students' confidence to be able to recognise and manage physical health deterioration through the use of high fidelity human patient simulation, the development of contextualised clinical scenarios and additional theory around the A to E mnemonic structured assessment. The project involved 95 third year mental health student nurses, using a self-rating pre and post intervention questionnaire to measure their perceived confidence levels and to evaluate the effectiveness of the learning intervention. Findings demonstrate improved overall confidence levels in recognising and managing physical health deterioration in human patient simulators displaying mental health problems.

  15. A health care navigation tool assesses asthma self-management and health literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Luzmercy; Morales, Knashawn H; Klusaritz, Heather; Han, Xiaoyan; Huang, Jingru; Rogers, Marisa; Bennett, Ian M; Rand, Cynthia S; Ndicu, Grace; Apter, Andrea J

    2016-12-01

    Self-management of moderate-to-severe asthma depends on the patient's ability to (1) navigate (access health care to obtain diagnoses and treatment), (2) use inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) properly, and (3) understand ICS function. We sought to test whether navigation skills (medication recall, knowledge of copay requirements, and ability to provide information needed for a medical visit about a persistent cough unresponsive to medication) are related to other self-management skills and health literacy. A 21-item Navigating Ability (NAV2) questionnaire was developed, validated, and then read to adults with moderate-to-severe asthma. ICS technique was evaluated by using scales derived from instructions in national guidelines; knowledge of ICS function was evaluated by using a validated 10-item questionnaire. Spearman correlation was computed between NAV2 score and these questionnaires and with numeracy (Asthma Numeracy Questionnaire) and print literacy (Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults). Two hundred fifty adults participated: age, 51 ± 13 years; 72% female; 65% African American; 10% Latino; 50% with household income of less than $30,000/y; 47% with no more than a 12th-grade education; and 29% experienced hospitalizations for asthma in the prior year. A higher NAV2 score was associated with correct ICS technique (ρ = 0.24, P = .0002), knowledge of ICSs (ρ = 0.35, P < .001), better print literacy (ρ = 0.44, P < .001), and numeracy (ρ = 0.41, P < .001). Patients with poor navigational ability are likely to have poor inhaler technique and limited understanding of ICS function, as well as limited numeracy and print literacy. Clinicians should consider these elements of self-management for their effect on asthma care and as a marker of more general health literacy deficits. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. COPD: Health Care Utilisation Patterns with Different Disease Management Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, Edwin K; Hutchinson, Anastasia F; Tacey, Mark; Irving, Louis; Khan, Fary

    2017-08-01

    The management of COPD is a significant and costly issue worldwide, with acute healthcare utilisation consisting of admissions and outpatient attendances being a major contributor to the cost. Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) and integrated disease management (IDM) are often offered. Whilst there is strong evidence of physical and quality of life outcomes following IDM and PR, few studies have looked into healthcare utilisation. The aims of this study were to confirm whether IDM and PR reduce acute healthcare utilisation and to identify factors which contribute to acute health care utilisation or increased mortality. This was a retrospective cohort study of patients with COPD who were referred to IDM over a 10-year period. Patients were also offered an 8-week PR program. Data collected were matched with the hospital dataset to obtain information on inpatient, ED and outpatient attendances. 517 patients were enrolled to IDM. 315 (61%) also commenced PR and 220 (43%) completed PR. Patients who were referred to PR were younger and had less comorbidities (p < 0.001). Both groups (IDM only and IDM + PR referred) had reductions in healthcare utilisation but the IDM-only group had greater reductions. A survival benefit (HR 0.68, 95% CI 0.50-0.92) was seen in those who were PR completers compared to patients who received IDM only. Patients with COPD who successfully complete PR in addition to participating in IDM have improved survival. IDM alone was effective in the reduction of healthcare utilisation; however, the addition of PR did not reduce healthcare usage further.

  17. Focusing on the software of managing health workers: what can we learn from high commitment management practices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchal, Bruno; Kegels, Guy

    2008-01-01

    Knowledge of what constitutes best practice in human resource management (HRM) in public-oriented services is limited and the operational aspects of managing health workers at provision level have been poorly studied. The magnet hospital concept offers some insights into HRM practices that are leading to high commitment. These have been shown to lead to superior performance in not only industrial business firms, but also service industries and the public service. The mechanisms that drive these practices include positive psychological links between managers and staff, organizational commitment and trust. Conditions for successful high commitment management (HiCoM) include health service managers with a strong vision and able to transmit this vision to their staff, appropriate decision spaces for healthcare managers and a pool of reasonable well-trained health workers. For this, adequate remuneration is the first condition. Equally important are the issues of cultural fit and of 'commitment'. What would staff expect from management in return for their commitment to the organization? Salary buys indeed time of employees, but other practices ensure their commitment. Only if these drivers are understood will managers be able to make their HRM practices more responsive to the needs and expectations of the health workers.

  18. Intelligent Integrated Health Management for a System of Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Harvey; Schmalzel, John; Figueroa, Fernando

    2008-01-01

    An intelligent integrated health management system (IIHMS) incorporates major improvements over prior such systems. The particular IIHMS is implemented for any system defined as a hierarchical distributed network of intelligent elements (HDNIE), comprising primarily: (1) an architecture (Figure 1), (2) intelligent elements, (3) a conceptual framework and taxonomy (Figure 2), and (4) and ontology that defines standards and protocols. Some definitions of terms are prerequisite to a further brief description of this innovation: A system-of-systems (SoS) is an engineering system that comprises multiple subsystems (e.g., a system of multiple possibly interacting flow subsystems that include pumps, valves, tanks, ducts, sensors, and the like); 'Intelligent' is used here in the sense of artificial intelligence. An intelligent element may be physical or virtual, it is network enabled, and it is able to manage data, information, and knowledge (DIaK) focused on determining its condition in the context of the entire SoS; As used here, 'health' signifies the functionality and/or structural integrity of an engineering system, subsystem, or process (leading to determination of the health of components); 'Process' can signify either a physical process in the usual sense of the word or an element into which functionally related sensors are grouped; 'Element' can signify a component (e.g., an actuator, a valve), a process, a controller, an actuator, a subsystem, or a system; The term Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) is used to describe a capability that focuses on determining the condition (health) of every element in a complex system (detect anomalies, diagnose causes, prognosis of future anomalies), and provide data, information, and knowledge (DIaK) not just data to control systems for safe and effective operation. A major novel aspect of the present development is the concept of intelligent integration. The purpose of intelligent integration, as defined and

  19. The importance of values in shaping how health systems governance and management can support universal health coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattore, Giovanni; Tediosi, Fabrizio

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we use cultural theory to investigate the nature of health systems governance and management, showing that it may be helpful in identifying key aspects of the debate about how to promote universal health coverage. Cultural theory argues that "how" we govern and manage health services depends on what we think about the nature of government organizations and the legitimacy of their scope of action. The values that are implied by universal health coverage underlie choices about "how" health systems are governed and their organizations are managed. We draw two main conclusions. First, the translation of principles and goals into practice requires exceptional efforts to design adequate decision-making arrangements (the essence of governance) and management practices. Management and governance, or "how" policies are decided and conducted, are not secondary to the selection of the best policy solutions (the "what"). Second, governance and management solutions are not independent of the values that they are expected to serve. Instead, they should be designed to be consonant with these values. Cultural theory suggests-and experience supports-the idea that "group identity" is favorable for shaping different forms of social life and public administrations. This approach should thus be a starting point for those who strive to obtain universal health coverage.

  20. A review of health leadership and management capacity in the Solomon Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asante, Augustine; Roberts, Graham; Hall, John

    2012-04-01

    ACCESS AND UTILISATION OF HEALTH CARE: The armed conflict that engulfed the Solomon Islands between 1998 and 2003 significantly disrupted the provision of health care especially in rural and remote areas. There is one doctor for 3,300 people and approximately 13 nurses and midwives for 10,000 people. Despite limitations 87% of people seek health care when sick. FINANCING THE HEALTH SYSTEM: The SIG placed a series of reservations on ministerial goods and services budgets that effectively the budget by 33%, severely impacting provincial budgets and resulting in acquired debts. Shortfalls have been addressed by allocating Health Sector Support Program funds to the provinces to allow services to continue, a strategy that will likely recur, but by which donor support replaces government provision Provincial health accountants have received training in MYOB in 2009 but acquittal systems require higher level accounting skills for reports to be submitted on time to permit the release of subsequent funding tranches. HUMAN RESOURCES FOR HEALTH: The shortage of doctors and specialists is a key challenge. As at December 2010, there were a total of 2,728 health workers in the public sector in Solomon Islands. Staff costs consume on average 55% of provincial health grants Filled Public Service Division staff establishments and budgetary reservations have reduced the ability to meet the salary and wage costs of new graduates. Solomon Islands is currently negotiating to assist Vanuatu in filling its nursing staff vacancies with its surplus The return of 75 Cuban trained medical officers from 2013 presents the management challenge of accessing budget provisions for so many new positions and in funding the infrastructure needed to house, equip and maintain them in service. HEALTH MANAGEMENT STRUCTURE: Provincial health managers are operationally responsive to local needs, managerially responsible to provincial governments, while being concerned with adherence to central MHMS policy

  1. Health promotion and disease prevention: a look at demand management programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fronstin, P

    1996-09-01

    This Issue Brief describes employers' efforts to contain health expenditures through demand management programs. These programs are designed to reduce utilization by focusing on disease prevention and health promotion. Demand management includes work site health promotion, wellness programs, and access management. Work site health promotion is a comprehensive approach to improving health and includes awareness, health education, behavioral change, and organizational health initiatives. Wellness programs usually include stress management, smoking cessation, weight management, back care, health screenings, nutrition education, work place safety, prenatal and well baby care, CPR and first aid classes, and employee assistance programs (EAPs). These programs are often viewed positively by workers and can have long-term benefits for employers above and beyond health care cost containment. Demand management can benefit employers by increasing productivity, employee retention, and employee morale and by reducing turnover, absenteeism, future medical claims, and ultimately expenditures on health care. Even though a growing number of employers are offering wellness programs, only 37 percent of full-time workers employed in medium and large private establishments were eligible for wellness programs by 1993. However, a recent survey found that 88 percent of major employers have introduced some form of health promotion, disease prevention, or early intervention initiative to encourage healthy lifestyles among their salaried employees. Distinctions must be drawn between short- and long-term strategies. Demand management can be thought of as a short-term strategy when the focus of the program is on creating more appropriate and efficient health care utilization. Disease prevention is characterized by longer-term health improvement objectives. Whether the purpose is to reduce utilization in the short term or in the long term, the ultimate goal remains the same: to reduce health

  2. Interviewing Key Informants: Strategic Planning for a Global Public Health Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kun, Karen E.; Kassim, Anisa; Howze, Elizabeth; MacDonald, Goldie

    2013-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Sustainable Management Development Program (SMDP) partners with low- and middle-resource countries to develop management capacity so that effective global public health programs can be implemented and better health outcomes can be achieved. The program's impact however, was variable. Hence, there…

  3. An empowerment-based approach to developing innovative e-health tools for self-management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alpay, L.; Boog, P. van der; Dumaij, A.

    2011-01-01

    E-health is seen as an important technological tool in achieving self-management; however, there is little evidence of how effective e-health is for self-management. Example tools remain experimental and there is limited knowledge yet about the design, use, and effects of this class of tools. By way

  4. Forest management practices and the occupational safety and health administration logging standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    John R. Myers; David Elton Fosbroke

    1995-01-01

    The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has established safety and health regulations for the logging industry. These new regulations move beyond the prior OSHA pulpwood harvesting standard by including sawtimber harvesting operations. Because logging is a major tool used by forest managers to meet silvicultural goals, managers must be aware of what...

  5. Introduction to the special issue on advances in clinical and health-care knowledge management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bali, Rajeev K; Feng, David Dagan; Burstein, Frada; Dwivedi, Ashish N

    2005-06-01

    Clinical and health-care knowledge management (KM) as a discipline has attracted increasing worldwide attention in recent years. The approach encompasses a plethora of interrelated themes including aspects of clinical informatics, clinical governance, artificial intelligence, privacy and security, data mining, genomic mining, information management, and organizational behavior. This paper introduces key manuscripts which detail health-care and clinical KM cases and applications.

  6. Creative Approaches to Health Education in Higher Education: Wellness Management Option.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burckes-Miller, Mardie E.

    Wellness Management has been designed as an option in the health education bachelors program at Plymouth State College of the University System of New Hampshire. The Wellness Management option was created because alumni and employers stated that graduates needed business skills in order to be more marketable and effective as health educators. The…

  7. Development of a national health care waste management policy for South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Molefe, GS

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available A Policy for Health Care Risk Waste (HCRW) Management is being developed by the Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism in collaboration with the national Department of Health. The HCRW Management Policy aims at: i) Setting of standards...

  8. Integrated Environment and Safety and Health Management System (ISMS) Implementation Project Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MITCHELL, R.L.

    2000-01-10

    The Integrated Environment, Safety and Health Management System (ISMS) Implementation Project Plan serves as the project document to guide the Fluor Hanford, Inc (FHI) and Major Subcontractor (MSC) participants through the steps necessary to complete the integration of environment, safety, and health into management and work practices at all levels.

  9. People Management Practices in the Public Health Sector: Developments from Victoria, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Pauline; Bartram, Timothy; Harbridge, Raymond

    2004-01-01

    This study investigates the impact on human resource management (HRM) practices in the public health sector in Victoria, Australia of two different government policy environments. First, it explores the Liberal Coalition Government's decentralisation of public health sector management, from 1992-1999 and second, the Labor Government's…

  10. Self-management as management of the self : Future directions for healthcare and the promotion of mental health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franssen, G.; Van Geelen, S.

    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content: In a recent attempt to update the 1948 World Health Organization definition of health as a state of complete well-being and absence of disease, it has now been proposed to change its emphasis to the ability to adapt and self manage in

  11. Allied health team management of rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, J R; Brandt, K D

    1984-09-01

    The use of a coordinated team of allied health professionals (AHPs) to treat patients with rheumatoid arthritis assigned to experimental groups (EG) and comparison groups (CG) was assessed. The EG patients were evaluated regularly by each AHP team member, whereas CG patients were seen by AHPs only upon referral. Of the 10 EG and 13 CG patients who remained in the study for 2 years, the EG patients initially exhibited somewhat greater disease activity than CG (as reflected by erythrocyte sedimentation rate and duration of morning stiffness). After 2 years, EG patients demonstrated less disease activity than at the outset, whereas CG patients either showed little change in these parameters or deteriorated during the study. Grip strength, which was initially similar in the two groups, improved in EG patients but decreased in CG patients, so that after 2 years a significant difference was noted between the two groups (p less than .05). Tendency to lose hand range of motion was also greater in CG than in EG patients. Some EG patients showed improvement in finger flexion deformities during the study. Furthermore, EG patients showed a greater tendency to acquire positive attitudes regarding themselves and family relationships. These results suggest that ongoing "team care" may be more efficacious than episodic use of AHPs in management of patients with mild rheumatoid arthritis.

  12. Prognostics and Health Management of an Automated Machining Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng He

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Machine failure modes are presenting a major burden to the operator, the plant, and the enterprise causing significant downtime, labor cost, and reduced revenue. New technologies are emerging over the past years to monitor the machine’s performance, detect and isolate incipient failures or faults, and take appropriate actions to mitigate such detrimental events. This paper addresses the development and application of novel Prognostics and Health Management (PHM technologies to a prototype machining process (a screw-tightening machine. The enabling technologies are built upon a series of tasks starting with failure analysis, testing, and data processing aimed to extract useful features or condition indicators from raw data, a symbolic regression modeling framework, and a Bayesian estimation method called particle filtering to predict the feature state estimate accurately. The detection scheme declares the fault of a machine critical component with user specified accuracy or confidence and given false alarm rate while the prediction algorithm estimates accurately the remaining useful life of the failing component. Simulation results support the efficacy of the approach and match well the experimental data.

  13. Introduction to System Health Engineering and Management in Aerospace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Stephen B.

    2005-01-01

    This paper provides a technical overview of Integrated System Health Engineering and Management (ISHEM). We define ISHEM as "the paper provides a techniques, and technologies used to design, analyze, build, verify, and operate a system to prevent faults and/or minimize their effects." This includes design and manufacturing techniques as well operational and managerial methods. ISHEM is not a "purely technical issue" as it also involves and must account for organizational, communicative, and cognitive f&ms of humans as social beings and as individuals. Thus the paper will discuss in more detail why all of these elements, h m the technical to the cognitive and social, are necessary to build dependable human-machine systems. The paper outlines a functional homework and architecture for ISHEM operations, describes the processes needed to implement ISHEM in the system life-cycle, and provides a theoretical framework to understand the relationship between the different aspects of the discipline. It then derives from these and the social and cognitive bases a set of design and operational principles for ISHEM.

  14. A Structural Model Decomposition Framework for Systems Health Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roychoudhury, Indranil; Daigle, Matthew J.; Bregon, Anibal; Pulido, Belamino

    2013-01-01

    Systems health management (SHM) is an important set of technologies aimed at increasing system safety and reliability by detecting, isolating, and identifying faults; and predicting when the system reaches end of life (EOL), so that appropriate fault mitigation and recovery actions can be taken. Model-based SHM approaches typically make use of global, monolithic system models for online analysis, which results in a loss of scalability and efficiency for large-scale systems. Improvement in scalability and efficiency can be achieved by decomposing the system model into smaller local submodels and operating on these submodels instead. In this paper, the global system model is analyzed offline and structurally decomposed into local submodels. We define a common model decomposition framework for extracting submodels from the global model. This framework is then used to develop algorithms for solving model decomposition problems for the design of three separate SHM technologies, namely, estimation (which is useful for fault detection and identification), fault isolation, and EOL prediction. We solve these model decomposition problems using a three-tank system as a case study.

  15. Challenges and Opportunities with Empowering Baby Boomers for Personal Health Information Management Using Consumer Health Information Technologies: an Ecological Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia M. LeRouge

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available “Baby Boomers” (adults born between the years of 1946 and 1964 make up the largest segment of the population in many countries, including the United States (about 78 million Americans [1]. As Baby Boomers reach retirement age and beyond, many will have increasing medical needs and thus demand more health care resources that will challenge the healthcare system. Baby Boomers will likely accelerate the movement toward patient self-management and prevention efforts. Consumer Health Information Technologies (CHIT hold promise for empowering health consumers to take an active role in health maintenance and disease management, and thus, have the potential to address Baby Boomers' health needs. Such innovations require changes in health care practice and processes that take into account Baby Boomers' personal health needs, preferences, health culture, and abilities to use these technologies. Without foundational knowledge of barriers and opportunities, Baby Boomers may not realize the potential of these innovations for improving self-management of health and health outcomes. However, research to date has not adequately explored the degree to which Baby Boomers are ready to embrace consumer health information technology and how their unique subcultures affect adoption and diffusion. This position paper describes an ecological conceptual framework for understanding and studying CHIT aimed at satisfying the personal health needs of Baby Boomers. We explore existing literature to provide a detailed depiction of our proposed conceptual framework, which focuses characteristics influencing Baby Boomers and their Personal Health Information Management (PHIM and potential information problems. Using our ecological framework as a backdrop, we provide insight and implications for future research based on literature and underlying theories represented in our model.

  16. Using Mobile-Health to Connect Women with Cardiovascular Disease and Improve Self-Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakakibara, Brodie M; Ross, Emily; Arthur, Gavin; Brown-Ganzert, Lynda; Petrin, Samantha; Sedlak, Tara; Lear, Scott A

    2017-03-01

    Background/Introduction: Self-management approaches are regarded as appropriate methods to support patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and to prevent secondary complications and hospitalizations. Key to successful self-management is the ability of individuals to enlist peer supports to help sustain motivation and efforts to manage their condition. The purpose of this study was to investigate the proof of concept of a peer-support mobile-health (m-health) program, called Healing Circles, and explore the program's effect on self-management, social support, and health-related quality of life in women with CVD.

  17. Excel 2010 for health services management statistics a guide to solving practical problems

    CERN Document Server

    Quirk, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    This is the first book to show the capabilities of Microsoft Excel to teach health services management statistics effectively. It is a step-by-step exercise-driven guide for students and practitioners who need to master Excel to solve practical health services management problems. If understanding statistics isn’t your strongest suit, you are not especially mathematically-inclined, or if you are wary of computers, this is the right book for you.   Excel, a widely available computer program for students and managers, is also an effective teaching and learning tool for quantitative analyses in health services management courses. Its powerful computational ability and graphical functions make learning statistics much easier than in years past. However, Excel 2010 for Health Services Management Statistics: A Guide to Solving Practical Problems is the first book to capitalize on these improvements by teaching students and managers how to apply Excel to statistical techniques necessary in their courses and work....

  18. Linking better shiftwork arrangements with safety and health management systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazutaka Kogi

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Various support measures useful for promoting joint change approaches to the improvement of both shiftworking arrangements and safety and health management systems were reviewed. A particular focus was placed on enterprise-level risk reduction measures linking working hours and management systems. METHODS: Voluntary industry-based guidelines on night and shift work for department stores and the chemical, automobile and electrical equipment industries were examined. Survey results that had led to the compilation of practicable measures to be included in these guidelines were also examined. The common support measures were then compared with ergonomic checkpoints for plant maintenance work involving irregular nightshifts. On the basis of this analysis, a new night and shift work checklist was designed. RESULTS: Both the guidelines and the plant maintenance work checkpoints were found to commonly cover multiple issues including work schedules and various job-related risks. This close link between shiftwork arrangements and risk management was important as shiftworkers in these industries considered teamwork and welfare services to be essential for managing risks associated with night and shift work. Four areas found suitable for participatory improvement by managers and workers were work schedules, ergonomic work tasks, work environment and training. The checklist designed to facilitate participatory change processes covered all these areas. CONCLUSIONS: The checklist developed to describe feasible workplace actions was suitable for integration with comprehensive safety and health management systems and offered valuable opportunities for improving working time arrangements and job content together.OBJETIVOS: Foram revisados diversas medidas de apoio úteis para incentivar abordagens conjuntas para a melhoria na organização do trabalho por turnos e os processos de gestão de saúde e segurança. As medidas para redução de risco em n

  19. A descriptive study of visits by animal health specialists in pig farming: type, frequency, and herd-health management factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Enting, J.; Laak, van de M.J.L.; Tielen, M.J.M.; Huirne, R.B.M.; Dijkhuizen, A.A.

    1998-01-01

    This research was carried out to analyse the visits specialists of the Dutch Animal Health Service made to growing and fattening pig farms. The type and frequency of the visits and identified herd-health management factors that did not meet accepted standards were investigated. In total 373 visit re

  20. Targeted population health management can help a hospital grow market share.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Gary; Talbert, Pearson

    2012-06-01

    In 2005, St. Luke's Hospital in Chesterfield, Mo., launched the "Passport to Wellness" program to help employers reduce preventable illnesses by providing access to screenings, health education, health coaching, disease management, and healthy lifestyle programs. The program was designed to influence consumer choice of hospitals and physicians and influence health insurance purchasing decisions. St. Luke's program also met goals created by local businesses, including identifying health risks of each employer's workforce and reducing health-related costs.

  1. Analyzing best practices in employee health management: how age, sex, and program components relate to employee engagement and health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Paul E; Grossmeier, Jessica; Mangen, David J; Gingerich, Stefan B

    2013-04-01

    Examine the influence of employee health management (EHM) best practices on registration, participation, and health behavior change in telephone-based coaching programs. Individual health assessment data, EHM program data, and health coaching participation data were analyzed for associations with coaching program enrollment, active participation, and risk reduction. Multivariate analyses occurred at the individual (n = 205,672) and company levels (n = 55). Considerable differences were found in how age and sex impacted typical EHM evaluation metrics. Cash incentives for the health assessment were associated with more risk reduction for men than for women. Providing either a noncash or a benefits-integrated incentive for completing the health assessment, or a noncash incentive for lifestyle management, strengthened the relationship between age and risk reduction. In EHM programs, one size does not fit all. These results can help employers tailor engagement strategies for their specific population.

  2. Human Resources and Vaccine Management at Provincial Health Office, District/City Health Office and Primary Health Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andi Leny Susyanty

    2015-03-01

    (GAIN UCI 2010–2014 stated that the general problems of decline in immunization coverage and quality of service were caused by several things, one of which is the lack of quantity, quality and distribution of human resources. Methods: A cross-sectional mix-method study to investigate human resources in vaccine management had been conducted in two provinces in 2012. Primary data were collected by interviewing stakeholders thoroughly, secondary data collection and observation were also carried out. Analysis was done by scoring for data concerning education, length of employment, training experience and knowledge. Result:The number of Vaccine management officers are still lacking. While the immunization guidelines required minimal two officers for each health centers. Officers’ knowledge in primary health centers is still inadequate, especially in terms of the vaccine and Coldchain (Ice Lined Refrigerators. Officers at Provincial Health Office had been trained in vaccine management, but not all officers at District Health Office and Primary Health Centers had received training yet. Suggestion: This study suggests the addition of the quantity and quality of human resources in vaccine management, because the officers can affect the quality of the vaccines, because vaccines need a special handling to maintain the quality to provide immunity and prevent the occurrence of diseases that can be prevented by immunization (PD3I.Key words: vaccine, human resources, training, knowledge

  3. A Basic Strategy to Manage Global Health with Reference to Livestock Production in Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C. Hall

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Newly emerging infectious diseases (nEIDs have increased rapidly presenting alarming challenges to global health. We argue that for effective management of global health a basic strategy should include at least three essential tactical forms: actions of a directly focused nature, institutional coordination, and disciplinary integration in approaches to health management. Each level of action is illustrated with examples from the livestock sector in Asia. No clear example of all three tactical forms in place can be found from developing countries where food security is a significant threat although Vietnam is developing a comprehensive strategy. Finally, an ecosystem health approach to global health management is advocated; such an approach moves away from the traditional single disciplinary approach. Stronger guidance is needed to direct ecohealth research and application in the management of global health.

  4. Web-based data warehouse in the osteoporosis community health information management system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Qiang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the remote management system of osteoporosis community intervention and design the data warehouse. Materials and Methods: The basic principles and methods of data warehouse were applied to the osteoporosis community intervention to build the MySQL 4.5 relational database using PHP as the development tool. A web-based B/S Model remote management system was established for the high risk population of osteoporosis in the community. Results: The system can be used for data management, data query, online analysis, etc., in community health service center, specialist outpatient for osteoporosis, and health administration sectors. Conclusion: The remote management system and data warehouse can provide guidance for policymaking of health administrators, residents health information, and intervention suggestions for general practitioners in community health service centers, patients follow-up information for osteoporosis specialists in general hospitals, as well as large quantities of original research data and preliminary health statistic results.

  5. A basic strategy to manage global health with reference to livestock production in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, David C; Le, Quynh Ba

    2011-01-01

    Newly emerging infectious diseases (nEIDs) have increased rapidly presenting alarming challenges to global health. We argue that for effective management of global health a basic strategy should include at least three essential tactical forms: actions of a directly focused nature, institutional coordination, and disciplinary integration in approaches to health management. Each level of action is illustrated with examples from the livestock sector in Asia. No clear example of all three tactical forms in place can be found from developing countries where food security is a significant threat although Vietnam is developing a comprehensive strategy. Finally, an ecosystem health approach to global health management is advocated; such an approach moves away from the traditional single disciplinary approach. Stronger guidance is needed to direct ecohealth research and application in the management of global health.

  6. Information security risk management for computerized health information systems in hospitals: a case study of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarei J

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Javad Zarei,1 Farahnaz Sadoughi2 1Health Information Management, Health Management and Economics Research Center, School of Health Management and Information Science, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran, 2Health Information Management Department, School of Health Management and Information Science, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran Background: In recent years, hospitals in Iran – similar to those in other countries – have experienced growing use of computerized health information systems (CHISs, which play a significant role in the operations of hospitals. But, the major challenge of CHIS use is information security. This study attempts to evaluate CHIS information security risk management at hospitals of Iran.Materials and methods: This applied study is a descriptive and cross-sectional research that has been conducted in 2015. The data were collected from 551 hospitals of Iran. Based on literature review, experts’ opinion, and observations at five hospitals, our intensive questionnaire was designed to assess security risk management for CHISs at the concerned hospitals, which was then sent to all hospitals in Iran by the Ministry of Health.Results: Sixty-nine percent of the studied hospitals pursue information security policies and procedures in conformity with Iran Hospitals Accreditation Standards. At some hospitals, risk identification, risk evaluation, and risk estimation, as well as risk treatment, are unstructured without any specified approach or methodology. There is no significant structured approach to risk management at the studied hospitals.Conclusion: Information security risk management is not followed by Iran’s hospitals and their information security policies. This problem can cause a large number of challenges for their CHIS security in future. Therefore, Iran’s Ministry of Health should develop practical policies to improve information security

  7. Evaluation in health: participatory methodology and involvement of municipal managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Cristiane Andrea Locatelli de; Tanaka, Oswaldo Yoshimi

    2016-08-04

    To analyze scopes and limits of the use of participatory methodology of evaluation with municipal health managers and administrators. Qualitative research with health policymakers and managers of the Comissão Intergestores Regional (CIR - Regional Interagency Commission) of a health region of the state of Sao Paulo in Brazil. Representatives from seven member cities participated in seven workshops facilitated by the researchers, with the aim of assessing a specific problem of the care line, which would be used as a tracer of the system integrality. The analysis of the collected empirical material was based on the hermeneutic-dialectic methodology and aimed at the evaluation of the applied participatory methodology, according to its capacity of promoting a process of assessment capable to be used as a support for municipal management. With the participatory approach of evaluation, we were able to promote in-depth discussions with the group, especially related to the construction of integral care and to the inclusion of the user's perspective in decision-making, linked to the search for solution to concrete problems of managers. By joint exploration, the possibility of using data from electronic information systems was opened, as well as information coming directly from the users of the services, to enhance discussions and negotiations between partners. The participants were disbelievers of the replication potential of this type of evaluation without the direct monitoring of the academy, given the difficulty of organizing the process in everyday life, already taken by emergency and political issues. Evaluations of programs and services carried out within the Regional Interagency Commission, starting from the local interest and facilitating the involvement of its members by the use of participatory methodologies, can contribute to the construction of integral care. To the extent that the act of evaluating stay invested with greater significance to the local actors

  8. The Role of Health Systems in Obesity Management and Prevention: Problems and Paradigm Shifts

    OpenAIRE

    Kirk, Sara F. L.; Penney, Tarra L

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of a new section of Current Obesity Reports, called Health Services and programs. This new section seeks to better understand the problems within health systems around obesity management and prevention and to discuss the latest research on solutions. There are few health system issues that are quite as controversial as obesity and there remain several key problems inherent within existing obesity management and prevention approaches that necessitate the adoptio...

  9. [Psychiatric case management. Chronic Disease Management application experience in a public Mental Health Service].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompili, Enrico; Silvestrini, Cristiana; Nicolò, Giuseppe; Pitino, Annalisa; Bernabei, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Aim of this study is to investigate the possible effectiveness of a specific program management needs of patients at high impact health care, case management (CM). The welfare impact is evaluated in terms of the severity of the presented disorder or to other characteristic factors of the individual patient, such as: adherence to the proposed treatments, possible resistance to drug treatment, cognitive structure, the presence of comorbid medical pathologies, abuse/addiction and, more generally, all bio-psycho-social functioning variables that can complicate the treatment of the patient. Twenty five outpatients with chronic schizophrenia (age mean 49,5 yrs) were evaluated through the Camberwell Assessment of Need (CAN20) and Life Skill Profile (LSP) before and after 1 year of CM treatment. General psychopathology was assessed by the Clinical Global Impression (CGI) and the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS). Demographic data were collected, as well as data related to the severity of the disorder: number of hospitalizations and number of switch in drug treatment in the year before the study. Between T0 and T1 there is a significant improvement on CGI-G, BPRS (total and HOST factor), LSP and CAN TOT in patients treated with CM. Moreover, in CM treated patients a 58% reduction of hospitalizations is noted in the year of study. There is a possible effectiveness of CM in improving patient's clinical and social needs in chronic psychiatric diseases. The CM reduces the number of hospitalizations.

  10. Competency requirements for middle and senior managers in community health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhanming; Howard, Peter F; Koh, Lee C; Leggat, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    The Australian health system has been subjected to rapid changes in the last 20 years to meet increasingly unmet health needs. Improvement of the efficiency and comprehensiveness of community-based services is one of the solutions to reducing the increasing demand for hospital care. Competent managers are one of the key contributors to effective and efficient health service delivery. However, the understanding of what makes a competent manager, especially in the community health services (CHS), is limited. Using an exploratory and mixed-methods approach, including focus group discussions and an online survey, this study identified five key competencies required by senior and mid-level CHS managers in metropolitan, regional and rural areas of Victoria: Interpersonal, communication qualities and relationship management; Operations, administration and resource management; Knowledge of the health care environment; Leading and managing change; and Evidence-informed decision-making. This study confirms that core competencies do exist across different management levels and improves our understanding of managerial competency requirements for middle to senior CHS managers, with implications for current and future health service management workforce development.

  11. Ineffective programme management on the delivery of health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Programme management, critical success factors, functional silos, construction .... To conduct the strategic management and the overall administration of the ...... A process approach based on the global standards. Fort Lauderdale,.

  12. Health-Literacy-Sensitive Diabetes Self-Management Interventions: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su Hyun; Lee, Anna

    2016-08-01

    Low health literacy is a potential barrier to self-management among patients with diabetes. A variety of strategies for low health literacy have been proposed for diabetes self-management interventions, but interventions accommodating low health literacy have been heterogeneous in terms of content and have produced mixed results. To systematically review health-literacy-sensitive diabetes management interventions, with a focus on identifying strategies for accommodating patients with low health literacy, and to examine the efficacy of these interventions to improve health outcomes. PubMed, CINAHL, and EMBASE were searched for intervention studies published between January 2000 and January 2015. Two authors separately identified full-texts according to the inclusion criteria and assessed study quality using the quantitative components of the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool. The final list of studies to be analyzed was made through discussion. The meta-analysis was conducted using a random effects model. Thirteen studies were selected from the 490 studies found in our initial search. We identified a range of strategies for accommodating those with low health literacy in diabetes self-management interventions, which encompassed four domains: written communication, spoken communication, empowerment, and language/cultural consideration. Using at least one of the spoken communication strategies led to positive cognitive/psychological, self-care, and health outcomes. We found that, overall, health-literacy-sensitive diabetes management interventions were effective in reducing HbA1C level in the meta-analysis. Healthcare providers should consider active implementation of strategies for accommodating people with low health literacy in diabetes self-management interventions. The routine use of spoken communication strategies would be necessary to achieve the best health outcomes in diabetes self-management interventions. More research is needed to determine the individual

  13. Mobile health technology in the prevention and management of Type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Muralidharan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Essential steps in diabetes prevention and management include translating research into the real world, improving access to health care, empowering the community, collaborative efforts involving physicians, diabetes educators, nurses, and public health scientists, and access to diabetes prevention and management efforts. Mobile phone technology has shown wide acceptance across various ages and socioeconomic groups and offers several opportunities in health care including self-management as well as prevention of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. The future seems to lie in mobile health (mHealth applications that can use embedded technology to showcase advanced uses of a smartphone to help with prevention and management of chronic disorders such as T2DM. This article presents a narrative review of the mHealth technologies used for the prevention and management of T2DM. Majority (48% of the studies used short message service (SMS technology as their intervention while some studies (29% incorporated applications for medication reminders and insulin optimization for T2DM management. Few studies (23% showed that, along with mHealth technology, health-care professionals' support resulted in added positive outcomes for the patients. This review highlights the fact that an mHealth intervention need not be restricted to SMS alone.

  14. Qualifications and Competencies for Population Health Management Positions: A Content Analysis of Job Postings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Melanie

    2017-04-06

    The need for population health management expertise has increased as the health care industry shifts toward value-based care. However, many organizations report hiring gaps as they seek to fill positions. The purpose of this study was to analyze the types of population health management positions for which health care organizations are hiring, including qualifications and competencies required for these positions. A content analysis was conducted on 271 job postings collected during a 2-month period. A typology of qualifications and competencies was developed based on the content analysis. Profiles were generated for the top 5 job title classifications: directors, coordinators, care managers, analysts, and specialists. This study highlights the investment health care organizations are making in population health management and the prominent role these positions are playing in the health care environment today. Many organizations are building out population health management teams resulting in multiple positions at different levels being added. As the market demands competent candidates who are equipped with specialized population health expertise as well as practical experience in program development, technology applications, care management, and analytics, professional education programs will need to adapt curricula to address the required areas. Competencies for specific job title classifications may need further evaluation and refinement over time. Study results can be used by organizations for strategic planning, by educators to target needed qualifications and competencies, and by researchers and policy advisors to assess progress toward value-based care.

  15. Socio-technical aspects of the use of health related personal information for management and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversen, K R; Grøtan, T O

    1996-10-01

    This paper focuses on the organisational, technical and ethical aspects related to the use of person identifiable health information for various health care management, administration, finance, research and educational purposes. It is based on the ethical standpoint that to the individuals in question, the identifiable health information represents the uttermost sensitive and critical information. In addition, nobody, possibly apart from the patients themselves, may claim ownership of such information. Thus identifiable health information should be (per individual) kept as collected and protected as possible, within the scope of the patient provider relationship. Identifiable health information should, whenever possible and reasonable, be restricted to the health care professionals providing the treatment and care to the patient, and only be made available to others, e.g. for management, research or educational purposes, either in anonymous or pseudonymous form. Secure information management (SIM) is presented as the socio-technical means to facilitate our ethical standpoint in a practical health care environment.

  16. Employee health and wellness in South Africa: The role of legislation and management standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Sieberhagen

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the role that legislation and management standards might play in ensuring occupational health and wellness in South Africa. The Occupational Health and Safety Act of 1993 determines that an employer must establish and maintain a work environment that is safe and without risk to the health of employees. It seems that there is a lack of guidance in the laws and statutes with regard to dealing with employee health and wellness. A management standards approach, which involves all the role players in the regulation of employee health and wellness, should be implemented.

  17. Views of the Workplace as a Health Promotion Arena among Managers of Small Companies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiman, Virginia; Lydell, Marie; Nyholm, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Several studies have shown that workplace health promotion leads to better health, increased productivity, as well as reduced absenteeism and presenteeism among employees. The objective of this study was to describe how managers in small companies (10-19 employees) perceive their company as an arena for promoting employees' health.…

  18. Incorporating Personal Health Records into the Disease Management of Rural Heart Failure Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Karen Parsley

    2012-01-01

    Personal Health Records (PHRs) allow patients to access and in some cases manage their own health records. Their potential benefits include access to health information, enhanced asynchronous communication between patients and clinicians, and convenience of online appointment scheduling and prescription refills. Potential barriers to PHR use…

  19. Developing a broader approach to management of infection control breaches in health care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Priti R; Srinivasan, Arjun; Perz, Joseph F

    2008-12-01

    Our experiences with health departments and health care facilities suggest that questions surrounding instrument reprocessing errors and other infection control breaches are becoming increasingly common. We describe an approach to management of these incidents that focuses on risk of bloodborne pathogen transmission and the role of public health and other stakeholders to inform patient notification and testing decisions.

  20. Switching gains and health plan price elasticities: 20 years of managed competition reforms in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.C.H.M. Douven (Rudy); K. Katona (Katalin); T. Schut, F. (Frederik); V. Shestalova (Victoria)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we estimate health plan price elasticities and financial switching gains for consumers over a 20-year period in which managed competition was introduced in the Dutch health insurance market. The period is characterized by a major health insurance reform in 2006 to provide h