WorldWideScience

Sample records for health literacy-focused program

  1. Mental health literacy: focus on developing countries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Indonesia, Pakistan, Brazil and Chile) found the median prevalence rate of ..... aspects of well-being of their patients.39 Programs aimed at integrating mental health ... tural beliefs and formulate their inclusion in an appropriate referral system.

  2. Mental health literacy: focus on developing countries | Ganasen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... is of particular concern in low and middle-income countries where mental health services are already scarce. It is likely that strategies for improvement will need to be comprehensive and innovative, taking advantage of opportunities and meeting challenges faced in the developing world. African Journal of Psychiatry Vol.

  3. The Effects of Language- and Literacy-Focused Professional Development on Early Educators and Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen-Brown, Justin; Juhl, Carsten Bogh; Piasta, Shayne B.

    2017-01-01

    Professional development (PD) is increasingly used to improve early childhood educators' skills and lcnowledge in providing quality language and emergent literacy environments for children. However, the literature does not clearly indicate the extent to which such efforts reach their goals......, or whether improvements in educator outcomes translate to learning gains for children. In the current synthesis, we conducted meta-analyses to evaluate the effects of language- and literacy-focused PD on process quality, structural quality, and educator knowledge as primary outcomes. Furthermore, we...... estimated effects for three child outcomes: receptive vocabulary, phonological awareness, and alphabet knowledge. PD produced a medium effect for process quality and a large effect for structural quality but no effect for educator knowledge. PD also produced a small to medium effect for phonological...

  4. Clinic Health Awareness Program Subsystem -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Clinic Health Awareness Program Subystem (CHAPS) is a comprehensive system for recording, reporting, and analyzing a patient’s medical information and managing an...

  5. Health Programs for Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Accountability & Whistleblower Protection Transparency Media Room Inside the Media Room Public Affairs News Releases Speeches Videos Publications National Observances Veterans Day Memorial Day Celebrating America's Freedoms Special Events Adaptive Sports Program Creative Arts Festival ...

  6. Environmental health program activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergtholdt, C. P.

    1969-01-01

    Activities reported include studies on toxic air contaminants, excessive noise, poor lighting, food sanitation, water pollution, and exposure to nonionizing radiation as health hazards. Formulations for a radiological health manual provide guidance to personnel in the procurement and safe handling of radiation producing equipment and Apollo mission planning. A literature search and development of a water analysis laboratory are outlined to obtain information regarding microbiological problems involving potable water, waste management, and personal hygiene.

  7. Childrens Health Insurance Program (CHIP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This Web site discusses and provides downloadable data on state and program type, number of children ever enrolled, and the percentage of growth compared to the...

  8. Lessons from Canada's health program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terris, M

    1990-01-01

    The Canadian health program is described and analyzed. Positive features include financing through progressive taxation; complete coverage of physician and hospital services; complete absence of deductibles, copayments, and extra charges by physicians and hospitals; lower administrative costs because private insurance companies are excluded from the program; and avoidance of the straitjacket of a single federal program by decentralization to the provinces. Negative features include ever-rising costs due to the almost complete dominance of fee-for-service payment to physicians; failure to monitor the quality of care; and neglect of serious support for preventive services and improved living standards--the two most important determinants of health status. Recommendations are made for a U.S. national health program that would incorporate the positive features of the Canadian program and avoid its deficiencies.

  9. Alaska Dental Health Aide Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoffstall-Cone, Sarah; Williard, Mary

    2013-01-01

    In 1999, An Oral Health Survey of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) Dental Patients found that 79% of 2- to 5-year-olds had a history of tooth decay. The Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium in collaboration with Alaska's Tribal Health Organizations (THO) developed a new and diverse dental workforce model to address AI/AN oral health disparities. This paper describes the workforce model and some experience to date of the Dental Health Aide (DHA) Initiative that was introduced under the federally sanctioned Community Health Aide Program in Alaska. These new dental team members work with THO dentists and hygienists to provide education, prevention and basic restorative services in a culturally appropriate manner. The DHA Initiative introduced 4 new dental provider types to Alaska: the Primary Dental Health Aide, the Expanded Function Dental Health Aide, the Dental Health Aide Hygienist and the Dental Health Aide Therapist. The scope of practice between the 4 different DHA providers varies vastly along with the required training and education requirements. DHAs are certified, not licensed, providers. Recertification occurs every 2 years and requires the completion of 24 hours of continuing education and continual competency evaluation. Dental Health Aides provide evidence-based prevention programs and dental care that improve access to oral health care and help address well-documented oral health disparities.

  10. Alaska Dental Health Aide Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Shoffstall-Cone

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. In 1999, An Oral Health Survey of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN Dental Patients found that 79% of 2- to 5-year-olds had a history of tooth decay. The Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium in collaboration with Alaska’s Tribal Health Organizations (THO developed a new and diverse dental workforce model to address AI/AN oral health disparities. Objectives. This paper describes the workforce model and some experience to date of the Dental Health Aide (DHA Initiative that was introduced under the federally sanctioned Community Health Aide Program in Alaska. These new dental team members work with THO dentists and hygienists to provide education, prevention and basic restorative services in a culturally appropriate manner. Results. The DHA Initiative introduced 4 new dental provider types to Alaska: the Primary Dental Health Aide, the Expanded Function Dental Health Aide, the Dental Health Aide Hygienist and the Dental Health Aide Therapist. The scope of practice between the 4 different DHA providers varies vastly along with the required training and education requirements. DHAs are certified, not licensed, providers. Recertification occurs every 2 years and requires the completion of 24 hours of continuing education and continual competency evaluation. Conclusions. Dental Health Aides provide evidence-based prevention programs and dental care that improve access to oral health care and help address well-documented oral health disparities.

  11. School Health: Findings from Evaluated Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Public Health Service (DHHS), Rockville, MD. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion.

    This publication presents findings from evaluations of many school health programs from across the United States. Each program includes at least one of the following eight components of a comprehensive school health program: health education, clinical services, counseling and mental health services, school environment, school food programs,…

  12. Public Health Service Safety Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McBride, J R [Southwestern Radiological Health Laboratory, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1969-07-01

    Off-Site Radiological Safety Programs conducted on past Plowshare experimental projects by the Southwestern Radiological Health Laboratory for the AEC will be presented. Emphasis will be placed on the evaluation of the potential radiation hazard to off-site residents, the development of an appropriate safety plan, pre- and post-shot surveillance activities, and the necessity for a comprehensive and continuing community relations program. In consideration of the possible wide use of nuclear explosives in industrial applications, a new approach to off-site radiological safety will be discussed. (author)

  13. Public Health Service Safety Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McBride, J.R.

    1969-01-01

    Off-Site Radiological Safety Programs conducted on past Plowshare experimental projects by the Southwestern Radiological Health Laboratory for the AEC will be presented. Emphasis will be placed on the evaluation of the potential radiation hazard to off-site residents, the development of an appropriate safety plan, pre- and post-shot surveillance activities, and the necessity for a comprehensive and continuing community relations program. In consideration of the possible wide use of nuclear explosives in industrial applications, a new approach to off-site radiological safety will be discussed. (author)

  14. 3 CFR - State Children's Health Insurance Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false State Children's Health Insurance Program... Insurance Program Memorandum for the Secretary of Health and Human Services The State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) encourages States to provide health coverage for uninsured children in families...

  15. 76 FR 17139 - Health Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of Noncompetitive... Improvement Project (CIP) from Saint Vincent's Catholic Medical Centers (SVCMC) of New York, current grantee...

  16. 76 FR 1441 - Health Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of Noncompetitive... for Services (IDS) and a portion of the Capital Improvement Project (CIP) from Saint Vincent's...

  17. 75 FR 2549 - Health Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-15

    ... Program AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration, HHS ACTION: Notice of Noncompetitive Replacement Award to Regional Health Care Affiliates. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) will be transferring Health Center Program (section 330 of the Public Health Service Act...

  18. Incorporating Health Education into Employee Assistance Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Richard E.

    1985-01-01

    Methods of aligning health education with the goals and functions of employee assistance programs are discussed. The role of the health educator in developing these programs is explained in a description of employee assistance program service standards and specific sub-tasks. (DF)

  19. Evaluating a Health Risk Reduction Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagelberg, Daniel B.

    1981-01-01

    A health risk reduction program at Bowling Green State University (Ohio) tested the efficacy of peer education against the efficacy of returning (by mail) health questionnaire results. A peer health education program did not appear to be effective in changing student attitudes or lifestyles; however, the research methodology may not have been…

  20. Starting a Health Professions Education Graduate Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansman, Catherine A.

    2018-01-01

    This chapter is a case story of the evolution of the Master of Education in Health Professions Education (MEHPE), a collaborative graduate program developed by the Adult Learning and Development program at Cleveland State University and the Cleveland Clinic.

  1. Program Planning in Health Professions Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Steven W.; Lawson, Luan

    2018-01-01

    In this chapter, the major concepts from program planning in adult education will be applied to health professions education (HPE). Curriculum planning and program planning will be differentiated, and program development and planning will be grounded in a systems thinking approach.

  2. Kennedy Space Center environmental health program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marmaro, G.M.; Cardinale, M.A.; Summerfield, B.R.; Tipton, D.A.

    1992-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center's environmental health organization is responsible for programs which assure its employees a healthful workplace under diverse and varied working conditions. These programs encompass the disciplines of industrial hygiene, radiation protection (health physics), and environmental sanitation/pollution control. Activities range from the routine, such as normal office work, to the highly specialized, such as the processing of highly toxic and hazardous materials

  3. A Design-Based Research Project on Information Literacy Focusing on Process, Reflections and Self-Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majbritt Ursula Johansen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Many curriculums assume that the new generation of students are digital natives and information literate. However, studies show that this is not often the case. From these studies and our own experiences working with multidisciplinary students in the Health Sciences we found that students were not as information literate as required in the curriculum. Using Design Based Research as a method (following the four phases below, we developed a new information search process and a web-based tool with feedback opportunities from teachers and librarians in order to qualify the students competencies. Problem identification: Despite earlier initiatives from library and department, the students didn’t achieve higher levels of information literacy. Prototyping: Requirements and educational material were merged and tested while gathering feedback. Iterations: The prototype and feedback were evaluated and developed into a new information search process, which was tested and evaluated. Reflection and generalization: Initiative was taken to develope a web-based application visualizing the steps with the learning points: self-feedback, peer-feedback and counselor feedback. The result of the project is a new information search process model and a web-based learning environment called B!NKO 2.0. The evaluations have shown positive feedback on both the process and the web tool. The project has opened up new possibilities that go beyond the Health multidisciplinary students. A new project concerning the Humanities and Social Sciences is incipient. In this project new functionalities are also expected. B!NKO 2.0 has to a great extent shown its worth to help Health multidisciplinary students to get a deeper understanding of information literacy, and how to develop and change searches to get better results. B!NKO 2.0 has also given a positive "side effect” on the librarians work. Time spend on the "Book a Librarian” service have decreased for the librarians using

  4. Introduction to:Forest health monitoring program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark J. Ambrose

    2009-01-01

    This annual technical report is a product of the Forest Health Monitoring (FHM) Program. The report provides information about a variety of issues relating to forest health at a national scale. FHM national reports have the dual focus of presenting analyses of the latest available data and showcasing innovative techniques for analyzing forest health data. The report is...

  5. Impacts on power reactor health physics programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, B.A.

    1991-01-01

    The impacts on power reactor health physics programs form implementing the revised 10 CFR Part 20 will be extensive and costly. Every policy, program, procedure and training lesson plan involving health physics will require changes and the subsequent retraining of personnel. At each power reactor facility, hundreds of procedures and thousands of people will be affected by these changes. Every area of a power reactor health physics program will be affected. These areas include; ALARA, Respiratory Protection, Exposure Control, Job Coverage, Dosimetry, Radwaste, Effluent Accountability, Emergency Planning and Radiation Worker Training. This paper presents how power reactor facilities will go about making these changes and gives possible examples of some of these changes and their impact on each area of power reactor health physics program

  6. Worksite health promotion programs in college settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill-Mey, Patricia E.; Kumpfer, Karol L.; Merrill, Ray M.; Reel, Justine; Hyatt-Neville, Beverly; Richardson, Glenn E.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the multifaceted nature and benefits of worksite health promotion programs (WHPPs), with emphasis on the college setting. An assessment of the peer-reviewed literature was conducted of articles published since 2000. Several search engines were accessed and selected key words were used. Most studies examining WHPPs have focused on return on investment and productivity. Research that targets the softer side-benefits of health promotion programs in the workplace is less available. Although the college setting offers some advantages for implementing health promotion programs. They may also have unique challenges due to their large and diverse employee population. There is little research to show the effectiveness and unique challenges of college-based health promotion programs. PMID:25861657

  7. The Environmental Science and Health Effects Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael Gurevich; Doug Lawson; Joe Mauderly

    2000-01-01

    The goal of the Environmental Science and Health Effect Program is to conduct policy-relevant research that will help us understand atmospheric impacts and potential health effects that may be caused by the use of petroleum-based fuels and alternative transportation fuels from mobile sources

  8. Introduction to: The Forest Health monitoring program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbara L. Conkling

    2011-01-01

    The National Forest Health Monitoring (FHM) Program of the Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, produces an annual technical report on forest health as one of its products. The report is organized using the Criteria and Indicators for the Conservation and Sustainable Management of Temperate and Boreal Forests (Montréal Process Working Group 2007) as a...

  9. THE SCHOOL HEALTH AND SAFETY PROGRAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1963

    INVOLVING INDIVIDUALS AS WELL AS ORGANIZATIONS, THE PROGRAM AIMED AT THE OPTIMUM HEALTH OF ALL CHILDREN, AND IMPROVEMENT OF HEALTH AND SAFETY STANDARDS WITHIN THE COMMUNITY. EACH OF THE CHILDREN WAS URGED TO HAVE A SUCCESSFUL VACCINATION FOR SMALL POX, THE DPT SERIES AND BOOSTER, THE POLIO SERIES, AND CORRECTIONS OF ALL DENTAL DEFECTS AND…

  10. The Environmental Science and Health Effects Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Gurevich; Doug Lawson; Joe Mauderly

    2000-04-10

    The goal of the Environmental Science and Health Effect Program is to conduct policy-relevant research that will help us understand atmospheric impacts and potential health effects that may be caused by the use of petroleum-based fuels and alternative transportation fuels from mobile sources.

  11. Workplace Participatory Occupational Health/Health Promotion Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuan; Flum, Marian; Kotejoshyer, Rajashree; Fleishman, Jane; Henning, Robert; Punnett, Laura

    2018-01-01

    Nursing home employees experience high physical and psychosocial workloads, resulting in poor health outcomes. An occupational health/health promotion program, designed to facilitate employee participation, was initiated in three nursing homes. The aim of the current study was to evaluate facilitators and barriers of the program after 3-year implementation. Focus groups with employees and in-depth interviews with top and middle managers were conducted. The Social Ecological Model was used to organize the evaluation. Facilitators and barriers were reported from both managers’ and employees’ perspectives, and were categorized as intrapersonal, interpersonal, institutional, and corporate level. Management support, financial resources, and release time for participation were identified as the three most important factors. Supports from multiple levels including both human and environment, and managers and employees, are important for a successful participatory occupational health/health promotion program. PMID:26977705

  12. Can health promotion programs save Medicare money?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ron Z Goetzel

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Ron Z Goetzel1, David Shechter2, Ronald J Ozminkowski1, David C Stapleton3, Pauline J Lapin4, J Michael McGinnis5, Catherine R Gordon6, Lester Breslow71Institute for Health and Productivity Studies, Cornell University, Washington, DC; 2Health and Productivity Research, Thomson Medstat, Santa Barbara, CA; 3Cornell Institute for Policy Research, Cornell University, Washington, DC; 4Office of Research, Development, and Information, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, Baltimore, MD; 5National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Medicine, The National Academies, Washington, DC; 6Office of the Director, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Washington, DC; 7UCLA School of Public Health, Dept. of Health Services, Los Angeles, CA, USAAbstract: The impact of an aging population on escalating US healthcare costs is influenced largely by the prevalence of chronic disease in this population. Consequently, preventing or postponing disease onset among the elderly has become a crucial public health issue. Fortunately, much of the total burden of disease is attributable to conditions that are preventable. In this paper, we address whether well-designed health promotion programs can prevent illness, reduce disability, and improve the quality of life. Furthermore, we assess evidence that these programs have the potential to reduce healthcare utilization and related expenditures for the Medicare program. We hypothesize that seniors who reduce their modifiable health risks can forestall disability, reduce healthcare utilization, and save Medicare money. We end with a discussion of a new Senior Risk Reduction Demonstration, which will be initiated by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services in 2007, to test whether risk reduction programs developed in the private sector can achieve health improvements among seniors and a positive return on investment for the Medicare program.Keywords: health promotion, return on investment, Medicare, financial

  13. Health, safety and environmental research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinner, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    This report outlines the Health, Safety and Environmental Research Program being undertaken by the CFFTP. The Program objectives, relationship to other CFFTP programs, implementation plans and expected outputs are stated. Opportunities to build upon the knowledge and experience gained in safely managing tritium in the CANDU program, by addressing generic questions pertinent to tritium safety for fusion facilities, are identified. These opportunities exist across a broad spectrum of issues covering the anticipated behaviour of tritium in fusion facilities, the surrounding environment and in man

  14. Improving Defense Health Program Medical Research Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-08

    research , including a Business Cell; 87 Research Development, 88 Research Oversight, 89 and Research Compliance offices;90 and the Center...needed for DHP medical research , such as the Army’s Clinical and Translational Research Program Office, 38 the Navy’s Research Methods Training Program... research stated, “key infrastructure for a learning health system will encompass three core elements: data networks, methods , and workforce.” 221

  15. Can health promotion programs save Medicare money?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetzel, Ron Z; Shechter, David; Ozminkowski, Ronald J; Stapleton, David C; Lapin, Pauline J; McGinnis, J Michael; Gordon, Catherine R; Breslow, Lester

    2007-01-01

    The impact of an aging population on escalating US healthcare costs is influenced largely by the prevalence of chronic disease in this population. Consequently, preventing or postponing disease onset among the elderly has become a crucial public health issue. Fortunately, much of the total burden of disease is attributable to conditions that are preventable. In this paper, we address whether well-designed health promotion programs can prevent illness, reduce disability, and improve the quality of life. Furthermore, we assess evidence that these programs have the potential to reduce healthcare utilization and related expenditures for the Medicare program. We hypothesize that seniors who reduce their modifiable health risks can forestall disability, reduce healthcare utilization, and save Medicare money. We end with a discussion of a new Senior Risk Reduction Demonstration, which will be initiated by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services in 2007, to test whether risk reduction programs developed in the private sector can achieve health improvements among seniors and a positive return on investment for the Medicare program. PMID:18044084

  16. Training program attracts work and health researchers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skakon, Janne

    2007-01-01

    Each year in Canada, the costs of disability arising from work-related causes – including workers’ compensation and health-care costs – exceed $6.7 billion. Despite the significant financial and social impacts of worker injury and illness, only a small fraction of Canadian researchers are dedicated...... to examining work disability prevention issues. An innovative program that attracts international students, the Work Disability Prevention Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Strategic Training Program, aims to build research capacity in young researchers and to create a strong network that examines...

  17. Computer Programming Languages for Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Joseph T.

    1979-01-01

    This paper advocates the use of standard high level programming languages for medical computing. It recommends that U.S. Government agencies having health care missions implement coordinated policies that encourage the use of existing standard languages and the development of new ones, thereby enabling them and the medical computing community at large to share state-of-the-art application programs. Examples are based on a model that characterizes language and language translator influence upon the specification, development, test, evaluation, and transfer of application programs.

  18. Mental Health and Mental Disorder Recommendation Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruchiwit, Manyat

    2017-12-01

    The characteristic differences among the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS) countries in terms of trade and investment, society and cultural values, medical information and technology, and the living and working environment have become major health problems in terms of mental disorders. The purpose of this article is to identify the gaps in those aspects, to propose mental health and mental disorder recommendation programs, and to recommend policies for policy makers and research investors. A comparative analysis and literature review of existing policy, including overviews of previous research were used to generate a synthesis of the existing knowledge of the mental health and mental disorder recommendation programs. The review results recommend mental health and mental disorder programs for policy makers, research investors, and stakeholders in order to strengthen the directions for implementing these programs in the future. The healthcare provision in each country will not be limited only to its citizens; the healthcare markets and target groups are likely to expand to the neighboring countries in the context of changes in domestic and international factors, which have both positive and negative impacts according to the political, economic, and social situations of the influencing countries.

  19. School Oral Health Program in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariga, Jitendra; Al-Mutawa, Sabiha; Nazar, Huda

    2014-01-01

    The School Oral Health Program (SOHP), Kuwait, is a joint venture between the Ministry of Health, Kuwait, and Forsyth Institute, Cambridge, Mass., USA. This program provides oral health education, prevention and treatment to almost 280,000 public school children in Kuwait. Services are delivered through a system of center- and school-based clinics and preventive mobile teams. One of the recent developments is the effective use of portable dental units for the delivery of preventive care to children in schools without the need for children to go to dental clinics. Preventive procedures performed under this program are the biannual application of fluoride varnish and the placement of pit and fissure sealants on newly erupted permanent molars and premolars. During recent years, the SOHP has improved its coverage of children, with prevention up to 80%. This has resulted in a considerable reduction in treatment needs, which is evident from the reduced number of composite restorations performed under this program during the last 6 years. This indicates that the disease level is on a decline, which can be confirmed from the results of the ongoing National Oral Health Survey on Kuwaiti school children. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. 78 FR 24756 - Health Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-26

    ...'s funded section 330 grant application. Genesee County Community Mental Health (GCCMH)--now Genesee... operations of the grant program since its award in June 2012. On January 1, 2013, the State of Michigan... care services on the County of Genesee's behalf and has indicated an ability to continue operations...

  1. 77 FR 59931 - Single Source Program Expansion Supplement Award to Area Health Education Centers (AHEC) Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    ... Program Expansion Supplement Award to Area Health Education Centers (AHEC) Program Grantee; Exception to... Competition--Single Source Program Expansion Supplement Award to Area Health Education Centers (AHEC) Program... supplement award to the University of Guam School of Nursing, an Area Health Education Center (AHEC) Program...

  2. 75 FR 48815 - Medicaid Program and Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP); Revisions to the Medicaid...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-11

    ... Parts 431, 447, and 457 Medicaid Program and Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP); Revisions to... 431, 447, and 457 [CMS-6150-F] RIN 0938-AP69 Medicaid Program and Children's Health Insurance Program... final rule implements provisions from the Children's Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act of...

  3. Peer tutoring programs in health professions schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santee, Jennifer; Garavalia, Linda

    2006-06-15

    Peer tutoring programs may be one method of maintaining quality of pharmacy education in the face of growing student enrollment and a small faculty body. A critical review of the literature was performed to ascertain whether peer tutoring programs improve or maintain the academic performance of health care professional students. Various electronic databases and abstracts from past American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy's annual meetings were searched to identify pertinent research. Only those articles with quantitative data, an experimental design, and comparative statistical analysis were included for review. Most studies found that peer tutoring had a positive impact on academic performance. These results may not be readily generalizable as there were numerous methodological flaws and limited descriptions of the programs and participants. Studies with better designs and more detail are needed to answer definitively whether peer tutoring is of benefit. Details of what resources were required should be included in the study to allow the reader to determine the feasibility of the intervention.

  4. An operational health physics quality assurance program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costigan, S.A.; McAtee, J.L. III; Somers, W.M.; Huchton, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    DOE Order 5700.6C, Quality Assurance, stipulates QA requirements for all DOE activities. This order is now codified as 10CFR830.120, Nuclear Safety Management, Quality Assurance Requirements, which is applicable to DOE nuclear facilities. A Quality Assurance Management Plan (QAMP) was developed by the Health Physics Operations Group (ESH-1) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The goal of the ESH-1 QAMP is to ensure that operational radiation protection activities meet the criteria outlined in DOE Order 5700.6C, DOE-ER-STD-6001-92 and 10CFR830.120. The ten required elements are QA Program, Personal Training and Qualifications, Quality Improvement, Documents and Records, Work Processes, Design, Procurement, Inspection and Acceptance Testing, Management Assessment and Independent Assessment. The QAMP has been useful for the development of QAMPs at nuclear facilities and has helped ensure uniformity of institutional requirements where Health Physics services are deployed to facilities. To implement a subset of QAMP requirements, a Quality Assurance Self-Evaluation Program (QASE) was established. This program provides a novel self-audit mechanism for the formal identification and correction of non-conforming items related to Operational Health Physics. Additionally, the QASE is a useful management tool for Radiological Control Technician Supervisors and staff and provides a tracking mechanism for ongoing problem areas. Data have been Collected for two calendar years on a number of concerns that fall into four general categories: radiological posting and labeling, instrumentation, monitoring requirements, and radiological documents/records

  5. 76 FR 4350 - Health Information Technology Extension Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Information Technology Extension Program ACTION: Public Notice. SUMMARY: This notice announces changes to the Health Information Technology Extension... of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, 200 Independence Ave, SW., Suite 729D...

  6. 42 CFR 441.106 - Comprehensive mental health program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... health and public welfare resources; including— (i) Community mental health centers; (ii) Nursing homes... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Comprehensive mental health program. 441.106... Comprehensive mental health program. (a) If the plan includes services in public institutions for mental...

  7. Physical fitness and health education program at NASA Headquarters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angotti, Cathy

    1993-01-01

    The topics discussed include the following: policy procedures to enter the NASA Headquarters Physical Fitness and Health Program; eligibility; TDY eligibility; health promotions offered; and general facility management.

  8. A health equity impact assessment umbrella program (AAPRISS) to tackle social inequalities in health: program description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Thierry; Bidault, Elsa; Villeval, Mélanie; Alias, François; Gandouet, Benjamin; Servat, Martine; Theis, Ivan; Breton, Eric; Haschar-Noé, Nadine; Grosclaude, Pascale

    2016-09-01

    The failure to simultaneously address two objectives (increasing the average health of the population and reducing health inequalities) may have led to what has been observed in France so far: an overall decrease in mortality and increase in inequality. The Apprendre et Agir pour Réduire les Inégalités Sociales de Santé (AAPRISS) methodology is to analyze and modify interventions that are already underway in terms of their potential impact on health inequalities. It relies on partnership between researchers and actors in the health field, as well as policy makers. In this paper, we describe the program and discuss its feasibility and acceptability. This program is not a single intervention, but a process aiming at assessing and reshaping existing health programs, therefore acting as a kind of meta-intervention. The program develops scientific and methodological support stemming from co-construction methods aimed at increasing equity within the programs. Stakeholders from prevention policy-making and the health care system, as well as researchers, collaborate in defining interventions, monitoring their progress, and choosing indicators, methods and evaluation procedures. The target population is mainly the population of the greater Toulouse area. The steps of the process are described: (1) establishment of AAPRISS governance and partnerships; (2) inclusion of projects; and (3) the projects' process. Many partners have rallied around this program, which has been shown to be feasible and acceptable by partners and health actors. A major challenge is understanding each partner's expectations in terms of temporality of interventions, expected outcomes, assessment methods and indicators. Analyzing the projects has been quite feasible, and some modifications have been implemented in them in order to take inequalities in health into account. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. 77 FR 23193 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Electronic Health Record Incentive Program-Stage 2; Corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-18

    ..., 413, and 495 [CMS-0044-CN] RIN 0938-AQ84 Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Electronic Health Record... proposed rule entitled ``Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Electronic Health Record Incentive Program--Stage... (77 FR 13698), the proposed rule entitled ``Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Electronic Health Record...

  10. 75 FR 63480 - Medicaid Program: Implementation of Section 614 of the Children's Health Insurance Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-15

    ... Children's Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act of 2009 for Adjustments to the Federal Medical... section 614 of the Children's Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act of 2009 (CHIPRA), Public Law... Medicaid program and required by Section 614 of the Children's Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act...

  11. Health effects of unemployment benefit program generosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cylus, Jonathan; Glymour, M Maria; Avendano, Mauricio

    2015-02-01

    We assessed the impact of unemployment benefit programs on the health of the unemployed. We linked US state law data on maximum allowable unemployment benefit levels between 1985 and 2008 to individual self-rated health for heads of households in the Panel Study of Income Dynamics and implemented state and year fixed-effect models. Unemployment was associated with increased risk of reporting poor health among men in both linear probability (b=0.0794; 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.0623, 0.0965) and logistic models (odds ratio=2.777; 95% CI=2.294, 3.362), but this effect is lower when the generosity of state unemployment benefits is high (b for interaction between unemployment and benefits=-0.124; 95% CI=-0.197, -0.0523). A 63% increase in benefits completely offsets the impact of unemployment on self-reported health. Results suggest that unemployment benefits may significantly alleviate the adverse health effects of unemployment among men.

  12. How federalism shapes public health financing, policy, and program options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogden, Lydia L

    2012-01-01

    In the United States, fiscal and functional federalism strongly shape public health policy and programs. Federalism has implications for public health practice: it molds financing and disbursement options, including funding formulas, which affect allocations and program goals, and shapes how funding decisions are operationalized in a political context. This article explores how American federalism, both fiscal and functional, structures public health funding, policy, and program options, investigating the effects of intergovernmental transfers on public health finance and programs.

  13. Health risk assessment for program managers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jump, R.A.; Williamson, D.S.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a sensitivity analysis into the independent variables that determine the levels of health risks posed by buried plutonium and americium at a typical contaminated site in an arid region. Environmental Restoration Program Managers often must make decisions concerning cleanup levels, remediation alternatives, schedules, cost estimates, etc. based upon extraordinarily safe assumptions about risk assessment calculation inputs. This study reveals to the Program Manager which variables are major drivers to the calculated levels of risk posed by transuranic radionuclides and which ones have second order effects or less. The findings of this study should indicate which inputs should be the focus of attention during negotiations with regulators and of further empirical investigation

  14. 78 FR 4593 - Medicaid, Children's Health Insurance Programs, and Exchanges: Essential Health Benefits in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    ...'s Health Insurance Programs, and Exchanges: Essential Health Benefits in Alternative Benefit Plans...-2334-P] RIN 0938-AR04 Medicaid, Children's Health Insurance Programs, and Exchanges: Essential Health... 2010 (collectively referred to as the Affordable Care Act), and the Children's Health Insurance Program...

  15. Space Station Freedom Environmental Health Care Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Elizabeth E.; Russo, Dane M.

    1992-01-01

    The paper discusses the environmental planning and monitoring aspects of the Space Station Freedom (SSF) Environmental Health Care Program, which encompasses all phases of the SSF assembly and operation from the first element entry at MB-6 through the Permanent Manned Capability and beyond. Environmental planning involves the definition of acceptability limits and monitoring requirements for the radiation dose barothermal parameters and potential contaminants in the SSF air and water and on internal surfaces. Inflight monitoring will be implemented through the Environmental Health System, which consists of five subsystems: Microbiology, Toxicology, Water Quality, Radiation, and Barothermal Physiology. In addition to the environmental data interpretation and analysis conducted after each mission, the new data will be compared to archived data for statistical and long-term trend analysis and determination of risk exposures. Results of these analyses will be used to modify the acceptability limits and monitoring requirements for the future.

  16. Health insurers promoting employee wellness: strategies, program components and results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Brigid M; Schoenman, Julie A; Pirani, Hafiza

    2010-01-01

    To examine health insurance companies' role in employee wellness. Case studies of eight insurers. Wellness activities in work, clinical, online, and telephonic settings. Senior executives and wellness program leaders from Blue Cross Blue Shield health insurers and from one wellness organization. Telephone interviews with 20 informants. Health insurers were engaged in wellness as part of their mission to promote health and reduce health care costs. Program components included the following: education, health risk assessments, incentives, coaching, environmental consultation, targeted programming, onsite biometric screening, professional support, and full-time wellness staff. Programs relied almost exclusively on positive incentives to encourage participation. Results included participation rates as high as 90%, return on investment ranging from $1.09 to $1.65, and improved health outcomes. Health insurers have expertise in developing, implementing, and marketing health programs and have wide access to employers and their employees' health data. These capabilities make health insurers particularly well equipped to expand the reach of wellness programming to improve the health of many Americans. By coupling members' medical data with wellness-program data, health insurers can better understand an individual's health status to develop and deliver targeted interventions. Through program evaluation, health insurers can also contribute to the limited but growing evidence base on employee wellness programs.

  17. Epigenomic programing: a future way to health?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris A. Shenderov

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available It is now generally accepted that the ‘central genome dogma’ (i.e. a causal chain going from DNA to RNA to proteins and downstream to biological functions should be replaced by the ‘fluid genome dogma’, that is, complex feed-forward and feed-back cycles that interconnect organism and environment by epigenomic programing – and reprograming – throughout life and at all levels, sometimes also down the generations. The epigenomic programing is the net sum of interactions derived from own metabolism and microbiota as well as external factors such as diet, pharmaceuticals, environmental compounds, and so on. It is a growing body of results indicating that many chronic metabolic and degenerative disorders and diseases – often called ‘civilization diseases’ – are initiated and/or influenced upon by non-optimal epigenomic programing, often taking place early in life. In this context, the first 1,000 days of life – from conception into early infancy – is often called the most important period of life. The following sections present some major mechanisms for epigenomic programing as well as some factors assumed to be of importance. The need for more information about own genome and metagenome, as well as a substantial lack of adequate information regarding dietary and environmental databases are also commented upon. However, the mere fact that we can influence epigenomic health programing opens up the way for prophylactic and therapeutic interventions. The authors underline the importance of creating a ‘Human Gut Microbiota and Epigenomic Platform’ in order to facilitate interdisciplinary collaborations among scientists and clinicians engaged in host microbial ecology, nutrition, metagenomics, epigenomics and metabolomics as well as in disease epidemiology, prevention and treatment.

  18. Epigenomic programing: a future way to health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenderov, Boris A; Midtvedt, Tore

    2014-01-01

    It is now generally accepted that the 'central genome dogma' (i.e. a causal chain going from DNA to RNA to proteins and downstream to biological functions) should be replaced by the 'fluid genome dogma', that is, complex feed-forward and feed-back cycles that interconnect organism and environment by epigenomic programing - and reprograming - throughout life and at all levels, sometimes also down the generations. The epigenomic programing is the net sum of interactions derived from own metabolism and microbiota as well as external factors such as diet, pharmaceuticals, environmental compounds, and so on. It is a growing body of results indicating that many chronic metabolic and degenerative disorders and diseases - often called 'civilization diseases' - are initiated and/or influenced upon by non-optimal epigenomic programing, often taking place early in life. In this context, the first 1,000 days of life - from conception into early infancy - is often called the most important period of life. The following sections present some major mechanisms for epigenomic programing as well as some factors assumed to be of importance. The need for more information about own genome and metagenome, as well as a substantial lack of adequate information regarding dietary and environmental databases are also commented upon. However, the mere fact that we can influence epigenomic health programing opens up the way for prophylactic and therapeutic interventions. The authors underline the importance of creating a 'Human Gut Microbiota and Epigenomic Platform' in order to facilitate interdisciplinary collaborations among scientists and clinicians engaged in host microbial ecology, nutrition, metagenomics, epigenomics and metabolomics as well as in disease epidemiology, prevention and treatment.

  19. The Practice of Health Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Sarah R

    2017-11-01

    The Practice of Health Program Evaluation provides an overview of the evaluation process for public health programs while diving deeper to address select advanced concepts and techniques. The book unfolds evaluation as a three-phased process consisting of identification of evaluation questions, data collection and analysis, and dissemination of results and recommendations. The text covers research design, sampling methods, as well as quantitative and qualitative approaches. Types of evaluation are also discussed, including economic assessment and systems research as relative newcomers. Aspects critical to conducting a successful evaluation regardless of type or research design are emphasized, such as stakeholder engagement, validity and reliability, and adoption of sound recommendations. The book encourages evaluators to document their approach by developing an evaluation plan, a data analysis plan, and a dissemination plan, in order to help build consensus throughout the process. The evaluative text offers a good bird's-eye view of the evaluation process, while offering guidance for evaluation experts on how to navigate political waters and advocate for their findings to help affect change.

  20. ASTDD Synopses of State Oral Health Programs - Selected indicators

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2011-2017. The ASTDD Synopses of State Oral Health Programs contain information useful in tracking states’ efforts to improve oral health and contributions to...

  1. ASTDD Synopses of State Oral Health Programs - Selected indicators

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2011-2017. The ASTDD Synopses of State Oral Health Programs contain information useful in tracking states’ efforts to improve oral health and contributions to...

  2. OSHA Training Programs. Module SH-48. Safety and Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This student module on OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Act) training programs is one of 50 modules concerned with job safety and health. This module provides a list of OSHA training requirements and describes OSHA training programs and other safety organizations' programs. Following the introduction, 11 objectives (each keyed to a page in the…

  3. Programed Instruction in Health Education and Physical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayshark, Cyrus; Evaul, Thomas W.

    This book contains eight chapters by several different authors, most of them professors of health or physical education. Focus is on applications and implications of programed instruction for professionals in the health and physical education fields. "Overview of Programed Instruction" defines programing, its development and implications for…

  4. On models of health assistance and the program of family health of the Brazilian Health Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Hausman Silveira

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The article makes reference to the three models that have inspired the construction of the Program of Family Health in Brazil (Cuban, English and Canadian, observing their differences and similarities and comparing them with the Brazilian case. Therefore, an associative line is also constructed between the Only System of Health (SUS and the necessity of a practice which allows the functioning of its lines of direction and organization principles. Thus, we reach the conclusion that the Program of Family Health in Brazil, for its multi professional work proposal in interdisciplinary teams, in accordance with the SUS, can help keep the law of health in the Country. Key-words: SUS; Program of Family Health; Interdisciplinary; Medical care model; Sanitary practice

  5. 78 FR 6275 - Medicaid, Children's Health Insurance Programs, and Exchanges: Essential Health Benefits in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-30

    ... Medicaid, Children's Health Insurance Programs, and Exchanges: Essential Health Benefits in Alternative...'s Health Insurance Programs, and Exchanges: Essential Health Benefits in Alternative Benefit Plans... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services 42 CFR Parts 430...

  6. Wellness Programs: Preventive Medicine to Reduce Health Care Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Gilbert R., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A wellness program is a formalized approach to preventive health care that can positively affect employee lifestyle and reduce future health-care costs. Describes programs for health education, smoking cessation, early detection, employee assistance, and fitness, citing industry success figures. (eight references) (MLF)

  7. Development of the Digital Health Literacy Instrument : Measuring a Broad Spectrum of Health 1.0 and Health 2.0 Skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vaart, Rosalie; Drossaert, Constance

    2017-01-01

    Background: With the digitization of health care and the wide availability of Web-based applications, a broad set of skills is essential to properly use such facilities; these skills are called digital health literacy or eHealth literacy. Current instruments to measure digital health literacy focus

  8. Family support programs and adolescent mental health: review of evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuhn ES

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Emily S Kuhn, Robert D Laird Department of Psychology, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA, USA Abstract: Family support programs aim to improve parent wellbeing and parenting as well as adolescent mental and behavioral health by addressing the needs of parents of adolescents experiencing or at risk for mental health problems. Family support programs can be part of the treatment for adolescents diagnosed with mental or behavioral health problems, or family support programs can be delivered as prevention programs designed to prevent the onset or escalation of mental or behavioral health problems. This review discusses the rationale for family support programs and describes the range of services provided by family support programs. The primary focus of the review is on evaluating the effectiveness of family support programs as treatments or prevention efforts delivered by clinicians or peers. Two main themes emerged from the review. First, family support programs that included more forms of support evidenced higher levels of effectiveness than family support programs that provided fewer forms of support. Discussion of this theme focuses on individual differences in client needs and program adaptions that may facilitate meeting diverse needs. Second, family support prevention programs appear to be most effective when serving individuals more in need of mental and behavioral health services. Discussion of this theme focuses on the intensity versus breadth of the services provided in prevention programs. More rigorous evaluations of family support programs are needed, especially for peer-delivered family support treatments. Keywords: intervention, parent, mental and behavioral health

  9. Family support programs and adolescent mental health: review of evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Laird, Robert; Kuhn,Emily

    2014-01-01

    Emily S Kuhn, Robert D Laird Department of Psychology, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA, USA Abstract: Family support programs aim to improve parent wellbeing and parenting as well as adolescent mental and behavioral health by addressing the needs of parents of adolescents experiencing or at risk for mental health problems. Family support programs can be part of the treatment for adolescents diagnosed with mental or behavioral health problems, or family support programs can be deli...

  10. Health plans' disease management programs: extending across the medical and behavioral health spectrum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrick, Elizabeth Levy; Horgan, Constance M; Garnick, Deborah W; Hodgkin, Dominic; Morley, Melissa

    2008-01-01

    Although the disease management industry has expanded rapidly, there is little nationally representative data regarding medical and behavioral health disease management programs at the health plan level. National estimates from a survey of private health plans indicate that 90% of health plan products offered disease management for general medical conditions such as diabetes but only 37% had depression programs. The frequency of specific depression disease management activities varied widely. Program adoption was significantly related to product type and behavioral health contracting. In health plans, disease management has penetrated more slowly into behavioral health and depression program characteristics are highly variable.

  11. Factors influencing perceived sustainability of Dutch community health programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeer, A. J. M.; van Assema, P.; Hesdahl, B.; Harting, J.; de Vries, N. K.

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the perceived sustainability of community health programs organized by local intersectoral coalitions, as well as the factors that collaborating partners think might influence sustainability. Semi-structured interviews were conducted among 31 collaborating partners of 5 community health

  12. Program Spotlight: National Outreach Network's Community Health Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Outreach Network of Community Health Educators located at Community Network Program Centers, Partnerships to Advance Cancer Health Equity, and NCI-designated cancer centers help patients and their families receive survivorship support.

  13. 78 FR 42788 - School-Based Health Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration School-Based... Gadsden County. SUMMARY: HRSA will be transferring a School-Based Health Center Capital (SBHCC) Program... support the expansion of services at school-based health centers will continue. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION...

  14. Healthe Kids: An Assessment of Program Performance and Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Bonnie B.; Kindermann, Sylvia L.; Carson, Tabetha; Gavin, Jan; Frerking, Melissa; Bergren, Martha Dewey

    2014-01-01

    Many states in the United States have mandated school health screenings for early identification and referral to professional services for a set of health conditions. Healthe Kids, a community-based program, began offering school-based health screenings to Missouri elementary schools in March 2007. The purpose of the article is to provide a…

  15. Transitions: A Mental Health Literacy Program for Postsecondary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potvin-Boucher, Jacqueline; Szumilas, Magdalena; Sheikh, Tabinda; Kutcher, Stan

    2010-01-01

    Enhancement of mental health literacy is a mental health promotion strategy that may be effective at destigmatizing mental illness and increasing self-seeking behavior. Transitions is a mental health literacy program intended to heighten students' awareness and discussion of mental health problems and promote help-seeking behaviors. Transitions…

  16. The Association Between Health Program Participation and Employee Retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Rebecca J; Ozminkowski, Ronald J; Hartley, Stephen K

    2016-09-01

    Using health plan membership as a proxy for employee retention, the objective of this study was to examine whether use of health promotion programs was associated with employee retention. Propensity score weighted generalized linear regression models were used to estimate the association between telephonic programs or health risk surveys and retention. Analyses were conducted with six study samples based on type of program participation. Retention rates were highest for employees with either telephonic program activity or health risk surveys and lowest for employees who did not participate in any interventions. Participants ranged from 71% more likely to 5% less likely to remain with their employers compared with nonparticipants, depending on the sample used in analyses. Using health promotion programs in combination with health risk surveys may lead to improvements in employee retention.

  17. 78 FR 42159 - Medicaid and Children's Health Insurance Programs: Essential Health Benefits in Alternative...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-15

    ... and 156 Medicaid and Children's Health Insurance Programs: Essential Health Benefits in Alternative... Secretary 45 CFR Parts 155 and 156 [CMS-2334-F] RIN 0938-AR04 Medicaid and Children's Health Insurance... Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) eligibility notices, delegation of appeals, and...

  18. Public health program capacity for sustainability: a new framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schell, Sarah F; Luke, Douglas A; Schooley, Michael W; Elliott, Michael B; Herbers, Stephanie H; Mueller, Nancy B; Bunger, Alicia C

    2013-02-01

    Public health programs can only deliver benefits if they are able to sustain activities over time. There is a broad literature on program sustainability in public health, but it is fragmented and there is a lack of consensus on core constructs. The purpose of this paper is to present a new conceptual framework for program sustainability in public health. This developmental study uses a comprehensive literature review, input from an expert panel, and the results of concept-mapping to identify the core domains of a conceptual framework for public health program capacity for sustainability. The concept-mapping process included three types of participants (scientists, funders, and practitioners) from several public health areas (e.g., tobacco control, heart disease and stroke, physical activity and nutrition, and injury prevention). The literature review identified 85 relevant studies focusing on program sustainability in public health. Most of the papers described empirical studies of prevention-oriented programs aimed at the community level. The concept-mapping process identified nine core domains that affect a program's capacity for sustainability: Political Support, Funding Stability, Partnerships, Organizational Capacity, Program Evaluation, Program Adaptation, Communications, Public Health Impacts, and Strategic Planning. Concept-mapping participants further identified 93 items across these domains that have strong face validity-89% of the individual items composing the framework had specific support in the sustainability literature. The sustainability framework presented here suggests that a number of selected factors may be related to a program's ability to sustain its activities and benefits over time. These factors have been discussed in the literature, but this framework synthesizes and combines the factors and suggests how they may be interrelated with one another. The framework presents domains for public health decision makers to consider when developing

  19. Community health events for enrolling uninsured into public health insurance programs: implications for health reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Scott; Tsai, Kai-ya; Nascimento, Lori M; Cousineau, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether enrollment events may serve as a venue to identify eligible individuals, enroll them into health insurance programs, and educate them about the changes the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act will bring about. More than 2900 surveys were administered to attendees of 7 public health insurance enrollment events in California. Surveys were used to identify whether participants had any change in understanding of health reform after participating in the event. More than half of attendees at nearly all events had no knowledge about health reform before attending the event. On average, more than 80% of attendees knew more about health reform following the event and more than 80% believed that the law would benefit their families. Enrollment events can serve as an effective method to educate the public on health reform. Further research is recommended to explore in greater detail the impact community enrollment events can have on expanding public understanding of health reform.

  20. PLAN Bicol, Philippines: health manpower development program in action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, K

    1994-06-01

    PLAN Bicol in the Philippines is a community based Health Manpower Development Program (HMDP) geared toward training and mobilization of indigenous health practitioners, providing infrastructural and logistical support to individual families, and educating the community about health, nutrition, and the environment. The field officer recommends at the initiation of a project that program staff have roles that are well defined. New programs should be introduced to the community first and should involve the community in the planning stages. The HMDP program is directed to 38 villages located around national parks that have suffered from deforestation. Community health issues are malnutrition, low immunization, and lack of access to health services. HMDP established a training program for auxiliary health workers (AHWs), who make a commitment to return to their villages after training. Midwives are being trained at local schools. Village houses are being built and repaired; water systems and sanitary toilet facilities are being installed. Village health stations have been constructed and equipped with basic medicines, supplies, and equipment, and are open 5 days a week. Health education classes inform the community about nutrition and health. The problems at inception were the unwillingness of field staff to participate in the program and a high drop out rate among AHWs. Problems were worked out as the program progressed. Facilitative factors are the close coordination with the provincial health office, community acceptance, and the availability of qualified people.

  1. A Guide for Understanding Health Education and Promotion Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Richard W; Nahar, Vinayak K

    2018-03-01

    Planning, Implementing & Evaluating Health Promotion Programs: A Primer is a versatile and comprehensive resource on the theoretical and practical underpinnings of successful health promotion programs. The requirements for effective health promotion program development are presented with frequent use of practical planning examples, pedagogical devices, and expert rationale. Ideal for undergraduate and graduate students in health education, promotion, and planning courses, this 15-chapter textbook is organized in a manner that specifically addresses the responsibilities and competencies required of health education specialists as published in the Health Education Specialist Practice Analysis of 2015. The authors of this textbook are leaders in the field and provide readers with the skills necessary to carry out the full process of health promotion program execution, while also offering direct preparation for CHES and MCHES licensing exams.

  2. Sexual Health Education in Massage Therapy Programs: A Survey of Program Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamboni, Brian D.; Healey, Dale K.

    2016-01-01

    Massage therapy program directors completed an online survey to explore sexual education in massage therapy programs. The overall data suggest that program directors are supportive of sexual health education in the training of massage therapists and that such education is integrated into several aspects of their training programs. To enhance…

  3. [Common competencies and contents in public health in graduate programs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davó, M A Carmen; Vives-Cases, Carmen; Benavides, Fernando García; Alvarez-Dardet, Carlos; Segura-Benedicto, Andreu; Icart, Teresa; Astasio, Paloma; Gil, Angel; Ortiz, M Del Rocío; García, Angel; Ronda, Elena; Bosch, Félix

    2011-01-01

    To identify fundamental public health competencies and contents in nursing, pharmacy, teaching, medicine, human nutrition and dietetics, optics and optometry, labor relations and human resources, and social work in graduate programs and to formulate proposals for their improvement. The workshop on Public health contents in graduate programs in the XXI Menorca Public Health School was organized as follows: eight groups were set up, coordinated by 37 Spanish university teachers participating in the workshop and selected through key informants and snowball techniques. Two studies on public health professional competencies and the participants' own graduate programs were used to discuss public health professional competencies and contents and establish recommendations to improve public health programs. Each group worked on a particular degree course and the results were shared in plenary. Professional competencies for the three essential public health functions were indentified in all the degrees, except teaching, optics and optometry, and social work. Some of the competencies included in degrees in nursing, teaching, human nutrition and dietetics, and social work were rewritten to highlight the role of each type of professional in public health functions. The groups agreed on the introductory topics (basic concepts and health determinants) and intervention strategies. Common competencies and contents were identified in graduate programs. Updating public health contents in graduate programs would help to define and promote the profile of public health professionals. Copyright © 2011 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. Changes in health indicators related to health promotion and microcredit programs in the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohn, Anita L; Chávez, Andrea; Dohn, Michael N; Saturria, Luis; Pimentel, Carlos

    2004-03-01

    To assess the impact of health promotion programs and microcredit programs on three communities in the Dominican Republic. One community had only the health promotion program, one community had only the microcredit program, and one community had both a health promotion program and a microcredit program. This pilot project examined the hypothesis that the largest changes in 11 health indicators that were studied would be in the community with both a health promotion program and a microcredit program, that there would be intermediate changes in the community with only a health promotion program, and that the smallest changes would be in the community with only a microcredit program. The health promotion programs used community volunteers to address two major concerns: (1) the prevalent causes of mortality among children under 5 years of age and (2) women's health (specifically breast and cervical cancer screening). The microcredit program made small loans to individuals to start or expand small businesses. Outcome measures were based on comparisons for 11 health indicators from baseline community surveys (27 households surveyed in each of the three communities, done in December 2000 and January 2001) and from follow-up surveys (also 27 households surveyed in each of the three communities, in June and July 2002, after the health promotion program had been operating for about 13 months). Households were randomly chosen during both the baseline and follow-up surveys, without regard to their involvement in the microcredit or health promotion programs. The health indicators improved in all three communities. However, the degree of change was different among the communities (P microcredit and health promotion programs had the largest changes for 10 of the 11 health indicators. Multisector development is known to be important on a macroeconomic scale. The results of this pilot project support the view that multisector development is also important on a microeconomic level

  5. INTRODUCTION OF UNIVERSAL HEALTH PROGRAM IN GEORGIA: PROBLEMS AND PERSPECTIVES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verulava, T; Jorbenadze, R; Barkalaia, T

    2017-01-01

    Since 2013, Georgia enacted Universal Healthcare (UHC) program. Inclusion of uninsured population in the UHC program will have a positive impact on their financial accessibility to the health services. The study aims to analyze the referral rate of the beneficiaries to the health service providers before introduction and after application of the UHC program, particularly, how much it increased the recently uninsured population referral to primary health care units, and also to study the level of satisfaction with the UHC program. Research was conducted by qualitative and quantitative methods. The target groups' (program beneficiaries, physicians, personnel of the Social Service Agency) opinions were identified by means of face-to-face interviews. Enactment of the UHC programs significantly raised the population refferal to the family physicians, and the specialists. Insignificantly, but also increased the frequency of laboratory and diagnostic services. Despite the serious positive changes caused by UHC program implementation there still remain the problems in the primary healthcare system. Also, it is desirable to raise the financial availability of those medical services, which may cause catastrophic costs. In this respect, such medical services must be involved in the universal healthcare program and been expanded their scale. For the purpose of effective usage of the limited funds allocated for health care services provision, the private health insurance companies should be involved in UHC programs. This, together with the reduction of health care costs will increase a competition in the medical market, and enhance the quality of health service.

  6. Stakeholder Knowledge Levels of Coordinated School Health Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minor, Lisa Crouch

    2012-01-01

    Acute and chronic health conditions may be important factors impacting absenteeism and student achievement in schools. Coordinated school health programs can support students who have these conditions. Although such programs have had documented success, implementation can be costly and time consuming. The local problem addressed in this project…

  7. Directory of Academic Programs in Occupational Safety and Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, William J., III; And Others

    This booklet describes academic program offerings in American colleges and universities in the area of occupational safety and health. Programs are divided into five major categories, corresponding to each of the core disciplines: (1) occupational safety and health/industrial hygiene, (2) occupational safety, (3) industrial hygiene, (4)…

  8. Occupational Safety and Health Programs in Career Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiCarlo, Robert D.; And Others

    This resource guide was developed in response to the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 and is intended to assist teachers in implementing courses in occupational safety and health as part of a career education program. The material is a synthesis of films, programed instruction, slides and narration, case studies, safety pamphlets,…

  9. Sexual health education in U.S. physician assistant programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaborne, Lori A; Prince, Ronald J; Kushner, David M

    2015-05-01

    Since the 1950s, sexual health education in medical schools has been evaluated and reported upon, but there has never been an assessment published about sexual health curricula in U.S. physician assistant (PA) programs. The aim of this study was to gain better understanding of how PA programs cover sexual health topics. Between January and March 2014, 181 accredited PA programs received a mailed survey inquiring about their sexual health curriculum. The survey assessed general sexual health topics; lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) topics; teaching methods; and the amount of time spent on sexual health education. A total of 106 programs responded (59%). Ten programs offered a required, discrete course on human sexuality. The majority incorporated training into other coursework, which is consistent with most medical schools. LGBT topics were covered less thoroughly than the general sexual health topics. Total amount of time spent on sexual health topics varied widely among programs, from a minimum of 2-4 hours to a maximum of 60 hours, with a median of 12 hours. PA programs in the United States appear to compare favorably with the training offered to medical students in regard to time spent on sexual health education. Transgender issues were least well-covered of all the topics queried. © 2015 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  10. Tensions of Health: Narratives of Employee Wellness Program Participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lu; Baker, Jane S; Meadows, Cui Zhang

    2016-09-01

    This article examines dialectical tensions in the health narratives of participants of the Employee Wellness Program (EWP) of a large public university in the southeastern United States. Semi-structured interviews (n = 12) with team leaders in the program indicated that health is a multifaceted concept characterized by three pairs of dialectical tensions: autonomy versus connection, private versus public, and control versus lack of control. These findings suggest that to better promote health and wellness in the workplace, EWP staff should consider employees' unique experiences and beliefs about health when designing organization-wide programs and campaigns. © 2016 The Author(s).

  11. Defence Health Service Mentoring Program Evaluation 2001

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Highfield, Jane

    2002-01-01

    The Defense Health Services (DHS) Steering Committee has considered the concept of Mentoring as part of an effort to assist in the development of future health leaders in the Australian Defense Force (ADF...

  12. Designing health promotion programs by watching the market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelb, B D; Bryant, J M

    1992-03-01

    More health care providers and payors are beginning to see health promotion programs as a significant tool for attracting patients, reducing costs, or both. To help design programs that take into account the values and lifestyles of the target group, naturalistic observation can be useful. The authors illustrate the approach in a study of pipeline workers that provided input for the design of nutrition and smoking cessation programs.

  13. Public dental health care program for persons with disability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lisa Bøge; Hede, Børge; Petersen, Poul Erik

    2005-01-01

    The objectives of the study were (1) to describe the organization and content of the Danish public oral health care program for persons with disability, and (2) to analyse possible variations in relation to the goals and requirements set by the health authorities. Data were collected by means......) payment of service, (4) providers of oral health care, (5) special training of staff, 6) dental services delivered, (7) ethical issues, and (8) patient rights. Less than one-third of persons estimated by the health authorities were enrolled in the program. On average, 0.4% of the municipal population...... of knowledge of oral health and oral health care for persons with disability were barriers to equal access to the program. Preventive dental services were the most frequent services delivered, although relatively few oral hygienists were involved in the program. Special training was most frequent in large...

  14. Directory of personnel responsible for radiological health programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This is a directory of professional personnel who administer the radiological health program activities in state and local governmental agencies. Included in the directory is a listing of each state health officer or the head of the agency responsible for the radiological health program. The name, address, and telephone number of the radiological health personnel are listed, followed by the alternate contact who, in many instances, may be chief of a larger administrative unit of which the radiological health program is a subunit. The address for the program is also included if it differs from the official health department or agency. Generally, the titles of the personnel listed will indicate the administrative status of the radiological health program. The directory also includes a list of key professional personnel in the Bureau of Radiological Health, Radiation Operations Staff, Regional Radiological Health Representatives, Winchester Engineering and Analytical Center, Food and Drug Administration; Office of Radiation Programs, Regional Radiation Representatives, National Environmental Research Center, and Eastern Environmental Radiation Laboratory, Environmental Protection Agency; selected personnel in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; and selected personnel in the National Bureau of Standards

  15. 42 CFR 457.618 - Ten percent limit on certain Children's Health Insurance Program expenditures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Insurance Program expenditures. 457.618 Section 457.618 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STATE CHILDREN'S HEALTH INSURANCE PROGRAMS... Children's Health Insurance Program expenditures. (a) Expenditures. (1) Primary expenditures are...

  16. Professional competence in a health promotion program in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijkers-de Boer, Caroline J. M.; Heijsman, Anke; van Nes, Fenna; Abma, Tineke A.

    Health promotion for senior citizens ('seniors') is an increasingly important factor in health and welfare policy, having important implications for occupational therapy. The health promotion program 'Healthy and Active Aging' originated in the US, has been modified and adapted to the Dutch context

  17. Federal Program Encourages Health Service Innovations on Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nix, Mary P.

    2009-01-01

    There is always room for improvement in the delivery of health services. This article discusses the U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's (AHRQ) Health Care Innovations Exchange (www.innovations.ahrq.gov), a comprehensive program that aims to increase awareness of innovative strategies to meet health service delivery challenges and…

  18. Workplace Setting of Mental Health Nursing Program Graduates in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rwanda Journal Series F: Medicine and Health Sciences Vol. 2 No. 2, 2015. Workplace Setting of Mental Health Nursing Program Graduates in Rwanda. Marie Claire Gasanganwa. 1. , Benoite Umubyeyi1, Darius Gishoma1. 1. University of Rwanda, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Rwanda. Background.

  19. Leading by Example: Health Promotion Programs for School Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Patrick C.; Lohrmann, David K.

    2011-01-01

    Health promotion programs for school staff are an overlooked and underused resource that can reduce overweight and obesity among teachers and other staff members. They can also reduce staff absenteeism, increase productivity, reduce costs associated with health care and disability, and foster a climate that promotes good health schoolwide. An…

  20. Evaluation of the Health Rocks! Program: The Association of Youth Engagement with Program Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Xia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This evaluation research examined the relationship between program process and program outcome, specifically, youth engagement in the national 4-H Council Health Rocks! program and their program outcomes.  Based on program evaluation surveys completed after the program by participants, youths’ engagement in the program was associated with their gains in knowledge and skills about substance use, and personal assets related to avoiding risks.  When youth participants find a program interesting, are actively engaged in the program, and find the program staff friendly, they benefit more from the program.  Findings underscore the importance of engaging curriculum and friendly staff to the success of extension or afterschool youth programs. The evaluation method may offer an example of balancing rigor of evaluation design and feasibility of implementing an evaluation.

  1. AAHD's Health Promotion and Wellness, Part 2: Health Promotion Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exceptional Parent, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This article is part 2 of a 4-part series on "Health Promotion and Wellness" from the American Association on Health and Disability (AAHD). According to the U.S. Census Bureau, more than 54 million people--one in five Americans--have a disability, and these Americans are more likely to report: (1) Being in poorer overall health; (2) Having less…

  2. Infusing Adult Education Principles Into a Health Insurance Literacy Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Virginia

    2018-03-01

    Health insurance literacy is an emerging concept in the health education and health promotion field. The passage of the Affordable Care Act highlighted the link between health insurance and health outcomes. However, the law does not specifically address how the public should be educated on choosing an appropriate health insurance plan. Research shows adults, regardless of previous health insurance status, are likely confused and uncertain about their selection. The University of Maryland Extension developed and created health insurance Smart Choice Health Insurance™ to reduce confusion and increase confidence and capability to make this decision. Andragogy, an adult learning theory, was used to guide the development of the program and help ensure best practices are used to achieve desired outcomes. Using the six principles of andragogy, the team incorporated reality-based case studies, allowed adults time to practice, and emphasized choice making and many other elements to create an atmosphere conducive to adult learning. Results from Smart Choice indicate the program is successful in reducing confusion and increasing confidence. Furthermore, feedback from participants and trained educators indicates that adults were engaged in the program and found the materials useful. Based on program success, creation of new health insurance literacy programs grounded in adult education principles is under way.

  3. Defence Health Service Mentoring Program Evaluation 2001

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Highfield, Jane

    2002-01-01

    ...). DHS commissioned the Directorate of Strategic Personnel Planning and Research (DSPPR) to evaluate a recent Mentoring Program trial in order to assess the effectiveness and organizational value of Mentoring within DHS...

  4. [Evaluation of a workplace health promotion program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forette, Françoise; Brieu, Marie-Anne; Lemasson, Hervé; Salord, Jean-Claude; Le Pen, Claude

    2014-01-01

    Some studies suggest that a workplace prevention programme could reduce health inequalities related to education level and improve the health status of the employees. The objective of the study was to demonstrate the advantages for a company to implement a health prevention programme in the workplace in order to: 1-improve health literacy 2 - change health-related behaviours 3-improve the company image. A "before - after" methodology was used in a population of 2153 employees of three companies. Three areas of prevention were considered: nutrition, physical activity and prevention of back pain. The successive steps of the EBS programme included general communication, group workshops and individual coaching. Data collection was carried out using anonymous questionnaires sent by e-mail. A global assessment was performed based on the companies' pooled data, with separate analysis according to the steps of the programme. The programme mobilized employees with participation rates ranging from 25% to 45.5%. After completion of the full programme, 77.5% of respondents reported an improvement of their health knowledge versus 50.3% of those who only received general communication. Behavioural modification was observed, especially in the fields of nutrition and back pain.. EBS can be considered to be a vector of the company image for almost 7 out of 10 employees. A health prevention education programme provided by the company in the workplace mobilizes employees and contributes to improvement of health knowledge and behaviour change. All approaches tested were important and applicable to various types of companies or workers.

  5. 78 FR 54256 - Health Careers Opportunity Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-03

    ..., such as a graduate degree in Clinical or Counseling Psychology, Clinical Social Work, and/or Marriage.... D18HP23014 Research NY 111,764 Foundation of the State University of New York. D18HP23023 Howard DC 111,764..., dentistry, pharmacy, and allied health. With the growing need for mental health and substance abuse services...

  6. Coordinated school health program and dietetics professionals: partners in promoting healthful eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Sandra M; Cinelli, Bethann

    2004-05-01

    Although research indicates that school meal programs contribute to improved academic performance and healthier eating behaviors for students who participate, fewer than 60% of students choose the National School Lunch Program or School Breakfast Program. School meal programs have a difficult time competing with foods that are marketed to young people through sophisticated advertising campaigns. Youth's preferences for fast foods, soft drinks, and salty snacks; mixed messages sent by school personnel; school food preparation and serving space limitations; inadequate meal periods; and lack of education standards for school foodservice directors challenge school meal programs as well. A coordinated school health program offers a framework for meeting these challenges and provides children and adolescents with the knowledge and skills necessary for healthful eating. This article identifies challenges facing school foodservice directors in delivering healthful meals and acquaints dietetics professionals with the coordinated school health program to be used as a tool for addressing unhealthful weight gain and promoting healthful eating.

  7. Health policy programs realised in Poland in 2016-2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurowska, Patrycja; Królak, Anna; Giermaziak, Wojciech

    2018-01-01

    Health Policy Program (Program Polityki Zdrowotnej – PPZ) is a state policy tool for engaging local government units into the mechanism of granting provision of health services. Authors show areas in which self-governments most often took preventive health care actions and describe legislative changes in the Act on provision of health services. The aim of the article is to quantitative and qualitative statement of PPZ prepared in Poland in 2016 and 2017, as well as presenting changing legal situation in the scope of evaluation of these projects. Authors use descriptive method, presenting changes of legal status. The article includes data available in the Bulletin of Public Information by The Agency for Health Technology Assessment. 590 programs were analyzed (239 from 2016 and 351 from 2017). In 2016 – 67% of submitted programs were given a positive opinion and in 2017 – 71%. The most of positively evaluated PPZ submitted by local government units (53% in 2016; 47% in 2017) referred to prevention of infectious diseases by vaccines. On the basis of analyses conducted, significant differences were observed in the implementation of the PPZ in various regions of Poland. In the recent years a big improvement in the quality of planned self-government health programs is observed. It is suggested that due to the regulation defining the model of the health policy program and the model of the final report, this trend will continue.

  8. Selecting, adapting, and sustaining programs in health care systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zullig LL

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Leah L Zullig,1,2 Hayden B Bosworth1–4 1Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care, Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 2Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 3School of Nursing, 4Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA Abstract: Practitioners and researchers often design behavioral programs that are effective for a specific population or problem. Despite their success in a controlled setting, relatively few programs are scaled up and implemented in health care systems. Planning for scale-up is a critical, yet often overlooked, element in the process of program design. Equally as important is understanding how to select a program that has already been developed, and adapt and implement the program to meet specific organizational goals. This adaptation and implementation requires attention to organizational goals, available resources, and program cost. We assert that translational behavioral medicine necessitates expanding successful programs beyond a stand-alone research study. This paper describes key factors to consider when selecting, adapting, and sustaining programs for scale-up in large health care systems and applies the Knowledge to Action (KTA Framework to a case study, illustrating knowledge creation and an action cycle of implementation and evaluation activities. Keywords: program sustainability, diffusion of innovation, information dissemination, health services research, intervention studies 

  9. Epigenomic programing: a future way to health?

    OpenAIRE

    Shenderov, Boris A.; Midtvedt, Tore

    2014-01-01

    It is now generally accepted that the ‘central genome dogma’ (i.e. a causal chain going from DNA to RNA to proteins and downstream to biological functions) should be replaced by the ‘fluid genome dogma’, that is, complex feed-forward and feed-back cycles that interconnect organism and environment by epigenomic programing – and reprograming – throughout life and at all levels, sometimes also down the generations. The epigenomic programing is the net sum of interactions derived from own metabol...

  10. The duty health physicist program at Byron Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldsmith, D.G.; Carey, T.R.

    1987-01-01

    The Duty Health Physicist Program at Byron Station was established to deal with routine health physics tasks and provide an interface between frontline and upper radiation-chemistry management. The program consists of a weekly rotation of selected members of the health physics staff into the duty health physicist position to handle the assigned duty tasks. The tasks include, but are not limited to, daily isotopic and air sample review, effluent release package review, maximum permissible concentration calculations, dose approvals, as-low-as-reasonably-achievable action review of pending jobs, and general availability to answer questions and address problems in health-physics-related areas of plant operation. The daily attendance of the duty health physicist at the radiation-chemistry and station plan-of-the-day meetings has increased the overall presence and visibility of the health physics program to upper station management and other station departments. Since its inception in July of 1985, the Duty Health Physics Program has been a major contributor to the observed 50% reduction in reportable personnel errors in the radiation-chemistry department (based on personnel-error-related deviation reports and license event reports generated on the radiation-chemistry department at Byron Station). Although difficulty to quantify, other important benefits of this program are also discussed in this paper

  11. The Need and Curricula for Health Professions Education Graduate Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervero, Ronald M.; Daley, Barbara J.

    2018-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of the emerging social and organizational contexts for health professions education and the rationale for foundational adult and continuing education concepts to be included in the curricula of HPE graduate programs.

  12. Federal Employees Health Benefits Program (FEHBP) Plan Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — A list of all Federal Employees Health Benefits Program (FEHBP) plans available in each state, as well as links to the plan brochures, changes for each plan from the...

  13. Satisfaction with a distance continuing education program for health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bynum, Ann B; Irwin, Cathy A; Cohen, Betty

    2010-09-01

    This study assessed differences in program satisfaction among health professionals participating in a distance continuing education program by gender, ethnicity, discipline, and community size. A one-group posttest design was used with a sample of 45,996 participants in the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Rural Hospital, Distance Continuing Medical Education Program during 1995-2007. This program provided 2,219 continuing education programs for physicians (n = 7,047), nurses (n = 21,264), allied health (n = 3,230) and dental (n = 305) professionals, pharmacists (n = 4,088), administrators (n = 1,211), and marketing/finance/human resources professionals (n = 343). These programs were provided in Arkansas hospitals, clinics, and area health education centers. Interactive video technology and the Internet were used to deliver these programs. The program satisfaction instrument demonstrated adequate internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alpha = 0.91) and construct validity. Participants had high levels of satisfaction regarding knowledge and skills, use of information to enhance patient care, program quality, and convenience of the technology (mean total satisfaction score = 4.44, range: 1-5). Results from the t-test for independent samples and one-way analysis of variance indicated that men (p = 0.01), African-Americans and Hispanics (p affect satisfaction with distance continuing education programs.

  14. 77 FR 37415 - Office of Urban Indian Health Programs; Title V HIV/AIDS Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-21

    ... Indian health program HIV/AIDS activities is necessary to reduce the incidence of HIV/AIDS in the urban Indian communities by increasing access to HIV related services, reducing stigma, and making testing..., Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Health Resource and Services Administration, and...

  15. The US Public Health Service's radioactive materials program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villforth, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    This review concentrates primarily on the U.S. Public Health Service's radiological health programs that are related to the use of radium in medicine. The history of program development is given, with a focus on legal and regulatory aspects. Federal and state cooperative actions are outlined, including congressional radium hearings, National Advisory Committee on Radiation, and Federal Radiation Council rulings. Problems associated with the medical use of radium, such as contamination and disposal, are also described. 30 refs

  16. Integrated Worker Health Protection and Promotion Programs: Overview and Perspectives on Health and Economic Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronk, Nicolaas P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe integrated worker health protection and promotion (IWHPP) program characteristics, to discuss the rationale for integration of OSH and WHP programs, and to summarize what is known about the impact of these programs on health and economic outcomes. Methods A descriptive assessment of the current state of the IWHPP field and a review of studies on the effectiveness of IWHPP programs on health and economic outcomes. Results Sufficient evidence of effectiveness was found for IWHPP programs when health outcomes are considered. Impact on productivity-related outcomes is considered promising, but inconclusive, whereas insufficient evidence was found for health care expenditures. Conclusions Existing evidence supports an integrated approach in terms of health outcomes but will benefit significantly from research designed to support the business case for employers of various company sizes and industry types. PMID:24284747

  17. Sri Lanka's Health Unit Program: A Model of "Selective" Primary Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soma Hewa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper argues that the health unit program developed in Sri Lanka in the early twentieth century was an earlier model of selective primary health care promoted by the Rockefeller Foundation in the 1980s in opposition to comprehensive primary health care advocated by the Alma-Ata Declaration of the World Health Organization. A key strategy of the health unit program was to identify the most common and serious infectious diseases in each health unit area and control them through improved sanitation, health education, immunization and treatment with the help of local communities. The health unit program was later introduced to other countries in South and Southeast Asia as part of the Rockefeller Foundation's global campaign to promote public health.

  18. Home Economics/Health Grades 6-12. Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Des Moines Public Schools, IA. Teaching and Learning Div.

    Home economics programs are offered to students in grades 6-12 in the Des Moines INdependent Community School District (Iowa). Programs at the middle school level are exploratory, leading to occupational training in family and consumer science, child care, food service, and textile and fashion arts at the high school level. Health education…

  19. Ethics in Worksite Health Programming: Who Is Served?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Paul M.; Blum, Terry C.

    1987-01-01

    Based on extensive research experience with employee assistance programs, ethical issues concerning employee assistance and wellness/health promotion programs are considered at three levels: (1) the individual level, (2) the organizational level, and (3) the interorganizational level. (Author/CH)

  20. 77 FR 10455 - National Institutes of Health Loan Repayment Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-22

    ... science or clinical research parameters and is not targeted toward a specific area (e.g., AIDS) or type of..., whether the time is spent on research, teaching, patient care, or other activities. Living Expenses: Means...) Primary Care Loan (PCL) Program, and (10) Public Health Service Scholarship (PHS) Program; (d) For...

  1. 78 FR 20466 - National Institutes of Health Loan Repayment Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-05

    ... science or clinical research parameters and is not targeted toward a specific area (e.g., AIDS) or type of..., whether the time is spent on research, teaching, patient care, or other activities. Living expenses means... Shortage Area Scholarship Program, (9) Primary Care Loan (PCL) Program, and (10) Public Health Service...

  2. Outcomes Assessment in Accredited Health Information Management Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Dorine

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the use and perceived usefulness of outcomes assessment methods in health information management programs. Additional characteristics of the outcomes assessment practices were recognized. The findings were evaluated for significant differences in results based on age of the program, type of institution,…

  3. Assessment of Student Outcomes in Undergraduate Health Information Administration Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Jody

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to a) determine what assessment methods are being used in undergraduate health information administration programs to assess student learning and the usefulness of those methods, b) determine to what extent programs have incorporated good student learning assessment practices. Programs use a variety of assessment tools to measure student learning; the most useful include assessments by the professional practice supervisor, course tests, assignments, presentati...

  4. Planning and Implementing a Public Health Professional Distance Learning Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escoffery, Cam; Leppke, Allison M.; Robinson, Kara B.; Mettler, Erik P.; Miner, Kathleen R.; Smith, Iris

    2005-01-01

    Training of public health professionals through web-based technology is rapidly increasing. This article describes one school of public health's effort to establish an online Master's program that serves students nationally and internationally. It examines the critical components in the design and implementation of distance education, including…

  5. Evaluation of a Reproductive Health Program to Support Married ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... self-esteem, reproductive health and gender through girls' groups. The husbands' program focused on non-violence, support to families, and reproductive health. Population-based surveys were undertaken among married girls, at midterm and end line. Outcomes of interest were husbands' assistance with domestic work, ...

  6. The Rural Alabama Pregnancy and Infant Health (RAPIH) Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeper, J. D.; And Others

    The impact of the Rural Alabama Pregnancy and Infant Health (RAPIH) Program was evaluated in relation to prenatal care, birth outcome measures, and several child health and home environment outcomes. Begun in 1983, RAPIH targets poor rural blacks in three of west-central Alabama's poorest counties, where economic conditions and infant mortality…

  7. 78 FR 46339 - Medicare, Medicaid, and Children's Health Insurance Programs: Announcement of Temporary Moratoria...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-31

    ...] Medicare, Medicaid, and Children's Health Insurance Programs: Announcement of Temporary Moratoria on... combat fraud, waste, and abuse in Medicare, Medicaid, and the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP... Health Insurance Programs; Additional Screening Requirements, Application Fees, Temporary Enrollment...

  8. Operating plan for the Office of International Health Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    In this report unified ideas are presented about what the Office of International Health Programs does, what the individual contributions are, and how the organization connects to the Department of Energy. The planning efforts have focused on the office's three areas of responsibility: Europe, Japan, and the Marshall Islands. Common to each technical program area are issues related to the following: health of populations exposed to radiation incidents and the associated medical aspects of exposure; dose reconstruction; training; and public involvement. Each of the program areas, its customers, and primary customer interests are described

  9. Building an Educational Program together health community agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcia Rondelo Duarte

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at contributing inputs to the learning process of community health agents from Family Health Strategy, this study has sought to devise an Educational Program to qualify seven community agents from the Family Health Unit on Habiteto, a neighborhood in the Brazilian city of Sorocaba. Speeches on the perception these agents have of their work, their difficulties and proposals were captured and analyzed within the framework of the "Collective Subject Speech". Results showed the group's learning needs, and guided the devising and implementation of the Educational Program, which adopted the "Problem-Based Education" model. This knowledge was built by the agents through a problem-focused reality, debating, searching for solutions, and implementing intervention projects. They noticed that being a community health agent means, above all, to struggle and harness community forces for purposes of defending health & education public services and for improving social health determinants.

  10. Counseling Health Psychology: Assessing Health Psychology Training within Counseling Psychology Doctoral Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raque-Bogdan, Trisha L.; Torrey, Carrie L.; Lewis, Brian L.; Borges, Nicole J.

    2013-01-01

    Training directors of American Psychological Association-approved counseling psychology doctoral programs completed a questionnaire assessing (a) student and faculty involvement in health-related research, practice, and teaching; (b) health-related research conducted by students and faculty; and (c) programs' expectations and ability to…

  11. Program Development and Evaluation - Nutrition / Health

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Martha Archuleta: Kitchen Creations - A Cooking School for People with Diabetes. Darlene Christensen: University of Wyoming Food & Nutrition Extension Website. Judith L. Corbus: Hawaii Five-A-Day A Taste of the Tropics with Fruits and Vegetables. Luanne J. Hughes: Reaching Key Audiences with Food Safety Messages. Darlene Liesch: Pregnancy Prevention for Latino Teens. Karen Richey: Food Irradiation - Insuring your Food’s Safety. Carole Rison: Farmers Markets – Impacting Health through Economic...

  12. Fetal health locus of control: Scale properties and applications in preconception health programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliday, Elizabeth; Strahm, Anna; Mammenga, Stefani

    2016-04-01

    Preconception health programs have resulted in improved health behaviors among participants and have shown promise in reducing adverse birth outcomes. However, the role of health beliefs in preconception health program outcomes has been overlooked but warrants attention due to reported positive associations between women's views of control over fetal health and health behavior in pregnancy. Towards an ultimate aim of improving preconception health program reach and effectiveness, we examined properties of a fetal health locus of control (FHLC; Labs & Wurtele, 1986) measure in nulliparous, childbearing aged university women and men. Students (n=1467) completed an online survey that included the FHLC subscales maternal, powerful others', and chance control over fetal health. Factor analyses and correlations with related scales supported the soundness of FHLC constructs in both women and men. All participants rated maternal control in fetal health nearly twice as highly as powerful others' and chance. We therefore recommend that FHLC be integrated into preconception health program evaluation as personal agency in fetal health likely has an important role in women's and men's preconception health behavior and health behavior change. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Health physics educational program in the Tennessee Valley Authority

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holley, Wesley L.

    1978-01-01

    In the spring of 1977, the Radiological Hygiene Branch of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) instituted a training program for health physics technicians to ensure availability of qualified personnel for the agency, which is rapidly becoming the world's largest nuclear utility. From this, a health physics education program is developing to also include health physics orientation and retraining for unescorted entry into nuclear power plants, health physics training for employees at other (non-TVA) nuclear plants, specialized health physics training, and possibly theoretical health physics courses to qualify technician-level personnel for professional status. Videotaped presentations are being used extensively, with innovations such as giving examinations by videotape of real-life, in-plant experiences and acted out scenarios of health physics procedures; and teaching health physics personnel to observe, detect, and act on procedural, equipment, and personnel deficiencies promptly. Video-taped lectures are being used for review and to complement live lectures. Also, a 35-mm slide and videotape library is being developed on all aspects of the operational health physics program for nuclear plants using pressurized and boiling water reactors. (author)

  14. Program collaboration and service integration activities among HIV programs in 59 U.S. health departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitz Harris, Lauren F; Toledo, Lauren; Dunbar, Erica; Aquino, Gustavo A; Nesheim, Steven R

    2014-01-01

    We identified the level and type of program collaboration and service integration (PCSI) among HIV prevention programs in 59 CDC-funded health department jurisdictions. Annual progress reports (APRs) completed by all 59 health departments funded by CDC for HIV prevention activities were reviewed for collaborative and integrated activities reported by HIV programs for calendar year 2009. We identified associations between PCSI activities and funding, AIDS diagnosis rate, and organizational integration. HIV programs collaborated with other health department programs through data-related activities, provider training, and providing funding for sexually transmitted disease (STD) activities in 24 (41%), 31 (53%), and 16 (27%) jurisdictions, respectively. Of the 59 jurisdictions, 57 (97%) reported integrated HIV and STD testing at the same venue, 39 (66%) reported integrated HIV and tuberculosis testing, and 26 (44%) reported integrated HIV and viral hepatitis testing. Forty-five (76%) jurisdictions reported providing integrated education/outreach activities for HIV and at least one other disease. Twenty-six (44%) jurisdictions reported integrated partner services among HIV and STD programs. Overall, the level of PCSI activities was not associated with HIV funding, AIDS diagnoses, or organizational integration. HIV programs in health departments collaborate primarily with STD programs. Key PCSI activities include integrated testing, integrated education/outreach, and training. Future assessments are needed to evaluate PCSI activities and to identify the level of collaboration and integration among prevention programs.

  15. A Qualitative Study Exploring Facilitators for Improved Health Behaviors and Health Behavior Programs: Mental Health Service Users’ Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candida Graham

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Mental health service users experience high rates of cardiometabolic disorders and have a 20–25% shorter life expectancy than the general population from such disorders. Clinician-led health behavior programs have shown moderate improvements, for mental health service users, in managing aspects of cardiometabolic disorders. This study sought to potentially enhance health initiatives by exploring (1 facilitators that help mental health service users engage in better health behaviors and (2 the types of health programs mental health service users want to develop. Methods. A qualitative study utilizing focus groups was conducted with 37 mental health service users attending a psychosocial rehabilitation center, in Northern British Columbia, Canada. Results. Four major facilitator themes were identified: (1 factors of empowerment, self-value, and personal growth; (2 the need for social support; (3 pragmatic aspects of motivation and planning; and (4 access. Participants believed that engaging with programs of physical activity, nutrition, creativity, and illness support would motivate them to live more healthily. Conclusions and Implications for Practice. Being able to contribute to health behavior programs, feeling valued and able to experience personal growth are vital factors to engage mental health service users in health programs. Clinicians and health care policy makers need to account for these considerations to improve success of health improvement initiatives for this population.

  16. Factors influencing perceived sustainability of Dutch community health programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeer, A J M; Van Assema, P; Hesdahl, B; Harting, J; De Vries, N K

    2015-09-01

    We assessed the perceived sustainability of community health programs organized by local intersectoral coalitions, as well as the factors that collaborating partners think might influence sustainability. Semi-structured interviews were conducted among 31 collaborating partners of 5 community health programs in deprived neighborhoods in the southern part of the Netherlands. The interview guide was based on a conceptual framework that includes factors related to the context, the leading organization, leadership, the coalition, collaborating partners, interventions and outcomes. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and content analyzed using NVivo 8.0. Participants in each of the programs varied in their perceptions of the sustainability of the program, but those people collaborating in pre-existing neighborhood structures expressed relatively high faith in their continuation. The participating citizens in particular believed that these structures would continue to address the health of the community in the future. We found factors from all categories of the conceptual framework that were perceived to influence sustainability. The program leaders appeared to be crucial to the programs, as they were frequently mentioned in close interaction with other factors. Program leaders should use a motivating and supportive leadership style and should act as 'program champions'. © The Author (2013). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Review and analysis of the Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happell, Brenda; Platania-Phung, Chris

    2017-09-04

    Objective The aim of the present study was to review and synthesise research on the Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program (MHNIP) to ascertain the benefits and limitations of this initiative for people with mental illness, general practitioners, mental health nurses and the wider community. Methods An electronic and manual search was made of the research literature for MHNIP in May 2017. Features of studies, including cohorts and findings, were tabulated and cross-study patterns in program processes and outcomes were closely compared. Results Seventeen reports of primary research data have been released. Triangulation of data from different cohorts, regions and design show that the program has been successful on the primary objectives of increased access to primary mental health care, and has received positive feedback from all major stakeholders. Although the program has been broadly beneficial to consumer health, there are inequities in access for people with mental illness. Conclusions The MHNIP greatly benefits the health of people with mental illness. Larger and more representative sampling of consumers is needed, as well as intensive case studies to provide a more comprehensive and effective understanding of the benefits and limitations of the program as it evolves with the establishment of primary health networks. What is known about the topic? The MHNIP is designed to increase access to mental health care in primary care settings such as general practice clinics. Studies have reported favourable views about the program. However, research is limited and further investigation is required to demonstrate the strengths and limitations of the program. What does this paper add? All studies reviewed reported that the MHNIP had positive implications for people with severe and persistent mental illness. Qualitative research has been most prevalent for mental health nurse views and research on Health of the Nation Outcome Scale scores for recipients of the program

  18. Impact of a health promotion program on employee health risks and work productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Peter R; Kessler, Ronald C; Cooper, John; Sullivan, Sean

    2007-01-01

    Evaluate the impact of a multicomponent workplace health promotion program on employee health risks and work productivity. Quasi-experimental 12-month before-after intervention-control study. A multinational corporation headquartered in the United Kingdom. Of 618 employees offered the program, 266 (43%) completed questionnaires before and after the program. A total of 1242 of 2500 (49.7%) of a control population also completed questionnaires 12 months apart. A multicomponent health promotion program incorporating a health risk appraisal questionnaire, access to a tailored health improvement web portal, wellness literature, and seminars and workshops focused upon identified wellness issues. Outcomes were (1) cumulative count of health risk factors and the World Health Organization health and work performance questionnaire measures of (2) workplace absenteeism and (3) work performance. After adjusting for baseline differences, improvements in all three outcomes were significantly greater in the intervention group compared with the control group. Mean excess reductions of 0.45 health risk factors and 0.36 monthly absenteeism days and a mean increase of 0.79 on the work performance scale were observed in the intervention group compared with the control group. The intervention yielded a positive return on investment, even using conservative assumptions about effect size estimation. The results suggest that a well-implemented multicomponent workplace health promotion program can produce sizeable changes in health risks and productivity.

  19. Components of cultural competence in three mental health programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Carole; Haugland, Gary; Reid-Rose, Lenora; Hopper, Kim

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to identify components of cultural competence in mental health programs developed for cultural groups by community and mental health professionals from these groups. Three programs were studied: a prevention program primarily serving African-American and Afro-Caribbean youth, a Latino adult acute inpatient unit, and a Chinese day treatment program in a community-based agency. Nine study-trained field researchers used a semistructured instrument that captures program genealogy, structure, processes, and cultural infusion. Program cultural elements were identified from field notes and from individual and group interviews of consumers and staff (N=104). A research-group consensus process with feedback from program staff was used to group elements by shared characteristics into the program components of cultural competence. Components included communication competencies (with use of colloquialisms and accepted forms of address); staff in culturally acceptable roles; culturally framed trust building (such as pairing youths with mentors), stigma reduction, friendly milieus (such as serving culturally familiar foods and playing music popular with the culture), and services; and peer, family, and community involvement (including use of peer counselors and mentors, hosting parent weekends, and linking clients with senior center and community services). Incorporating these components into any program in which underserved cultural populations are seen is recommended for improving cultural competence.

  20. Workplace Violence Training Programs for Health Care Workers: An Analysis of Program Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbury, Sheila; Hodgson, Michael; Zankowski, Donna; Lipscomb, Jane

    2017-06-01

    Commercial workplace violence (WPV) prevention training programs differ in their approach to violence prevention and the content they present. This study reviews 12 such programs using criteria developed from training topics in the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) Guidelines for Preventing Workplace Violence for Healthcare and Social Service Workers and a review of the WPV literature. None of the training programs addressed all the review criteria. The most significant gap in content was the lack of attention to facility-specific risk assessment and policies. To fill this gap, health care facilities should supplement purchased training programs with specific training in organizational policies and procedures, emergency action plans, communication, facility risk assessment, and employee post-incident debriefing and monitoring. Critical to success is a dedicated program manager who understands risk assessment, facility clinical operations, and program management and evaluation.

  1. Prevalence of health promotion programs in primary health care units in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Luiz Roberto; Malta, Deborah Carvalho; Gomes, Grace Angélica de Oliveira; Bracco, Mário M; Florindo, Alex Antonio; Mielke, Gregore Iven; Parra, Diana C; Lobelo, Felipe; Simoes, Eduardo J; Hallal, Pedro Curi

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Assessment of prevalence of health promotion programs in primary health care units within Brazil’s health system. METHODS We conducted a cross-sectional descriptive study based on telephone interviews with managers of primary care units. Of a total 42,486 primary health care units listed in the Brazilian Unified Health System directory, 1,600 were randomly selected. Care units from all five Brazilian macroregions were selected proportionally to the number of units in each region. We examined whether any of the following five different types of health promotion programs was available: physical activity; smoking cessation; cessation of alcohol and illicit drug use; healthy eating; and healthy environment. Information was collected on the kinds of activities offered and the status of implementation of the Family Health Strategy at the units. RESULTS Most units (62.0%) reported having in place three health promotion programs or more and only 3.0% reported having none. Healthy environment (77.0%) and healthy eating (72.0%) programs were the most widely available; smoking and alcohol use cessation were reported in 54.0% and 42.0% of the units. Physical activity programs were offered in less than 40.0% of the units and their availability varied greatly nationwide, from 51.0% in the Southeast to as low as 21.0% in the North. The Family Health Strategy was implemented in most units (61.0%); however, they did not offer more health promotion programs than others did. CONCLUSIONS Our study showed that most primary care units have in place health promotion programs. Public policies are needed to strengthen primary care services and improve training of health providers to meet the goals of the agenda for health promotion in Brazil. PMID:25372175

  2. Formal intervention in employee health: comparisons of the nature and structure of employee assistance programs and health promotion programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, P M; Blum, T C

    1988-01-01

    Health promotion programs (HPP) and employee assistance programs (EAP) are compared in terms of their structure and process. Two common themes are extracted: a belief that both are beneficial to both employers and employees, and a sense of 'mission'. The technology of HPP and EAP are examined and compared. EAPs' stimulation from Federal funding is contrasted with the more indigenous roots of HPPs. Examination of empirical data comparing organizations with EAPs which have and have not adopted HPPs indicate the former tend to be somewhat more 'caring' toward employees. An examination of program ingredients indicates much greater commonality of structural and processual ingredients within EAPs as compared to HPPs. The extent to which each program type has become more 'populist' in orientation and the implications of these changes for program technology are considered. Finally the paper describes differences in program evaluation stemming from target group definitions in the two types of programs.

  3. Measuring the diffusion of innovative health promotion programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steckler, A; Goodman, R M; McLeroy, K R; Davis, S; Koch, G

    1992-01-01

    Once a health promotion program has proven to be effective in one or two initial settings, attempts may be made to transfer the program to new settings. One way to conceptualize the transference of health promotion programs from one locale to another is by considering the programs to be innovations that are being diffused. In this way, diffusion of innovation theory can be applied to guide the process of program transference. This article reports on the development of six questionnaires to measure the extent to which health promotion programs are successfully disseminated: Organizational Climate, Awareness-Concern, Rogers's Adoption Variables, Level of Use, Level of Success, and Level of Institutionalization. The instruments are being successfully used in a study of the diffusion of health promotion/tobacco prevention curricula to junior high schools in North Carolina. The instruments, which measure the four steps of the diffusion process, have construct validity since they were developed within existing theories and are derived from the work of previous researchers. No previous research has attempted to use instruments like these to measure sequentially the stages of the diffusion process.

  4. Health risk reduction programs in employer-sponsored health plans: Part II-law and ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothstein, Mark A; Harrell, Heather L

    2009-08-01

    We sought to examine the legal and ethical implications of workplace health risk reduction programs (HRRPs) using health risk assessments, individually focused risk reduction, and financial incentives to promote compliance. We conducted a literature review, analyzed relevant statutes and regulations, and considered the effects of these programs on employee health privacy. A variety of laws regulate HRRPs, and there is little evidence that employer-sponsored HRRPs violate these provisions; infringement on individual health privacy is more difficult to assess. Although current laws permit a wide range of employer health promotion activities, HRRPs also may entail largely unquantifiable costs to employee privacy and related interests.

  5. Health Risk Reduction Programs in Employer-Sponsored Health Plans: Part II—Law and Ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothstein, Mark A.; Harrell, Heather L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective We sought to examine the legal and ethical implications of workplace health risk reduction programs (HRRPs) using health risk assessments, individually focused risk reduction, and financial incentives to promote compliance. Methods We conducted a literature review, analyzed relevant statutes and regulations, and considered the effects of these programs on employee health privacy. Results A variety of laws regulate HRRPs, and there is little evidence that employer-sponsored HRRPs violate these provisions; infringement on individual health privacy is more difficult to assess. Conclusion Although current laws permit a wide range of employer health promotion activities, HRRPs also may entail largely unquantifiable costs to employee privacy and related interests. PMID:19625971

  6. Chronic beryllium disease prevention program; worker safety and health program. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-02-09

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is today publishing a final rule to implement the statutory mandate of section 3173 of the Bob Stump National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2003 to establish worker safety and health regulations to govern contractor activities at DOE sites. This program codifies and enhances the worker protection program in operation when the NDAA was enacted.

  7. Honolulu Community College Program Health Indicators: 2000-2001 Program Reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawaii Univ., Honolulu. Honolulu Community Coll.

    This report presents an overall health summation of 21 programs offered at Honolulu Community College (Hawaii) during 2000-2001. The programs profiled are: (1) Auto Body Repair and Painting; (2) Aeronautics Maintenance Technology; (3) Administration of Justice; (4) Automotive Mechanics Technology; (5) Boat Maintenance Repair; (6) Carpentry; (7)…

  8. 76 FR 40733 - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, (NIOSH), World Trade Center Health Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, (NIOSH), World Trade Center Health Program Science/Technical Advisory Committee (WTCHP-STAC) Correction: This notice was published in the Federal Register on June 23...

  9. An Overview of State Policies Supporting Worksite Health Promotion Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderVeur, Jennifer; Gilchrist, Siobhan; Matson-Koffman, Dyann

    2017-05-01

    Worksite health promotion (WHP) programs can reduce the occurrence of cardiovascular disease risk factors. State law can encourage employers and employer-provided insurance companies to offer comprehensive WHP programs. This research examines state law authorizing WHP programs. Quantitative content analysis. Worksites or workplaces. United States (and the District of Columbia). State law in effect in 2013 authorizing WHP programs. Frequency and distribution of states with WHP laws. To determine the content of the laws for analysis and coding, we identified 18 policy elements, 12 from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Worksite Health ScoreCard (HSC) and 6 additional supportive WHP strategies. We used these strategies as key words to search for laws authorizing WHP programs or select WHP elements. We calculated the number and type of WHP elements for each state with WHP laws and selected two case examples from states with comprehensive WHP laws. Twenty-four states authorized onsite WHP programs, 29 authorized WHP through employer-provided insurance plans, and 18 authorized both. Seven states had a comprehensive WHP strategy, addressing 8 or more of 12 HSC elements. The most common HSC elements were weight management, tobacco cessation, and physical activity. Most states had laws encouraging the adoption of WHP programs. Massachusetts and Maine are implementing comprehensive WHP laws but studies evaluating their health impact are needed.

  10. Including oral health training in a health system strengthening program in Rwanda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany Seymour

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Rwanda's Ministry of Health, with the Clinton Health Access Initiative, implemented the Human Resources for Health (HRH Program. The purpose of the program is to train and retain high-quality health care professionals to improve and sustain health in Rwanda. Design: In May 2011, an oral health team from Rwanda and the United States proposed that oral health be included in the HRH Program, due to its important links to health, in a recommendation to the Rwandan Ministry of Health. The proposal outlined a diagonal approach to curriculum design that supports the principles of global health through interconnected training for both treatment and collaborative prevention, rather than discipline-based fragmented training focused on isolated risk factors. It combined ‘vertical’ direct patient care training with ‘horizontal’ interdisciplinary training to address common underlying risk factors and associations for disease through primary care, program retention, and sustainability. Results: The proposal was accepted by the Ministry of Health and was approved for funding by the US Government and The Global Fund. Rwanda's first Bachelor of Dental Surgery program, which is in the planning phase, is being developed. Conclusions: Competencies, the training curriculum, insurance and payment schemes, licensure, and other challenges are currently being addressed. With the Ministry of Health supporting the dental HRH efforts and fully appreciating the importance of oral health, all are hopeful that these developments will ultimately lead to more robust oral health data collection, a well-trained and well-retained dental profession, and vastly improved oral health and overall health for the people of Rwanda in the decades to come.

  11. Including oral health training in a health system strengthening program in Rwanda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Brittany; Muhumuza, Ibra; Mumena, Chris; Isyagi, Moses; Barrow, Jane; Meeks, Valli

    2013-01-01

    Objective Rwanda's Ministry of Health, with the Clinton Health Access Initiative, implemented the Human Resources for Health (HRH) Program. The purpose of the program is to train and retain high-quality health care professionals to improve and sustain health in Rwanda. Design In May 2011, an oral health team from Rwanda and the United States proposed that oral health be included in the HRH Program, due to its important links to health, in a recommendation to the Rwandan Ministry of Health. The proposal outlined a diagonal approach to curriculum design that supports the principles of global health through interconnected training for both treatment and collaborative prevention, rather than discipline-based fragmented training focused on isolated risk factors. It combined ‘vertical’ direct patient care training with ‘horizontal’ interdisciplinary training to address common underlying risk factors and associations for disease through primary care, program retention, and sustainability. Results The proposal was accepted by the Ministry of Health and was approved for funding by the US Government and The Global Fund. Rwanda's first Bachelor of Dental Surgery program, which is in the planning phase, is being developed. Conclusions Competencies, the training curriculum, insurance and payment schemes, licensure, and other challenges are currently being addressed. With the Ministry of Health supporting the dental HRH efforts and fully appreciating the importance of oral health, all are hopeful that these developments will ultimately lead to more robust oral health data collection, a well-trained and well-retained dental profession, and vastly improved oral health and overall health for the people of Rwanda in the decades to come. PMID:23473054

  12. 78 FR 59121 - Basic Health Program: State Administration of Basic Health Programs; Eligibility and Enrollment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-25

    ... coverage program for low-income individuals who would otherwise be eligible to purchase coverage through... applicability to the new program. Beginning in 2014, individuals and small businesses will be able to purchase... impact on the enrollee experience in BHP or the program financing. 7. Withdrawal of a BHP Blueprint prior...

  13. 76 FR 11782 - Medicare, Medicaid, and Children's Health Insurance Programs; Renewal, Expansion, and Renaming of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-03

    ...] Medicare, Medicaid, and Children's Health Insurance Programs; Renewal, Expansion, and Renaming of the...'s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) about options for selecting health care coverage under these and... needs are for experts in health disparities, State Health Insurance Assistance Programs (SHIPs), health...

  14. Improving delivery of a health-promoting-environments program: experiences from Queensland Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, S

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to outline the key components of a statewide multisite health-promoting-environments program. Contemporary health-promotion programs in settings such as schools, workplaces and hospitals use organisational development theory to address the health issues of the setting, including the physical environment, the organisational environment, and the specific health needs of the employees and consumers of the service. Program principles include management of each project by the participant organisation or site (for example, a school or workplace), using resources available within the organisation and the local community, voluntary participation, social justice and participant-based priority setting, and evaluation and monitoring. Adoption of these principles implies a shift in the role of the health worker from implementer to facilitator. Based on the experience of Queensland Health, it is proposed that the essential building blocks of the health-promoting-environments program are an intersectoral policy base, a model for action, training and resources, local facilitators, support from local organisations, a supportive network of sites, marketing of the program, and a state-based evaluation and monitoring system. The program in Queensland was able to develop a significant number of these components over the 1990-1996 period. In regard to evaluation, process measures can be built around the program components; however, further research is required for development of impact indicators and benchmarks on quality.

  15. Comprehensive adolescent health programs that include sexual and reproductive health services: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kågesten, Anna; Parekh, Jenita; Tunçalp, Ozge; Turke, Shani; Blum, Robert William

    2014-12-01

    We systematically reviewed peer-reviewed and gray literature on comprehensive adolescent health (CAH) programs (1998-2013), including sexual and reproductive health services. We screened 36 119 records and extracted articles using predefined criteria. We synthesized data into descriptive characteristics and assessed quality by evidence level. We extracted data on 46 programs, of which 19 were defined as comprehensive. Ten met all inclusion criteria. Most were US based; others were implemented in Egypt, Ethiopia, and Mexico. Three programs displayed rigorous evidence; 5 had strong and 2 had modest evidence. Those with rigorous or strong evidence directly or indirectly influenced adolescent sexual and reproductive health. The long-term impact of many CAH programs cannot be proven because of insufficient evaluations. Evaluation approaches that take into account the complex operating conditions of many programs are needed to better understand mechanisms behind program effects.

  16. Can health insurance improve employee health outcome and reduce cost? An evaluation of Geisinger's employee health and wellness program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeng, Daniel D; Pitcavage, James M; Tomcavage, Janet; Steinhubl, Steven R

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate the impact of a health plan-driven employee health and wellness program (known as MyHealth Rewards) on health outcomes (stroke and myocardial infarction) and cost of care. A cohort of Geisinger Health Plan members who were Geisinger Health System (GHS) employees throughout the study period (2007 to 2011) was compared with a comparison group consisting of Geisinger Health Plan members who were non-GHS employees. The GHS employee cohort experienced a stroke or myocardial infarction later than the non-GHS comparison group (hazard ratios of 0.73 and 0.56; P employee health and wellness programs similarly designed as MyHealth Rewards can potentially have a desirable impact on employee health and cost.

  17. Health physics program for the Edgemont Uranium Mill decommissioning project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polehn, J.L.; Wallace, R.G.; Reed, R.P.; Wilson, G.T.

    1986-01-01

    The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) is actively involved in decommissioning a uranium mill located near the town of Edgemont, South Dakota. The Edgemont Mill Decommissioning Project, which is unique in many respects, will involve dismantlement of the old inactive mill building and excavation and transportation of several million tons of uranium mill tailings to a permanent disposal site. To ensure that workers are adequately protected from radiation exposure during decommissioning operations, a health physics program appropriate for the decommissioning situation was developed. The Edgemont Mill Decommissioning Project Health Physics Manual (HPM) gives the programmatic requirements for worker radiation protection. The requirements of the HPM are implemented by means of detailed onsite operating procedures. The Edgemont project health physics program was developed using currently available regulations and guidance for an operating uranium mill with appropriate modifications for decommissioning. This paper discusses the development, implementation, and documentation of that program

  18. Success of the Undergraduate Public Health Program At Tulane University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luann Ellis White

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine (SPHTM launched the Bachelors of Science in Public Health (BSPH in 2005. The BSPH has steadily grown and comprises one third of the total enrollment in the school. A review of the organizational structure demonstrates that direct responsibility for undergraduate education by a school of public health is advantageous to the success of the program. The competency and skills-based curriculum attracts students. Outcome measures show the enrollment is steadily increasing. The majority of the BSPH graduates continue onto competitive graduate and professional degree programs. Those who seek jobs find employment related to their public health education, but outside of the traditional governmental public health agencies. The combined BSPH/MPH degree is a pipeline for students to pursue a MPH and increases the likelihood students will pursue careers in public health. The range and depth of study in the bachelors program is continually examined. Topics once within the purview of graduate education are now being incorporated into undergraduate courses. Undergraduate public health is one of a number of factors that is influencing changes in the MPH degree.

  19. Needs and Problems of Posbindu Program: Community Health Volunteers Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putri, S. T.; Andriyani, S.

    2018-01-01

    Posbindu is a form of public participation to conduct early detection and monitoring of risk factors for non-communicable diseases(NCD), and where it was carried out in as an integrated manner, routine and periodic event. This paper aims to investigates the needs and problems on Posbindu Program based on community health volunteers(CHVs) perspective. This study used descriptive qualitative method by open ended questions. Content analysis using to explicating the result. There are 3 theme finding about elderly needs in Posbindu; medical care, support group community, and health education. We found four theme problems which in Posbindu program: low motivation from elderly, Inadequate of facilities, physical disability, failed communication. To be effective in Posbindu program, all the stakeholders have reached consensus on the Posbindu program as elderly need. CHVs need given wide knowledge about early detection, daily care, control disease continuously so that the elderly keep feeling the advantages of coming to the Posbindu.

  20. Health for Life in Primary Schools Program, United Kingdom: a Program Impact Pathways (PIP) analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passmore, Sandra; Donovan, Martin

    2014-09-01

    The Health for Life in Primary Schools Program helps schools promote healthy, active lifestyles through curriculum support related to healthy eating and cooking, growing food, physical activity, and family involvement. These interrelated strands are shown to have the greatest impact on healthy lifestyles, and the Health for Life in Primary Schools Program seeks to make these not one-off lessons, but a sustainable part of a school's culture. Each school involved with the program develops its own Action Plan in order to achieve program goals. Each school is assessed by an audit of facilities, skills, and curriculum at baseline and follow-up, and the pupils complete an on-line questionnaire at baseline and follow-up. Other impact measures are individual to the school and relate to its own Action Plan. Health for Life in Primary Schools sought to assess the cohesiveness and strength of the program using the Program Impact Pathways (PIP) model. The program was deconstructed to its individual parts, with each part assessed in terms of its contribution to the overall program and constraints upon its effectiveness. The PIP analysis helped clarify the logic and structure of the program, whether its objectives can be achieved, the Critical Quality Control Points (CCPs), and the impact measures required to demonstrate success. The core indicators identified for impact evaluation were knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of pupils around healthy eating cooking, growing food, and physical activity. The PIP model confirmed that the Health for Life in Primary Schools Program is well structured and is well suited to achieve its goals. The findings were presented at the Healthy Lifestyles Program Evaluation Workshop held in Granada, Spain, 13-14 September 2013, under the auspices of the Mondelēz International Foundation.

  1. Assessing environmental assets for health promotion program planning: a practical framework for health promotion practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Andrew E; Evans, Alexandra E

    2016-01-01

    Conducting a health needs assessment is an important if not essential first step for health promotion planning. This paper explores how health needs assessments may be further strengthened for health promotion planning via an assessment of environmental assets rooted in the multiple environments (policy, information, social and physical environments) that shape health and behavior. Guided by a behavioral-ecological perspective- one that seeks to identify environmental assets that can influence health behavior, and an implementation science perspective- one that seeks to interweave health promotion strategies into existing environmental assets, we present a basic framework for assessing environmental assets and review examples from the literature to illustrate the incorporation of environmental assets into health program design. Health promotion practitioners and researchers implicitly identify and apply environmental assets in the design and implementation of health promotion interventions;this paper provides foundation for greater intentionality in assessing environmental assets for health promotion planning.

  2. Health Education Assistance Loan (HEAL) Program. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-15

    On July 1, 2014, the HEAL Program was transferred from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to the U.S. Department of Education (the Department). To reflect this transfer and to facilitate the servicing of all HEAL loans that are currently held by the Department, the Secretary adds the HEAL Program regulations to the Department's chapter in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR).

  3. Health-Based Capitation Risk Adjustment in Minnesota Public Health Care Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, Gregory A.; Edwards, Kevan R.; Knutson, David J.

    2004-01-01

    This article documents the history and implementation of health-based capitation risk adjustment in Minnesota public health care programs, and identifies key implementation issues. Capitation payments in these programs are risk adjusted using an historical, health plan risk score, based on concurrent risk assessment. Phased implementation of capitation risk adjustment for these programs began January 1, 2000. Minnesota's experience with capitation risk adjustment suggests that: (1) implementation can accelerate encounter data submission, (2) administrative decisions made during implementation can create issues that impact payment model performance, and (3) changes in diagnosis data management during implementation may require changes to the payment model. PMID:25372356

  4. Teaching corner: child family health international : the ethics of asset-based global health education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evert, Jessica

    2015-03-01

    Child Family Health International (CFHI) is a U.S.-based nonprofit, nongovernmental organization (NGO) that has more than 25 global health education programs in seven countries annually serving more than 600 interprofessional undergraduate, graduate, and postgraduate participants in programs geared toward individual students and university partners. Recognized by Special Consultative Status with the United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC), CFHI utilizes an asset-based community engagement model to ensure that CFHI's programs challenge, rather than reinforce, historical power imbalances between the "Global North" and "Global South." CFHI's programs are predicated on ethical principles including reciprocity, sustainability, humility, transparency, nonmaleficence, respect for persons, and social justice.

  5. Worksite health and wellness programs: Canadian achievements & prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Després, Jean-Pierre; Alméras, Natalie; Gauvin, Lise

    2014-01-01

    Canada has experienced a substantial reduction in mortality related to cardiovascular disease (CVD). There is a general consensus that more effective and widespread health promotion interventions may lead to further reductions in CVD risk factors and actual disease states. In this paper, we briefly outline the prevalence of selected risk factors for CVD in Canada, describe characteristics of the Canadian labor market and workforce, and depict what is known about health and wellness program delivery systems in Canadian workplaces. Our review indicates that there have been numerous and diverse relevant legislative and policy initiatives to create a context conducive to improve the healthfulness of Canadian workplaces. However, there is still a dearth of evidence on the effectiveness of the delivery system and the actual impact of workplace health and wellness programs in reducing CVD risk in Canada. Thus, while a promising model, more research is needed in this area. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Global agenda, local health: including concepts of health security in preparedness programs at the jurisdictional level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eby, Chas

    2014-01-01

    The Global Health Security Agenda's objectives contain components that could help health departments address emerging public health challenges that threaten the population. As part of the agenda, partner countries with advanced public health systems will support the development of infrastructure in stakeholder health departments. To facilitate this process and augment local programs, state and local health departments may want to include concepts of health security in their public health preparedness offices in order to simultaneously build capacity. Health security programs developed by public health departments should complete projects that are closely aligned with the objectives outlined in the global agenda and that facilitate the completion of current preparedness grant requirements. This article identifies objectives and proposes tactical local projects that run parallel to the 9 primary objectives of the Global Health Security Agenda. Executing concurrent projects at the international and local levels in preparedness offices will accelerate the completion of these objectives and help prevent disease epidemics, detect health threats, and respond to public health emergencies. Additionally, future funding tied or related to health security may become more accessible to state and local health departments that have achieved these objectives.

  7. FAMILY HEALTH PROGRAM: CHALLENGES AND POTENTIALITIES REGARDING DRUGS USE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelle Aparecida de Barros

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Epidemiological studies on drugs use point towards this phenomenon as a public health problem. Nowadays, the Family Health Program (FHP is presented by the Health Ministry as a model to restructure primary health care and aims to offer family-centered care, permeated by integrality, problem solving and community bonds. This article aims to discuss action possibilities of Family Health Care professionals involving drugs patients. It is evident that, as opposed to other actions already developed by FHP professionals in other health care areas, which has appeared clearly and objectively. This fact is observed in the daily activities of FHP professionals, which give little attention to drugs-related problems. However, research emphasizes that there exists a broad range of action possibilities for FHP professionals. Although other studies evidence this team’s fragilities in terms of care for drugs users, these can be overcome by investing in the training and valuation of these professionals. KEY WORDS: Family Health Program; Street drugs; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice.

  8. Programming Languages or Generic Software Tools, for Beginners' Courses in Computer Literacy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuwirth, Erich

    1987-01-01

    Discussion of methods that can be used to teach beginner courses in computer literacy focuses on students aged 10-12. The value of using a programing language versus using a generic software package is highlighted; Logo and Prolog are reviewed; and the use of databases is discussed. (LRW)

  9. Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program: facilitating physical health care for people with mental illness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happell, Brenda; Platania-Phung, Chris; Scott, David

    2013-10-01

    People with serious mental illness have increased rates of physical ill-health and reduced contact with primary care services. In Australia, the Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program (MHNIP) was developed to facilitate access to mental health services. However, as a primary care service, the contribution to physical health care is worthy of consideration. Thirty-eight nurses who were part of the MHNIP participated in a national survey of nurses working in mental health about physical health care. The survey invited nurses to report their views on the physical health of consumers and the regularity of physical health care they provide. Physical health-care provision in collaboration with general practitioners (GPs) and other health-care professionals was reported as common. The findings suggest that the MHNIP provides integrated care, where nurses and GPs work in collaboration, allowing enough time to discuss physical health or share physical health activities. Consumers of this service appeared to have good access to physical and mental health services, and nurses had access to primary care professionals to discuss consumers' physical health and develop their clinical skills in the physical domain. The MHNIP has an important role in addressing physical health concerns, in addition to the mental health issues of people accessing this service. © 2012 The Authors; International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2012 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  10. 42 CFR 431.636 - Coordination of Medicaid with the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Insurance Program (CHIP). 431.636 Section 431.636 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES...'s Health Insurance Program (CHIP). (a) Statutory basis. This section implements— (1) Section 2102(b... coordination between a State child health program and other public health insurance programs. (b) Obligations...

  11. Electronic Health Record Vendors Reported by Health Care Providers Participating in Federal EHR Incentive Programs

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This public use file combines registration data compiled from two federal programs that are on-going since February 2009 – the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid...

  12. Assessing the health, functional characteristics, and health needs of youth attending a noncategorical transition support program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Jason F; Swigonski, Nancy L; Ciccarelli, Mary R

    2012-09-01

    To assess the health, functional characteristics, and health care service needs of youth and young adults with special health care needs attending a comprehensive, noncategorical transition program. A self-administered survey was developed from national health surveys and clinical experience to assess concepts identified as important for successful transition to adulthood. Surveys were mailed to 198 parents of youth and young adults with special health care needs attending the transition clinic. Parents were asked about the youth's health, functional status, and health care services needed. The clinical database provided demographic and patient health characteristics. Results were compared against the 2005-2006 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs. Forty-four percent of surveys were returned. Average age of youth was 17.5 (11-22) years old and diagnoses included cerebral palsy (36%), spina bifida (10%), developmental delay or Down syndrome (17%), and autism (6%). Most youth needed assistance with personal care (69%) and routine needs (91%) and used assistive devices (59%). Compared with the 2005-2006 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs, parents reported higher needs for all services except mental health care and tobacco or substance use counseling. Forty three percent reported at least one unmet health need. Few parents reported the need for counseling on substance use (1%), sexual health screening (16%), nutrition (34%), and exercise (41%). Youth attending our transition program had more functional limitations, poorer reported health status, different diagnosis distribution, and higher levels of needed health services. Few parents identified needs for other recommended adolescent preventive services. Transition programs should assess patient health characteristics and service needs to design effective patient-centered services. Copyright © 2012 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  13. Program Development and Effectiveness of Workplace Health Promotion Program for Preventing Metabolic Syndrome among Office Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Hosihn; Jung, Jiyeon; Cho, Jeonghyun; Chin, Dal Lae

    2017-08-04

    This paper aims to develop and analyze the effects of a socio-ecological model-based intervention program for preventing metabolic syndrome (MetS) among office workers. The intervention program was developed using regular health examinations, a "health behavior and need" assessment survey among workers, and a focus group study. According to the type of intervention, subjects took part in three groups: health education via an intranet-based web magazine (Group 1), self-monitoring with the U-health system (Group 2), and the target population who received intensive intervention (Group 3). The intervention programs of Group 1 and Group 2, which relied on voluntary participation, did not show significant effects. In Group 3, which relied on targeted and proactive programs, showed a decrease in waist circumference and in fasting glucose ( p light of the effectiveness of the intensive intervention strategy for metabolic syndrome prevention among workers used in this study, companies should establish targeted and proactive health care programs rather than providing a healthcare system that is dependent on an individual's voluntary participation.

  14. Teaching children about mental health and illness: a school nurse health education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desocio, Janiece; Stember, Lisa; Schrinsky, Joanne

    2006-04-01

    A mental health education program designed by school nurses for children ages 10- 12 was developed in 2000-2001 and expanded with broader distribution in 2004-2005. Six classroom sessions, each 45 minutes in length, provided information and activities to increase children's awareness of mental health and illness. Education program content included facts about the brain's connection to mental health, information about healthy ways to manage stress, resources and activities to promote mental health, common mental health problems experienced by children, and how to seek help for mental health problems. Classes included a combination of didactic presentation and open discussion, encouraging students to ask questions and allowing the school nurse to correct misinformation. Analysis of pre- and posttests from 370 elementary and middle school students revealed statistically significant improvements in their knowledge of mental health and mental illness.

  15. A health recreation program for u-healthcare clients: effects on mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jisan; Kim, Jeongeun; Jeong, Suyong; Choi, Hanna; Jin, Meiling; Kim, Sukwha

    2014-10-01

    In this study, a health recreation program was implemented with elderly patients (60 years of age or older) who were receiving ubiquitous healthcare (u-healthcare) services. Furthermore, we examined the effects of health recreation on perceived stress, anxiety, and depression, by comparing survey results before and after the recreation program was conducted. Thus, the aim of this study was to develop an offline service with the ability to promote the impact of the u-healthcare service on mental healthcare. A health recreation program, consisting of a variety of weekly games, songs, and minilectures about mental health over a 10-week period, was offered at a senior citizens center in K-Gu, Seoul, Korea. This program targeted 18 elderly people currently receiving u-healthcare services. Data on the impact of the program on the mental health of the elderly were collected through surveys administered before and after the recreation program, and the results were compared with those of a control group. The control group consisted of 18 elderly people who were receiving u-healthcare services from the same district. The perceived stress and anxiety of the experimental group decreased significantly compared with those of the control group. However, the program did not result in a significant reduction in depression. This offline health recreation program offered to elderly u-healthcare service clients contributed to the promotion of their mental health. Further studies will be required to better incorporate the offline mental healthcare program into their daily lives within the u-healthcare service.

  16. Formulating Employability Skills for Graduates of Public Health Study Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qomariyah, Nurul; Savitri, Titi; Hadianto, Tridjoko; Claramita, Mora

    2016-01-01

    Employability skills (ES) are important for effective and successful individual participation in the workplace. The main aims of the research were to identify important ES needed by graduates of Public Health Study Program Universitas Ahmad Dahlan (PHSP UAD) and to assess the achievement of the ES development that has been carried out by PHSP UAD.…

  17. Programming microphysiological systems for children's health protection (SEBM meeting)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presentation: Programming microphysiological systems for children’s health protectionAuthors: Knudsen1 T, Klieforth2 B, and Slikker3 W Jr.1National Center for Computational Toxicology/EPA, Research Triangle Park NC2National Center for Environmental Research/EPA, Washington DC3Nat...

  18. Professional competence in a health promotion program in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijkers-de Boer, Caroline J M; Heijsman, Anke; van Nes, Fenna; Abma, Tineke A

    2017-07-12

    Health promotion for senior citizens ('seniors') is an increasingly important factor in health and welfare policy, having important implications for occupational therapy. The health promotion program 'Healthy and Active Aging' originated in the US, has been modified and adapted to the Dutch context and has been implemented in community contexts. This study aimed to generate an in-depth understanding of the Healthy and Active Aging program and to use this knowledge to inform professional practice. A naturalistic case study methodology was followed, using document analysis, observations, interviews and a group interview as data gathering methods. Data were analyzed and interpreted using narrative analyses. In this specific case, a small group of women joined the program. During 10 sessions, the participants explored the meaning of everyday activities for their self-perceived health and well-being. The key experience reported by the participants and professionals related to the positive ambience within the group, the emotional recognition among the participants and the responsive guidance of the professionals. This case showed how the framework of the program can be modified and tailored to the wishes and needs of the participating seniors. The group facilitators chose a subtle, responsive manner to support and motivate the participants. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. A Mental Health Consultation Program for Project Head Start.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawin, Marjorie R.

    The Psychological Center provided a family oriented mental health consultation service to 17 delegate agencies who had contracts with Head Start programs in 1966-67. This paper presents an overview of the services which an interdisciplinary staff of 52 professionals provided to 6,780 families and 1,500 agency staff members. Gerald Caplan's (1964)…

  20. Medicaid program; health care-related taxes. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-30

    This rule finalizes our proposal to delay enforcement of certain clarifications regarding standards for determining hold harmless arrangements in the final rule entitled, "Medicaid Program; Health Care-Related Taxes" from the expiration of a Congressional moratorium on enforcement from July 1, 2009 to June 30, 2010.

  1. Targeting Obesity through Health Promotion Programs for School Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Patrick C.; Lohrmann, David K.; Hall, Cougar

    2017-01-01

    Health promotion programs for school staff are an overlooked and under-utilized resource that can lead to reductions in overweight and obesity among teachers and other staff members if implemented properly. In addition to increasing the overall staff wellness, boosting morale, increasing productivity, improving academic achievement, providing…

  2. Prenatal Foundations: Fetal Programming of Health and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Elysia Poggi; Thompson, Ross A.

    2014-01-01

    The fetal programming and developmental origins of disease models suggest that experiences that occur before birth can have consequences for physical and mental health that persist across the lifespan. Development is more rapid during the prenatal period as compared to any other stage of life. This introductory article considers evidence that…

  3. 75 FR 79323 - Health Care for Homeless Veterans Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-20

    ... during performance. Any failure to meet the standards in Sec. 63.15 must be remedied to the satisfaction..., a sector of the economy, productivity, competition, jobs, the environment, public health or safety..., Individuals with disabilities, Low and moderate income housing, Public assistance programs, Public housing...

  4. Social network analysis of public health programs to measure partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoen, Martin W; Moreland-Russell, Sarah; Prewitt, Kim; Carothers, Bobbi J

    2014-12-01

    In order to prevent chronic diseases, community-based programs are encouraged to take an ecological approach to public health promotion and involve many diverse partners. Little is known about measuring partnership in implementing public health strategies. We collected data from 23 Missouri communities in early 2012 that received funding from three separate programs to prevent obesity and/or reduce tobacco use. While all of these funding programs encourage partnership, only the Social Innovation for Missouri (SIM) program included a focus on building community capacity and enhancing collaboration. Social network analysis techniques were used to understand contact and collaboration networks in community organizations. Measurements of average degree, density, degree centralization, and betweenness centralization were calculated for each network. Because of the various sizes of the networks, we conducted comparative analyses with and without adjustment for network size. SIM programs had increased measurements of average degree for partner collaboration and larger networks. When controlling for network size, SIM groups had higher measures of network density and lower measures of degree centralization and betweenness centralization. SIM collaboration networks were more dense and less centralized, indicating increased partnership. The methods described in this paper can be used to compare partnership in community networks of various sizes. Further research is necessary to define causal mechanisms of partnership development and their relationship to public health outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Sustaining health education research programs in Aboriginal communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisener, Katherine; Shapka, Jennifer; Jarvis-Selinger, Sandra

    2017-09-01

    Despite evidence supporting the ongoing provision of health education interventions in First Nations communities, there is a paucity of research that specifically addresses how these programs should be designed to ensure sustainability and long-term effects. Using a Community-Based Research approach, a collective case study was completed with three Canadian First Nations communities to address the following research question: What factors are related to sustainable health education programs, and how do they contribute to and/or inhibit program success in an Aboriginal context? Semi-structured interviews and a sharing circle were completed with 19 participants, including members of community leadership, external partners, and program staff and users. Seven factors were identified to either promote or inhibit program sustainability, including: 1) community uptake; 2) environmental factors; 3) stakeholder awareness and support; 4) presence of a champion; 5) availability of funding; 6) fit and flexibility; and 7) capacity and capacity building. Each factor is provided with a working definition, influential moderators, and key evaluation questions. This study is grounded in, and builds on existing research, and can be used by First Nations communities and universities to support effective sustainability planning for community-based health education interventions.

  6. Occupational safety and health program for a model uranium mill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, H.T.

    1981-01-01

    The basic purpose of this paper is to suggest procedures and practices to insure that no employee working in a uranium milling operation receives exposure to radioactive, toxic, or other materials or agents that might produce a permanent, deleterious effect upon his physical health and well-being. This program is also designed to insure that each employee can carry out his assigned duties without risk to his health or to that of his fellow workers. The total program is envisioned as a balanced combination of occupational hygiene and radiation monitoring. This includes surveying, air sampling, personnel dosimetry, bioassay, medical surveillance, epidemiology, and training - all backed by a thoroughly tested and evaluated set of emergency procedures. The program, as presented, is keyed to the results of monitoring, surveying, air sampling, medical surveillance, and epidemiology - it being obvious that no problem can result when no hazard can be identified

  7. [Pedagogical training in stricto sensu graduate programs in public health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, Guilherme Torres; Ribeiro, Victoria Maria Brant

    2013-06-01

    The scope of this research is to discuss the relevance and need for pedagogical training of university lecturers in the Public Health field. The contention is that college teaching is a practice that requires specific training, since it is characterized by complex elements that transcend the mastery of given content. Considering stricto sensu graduate studies as an important stage in the training of future university lecturers, an attempt was made to identify and analyze the subjects and practices of pedagogical training in academic masters and doctorate programs in Public Health. To achieve the research aim, this work was based on Pierre Bourdieu's field theory and on Tomaz Tadeu da Silva's curriculum theory. Results indicate that the programs do not consider the aspect of teacher training as a major issue. With regard to the Public Health field approximately 61% of masters and 38% of doctorate programs have pedagogical training subjects/practices. Furthermore, there is a tendency for technical-instrumental training, which is in line with the history of the Public Health field. The conclusion is that there is a need to develop a culture that values college and graduate Public Health teaching, considering the complexity of pedagogical practice in all its dimensions.

  8. Effective recruitment and retention strategies in community health programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Jennifer; Ridgers, Nicola D; Carver, Alison; Thornton, Lukar E; Teychenne, Megan

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this project was to identify effective recruitment and retention strategies used by health-promotion organisations that focus on increasing physical activity and improving nutrition within the local community. Semistructured telephone or face-to-face interviews with 25 key informants from stakeholder organisations were conducted. Key informants discussed strategies used by their organisation to effectively recruit and retain participants into community-based healthy eating and/or physical activity programs. Transcribed data were analysed with NVivo software. Effective recruitment strategies included word of mouth, links with organisations, dissemination of printed materials, media, referrals, cross-promotion of programs and face-to-face methods. Effective retention strategies included encouraging a sense of community ownership, social opportunities, recruiting a suitable leader and offering flexibility and support. Fees and support for recruiting and retaining participants was also identified. This study provides novel insights to a greatly under researched topic in the field of health promotion. There are two key take-home messages from the present study that are applicable to health practitioners as well as developers and deliverers of community health-promotion programs: (1) it is imperative that all community health organisations report on the effectiveness of their recruitment and retention, both successes and failures; and (2) there is a clear need to tailor the recruitment and retention approach to the target population and the setting the program is occurring in. SO WHAT? These findings provide important insights for the development of future community-based healthy eating and physical activity programs.

  9. 78 FR 72089 - Medicare, Medicaid, and Children's Health Insurance Programs; Provider Enrollment Application Fee...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services [CMS-6051-N] Medicare, Medicaid, and Children's Health Insurance Programs; Provider Enrollment Application Fee Amount... period entitled ``Medicare, Medicaid, and Children's Health Insurance Programs; Additional Screening...

  10. A computerized program to educate adults about environmental health risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, M.; Dewey, J.; Schur, P.

    1993-01-01

    A computerized program called Environmental Risk Appraisal (ERA) has been developed to educate adults about environmental health risks and to motivate positive behavior change. A questionnaire addresses issues such as radon, environmental tobacco smoke, pesticides, lead, air and water pollution, and work-site risks. Responses are computer processed in seconds to produce an individualized computer printout containing a score, educational messages, and phone numbers to call for more information. A variety of audiences including environmental groups, worksites, women's organizations and health professionals were represented in this study of 269 participants. Many respondents indicated they were exposed to important environmental hazards and nearly 40 percent reported they had, or might have had, an environmental related illness at some time. Preliminary evaluation indicates the program is effective as an educational tool in raising awareness of environmental health risks

  11. Australia’s National Health Programs: An Ontological Mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkalgud Ramaprasad

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Australia has a large number of health program initiatives whose comprehensive assessment will help refine and redefine priorities by highlighting areas of emphasis, under-emphasis, and non-emphasis. The objectives of our research are to: (a systematically map all the programs onto an ontological framework, and (b systemically analyse their relative emphases at different levels of granularity. We mapped all the health program initiatives onto an ontology with five dimensions, namely: (a Policy-scope, (b Policy-focus, (c Outcomes, (d Type of care, and (e Population served. Each dimension is expanded into a taxonomy of its constituent elements. Each combination of elements from the five dimensions is a possible policy initiative component. There are 30,030 possible components encapsulated in the ontology. It includes, for example: (a National financial policies on accessibility of preventive care for family, and (b Local-urban regulatory policies on cost of palliative care for individual-aged. Four of the authors mapped all of Australia’s health programs and initiatives on to the ontology. Visualizations of the data are used to highlight the relative emphases in the program initiatives. The dominant emphasis of the program initiatives is: [National] [educational, personnel-physician, information] policies on [accessibility, quality] of [preventive, wellness] care for the [community]. However, although (a information is emphasized technology is not; and (b accessibility and quality are emphasized cost, satisfaction, and quality are not. The ontology and the results of the mapping can help systematically reassess and redirect the relative emphases of the programs and initiatives from a systemic perspective.

  12. Effectiveness of a Multilevel Workplace Health Promotion Program on Vitality, Health, and Work-Related Outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriksen, I.J.M.; Snoijer, M.; Kok, B.P. de; Vlisteren, J. van; Hofstetter, H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Evaluation of the effectiveness of a workplace health promotion program on employees’ vitality, health, and work-related outcomes, and exploring the influence of organizational support and the supervisors’ role on these outcomes. Methods: The 5-month intervention included activities at

  13. Learning professional ethics: Student experiences in a health mentor program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlois, Sylvia; Lymer, Erin

    2016-01-01

    The use of patient centred approaches to healthcare education is evolving, yet the effectiveness of these approaches in relation to professional ethics education is not well understood. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences and learning of health profession students engaged in an ethics module as part of a Health Mentor Program at the University of Toronto. Students were assigned to interprofessional groups representing seven professional programs and matched with a health mentor. The health mentors, individuals living with chronic health conditions, shared their experiences of the healthcare system through 90 minute semi-structured interviews with the students. Following the interviews, students completed self-reflective papers and engaged in facilitated asynchronous online discussions. Thematic analysis of reflections and discussions was used to uncover pertaining to student experiences and learning regarding professional ethics. Five major themes emerged from the data: (1) Patient autonomy and expertise in care; (2) ethical complexity and its inevitable reality in the clinical practice setting; (3) patient advocacy as an essential component of day-to-day practice; (4) qualities of remarkable clinicians that informed personal ideals for future practice; (5) patients' perspectives on clinician error and how they enabled suggestions for improving future practice. The findings of a study in one university context suggest that engagement with the health mentor narratives facilitated students' critical reflection related to their understanding of the principles of healthcare ethics.

  14. Global health education programming as a model for inter-institutional collaboration in interprofessional health education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peluso, Michael J; Hafler, Janet P; Sipsma, Heather; Cherlin, Emily

    2014-07-01

    While global health (GH) opportunities have expanded at schools of medicine, nursing, and public health, few examples of interprofessional approaches to GH education have been described. The elective GH program at our university serves as an important opportunity for high-quality interprofessional education. We undertook a qualitative study to examine the experience of student, faculty and administrative leaders of the program. We used content analysis to code responses and analyze data. Among the leadership, key themes fell within the categories of interprofessional education, student-faculty collaboration, professional development, and practical considerations for the development of such programs. The principles described could be considered by institutions seeking to develop meaningful partnerships in an effort to develop or refine interprofessional global health education programs.

  15. Report on an interdisciplinary program for allied health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peloquin, S M; Cavazos, H; Marion, R; Stephenson, K S; Pearrow, D

    2007-11-01

    A central recommendation from the Pew Health Commission to educators has been to empower future care providers to function effectively as teams. Administrators and faculty members within a school of allied health sciences thus established an interdisciplinary program where students would learn to function as team members and demonstrate competencies required for practice in diverse, demanding, and continually changing health care environments. Students from five disciplines have participated in featured events, mentored activities and capstone projects, earning credit in an interdisciplinary course of study that complements offerings in their home disciplines. This follow-up article reports on the progress and development since 2002 of an interdisciplinary program known as Team IDEAL. Formative evaluation measures used to assess satisfaction with the program are presented alongside a discussion of new directions. Team IDEAL will move forward in a streamlined form that reflects its central aim. IDEAL leadership will remain cognizant of the effects of discipline-specific curricular changes, complex programming, and student perspectives on the process interdisciplinary education.

  16. NASA Occupational Health Program FY98 Self-Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisbin, Steven G.

    1999-01-01

    The NASA Functional Management Review process requires that each NASA Center conduct self-assessments of each functional area. Self-Assessments were completed in June 1998 and results were presented during this conference session. During FY 97 NASA Occupational Health Assessment Team activities, a decision was made to refine the NASA Self-Assessment Process. NASA Centers were involved in the ISO registration process at that time and wanted to use the management systems approach to evaluate their occupational health programs. This approach appeared to be more consistent with NASA's management philosophy and would likely confer status needed by Senior Agency Management for the program. During FY 98 the Agency Occupational Health Program Office developed a revised self-assessment methodology based on the Occupational Health and Safety Management System developed by the American Industrial Hygiene Association. This process was distributed to NASA Centers in March 1998 and completed in June 1998. The Center Self Assessment data will provide an essential baseline on the status of OHP management processes at NASA Centers. That baseline will be presented to Enterprise Associate Administrators and DASHO on September 22, 1998 and used as a basis for discussion during FY 99 visits to NASA Centers. The process surfaced several key management system elements warranting further support from the Lead Center. Input and feedback from NASA Centers will be essential to defining and refining future self assessment efforts.

  17. Critical evaluation of international health programs: Reframing global health and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Chunhuei; Tuepker, Anaïs; Schoon, Rebecca; Núñez Mondaca, Alicia

    2018-01-05

    Striking changes in the funding and implementation of international health programs in recent decades have stimulated debate about the role of communities in deciding which health programs to implement. An important yet neglected piece of that discussion is the need to change norms in program evaluation so that analysis of community ownership, beyond various degrees of "participation," is seen as central to strong evaluation practices. This article challenges mainstream evaluation practices and proposes a framework of Critical Evaluation with 3 levels: upstream evaluation assessing the "who" and "how" of programming decisions; midstream evaluation focusing on the "who" and "how" of selecting program objectives; and downstream evaluation, the focus of current mainstream evaluation, which assesses whether the program achieved its stated objectives. A vital tenet of our framework is that a community possesses the right to determine the path of its health development. A prerequisite of success, regardless of technical outcomes, is that programs must address communities' high priority concerns. Current participatory methods still seldom practice community ownership of program selection because they are vulnerable to funding agencies' predetermined priorities. In addition to critiquing evaluation practices and proposing an alternative framework, we acknowledge likely challenges and propose directions for future research. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Evaluation of Medicare Health Support chronic disease pilot program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cromwell, Jerry; McCall, Nancy; Burton, Joe

    2008-01-01

    The Medicare Program is conducting a randomized trial of care management services among fee-for-service (FFS) beneficiaries called the Medicare Health Support (MHS) pilot program. Eight disease management (DM) companies have contracted with CMS to improve clinical quality, increase beneficiary and provider satisfaction, and achieve targeted savings for chronically ill Medicare FFS beneficiaries. In this article, we present 6-month intervention results on beneficiary selection and participation rates, mortality rates, trends in hospitalizations, and success in achieving Medicare cost savings. Results to date indicate limited success in achieving Medicare cost savings or reducing acute care utilization.

  19. [Gender inequality and reproductive health: a perspective for the program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szasz, I

    1993-01-01

    Research on the influence of the social, economic, and cultural context on reproductive health is just beginning in Mexico. Because health risks and damage appear to be associated with living conditions of the population, the mechanisms through which social inequality affects reproductive health should be analyzed. Gender inequality is of particular importance to the study of reproductive health. The construction of feminine identity, centered on motherhood and the ability to relate to others, has decisive consequences for self-esteem, social valuation, and the capacity of women to make decisions and act in their own self interest. The obstacles that women face in making decisions about sexuality and reproduction have psychological, affective, and health costs. Women living in contexts of limited female autonomy are often pressured into early pregnancy and union and to having large families. The need to satisfy expectations for their gender and social position, fear of being devalued or abandoned, and the desire to cement affective relationships may restrict their capacity to exercise their sexuality with autonomy and to separate it from procreation. The low rates of use of contraceptives by men and the almost exclusive focus on women of contraceptive technologies and programs also reflect the inequality of the sexes. The lesser access to resources and exercise of power by women in the household may lead to nutritional disadvantages, and societal standards that tolerate extramarital sexual activity for men but not for women leave women vulnerable to sexually transmitted diseases. The health effects of gender inequalities are magnified by poverty and other forms of social disadvantage. The Program of Reproductive Health and Society aims to contribute to improved reproductive health in the Mexican population through study of the consequences of social and gender inequality.

  20. Delaware's Wellness Program: Motivating Employees Improves Health and Saves Money.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jennifer J J

    2008-09-01

    Every year, employers around the country evaluate their company benefits package in the hopes of finding a solution to the ever-rising cost of health insurance premiums. For many business executives, the only logical choice is to pass along those costs to the employee. As an employer, our goal in Delaware has always been to come up with innovative solutions to drive down the cost of health insurance premiums while encouraging our employees to take responsibility for their own health and wellness by living a healthy and active lifestyle, and provide them with the necessary tools. The DelaWELL program (N = 68,000) was launched in 2007, after being tested in initial (N = 100) and expanded (N = 1500) pilot programs from 2004 to 2006 in which 3 similar groups were compared before and after the pilot. Employee health risk assessment, education, and incentives provided employees the necessary tools we had assumed would help them make healthier lifestyle choices. In the first pilot, fewer emergency department visits and lower blood pressure levels resulted in direct savings of more than $62,000. In the expanded pilot, in all 3 groups blood pressure was significantly reduced (P employees participating in DelaWELL had a combined weight loss of 5162 lb. Decision makers in the State of Delaware have come up with an innovative solution to controlling costs while offering employees an attractive benefits package. The savings from its employee benefit program have allowed the state to pass along the savings to employees by maintaining employee-paid health insurance contributions at the same level for the past 3 years. DelaWELL has already confirmed our motto, "Although it may seem an unusual business investment to pay for healthcare before the need arises, in Delaware we concluded that this makes perfect sense." This promising approach to improving health and reducing healthcare costs could potentially be applied to other employer groups.

  1. Delaware's Wellness Program: Motivating Employees Improves Health and Saves Money

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jennifer “J. J.”

    2008-01-01

    Background Every year, employers around the country evaluate their company benefits package in the hopes of finding a solution to the ever-rising cost of health insurance premiums. For many business executives, the only logical choice is to pass along those costs to the employee. Objectives As an employer, our goal in Delaware has always been to come up with innovative solutions to drive down the cost of health insurance premiums while encouraging our employees to take responsibility for their own health and wellness by living a healthy and active lifestyle, and provide them with the necessary tools. Methods The DelaWELL program (N = 68,000) was launched in 2007, after being tested in initial (N = 100) and expanded (N = 1500) pilot programs from 2004 to 2006 in which 3 similar groups were compared before and after the pilot. Employee health risk assessment, education, and incentives provided employees the necessary tools we had assumed would help them make healthier lifestyle choices. Results In the first pilot, fewer emergency department visits and lower blood pressure levels resulted in direct savings of more than $62,000. In the expanded pilot, in all 3 groups blood pressure was significantly reduced (P employees participating in DelaWELL had a combined weight loss of 5162 lb. Conclusions Decision makers in the State of Delaware have come up with an innovative solution to controlling costs while offering employees an attractive benefits package. The savings from its employee benefit program have allowed the state to pass along the savings to employees by maintaining employee-paid health insurance contributions at the same level for the past 3 years. DelaWELL has already confirmed our motto, “Although it may seem an unusual business investment to pay for healthcare before the need arises, in Delaware we concluded that this makes perfect sense.” This promising approach to improving health and reducing healthcare costs could potentially be applied to other

  2. Northern Rivers Basins human health monitoring program : report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabos, S.

    1999-04-01

    The Northern River Basins Human Health Monitoring Program was established in 1994 to investigate the possible relationships between various environmental risk factors and the health of northern residents in the province. This report presents the initial analysis of the health program and examines the differences in health outcomes across the province and compares the Northern Rivers Basin Study (NRBS) area with the other areas of the province. A series of maps and graphs showed the prevalence of certain diseases and disorders within the Peace and Athabasca river basins. The focus of the report was on reproductive health, congenital anomalies, respiratory ailments, circulatory diseases, gastrointestinal disorders, endocrine and metabolic disorders, and neurocognitive disorders. The study showed that compared to other areas of the province, the NRBS area had higher incidences of endometriosis, selected congenital anomalies, bronchitis, pneumonia, peptic ulcers and epilepsy. There were three potential exposure pathways to environmental contaminants. These were through ingestion of water or food, inhalation of air and through dermal exposure. refs., tabs., figs

  3. Northern Rivers Basins human health monitoring program : report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabos, S. [Alberta Health, Edmonton, AB (Canada). Health Surveillance

    1999-04-01

    The Northern River Basins Human Health Monitoring Program was established in 1994 to investigate the possible relationships between various environmental risk factors and the health of northern residents in the province. This report presents the initial analysis of the health program and examines the differences in health outcomes across the province and compares the Northern Rivers Basin Study (NRBS) area with the other areas of the province. A series of maps and graphs showed the prevalence of certain diseases and disorders within the Peace and Athabasca river basins. The focus of the report was on reproductive health, congenital anomalies, respiratory ailments, circulatory diseases, gastrointestinal disorders, endocrine and metabolic disorders, and neurocognitive disorders. The study showed that compared to other areas of the province, the NRBS area had higher incidences of endometriosis, selected congenital anomalies, bronchitis, pneumonia, peptic ulcers and epilepsy. There were three potential exposure pathways to environmental contaminants. These were through ingestion of water or food, inhalation of air and through dermal exposure. refs., tabs., figs.

  4. 29 CFR 1960.12 - Dissemination of occupational safety and health program information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dissemination of occupational safety and health program... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Administration § 1960.12 Dissemination of occupational safety and health program information. (a) Copies of the Act, Executive Order 12196, program...

  5. Management characteristics of successful public health programs: "Avahan" HIV prevention program in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabuchi, Shunsuke; Singh, Suneeta; Bishnu, Rituparna; Bennett, Sara

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyzes Avahan, an HIV prevention program in India, that achieved very rapid scale-up. The paper aims to (i) define the distinctive features of the management of Avahan, (ii) examine how the distinctive features relate to key constructs in management frameworks and (iii) investigate how the management approaches of Avahan contributed to the program's ability to scale-up rapidly while maintaining service quality. The Delphi method was used to identify the distinctive features of Avahan. Through three rounds of questions, 38 participants closely associated with Avahan were asked to identify and develop consensus on its distinctive features. These features were then mapped against the Baldrige Health Care Criteria for Performance Excellence to investigate how they related to important dimensions of management. A total of 17 distinctive features of Avahan were identified. These distinctive features emphasized the importance of data use and performance monitoring at all levels, especially combined with a flexible management style that facilitated local responsiveness to community, innovation and learning. The distinctive features comprehensively addressed the criteria for management excellence in the Baldridge framework. In the case of Avahan, the rigorous application of known management techniques to public health programs appears to have been an important factor in the successful scale-up of the program. Also, the Baldrige criteria seem applicable to health programs in low-income and middle-income countries; further applications would help test their robustness and utility in such contexts. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Digital Citizenship and Health Promotion Programs: The Power of Knowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Elaine R

    2016-11-03

    Patterns of Internet access and use among disadvantaged subgroups of Americans reveal that not all disparities are the same, a distinction crucial for appropriate public policies and health promotion program planning. In their book, Digital Citizenship: The Internet, Society, and Participation, authors Karen Mossberger, Caroline Tolbert, and Ramona McNeal deconstructed national opinion surveys and used multivariate methods of data analysis to demonstrate the impact of exclusion from online society economically, socially, and politically among disadvantaged Americans. © 2016 Society for Public Health Education.

  7. [Impact of a disaster preparedness training program on health staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra Cotanda, Cristina; Rebordosa Martínez, Mónica; Trenchs Sainz de la Maza, Victoria; Luaces Cubells, Carles

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a disaster preparedness training program in a Paediatric Emergency Department (PED). A quasi-experimental study was conducted using an anonymous questionnaire that was distributed to health care providers of a PED in a tertiary paediatric hospital. The questions concerned the disaster plan (DP), including theoretical and practical aspects. Questionnaires were distributed and completed in January 2014 (period 1) and November 2014 (period 2). The disaster training program includes theoretical and practical sessions. A total of 110 questionnaires were collected in period 1, and 80 in period 2. Almost three-quarters (71.3%) of PED staff attended the theoretical sessions, and 43.8% attended the practical sessions. The application of this training program significantly improved knowledge about the DP, but no improvement was observed in the practical questions. PED staff felt more prepared to face a disaster after the training program (15.5% vs. 41.8%, Ptraining program improved some knowledge about the disaster plan, but it has not improved responses in practical situations, which may be due to the low attendance at practical sessions and the time between the training program and the questionnaires. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. SHPPS 2006: School Health Policies and Programs Study--Foods and Beverages Sold Outside of the School Meals Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The School health Policies and Programs Study (SHPPS) is a national survey periodically conducted to assess school health policies and programs at the state, district, school, and classroom levels. This brief reports study results in the area of foods and beverages sold outside of the school meals program. (Contains 3 tables, 1 figure, and 2…

  9. 29 CFR 1960.80 - Secretary's evaluations of agency occupational safety and health programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Evaluation of Federal Occupational Safety and Health Programs § 1960.80 Secretary's evaluations of agency occupational safety and health... evaluating an agency's occupational safety and health program. To accomplish this, the Secretary shall...

  10. 29 CFR 1960.79 - Self-evaluations of occupational safety and health programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Self-evaluations of occupational safety and health programs. 1960.79 Section 1960.79 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH... AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Evaluation of Federal Occupational Safety and Health Programs...

  11. 42 CFR 9.10 - Occupational Health and Safety Program (OHSP) and biosafety requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Occupational Health and Safety Program (OHSP) and... SANCTUARY SYSTEM § 9.10 Occupational Health and Safety Program (OHSP) and biosafety requirements. (a) How are employee Occupational Health and Safety Program risks and concerns addressed? The sanctuary shall...

  12. 78 FR 45208 - Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP); Final Allotments to States, the District of Columbia...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-26

    ... 0938-AR79 Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP); Final Allotments to States, the District of... and expand health insurance coverage to uninsured, low-income children under the Children's Health...). States may implement the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) through a separate state program...

  13. 1997 Operating plan for the Office of International Health Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    One year ago, the Office of International Health Programs provided you with our 1996 Operating Plan, which defined our ideas and ideals for conducting business in 1996. We have again this year undertaken an intensive planning effort, first reviewing our accomplishments and shortcomings during 1996, and then developing plans and priorities for the upcoming year, taking into account input from customers and outside review panels, and ensuring that the demands on the office have been balanced with anticipated human, financial, and material resources.

  14. Teaching nutrition in an International Master of Public Health program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Elliot M; Fatunmbi, Bayo S; Kaluski, Dorit Nitzan

    2002-01-01

    The health of populations is related to the norms and characteristics of society and its socio-economic organization. The causes of food-related ill health are located at the national and international levels and the cure must be sought in good governance. Thus, it is obvious that a Master's Degree in International Public Health must include a thorough overview of the "food chain" from "plough to plate" within the political, economical, socio-economic changes, environmental, industrial, scientific, and health contexts. Nutritional deficiencies are addressed by a variety of measures, including food supply and utilization programs, specific supplementation for high-risk groups, and food fortification to reach a general population. All are part of a wide-based public health nutrition approach, applicable in developed, redeveloping, and newly developing countries. This article is based on experience in teaching Public Health Nutrition to a mixed group of foreign students from different countries. Our goal is to prepare students for a variety of public health careers related to nutrition and health. The aim of this course is to introduce current roles and aspects of food and nutrition policy, focusing on food and nutrition security, human rights for food and nutrition, and the complex interactions among local and global systems. Students are introduced to nutrition screening, assessment, and research skills, and nutrition in emergency situations and in disaster relief. During the course the students learn about the design and the evaluation of nutrition interventions at the individual, community, and national level. The course gives a broad-based examination of major themes related to development and underdevelopment, poverty and wealth, equality and inequality. It also introduces program planning from the perspective of international organisations such as the World Food Program and the Food and Agriculture Organisation and the World Health Organisation of the United

  15. Health Physics Society program for accreditation of calibration laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, L.; Masse, F.X.; Swinth, K.L.

    1988-01-01

    The Health Physics Society has instituted a new program for accreditation of organizations that calibrate radiation survey instruments. The purpose of the program is to provide radiation protection professionals with an expanded means of direct and indirect access to national standards, thus introducing a means for improving the uniformity, accuracy, and quality of ionizing radiation field measurements. Secondary accredited laboratories are expected to provide a regional support basis. Tertiary accredited laboratories are expected to operate on a more local basis and provide readily available expertise to end users. The accreditation process is an effort to provide better measurement assurance for surveys of radiation fields. The status of the accreditation program, general criteria, gamma-ray calibration criteria, and x-ray calibration criteria are reviewed

  16. Community-Based Global Health Program for Maltreated Children and Adolescents in Brazil: The Equilibrium Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Andrea Horvath; Oliveira, Paula Approbato; Scomparini, Luciana Burim; Silva, Uiara Maria Rêgo E; Silva, Angelica Cristine; Doretto, Victoria; de Medeiros Filho, Mauro Victor; Scivoletto, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    The maltreatment of children and adolescents is a global public health problem that affects high- and low-middle income countries ("LMICs"). In the United States, around 1.2 million children suffer from abuse, while in LMICs, such as Brazil, these rates are much higher (an estimated 28 million children). Exposition to early environmental stress has been associated with suboptimal physical and brain development, persistent cognitive impairment, and behavioral problems. Studies have reported that children exposed to maltreatment are at high risk of behavioral problems, learning disabilities, communication and psychiatric disorders, and general clinical conditions, such as obesity and systemic inflammation later in life. The aim of this paper is to describe The Equilibrium Program ("TEP"), a community-based global health program implemented in São Paulo, Brazil to serve traumatized and neglected children and adolescents. We will describe and discuss TEP's implementation, highlighting its innovation aspects, research projects developed within the program as well as its population profile. Finally, we will discuss TEP's social impact, challenges, and limitations. The program's goal is to promote the social and family reintegration of maltreated children and adolescents through an interdisciplinary intervention program that provides multi-dimensional bio-psycho-social treatment integrated with the diverse services needed to meet the unique demands of this population. The program's cost effectiveness is being evaluated to support the development of more effective treatments and to expand similar programs in other areas of Brazil. Policy makers should encourage early evidence-based interventions for disadvantaged children to promote healthier psychosocial environments and provide them opportunities to become healthy and productive adults. This approach has already shown itself to be a cost-effective strategy to prevent disease and promote health.

  17. Behavioral Health and Performance Operations During the Space Shuttle Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beven, G.; Holland, A.; Moomaw, R.; Sipes, W.; Vander Ark, S.

    2011-01-01

    Prior to the Columbia STS 107 disaster in 2003, the Johnson Space Center s Behavioral Health and Performance Group (BHP) became involved in Space Shuttle Operations on an as needed basis, occasionally acting as a consultant and primarily addressing crew-crew personality conflicts. The BHP group also assisted with astronaut selection at every selection cycle beginning in 1991. Following STS 107, an event that spawned an increased need of behavioral health support to STS crew members and their dependents, BHP services to the Space Shuttle Program were enhanced beginning with the STS 114 Return to Flight mission in 2005. These services included the presence of BHP personnel at STS launches and landings for contingency support, a BHP briefing to the entire STS crew at L-11 months, a private preflight meeting with the STS Commander at L-9 months, and the presence of a BHP consultant at the L-1.5 month Family Support Office briefing to crew and family members. The later development of an annual behavioral health assessment of all active astronauts also augmented BHP s Space Shuttle Program specific services, allowing for private meetings with all STS crew members before and after each mission. The components of each facet of these BHP Space Shuttle Program support services will be presented, along with valuable lessons learned, and with recommendations for BHP involvement in future short duration space missions

  18. [Evaluating training programs on occupational health and safety: questionnaire development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Zhi-Ming; Wang, Mian-Zhen

    2006-03-01

    To develop a questionnaire to evaluate the quality of training programs on occupational health and safety. A questionnaire comprising five subscales and 21 items was developed. The reliability and validity of the questionnaire was tested. Final validation of the questionnaire was undertaken in 700 workers in an oil refining company. The Cronbach's alpha coefficients of the five subscales ranged from 0.6194 to 0.6611. The subscale-scale Pearson correlation coefficients ranged from 0.568 to 0.834 . The theta coefficients of the five subscales were greater than 0.7. The factor loadings of the five subscales in the principal component analysis ranged from 0.731 to 0.855. Use of the questionnaire in the 700 workers produced a good discriminability, with excellent, good, fair and poor comprising 22.2%, 31.2%, 32.4% and 14.1 respectively. Given the fact that 18.7% of workers had never been trained and 29.7% of workers got one-off training only, the training program scored an average of 57.2. The questionnaire is suitable to be used in evaluating the quality of training programs on occupational health and safety. The oil refining company needs to improve training for their workers on occupational health and safety.

  19. Determinants of participation in a web-based health risk assessment and consequences for health promotion programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, Maurice A. J.; Laan, Eva L.; Robroek, Suzan J. W.; Essink-Bot, Marie-Louise; Peek, Niels; Kraaijenhagen, Roderik A.; van Kalken, Coen K.; Burdorf, Alex

    2013-01-01

    The health risk assessment (HRA) is a type of health promotion program frequently offered at the workplace. Insight into the underlying determinants of participation is needed to evaluate and implement these interventions. To analyze whether individual characteristics including demographics, health

  20. A suicide awareness and intervention program for health professional students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, Eve; Bowerman, Lisa; Zimitat, Craig

    2015-01-01

    Many emergency service professionals and health professionals play important roles in the assessment and management of suicide risk but often receive inadequate mental health training in this area. A 'Suicide Awareness and Intervention Program' (SAIP) was developed for first year medical, paramedical and pharmacy students at the University of Tasmania, Australia. The program aimed to increase students' knowledge and awareness about suicide-related issues, develop interpersonal skills around suicide screening and increase awareness of available support services. A 5-hour experiential SAIP was embedded within the curriculum. A pre and post evaluation of knowledge, skills and attitudes was conducted, with an open-ended follow-up survey regarding use of what was learned in the program. Pre and post SAIP surveys showed significant improvement inknowledge and practical skills. Feedback from students and the counselling service indicated enduring impact of the program. Participation in the SAIP increased knowledge, skills and attitudes related to the assessment and management of individuals at risk for suicide, and the application of this ability to students' personal and professional lives.

  1. [Ethic evaluation of sexual health programs on adolescence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara Rascón, José; Alonso Sandoica, Esmeralda

    2011-01-01

    In public health services, the interest in sexuality seems to turning from traditional topics such as potential treatments for male erectile dysfunction, psychosomatic disorders, the control of premature ejaculation and contraception. Instead, an increasingly prominent role is being given to prevention strategies carried out by means of campaigns or through sexual health programme sin schools. The different teaching strategies that underlie these programmes, which in many cases lack social consensus but are often promoted by international organizations such as WHO or UNESCO, reveal not only divergent ethical conceptions and worldviews on the meaning of sexuality, but also conflicting starting points, means and goals, focusing either on barrier-contraceptive methods or on sexual abstinence and personal responsibility. There is therefore a pressing need to understand the scientific evidence underlying each educational approach and the ethical postulates of each pedagogical proposal. This paper presents an outline of a six-point adolescent sexuality education program, which is respectful of individuals' ethical convictions. Given that few works on preventive medicine issues include an ethical evaluation of the steps followed in their development, this article also proposes a systematic evaluation of strategies for sexual health in the community that is developed through four steps verifying the following aspects: 1) the accuracy of information, 2) the level of evidence, 3) efficiency and 4) non-maleficence about the target population of each health program. The methodology used in these sexual health programs is another aspect that will verify their ethical consistence or, conversely, their absence of ethical values. We emphasize the duty of designers of programme for children not to carry then out against the will of their parents or tutors, and not conceal sensitive and relevant information.

  2. 78 FR 64873 - Federal Employees Health Benefits Program and Federal Employees Dental and Vision Insurance...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-30

    ... family members under the FEHB and the Federal Employees Dental and Vision Insurance Program (FEDVIP... procedure, Government employees, Health facilities, Health insurance, Health professions, Hostages, Iraq... Administrative practice and procedure, Government employees, Health insurance, Taxes, Wages. 5 CFR Part 894...

  3. Effects of donor proliferation in development aid for health on health program performance: A conceptual framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallas, Sarah Wood; Ruger, Jennifer Prah

    2017-02-01

    Development aid for health increased dramatically during the past two decades, raising concerns about inefficiency and lack of coherence among the growing number of global health donors. However, we lack a framework for how donor proliferation affects health program performance to inform theory-based evaluation of aid effectiveness policies. A review of academic and gray literature was conducted. Data were extracted from the literature sample on study design and evidence for hypothesized effects of donor proliferation on health program performance, which were iteratively grouped into categories and mapped into a new conceptual framework. In the framework, increases in the number of donors are hypothesized to increase inter-donor competition, transaction costs, donor poaching of recipient staff, recipient control over aid, and donor fragmentation, and to decrease donors' sense of accountability for overall development outcomes. There is mixed evidence on whether donor proliferation increases or decreases aid volume. These primary effects in turn affect donor innovation, information hoarding, and aid disbursement volatility, as well as recipient country health budget levels, human resource capacity, and corruption, and the determinants of health program performance. The net effect of donor proliferation on health will vary depending on the magnitude of the framework's competing effects in specific country settings. The conceptual framework provides a foundation for improving design of aid effectiveness practices to mitigate negative effects from donor proliferation while preserving its potential benefits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The importance of internal health beliefs for employees' participation in health promotion programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rongen, Anne; Robroek, Suzan J W; Burdorf, Alex

    2014-10-01

    To investigate associations between employees' health locus of control (HLOC) and self-perceived health, health behaviors, and participation in health promotion programs (HPPs) and the mediating effect of self-perceived health and health behaviors on the relation between HLOC and participation. Between 2010 and 2012, a six-month longitudinal study was conducted among 691 Dutch employees. Using questionnaires, information was collected on health behaviors, self-perceived health, HLOC, and intention to participate at baseline. Actual participation was assessed at follow-up. Logistic regression analyses were used to study associations between HLOC and self-perceived health, health behaviors, and participation, and to examine whether associations between HLOC and participation were mediated by self-perceived health and health behaviors. Higher internal HLOC was associated with sufficient physical activity (moderate: OR:1.04, 95%CI:1.00-1.08; vigorous: OR:1.05, 95%CI:1.01-1.10) and fruit and vegetable intake (OR:1.05, 95%CI:1.01-1.09), a good self-perceived health (OR:1.20, 95%CI:1.11-1.30), a positive intention towards participation (OR:1.05, 95%CI:1.00-1.09), and actual participation (OR:1.06, 95%CI:1.00-1.13). Self-perceived health or health behaviors did not mediate associations between HLOC and participation. Employees with a higher internal HLOC behaved healthier and were more likely to participate in HPPs, irrespectively of their health. Increasing internal HLOC seems a promising avenue for improving employees' health and participation in HPPs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Stress transgenerationally programs metabolic pathways linked to altered mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Douglas; Ambeskovic, Mirela; Montina, Tony; Metz, Gerlinde A S

    2016-12-01

    Stress is among the primary causes of mental health disorders, which are the most common reason for disability worldwide. The ubiquity of these disorders, and the costs associated with them, lends a sense of urgency to the efforts to improve prediction and prevention. Down-stream metabolic changes are highly feasible and accessible indicators of pathophysiological processes underlying mental health disorders. Here, we show that remote and cumulative ancestral stress programs central metabolic pathways linked to mental health disorders. The studies used a rat model consisting of a multigenerational stress lineage (the great-great-grandmother and each subsequent generation experienced stress during pregnancy) and a transgenerational stress lineage (only the great-great-grandmother was stressed during pregnancy). Urine samples were collected from adult male F4 offspring and analyzed using 1 H NMR spectroscopy. The results of variable importance analysis based on random variable combination were used for unsupervised multivariate principal component analysis and hierarchical clustering analysis, as well as metabolite set enrichment analysis (MSEA) and pathway analysis. We identified distinct metabolic profiles associated with the multigenerational and transgenerational stress phenotype, with consistent upregulation of hippurate and downregulation of tyrosine, threonine, and histamine. MSEA and pathway analysis showed that these metabolites are involved in catecholamine biosynthesis, immune responses, and microbial host interactions. The identification of metabolic signatures linked to ancestral programming assists in the discovery of gene targets for future studies of epigenetic regulation in pathogenic processes. Ultimately, this research can lead to biomarker discovery for better prediction and prevention of mental health disorders.

  6. Expanded BPA residential weatherization program: summary of regional health effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandusky, W.F.; Thor, P.W.; Alton, C.C.; Mellinger, P.J.; Cross, F.T.

    1984-11-01

    The Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Expanded Residential Weatherization Program has been completed, printed, and distributed. This document incorporates numerous revisions based on both oral and written comments received during the public comment of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS). The estimates of regional health effects were revised to incorporate results of the second Pacific Northwest Residential Energy Survey (PNWRES). The FEIS now expresses the estimated regional health effects in terms of incidence of cancers per 100,000 people exposed, which allows comparison to be made to the annual average risk of fatality by other causes. The estimates of regional health effects are also compared to health effects resulting from supplying and operating a conventional coal plant at a power level equal to the amount of energy saved from installation of additional tightening measures. Numerical results for the estimated health effects described above are provided. A summary of the comments received on the DEIS is also provided, along with estimated health effects associated with the Environmentally Preferred and BPA Preferred Alternatives to the Proposed Action. 8 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs

  7. Protecting Health and Saving Lives: The Part-Time/Internet-Based Master of Public Health Program at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Linda; Gresh, Kathy; Vanchiswaran, Rohini; Werapitiya, Deepthi

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses the part-time/Internet-based Master of Public Health (MPH) program at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health (JHSPH). The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health was the first school of public health in the United States to offer a Master of Public Health program via the Internet. The JHSPH MPH Program…

  8. Health-related Culinary Education: A Summary of Representative Emerging Programs for Health Professionals and Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, Rani; Phillips, Edward M; Nordgren, Julia; La Puma, John; La Barba, Julie; Cucuzzella, Mark; Graham, Robert; Harlan, Timothy S; Burg, Tracey; Eisenberg, David

    2016-01-01

    Beneficial correlations are suggested between food preparation and home food preparation of healthy choices. Therefore, there is an emergence of culinary medicine (CM) programs directed at both patients and medical professionals which deliver education emphasizing skills such as shopping, food storage, and meal preparation. The goal of this article is to provide a description of emerging CM programs and to imagine how this field can mature. During April 2015, 10 CM programs were identified by surveying CM and lifestyle medicine leaders. Program directors completed a narrative describing their program's structure, curricula, educational design, modes of delivery, funding, and cost. Interviews were conducted in an effort to optimize data collection. All 10 culinary programs deliver medical education curricula educating 2654 health professionals per year. Educational goals vary within the domains of (1) provider's self-behavior, (2) nutritional knowledge and (3) prescribing nutrition. Six programs deliver patients' curricula, educating 4225 individuals per year. These programs' content varies and focuses on either specific diets or various culinary behaviors. All the programs' directors are health professionals who are also either credentialed chefs or have a strong culinary background. Nine of these programs offer culinary training in either a hands-on or visual demonstration within a teaching kitchen setting, while one delivers remote culinary tele-education. Seven programs track outcomes using various questionnaires and biometric data. There is currently no consensus about learning objectives, curricular domains, staffing, and facility requirements associated with CM, and there has been little research to explore its impact. A shared strategy is needed to collectively overcome these challenges.

  9. Health-related Culinary Education: A Summary of Representative Emerging Programs for Health Professionals and Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Edward M.; Nordgren, Julia; La Puma, John; La Barba, Julie; Cucuzzella, Mark; Graham, Robert; Harlan, Timothy S.; Burg, Tracey; Eisenberg, David

    2016-01-01

    Background: Beneficial correlations are suggested between food preparation and home food preparation of healthy choices. Therefore, there is an emergence of culinary medicine (CM) programs directed at both patients and medical professionals which deliver education emphasizing skills such as shopping, food storage, and meal preparation. Objective: The goal of this article is to provide a description of emerging CM programs and to imagine how this field can mature. Methods: During April 2015, 10 CM programs were identified by surveying CM and lifestyle medicine leaders. Program directors completed a narrative describing their program's structure, curricula, educational design, modes of delivery, funding, and cost. Interviews were conducted in an effort to optimize data collection. Results: All 10 culinary programs deliver medical education curricula educating 2654 health professionals per year. Educational goals vary within the domains of (1) provider's self-behavior, (2) nutritional knowledge and (3) prescribing nutrition. Six programs deliver patients' curricula, educating 4225 individuals per year. These programs' content varies and focuses on either specific diets or various culinary behaviors. All the programs' directors are health professionals who are also either credentialed chefs or have a strong culinary background. Nine of these programs offer culinary training in either a hands-on or visual demonstration within a teaching kitchen setting, while one delivers remote culinary tele-education. Seven programs track outcomes using various questionnaires and biometric data. Conclusions: There is currently no consensus about learning objectives, curricular domains, staffing, and facility requirements associated with CM, and there has been little research to explore its impact. A shared strategy is needed to collectively overcome these challenges. PMID:26937315

  10. Health consequences and health systems response to the Pacific U.S. Nuclear Weapons Testing Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palafox, Neal A; Riklon, Sheldon; Alik, Wilfred; Hixon, Allen L

    2007-03-01

    Between 1946 and 1958, the United States detonated 67 thermonuclear devices in the Pacific as part of their U.S. Nuclear Weapons Testing Program (USNWTP). The aggregate explosive power was equal to 7,200 Hiroshima atomic bombs. Recent documents released by the U.S. government suggest that the deleterious effects of the nuclear testing were greater and extended farther than previously known. The Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) government and affected communities have sought refress through diplomatic routes with the U.S. government, however, existing medical programs and financial reparations have not adequately addressed many of the health consequences of the USNWTP. Since radiation-induced cancers may have a long latency, a healthcare infrastructure is needed to address both cancer and related health issues. This article reviews the health consequences of the Pacific USNWTP and the current health systems ability to respond.

  11. 77 FR 60128 - Noncompetitive Supplements to Nursing Assistant and Home Health Aide Program Grantees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-02

    ... Noncompetitive Supplements to Nursing Assistant and Home Health Aide Program Grantees AGENCY: Health Resources... expansion supplements of $100,000 to 10 Nursing Assistant and Home Health Aide (NAHHA) Program grantees to... Management; Care Coordination and Follow Up; and Behavioral Health and Social Support for Home Health Aides...

  12. Team sponsors in community-based health leadership programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Tracy Enright; Dinkin, Donna R; Champion, Heather

    2017-05-02

    Purpose The purpose of this article is to share the lessons learned about the role of team sponsors in action-learning teams as part of community-based health leadership development programs. Design/methodology/approach This case study uses program survey results from fellow participants, action learning coaches and team sponsors to understand the value of sponsors to the teams, the roles they most often filled and the challenges they faced as team sponsors. Findings The extent to which the sponsors were perceived as having contributed to the work of the action learning teams varied greatly from team to team. Most sponsors agreed that they were well informed about their role. The roles sponsors most frequently played were to provide the teams with input and support, serve as a liaison to the community and serve as a sounding board, motivator and cheerleader. The most common challenges or barriers team sponsors faced in this role were keeping engaged in the process, adjusting to the role and feeling disconnected from the program. Practical implications This work provides insights for program developers and community foundations who are interested in building the capacity for health leadership by linking community sponsors with emerging leaders engaged in an action learning experience. Originality/value This work begins to fill a gap in the literature. The role of team sponsors has been studied for single organization work teams but there is a void of understanding about the role of sponsors with multi-organizational teams working to improve health while also learning about leadership.

  13. The NLM evaluation lecture series: introduction to the special section on evaluating health communication programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Robert A; Kreps, Gary L

    2014-12-01

    This article introduces the Journal of Health Communication's special section, Evaluating Health Communication Programs. This special section is based on a public lecture series supported by the National Library of Medicine titled "Better Health: Evaluating Health Communication Programs" designed to share best practices for using evaluation research to develop, implement, refine, and institutionalize the best health communication programs for promoting public health. This introduction provides an overview to the series, summarizes the major presentations in the series, and describe implications from the series for translational health communication research, interventions, and programs that can enhance health outcomes.

  14. Adverse Selection in the Children’s Health Insurance Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Morrisey PhD

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates whether new enrollees in the Alabama Children’s Health Insurance Program have different claims experience from renewing enrollees who do not have a lapse in coverage and from continuing enrollees. The analysis compared health services utilization in the first month of enrollment for new enrollees (who had not been in the program for at least 12 months with utilization among continuing enrollees. A second analysis compared first-month utilization of those who renew immediately with those who waited at least 2 months to renew. A 2-part model estimated the probability of usage and then the extent of usage conditional on any utilization. Claims data for 826 866 child-years over the period from 1999 to 2012 were used. New enrollees annually constituted a stable 40% share of participants. Among those enrolled in the program, 13.5% renewed on time and 86.5% of enrollees were late to renew their enrollment. In the multivariate 2-part models, controlling for age, gender, race, income eligibility category, and year, new enrollees had overall first-month claims experience that was nearly $29 less than continuing enrollees. This was driven by lower ambulatory use. Late renewals had overall first-month claims experience that was $10 less than immediate renewals. However, controlling for the presence of chronic health conditions, there was no statistically meaningful difference in the first-month claims experience of late and early renewals. Thus, differences in claims experience between new and continuing enrollees and between early and late renewals are small, with greater spending found among continuing and early renewing participants. Higher claims experience by early renewals is attributable to having chronic health conditions.

  15. Evaluation of a nursing student health fair program: Meeting curricular standards and improving community members' health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, John P; McEwing, Evan; Matsuda, Yui; Gonzalez-Guarda, Rosa M; Ogunrinde, Olutola; Azaiza, Mona; Williams, Jessica R

    2018-04-17

    Public health nursing (PHN) is an essential component of baccalaureate nursing education. In order to build PHN competencies, universities must design and operationalize meaningful clinical activities addressing community and population health. Currently, there is a paucity of literature delineating best practices for promoting competency in PHN. The purpose of this manuscript is to describe a PHN-student health fair program as a means for meeting undergraduate PHN curricular standards, and to report results of an evaluation conducted examining its effectiveness in improving community member's health knowledge. Health fairs were held at community agencies that served the homeless or victims of intimate partner violence. A total of 113 community members that attended a health fair were assessed at baseline and immediate posttest using open-ended questionnaires. The design of the health fairs included a community assessment, intervention, and evaluation flow that followed the nursing process. We report that results from participants surveyed indicated that PHN-student delivered health fairs improved health knowledge among community members in this sample (p = .000). Health fairs conducted by PHN students appear to be promising community health promotion and disease prevention interventions that can serve as an effective strategy for teaching PHN student competencies and facilitating engagement with the community. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Developing Leaders: Implementation of a Peer Advising Program for a Public Health Sciences Undergraduate Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan eGriffin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Peer advising is an integral part of our undergraduate advising system in the Public Health Sciences major at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. The program was developed in 2009 to address the advising needs of a rapidly growing major that went from 25 to over 530 majors between 2007 and 2014. Each year, 9-12 top performing upper-level students are chosen through an intensive application process. A major goal of the program is to provide curriculum and career guidance to students in the major and empower students in their academic and professional pursuits. The year-long program involves several components, including: staffing the drop-in advising center, attending training seminars, developing and presenting workshops for students, meeting prospective students and families, evaluating ways to improve the program, and collaborating on self-directed projects. The peer advisors also provide program staff insight into the needs and perspectives of students in the major. In turn, peer advisors gain valuable leadership and communication skills, and learn strategies for improving student success. The Peer Advising Program builds community and fosters personal and professional development for the peer advisors. In this paper, we will discuss the undergraduate peer advising model, the benefits and challenges of the program, and lessons learned. Several methods were used to understand the perceived benefits and challenges of the program and experiences of students who utilized the Peer Advising Center. The data for this evaluation were drawn from three sources: 1 archival records from the Peer Advising Center; 2 feedback from peer advisors who completed the year-long internship; and 3 a survey of students who utilized the Peer Advising Center. Results of this preliminary evaluation indicate that peer advisors gain valuable skills that they can carry into their professional world. The program is also a way to engage students in building community

  17. Work engagement in employees at professional improvement programs in health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizangela Gianini Gonsalez

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study evaluated the levels of engagement at work in enhancement programs and professionals training in health. Method: A cross-sectional study with 82 health professionals enhancement programs and improvement of a public institution in the State of São Paulo, using the Utrech Work Engagement Scale (UWES, a self-administered questionnaire composed of seventeen self-assessment items in three dimensions: vigor, dedication and absorption. The scores were calculated according to the statistical model proposed in the Preliminary Manual UWES. Results: Engagement levels were too high on the force, high dedication and dimension in general score, and medium in size to 71.61% absorption, 58.03%, 53.75% and 51.22% of workers, respectively. The professionals present positive relationship with the work; they are responsible, motivated and dedicated to the job and to the patients. Conclusion: Reinforces the importance of studies that evaluate positive aspects of the relationship between professionals and working environment, contributing to strengthen the programs of improvement, advancing the profile of professionals into the labour market.

  18. Multidisciplinary training program to create new breed of radiation monitor: the health and safety technician

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vance, W.F.

    1979-01-01

    A multidiscipline training program established to create a new monitor, theHealth and Safety Technician, is described. The training program includes instruction in fire safety, explosives safety, industrial hygiene, industrial safety, health physics, and general safety practices

  19. The FAA Health Awareness Program: Results of the 1998 Customer Service Assessment Survey

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hilton, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    ... (even if they did not realize that the event was HAP-sponsored). In terms of attendance, the most popular HAP information programs were health fairs, health awareness lectures, and stress management awareness programs...

  20. Texas Employee Health and Fitness Program. An Example of Unique Legislation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haydon, Donald F.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    The Texas State Employee Health Fitness and Education Act of 1983 enables state agencies and educational institutions to finance employee health and fitness programs. This legislation is discussed and an example of the state-supported program is given. (MT)

  1. Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Department of Veterans Affairs (CHAMPVA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Department of Veterans Affairs (CHAMPVA) is a health care benefit program designed for the dependents of certain Veterans....

  2. 76 FR 46684 - Medicaid and Children's Health Insurance Programs; Disallowance of Claims for FFP and Technical...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-03

    ..., 433, 447, and 457 [CMS-2292-P] RIN 0938-AQ32 Medicaid and Children's Health Insurance Programs... Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) disallowance process to allow States the option to retain... [[Page 46685

  3. 2015 Edition Health Information Technology (Health IT) Certification Criteria, 2015 Edition Base Electronic Health Record (EHR) Definition, and ONC Health IT Certification Program Modifications. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-16

    This final rule finalizes a new edition of certification criteria (the 2015 Edition health IT certification criteria or "2015 Edition'') and a new 2015 Edition Base Electronic Health Record (EHR) definition, while also modifying the ONC Health IT Certification Program to make it open and accessible to more types of health IT and health IT that supports various care and practice settings. The 2015 Edition establishes the capabilities and specifies the related standards and implementation specifications that Certified Electronic Health Record Technology (CEHRT) would need to include to, at a minimum, support the achievement of meaningful use by eligible professionals (EPs), eligible hospitals, and critical access hospitals (CAHs) under the Medicare and Medicaid EHR Incentive Programs (EHR Incentive Programs) when such edition is required for use under these programs.

  4. [International cooperation in health: the Special Service of Public Health and its nursing program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Campos, André Luiz Vieira

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyzes the role of the Serviço Especial de Saúde Pública (Special Service of Public Health) in developing and expanding higher education in nursing and to train auxiliary health personnel in Brazil under bilateral agreements between the US and Brazil during the 1940s and 1950s. The Nursing Program of the Special Service is approached from the perspective of its participation in a broader international cooperation developed by the Pan American Health Organization, but also as part of the state and nation building effort of the first Vargas Regime.

  5. Community-Based Global Health Program for Maltreated Children and Adolescents in Brazil: The Equilibrium Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Andrea Horvath; Oliveira, Paula Approbato; Scomparini, Luciana Burim; Silva, Uiara Maria Rêgo e; Silva, Angelica Cristine; Doretto, Victoria; de Medeiros Filho, Mauro Victor; Scivoletto, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    The maltreatment of children and adolescents is a global public health problem that affects high- and low-middle income countries (“LMICs”). In the United States, around 1.2 million children suffer from abuse, while in LMICs, such as Brazil, these rates are much higher (an estimated 28 million children). Exposition to early environmental stress has been associated with suboptimal physical and brain development, persistent cognitive impairment, and behavioral problems. Studies have reported that children exposed to maltreatment are at high risk of behavioral problems, learning disabilities, communication and psychiatric disorders, and general clinical conditions, such as obesity and systemic inflammation later in life. The aim of this paper is to describe The Equilibrium Program (“TEP”), a community-based global health program implemented in São Paulo, Brazil to serve traumatized and neglected children and adolescents. We will describe and discuss TEP’s implementation, highlighting its innovation aspects, research projects developed within the program as well as its population profile. Finally, we will discuss TEP’s social impact, challenges, and limitations. The program’s goal is to promote the social and family reintegration of maltreated children and adolescents through an interdisciplinary intervention program that provides multi-dimensional bio-psycho-social treatment integrated with the diverse services needed to meet the unique demands of this population. The program’s cost effectiveness is being evaluated to support the development of more effective treatments and to expand similar programs in other areas of Brazil. Policy makers should encourage early evidence-based interventions for disadvantaged children to promote healthier psychosocial environments and provide them opportunities to become healthy and productive adults. This approach has already shown itself to be a cost-effective strategy to prevent disease and promote health. PMID

  6. 42 CFR 413.87 - Payments for Medicare+Choice nursing and allied health education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... reimbursement for approved nursing and allied health education programs and the methodology for determining the... receives payment for a nursing or allied health education program under § 413.85 may receive an additional... establishes a nursing or allied health education program after FY 1998 and receives reasonable cost payment...

  7. 76 FR 78741 - Medicare, Medicaid, Children's Health Insurance Programs; Transparency Reports and Reporting of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-19

    ... Parts 402 and 403 [CMS-5060-P] RIN 0938-AR33 Medicare, Medicaid, Children's Health Insurance Programs...'s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) to report annually to the Secretary certain payments or transfers... State plan under title XIX (Medicaid) or XXI of the Act (the Children's Health Insurance Program, or...

  8. 75 FR 32182 - Medicaid Program: Proposed Implementation of Section 614 of the Children's Health Insurance...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-07

    ... of the Children's Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act of 2009 for Adjustments to the Federal... subject to adjustment pursuant to section 614 of the Children's Health Insurance Program Reauthorization... assistance expenditures under the Children's Health Insurance Program under title XXI of the Social Security...

  9. 75 FR 6673 - Expert Meeting on Measurement Criteria for Children's Health Insurance Program; Reauthorization...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-10

    ... on Measurement Criteria for Children's Health Insurance Program; Reauthorization Act Pediatric... enacted in the Children's Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act (CHIPRA). DATES: The meeting will...) reauthorized the Child Health Insurance Program (CHIP) originally established in 1997, and in Title IV of the...

  10. 76 FR 9233 - Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP); Allotment Methodology and States' Fiscal Years 2009...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-17

    ... [CMS-2291-F] RIN 0938-AP53 Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP); Allotment Methodology and States... under Title XXI of the Social Security Act (the Act), for the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP), as amended by the Children's Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act of 2009 (CHIPRA), by the...

  11. 32 CFR 199.16 - Supplemental Health Care Program for active duty members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Supplemental Health Care Program for active duty... (CHAMPUS) § 199.16 Supplemental Health Care Program for active duty members. (a) Purpose and applicability... the supplemental health care program for active duty members of the uniformed services, the provision...

  12. Health Promotion and Wellness Programs: An Insight into the Fortune 500.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forouzesh, Mohammed Reza; Ratzker, Leslie E.

    1985-01-01

    Employee health promotion and wellness programs have become a popular method of decreasing employee health care costs. The characteristics of worksite health-promotion programs were surveyed in a study of Fortune 500 companies. This study also served to examine the extent of activities offered in these programs. (DF)

  13. An eHealth program versus a standard care supervised health program and associated health outcomes in individuals with mobility disability: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglind, Daniel; Nyberg, Gisela; Willmer, Mikaela; Persson, Margareta; Wells, Michael; Forsell, Yvonne

    2018-04-27

    Young adults with mobility disability (MD) are less likely to engage in regular physical activity (PA) compared with their able-bodied peers and inactive adults with a MD are more likely to report one or more chronic diseases compared to those who are physically active. Despite the vast amount of research published in the field of PA interventions over the past decades, little attention has been focused on interventions aiming to increase PA among individuals with MD. Thus, we propose to compare the effects of an eHealth program compared to a usual care supervised health program on levels of PA and other health behaviors. The current intervention will use a randomized controlled trial (RCT) design with two treatment groups (an eHealth program and a usual care supervised health program) in young adults with newly acquired MD. In total, 110 young adults (aged 18-40 years) with a MD, acquired within the past 3 years, will be recruited to participate in a 12-week intervention. The primary study outcome is accelerometer-measured time spent in moderate to vigorous PA. Secondary outcomes includes health-related quality of life, depression, stress, fitness, body composition, diet, musculoskeletal pain, motivation to exercise and work ability. There is a lack of RCTs investigating effective ways to increase levels of PA in young adults with MD. Increased levels of PA among this physically inactive population have the potential to substantially improve health-related outcomes, possibly more so than in the general population. The trial will put strong emphasis on optimizing exercise adherence and investigating feasibility in the two treatment programs. The Ethical Review Board (EPN) at Karolinska Institutet has approved the study (2017/1206-31/1). International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number (ISRCTN), reference number ISRCTN22387524 . Prospectively registered February 4, 2018.

  14. Fellowship Program in Health System Improvement: A novel approach integrating leadership development and patient-centred health system transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippon, Donald J; Montesanti, Stephanie; Stafinski, Tania

    2018-03-01

    This article highlights a novel approach to professional development, integrating leadership, development and patient-centred health system transformation in the new Fellowship Program in Health System Improvement offered by the School of Public Health at the University of Alberta. Early assessment of the program is also provided.

  15. Pilot evaluation of the text4baby mobile health program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evans William Douglas

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mobile phone technologies for health promotion and disease prevention have evolved rapidly, but few studies have tested the efficacy of mobile health in full-fledged programs. Text4baby is an example of mobile health based on behavioral theory, and it delivers text messages to traditionally underserved pregnant women and new mothers to change their health, health care beliefs, practices, and behaviors in order to improve clinical outcomes. The purpose of this pilot evaluation study is to assess the efficacy of this text messaging campaign. Methods We conducted a randomized pilot evaluation study. All participants were pregnant women first presenting for care at the Fairfax County, Virginia Health Department. We randomized participants to enroll in text4baby and receive usual health care (intervention, or continue simply to receive usual care (control. We then conducted a 24-item survey by telephone of attitudes and behaviors related to text4baby. We surveyed participants at baseline, before text4baby was delivered to the intervention group, and at follow-up at approximately 28 weeks of baby’s gestational age. Results We completed 123 baseline interviews in English and in Spanish. Overall, the sample was predominantly of Hispanic origin (79.7% with an average age of 27.6 years. We completed 90 follow-up interviews, and achieved a 73% retention rate. We used a logistic generalized estimating equation model to evaluate intervention effects on measured outcomes. We found a significant effect of text4baby intervention exposure on increased agreement with the attitude statement “I am prepared to be a new mother” (OR = 2.73, CI = 1.04, 7.18, p = 0.042 between baseline and follow-up. For those who had attained a high school education or greater, we observed a significantly higher overall agreement to attitudes against alcohol consumption during pregnancy (OR = 2.80, CI = 1.13, 6.90, p = 0.026. We also observed a

  16. mHealth for Smoking Cessation Programs: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koel Ghorai

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available mHealth transforms healthcare delivery around the world due to its affordability and right time availability. It has been used for delivery of various smoking cessation programs and interventions over the past decade. With the proliferation of smartphone usage around the world, many smartphone applications are being developed for curbing smoking among smokers. Various interventions like SMS, progress tracking, distractions, peer chats and others are being provided to users through smartphone applications. This paper presents a systematic review that analyses the applications of mobile phones in smoking cessations. The synthesis of the diverse concepts within the literature on smoking cessations using mobile phones provides deeper insights in the emerging mHealth landscape.

  17. Health Literacy Training for Public Health Nurses in Fukushima: A Multi-site Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Aya; Lai, Alden Yuanhong; Rudd, Rima E

    2015-09-01

    Public health nurses (PHNs) are community residents' access points to health information and services in Japan. After the Fukushima nuclear accident, they were challenged to communicate radiation-related health information to best meet community needs. We previously developed and evaluated the outcome of a single-site health literacy training program to augment PHNs' ability to improve community residents' access to written health information. This paper presents an evaluation of an identical training program using data combined from multiple sites, and further included proximal and distal evaluations to document the impact of health literacy training in a post-disaster setting. A total of 64 participants, primarily experienced PHNs, attended one of three multi-session health literacy workshops conducted in multiple sites across Fukushima. Quantitative and qualitative data on PHNs' training satisfaction, self-evaluation of achievements regarding training goals, and application of learned skills were collected and analyzed. Each workshop consisted of two 2-hour sessions introducing health literacy and assessment tools and developing skills to improve written materials, followed by a one-month follow-up assessment on PHNs' application of the gained skills in the field. Post-training evaluations on the appropriateness and usefulness of the workshop were highly positive. At the end of the one-month follow-up, 45% of participants had gained confidence in assessing and revising written materials and had applied the skills they had gained to develop and communicate health information in various settings and modes. This increase in confidence was associated with further application of the learned skills at the municipal level. However, participants reported difficulties in explaining risks, and the need to learn more about plain language to be able to paraphrase professional terms. This paper highlighs the positive outcomes of health literacy training among PHNs. Practical

  18. Health promotion and disease prevention: a look at demand management programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fronstin, P

    1996-09-01

    This Issue Brief describes employers' efforts to contain health expenditures through demand management programs. These programs are designed to reduce utilization by focusing on disease prevention and health promotion. Demand management includes work site health promotion, wellness programs, and access management. Work site health promotion is a comprehensive approach to improving health and includes awareness, health education, behavioral change, and organizational health initiatives. Wellness programs usually include stress management, smoking cessation, weight management, back care, health screenings, nutrition education, work place safety, prenatal and well baby care, CPR and first aid classes, and employee assistance programs (EAPs). These programs are often viewed positively by workers and can have long-term benefits for employers above and beyond health care cost containment. Demand management can benefit employers by increasing productivity, employee retention, and employee morale and by reducing turnover, absenteeism, future medical claims, and ultimately expenditures on health care. Even though a growing number of employers are offering wellness programs, only 37 percent of full-time workers employed in medium and large private establishments were eligible for wellness programs by 1993. However, a recent survey found that 88 percent of major employers have introduced some form of health promotion, disease prevention, or early intervention initiative to encourage healthy lifestyles among their salaried employees. Distinctions must be drawn between short- and long-term strategies. Demand management can be thought of as a short-term strategy when the focus of the program is on creating more appropriate and efficient health care utilization. Disease prevention is characterized by longer-term health improvement objectives. Whether the purpose is to reduce utilization in the short term or in the long term, the ultimate goal remains the same: to reduce health

  19. Health and safety information program for hazardous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, M.P.; Fallon, N.J.; Kuehner, A.V.

    1979-01-01

    The system is used as a management tool in several safety and health programs. It is used to: trace the use of hazardous materials and to determine monitoring needs; inform the occupational physician of the potential health problems associated with materials ordered by a given individual; inform the fire and rescue group of hazardous materials in a given building; provide waste disposal recommendations to the hazardous waste management group; assist the hazardous materials shipping coordinator in identifying materials which are regulated by the Department of Transportation; and guide management decisions in the area of recognizing and rectifying unsafe conditions. The information system has been expanded from a manual effort to provide a brief description of health hazards of chemicals used at the lab to a computerized health and safety information system which serves the needs of all personnel who may encounter the material in the course of their work. The system has been designed to provide information needed to control the potential problems associated with a hazardous material up to the time that it is consumed in a given operation or is sent to the waste disposal facility

  20. Efficiency of mobile dental unit in public health programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Gupta

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Almost all dental Colleges run a mobile dental operation for people living in far inaccessible areas who are not able to avail dental care. Mobile dental clinics provide a mode of reaching the unreached by delivering dental care in areas where alternative i.e. private practitioners and fixed clinics are unavailable or inaccessible. Oral diseases account for high morbidity in the community which is compounded by the gross mal-distribution of provision of oral health services in India. In order to ensure accessibility to basic oral health services innovative models of service delivery are being explored. In this context the health economics of mobile oral health care is critically evaluated in this paper. Thus a cost analysis was undertaken to determine the operating expenses for the existing mobile dental unit. Requisite permission of Head of institution was obtained and data was extracted from the records of the mobile dental unit for the year 2014-15.Information on the operating expenses was collected. Costing was done using step down accounting method. Total operating cost of the unit for the year 2014-15 was Rs. 184888/-.Unit cost for each camp was Rs.3625/- and for each patient Rs.76/-. Mobile dental programs can play a vital role in providing access to care to underserved populations and ensuring their mission requires long-term planning. Careful cost analysis based on sound assumptions is of utmost importance.

  1. Mobile health in China: a review of research and programs in medical care, health education, and public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corpman, David W

    2013-01-01

    There are nearly 1 billion mobile phone subscribers in China. Health care providers, telecommunications companies, technology firms, and Chinese governmental organizations use existing mobile technology and social networks to improve patient-provider communication, promote health education and awareness, add efficiency to administrative practices, and enhance public health campaigns. This review of mobile health in China summarizes existing clinical research and public health text messaging campaigns while highlighting potential future areas of research and program implementation. Databases and search engines served as the primary means of gathering relevant resources. Included material largely consists of scientific articles and official reports that met predefined inclusion criteria. This review includes 10 reports of controlled studies that assessed the use of mobile technology in health care settings and 17 official reports of public health awareness campaigns that used text messaging. All source material was published between 2006 and 2011. The controlled studies suggested that mobile technology interventions significantly improved an array of health care outcomes. However, additional efforts are needed to refine mobile health research and better understand the applicability of mobile technology in China's health care settings. A vast potential exists for the expansion of mobile health in China, especially as costs decrease and increasingly sophisticated technology becomes more widespread.

  2. An evaluation of the Well at Dell health management program: health risk change and financial return on investment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musich, Shirley; McCalister, Tre'; Wang, Sara; Hawkins, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of the Well at Dell comprehensive health management program in delivering health care and productivity cost savings relative to program investment (i.e., return on investment). A quasi-experimental design was used to quantify the financial impact of the program and nonexperimental pre-post design to evaluate change in health risks. Ongoing worksite health management program implemented across multiple U.S. locations. Subjects were 24,651 employees with continuous medical enrollment in 2010-2011 who were eligible for 2011 health management programming. Incentive-driven, outcomes-based multicomponent corporate health management program including health risk appraisal (HRA)/wellness, lifestyle management, and disease management coaching programs. Medical, pharmacy, and short-term disability pre/post expenditure trends adjusted for demographics, health status, and baseline costs. Self-reported health risks from repeat HRA completers. Analysis: Propensity score-weighted and multivariate regression-adjusted comparison of baseline to post trends in health care expenditures and productivity costs for program participants and nonparticipants (i.e., difference in difference) relative to programmatic investment. The Well at Dell program achieved an overall return on investment of 2.48 in 2011. Most of the savings were realized from the HRA/wellness component of the program. Cost savings were supported with high participation and significant health risk improvement. An incentive-driven, well-managed comprehensive corporate health management program can continue to achieve significant health improvement while promoting health care and productivity cost savings in an employee population.

  3. Monitoring of health care personnel employee and occupational health immunization program practices in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrico, Ruth M; Sorrells, Nikka; Westhusing, Kelly; Wiemken, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have identified concerns with various elements of health care personnel immunization programs, including the handling and management of the vaccine. The purpose of this study was to assess monitoring processes that support evaluation of the care of vaccines in health care settings. An 11-question survey instrument was developed for use in scripted telephone surveys. State health departments in all 50 states in the United States and the District of Columbia were the target audience for the surveys. Data from a total of 47 states were obtained and analyzed. No states reported an existing monitoring process for evaluation of health care personnel immunization programs in their states. Our assessment indicates that vaccine evaluation processes for health care facilities are rare to nonexistent in the United States. Identifying existing practice gaps and resultant opportunities for improvements may be an important safety initiative that protects patients and health care personnel. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Reducing Health Services for Refugees Through Reforms to the Interim Federal Health Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew C. Stevenson

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Since 1957 the Interim Federal Health Program (IFHP has provided temporary health care coverage to refugees and refugee claimants, but in 2012 the Conservative government reformed the IFHP, reducing, or eliminating access to health services for these groups. The government framed the changes around fairness and safety, stating that it would save tax payers $100 million over five years, reduce incentive for migrants with unfounded refugee claims from coming to Canada, protect public health and safety, and defend the integrity of the immigration system. With a Conservative majority, the reform was easily implemented despite a lack of evidence supporting these claims. In 2014, the Federal Court rejected the government's notion of fairness and safety, ruling that the cuts were cruel and unusual treatment of an already vulnerable population. The government appealed this ruling but, in 2016, the Liberals took power and restored funding to the IFHP to pre-2012 levels. Ad hoc evaluations predicted inequitable and adverse impacts on refugees, negative impacts on health, and increased costs to refugees, provincial governments, and health providers. Overall the threats and weaknesses of this reform clearly outweighed the few and unconvincing opportunities and strengths of the program, leading to its demise.

  5. 76 FR 1261 - Establishment of the Permanent Certification Program for Health Information Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-07

    ... Certification Program for Health Information Technology; Final Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 5... Program for Health Information Technology AGENCY: Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, Department of Health and Human Services. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This final rule...

  6. 2009 Annual Health Physics Report for the HEU Transparency Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radev, R.

    2010-01-01

    During the 2009 calendar year, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) provided health physics support for the Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) Transparency Program for external and internal radiation protection. LLNL also provided technical expertise related to BDMS radioactive sources and Russian radiation safety regulatory compliance. For the calendar year 2009, there were 159 person-trips that required dose monitoring of the U.S. monitors. Of the 159 person-trips, 149 person-trips were SMVs and 10 person-trips were Transparency Monitoring Office (TMO) trips. There were 4 monitoring visits by TMO monitors to facilities other than UEIE and 10 to UEIE itself. LLNL's Hazard Control Department laboratories provided the dosimetry services for the HEU Transparency monitors. In 2009, the HEU Transparency activities in Russia were conducted in a radiologically safe manner for the HEU Transparency monitors in accordance with the expectations of the HEU Transparency staff, NNSA and DOE. The HEU Transparency Program now has over fifteen years of successful experience in developing and providing health and safety support in meeting its technical objectives.

  7. Structural health monitoring feature design by genetic programming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, Dustin Y; Todd, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) systems provide real-time damage and performance information for civil, aerospace, and other high-capital or life-safety critical structures. Conventional data processing involves pre-processing and extraction of low-dimensional features from in situ time series measurements. The features are then input to a statistical pattern recognition algorithm to perform the relevant classification or regression task necessary to facilitate decisions by the SHM system. Traditional design of signal processing and feature extraction algorithms can be an expensive and time-consuming process requiring extensive system knowledge and domain expertise. Genetic programming, a heuristic program search method from evolutionary computation, was recently adapted by the authors to perform automated, data-driven design of signal processing and feature extraction algorithms for statistical pattern recognition applications. The proposed method, called Autofead, is particularly suitable to handle the challenges inherent in algorithm design for SHM problems where the manifestation of damage in structural response measurements is often unclear or unknown. Autofead mines a training database of response measurements to discover information-rich features specific to the problem at hand. This study provides experimental validation on three SHM applications including ultrasonic damage detection, bearing damage classification for rotating machinery, and vibration-based structural health monitoring. Performance comparisons with common feature choices for each problem area are provided demonstrating the versatility of Autofead to produce significant algorithm improvements on a wide range of problems. (paper)

  8. Building the Foundation for a Health Education Program for Rural Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Seung Eun; Parker, Stephany; Hermann, Janice; Phelps, Joshua; Shin, Yeon Ho

    2018-01-01

    We explored rural older adults perceptions of health to inform health promotion program development, using social marketing as our framework. Participants in seven focus groups viewed independence and holistic health as indicators of health and identified healthful eating and physical activity as actions to promote health. Barriers to these…

  9. 75 FR 75469 - Priority Setting for the Children's Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act (CHIPRA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-03

    ... Advisor, Child Health and Quality Improvement, Office of Extramural Research, Education, and Priority...: Importance has several dimensions: To what extent is the topic important to children's health outcomes... Setting for the Children's Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act (CHIPRA) Pediatric Quality...

  10. Perinatal Maternal Mental Health, Fetal Programming and Child Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Lewis

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Maternal mental disorders over pregnancy show a clear influence on child development. This review is focused on the possible mechanisms by which maternal mental disorders influence fetal development via programming effects. This field is complex since mental health symptoms during pregnancy vary in type, timing and severity and maternal psychological distress is often accompanied by higher rates of smoking, alcohol use, poor diet and lifestyle. Studies are now beginning to examine fetal programming mechanisms, originally identified within the DOHaD framework, to examine how maternal mental disorders impact fetal development. Such mechanisms include hormonal priming effects such as elevated maternal glucocorticoids, alteration of placental function and perfusion, and epigenetic mechanisms. To date, mostly high prevalence mental disorders such as depression and anxiety have been investigated, but few studies employ diagnostic measures, and there is very little research examining the impact of maternal mental disorders such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, eating disorders and personality disorders on fetal development. The next wave of longitudinal studies need to focus on specific hypotheses driven by plausible biological mechanisms for fetal programming and follow children for a sufficient period in order to examine the early manifestations of developmental vulnerability. Intervention studies can then be targeted to altering these mechanisms of intergenerational transmission once identified.

  11. Evolution of a multilevel framework for health program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masso, Malcolm; Quinsey, Karen; Fildes, Dave

    2017-07-01

    A well-conceived evaluation framework increases understanding of a program's goals and objectives, facilitates the identification of outcomes and can be used as a planning tool during program development. Herein we describe the origins and development of an evaluation framework that recognises that implementation is influenced by the setting in which it takes place, the individuals involved and the processes by which implementation is accomplished. The framework includes an evaluation hierarchy that focuses on outcomes for consumers, providers and the care delivery system, and is structured according to six domains: program delivery, impact, sustainability, capacity building, generalisability and dissemination. These components of the evaluation framework fit into a matrix structure, and cells within the matrix are supported by relevant evaluation tools. The development of the framework has been influenced by feedback from various stakeholders, existing knowledge of the evaluators and the literature on health promotion and implementation science. Over the years, the framework has matured and is generic enough to be useful in a wide variety of circumstances, yet specific enough to focus data collection, data analysis and the presentation of findings.

  12. Perinatal Maternal Mental Health, Fetal Programming and Child Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Andrew J; Austin, Emma; Knapp, Rebecca; Vaiano, Tina; Galbally, Megan

    2015-11-26

    Maternal mental disorders over pregnancy show a clear influence on child development. This review is focused on the possible mechanisms by which maternal mental disorders influence fetal development via programming effects. This field is complex since mental health symptoms during pregnancy vary in type, timing and severity and maternal psychological distress is often accompanied by higher rates of smoking, alcohol use, poor diet and lifestyle. Studies are now beginning to examine fetal programming mechanisms, originally identified within the DOHaD framework, to examine how maternal mental disorders impact fetal development. Such mechanisms include hormonal priming effects such as elevated maternal glucocorticoids, alteration of placental function and perfusion, and epigenetic mechanisms. To date, mostly high prevalence mental disorders such as depression and anxiety have been investigated, but few studies employ diagnostic measures, and there is very little research examining the impact of maternal mental disorders such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, eating disorders and personality disorders on fetal development. The next wave of longitudinal studies need to focus on specific hypotheses driven by plausible biological mechanisms for fetal programming and follow children for a sufficient period in order to examine the early manifestations of developmental vulnerability. Intervention studies can then be targeted to altering these mechanisms of intergenerational transmission once identified.

  13. Partnership in employee health. A workplace health program for British Columbia Public Service Agency (Canada).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarride, J E; Harrington, K; Balfour, R; Simpson, P; Foord, L; Anderson, L; Lakey, W

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the My Health Matters! (MHM) program, a multifaceted workplace intervention relying on education and awareness, early detection and disease management with a focus on risk factors for metabolic syndrome. The MHM program was offered to 2,000 public servants working in more than 30 worksites in British Columbia, Canada. The MHM program included a health risk assessment combined with an opportunity to attend an on-site screening and face-to-face call back visits and related on-site educational programs. Clinical and economic outcomes were collected over time in this one-year prospective study coupled with administrative and survey data. Forty three per cent of employees (N=857) completed the online HRA and 23 per cent (N=447) attended the initial clinical visit with the nurse. Risk factors for metabolic syndrome were identified in more than half of those attending the clinical visit. The number of risk factors significantly decreased by 15 per cent over six months (N=141). The cost per employee completing the HRA was $205 while the cost per employee attending the initial clinical visit was $394. Eighty-two per cent of employees would recommend the program to other employers. This study supports that workplace interventions are feasible, sustainable and valued by employees. As such, this study provides a new framework for implementing and evaluating workplace interventions focussing on metabolic disorders.

  14. Healthy Start: a comprehensive health education program for preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, C L; Squillace, M M; Bollella, M C; Brotanek, J; Campanaro, L; D'Agostino, C; Pfau, J; Sprance, L; Strobino, B A; Spark, A; Boccio, L

    1998-01-01

    Healthy Start is a 3-year demonstration and education research project designed to evaluate the effectiveness of a multidimensional cardiovascular (CV) risk reduction intervention in preschool centers over a 3-year period of time. Two primary interventions are employed. The first is the preschool food service intervention program designed to reduce the total fat in preschool meals and snacks to less than 30% of calories and reduce the saturated fat to less than 10% of calories. The second major intervention is a comprehensive preschool health education curriculum, focused heavily on nutrition. Effectiveness of the intervention will be determined through evaluation of changes in dietary intake of preschool children at school meals and snacks, especially with respect to intake of total and saturated fat. Evaluation of the education component will include assessment of program implementation by teachers, assessment of changes in nutrition knowledge by preschool children, and assessment of changes in home meals that children consume (total and saturated fat content). Blood cholesterol will be evaluated semiannually to evaluate changes that may be due to modification of dietary intake. Growth and body fatness will also be assessed. While substantial efforts have targeted CV risk reduction and health education for elementary school children, similar efforts aimed at preschool children have been lacking. The rationale for beginning CV risk reduction programs for preschool children is based upon the premise that risk factors for heart disease are prevalent by 3 years of age and tend to track over time, most commonly hypercholesterolemia and obesity, both related to nutrition. Since the behavioral antecedents for nutritional risk factors begin to be established very early in life, it is important to develop and evaluate new educational initiatives such as Healthy Start, aimed at the primary prevention of cardiovascular risk factors in preschool children. The purpose of this

  15. Faculty Development Program Models to Advance Teaching and Learning Within Health Science Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Jason W.; Stein, Susan M.; MacLean, Linda Garrelts; Van Amburgh, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Within health science programs there has been a call for more faculty development, particularly for teaching and learning. The primary objectives of this review were to describe the current landscape for faculty development programs for teaching and learning and make recommendations for the implementation of new faculty development programs. A thorough search of the pertinent health science databases was conducted, including the Education Resource Information Center (ERIC), MEDLINE, and EMBASE, and faculty development books and relevant information found were reviewed in order to provide recommendations for best practices. Faculty development for teaching and learning comes in a variety of forms, from individuals charged to initiate activities to committees and centers. Faculty development has been effective in improving faculty perceptions on the value of teaching, increasing motivation and enthusiasm for teaching, increasing knowledge and behaviors, and disseminating skills. Several models exist that can be implemented to support faculty teaching development. Institutions need to make informed decisions about which plan could be most successfully implemented in their college or school. PMID:24954939

  16. Faculty development program models to advance teaching and learning within health science programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Jason W; Stein, Susan M; MacLean, Linda Garrelts; Van Amburgh, Jenny; Persky, Adam M

    2014-06-17

    Within health science programs there has been a call for more faculty development, particularly for teaching and learning. The primary objectives of this review were to describe the current landscape for faculty development programs for teaching and learning and make recommendations for the implementation of new faculty development programs. A thorough search of the pertinent health science databases was conducted, including the Education Resource Information Center (ERIC), MEDLINE, and EMBASE, and faculty development books and relevant information found were reviewed in order to provide recommendations for best practices. Faculty development for teaching and learning comes in a variety of forms, from individuals charged to initiate activities to committees and centers. Faculty development has been effective in improving faculty perceptions on the value of teaching, increasing motivation and enthusiasm for teaching, increasing knowledge and behaviors, and disseminating skills. Several models exist that can be implemented to support faculty teaching development. Institutions need to make informed decisions about which plan could be most successfully implemented in their college or school.

  17. Effectiveness of a Multilevel Workplace Health Promotion Program on Vitality, Health, and Work-Related Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriksen, Ingrid J M; Snoijer, Mirjam; de Kok, Brenda P H; van Vilsteren, Jeroen; Hofstetter, Hedwig

    2016-06-01

    Evaluation of the effectiveness of a workplace health promotion program on employees' vitality, health, and work-related outcomes, and exploring the influence of organizational support and the supervisors' role on these outcomes. The 5-month intervention included activities at management, team, and individual level targeting self-management to perform healthy behaviors: a kick-off session, vitality training sessions, workshops, individual coaching, and intervision. Outcome measures were collected using questionnaires, health checks, and sickness absence data at baseline, after the intervention and at 10 months follow-up. For analysis linear and generalized mixed models were used. Vitality, work performance, sickness absence, and self-management significantly improved. Good organizational support and involved supervisors were significantly associated with lower sickness absence. Including all organizational levels and focusing on increasing self-management provided promising results for improving vitality, health, and work-related outcomes.

  18. Determinants of participation in a web-based health risk assessment and consequences for health promotion programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A.J. Niessen (Maurice); E.L. Laan (Eva); S.J.W. Robroek (Suzan); M.L.E. Essink-Bot (Marie-Louise); N. Peek (Niels); R.A. Kraaijenhagen (Roderik); C.K. van Kalken (Coen); A. Burdorf (Alex)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The health risk assessment (HRA) is a type of health promotion program frequently offered at the workplace. Insight into the underlying determinants of participation is needed to evaluate and implement these interventions. Objective: To analyze whether individual

  19. The importance of using evidence-based e-health smoking cessation programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hein De Vries

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available eHealth programs have become very popular to help people to quit smoking. Yet, the efficacy of eHealth programs is dependent on the health communication theories used and applied in these programs. Computer tailored technology has shown to be an effective tool to help people to quit smoking. Programs with even one session can increase the success rates significantly. During this presentation I will discuss several computer tailored eHealth programs for smoking cessation that have been developed and tested at Maastricht University. I will discuss the theoretical grounding of these programs, their effects and the cost-effectiveness. Additionally I will also outline some potential innovations for eHealth programs, and will also share the results of a test comparing eHealth and mHealth.

  20. Family health program user: knowledge and satisfaction about user embracement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saulo Lacerda Borges de Sá

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the knowledge and satisfaction of users of a Basic Health Unit about the strategy of embracement. Methods: Descriptive study with qualitative approach, carried out in a Basic Health Unit, Fortaleza, Brazil, where practical activities of the Education Program of Work for Health of the University of Fortaleza were performed. Fifty eight service users were involved, following inclusion criteria: being present during the data collection, age over 18, regardless of sex, and voluntary participation. Data collection occurred in December 2009, through semi-structured interview. The data associated with the identification of users were processed in Microsoft Office Excel 2007, being organizedstatistically in table. Data related to qualitative aspects were analyzed according to the technique of content analysis. Results: 56 (97% were women, with ages ranging between 21 and 40 years, 34 (59% were married and 53 (91% are literate. On family income, 55 (95%received less than two minimum salaries per month. In order to facilitate understanding the speech of users, these were evaluated from the perspective of two categories: knowledge about embracement and satisfaction with embracement. Conclusion: Users have a limited view of the significance and magnitude of the embracement to provide the care. Although satisfied with the service, respondents report as negative aspects: the shortage of professionals, the professional relationship with user impaired due to constant delays of the professional, and the dehumanization of care.

  1. Efficacy of a public promotion program on children's oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Ana Paula S; Rank, Rise C I C; Vilela, Joana Estela R; Rank, Marcos S; Ogawa, Wataro N; Molina, Omar F

    2017-09-25

    To assess the efficacy of the Baby's Mouth early dental care prevention and promotion program in preventing oral diseases (caries, gingivitis, or malocclusions) in children attended since 2010. This was a cross-sectional and cohort study that assessed 252 children between 36 and 60 months of age in both sexes. The children were divided into three groups: G1: effective participants of the program from birth; G2: children who have stopped participating for more than 24 months, and G3: children who have never attended a prevention program. The evaluation was carried out in two stages: first, an interview with the mothers and, afterwards, a clinical children examination to assess the presence of caries, gingivitis, and malocclusion. The chi-squared test was used for statistical analysis between groups (p<0.05). The diseases assessed were: caries (G1: 5.9%, G2: 54.7%, G3: 70%), gingivitis (G1: 8.3%, G2: 17.9%, G3: 40.5%), and malocclusion (G1: 22.6%; G2: 28.6%; G3: 50%). For gingivitis, there was no significant difference when comparing G1 and G2 (p=0.107), but it was significant between G1 and G3 (p<0.001). Regarding malocclusion, a statistically significant relationship was observed (p=0.004) among all groups. The prevention and promotion program in public oral health was effective in preventing caries disease, gingivitis, and malocclusion in children under 5 years of age. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  2. Implementing program-wide awareness about recovery in a large mental health and addictions program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVanel-Viney, Sarah; Younger, Jodi; Doyle, Winnie; Kirkpatrick, Helen

    2006-01-01

    St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton conceptualized a multi-step plan for implementing a recovery oriented service delivery approach within their Mental Health and Addictions Program. This brief report discusses the first phase of this plan which included building awareness of recovery utilizing Anthony's (2000) system standards to develop a needs assessment for managers and senior team members. The survey had three purposes: to increase managers' awareness about recovery; to allow managers to express concerns that they had with this paradigm; and to afford managers an opportunity to explore the ways in which their service was and was not operating in a recovery oriented way. Initiatives designed to build awareness throughout the program are discussed.

  3. Health Care Access and Use Among Low-Income Children on Subsidized Insurance Programs in California.

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher Trenholm; Anna Saltzman; Shanna Shulman; Michael Cousineau; Dana Hughes

    2008-01-01

    This paper summarizes the CaliforniaKids and Healthy Kids programs—county-based insurance programs in California for low-income children. The study examined features of both programs, use of basic health care services by the children enrolled, and typical experiences accessing inpatient and other high-cost care. Children enrolled in the two programs made substantial use of outpatient health care, despite important variation in program features. The study concludes with recommendations on ho...

  4. NON-COMMUNICABLE DISEASE PROGRAM IN AMPANGAN HEALTH CLINIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MASTURA I

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-communicable diseases (NCDs represent among the most common and debilitating conditions seen in primary care. Patients’ care will often involves multiple providers and follow-up requires persistence by patients and clinicians alike, therefore ideal outcomes are often difficult to achieve. The need for better disease management policies and practice is growing. This is due to the changing demographic profile of the population, the increasing cost of managing people in acute care hospitals and the availability of new technologies and services. All these changes enable a different care paradigm which is more cost effective and provides people with chronic conditions an improved quality of life. Management of the NCDs therefore offers an excellent opportunity to practice chronic disease management - a systems approach designed to ensure excellent care. The NCD team has developed a comprehensive approach to chronic disease care. We would like to describe the NCD Program in Ampangan Health Clinic which represents many typical government health clinics in Malaysia and the processes by which it was developed. Included are specific examples of the tools and how they can be used by individual clinicians incaring for patients. The integration of Chronic Disease Management Services into health care systems is the direction being undertaken to tackle the burden of chronic disease. Disease management supports the shift in healthcare from an emphasis on managing the acute episode to managing the entire disease course, highlighting both prevention and maintenance of wellbeing for patients with chronic diseases. Disease management promotes better integration and coordination of care across all aspects of the health sector.

  5. 77 FR 36557 - Office of Urban Indian Health Programs Funding Opportunity: Title V HIV/AIDS Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-19

    ... health program HIV/AIDS activities is necessary to reduce the incidence of HIV/AIDS in the urban Indian communities by increasing access to HIV related services, reducing stigma, and making testing routine. Purpose..., Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Health Resource and Services Administration, and...

  6. Worksite Health Program Promoting Changes in Eating Behavior and Health Attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mache, Stefanie; Jensen, Sarah; Jahn, Reimo; Steudtner, Mirko; Ochsmann, Elke; Preuß, Geraldine

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a worksite multicomponent health promotion intervention on eating behavior and attitudes, changes in body weight, and readiness to make eating behavior changes among workers over a 12-month intervention period. A total of 3,095 workers of a logistic company participated in a quasi-experimental comparison group study design. The intervention group received a multicomponent health training. Two of the main elements of the multicomponent intervention were physical exercise training and nutrition counseling/training. During the pilot year, participants completed a survey at baseline and again after 12 months to assess physical activity-, health-, and diet-related factors. Results showed that participants' body weight did not significantly decrease in the intervention group. Mean weight loss in the intervention groups was 0.5 kg (body mass index = 0.1 kg/m(2)). Eating behaviors in the intervention group improved more than in the comparison group. Some positive intervention effects were observed for the cognitive factors (e.g., changes in eating attitudes). Baseline readiness to change eating behavior was significantly improved over time. We demonstrated initial results of a long-term multicomponent worksite health promotion program with regard to changes in body weight, eating behavior, and attitudes. This evaluation of a 12-month pilot study suggests that a worksite health promotion program may lead to improvements in nutritional health behaviors for a number of workers. An investigation of long-term effects of this multicomponent intervention is strongly recommended. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.

  7. Digital health intervention as an adjunct to a workplace health program in hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senecal, Conor; Widmer, R Jay; Johnson, Matthew P; Lerman, Lilach O; Lerman, Amir

    2018-05-30

    Hypertension is a common and difficult-to-treat condition; digital health tools may serve as adjuncts to traditional pharmaceutical and lifestyle-based interventions. Using a retrospective observational study we sought to evaluate the effect of a desktop and mobile digital health intervention (DHI) as an adjunct to a workplace health program in those previously diagnosed with hypertension. As part of a workplace health program, 3330 patients were identified as previously diagnosed with hypertension. A DHI was made available to participants providing motivational and educational materials assisting in the management of hypertension. We evaluated changes in blood pressure, weight, and body mass index (BMI) between users and nonusers based on login frequency to the DHI using multivariate regression through the five visits over the course of 1 year. One thousand six hundred twenty-two (49%) participants logged into the application at least once. DHI users had significant greater improvements in systolic blood pressure (SBP; -2.79 mm Hg), diastolic blood pressure (-2.12 mm Hg), and BMI (-0.23 kg/m 2 ) at 1 year. Increased login frequency was significantly correlated with reductions in SBP, diastolic blood pressure, weight, and BMI (P ≤ .014). This large, observational study provides evidence that a DHI as an adjunct to a workplace health program is associated with greater improvement in blood pressure and BMI at 1 year. This study adds to the growing body of evidence that DHIs may be useful in augmenting the treatment of hypertension in addition to traditional management with pharmaceuticals and lifestyle changes. Copyright © 2018 American Heart Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Newborn access and care in a health attention program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poliana Remundini de Lima

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A cross-sectional study aimed to describe the access and integrality of attention to children before one year old, born between January of 2010 and December of 2012 in a Brazilian city, in a newborn attention program. From the 24.560 children, 55.0% were users of the Unified Health System (SUS; 10.1% children presented low weight at birth; 6,332 (46.9% children received BCG vaccine at the nursing consultation day; 13,590 (79.5% children had neonatal screening being less than seven days old; 17,035 (69.4% children were vaccinated for Hepatitis B at birth. Within SUS users, 68% of children went to nursing consultation at their first week of life and, 37.8% went to a medical consultation being 10 days old. The study presents information of care after birth at the primary healthcare as potential instrument to coordinate assistance to this clientele.

  9. Interactions between youth and mental health professionals: The Youth Aware of Mental health (YAM) program experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, Camilla; Postuvan, Vita; Herta, Dana; Iosue, Miriam; Värnik, Peeter; Carli, Vladimir

    2018-01-01

    The Youth Aware of Mental health (YAM) experience Youth stand at the core of much mental health promotion, yet little is written about their experiences of such efforts. We aimed to take this on by interviewing youth after they participated in Youth Aware of Mental Health (YAM), a universal mental health promotion program. YAM has a non-anticipatory methodology that provides youth with a safe space for reflection, role-play, and discussion. Addressing everyday mental health, YAM invites the experiences and issues relevant to the youth present to influence the program in a slightly different direction every time. The YAM instructor guides the participants but does not present the youth with given formulas on how to solve their problems. Like any mental health promotion, YAM appeals to some more than others in its intended audience and individuals engage with the program in many different ways. We set out to learn more about these experiences. Conversations about mental health Thirty-two semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15–17 year olds in Estonia, Italy, Romania and Spain. In these interviews, the researchers made an effort to discuss mental health in terms relevant to youth. Still, wide-ranging levels of motivation, ease with engaging in dialogue with mental health professionals, and comfort with the format and content of YAM were detected. The youth were clustered in five different groups relating to their positioning vis-à-vis the researcher during the interview. The following evocative labels were used: “interested”, “foot in the door”, “respect for authority”, “careful”, and “not my topic”. Corresponding labels were devised for their YAM experience: “engaged”, “initially hesitant”, “cautious”, “eager to please”, or “disengaged”. We also observed that the researchers brought their own expectations and employed a variety of approaches that led to anticipating answers, stating the obvious, or getting along

  10. School Health Connection Goes Electronic: Developing a Health Information Management System for New Orleans' School-Based Health Centers. Program Results Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastorfer, Darl

    2011-01-01

    From February 2008 through April 2011, School Health Connection, a program of the Louisiana Public Health Institute, developed an electronic health information management system for newly established school-based health centers in Greater New Orleans. School Health Connection was established as part of a broader effort to restore community health…

  11. Translating Knowledge: Promoting Health Through Intergenerational Community Arts Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Sharon; Fast, Janet; Keating, Norah; Eales, Jacquie; Chivers, Sally; Barnet, David

    2016-03-01

    Intergenerational programs have been touted to address the generation gaps and isolation of older adults. Mutual contact alone has produced mixed results, but attention to the intergenerational program content demonstrates well-being benefits. This practice-based article examines the benefits of creating and performing ensemble-created plays to older adults' and university students' well-being and the key processes that promote well-being. This community participatory research project involved older adults as researchers as well as research subjects. Individual semistructured interviews were conducted by two trained interviewers with older adults (n = 15) and university students (n = 17). Professional dramaturgical processes of storytelling, reminiscence, and playfulness were key elements in participants' generative learning. They augmented older adults' and university students' ability to understand their situations and try innovative solutions. Skills such as openness, flexibility, and adaptation transferred into students' and older adults' daily lives. Participating in this intergenerational theatre group reduced ageism and improved intergenerational relationships. It increased older adults' and university students' well-being by building social networks, confidence, and self-esteem and developed a sense of social justice, empathy, and support for others. © 2016 Society for Public Health Education.

  12. Enhancing Global Health Security: US Africa Command's Disaster Preparedness Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton Hamer, Melinda J; Reed, Paul L; Greulich, Jane D; Beadling, Charles W

    2018-03-07

    US Africa Command's Disaster Preparedness Program (DPP), implemented by the Center for Disaster and Humanitarian Assistance Medicine, partnered with US Government agencies and international organizations to promote stability and security on the African continent by engaging with African Partner Nations' (PN) civil and military authorities to improve disaster management capabilities. From 2008 to 2015, DPP conducted disaster preparedness and response programming with 17 PNs. DPP held a series of engagements with each, including workshops, strategic planning, developing preparedness and response plans, tabletop exercises, and prioritizing disaster management capability gaps identified through the engagements. DPP partners collected data for each PN to further capacity building efforts. Thus far, 9 countries have completed military pandemic plans, 10 have developed national pandemic influenza plans, 9 have developed military support to civil authorities plans, and 11 have developed disaster management strategic work plans. There have been 20 national exercises conducted since 2009. DPP was cited as key in implementation of Ebola response plans in PNs, facilitated development of disaster management agencies in DPP PNs, and trained nearly 800 individuals. DPP enhanced PNs' ability to prepare and respond to crises, fostering relationships between international agencies, and improving civil-military coordination through both national and regional capacity building. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2018;page 1 of 11).

  13. Microbial programming of health and disease starts during fetal life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koleva, Petya T; Kim, Ji-Sun; Scott, James A; Kozyrskyj, Anita L

    2015-12-01

    The pioneer microbiota of the neonatal gut are essential for gut maturation, and metabolic and immunologic programming. Recent research has shown that early bacterial colonization may impact the occurrence of disease later in life (microbial programming). Despite early conflicting evidence, it has long been considered that the womb is a sterile environment and human microbial colonization begins at birth. In the last few years, several findings have reiterated the presence of microbes in infant first stool (meconium) and pointed to the existence of in utero microbial colonization of the infant gut. The dominant bacterial taxa detected in meconium specimens belong to the Enterobacteriaceae family (Escherichia genus) and lactic acid bacteria (notably members of the genera Leuconostoc, Enterococcus, and Lactococcus). Maternal atopy promotes dominance of Enterobacteriaceae in newborn meconium, which in turn may lead to respiratory problems in the infant. This microbial interaction with the host immune system may in fact, originate during fetal life. Our review evaluates the evidence for an intrauterine origin of meconium microbiota, their composition and influences, and potential clinical implications on infant health. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Barriers and Facilitators to Sustaining School Health Teams in Coordinated School Health Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Karen; Lesesne, Catherine A; Rasberry, Catherine N; Kroupa, Elizabeth; Fisher, Deborah; Robin, Leah; Pitt Barnes, Seraphine

    2017-05-01

    Coordinated school health (CSH) programs address multiple factors related to students' overall health, thereby increasing their physical and mental readiness to learn. A formative evaluation of three school districts in 2010-2011 examined strategies for sustaining the school health teams (SHTs) that lead CSH efforts. Qualitative data from 39 interviews and 13 focus groups revealed facilitators and barriers for sustaining SHTs. Quantitative data from 68 questionnaires completed by SHT members and school principals examined factors associated with having more active SHTs and district and school characteristics SHT members believed to be important to their schools' efforts to implement CSH. Facilitators of sustaining SHTs included administrative support, staff engagement in the SHT, and shared goals and responsibility. Barriers to sustaining SHTs included limited time and competing priorities, budget and funding constraints, and staff turnover. Findings provide valuable insight into challenges and potential solutions for improving the sustainability of SHTs to enable them to better support CSH efforts.

  15. Interviewing Key Informants: Strategic Planning for a Global Public Health Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kun, Karen E.; Kassim, Anisa; Howze, Elizabeth; MacDonald, Goldie

    2013-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Sustainable Management Development Program (SMDP) partners with low- and middle-resource countries to develop management capacity so that effective global public health programs can be implemented and better health outcomes can be achieved. The program's impact however, was variable. Hence, there…

  16. 75 FR 55587 - Family-to-Family Health Information Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Family-to-Family Health Information Center Program AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration, HHS... Vermont Family-to-Family Health Information Center (F2F HIC) grant (H84MC00002) from the Parent to Parent...

  17. Consumer involvement in the health technology assessment program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royle, Jane; Oliver, Sandy

    2004-01-01

    This study aims to describe a cycle of development leading to sustainable methods for involving consumers in the management of a program commissioning health technology assessment. Staff time was dedicated to developing procedures for recruiting and briefing consumers to participate in prioritizing, commissioning, and reporting research. Resources and support were developed in light of early feedback from consumers and those working with them. These were piloted and amended before being used routinely. Over 4 years, procedures and resources have been developed to support six consumers attending seven to eight prioritization meetings a year; thirty to forty-five consumers each year commenting on research need for particular topics; thirty consumers a year commenting on research proposals, and twenty a year commenting on research reports. The procedures include clear job descriptions, induction and development days, clear briefing materials, payment for substantial tasks, and regularly seeking feedback to improve procedures. Explicit, inclusive, and reproducible methods for supporting consumer involvement that satisfy National Health Service policy recommendations for involving consumers in research require dedicated staff time to support a cycle of organizational development.

  18. 2011 Annual Health Physics Report for the HEU transparency Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radev, R.

    2012-01-01

    During the 2008 calendar year, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) provided health physics support for the Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) Transparency Program for external and internal radiation protection. They also provided technical expertise related to BDMS radioactive sources and Russian radiation safety regulatory compliance. For the calendar year 2008, there were 158 person-trips that required dose monitoring of the U.S. monitors. Of the 158 person-trips, 148 person-trips were SMVs and 10 person-trips were Transparency Monitoring Office (TMO) trips. There were 6 monitoring visits by TMO monitors to facilities other than UEIE and 8 to UEIE itself. There were three monitoring visits (source changes) that were back-to-back with a total of 24 monitors. LLNL's Hazard Control Department laboratories provided the dosimetry services for the HEU Transparency monitors. In 2008, the HEU Transparency activities in Russia were conducted in a radiologically safe manner for the HEU Transparency monitors in accordance with the expectations of the HEU Transparency staff, NNSA and DOE. The HEU Transparency now has thirteen years of successful experience in developing and providing health and safety support in meeting its technical objectives.

  19. Empowering primary care workers to improve health services: results from Mozambique's leadership and management development program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Cary

    2008-07-23

    This article is the third article in the Human Resources for Health journal's feature on the theme of leadership and management in public health. The series of six articles has been contributed by Management Sciences for Health (MSH) and will be published article-by-article over the next few weeks. The third article presents a successful application in Mozambique of a leadership development program created by Management Sciences for Health (MSH). Through this program, managers from 40 countries have learned to work in teams to identify their priority challenges and act to implement effective responses. From 2003 to 2004, 11 health units in Nampula Province, participated in a leadership and management development program called the Challenges Program. This was following an assessment which found that the quality of health services was poor, and senior officials determined that the underlying cause was the lack of human resource capacity in leadership and management in a rapidly decentralizing health care system. The program was funded by the US Agency for International Development (USAID) and implemented in partnership between the Mozambican Ministry of Health (MOH) Provincial Directorate in Nampula and Management Sciences for Health (MSH). The Challenges Program used simple management and leadership tools to assist the health units and their communities to address health service challenges. An evaluation of the program in 2005 showed that 10 of 11 health centers improved health services over the year of the program. The Challenges Program used several strategies that contributed to successful outcomes. It integrated leadership strengthening into the day-to-day challenges that staff were facing in the health units. The second success factor in the Challenges Program was the creation of participatory teams. After the program, people no longer waited passively to be trained but instead proactively requested training in needed areas. MOH workers in Nampula reported

  20. Reductions in employee productivity impairment observed after implementation of web-based worksite health promotion programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberman, Jordan; Schwartz, Steven; Giuseffi, Danielle L; Wang, Chun; Nevedal, Dana; Bedrosian, Richard

    2011-12-01

    To assess changes in employee productivity impairment observed after the implementation of several Web-based health promotion programs. Health risk assessments and self-report measures of productivity impairment were administered on-line to more than 43,000 participants of Web-based health promotion programs. Reductions in productivity impairment were observed after 1 month of program utilization. Productivity impairment at 90- and 180-day follow-ups also decreased relative to baseline. Improvements in employee health were associated with reductions in employee productivity impairment. The use of Web-based health promotion programs was associated with reductions in productivity impairment and improvements in employee health. After the implementation of Web-based health promotion programs, reductions in productivity impairment may be observed before reductions in direct health care costs.

  1. HMO innovations. Video-enhanced medical advice; senior zoo walkers; Group Health Resource Line; enhancing health education programs through desktop publishing; home health beat; innovative school health partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paperny, D M; Maeser, J D; Artz, K; Stroh, M J; Jackson, L; Cohen, K; Lancaster, M S; Heyer, A L; Clevenson, D S

    1991-01-01

    The editors of HMO PRACTICE asked clinicians and health educators in HMOs across the country to submit reports on their unique, successful patient education programs. The following HMO Innovations testify to the wide range of new technologies, enterprising partnerships, and creative ideas that are shaping health education in HMOs today.

  2. Health workers' views of a program to facilitate physical health care in mental health settings: implications for implementation and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Wendy; Harris, Melanie; Battersby, Malcolm

    2014-12-01

    Physical comorbidities shorten the lifespan of people with severe mental illness therefore mental health clinicians need to support service users in risk factor-related behaviour change. We investigated mental health care workers' views of a physical health self-management support program in order to identify implementation requirements. Qualitative interviews were conducted with workers who had differing levels of experience with a self-management support program. Themes were identified using interpretive descriptive analysis and then matched against domains used in implementation models to draw implications for successful practice change. Three main themes emerged related to: (1) understandings of disease management within job roles; (2) requirements for putting self-management support into practice; and (3) challenges of coordination in disease management. Priority domains from implementation models were inner and outer health service settings. While staff training is required, practice change for care which takes account of both mental and physical health also requires changes in organisational frameworks. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2014.

  3. 75 FR 36157 - Establishment of the Temporary Certification Program for Health Information Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-24

    ... Certification Program for Health Information Technology; Final Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 75 , No. 121... Information Technology AGENCY: Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology... certification program for the purposes of testing and certifying health information technology. This final rule...

  4. Collaborative Learning Processes in the Context of a Public Health Professional Development Program: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Marie-Claude; Richard, Lucie; Brousselle, Astrid; Chiocchio, François; Beaudet, Nicole

    2017-01-01

    The health promotion laboratory (HPL-Canada) is a public health professional development program building on a collaborative learning approach in order to support long-term practice change in local health services teams. This study aims to analyse the collaborative learning processes of two teams involved in the program during the first year of…

  5. A Systematic Review of Health-Promotion Programs in NCAA Division III Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Health-promotion in the workplace has existed for numerous years. However, the availability of health-promotion programs offered in institutions of higher education has seemed to lag behind other industries such as business. The purpose of this survey research project was to identify specific components of health-promotion programs within NCAA…

  6. 76 FR 31998 - Federal Employees Health Benefits Program: Medically Underserved Areas for 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-02

    ... OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT Federal Employees Health Benefits Program: Medically Underserved... Underserved Areas under the Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Program for calendar year 2012. This is... certain FEHB plans who receive covered health services in States with critical shortages of primary care...

  7. 75 FR 32972 - Federal Employees Health Benefits Program; Medically Underserved Areas for 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-10

    ... OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT Federal Employees Health Benefits Program; Medically Underserved... Underserved Areas under the Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Program for calendar year 2011. This is... certain FEHB plans who receive covered health services in States with critical shortages of primary care...

  8. An Update of Oral Health Curricula in US Family Medicine Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Hugh; Savageau, Judith A; Sullivan, Kate; Sawosik, Gail; Wang, Min

    2018-06-01

    National initiatives have encouraged oral health training for family physicians and other nondental providers for almost 2 decades. Our national survey assesses progress of family medicine residency programs on this important health topic since our last survey in 2011. Family medicine residency program directors (PDs) completed an online survey covering various themes including number of hours of oral health (OH) teaching, topics covered, barriers, evaluation, positive influences, and program demographics. Compared to 2011, more PDs feel OH should be addressed by physicians (86% in 2017 vs 79% in 2011), yet fewer programs are teaching OH (81% vs 96%) with fewer hours overall (31% vs 45% with 4 or more hours). Satisfaction with the competence of graduating residents in OH significantly decreased (17% in 2017 vs 32% in 2011). Program directors who report graduates being well prepared to answer board questions on oral health topics are more likely to have an oral health champion (P<0.001) and report satisfaction with the graduates' level of oral health competency (P<0.001). Programs with an oral health champion, or having a relationship with a state or national oral health coalition, or having routine teaching from a dental professional are significantly more likely to have more hours of oral health curriculum (P<0.001). Family medicine PDs are more aware of the importance of oral health, yet less oral health is being taught in residency programs. Developing more faculty oral health champions and connecting programs to dental faculty and coalitions may help reduce this educational void.

  9. 78 FR 54255 - HRSA's Bureau of Health Professions Advanced Education Nursing Traineeship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-03

    ... of Health Professions Advanced Education Nursing Traineeship Program AGENCY: Health Resources and... announcing a change to its Advanced Education Nursing Traineeship (AENT) program. Effective fiscal year (FY... Wasserman, DrPH, RN, Advanced Nursing Education Branch Chief, Division of Nursing, Bureau of Health...

  10. 75 FR 76293 - Medicare Program; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for Calendar Year 2011...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-08

    ... [CMS-1510-CN] RIN 0938-AP88 Medicare Program; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for... Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for Calendar Year 2011; Changes in Certification... effective as if they had been included in the Medicare Program; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate...

  11. Quantifying Collaboration Using Himmelman's Strategies for Working Together: Findings from the Tennessee Coordinated School Health Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Megan A; Southerland, Jodi L.; Richards, Kasie; Slawson, Deborah L; Behringer, Bruce; Johns-Womack, Rebecca; Smith, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Coordinated school health programs (CSHPs), a type of health promoting school (HPS) program adopted by Canada and the USA, were developed to provide a comprehensive approach to school health in the USA. Community partnerships are central to CSHP and HPS efforts, yet the quality of collaboration efforts is rarely assessed. The purpose of…

  12. 78 FR 9457 - Medicare, Medicaid, Children's Health Insurance Programs; Transparency Reports and Reporting of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-08

    ... Parts 402 and 403 [CMS-5060-F] RIN 0938-AR33 Medicare, Medicaid, Children's Health Insurance Programs...'s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) to report annually to the Secretary certain payments or transfers... Vol. 78 Friday, No. 27 February 8, 2013 Part II Department of Health and Human Services Centers...

  13. 77 FR 31499 - Medicaid and Children's Health Insurance Programs; Disallowance of Claims for FFP and Technical...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services 42 CFR Parts 430, 433, 447, and 457 [CMS-2292-F] RIN 0938-AQ32 Medicaid and Children's Health Insurance Programs... Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) disallowance process to allow States the option to retain...

  14. 75 FR 72682 - Health Care Eligibility Under the Secretarial Designee Program and Related Special Authorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-26

    ... members not in a present duty status. This authority includes payment for health care services in private... 0790-AI52 Health Care Eligibility Under the Secretarial Designee Program and Related Special... assigns responsibilities for health care eligibility under the Secretarial Designee Program. It also...

  15. Analyzing best practices in employee health management: how age, sex, and program components relate to employee engagement and health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Paul E; Grossmeier, Jessica; Mangen, David J; Gingerich, Stefan B

    2013-04-01

    Examine the influence of employee health management (EHM) best practices on registration, participation, and health behavior change in telephone-based coaching programs. Individual health assessment data, EHM program data, and health coaching participation data were analyzed for associations with coaching program enrollment, active participation, and risk reduction. Multivariate analyses occurred at the individual (n = 205,672) and company levels (n = 55). Considerable differences were found in how age and sex impacted typical EHM evaluation metrics. Cash incentives for the health assessment were associated with more risk reduction for men than for women. Providing either a noncash or a benefits-integrated incentive for completing the health assessment, or a noncash incentive for lifestyle management, strengthened the relationship between age and risk reduction. In EHM programs, one size does not fit all. These results can help employers tailor engagement strategies for their specific population.

  16. Enhancing global health and education in Malawi, Zambia, and the United States through an interprofessional global health exchange program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Lynda Law; Somerall, D'Ann; Theus, Lisa; Rankin, Sally; Ngoma, Catherine; Chimwaza, Angela

    2014-05-01

    This article describes participant outcomes of an interprofessional collaboration between health professionals and faculty in Malawi, Zambia, and the United States (US). One strategy critical for improving global health and addressing Millennium Development goals is promotion of interprofessional education and collaboration. Program participants included 25 health professionals from Malawi and Zambia, and 19 faculty/health professionals from Alabama and California. African Fellows participated in a 2 week workshop on Interprofessional Education in Alabama followed by 2 weeks working on individual goals with faculty collaborators/mentors. The US Fellows also spent 2 weeks visiting their counterparts in Malawi and Zambia to develop plans for sustainable partnerships. Program evaluations demonstrated participants' satisfaction with the program and indicated that the program promoted interprofessional and cross-cultural understanding; fostered development of long-term sustainable partnerships between health professionals and educators in Zambia and the US; and created increased awareness and use of resources for global health education. © 2014.

  17. Health promotion in schools: a multi-method evaluation of an Australian School Youth Health Nurse Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banfield, Michelle; McGorm, Kelly; Sargent, Ginny

    2015-01-01

    Health promotion provides a key opportunity to empower young people to make informed choices regarding key health-related behaviours such as tobacco and alcohol use, sexual practices, dietary choices and physical activity. This paper describes the evaluation of a pilot School Youth Health Nurse (SYHN) Program, which aims to integrate a Registered Nurse into school communities to deliver health promotion through group education and individual sessions. The evaluation was guided by the RE-AIM (reach, effectiveness, adoption, implementation, maintenance) framework. The objectives were to explore: 1) whether the Program was accessible to the high school students; 2) the impacts of the Program on key stakeholders; 3) which factors affected adoption of the Program; 4) whether implementation was consistent with the Program intent; and 5) the long-term sustainability of the Program. Research included retrospective analysis of Program records, administration of a survey of student experiences and interviews with 38 stakeholders. This evaluation provided evidence that the SYHN Program is reaching students in need, is effective, has been adopted successfully in schools, is being implemented as intended and could be maintained with sustained funding. The nurses deliver an accessible and acceptable primary health care service, focused on health promotion, prevention and early intervention. After some initial uncertainty about the scope and nature of the role, the nurses are a respected source of health information in the schools, consulted on curriculum development and contributing to whole-of-school health activities. Findings demonstrate that the SYHN model is feasible and acceptable to the students and schools involved in the pilot. The Program provides health promotion and accessible primary health care in the school setting, consistent with the Health Promoting Schools framework.

  18. Interactions between youth and mental health professionals: The Youth Aware of Mental health (YAM) program experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, Camilla; Postuvan, Vita; Herta, Dana; Iosue, Miriam; Värnik, Peeter; Carli, Vladimir

    2018-01-01

    Youth stand at the core of much mental health promotion, yet little is written about their experiences of such efforts. We aimed to take this on by interviewing youth after they participated in Youth Aware of Mental Health (YAM), a universal mental health promotion program. YAM has a non-anticipatory methodology that provides youth with a safe space for reflection, role-play, and discussion. Addressing everyday mental health, YAM invites the experiences and issues relevant to the youth present to influence the program in a slightly different direction every time. The YAM instructor guides the participants but does not present the youth with given formulas on how to solve their problems. Like any mental health promotion, YAM appeals to some more than others in its intended audience and individuals engage with the program in many different ways. We set out to learn more about these experiences. Thirty-two semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15-17 year olds in Estonia, Italy, Romania and Spain. In these interviews, the researchers made an effort to discuss mental health in terms relevant to youth. Still, wide-ranging levels of motivation, ease with engaging in dialogue with mental health professionals, and comfort with the format and content of YAM were detected. The youth were clustered in five different groups relating to their positioning vis-à-vis the researcher during the interview. The following evocative labels were used: "interested", "foot in the door", "respect for authority", "careful", and "not my topic". Corresponding labels were devised for their YAM experience: "engaged", "initially hesitant", "cautious", "eager to please", or "disengaged". We also observed that the researchers brought their own expectations and employed a variety of approaches that led to anticipating answers, stating the obvious, or getting along better with some of the youth. These modes of interaction were categorized under: "favoritism", "familiarity", "frustration

  19. Nurse-midwives in federally funded health centers: understanding federal program requirements and benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Martha

    2012-01-01

    Midwives are working in federally funded health centers in increasing numbers. Health centers provide primary and preventive health care to almost 20 million people and are located in every US state and territory. While health centers serve the entire community, they also serve as a safety net for low-income and uninsured individuals. In 2010, 93% of health center patients had incomes below 200% of the Federal Poverty Guidelines, and 38% were uninsured. Health centers, including community health centers, migrant health centers, health care for the homeless programs, and public housing primary care programs, receive grant funding and enjoy other benefits due to status as federal grantees and designation as federally qualified health centers. Clinicians working in health centers are also eligible for financial and professional benefits because of their willingness to serve vulnerable populations and work in underserved areas. Midwives, midwifery students, and faculty working in, or interacting with, health centers need to be aware of the regulations that health centers must comply with in order to qualify for and maintain federal funding. This article provides an overview of health center regulations and policies affecting midwives, including health center program requirements, scope of project policy, provider credentialing and privileging, Federal Tort Claims Act malpractice coverage, the 340B Drug Pricing Program, and National Health Service Corps scholarship and loan repayment programs. © 2012 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  20. Guidance for implementing an environmental, safety, and health-assurance program. Volume 15. A model plan for line organization environmental, safety, and health-assurance programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellingson, A.C.; Trauth, C.A. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    This is 1 of 15 documents designed to illustrate how an Environmental, Safety and Health (ES and H) Assurance Program may be implemented. The generic definition of ES and H Assurance Programs is given in a companion document entitled An Environmental, Safety and Health Assurance Program Standard. This particular document presents a model operational-level ES and H Assurance Program that may be used as a guide by an operational-level organization in developing its own plan. The model presented here reflects the guidance given in the total series of 15 documents.

  1. The Risks Of Using Workplace Wellness Programs To Foster A Culture Of Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madison, Kristin M

    2016-11-01

    In many respects, employers are well positioned to take a leading role in helping create a culture of health. Employers have access to many programs that could be beneficial to their employees' health. The potential for financial gains related to health improvement may motivate employers to offer these programs, and if the gains are realized, they may help finance the programs. At the same time, employers' involvement in such programs may create substantial risks. Enthusiasm about the financial and health gains that wellness programs might yield coexists with concerns about health costs shouldered by employees, the possibility of employment discrimination, and the potential for employers' invasion of employees' privacy. A fragmented regulatory regime, including a recently issued final rule under the Americans with Disabilities Act, has been created to address these concerns. Whether the regime strikes the right balance between wellness program benefits and risks remains to be determined. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  2. 78 FR 308 - Medicare Program; Request for Information on Hospital and Vendor Readiness for Electronic Health...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-03

    ... (PQRS), the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP), and the Pioneer Accountable Care Organization... No. 93.773, Medicare--Hospital Insurance; and Program No. 93.774, Medicare-- Supplementary Medical...

  3. 76 FR 23479 - Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Uniformed Services (CHAMPUS); TRICARE Young Adult

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-27

    ... 0720-AB48] Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Uniformed Services (CHAMPUS); TRICARE Young Adult... Year 2011 (NDAA for FY11). It establishes the TRICARE Young Adult (TYA) program to provide an extended.... The TRICARE Young [[Page 23480

  4. CDC's National Environmental Public Health Tracking Program in Action: Case Studies From State and Local Health Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eatman, Shana; Strosnider, Heather M

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC's) National Environmental Public Health Tracking Program (Tracking Program) is a multidisciplinary collaboration that involves the ongoing collection, integration, analysis, interpretation, and dissemination of data from environmental hazard monitoring, human exposure surveillance, and health effects surveillance. With a renewed focus on data-driven decision-making, the CDC's Tracking Program emphasizes dissemination of actionable data to public health practitioners, policy makers, and communities. The CDC's National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network (Tracking Network), a Web-based system with components at the national, state, and local levels, houses environmental public health data used to inform public health actions (PHAs) to improve community health. This article serves as a detailed landscape on the Tracking Program and Tracking Network and the Tracking Program's leading performance measure, "public health actions." Tracking PHAs are qualitative statements addressing a local problem or situation, the role of the state or local Tracking Program, how the problem or situation was addressed, and the action taken. More than 400 PHAs have been reported by funded state and local health departments since the Tracking Program began collecting PHAs in 2005. Three case studies are provided to illustrate the use of the Tracking Program resources and data on the Tracking Network, and the diversity of actions taken. Through a collaborative network of experts, data, and tools, the Tracking Program and its Tracking Network are actively informing state and local PHAs. In a time of competing priorities and limited funding, PHAs can serve as a powerful tool to advance environmental public health practice.

  5. Special delivery: an analysis of mHealth in maternal and newborn health programs and their outcomes around the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamrat, Tigest; Kachnowski, Stan

    2012-07-01

    Mobile health (mHealth) encompasses the use of mobile telecommunication and multimedia into increasingly mobile and wireless health care delivery systems and has the potential to improve tens of thousands of lives each year. The ubiquity and penetration of mobile phones presents the opportunity to leverage mHealth for maternal and newborn care, particularly in under-resourced health ecosystems. Moreover, the slow progress and funding constraints in attaining the Millennium Development Goals for child and maternal health encourage harnessing innovative measures, such as mHealth, to address these public health priorities. This literature review provides a schematic overview of the outcomes, barriers, and strategies of integrating mHealth to improve prenatal and neonatal health outcomes. Six electronic databases were methodically searched using predetermined search terms. Retrieved articles were then categorized according to themes identified in previous studies. A total of 34 articles and reports contributed to the findings with information about the use and limitations of mHealth for prenatal and neonatal healthcare access and delivery. Health systems have implemented mHealth programs to facilitate emergency medical responses, point-of-care support, health promotion and data collection. However, the policy infrastructure for funding, coordinating and guiding the sustainable adoption of prenatal and neonatal mHealth services remains under-developed. The integration of mobile health for prenatal and newborn health services has demonstrated positive outcomes, but the sustainability and scalability of operations requires further feedback from and evaluation of ongoing programs.

  6. The effect of a community mental health training program for multidisciplinary staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bing Xiang; Stone, Teresa E; Davis, Scott A

    2018-06-01

    Primary health workers play a critical role in providing health education to people with mental disorders. In China community health workers working with people with mental health problems lack experience and training in this area. Additionally, coordination between hospital and community staff is not well established. The aim of this study was to provide an interdisciplinary community mental health training program and to evaluate the effect of the training on staff knowledge about mental health and confidence in their roles. A three-day community mental health training program was offered specifically for interdisciplinary mental health professionals. Using a one-group pre-test post-test design, participants completed a self-assessment of mental health concepts and program evaluation which included asking participants to rate their satisfaction using a five-point Likert scale and to respond to open-ended questions. Forty-eight participants including health professionals from colleges, hospital and community health centers were recruited. Only 8.7% of participants had ever received community mental health training. Post-test evaluation demonstrated improvements in knowledge, and most participants were very satisfied with the program. The findings indicate that this brief interdisciplinary training program had a positive effect in improving knowledge about community mental health concepts and confidence in dealing with people with mental health disorders for multidisciplinary staff working in primary health care areas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Audit of a diabetic health education program at a large Primary Health Care Center in Asir region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khaldi, Y M; Khan, M Y

    2000-09-01

    To evaluate the health education program in a large Primary Health Care Center, to find out the problems faced by the staff and to suggest the practical and relevant solutions. This study was carried out at Wasat Abha Primary Health Care Center, Asir region during 1997. The files of diabetics who attended the center were evaluated for health education topics by using a checklist. The essential structure of diabetic health education program was assessed by using another check list designed by the investigators. Data entry and analysis was carried out through SPSS package. Chi-square test was applied wherever necessary. The total number of diabetics who attended Wasat Abha Primary Health Care Center was 198. The duration of diabetes mellitus was 7.7+5.8 years. Ninety percent of these were married, 50.5% were educated and 79% were employed. Compliance to appointment was good in 60% and poor in 30% of diabetics. About 73% of the diabetics received at least one health education topic while 27% did not receive any health education at all. Only 33% of diabetic patients had adequate health education. Ninety one percent were provided with diabetic identification cards, 80% were explained about diabetes and 77% were educated about the role of diet. Essential structure for diabetes education program was found to be unsatisfactory. Effective diabetic health education program needs the availability of all essential structures, community participation and integration of the government and private sectors. The deficiencies in the structures and the process of health education programs in our practice are almost universal to other Primary Health Care Centers in the Asir region. Providing the Primary Health Care Centers with all essential structures and annual auditing are complimentary to a successful diabetic health education program.

  8. Health behaviors of mandated and voluntary students in a motivational intervention program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna M. Kazemi

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Intervention programs to reduce drinking by college students need to address developmental dynamics of freshmen students, including gender, psychosocial factors, personality, and lifestyle health-promoting behaviors.

  9. Defense Health Program Financial Reporting of General Property, Plant, and Equipment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lane, F

    2000-01-01

    .... The Defense Health Program funds the operations of the Military Departments' medical treatment facilities, the development of DoD medical systems software, and congressionally directed research...

  10. The FAA Health Awareness Program: Results of the 1998 Customer Service Assessment Survey

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hilton, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    This report presents the results of an agency-wide survey of employee health and wellness to determine workforce involvement in and satisfaction with the Federal Aviation Administration's Health Awareness Program (HAP...

  11. Report on Health Manpower and Programs in Ohio: Part Two. Allied Health, Area Health Education Centers, Dentistry, Emergency Medical Services, Nursing, Optometry, Pharmacy, Podiatry, and Veterinary Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio Board of Regents, Columbus.

    Information on health occupations educational programs in Ohio and current and projected employment needs for health professionals are presented. The following health fields are examined: allied health, dentistry, emergency medical service, nursing, optometry, pharmacy, podiatry, and veterinary medicine. Issues and trends affecting each field are…

  12. Satellite stories: capturing professional experiences of academic health sciences librarians working in delocalized health sciences programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phinney, Jackie; Horsman, Amanda Rose

    2018-01-01

    Health sciences training programs have progressively expanded onto satellite campuses, allowing students the opportunity to learn in communities away from an academic institution's main campus. This expansion has encouraged a new role for librarians to assume, in that a subset of health sciences librarians identify as "satellite librarians" who are permanently located at a distance from the main campus. Due to the unique nature of this role and lack of existing data on the topic, the authors investigated the experiences and perceptions of this unique group of information professionals. An electronic survey was distributed to health sciences librarians via two prominent North American email discussion lists. Questions addressed the librarians' demographics, feelings of social inclusion, technological support, autonomy, professional support, and more. Eighteen surveys were analyzed. While several respondents stated that they had positive working relationships with colleagues, many cited issues with technology, scheduling, and lack of consideration as barriers to feeling socially included at both the parent and local campuses. Social inclusion, policy creation, and collection management issues were subject to their unique situations and their colleagues' perceptions of their roles as satellite librarians. The results from this survey suggest that the role of the academic health sciences librarian at the satellite campus needs to be clearly communicated and defined. This, in turn, will enhance the experience for the librarian and provide better service to the client.

  13. Assessing the reach and effectiveness of mHealth: evidence from a reproductive health program for adolescent girls in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokicki, Slawa; Fink, Günther

    2017-12-20

    While mobile health (mHealth) programs are increasingly used to provide health information and deliver interventions, little is known regarding the relative reach and effectiveness of these programs across sociodemographic characteristics. We use data from a recent trial of a text-messaging intervention on adolescent sexual and reproductive health (SRH) to assess the degree to which mHealth programs reach target adolescent subpopulations who may be at higher risk of poor SRH outcomes. The study was conducted among girls aged 14-24 in 22 secondary schools in Accra, Ghana. The mHealth intervention was an interactive mobile phone quiz in which participants could win phone credit for texting correct answers to SRH questions. We use detailed data on individuals' level of engagement with the program, SRH knowledge scores, and self-reported pregnancy collected as part of the original trial to assess the extent to which engagement and program impact vary across parental education, sexual experience, SRH knowledge deficit, and parental support. Eighty-one percent of participants engaged with the mHealth program, with no evidence that the program disproportionally reached better-off groups. The program was effective at increasing knowledge of SRH across all strata. Higher levels of engagement were associated with higher knowledge scores up to year later. There was no significant impact of the program on self-reported pregnancy within subgroups. mHealth programs for adolescents have the potential to engage and increase SRH knowledge of adolescent girls across sociodemographic strata, including those who may be at higher risk of poor SRH outcomes. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02031575 . Registered 07 Jan 2014.

  14. Primary mental health prevention themes in published research and academic programs in Israel

    OpenAIRE

    Nakash, Ora; Razon, Liat; Levav, Itzhak

    2015-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization Comprehensive Mental Health Action Plan (CMHAP) 2013?2020 proposes the implementation of primary prevention strategies to reduce the mental health burden of disease. The extent to which Israeli academic programs and published research adhere to the principles spelled out by the CMHAP is unknown. Objective To investigate the presence of mental health primary prevention themes in published research and academic programs in Israel. Methods We searched for...

  15. CDC’s National Environmental Public Health Tracking Program in Action: Case Studies From State and Local Health Departments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eatman, Shana; Strosnider, Heather M.

    2017-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) National Environmental Public Health Tracking Program (Tracking Program) is a multidisciplinary collaboration that involves the ongoing collection, integration, analysis, interpretation, and dissemination of data from environmental hazard monitoring, human exposure surveillance, and health effects surveillance. With a renewed focus on data-driven decision-making, the CDC’s Tracking Program emphasizes dissemination of actionable data to public health practitioners, policy makers, and communities. The CDC’s National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network (Tracking Network), a Web-based system with components at the national, state, and local levels, houses environmental public health data used to inform public health actions (PHAs) to improve community health. This article serves as a detailed landscape on the Tracking Program and Tracking Network and the Tracking Program’s leading performance measure, “public health actions.” Tracking PHAs are qualitative statements addressing a local problem or situation, the role of the state or local Tracking Program, how the problem or situation was addressed, and the action taken. More than 400 PHAs have been reported by funded state and local health departments since the Tracking Program began collecting PHAs in 2005. Three case studies are provided to illustrate the use of the Tracking Program resources and data on the Tracking Network, and the diversity of actions taken. Through a collaborative network of experts, data, and tools, the Tracking Program and its Tracking Network are actively informing state and local PHAs. In a time of competing priorities and limited funding, PHAs can serve as a powerful tool to advance environmental public health practice. PMID:28763381

  16. Learning Preferences and Impacts of Education Programs in Dog Health Programs in Five Rural and Remote Australian Indigenous Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constable, Sophie; Dixon, Roselyn; Dixon, Robert

    2011-01-01

    As part of strategies to improve dog and community health in rural and remote Indigenous communities, this study investigated preferences and impacts of dog health education programs. Semistructured interviews with 63 residents from five communities explored learning preferences. Though each community differed, on average yarning was preferred by…

  17. Incorporating Reporting Efforts to Manage and Improve Health and Wellness Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Timothy S; Ozminkowski, Ronald J; McGinn, Michael P; Hawkins, Kevin; Bhattarai, Gandhi R; Serxner, Seth A; Greame, Chris

    2017-06-01

    Wellness programs are designed to help individuals maintain or improve their health. This article describes how a reporting process can be used to help manage and improve a wellness program. Beginning in 2014, a wellness pilot program became available in New Jersey for individuals with an AARP Medicare Supplement Insurance plan insured by UnitedHealthcare Insurance Company. The program has since expanded to include Missouri, Texas, Alabama, and Washington. This wellness program includes an online health portal, one-on-one telephonic coaching, gym membership discounts, and local health events. To assure smooth program operations and alignment with program objectives, weekly and monthly reports are produced. The weekly report includes metrics on member engagement and utilization for the aforementioned 4 program offerings and reports on the last 4 weeks, as well as for the current month and the current year to date. The monthly report includes separate worksheets for each state and a summary worksheet that includes all states combined, and provides metrics on overall engagement as well as utilization of the 4 program components. Although the monthly reports were used to better manage the 4 program offerings, the weekly reports help management to gauge response to program marketing. Reporting can be a data-driven management tool to help manage wellness programs. Reports provide rapid feedback regarding program performance. In contrast, in-depth program evaluations serve a different purpose, such as to report program-related savings, return on investment, or to report other longer term program-related outcomes.

  18. 75 FR 11327 - Proposed Establishment of Certification Programs for Health Information Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-10

    ... Certification Programs for Health Information Technology; Proposed Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 46... for Health Information Technology AGENCY: Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information... granted to the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (the National Coordinator) by...

  19. 76 FR 72636 - Permanent Certification Program for Health Information Technology; Revisions to ONC-Approved...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-25

    ... Permanent Certification Program for Health Information Technology; Revisions to ONC-Approved Accreditor Processes AGENCY: Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC), Department of... Coordinator for Health Information Technology by section 3001(c)(5) of the Public Health Service Act (PHSA) as...

  20. 77 FR 43290 - Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP); Final Allotments to States, the District of Columbia...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-24

    ... 0938-AR45 Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP); Final Allotments to States, the District of... and expand health insurance coverage to uninsured, low-income children under the Children's Health... under title XXI of the Social Security Act (the Act). States may implement Children's Health Insurance...

  1. Spanish-Language Community-Based Mental Health Treatment Programs, Policy-Required Language-Assistance Programming, and Mental Health Treatment Access Among Spanish-Speaking Clients

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClellan, Sean R.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated the extent to which implementing language assistance programming through contracting with community-based organizations improved the accessibility of mental health care under Medi-Cal (California’s Medicaid program) for Spanish-speaking persons with limited English proficiency, and whether it reduced language-based treatment access disparities. Methods. Using a time series nonequivalent control group design, we studied county-level penetration of language assistance programming over 10 years (1997–2006) for Spanish-speaking persons with limited English proficiency covered under Medi-Cal. We used linear regression with county fixed effects to control for ongoing trends and other influences. Results. When county mental health plans contracted with community-based organizations, those implementing language assistance programming increased penetration rates of Spanish-language mental health services under Medi-Cal more than other plans (0.28 percentage points, a 25% increase on average; P language-related disparities. Conclusions. Mental health treatment programs operated by community-based organizations may have moderately improved access after implementing required language assistance programming, but the programming did not reduce entrenched disparities in the accessibility of mental health services. PMID:23865663

  2. Spanish-language community-based mental health treatment programs, policy-required language-assistance programming, and mental health treatment access among Spanish-speaking clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, Lonnie R; McClellan, Sean R

    2013-09-01

    We investigated the extent to which implementing language assistance programming through contracting with community-based organizations improved the accessibility of mental health care under Medi-Cal (California's Medicaid program) for Spanish-speaking persons with limited English proficiency, and whether it reduced language-based treatment access disparities. Using a time series nonequivalent control group design, we studied county-level penetration of language assistance programming over 10 years (1997-2006) for Spanish-speaking persons with limited English proficiency covered under Medi-Cal. We used linear regression with county fixed effects to control for ongoing trends and other influences. When county mental health plans contracted with community-based organizations, those implementing language assistance programming increased penetration rates of Spanish-language mental health services under Medi-Cal more than other plans (0.28 percentage points, a 25% increase on average; P language-related disparities. Mental health treatment programs operated by community-based organizations may have moderately improved access after implementing required language assistance programming, but the programming did not reduce entrenched disparities in the accessibility of mental health services.

  3. Impacting Binational Health through Leadership Development: A Program Evaluation of the Leaders across Borders Program, 2010–2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar A. Contreras

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundWorkforce and leadership development is imperative for the advancement of public health along the U.S./Mexico border. The Leaders across borders (LaB program aims to train the public health and health-care workforce of the border region. The LaB is a 6-month intensive leadership development program, which offers training in various areas of public health. Program curriculum topics include: leadership, border health epidemiology, health diplomacy, border public policies, and conflict resolution.MethodsThis article describes the LaB program evaluation outcomes across four LaB cohort graduates between 2010 and 2014. LaB graduates received an invitation to participate via email in an online questionnaire. Eighty-five percent (n = 34 of evaluation participants indicated an improvement in the level of binationality since participating in the LaB program. Identified themes in the evaluation results included increased binational collaborations and partnerships across multidisciplinary organizations that work towards improving the health status of border communities. Approximately 93% (n = 37 of the LaB samples were interested in participating in future binational projects while 80% (n = 32 indicated interest in the proposal of other binational initiatives. Participants expressed feelings of gratitude from employers who supported their participation and successful completion of LaB.DiscussionPrograms such as LaB are important in providing professional development and education to a health-care workforce along the U.S./Mexico border that is dedicated to positively impacting the health outcomes of vulnerable populations residing in this region.

  4. Integrating design science theory and methods to improve the development and evaluation of health communication programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhauser, Linda; Kreps, Gary L

    2014-12-01

    Traditional communication theory and research methods provide valuable guidance about designing and evaluating health communication programs. However, efforts to use health communication programs to educate, motivate, and support people to adopt healthy behaviors often fail to meet the desired goals. One reason for this failure is that health promotion issues are complex, changeable, and highly related to the specific needs and contexts of the intended audiences. It is a daunting challenge to effectively influence health behaviors, particularly culturally learned and reinforced behaviors concerning lifestyle factors related to diet, exercise, and substance (such as alcohol and tobacco) use. Too often, program development and evaluation are not adequately linked to provide rapid feedback to health communication program developers so that important revisions can be made to design the most relevant and personally motivating health communication programs for specific audiences. Design science theory and methods commonly used in engineering, computer science, and other fields can address such program and evaluation weaknesses. Design science researchers study human-created programs using tightly connected build-and-evaluate loops in which they use intensive participatory methods to understand problems and develop solutions concurrently and throughout the duration of the program. Such thinking and strategies are especially relevant to address complex health communication issues. In this article, the authors explore the history, scientific foundation, methods, and applications of design science and its potential to enhance health communication programs and their evaluation.

  5. Engagement in health and wellness: An online incentive-based program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Teresa B; Maclean, J Ross; Carls, Ginger S; Moore, Brian J; Ehrlich, Emily D; Fener, Victoria; Goldberg, Jordan; Mechanic, Elaine; Baigel, Colin

    2017-09-01

    Increasingly, corporate health promotion programs are implementing wellness programs integrating principles of behavioral economics. Employees of a large firm were provided a customized online incentive program to design their own commitments to meet health goals. This study examines patterns of program participation and engagement in health promotion activities. Subjects were US-based employees of a large, nondurable goods manufacturing firm who were enrolled in corporate health benefits in 2010 and 2011. We assessed measures of engagement with the workplace health promotion program (e.g., incentive points earned, weight loss). To further examine behaviors indicating engagement in health promotion activities, we constructed an aggregate, employee-level engagement index. Regression models were employed to assess the association between employee characteristics and the engagement index, and the engagement index and spending. 4220 employees utilized the online program and made 25,716 commitments. Male employees age 18-34 had the highest level of engagement, and male employees age 55-64 had the lowest level of engagement overall. Prior year health status and prior year spending did not show a significant association with the level of engagement with the program ( p  > 0.05). Flexible, incentive-based behavioral health and lifestyle programs may reach the broader workforce including those with chronic conditions and higher levels of health spending.

  6. Engagement in health and wellness: An online incentive-based program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa B. Gibson

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Increasingly, corporate health promotion programs are implementing wellness programs integrating principles of behavioral economics. Employees of a large firm were provided a customized online incentive program to design their own commitments to meet health goals. This study examines patterns of program participation and engagement in health promotion activities. Subjects were US-based employees of a large, nondurable goods manufacturing firm who were enrolled in corporate health benefits in 2010 and 2011. We assessed measures of engagement with the workplace health promotion program (e.g., incentive points earned, weight loss. To further examine behaviors indicating engagement in health promotion activities, we constructed an aggregate, employee-level engagement index. Regression models were employed to assess the association between employee characteristics and the engagement index, and the engagement index and spending. 4220 employees utilized the online program and made 25,716 commitments. Male employees age 18–34 had the highest level of engagement, and male employees age 55–64 had the lowest level of engagement overall. Prior year health status and prior year spending did not show a significant association with the level of engagement with the program (p > 0.05. Flexible, incentive-based behavioral health and lifestyle programs may reach the broader workforce including those with chronic conditions and higher levels of health spending.

  7. Increasing health insurance coverage through an extended Federal Employees Health Benefits Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, B C

    2001-01-01

    The Federal Employees Health Benefits Program (FEHBP) could be combined with health insurance tax credits to extend coverage to the uninsured. An extended FEHBP, or "E-FEHBP," would be open to all individuals who were not covered through work or public programs and who also were eligible for the tax credits on the basis of income. E-FEHBP also would be open to employees of very small firms, regardless of their eligibility for tax credits. Most plans available to FEHBP participants would be required to offer enrollment to E-FEHBP participants, although premiums would be rated separately. High-risk individuals would be diverted to a separate high-risk pool, the cost of which would be subsidized by the federal government. E-FEHBP would be administered by the states, or if a state declined, by an entity that contracted with the Office of Personnel Management. While E-FEHBP would provide group insurance to people who otherwise could not get it, premiums could exceed the tax-credit amount and some people still might find the coverage unaffordable.

  8. [The Articulator of Primary Health Care Program: an innovative proposal for qualification of Primary Health Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doricci, Giovanna Cabral; Guanaes-Lorenzi, Carla; Pereira, Maria José Bistafa

    2017-06-01

    In 2009, the Secretary of State for Health of Sao Paulo created a Program with a view to qualify the primary care in the state. This proposal includes a new job function, namely the articulator of primary care. Due to the scarcity of information about the practice of these new professionals in the scientific literature, this article seeks to analyze how articulators interpret their function and how they describe their daily routines. Thirteen articulators were interviewed. The interviews were duly analyzed by qualitative delineation. The results describe three themes: 1)Roles of the articulator: technical communicator and political advisor; 2) Activities performed to comply with the expected roles, examples being diagnosis of the municipalities, negotiation of proposals, participation in meetings, visits to municipalities; and 3) Challenges of the role, which are configured as challenges to the health reform process, examples being the lack of physical and human resources, activities of professionals in the medical-centered model, among others. The conclusion drawn is that the Program has great potential to provide input for the development and enhancement of Primary Care. Nevertheless, there are a series of challenges to be overcome, namely challenges to the context per se.

  9. Addressing the Health and Wellness Needs of Vulnerable Rockaway Residents in the Wake of Hurricane Sandy: Findings From a Health Coaching and Community Health Worker Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, David; Oberlink, Mia R; Shah, Shivani; Evans, Lauren; Bassuk, Karen

    To describe the design and participants of a program that employed health coaches and community health workers to address the social, health, and long-term disaster recovery needs of Rockaway residents roughly 2 years after Hurricane Sandy made landfall. Baseline and exit questionnaires, containing demographic, health, and health care utilization measures, were administered to participants at the start and end of the program. Enrollment and encounter information was captured in program administrative records. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize participant characteristics, personal goals, referrals to local organizations and agencies, and outcomes. Qualitative analyses were used to identify recurring themes in challenges faced by participants and barriers to health and wellness. The program served 732 community residents, of whom 455 (62%) completed baseline and exit questionnaires. Participants were directly and/or indirectly impacted by Hurricane Sandy through property damage, closures of health care facilities, limited employment opportunities, and trouble securing affordable housing. Furthermore, many participants faced considerable adversities and struggled to manage chronic health conditions. Personal goals set by participants included locating health care and other resources (44%), weight management and healthy eating (35%), and self-management of chronic conditions (24%). Health coaches and community health workers engaged participants an average of 4 times-providing counseling and referrals to local organizations and services, including medical and dental services (29%), city-issued identification cards (27%), and health insurance and other entitlements (23%). Comparisons of baseline and exit surveys indicated significant improvements in self-reported health, health care utilization, and confidence managing health issues. No significant improvement was observed in the use of preventive health care services. The program represents a model for

  10. Programs to improve adolescent sexual and reproductive health in the US: a review of the evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manlove J

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Jennifer Manlove, Heather Fish, Kristin Anderson Moore Child Trends, Bethesda, MD, USA Background: US adolescents have high rates of teen pregnancy, childbearing, and sexually transmitted infections (STIs, highlighting the need to identify and implement effective programs that will help improve teen sexual and reproductive health. Materials and methods: This review identified 103 random-assignment evaluations of 85 programs that incorporated intent-to-treat analyses and assessed impacts on pregnancy, childbearing, STIs, and their key determinants – sexual activity, number of sexual partners, condom use, and other contraceptive use – among teens. This review describes the evidence base for five broad program approaches, including abstinence education, comprehensive sex education, clinic-based programs, youth development programs, and parent–youth relationship programs. We also describe programs with impacts on key outcomes, including pregnancy/childbearing, STIs, and those that found impacts on both sexual activity and contraceptive use. Results: Our review identified 52 effective programs: 38 with consistent impacts on reproductive health outcomes, and 14 with mixed findings (across subpopulations, follow-ups, or multiple measures of a single outcome. We found that a variety of program approaches produced impacts on sexual and reproductive health outcomes. Parent–youth relationship programs and clinic-based program evaluations more frequently showed impacts than other program approaches, although we also identified a number of abstinence-education, comprehensive sex education, and youth-development programs with impacts on sexual and reproductive health outcomes. Overall, we identified nine program evaluations with impacts on teen pregnancies or births, five with impacts on reducing STIs, and 15 with impacts on both delaying/reducing sexual activity and increasing contraceptive use (including condom use. Conclusion: Future efforts should

  11. Cultivating a community of practice: the evolution of a health information specialists program for public librarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton, Shari; Jo, Phill; Longo, Jean Marie; Malone, Tara

    2017-07-01

    To help improve the culture of health in Oklahoma-a state that frequently ranks poorly on multiple measures of health and wellness-faculty librarians from an academic health sciences library sought to create a collaborative network of health information professionals in Oklahoma's public libraries through the implementation of the Health Information Specialists Program. Health sciences librarians offered a variety of consumer health information courses for public library staff across the state of Oklahoma for three years. Courses were approved by the Medical Library Association for credit toward the Consumer Health Information Specialization. A total of seventy-two participants from public libraries attended the courses, sixty-five achieved a Level I Consumer Health Information Specialization, and nine went on to achieve Level II. Feedback from participants in the Health Information Specialists Program has indicated a positive impact on the health information expertise of participants, who in turn have used the knowledge that they gained to help their patrons.

  12. National findings regarding health IT use and participation in health care delivery reform programs among office-based physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisey-Grove, Dawn; Patel, Vaishali

    2017-01-01

    Our objective was to characterize physicians' participation in delivery and payment reform programs over time and describe how participants in these programs were using health information technology (IT) to coordinate care, engage patients, manage patient populations, and improve quality. A nationally representative cohort of physicians was surveyed in 2012 (unweighted N = 2567) and 2013 (unweighted N = 2399). Regression analyses used those survey responses to identify associations between health IT use and participation in and attrition from patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs), accountable care organizations (ACOs), and pay-for-performance programs (P4Ps). In 2013, 45% of physicians participated in PCMHs, ACOs, or P4Ps. While participation in each program increased (P payment reform programs increased between 2012 and 2013. Participating physicians were more likely to use health IT. There was significant attrition from and switching between PCMHs, ACOs, and P4Ps. This work provides the basis for understanding physician participation in and attrition from delivery and payment reform programs, as well as how health IT was used to support those programs. Understanding health IT use by program participants may help to identify factors enabling a smooth transition to alternative payment models. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association 2016. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the United States.

  13. The Evolution of an Innovative Community-Engaged Health Navigator Program to Address Social Determinants of Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page-Reeves, Janet; Moffett, Maurice L; Steimel, Leah; Smith, Daryl T

    Health navigators and other types of community health workers (CHWs) have become recognized as essential components of quality care, and key for addressing health disparities owing to the complex health care services landscape presents almost insurmountable challenges for vulnerable individuals. Bernalillo County, New Mexico, has high rates of uninsurance, poverty, and food insecurity. The design of the Pathways to a Healthy Bernalillo County Program (BP) has evolved innovations that are unique in terms of program stability and security, expansive reach, and community capacity across six domains: sustainable public mechanism for program funding, involvement of community organizations in designing the program, expanded focus to address the broader social determinants of health with targeted outreach, an integrated, community-based implementation structure, an outcomes-based payment structure, and using an adaptive program design that actively incorporates navigators in the process. In 2008, the Pathways to a Healthy Bernalillo County Program (BP), located in the Albuquerque metropolitan area in central New Mexico, was established to provide navigation and support for the most vulnerable county residents. BP is funded through a 1% carve out of county mill levy funds. The pathways model is an outcome-based approach for health and social services coordination that uses culturally competent CHW as "navigators" trained to connect at-risk individuals to needed health and social services. One of the important innovations of the pathways approach is a shift in focus from merely providing discrete services to confirming healthy outcomes for the individual patient.

  14. Effects of a Program to Improve Mental Health Literacy for Married Immigrant Women in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yun-Jung

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to develop and evaluate a mental health improvement program for the acculturative stress and mental health literacy of married immigrant women using bilingual gatekeepers. Bilingual gatekeepers were recruited from multicultural centers and trained to provide 8-week structured mental health improvement services to the women in the experimental group using a mental health improvement guidebook developed by the authors in 8 different languages. The program was effective in improving mental health and mental health literacy scores as well as reducing the degree of acculturative stress. This study offers a model of effective mental healthcare for multicultural communities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The Children's Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act Evaluation Findings on Children's Health Insurance Coverage in an Evolving Health Care Landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Mary E

    2015-01-01

    The Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) Reauthorization Act (CHIPRA) reauthorized CHIP through federal fiscal year 2019 and, together with provisions in the Affordable Care Act, federal funding for the program was extended through federal fiscal year 2015. Congressional action is required or federal funding for the program will end in September 2015. This supplement to Academic Pediatrics is intended to inform discussions about CHIP's future. Most of the new research presented comes from a large evaluation of CHIP mandated by Congress in the CHIPRA. Since CHIP started in 1997, millions of lower-income children have secured health insurance coverage and needed care, reducing the financial burdens and stress on their families. States made substantial progress in simplifying enrollment and retention. When implemented optimally, Express Lane Eligibility has the potential to help cover more of the millions of eligible children who remain uninsured. Children move frequently between Medicaid and CHIP, and many experienced a gap in coverage with this transition. CHIP enrollees had good access to care. For nearly every health care access, use, care, and cost measure examined, CHIP enrollees fared better than uninsured children. Access in CHIP was similar to private coverage for most measures, but financial burdens were substantially lower and access to weekend and nighttime care was not as good. The Affordable Care Act coverage options have the potential to reduce uninsured rates among children, but complex transition issues must first be resolved to ensure families have access to affordable coverage, leading many stakeholders to recommend funding for CHIP be continued. Copyright © 2015 Academic Pediatric Association. All rights reserved.

  16. Improving bovine udder health: A national mastitis control program in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lam, T.J.G.M.; Borne, van den B.H.P.; Jansen, J.; Huijps, K.; Veersen, J.C.L.; Schaick, van G.; Hogeveen, H.

    2013-01-01

    Because of increasing bulk milk somatic cell counts and continuous clinical mastitis problems in a substantial number of herds, a national mastitis control program was started in 2005 to improve udder health in the Netherlands. The program started with founding the Dutch Udder Health Centre (UGCN),

  17. Does Information Improve the Health Behavior of Adults Targeted by a Conditional Transfer Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avitabile, Ciro

    2012-01-01

    We use data from the evaluation sample of Mexico's Food Assistance Program (PAL) to study whether including the attendance at health and nutrition classes among the requirements for receiving a transfer affects the health behavior of adults living in localities targeted by the program. The experimental trial has four different treatment types,…

  18. Experiences of School Teachers on Participation in a Brief School Mental Health Program: A Qualitative Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrinivasa, Basavaraj; Reshma, B. K.; Virupaksha, H. G.; Chaithra, Chandrakanth; Vidya, Naik; Nithyananda, S.; Joseph Arthur, Julian Anthony; Amaresha, Anekal C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: School mental health programs (SMHPs) aim to strengthen school teachers' understanding about issues related to child and adolescent mental health and their management. Many studies have looked at outcomes of such programs quantitatively. However, there is a lack of studies on the qualitative effects of SMHPs. With this in mind, the aim…

  19. Use of Mobile Technology for Monitoring and Evaluation in International Health and Development Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Kerry

    2013-01-01

    Background: Mobile phones and other technologies are widely used in health programming in developing countries, many introduced by international nongovernmental organizations (INGOs) to accelerate data collection. This research examined: How are INGOs adopting the innovation of mobile technology into M&E systems for health care programs in…

  20. 75 FR 81138 - Medicare Program; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for Calendar Year 2011...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-27

    ... [CMS-1510-CN2] RIN 0938-AP88 Medicare Program; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for... ``Medicare Program; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for Calendar Year 2011; Changes in... Prospective Payment System Rate Update for Calendar Year 2011; Changes in Certification Requirements for Home...

  1. 78 FR 18855 - World Trade Center Health Program Eligibility Requirements for Shanksville, Pennsylvania and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-28

    .... Public Participation III. Background A. WTC Health Program History B. Statutory Authority C. Summary of... may revise the final rule as appropriate. III. Background A. WTC Health Program History After the... the Pentagon within the first 8 hours of the terrorist- related plane crash. Response activities...

  2. Evaluation of an Online Youth Ambassador Program to Promote Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beamish, Nicola; Cannan, Philippa; Fujiyama, Hakuei; Matthews, Allison; Spiranovic, Caroline; Briggs, Kate; Kirkby, Kenneth; Mobsby, Caroline; Daniels, Brett

    2011-01-01

    This article presents results of an evaluation of an online Youth Ambassador (YA) program designed to promote internet resources for mental health in an adolescent population. Results suggest that an online YA program delivered in school is useful in improving mental health awareness for workshop participants. (Contains 1 table.)

  3. Employee assistance programs: an alternative resource for mental health service delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santa-Barbara, J

    1984-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a very brief introduction to employee assistance programs (EAPs) and their role in the mental health delivery system. In addition, some consideration will be given to the opportunity these programs offer for making a significant impact on both the mental health of Canadians and the productivity of Canadian business.

  4. Evaluating Youth Sexual Health Peer Education Programs: "Challenges and Suggestions for Effective Evaluation Practices"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworsky, Denise; Larkin, June; Sriranganathan, Gobika; Clout, Jerri; Janssen, Jesse; Campbell, Lisa; Flicker, Sarah; Stadnicki, Dan; Erlich, Leah; Flynn, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Although peer sexual health education is a common form of sexual health promotion for youth, systematic reviews of these programs are relatively rare. In this study we interviewed youth peer educators to inquire about their experience of program evaluation and their perception of what is needed to develop effective evaluation practices. Data were…

  5. Federal Employees Health Benefits Program and Federal Employees Dental and Vision Insurance Program: eligibility for Pathway Programs participants. Interim final rule with request for comments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-06

    The U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM) is issuing an interim final regulation to update the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program (FEHBP) and the Federal Employees Dental and Vision Insurance Program (FEDVIP) regulations to reflect updated election opportunities for participants in the Pathways Programs. The Pathways Programs were created by Executive Order (E.O.) 13562, signed by the President on December 27, 2010, and are designed to enable the Federal Government to compete effectively for students and recent graduates by improving its recruitment efforts through internships and similar programs with Federal agencies. This interim final rule furthers these recruitment and retention efforts by providing health insurance, as well as dental and vision benefits, to eligible program participants and their families.

  6. Planning for the next generation of public health advocates: evaluation of an online advocacy mentoring program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Emily; Stoneham, Melissa; Saunders, Julie

    2016-04-01

    Issue addressed Despite being viewed as a core competency for public health professionals, public health advocacy lacks a prominent place in the public health literature and receives minimal coverage in university curricula. The Public Health Advocacy Institute of Western Australia (PHAIWA) sought to fill this gap by establishing an online e-mentoring program for public health professionals to gain knowledge through skill-based activities and engaging in a mentoring relationship with an experienced public health advocate. This study is a qualitative evaluation of the online e-mentoring program. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with program participants at the conclusion of the 12-month program to examine program benefits and determine the perceived contribution of individual program components to overall advocacy outcomes. Results Increased mentee knowledge, skills, level of confidence and experience, and expanded public health networks were reported. Outcomes were dependent on participants' level of commitment, time and location barriers, mentoring relationship quality, adaptability to the online format and the relevance of activities for application to participants' workplace context. Program facilitators had an important role through the provision of timely feedback and maintaining contact with participants. Conclusion An online program that combines public health advocacy content via skill-based activities with mentoring from an experienced public health advocate is a potential strategy to build advocacy capacity in the public health workforce. So what? Integrating advocacy as a core component of professional development programs will help counteract current issues surrounding hesitancy by public health professionals to proactively engage in advocacy, and ensure that high quality, innovative and effective advocacy leadership continues in the Australian public health workforce.

  7. Influence of a screening navigation program on social inequalities in health beliefs about colorectal cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallet, Fanny; Guillaume, Elodie; Dejardin, Olivier; Guittet, Lydia; Bouvier, Véronique; Mignon, Astrid; Berchi, Célia; Salinas, Agnès; Launoy, Guy; Christophe, Véronique

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the study was to test whether a screening navigation program leads to more favorable health beliefs and decreases social inequalities in them. The selected 261 noncompliant participants in a screening navigation versus a usual screening program arm had to respond to health belief measures inspired by the Protection Motivation Theory. Regression analyses showed that social inequalities in perceived efficacy of screening, favorable attitude, and perceived facility were reduced in the screening navigation compared to the usual screening program. These results highlight the importance of health beliefs to understand the mechanism of screening navigation programs in reducing social inequalities. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Education projects: an opportunity for student fieldwork in global health academic programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyfe, Molly V

    2012-01-01

    Universities, especially in higher-income countries, increasingly offer programs in global health. These programs provide different types of fieldwork projects, at home and abroad, including: epidemiological research, community health, and clinical electives. I illustrate how and why education projects offer distinct learning opportunities for global health program fieldwork. As University of California students, we partnered in Tanzania with students from Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Science (MUHAS) to assist MUHAS faculty with a curricular project. We attended classes, clinical rounds, and community outreach sessions together, where we observed teaching, materials used, and the learning environment; and interviewed and gathered data from current students, alumni, and health professionals during a nationwide survey. We learned together about education of health professionals and health systems in our respective institutions. On the basis of this experience, I suggest some factors that contribute to the productivity of educational projects as global health fieldwork.

  9. Navigating the Leadership Landscape: Creating an Inventory to Identify Leadership Education Programs for Health Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gertler, Matthew; Verma, Sarita; Tassone, Maria; Seltzer, Jane; Careau, Emmanuelle

    2015-01-01

    As health systems become increasingly complex, there is growing emphasis on collaborative leadership education for health system change. The Canadian Interprofessional Health Leadership Collaborative conducted research on this phenomenon through a scoping and systematic review of the health leadership literature, key informant interviews and an inventory of health leadership programs in Canada. The inventory is unique, accounting for educational programming missed by traditional scholarly literature reviews. A major finding is that different health professions have access to health leadership education in different stages of their careers. This pioneering inventory suggests that needs may differ between health professions but also that there is a growing demand for multiple types of programs for specific targeted audiences, and a strategic need for collaborative leadership education in healthcare.

  10. Intervention mapping: a process for developing theory- and evidence-based health education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomew, L K; Parcel, G S; Kok, G

    1998-10-01

    The practice of health education involves three major program-planning activities: needs assessment, program development, and evaluation. Over the past 20 years, significant enhancements have been made to the conceptual base and practice of health education. Models that outline explicit procedures and detailed conceptualization of community assessment and evaluation have been developed. Other advancements include the application of theory to health education and promotion program development and implementation. However, there remains a need for more explicit specification of the processes by which one uses theory and empirical findings to develop interventions. This article presents the origins, purpose, and description of Intervention Mapping, a framework for health education intervention development. Intervention Mapping is composed of five steps: (1) creating a matrix of proximal program objectives, (2) selecting theory-based intervention methods and practical strategies, (3) designing and organizing a program, (4) specifying adoption and implementation plans, and (5) generating program evaluation plans.

  11. [Organization and functioning of health services of the IMSS-Solidaridad program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez-Díaz, G

    1992-01-01

    In this report the organization and performance of the IMSS-Solidaridad Program of Mexico is described. This program is managed by the Mexican Institute for Social Security, which services 10.5 million inhabitants of the rural underserved areas, with federal government resources in 18 states. This study compares the structure and functioning of the IMSS-Solidaridad Program with Local Health Systems, as they have been proposed by the Panamerican Health Organization for country members and by the Ministry of Health of Mexico, particularly in relation to the decision-making process at local level. Some assets and limitations of the IMSS-Solidaridad Program are analyzed and, finally, concrete procedures to improve coordination between the IMSS-Solidaridad Program and other health services for similar populations (populations without social security protection) in Mexico are suggested, with the purpose of using resources more adequately and succeed in the national goal to achieve equity in health.

  12. The Role of Occupational Therapy in Community-Based Programming: Addressing Childhood Health Promotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Kugel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Obesity and poor health habits impact youth’s health and occupational participation. Occupational therapy’s role in preventing and treating obesity continues to emerge in the research literature. This article explores the impact of a community-based program emphasizing health and wellness for female youth. Methods: Five girls 11 to 13 years of age participated in the healthy occupations program. Before and after the program, the participants engaged in an individual semi-structured interview and completed the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure and the CATCH Kids Club Questionnaire. The youth participated in a focus group midprogram. Results: The participants were receptive to information regarding healthy behaviors and initiated positive health behavior changes after implementation of a 7-week healthy lifestyle community- based program. Conclusion: Occupational therapy can collaborate with community partners to provide programming focused on health promotion and prevention as part of the interprofessional approach to preventing and treating childhood obesity and building healthier communities.

  13. Seven health physics calculator programs for the HP-41CV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rittmann, P.D.

    1984-08-01

    Several user-oriented programs for the Hewlett-Packard HP-41CV are explained. The first program builds, stores, alters, and ages a list of radionuclides. This program only handles single- and double-decay chains. The second program performs convenient conversions for the six nuclides of concern in plutonium handling. The conversions are between mass, activity, and weight percents of the isotopes. The source can be aged and/or neutron generation rates can be computed. The third program is a timekeeping program that improves the process of manually estimating and tracking personnel exposure during high dose rate tasks by replacing the pencil, paper, and stopwatch method. This program requires a time module. The remaining four programs deal with computations of time-integrated air concentrations at various distances from an airborne release. Building wake effects, source depletion by ground deposition, and sector averaging can all be included in the final printout of the X/Q - Hanford and X/Q - Pasquill programs. The shorter versions of these, H/Q and P/Q, compute centerline or sector-averaged values and include a subroutine to facilitate dose estimation by entering dose factors and quantities released. The horizontal and vertical dispersion parameters in the Pasquill-Gifford programs were modeled with simple, two-parameter functions that agreed very well with the usual textbook graphs. 8 references, 7 appendices

  14. Military Health System Utilization Management Program at Medical Centers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1998-01-01

    .... This audit topic was the result of a coordinated effort by the Joint Audit Planning Group for Health Care and representatives from the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health Affairs) (OASD(HA...

  15. Process Evaluation of a Workers' Health Surveillance Program for Meat Processing Workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Holland, Berry J; Brouwer, Sandra; de Boer, Michiel R; Reneman, Michiel F; Soer, Remko

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the implementation process of a workers' health surveillance (WHS) program in a Dutch meat processing company. Methods Workers from five plants were eligible to participate in the WHS program. The program consisted of four evaluative components and an intervention component.

  16. Process Evaluation of a Workers' Health Surveillance Program for Meat Processing Workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Holland, Berry; Brouwer, Sandra; de Boer, Michiel R; Reneman, Michiel F; Soer, Remko

    Objective To evaluate the implementation process of a workers' health surveillance (WHS) program in a Dutch meat processing company. Methods Workers from five plants were eligible to participate in the WHS program. The program consisted of four evaluative components and an intervention component.

  17. A Model for Mental Health Programming in Schools and Communities: Introduction to the Mini-Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nastasi, Bonnie K.

    1998-01-01

    Describes conceptual framework for mini-series on mental health programming. Model includes five components considered to be critical for comprehensive and effective programming. Components include: action research, ecological perspective of program development, collaborative/participatory approach, prevention to treatment via mental health…

  18. Innovation in Rehabilitation Services and Clinical Programs for Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asghar Dadkhah

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Rehabilitation program is a critical piece of clinical care strategy in order to accelerate healing and improve quality of life to the fullest extent possible. An innovated program should have 3 inspiring concepts: Seek inspire and Advance. Seeking and evaluating is a breakthrough technology, innovative methodology and emerging trend in the healthcare industry. The program should inspire clinicians to critically evaluate and implement the highest standards of care. Also an innovated program should advance clinical program development to maximize opportunities for first to market positioning and community partnerships. The scope of program can be from psycho-rehabilitation to predictor in addiction (1-3, Cognitive and motor rehabilitation researchers are quite concerned about system wide biases that may impair development of innovative rehabilitation techniques. In this issue ....

  19. Abstract: Workplace Setting of Mental Health Nursing Program ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The department of Mental Health Nursing (MHN) at the University of Rwanda was founded in 1998.Until that time, Rwanda had faced a huge shortage of mental health professionals; specifically, there were 1 psychiatrist, 3 mental health nurses and very few clinical psychologists (less than 5) in the country.

  20. Implementing an overdose education and naloxone distribution program in a health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devries, Jennifer; Rafie, Sally; Polston, Gregory

    To design and implement a health system-wide program increasing provision of take-home naloxone in patients at risk for opioid overdose, with the downstream aim of reducing fatalities. The program includes health care professional education and guidelines, development, and dissemination of patient education materials, electronic health record changes to promote naloxone prescriptions, and availability of naloxone in pharmacies. Academic health system, San Diego, California. University of California, San Diego Health (UCSDH), offers both inpatient and outpatient primary care and specialty services with 563 beds spanning 2 hospitals and 6 pharmacies. UCSDH is part of the University of California health system, and it serves as the county's safety net hospital. In January 2016, a multisite academic health system initiated a system-wide overdose education and naloxone distribution program to prevent opioid overdose and opioid overdose-related deaths. An interdisciplinary, interdepartmental team came together to develop and implement the program. To strengthen institutional support, naloxone prescribing guidelines were developed and approved for the health system. Education on naloxone for physicians, pharmacists, and nurses was provided through departmental trainings, bulletins, and e-mail notifications. Alerts in the electronic health record and preset naloxone orders facilitated co-prescribing of naloxone with opioid prescriptions. Electronic health record reports captured naloxone prescriptions ordered. Summary reports on the electronic health record measured naloxone reminder alerts and response rates. Since the start of the program, the health system has trained 252 physicians, pharmacists, and nurses in overdose education and take-home naloxone. There has been an increase in the number of prescriptions for naloxone from a baseline of 4.5 per month to an average of 46 per month during the 3 months following full implementation of the program including

  1. Implementation of a National Workplace Wellness Program for Health Workers in Botswana

    OpenAIRE

    Ledikwe, Jenny H.; Semo, Bazghina-werq; Sebego, Miram; Mpho, Maureen; Mothibedi, Heather; Mawandia, Shreshth; O?Malley, Gabrielle

    2017-01-01

    The Botswana workplace wellness program (WWP) for health care workers (HCWs) was initiated in 2007. WWP implementation was assessed using a sequential, explanatory, mixed methods design including a national implementation assessment (27 health districts) and in-depth interviews (n?=?38). Level of implementation varied across districts with health screening, therapeutic recreation, and health promotion implemented more frequently than occupational health activities and psychosocial services. F...

  2. Oral health knowledge and attitudes of primary school teachers toward school-based oral health programs in Abha-Khamis, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreyas Tikare

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: The oral health knowledge among primary school teachers was found to be good with positive attitudes toward school-based oral health programs. The most significant barriers in implementing a school oral health program were administrative barriers. There is a need for concerned school authorities and health policy makers to address these barriers and to promote oral health in the community.

  3. Veteran participation in the integrative health and wellness program: Impact on self-reported mental and physical health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Amanda; Brooks Holliday, Stephanie; Eickhoff, Christine; Sullivan, Patrick; Courtney, Rena; Sossin, Kayla; Adams, Alyssa; Reinhard, Matthew

    2018-04-05

    Complementary and integrative health (CIH) services are being used more widely across the nation, including in both military and veteran hospital settings. Literature suggests that a variety of CIH services show promise in treating a wide range of physical and mental health disorders. Notably, the Department of Veterans Affairs is implementing CIH services within the context of a health care transformation, changing from disease based health care to a personalized, proactive, patient-centered approach where the veteran, not the disease, is at the center of care. This study examines self-reported physical and mental health outcomes associated with participation in the Integrative Health and Wellness Program, a comprehensive CIH program at the Washington DC VA Medical Center and one of the first wellbeing programs of its kind within the VA system. Using a prospective cohort design, veterans enrolled in the Integrative Health and Wellness Program filled out self-report measures of physical and mental health throughout program participation, including at enrollment, 12 weeks, and 6 months. Analyses revealed that veterans reported significant improvements in their most salient symptoms of concern (primarily pain or mental health symptoms), physical quality of life, wellbeing, and ability to participate in valued activities at follow-up assessments. These results illustrate the potential of CIH services, provided within a comprehensive clinic focused on wellbeing not disease, to improve self-reported health, wellbeing, and quality of life in a veteran population. Additionally, data support recent VA initiatives to increase the range of CIH services available and the continued growth of wellbeing programs within VA settings. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. A review of positive youth development programs that promote adolescent sexual and reproductive health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavin, Loretta E; Catalano, Richard F; David-Ferdon, Corinne; Gloppen, Kari M; Markham, Christine M

    2010-03-01

    Positive youth development (PYD) may be a promising strategy for promoting adolescent health. A systematic review of the published data was conducted to identify and describe PYD programs that improve adolescent sexual and reproductive health. Eight databases were searched for articles about PYD programs published between 1985 and 2007. Programs included met the following criteria: fostered at least one of 12 PYD goals in multiple socialization domains (i.e., family, school, community) or addressed two or more goals in at least one socialization domain; allocated at least half of the program activities to promoting general PYD outcomes (as compared with a focus on direct sexual health content); included youth younger than 20 years old; and used an experimental or quasi-experimental evaluation design. Thirty programs met the inclusion criteria, 15 of which had evidence of improving at least one adolescent sexual and reproductive health outcome. Program effects were moderate and well-sustained. Program goals addressed by approximately 50% or more of the effective programs included promoting prosocial bonding, cognitive competence, social competence, emotional competence, belief in the future, and self-determination. Effective programs were significantly more likely than those that did not have an impact to strengthen the school context and to deliver activities in a supportive atmosphere. Effective programs were also more likely to build skills, enhance bonding, strengthen the family, engage youth in real roles and activities, empower youth, communicate expectations, and be stable and relatively long-lasting, although these differences between effective and ineffective programs were not statistically significant. PYD programs can promote adolescent sexual and reproductive health, and tested, effective PYD programs should be part of a comprehensive approach to promoting adolescent health. However, more research is needed before a specific list of program

  5. National program for family planning and primary health care Pakistan: a SWOT analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wazir, Mohammad Salim; Shaikh, Babar Tasneem; Ahmed, Ashfaq

    2013-11-22

    The National Program for Family Planning and Primary Healthcare was launched in 1994. It is one of the largest community based programs in the world, providing primary healthcare services to about 80 million people, most of which is rural poor. The program has been instrumental in improving health related indicators of maternal and child health in the last two decades. SWOT analysis was used by making recourse to the structure and dynamics of the program as well as searching the literature. Strengths of the program include: comprehensive design of planning, implementation and supervision mechanisms aided by an MIS, selection and recruitments processes and evidence created through improving health impact indicators. Weaknesses identified are slow progress, poor integration of the program with health services at local levels including MIS, and de-motivational factors such as job insecurity and non-payment of salaries in time. Opportunities include further widening the coverage of services, its potential contribution to health system research, and its use in areas other than health like women empowerment and poverty alleviation. Threats the program may face are: political interference, lack of funds, social threats and implications for professional malpractices. Strengthening of the program will necessitate a strong political commitment, sustained funding and a just remuneration to this bare foot doctor of Pakistan, the Lady Health Worker.

  6. Prevalence and Predictors of Mental Health Programming Among U.S. Religious Congregations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Eunice C; Fulton, Brad R; Derose, Kathryn P

    2018-02-01

    This study assessed the prevalence of and factors associated with congregation-based programming in support of people with mental illness. To estimate the proportion of congregations that provide mental health programming, this study reports analyses of survey responses from the 2012 National Congregations Study, a nationally representative survey of religious congregations in the United States (N=1,327). The analysis used multivariate logistic regression to identify congregational characteristics associated with the provision of mental health programming. Nearly one in four U.S. congregations (23%) provided some type of programming to support people with mental illness. Approximately 31% of all attendees belonged to a congregation that provided mental health programming. Congregational characteristics associated with providing mental health programming included having more members and having members with higher incomes, employing staff for social service programs, and providing health-focused programs. Other significant predictors included engaging with the surrounding community (that is, conducting community needs assessments and hosting speakers from social service organizations) and being located in a predominantly African-American community. Greater coordination between mental health providers and congregations with programs that support people with mental illness could foster more integrated and holistic care, which in turn may lead to improved recovery outcomes.

  7. Workplace Financial Wellness Programs Help Employees Manage Health Care Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Cynthia; Smith, Michael C

    Employers and employees are navigating major changes in health insurance benefits, including the move to high-deductible health plans in conjunction with health savings accounts (HSAs). The HSA offers unique benefits that could prove instrumental in helping workers both navigate current health care expenses and build a nest egg for much larger health care costs in retirement. Yet employees often don't understand the HSA and how to best use it. How can employers help employees make wise benefits choices that work for their personal financial circumstances?

  8. Programs to improve adolescent sexual and reproductive health in the US: a review of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manlove, Jennifer; Fish, Heather; Moore, Kristin Anderson

    2015-01-01

    US adolescents have high rates of teen pregnancy, childbearing, and sexually transmitted infections (STIs), highlighting the need to identify and implement effective programs that will help improve teen sexual and reproductive health. This review identified 103 random-assignment evaluations of 85 programs that incorporated intent-to-treat analyses and assessed impacts on pregnancy, childbearing, STIs, and their key determinants - sexual activity, number of sexual partners, condom use, and other contraceptive use - among teens. This review describes the evidence base for five broad program approaches, including abstinence education, comprehensive sex education, clinic-based programs, youth development programs, and parent-youth relationship programs. We also describe programs with impacts on key outcomes, including pregnancy/childbearing, STIs, and those that found impacts on both sexual activity and contraceptive use. Our review identified 52 effective programs: 38 with consistent impacts on reproductive health outcomes, and 14 with mixed findings (across subpopulations, follow-ups, or multiple measures of a single outcome). We found that a variety of program approaches produced impacts on sexual and reproductive health outcomes. Parent-youth relationship programs and clinic-based program evaluations more frequently showed impacts than other program approaches, although we also identified a number of abstinence-education, comprehensive sex education, and youth-development programs with impacts on sexual and reproductive health outcomes. Overall, we identified nine program evaluations with impacts on teen pregnancies or births, five with impacts on reducing STIs, and 15 with impacts on both delaying/reducing sexual activity and increasing contraceptive use (including condom use). Future efforts should conduct replications of existing program evaluations, identify implementation components linked to impacts, rigorously evaluate programs that appear promising, and

  9. The Health Frontiers in Tijuana Undergraduate Internship Program: A Novel Global Health Experience in Mexico for Pre-medical/Pre-health Undergraduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos, Jose L; Yee, Daniel C; Vargas-Ojeda, Adriana Carolina; Ojeda, Victoria D

    2016-01-01

    We describe the creation of the Health Frontiers in Tijuana (HFiT) Undergraduate Internship Program (UIP), a novel global health experience for U.S. and Mexican undergraduate students based at the binational HFiT student-run free clinic. The UIP introduces students to a diverse underserved patient population, and U.S.-Mexico border public health.

  10. Advancing Care Within an Adult Mental Health Day Hospital: Program Re-Design and Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taube-Schiff, Marlene; Mehak, Adrienne; Marangos, Sandy; Kalim, Anastasia; Ungar, Thomas

    2017-11-13

    Day hospital mental health programs provide alternate care to individuals of high acuity that do not require an inpatient psychiatric stay. Ensuring provision of best practice within these programs is essential for patient stabilization and recovery. However, there is scant literature to review when creating such a program. This paper provides an overview of the steps an acute care hospital took when designing and implementing new programming within a day hospital program. Qualitative data was collected following initial program rollout. This data helped to inform the ongoing modification of groups offered, group scheduling and content, as well as ensuring patient satisfaction and adequate skill delivery during the rollout period and beyond. The goal of this paper is to inform health service delivery for other programs when attempting to build or re-design a day hospital program.

  11. 'teen Mental Health First Aid': a description of the program and an initial evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Laura M; Mason, Robert J; Kelly, Claire M; Cvetkovski, Stefan; Jorm, Anthony F

    2016-01-01

    Many adolescents have poor mental health literacy, stigmatising attitudes towards people with mental illness, and lack skills in providing optimal Mental Health First Aid to peers. These could be improved with training to facilitate better social support and increase appropriate help-seeking among adolescents with emerging mental health problems. teen Mental Health First Aid (teen MHFA), a new initiative of Mental Health First Aid International, is a 3 × 75 min classroom based training program for students aged 15-18 years. An uncontrolled pilot of the teen MHFA course was undertaken to examine the feasibility of providing the program in Australian secondary schools, to test relevant measures of student knowledge, attitudes and behaviours, and to provide initial evidence of program effects. Across four schools, 988 students received the teen MHFA program. 520 students with a mean age of 16 years completed the baseline questionnaire, 345 completed the post-test and 241 completed the three-month follow-up. Statistically significant improvements were found in mental health literacy, confidence in providing Mental Health First Aid to a peer, help-seeking intentions and student mental health, while stigmatising attitudes significantly reduced. teen MHFA appears to be an effective and feasible program for training high school students in Mental Health First Aid techniques. Further research is required with a randomized controlled design to elucidate the causal role of the program in the changes observed.

  12. A Student-Led Global Health Education Initiative: Reflections on the Kenyan Village Medical Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Christopher; Asquith, Heidi; Wren, Tom; Mercuri, Stephanie; Brownlow, Sian

    2016-01-01

    The Kenyan Village Medical Education Program is a student-led global health initiative that seeks to improve health outcomes in rural Kenya through culturally appropriate health education. The month-long program, which is organised by the Melbourne University Health Initiative (Australia), is conducted each January in southern rural Kenya. Significance for public health The Kenyan Village Medical Education (KVME) Program is a student-led global health initiative that involves exploring well-established strategies for the prevention of disease through workshops that are conducted in southern rural Kenya. These workshops are tailored to the unique needs and circumstances of rural Kenyan communities, and are delivered to community leaders, as well as to adults and children within the wider community. Aside from the KVME Program’s emphasis on reducing the burden of preventable disease through health education, the positive impact of the KVME Program on the Program’s student volunteers also deserves consideration. Throughout the month-long KVME Program, student volunteers are presented with opportunities to develop their understanding of cultural competency, the social and economic determinants of health, as well as the unique challenges associated with working in resource-poor communities. Importantly, the KVME Program also represents an avenue through which global health leadership can be fostered amongst student volunteers. PMID:27190974

  13. Contraceptive Health Programs for Adolescents: A Critical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagana, Luciana; Hayes, David M.

    1993-01-01

    Reviews some contraceptive education programs designed for adolescents that differ in educational process based on delivery setting. Reviews school-based, community-based, and college/university-based programs and discusses them in terms of their effectiveness, potential, and limitations. Notes that educational accountability in each setting…

  14. Family health nurse project--an education program of the World Health Organization: the University of Stirling experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Ian

    2008-11-01

    This article outlines the delivery of the Family Health Nurse Education Programme of the World Health Organization (WHO) at the University of Stirling, Scotland, from 2001 to 2005. The program was part of the WHO European Family Health Nurse pilot project. The curriculum outlined by the WHO Curriculum Planning Group detailed the broad thrust of the Family Health Nurse Education Programme and was modified to be responsive to the context in which it was delivered, while staying faithful to general principles and precepts. The Family Health Nurse Education Programme is described in its evolving format over the two phases of the project; the remote and rural context occurred from 2001 to 2003, and the modification of the program for the urban phase of the project occurred during 2004 and 2005. The conceptual framework that was foundational to the development of the curriculum to prepare family health nurses will be described.

  15. Understanding the decision-making process for health promotion programming at small to midsized businesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, M Courtney; Patrick, Donald L; Hannon, Peggy A; Harris, Jeffrey R; Ghosh, Donetta L

    2011-07-01

    This study explores the decision-making process for implementing and continuing health promotion programs at small to midsized businesses to inform health promotion practitioners and researchers as they market their services to these businesses. Qualitative interviews are conducted with 24 employers located in the Pacific Northwest ranging in size from 75 to 800 employees, with the majority having between 100 and 200 employees. Small to midsized employers depend most on company success-related factors rather than on humanitarian motives when deciding whether to adopt workplace health promotion programs. They rely heavily on health insurers for health promotion and desire more information about the actual costs and cost-benefits of programs. To increase health promotion adoption at small to midsized businesses, health promotion practitioners should appeal to overall company success-related factors, use the insurance channel, and target their information to both human resource personnel and senior management.

  16. [Do the practices developed in Family Health Program contribute to transform the present model of health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Helena Eri; Rosales, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to identify and analyze the main primary health care practices developed in the Family Health Care Program. Qualitative case study was carried out in the region of São Sebastião, DF. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with team workers and observation of the work process. The author concluded that diverse basic practices are developed in primary health care, but others practices focused in health care promotion are necessary in order to transform the health care model.

  17. Empowering primary care workers to improve health services: results from Mozambique's leadership and management development program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perry Cary

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This article is the third article in the Human Resources for Health journal's feature on the theme of leadership and management in public health. The series of six articles has been contributed by Management Sciences for Health (MSH and will be published article-by-article over the next few weeks. The third article presents a successful application in Mozambique of a leadership development program created by Management Sciences for Health (MSH. Through this program, managers from 40 countries have learned to work in teams to identify their priority challenges and act to implement effective responses. From 2003 to 2004, 11 health units in Nampula Province, participated in a leadership and management development program called the Challenges Program. This was following an assessment which found that the quality of health services was poor, and senior officials determined that the underlying cause was the lack of human resource capacity in leadership and management in a rapidly decentralizing health care system. The program was funded by the US Agency for International Development (USAID and implemented in partnership between the Mozambican Ministry of Health (MOH Provincial Directorate in Nampula and Management Sciences for Health (MSH. The Challenges Program used simple management and leadership tools to assist the health units and their communities to address health service challenges. An evaluation of the program in 2005 showed that 10 of 11 health centers improved health services over the year of the program. The Challenges Program used several strategies that contributed to successful outcomes. It integrated leadership strengthening into the day-to-day challenges that staff were facing in the health units. The second success factor in the Challenges Program was the creation of participatory teams. After the program, people no longer waited passively to be trained but instead proactively requested training in needed areas. MOH workers

  18. Feasibility and acceptability of a workers' health surveillance program for hospital physicians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruitenburg, Martijn M.; Plat, Marie-Christine J.; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.; Sluiter, Judith K.

    2015-01-01

    A Workers' Health Surveillance (WHS) program is an occupational health strategy used to detect and address the health of individual workers to improve their ability to work. This study aims to investigate the feasibility and acceptability of a new job-specific WHS for hospital physicians. All

  19. 76 FR 31272 - Permanent Certification Program for Health Information Technology; Revisions to ONC-Approved...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-31

    ... Permanent Certification Program for Health Information Technology; Revisions to ONC-Approved Accreditor Processes AGENCY: Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC), Department of... Coordinator for Health Information Technology (the National Coordinator) by section 3001(c)(5) of the Public...

  20. 77 FR 43127 - Federal Employees Health Benefits Program: Medically Underserved Areas for 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-23

    ... OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT Federal Employees Health Benefits Program: Medically Underserved... determination of the States that qualify as Medically Underserved Areas under the Federal Employees Health... law that mandates special consideration for enrollees of certain FEHB plans who receive covered health...

  1. 78 FR 50119 - Federal Employees Health Benefits Program: Medically Underserved Areas for 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ... OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT Federal Employees Health Benefits Program: Medically Underserved... determination of the states that qualify as Medically Underserved Areas under the Federal Employees Health... law that mandates special consideration for enrollees of certain FEHB plans who receive covered health...

  2. 76 FR 38281 - Federal Employees Health Benefits Program: New Premium Rating Method for Most Community Rated...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-29

    ... CFR Parts 1602, 1615, et al. Federal Employees Health Benefits Program: New Premium Rating Method for... Part 890; 48 CFR Parts 1602, 1615, 1632, and 1652 RIN 3206-AM39 Federal Employees Health Benefits..., 2011 (76 FR 36857). The document amends the Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) regulations at 5...

  3. The Coordinated School Health Program: Implementation in a Rural Elementary School District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kim H.; Bice, Matthew R.

    2014-01-01

    Child health is a complex issue that requires a comprehensive approach to address the many factors that influence it and are influenced by it. In light of the complexity of children's health, the Coordinated School Health Program (CSHP) was developed as a framework for a systems approach to planning and implementing school-based children's health…

  4. Accreditation of Professional Preparation Programs for School Health Educators: The Changing Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taub, Alyson; Goekler, Susan; Auld, M. Elaine; Birch, David A.; Muller, Susan; Wengert, Deitra; Allegrante, John P.

    2014-01-01

    The health education profession is committed to maintaining the highest standards of quality assurance, including accreditation of professional preparation programs in both school and community/public health education. Since 2001, the Society for Public Health Education (SOPHE) has increased attention to strengthening accreditation processes for…

  5. Florida Public Health Training Center: Evidence-Based Online Mentor Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frahm, Kathryn A.; Alsac-Seitz, Biray; Mescia, Nadine; Brown, Lisa M.; Hyer, Kathy; Liburd, Desiree; Rogoff, David P.; Troutman, Adewale

    2013-01-01

    This article describes an Online Mentor Program (OMP) designed to support and facilitate mentorships among and between Florida Department of Health (FDOH) employees and USF College of Public Health students using a Web-based portal. The Florida Public Health Training Center (FPHTC) at the University of South Florida (USF) College of Public Health…

  6. 77 FR 42914 - Federal Employees Health Benefits Program and Federal Employees Dental and Vision Insurance...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-20

    ... Federal Flexible Benefits Plan: Pre-Tax Payment of Health Benefits Premiums AGENCY: Office of Personnel... this proposed rule; and (4) update the Federal Flexible Benefits Plan: Pre-Tax Payment of Health...--FEDERAL FLEXIBLE BENEFITS PLAN: PRE-TAX PAYMENTS OF HEALTH BENEFITS PREMIUMS PROGRAM 8. The authority...

  7. 75 FR 18138 - Health Care Eligibility Under the Secretarial Designee Program and Related Special Authorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ... Component members not in a present duty status. This authority includes payment for health care services in... 0790-AI52] Health Care Eligibility Under the Secretarial Designee Program and Related Special... establish policies and assign responsibilities for health care eligibility under the Secretarial Designee...

  8. Rural and remote young people's health career decision making within a health workforce development program: a qualitative exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Koshila; Jones, Debra; Naden, Kathryn; Roberts, Chris

    2015-01-01

    One strategy aimed at resolving ongoing health workforce shortages in rural and remote settings has been to implement workforce development initiatives involving the early activation and development of health career aspirations and intentions among young people in these settings. This strategy aligns with the considerable evidence showing that rural background is a strong predictor of rural practice intentions and preferences. The Broken Hill Regional Health Career Academy Program (BHRHCAP) is an initiative aimed at addressing local health workforce challenges by helping young people in the region develop and further their health career aspirations and goals. This article reports the factors impacting on rural and remote youths' health career decision-making within the context of a health workforce development program. Data were collected using interviews and focus groups with a range of stakeholders involved in the BHRHCAP including local secondary school students, secondary school teachers, career advisors, school principals, parents, and pre-graduate health students undertaking a clinical placement in Broken Hill, and local clinicians. Data interpretation was informed by the theoretical constructs articulated within socio cognitive career theory. Young people's career decision-making in the context of a local health workforce development program was influenced by a range of personal, contextual and experiential factors. These included personal factors related to young people's career goals and motivations and their confidence to engage in career decision-making, contextual factors related to BHRHCAP program design and structure as well as the visibility and accessibility of health career pathways in a rural setting, and experiential factors related to the interaction and engagement between young people and role models or influential others in the health and education sectors. This study provided theoretical insight into the broader range of interrelating and

  9. The Latino Migrant Worker HIV Prevention Program: building a community partnership through a community health worker training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Jesús; Silva-Suarez, Georgina; Serna, Claudia A; De La Rosa, Mario

    2012-01-01

    There is limited information on the impact of the HIV/AIDS epidemic on Latino migrant workers (LMWs), although available data indicate that this community is being disproportionally affected. The need for prevention programs that address the specific needs of LMWs is becoming well recognized. HIV prevention interventions that train and employ community health workers are a culturally appropriate way to address the issues of community trust and capacity building in this community. This article describes the Latino Migrant Worker HIV Prevention Program and its efforts to train and engage community health workers in the prevention of HIV among LMWs in South Florida.

  10. Direct and Mediated Relationships Between Participation in a Telephonic Health Coaching Program and Health Behavior, Life Satisfaction, and Optimism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Lindsay E; Coberley, Carter R; Pope, James E

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the direct and mediated effects of a telephonic health coaching program on changes to healthy behaviors, life satisfaction, and optimism. This longitudinal correlational study of 4881 individuals investigated simple and mediated relationships between participation in a telephonic health risk coaching program and outcomes from three annual Well-being Assessments. Program participation was directly related to improvements in healthy behaviors, life satisfaction and optimism, and indirect effects of coaching on these variables concurrently and over a one-year time lag were also supported. Given previous research that improvements to life satisfaction, optimism, and health behaviors are valuable for individuals, employers, and communities, a clearer understanding of intervention approaches that may impact these outcomes simultaneously can drive greater program effectiveness and value on investment.

  11. Corporate characteristics and worksite health promotion programs: survey findings from Fortune 500 companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollander, R B; Lengermann, J J

    1988-01-01

    A study was carried out to assess the nature and extent of worksite health promotion programs in Fortune 500 companies. Growth and interest in worksite health promotion continues at a remarkable rate. Fortune 500 firms are a good barometer of the state of the art of programs in work settings because these companies have large numbers of employees, an interest in cost savings, and expertise to invest in innovative efforts. Data collection consisted of questionnaires sent to the medical officer or Chief Executive Officer of all companies appearing on the 1984 Fortune 500 list. The following issues were addressed: whether companies offered worksite programs; what health promotion activities were provided in their programs; whether organizations had plans to start up or expand programs; what organizational support existed for programs (i.e. who pays, on whose time employees participate, when activities are offered, and what types of personnel are hired to staff programs); and whether these companies applied needs assessments, evaluation and cost analysis in their programs. Differences in these characteristics were examined in relation to the organizational variables of size (number of employees), Fortune 500 rank and type of industry (low-technology versus high-technology). The response rate for the survey was 49.4% (n = 247). Results of the study indicate a high level of health promotion activity in Fortune 500 firms. Out of the total group of respondents, two-thirds (n = 164) report having worksite programs and two-thirds of organizations with programs have plans to expand their health promotion offerings. One-third of responding organizations without programs planned to initiate them. The health promotion activities provided are numerous and varied, and within units that have programs rates of employee eligibility are reported to be high. However, the participation rates reported are appreciably lower. It is of special interest that, in general, the higher ranked

  12. Occupational health and environmental reseach program of the Health Division 1980. Status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voelz, G.L.

    1981-12-01

    The primary responsibility of the Health Division at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is to provide effective health, safety, waste processing, and environmental programs for the Laboratory. During 1980, several new technical areas of radiobiological literature assessment were started that may be applicable to standards development. These areas include a new method for comparison of long-term effects of internal emitters in different species, a review of plutonium concentration in gonads, and preliminary study of plutonium distribution between bone and liver. Industrial hygiene studies were directed particularly toward the evaluation of potential hazards involved in the emerging oil shale industry. This work involved field surveys, aerosol production for inhalation toxicology experiments, and assistance in design of a controlled laboratory retort. Work was done on studies of resuspension of particles in controlled wind tunnel experiments. Instrumentation development resulted in a new type of prototype particulate stack sampler and a fluorescent lidar system that monitors the dispersal of atmospheric pollutants in real time over distances up to 8 kilometers. Investigation of human health effects that may be associated with exposures to plutonium and other transuranium radionuclides continues as a major effort. The national epidemiology study of plutonium workers at four Department of Energy facilities was devoted primarily to records ascertainment. An important study was completed on the validity of determining mortality status through the Social Security Administration. The study showed ascertainment of death was strongly related to the individual's age at the time of death. Analysis for plutonium and americium in human autopsy tissues was continued for both transuranium workers and for base-line studies of persons in the general population

  13. Discovering and Promoting Commodity Health Attributes: Programs and Issues

    OpenAIRE

    Carman, Hoy F.

    2007-01-01

    There is a growing consumer segment demanding healthy foods and diets, health and nutrition messages can expand food demand, and governments in the U.S. and EU, faced with increasing obesity and associated health outcomes, want consumers to have reliable information to choose healthy diets. California commodity organizations, charged with expanding the demand for almonds, avocados, strawberries and walnuts, are funding health and nutrition research as a means to discover a unique selling prop...

  14. Programs director's report for the Office of Health and Environmental Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    Since its establishment, the Department of Energy's Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) has had responsibility for conducting biological research to develop the knowledge needed to identify, understand, and anticipate the long-term health consequences of energy use and development, including the potential health impacts of radiation. The Health Effects Research Program has established the basis for understanding the health consequences of radiation for humans, developed radiation dosimetry methodology, characterized and evaluated the health impacts of fossil fuels, and developed and conducted research to determine the health impacts of inhaled toxicants. The results of this research have provided input for setting genetic standards for radiation and chemical exposure

  15. Programs director`s report for the Office of Health and Environmental Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    Since its establishment, the Department of Energy`s Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) has had responsibility for conducting biological research to develop the knowledge needed to identify, understand, and anticipate the long-term health consequences of energy use and development, including the potential health impacts of radiation. The Health Effects Research Program has established the basis for understanding the health consequences of radiation for humans, developed radiation dosimetry methodology, characterized and evaluated the health impacts of fossil fuels, and developed and conducted research to determine the health impacts of inhaled toxicants. The results of this research have provided input for setting genetic standards for radiation and chemical exposure.

  16. Do health benefits outweigh the costs of mass recreational programs? An economic analysis of four Ciclovía programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, Felipe; Sarmiento, Olga L; Zarama, Roberto; Pratt, Michael; Wang, Guijing; Jacoby, Enrique; Schmid, Thomas L; Ramos, Mauricio; Ruiz, Oscar; Vargas, Olga; Michel, Gabriel; Zieff, Susan G; Valdivia, Juan Alejandro; Cavill, Nick; Kahlmeier, Sonja

    2012-02-01

    One promising public health intervention for promoting physical activity is the Ciclovía program. The Ciclovía is a regular multisectorial community-based program in which streets are temporarily closed for motorized transport, allowing exclusive access to individuals for recreational activities and physical activity. The objective of this study was to conduct an analysis of the cost-benefit ratios of physical activity of the Ciclovía programs of Bogotá and Medellín in Colombia, Guadalajara in México, and San Francisco in the U.S.A. The data of the four programs were obtained from program directors and local surveys. The annual cost per capita of the programs was: U.S. $6.0 for Bogotá, U.S. $23.4 for Medellín, U.S. $6.5 for Guadalajara, and U.S. $70.5 for San Francisco. The cost-benefit ratio for health benefit from physical activity was 3.23-4.26 for Bogotá, 1.83 for Medellín, 1.02-1.23 for Guadalajara, and 2.32 for San Francisco. For the program of Bogotá, the cost-benefit ratio was more sensitive to the prevalence of physically active bicyclists; for Guadalajara, the cost-benefit ratio was more sensitive to user costs; and for the programs of Medellín and San Francisco, the cost-benefit ratios were more sensitive to operational costs. From a public health perspective for promoting physical activity, these Ciclovía programs are cost beneficial.

  17. Synergism in work site adoption of employee assistance programs and health promotion activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, T C; Roman, P M; Patrick, L

    1990-05-01

    As workplaces increasingly adopt proactive programs directed toward employee health issues, the interrelation between different programs becomes an important issue. Of interest here is the "synergy" in patterns of program adoption between employee assistance programs (EAPs) and health promotion activities (HPAs). We utilize the 1985 National Survey of Worksite Health Promotion Activities (N = 1358) for analyses of the dual presence of EAPs and HPAs, and in multivariate analyses we consider factors affecting such dual presence. The data suggest that synergy occurs, with EAP adoption appearing to influence HPA adoption to a greater extent than the reverse. In multivariate analyses, synergy is confirmed by the finding that, among a variety of relevant organizational characteristics, EAP presence and HPA presence are the best predictors of each other's presence. The analyses also indicate that there is minimal commonality in program ingredients across organizations reporting the presence of HPAs. Implications of the data for the future development of these two programming strategies are discussed.

  18. Finding the Right Fit: Understanding Health Tracking in Workplace Wellness Programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chung, Chia-Fang; Jensen, Nanna Gorm; Shklovski, Irina

    2017-01-01

    Workplace health and wellness programs are increasingly integrating personal health tracking technologies, such as Fitbit and Apple Watch. Many question whether these technologies truly support employees in their pursuit of better wellness levels, raising objections about workplace surveillance...... and further blurring of boundaries between work and personal life. We conducted a study to understand how tracking tools are adopted in wellness programs and employees' opinions about these programs. We find that employees are generally positive about incentivized health tracking in the workplace, as it helps...... raise awareness of activity levels. However, there is a gap between the intentions of the programs and individual experiences and health goals. This sometimes results in confusion and creates barriers to participation. Even if this gap can be addressed, health tracking in the workplace...

  19. Building Capacity for Workplace Health Promotion: Findings From the Work@Health® Train-the-Trainer Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Jason; Cluff, Laurie; Rineer, Jennifer; Brown, Darigg; Jones-Jack, Nkenge

    2017-01-01

    Small- and mid-sized employers are less likely to have expertise, capacity, or resources to implement workplace health promotion programs, compared with large employers. In response, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention developed the Work@Health® employer training program to determine the best way to deliver skill-based training to employers of all sizes. The core curriculum was designed to increase employers’ knowledge of the design, implementation, and evaluation of workplace health strategies. The first arm of the program was direct employer training. In this article, we describe the results of the second arm—the program’s train-the-trainer (T3) component, which was designed to prepare new certified trainers to provide core workplace health training to other employers. Of the 103 participants who began the T3 program, 87 fully completed it and delivered the Work@Health core training to 233 other employers. Key indicators of T3 participants’ knowledge and attitudes significantly improved after training. The curriculum delivered through the T3 model has the potential to increase the health promotion capacity of employers across the nation, as well as organizations that work with employers, such as health departments and business coalitions. PMID:28829622

  20. Laser programs facility management plan for environment, safety, and health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, G.E.

    1996-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Laser Programs ES ampersand H policy is established by the Associate Director for Laser Programs. This FMP is one component of that policy. Laser Programs personnel design, construct and operate research and development equipment located in various Livermore and Site 300 buildings. The Programs include a variety of activities, primarily laser research and development, inertial confinement fusion, isotope separation, and an increasing emphasis on materials processing, imaging systems, and signal analysis. This FMP is a formal statement of responsibilities and controls to assure operational activities are conducted without harm to employees, the general public, or the environment. This plan identifies the hazards associated with operating a large research and development facility and is a vehicle to control and mitigate those hazards. Hazards include, but are not limited to: laser beams, hazardous and radioactive materials, criticality, ionizing radiation or x rays, high-voltage electrical equipment, chemicals, and powered machinery

  1. The Role of Leadership Support for Health Promotion in Employee Wellness Program Participation, Perceived Job Stress, and Health Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoert, Jennifer; Herd, Ann M; Hambrick, Marion

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore the relationship between leadership support for health promotion and job stress, wellness program participation, and health behaviors. A cross-sectional survey design was used. Four worksites with a range of wellness programs were selected for this study. Participants in this study were employees (n = 618) at 4 organizations (bank, private university, wholesale supplier, and public university) in the southeastern United States, each offering an employee wellness program. Response rates in each organization ranged from 3% to 34%. Leadership support for health promotion was measured with the Leading by Example instrument. Employee participation in wellness activities, job stress, and health behaviors were measured with multi-item scales. Correlation/regression analysis and descriptive statistics were used to analyze the relationships among the scaled variables. Employees reporting higher levels of leadership support for health promotion also reported higher levels of wellness activity participation, lower job stress, and greater levels of health behavior ( P = .001). To ascertain the amount of variance in health behaviors accounted for by the other variables in the study, a hierarchical regression analysis revealed a statistically significant model (model F 7,523 = 27.28; P = .001), with leadership support for health promotion (β = .19, t = 4.39, P = .001), wellness activity participation (β = .28, t = 6.95, P stress (β = -.27, t = -6.75, P ≤ .001) found to be significant predictors of health behaviors in the model. Exploratory regression analyses by organization revealed the focal variables as significant model predictors for only the 2 larger organizations with well-established wellness programs. Results from the study suggest that employees' perceptions of organizational leadership support for health promotion are related to their participation in wellness activities, perceived job stress levels, and health behaviors.

  2. Better Communication for Better Public Health: Perspectives From an Interdisciplinary Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlafer, Rebecca J; McRee, Annie-Laurie; Gower, Amy L; Bearinger, Linda H

    2016-03-01

    Myriad factors determine the health of young people-biological, psychological, familial, contextual, environmental, and political, to name a few. Improving the health of adolescents means that leaders in health care and public health must have the requisite skills for translating research into priorities, practices, and policies that influence a wide array of health determinants. While adolescent health training programs may give emphasis to effective communication with adolescents as patients or as priority populations in health education/promotion efforts, are we adequately preparing our future leaders with the skill sets necessary for moving scientific evidence into practice, programs, and policies? Internship and fellowship programs may invest heavily in teaching skills for conducting research and health education/promotion, but they may not focus enough on how to translate scientific evidence into practice, programs, and policy. In this commentary, we share our experiences equipping professionals working with adolescents in health care and public health settings with skills for scientific writing, public speaking, and advocacy on behalf of young people, and discuss the need for more collaboration across disciplines. © 2016 Society for Public Health Education.

  3. 77 FR 62243 - Rural Health Network Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-12

    ... project goals and now has the organizational structure to support the fiscal management responsibilities... prevention of chronic disease, increase provider knowledge and effective use of health information technology... Support: May 1, 2011, to April 30, 2014. Replacement Awardee: Siloam Springs Regional Health Cooperative...

  4. Strategic Directions for Extension Health and Wellness Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Michelle; Braun, Bonnie

    2015-01-01

    The new Cooperative Extension National Framework for Health and Wellness is a tool to help Extension systematically address the programmatic area of health and wellness at the individual, community, environmental, and policy levels. Key strategies of the framework tool are provided and suggestions for ways that Extension can use this framework…

  5. Persuasive technology as an intervention programs for Health care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The statistics regarding health problem in Malaysia shows more than 50% of Malaysian adults have at least one of Non-Communicable Disease. Thus, effort to create awareness as well as promoting mind-set change with regards to health habit is paramount. Researches prove that ICT played significant role in influencing ...

  6. 76 FR 58006 - Consumer Health IT Pledge Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-19

    ... Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) is leading a national campaign to educate and engage the... have the ability to educate consumers about the importance of getting access to and using their health information (e.g., employers, consumer and disease-based organizations, healthcare associations, product...

  7. A new "loyalty rewards" program in health care customer relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macstravic, Scott

    2006-01-01

    "Loyalty rewards" in sponsored DM and HRM programs can apply to both providers and consumers. Physicians and hospitals can be paid to "loyally" adhere to payers' guidelines for managing diseases and risks. Many payer and their outsourced vendor programs include significant efforts to create collaborations between payer and provider, rather than relying on unilateral efforts. And growing numbers are rewarding providers for their efforts and results achieved.

  8. Health promotion through employee assistance programs: a role for occupational therapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, M

    1986-11-01

    Health promotion is predicted to have a major impact on occupational therapy practice. Keeping people well and promoting a healthy life-style will be the focus for the future. Many companies and agencies are taking the lead by instituting employee assistance programs (EAPs). With the de-emphasis on long-term hospital care, many occupational therapists will be seeking employment with community health programs. This paper advocates a role for occupational therapists in health promotion and disease prevention in an EAP. A description of EAPs and the contributions that occupational therapists can make to these programs is offered. Practice and education considerations for occupational therapists' roles in EAPs are provided.

  9. Building Economic Security Today: making the health-wealth connection in Contra Costa county's maternal and child health programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthasarathy, Padmini; Dailey, Dawn E; Young, Maria-Elena D; Lam, Carrie; Pies, Cheri

    2014-02-01

    In recent years, maternal and child health professionals have been seeking approaches to integrating the Life Course Perspective and social determinants of health into their work. In this article, we describe how community input, staff feedback, and evidence from the field that the connection between wealth and health should be addressed compelled the Contra Costa Family, Maternal and Child Health (FMCH) Programs Life Course Initiative to launch Building Economic Security Today (BEST). BEST utilizes innovative strategies to reduce inequities in health outcomes for low-income Contra Costa families by improving their financial security and stability. FMCH Programs' Women, Infants, and Children Program (WIC) conducted BEST financial education classes, and its Medically Vulnerable Infant Program (MVIP) instituted BEST financial assessments during public health nurse home visits. Educational and referral resources were also developed and distributed to all clients. The classes at WIC increased clients' awareness of financial issues and confidence that they could improve their financial situations. WIC clients and staff also gained knowledge about financial resources in the community. MVIP's financial assessments offered clients a new and needed perspective on their financial situations, as well as support around the financial and psychological stresses of caring for a child with special health care needs. BEST offered FMCH Programs staff opportunities to engage in non-traditional, cross-sector partnerships, and gain new knowledge and skills to address a pressing social determinant of health. We learned the value of flexible timelines, maintaining a long view for creating change, and challenging the traditional paradigm of maternal and child health.

  10. The effects of a disease management program on self-reported health behaviors and health outcomes: evidence from the "Florida: a healthy state (FAHS)" Medicaid program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisky, Donald E; Kominski, Gerald F; Afifi, Abdelmonem A; Kotlerman, Jenny B

    2009-06-01

    Premature morbidity and mortality from chronic diseases account for a major proportion of expenditures for health care cost in the United States. The purpose of this study was to measure the effects of a disease management program on physiological and behavioral health indicators for Medicaid patients in Florida. A two-year prospective study of 15,275 patients with one or more chronic illnesses (congestive heart failure, hypertension, diabetes, or asthma) was undertaken. Control of hypertension improved from baseline to Year 1 (adjusted odds ratio = 1.60, p management program benefited in terms of controlling hypertension, asthma symptoms, and cholesterol and blood glucose levels.

  11. Evaluation of a model training program for respiratory-protection preparedness at local health departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfano-Sobsey, Edie; Kennedy, Bobby; Beck, Frank; Combs, Brian; Kady, Wendy; Ramsey, Steven; Stockweather, Allison; Service, Will

    2006-04-01

    Respiratory-protection programs have had limited application in local health departments and have mostly focused on protecting employees against exposure to tuberculosis (TB). The need to provide the public health workforce with effective respiratory protection has, however, been underscored by recent concerns about emerging infectious diseases, bioterrorism attacks, drug-resistant microbes, and environmental exposures to microbial allergens (as in recent hurricane flood waters). Furthermore, OSHA has revoked the TB standard traditionally followed by local health departments, replacing it with a more stringent regulation. The additional OSHA requirements may place increased burdens on health departments with limited resources and time. For these reasons, the North Carolina Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response and industrial hygienists of the Public Health Regional Surveillance Teams have developed a training program to facilitate implementation of respiratory protection programs at local health departments. To date, more than 1,400 North Carolina health department employees have been properly fit-tested for respirator use and have received training in all aspects of respiratory protection. This article gives an overview of the development and evaluation of the program. The training approach presented here can serve as a model that other health departments and organizations can use in implementing similar respiratory-protection programs.

  12. [The intervention mapping protocol: A structured process to develop, implement and evaluate health promotion programs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassier, J-B; Lamort-Bouché, M; Sarnin, P; Durif-Bruckert, C; Péron, J; Letrilliart, L; Durand, M-J

    2016-02-01

    Health promotion programs are expected to improve population health and reduce social inequalities in health. However, their theoretical foundations are frequently ill-defined, and their implementation faces many obstacles. The aim of this article is to describe the intervention mapping protocol in health promotion programs planning, used recently in several countries. The challenges of planning health promotion programs are presented, and the six steps of the intervention mapping protocol are described with an example. Based on a literature review, the use of this protocol, its requirements and potential limitations are discussed. The intervention mapping protocol has four essential characteristics: an ecological perspective (person-environment), a participative approach, the use of theoretical models in human and social sciences and the use of scientific evidence. It comprises six steps: conduct a health needs assessment, define change objectives, select theory-based change techniques and practical applications, organize techniques and applications into an intervention program (logic model), plan for program adoption, implementation, and sustainability, and generate an evaluation plan. This protocol was used in different countries and domains such as obesity, tobacco, physical activity, cancer and occupational health. Although its utilization requires resources and a critical stance, this protocol was used to develop interventions which efficacy was demonstrated. The intervention mapping protocol is an integrated process that fits the scientific and practical challenges of health promotion. It could be tested in France as it was used in other countries, in particular to reduce social inequalities in health. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  13. Approaches to dog health education programs in Australian rural and remote Indigenous communities: four case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constable, S E; Dixon, R M; Dixon, R J; Toribio, J-A

    2013-09-01

    Dog health in rural and remote Australian Indigenous communities is below urban averages in numerous respects. Many Indigenous communities have called for knowledge sharing in this area. However, dog health education programs are in their infancy, and lack data on effective practices. Without this core knowledge, health promotion efforts cannot progress effectively. This paper discusses a strategy that draws from successful approaches in human health and indigenous education, such as dadirri, and culturally respectful community engagement and development. Negotiating an appropriate education program is explored in its practical application through four case studies. Though each case was unique, the comparison of the four illustrated the importance of listening (community consultation), developing and maintaining relationships, community involvement and employment. The most successful case studies were those that could fully implement all four areas. Outcomes included improved local dog health capacity, local employment and engagement with the program and significantly improved dog health.

  14. Critical interactions between the Global Fund-supported HIV programs and the health system in Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atun, Rifat; Pothapregada, Sai Kumar; Kwansah, Janet

    2011-01-01

    of the strengths and weaknesses of the relationship between Global Fund-supported activities and the health system and to identify positive synergies and unintended consequences of integration. Ghana has a well-functioning sector-wide approach to financing its health system, with a strong emphasis on integrated......The support of global health initiatives in recipient countries has been vigorously debated. Critics are concerned that disease-specific programs may be creating vertical and parallel service delivery structures that to some extent undermine health systems. This case study of Ghana aimed to explore...... how the Global Fund-supported HIV program interacts with the health system there and to map the extent and nature of integration of the national disease program across 6 key health systems functions. Qualitative interviews of national stakeholders were conducted to understand the perceptions...

  15. Observations on reproductive health programs in the Baltic States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarus, Jeff; Nadisauskiene, R J; Liljestrand, J

    2004-01-01

    Public attention in Sweden has been drawn to three neighboring states that recently joined the European Union: Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania. At this historic moment, it seems instructive to look at how the rapidly reformed health sectors of these ex-Soviet republics are responding to the vision...... of reproductive health articulated in Cairo 10 years ago. Reproductive health and rights have improved in these states in spite of recent reforms often acting to oppose improvement. Reforms such as the introduction of family medicine need continued adjustment, especially regarding antenatal care. One special...

  16. Employee health services integration: meeting the challenge. Successful program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Y C

    1998-02-01

    1. The first step of a successful Employee Health Service integration is to have a plan supported by management. The plan must be presented to the employees prior to implementation in a "user friendly" manner. 2. Prior to computerization of employee health records, a record order system must be developed to prevent duplication and to enhance organization. 3. Consistency of services offered must be maintained. Each employee must have the opportunity to receive the same service. Complexity of services will determine the site of delivery. 4. Integration is a new and challenging development for the health care field. Flexibility and brainstorming are necessary in an attempt to meet both employee and employer needs.

  17. Mapping Dual-Degree Programs in Social Work and Public Health: Results From a National Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dory Ziperstein

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Dramatic changes in the health system due to national health reform are raising important questions regarding the educational preparation of social workers for the new health arena. While dual-degree programs in public health and social work can be an important response to what is needed educationally, little is known about them. The National MSW/MPH Programs Study surveyed MSW/MPH program administrators to better understand the prevalence, models, structure, and challenges of these dual-degree programs. Forty-two programs were identified, and 97.6% of those contacted participated (n=41. Findings indicate that MSW/MPH programs are popular, increasing, geographically dispersed, and drawing talented students interested in trans-disciplinary public health social work practice. Challenges for these programs include the need for greater institutional support, particularly funding, and a general lack of best practices for MSW/MPH education. While findings from this study suggest graduates appear especially well-prepared for leadership and practice in the new health environment, additional research is needed to assess their particular contributions and career trajectories.

  18. The decriminalization of prostitution is associated with better coverage of health promotion programs for sex workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harcourt, Christine; O'Connor, Jody; Egger, Sandra; Fairley, Christopher K; Wand, Handan; Chen, Marcus Y; Marshall, Lewis; Kaldor, John M; Donovan, Basil

    2010-10-01

    In order to assess whether the law has an impact on the delivery of health promotion services to sex workers, we compared health promotion programs in three Australian cities with different prostitution laws. The cities were Melbourne (brothels legalized if licensed, unlicensed brothels criminalized), Perth (criminalization of all forms of sex work) and Sydney (sex work largely decriminalized, without licensing). We interviewed key informants and gave questionnaires to representative samples of female sex workers in urban brothels. Despite the different laws, each city had a thriving and diverse sex industry and a government-funded sex worker health promotion program with shopfront, phone, online and outreach facilities. The Sydney program was the only one run by a community-based organisation and the only program employing multi-lingual staff with evening outreach to all brothels. The Melbourne program did not service the unlicensed sector, while the Perth program accessed the minority of brothels by invitation only. More Sydney workers reported a sexual health centre as a source of safer sex training and information (Sydney 52% v Melbourne 33% and Perth 35%; plegal context appeared to affect the conduct of health promotion programs targeting the sex industry. Brothel licensing and police-controlled illegal brothels can result in the unlicensed sector being isolated from peer-education and support. © 2010 The Authors. Journal Compilation © 2010 Public Health Association of Australia.

  19. [Research within the reach of Osakidetza professionals: Primary Health Care Research Program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandes, Gonzalo; Arce, Verónica; Arietaleanizbeaskoa, María Soledad

    2014-04-01

    To provide information about the process and results of the Primary Health Care Research Program 2010-2011 organised by the Primary Care Research Unit of Bizkaia. Descriptive study. Osakidetza primary care. The 107 health professionals who applied for the program from a total of 4,338 general practitioners, nurses and administrative staff who were informed about it. Application level, research topics classification, program evaluation by participants, projects funding and program costs. Percentage who applied, 2.47%; 95% CI 2.41-2.88%. Of the 28 who were selected and 19 completed. The research topics were mostly related to the more common chronic diseases (32%), and prevention and health promotion (18%). Over 90% of participants assessed the quality of the program as good or excellent, and half of them considered it as difficult or very difficult. Of the18 new projects generated, 12 received funding, with 16 grants, 10 from the Health Department of the Basque Government, 4 from the Carlos III Institute of Health of the Ministry of Health of Spain, and 2 from Kronikgune. A total of €500,000 was obtained for these projects. This program cost €198,327. This experience can be used by others interested in the promotion of research in primary care, as the program achieved its objectives, and was useful and productive. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  20. Accreditation of emerging oral health professions: options for dental therapy education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelmon, Sherril B; Tresidder, Anna Foucek

    2011-01-01

    The study explored the options for accreditation of educational programs to prepare a new oral health provider, the dental therapist. A literature review and interviews of 10 content experts were conducted. The content experts represented a wide array of interests, including individuals associated with the various dental stakeholder organizations in education, accreditation, practice, and licensure, as well as representatives of non-dental accrediting organizations whose experience could inform the study. Development of an educational accreditation program for an emerging profession requires collaboration among key stakeholders representing education, practice, licensure, and other interests. Options for accreditation of dental therapy education programs include establishment of a new independent accrediting agency; seeking recognition as a committee within the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs; or working with the Commission on Dental Accreditation (CODA) to create a new accreditation program within CODA. These options are not mutually exclusive, and more than one accreditation program could potentially exist. An educational accreditation program is built upon a well-defined field, where there is a demonstrated need for the occupation and for accreditation of educational programs that prepare individuals to enter that occupation. The fundamental value of accreditation is as one player in the overall scheme of improving the quality of higher education delivered to students and, ultimately, the delivery of health services. Leaders concerned with the oral health workforce will need to consider future directions and the potential roles of new oral health providers as they determine appropriate directions for educational accreditation for dental therapy.

  1. Early Careerist Interest and Participation in Health Care Leadership Development Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jon M; Temple, April

    2015-01-01

    Health care organizations are increasingly embracing leadership development programs. These programs include a variety of specific activities, such as formally structured leadership development, as well as mentoring, personal development and coaching, 360-degree feedback, and job enlargement, in order to increase the leadership skills of managers and high-potential staff. However, there is a lack of information on how early careerists in health care management view these programs and the degree to which they participate. This article reports on a study undertaken to determine how early careerists working in health care organizations view leadership development programs and their participation in such programs offered by their employers. Study findings are based on a survey of 126 early careerists who are graduates of an undergraduate health services administration program. We found varying levels of interest and participation in specific leadership development activities. In addition, we found that respondents with graduate degrees and those with higher compensation were more likely to participate in selected leadership development program activities. Implications of study findings for health care organizations and early careerists in the offering of, and participation in, leadership development programs are discussed.

  2. Geographic variation in health IT and health care outcomes: A snapshot before the meaningful use incentive program began.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Catherine G; Lammers, Eric

    2015-03-01

    The 2009 Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act, which includes the Meaningful Use (MU) incentive program, was designed to increase the adoption of health information technology (IT) by physicians and hospitals. Policymakers hope that increased use of health IT to exchange health information will in turn enhance the quality and efficiency of health care delivery. In this study, we analyze the extent to which key outcomes vary based on the levels of health ITness among physicians and hospitals before the HITECH and MU programs led to increases in adoption and changes in use. Our findings provide an important baseline for a future evaluation of the impact of these programs on population-level outcomes. We constructed measures of the degree of hospital and physician adoption and use ("health ITness") at the level of the hospital referral region (HRR). We used data from the 2010 IT Supplement of the American Hospital Association (AHA) Annual Survey of Hospitals to capture hospital health ITness and data from the 2010 survey of ambulatory health care sites produced by SK&A Information Services for the physician measure. We conducted cross-sectional analyses of the relationship between market-level Medicare costs and use and three measures: (1) physician health ITness, (2) hospital health ITness, and (3) an overall measure of health ITness. In general, greater levels of physician health ITness are associated with decreasing costs and use. Many of these relationships lose statistical significance, however, when we control for population and market characteristics such as the average age and health status of Medicare beneficiaries, mean household income, and the HMO penetration rate. Several of the relationships also change according to the level of hospital health ITness. Our findings suggest that greater levels of physician health ITness are associated with decreasing costs and use for a number of services, including inpatient costs

  3. Improving Urban Minority Girls' Health Via Community Summer Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, Amy M; Bates, Carolyn R; Heard, Amy M; Burdette, Kimberly A; Ward, Amanda K; Silton, Rebecca L; Dugas, Lara R

    2017-12-01

    Summertime has emerged as a high-risk period for weight gain among low-income minority youth who often experience a lack of resources when not attending school. Structured programming may be an effective means of reducing risk for obesity by improving obesogenic behaviors among these youth. The current multi-method study examined sedentary time, physical activity, and dietary intake among low-income urban minority girls in two contexts: an unstructured summertime setting and in the context of a structured 4-week community-based summer day camp program promoting physical activity. Data were analyzed using paired-sample t tests and repeated-measure analyses of variance with significance at the p time of over 2 h/day and dairy consumption when engaged in structured summer programming. All improvements were independent of weight status and age, and African-American participants evidenced greater changes in physical activity during programming. The study concludes that structured, community-based summertime programming may be associated with fewer obesogenic behaviors in low-income urban youth and may be a powerful tool to address disparities in weight gain and obesity among high-risk samples.

  4. How a Fully Automated eHealth Program Simulates Three Therapeutic Processes: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holter, Marianne T S; Johansen, Ayna; Brendryen, Håvar

    2016-06-28

    eHealth programs may be better understood by breaking down the components of one particular program and discussing its potential for interactivity and tailoring in regard to concepts from face-to-face counseling. In the search for the efficacious elements within eHealth programs, it is important to understand how a program using lapse management may simultaneously support working alliance, internalization of motivation, and behavior maintenance. These processes have been applied to fully automated eHealth programs individually. However, given their significance in face-to-face counseling, it may be important to simulate the processes simultaneously in interactive, tailored programs. We propose a theoretical model for how fully automated behavior change eHealth programs may be more effective by simulating a therapist's support of a working alliance, internalization of motivation, and managing lapses. We show how the model is derived from theory and its application to Endre, a fully automated smoking cessation program that engages the user in several "counseling sessions" about quitting. A descriptive case study based on tools from the intervention mapping protocol shows how each therapeutic process is simulated. The program supports the user's working alliance through alliance factors, the nonembodied relational agent Endre and computerized motivational interviewing. Computerized motivational interviewing also supports internalized motivation to quit, whereas a lapse management component responds to lapses. The description operationalizes working alliance, internalization of motivation, and managing lapses, in terms of eHealth support of smoking cessation. A program may simulate working alliance, internalization of motivation, and lapse management through interactivity and individual tailoring, potentially making fully automated eHealth behavior change programs more effective.

  5. Healthcare organization-education partnerships and career ladder programs for health care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dill, Janette S; Chuang, Emmeline; Morgan, Jennifer C

    2014-12-01

    Increasing concerns about quality of care and workforce shortages have motivated health care organizations and educational institutions to partner to create career ladders for frontline health care workers. Career ladders reward workers for gains in skills and knowledge and may reduce the costs associated with turnover, improve patient care, and/or address projected shortages of certain nursing and allied health professions. This study examines partnerships between health care and educational organizations in the United States during the design and implementation of career ladder training programs for low-skill workers in health care settings, referred to as frontline health care workers. Mixed methods data from 291 frontline health care workers and 347 key informants (e.g., administrators, instructors, managers) collected between 2007 and 2010 were analyzed using both regression and fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis (QCA). Results suggest that different combinations of partner characteristics, including having an education leader, employer leader, frontline management support, partnership history, community need, and educational policies, were necessary for high worker career self-efficacy and program satisfaction. Whether a worker received a wage increase, however, was primarily dependent on leadership within the health care organization, including having an employer leader and employer implementation policies. Findings suggest that strong partnerships between health care and educational organizations can contribute to the successful implementation of career ladder programs, but workers' ability to earn monetary rewards for program participation depends on the strength of leadership support within the health care organization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Development of a training program to support health care professionals to deliver the SPACE for COPD self-management program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blackmore C

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Claire Blackmore,1 Vicki L Johnson-Warrington,2 Johanna EA Williams,2 Lindsay D Apps,2 Hannah ML Young,2 Claire LA Bourne,2 Sally J Singh2 1Kettering General Hospital National Health Service (NHS Trust, Kettering, Northamptonshire, 2Centre for Exercise and Rehabilitation Science, Leicester Respiratory Biomedical Research Unit, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester, UK Background: With the growing burden of COPD and associated morbidity and mortality, a need for self-management has been identified. The Self-management Programme of ­Activity, Coping and Education for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (SPACE for COPD manual was developed to support self-management in COPD patients. Currently, there is no literature available regarding health care professionals’ training needs when supporting patients with COPD on self-management.Aim: This study sought to identify these needs to inform, design and develop a training program for health care professionals being trained to deliver a self-management program in COPD.Methods: Fourteen health care professionals from both primary and secondary care COPD services participated in face-to-face semistructured interviews. Thematic analysis was used to produce a framework and identify training needs and views on delivery of the SPACE for COPD self-management program. Components of training were web-based knowledge training, with pre- and posttraining knowledge questionnaires, and a 1-day program to introduce the self-management manual. Feedback was given after training to guide the development of the training program.Results: Health care professionals were able to identify areas where they required increased knowledge to support patients. This was overwhelming in aspects of COPD seen to be outside of their current clinical role. Skills in goal setting and behavioral change were not elicited as a training need, suggesting a lack of understanding of components of supporting self

  7. Health x profit: who does win with a worksite health promotion program?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glaycon Michels

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Even though many managers only invest in workers’ health to increase their profi ts, countless employees have been improving their quality of life due to Workplace Health Promotion Programs (WHPP. This purpose of this article is to demonstrate the benefi ts to workers at the Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina achieved in the year 2000 with a WHPP. By means of a questionnaire, data were collected on compliance with workplace exercise breaks, wellbeing, changes to lifestyle and dissemination of knowledge that suggest that the quality of life of these workers improved in terms of less pain, better relationships, more physical activity and more stretching exercises and that what they learnt was lasting longer. RESUMO Mesmo que muitos empresários invistam na saúde do trabalhador somente para aumentar seus lucros, inúmeros empregados têm melhorado sua qualidade de vida devido a Programas de Promoção da Saúde do Trabalhador (PPST. Este artigo tem como objetivo relatar benefícios referentes à aplicação de um PPST em funcionários da reitoria da Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, decorridos no ano 2000. Através da aplicação de um questionário, respostas condizentes à adesão à ginástica laboral, bem-estar, alteração do estilo de vida e difusão de conhecimento sugerem melhorias na qualidade de vida destes trabalhadores devido à diminuição de dores, melhor relacionamento, maior prática de exercício físico, mais alongamentos e maior vivência de ensinamentos.

  8. Occupational health, waste management, and environmental research program of the Health Division 1981. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voelz, G.L.

    1983-09-01

    The primary responsibility of the Health Division at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is to provide effective programs in health, safety, waste processing, and environmental protection for the Laboratory. During 1981, evaluations of respiratory protective equipment included 3 special DOE contractor supplied-air suits or hoods and 10 commercial supplied-air devices. Preliminary results of chemical permeation tests of different protective garment materials are reported. Industrial hygiene field studies of oil shale work were conducted at the Geokinetics true in situ facility and the Rio Blanco modified in situ facility. An occupational medical survey of workers at the Geokinetics, Inc., facility was completed. Research on the generation and characterization of aerosols was continued for inhalation studies of man-made mineral fibers and oil shale aerosols. The distribution of 241 Am in a whole body was determined by tissue analyses. Preliminary results of mortality in workers formerly employed at the Rocky Flats plant were reported. A simplified method for the analysis of plutonium in urine has been developed. Instrumentation development resulted in a portable computer system for field data analysis and a small, computerized, wristwatch-style radiation dosimeter. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1981 showed the highest estimated radiation dose due to Laboratory operations is about 4% of the dose due to the natural radioactivity here. A study was completed on alternative strategies for long-term management of Los Alamos transuranic wastes. A successful 10-day test burn of pentachlorophenol-contaminated wastes was conducted in the Controlled Air Incinerator. Decontamination factors for five fission products in the off-gas handling system of the incinerator were measured

  9. Development of a Teen-Friendly Health Education Program on Facebook: Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Bu Kyung; Nahm, Eun-Shim; Rogers, Valerie E

    2016-01-01

    Facebook is the most popular online platform among adolescents and can be an effective medium to deliver health education. Although Korean American (KA) adolescents are at risk of obesity, a culturally tailored health education program is not available for them. Thus, our research team developed a health education program for KA adolescents on Facebook called "Healthy Teens." The aim of this study was to discuss important lessons learned through the program development process. This program includes culturally tailored learning modules about healthy eating and physical activity. The program was developed on the basis of the social cognitive theory, and the online program was developed by applying Web usability principles for adolescents. Upon completion, the usability of the program was assessed using heuristic evaluation. The findings from the heuristic evaluation showed that the Healthy Teens program was usable for KA adolescents. The findings from this study will assist researchers who are planning to build similar Facebook-based health education programs. Copyright © 2016 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Using 10-essential-services training to revive, refocus, and strengthen your environmental health programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaki, Carl S; Hinchey, Deborah; Harris, Joy

    2007-01-01

    The 10 essential services of environmental health, which are based on the 10 essential public health services, can guide environmental health practitioners in systematically organizing and managing environmental public health programs and activities. The National Center for Environmental Health of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has used the 10 essential services of environmental health as a basis for its six goals for the revitalization of environmental health in the 21st century. Nevertheless, studies indicate that very few environmental health practitioners are aware of the 10 essential services. This article discusses how essential-services training has increased the awareness and knowledge of environmental health practitioners about the development, value, and use of the essential services. Examples of training outcomes are offered to illustrate how the use of the essential-services framework has improved environmental health performance and practice.

  11. Community oriented interprofessional health education in Mozambique: one student/one family program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrão, L J; Fernandes, Tito H

    2014-01-01

    In the remote northern region of Mozambique the ratio of doctors to patients is 1:50,000. In 2007, Lúrio University initiated an innovative, "One Student/One Family" program of teaching and learning for health professions students, to complement their traditional core curriculum. All students of each of the school's six health degree programs complete a curriculum in "Family and Community Health" in each year of their training. Groups of six students from six different health professions training programs make weekly visits to communities, where each student is allocated to a family. Students learn from their families about community life and health issues, within a community where 80% of the population still lacks access to modern health care and rely on indigenous doctors and traditional remedies. In turn, students transmit information to families about modern health care and report to the faculty any major health problems they find. The educational/experiential approach is interprofessional and community-oriented. The main perceived advantages of the program are that it is applied and problem-based learning for students, while simultaneously providing needed healthcare services to the community. The major disadvantages include the complexity of coordinating multidisciplinary groups, the time and distance required of students in traveling to communities, and interpretation of multiple reports with variable data. This community-oriented education program involving students from six disciplines uses nontraditional teaching/learning methods is the basis of the ex libris of Lúrio University.

  12. Enrolling Underserved Women in mHealth Programs: Results From Text4baby Outreach Campaigns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushar, Jessica A; Fishman, Jodie; Garfinkel, Danielle; Pirretti, Amy

    2018-03-01

    Public health practitioners have increasingly leveraged technology-based communication to get health information into the hands of hard-to-reach populations; however, best practices for outreach and enrollment into mobile health (mHealth) programs are lacking. This article describes enrollment results from campaigns focused on enrolling underserved pregnant women and mothers in Text4baby-a free, mHealth service-to inform outreach strategies for mHealth programs. Text4baby participants receive health and safety information, interactive surveys, alerts, and appointment reminders through at least three weekly texts and a free app-timed to users' due date or babies' birth date. Text4baby worked with partners to implement national, state, and community-based enrollment campaigns. Descriptive statistics were used to compare baseline enrollment prior to a campaign with enrollment during a campaign to generate enrollment estimates. Enrollment rates were calculated for campaigns for which the number targeted/reached was available. National television campaigns resulted in more than 10,000 estimated enrollments. Campaigns that were integrated with an existing program and text-based recruitment had the highest enrollment rates, ranging from 7% to 24%. Facebook advertisements and traditional media targeting providers and consumers were least effective. mHealth programs should consider text-based recruitment and outreach via existing programs; additional research is needed on return on investment for different outreach strategies and on the effectiveness of different outreach strategies at reaching and enrolling specific target populations.

  13. [The relationship between socioeconomic factors and maternal and infant health programs in 13 Argentine provinces].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etchegoyen, Graciela; Paganini, José María

    2007-04-01

    To analyze the relationship between maternal and infant health and socioeconomic, cultural, and sanitation factors in Argentina; to evaluate how health program quality affects the primary health indicators for mothers and infants. This is a cross-sectional study with multiple variables. The authors studied six indicators for maternal and infant health: rates for maternal, infant, neonatal, and postneonatal mortality; the percentage of newborns with low birthweight; and the percentage of premature newborns. The study was conducted in 79 administrative units in 13 provinces that represent different geographic regions of Argentina. They included (1) the provinces of Salta and Jujuy in northwest Argentina; (2) the provinces of Córdoba, Santa Fe, and Buenos Aires in central Argentina; (3) the provinces of Entre Ríos and Misiones in the Mesopotamia or northeast region; (4) the provinces of San Luis, San Juan, and Mendoza in the Cuyo or northwest, Andean region; and (5) the provinces of Neuquén, Río Negro, and Chubut in the south. The explanatory variable in the study was the quality of health programs, controlled by socioeconomic, cultural, and sanitation factors in 1999 and 2000. The definition of program quality ("poor," "average," "good," and "very good") was based on quantitative and qualitative analysis of selected variables such as policies, organization, and procedures as determined by the investigators. Documentation was obtained from secondary official sources. The investigators interviewed 117 health system managers (including supervisors of provincial and local health programs, administrators of maternal and child health programs, and hospital directors), who provided information on characteristics and indicators of the health programs. There were marked geographic differences in the levels of maternal and infant health, medical care, and socioeconomic, cultural, and sanitation factors. Only 10.0% of health programs were classified as "very good," 35.4% as

  14. A Systematic Review of Reciprocal Peer Tutoring within Tertiary Health Profession Educational Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapnali Gazula

    2017-12-01

    Discussion: Whilst RPT has been found to have a positive impact upon learner experiences, further investigation is required around its use, particularly in assessing learning outcomes in health education programs.

  15. IMAGINE-ing interprofessional education: program evaluation of a novel inner city health educational experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Hu

    2017-02-01

    Conclusion: Interprofessional inner city health educational programs are beneficial for students to learn about poverty intervention and resources, and may represent a strategy to address a gap in the healthcare professional curriculum.

  16. Health and Aging Policy Fellows Program: Shaping a Healthy Future for Older Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pincus, Harold Alan; Pike, Kathleen M; Spaeth-Rublee, Brigitta; Elinson, Lynn

    2017-09-01

    As the size of the elderly population increases, so do the challenges of and barriers to high-quality, affordable health care. The Health and Aging Policy Fellows (HAPF) Program is designed to provide health and aging professionals with the skills and experience to help lead the effort in reducing these barriers and shaping a healthy and productive future for older Americans. Since its inception in 2008, the program has affected not only the fellows who participate, but also the field of health and aging policy. Work needs to be done to sustain this program so that more fellows can participate and sound policies for the elderly population can continue to be shaped and improved. This report describes the HAPF Program, including its background (rationale, description, partners, progress, effect), lessons learned, challenges and solutions, and policy implications. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  17. Protecting Human Health in a Changing Environment: 2018 Summer Enrichment Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in Research Triangle Park, NC is offering a free 1-week Summer Enrichment Program to educate students about how the Agency protects human health and the environment.

  18. CMS Medicare and Medicaid EHR Incentive Program, Electronic Health Record Products Used for Attestation

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Data set merges information about the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, Medicare and Medicaid EHR Incentive Programs attestations with the Office of the...

  19. Fish Health Data - Captive Broodstock Gene Rescue Program for Odd Year Class Elwha River Pink Salmon

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Conduct captive brood stock gene rescue program for Elwha River odd-year class pink salmon. All fresh mortalities larger than 100 mm are sent to Fish Health for...

  20. Implementation fidelity trajectories of a health promotion program in multidisciplinary settings : Managing tensions in rehabilitation care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Femke; van Offenbeek, Marjolein A. G.; Dekker, Rienk; Hettinga, Florentina J.; Hoekstra, Trynke; van der Woude, Lucas H. V.; van der Schans, Cees P.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Although the importance of evaluating implementation fidelity is acknowledged, little is known about heterogeneity in fidelity over time. This study aims to generate insight into the heterogeneity in implementation fidelity trajectories of a health promotion program in multidisciplinary

  1. Programming and Process in Prisoner Rehabilitation: A Prison Mental Health Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James A., III; Faubert, Marie

    1990-01-01

    Reviews literature concerning men in prisons. Describes specific program at a prison mental health center which prepares men for reentry into society. Closes with reflections on one man's struggle to grow and prepare for the outside. (CM)

  2. Organizational leadership, health risk screening, individually tailored programs, and supportive workplace culture might reduce presenteeism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Steultjens; E. Baker; N. Aas; W. Randi

    2012-01-01

    To determine if Workplace Health Promotion programs (WHPs) are effective in improving presenteeism. The secondary objective was to identify characteristics of successful programmes and potential risk factors for presenteeism. The Cochrane Library, Medline and other electronic databases were searched

  3. A literature review of teledermatology programs in the South African public health sector

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Walters, LEM

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This is presentation on teledermatology programs in South Africa that indicate the inequitable access to health care, the ineffective and inefficient referral system as well as the shortage of dermatologists....

  4. Addiction Competencies in the 2009 CACREP Clinical Mental Health Counseling Program Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tiffany K.; Craig, Stephen E.; Fetherson, Bianca T. L.; Simpson, C. Dennis

    2013-01-01

    The Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs developed addiction competencies for clinical mental health counseling students. This article highlights these competencies, provides an overview of current addiction training, and describes methods to integrate addiction education into curricula.

  5. Using tracking infrastructure to support public health programs, policies, and emergency response in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Nancy Loder; McKelvey, Wendy; Matte, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    To describe how the New York City (NYC) Tracking Program has used nationally mandated Secure Portal infrastructure and staff analytical expertise to support programs and inform policy. The NYC Health Department assesses, investigates, and acts on a wide range of environmental concerns to protect the health of New Yorkers. Specific examples of highly effective policies or initiatives that relied on the NYC Tracking Program are described, including restaurant sanitary grade posting, rat indexing, converting boilers to cleaner-burning fuels, reducing exposure to mercury from fish and contaminated products, and responding to Superstorm Sandy. The NYC Tracking Program supports the Health Department in using inspectional, administrative, and health data to guide operations. Tracking has also allowed internal and external partners to use these data to guide policy development.

  6. The Importance of Health Risk Communication in the Creation of the Anthrax Vaccine Immunization Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Freeman, Bradley

    2001-01-01

    ... press. This paper suggests that a more proactive educational program with a greater utilization of health risk communication techniques would have reduced much of the negative reaction to the anthrax vaccine...

  7. Risk assessment - a research program aimed at health risks from air pollution in the general environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindahl-Kiessling, K.; Ahlborg, U.; Bylin, G.; Ehrenberg, L.; Hemminki, K.; Lindell, B.; Nilsson, Robert; Bostroem, C.E.; Swarn, U.

    1991-01-01

    The paper presents a new research program for assessment of health risks caused by air pollutants. It is important to develop general methods for quantitative risk assessments and to improve the scientific base materials. (KAE)

  8. Technical efficiency of women's health prevention programs in Bucaramanga, Colombia: a four-stage analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Rodriguez, Myriam; Rodriguez-Villamizar, Laura A; Heredia-Pi, Ileana

    2016-10-13

    Primary Health Care (PHC) is an efficient strategy to improve health outcomes in populations. Nevertheless, studies of technical efficiency in health care have focused on hospitals, with very little on primary health care centers. The objective of the present study was to use the Data Envelopment Analysis to estimate the technical efficiency of three women's health promotion and disease prevention programs offered by primary care centers in Bucaramanga, Colombia. Efficiency was measured using a four-stage data envelopment analysis with a series of Tobit regressions to account for the effect of quality outcomes and context variables. Input/output information was collected from the institutions' records, chart reviews and personal interviews. Information about contextual variables was obtained from databases from the primary health program in the municipality. A jackknife analysis was used to assess the robustness of the results. The analysis was based on data from 21 public primary health care centers. The average efficiency scores, after adjusting for quality and context, were 92.4 %, 97.5 % and 86.2 % for the antenatal care (ANC), early detection of cervical cancer (EDCC) and family planning (FP) programs, respectively. On each program, 12 of the 21 (57.1 %) health centers were found to be technically efficient; having had the best-practice frontiers. Adjusting for context variables changed the scores and reference rankings of the three programs offered by the health centers. The performance of the women's health prevention programs offered by the centers was found to be heterogeneous. Adjusting for context and health care quality variables had a significant effect on the technical efficiency scores and ranking. The results can serve as a guide to strengthen management and organizational and planning processes related to local primary care services operating within a market-based model such as the one in Colombia.

  9. School-Based Mental Health Programs in the United States: Present Status and a Blueprint for the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Steven I.; Reddy, Linda A.

    1998-01-01

    Provides overview of sociocultural and political factors in the United States that have influenced recent interest in school-based health and mental health programs. Describes four well-known programs and presents a new framework, the Tripartite Model of School-Based Mental Health Interventions, to stimulate thinking on future programs. Addresses…

  10. 20 CFR 422.510 - Applications and related forms used in the health insurance for the aged program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... health insurance for the aged program. 422.510 Section 422.510 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY... forms used in the health insurance for the aged program. (a) Application forms. The following forms are prescribed for use in applying for entitlement to benefits under the health insurance for the aged program...

  11. Rationale for the Cultural Construction of School Mental Health Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Prerna G.; Nastasi, Bonnie K.; Leff, Stephen S.

    2017-01-01

    The implementation of evidence-based psychological programming to meet the needs of a global population has been impeded by the translation of theories and research findings across populations and settings without due consideration of cultural factors. The purpose of this article is to discuss the rationale for use of partnership-based methods in…

  12. A Big Data Analytics Methodology Program in the Health Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, James; Joseph, Anthony; Howell-Barber, H.

    2016-01-01

    The benefits of Big Data Analytics are cited frequently in the literature. However, the difficulties of implementing Big Data Analytics can limit the number of organizational projects. In this study, the authors evaluate business, procedural and technical factors in the implementation of Big Data Analytics, applying a methodology program. Focusing…

  13. 76 FR 52575 - Health Care for Homeless Veterans Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-23

    ... affect in a material way the economy, a sector of the economy, productivity, competition, jobs, the..., Individuals with disabilities, Low and moderate income housing, Public assistance programs, Public housing... facilities have been ascertained to VA's satisfaction, and then only to applicants determined by VA to meet...

  14. Medicaid/CHIP Program; Medicaid Program and Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP); Changes to the Medicaid Eligibility Quality Control and Payment Error Rate Measurement Programs in Response to the Affordable Care Act. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-05

    This final rule updates the Medicaid Eligibility Quality Control (MEQC) and Payment Error Rate Measurement (PERM) programs based on the changes to Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) eligibility under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. This rule also implements various other improvements to the PERM program.

  15. Environment Health & Safety Research Program. Organization and 1979-1980 Publications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-01-01

    This document was prepared to assist readers in understanding the organization of Pacific Northwest Laboratory, and the organization and functions of the Environment, Health and Safety Research Program Office. Telephone numbers of the principal management staff are provided. Also included is a list of 1979 and 1980 publications reporting on work performed in the Environment, Health and Safety Research Program, as well as a list of papers submitted for publication.

  16. [Public health competencies and contents in pharmacy degree programs in Spanish universities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumbreras, Blanca; Davó-Blanes, María Carmen; Vives-Cases, Carmen; Bosch, Félix

    2015-01-01

    To identify public health core competencies and contents in pharmacy degrees at a meeting of public health lecturers in pharmacy degrees from various public and private universities. The first Meeting of the Forum of University Teaching Staff in Pharmacy Degrees was held at the Faculty of Medicine in the Complutense University, Madrid, Spain on the 19(th) and 20(th) of November 2013. The meeting was attended by 17 lecturers. Participants brought their own teaching programs and were given two previous studies on public health competencies for analysis of public health contents and competencies in pharmacy degrees. Working groups were formed and the results were shared. The highest number of core competencies was identified in the following functions: "Assessment of the population's health needs" and "Developing health policies". The final program included basic contents organized into 8 units: Concept of Public Health, Demography, Epidemiological Method, Environment and Health, Food Safety, Epidemiology of Major Health Problems, Health Promotion and Education, and Health Planning and Management. Representation of almost all the Spanish Pharmacy Faculties and the consensus reached in the description of competences and program contents will greatly improve the quality of teaching in this area. Copyright © 2014 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Nuclear engineering, health physics, and radioactive waste management fellowship program: Summary of program activities: Nuclear engineering and health physics fellowship, 1985-1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    Progress is reported in the nuclear engineering and health physics elements of the fellowship program. Statistics are given on numbers of student applications and new appointments, the degree areas of applicants, GPA and GRE score averages of the fellows, and employment of completed fellows

  18. The Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program: desirable knowledge, skills and attitudes from the perspective of nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happell, Brenda; Palmer, Christine; Tennent, Rebeka

    2011-03-01

    To enhance the understanding of the skills and attitudes of mental health nurses working in the Australian Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program. The Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program places qualified mental health nurses alongside community-based general practitioners, private psychiatric practices and other appropriate organisations to provide clients with mental health conditions with a more integrated treatment plan. An exploratory, qualitative approach was undertaken, given the paucity of relevant research in this area. Exploratory individual interviews were conducted with ten mental health nurses working in this scheme. Data analysis was organised and managed using QSR NVivo qualitative analysis software. Respondents identified specific skills and attitudes required for practice under the Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program. Eight areas of skill and attitude were identified as essential for mental health nurses working in this field. This study highlights that many of these skills and attitudes are specific to the setting where mental health nurses are working. Mental health nurses working under this programme have a role to play in the dissemination of knowledge about their practice. More needs to be done by governments and other institutions to ensure that general practitioners and other health professionals understand the role played by mental health nurses in the provision of care. The extent to which the Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program becomes a sustainable strategy to promote quality and accessible mental health care will depend to some degree on the capacity to identify the skills and attitudes necessary for practice. The findings presented in this paper provide a significant contribution to articulating the essential characteristics required for this area of practice. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Costs of implementing and maintaining comprehensive school health: the case of the Annapolis Valley Health Promoting Schools program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohinmaa, Arto; Langille, Jessie-Lee; Jamieson, Stuart; Whitby, Caroline; Veugelers, Paul J

    2011-01-01

    Comprehensive school health (CSH) is increasingly receiving renewed interest as a strategy to improve health and learning. The present study estimates the costs associated with implementing and maintaining CSH. We reviewed the accounting information of all schools in the Annapolis Valley Health Promoting Schools (AVHPS) program in 2008/2009. We considered support for nutrition and physical activity programs by the public system, grants, donations, fundraising and volunteers. The annual public funding to AVHPS to implement and maintain CSH totaled $344,514, which translates, on average, to $7,830 per school and $22.67 per student. Of the public funding, $140,500 was for CSH, $86,250 for breakfast programs, $28,750 for school food policy programs, and the remainder for other subsidized programs. Grants, donations and fundraising were mostly locally acquired. They totaled $127,235, which translates, on average, to $2,892 per school or $8.37 per student. The value of volunteer support was estimated to be equivalent to the value of grants, donations and fundraising combined. Of all grants, donations, fundraising and volunteers, 20% was directed to physical activity programs and 80% to nutrition programs. The public costs to implement and maintain CSH are modest. They leveraged substantial local funding and in-kind contributions, underlining community support for healthy eating and active living. Where CSH is effective in preventing childhood overweight, it is most likely cost-effective too, as costs for future chronic diseases are mounting. CSH programs that are proven effective and cost-effective have enormous potential for broad implementation and for reducing the public health burden associated with obesity.

  20. The Assessment, Development, Assurance Pharmacist's Tool (ADAPT) for ensuring quality implementation of health promotion programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Hoai-An; Taylor, Catherine R; DiPietro, Natalie A

    2012-02-10

    To develop and validate the Assessment, Development, Assurance Pharmacist's Tool (ADAPT), an instrument for pharmacists and student pharmacists to use in developing and implementing health promotion programs. The 36-item ADAPT instrument was developed using the framework of public health's 3 core functions (assessment, policy development, and assurance) and 10 essential services. The tool's content and usage was assessed and conducted through peer-review and initial validity testing processes. Over 20 faculty members, preceptors, and student pharmacists at 5 institutions involved in planning and implementing health promotion initiatives reviewed the instrument and conducted validity testing. The instrument took approximately 15 minutes to complete and the findings resulted in changes and improvements to elements of the programs evaluated. The ADAPT instrument fills a need to more effectively plan, develop, implement, and evaluate pharmacist-directed public health programs that are evidence-based, high-quality, and compliant with laws and regulations and facilitates documentation of pharmacists' contributions to public health.

  1. Designing and implementing an undergraduate health administration program for nontraditional students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, Nancy; Gordon, Jean; Rushing, John

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the development and implementation of an undergraduate health administration program for nontraditional students at a Hispanic serving institution. The program had to meet the needs of a diverse, adult student population, the local community, and the future leadership requirements of the healthcare industry. As such, the program was designed as a "bridge" for full-time employed healthcare licensed professionals seeking to complete a baccalaureate degree and obtain positions in the healthcare management field. It answered the call of the local community to strengthen partnerships between business and education by offering the program at healthcare employer worksites. Furthermore, the program addressed three needs of the healthcare industry: (1) the recognized shortage of future healthcare leaders, (2) the under-representation of minorities in the industry, and (3) proposed changes in health administration programs' curricula to focus on competencies in the areas of communication skills, decision making, ethical leadership, and self-development.

  2. Cost-benefit analysis of comprehensive mental health prevention programs in Japanese workplaces: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Sachiko; Yokoyama, Kazuhito; Kitamura, Fumihiko; Fukuda, Takashi; Inaba, Ryoichi

    2013-01-01

    We examined the implementation of mental health prevention programs in Japanese workplaces and the costs and benefits. A cross-sectional survey targeting mental health program staff at 11 major companies was conducted. Questionnaires explored program implementation based on the guidelines of the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare. Labor, materials, outsourcing costs, overheads, employee mental discomfort, and absentee numbers, and work attendance were examined. Cost-benefit analyses were conducted from company perspectives assessing net benefits per employee and returns on investment. The surveyed companies employ an average of 1,169 workers. The implementation rate of the mental health prevention programs was 66% for primary, 51% for secondary, and 60% for tertiary programs. The program's average cost was 12,608 yen per employee and the total benefit was 19,530 yen per employee. The net benefit per employee was 6,921 yen and the return on investment was in the range of 0.27-16.85. Seven of the 11 companies gained a net benefit from the mental health programs.

  3. Financial incentives and accountability for integrated medical care in Department of Veterans Affairs mental health programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourne, Amy M; Greenwald, Devra E; Hermann, Richard C; Charns, Martin P; McCarthy, John F; Yano, Elizabeth M

    2010-01-01

    This study assessed the extent to which mental health leaders perceive their programs as being primarily accountable for monitoring general medical conditions among patients with serious mental illness, and it assessed associations with modifiable health system factors. As part of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) 2007 national Mental Health Program Survey, 108 mental health program directors were queried regarding program characteristics. Perceived accountability was defined as whether their providers, as opposed to external general medical providers, were primarily responsible for specific clinical tasks related to serious mental illness treatment or high-risk behaviors. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine whether financial incentives or other system factors were associated with accountability. Thirty-six percent of programs reported primary accountability for monitoring diabetes and cardiovascular risk after prescription of second-generation antipsychotics, 10% for hepatitis C screening, and 17% for obesity screening and weight management. In addition, 18% and 27% of program leaders, respectively, received financial bonuses for high performance for screening for risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease and for alcohol misuse. Financial bonuses for diabetes and cardiovascular screening were associated with primary accountability for such screening (odds ratio=5.01, pFinancial incentives to improve quality performance may promote accountability in monitoring diabetes and cardiovascular risk assessment within mental health programs. Integrated care strategies (co-location) might be needed to promote management of high-risk behaviors among patients with serious mental illness.

  4. Integration of Health Systems Management Bachelors Program graduates into the Israeli healthcare market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz-Ilan, Dana; Goldberg, Avishay; Pliskin, Joseph S; Peled, Ronit; Shvarts, Shifra

    2005-01-01

    Ben-Gurion University (BGU) in Beer-Sheva, opened a special program (B.A. degree) for training junior academic administrative personnel who can improve the quality of service in health care organizations through suitable and high-quality administration. The program the first of its kind in Israel, has been in operation since 1994, providing 50 candidates for administrative positions within the health system per year. The research goals of the project described in this paper were to examine integration of 224 graduates of the undergraduate program in Health Systems Management (HSM) within the private and public health system in Israel, including employment trends and evaluation of the program in retrospect. Questionnaires were sent to all graduates of the program. Participants were requested to answer questions regarding their present place of employment and their satisfaction with their academic degree. The findings showed that the graduates of the undergraduate program in HSM have integrated well into the health system, butnotas well as they could have. The graduates encountered difficulties in their absorption into management roles in the public health system and feel that the extent of their abilities has yet to be fully recognized and utilized by the system.

  5. Methods and challenges for the health impact assessment of vaccination programs in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Marli Christovam Sartori

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To describe methods and challenges faced in the health impact assessment of vaccination programs, focusing on the pneumococcal conjugate and rotavirus vaccines in Latin America and the Caribbean. METHODS For this narrative review, we searched for the terms "rotavirus", "pneumococcal", "conjugate vaccine", "vaccination", "program", and "impact" in the databases Medline and LILACS. The search was extended to the grey literature in Google Scholar. No limits were defined for publication year. Original articles on the health impact assessment of pneumococcal and rotavirus vaccination programs in Latin America and the Caribbean in English, Spanish or Portuguese were included. RESULTS We identified 207 articles. After removing duplicates and assessing eligibility, we reviewed 33 studies, 25 focusing on rotavirus and eight on pneumococcal vaccination programs. The most frequent studies were ecological, with time series analysis or comparing pre- and post-vaccination periods. The main data sources were: health information systems; population-, sentinel- or laboratory-based surveillance systems; statistics reports; and medical records from one or few health care services. Few studies used primary data. Hospitalization and death were the main outcomes assessed. CONCLUSIONS Over the last years, a significant number of health impact assessments of pneumococcal and rotavirus vaccination programs have been conducted in Latin America and the Caribbean. These studies were carried out few years after the programs were implemented, meet the basic methodological requirements and suggest positive health impact. Future assessments should consider methodological issues and challenges arisen in these first studies conducted in the region.

  6. Suicide Prevention Programs in the Schools: A Review and Public Health Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David N.; Eckert, Tanya L.; Mazza, James J.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of school-based suicide prevention programs from a public health perspective. A literature review of empirical studies examining school-based suicide prevention programs was conducted. Studies were required to contain information pertaining to the implementation and outcomes of a…

  7. The Feasibility of an Online Health Program for Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Elizabeth; Chiauzzi, Emil; Floyd, Deborah L.; Bond, Kathleen; Wood, Mollie

    2012-01-01

    A comprehensive, four-phase approach was used to test the feasibility of an online, tailored health program for community college students. The prototype was perceived by students as relevant and useful; practitioners were favorable toward offering the program as part of orientation and in a credit-course format. (Contains 4 tables and 2 figures.)

  8. Evaluation of Three Osteoporosis Prevention Programs for Young Women: Application of the Health Belief Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lein, Donald H.; Turner, Lori; Wilroy, Jereme

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of theory-based osteoporosis prevention programs on calcium and vitamin D intakes and osteoporosis health beliefs in young women. Methods: Women (N = 152) aged 19 to 25 years were randomly assigned to one of 3 groups: a brochure group (n = 51), a computer-tailored program group…

  9. A High School Depression and Suicide Prevention Program: A Collaboration between Health Education and Psychological Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moilanen, Donna L.; Bradbury, Susan

    2002-01-01

    Examined a collaboration between health education and psychological services in generating a high school depression and suicide prevention program. The five-component program raised awareness of teen depression and suicide, increased communication about these issues within the school and community, and provided information about available…

  10. A program for thai rubber tappers to improve the cost of occupational health and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arphorn, Sara; Chaonasuan, Porntip; Pruktharathikul, Vichai; Singhakajen, Vajira; Chaikittiporn, Chalermchai

    2010-01-01

    The purposes of this research were to determine the cost of occupational health and safety and work-related health problems, accidents, injuries and illnesses in rubber tappers by implementing a program in which rubber tappers were provided training on self-care in order to reduce and prevent work-related accidents, injuries and illnesses. Data on costs for healthcare, the prevention and the treatment of work-related accidents, injuries and illnesses were collected by interview using a questionnaire. The findings revealed that there was no relationship between what was spent on healthcare and the prevention of work-related accidents, injuries and illnesses and that spent on the treatment of work-related accidents, injuries and illnesses. The proportion of the injured subjects after the program implementation was significantly less than that before the program implementation (p<0.001). The level of pain after the program implementation was significantly less than that before the program implementation (p<0.05). The treatment costs incurred after the program implementation were significantly less than those incurred before the program implementation (p<0.001). It was demonstrated that this program raised the health awareness of rubber tappers. It strongly empowered the leadership in health promotion for the community.

  11. Health Sciences Library Support of a University Common Reading Program: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delwiche, Frances A

    2017-01-01

    Common reading programs have become increasingly popular on college and university campuses as a means for increasing student engagement, retention, and success. This article describes the characteristics, goals, and benefits of common reading programs and provides examples from the literature of academic library involvement in them. Finally, an example is provided of how one academic health sciences library participated in its institution's First-Year Summer Reading program.

  12. A Guide for Planning and Implementing Successful Mental Health Educational Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Vieira, Thiago; Ramos, Fernando Augusto da Cunha; Lauridsen-Ribeiro, Edith; Ribeiro, Marcos Vinícius Vieira; Meireles, Elisa Andrade; Nóbrega, Brunno Araújo; Motta Palma, Sonia Maria; Ratto, Maria de Fátima; Caetano, Sheila Cavalcante; Ribeiro, Wagner Silva; Rosário, Maria Conceição do

    2018-01-01

    Considering the global burden of mental disorders, there is a worldwide need to improve the quality of mental health care. In order to address this issue, a change in how health care professionals are trained may be essential. However, the majority of the few reports published on this field's training programs do not discuss the characteristics associated with the success or failure of these strategies. The purpose of this review was to systematically examine the literature about mental health training programs designed for health care professionals in order to identify the relevant factors associated with their effective implementation. The MEDLINE/PubMed, SciELO, and Virtual Health Library databases were used to search for articles published before February 2017 and reviewed by two double-blind reviewers. We found 77 original papers about mental health educational programs. Many of these studies were conducted in the USA (39%), addressed depression as the main subject (34%), and applied a quasi-experimental design (52%). Effective interventions were associated with the following characteristics: the use of learner-centered and interactive methodological approaches; a curriculum based on challenges in the trainees' daily routines; the involvement of experts in the program's development; the enrollment of experienced participants; interdisciplinary group work; flexible timing; the use of e-learning resources; and optimizing the implementation of knowledge into the participants' routine work practices. These results will be helpful for planning and improving the quality of future educational programs in mental health.

  13. Perceived Impacts of a Public Health Training Center Field Placement Program Among Trainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrik eJohansson

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available There is heightened interest in identifying the impact of the federally-funded Public Health Training Center (PHTC program. Although evaluation studies have been conducted of public health training in general, evaluations of PHTC programs are rare. Field placement components are Congressionally-mandated requirements of PHTCs. Field placements are typically intensive, supervised externships for students to gain public health experience with local health departments or non-profit organizations. We have found no published evaluations of PHTC field placement components. This may be because of their small size and unique nature. We designed and evaluated a 200-hour field placement program at an established Public Health Training Center. The evaluation included pre/post surveys measuring public health core competencies, and post-experience interviews. We found significant increases in three competency domains among trainees: policy development and program planning, communication skills, and community dimensions of practice. These outcomes contribute to an evidence base on the efficacy of PHTC field placement programs, and underscore their role in public health training.

  14. Process Evaluation of a Workers' Health Surveillance Program for Meat Processing Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Holland, Berry J; Brouwer, Sandra; de Boer, Michiel R; Reneman, Michiel F; Soer, Remko

    2017-09-01

    Objective To evaluate the implementation process of a workers' health surveillance (WHS) program in a Dutch meat processing company. Methods Workers from five plants were eligible to participate in the WHS program. The program consisted of four evaluative components and an intervention component. Qualitative and quantitative methods were used to evaluate seven process aspects. Data were gathered by interviews with stakeholders, participant questionnaires, and from registries of the company and occupational health service. Results Two recruitment strategies were used: open invitation or automatic participation. Of the 986 eligible workers, 305 participated in the program. Average reach was 53 %. Two out of five program components could not be assessed on dose delivered, dose received and fidelity. If components were assessable, 85-100 % of the components was delivered, 66-100 % of the components was received by participants, and fidelity was 100 %. Participants were satisfied with the WHS program (mean score 7.6). Contextual factors that facilitated implementation were among others societal developments and management support. Factors that formed barriers were program novelty and delayed follow-up. Conclusion The WHS program was well received by participants. Not all participants were offered the same number of program components, and not all components were performed according to protocol. Deviation from protocol is an indication of program failure and may affect program effectiveness.

  15. Workplace health promotion programs for older workers in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnavita, Nicola; Capitanelli, Ilaria; Garbarino, Sergio; La Milia, Daniele Ignazio; Moscato, Umberto; Pira, Enrico; Poscia, Andrea; Ricciardi, Walter

    2017-10-27

    Italy is the European country with the highest number of citizens over the age of sixty. In recent years, the unsustainability of the social security system has forced the Italian government to raise the retirement age and reduce the chances of early exit, thus sharply increasing the age of the workforce. Consequently, a significant proportion of older workers are currently obliged to do jobs that were designed for young people. Systematic health promotion intervention for older workers is therefore essential. The European Pro Health 65+ project aims at selecting and validating best practices for successful/active aging. In this context we set out to review workplace health promotion projects carried out in Italy. To ascertain examples of workplace health promotion for older workers (WHPOW), we carried out a review of the scientific and grey literature together with a survey of companies. We detected 102 WHPOW research studies conducted in conjunction with supranational organizations, public institutions, companies, social partners, NGOs and educational institutions. The main objectives of the WHPOW were to improve the work environment, the qualifications of older workers and attitudes towards the elderly, and, in many cases, also to improve work organization. The best way to promote effective WHPOW interventions is by disseminating awareness of best practices and correct methods of analysis. Our study suggests ways of enhancing WHPOW at both a national and European level.

  16. 76 FR 64110 - Safety and Health Management Programs for Mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-17

    ... section of this notice. Comment Dates: MSHA will hold the date for comments open until all meetings are... Identification, including workplace inspections for violations of mandatory health and safety standards. Hazard.... Improved communication. Increased productivity. Increased and improved worker and management involvement in...

  17. 75 FR 20314 - Federal Employees Health Benefits Program; Miscellaneous Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-19

    ... employees of the Senate Restaurants after the operations of the Senate Restaurants are contracted to be... business concern to which the Senate Restaurants' food service operations were transferred as described in... continuation of Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) coverage for certain former Senate Restaurant...

  18. 75 FR 76615 - Federal Employees Health Benefits Program Miscellaneous Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-09

    ... employees of the Senate Restaurants after the operations of the Senate Restaurants are contracted to be... which the Senate Restaurants' food service operations were transferred as described in section 1 of... continuation of Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) coverage for certain former Senate Restaurant...

  19. Health and safety plan for operations performed for the Environmental Restoration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trippet, W.A. II; Reneau, M.; Morton, S.L.

    1992-04-01

    This document constitutes the generic health and safety plan for the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP). It addresses the health and safety requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA); Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) 29 CFR 1910.120 standard; and EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc. This plan is a guide to individuals who must complete a health and safety plan for a task performed for the EPR. It contains a task specific addendum that, when completed, specifically addresses task specific health and safety issues. This health and safety plan reduces the time it takes to write a task specific health and safety plan by providing discussions of requirements, guidance on where specific information is located, and specific topics in the Addendum that must be discussed at a task level. This format encourages a complete task specific health and safety plan and a standard for all health and safety plans written for ERP

  20. Health and safety plan for operations performed for the Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trippet, W.A. II (IT Corp., (United States)); Reneau, M.; Morton, S.L. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

    1992-04-01

    This document constitutes the generic health and safety plan for the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP). It addresses the health and safety requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA); Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) 29 CFR 1910.120 standard; and EG G Idaho, Inc. This plan is a guide to individuals who must complete a health and safety plan for a task performed for the EPR. It contains a task specific addendum that, when completed, specifically addresses task specific health and safety issues. This health and safety plan reduces the time it takes to write a task specific health and safety plan by providing discussions of requirements, guidance on where specific information is located, and specific topics in the Addendum that must be discussed at a task level. This format encourages a complete task specific health and safety plan and a standard for all health and safety plans written for ERP.