WorldWideScience

Sample records for health examination protocols

  1. Spermiologic examination protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. Ye. Bragina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The 2010 World Health Organization (WHO guidelines for semiological examinations describe standard, additional tests and tests of scientific value and analyze in detail different situations and possible errors. This paper gives an abstract of the WHO guidelines, a concise protocol for using the standard methods of a spermiolofic examination, and a number of commentaries that reflect the alternative view of a number of problems.

  2. Impact of Partial-Mouth Periodontal Examination Protocols on the Association Between Gingival Bleeding and Oral Health-Related Quality of Life in Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediani Machado, Michely; Tomazoni, Fernanda; Ruffo Ortiz, Fernanda; Ardenghi, Thiago Machado; Zanatta, Fabricio Batistin

    2017-07-01

    It is not clear how using partial-mouth periodontal examination (PMPE) protocols affects estimates of the association between gingival bleeding (GB) and oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL). The aim of the present study is to assess impact of different PMPEs on the association between GB and OHRQoL in 12-year-old adolescents. A total of 1,134 adolescents were evaluated for clinical and subjective variables. GB was determined by full-mouth examination (FME) of six sites (disto-buccal [DB], mid-buccal [B], mesio-buccal [MB], disto-lingual [DL], mid-lingual, and mesio-lingual [ML]) and different PMPEs were calculated using a 15% cut-off point: 1) full-mouth (MB-B-DB/MB-B-DL); 2) two diagonal quadrants (six sites/MB-B-DB/MB-B-DL); 3) two randomly selected half-mouth quadrants (six sites/MB-B-DB/ MB-B-DL/MB-DB-ML-DL); and 4) the community periodontal index. OHRQoL was assessed using the Child Perceptions Questionnaire (CPQ 11-14 ). Adjusted negative binomial regression models were used to calculate the rate ratio of CPQ 11-14 scores for each PMPE. Adolescents with GB showed significantly poorer OHRQoL than their counterparts when FME was used. In contrast, more than half of PMPE protocols did not detect significant associations between GB and CPQ 11-14 scores in the adjusted analysis. Using PMPE to assess GB in adolescents significantly affects associations with OHRQoL outcomes, depending on the protocol used. PMPEs that evaluated MB-B-DL sites of randomly selected half-mouth quadrants (1 or 2 and 3 or 4) achieved results closer to those obtained with FME.

  3. Using NHANES oral health examination protocols as part of an esophageal cancer screening study conducted in a high-risk region of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong Wei

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The oral health status of rural residents in the People's Republic of China has not been extensively studied and the relationship between poor oral health and esophageal cancer (EC is unclear. We aim to report the oral health status of adults participating in an EC screening study conducted in a rural high-risk EC area of China and to explore the relationship between oral health and esophageal dysplasia. Methods National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES oral health examination procedures and the Modified Gingival Index (MGI were used in a clinical study designed to examine risk factors for esophageal cancer and to test a new esophageal cytology sampling device. This study was conducted in three rural villages in China with high rates of EC in 2002 and was a collaborative effort involving investigators from the National Institutes of Health and the Cancer Institute of the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences. Results Nearly 17% of the study participants aged 40–67 years old were edentulous. Overall, the mean number of adjusted missing teeth (including third molars and retained dental roots was 13.8 and 35% had 7 contacts or less. Women were more likely to experience greater tooth loss than men. The average age at the time of first tooth loss for those with no posterior functional contacts was approximately 41 years for men and 36 years for women. The mean DMFT (decayed, missing, and filled teeth score for the study population was 8.5. Older persons, females, and individuals having lower educational attainment had higher DMFT scores. The prevalence of periodontal disease (defined as at least one site with 3 mm of attachment loss and 4 mm of pocket depth was 44.7%, and 36.7% of the study participants had at least one site with 6 mm or more of attachment loss. Results from a parsimonious multivariate model indicate that participants with poor oral health wemore likely to have esophageal dysplasia (OR = 1.59; 95

  4. Examining the ethical and social issues of health technology design through the public appraisal of prospective scenarios: a study protocol describing a multimedia-based deliberative method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehoux, Pascale; Gauthier, Philippe; Williams-Jones, Bryn; Miller, Fiona A; Fishman, Jennifer R; Hivon, Myriam; Vachon, Patrick

    2014-06-21

    The design of health technologies relies on assumptions that affect how they will be implemented, such as intended use, complexity, impact on user autonomy, and appropriateness. Those who design and implement technologies make several ethical and social assumptions on behalf of users and society more broadly, but there are very few tools to examine prospectively whether such assumptions are warranted and how the public define and appraise the desirability of health innovations. This study protocol describes a three-year study that relies on a multimedia-based prospective method to support public deliberations that will enable a critical examination of the social and ethical issues of health technology design. The first two steps of our mixed-method study were completed: relying on a literature review and the support of our multidisciplinary expert committee, we developed scenarios depicting social and technical changes that could unfold in three thematic areas within a 25-year timeframe; and for each thematic area, we created video clips to illustrate prospective technologies and short stories to describe their associated dilemmas. Using this multimedia material, we will: conduct four face-to-face deliberative workshops with members of the public (n=40) who will later join additional participants (n=25) through an asynchronous online forum; and analyze and integrate three data sources: observation, group deliberations, and a self-administered participant survey. This study protocol will be of interest to those who design and assess public involvement initiatives and to those who examine the implementation of health innovations. Our premise is that using user-friendly tools in a deliberative context that foster participants' creativity and reflexivity in pondering potential technoscientific futures will enable our team to analyze a range of normative claims, including some that may prove problematic and others that may shed light over potentially more valuable

  5. Early detection of memory impairment in people over 65 years old consulting at Health Examination Centers for the French health insurance: the EVATEM protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannier-Nitenberg, Christiane; Dauphinot, Virginie; Bongue, Bienvenu; Sass, Catherine; Rouch, Isabelle; Beauchet, Olivier; Krolak-Salmon, Pierre; Fantino, Bruno

    2013-06-06

    Only half of those living with Alzheimer's disease in France are currently diagnosed, and only one patient in three is supported during the early stages of dementia. This study aims to evaluate three cognitive tests for their predictive ability to diagnose mild cognitive impairments and Alzheimer's disease and related disorders. For people aged 65 years or over, presenting with a memory complaint, these tests can be performed easily during a preventative consultation. The EVATEM (évaluation des troubles de l'équilibre et de la mémoire (evaluation of balance and memory problems)) cohort study was designed to prospectively assess the predictive value of tests for the diagnosis of mild cognitive impairments and Alzheimer's disease in elderly subjects aged 65 years or over. Subjects were recruited from three health examination centers that are part of the French health insurance system. If a memory complaint was identified (using a dedicated questionnaire), the five-word test, the cognitive disorders examination test and the verbal fluency test were administered during a preventative consultation. A memory consultation was performed at a University Hospital to diagnosis any potential cognitive disorder and a one-year follow-up consultation was also scheduled. We recorded 2041 cases of memory complaint at our Health Examination Centers. Cognitive tests were refused by 33.6% of people who had a memory complaint. The number of subjects sent to a University Hospital memory consultation was 832 and 74.5% of them completed this consultation. The study population therefore includes 620 subjects. Tests for the early diagnosis of a mild cognitive impairment or Alzheimer's disease and related disorders should be used in centers dedicated to disease prevention. These should guide subjects with memory impairment to full memory consultations at hospitals and improve the access to early medical and behavioral support. ClinicalTrials.gov:NCT01316562.

  6. A Study to Examine the Uses of Personal Strength in Relation to Mental Health Recovery in Adults with Serious Mental Illnesses: A Research Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Huiting; Yuan, Peng; Cui, Song Song; Yen, Melissa Sng Siok

    2015-09-30

    This study will explore the relationships among strengths self-efficacy, resourcefulness, stigma experience and mental health recovery in community-dwelling adults with serious mental illnesses. Mental health practices have focued on psychopathphysiology. Stigma heavily plagued clients with mental illnesses and is one of the greatest barriers to mental health recovery. Personal strengths like strengths self-efficacy, people's confidence in using their personal strengths, and resourcefulness, the ability to carry out daily activities, have been linked to positive mental health. However, the linkage between strengths self-efficacy, resourcefulness and mental health recovery remains uncharted. A cross-sectional, descriptive, mixed methods study will be conducted. A funded study by the Sigma Theta Tau, Upsilon Eta Chapter, August 2013, involving a convenience sample of 100 participants is planned. Included are community dwelling adults between 21 to 65 years old having been diagnosed with serious mental illnesses. Clients with current co-occurring substance abuse will be excluded. Participants complete questionnaires and undergo an interview. Correlations among the study variables will be examined. Regression analysis will determine if recovery can be predicted by strengths self-efficacy, resourcefulness and stigma experience. Interview data will be transcribed and analyzed by thematic analysis. This study will look beyond clients' disability to focus on their recovery and healing capacities such as strengths self-efficacy and resourcefulness. Findings will expand our knowledge about mental health recovery. Knowledge gained from this study may pave the way for future nursing strategies to aid recovery and inform the development of positive, strengths-based interventions.

  7. Bath Breakfast Project (BBP - Examining the role of extended daily fasting in human energy balance and associated health outcomes: Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial [ISRCTN31521726

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeans Matthew

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current guidance regarding the role of daily breakfast in human health is largely grounded in cross-sectional observations. However, the causal nature of these relationships has not been fully explored and what limited information is emerging from controlled laboratory-based experiments appears inconsistent with much existing data. Further progress in our understanding therefore requires a direct examination of how daily breakfast impacts human health under free-living conditions. Methods/Design The Bath Breakfast Project (BBP is a randomised controlled trial comparing the effects of daily breakfast consumption relative to extended fasting on energy balance and human health. Approximately 70 men and women will undergo extensive laboratory-based assessments of their acute metabolic responses under fasted and post-prandial conditions, to include: resting metabolic rate, substrate oxidation, dietary-induced thermogenesis and systemic concentrations of key metabolites/hormones. Physiological and psychological indices of appetite will also be monitored both over the first few hours of the day (i.e. whether fed or fasted and also following a standardised test lunch used to assess voluntary energy intake under controlled conditions. Baseline measurements of participants' anthropometric characteristics (e.g. DEXA will be recorded prior to intervention, along with an oral glucose tolerance test and acquisition of adipose tissue samples to determine expression of key genes and estimates of tissue-specific insulin action. Participants will then be randomly assigned either to a group prescribed an energy intake of ≥3000 kJ before 1100 each day or a group to extend their overnight fast by abstaining from ingestion of energy-providing nutrients until 1200 each day, with all laboratory-based measurements followed-up 6 weeks later. Free-living assessments of energy intake (via direct weighed food diaries and energy expenditure (via

  8. The Taste and Smell Protocol in the 2011–2014 US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES): Test–Retest Reliability and Validity Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawal, Shristi; Hoffman, Howard J.; Honda, Mallory; Huedo-Medin, Tania B.; Duffy, Valerie B.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The US NHANES 2011–2014 protocol includes a taste and smell questionnaire (CSQ) in home-based interviews and brief assessments in mobile exam centers. We report the short- and longer-term test–retest reliability and validity of this protocol against broader chemosensory measures. Methods A convenience sample of 73 adults (age=39.5±20.8 years) underwent the NHANES protocol at baseline, 2 weeks and 6 months. For taste, participants rated intensities of two tastants (1 M NaCl, 1 mM quinine) applied to the tongue tip and three tastants (1 M NaCl, 1 mM quinine, 0.32 M NaCl) sampled with the whole mouth. Smell function was assessed with a Pocket Smell Test™ (PST; eight-item odor identification test). The CSQ asked about chemosensory problems, distortions, and age-related changes. Broader baseline measurements were a 40-item olfactometer-generated identification task and additional whole-mouth taste intensities (1 M sucrose, 32 mM citric acid, 3.2 mM propylthiouracil). Results Intraclass correlations (ICCs) for NHANES taste measures showed moderate-to-good agreement after 2 weeks and 6 months (ICCs 0.42–0.71). Whole-mouth quinine intensity was significantly correlated with other taste intensities, supporting its utility as a marker for overall taste functioning. Olfactory classification from PSTs agreed for 98.5 % of participants across 2 weeks (κ=0.85; 95 % CI 0.71–0.99) and had good correspondence with the olfactometer task. CSQ items showed good-to-excellent agreement over 6 months (ICCs 0.66–0.90). Conclusions These findings further support that the NHANES chemosensory protocol has moderate-to-good test–retest reliability when administered to healthy, educated adults. Despite being a brief procedure with limited measures, the NHANES taste and smell assessments provided good information when compared to broader measures of taste and smell function. PMID:27833669

  9. Study protocol for two randomized controlled trials examining the effectiveness and safety of current weekend allied health services and a new stakeholder-driven model for acute medical/surgical patients versus no weekend allied health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Terry P; O'Brien, Lisa; Mitchell, Deb; Bowles, Kelly-Ann; Haas, Romi; Markham, Donna; Plumb, Samantha; Chiu, Timothy; May, Kerry; Philip, Kathleen; Lescai, David; McDermott, Fiona; Sarkies, Mitchell; Ghaly, Marcelle; Shaw, Leonie; Juj, Genevieve; Skinner, Elizabeth H

    2015-04-02

    , and patient discharge destination, satisfaction, and functional independence at discharge. This is the world's first application of the recently described non-inferiority (roll-in) stepped wedge trial design, and the largest investigation of the effectiveness of weekend allied health services on acute medical surgical wards to date. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry. ACTRN12613001231730 (first study) and ACTRN12613001361796 (second study). Was this trial prospectively registered?: Yes. Date registered: 8 November 2013 (first study), 12 December 2013 (second study). Anticipated completion: June 2015. Protocol version: 1. Role of trial sponsor: KP and DL are directly employed by one of the trial sponsors, their roles were: KP assisted with overall development of research design and assisted with overall project management; DL contributed to project management, administration and communications strategy.

  10. The Tehran Eye Study: research design and eye examination protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fotouhi Akbar

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Visual impairment has a profound impact on society. The majority of visually impaired people live in developing countries, and since most disorders leading to visual impairment are preventable or curable, their control is a priority in these countries. Considering the complicated epidemiology of visual impairment and the wide variety of factors involved, region specific intervention strategies are required for every community. Therefore, providing appropriate data is one of the first steps in these communities, as it is in Iran. The objectives of this study are to describe the prevalence and causes of visual impairment in the population of Tehran city; the prevalence of refractive errors, lens opacity, ocular hypertension, and color blindness in this population, and also the familial aggregation of refractive errors, lens opacity, ocular hypertension, and color blindness within the study sample. Methods Design Through a population-based, cross-sectional study, a total of 5300 Tehran citizens will be selected from 160 clusters using a stratified cluster random sampling strategy. The eligible people will be enumerated through a door-to-door household survey in the selected clusters and will be invited. All participants will be transferred to a clinic for measurements of uncorrected, best corrected and presenting visual acuity; manifest, subjective and cycloplegic refraction; color vision test; Goldmann applanation tonometry; examination of the external eye, anterior segment, media, and fundus; and an interview about demographic characteristics and history of eye diseases, eye trauma, diabetes mellitus, high blood pressure, and ophthalmologic cares. The study design and eye examination protocol are described. Conclusion We expect that findings from the TES will show the status of visual problems and their causes in the community. This study can highlight the people who should be targeted by visual impairment prevention programs.

  11. 36 CFR 21.7 - Health examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Health examinations. 21.7... SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK; BATHHOUSE REGULATIONS § 21.7 Health examinations. No employee who comes in direct... health examination, or remain in such employment without undergoing periodic health examinations, as...

  12. Changing the malaria treatment protocol policy in Timor-Leste: an examination of context, process, and actors’ involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    In 2007 Timor-Leste, a malaria endemic country, changed its Malaria Treatment Protocol for uncomplicated falciparum malaria from sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine to artemether-lumefantrine. The change in treatment policy was based on the rise in morbidity due to malaria and perception of increasing drug resistance. Despite a lack of nationally available evidence on drug resistance, the Ministry of Health decided to change the protocol. The policy process leading to this change was examined through a qualitative study on how the country developed its revised treatment protocol for malaria. This process involved many actors and was led by the Timor-Leste Ministry of Health and the WHO country office. This paper examines the challenges and opportunities identified during this period of treatment protocol change. PMID:23672371

  13. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 1999-2000 forward. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) is a program of studies designed to assess the health and nutritional status of...

  14. Health Examination Findings among Active Civil Airmen,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-08-01

    11111.2lIII lliIIIII . MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART NATIONAL BUREAU Of STANDARDS 95, A -. ° . FAA-AM-84- 8 HEALTH EXAMINATION FINDINGS AMONG...Subtitfe 5. Report Dote August 1984 ; 6., Pefo,m,ng Ogon, zaton Code *. HEALTH EXAMINATION FINDINGS AMONG ACTIVE CIVIL AIRMEN I 4 1 8. Performing O,gon... Health Examination Findings Document is available to the public Active Airmen through the National Technical Information Service, Springfield

  15. Structural Factors Affecting Health Examination Behavioral Intention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hui-Ting; Kuo, Yu-Ming; Wang, Shiang-Ru; Wang, Chia-Fen; Tsai, Chung-Hung

    2016-04-01

    Disease screening instruments used for secondary prevention can facilitate early determination and treatment of pathogenic factors, effectively reducing disease incidence, mortality rates, and health complications. Therefore, people should be encouraged to receive health examinations for discovering potential pathogenic factors before symptoms occur. Here, we used the health belief model as a foundation and integrated social psychological factors and investigated the factors influencing health examination behavioral intention among the public in Taiwan. In total, 388 effective questionnaires were analyzed through structural model analysis. Consequently, this study yielded four crucial findings: (1) The established extended health belief model could effectively predict health examination behavioral intention; (2) Self-efficacy was the factor that most strongly influenced health examination behavioral intention, followed by health knowledge; (3) Self-efficacy substantially influenced perceived benefits and perceived barriers; (4) Health knowledge and social support indirectly influenced health examination behavioral intention. The preceding results can effectively increase the acceptance and use of health examination services among the public, thereby facilitating early diagnosis and treatment and ultimately reducing disease and mortality rates.

  16. Examining recombinant human TSH primed {sup 131}I therapy protocol in patients with metastatic differentiated thyroid carcinoma: comparison with the traditional thyroid hormone withdrawal protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rani, Deepa; Kaisar, Sushma; Awasare, Sushma; Kamaldeep; Abhyankar, Amit; Basu, Sandip [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Radiation Medicine Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2014-09-15

    the difference was not found to be statistically significant (p = 0.301). The mean tumor radiation absorbed dose per mCi was less during the rhTSH protocol (6.04 rad/mCi) than during the thyroid hormone withdrawal protocol (8.68 rad/mCi), and the difference was statistically significant (p = 0.049), though visual analysis of the rhTSH posttherapy scans showed avid concentration of {sup 131}I in the metastatic sites and revealed more lesions in 30 % of the patients compared to the traditional large dose scan and equal number of lesions in 65 % of the patients. Visual analysis of the traditional large dose scan, rhTSH pretreatment scan, and rhTSH posttherapy scans showed that the traditional large dose scan is better compared to the rhTSH 1 mCi scan as it showed more lesions in 19 of 37 patients (51.35 %). rhTSH posttherapy scans were better compared to the traditional large dose scans and rhTSH pretreatment scans. More lesions were seen on rhTSH posttherapy scans in 11 of 37 patients (29.7 %) compared to the traditional large dose scans and in 24 of 37 (64.86 %) patients compared to the rhTSH 1 mCi scans. Our findings demonstrate that the rhTSH primed pretreatment scan undertaken at 24 h after diagnostic dose is suboptimal to evaluate whether a metastatic lesion concentrates {sup 131}I. The majority of these lesions demonstrated radioiodine accumulation in the posttreatment scan. Quality of life as assessed using EORTC QOL-3 forms clearly showed that rhTSH improved the quality of life of patients compared to the thyroid hormone withdrawal protocol. Functional scale and global health status were significantly better in the rhTSH protocol compared to the thyroid hormone withdrawal protocol (p < 0.001). The mean symptom scale score was significantly higher in the thyroid hormone withdrawal protocol (45.25) compared to the rhTSH protocol (13.59) (p < 0.001). Of the 20 patients, 4 (20 %) had more than 25 % increase in the TG value on follow-up. The median hospital stay of

  17. Bath Breakfast Project (BBP)--examining the role of extended daily fasting in human energy balance and associated health outcomes: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial [ISRCTN31521726].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, James A; Thompson, Dylan; Richardson, Judith D; Chowdhury, Enhad A; Jeans, Matthew; Holman, Geoffrey D; Tsintzas, Kostas

    2011-07-08

    Current guidance regarding the role of daily breakfast in human health is largely grounded in cross-sectional observations. However, the causal nature of these relationships has not been fully explored and what limited information is emerging from controlled laboratory-based experiments appears inconsistent with much existing data. Further progress in our understanding therefore requires a direct examination of how daily breakfast impacts human health under free-living conditions. The Bath Breakfast Project (BBP) is a randomised controlled trial comparing the effects of daily breakfast consumption relative to extended fasting on energy balance and human health. Approximately 70 men and women will undergo extensive laboratory-based assessments of their acute metabolic responses under fasted and post-prandial conditions, to include: resting metabolic rate, substrate oxidation, dietary-induced thermogenesis and systemic concentrations of key metabolites/hormones. Physiological and psychological indices of appetite will also be monitored both over the first few hours of the day (i.e. whether fed or fasted) and also following a standardised test lunch used to assess voluntary energy intake under controlled conditions. Baseline measurements of participants' anthropometric characteristics (e.g. DEXA) will be recorded prior to intervention, along with an oral glucose tolerance test and acquisition of adipose tissue samples to determine expression of key genes and estimates of tissue-specific insulin action. Participants will then be randomly assigned either to a group prescribed an energy intake of ≥3000 kJ before 1100 each day or a group to extend their overnight fast by abstaining from ingestion of energy-providing nutrients until 1200 each day, with all laboratory-based measurements followed-up 6 weeks later. Free-living assessments of energy intake (via direct weighed food diaries) and energy expenditure (via combined heart-rate/accelerometry) will be made during the

  18. Health promotion and primary health care: examining the discourse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashcroft, Rachelle

    2015-01-01

    The health promotion discourse is comprised of assumptions about health and health care that are compatible with primary health care. An examination of the health promotion discourse illustrates how assumptions of health can help to inform primary health care. Despite health promotion being a good fit for primary health care, this analysis demonstrates that the scope in which it is being implemented in primary health care settings is limited. The health promotion discourse appears largely compatible with primary health care-in theory and in the health care practices that follow. The aim of this article is to contribute to the advancement of theoretical understanding of the health promotion discourse, and the relevance of health promotion to primary health care.

  19. Periodic health examination by Austrian general practitioners.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Devillé, W.; Piribauer, F.; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2005-01-01

    In European countries professional opinions differ about the usefulness of periodic health examination (PHE). Austria and Germany are the only one with a standardized PHE in the basic social insurance package. New insights in the role of GPs in monitoring population health and the role of PHE in

  20. Occupational health nurses' activity after general health examination for workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Masaiwa

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the present condition of occupational health nurse's role after performing general health examination was surveyed. Questionnaires were mailed to 41 companies, and returned questionnaires from 24 of them were analyzed. Although general health examination results were reported to all workers individually in 100% of companies, physician's opinion regarding the examination results were obtained in 86% of companies with part-time physicians comparing with 100% of those with full-time physicians. Health care support related to the examination results were performed by 90% of occupational health nurses and 70% of physicians in companies which employed full-time physicians, but by 100% of occupational health nurses and 50% of physicians in those which employed part-time physicians. In companies with part-time physicians, 64% of occupational health nurses played roles in submitting reports to Labor Standard Inspection Office, but only 30% of occupational health nurses did it in those with full-time physicians. These results show that occupational health nurses working in companies with part-time occupational health physicians were more active in providing health care for workers after general health examination than occupational health nurses working in those with full-time occupational health physicians.

  1. Electronic Health Information Legal Epidemiology Protocol 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Authors: Cason Schmit, JD, Gregory Sunshine, JD, Dawn Pepin, JD, MPH, Tara Ramanathan, JD, MPH, Akshara Menon, JD, MPH, Matthew Penn, JD, MLIS The Health Information...

  2. SSh versus TSE sequence protocol in rapid MR examination of pediatric patients with programmable drainage system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brichtová, Eva; Šenkyřík, J

    2017-05-01

    A low radiation burden is essential during diagnostic procedures in pediatric patients due to their high tissue sensitivity. Using MR examination instead of the routinely used CT reduces the radiation exposure and the risk of adverse stochastic effects. Our retrospective study evaluated the possibility of using ultrafast single-shot (SSh) sequences and turbo spin echo (TSE) sequences in rapid MR brain imaging in pediatric patients with hydrocephalus and a programmable ventriculoperitoneal drainage system. SSh sequences seem to be suitable for examining pediatric patients due to the speed of using this technique, but significant susceptibility artifacts due to the programmable drainage valve degrade the image quality. Therefore, a rapid MR examination protocol based on TSE sequences, less sensitive to artifacts due to ferromagnetic components, has been developed. Of 61 pediatric patients who were examined using MR and the SSh sequence protocol, a group of 15 patients with hydrocephalus and a programmable drainage system also underwent TSE sequence MR imaging. The susceptibility artifact volume in both rapid MR protocols was evaluated using a semiautomatic volumetry system. A statistically significant decrease in the susceptibility artifact volume has been demonstrated in TSE sequence imaging in comparison with SSh sequences. Using TSE sequences reduced the influence of artifacts from the programmable valve, and the image quality in all cases was rated as excellent. In all patients, rapid MR examinations were performed without any need for intravenous sedation or general anesthesia. Our study results strongly suggest the superiority of the TSE sequence MR protocol compared to the SSh sequence protocol in pediatric patients with a programmable ventriculoperitoneal drainage system due to a significant reduction of susceptibility artifact volume. Both rapid sequence MR protocols provide quick and satisfactory brain imaging with no ionizing radiation and a reduced need

  3. Udder Health in Organic Dairy Herds in the US with a Strategy of Non-use of Antimicrobial Drugs - Evaluated on the basis of systematic clinical examinations, test day results, bulk tank milk samples, treatment protocols and interviews

    OpenAIRE

    Solgaard, Camilla

    2011-01-01

    Mastitis is often considered the most common production disease in organic and conventional dairy herds and most antibiotic treatnments in cattle are due to mastitis. Moreover, mastitis is of great importance for animal welfare. One of the main goals in organic livestock farmin is the promotion of health and welfare. Use of antimicrobial drugs to treat sick animals are considered to be in controversy with th organic aims of a production based on naturalness and the risk of antimicrobial r...

  4. Health examination for A-bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Chikako [Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Casualty Council Health Management Center (Japan)

    1996-03-01

    The health examination for A-bomb survivors by national, prefectural and city administrations was described and discussed on its general concept, history, time change of examinee number, improvement of examination, prevalence of individual diseases, significance of cancer examinations, examinees` point of view and future problems. Subjects were the survivors living in Hiroshima city: in 1994, their number was 100,188, whose ages were 63 y in average for males consisting of 39.5% and 67 y for females of 60.5%. The examination was begun in 1957 on the law for medical care for the survivors firstly and then systematically in 1961. From 1965, it was performed 4 times a year, and in 1988, one examination in the four was made for cancer. Authors` Center examined previously 90% but recently 70% of the examinees. The remainder underwent the examination in other medical facilities. Tests are blood analysis, electrocardiography and computed radiography of chest with imaging plate, of which data have been accumulated either in photodisc or in host computer. From 1973 to 1993, the cardiovascular diseases increased from 6.1% to 26.9%, metabolic and endocrinic ones like diabetes, 3.6% to 19.7%, and bowel ones, 0.9% to 12.3%. Correlations of these diseases with A-bomb irradiation are not elucidated and possibly poor. Five classes of cancer examinations are performed but the examinee rate in the survivors is as low as 7.6-21.8% (1993). The cancer of the large intestine is increasing. The overall examinee rates in the survivors were 70.6% in 1965-1967, 69.5% in 1976-1977 and 58.2% in 1990. In conclusion, how to examine the survivors, who are getting older, as many as possible is the future problem. (H.O.)

  5. Examining the Validity of the Rush Protocol to Screen for Religious/Spiritual Struggle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitchett, George; Murphy, Patricia; King, Stephen D W

    2017-01-01

    Effective deployment of limited spiritual care resources requires valid and reliable methods of screening that can be used by nonchaplain health care professionals to identify and refer patients with potential religious/spiritual (R/S) need. Research regarding the validity of existing approaches to R/S screening is limited. In a sample of 1,399 hematopoietic stem cell transplant survivors, we tested the validity of the Rush Protocol and two alternative versions of it. The negative religious coping subscale of the Brief RCOPE provided the reference standard. Based on the Protocol, 21.9% of the survivors were identified as having potential R/S struggle. The sensitivity of the Protocol was low (42.1%) and the specificity was marginally acceptable (81.3%). The sensitivity and specificity of the two alternative versions were similar to those for the unmodified Protocol. Further research with the Rush Protocol, and other models, should be pursued to develop the best evidence-based approaches to R/S screening.

  6. An orthopedist's guide to shoulder ultrasound: a systematic review of examination protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoo-Achampong, Kelms; Nwachukwu, Benedict U; McCormick, Frank

    2016-11-01

    The utilization of musculoskeletal ultrasound has expanded within the setting of the orthopedic clinic as a cost-effective, point-of-care diagnostic tool for shoulder pathology. In experienced hands, ultrasound exhibits capabilities equivalent to that of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of many shoulder diseases including full-thickness and partial-thickness rotator cuff tears. Although similarly effective in identifying additional shoulder disease processes, major obstacles to its widespread use include user dependence and intrinsic limitation to extra-articular diagnosis. The purpose of this review is to present a step-by-step guide of how to perform a comprehensive shoulder examination and to discuss the appropriate use, economic benefit and implementation of ultrasound within the clinic. A systematic search (June 2016) of PubMed, Scopus, and EMBASE databases was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines for literature presenting shoulder ultrasound examination protocols. Included studies were peer-reviewed articles or academic society endorsed protocols presenting comprehensive sonographic examinations of the adult shoulder. Papers with limited or single structure examination descriptions, non-English language, and publication dates before 1980 were excluded. Final papers meeting criteria were secondarily screened for publication after 2005 to reflect the current state of ultrasound imaging. The search yielded 1,725 unique articles with 17 studies meeting final selection criteria. Information from identified studies was summarized to formulate a 4-part shoulder examination protocol, including steps most pertinent to orthopedic in-office diagnoses. In agreement with previous studies, the inexperienced orthopedic surgeon can be quickly trained to expert level proficiency in shoulder ultrasound diagnosis. Using an established protocol, a comprehensive, yet effective shoulder

  7. Examining the Influence of a New Light Rail Line on the Health of a Demographically Diverse and Understudied Population within the Washington, D.C. Metropolitan Area: A Protocol for a Natural Experiment Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer D. Roberts

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Approximately two-thirds of adults and youth in Prince George’s County, Maryland, a suburb of Washington, D.C. are overweight or obese and less than half are achieving daily physical activity recommendations. Active transportation (AT, such as walking, biking or using public transportation (PT, is a strategic pathway to improving physical activity levels and thus reducing excess weight. Utilizing an expansion of the Washington, D.C. area transportation system with a new light rail line, the Purple Line Outcomes on Transportation (PLOT Study will exam pre- and post-Purple Line PT use, AT behaviors and attitudes and physical activity among Prince George’s County adults and youth. The PLOT Study will take advantage of this natural experiment in an area enduring significant racial/ethnic and gender-based overweight or obesity and physical inactivity disparities. While similar natural experiments on AT have been conducted in other U.S. cities, those studies lacked diverse and representative samples. To effectively evaluate these physical activity outcomes among this population, efforts will be used to recruit African American and Latino populations, the first and second most common racial/ethnic groups in Prince George’s County. Finally, the PLOT Study will also examine how contextual effects (e.g., neighborhood built environment impact PT, AT and physical activity.

  8. [Bone Mineral Density in Yusho Health Examination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushi, Jun-ichi; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2015-05-01

    We examined the bone mineral density in Yusho patients. 460 subjects underwent dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry bone scans as part of the nationwide Yusho health examination in 2011. Serum levels of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin, polychlorinated dibenzofurans, and non-ortho polychlorinated biphenyls were measured using high-resolution gas chromatography and high-resolution mass spectrometry. The average age was 64.0 years in women and 63.4 in men. About one-third (35%) of women (n = 89) had low bone mineral density (BMD), defined as a T-score less than 70, while only 4.9% of men (n = 10) had low BMD. Serum levels of several congeners were positively associated with Z-scores in simple regression analysis. Further multivariate linear regression analysis should be required in the future.

  9. European Health Examination Survey--towards a sustainable monitoring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolonen, Hanna; Koponen, Päivikki; Mindell, Jennifer; Männistö, Satu; Kuulasmaa, Kari

    2014-04-01

    Health examination surveys (HESs), including both questionnaire and physical measurements, and in most cases also collection of biological samples, can provide objective health indicators. This information complements data from health interview surveys and administrative registers, and is important for evidence-based planning of health policies and prevention activities. HESs are valuable data sources for research. The first national HESs in Europe were conducted in the late 1950s and early 1960s. They have recently been carried out in an increasing number of countries, but there has been no joint standardization between the countries. The European Health Examination Survey Pilot Project was conducted in 2009-2012. The European Health Examination Survey Pilot Reference Centre was established and pilot surveys were conducted in 12 countries.  European standardized protocols for key measurements on main chronic disease risk factors (height, weight, waist circumference, blood pressure, blood lipids and fasting glucose or HbA1c) were prepared. European-level training and external quality assessment were organized. Although the level of earlier experience, infrastructures, economic status and cultural settings varied between the pilot countries, it was possible to standardize measurements of HESs across the populations. Obtaining high participation rates was challenging.  HESs provide high-quality and representative population data to support policy decisions and research. For future national HESs, centralized coordination, training and external quality assessment are needed to ensure comparability of the results. Further studies on effects of different survey methods on comparability of the results and on recruitment and motivation of survey participants are needed.

  10. [Colombia 2015 National Mental Health Survey. Study Protocol].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos; de Santacruz, Cecilia; Rodriguez, María Nelcy; Rodriguez, Viviana; Tamayo Martínez, Nathalie; Matallana, Diana; Gonzalez, Lina M

    2016-12-01

    The 2015 National Mental Health Survey (NMHS) is the fourth mental survey conducted in Colombia, and is part of the National System of Surveys and Population Studies for health. A narrative description is used to explain the background, references, the preparation, and characteristics of the 2015 NMHS. The 2015 NMHS and its protocol emerge from the requirements that support the national and international policies related to mental health. Together with the Ministry of Health and Social Protection, the objectives, the collection tools, the sample, and the operational plan are defined. The main objective was to obtain updated information about the mental health, mental problems and disorders, accessibility to health services, and an evaluation of health conditions. Participants were inhabitants from both urban and rural areas, over 7 years old, and in whom the comprehension of social determinants and equity were privileged. An observational cross-sectional design with national, regional and age group representativity, was used. The age groups selected were 7-11, 12-17, and over 18 years old. The regions considered were Central, Orient, Atlantic, Pacific, and Bogota. The calculated sample had a minimum of 12,080 and a maximum of 14,496 participants. A brief summary of the protocol of the 2015 NMHS is presented. The full document with all the collection tools can be consulted on the Health Ministry webpage. Copyright © 2016. Publicado por Elsevier España.

  11. Sleep, biological stress, and health among toddlers living in socioeconomically disadvantaged homes: A research protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordway, Monica R; Sadler, Lois S; Canapari, Craig A; Jeon, Sangchoon; Redeker, Nancy S

    2017-12-01

    Healthy sleep is important to behavioral, neurobiological, and physiologic health. In older children and adults, stress biomarkers, such as cortisol and C-reactive protein, increase when they do not practice healthy sleep habits. However, little is known about the relationships among sleep health, stress, and health outcomes among very young children living with socioeconomic adversity, a group that is particularly at risk for poor future health. The NIH-funded study described in this protocol addresses this scientific gap to improve understanding of these relationships during a critical developmental period in children's lives-toddlerhood. We will use a longitudinal design with repeated measures to prospectively examine the relationships among sleep health, stress, and toddlers' health from age 12 to 24 months, to address the following aims: i) examine changes in subjective and objective sleep health measures; ii) examine changes in stress biomarkers; iii) examine the cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships between sleep health measures and stress response; and iv) examine the cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships between sleep health measures, stress biomarkers, and toddlers' behavioral health. The sample will include 113 toddlers and their caregivers. We are collecting subjective and objective data on sleep health, multi-systemic biomarkers of stress, and toddlers' behavioral health. Generalized linear models will be used in the data analyses. Results from this study will be used to support development and testing of interventions, such as those that may improve sleep, among young children at risk for toxic stress. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Conducting a statewide health examination survey: the Arkansas Cardiovascular Health Examination Survey (ARCHES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohoori, Namvar; Pulley, LeaVonne; Jones, Camille; Senner, John; Shoob, Hylan; Merritt, Robert K

    2011-05-01

    The Arkansas Cardiovascular Health Examination Survey is a health and nutrition examination survey designed to serve as a demonstration project for collection of data on the prevalence of chronic diseases and their risk factors at the state level. The survey was conducted from mid-2006 through early 2008. We chose a cross-sectional representative sample of adult residents in Arkansas by using a 3-stage, cluster sample design. Trained interviewers conducted interviews and examinations in respondents' homes, collecting data on risk factors and diseases, blood pressure and anthropometric measurements, and blood and urine samples for analysis and storage. Food frequency questionnaires provided dietary and nutrient intake data. We accomplished the project using a collaborative model among several programs and partners within the state. A total of 4,894 eligible households were contacted by telephone. Of these, refusals accounted for 2,748, and 2,146 gave initial consent to participate, for an initial response rate of 44%. The final number of completed household visits was 1,385, resulting in a final response rate of 28.3%. The Arkansas Cardiovascular Health Examination Survey is among the first state-level health and nutrition examination surveys to be conducted in the United States. By using a collaborative model and leveraging federal funds, we engaged several partners who provided additional resources to complete the project. The survey provides the state with valuable state-level data and information for program design and delivery.

  13. Study protocol: Evaluating the impact of a rural Australian primary health care service on rural health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buykx Penny

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rural communities throughout Australia are experiencing demographic ageing, increasing burden of chronic diseases, and de-population. Many are struggling to maintain viable health care services due to lack of infrastructure and workforce shortages. Hence, they face significant health disadvantages compared with urban regions. Primary health care yields the best health outcomes in situations characterised by limited resources. However, few rigorous longitudinal evaluations have been conducted to systematise them; assess their transferability; or assess sustainability amidst dynamic health policy environments. This paper describes the study protocol of a comprehensive longitudinal evaluation of a successful primary health care service in a small rural Australian community to assess its performance, sustainability, and responsiveness to changing community needs and health system requirements. Methods/Design The evaluation framework aims to examine the health service over a six-year period in terms of: (a Structural domains (health service performance; sustainability; and quality of care; (b Process domains (health service utilisation and satisfaction; and (c Outcome domains (health behaviours, health outcomes and community viability. Significant international research guided the development of unambiguous reliable indicators for each domain that can be routinely and unobtrusively collected. Data are to be collected and analysed for trends from a range of sources: audits, community surveys, interviews and focus group discussions. Discussion This iterative evaluation framework and methodology aims to ensure the ongoing monitoring of service activity and health outcomes that allows researchers, providers and administrators to assess the extent to which health service objectives are met; the factors that helped or hindered achievements; what worked or did not work well and why; what aspects of the service could be improved and how

  14. Vision Examination Protocol for Archery Athletes Along With an Introduction to Sports Vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Seyed Farzad; Aghazade Amiri, Mohammad; Naderifar, Homa; Rakhshi, Elham; Vakilian, Banafsheh; Ashrafi, Elham; Behesht-Nejad, Amir-Houshang

    2016-03-01

    Visual skills are one of the main pillars of intangible faculties of athletes that can influence their performance. Great number of vision tests used to assess the visual skills and it will be irrational to perform all vision tests for every sport. The purpose of this protocol article is to present a relatively comprehensive battery of tests and assessments on static and dynamic aspects of sight which seems relevant to sports vision and introduce the most useful ones for archery. Through extensive review of the literature, visual skills and respective tests were listed; such as 'visual acuity, 'contrast sensitivity', 'stereo-acuity', 'ocular alignment', and 'eye dominance'. Athletes were defined as "elite" and "non-elite" category based on their past performance. Dominance was considered for eye and hand; binocular or monocular aiming was planned to be recorded. Illumination condition was defined as to simulate the real archery condition to the extent possible. The full cycle of examinations and their order for each athlete was sketched (and estimated to take 40 minutes). Protocol was piloted in an eye hospital. Female and male archers aged 18 - 38 years who practiced compound and recurve archery with a history of more than 6 months were included. We managed to select and design a customized examination protocol for archery (a sight-intensive and aiming type of sports), serving skill assessment and research purposes. Our definition for elite and non-elite athletes can help to define sports talent and devise skill development methods as we compare the performance of these two groups. In our pilot, we identified 8 "archery figures" (by hand dominance, eye dominance and binocularity) and highlighted the concept "congruence" (dominant hand and eye in the same side) in archery performance.

  15. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 2009-2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) is a program of studies designed to assess the health and nutritional status of adults and children in...

  16. Annual health examination program, Ames Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, L.; Ladou, J.

    1975-01-01

    A cost analysis of a low-volume multiphasic health testing program is presented. The results indicate that unit costs are similar to those of high-volume automated programs. The comparability in unit cost appears to result from the savings in personnel and space requirements of the smaller program as compared with the larger ones.

  17. e-SCP-ECG+ Protocol: An Expansion on SCP-ECG Protocol for Health Telemonitoring—Pilot Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George J. Mandellos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Standard Communication Protocol for Computer-assisted Electrocardiography (SCP-ECG provides standardized communication among different ECG devices and medical information systems. This paper extends the use of this protocol in order to be included in health monitoring systems. It introduces new sections into SCP-ECG structure for transferring data for positioning, allergies, and five additional biosignals: noninvasive blood pressure (NiBP, body temperature (Temp, Carbon dioxide (CO2, blood oxygen saturation (SPO2, and pulse rate. It also introduces new tags in existing sections for transferring comprehensive demographic data. The proposed enhanced version is referred to as e-SCP-ECG+ protocol. This paper also considers the pilot implementation of the new protocol as a software component in a Health Telemonitoring System.

  18. An examination of the factors affecting people's participation in future health examinations based on community health exam interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Shih-Kai; Liao, Hung-En

    2014-01-01

    Community-based intervention health examinations were implemented at a health care facility to comply with the government's primary health care promotion policy. The theory of planned behavior model was applied to examine the effect that community-based health examinations had on people's health concepts regarding seeking future health examinations. The research participants were individuals who had received a health examination provided at two branches of a hospital in central Taiwan in 2012. The hospital's two branches held a total of 14 free community-based health examination sessions. The hospital provided health examination equipment and staff to perform health examinations during public holidays. We conducted an exploratory questionnaire survey to collect data and implemented cross-sectional research based on anonymous self-ratings to examine the public's intention to receive future community-based or hospital-based health examinations. Including of 807 valid questionnaires, accounting for 89.4% of the total number of questionnaires distributed. The correlation coefficients of the second-order structural model indicate that attitudes positively predict behavioral intentions (γ = .66, p .05). The results of the first-order structural model indicated that the second-order constructs had a high explanatory power for the first-order constructs. People's health concepts regarding health examinations and their desire to continue receiving health examinations must be considered when promoting health examinations in the community. Regarding hospital management and the government's implementation of primary health care, health examination services should address people's medical needs to increase coverage and participation rates and reduce the waste of medical resources.

  19. Effectiveness of workers? general health examination in Korea by health examination period and compliance: retrospective cohort study using nationwide data

    OpenAIRE

    Eom, Huisu; Myong, Jun-Pyo; Kim, Eun-A; Choi, Bohwa; Park, Soon Woo; Kang, Young Joong

    2017-01-01

    Background Our study evaluated the effectiveness of the Workers? General Health Examination by health examination period and compliance. Methods A retrospective cohort of the health examination participants in 2006 (baseline year: N?=?6,527,045) was used. We identified newly occurring cardio-cerebrovascular disease over 7?years (from 2007 to 2013). After stratification by age, sex, and national health insurance type, we identified 7?years? cumulative incidence of cardio-cerebrovascular diseas...

  20. The Development and Evaluation of a Video-Tape Protocol for the Examination of Multicapped Deaf-Blind Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donlon, Edward T.; Curtis, W. Scott

    Due to the belief that written communication about a deaf blind child among professional examiners and treatment agencies can be more accurate and precise, the experimenters developed and evaluated a video tape protocol for the examination of the communication skills of 20 multiply handicapped deaf blind children, who ranged from 3 to 8 years in…

  1. A health examination system integrated with clinical decision support system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Kuan-Liang; Fuh, Chiou-Shann

    2010-10-01

    Health examinations play a key role in preventive medicine. We propose a health examination system named Health Examination Automatic Logic System (HEALS) to assist clinical workers in improving the total quality of health examinations. Quality of automated inference is confirmed by the zero inference error where during 6 months and 14,773 cases. Automated inference time is less than one second per case in contrast to 2 to 5 min for physicians. The most significant result of efficiency evaluation is that 3,494 of 4,356 (80.2%) cases take less than 3 min per case for producing a report summary. In the evaluation of effectiveness, novice physicians got 18% improvement in making decisions with the assistance of our system. We conclude that a health examination system with a clinical decision system can greatly reduce the mundane burden on clinical workers and markedly improve the quality and efficiency of health examination tasks.

  2. The current status of the Korean student health examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hye-Jung

    2013-08-01

    Recent trends place an emphasis on school health care, the ultimate goal of which is to protect, maintain, and promote students' health. School health care is a program that integrates health care services, health education, health counseling, and local social health services. The student health examination (SHE) system is a part of school health care and schools and communities must be available to provide professional health services. Pediatricians also have important roles as experts in both school health care and the SHE system. In this article, the history of school health care, its legal basis, and the current status of the SHE system in Korea are reviewed. Furthermore, sample surveys from the past few years are reviewed. Through this holistic approach, future directions are proposed for the improvement of SHE and school health care.

  3. Supporting Tablet Configuration, Tracking, and Infection Control Practices in Digital Health Interventions: Study Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furberg, Robert D; Ortiz, Alexa M; Zulkiewicz, Brittany A; Hudson, Jordan P; Taylor, Olivia M; Lewis, Megan A

    2016-06-27

    Tablet-based health care interventions have the potential to encourage patient care in a timelier manner, allow physicians convenient access to patient records, and provide an improved method for patient education. However, along with the continued adoption of tablet technologies, there is a concomitant need to develop protocols focusing on the configuration, management, and maintenance of these devices within the health care setting to support the conduct of clinical research. Develop three protocols to support tablet configuration, tablet management, and tablet maintenance. The Configurator software, Tile technology, and current infection control recommendations were employed to develop three distinct protocols for tablet-based digital health interventions. Configurator is a mobile device management software specifically for iPhone operating system (iOS) devices. The capabilities and current applications of Configurator were reviewed and used to develop the protocol to support device configuration. Tile is a tracking tag associated with a free mobile app available for iOS and Android devices. The features associated with Tile were evaluated and used to develop the Tile protocol to support tablet management. Furthermore, current recommendations on preventing health care-related infections were reviewed to develop the infection control protocol to support tablet maintenance. This article provides three protocols: the Configurator protocol, the Tile protocol, and the infection control protocol. These protocols can help to ensure consistent implementation of tablet-based interventions, enhance fidelity when employing tablets for research purposes, and serve as a guide for tablet deployments within clinical settings.

  4. Study protocol for the Fukushima Health Management Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasumura, Seiji; Hosoya, Mitsuaki; Yamashita, Shunichi; Kamiya, Kenji; Abe, Masafumi; Akashi, Makoto; Kodama, Kazunori; Ozasa, Kotaro

    2012-01-01

    The accidents that occurred at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant after the Great East Japan Earthquake on 11 March 2011 have resulted in long-term, ongoing anxiety among the residents of Fukushima, Japan. Soon after the disaster, Fukushima Prefecture launched the Fukushima Health Management Survey to investigate long-term low-dose radiation exposure caused by the accident. Fukushima Medical University took the lead in planning and implementing this survey. The primary purposes of this survey are to monitor the long-term health of residents, promote their future well-being, and confirm whether long-term low-dose radiation exposure has health effects. This report describes the rationale and implementation of the Fukushima Health Management Survey. This cohort study enrolled all people living in Fukushima Prefecture after the earthquake and comprises a basic survey and 4 detailed surveys. The basic survey is to estimate levels of external radiation exposure among all 2.05 million residents. It should be noted that internal radiation levels were estimated by Fukushima Prefecture using whole-body counters. The detailed surveys comprise a thyroid ultrasound examination for all Fukushima children aged 18 years or younger, a comprehensive health check for all residents from the evacuation zones, an assessment of mental health and lifestyles of all residents from the evacuation zones, and recording of all pregnancies and births among all women in the prefecture who were pregnant on 11 March. All data have been entered into a database and will be used to support the residents and analyze the health effects of radiation. The low response rate (<30%) to the basic survey complicates the estimation of health effects. There have been no cases of malignancy to date among 38 114 children who received thyroid ultrasound examinations. The importance of mental health care was revealed by the mental health and lifestyle survey and the pregnancy and birth survey. This long

  5. [Evaluating the applicability of medical examinations constituting "the protocol of obtaining a blood sample" in measuring the degree of intoxication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelgardt, Piotr; Grzech, Weronika; Drzewiecki, Jarosław; Sliwka, Karol

    2010-01-01

    Breathalysing and blood analysis is the basic instrument of measuring the level of intoxication. Prior to collecting a blood sample, an individual suspected of being under the influence of alcohol is examined by a physician, who fills out the "protocol of obtaining a blood sample". This work aims at evaluating the applicability of the described examination in measuring the level of intoxication. In order to do so, our team analyzed 352 "protocols of obtaining blood sample" referred to the Forensic Laboratory KWP in Bydgoszcz, Poland, and compared them with the results of blood analysis. The results of the above analysis point to the fact that the elements of medical examination constituting "the protocol of obtaining a blood sample" are of a minor usefulness in determining the degree of intoxication with ethyl alcohol. The smell from the mouth and the conclusions formulated the examining physician prove to be the most useful. The summary usage of deviations from the norm does not seem to increase the usefulness of methods used within "the protocol of obtaining a blood sample" in evaluating the degree of intoxication.

  6. Students' Reactions to Three Typical Examinations in Health Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarid, Orly; Anson, Ofra; Bentov, Yaakov

    2005-01-01

    Objective: A search for universal and particular changes in emotional, behavioral and cognitive assessments in relation to three types of examinations: an oral presentation, an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) and a pencil and paper examination. Methods: One hundred and two students of health professions completed the Profile of…

  7. [Neuropathology of sudden infant death syndrome: Review of the literature and proposal of a protocol for neuropathological examination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delteil, Clémence; Meyronet, David; Maues de Paula, Andre; Jouvet, Anne; Piercecchi-Marti, Marie-Dominique

    2018-02-08

    According to the French High Authority for Health, sudden unexpected death in infants (SUDI) is defined as "a sudden death that occurs in an infant, whereas nothing in its known history could have predicted it". This is an exclusion diagnosis. There are great interregional disparities despite the professional recommendations established in February 2007. For the examination of the brain, instructions are not adapted to current and research practice. The role of the pathologist, like anyone involved in SUDI, is to eliminate an abuse head trauma and to determine the cause of death. Major neuropathological lesions by definition do not exist. Lesions of hypoxia/ischemia are the most frequent but not specific. The accessibility of anti-APP immunoblotting has highlighted the role of anoxia in the development of axonal diffuse damages. Many studies are looking for a neurological substratum of the SUDI (neuropathological and/or neurobiochinic). This article aims to define a detailed sampling protocol based on foreign consensus and current data of science in order to assist pathologists and to promote a homogeneous data bank in France. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. [The intervention mapping protocol: A structured process to develop, implement and evaluate health promotion programs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassier, J-B; Lamort-Bouché, M; Sarnin, P; Durif-Bruckert, C; Péron, J; Letrilliart, L; Durand, M-J

    2016-02-01

    Health promotion programs are expected to improve population health and reduce social inequalities in health. However, their theoretical foundations are frequently ill-defined, and their implementation faces many obstacles. The aim of this article is to describe the intervention mapping protocol in health promotion programs planning, used recently in several countries. The challenges of planning health promotion programs are presented, and the six steps of the intervention mapping protocol are described with an example. Based on a literature review, the use of this protocol, its requirements and potential limitations are discussed. The intervention mapping protocol has four essential characteristics: an ecological perspective (person-environment), a participative approach, the use of theoretical models in human and social sciences and the use of scientific evidence. It comprises six steps: conduct a health needs assessment, define change objectives, select theory-based change techniques and practical applications, organize techniques and applications into an intervention program (logic model), plan for program adoption, implementation, and sustainability, and generate an evaluation plan. This protocol was used in different countries and domains such as obesity, tobacco, physical activity, cancer and occupational health. Although its utilization requires resources and a critical stance, this protocol was used to develop interventions which efficacy was demonstrated. The intervention mapping protocol is an integrated process that fits the scientific and practical challenges of health promotion. It could be tested in France as it was used in other countries, in particular to reduce social inequalities in health. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  9. Procedures for the ethical review of public health surveillance protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Petrini

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The present commentary is based on the following considerations: 1 for the purposes of authorisation, a distinction is drawn between "research" and "intervention". The procedures for authorising the former are more complex, the relevant controls are stricter and approval has to be granted by a Research Ethics Committee (REC; 2 although the debate is still open, it is barely credible to claim that public health surveillance is not a form of research. It should, therefore, be subject to rigorous ethical assessment; 3 when addressing specifically the issue of surveillance, it would be appropriate to shift the focus of attention from the type of procedure (research/intervention to the risk implied in that procedure; 4 much emphasis has hitherto been placed on the risks that public health surveillance may imply for the protection of personal data; 5 the emphasis on the protection of personal data is frequently excessive and the risks should be examined in a broader context.

  10. Examination of a New Protocol for the Identification of At-Risk Gifted Learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Thomas J., Jr.; And Others

    This study, part of Project Mandala, created and tested an identification model which utilized a profile approach to identify gifted students (including those traditionally under-identified) in two age groups, 4-8 years and 11-14 years. The overall protocol included seven steps: (1) drawing nominations from a wide base including parents, school…

  11. Standardization of physical measurements in European health examination surveys-experiences from the site visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolonen, Hanna; Mäki-Opas, Johanna; Mindell, Jennifer S; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Naska, Androniki; Männistö, Satu; Giampaoli, Simona; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Koponen, Päivikki

    2017-10-01

    Health examination surveys (HESs) provide valuable data on health and its determinants at the population level. Comparison of HES results within and between countries and over time requires measurements which are free of bias due to differences in or adherence to measurement procedures and/or measurement devices. In the European HES (EHES) Pilot Project, 12 countries conducted a pilot HES in 2010-11 using standardized measurement protocols and centralized training. External evaluation visits (site visits) were performed by the EHES Reference Centre staff to evaluate the success of standardization and quality of data collection. In general, standardized EHES protocols were followed adequately in all the pilot surveys. Small deviations were observed in the posture of participants during the blood pressure and height measurement; in the use of a tourniquet when drawing blood samples; and in the calibration of measurement devices. Occasionally, problems with disturbing noise from outside or people coming into the room during the measurements were observed. In countries with an ongoing national HES or a long tradition of conducting national HESs at regular intervals, it was more difficult to modify national protocols to fulfil EHES requirements. The EHES protocols to standardize HES measurements and procedures for collection of blood samples are feasible in cross-country settings. The prerequisite for successful standardization is adequate training. External and internal evaluation activities during the survey fieldwork are also needed to monitor compliance to standards.

  12. Effectiveness of workers' general health examination in Korea by health examination period and compliance: retrospective cohort study using nationwide data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Huisu; Myong, Jun-Pyo; Kim, Eun-A; Choi, Bohwa; Park, Soon Woo; Kang, Young Joong

    2017-01-01

    Our study evaluated the effectiveness of the Workers' General Health Examination by health examination period and compliance. A retrospective cohort of the health examination participants in 2006 (baseline year: N = 6,527,045) was used. We identified newly occurring cardio-cerebrovascular disease over 7 years (from 2007 to 2013). After stratification by age, sex, and national health insurance type, we identified 7 years' cumulative incidence of cardio-cerebrovascular disease by health examination compliance and estimated its relative risk by health examination period and compliance. The compliant group presented a lower cumulative incidence of cardio-cerebrovascular disease than the non-compliant group; this result was consistent across sex, working age (40s and 50s), and workplace policyholder. Relative risk of cardio-cerebrovascular disease by health examination period (1 and 2 years) showed statistically significant results in ischemic heart disease for male participants. Of men in their 40s, office workers (over a 2-year period) presented statistically higher relative risk of ischemic heart disease than non-office workers (over a 1-year period: 1.03; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.03). However, there were no consistent results in ischemic cerebrovascular disease and hemorrhagic cerebrovascular disease for men or cardio-cerebrovascular disease for women. A 1-year period of Workers' General Health Examinations in non-office workers had a more significant prevention effect on ischemic heart disease than a 2-year period in office workers among working age (40s-50s) men. It is, however, necessary to consider that prevention of cardio-cerebrovascular disease can be partially explained by their occupational characteristics rather than by health examination period.

  13. Sexual Victimization and Physical Health: An Examination of Explanatory Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm, Kathleen M.; Follette, Victoria M.

    2008-01-01

    There is a growing body of research illustrating a significant relationship between a history of sexual victimization and the development of physical health problems; however, few researchers have examined variables that mediate this relationship. The present study examined two potential mediating variables: experiential avoidance and current…

  14. Examining Rural Older Adults' Perceptions of Cognitive Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacsu, Juanita; Abonyi, Sylvia; Viger, Marc; Morgan, Debra; Johnson, Shanthi; Jeffery, Bonnie

    2017-09-01

    Existing cognitive health literature focuses on the perspectives of older adults with dementia. However, little is known about the ways in which healthy older adults without dementia understand their cognitive health. In rural communities, early dementia diagnosis may be impeded by numerous factors including transportation challenges, cultural obstacles, and inadequate access to health and support services. Based on participant observation and two waves of 42 semi-structured interviews, this study examined healthy, rural older adults' perceptions of cognitive health. By providing an innovative theoretical foundation informed by local perspectives and culture, findings reveal a complex and multidimensional view of cognitive health. Rural older adults described four key areas of cognitive health ranging from independence to social interaction. As policy makers, community leaders, and researchers work to address the cognitive health needs of the rural aging demographic, it is essential that they listen to the perspectives of rural older adults.

  15. Dietary phytochemical intake from foods and health outcomes: a systematic review protocol and preliminary scoping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst, Yasmine C; Guan, Vivienne X; Kent, Katherine

    2017-02-15

    Dietary phytochemicals are found in plant-based foods such as fruits, vegetables and grains and may be categorised in a nested hierarchical manner with many hundred individual phytochemicals identified to date. To associate phytochemical intakes with positive health outcomes, a fundamental step is to accurately estimate the dietary phytochemical intake from foods reported. The purpose of this systematic review protocol is to describe the process to be undertaken to summarise the evidence for food-based dietary phytochemical intakes and health outcomes for adults. The review will be undertaken following the PRISMA guidelines and the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions using the Review Manager software. Phytochemical subclasses (phenolic acids, flavanols, etc) will be used to search for relevant studies using the Web of Science and Scopus scientific databases. The retrieved studies will be screened based on inclusion of natural whole food items and health outcomes. Phytochemical studies related to cardiovascular disease, cancer, overweight, glucose tolerance, digestive, reproductive, macular and bone health and mental disorders, fatigue and immunity will be examined based on prior scoping. The evidence will be aggregated by the food types and health outcomes. Comparison of differences in the outcomes for randomised controlled trials and observational studies will be undertaken. The strength of the review lies in its focus on whole food items and health conditions rather than one type of phytochemical related to one single health condition. Subgroup and sensitivity analyses will be conducted where an adequate number of publications are found per phytochemical subclass. By comparing the outcomes from experimental and observational studies, the review will determine whether the overall conclusions related to the phytochemical subclasses are the same between study types for the identified health conditions. This is useful to public health

  16. Dietary phytochemical intake from foods and health outcomes: a systematic review protocol and preliminary scoping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Vivienne X; Kent, Katherine

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Dietary phytochemicals are found in plant-based foods such as fruits, vegetables and grains and may be categorised in a nested hierarchical manner with many hundred individual phytochemicals identified to date. To associate phytochemical intakes with positive health outcomes, a fundamental step is to accurately estimate the dietary phytochemical intake from foods reported. The purpose of this systematic review protocol is to describe the process to be undertaken to summarise the evidence for food-based dietary phytochemical intakes and health outcomes for adults. Methods and analysis The review will be undertaken following the PRISMA guidelines and the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions using the Review Manager software. Phytochemical subclasses (phenolic acids, flavanols, etc) will be used to search for relevant studies using the Web of Science and Scopus scientific databases. The retrieved studies will be screened based on inclusion of natural whole food items and health outcomes. Phytochemical studies related to cardiovascular disease, cancer, overweight, glucose tolerance, digestive, reproductive, macular and bone health and mental disorders, fatigue and immunity will be examined based on prior scoping. The evidence will be aggregated by the food types and health outcomes. Comparison of differences in the outcomes for randomised controlled trials and observational studies will be undertaken. The strength of the review lies in its focus on whole food items and health conditions rather than one type of phytochemical related to one single health condition. Subgroup and sensitivity analyses will be conducted where an adequate number of publications are found per phytochemical subclass. Dissemination By comparing the outcomes from experimental and observational studies, the review will determine whether the overall conclusions related to the phytochemical subclasses are the same between study types for the identified health

  17. Examining the association between oral health and oral HPV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Thanh Cong; Markham, Christine M; Ross, Michael Wallis; Mullen, Patricia Dolan

    2013-09-01

    Oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the cause of 40% to 80% of oropharyngeal cancers; yet, no published study has examined the role of oral health in oral HPV infection, either independently or in conjunction with other risk factors. This study examined the relation between oral health and oral HPV infection and the interactive effects of oral health, smoking, and oral sex on oral HPV infection. Our analyses comprised 3,439 participants ages 30 to 69 years for whom data on oral HPV and oral health were available from the nationally representative 2009-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Results showed that higher unadjusted prevalence of oral HPV infection was associated with four measures of oral health, including self-rated oral health as poor-to-fair [prevalence ratio (PR) = 1.56; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.25-1.95], indicated the possibility of gum disease (PR = 1.51; 95% CI, 1.13-2.01), reported use of mouthwash to treat dental problems in the past week (PR = 1.28; 95% CI, 1.07-1.52), and higher number of teeth lost (Ptrend = 0.035). In multivariable logistic regression models, oral HPV infection had a statistically significant association with self-rated overall oral health (OR = 1.55; 95% CI, 1.15-2.09), independent of smoking and oral sex. In conclusion, poor oral health was an independent risk factor of oral HPV infection, irrespective of smoking and oral sex practices. Public health interventions may aim to promote oral hygiene and oral health as an additional measure to prevent HPV-related oral cancers.

  18. Yield and Efficiency of Mental Health Screening: A Comparison of Screening Protocols at Intake to Prison

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Martin, Michael S; Potter, Beth K; Crocker, Anne G; Wells, George A; Colman, Ian

    2016-01-01

    .... We compared the yield (i.e. newly detected cases) and efficiency (i.e. false positives) of five screening protocols to detect mental illness in prisons against the use of mental health history taking...

  19. The protocol and preliminary baseline survey results of the thyroid ultrasound examination in Fukushima [Rapid Communication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shinichi; Yamashita, Shunichi; Fukushima, Toshihiko; Nakano, Keiichi; Midorikawa, Sanae; Ohtsuru, Akira; Yasumura, Seiji; Hosoya, Mitsunori; Kamiya, Kenji; Shimura, Hiroki; Suzuki, Satoru; Nakamura, Izumi; Abe, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    After the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident on March 11, 2011, the public of Japan became particularly concerned about the possibility of an increased risk of childhood thyroid cancer, similar to what was observed after the Chernobyl's accident. Due to serious public health perception, there was an urgency to evaluate the baseline levels of childhood thyroid status in Fukushima prefecture. Therefore we have commenced a thyroid ultrasound examination (TUE) survey of the approximately 360,000 pediatric inhabitants (0 to 18 years of age) who lived in Fukushima at the time of the accident in October 2011. The subjects were divided into three categories according to the standardized diagnostic criteria of ultrasound findings. Category A contained the subjects whose TUE findings were intact or benign. Category B were recommended a confirmatory TUE. Category C was recommended an immediate confirmatory TUE. The survey of 40,302 subjects in the first year was completed in March, 2013. There were 40,097 (99.5%), 205 (0.50%) and 0 subjects in categories A, B and C, respectively. Of the 82 category B subjects who underwent fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC), 12 were diagnosed with a malignant tumor or were suspected to have malignancy. The 12 subjects received thyroid surgery and 11 thyroid cancers and one benign nodule were confirmed histologically after surgery. This is the first large-scaled TUE survey to employ sophisticated ultrasound screening and aim to evaluate the baseline frequency of childhood thyroid nodules and cysts. The results will become the golden standard of future comparative TUE in Fukushima, Japan.

  20. Design, Implementation, and Study Protocol of a Kindergarten-Based Health Promotion Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Kobel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Inactivity and an unhealthy diet amongst others have led to an increased prevalence of overweight and obesity even in young children. Since most health behaviours develop during childhood health promotion has to start early. The setting kindergarten has been shown as ideal for such interventions. “Join the Healthy Boat” is a kindergarten-based health promotion programme with a cluster-randomised study focussing on increased physical activity, reduced screen media use, and sugar-sweetened beverages, as well as a higher fruit and vegetable intake. Intervention and materials were developed using Bartholomew’s Intervention Mapping approach considering Bandura’s social-cognitive theory and Bronfenbrenner’s ecological framework for human development. The programme is distributed using a train-the-trainer approach and currently implemented in 618 kindergartens. The effectiveness of this one-year intervention with an intervention and a control group will be examined in 62 kindergartens using standardised protocols, materials, and tools for outcome and process evaluation. A sample of 1021 children and their parents provided consent and participated in the intervention. Results of this study are awaited to give a better understanding of health behaviours in early childhood and to identify strategies for effective health promotion. The current paper describes development and design of the intervention and its implementation and planned evaluation. Trial Registration. The study is registered at the German Clinical Trials Register (DRKS, Freiburg University, Germany, ID: DRKS00010089.

  1. The impact of mHealth interventions on health systems: a systematic review protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill Fortuin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mobile health (mHealth has been described as a health enabling tool that impacts positively on the health system in terms of improved access, quality and cost of health care. The proposed systematic review will examine the impact of mHealth on health systems by assessing access, quality and cost of health care as indicators. Methods The systematic review will include literature from various sources including published and unpublished/grey literature. The databases to be searched include: PubMed, Cochrane Library, Google Scholar, NHS Health Technology Assessment Database and Web of Science. The reference lists of studies will be screened and conference proceedings searched for additional eligible reports. Literature to be included will have mHealth as the primary intervention. Two authors will independently screen the search output, select studies and extract data; discrepancies will be resolved by consensus and discussion with the assistance of the third author. Discussion The systematic review will inform policy makers, investors, health professionals, technologists and engineers about the impact of mHealth in strengthening the health system. In particular, it will focus on three metrics to determine whether mHealth strengthens the health system, namely quality of, access to and cost of health care services. Systematic review registration: PROSPERO CRD42015026070

  2. Effectiveness of the Health Complex Model in Iranian primary health care reform: the study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabrizi, Jafar Sadegh; Farahbakhsh, Mostafa; Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun; Hassanzadeh, Roya; Zakeri, Akram; Abedi, Leili

    2016-01-01

    Iranian traditional primary health care (PHC) system, although proven to be successful in some areas in rural populations, suffers major pitfalls in providing PHC services in urban areas especially the slum urban areas. The new government of Iran announced a health reform movement including the health reform in PHC system of Iran. The Health Complex Model (HCM) was chosen as the preferred health reform model for this purpose. This paper aims to report a detailed research protocol for the assessment of the effectiveness of the HCM in Iran. An adaptive controlled design is being used in this research. The study is planned to measure multiple endpoints at the baseline and 2 years after the intervention. The assessments will be done both in a population covered by the HCM, as intervention area, and in control populations covered by the traditional health care system as the control area. Assessing the effectiveness of the HCM, as the Iranian PHC reform initiative, could help health system policy makers for future decisions on its continuation or modification.

  3. The value of physical examination in mental health nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Carolyn T

    2016-03-01

    This article explores the use of a physical examination assignment in a mental health general nursing clinical placement course that addresses the poor physical health of people with mental illness and the barriers traditionally impeding health care provision for this population. A descriptive qualitative approach utilizes inductive content analysis to investigate 145 student survey responses. The assignment assists student nurses in understanding that physical and mental well-being are intrinsically linked. Students report increased comfort performing a physical examination on patients with mental illness post assignment. Students' initial bias towards this population was minimized post the clinical assignment. Poor physical health is common among people with mental health problems. Many view the provision of care as a major public health issue. Nurses are the front line caregivers of mental health service consumers and are well positioned to assess their physical needs. Their assessment may be the first step in recognizing health care issues in this population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Prevalence among adolescents in Bergen, Western Norway, of temporomandibular disorders according to the DC/TMD criteria and examination protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graue, Anne Marit; Jokstad, Asbjørn; Assmus, Jörg; Skeie, Marit Slåttelid

    2016-08-01

    The aims of this study were to assess the prevalence of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) among adolescents and to contrast the prevalence of TMD according to the DC/TMD clinical examination protocol versus the prevalence of pain related to TMD according to two screening questions. Two hundred and ten adolescents living in the county of Bergen, Norway, were offered an additional examination for TMD in connection with their regular dental check-up appointment. Five dental clinics were selected with differing socio-economic patient populations, as reflected by stratification of average levels of DMFT, and an equal number of girls and boys were invited to participate. The participants answered two screening questions for pain related to TMD followed by a clinical examination according to the DC/TMD protocol by five calibrated examiners. Acceptable calibration results were obtained. Approximately 80% of eligible participants consented to partake. According to the criteria of DC/TMD, the prevalence of TMD among the study participants was 11.9%, with a peak at 16 years of age. According to the self-reported screening questions for pain related to TMD, 7.2% responded positively. Only seven participants with a TMD diagnosis established according to the DC/TMD clinical examination protocol reported also pain related to TMD based on answering the two screening questions. The prevalence of TMD is higher for girls than for boys and the prevalence of TMD established according to the DC/TMD criteria was higher than the prevalence of pain related to TMD estimated by use of two screening questions for self-reported pain.

  5. Adjusting for nonresponse bias in a health examination survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, M L; Forthofer, R N

    1993-01-01

    There is a potential for nonresponse bias in most population studies using health examinations. This is true of the Mexican American portion of the Hispanic Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (HHANES), conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics, in which unit nonresponse to the examination accounted for 24 percent of the sample. Even though the full effect of nonresponse can never be really known, ancillary information from the interview sample can be used in an attempt to adjust for bias in estimates. Two techniques for nonresponse bias adjustment are presented and illustrated using health status level and hypertension status from published studies based on the HHANES of 1982-84. The first approach uses conditional probabilities and the second approach uses direct standardization. The examples examine whether or not an adjustment for socioeconomic status, sex, and age--variables related to both response status and the conditions under study--changes the prevalence estimates of (a) Mexican Americans who report poor, fair, or good health status and (b) hypertension among Mexican Americans. PMID:8497577

  6. Optimized negative staining: a high-throughput protocol for examining small and asymmetric protein structure by electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rames, Matthew; Yu, Yadong; Ren, Gang

    2014-08-15

    Structural determination of proteins is rather challenging for proteins with molecular masses between 40 - 200 kDa. Considering that more than half of natural proteins have a molecular mass between 40 - 200 kDa, a robust and high-throughput method with a nanometer resolution capability is needed. Negative staining (NS) electron microscopy (EM) is an easy, rapid, and qualitative approach which has frequently been used in research laboratories to examine protein structure and protein-protein interactions. Unfortunately, conventional NS protocols often generate structural artifacts on proteins, especially with lipoproteins that usually form presenting rouleaux artifacts. By using images of lipoproteins from cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) as a standard, the key parameters in NS specimen preparation conditions were recently screened and reported as the optimized NS protocol (OpNS), a modified conventional NS protocol. Artifacts like rouleaux can be greatly limited by OpNS, additionally providing high contrast along with reasonably high-resolution (near 1 nm) images of small and asymmetric proteins. These high-resolution and high contrast images are even favorable for an individual protein (a single object, no average) 3D reconstruction, such as a 160 kDa antibody, through the method of electron tomography. Moreover, OpNS can be a high-throughput tool to examine hundreds of samples of small proteins. For example, the previously published mechanism of 53 kDa cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) involved the screening and imaging of hundreds of samples. Considering cryo-EM rarely successfully images proteins less than 200 kDa has yet to publish any study involving screening over one hundred sample conditions, it is fair to call OpNS a high-throughput method for studying small proteins. Hopefully the OpNS protocol presented here can be a useful tool to push the boundaries of EM and accelerate EM studies into small protein structure, dynamics and mechanisms.

  7. Examining Reports of Mental Health in Adults with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinton, Chris; Tomlinson, Katie; Estes, Zachary

    2012-01-01

    Prior research suggests that individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) have a disposition towards anxiety. Information regarding this is typically derived from parents and carers. The perspectives of the individuals with WS are rarely included in research of this nature. We examined the mental health of 19 adults with WS using explicit (psychiatric…

  8. Oral Sexual Experience among Young Adolescents Receiving General Health Examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boekeloo, Bradley O.; Howard, Donna E.

    2002-01-01

    Surveyed young adolescents receiving general health examinations regarding oral sex occurrence. Overall, 18 percent reported having oral sex, and of that 18 percent, 25 percent reported no vaginal sex. Few adolescents used barrier protection during oral sex. Most adolescents thought that penile-anal sex could transmit HIV, but only 68 percent…

  9. An Examination of Health Promoting Schools in Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynihan, Sharon; Jourdan, Didier; Mannix McNamara, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report the results of a national survey that examined the extent of implementation of Health Promoting Schools (HPS) in Ireland. Design/methodology/approach: A quantitative research design was adopted. A questionnaire was administered to all post-primary schools in the country (n = 704). Data were analysed…

  10. An institutional ethnography inquiry of health care work in special education: a research protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella L. Ng

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Special education for children with chronic health conditions or disabilities requires the integration of health care work with education. This phenomenon is an under-studied and challenging context for integrated care despite policies and protocols that outline work processes in this context. We are interested in an approach to inquiry that will allow us to address gaps in current literature and practices in integrated care, and move toward policy change. Study design and data collection methods: Institutional ethnography is an approach to inquiry that maps the actualities of what individuals do at an everyday local level, while examining this work activity in relation to the socio-political context. It has been used to change policy and local practice by highlighting disjunctures between policy and actuality. We are adopting institutional ethnography and its three common methods of data collection: document collection, interviews, and observations/shadowing. Informants to this inquiry are chosen from school-based teams, family-centered units, and constellations of clinical professionals. Methods of analysis: We are following work processes, verbally and visually mapping what is done and by whom. The mediating role of texts in work processes is also being mapped. It is important to note that work includes “unofficial” work, including the work of families and others who may not be officially assigned a work role in a policy or protocol. Conclusion: A primary outcome of this study will be the creation of maps that demonstrate the social organization of work processes occurring in the health care-special education interface. These maps will make invisible work visible, highlight disjunctures between policy and practice, and identify opportunities for change. They may be useful for educational purposes, providing an orientation to the complex terrain of integrated care to professionals and families.

  11. An institutional ethnography inquiry of health care work in special education: a research protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella L. Ng

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Special education for children with chronic health conditions or disabilities requires the integration of health care work with education. This phenomenon is an under-studied and challenging context for integrated care despite policies and protocols that outline work processes in this context. We are interested in an approach to inquiry that will allow us to address gaps in current literature and practices in integrated care, and move toward policy change.Study design and data collection methods: Institutional ethnography is an approach to inquiry that maps the actualities of what individuals do at an everyday local level, while examining this work activity in relation to the socio-political context. It has been used to change policy and local practice by highlighting disjunctures between policy and actuality. We are adopting institutional ethnography and its three common methods of data collection: document collection, interviews, and observations/shadowing. Informants to this inquiry are chosen from school-based teams, family-centered units, and constellations of clinical professionals.Methods of analysis: We are following work processes, verbally and visually mapping what is done and by whom. The mediating role of texts in work processes is also being mapped. It is important to note that work includes “unofficial” work, including the work of families and others who may not be officially assigned a work role in a policy or protocol.Conclusion: A primary outcome of this study will be the creation of maps that demonstrate the social organization of work processes occurring in the health care-special education interface. These maps will make invisible work visible, highlight disjunctures between policy and practice, and identify opportunities for change. They may be useful for educational purposes, providing an orientation to the complex terrain of integrated care to professionals and families.

  12. Periodic health examination, 1994 update: 1. Obesity in childhood. Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Examination.

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To update the 1979 Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Examination recommendation on screening for childhood obesity by reviewing any new evidence concerning health risks in childhood and adulthood, and effective preventive or therapeutic interventions. OPTIONS: Detection: routine measurement of height and weight, use of skinfold thickness measurements, calculation of body mass index (BMI). Intervention: diet, exercise, behaviour modification and comprehensive family-based w...

  13. Lower-dose CT urography (CTU) with iterative reconstruction technique in children - initial experience and examination protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bombiński, Przemysław; Warchoł, Stanisław; Brzewski, Michał; Biejat, Agnieszka; Dudek-Warchoł, Teresa; Krzemień, Grażyna; Szmigielska, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Conventional X-ray urography is one of the basic imaging techniques in urinary tract diseases in children. CT urography (CTU) employing standard Filtered Back Projection (FBP) reconstruction algorithms is connected with higher radiation dose. Advanced iterative reconstruction techniques enable lowering the radiation dose to the level comparable with conventional X-ray urography with better visualization of the urinary tract. Study protocol and indications for this modified technique should be discussed. Introduction of iterative image reconstruction techniques allowed to significantly reduce the radiation dose delivered during examinations performed at our Department, including CT examinations of urinary tract in children. During the last two years, CT urography replaced conventional X-ray urography and became the basic imaging technique in our Department. We discuss the study protocol regarding pediatric CTU examinations. The main goal is to receive an optimal image quality at reduced radiation dose. CTU examinations performed using the standard filtered back projection (FBP) reconstruction technique are associated with radiation doses about 1.5 times higher than those in conventional X-ray urography. Implementation of iterative reconstruction algorithms in advanced CT scanners allow to reduce the radiation dose to a level comparable or even lower than that in X-ray urography. In addition, urinary tract can be evaluated more precisely in multiplanar reformatted (MPR) and volume rendered (VR) images. 1. Advanced iterative reconstruction techniques allow to reduce radiation dose in CT examinations and to extend indications for CT urography in children. 2. Urinary tract can be evaluated more precisely in multiplanar reformatted and volume rendered images. 3. CTU may replace conventional X-ray urography in children.

  14. Exploring why quality circles work in primary health care: a realist review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrbasser, Adrian; Mickan, Sharon; Harris, Janet

    2013-12-09

    Quality circles (QCs) are commonly used in primary health care in Europe to consider and improve standard practice over time. They represent a complex social intervention that occurs within the fast-changing system of primary health care. Numerous controlled trials, reviews, and studies have shown small but unpredictable positive effect sizes on behavior change. Although QCs seem to be effective, stakeholders have difficulty understanding how the results are achieved and in generalizing the results with confidence. They also lack understanding of the active components of QCs which result in changes in the behavior of health care professionals. This protocol for a realist synthesis will examine how configurations of components and the contextual features of QCs influence their performance. Stakeholder interviews and a scoping search revealed the processes of QCs and helped to describe their core components and underlying theories. After clarifying their historical and geographical distribution, a purposive and systematic search was developed to identify relevant papers to answer the research questions, which are: understanding why, how, and when QCs work, over what time frame, and in what circumstances. After selecting and abstracting appropriate data, configurations of contexts and mechanisms which influence the outcome of QCs within each study will be identified. Studies will be grouped by similar propositional statements in order to identify patterns and validation from stakeholders sought. Finally, theories will be explored in order to explain these patterns and to help stakeholders maintain and improve QC performance. Analyzing context-mechanism-outcome (CMO) patterns will reveal how QCs work and how contextual factors interact to influence their outcome. The aim is to investigate unique configurations that enable them to improve the performance of health care professionals. Using a standardized reporting system, this realist review will allow the research

  15. Assessment of a sequential extraction protocol by examining solution chemistry and mineralogical evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maubec, Nicolas; Pauwels, Hélène; Noël, Hervé; Bourrat, Xavier

    2015-04-01

    Knowledge of the behavior of heavy metals, such as copper and zinc in sediments, is a key factor to improve the management of rivers. The mobility of these metals, which may be harmful to the environment, depends directly on their concentration and speciation , which in turn depend on physico-chemical parameters such as mineralogy of the sediment fraction, pH, redox potential, salinity etc ... (Anderson et al., 2000; Sterckeman et al., 2004; Van Oort et al., 2008). Several methods based on chemical extractions are currently applied to assess the behavior of heavy metals in soils and sediments. Among them, sequential extraction procedure is widely used in soil and sediment science and provides details about the origin, biological and physicochemical availability, mobilization and transports of trace metals elements. It is based on the use of a series of extracting reagents to extract selectively heavy metals according to their association within the solid phase (Cornu and Clozel, 2000) including the following different fraction : exchangeable, bound to carbonates, associated to oxides (reducible fraction), linked to organic matter and sulfides (oxidizable fraction) as well as silicate minerals so called residual fraction (Hickey and Kittrick, 1984; Tessier et al., 1979). Consequently sequential extraction method is expected to simulate a lot of potential natural and anthropogenic modifications of environmental conditions (Arey et al., 1999; Brannon and Patrick, 1987; Hickey and Kittrick, 1984; La Force et al., 1999; Tessier et al., 1979). For three decades, a large number of protocols has been proposed, characterized by specific reagents and experimental conditions (concentrations, number of steps, extraction orders and solid/solution ratio) (Das et al., 1995; Gomez Ariza et al., 2000; Quevauviller et al., 1994; Rauret, 1998; Tack and Verloo, 1995), but it appeared that several of them suffer from a lack of selectivity of applied reagents: besides target ones, some

  16. Associations between family characteristics and public health nurses' concerns at children's health examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poutiainen, Hannele; Hakulinen-Viitanen, Tuovi; Laatikainen, Tiina

    2014-06-01

    The family and the way it functions have a key role for the health and well-being of children and adolescents. Approximately 10-30% of children grow up in families where their health and well-being may be endangered or weakened. There is very little research data on public health nurses' concerns in connection with children's health examinations related to family characteristics. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations of children's gender, age, family structure, mother's employment status and parents' perception on the sufficiency of income with public health nurses' concerns on physical and psychosocial health at children's health examinations. In 2007-2009, information about children's health and well-being and their background factors was collected from the health examinations of altogether 6506 children in Finland using a cross-sectional design. Associations between family characteristics and nurses concern related to physical and psychosocial health and development of children were assessed using logistic regression analysis. Physical health and psychosocial issues of school-age children raised most concern in public health nurses. Especially, public health nurses felt concern for the psychosocial development of boys both under and of school age. Family structure and the family's financial situation were associated with public health nurses' concern for children's physical health, psychosocial development and the presence of at least one concern. The fact that public health nurses found cause for concern during health examinations was associated with the child's gender, development stage and family characteristic. The research findings may be utilised in planning and targeting health counselling and services in child and school health care. Understanding the role of family characteristics in health and well-being challenges in children is useful in promoting multidisciplinary work in health care. © 2013 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  17. Clinical and regulatory protocols for the management of impaired vision in the public health care network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayter Silva Paula

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To describe the procedures used in developing Clinical and Regulatory Protocols for primary care teams to use in the management of the most common scenarios of impaired vision in Southern Brazil. METHODS: A retrospective review of 1.333 referral forms from all primary care practitioners was performed in Ribeirão Preto city, during a 30-day period. The major ophthalmic diagnostic categories were evaluated from those referrals forms. The Clinical and Regulatory Protocols development process was held afterwards and involved scientific cooperation between a university and the health care system, in the form of workshops attended by primary care practitioners and regulatory system team members composed of health care administrators, ophthalmologists, and professors of ophthalmology and social medicine. RESULTS: The management of impaired vision was chosen as the theme, since it accounted for 43.6% of the ophthalmology-related referrals from primary care providers of Ribeirão Preto. The Clinical and Regulatory Protocols developed involve distinctive diagnostic and therapeutic interventions that can be performed at the primary care level and in different health care settings. The most relevant clinical and regulatory interventions were expressed as algorithms in order to facilitate the use of the Clinical and Regulatory Protocols by health care practitioners. CONCLUSIONS: These Clinical and Regulatory Protocols could represent a useful tool for health systems with universal access, as well as for health care networks based on primary care and for regulatory system teams. Implementation of these Clinical and Regulatory Protocols can minimize the disparity between the needs of patients with impaired vision and the treatment modalities offered, resulting in a more cooperative health care network.

  18. Breast Self-examination and Health Beliefs in Grenadian Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delpech, Paula Alexander; Haynes-Smith, Glenenna

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer incidence and mortality are rising in Grenada, and there is a lack of knowledge about women's beliefs about breast self-examination (BSE). The objective of this study was to quantify and identify patterns of beliefs about health and BSE in Grenadian women to help plan targeted community interventions. In this descriptive cross-sectional study of 110 women in a community parish in Grenada, sociodemographic data and health beliefs were collected using a self-administered questionnaire. The Champion revised Health Belief Model Scale was used to measure general health motivation (5 items), perceived susceptibility to breast cancer (4 items), seriousness of breast cancer (7 items), confidence in performing BSE (7 items), benefits of BSE (2 items), and barriers to BSE (6 items). Younger women were motivated to perform BSE (P = .018), and divorced/separated/widowed women felt more susceptible to breast cancer (P = .014) but perceived fewer benefits in performing BSE (P = .032). Women who did not attend church were more motivated (P = .015) and saw greater benefit (P = .033) in BSE. Frequent church attendees perceived that they were more susceptible (P = .01), were less confident (P women in Grenada with belief patterns and sociodemographic characteristics that may benefit from targeted community intervention, perhaps in partnership with other stakeholders such as the church. Beliefs about health and BSE affect BSE uptake and are culture dependent. These data help identify the at-risk population to guide the development of targeted community-based and culturally appropriate breast screening programs.

  19. MDCT urography: experience with a bi-phasic excretory phase examination protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meindl, Thomas; Coppenrath, Eva; Degenhart, Christoph; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Mueller-Lisse, Ullrich G. [University Munich, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Mueller-Lisse, Ulrike L. [University Munich, Department of Urology, Munich (Germany)

    2007-10-15

    The benefit of multidetector computed tomographic urography (MDCTU) for visualising early and late excretory phase (EP) upper urinary tract (UUT) opacification has been studied. UUT opacification was retrospectively evaluated in 45 bi-phasic four-row MDCTU examinations. The UUT was divided into intrarenal collecting system (IRCS), proximal, middle and distal ureter. Two independent readers rated opacification: 1, none; 2, partial; 3, complete. Numbers of segments and percentages of UUTs at each score were calculated for each EP and two EPs combined. Results of a single EP and of combined EPs were compared by Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks. IRCS and proximal ureter were at least partially opacified in each EP in >95%. The middle ureter was at least partially opacified in the early and late EP in 85% and 93%, respectively. The distal ureter was opacified in 65% (49/75) in the early EP and in 78% (59/75) in the late EP. Combining two EPs, non-opacified distal segments decreased to 9% (7/75). Significant improvement between a single EP and combining two EPs were found for the middle and distal ureter (P < 0.03). Bi-phasic MDCTU substantially improved opacification of the middle and distal ureter. IRCS and proximal ureter are reliably opacified with one EP. (orig.)

  20. MDCT urography: experience with a bi-phasic excretory phase examination protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meindl, Thomas; Coppenrath, Eva; Degenhart, Christoph; Müller-Lisse, Ulrike L; Reiser, Maximilian F; Müller-Lisse, Ullrich G

    2007-10-01

    The benefit of multidetector computed tomographic urography (MDCTU) for visualising early and late excretory phase (EP) upper urinary tract (UUT) opacification has been studied. UUT opacification was retrospectively evaluated in 45 bi-phasic four-row MDCTU examinations. The UUT was divided into intrarenal collecting system (IRCS), proximal, middle and distal ureter. Two independent readers rated opacification: 1, none; 2, partial; 3, complete. Numbers of segments and percentages of UUTs at each score were calculated for each EP and two EPs combined. Results of a single EP and of combined EPs were compared by Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks. IRCS and proximal ureter were at least partially opacified in each EP in >95%. The middle ureter was at least partially opacified in the early and late EP in 85% and 93%, respectively. The distal ureter was opacified in 65% (49/75) in the early EP and in 78% (59/75) in the late EP. Combining two EPs, non-opacified distal segments decreased to 9% (7/75). Significant improvement between a single EP and combining two EPs were found for the middle and distal ureter (P < 0.03). Bi-phasic MDCTU substantially improved opacification of the middle and distal ureter. IRCS and proximal ureter are reliably opacified with one EP.

  1. Home diuretic protocol for heart failure: partnering with home health to improve outcomes and reduce readmissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veilleux, Richard P; Wight, Joseph N; Cannon, Ann; Whalen, Moira; Bachman, David

    2014-01-01

    The management of heart failure (HF) is challenging, with high rates of readmission and no single solution. MaineHealth, a health care system serving southern Maine, has shown initial success with home health nurses partnering with physicians in the management of complex patients with HF using the MaineHealth Home Diuretic Protocol (HDP). To demonstrate that augmented diuretic therapy, both oral and intravenous, an evidence-based treatment for care of patients with HF experiencing fluid retention, can be delivered safely in the home setting using the HDP and can improve outcomes for recently hospitalized patients with HF. In late 2011, the MaineHealth HDP was implemented in two hospitals and in the home health agency serving those hospitals. The patient population included recently hospitalized patients with a diagnosis of advanced HF, eligible for home health services and telemonitoring. Home health nurses reported data on the patients managed using the protocol, including interventions made, physical findings, lab values, and patient disposition after each episode of care. Questionnaires were used to determine patient and clinician satisfaction. Sixty patients meeting the criteria above were enrolled between November 2011 and January 2014. The protocol was initiated 84 times for 30 of these patients. Sixteen patients had multiple activations. The readmission rate was 10% and no adverse outcomes were observed. Clinician and patient satisfaction was 97% or greater. The MaineHealth HDP can be delivered effectively and safely to improve outcomes, reducing readmissions and allowing patients to remain at home.

  2. Increasing health examination survey participation rates by SMS reminders and flexible examination times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolonen, Hanna; Aistrich, Anna; Borodulin, Katja

    2014-11-01

    Declining participation rates are an increasing problem in population surveys. Different kinds of methods have been used to ensure participation rates as high as possible. Monetary incentives and reminders have been found to be effective ways to increase participation rates, but these are rather expensive to implement in large population surveys. There is a need for cheaper ways to motivate survey invitees to participate. The Kuusamo Health Examination Survey was conducted in May-June 2011. A random sample of 250 people was selected for the survey. Mobile phone numbers, when available, were obtained for people within the sample. For a random sample of 50% of survey invitees with a mobile phone number, a short message service (SMS) reminder was sent prior to their appointment. All survey participants were asked to fill in a feedback questionnaire. Participation rate was 58% for men and 74% for women. Mobile phone numbers were available for 66% of the sample. Among those receiving an SMS reminder about their appointment, participation rates were up to 25 percentage points higher than among the group not receiving a reminder. In the feedback questionnaire, 9% of the survey participants reported that they would not have participated without the SMS reminder they received. Participants preferred morning hours and Monday-Tuesday as time and day options for the examinations. SMS reminder about the appointment time was an effective way to increase participation rate, especially among the youngest age groups also, providing flexible office hours for the examination clinic may increase participation rate. © 2014 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  3. A new biomonitoring protocol to determine the ecological health of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Both Hartbeespoort and Roodeplaat Dams had large algal populations that resulted in very alkaline water during summer. Microsystis dominated the phytoplankton population in these two impoundments during summer and autumn, while green algae and diatoms were dominant during winter and spring. Ecological health ...

  4. A systematic review protocol examining the effect of vitamin D supplementation on endothelial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyami, A; Soares, M J; Sherriff, J L; Zhao, Y; Hallett, J; Coombes, F

    2015-06-12

    Vitamin D has potential benefits for extraskeletal health. These could include an anti-inflammatory effect as well as a reduction in endothelial dysfunction. We aim to provide quality evidence for the hypothesis that supplementation with vitamin D will improve endothelial function (EF), possibly through the abrogation of systemic inflammation. We will conduct a systematic review of all randomised controlled trials on vitamin D supplementation and EF lasting 12 weeks or more. The search will cover the period 2000-2015 and include studies that describe direct measures of EF, markers of endothelial cell (EC) activation and if concurrently reported, indicators of systemic inflammation. Study selection will follow the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines and study quality will be assessed by the Jadad score in addition to an evaluation of allocation concealment and data analysis. If sufficient data are available, a meta-analysis will be conducted. The effect sizes will be generated using Hedges' g score, for both fixed and random effect models. I(2) statistics and Galbraith plots will be used to assess heterogeneity and identify their potential sources. Potential publication and small sample size bias will be assessed by visual inspections of funnel plots and also Egger's test. Meta-regression analysis (if feasible) will be conducted with restricted maximum likelihood (REML) estimation method, controlling for potential confounders (demographics, study methods, location, etc). A backward elimination process will be applied in the regression modelling procedure. Subgroup analysis, conditional on number of studies retrieved and their sample size, will be stratified on participant disease category, total dose administered, degree of 25(OH)D change and type of supplement used. Formal ethical approval is not required as primary data will not be collected. The results will be disseminated through a peer-reviewed publication

  5. Iran's Multiple Indicator Demographic and Health Survey - 2010: Study Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidian, Arash; Karimi-Shahanjarini, Akram; Khosravi, Ardeshir; Elahi, Elham; Beheshtian, Maryam; Shakibazadeh, Elham; Khabiri, Roghayeh; Arab, Mohammad; Zakeri, Mohammad-Reza

    2014-05-01

    There is an international emphasis on providing timely and high quality data to monitor progress of countries toward Millennium Development Goals. Iran's Multiple Indicator Demographic and Health Survey (IrMIDHS) aimed to provide valid information on population and health outcomes to monitor progress in achieving national priorities and health programs and to assist policy makers to design effective strategies for improving health outcomes and equity in access to care. A cross-sectional multi-stage stratified cluster-random survey is conducted through face-to-face household interviews. The sampling frame is developed using Iran's 2006 population and housing census. Provincial samples ranging are from a minimum of 400 households per province to 6400 households in Tehran province. Cluster size is 10 households. The target sample includes 3096 clusters: 2187 clusters in urban and 909 clusters in rural areas. IrMIDHS instruments include three questionnaires: Household questionnaire, women aged 15-54 questionnaire, children under five questionnaire, supervision and quality assessment checklists and data collection sheets and standard weight and height measurement tools for under-five children. A cascading decentralized training method is used for training data collection and supervision teams. Quality assurance procedures are defined for the five steps of conducting the survey including: Sampling, training data collection and training teams, survey implementation, data entry and analysis. A multi-layer supervision and monitoring procedure is established. All the questionnaires are double entered. IrMIDHS will provide valuable data for policymakers in Iran. Designing and implementation of the study involve contributions from academics as well as program managers and policy makers. The collaborative nature of the study may facilitate better usage of its results.

  6. [Soliciting Job Centre Clients for a Cardiopreventive Health Examination Programme].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbricht, S; Gürtler, D; Braatz, J; Weymar, F; Meyer, C; Dörr, M; John, U

    2017-06-01

    Aim: There is limited knowledge about the reaching of socioeconomic disadvantaged groups for prevention measures. Results of proactive contacting are presented for a 2-step cardiopreventive health examination programme (CHP) in 2 job centres in Northern Germany. Methods: The duration of the programme extended over a period of 10 weeks. All clients aged between 40 and 65 years were included. Phase 1consisted of a self-administered computer-based assessment, and if medical staff were present, blood pressure measurement and/or blood samples were taken. Participants without a history of cardiovascular diseases, interventional/surgical blood vessel procedures, diabetes and a body-mass-index ≤35 kg/m2 were invited to a specialised examination centre (phase 2). Logistic regression analysis was used to test predictors for participation in both phases. Variables were age, gender and for phase 2 the distance between participants' residence addresses and the address of the examination centre, cardiovascular risk factors, subjective health and socio-demographics. Results: 344 of the 1 049 invited job centre clients participated in the assessment. Women were more likely to participate than men. A number of 253 participants were invited for blood pressure measurement and blood sample taking. Participation of 209 persons was positively associated with age. A number of 138 participated in phase 2. Participation decreased with increasing distance between the participant's residence address and the address of the examination centre. Smokers, persons with less than 10 years of schooling and those who did not report an elevated level of blood lipids were less likely to participate. Conclusion: Blood pressure measurements and taking of blood samples in job centres were found to be highly accepted. The burden on potential participants to reach preventive measures should be minimised. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Feasibility of Automatic Extraction of Electronic Health Data to Evaluate a Status Epilepticus Clinical Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafeez, Baria; Paolicchi, Juliann; Pon, Steven; Howell, Joy D; Grinspan, Zachary M

    2016-05-01

    Status epilepticus is a common neurologic emergency in children. Pediatric medical centers often develop protocols to standardize care. Widespread adoption of electronic health records by hospitals affords the opportunity for clinicians to rapidly, and electronically evaluate protocol adherence. We reviewed the clinical data of a small sample of 7 children with status epilepticus, in order to (1) qualitatively determine the feasibility of automated data extraction and (2) demonstrate a timeline-style visualization of each patient's first 24 hours of care. Qualitatively, our observations indicate that most clinical data are well labeled in structured fields within the electronic health record, though some important information, particularly electroencephalography (EEG) data, may require manual abstraction. We conclude that a visualization that clarifies a patient's clinical course can be automatically created using the patient's electronic clinical data, supplemented with some manually abstracted data. Future work could use this timeline to evaluate adherence to status epilepticus clinical protocols. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Protocol of specific health monitoring: ionizing radiation, 11 years later; Protocolo de vigilancia sanitaria especifica: radiaciones ionizantes, 11 anos despues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillejo Puertas, F. M.

    2016-08-01

    Since the approval on November 11{sup t}h 2003 of the Protocol of Specific Health Monitoring for Workers Exposed to Ionizing Radiation a study has been carried out to discover its effectiveness. These areas were examined: the daily practice od accupational medicine and, in particular, its specific task in the application of the different clinical/labour criteria for workers exposed to ionizing radiation or at risk of radioactive contamination; the degree of its uses as well as the updates and improvements. For that purpose, a descriptive bibliographic revision has been used for the last 11 years. The results revealed the lack of updates of the Protocol as well as the few usable objective criteria, when the clinical/labour aptitudes are reflected upon. (Author)

  9. NADA Protocol for Behavioral Health. Putting Tools in the Hands of Behavioral Health Providers: The Case for Auricular Detoxification Specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuyt, Elizabeth B; Voyles, Claudia A; Bursac, Sara

    2018-02-07

    Background: The National Acupuncture Detoxification Association (NADA) protocol, a simple standardized auricular treatment has the potential to provide vast public health relief on issues currently challenging our world. This includes but is not limited to addiction, such as the opioid epidemic, but also encompasses mental health, trauma, PTSD, chronic stress, and the symptoms associated with these conditions. Simple accessible tools that improve outcomes can make profound differences. We assert that the NADA protocol can have greatest impact when broadly applied by behavioral health professionals, Auricular Detoxification Specialists (ADSes). Methods: The concept of ADS is described and how current laws vary from state to state. Using available national data, a survey of practitioners in three selected states with vastly different laws regarding ADSes, and interviews of publicly funded programs which are successfully incorporating the NADA protocol, we consider possible effects of ADS-friendly conditions. Results: Data presented supports the idea that conditions conducive to ADS practice lead to greater implementation. Program interviews reflect settings in which adding ADSes can in turn lead to improved outcomes. Discussion: The primary purpose of non-acupuncturist ADSes is to expand the access of this simple but effective treatment to all who are suffering from addictions, stress, or trauma and to allow programs to incorporate acupuncture in the form of the NADA protocol at minimal cost, when and where it is needed. States that have changed laws to allow ADS practice for this standardized ear acupuncture protocol have seen increased access to this treatment, benefiting both patients and the programs.

  10. An examination of sleep health, lifestyle and mental health in junior high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hideki; Taira, Kazuhiko; Arakawa, Masashi; Masuda, Atushi; Yamamoto, Yukari; Komoda, Yoko; Kadegaru, Hathuko; Shirakawa, Shuichiro

    2002-06-01

    The factors that influence sleep health and mental health in junior high school students' lifestyles was examined. The proportion of students who replied that they feel bad in the morning, and who do not have breakfast was significantly higher in poor sleepers. The proportion of students who regularly take exercise was significantly lower among poor sleepers. Compared with good sleepers, poor sleepers had a higher number of illnesses and their General Health Questionnaire score was worse. The study's results suggest that sleep health is closely related to both physical and mental health, and that habits such as exercise, and regular sleeping and eating, are important for maintaining and improving students' sleep health.

  11. Social Media for e-Government in the Public Health Sector: Protocol for a Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Massimo; Tursunbayeva, Aizhan

    2016-01-01

    Background Public sector organizations worldwide are engaging with social media as part of a growing e-government agenda. These include government departments of health, public health agencies, and state-funded health care and research organizations. Although examples of social media in health have been described in the literature, little is known about their overall scope or how they are achieving the objectives of e-government. A systematic literature review is underway to capture and synthesize existing evidence on the adoption, use, and impacts of social media in the public health sector. A series of parallel scoping exercises has taken place to examine (1) relevant existing systematic reviews, to assess their focus, breadth, and fit with our review topic, (2) existing concepts related to e-government, public health, and the public health sector, to assess how semantic complexity might influence the review process, and (3) the results of pilot searches, to examine the fit of social media within the e-government and health literatures. The methods and observations of the scoping exercises are reported in this protocol, alongside the methods and interim results for the systematic review itself. Objective The systematic review has three main objectives: To capture the corpus of published studies on the uses of social media by public health organizations; to classify the objectives for which social media have been deployed in these contexts and the methods used; and to analyze and synthesize evidence of the uptake, use, and impacts of social media on various outcomes. Methods A set of scoping exercises were undertaken, to inform the search strategy and analytic framework. Searches have been carried out in MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, Web of Science, and the Scopus international electronic databases, and appropriate gray literature sources. Articles published between January 1, 2004, and July 12, 2015, were included. There was no restriction by language. One

  12. Social Media for e-Government in the Public Health Sector: Protocol for a Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Massimo; Tursunbayeva, Aizhan; Pagliari, Claudia

    2016-03-11

    Public sector organizations worldwide are engaging with social media as part of a growing e-government agenda. These include government departments of health, public health agencies, and state-funded health care and research organizations. Although examples of social media in health have been described in the literature, little is known about their overall scope or how they are achieving the objectives of e-government. A systematic literature review is underway to capture and synthesize existing evidence on the adoption, use, and impacts of social media in the public health sector. A series of parallel scoping exercises has taken place to examine (1) relevant existing systematic reviews, to assess their focus, breadth, and fit with our review topic, (2) existing concepts related to e-government, public health, and the public health sector, to assess how semantic complexity might influence the review process, and (3) the results of pilot searches, to examine the fit of social media within the e-government and health literatures. The methods and observations of the scoping exercises are reported in this protocol, alongside the methods and interim results for the systematic review itself. The systematic review has three main objectives: To capture the corpus of published studies on the uses of social media by public health organizations; to classify the objectives for which social media have been deployed in these contexts and the methods used; and to analyze and synthesize evidence of the uptake, use, and impacts of social media on various outcomes. A set of scoping exercises were undertaken, to inform the search strategy and analytic framework. Searches have been carried out in MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, Web of Science, and the Scopus international electronic databases, and appropriate gray literature sources. Articles published between January 1, 2004, and July 12, 2015, were included. There was no restriction by language. One reviewer (AT) has independently

  13. Health effects of smoke from planned burns: a study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David O’Keeffe

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Large populations are exposed to smoke from bushfires and planned burns. Studies investigating the association between bushfire smoke and health have typically used hospital or ambulance data and been done retrospectively on large populations. The present study is designed to prospectively assess the association between individual level health outcomes and exposure to smoke from planned burns. Methods/design A prospective cohort study will be conducted during a planned burn season in three locations in Victoria (Australia involving 50 adult participants who undergo three rounds of cardiorespiratory medical tests, including measurements for lung inflammation, endothelial function, heart rate variability and markers of inflammation. In addition daily symptoms and twice daily lung function are recorded. Outdoor particulate air pollution is continuously measured during the study period in these locations. The data will be analysed using mixed effect models adjusting for confounders. Discussion Planned burns depend on weather conditions and dryness of ‘fuels’ (i.e. forest. It is potentially possible that no favourable conditions occur during the study period. To reduce the risk of this occurring, three separate locations have been identified as having a high likelihood of planned burn smoke exposure during the study period, with the full study being rolled out in two of these three locations. A limitation of this study is exposure misclassification as outdoor measurements will be conducted as a measure for personal exposures. However this misclassification will be reduced as participants are only eligible if they live in close proximity to the monitors.

  14. Treating sexual assault victims. A protocol for health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, C R; Groetzinger, L L

    1990-02-01

    Sexual assault victims require a multidisciplinary approach encompassing emotional, medical, and forensic care. Evaluation should include general and genital examinations, collection of forensic specimens, and culturing for sexually transmitted diseases. Obtaining a complete history is not only medically and legally crucial, but also can be a valuable therapeutic activity. Antibiotic prophylaxis, postcoital contraception, and testing for human immunodeficiency virus should be offered. An understanding of the rape trauma syndrome is the foundation for providing emotional support. The need for follow-up evaluation and counseling should be stressed.

  15. Institutionalizing a Comprehensive Tobacco-Cessation Protocol in an Indigenous Health System: Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, LorrieAnn; Braun, Kathryn; Aea, Kamuela; Shearer, Leimomi

    2008-01-01

    Background Native Hawaiians have high smoking prevalence and high lung cancer mortality rates. Objectives To describe a comprehensive tobacco cessation protocol and share lessons learned in institutionalizing it across the five Native Hawaiian Health Care Systems (NHHCS). Methods NHHCS representatives worked together to culturally tailor the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality protocol for smoking cessation. Process objectives included number of staff trained in tobacco cessation, inclusion of the Tobacco User Guide Sheet (TUGS) in the intake process and medical record, and expansion of programs for smokers who want to quit. Outcome objectives included percent of individuals asked about smoking status and percent of identified smokers that received brief intervention, set a quit date, were linked to services, and remained smoke-free for 90 days. Results After 18 months, the NHHCS were at different stages of protocol adoption. More successful NHHCS were more likely to have several champions for the program and administrative support for staff training, new programs, and integrating the TUGS into client charts. They also showed greater success in getting smokers to set a quit date and remain smoke-free for 90 days. Conclusion Although the five NHHCS helped design the protocol, each operates independently. More effort and time are needed to help each system overcome internal barriers to institutionalizing a new protocol and to facilitate support for tobacco-cessation champions among medical records and data management supervisors. These lessons may be useful to other organizations that want to institutionalize a comprehensive tobacco-cessation protocol. PMID:20208308

  16. The korean social life, health and aging project-health examination cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju-Mi; Lee, Won Joon; Kim, Hyeon Chang; Choi, Wungrak; Lee, Jina; Sung, Kiho; Chu, Sang Hui; Park, Yeong-Ran; Youm, Yoosik

    2014-01-01

    The Korean Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (KSHAP) is a population-based longitudinal study of health determinants among elderly Koreans. The target population of the KSHAP are people aged 60 years or older and their spouses living in a rural community of Korea. A complete enumeration survey was conducted in the first wave of the KSHAP on 94.7% (814 of 860) of the target population between December 2011 and July 2012. The KSHAP-Health Examination (KSHAP-HE) cohort consists of 698 people who completed additional health examinations at a public health center (n=533) or at their home (n=165). Face-to-face questionnaires were used to interview participants on their demographics, social network characteristics, medical history, health behaviors, cognitive function, and depression symptoms. Health center examinations included anthropometric measures, body impedance analysis, resting blood pressure measurement, radial artery tonometry, bone densitometry, the timed up-and-go test, and fasting blood analysis. However, only anthropometric measures, blood pressure measurement, and non-fasting blood analysis were available for home health examinations. Collaboration is encouraged and access to the KSHAP baseline data will be available via the website of the Korean Social Science Data Archive (http://www.kossda.or.kr). The Korean Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (KSHAP) is a population-based longitudinal study of health determinants among elderly Koreans. The target population of the KSHAP are people aged 60 years or older and their spouses living in a rural community of Korea. A complete enumeration survey was conducted in the first wave of the KSHAP on 94.7% (814 of 860) of the target population between December 2011 and July 2012. The KSHAP-Health Examination (KSHAP-HE) cohort consists of 698 people who completed additional health examinations at a public health center (n=533) or at their home (n=165). Face-to-face questionnaires were used to interview

  17. European project HOPE (Health Optimization Protocol for Energy-efficient Buildings)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bluyssen, P.M.; Cox, C.W.J.; Maroni, M.; Boschi, N.; Raw, G.; Roulet, C.A.; Foradini, F.

    2003-01-01

    In January 2002, a new European project named HOPE (Health Optimization Protocol for Energy-efficient Buildings) started with 14 participants from nine European countries. The final goal of the project is to provide the means to increase the number of energy-efficient buildings, i.e. buildings that

  18. Inside the Mind of the Online Health Information Searcher using Think-Aloud Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias, Wendy; Lee, Mina; Cunningham, Nicole

    2017-09-27

    In this article we employ the think-aloud protocol to gain an in-depth look at how 23 individuals searched for online health information. Participants narrated their health searches as we audio and video recorded using screen-capture software. We transcribed the recordings verbatim and used axial and selective coding to inductively identify themes into two main search stages: online processing and consequences. A typology of online health searchers, including flounderer, skimmer, digester, aficionado and devourer, is used to guide the reader through our findings about individual's attitudes, cognitions, emotions, and behaviors. Finally, we discuss implications for online health literacy and provide suggestions for future research.

  19. Health professionals’ knowledge of prevention strategies and protocol following percutaneous injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Bodkin

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Prevention strategies and protocols for the management of percutaneous injuries are developed for the purpose of preventing transmission of HIV and other infections. However, implementation thereof requires health professionals to be conversant with the content of protocols and ways to prevent percutaneous injuries. The purpose of the study was to determine health professionals’ knowledge of prevention strategies and protocols following percutaneous injury. The purpose was addressed within a quantitative survey design. Data were collected by means of a self-administered questionnaire. The study was conducted at a public-sector tertiary academic hospital in Gauteng. Seven units within the hospital were randomly selected for investigation. These included, trauma, intensive care, medical, surgical, maternity, theatre and paediatrics. A population of 800 health professionals worked within the sampled units. Health professionals were stratified according to the following three categories, doctors, registered and enrolled nurses and medical and nursing students. A sample size of 200 health professionals was purposively selected of which a response rate of 79.5% (n= 159 was achieved. The sample consisted of 76.7 % (n=122 registered and enrolled nurses, 13.2% (n=21 doctors and 8.8% (n=14 medical and nursing students; 1.3% (n=2 did not specify their health professional category.

  20. EVA Human Health and Performance Benchmarking Study Overview and Development of a Microgravity Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcross, Jason; Jarvis, Sarah; Bekdash, Omar; Cupples, Scott; Abercromby, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    The primary objective of this study is to develop a protocol to reliably characterize human health and performance metrics for individuals working inside various EVA suits under realistic spaceflight conditions. Expected results and methodologies developed during this study will provide the baseline benchmarking data and protocols with which future EVA suits and suit configurations (e.g., varied pressure, mass, center of gravity [CG]) and different test subject populations (e.g., deconditioned crewmembers) may be reliably assessed and compared. Results may also be used, in conjunction with subsequent testing, to inform fitness-for-duty standards, as well as design requirements and operations concepts for future EVA suits and other exploration systems.

  1. Examining the Association Between Temperature and Mental Health in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, R.; Gavin, L.; Pearson, D.; Malig, B. J.; Ebisu, K.

    2016-12-01

    Background: The association between temperature and morbidity from some specific causes has been well established. However, the association between temperature and mental health effects has not been examined closely, although those with mental illnesses may be susceptible to temperature. Methods: We obtained daily counts of emergency room visits and hospitalizations (ICD-9 codes) from the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development from 16 California climate zones from 2005 - 2013. Mean apparent temperature was determined by combining monitored temperature and humidity data from the US EPA, California Irrigation Management Information System, and the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration and weighting monitor values by distance to zip code tabulation areas (ZCTA) and ZCTA populations in the same climate zone as each monitor. We used a two-stage hierarchical model to analyze this data, adjusted by the following independent variables: mean daily apparent temperature, holiday, day of the week, and a natural spline smoothing function of time. The regression was performed for both warm (5/1 - 10/31) and cold (11/1 - 4/30) seasons. Results were stratified by race/ethnicity and age group. Results: We observed an association between same-day mean apparent temperature and mental health outcomes during the warm and cold seasons. We also observed associations between temperature and suicide/self-injury and homicide/assault injury. A 10°F increase in mean apparent temperature was associated with a 4.98% [95% confidence interval, 3.73-6.23], 5.82% [4.34-7.30], and 7.43% [6.75-8.12], increase in mental health events, suicide, and homicide events during the warm season, respectively. Similar results were observed during the cold season. Effect modification by race/ethnic and age groups was observed for some outcomes for both seasons. Conclusions: Increase in mean apparent temperature was found to have same-day associations with several mental health

  2. Findings from the oral health study of the Danish Health Examination Survey 2007-2008

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongstad, Johanne; Ekstrand, Kim; Qvist, Vibeke

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective. The aims of the oral part of the Danish Health Examination Survey (DANHES 2007-2008) were (1) to establish an oral health database for adult Danes and (2) to explore the influence of general diseases and lifestyle on oral health. This paper presents the study population....... The validated questionnaire and the clinical characteristics enable robust analyses, although the conclusions may be hampered by limited external validity....

  3. Caries risk assessment tool and prevention protocol for public health nurses in mother and child health centers, Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natapov, Lena; Dekel-Markovich, Dan; Granit-Palmon, Hadas; Aflalo, Efrat; Zusman, Shlomo Paul

    2018-01-01

    Dental caries is the most prevalent chronic disease in children. Caries risk assessment tools enable the dentists, physicians, and nondental health care providers to assess the individual's risk. Intervention by nurses in primary care settings can contribute to the establishment of oral health habits and prevention of dental disease. In Israel, Mother and Child Health Centers provide free preventive services for pregnant women and children by public health nurses. A caries prevention program in health centers started in 2015. Nurses underwent special training regarding caries prevention. A customized Caries Risk Assessment tool and Prevention Protocol for nurses, based on the AAPD tool, was introduced. A two-step evaluation was conducted which included a questionnaire and in-depth phone interviews. Twenty-eight (out of 46) health centers returned a completed questionnaire. Most nurses believed that oral health preventive services should be incorporated into their daily work. In the in-depth phone interviews, nurses stated that the integration of the program into their busy daily schedule was realistic and appropriate. The lack of specific dental module for computer program was mentioned as an implementation difficulty. The wide use of our tool by nurses supports its simplicity and feasibility which enables quick calculation and informed decision making. The nurses readily embraced the tool and it became an integral part of their toolkit. We provide public health nurses with a caries risk assessment tool and prevention protocol thus integrating oral health into general health of infants and toddlers. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Using institutional and behavioural economics to examine animal health systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, C A

    2017-04-01

    Economics provides a framework for understanding management decisions and their policy implications for the animal health system. While the neoclassical economic model is useful for framing animal health decisions on the farm, some of its assumptions and prescriptive results may be unrealistic. Institutional and behavioural economics address some of these potential shortcomings by considering the role of information, psychology and social factors in decisions. Framing such decisions under contract theory allows us to consider asymmetric information between policy-makers and farmers. Perverse incentives may exist in the area of preventing and reporting disease. Behavioural economics examines the role of internal and external psychological and social factors. Biases, heuristics, habit, social norms and other such aspects can result in farm decision-makers arriving at what might be considered irrational or otherwise sub-optimal decisions. Framing choices and providing relevant information and examples can alleviate these behavioural issues. The implications of this approach for disease policy and an applied research and outreach programme to respond to animal diseases are discussed.

  5. How much do workers' health examinations add to health and safety at the workplace? Occupational preventive usefulness of routine health examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Jareño, Maria Cruz; Molinero, Emilia; de Montserrat, Jaume; Vallès, Antoni; Aymerich, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Despite no evidence in favour, routine workers' health examinations, mostly pre-employment and periodic, are extensively performed worldwide with important allocation of resources. In Spain they are performed within a theoretical job-specific health surveillance system. Our objective was to ascertain their occupational preventive usefulness from the perspective of occupational health professionals. Cross sectional study. Online survey addressed to all physicians and nurses members of the Catalan Society of Safety and Occupational Medicine (n=539) in 2011. Univariate and bivariate analyses of prevalence and prevalence differences of answers. Response rate 53% (n=285). According to more than 70% of respondents the health surveillance system isn't cost-effective, doesn't meet the goal of early detection of health damage related to work, and doesn't contribute to improve the occupational risk prevention system. Further deficiencies were identified regarding specificity and scientific basis for health examinations, quality of collective health surveillance and referral of suspected cases to mutual insurance companies for diagnosis and treatment. Bivariate analysis showed a significantly more negative opinion for several items amongst physicians (versus nurses) and amongst professionals working in external prevention services (versus internal services). This study raises serious concerns about how health examinations are performed within our workers' health surveillance system, which should be reviewed to ensure the fulfilment of its occupational preventive objective. Our results might encourage other countries with similar practices to assess them in order to assure their fitness for purpose. Copyright © 2014 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. The Relationship between Health Behavior and General Health Status: Based on 2011 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Cheon, Chunhoo; Oh, So-Mi; Jang, Soobin; Park, Jeong-Su; Park, Sunju; Jang, Bo-Hyoung; SHIN, YONG-CHEOL; KO, SEONG-GYU

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the present study is to investigate the relationship between health behavior and general health status. Methods We used data from the 2011 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Mental health was measured by stress recognition and depression. Dietary habit was measured by mixed grain diet. Life pattern was measured by sleeping time and working pattern. Physical activity was measured by walking and exercise. We defined general health status as Euro Qualit...

  7. 77 FR 34387 - National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) DNA Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Health and Nutrition Examination... Health and Human Services (DHHS). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The National Health and Nutrition Examination...: Geraldine McQuillan, Ph.D., Division of Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, National Center for Health...

  8. The current status of the Korean student health examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye-Jung Shin

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent trends place an emphasis on school health care, the ultimate goal of which is to protect,maintain, and promote students’ health. School health care is a program that integrates health careservices, health education, health counseling, and local social health services. The student healthexamination (SHE system is a part of school health care and schools and communities must beavailable to provide professional health services. Pediatricians also have important roles as experts inboth school health care and the SHE system. In this article, the history of school health care, its legalbasis, and the current status of the SHE system in Korea are reviewed. Furthermore, sample surveysfrom the past few years are reviewed. Through this holistic approach, future directions are proposed forthe improvement of SHE and school health care.

  9. Policies and protocols for preventing transmission of HIV infection in oral health care in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunbodede, E O; Rudolph, M J

    2002-12-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection constitutes an unparalleled public health challenge. The unique nature of most oral health procedures, instrumentation and patient-care settings requires specific strategies and protocols aimed at preventing the transmission of HIV/AIDS between oral health care providers and patients, as well as between patients themselves. The present study investigated the level of information and training about protocols and policies for preventing the transmission of HIV/AIDS in oral health care settings in South Africa. The data collection techniques utilised available information, in-depth interviews and an open-ended questionnaire. The respondents were 20 purposively selected key informants who were senior officers for HIV/AIDS programmes and/or oral health organisations. Sixteen (80%) of the respondents reported that there were no existing oral health policies on HIV/AIDS in their health care institutions or organisations. None of the interviewees knew of any specific protocols on HIV/AIDS in the oral health care setting that emanated from South Africa. In addition, none of the dental professional associations had established an infection control committee or a support system for members who might become infected with HIV and develop AIDS. Territorial boundaries existed between sectors within the medical disciplines, as well as between the medical and oral health disciplines. Numerous general impediments were identified, such as prejudice, denial and fear, inadequate training and/or information about the infection, lack of representation and resources for policy planning, a lack of interest from the business sector, and approaching HIV/AIDS in the workplace as a 'one-time issue' Other obstacles identified included unemployment, poverty, illiteracy, disempowerment of women and inadequate communication of policies to service providers. Additional issues raised included the migrant labour systeM, complexities of language and culture

  10. A randomized controlled trial examining the effectiveness of a STOMA psychosocial intervention programme on the outcomes of colorectal patients with a stoma: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Siew Hoon; Chan, Sally Wai-Chi; Lai, Jiunn Herng; He, Hong-Gu

    2015-06-01

    To report a study protocol that evaluates the effects of a psychosocial intervention on patients with a newly formed stoma. With the loss of a significant body function and distorted body image, stoma patients experience physical, psychological and social challenges. Nurses have an important role in helping patients' make a smooth transition to living with their stoma. Limited studies have examined the effects of psychosocial interventions on improving stoma-related health outcomes. A randomized controlled trial is planned. Eighty-four patients with newly formed stoma in a tertiary hospital in Singapore (Research Ethics Committee approval obtained in January 2013) will be recruited. Participants will be randomly assigned to either a control group who receive routine care or an intervention group who receive STOMA psychosocial intervention besides routine care. Outcome variables include stoma care self-efficacy, days to stoma proficiency, length of hospital stay, acceptance of stoma, anxiety and depression and quality of life. Data will be collected at four time points: before randomization and intervention (baseline), on the day of discharge (mid-intervention), at 4 weeks after discharge (postintervention 1) and at 4 months after discharge (postintervention 2). This study will develop a psychosocial intervention programme, which may improve patients' stoma-related outcomes. The findings will provide direction to health professionals about education and the type of support that could be offered to patients concerning stoma care in the hospital setting, which will eventually improve their quality of life. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Health impact assessment as an instrument to examine the health implications of education policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pharr, J; Gakh, M; Coughenour, C; Clark, S

    2017-04-01

    Health impact assessment (HIA) is a systematic process that can be used by public health professionals to examine the potential health effects of a policy, plan, program, or project that originates outside of the health sector. This article presents a case study of how an interdisciplinary team utilized an HIA to analyze the potential health impact of full-day kindergarten (FDK) on communities in Nevada. Case study. With stakeholder and community engagement, we conducted a multistage HIA that included qualitative and quantitative data collection and analysis, a review of existing literature, and projections. The team considered several pathways through which FDK could impact health in Nevada: (1) school performance; (2) physical development (physical activity and nutrition education); and (3) access to school-based meals and health screenings. Findings indicated that access to FDK could enhance opportunities for Nevada's children to harness school-based services, increase physical activity, and promote nutrition education. In addition, based on existing research that suggests relationships between (1) FDK attendance and 3rd and 5th grade math and reading standardized test scores and (2) 3rd and 5th grade test scores and high school graduation, as well as available state and national data, we estimated that access to FDK could increase high school graduation in Nevada by 499-820 students per year. This HIA demonstrated that access to FDK could impact both student and adult health in Nevada. Our engagement of public health professionals along with stakeholders and the community in the HIA process demonstrated that HIAs can be an important tool for public health professionals to examine the effects on community health of policies, programs, plans or projects that arise outside of the health sector. Copyright © 2016 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Implementation examined in a health center-delivered, educational intervention that improved infant growth in Trujillo, Peru: successes and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Rebecca C; Gittelsohn, Joel; Creed-Kanashiro, Hilary M; Penny, Mary E; Caulfield, Laura E; Narro, M Rocio; Steckler, Allan; Black, Robert E

    2007-06-01

    Process evaluation was used to examine the implementation of a randomized, controlled trial of an education intervention that improved infant growth in Trujillo, Peru. Health personnel delivered the multi-component intervention as part of usual care in the government health centers. Quantitative and qualitative methods were used to examine process indicators, which included the extent of delivery (dose), fidelity to intervention protocol, barriers to implementation and context. Results demonstrated that most intervention components were delivered at a level of 50-90% of expectations. Fidelity to intervention protocol, where measured, was lower (28-70% of expectations). However, when compared with existing nutrition education, as represented by the control centers, significant improvements were demonstrated. This included both improved delivery of existing educational activities as well as delivery of new intervention components to strengthen overall nutrition education. Barriers to, and facilitators of, implementation were explored with health personnel and helped to explain results. This study demonstrates the importance of examining actual versus planned implementation in order to improve our understanding of how interventions succeed. The information gained from this study will inform future evaluation designs, and lead to the development and implementation of more effective intervention programs for child health.

  13. A protocol to examine vision and gait in Parkinson's disease: impact of cognition and response to visual cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Samuel; Galna, Brook; Lord, Sue; Rochester, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Background Cognitive and visual impairments are common in Parkinson's disease (PD) and contribute to gait deficit and falls. To date, cognition and vision in gait in PD have been assessed separately. Impact of both functions (which we term 'visuo-cognition') on gait however is likely interactive and can be tested using visual sampling (specifically saccadic eye movements) to provide an online behavioural measure of performance. Although experiments using static paradigms show saccadic impairment in PD, few studies have quantified visual sampling during dynamic motor tasks such as gait. This article describes a protocol developed for testing visuo-cognition during gait in order to examine the: 1) independent roles of cognition and vision in gait in PD, 2) interaction between both functions, and 3) role of visuo-cognition in gait in PD. Methods Two groups of older adults (≥50 years old) were recruited; non-demented people with PD (n=60) and age-matched controls (n=40). Participants attended one session and a sub-group (n=25) attended two further sessions in order to establish mobile eye-tracker reliability. Participants walked in a gait laboratory under different attentional (single and dual task), environmental (walk straight, through a door and turning), and cueing (no visual cues and visual cues) conditions. Visual sampling was recorded using synchronised mobile eye-tracker and electrooculography systems, and gait was measured using 3D motion analysis. Discussion This exploratory study examined visuo-cognitive processes and their impact on gait in PD. Improved understanding of the influence of cognitive and visual functions on visual sampling during gait and gait in PD will assist in development of interventions to improve gait and reduce falls risk. This study will also help establish robust mobile eye-tracking methods in older adults and people with PD.

  14. A protocol to examine vision and gait in Parkinson’s disease: impact of cognition and response to visual cues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Samuel; Galna, Brook; Lord, Sue; Rochester, Lynn

    2016-01-01

    Background Cognitive and visual impairments are common in Parkinson’s disease (PD) and contribute to gait deficit and falls. To date, cognition and vision in gait in PD have been assessed separately. Impact of both functions (which we term ‘visuo-cognition’) on gait however is likely interactive and can be tested using visual sampling (specifically saccadic eye movements) to provide an online behavioural measure of performance. Although experiments using static paradigms show saccadic impairment in PD, few studies have quantified visual sampling during dynamic motor tasks such as gait. This article describes a protocol developed for testing visuo-cognition during gait in order to examine the: 1) independent roles of cognition and vision in gait in PD, 2) interaction between both functions, and 3) role of visuo-cognition in gait in PD. Methods Two groups of older adults (≥50 years old) were recruited; non-demented people with PD (n=60) and age-matched controls (n=40). Participants attended one session and a sub-group (n=25) attended two further sessions in order to establish mobile eye-tracker reliability. Participants walked in a gait laboratory under different attentional (single and dual task), environmental (walk straight, through a door and turning), and cueing (no visual cues and visual cues) conditions. Visual sampling was recorded using synchronised mobile eye-tracker and electrooculography systems, and gait was measured using 3D motion analysis. Discussion This exploratory study examined visuo-cognitive processes and their impact on gait in PD. Improved understanding of the influence of cognitive and visual functions on visual sampling during gait and gait in PD will assist in development of interventions to improve gait and reduce falls risk. This study will also help establish robust mobile eye-tracking methods in older adults and people with PD. PMID:27092242

  15. Relationship between Health-Seeking Behavior by Basic Health Examination and Subsequent Health Expenditure among Remote Island Inhabitants of Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinjo, Aya; Myoga, Yoshinori; Osaki, Yoneatsu

    2014-09-01

    Convincing evidence has not been obtained as to whether having a basic health examination in the prime of life inhibits the surge of health expenditure in old age. Data on participants in the basic health examination from 1996 to 2000 among residents of a remote island in Japan, and individual health care expenditure data from March 2005 to February 2008. A community-based retrospective study. Japanese residents who were subscribers to the National Health Insurance Scheme of Chibu Town from March 1996 to March 2007 and were aged 40 to 64 years in March 1996 (n = 179) were divided into 3 groups depending on the frequency of participating in the basic health examination over 5 years: 0 times (nontakers), 1 to 3 times (occasional takers), or 4 to 5 times (regular takers). The distribution of total health expenditure according to the frequency of having a basic health examination was determined, and the Cochrane-Armitage test was used for comparison. Nontakers formed the highest proportion of subjects with low expenditure (0-200,000 yen) (nontaker, occasional, regular: 38.5%, 24.1%, 23.5%; P = 0.002), and also accounted for the highest proportion of subjects with high expenditure (> 1,400,000 yen) (33.3%, 16.1%, 9.4%; P = 0.004). Persons not participating in health examinations during middle age include a group with high future health care expenditure.

  16. Comparison of Health Examination Survey Methods in Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, England, Scotland, and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindell, Jennifer S; Moody, Alison; Vecino-Ortiz, Andres I; Alfaro, Tania; Frenz, Patricia; Scholes, Shaun; Gonzalez, Silvia A; Margozzini, Paula; de Oliveira, Cesar; Sanchez Romero, Luz Maria; Alvarado, Andres; Cabrera, Sebastián; Sarmiento, Olga L; Triana, Camilo A; Barquera, Simón

    2017-09-15

    Comparability of population surveys across countries is key to appraising trends in population health. Achieving this requires deep understanding of the methods used in these surveys to examine the extent to which the measurements are comparable. In this study, we obtained detailed protocols of 8 nationally representative surveys from 2007-2013 from Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, the United Kingdom (England and Scotland), and the United States-countries that that differ in economic and inequity indicators. Data were collected on sampling frame, sample selection procedures, recruitment, data collection methods, content of interview and examination modules, and measurement protocols. We also assessed their adherence to the World Health Organization's "STEPwise Approach to Surveillance" framework for population health surveys. The surveys, which included half a million participants, were highly comparable on sampling methodology, survey questions, and anthropometric measurements. Heterogeneity was found for physical activity questionnaires and biological samples collection. The common age range included by the surveys was adults aged 18-64 years. The methods used in these surveys were similar enough to enable comparative analyses of the data across the 7 countries. This comparability is crucial in assessing and comparing national and subgroup population health, and to assisting the transfer of research and policy knowledge across countries. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. [Climatic change and public health: scenarios after the coming into force of the Kyoto Protocol].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballester, Ferran; Díaz, Julio; Moreno, José Manuel

    2006-03-01

    According to the reports of the intergovernmental panel for climatic change (IPCC) human beings of the present and near future are going to experiment, in fact we are already experimenting, important changes in the world climate. Conscious of the magnitude of the problem, international organizations have taken a series of initiatives headed to stop the climatic change and to reduce its impact. This willingness has been shaped into the agreements established in the Kyoto protocol, where countries commit to reduce greenhouse-effect gas emissions. Kyoto protocol has come into force on February 16th 2005 with the support of 141 signing countries. Among the major worries are the effects which climatic change may have upon health, such as: 1) changes in the morbidity- mortality related to temperature; 2) Effects on health related with extreme meteorological events (tornados, storms, hurricanes and extreme raining); 3) Air pollution and increase of associated health effects; d) Diseases transmitted by food and water and 4) Infectious diseases transmitted by vectors and by rodents. Even if all the countries in the world committed to the Kyoto Protocol, some consequences of the climatic change will be inevitable; among them some will have a negative impact on health. It would be necessary to adapt a key response strategy to minimize the impacts of climatic change and to reduce, at minimum cost, its adverse effects on health. From the Public Health position, a relevant role can and must be played concerning the understanding of the risks for health of such climatic changes, the design of surveillance systems to evaluate possible impacts, and the establishment of systems to prevent or reduce damages as well as the identification and development of investigation needs.

  18. A Machine-to-Machine protocol benchmark for eHealth applications - Use case: Respiratory rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaminos-Barroso, Alejandro; Estudillo-Valderrama, Miguel A; Roa, Laura M; Reina-Tosina, Javier; Ortega-Ruiz, Francisco

    2016-06-01

    M2M (Machine-to-Machine) communications represent one of the main pillars of the new paradigm of the Internet of Things (IoT), and is making possible new opportunities for the eHealth business. Nevertheless, the large number of M2M protocols currently available hinders the election of a suitable solution that satisfies the requirements that can demand eHealth applications. In the first place, to develop a tool that provides a benchmarking analysis in order to objectively select among the most relevant M2M protocols for eHealth solutions. In the second place, to validate the tool with a particular use case: the respiratory rehabilitation. A software tool, called Distributed Computing Framework (DFC), has been designed and developed to execute the benchmarking tests and facilitate the deployment in environments with a large number of machines, with independence of the protocol and performance metrics selected. DDS, MQTT, CoAP, JMS, AMQP and XMPP protocols were evaluated considering different specific performance metrics, including CPU usage, memory usage, bandwidth consumption, latency and jitter. The results obtained allowed to validate a case of use: respiratory rehabilitation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients in two scenarios with different types of requirement: Home-Based and Ambulatory. The results of the benchmark comparison can guide eHealth developers in the choice of M2M technologies. In this regard, the framework presented is a simple and powerful tool for the deployment of benchmark tests under specific environments and conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. 76 FR 72417 - National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) DNA Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-23

    ... National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) DNA Samples AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control... National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) will not be receiving DNA proposals in 2012... of Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for...

  20. Systematic Review Protocol to Assess the Effectiveness of Usability Questionnaires in mHealth App Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Leming; Bao, Jie; Parmanto, Bambang

    2017-08-01

    Usability questionnaires have a wide use in mobile health (mHealth) app usability studies. However, no systematic review has been conducted for assessing the effectiveness of these questionnaires. This paper describes a protocol for conducting a systematic review of published questionnaire-based mHealth app usability studies. In this systematic review, we will select recently published (2008-2017) articles from peer-reviewed journals and conferences that describe mHealth app usability studies and implement at least one usability questionnaire. The search strategy will include terms such as "mobile app" and "usability." Multiple databases such as PubMed, CINAHL, IEEE Xplore, ACM Digital Library, and INSPEC will be searched. There will be 2 independent reviewers in charge of screening titles and abstracts as well as determining those articles that should be included for a full-text review. The third reviewer will act as a mediator between the other 2 reviewers. Moreover, a data extraction form will be created and used during the full article data analysis. Notably, the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Protocols (PRISMA-P) guidelines will be followed in reporting this protocol. A preliminary search produced 1271 articles, 40 of which are duplicate records. The inclusion-exclusion criteria are being strictly followed in performing the ongoing study selection. Usability questionnaires are an important tool in mHealth app usability studies. This review will summarize the usability questionnaires used in published research articles while assessing the efficacy of these questionnaires in determining the usability of mHealth apps.

  1. Planning oral health and clinical discharge in primary care: the comprehensive dental care protocol outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, Yuri Wanderley; Dantas de Almeida, Leopoldina de Fátima; Barbosa, Ailma de Souza; Nascimento Padilha, Wilton Wilney

    2015-03-01

    The dental care must be driven by preventive and curative measures that can contribute to the population's oral health promotion. To evaluate the impact of the actions proposed by a comprehensive dental care protocol (CDCP) on the oral health condition of primary care users. The sample consisted of 32 volunteers, assisted throughout the six phases proposed by the CDCP: diagnosis of dental needs; resolution of urgencies; restorative interventions; application of promotional measures; evaluation of the achieved health level; and periodic controls. Data were collected through clinical exams, which measured the simplified oral hygiene index (OHI-S), gingival bleeding index (GBI) and the decayed, missing and filled teeth (DMFT) Index, before and after the CDCP was implemented. Statistical analysis consisted of the Wilcoxon test, at 5% significance level (α = 0.05). The OHI-S and GBI indices showed a significant reduction (p 0.05), showing final values equal to 12.7 ± 9.6 and 5.6 ± 7.8, respectively. Decayed elements were fully converted into filled elements, and the final values of the decayed and filled elements were, respectively, 0.0 ± 0.0 and 7.3 ± 5.7 (p health of the population assisted by the dental services offered in primary care and this protocol seems to ft the public dental service demands. The CDCP can be useful to public dental service planning since it showed an efficient clinical outcome to the patients. We consider that this protocol should be employed in primary care oral health services in order to achieve overall upgrade, access enlargement and public oral health promotion.

  2. Effect of Aditional Brief Counselling after Periodic Health Examination on Motivation for Health Behavior Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Ki Young; Lee, Cheol Min; Lym, Youl Lee; Oh, Seung Won; Chung, Wonjoo; Lee, Jin-Seok; Park, DuShin; Kim, Han Suk

    2012-01-01

    This study was to evaluate the effect of additional brief counseling by a primary care physician on lifestyle modification of examinees after a periodic health examination. 1,000 participants of the 2007 Korean national health screening program were asked to note any variation in their health behavior after participating in the screening program. The degree of comprehensive motivation for lifestyle modification was assessed in terms of stages of health behavior change. We calculated odds ratio of positive change (enhanced stage of change) with multiple logistic regression analysis and age-adjusted proportion of positive changers. Of 989 respondents, 486 and 503 received the basic and additional programs, respectively. Additional group were more likely to be positive changer than basic group (adjusted OR 1.78; 95% CI 1.19-2.65), and this was more prominent in older age group (adjusted OR 2.38, 95% CI 1.23-4.58). The age-adjusted proportions of positive changers were 22.7% (95% CI, 17.9-28.3) and 36.2% (95% CI, 30.4-42.4) in the basic and additional groups, respectively (P < 0.001). The additional consultation led to improvements in the stage of health behavior change after the health examination. Thus, such a consultation should be considered when designing a health-screening program. PMID:23166407

  3. Impact of a Vitamin D Protocol in Pregnancy at an Urban Women's Health Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awker, Amy L; Herbranson, Amy T; Rhee, Taeho Greg; Westberg, Sarah M

    2016-11-01

    Adequate vitamin D levels are important during pregnancy for maternal and fetal health. The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and appropriate treatment during pregnancy are not well documented. This study aims to identify the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in pregnant women and analyze the impact of a vitamin D protocol on achieving sufficient vitamin D levels. A retrospective chart review was conducted among 200 women who received prenatal care between April 1, 2011, and December 1, 2012 (preprotocol) and July 1, 2013, and June 30, 2014 (postprotocol). In each sample period, 100 women were included. Women were included if they had 2 vitamin D levels drawn during pregnancy. Maternal age, ethnicity, vitamin D levels, gestational age at each level, and the status of vitamin D supplement were controlled for. Women in the preprotocol group achieving sufficiency (25[OH]D ≥ 30 ng/mL) increased from 43% to 60%. In the postprotocol group, sufficiency increased from 19% to 69%. Adherence to the protocol dose was highest in women who were initially deficient (25[OH]D ≤ 20 ng/mL), and correlation between adherence to the protocol dose and achievement of sufficiency was also highest in the group of women who were initially deficient. Vitamin D deficiency was prevalent (25% total) in this population. Implementation of a clinic-wide protocol for vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy resulted in a nonsignificant increase in the percentage of women achieving vitamin D sufficiency.

  4. Development and implementation of intranasal naloxone opioid overdose response protocol at a homeless health clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlem, Chin Hwa Y; Horstman, Molly J; Williams, Brent C

    2016-01-01

    To describe the development, implementation, and preliminary evaluation of Opioid Overdose Response Protocol using intranasal (IN) naloxone in a homeless shelter. Opioid Overdose Response Protocol and training curriculum were developed using the Massachusetts Department of Public Health Opioid Overdose Education and Naloxone Distribution (OEND) flow chart, the American Heart Association (AHA) simplified adult basic life support algorithm, and resources through Harms Reduction Coalition. Intranasal naloxone offers a safe and effective method for opioid reversal. To combat the rising incidence of opioid overdose, IN naloxone should be made available at homeless shelters and other facilities with high frequency of opioid overdose, including the training of appropriate staff. This project has demonstrated the effective training and implementation of an Opioid Overdose Response Protocol, based on feedback received from cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) trained nonhealthcare staff. Nurse practitioners (NPs), with our focus on patient care, prevention, and education, are well suited to the deployment of this life-saving protocol. NPs are in critical positions to integrate opioid overdose prevention education and provide naloxone rescue kits in clinical practices. ©2015 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  5. Health care professionals protocol for secure online transmission of patient data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, C F

    1999-01-01

    One of the results of the 49th Bavarian Physician's Conference was that in 1996 the Bavarian Statutory Health Care Administration (Kassenärztliche Vereinigung Bayerns, KVB) and the Bavarian Medical Association (Bayerische Landesärztekammer, BLAK) jointly suggested a project for the development and verification of a security infrastructure for the online transmission of medical patient data. This Project, the so-called "Health Care Professionals Protocol" (HCP-Protokoll), was designed to establish the first consensus standard for a secure and probably open system to be used in the health care system operating under the constraints of the diverse and heterogeneous IT-infrastructure in Bavaria, with a view towards utilization in all of Germany. In January 1997, the HCP-Protocol was accepted as the strategic mainline project for telematics applications in medicine by the State of Bavaria and endowed with more than 1.3 million DM in the framework of "Bavaria Online II". In the meantime, various national organizations of the German medical community as well as important industrial partners have expressed support for this initiative. Mention in the Roland-Berger study "Telematics in Health Care, Perspectives of Telemedicine in Germany", designation as an "exemplary scenario" in the final report of the Working Group 7 of the Forum Info 2000 "Telematics Applications in Health Care", as well as integration of the new German health professional card, make the HCP-Protocol the most promising candidate for a de facto standard in the security infrastructure for all participants in health care telecommunication in Germany. Since the middle of 1998, an expert group under the guidance of the joint "Projektbüro Telemedizin" of the KVB and BLAK has been working on the definition of this protocol, taking into consideration the current legal framework of the German medical profession (Berufsordnung), the German signature law (SigG), and the national data security laws (BDSG), as

  6. Assessing health systems for type 1 diabetes in sub-Saharan Africa: developing a 'Rapid Assessment Protocol for Insulin Access'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beran, David; Yudkin, John S; de Courten, Maximilian

    2006-01-01

    In order to improve the health of people with Type 1 diabetes in developing countries, a clear analysis of the constraints to insulin access and diabetes care is needed. We developed a Rapid Assessment Protocol for Insulin Access, comprising a series of questionnaires as well as a protocol for th...

  7. Protocol liver biopsy is the only examination that can detect mid-term graft fibrosis after pediatric liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanada, Yukihiro; Matsumoto, Koshi; Urahashi, Taizen; Ihara, Yoshiyuki; Wakiya, Taiichi; Okada, Noriki; Yamada, Naoya; Hirata, Yuta; Mizuta, Koichi

    2014-06-07

    To assessed the clinical significance of protocol liver biopsy (PLB) in pediatric liver transplantation (LT). Between July 2008 and August 2012, 89 and 55 PLBs were performed in pediatric patients at two and five years after LT, respectively. We assessed the histopathological findings using the Metavir scoring system, including activity (A) and fibrosis (F), and we identified factors associated with scores of ≥ A1 and ≥ F1. Our results clarified the timing and effectiveness of PLB. The incidences of scores of ≥ A1 and ≥ F1 were 24.7% and 24.7%, respectively, at two years after LT and 42.3% and 34.5%, respectively, at five years. Independent risk factors in a multivariate analysis of a score of ≥ A1 at two years included ≥ 2 h of cold ischemic time, no acute cellular rejection and an alanine amino transaminase (ALT) level of ≥ 20 IU/L (P = 0.028, P = 0.033 and P = 0.012, respectively); however, no risk factors were identified for a score of ≥ F1. Furthermore, no independent risk factors associated with scores of ≥ A1 and ≥ F1 at five years were identified using multivariate analysis. A ROC curve analysis of ALT at two years for a score of ≥ A1 demonstrated the recommended cutoff value for diagnosing ≥ A1 histology to be 20 IU/L. The incidence of scores of ≥ A2 or ≥ F2 at two years after LT was 3.4% (three cases), and all patients had an absolute score of ≥ A2. In contrast to that observed for PLBs at five years after LT, the incidence of scores of ≥ A2 or ≥ F2 was 20.0% (11 cases), and all patients had an absolute score of ≥ F2. In all cases, the dose of immunosuppressants was increased after the PLB, and all ten patients who underwent a follow-up liver biopsy improved to scores of ≤ A1 or F1. PLB at two years after LT is an unnecessary examination, because the serum ALT level reflects portal inflammation. In addition, immunosuppressive therapy should be modulated to maintain the ALT concentration at a level less than 20 IU

  8. A participatory approach to designing and enhancing integrated health information technology systems for veterans: protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haun, Jolie N; Nazi, Kim M; Chavez, Margeaux; Lind, Jason D; Antinori, Nicole; Gosline, Robert M; Martin, Tracey L

    2015-02-27

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has developed health information technologies (HIT) and resources to improve veteran access to health care programs and services, and to support a patient-centered approach to health care delivery. To improve VA HIT access and meaningful use by veterans, it is necessary to understand their preferences for interacting with various HIT resources to accomplish health management related tasks and to exchange information. The objective of this paper was to describe a novel protocol for: (1) developing a HIT Digital Health Matrix Model; (2) conducting an Analytic Hierarchy Process called pairwise comparison to understand how and why veterans want to use electronic health resources to complete tasks related to health management; and (3) developing visual modeling simulations that depict veterans' preferences for using VA HIT to manage their health conditions and exchange health information. The study uses participatory research methods to understand how veterans prefer to use VA HIT to accomplish health management tasks within a given context, and how they would like to interact with HIT interfaces (eg, look, feel, and function) in the future. This study includes two rounds of veteran focus groups with self-administered surveys and visual modeling simulation techniques. This study will also convene an expert panel to assist in the development of a VA HIT Digital Health Matrix Model, so that both expert panel members and veteran participants can complete an Analytic Hierarchy Process, pairwise comparisons to evaluate and rank the applicability of electronic health resources for a series of health management tasks. This protocol describes the iterative, participatory, and patient-centered process for: (1) developing a VA HIT Digital Health Matrix Model that outlines current VA patient-facing platforms available to veterans, describing their features and relevant contexts for use; and (2) developing visual model simulations based on

  9. Taking mHealth Forward: Examining the Core Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of mobile health (mHealth) offers unique and varied opportunities to address some of the most difficult problems of health. Some of the most promising and active efforts of mHealth involve the engagement of mobile phone technology. As this technology has spread and as this technology is still evolving, we begin a conversation about the core characteristics of mHealth relevant to any mobile phone platform. We assert that the relevance of these characteristics to mHealth will endure as the technology advances, so an understanding of these characteristics is essential to the design, implementation, and adoption of mHealth-based solutions. The core characteristics we discuss are (1) the penetration or adoption into populations, (2) the availability and form of apps, (3) the availability and form of wireless broadband access to the Internet, and (4) the tethering of the device to individuals. These collectively act to both enable and constrain the provision of population health in general, as well as personalized and precision individual health in particular. PMID:27511612

  10. Effect of additional brief counselling after periodic health examination on motivation for health behavior change [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Ki Young; Lee, Cheol Min; Cho, BeLong; Lym, Youl Lee; Oh, Seung Won; Chung, Wonjoo; Lee, Jin-Seok; Park, DuShin; Kim, Han Suk

    2012-11-01

    This study was to evaluate the effect of additional brief counseling by a primary care physician on lifestyle modification of examinees after a periodic health examination. 1,000 participants of the 2007 Korean national health screening program were asked to note any variation in their health behavior after participating in the screening program. The degree of comprehensive motivation for lifestyle modification was assessed in terms of stages of health behavior change. We calculated odds ratio of positive change (enhanced stage of change) with multiple logistic regression analysis and age-adjusted proportion of positive changers. Of 989 respondents, 486 and 503 received the basic and additional programs, respectively. Additional group were more likely to be positive changer than basic group (adjusted OR 1.78; 95% CI 1.19-2.65), and this was more prominent in older age group (adjusted OR 2.38, 95% CI 1.23-4.58). The age-adjusted proportions of positive changers were 22.7% (95% CI, 17.9-28.3) and 36.2% (95% CI, 30.4-42.4) in the basic and additional groups, respectively (P health examination. Thus, such a consultation should be considered when designing a health-screening program.

  11. An Examination of Health Information Management by the Deaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karras, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about how Deaf people perceive, access, and utilize interpersonal and media sources for health information. In light of the scarcity of research on health information management among this group, a two-phase study was conducted that included eight focus groups (N=39) and survey data (N=366) with Deaf participants to determine the…

  12. Aboriginal urbanization and rights in Canada: examining implications for health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senese, Laura C; Wilson, Kathi

    2013-08-01

    Urbanization among Indigenous peoples is growing globally. This has implications for the assertion of Indigenous rights in urban areas, as rights are largely tied to land bases that generally lie outside of urban areas. Through their impacts on the broader social determinants of health, the links between Indigenous rights and urbanization may be related to health. Focusing on a Canadian example, this study explores relationships between Indigenous rights and urbanization, and the ways in which they are implicated in the health of urban Indigenous peoples living in Toronto, Canada. In-depth interviews focused on conceptions of and access to Aboriginal rights in the city, and perceived links with health, were conduced with 36 Aboriginal people who had moved to Toronto from a rural/reserve area. Participants conceived of Aboriginal rights largely as the rights to specific services/benefits and to respect for Aboriginal cultures/identities. There was a widespread perception among participants that these rights are not respected in Canada, and that this is heightened when living in an urban area. Disrespect for Aboriginal rights was perceived to negatively impact health by way of social determinants of health (e.g., psychosocial health impacts of discrimination experienced in Toronto). The paper discusses the results in the context of policy implications and future areas of research. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. What are the physical and psychological health effects of suicide bereavement on family members? Protocol for an observational and interview mixed-methods study in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Spillane, Ailbhe

    2017-03-30

    Research indicates that experiencing the suicide of a relative can have a significant impact on family members\\' emotional health. However, research incorporating the impact of suicide bereavement on family members\\' physical health is sparse. This paper details the protocol for a mixed-methods study of suicide-bereaved family members. The study will primarily examine the physical and mental health needs of those bereaved by suicide. A secondary objective of the study is to describe the support service needs of family members bereaved by suicide.

  14. A protocol for identifying suitable biomarkers to assess fish health: A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Background Biomarkers have been used extensively to provide the connection between external levels of contaminant exposure, internal levels of tissue contamination, and early adverse effects in organisms. Objectives To present a three-step protocol for identifying suitable biomarkers to assess fish health in coastal and marine ecosystems, using Gladstone Harbour (Australia) as a case study. Methods Prior to applying our protocol, clear working definitions for biomarkers were developed to ensure consistency with the global literature on fish health assessment. First, contaminants of concern were identified based on the presence of point and diffuse sources of pollution and available monitoring data for the ecosystem of interest. Second, suitable fish species were identified using fisheries dependent and independent data, and prioritised based on potential pathways of exposure to the contaminants of concern. Finally, a systematic and critical literature review was conducted on the use of biomarkers to assess the health of fish exposed to the contaminants of concern. Results/Discussion We present clear working definitions for bioaccumulation markers, biomarkers of exposure, biomarkers of effect and biomarkers of susceptibility. Based on emission and concentration information, seven metals were identified as contaminants of concern for Gladstone Harbour. Twenty out of 232 fish species were abundant enough to be potentially suitable for biomarker studies; five of these were prioritised based on potential pathways of exposure and susceptibility to metals. The literature search on biomarkers yielded 5,035 articles, of which 151met the inclusion criteria. Based on our review, the most suitable biomarkers include bioaccumulation markers, biomarkers of exposure (CYP1A, EROD, SOD, LPOX, HSP, MT, DNA strand breaks, micronuclei, apoptosis), and biomarkers of effect (histopathology, TAG:ST). Conclusion Our protocol outlines a clear pathway to identify suitable biomarkers to

  15. Using risk-assessment sheet to improve effectiveness of health examination service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohtubtiang, Kraisorn; Tantibhaedhyangkul, Usa

    2005-11-01

    Several techniques to improve compliance of physicians toward health examination guidelines of many countries were studied. However the method to improve compliance of Thai physicians toward Thailand's guidelines has never been studied. To determine the effectiveness of using risk-assessment sheets to improve the compliance of physicians toward Thailand's health examination service guideline. Risk-assessment sheets were constructed based on recommendations in Guide to Periodic Health Examination and Maintenance for Thai People. One hundred and two adult clients who came for health examination service from January to March 2003 were asked to fill in risk-assessment sheets and compared them with 103 recorded health examination report from the hospitals computer before the risk-assessment sheets were developed. Clients using the risk-assessment sheets group received recommended health examination significantly more than those in the non-using group (p health examination statistically and practically increased the compliance of physicians toward health examination guidelines and reduced unnecessary expenditure.

  16. Health status, intention to seek health examination, and participation in health education among taxi drivers in jinan, china.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yan; Fan, Xiao-Sheng; Tian, Cui-Huan; Zhang, Wei; Li, Jie; Li, Shu-Qing

    2014-04-01

    Taxi drivers are exposed to various risk factors such as work overload, stress, an irregular diet, and a sedentary lifestyle, which make these individuals vulnerable to many diseases. This study was designed to assess the health status of this occupational group. The objective was to explore the health status, the intention to seek health examination, and participation in health education among taxi drivers in Jinan, China. The sample-size was determined scientifically. The systematic sampling procedure was used for selecting the sample. Four hundred taxi drivers were randomly selected from several taxi companies in Jinan. In total, 396 valid questionnaires (from 370 males and 26 females) were returned. Health status, intention to seek health examination, and participation in health education were assessed by a self-designed questionnaire. Other personal information including sex, age, ethnicity, marital status, years of employment as a taxi driver, education level, and habits were also collected. This survey revealed that 54.8% of taxi drivers reported illness in the last two weeks and 44.7% of participants reported chronic diseases. The prevalence rates of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, gastroenteritis, arthritis, and heart disease were 18.2%, 8.8%, 26%, 18.4%, and 4.8% of questioned taxi drivers, respectively. Significant self-reported symptoms included fatigue, waist and back pain, headache, dyspepsia, and dry throat affecting 49.7%, 26.2%, 23.5%, 26%, and 27% of participants, respectively. In total, 90.1% of subjects thought that it was necessary to receive a regular health examination. Only 17.9% of subjects had been given information about health education, and significantly, more than 87% of subjects who had been given information about health education reported that the information had been helpful. Taxi drivers' health was poor in our survey. Thus, using health education interventions to improve knowledge and change in behaviors are necessary and

  17. Health care access for rural youth on equal terms? A mixed methods study protocol in northern Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goicolea, Isabel; Carson, Dean; San Sebastian, Miguel; Christianson, Monica; Wiklund, Maria; Hurtig, Anna-Karin

    2018-01-11

    The purpose of this paper is to propose a protocol for researching the impact of rural youth health service strategies on health care access. There has been no published comprehensive assessment of the effectiveness of youth health strategies in rural areas, and there is no clearly articulated model of how such assessments might be conducted. The protocol described here aims to gather information to; i) Assess rural youth access to health care according to their needs, ii) Identify and understand the strategies developed in rural areas to promote youth access to health care, and iii) Propose actions for further improvement. The protocol is described with particular reference to research being undertaken in the four northernmost counties of Sweden, which contain a widely dispersed and diverse youth population. The protocol proposes qualitative and quantitative methodologies sequentially in four phases. First, to map youth access to health care according to their health care needs, including assessing horizontal equity (equal use of health care for equivalent health needs,) and vertical equity (people with greater health needs should receive more health care than those with lesser needs). Second, a multiple case study design investigates strategies developed across the region (youth clinics, internet applications, public health programs) to improve youth access to health care. Third, qualitative comparative analysis of the 24 rural municipalities in the region identifies the best combination of conditions leading to high youth access to health care. Fourth, a concept mapping study involving rural stakeholders, care providers and youth provides recommended actions to improve rural youth access to health care. The implementation of this research protocol will contribute to 1) generating knowledge that could contribute to strengthening rural youth access to health care, as well as to 2) advancing the application of mixed methods to explore access to health care.

  18. Implications of sociodemographic factors and health examination rate for people with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Seong Min; Hwang, Byungkwan; Park, Jong-Hyock; Shin, Hyung-Ik

    2012-07-01

    To determine disparities in health examination rates between people with disabilities (PWD) and the general population (GP), and to investigate the sociodemographic factors influencing health examination rates in PWD. The study compared the health examination rates between PWD and the GP using data from 2 national surveys. We used data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey of (KNHANES) 2008 and the National Survey on Persons with Disabilities (NSPD) in 2008. The study comprised data from the NSPD 2008 for PWD (n=6999) and data from the KNHANES 2008 for the GP (n=6582). Not applicable. Health examination rates of 2 groups were assessed. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to identify the related factors influencing health examination rates in PWD. Health examination rates for PWD were significantly lower than those for the GP (Phealth examination rates for PWD were lowest when they were in the age group of 30 to 39 years, in the quartile 2 group of income level, had no "existing spouse," had chronic diseases, thought their health condition was very bad, and when they needed complete help from others to carry out activities of daily living. Health examination rates were reduced by the disability factor. To enhance the overall rate of health examinations, researchers should determine which groups of PWD have relatively low health examination rates and propose measures to increase their rates of health examination. Copyright © 2012 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Examination of mechanisms (E-MECHANIC) of exercise-induced weight compensation: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Candice A; Johnson, William D; Earnest, Conrad P; Rood, Jennifer C; Tudor-Locke, Catrine; Johannsen, Neil M; Cocreham, Shannon; Harris, Melissa; Church, Timothy S; Martin, Corby K

    2014-06-07

    Weight loss induced only by exercise is frequently less than expected, possibly because of compensatory changes in energy intake and/or energy expenditure. The purpose of the Examination of Mechanisms (E-MECHANIC) of Exercise-Induced Weight Compensation trial is to examine whether increased energy intake and/or reduced spontaneous activity or energy expenditure (outside of structured exercise) account for the less than expected, exercise-associated weight loss. E-MECHANIC is a three-arm, 6-month randomized (1:1:1) controlled trial. The two intervention arms are exercise doses that reflect current recommendations for (1) general health (8 kcal/kg body weight per week (8 KKW), about 900 kcal/wk) and (2) weight loss (20 KKW, about 2,250 kcal/wk). The third arm, a nonexercise control group, will receive health information only. The sample will include a combined total of 198sedentary, overweight or obese (body mass index: ≥25 kg/m² to ≤45 kg/m²) men and women ages 18 to 65 years. The exercise dose will be supervised and tightly controlled in an exercise training laboratory. The primary outcome variables are energy intake, which will be measured using doubly labeled water (adjusted for change in energy stores) and laboratory-based food intake tests, and the discrepancy between expected weight loss and observed weight loss. Secondary outcomes include changes in resting metabolic rate (adjusted for change in body mass), activity levels (excluding structured exercise) and body composition. In an effort to guide the development of future interventions, the participants will be behaviorally phenotyped and defined as those who do compensate (that is, fail to lose the amount of weight expected) or do not compensate (that is, lose the amount of weight expected or more). In this study, we will attempt to identify underlying mechanisms to explain why exercise elicits less weight loss than expected. This information will guide the development of interventions to increase

  20. Physical examination for lumbar radiculopathy due to disc herniation in patients with low-back pain (Protocol)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Windt, D.A.W.M.; Simons, E.; Riphagen, I.; Ammendolia, C.; Verhagen, A.P.; Laslett, M.; Devillé, W.; Aertgeerts, B.; Deyo, R.A.; Bouter, L.M.; de Vet, H.C.W.

    2008-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: The general aim of our review is to provide information that may assist the clinician in making decisions about appropriate management in patients with low-back pain and leg pain suspected of having radicular

  1. Non-participation modestly increased with distance to the examination clinic among adults in Finnish health examination surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinikainen, Jaakko; Saarsalmi, Perttu; Härkänen, Tommi; Jousilahti, Pekka; Karvanen, Juha; Männistö, Satu; Tolonen, Hanna

    2017-11-01

    Health examination surveys (HES) provide important information about population health and health-related factors, but declining participation rates threaten the representativeness of collected data. It is hard to conduct national HESs at examination clinics near to every sampled individual. Thus, it is interesting to look into the possible association between the distance from home to the examination clinic and non-participation, and whether there is a certain distance after which the participation activity decreases considerably. Data from two national HESs conducted in Finland in 2011 and 2012 were used and a logistic regression model was fitted to investigate how distance was related to non-participation. We found out that non-participation modestly increased with distance to the examination clinic. An additional analysis indicated that the option of having an examination at home may decrease the effect of distance to participation. Long distances from home to the examination clinic are one reason for low participation activity. Possible bias caused by these differences in participation could be decreased by providing the option of a home examination.

  2. Examination of the relationship between public health statute modernization and local public health system performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Jacqueline; Meier, Benjamin Mason; Keeling, Jonathan; Jia, Haomiao; Gebbie, Kristine M

    2009-01-01

    Wide variation in performance of public health (PH) systems, coupled with national interest in improving PH system quality, makes it a priority to identify factors associated with performance. One factor may be congruence between a state's PH enabling statutes and the obligations outlined in Public Health in America-the collaboratively developed framework that defines the mission and essential services (ESs) of PH. This research examined the relationship between (1) the degree to which language in a state's PH enabling statutes reflects PH's mission and ESs and (2) the performance of local public health systems in delivering ESs, measured by National Public Health Performance Standards scores in 207 local jurisdictions. Binary logistic regression demonstrated that a high degree of congruence between statutory language and public health's mission increased the odds of above-average system performance for 5 of 10 ESs. High levels of congruence between statutory language and the ESs themselves increased odds of above-average system performance for 6 of 10 ESs. Results yielded modest odds ratios (firm conclusions; however, these modest results suggest that statutory language may account for little of the variation in local public health system performance.

  3. Examining Health Care Students' Attitudes toward E-Professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettig, Jacob P; Noronha, Sandhya; Graneto, John; Obucina, Lillian; Christensen, Kelli J; Fjortoft, Nancy F

    2016-12-25

    Objective. To compare pharmacy, osteopathic medicine, dental medicine, and physician assistant (PA) students' perceptions of e-professionalism. Methods. A 20-item questionnaire was developed and administered to four cohorts of health care professions students early in their first professional year. The questionnaire contained 16 scenarios in which a hypothetical health care student or professional shared information or content electronically and students were asked to indicate how much they agreed that the scenario represented professional behavior. Results. Ninety-four percent of students completed the questionnaire. More female students were in the pharmacy and PA cohorts. There were statistical differences in students' perceptions of e-professionalism in five of 16 scenarios. Specific differences were most often between the osteopathic medicine students and the other cohorts. Conclusions. The health care professions students surveyed had similar perceptions of e-professionalism. Of the four cohorts, osteopathic medicine students appeared less conservative in their approach to e-professionalism than the other cohorts.

  4. Yield and Efficiency of Mental Health Screening: A Comparison of Screening Protocols at Intake to Prison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Michael S; Potter, Beth K; Crocker, Anne G; Wells, George A; Colman, Ian

    2016-01-01

    The value of screening for mental illness has increasingly been questioned in low prevalence settings due to high false positive rates. However, since false positive rates are related to prevalence, screening may be more effective in higher prevalence settings, including correctional institutions. We compared the yield (i.e. newly detected cases) and efficiency (i.e. false positives) of five screening protocols to detect mental illness in prisons against the use of mental health history taking (the prior approach to detecting mental illness). We estimated the accuracy of the six approaches to detect an Axis I disorder among a sample of 467 newly admitted male inmates (83.1% participation rate). Mental health history taking identified only 41.0% (95% CI 32.1, 50.6) of all inmates with mental illness. Screening protocols identified between 61.9 and 85.7% of all cases, but referred between 2 and 3 additional individuals who did not have a mental illness for every additional case detected compared to the mental health history taking approach. In low prevalence settings (i.e. 10% or less) the screening protocols would have had between 4.6 and 16.2 false positives per true positive. While screening may not be practical in low prevalence settings, it may be beneficial in jails and prisons where the prevalence of mental illness is higher. Further consideration of the context in which screening is being implemented, and of the impacts of policies and clinical practices on the benefits and harms of screening is needed to determine the effectiveness of screening in these settings.

  5. Recruitment of heterosexual couples in public health research: a study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pouget Enrique R

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Public health research involving social or kin groups (such as sexual partners or family members, rather than samples of unrelated individuals, has become more widespread in response to social ecological approaches to disease treatment and prevention. This approach requires the development of innovative sampling, recruitment and screening methodologies tailored to the study of related individuals. Methods In this paper, we describe a set of sampling, recruitment and screening protocols developed to enlist urban, drug-using, heterosexual couples into a public health research study. This population is especially hard to reach because they are engaged in illegal and/or stigmatized behaviors. The protocols were designed to integrate adaptive sampling, street- and referral-based recruitment, and screening procedures to verify study eligibility and relationship status. Discussion Recruitment of heterosexual couples through one partner, preferably the female, can be an effective enlistment technique. Verification of relationship status is an important component of dyadic research. Comparison of parallel questionnaires administered to each member of a dyad can aid in the assessment of relationship status. However, multiple independent sources of information should be used to verify relationship status when available. Adaptive sampling techniques were effective in reaching drug-using heterosexual couples in an urban setting, and the application of these methods to other groups of related individuals in clinical and public health research may prove to be useful. However, care must be taken to consider potential sources of sampling bias when interpreting and generalizing study results.

  6. Protocol: realist synthesis of the impact of unemployment insurance policies on poverty and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, Agnes; O'Campo, Patricia; Ng, Edwin; Mitchell, Christiane; Muntaner, Carles; Renahy, Emilie; St John, Alexander; Shankardass, Ketan

    2015-02-01

    Unemployment insurance is an important social protection policy that buffers unemployed workers against poverty and poor health. Most unemployment insurance studies focus on whether increases in unemployment insurance generosity are predictive of poverty and health outcomes. Less work has used theory-driven approaches to understand and explain how and why unemployment insurance works, for whom, and under what circumstances. Given this, we present a realist synthesis protocol that seeks to unpack how contextual influences trigger relevant mechanisms to generate poverty and health outcomes. In this protocol, we conceptualize unemployment insurance as a key social protection policy; provide a supporting rationale on the need for a realist synthesis; and describe our process on identifying context-mechanism-outcome pattern configurations. Six methodological steps are described: initial theory development, search strategy; selection and appraisal of documents; data extraction; analysis and synthesis process; and presentation and dissemination of revised theory. Our forthcoming realist synthesis will be the first to build and test theory on the intended and unintended outcomes of unemployment insurance policies. Anticipated findings will allow policymakers to move beyond 'black box' approaches to consider 'mechanism-based' explanations that explicate the logic on how and why unemployment insurance matters. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A protocol to prevent and deal with aggressive behavior against health workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altemir, María; Arteaga, Alfonso

    2017-10-26

    Violence against health workers is a highly prevalent phenomenon with serious psychological and labour consequences among professionals. This paper aims, first, to find out the main studies undertaken to date to describe and analyse the phenomenon, as well as to present different initiatives and protocols of action carried out. The second objective is to offer a procedure of action both to prevent aggression and to intervene in the event of receiving an aggression at work. After a bibliographic search in PubMed, Scopus and SciELO databases, the impact of the aggressions suffered by health professionals, the contexts in which aggressions are more frequent, their main consequences and different strategies and protocols conducted in Spain are reviewed. Given that rigorous reviews supporting such procedures are lacking in scientific journals, different action guidelines for professionals to prevent and to deal with hostile behaviour based on available evidence are developed and proposed. Finally, an easily consultable and applicable action procedure for health workers attacked in the workplace is presented. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Penicillin allergy: optimizing diagnostic protocols, public health implications, and future research needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macy, Eric

    2015-08-01

    Unverified penicillin allergy is being increasingly recognized as a public health concern. The ideal protocol for verifying true clinically significant IgE-mediated penicillin allergy needs to use only commercially available materials, be well tolerated and easy to perform in both the inpatient and outpatient settings, and minimize false-positive determinations. This review concentrates on articles published in 2013 and 2014 that present new data relating to the diagnosis and management of penicillin allergy. Penicillin allergy can be safely evaluated at this time, in patients with an appropriate clinical history of penicillin allergy, using only penicilloyl-poly-lysine and native penicillin G as skin test reagents, if an oral challenge with amoxicillin 250 mg, followed by 1 h of observation, is given to all skin test negative individuals. Millions of individuals falsely labeled with penicillin allergy need to be evaluated to safely allow them to use penicillin-class antibiotics and avoid morbidity associated with penicillin avoidance. Further research is needed to determine optimal protocol(s). There will still be a 1-2% rate of adverse reactions reported with all future therapeutic penicillin-class antibiotic use, even with optimal methods used to determine acute penicillin tolerance. Only a small minority of these new reactions will be IgE-mediated.

  9. Health communication, information technology and the public's attitude toward periodic general health examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuong, Quan-Hoang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Periodic general health examinations (GHEs) are gradually becoming more popular as they employ subclinical screenings, as a means of early detection. This study considers the effect of information technology (IT), health communications and the public's attitude towards GHEs in Vietnam. Methods: A total of 2,068 valid observations were obtained from a survey in Hanoi and its surrounding areas. Results: In total, 42.12% of participants stated that they were willing to use IT applications to recognise illness symptoms, and nearly 2/3 of them rated the healthcare quality at average level or below. Discussion: The data, which was processed by the BCL model, showed that IT applications (apps) reduce hesitation toward GHEs; however, older people seem to have less confidence in using these apps. Health communications and government's subsidy also increased the likelihood of people attending periodic GHEs. The probability of early check-ups where there is a cash subsidy could reach approximately 80%.

  10. Supporting successful implementation of public health interventions: protocol for a realist synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Marjorie; Pauly, Bernadette; Wong, Geoff; Schick-Makaroff, Kara; van Roode, Thea; Strosher, Heather Wilson; Kothari, Anita; Valaitis, Ruta; Manson, Heather; O'Briain, Warren; Carroll, Simon; Lee, Victoria; Tong, Samantha; Smith, Karen Dickenson; Ward, Megan

    2016-04-07

    There is a growing emphasis in public health on the importance of evidence-based interventions to improve population health and reduce health inequities. Equally important is the need for knowledge about how to implement these interventions successfully. Yet, a gap remains between the development of evidence-based public health interventions and their successful implementation. Conventional systematic reviews have been conducted on effective implementation in health care, but few in public health, so their relevance to public health is unclear. In most reviews, stringent inclusion criteria have excluded entire bodies of evidence that may be relevant for policy makers, program planners, and practitioners to understand implementation in the unique public health context. Realist synthesis is a theory-driven methodology that draws on diverse data from different study designs to explain how and why observed outcomes occur in different contexts and thus may be more appropriate for public health. This paper presents a realist review protocol to answer the research question: Why are some public health interventions successfully implemented and others not? Based on a review of implementation theories and frameworks, we developed an initial program theory, adapted for public health from the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research, to explain the implementation outcomes of public health interventions within particular contexts. This will guide us through the review process, which comprises eight iterative steps based on established realist review guidelines and quality standards. We aim to refine this initial theory into a 'final' realist program theory that explains important context-mechanism-outcome configurations in the successful implementation of public health interventions. Developing new public health interventions is costly and policy windows that support their implementation can be short lived. Ineffective implementation wastes scarce resources and is

  11. A Feasibility Randomised Controlled Trial of the New Orleans Intervention for Infant Mental Health: A Study Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Pritchett

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Child maltreatment is associated with life-long social, physical, and mental health problems. Intervening early to provide maltreated children with safe, nurturing care can improve outcomes. The need for prompt decisions about permanent placement (i.e., regarding adoption or return home is internationally recognised. However, a recent Glasgow audit showed that many maltreated children “revolve” between birth families and foster carers. This paper describes the protocol of the first exploratory randomised controlled trial of a mental health intervention aimed at improving placement permanency decisions for maltreated children. This trial compares an infant's mental health intervention with the new enhanced service as usual for maltreated children entering care in Glasgow. As both are new services, the trial is being conducted from a position of equipoise. The outcome assessment covers various fields of a child’s neurodevelopment to identify problems in any ESSENCE domain. The feasibility, reliability, and developmental appropriateness of all outcome measures are examined. Additionally, the potential for linkage with routinely collected data on health and social care and, in the future, education is explored. The results will inform a definitive randomised controlled trial that could potentially lead to long lasting benefits for the Scottish population and which may be applicable to other areas of the world. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (NC01485510.

  12. Physical activity for health: examining similarities and differences ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the face of a rising diabetes epidemic, a target population for prevention programme is the children of patients with type 2 diabetes. This study examined physical activity of patients with type 2 diabetes and that of their adult children, and characterized the factors associated with physical inactivity among the participants.

  13. Lean management in health care: definition, concepts, methodology and effects reported (systematic review protocol).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawal, Adegboyega K; Rotter, Thomas; Kinsman, Leigh; Sari, Nazmi; Harrison, Liz; Jeffery, Cathy; Kutz, Mareike; Khan, Mohammad F; Flynn, Rachel

    2014-09-19

    Lean is a set of operating philosophies and methods that help create a maximum value for patients by reducing waste and waits. It emphasizes the consideration of the customer's needs, employee involvement and continuous improvement. Research on the application and implementation of lean principles in health care has been limited. This is a protocol for a systematic review, following the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) methodology. The review aims to document, catalogue and synthesize the existing literature on the effects of lean implementation in health care settings especially the potential effects on professional practice and health care outcomes. We have developed a Medline keyword search strategy, and this focused strategy will be translated into other databases. All search strategies will be provided in the review. The method proposed by the Cochrane EPOC group regarding randomized study designs, non-randomised controlled trials controlled before and after studies and interrupted time series will be followed. In addition, we will also include cohort, case-control studies, and relevant non-comparative publications such as case reports. We will categorize and analyse the review findings according to the study design employed, the study quality (low- versus high-quality studies) and the reported types of implementation in the primary studies. We will present the results of studies in a tabular form. Overall, the systematic review aims to identify, assess and synthesize the evidence to underpin the implementation of lean activities in health care settings as defined in this protocol. As a result, the review will provide an evidence base for the effectiveness of lean and implementation methodologies reported in health care. PROSPERO CRD42014008853.

  14. Mental health first aid training for nursing students: a protocol for a pragmatic randomised controlled trial in a large university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Gemma; Burns, Sharyn K; Chih, Hui Jun; Hunt, Kristen; Tilley, P J Matt; Hallett, Jonathan; Coleman, Kim; Smith, Sonya

    2015-02-19

    The impact of mental health problems and disorders in Australia is significant. Mental health problems often start early and disproportionately affect young people. Poor adolescent mental health can predict educational achievement at school and educational and occupational attainment in adulthood. Many young people attend higher education and have been found to experience a range of mental health issues. The university setting therefore presents a unique opportunity to trial interventions to reduce the burden of mental health problems. Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) aims to train participants to recognise symptoms of mental health problems and assist an individual who may be experiencing a mental health crisis. Training nursing students in MHFA may increase mental health literacy and decrease stigma in the student population. This paper presents a protocol for a trial to examine the efficacy of the MHFA training for students studying nursing at a large university in Perth, Western Australia. This randomised controlled trial will follow the CONSORT guidelines. Participants will be randomly allocated to the intervention group (receiving a MHFA training course comprising two face to face 6.5 hour sessions run over two days during the intervention period) or a waitlisted control group (not receiving MHFA training during the study). The source population will be undergraduate nursing students at a large university located in Perth, Western Australia. Efficacy of the MHFA training will be assessed by following the intention-to-treat principle and repeated measures analysis. Given the known burden of mental health disorders among student populations, it is important universities consider effective strategies to address mental health issues. Providing MHFA training to students offers the advantage of increasing mental health literacy, among the student population. Further, students trained in MHFA are likely to utilise these skills in the broader community, when they

  15. Integrating the lightweight authentication protocol (LAP) with access control mechanisms in wireless health care information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chousiadis, C; Georgiadis, C K; Pangalos, G

    2002-01-01

    Health information networks are expected to support information exchange that is authentic, accurate, private and available when, where and to whom is needed. With the increase of the shared medical information and resources in healthcare wireless information systems, unauthorized access to the information by illegal users also increases. The security of the transmitted information is a vital issue. In this paper, we report on the development of the Lightweight Authentication Protocol (LAP), which makes a mobile and distributed system more secure and flexible and we implement it in a Health Care Environment where the clinicians use mobile and wireless devices like PDAs. We also provide an indicative example of integrating the LAP with access control mechanisms. Context-based Team Access Control (C-TMAC) model is used in this example, since it provides great flexibility on user-permissions management in collaborative healthcare environments. LAP is indeed capable to support efficiently the advanced authorization procedures of such demanding active security models.

  16. [Study protocol on the effect of the economic crisis on mortality and reproductive health and health inequalities in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Glòria; Gotsens, Mercè; Palència, Laia; Marí-Dell'Olmo, Marc; Domínguez-Berjón, M Felicitas; Rodríguez-Sanz, Maica; Puig, Vanessa; Bartoll, Xavier; Gandarillas, Ana; Martín, Unai; Bacigalupe, Amaia; Díez, Elia; Ruiz, Miguel; Esnaola, Santiago; Calvo, Montserrat; Sánchez, Pablo; Luque Fernández, Miguel Ángel; Borrell, Carme

    The aim is to present the protocol of the two sub-studies on the effect of the economic crisis on mortality and reproductive health and health inequalities in Spain. Substudy 1: describe the evolution of mortality and reproductive health between 1990 and 2013 through a longitudinal ecological study in the Autonomous Communities. This study will identify changes caused by the economic crisis in trends or reproductive health and mortality indicators using panel data (17 Autonomous Communities per study year) and adjusting Poisson models with random effects variance. Substudy 2: analyse inequalities by socioeconomic deprivation in mortality and reproductive health in several areas of Spain. An ecological study analysing trends in the pre-crisis (1999-2003 and 2004-2008) and crisis (2009-2013) periods will be performed. Random effects models Besag York and Mollié will be adjusted to estimate mortality indicators softened in reproductive health and census tracts. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. The Danish preventive child health examination should expand on mental health and the well-being of the family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke Nielsen, Kirsten Lykke; Graungaard, Anette Hauskov; Ertmann, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In Denmark, around one in six children has significant somatic, psychological or social health problems, often in combination. The preventive child health examinations have a high participation rate; and they produce significant findings, predominantly concerning the child's physical...... of the health examination. Motor, cognitive, social skills and mental health are assessed globally through observation and communication with the child, and, to a lesser degree, through conversation with the parents. The child health examination rarely has a family perspective, unless the doctor is already...... health. The aim of this study was to explore how the child's physical, cognitive and psychosocial health are examined and assessed at the health examinations of children aged 0-5 years in general practice. METHODS: Our study employed observations of the consultations as well as individual interviews...

  18. Comprehensive overview of computer-based health information tailoring: a scoping review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghalibaf, Azadeh Kamel; Nazari, Elham; Gholian-Aval, Mahdi; Tabesh, Hamed; Tara, Mahmood

    2017-12-27

    Tailoring health information to the needs of individuals has become an important part of modern health communications. Tailoring has been addressed by researchers from different disciplines leading to the emergence of a wide range of approaches, making the newcomers confused. In order to address this, a comprehensive overview of the field with the indications of research gaps, tendencies and trends will be helpful. As a result, a systematic protocol was outlined to conduct a scoping review within the field of computer-based health information tailoring. This protocol is based on the York's five-stage framework outlined by Arksey and O'Malley. A field-specific structure was defined as a basis for undertaking each stage. The structure comprised three main aspects: system design, information communication and evaluation. Five leading databases were searched: PubMed, Scopus, Science Direct, EBSCO and IEEE and a broad search strategy was used with less strict inclusion criteria to cover the breadth of evidence. Theoretical frameworks were used to develop the data extraction form and a rigorous approach was introduced to identify the categories from data. Several explanatory-descriptive methods were considered to analyse the data, from which some were proposed to be employed for the first time in scoping studies. This study investigates the breadth and depth of existing literature on computer-tailoring and as a secondary analysis, does not require ethics approval. We anticipate that the results will identify research gaps and novel ideas for future studies and provide direction to combine methods from different disciplines. The research findings will be submitted for publication to relevant peer-reviewed journals and conferences targeting health promotion and patient education. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  19. Discrepancies in Outcome Reporting Exist Between Protocols and Published Oral Health Cochrane Systematic Reviews.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos Pandis

    Full Text Available To assess discrepancies in the analyzed outcomes between protocols and published reviews within Cochrane oral health systematic reviews (COHG on the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR.All COHG systematic reviews on the CDSR and the corresponding protocols were retrieved in November 2014 and information on the reported outcomes was recorded. Data was collected at the systematic review level by two reviewers independently.One hundred and fifty two reviews were included. In relation to primary outcomes, 11.2% were downgraded to secondary outcomes, 9.9% were omitted altogether in the final publication and new primary outcomes were identified in 18.4% of publications. For secondary outcomes, 2% were upgraded to primary, 12.5% were omitted and 30.9% were newly introduced in the publication. Overall, 45.4% of reviews had at least one discrepancy when compared to the protocol; these were reported in 14.5% reviews. The number of review updates appears to be associated with discrepancies between final review and protocol (OR: 3.18, 95% CI: 1.77, 5.74, p<0.001. The risk of reporting significant results was lower for both downgraded outcomes [RR: 0.52, 95% CI: 0.17, 1.58, p = 0.24] and upgraded or newly introduced outcomes [RR: 0.77, 95% CI: 0.36, 1.64, p = 0.50] compared to outcomes with no discrepancies. The risk of reporting significant results was higher for upgraded or newly introduced outcomes compared to downgraded outcomes (RR = 1.19, 95% CI: 0.65, 2.16, p = 0.57. None of the comparisons reached statistical significance.While no evidence of selective outcome reporting was found in this study, based on the present analysis of SRs published within COHG systematic reviews, discrepancies between outcomes in pre-published protocols and final reviews continue to be common. Solutions such as the use of standardized outcomes to reduce the prevalence of this issue may need to be explored.

  20. Impacts of structuring the electronic health record: a systematic review protocol and results of previous reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyppönen, Hannele; Saranto, Kaija; Vuokko, Riikka; Mäkelä-Bengs, Päivi; Doupi, Persephone; Lindqvist, Minna; Mäkelä, Marjukka

    2014-03-01

    This paper (1) presents the protocol of an on-going systematic literature review on the methods of structuring electronic health record (EHR) data and studying the impacts of implemented structures, thus laying basis for the analysis of the empirical articles (2) describes previous reviews published on the subject and retrieved during the search of bibliographic databases, and (3) presents a summary of the results of previous reviews. Cochrane instructions were exploited to outline the review protocol - phases and search elements. Test searches were conducted to refine the search. The abstracts and/or full texts of review papers captured by the search were read by two of the team members independently, with disagreements first negotiated between them and if necessary eventually resolved in the team meetings. Additional review articles were picked from the reference lists of the reviews included in our search results. The elements defined in the search strategy and analytic framework were converted to a data extraction tool, which was tested by extracting data from the reviews captured by the search. Descriptive analysis of the extracted data was conducted. The 12-stage review protocol that we developed includes definition of the problem, the search strategy and search terms, testing the strategy, conducting the search, updating search from references found, removing duplicates, defining the inclusion and exclusion criteria, exclusion and inclusion of papers, definition of the analytic framework to extract data, extracting data and reporting results. Our searches in fifteen electronic bibliographic databases retrieved 27 reviews, of which 14 were included for full text analysis. Of these, 11 focused on medical and three on nursing record structures. The data structures included forms, ontologies, classifications and terminologies. Some evidence was found on data structure impact on information quality, process quality and efficiency, but not on patients or

  1. How Much Is the Dose Varying between Follow-Up CT-Examinations Performed on the Same Scanner with the Same Imaging Protocol?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saravanabavaan Suntharalingam

    Full Text Available To investigate the dose variation between follow-up CT examinations, when a patient is examined several times on the same scanner with the identical scan protocol which comprised automated exposure control.This retrospective study was approved by the local ethics committee. The volume computed tomography dose index (CTDIvol and the dose-length-product (DLP were recorded for 60 cancer patients (29 male, 31 female, mean age 60.1 years, who received 3 follow-up CT examinations each composed of a non-enhanced scan of the liver (LI-CT and a contrast-enhanced scan of chest (CH-CT and abdomen (AB-CT. Each examination was performed on the same scanner (Siemens Definition FLASH equipped with automated exposure control (CARE Dose 4D and CARE KV using the identical scan protocol.The median percentage difference in DLP between follow-up examinations was 9.6% for CH-CT, 10.3% for LI-CT, and 10.1% for AB-CT; the median percentage difference in CTDIvol 8.3% for CH-CT, 7.4% for LI-CT and 7.7% for AB-CT (p<0.0001 for all values. The maximum difference in DLP between follow-up examinations was 67.5% for CH-CT, 50.8% for LI-CT and 74.3% for AB-CT; the maximum difference in CTDIvol 62.9% for CH-CT, 47.2% for LI-CT, and 49% for AB-CT.A significant variance in the radiation dose occurs between follow-up CT examinations when the same CT scanner and the identical imaging protocol are used in combination with automated exposure control.

  2. How Much Is the Dose Varying between Follow-Up CT-Examinations Performed on the Same Scanner with the Same Imaging Protocol?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suntharalingam, Saravanabavaan; Stecker, Franz Ferdinand; Guberina, Nika; Ringelstein, Adrian; Schlosser, Thomas; Theysohn, Jens Matthias; Forsting, Michael; Nassenstein, Kai

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the dose variation between follow-up CT examinations, when a patient is examined several times on the same scanner with the identical scan protocol which comprised automated exposure control. This retrospective study was approved by the local ethics committee. The volume computed tomography dose index (CTDIvol) and the dose-length-product (DLP) were recorded for 60 cancer patients (29 male, 31 female, mean age 60.1 years), who received 3 follow-up CT examinations each composed of a non-enhanced scan of the liver (LI-CT) and a contrast-enhanced scan of chest (CH-CT) and abdomen (AB-CT). Each examination was performed on the same scanner (Siemens Definition FLASH) equipped with automated exposure control (CARE Dose 4D and CARE KV) using the identical scan protocol. The median percentage difference in DLP between follow-up examinations was 9.6% for CH-CT, 10.3% for LI-CT, and 10.1% for AB-CT; the median percentage difference in CTDIvol 8.3% for CH-CT, 7.4% for LI-CT and 7.7% for AB-CT (p<0.0001 for all values). The maximum difference in DLP between follow-up examinations was 67.5% for CH-CT, 50.8% for LI-CT and 74.3% for AB-CT; the maximum difference in CTDIvol 62.9% for CH-CT, 47.2% for LI-CT, and 49% for AB-CT. A significant variance in the radiation dose occurs between follow-up CT examinations when the same CT scanner and the identical imaging protocol are used in combination with automated exposure control.

  3. The Danish preventive child health examination should expand on mental health and the well-being of the family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lykke, Kirsten; Graungaard, Anette Hauskov; Ertmann, Ruth; Reventlow, Susanne

    2015-05-01

    In Denmark, around one in six children has significant somatic, psychological or social health problems, often in combination. The preventive child health examinations have a high participation rate; and they produce significant findings, predominantly concerning the child's physical health. The aim of this study was to explore how the child's physical, cognitive and psychosocial health are examined and assessed at the health examinations of children aged 0-5 years in general practice. Our study employed observations of the consultations as well as individual interviews. A total of nine doctors from seven clinics participated. We included 21 cases in our study, each consisting of a consultation and subsequent interviews with the child's parents and with the doctor. The examination of the child's physical health and development is an important feature of the health examination. Motor, cognitive, social skills and mental health are assessed globally through observation and communication with the child, and, to a lesser degree, through conversation with the parents. The child health examination rarely has a family perspective, unless the doctor is already aware of problems in the family. The preventive child health examination is an important platform for examination and dialogue concerning a child's health. The physical aspect works well, but there is a need for development of the assessment of the child's mental health and the well-being of the family. Postdoctoral Fellowships in General Practice/Family Medicine - Denmark. not relevant.

  4. Research protocol: Management of obesity in patients with low health literacy in primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faruqi, Nighat; Stocks, Nigel; Spooner, Catherine; El Haddad, Nouhad; Harris, Mark F

    2015-01-01

    Socioeconomically disadvantaged adults are both more likely to be obese and have lower levels of health literacy. Our trial evaluates the implementation and effectiveness of primary care nurses acting as prevention navigators to support obese patients with low health literacy to lose weight. A pragmatic cluster randomised trial will be conducted. Twenty practices in socioeconomically deprived areas, 10 each in Sydney and Adelaide, will be recruited and randomised to intervention and control groups. Twenty to 40 eligible obese patients aged 40-70 years with a BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2) and with low health literacy will be enrolled per practice. The intervention is based on the '5As' of the chronic disease model approach - Assess, Advise, Agree, Assist and Arrange - and the recommendations of the 2013 Clinical practice guidelines for the management of overweight and obesity in adults, adolescents and children in Australia. In the intervention practices, patients will be invited to attend a health check with the prevention navigator who will assess the patient's risk and provide brief advice, assistance with goal setting and referral navigation. Provider training and educational meetings will be held. The providers' attitudes to obesity, confidence in treating obesity and preventive care they provide to obese people with low health literacy will be evaluated through questionnaires and interviews. Patients' self-assessment of lifestyle risk factors, perception of preventive care received in general practice, health-related quality of life, and health literacy will be assessed in telephone interviews. Patients' anthropometric measures will be recorded and their health service usage will be determined via linkage to the Australian government-held medical and pharmaceutical data. Our trial will provide evidence for the effectiveness of practice nurses as prevention navigators to support better weight management for obese patients with low health literacy. This trial is

  5. Protocol: A grounded theory of 'recovery'-perspectives of adolescent users of mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmquist, Lucianne; Patterson, Sue; O'Donovan, Analise; Bradley, Graham

    2017-07-20

    Policies internationally endorse the recovery paradigm as the appropriate foundation for youth mental health services. However, given that this paradigm is grounded in the views of adults with severe mental illness, applicability to youth services and relevance to young people is uncertain, particularly as little is known about young people's views. A comprehensive understanding of the experiences and expectations of young people is critical to developing youth mental health services that are acceptable, accessible, effective and relevant. To inform development of policy and youth services, the study described in this protocol aims to develop a comprehensive account of the experiences and expectations of 12-17 year olds as they encounter mental disorders and transition through specialist mental health services. Data will be analysed to model recovery from the adolescents' perspective. This grounded theory study will use quantitative and qualitative data collected in interviews with 12-17 year olds engaged with specialist Child/Youth Mental Health Service in Queensland, Australia. Interviews will explore adolescents' expectations and experiences of mental disorder, and of services, as they transition through specialist mental health services, including the meaning of their experiences and ideas of 'recovery' and how their experiences and expectations are shaped. Data collection and analysis will use grounded theory methods. Adolescents' experiences will be presented as a mid-range theory. The research will provide tangible recommendations for youth-focused mental health policy and practice. Findings will be disseminated within academic literature and beyond to participants, health professionals, mental health advocacy groups and policy and decision makers via publications, research summaries, conferences and workshops targeting different audiences. Ethical and research governance approvals have been obtained from relevant Human Research Ethics committees and all

  6. The Effect of Health Information Technology on Health Care Provider Communication: A Mixed-Method Protocol

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Manojlovich, Milisa; Adler-Milstein, Julia; Harrod, Molly; Sales, Anne; Hofer, Timothy P; Saint, Sanjay; Krein, Sarah L

    2015-01-01

    ...), which is a component of health information technology (HIT), may help reduce some communication failures but increase others because of an inadequate understanding of how communication technology is used...

  7. The Effect of Health Information Technology on Health Care Provider Communication: A Mixed-Method Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manojlovich, Milisa; Adler-Milstein, Julia; Harrod, Molly; Sales, Anne; Hofer, Timothy P; Saint, Sanjay; Krein, Sarah L

    2015-06-11

    Communication failures between physicians and nurses are one of the most common causes of adverse events for hospitalized patients, as well as a major root cause of all sentinel events. Communication technology (ie, the electronic medical record, computerized provider order entry, email, and pagers), which is a component of health information technology (HIT), may help reduce some communication failures but increase others because of an inadequate understanding of how communication technology is used. Increasing use of health information and communication technologies is likely to affect communication between nurses and physicians. The purpose of this study is to describe, in detail, how health information and communication technologies facilitate or hinder communication between nurses and physicians with the ultimate goal of identifying how we can optimize the use of these technologies to support effective communication. Effective communication is the process of developing shared understanding between communicators by establishing, testing, and maintaining relationships. Our theoretical model, based in communication and sociology theories, describes how health information and communication technologies affect communication through communication practices (ie, use of rich media; the location and availability of computers) and work relationships (ie, hierarchies and team stability). Therefore we seek to (1) identify the range of health information and communication technologies used in a national sample of medical-surgical acute care units, (2) describe communication practices and work relationships that may be influenced by health information and communication technologies in these same settings, and (3) explore how differences in health information and communication technologies, communication practices, and work relationships between physicians and nurses influence communication. This 4-year study uses a sequential mixed-methods design, beginning with a

  8. Personal Electronic Health Record for Patients with Diabetes; Health Technology Assessment Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MasoomehRahimi Alami

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In recent decades, diabetes has contributed significantly to the burden of disease in developed and developing countries, due to the considerable prevalence and involvement of various age groups in the communities.Today, a variety of ways to manage and control the disease are used, one of which is the use of personal electronic health records. Recently there has been a remarkable upsurge in activity surrounding the adoption of personal electronic health records systems for patients and consumers. personal electronic health records systems are more than just static repositories for patient data; they combine data, knowledge, and software tools, which help patients to become active participants in their own care.The present study was conducted with the goal of Health Technology Assessment the impact of personal electronic health records in Patients with Diabetes. Methods: Writing is based on PRISMA standards.  This was a Health Technology Assessment  study. It aimed to evaluate the technology of personal electronic health record . The scoping review was conducted to evaluate 8 dimensions (Health Problem and Current Use of the Technology, Description and technical characteristics of technology, Safety, Costs and economic evaluation, Ethical analysis, Organisational aspects, Patients and Social aspects, Legal aspects of  Personal electronic health record . This study was based on answering questions which were developed based on Health Diagnostics Technology Assessment Documents Framework and HTA Core Model 3.0 . A systematic review was conducted to evaluate the Clinical Effectiveness dimension of personal electronic health record  in controlling diabetes. In order to gather evidences, Ovid databases, Cochrane Library, PubMed, CRD, Trip database and EMBASE, and Randomized Controlled Trial Registries, such as the Clinical Trial and Trial Registry, were searched using specific keywords and strategies. .Articles are evaluated on the

  9. Racism as a determinant of health: a protocol for conducting a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradies, Yin; Priest, Naomi; Ben, Jehonathan; Truong, Mandy; Gupta, Arpana; Pieterse, Alex; Kelaher, Margaret; Gee, Gilbert

    2013-09-23

    Racism is increasingly recognized as a key determinant of health. A growing body of epidemiological evidence shows strong associations between self-reported racism and poor health outcomes across diverse minority groups in developed countries. While the relationship between racism and health has received increasing attention over the last two decades, a comprehensive meta-analysis focused on the health effects of racism has yet to be conducted. The aim of this review protocol is to provide a structure from which to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies that assess the relationship between racism and health. This research will consist of a systematic review and meta-analysis. Studies will be considered for review if they are empirical studies reporting quantitative data on the association between racism and health for adults and/or children of all ages from any racial/ethnic/cultural groups. Outcome measures will include general health and well-being, physical health, mental health, healthcare use and health behaviors. Scientific databases (for example, Medline) will be searched using a comprehensive search strategy and reference lists will be manually searched for relevant studies. In addition, use of online search engines (for example, Google Scholar), key websites, and personal contact with experts will also be undertaken. Screening of search results and extraction of data from included studies will be independently conducted by at least two authors, including assessment of inter-rater reliability. Studies included in the review will be appraised for quality using tools tailored to each study design. Summary statistics of study characteristics and findings will be compiled and findings synthesized in a narrative summary as well as a meta-analysis. This review aims to examine associations between reported racism and health outcomes. This comprehensive and systematic review and meta-analysis of empirical research will provide a rigorous and

  10. Community Health Worker Impact on Chronic Disease Outcomes Within Primary Care Examined Using Electronic Health Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Maia; Doubleday, Kevin; Bell, Melanie L; Lohr, Abby; Murrieta, Lucy; Velasco, Maria; Blackburn, John; Sabo, Samantha; Guernsey de Zapien, Jill; Carvajal, Scott C

    2017-10-01

    To investigate community health worker (CHW) effects on chronic disease outcomes using electronic health records (EHRs). We examined EHRs of 32 147 patients at risk for chronic disease during 2012 to 2015. Variables included contact with clinic-based CHWs, vitals, and laboratory tests. We estimated a mixed model for all outcomes. Within-group findings showed statistically significant improvements in chronic disease indicators after exposure to CHWs. In health center 1, HbA1c (glycated hemoglobin) decreased 0.15 millimoles per mole (95% confidence interval [CI] = -0.24, -0.06), body mass index decreased 0.29 kilograms per meter squared (CI = -0.39, -0.20), and total cholesterol decreased 11.9 milligrams per deciliter (CI = -13.5, -10.2). In health center 2, HbA1c decreased 0.43 millimoles per mole (CI = -0.7, -0.17), body mass index decreased by 0.08 kilograms per meter squared (CI = -0.14, -0.02), and triglycerides decreased by 22.50 milligrams per deciliter (CI = -39.0, -6.0). Total cholesterol of 3.62 milligrams per deciliter (CI = -6.6, -0.6) in health center 1 was the only improvement tied to CHW contact. Although patients' chronic disease indicators consistently improved, between-group models provided no additional evidence of impact. EHRs' evolution may elucidate CHW contributions moving forward.

  11. The Relationship between Health Behavior and General Health Status: Based on 2011 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheon, Chunhoo; Oh, So-Mi; Jang, Soobin; Park, Jeong-Su; Park, Sunju; Jang, Bo-Hyoung; Shin, Yong-Cheol; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2014-02-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the relationship between health behavior and general health status. We used data from the 2011 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Mental health was measured by stress recognition and depression. Dietary habit was measured by mixed grain diet. Life pattern was measured by sleeping time and working pattern. Physical activity was measured by walking and exercise. We defined general health status as Euro Quality of Life-5 Dimension (EQ-5Dindex), Euro Quality of Life Visual Analogue Scale (EQ-5Dvas), number of people experienced lying in a sickbed for the last one month, number of days lying in a sickbed for the last one month, and activity limitations. Mental health, dietary habit, life pattern, and physical activity have seven factors. Most of the factors have a significant correlation with EQ-5Dindex, EQ-5Dvas, number of people experienced lying in a sickbed for the last one month, number of days lying in a sickbed for the last one month, and activity limitations. Health behavior and general health status have a positive correlation.

  12. Health examination utilization in the visually disabled population in Taiwan: a nationwide population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yueh-Han; Tsai, Wen-Chen; Kung, Pei-Tseng

    2013-12-05

    People with visual disabilities have increased health needs but face worse inequity to preventive health examinations. To date, only a few nationwide studies have analyzed the utilization of preventive adult health examinations by the visually disabled population. The aim of this study was to investigate the utilization of health examinations by the visually disabled population, and analyze the factors associated with the utilization. Visual disability was certified by ophthalmologists and authenticated by the Ministry of the Interior (MOI), Taiwan. We linked data from three different nationwide datasets (from the MOI, Bureau of Health Promotion, and National Health Research Institutes) between 2006 and 2008 as the data sources. Independent variables included demographic characteristics, income status, health status, and severity of disability; health examination utilization status was the dependent variable. The chi-square test was used to check statistical differences between variables, and a multivariate logistic regression model was used to examine the associated factors with health examination utilization. In total, 47,812 visually disabled subjects aged 40 years and over were included in this study, only 16.6% of whom received a health examination. Lower utilization was more likely in male subjects, in those aged 65 years and above, insured dependents and those with a top-ranked premium-based salary, catastrophic illness/injury, chronic diseases of the genitourinary system, and severe or very severe disabilities. The overall health examination utilization in the visually disabled population was very low. Lower utilization occurred mainly in males, the elderly, and those with severe disabilities.

  13. M-HELP: a miniaturized total health examination system launched on a mobile phone platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Li, Jingjing; Liu, Jing

    2013-11-01

    A timely health examination is of great significance for incipient disease detection and prevention. However, conventional examinations generally rely heavily on bulky and expensive instrumentation, which is not easily available. To address technical barriers, an innovative, highly miniaturized, and integrated health examination system-Mobile Health Examination Launched on the Phone (M-HELP)-was developed. Based on the design of a multifunctional Android® (Google, Mountain View, CA) application and the development of different wireless biomedical sensor modules, a mobile phone was incorporated into a central terminal for personal health examination. More than 12 parameters, including electrocardiogram, heart sound, and eye test, as well as others, covered the majority of the crucial parameters in a total health examination and have been successfully established and incorporated into the system. Unlike the conventional examination, the M-HELP system could generate electronic health records and send them to physicians via e-mails or multimedia messages. This significantly simplifies the general health examination with much lower cost and fewer temporal and spatial restrictions. For proof of concept, a bench-scale test recruiting 11 volunteer subjects showed that the average time spent on a total health examination with M-HELP system was about 28 min. This article clarifies the basic concept of a total health examination on the platform of a mobile phone, demonstrates the basic features of the M-HELP system with group tests, and suggests the practical future application of the new system and the scientific issues thus raised.

  14. Health education interventions to raise awareness of rheumatic fever: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Laura Susan; Watkins, Lauren; Engel, Mark Emmanuel

    2013-07-18

    There is a significant global health burden associated with acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD), especially in developing countries. ARF and RHD most often strike children and young adults living in impoverished settings, where unhygienic conditions and lack of awareness and knowledge of streptococcal infection progression are common. Secondary prophylactic measures have been recommended in the past, but primary prevention measures have been gaining more attention from researchers frustrated by the perpetual prevalence of ARF and RHD in developing countries. Health education aims to empower people to take responsibility for their own well-being by gaining control over the underlying factors that influence health. We therefore conducted a review of the current best evidence for the use of health education interventions to increase awareness and knowledge of streptococcal pharyngitis and ARF. This article describes the protocol for a systematic review of the effectiveness of health education interventions aimed at increasing awareness and knowledge of the symptoms, causes and consequences of streptococcal pharyngitis, rheumatic fever and/or rheumatic heart disease. Studies will be selected in which the effect of an intervention is compared with either a pre-intervention or a control, targeting all possible audience types. Primary and secondary outcomes of interest are pre-specified. Randomized controlled trials, quasi-randomized trials, controlled before-after studies and controlled clinical trials will be considered. We will search several bibliographic databases (for example, PubMed, EMBASE, World Health Organization Library databases, Google Scholar) and search sources for gray literature. We will meta-analyze included studies. We will conduct subgroup analyses according to intervention subtypes: printed versus audiovisual and mass media versus training workshops. This review will provide evidence for the effectiveness of educational

  15. Physical Health Problems as a Late-Life Suicide Precipitant: Examination of Coroner/Medical Examiner and Law Enforcement Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Namkee G; DiNitto, Diana M; Marti, C Nathan; Conwell, Yeates

    2017-09-18

    In light of high late-life suicide rates, we compared older suicide decedents with and without physical health problems as a suicide precipitant with respect to their clinical characteristics and suicide means. We also examined health-related concerns noted in summary coroner/medical examiner or law enforcement (CME/LE) reports. The National Violent Death Reporting System, 2005-2014, provided data (N = 16,924 aged 65 or older). Quantitative data were analyzed using logistic regression models with physical health problems as a suicide precipitant as the dependent variable and depressive symptoms, other precipitating/risk factors, and suicide means as the independent variables. CME/LE reports were analyzed using content analysis and descriptive statistics. Physical health problems were recorded as a suicide precipitant for 50% of the older decedents. Compared to those without, those with physical health problems as a precipitant were older and more likely to have had depressed mood (adjusted odds ratios [AOR] = 2.39, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.21-2.59 for men and AOR = 1.79, 95% CI = 1.50-2.14 for women), disclosed suicide intent, left a suicide note, and used a firearm as suicide means. In CME/LE reports, pain and cancer were mentioned most frequently (29% and 28%, respectively). Dementia-related functional decline, fear of becoming a burden to loved ones, refusal of nursing homes, and loss of independence were also mentioned. Study findings call for more targeted, intensive suicide prevention strategies for older adults suffering from debilitating and painful health conditions. Training health care providers and informal support systems to assess suicide risk and in evidence-based intervention plans/guidelines is needed.

  16. Study protocol for examining job strain as a risk factor for severe unipolar depression in an individual participant meta-analysis of 14 European cohorts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ida E H; Hannerz, Harald; Nyberg, Solja T

    2013-01-01

    scales that do not necessarily correspond to clinically diagnosed depression. In addition, a meta-analysis from 2008 indicated publication bias in the field. METHODS: This study protocol describes the planned design and analyses of an individual participant data meta-analysis, to examine whether job...... using random effects meta-analysis. DISCUSSION: The planned analyses will help clarify whether job strain is associated with an increased risk of clinically diagnosed unipolar depression. As the analysis is based on pre-planned study protocols and an individual participant data meta-analysis, the pooled......BACKGROUND: Previous studies have shown that gainfully employed individuals with high work demands and low control at work (denoted "job strain") are at increased risk of common mental disorders, including depression. Most existing studies have, however, measured depression using self-rated symptom...

  17. Integrating addiction treatment into primary care using mobile health technology: protocol for an implementation research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quanbeck, Andrew R; Gustafson, David H; Marsch, Lisa A; McTavish, Fiona; Brown, Randall T; Mares, Marie-Louise; Johnson, Roberta; Glass, Joseph E; Atwood, Amy K; McDowell, Helene

    2014-05-29

    Healthcare reform in the United States is encouraging Federally Qualified Health Centers and other primary-care practices to integrate treatment for addiction and other behavioral health conditions into their practices. The potential of mobile health technologies to manage addiction and comorbidities such as HIV in these settings is substantial but largely untested. This paper describes a protocol to evaluate the implementation of an E-Health integrated communication technology delivered via mobile phones, called Seva, into primary-care settings. Seva is an evidence-based system of addiction treatment and recovery support for patients and real-time caseload monitoring for clinicians. Our implementation strategy uses three models of organizational change: the Program Planning Model to promote acceptance and sustainability, the NIATx quality improvement model to create a welcoming environment for change, and Rogers's diffusion of innovations research, which facilitates adaptations of innovations to maximize their adoption potential. We will implement Seva and conduct an intensive, mixed-methods assessment at three diverse Federally Qualified Healthcare Centers in the United States. Our non-concurrent multiple-baseline design includes three periods - pretest (ending in four months of implementation preparation), active Seva implementation, and maintenance - with implementation staggered at six-month intervals across sites. The first site will serve as a pilot clinic. We will track the timing of intervention elements and assess study outcomes within each dimension of the Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, and Maintenance framework, including effects on clinicians, patients, and practices. Our mixed-methods approach will include quantitative (e.g., interrupted time-series analysis of treatment attendance, with clinics as the unit of analysis) and qualitative (e.g., staff interviews regarding adaptations to implementation protocol) methods, and assessment of

  18. Health literacy and refugees' experiences of the health examination for asylum seekers - a Swedish cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wångdahl, Josefin; Lytsy, Per; Mårtensson, Lena; Westerling, Ragnar

    2015-11-23

    The purpose of the health examination for asylum seekers in most countries is to identify poor health in order to secure the well-being of seekers of asylum and to guarantee the safety of the population in the host country. Functional health literacy is an individual's ability to read information and instructions about health and to function effectively as a patient in the health system, and comprehensive health literacy is an individual's competence in accessing, understanding, appraising and applying health information. Little is known about refugees' health literacy and their experiences of the health examination for asylum seekers. The purposes of the study were to investigate refugees' experiences of communication during their health examination for asylum seekers and the usefulness of that examination, and whether health literacy is associated with those experiences. A cross-sectional study was made among 360 adult refugees speaking Arabic, Dari, Somali or English. Health literacy was measured using the Swedish Functional Health Literacy Scale and the short European Health Literacy Questionnaire. Experiences of communication and the usefulness of the health examination were measured in several questions. Associations were sought using univariate and multivariate statistical models. In the health examination for asylum seekers, a poor quality of communication was experienced by 36 %, receiving little information about health care by 55 %, and receiving little new knowledge by 41 % and/or help by 26 %. Having inadequate as compared to sufficient comprehensive health literacy was associated with the experience of a poorer quality of communication (OR: 9.64, CI 95 %: 3.25-28.58) and the experience of receiving little valuable health care information (OR: 6.54, CI 95 %: 2.45-17.47). Furthermore, having inadequate as compared to sufficient comprehensive health literacy was associated with the experience of not receiving new knowledge (OR: 7.94, CI 95 %: 3

  19. The Impact of mHealth Interventions on Breast Cancer Awareness and Screening: Systematic Review Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokosi, Temitope O; Fortuin, Jill; Douglas, Tania S

    2017-12-21

    Mobile health (mHealth) is the use of mobile communication technologies to promote health by supporting health care practices (eg, health data collection, delivery of health care information). mHealth technologies (such as mobile phones) can be used effectively by health care practitioners in the distribution of health information and have the potential to improve access to and quality of health care, as well as reduce the cost of health services. Current literature shows limited scientific evidence related to the benefits of mHealth interventions for breast cancer, which is the leading cause of cancer deaths in women worldwide and contributes a large proportion of all cancer deaths, especially in developing countries. Women, especially in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), are faced with low odds of surviving breast cancer. This finding is likely due to multiple factors related to health systems: low priority of women's health and cancer on national health agendas; lack of awareness that breast cancer can be effectively treated if detected early; and societal, cultural, and religious factors that are prevalent in LMICs. The proposed systematic review will examine the impact of mHealth interventions on breast cancer awareness and screening among women aged 18 years and older. The objectives of this study are to identify and describe the various mHealth intervention strategies that are used for breast cancer, and assess the impact of mHealth strategies on breast cancer awareness and screening. Literature from various databases such as MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials will be examined. Trial registers, reports, and unpublished theses will also be included. All mobile technologies such as cell phones, personal digital assistants, and tablets that have short message service, multimedia message service, video, and audio capabilities will be included. mHealth is the primary intervention. The search strategy will

  20. BETTER HEALTH: Durham -- protocol for a cluster randomized trial of BETTER in community and public health settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paszat, Lawrence; Sutradhar, Rinku; O'Brien, Mary Ann; Lofters, Aisha; Pinto, Andrew; Selby, Peter; Baxter, Nancy; Donnelly, Peter D; Elliott, Regina; Glazier, Richard H; Kyle, Robert; Manca, Donna; Pietrusiak, Mary-Anne; Rabeneck, Linda; Sopcak, Nicolette; Tinmouth, Jill; Wall, Becky; Grunfeld, Eva

    2017-09-29

    The Building on Existing Tools to Improve Chronic Disease Prevention and Screening (BETTER) cluster randomized trial in primary care settings demonstrated a 30% improvement in adherence to evidence-based Chronic Disease Prevention and Screening (CDPS) activities. CDPS activities included healthy activities, lifestyle modifications, and screening tests. We present a protocol for the adaptation of BETTER to a public health setting, and testing the adaptation in a cluster randomized trial (BETTER HEALTH: Durham) among low income neighbourhoods in Durham Region, Ontario (Canada). The BETTER intervention consists of a personalized prevention visit between a participant and a prevention practitioner, which is focused on the participant's eligible CDPS activities, and uses Brief Action Planning, to empower the participant to set achievable short-term goals. Durham aims to establish that the BETTER intervention can be adapted and proven effective among 40-64 year old residents of low income areas when provided in the community by public health nurses trained as prevention practitioners. Focus groups and key informant interviews among stakeholders and eligible residents of low income areas will inform the adaptation, along with feedback from the trial's Community Advisory Committee. We have created a sampling frame of 16 clusters composed of census dissemination areas in the lowest urban quintile of median household income, and will sample 10 clusters to be randomly allocated to immediate intervention or six month wait list control. Accounting for the clustered design effect, the trial will have 80% power to detect an absolute 30% difference in the primary outcome, a composite score of completed eligible CDPS actions six months after enrollment. The prevention practitioner will attempt to link participants without a primary care provider (PCP) to a local PCP. The implementation of BETTER HEALTH: Durham will be evaluated by focus groups and key informant interviews. The

  1. The current condition of the workers' general health examination in South Korea: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Young Joong; Myong, Jun-Pyo; Eom, Huisu; Choi, Bowha; Park, Jong Heon; L Kim, Eun-A

    2017-01-01

    Business owners in the Republic of Korea must take part in the workers' general health examination. However, there have been few formal analyses of the uptake of this examination by employees. In the present study, we examined the rates of participation in medical examinations according to age group, health insurance type, and enterprise size, and then compared these results with those of the national general health screening. Furthermore, we determined the distribution of patients with abnormal results for diabetes and hypertension, and outlined the significance and history of domestic health examinations. We started by comparing participation rates extracted from the among health examination data of the National Health Insurance Service from 2006-2013 by sex, age, insurance type, and enterprise size of workplace health insurance beneficiaries (i.e., those whose insurance is provided by their workplace). In addition, we analyzed the prevalence rates of abnormal results for hypertension and diabetes, and explored the history and significance of health examinations in the Republic of Korea. The overall participation rate in the primary health examination in 2006 was 56%, and this increased to 72% in 2013. However, the rates of the secondary screening did not increase much. Among workplace policyholders (i.e., those whose insurance is provided by their workplace), the participation rates of workers in enterprises with less than 50 employees were lower than were those in enterprises with 50 or more employees. Notably, the rates and odds ratios of patients with abnormal results for diabetes and hypertension were relatively high, particularly among those working in smaller enterprises. Although the workers' general health examination has been replaced with the national general health screening, it remains necessary to ensure uniform health management services among all workers in the Republic of Korea. This can, in turn, promote occupational health and improve working

  2. Multi-level analysis of electronic health record adoption by health care professionals: A study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labrecque Michel

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The electronic health record (EHR is an important application of information and communication technologies to the healthcare sector. EHR implementation is expected to produce benefits for patients, professionals, organisations, and the population as a whole. These benefits cannot be achieved without the adoption of EHR by healthcare professionals. Nevertheless, the influence of individual and organisational factors in determining EHR adoption is still unclear. This study aims to assess the unique contribution of individual and organisational factors on EHR adoption in healthcare settings, as well as possible interrelations between these factors. Methods A prospective study will be conducted. A stratified random sampling method will be used to select 50 healthcare organisations in the Quebec City Health Region (Canada. At the individual level, a sample of 15 to 30 health professionals will be chosen within each organisation depending on its size. A semi-structured questionnaire will be administered to two key informants in each organisation to collect organisational data. A composite adoption score of EHR adoption will be developed based on a Delphi process and will be used as the outcome variable. Twelve to eighteen months after the first contact, depending on the pace of EHR implementation, key informants and clinicians will be contacted once again to monitor the evolution of EHR adoption. A multilevel regression model will be applied to identify the organisational and individual determinants of EHR adoption in clinical settings. Alternative analytical models would be applied if necessary. Results The study will assess the contribution of organisational and individual factors, as well as their interactions, to the implementation of EHR in clinical settings. Conclusions These results will be very relevant for decision makers and managers who are facing the challenge of implementing EHR in the healthcare system. In addition

  3. Examining National Public Health Law to Realize the Global Health Security Agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Benjamin Mason; Tureski, Kara; Bockh, Emily; Carr, Derek; Ayala, Ana; Roberts, Anna; Cloud, Lindsay; Wilhelm, Nicolas; Burris, Scott

    2017-05-01

    Where the Global Health Security Agenda (GHSA) seeks to accelerate progress toward a world safe and secure from public health emergencies, the realization of GHSA 'Action Packages' will require national governments to establish necessary legal frameworks to prevent, detect, and respond to infectious disease. By analyzing the scope and content of existing national legislation in each of the GHSA Action Packages, this comparative cross-national research has developed a framework that disaggregates the legal domains necessary to meet each Action Package target. Based upon these legal domains, this study developed an assessment tool that can identify specific attributes of national legislation. This article applies this tool to assess the legal environment in twenty Sub-Saharan African countries, examining the content of laws across the GHSA Action Packages, analyzing the legal domains necessary to implement each Action Package, and highlighting specific national laws that reflect attributes of each legal domain. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press; all rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. A critical examination of the health workers\\' civil and criminal liabilities

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper set out to examine the subject matter of health and welfare administration and the human resources thereto to achieve the set objectives of health and welfare policies of the Government. It also aimed at examining the behaviour of the professionals in the hospitals, the ethical principles, law guiding their behavior ...

  5. An equity analysis of health examination service utilization by women from underdeveloped areas in western China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yuyan; Gao, Jianmin; Zhou, Zhongliang; Yan, Ju'e; Xu, Yongjian; Yang, Xiaowei; Li, Yanli

    2017-01-01

    This study sought to examine the sources of inequity in health examination service utilization by women from underdeveloped areas in western China. Based on data from the 5th National Health Service Survey in Shaanxi province, women's utilization of health examination services was examined according to gynecological, cervical smear, and breast examination rates. The equity of health examination service utilization by 15- to 64-year-old women and the factors contributing to inequity were determined using the health concentration index, decomposition of the concentration index, and the horizontal inequity index. The examination rates for gynecological, cervical smear, and breast exams for 15- to 64-year-old women in Shaanxi province were 40.61%, 27.08%, and 24.59%, respectively. The horizontal inequity indices of gynecological, cervical smear, and breast examination rates were 0.0480, 0.0423, and 0.0764, respectively, and each examination rate was higher for wealthy individuals. The contribution rates of economic status to the inequalities in gynecological, cervical smear, and breast examination rates were 65.80%, 74.31%, and 56.49%, respectively. The contribution rates of educational status to the inequalities in gynecological, cervical smear, and breast examination rates were 21.01%, 14.83% and 30.00%, respectively. The contribution rates of age to the inequalities in gynecological, cervical smear, and breast examination rates were 25.77%, 26.55%, and 18.40%, respectively. Women's health examination rates differed between populations with different socio-demographic characteristics. There is pro-wealth inequality in each examination rate. This study found that financial status, age, and education level were the main reasons for the unequal utilization of health examination services.

  6. An equity analysis of health examination service utilization by women from underdeveloped areas in western China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuyan Qian

    Full Text Available This study sought to examine the sources of inequity in health examination service utilization by women from underdeveloped areas in western China.Based on data from the 5th National Health Service Survey in Shaanxi province, women's utilization of health examination services was examined according to gynecological, cervical smear, and breast examination rates. The equity of health examination service utilization by 15- to 64-year-old women and the factors contributing to inequity were determined using the health concentration index, decomposition of the concentration index, and the horizontal inequity index.The examination rates for gynecological, cervical smear, and breast exams for 15- to 64-year-old women in Shaanxi province were 40.61%, 27.08%, and 24.59%, respectively. The horizontal inequity indices of gynecological, cervical smear, and breast examination rates were 0.0480, 0.0423, and 0.0764, respectively, and each examination rate was higher for wealthy individuals. The contribution rates of economic status to the inequalities in gynecological, cervical smear, and breast examination rates were 65.80%, 74.31%, and 56.49%, respectively. The contribution rates of educational status to the inequalities in gynecological, cervical smear, and breast examination rates were 21.01%, 14.83% and 30.00%, respectively. The contribution rates of age to the inequalities in gynecological, cervical smear, and breast examination rates were 25.77%, 26.55%, and 18.40%, respectively.Women's health examination rates differed between populations with different socio-demographic characteristics. There is pro-wealth inequality in each examination rate. This study found that financial status, age, and education level were the main reasons for the unequal utilization of health examination services.

  7. Examining the Pathways between Gratitude and Self-Rated Physical Health across Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Patrick L.; Allemand, Mathias; Roberts, Brent W.

    2012-01-01

    The current study examined whether dispositional gratitude predicts physical health among adults, and if so, whether this relationship occurs because grateful individuals lead healthier lives, either psychologically or physically. Specifically, we examined whether psychological health, healthy activities, and willingness to seek help for health concerns mediated the link between gratitude and self-reported physical health, as well as if these mediational pathways are moderated by age, in a broad sample of Swiss adults (N = 962, Mage = 52 years, age range: 19 to 84). Dispositional gratitude correlated positively with self-reported physical health, and this link was mediated by psychological health, healthy activities, and willingness to seek help for health concerns. However, the indirect effects for psychological health and healthy activities were stronger for older than younger adults. In other words, the mechanisms explaining why gratitude predicts health appear to differ across adulthood. PMID:23139438

  8. Examining Health Professional Educators' Adoption of Learning-Centered Pedagogy and Instructional Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Traci B.

    2014-01-01

    This mixed-methods study explored the extent to which health professions educators use instructional technologies and learning-centered pedagogical methods. Within the health professions, there is a lack of data on the pedagogical methods used by health professions educators within the classroom. The purpose of this study was to examine and…

  9. Sample Design and Estimation Procedures for a National Health Examination Survey of Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, E. Earl; And Others

    This report presents considerations for sample design and estimation procedures for the Health Examination Survey, one of the major survey programs employed by the National Center for Health Statistics. The survey collects data which provide national estimates and distributions of various health characteristics related to the growth and…

  10. [The requirement for the health examination in work place to focus on mood disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Norio

    2012-01-01

    In 2010 Mr. Nagatsuma, the former Minister of the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare of Japan expressed his opinion that the health examination of work place should includes items to focus on mental disorders such as depression, just after the Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology with related societies launched the Joint Declaration of Countermeasure for Depression. To carry out the examination the following requirement is necessary. 1) Keeping the results of the health examination in secret. 2) Enlightenment of mental disorders including depression, bipolar disorders, schizophrenia and pervasive developmental disorders. 3) Not only questionnaires for screening but also supportive and sympathetic interview methods that are reliable and valid. 4) Cooperation between work place and health professional In introduction of medical intervention and rehabilitation. The strategy to realize the above-mentioned requirements is as follows. 1) Education of the industrial mental health staff: public health nurses and psychologists. 2) Pilot study to examine the method of the health examination. 3) Research to establish the future preventive method of mental disrders. 4) Budgetary appropriation. As the health examination should be benefit for workers, hasty introduction of the examination should be avoided.

  11. Study protocol: national research partnership to improve primary health care performance and outcomes for Indigenous peoples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McDermott Robyn

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Strengthening primary health care is critical to reducing health inequity between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. The Audit and Best practice for Chronic Disease Extension (ABCDE project has facilitated the implementation of modern Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI approaches in Indigenous community health care centres across Australia. The project demonstrated improvements in health centre systems, delivery of primary care services and in patient intermediate outcomes. It has also highlighted substantial variation in quality of care. Through a partnership between academic researchers, service providers and policy makers, we are now implementing a study which aims to 1 explore the factors associated with variation in clinical performance; 2 examine specific strategies that have been effective in improving primary care clinical performance; and 3 work with health service staff, management and policy makers to enhance the effective implementation of successful strategies. Methods/Design The study will be conducted in Indigenous community health centres from at least six States/Territories (Northern Territory, Western Australia, New South Wales, South Australia, Queensland and Victoria over a five year period. A research hub will be established in each region to support collection and reporting of quantitative and qualitative clinical and health centre system performance data, to investigate factors affecting variation in quality of care and to facilitate effective translation of research evidence into policy and practice. The project is supported by a web-based information system, providing automated analysis and reporting of clinical care performance to health centre staff and management. Discussion By linking researchers directly to users of research (service providers, managers and policy makers, the partnership is well placed to generate new knowledge on effective strategies for improving the quality of primary

  12. Reasons for non-participation and ways to enhance participation in health examination surveys-the Health 2011 Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolonen, Hanna; Lundqvist, Annamari; Jääskeläinen, Tuija; Koskinen, Seppo; Koponen, Päivikki

    2017-10-01

    High-participation rates to the health examination surveys are needed to obtain representative information about population health. This study aimed to examine reasons for non-participation and factors that could enhance participation using data from the Health 2011 Survey, conducted in 2011-12 in Finland (N = 8135). The most common reason for non-participation was unsuitable timing or location of the health examinations. Older persons also reported that they were too sick to participate. Flexibility on selection of examination times and places and getting feedback on the measurements were most often mentioned as factors which would increase willingness to participate in the future. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  13. The effectiveness of M-health technologies for improving health and health services: a systematic review protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Vikram

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The application of mobile computing and communication technology is rapidly expanding in the fields of health care and public health. This systematic review will summarise the evidence for the effectiveness of mobile technology interventions for improving health and health service outcomes (M-health around the world. Findings To be included in the review interventions must aim to improve or promote health or health service use and quality, employing any mobile computing and communication technology. This includes: (1 interventions designed to improve diagnosis, investigation, treatment, monitoring and management of disease; (2 interventions to deliver treatment or disease management programmes to patients, health promotion interventions, and interventions designed to improve treatment compliance; and (3 interventions to improve health care processes e.g. appointment attendance, result notification, vaccination reminders. A comprehensive, electronic search strategy will be used to identify controlled studies, published since 1990, and indexed in MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Global Health, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library, or the UK NHS Health Technology Assessment database. The search strategy will include terms (and synonyms for the following mobile electronic devices (MEDs and a range of compatible media: mobile phone; personal digital assistant (PDA; handheld computer (e.g. tablet PC; PDA phone (e.g. BlackBerry, Palm Pilot; Smartphone; enterprise digital assistant; portable media player (i.e. MP3 or MP4 player; handheld video game console. No terms for health or health service outcomes will be included, to ensure that all applications of mobile technology in public health and health services are identified. Bibliographies of primary studies and review articles meeting the inclusion criteria will be searched manually to identify further eligible studies. Data on objective and self-reported outcomes and study quality will

  14. The effectiveness of M-health technologies for improving health and health services: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Free, Caroline; Phillips, Gemma; Felix, Lambert; Galli, Leandro; Patel, Vikram; Edwards, Philip

    2010-10-06

    The application of mobile computing and communication technology is rapidly expanding in the fields of health care and public health. This systematic review will summarise the evidence for the effectiveness of mobile technology interventions for improving health and health service outcomes (M-health) around the world. To be included in the review interventions must aim to improve or promote health or health service use and quality, employing any mobile computing and communication technology. This includes: (1) interventions designed to improve diagnosis, investigation, treatment, monitoring and management of disease; (2) interventions to deliver treatment or disease management programmes to patients, health promotion interventions, and interventions designed to improve treatment compliance; and (3) interventions to improve health care processes e.g. appointment attendance, result notification, vaccination reminders.A comprehensive, electronic search strategy will be used to identify controlled studies, published since 1990, and indexed in MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Global Health, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library, or the UK NHS Health Technology Assessment database. The search strategy will include terms (and synonyms) for the following mobile electronic devices (MEDs) and a range of compatible media: mobile phone; personal digital assistant (PDA); handheld computer (e.g. tablet PC); PDA phone (e.g. BlackBerry, Palm Pilot); Smartphone; enterprise digital assistant; portable media player (i.e. MP3 or MP4 player); handheld video game console. No terms for health or health service outcomes will be included, to ensure that all applications of mobile technology in public health and health services are identified. Bibliographies of primary studies and review articles meeting the inclusion criteria will be searched manually to identify further eligible studies. Data on objective and self-reported outcomes and study quality will be independently extracted by two review

  15. BETTER HEALTH: Durham -- protocol for a cluster randomized trial of BETTER in community and public health settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Paszat

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Building on Existing Tools to Improve Chronic Disease Prevention and Screening (BETTER cluster randomized trial in primary care settings demonstrated a 30% improvement in adherence to evidence-based Chronic Disease Prevention and Screening (CDPS activities. CDPS activities included healthy activities, lifestyle modifications, and screening tests. We present a protocol for the adaptation of BETTER to a public health setting, and testing the adaptation in a cluster randomized trial (BETTER HEALTH: Durham among low income neighbourhoods in Durham Region, Ontario (Canada. Methods The BETTER intervention consists of a personalized prevention visit between a participant and a prevention practitioner, which is focused on the participant’s eligible CDPS activities, and uses Brief Action Planning, to empower the participant to set achievable short-term goals. BETTER HEALTH: Durham aims to establish that the BETTER intervention can be adapted and proven effective among 40–64 year old residents of low income areas when provided in the community by public health nurses trained as prevention practitioners. Focus groups and key informant interviews among stakeholders and eligible residents of low income areas will inform the adaptation, along with feedback from the trial’s Community Advisory Committee. We have created a sampling frame of 16 clusters composed of census dissemination areas in the lowest urban quintile of median household income, and will sample 10 clusters to be randomly allocated to immediate intervention or six month wait list control. Accounting for the clustered design effect, the trial will have 80% power to detect an absolute 30% difference in the primary outcome, a composite score of completed eligible CDPS actions six months after enrollment. The prevention practitioner will attempt to link participants without a primary care provider (PCP to a local PCP. The implementation of BETTER HEALTH: Durham will be

  16. Cardiovascular health status in Chinese adults in urban areas: analysis of the Chinese Health Examination Database 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hai-Yun; Sun, Zhong-Hua; Cao, Dong-Ping; Wu, Liu-Xin; Zeng, Qiang

    2013-09-30

    The American Heart Association (AHA) recently developed definitions of cardiovascular health for adults and children based on 7 cardiovascular disease risk factors or health behaviors. We applied this new construct to examine the cardiovascular health status in adult Chinese urban residents. Data of 1,012,418 subjects aged 20-65 years (55% were men; mean age, 42.4 years) who received health examination at 58 health examination centers across China was analyzed. The AHA ideal health behaviors index and ideal health factor index were evaluated among the subjects. Only 0.6% of male and 2.6% of female subjects met all 7 health components, and only 39.1% of the subjects met 5 or more components of ideal cardiovascular health. The prevalence of "ideal", "intermediate" and "poor" cardiovascular health was 1.5%, 33.9% and 64.6%, respectively. About two-thirds of the adult Chinese urban population has "poor" cardiovascular health. Comprehensive individual and population-based interventions must be developed to improve cardiovascular health status in China. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A randomised controlled trial linking mental health inpatients to community smoking cessation supports: A study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clancy Richard

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mental health inpatients smoke at higher rates than the general population and are disproportionately affected by tobacco dependence. Despite the advent of smoke free policies within mental health hospitals, limited systems are in place to support a cessation attempt post hospitalisation, and international evidence suggests that most smokers return to pre-admission smoking levels following discharge. This protocol describes a randomised controlled trial that will test the feasibility, acceptability and efficacy of linking inpatient smoking care with ongoing community cessation support for smokers with a mental illness. Methods/Design This study will be conducted as a randomised controlled trial. 200 smokers with an acute mental illness will be recruited from a large inpatient mental health facility. Participants will complete a baseline survey and will be randomised to either a multimodal smoking cessation intervention or provided with hospital smoking care only. Randomisation will be stratified by diagnosis (psychotic, non-psychotic. Intervention participants will be provided with a brief motivational interview in the inpatient setting and options of ongoing smoking cessation support post discharge: nicotine replacement therapy (NRT; referral to Quitline; smoking cessation groups; and fortnightly telephone support. Outcome data, including cigarettes smoked per day, quit attempts, and self-reported 7-day point prevalence abstinence (validated by exhaled carbon monoxide, will be collected via blind interview at one week, two months, four months and six months post discharge. Process information will also be collected, including the use of cessation supports and cost of the intervention. Discussion This study will provide comprehensive data on the potential of an integrated, multimodal smoking cessation intervention for persons with an acute mental illness, linking inpatient with community cessation support. Trial Registration

  18. The viability of an ecologically valid chronic sleep restriction and circadian timing protocol: An examination of sample attrition, compliance, and effectiveness at impacting sleepiness and mood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, David L; Drummond, Sean P A; McElroy, Todd

    2017-01-01

    Chronic sleep restriction (SR) increases sleepiness, negatively impacts mood, and impairs a variety of cognitive performance measures. The vast majority of work establishing these effects are tightly controlled in-lab experimental studies. Examining commonly-experienced levels of SR in naturalistic settings is more difficult and generally involves observational methods, rather than active manipulations of sleep. The same is true for analyzing behavioral and cognitive outcomes at circadian unfavorable times. The current study tested the ability of an at-home protocol to manipulate sleep schedules (i.e., impose SR), as well as create a mismatch between a subject's circadian preference and time of testing. Viability of the protocol was assessed via completion, compliance with the SR, and success at manipulating sleepiness and mood. An online survey was completed by 3630 individuals to assess initial eligibility, 256 agreed via email response to participate in the 3-week study, 221 showed for the initial in-person session, and 184 completed the protocol (175 with complete data). The protocol consisted of 1 week at-home SR (5-6 hours in bed/night), 1 week wash-out, and 1 week well-rested (WR: 8-9 hours in bed/night). Sleep was monitored with actigraphy, diary, and call-ins. Risk management strategies were implemented for subject safety. At the end of each experimental week, subjects reported sleepiness and mood ratings. Protocol completion was 83%, with lower depression scores, higher anxiety scores, and morning session assignment predicting completion. Compliance with the sleep schedule was also very good. Subjects spent approximately 2 hours less time in bed/night and obtained an average of 1.5 hours less nightly sleep during SR, relative to WR, with 82% of subjects obtaining at least 60 minutes less average nightly sleep. Sleepiness and mood were impacted as expected by SR. These findings show the viability of studying experimental chronic sleep restriction outside

  19. The viability of an ecologically valid chronic sleep restriction and circadian timing protocol: An examination of sample attrition, compliance, and effectiveness at impacting sleepiness and mood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L Dickinson

    Full Text Available Chronic sleep restriction (SR increases sleepiness, negatively impacts mood, and impairs a variety of cognitive performance measures. The vast majority of work establishing these effects are tightly controlled in-lab experimental studies. Examining commonly-experienced levels of SR in naturalistic settings is more difficult and generally involves observational methods, rather than active manipulations of sleep. The same is true for analyzing behavioral and cognitive outcomes at circadian unfavorable times. The current study tested the ability of an at-home protocol to manipulate sleep schedules (i.e., impose SR, as well as create a mismatch between a subject's circadian preference and time of testing. Viability of the protocol was assessed via completion, compliance with the SR, and success at manipulating sleepiness and mood. An online survey was completed by 3630 individuals to assess initial eligibility, 256 agreed via email response to participate in the 3-week study, 221 showed for the initial in-person session, and 184 completed the protocol (175 with complete data. The protocol consisted of 1 week at-home SR (5-6 hours in bed/night, 1 week wash-out, and 1 week well-rested (WR: 8-9 hours in bed/night. Sleep was monitored with actigraphy, diary, and call-ins. Risk management strategies were implemented for subject safety. At the end of each experimental week, subjects reported sleepiness and mood ratings. Protocol completion was 83%, with lower depression scores, higher anxiety scores, and morning session assignment predicting completion. Compliance with the sleep schedule was also very good. Subjects spent approximately 2 hours less time in bed/night and obtained an average of 1.5 hours less nightly sleep during SR, relative to WR, with 82% of subjects obtaining at least 60 minutes less average nightly sleep. Sleepiness and mood were impacted as expected by SR. These findings show the viability of studying experimental chronic sleep

  20. The viability of an ecologically valid chronic sleep restriction and circadian timing protocol: An examination of sample attrition, compliance, and effectiveness at impacting sleepiness and mood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Sean P. A.; McElroy, Todd

    2017-01-01

    Chronic sleep restriction (SR) increases sleepiness, negatively impacts mood, and impairs a variety of cognitive performance measures. The vast majority of work establishing these effects are tightly controlled in-lab experimental studies. Examining commonly-experienced levels of SR in naturalistic settings is more difficult and generally involves observational methods, rather than active manipulations of sleep. The same is true for analyzing behavioral and cognitive outcomes at circadian unfavorable times. The current study tested the ability of an at-home protocol to manipulate sleep schedules (i.e., impose SR), as well as create a mismatch between a subject’s circadian preference and time of testing. Viability of the protocol was assessed via completion, compliance with the SR, and success at manipulating sleepiness and mood. An online survey was completed by 3630 individuals to assess initial eligibility, 256 agreed via email response to participate in the 3-week study, 221 showed for the initial in-person session, and 184 completed the protocol (175 with complete data). The protocol consisted of 1 week at-home SR (5-6 hours in bed/night), 1 week wash-out, and 1 week well-rested (WR: 8-9 hours in bed/night). Sleep was monitored with actigraphy, diary, and call-ins. Risk management strategies were implemented for subject safety. At the end of each experimental week, subjects reported sleepiness and mood ratings. Protocol completion was 83%, with lower depression scores, higher anxiety scores, and morning session assignment predicting completion. Compliance with the sleep schedule was also very good. Subjects spent approximately 2 hours less time in bed/night and obtained an average of 1.5 hours less nightly sleep during SR, relative to WR, with 82% of subjects obtaining at least 60 minutes less average nightly sleep. Sleepiness and mood were impacted as expected by SR. These findings show the viability of studying experimental chronic sleep restriction outside

  1. A Standard Mutual Authentication Protocol for Cloud Computing Based Health Care System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohit, Prerna; Amin, Ruhul; Karati, Arijit; Biswas, G P; Khan, Muhammad Khurram

    2017-04-01

    Telecare Medical Information System (TMIS) supports a standard platform to the patient for getting necessary medical treatment from the doctor(s) via Internet communication. Security protection is important for medical records (data) of the patients because of very sensitive information. Besides, patient anonymity is another most important property, which must be protected. Most recently, Chiou et al. suggested an authentication protocol for TMIS by utilizing the concept of cloud environment. They claimed that their protocol is patient anonymous and well security protected. We reviewed their protocol and found that it is completely insecure against patient anonymity. Further, the same protocol is not protected against mobile device stolen attack. In order to improve security level and complexity, we design a light weight authentication protocol for the same environment. Our security analysis ensures resilience of all possible security attacks. The performance of our protocol is relatively standard in comparison with the related previous research.

  2. The Danish preventive child health examination should expand on mental health and the well-being of the family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten Lykke; Graungaard, Anette Hauskov; Ertmann, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In Denmark, around one in six children hassignificant somatic, psychological or social health problems,often in combination. The preventive child health examinationshave a high participation rate; and they produce significantfindings, predominantly concerning the child.......Motor, cognitive, social skills and mental health areassessed globally through observation and communicationwith the child, and, to a lesser degree, through conversationwith the parents. The child health examination rarely has afamily perspective, unless the doctor is already aware ofproblems in the family......’sphysical health. The aim of this study was to explore howthe child’s physical, cognitive and psychosocial health areexamined and assessed at the health examinations of childrenaged 0-5 years in general practice. METHODS: Our study employed observations of the consultationsas well as individual interviews. A total...

  3. Protocol of the COSMIN study: COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick DL

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Choosing an adequate measurement instrument depends on the proposed use of the instrument, the concept to be measured, the measurement properties (e.g. internal consistency, reproducibility, content and construct validity, responsiveness, and interpretability, the requirements, the burden for subjects, and costs of the available instruments. As far as measurement properties are concerned, there are no sufficiently specific standards for the evaluation of measurement properties of instruments to measure health status, and also no explicit criteria for what constitutes good measurement properties. In this paper we describe the protocol for the COSMIN study, the objective of which is to develop a checklist that contains COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments, including explicit criteria for satisfying these standards. We will focus on evaluative health related patient-reported outcomes (HR-PROs, i.e. patient-reported health measurement instruments used in a longitudinal design as an outcome measure, excluding health care related PROs, such as satisfaction with care or adherence. The COSMIN standards will be made available in the form of an easily applicable checklist. Method An international Delphi study will be performed to reach consensus on which and how measurement properties should be assessed, and on criteria for good measurement properties. Two sources of input will be used for the Delphi study: (1 a systematic review of properties, standards and criteria of measurement properties found in systematic reviews of measurement instruments, and (2 an additional literature search of methodological articles presenting a comprehensive checklist of standards and criteria. The Delphi study will consist of four (written Delphi rounds, with approximately 30 expert panel members with different backgrounds in clinical medicine, biostatistics, psychology, and epidemiology. The final checklist will

  4. Relationship between receiving a workplace oral health examination including oral health instruction and oral health status in the Japanese adult population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshikohji, Tadaaki; Shimazaki, Yoshihiro; Shinagawa, Takashi; Fukui, Nao; Akifusa, Sumio; Hirata, Yukio; Yamashita, Yoshihisa

    2011-01-01

    Dental caries and periodontal disease are highly prevalent in the Japanese adult population. Oral examination is an effective method to find various oral health problems in their early stages. However, workplace oral examination is not common in Japan. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between receiving workplace oral health examination, including oral health instruction, and oral health status in the Japanese adult population. This study was performed using data from 4,484 Japanese employees aged 35-74 yr. The proportion of teeth with a probing depth (PD) ≥4 mm and the number of decayed teeth were used for periodontal disease and dental caries parameters. The subjects were asked by questionnaire about past experiences with workplace oral health examination. The subjects who received a workplace oral health examination every year had better periodontal health status than those receiving an examination for the first time. The odds ratio for having ≥10% of teeth with PD ≥4 mm in the subjects who received workplace oral health examination every year was 0.63 (phealth examination and number of decayed teeth. These results suggest that workplace oral health examination accompanied by oral health instruction may be effective for maintenance of periodontal health.

  5. Assessing health systems for type 1 diabetes in sub-Saharan Africa: developing a 'Rapid Assessment Protocol for Insulin Access'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Courten Maximilian

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to improve the health of people with Type 1 diabetes in developing countries, a clear analysis of the constraints to insulin access and diabetes care is needed. We developed a Rapid Assessment Protocol for Insulin Access, comprising a series of questionnaires as well as a protocol for the gathering of other data through site visits, discussions, and document reviews. Methods The Rapid Assessment Protocol for Insulin Access draws on the principles of Rapid Assessment Protocols which have been developed and implemented in several different areas. This protocol was adapted through a thorough literature review on diabetes, chronic condition management and medicine supply in developing countries. A visit to three countries in sub-Saharan Africa and meetings with different experts in the field of diabetes helped refine the questionnaires. Following the development of the questionnaires these were tested with various people familiar with diabetes and/or healthcare in developing countries. The Protocol was piloted in Mozambique then refined and had two further iterations in Zambia and Mali. Translations of questionnaires were made into local languages when necessary, with back translation to ensure precision. Results In each country the protocol was implemented in 3 areas – the capital city, a large urban centre and a predominantly rural area and their respective surroundings. Interviews were carried out by local teams trained on how to use the tool. Data was then collected and entered into a database for analysis. Conclusion The Rapid Assessment Protocol for Insulin Access was developed to provide a situational analysis of Type 1 diabetes, in order to make recommendations to the national Ministries of Health and Diabetes Associations. It provided valuable information on patients' access to insulin, syringes, monitoring and care. It was thus able to sketch a picture of the health care system with regards to its ability to

  6. Evaluation of a laboratory health examination programme in a Swedish industry (Volvo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, G; Bengtsson, C

    1991-04-01

    The records of 117 subjects, workers who had participated in a health examination at a Swedish industry, were studied retrospectively in order to find out which measures had been taken as a consequence of the results from the different examinations. The extensive laboratory examination programme that had been carried out seemed to be of limited value. It is concluded that the extensive examination programmes carried out in many industries should be re-evaluated more critically.

  7. Evidence on health-promoting lifestyle practices and information and communication technologies: scoping review protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph-Shehu, Elizabeth M; Ncama, Busisiwe P

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Information and communication technologies (ICTs) play a key role in improving health and maintaining health promoting behaviours. ICTs are therefore one potential solution for promoting healthy lifestyles. In addition, they can assist in the reduction and control of the menace of both communicable and non-communicable diseases. This study will map evidence of interventions that demonstrate the effect of ICTs on health-promoting lifestyle practices that can prevent and control diseases. It is anticipated that this study will help identify areas where there is need for primary research. Methods and analysis The following electronic databases will be searched: PsycArticle (EBSCO), PsycINFO (EBSCO), Science direct, PubMed, Medline (EBSCO) and Google Scholar. The study will be conducted in two stages: the first stage will map out the studies descriptively while the second stage will map the additional inclusion criteria of quality assessment. Two independent reviewers will undertake the data extraction. Relevant outcomes of the studies will be analysed thematically using NVIvo computer software. The authors will code all evidence independently. Thereafter the authors will critically cross-examine the relationship of the research questions to the emerging themes from the selected articles. The authors hope to find a large number of studies on health-promoting lifestyles that encompass six-subscales of health-promoting activities (nutrition, stress management, interpersonal relation, self-actualisation, health responsibility, physical activity) and ICT. Dissemination This study will be presented in conferences related to health promotion and health-promoting lifestyles. It will also be disseminated in print and electronically. Trial registration number CRD42016042568. PMID:28360246

  8. Evidence on health-promoting lifestyle practices and information and communication technologies: scoping review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph-Shehu, Elizabeth M; Ncama, Busisiwe P

    2017-03-29

    Information and communication technologies (ICTs) play a key role in improving health and maintaining health promoting behaviours. ICTs are therefore one potential solution for promoting healthy lifestyles. In addition, they can assist in the reduction and control of the menace of both communicable and non-communicable diseases. This study will map evidence of interventions that demonstrate the effect of ICTs on health-promoting lifestyle practices that can prevent and control diseases. It is anticipated that this study will help identify areas where there is need for primary research. The following electronic databases will be searched: PsycArticle (EBSCO), PsycINFO (EBSCO), Science direct, PubMed, Medline (EBSCO) and Google Scholar. The study will be conducted in two stages: the first stage will map out the studies descriptively while the second stage will map the additional inclusion criteria of quality assessment. Two independent reviewers will undertake the data extraction. Relevant outcomes of the studies will be analysed thematically using NVIvo computer software. The authors will code all evidence independently. Thereafter the authors will critically cross-examine the relationship of the research questions to the emerging themes from the selected articles. The authors hope to find a large number of studies on health-promoting lifestyles that encompass six-subscales of health-promoting activities (nutrition, stress management, interpersonal relation, self-actualisation, health responsibility, physical activity) and ICT. This study will be presented in conferences related to health promotion and health-promoting lifestyles. It will also be disseminated in print and electronically. CRD42016042568. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  9. [Protocols of health security in the light of some examples of risk management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postel-Vinay, Nicolas; Coquin, Yves

    2005-11-30

    Throughout medical training, medical risk management is a subject that has been insufficiently addressed and treated without a global vision. Yet the different dangers often make the front page of a media that addresses the question of health security when there is a failure of the system or new legal developments. Added to this disequilibrium of communication and training is the great complexity of risk management. Not only is the nature of the potentially dangerous agents extraordinarily varied but also the entity that detects the risk is sometimes a stranger to the causes of its appearance. The surrounding regulations are themselves complex and dense. Using the examples that have arisen over the last 2 or 3 years, this article describes the current French protocols in risk management, that rely upon the agencies delivering their expertise, certain of which are endowed with the power of policing these regulations. In practice, the doctor should understand the role of these agencies, know how to find the validated information that they can provide, and understand his role in this picture. A role that is perceived as far away as long as the risk has not emerged, but is in the forefront once the event arises.

  10. Blood Organic Mercury and Dietary Mercury Intake: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1999 and 2000

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kathryn R. Mahaffey; Robert P. Clickner; Catherine C. Bodurow

    Blood organic mercury (i.e., methyl mercury) concentrations among 1,709 women who were participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) in 1999 and 2000 (1999-2000 NHANES) were 0.6...

  11. Mining association rules between abnormal health examination results and outpatient medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao Huang, Yi

    Currently, interpretation of health examination reports relies primarily on the physician's own experience. If health screening data could be integrated with outpatient medical records to uncover correlations between disease and abnormal test results, the physician could benefit from having additional reference resources for medical examination report interpretation and clinic diagnosis. This study used the medical database of a regional hospital in Taiwan to illustrate how association rules can be found between abnormal health examination results and outpatient illnesses. The rules can help to build up a disease-prevention knowledge database that assists healthcare providers in follow-up treatment and prevention. Furthermore, this study proposes a new algorithm, the data cutting and sorting method, or DCSM, in place of the traditional Apriori algorithm. DCSM significantly improves the mining performance of Apriori by reducing the time to scan health examination and outpatient medical records, both of which are databases of immense sizes.

  12. [Psychological support for socially vulnerable people in the context of a periodic health examination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobeir, Houssine; Peton, Gabrielle; Brigand, Alain; Chatain, Carine; Sass, Catherine; Moulin, Jean-Jacques

    2009-01-01

    Social vulnerability often leads to the expression of psychological distress. The Health Examination Center of Côtes d'Armor, in Quimper, experimented with the development and implementation of psychological counseling for a highly socio-economically vulnerable population. As part of a periodic health examination, the center offers psychological counseling to patients with pathological sleep disorders and who lack sufficient psychological support. The Health Examination Center's framework and the context of the periodic health examination have facilitated the establishment of a tailored non-stigmatizing intervention well-embedded within the institutional environment. Marginalized people in situations of psychological distress are offered an opportunity to be listened to, and to receive counseling, appropriate prevention services and access to care.

  13. Participation inequality in the National General Health Examination based on enterprise size

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Young Joong Kang; Jong Heun Park; Huisu Eom; Bohwa Choi; Seyoung Lee; Ji-Won Lee; Jun-Pyo Myong

    2017-01-01

    ... and their participation in Workers' General Health Examinations (WGHE). The aim of the present study was to estimate the association of WGHE participation with the size of the enterprise and the type of policyholder...

  14. An examination of ecological predictors of health literacy in black college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosario, Carrie; Modeste, Naomi; Dos Santos, Hildemar; Handysides, Daniel; Gamboa-Maldonado, Thelma; Boyd, Kendal

    2017-06-15

    Health literacy is a determinant of health, but disparities in health literacy persist. This study examined the influence of ecological factors on college students' health literacy. During January 2016 a nonrandom sample of black undergraduate students (n = 298) aged 18-24 were recruited from enrollment lists at two urban universities in the Southeastern United States. Information on health literacy as well as numerous intrapersonal, social, and cultural-environment factors was obtained using an electronic questionnaire and then statistically modeled. Ecological factors accounted for 28.7% of the variance in health literacy. In particular, reappraisal (B = 0.323, p literacy. Although intrapersonal factors influence health literacy, the sociocultural environment of college can also foster or hinder college students' health literacy.

  15. Examining Linkages between Psychological Health Problems, Socio-Demographic Characteristics and Workplace Stressors in Pakistan's Academia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Anwar; Yusoff, Rosman Bin Md; Isa, Khairunesa Binti

    2016-01-01

    Scholarly work and research are globally known as stressful and challenging. Teachers may develop different psychological health problems once they are exposed to workplace stressors. Considering it as a serious issue of education sector, this study has examined the linkages between prevalent workplace stressors and psychological health problems…

  16. The Danish Health Examination Survey 2007-2008 (DANHES 2007-2008)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Louise; Grønbæk, Morten; Helge, Jørn Wulff

    2011-01-01

    The Danish Health Examination Survey (DANHES 2007-2008) was carried out by the National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, in 13 Danish municipalities in 2007-2008. The focus of the survey was diet, smoking, alcohol, and physical activity. The aim of the survey...

  17. The Danish Health Examination Survey 2007-2008 (DANHES 2007-2008).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, Louise; Grønbæk, Morten; Helge, Jørn Wulff; Tolstrup, Janne Schurmann; Curtis, Tine

    2011-03-01

    The Danish Health Examination Survey (DANHES 2007-2008) was carried out by the National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, in 13 Danish municipalities in 2007-2008. The focus of the survey was diet, smoking, alcohol, and physical activity. The aim of the survey was to establish a research database for future cross-sectional and follow-up studies. DANHES 2007-2008 included internet-based questionnaires and a health examination. There were two different questionnaires: a basic questionnaire on socio-demography, health behaviour, self-reported health status, and living conditions, and a supplementary food frequency questionnaire. The health examination contained measurements of blood pressure, resting heart rate, height, weight, fat percentage, waist and hip circumference, blood and hair samples, spirometry, bone mineral density, physical performance, muscle strength, and aerobic fitness. A total of 76,484 people completed the basic questionnaire, and 18,065 adult individuals participated in the health examination, corresponding to a response rate of 14% and a participation rate of 10%, respectively. The database from DANHES 2007-2008 is unique in its size and diversity of measurements and questionnaire contents. Data can be linked to various registers through the Danish civil registration system, and blood samples are stored in a biobank allowing for genetic analyses. Hence, DANHES 2007-2008 forms the basis for future research projects with a focus on health behaviour and prevention of lifestyle-related diseases.

  18. Examining the Relationship between Teacher Organizational Commitment and School Health in Turkish Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezgin, Ferudun

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between teachers' perceptions of organizational commitment and school health in Turkish primary schools. The Organizational Commitment Scale and the Organizational Health Inventory were used to gather data from 323 randomly selected teachers employed in 20 primary schools in Ankara.…

  19. Examining Mental Health Differences between Transfer and Nontransfer University Students Seeking Counseling Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehr, Kristin E.; Daltry, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    This article sought to examine the differences between transfer and nontransfer students on mental health factors, social involvement, and academic success. It was found that transfer students had significantly higher scores on several mental health factors as compared to nontransfer students. It was also found that transfer students were less…

  20. Underutilization of Mental Health Services among College Students: An Examination of System-Related Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Carey N.; Wilcoxon, S. Allen

    2015-01-01

    Despite the documented benefits of counseling and mental health services on academic performance and degree attainment, only about 10% of psychologically distressed college students ever seek professional help. This investigation examined mental health care system-related barriers that might distinguish help seekers from nonhelp seekers among…

  1. Breast Self-Examination Beliefs and Practices, Ethnicity, and Health Literacy: Implications for Health Education to Reduce Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armin, Julie; Torres, Cristina Huebner; Vivian, James; Vergara, Cunegundo; Shaw, Susan J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to quantitatively and qualitatively examine breast cancer screening practices, including breast self-examination (BSE), and health literacy among patients with chronic disease. Design: A prospective, multi-method study conducted with a targeted purposive sample of 297 patients with diabetes and/or hypertension from four…

  2. Vision Test Validation Study for the Health Examination Survey Among Youths 12-17 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jean

    A validation study of the vision test battery used in the Health Examination Survey of 1966-1970 was conducted among 210 youths 12-17 years-old who had been part of the larger survey. The study was designed to discover the degree of correspondence between survey test results and clinical examination by an opthalmologist in determining the…

  3. Association between health examination items and body mass index among school children in Hualien, Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chia-Hsiang; Wang, Jen-Hung; Jan, Rong-Hwa; Huang, Chih-Hao; Cheng, Ching-Feng

    2013-10-19

    To assess the prevalence of obesity and major physical examination items including dental caries, myopia, pinworm, hematuria, and proteinuria among school children in Hualien, Taiwan. In addition, the health status differences between gender, grader, levels of residence urbanization, and body mass index (BMI) were examined. Cross-sectional studies with a total of 11,080 students (age, 7-14 years) in grades 1, 4, and 7 were evaluated for weight, height, routine physical examination, and urine analysis during the 2010 Student Health Examination in Hualien. Frequencies, Chi-square test, and logistic regression were conducted using SPSS. Of the 11,080 students evaluated, 1357 (12.2%) were overweight, and 1421 (12.8%) were obese. There were significant differences in overweight/obese prevalence by gender, by grader, and by levels of residence urbanization. Dental caries, myopia, and obesity were the most prevalent health problems among these students (75.6%, 33.0%, and 12.8%, respectively). In crude and adjusted analyses, research results showed that there were significant differences in the prevalence of major physical examination items between different gender, grader, levels of residence urbanization, and BMI groups. Girls had a higher prevalence of dental caries, myopia, and hematuria than boys (all p health examination provides an important way to detect students' health problems. Our study elucidated major health problems among school children in Hualien, Taiwan. In addition, the results also indicated that the prevalence of health problems had a significant relationship with gender, grader, levels of residence urbanization, and BMI. It is suggested that school health interventions should consider students' health profiles along with their risk factors status in planning.

  4. Barriers to undergraduate peer-physical examination of the lower limb in the health sciences and strategies to improve inclusion: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, Gordon James

    2013-10-01

    Peer-physical examination is a widely adopted and an integral component of the undergraduate curriculum for many health science programs. Unwillingness or perceived inability to participate in peer-physical examination classes may have a negative impact upon students' abilities to competently conduct physical examinations of patients in future as registered health professionals. A literature review on the perceptions and attitudes of peer-physical examination of the lower limb amongst medical and health science students was conducted to identify potential barriers to participation, and to review strategies to improve participation in classes designed to develop clinical examination skills. A pragmatic search strategy of the literature from PubMed and Google Scholar published prior to June 2012 yielded 23 relevant articles. All articles were concerned with the views of medical students' education and there were no articles explicitly addressing the role of peer-physical examination in health science disciplines. Several ethical issues were identified including feelings of coercion, embarrassment, and perceptions of a lack of consideration for cultural and religious beliefs. The available evidence suggests that barriers to participation may be overcome by implementing standard protocols concerned with obtaining informed written consent, adequate choice of peer-examiner, changing facilities and garment advice, and possible alternative learning methods.

  5. How do nurses, midwives and health visitors contribute to protocol-based care? A synthesis of the UK literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilott, Irene; Booth, Andrew; Rick, Jo; Patterson, Malcolm

    2010-06-01

    To explore how nurses, midwives and health visitors contribute to the development, implementation and audit of protocol-based care. Protocol-based care refers to the use of documents that set standards for clinical care processes with the intent of reducing unacceptable variations in practice. Documents such as protocols, clinical guidelines and care pathways underpin evidence-based practice throughout the world. An interpretative review using the five-stage systematic literature review process. The data sources were the British Nursing Index, CINAHL, EMBASE, MEDLINE and Web of Science from onset to 2005. The Journal of Integrated Care Pathways was hand searched (1997-June 2006). Thirty three studies about protocol-based care in the United Kingdom were appraised using the Qualitative Assessment and Review Instrument (QARI version 2). The literature was synthesized inductively and deductively, using an official 12-step guide for development as a framework for the deductive synthesis. Most papers were descriptive, offering practitioner knowledge and positive findings about a locally developed and owned protocol-based care. The majority were instigated in response to clinical need or service re-design. Development of protocol-based care was a non-linear, idiosyncratic process, with steps omitted, repeated or completed in a different order. The context and the multiple purposes of protocol-based care influenced the development process. Implementation and sustainability were rarely mentioned, or theorised as a change. The roles and activities of nurses were so understated as to be almost invisible. There were notable gaps in the literature about the resource use costs, the engagement of patients in the decision-making process, leadership and the impact of formalisation and new roles on inter-professional relations. Documents that standardise clinical care are part of the history of nursing as well as contemporary evidence-based care and expanded roles. Considering the

  6. Developing an Innovative Customer Relationship Management Model for Better Health Examination Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyu JrJung

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available People emphasize on their own health and wish to know more about their conditions. Chronic diseases now take up to 50 percent of top 10 causes of death. As a result, the health-care industry has emerged and kept thriving. This work adopts an innovative customer-oriented business model since most clients are proactive and spontaneous in taking the “distinguished” health examination programs. We adopt the soft system dynamics methodology (SSDM to develop and to evaluate the steps of introducing customer relationship management model into a case health examination organization. Quantitative results are also presented for a case physical examination center and to assess the improved efficiency. The case study shows that the procedures developed here could provide a better service.

  7. Developing a Customer Relationship Management Model for Better Health Examination Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyu Jr-Jung

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available People emphasize on their own health and wish to know more about their conditions. Chronic diseases now take up to 50 percent of top 10 causes of death. As a result, the health-care industry has emerged and kept thriving. This work adopts a customer-oriented business model since most clients are proactive and spontaneous in taking the “distinguished” health examination programs. We adopt the soft system dynamics methodology (SSDM to develop and to evaluate the steps of introducing customer relationship management model into a case health examination organization. Quantitative results are also presented for a case physical examination center and to assess the improved efficiency. The case study shows that the procedures developed here could provide a better service.

  8. Be SMART: examining the experience of implementing the NHS Health Check in UK primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Rachel L; Pattison, Helen M; Holland, Carol; Cooke, Richard

    2015-01-22

    The NHS Health Check was designed by UK Department of Health to address increased prevalence of cardiovascular disease by identifying risk levels and facilitating behaviour change. It constituted biomedical testing, personalised advice and lifestyle support. The objective of the study was to explore Health Care Professionals' (HCPs) and patients' experiences of delivering and receiving the NHS Health Check in an inner-city region of England. Patients and HCPs in primary care were interviewed using semi-structured schedules. Data were analysed using Thematic Analysis. Four themes were identified. Firstly, Health Check as a test of 'roadworthiness' for people. The roadworthiness metaphor resonated with some patients but it signified a passive stance toward illness. Some patients described the check as useful in the theme, Health check as revelatory. HCPs found visual aids demonstrating levels of salt/fat/sugar in everyday foods and a 'traffic light' tape measure helpful in communicating such 'revelations' with patients. Being SMART and following the protocolrevealed that few HCPs used SMART goals and few patients spoke of them. HCPs require training to understand their rationale compared with traditional advice-giving. The need for further follow-up revealed disparity in follow-ups and patients were not systematically monitored over time. HCPs' training needs to include the use and evidence of the effectiveness of SMART goals in changing health behaviours. The significance of fidelity to protocol needs to be communicated to HCPs and commissioners to ensure consistency. Monitoring and measurement of follow-up, e.g., tracking of referrals, need to be resourced to provide evidence of the success of the NHS Health Check in terms of healthier lifestyles and reduced CVD risk.

  9. Secure Authentication and Prescription Safety Protocol for Telecare Health Services Using Ubiquitous IoT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahid Mahmood

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Internet-of-Things (IoT include a large number of devices that can communicate across different networks. Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS also includes a number of devices connected to the internet where wearable devices are also included. Both systems enable researchers to develop healthcare systems with additional intelligence as well as prediction capabilities both for lifestyle and in hospitals. It offers as much persistence as a platform to ubiquitous healthcare by using wearable sensors to transfer the information over servers, smartphones, and other smart devices in the Telecare Medical Information System (TMIS. Security is a challenging issue in TMIS, and resourceful access to health care services requires user verification and confidentiality. Existing schemes lack in ensuring reliable prescription safety along with authentication. This research presents a Secure Authentication and Prescription Safety (SAPS protocol to ensure secure communication between the patient, doctor/nurse, and the trusted server. The proposed procedure relies upon the efficient elliptic curve cryptosystem which can generate a symmetric secure key to ensure secure data exchange between patients and physicians after successful authentication of participants individually. A trusted server is involved for mutual authentication between parties and then generates a common key after completing the validation process. Moreover, the scheme is verified by doing formal modeling using Rubin Logic and validated using simulations in NS-2.35. We have analyzed the SAPS against security attacks, and then performance analysis is elucidated. Results prove the dominance of SAPS over preliminaries regarding mutual authentication, message integrity, freshness, and session key management and attack prevention.

  10. National Monitoring and Evaluation of Health IT: Protocol for a Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villumsen, Sidsel; Nøhr, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Monitoring the pace of Health Information Technology (HIT) adoption across states is critical for providing data to formulate future national and regional HIT policies. However, repeated monitoring of the progress on implementation of the strategies is often scarce. The lack of systematic monitoring of progress in availability and use of HIT has led to a need for an overview of the key concepts and methodologies used in the scattered scientific literature. The scoping study aims at achieving both in-depth and broad results, identifying all relevant material, regardless of the design. This paper presents and discuss a protocol for a scoping review. We aim to provide a comprehensive overview of the existing body of knowledge and to assess the extent, range and nature of monitoring and evaluation of availability and use of HIT at a national or regional level. This scoping review includes peer reviewed and grey literature. The search strategy is iterative and developed in cooperation with information specialists and key researchers in the field. Inclusion, data extraction, and quality assessment will be done by two independent reviewers. Data will be collated, summarized and analyzed thematically. 1760 references were included for screening. After screening for eligibility based on title and abstract 84 publications were included for full text review, which is currently being done. Final results are expected in March 2017. This scoping review will map the existing body of literature and describe the current approaches to monitoring and evaluating HIT on a national or regional level. The review will provide evidence-based information in order advance national strategies for monitoring and evaluating availability and use of HIT.

  11. A novel Smart Routing Protocol for remote health monitoring in Medical Wireless Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundararajan, T V P; Sumithra, M G; Maheswar, R

    2014-01-01

    In a Medical Wireless Network (MWN), sensors constantly monitor patient's physiological condition and movement. Inter-MWN communications are set up between the Patient Server and one or more Centralized Coordinators. However, MWNs require protocols with little energy consumption and the self-organizing attribute perceived in ad-hoc networks. The proposed Smart Routing Protocol (SRP) selects only the nodes with a higher residual energy and lower traffic density for routing. This approach enhances cooperation among the nodes of a Mobile Ad Hoc Network. Consequently, SRP produces better results than the existing protocols, namely Conditional Min-Max Battery Cost Routing, Min-Max Battery Cost Routing and AdHoc On-demand Distance Vector in terms of network parameters. The performance of the erstwhile schemes for routing protocols is evaluated using the network simulator Qualnet v 4.5.

  12. A Novel Smart Routing Protocol for Remote Health Monitoring in Medical Wireless Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. P. Sundararajan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In a Medical Wireless Network (MWN, sensors constantly monitor patient's physiological condition and movement. Inter-MWN communications are set up between the Patient Server and one or more Centralized Coordinators. However, MWNs require protocols with little energy consumption and the self-organizing attribute perceived in ad-hoc networks. The proposed Smart Routing Protocol (SRP selects only the nodes with a higher residual energy and lower traffic density for routing. This approach enhances cooperation among the nodes of a Mobile Ad Hoc Network. Consequently, SRP produces better results than the existing protocols, namely Conditional Min-Max Battery Cost Routing, Min-Max Battery Cost Routing and AdHoc On-demand Distance Vector in terms of network parameters. The performance of the erstwhile schemes for routing protocols is evaluated using the network simulator Qualnet v 4.5.

  13. Psychological, social and biological determinants of ill health (pSoBid): study protocol of a population-based study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Velupillai, Yoga N; Packard, Chris J; Batty, G David; Bezlyak, Vladimir; Burns, Harry; Cavanagh, Jonathan; Deans, Kevin; Ford, Ian; McGinty, Agnes; Millar, Keith; Sattar, Naveed; Shiels, Paul; Tannahill, Carol

    2008-01-01

    .... The purpose of the present study was to examine the psychosocial, behavioural and biological determinants of ill health within population groups in Glasgow that differed in socioeconomic status...

  14. Advancing the Certified in Public Health Examination: A Job Task Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Richard S; Yager, Christopher; Yager, James D; Foster, Allison; Breidenbach, Daniel H; Irwin, Zachary

    In 2014, the National Board of Public Health Examiners performed a job task analysis (JTA) to revise the Certified in Public Health (CPH) examination. The objectives of this study were to describe the development, administration, and results of the JTA survey; to present an analysis of the survey results; and to review the implications of this first-ever public health JTA. An advisory committee of public health professionals developed a list of 200 public health job tasks categorized into 10 work domains. The list of tasks was incorporated into a web-based survey, and a snowball sample of public health professionals provided 4850 usable responses. Respondents rated job tasks as essential (4), very important (3), important (2), not very important (1), and never performed (0). The mean task importance ratings ranged from 2.61 to 3.01 (important to very important). The highest mean ratings were for tasks in the ethics domain (mean rating, 3.01). Respondents ranked 10 of the 200 tasks as the most important, with mean task rankings ranging from 2.98 to 3.39. We found subtle differences between male and female respondents and between master of public health and doctor of public health respondents in their rankings. The JTA established a set of job tasks in 10 public health work domains, and the results provided a foundation for refining the CPH examination. Additional steps are needed to further modify the content outline of the examination. An empirical assessment of public health job tasks, using methods such as principal components analysis, may provide additional insight.

  15. Examining the cost effectiveness of interventions to promote the physical health of people with mental health problems: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Recently attention has begun to focus not only on assessing the effectiveness of interventions to tackle mental health problems, but also on measures to prevent physical co-morbidity. Individuals with mental health problems are at significantly increased risk of chronic physical health problems, such as cardiovascular disease or diabetes, as well as reduced life expectancy. The excess costs of co-morbid physical and mental health problems are substantial. Potentially, measures to reduce the risk of co-morbid physical health problems may represent excellent value for money. Methods To conduct a systematic review to determine what is known about economic evaluations of actions to promote better physical health in individuals identified as having a clinically diagnosed mental disorder, but no physical co-morbidity. Systematic searches of databases were supplemented by hand searches of relevant journals and websites. Results Of 1970 studies originally assessed, 11 met our inclusion criteria. In addition, five protocols for other studies were also identified. Studies looked at exercise programmes, nutritional advice, smoking, alcohol and drug cessation, and reducing the risk of blood borne infectious diseases such as HIV/AIDS and hepatitis. All of the lifestyle and smoking cessation studies focused on people with depression and anxiety disorders. Substance abuse and infectious disease prevention studies focused on people with psychoses and bipolar disorder. Conclusions There is a very small, albeit growing, literature on the cost effectiveness of interventions to promote the physical health of people with mental health problems. Most studies suggest that value for money actions in specific contexts and settings are available. Given that the success or failure of health promoting interventions can be very context specific, more studies are needed in more settings, focused on different population groups with different mental health problems and reporting

  16. Association of health-related quality of life with health examination and lifestyles of government managers in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Changrong; Lü, Bin; Lu, Zuxun; Qin, Shilong

    2007-06-01

    In order to study the association of each item of a health examination and lifestyles with health-related quality of life (HRQoL), a cross-sectional survey by a self-administered questionnaire using the 12-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-12, version 1) was conducted on 145 government managers that took health examinations in Tongji Hospital, Wuhan, China during 2005. The results showed that the determinations of organic functions including BMI, hemoglobin, blood platelet count, urine protein, urine WBC and lipid metabolism (LDL) were associated with HRQoL. The lifestyle items including age, sex, life satisfaction drinking alcohol and kind of alcohol drunk, drinking tea, sleep quality and adhering to bedtime, working overtime, work stress were associated with HRQoL in the multiple regression models. Sex, age and life satisfaction were the lifestyle items most closely associated with HRQoL, while LDL, hemoglobin and urine protein were the health examination items most closely associated HRQoL. This study revealed that both lifestyle and health examination items were associated with HRQoL.

  17. Structuring a written examination to assess ASBH health care ethics consultation core knowledge competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Bruce D; Jankowski, Jane B; Shelton, Wayne N

    2014-01-01

    As clinical ethics consultants move toward professionalization, the process of certifying individual consultants or accrediting programs will be discussed and debated. With certification, some entity must be established or ordained to oversee the standards and procedures. If the process evolves like other professions, it seems plausible that it will eventually include a written examination to evaluate the core knowledge competencies that individual practitioners should possess to meet peer practice standards. The American Society for Bioethics and Humanities (ASBH) has published core knowledge competencies for many years that are accepted by experts as the prevailing standard. Probably any written examination will be based upon the ASBH core knowledge competencies. However, much remains to be done before any examination may be offered. In particular, it seems likely that a recognized examining board must create and validate examination questions and structure the examination so as to establish meaningful, defensible parameters after dealing with such challenging questions as: Should the certifying examination be multiple choice or short-answer essay? How should the test be graded? What should the pass rate be? How may the examination be best administered? To advance the field of health care ethics consultation, thought leaders should start to focus on the written examination possibilities, to date unaddressed carefully in the literature. Examination models-both objective and written-must be explored as a viable strategy about how the field of health care ethics consultations can grow toward professionalization.

  18. Psychosocial Factors Associated With Routine Health Examination Scheduling and Receipt Among African American Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Wizdom Powell; Matthews, Derrick; Corbie-Smith, Giselle

    2010-01-01

    Introduction African American men often fail to obtain routine health examinations, which increases the probability of disease detection, yet little is known about psychosocial factors that motivate scheduling and receipt among this group. Methods We used the Andersen model and theory of reasoned action as frameworks to evaluate the relative contribution of psychosocial factors to self-reported routine health examination scheduling and receipt in a cross-sectional sample of African American men (N = 386) recruited from barbershops (65.3%) and academic institutions/events (34.7%) in Michigan, Georgia, and North Carolina between 2003-2004 and 2007-2009. Participants completed measures assessing demographic factors, physical/mental health status, traditional male role norms, health-promoting male subjective norms, health value, and medical mistrust. Pearson's χ2, analysis of variance, and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to investigate associations between these study factors and routine health examination scheduling and receipt in the past year. Results After final adjustment, the odds of scheduling a routine health examination were increased for men with a usual source of care (OR, 5.48; 95% CI, 3.06-9.78) and more health-promoting male subjective norms exposure (OR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.02-2.04). Higher medical mistrust (OR, 0.26; 95% CI, 0.09-0.76) and traditional male role norms (OR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.52-0.98) reduced the odds of routine health examination receipt. The odds of routine health examination receipt were increased among men who were older (OR=1.05; 95% CI, 1.01-1.10), had a usual source of care (OR, 2.91; 95% CI, 1.54-5.51) and reported more male subjective norms exposure (OR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.02-2.22). Conclusions Improving African American men's uptake of routine health examinations will require addressing medical mistrust, mitigating traditional masculine concerns about disclosing vulnerability, and leveraging male social networks. PMID

  19. Psychosocial factors associated with routine health examination scheduling and receipt among African American men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Wizdom Powell; Matthews, Derrick; Corbie-Smith, Giselle

    2010-04-01

    African American men often fail to obtain routine health examinations, which increases the probability of disease detection, yet little is known about psychosocial factors that motivate scheduling and receipt among this group. We used the Andersen model and theory of reasoned action as frameworks to evaluate the relative contribution of psychosocial factors to self-reported routine health examination scheduling and receipt in a cross-sectional sample of African American men (N = 386) recruited from barbershops (65.3%) and academic institutions/events (34.7%) in Michigan, Georgia, and North Carolina between 2003-2004 and 2007-2009. Participants completed measures assessing demographic factors, physical/mental health status, traditional male role norms, health-promoting male subjective norms, health value, and medical mistrust. Pearson's chi(2), analysis of variance, and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to investigate associations between these study factors and routine health examination scheduling and receipt in the past year. After final adjustment, the odds of scheduling a routine health examination were increased for men with a usual source of care (OR, 5.48; 95% CI, 3.06-9.78) and more health-promoting male subjective norms exposure (OR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.02-2.04). Higher medical mistrust (OR, 0.26;; 95% CI, 0.09-0.76) and traditional male role norms (OR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.52-0.98) reduced the odds of routine health examination receipt. The odds of routine health examination receipt were increased among men who were older (OR=1.05; 95% CI, 1.01-1.10), had a usual source of care (OR, 2.91; 95% CI, 1.54-5.51) and reported more male subjective norms exposure (OR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.02-2.22). Improving African American men's uptake of routine health examinations will require addressing medical mistrust, mitigating traditional masculine concerns about disclosing vulnerability, and leveraging male social networks.

  20. Examining levels, distribution and correlates of health insurance coverage in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazungu, Jacob S; Barasa, Edwine W

    2017-09-01

    To examine the levels, inequalities and factors associated with health insurance coverage in Kenya. We analysed secondary data from the Kenya Demographic and Health Survey (KDHS) conducted in 2009 and 2014. We examined the level of health insurance coverage overall, and by type, using an asset index to categorise households into five socio-economic quintiles with quintile 5 (Q5) being the richest and quintile 1 (Q1) being the poorest. The high-low ratio (Q5/Q1 ratio), concentration curve and concentration index (CIX) were employed to assess inequalities in health insurance coverage, and logistic regression to examine correlates of health insurance coverage. Overall health insurance coverage increased from 8.17% to 19.59% between 2009 and 2014. There was high inequality in overall health insurance coverage, even though this inequality decreased between 2009 (Q5/Q1 ratio of 31.21, CIX = 0.61, 95% CI 0.52-0.0.71) and 2014 (Q5/Q1 ratio 12.34, CIX = 0.49, 95% CI 0.45-0.52). Individuals that were older, employed in the formal sector; married, exposed to media; and male, belonged to a small household, had a chronic disease and belonged to rich households, had increased odds of health insurance coverage. Health insurance coverage in Kenya remains low and is characterised by significant inequality. In a context where over 80% of the population is in the informal sector, and close to 50% live below the national poverty line, achieving high and equitable coverage levels with contributory and voluntary health insurance mechanism is problematic. Kenya should consider a universal, tax-funded mechanism that ensures revenues are equitably and efficiently collected, and everyone (including the poor and those in the informal sector) is covered. © 2017 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Children's health status: examining the associations among income poverty, material hardship, and parental factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godwin S Ashiabi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We examined a model of multiple mediating pathways of income poverty, material hardship, parenting factors, and child health status to understand how material hardship and parental factors mediate the effects of poverty on child health. We hypothesized that: (a poverty will be directly associated with material hardship, parental depression, and health status, and indirectly with parenting behaviors through its effects on parental depression and material hardship; (b material hardship will be associated with parental depression, parenting behaviors, and health status; and (c parental depression will be correlated with parenting behaviors, and that both parental depression and parenting behaviors will predict child health. METHODS AND RESULTS: We used data from the 2002 National Survey of American Families for a sample of 9,645 6-to-11 year-olds to examine a 4-step structural equation model. The baseline model included covariates and income poverty. In the hardship model, food insufficiency and medical need were added to the baseline model. The parental model included parental depression and parenting behavior and baseline model. In the full model, all the constructs were included. First, income poverty had a direct effect on health status, and an indirect effect through its association with material hardship, parental depressive affect, and parenting behaviors. Medical need and food insufficiency had negative effects on child health, and indirect effects on health through their association with parental depression and parenting behaviors. Finally, parental depression and parenting behaviors were associated with child health, and part of the effect of parental depression on health was explained by its association with parenting behaviors. CONCLUSIONS: Poverty has an independent effect on health, however, its effects are partially explained by material hardship, parental depression and parental behaviors. To improve children's health

  2. Children's Health Status: Examining the Associations among Income Poverty, Material Hardship, and Parental Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashiabi, Godwin S.; O'Neal, Keri K.

    2007-01-01

    Background We examined a model of multiple mediating pathways of income poverty, material hardship, parenting factors, and child health status to understand how material hardship and parental factors mediate the effects of poverty on child health. We hypothesized that: (a) poverty will be directly associated with material hardship, parental depression, and health status, and indirectly with parenting behaviors through its effects on parental depression and material hardship; (b) material hardship will be associated with parental depression, parenting behaviors, and health status; and (c) parental depression will be correlated with parenting behaviors, and that both parental depression and parenting behaviors will predict child health. Methods and Results We used data from the 2002 National Survey of American Families for a sample of 9,645 6-to-11 year-olds to examine a 4-step structural equation model. The baseline model included covariates and income poverty. In the hardship model, food insufficiency and medical need were added to the baseline model. The parental model included parental depression and parenting behavior and baseline model. In the full model, all the constructs were included. First, income poverty had a direct effect on health status, and an indirect effect through its association with material hardship, parental depressive affect, and parenting behaviors. Medical need and food insufficiency had negative effects on child health, and indirect effects on health through their association with parental depression and parenting behaviors. Finally, parental depression and parenting behaviors were associated with child health, and part of the effect of parental depression on health was explained by its association with parenting behaviors. Conclusions Poverty has an independent effect on health, however, its effects are partially explained by material hardship, parental depression and parental behaviors. To improve children's health would require a multi

  3. What are the physical and psychological health effects of suicide bereavement on family members? Protocol for an observational and interview mixed-methods study in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spillane, Ailbhe; Larkin, Celine; Corcoran, Paul; Matvienko-Sikar, Karen; Arensman, Ella

    2017-03-30

    Research indicates that experiencing the suicide of a relative can have a significant impact on family members' emotional health. However, research incorporating the impact of suicide bereavement on family members' physical health is sparse. This paper details the protocol for a mixed-methods study of suicide-bereaved family members. The study will primarily examine the physical and mental health needs of those bereaved by suicide. A secondary objective of the study is to describe the support service needs of family members bereaved by suicide. A mixed-methods approach, using semistructured interviews and self-report questionnaires, will be used. Interviews will be conducted with a group of 15-20 relatives who experienced suicide bereavement. This protocol will follow the COREQ checklist criteria for the reporting of qualitative research interviews. Thematic analysis will be used to examine experiences and impact of bereavement on psychological and physical health. Self-report quantitative data on well-being will be analysed using descriptive statistics. Ethical approval to conduct this study has been granted from the Clinical Research Ethics Committee of the Cork Teaching Hospitals. Pseudonyms will be given to participants to protect anonymity. It will be explained to participants that participation in the study is voluntary and they have to right to withdraw at any time. The findings of this research will be disseminated to regional, national and international audiences through publication in peer-reviewed international journals and presentations at scientific conferences. This research also forms part of a PhD thesis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  4. A prospective randomized trial examining health care utilization in individuals using multiple smartphone-enabled biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinnamon S. Bloss

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Mobile health and digital medicine technologies are becoming increasingly used by individuals with common, chronic diseases to monitor their health. Numerous devices, sensors, and apps are available to patients and consumers–some of which have been shown to lead to improved health management and health outcomes. However, no randomized controlled trials have been conducted which examine health care costs, and most have failed to provide study participants with a truly comprehensive monitoring system. Methods. We conducted a prospective randomized controlled trial of adults who had submitted a 2012 health insurance claim associated with hypertension, diabetes, and/or cardiac arrhythmia. The intervention involved receipt of one or more mobile devices that corresponded to their condition(s (hypertension: Withings Blood Pressure Monitor; diabetes: Sanofi iBGStar Blood Glucose Meter; arrhythmia: AliveCor Mobile ECG and an iPhone with linked tracking applications for a period of 6 months; the control group received a standard disease management program. Moreover, intervention study participants received access to an online health management system which provided participants detailed device tracking information over the course of the study. This was a monitoring system designed by leveraging collaborations with device manufacturers, a connected health leader, health care provider, and employee wellness program–making it both unique and inclusive. We hypothesized that health resource utilization with respect to health insurance claims may be influenced by the monitoring intervention. We also examined health-self management. Results & Conclusions. There was little evidence of differences in health care costs or utilization as a result of the intervention. Furthermore, we found evidence that the control and intervention groups were equivalent with respect to most health care utilization outcomes. This result suggests there are not large

  5. A Preliminary Study Examining Women's Physical Health and Nonmedical Prescription Opioid Use in a Recovering Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Katherine R; Leukefeld, Carl G

    2017-03-01

    There is a growing need for research on women recovering from nonmedical prescription opioid use. A paradigm shift is to focus on wellness and factors that support, rather than hinder, recovering women. For example, although physical health is impacted by nonmedical prescription opioid use, improved health may be a strength-based factor among recovering women. The aim of this preliminary study was to examine physical health in a recovering framework as women begin recovering from nonmedical prescription opiate use. This study conducted secondary data analysis using self-report data from Kentucky's Targeted Assessment Program (TAP). TAP assesses and provides pretreatment for problems impeding work or interfering with parental responsibilities. Data included 1247 adult women reporting a history of nonmedical prescription opioid use and receiving pretreatment. Bivariate and logistic regression analyses examined whether physical health and access to health services at baseline were associated with substance-related behavior change upon completion of pretreatment. Women reporting better physical health and fewer days with no activities due to health barriers were more likely to engage in pretreatment substance-related behavior change [χ2(8) = 34.6, p medical providers should be incorporated into care to meet the need. Future research should continue to examine factors that support recovering women, using a recovering framework.

  6. The effectiveness of health literacy interventions on the informed consent process of health care users: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrenoud, Beatrice; Velonaki, Venetia-Sofia; Bodenmann, Patrick; Ramelet, Anne-Sylvie

    2015-10-01

    most tasks required to function in the health care setting.Low or inadequate health literacy has been found to have several adverse effects on health and health care use: reduced ability to take medications properly and to interpret labels and health messages, poorer overall health status and higher risk of mortality in seniors, increased emergency department and hospital use, and decreased use of preventive interventions.Most studies examining the relationship between health literacy and informed consent conclude that patients with low health literacy are less likely to participate in decision making concerning their health care. According to a recent literature review, health care users' literacy, together with other factors, were found to be important determinants of a patient's capacity to provide fully informed consent. According to this review, 21 to 86% of the patients were able to recall the potential risks and complications of their medical procedure. This percentage may be even lower because most of the included studies referred to self-reported recall, which may be a flawed measure. According to the literature, much of the written material related to the informed consent is too difficult for health care users to understand. In addition, in their study, McCarthy et al. observed that during consultations, physicians spoke and used significantly more complex language than their patients, which may result in inappropriate communication for the patients, mainly for those with limited literacy. The situations described above may raise a number of critical legal and ethical problems. Health professionals, who shape the conditions of interactions with the patient, are responsible for adapting appropriate interventions, such as communication approaches that take into account patients' health literacy. These interventions could have a major contribution to the improvement of the informed consent process.Sheridan et al. conducted a systematic review on interventions

  7. A trial examining an advanced practice nurse intervention to promote medication adherence and symptom management in adult cancer patients prescribed oral anti-cancer agents: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoelstra, Sandra L; Burhenn, Peggy S; DeKoekkoek, Tracy; Schueller, Monica

    2016-02-01

    To report a study protocol that refines then examines feasibility, preliminary efficacy and satisfaction of ADHERE, an intervention using motivational interviewing and brief cognitive behaviorial therapy as a mechanism for goal-oriented systematic patient education to promote symptom management and adherence among cancer patients prescribed oral anti-cancer agents. Cancer treatment with oral anti-cancer agents shifts responsibility for managing treatment from clinicians in supervised cancer centres to patients and their caregivers. Thus, a need exists to standardize start-of-care to support patient self-management of care at home. A two-phase quasi-experimental sequential design with repeated measures. Sixty-five adult patients newly prescribed an oral anti-cancer agent will be recruited from three community cancer centres. Phase 1 will enrol five patients to refine the ADHERE intervention prior to testing. After completion, Phase 2 will enrol 30 patients who receive usual care. Advanced practice nurses will then be trained. Thirty patients will be then enrolled in the intervention group and provided ADHERE, a 4-week intervention using semi-structured interactions (initial face-to-face session and once a week phone sessions over 3 weeks) and a Toolkit to promote self-management of care. Outcome measures include: oral anti-cancer agents adherence rate, symptom presence and severity, feasibility and satisfaction with ADHERE. This protocol was approved January 2014. This nurse-led intervention has the potential to standardize the start-of-care training for the patients to self-manage when oral anti-cancer agents for treatment were prescribed. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Sports chiropractic management of concussions using the Sport Concussion Assessment Tool 2 symptom scoring, serial examinations, and graded return to play protocol: a retrospective case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shane, Eric R; Pierce, Kevin M; Gonzalez, Jannet K; Campbell, Nathan J

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this case series is to report how the symptom section of the Sport Concussion Assessment Tool 2 (SCAT2) was used to manage athletes with concussions in a high school training room setting and to address the need for SCAT2 baseline measurements. During a 4-month period, 3 doctors of chiropractic with certification from the American Chiropractic Board of Sports Physicians managed 15 high school athletes with concussions in a multidisciplinary setting. Fourteen athletes were male American football players, and one was a female volleyball player. Of the 15 athletes, 3 athletes had baseline SCAT2 documentation. Athletes were evaluated and returned to play with a graded return to play protocol using the SCAT2 symptoms and serial physical examinations. Once participants were asymptomatic, they began a graded return to play process. A total of 47 SCAT2 tests were performed on the 15 athletes, averaging 3.13 SCAT2 evaluations per patient. Of the 15 athletes evaluated, 6 were managed and cleared for return to play; 2 of the athletes sustained concussions in the last week of the season, thus ending their season; and 3 athletes were cleared by medical doctors. None of the athletes under care reported an adverse event. The utilization of the SCAT2 with serial physical examinations provided objective measures for athlete's injuries, allowing the practitioners to evaluate concussions. More efforts are needed to collect baseline SCAT2 to compare these scores with subsequent SCAT2 scores following athletic injuries.

  9. Pretravel Health Advice Among Australians Returning From Bali, Indonesia: A Randomized Controlled Trial Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Chloe A; Gibbs, Robyn A; Heyworth, Jane S; Giele, Carolien; Firth, Martin J; Effler, Paul V

    2016-12-07

    The effect of pretravel health advice (PTHA) on travel-related illness rates is poorly understood, and to date there are no published randomized controlled trials evaluating the impact of PTHA outcomes. This study aims to determine the effect of an online PTHA intervention on travel-related illness rates in Western Australians visiting Bali, Indonesia. Western Australian travelers to Bali will be recruited online before departure and will be randomly allocated to an intervention or control group by computer algorithm. The intervention in this study is a short animated video, with accompanying text, containing PTHA relevant to Bali. An online posttravel survey will be administered to all participants within two weeks of their return from Bali. The primary outcome is the difference in self-reported travel-related illness rates between control and intervention groups. Secondary outcomes include the difference in risk prevention behaviors and health risk knowledge between the control and intervention groups. Further secondary outcomes include whether individuals in the control group who sought external PTHA differ from those who did not with respect to risk prevention behaviors, health risk knowledge, and health risk perception, as well as the rate of self-reported travel-related illness. The study began recruitment in September 2016 and will conclude in September 2017. Data analysis will take place in late 2017, with results disseminated via peer-reviewed journals in early 2018. This will be the first randomized controlled trial to examine the effect of a novel PTHA intervention upon travel-related illness. In addition, this study builds upon the limited existing data on the effectiveness of PTHA on travel-related illness. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR): ACTRN12615001230549; https://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?id=369567 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6m0G7xJg1).

  10. Examination of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Health Care Content in North Carolina Schools of Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, Judith B; Enweana, Ijeoma; Alston, Celeste Kaysha; Baldwin, Dee M

    2017-04-01

    Nursing students require academic and clinical training in preparation for the increased demand for culturally competent care. One group that is in need of culturally knowledgeable health care providers is lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals. The purpose of this study was to examine how LGBT health care content is integrated into North Carolina schools of nursing curricula and to examine the existence of specific LGBT policies. A survey was mailed to 70 deans and directors of RN programs in North Carolina. Over 90% of the schools indicated that LGBT health care issues were taught in the curricula. The majority of the content was taught as an "other" course (37%). More than two thirds of the schools devoted less than 5 hours teaching LGBT content. LGBT health care content is being taught, yet the presence of specific LGBT practice policies is basically nonexistent. [J Nurs Educ. 2017;56(4):223-226.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. The Prevalence of Open-Angle Glaucoma by Age in Myopia: The Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Seong Hee; Sung, Kyung Rim; Kim, Joon Mo; Kim, Hyun Tae; Jeong, Jinho; Kim, Chan Yun; Lee, Mi Yeon; Park, Ki Ho

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence of open-angle glaucoma (OAG) in myopia by age. A cross-sectional study using a stratified, multistage, probability cluster survey. Participants in the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey between 2010 and 2011 were included. A standardized protocol was used to interview every participant and perform comprehensive ophthalmic examinations. Glaucoma was diagnosed according to the International Society of Geographical and Epidemiological Ophthalmology (ISGEO) criteria. After adjusting for age and sex, there was a positive correlation between OAG prevalence and increasing myopic refractive error except in participants with hyperopia. Younger participants with higher myopic refractive error had higher OAG prevalence than older participants with lower myopic refractive error. Participants with high myopia (OR 3.90, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.30-6.59) had significantly greater age- and sex-adjusted odd ratios (ORs) than did those with emmetropia who were younger than 60 years. These data suggest that OAG develops earlier in participants with high myopia than in others. There was a high prevalence of OAG in participants with high myopia, even in those 19-29 years of age. Therefore, OAG screening should be performed earlier in participants with high myopia than is suggested by traditional guidelines.

  12. Application of an Original Wildfire Smoke Health Cost Benefits Transfer Protocol to the Western US, 2005-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Benjamin A.; Berrens, Robert P.

    2017-11-01

    Recent growth in the frequency and severity of US wildfires has led to more wildfire smoke and increased public exposure to harmful air pollutants. Populations exposed to wildfire smoke experience a variety of negative health impacts, imposing economic costs on society. However, few estimates of smoke health costs exist and none for the entire Western US, in particular, which experiences some of the largest and most intense wildfires in the US. The lack of cost estimates is troublesome because smoke health impacts are an important consideration of the overall costs of wildfire. To address this gap, this study provides the first time series estimates of PM2.5 smoke costs across mortality and several morbidity measures for the Western US over 2005-2015. This time period includes smoke from several megafires and includes years of record-breaking acres burned. Smoke costs are estimated using a benefits transfer protocol developed for contexts when original health data are not available. The novelty of our protocol is that it synthesizes the literature on choices faced by researchers when conducting a smoke cost benefit transfer. On average, wildfire smoke in the Western US creates 165 million in annual morbidity and mortality health costs.

  13. Critical examination of knowledge to action models and implications for promoting health equity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, Colleen M; Ndumbe-Eyoh, Sume; Clement, Connie

    2015-05-29

    Knowledge and effective interventions exist to address many current global health inequities. However, there is limited awareness, uptake, and use of knowledge to inform action to improve the health of disadvantaged populations. The gap between knowledge and action to improve health equity is of concern to health researchers and practitioners. This study identifies and critically examines the usefulness of existing knowledge to action models or frameworks for promoting health equity. We conducted a scoping review of existing literature to identify knowledge to action (KTA) models or frameworks and critiqued the models using a health equity support rubric. We identified forty-eight knowledge to action models or frameworks. Six models scored between eight and ten of a maximum 12 points on the health equity support rubric. These high scoring models or frameworks all mentioned equity-related concepts. Attention to multisectoral approaches was the factor most often lacking in the low scoring models. The concepts of knowledge brokering, integrative processes, such as those in some indigenous health research, and Ecohealth applied to KTA all emerged as promising areas. Existing knowledge to action models or frameworks can help guide knowledge translation to support action on the social determinants of health and health equity. There is a need to further test existing models or frameworks. This process should be informed by participatory and integrative research. There is room to develop more robust equity supporting models.

  14. Enhancing elderly health examination effectiveness by adding physical function evaluations and interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chia-Ming; Chang, Ching-I; Yu, Wen-Ruey; Yang, Winnie; Hsu, Chih-Cheng; Chen, Ching-Yu

    This study aimed to assess the benefit of adding physical function evaluations and interventions to routine elderly health examination. This is a Quasi-experimental controlled trial. 404 elderly adults (aged 70 and over) scoring 3-6 on the Canadian Study of Health and Aging Clinical Frailty Scale Chinese In-Person Interview Version (CSHA-CFS) in a 2012 annual elderly health examination were enrolled. Both the control and experimental groups received the routine annual health examination with the latter further provided with functional evaluations, exercise instruction, and nutrition education. 112 (84.8%) persons in the experiment group and 267 (98.2%) in the control group completed the study. CSHA-CFS performance of the experimental group was more likely to improve (odds ratio=9.50, 95% confidence interval (CI)=4.62-19.56) and less likely to deteriorate (OR=0.04, 95% CI=0.01-0.31) one year after intervention. Within the experimental group, Fried Frailty Index improvement percentage surpassed the deterioration percentage (29.5% vs. 0.9%, phealth examination appeared to benefit the health of adults aged 70 years and older. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Examining the Role of Anxiety and Apathy in Health Consumers' Intentions to Use Patient Health Portals for Personal Health Information Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Carlos A.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated college students' attitudes toward and intentions to use personal health portals (PHPs) for managing their personal health information using a survey method. The study also aimed to examine the roles electronic Personal Health Information Management (PHIM) anxiety and apathy play in influencing students' attitudes toward…

  16. eLearning for health system leadership and management capacity building: a protocol for a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudor Car, Lorainne; Atun, Rifat

    2017-08-21

    Health leadership and management capacity are essential for health system strengthening and for attaining universal health coverage by optimising the existing human, technological and financial resources. However, in health systems, health leadership and management training is not widely available. The use of information technology for education (ie, eLearning) could help address this training gap by enabling flexible, efficient and scalable health leadership and management training. We present a protocol for a systematic review on the effectiveness of eLearning for health leadership and management capacity building in improving health system outcomes. We will follow the Cochrane Collaboration methodology. We will search for experimental studies focused on the use of any type of eLearning modality for health management and leadership capacity building in all types of health workforce cadres. The primary outcomes of interest will be health outcomes, financial risk protection and user satisfaction. In addition, secondary outcomes of interest include the attainment of health system objectives of improved equity, efficiency, effectiveness and responsiveness. We will search relevant databases of published and grey literature as well as clinical trials registries from 1990 onwards without language restrictions. Two review authors will screen references, extract data and perform risk of bias assessment independently. Contingent on the heterogeneity of the collated literature, we will perform either a meta-analysis or a narrative synthesis of the collated data. The systematic review will aim to inform policy makers, investors, health professionals, technologists and educators about the existing evidence, potential gaps in literature and the impact of eLearning for health leadership and management capacity building on health system outcomes. We will disseminate the review findings by publishing it as a peer-reviewed journal manuscript and conference abstracts. PROSPERO CRD

  17. Examining Mental Health and Well-being Provision in Schools in Europe: Methodological Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveetha Patalay

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Schools are considered an ideal setting for community-based mental health and well-being interventions for young people. However, in spite of extensive literature examining the effectiveness of such interventions, very few studies have investigated existing mental health and well-being provision in schools. The current study aims to extend such previous research by surveying primary and secondary schools to investigate the nature of available provision in nine European countries (Germany, Ireland, the Netherlands, Poland, Serbia, Spain, Sweden, the UK and Ukraine. Furthermore, the study aims to investigate potential barriers to mental health and well-being provision and compare provision within and between countries.

  18. Sexual and gender minority's social media user characteristics: Examining preferred health information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyojung; Rodgers, Shelly; McElroy, Jane A; Everett, Kevin

    2017-05-03

    The authors examined the influence of social media involvement on health issues in sexual and gender minorities (SGMs). Demographic and technological characteristics of social media users and nonusers were identified, and the influence of social media involvement on these factors was assessed for its potential to influence health information needs and preferences. A survey of 2,274 SGM individuals revealed that age, sexual orientation, number of Internet access points, and use of smartphones predicted levels of social media involvement. Results suggest that a broader range of traditional and nontraditional communication channels is needed to meet a diversity of health information needs in SGMs.

  19. The picture of health: examining school-based health environments through photographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontak, Julia C H; McIsaac, Jessie-Lee D; Penney, Tarra L; Kuhle, Stefan; Kirk, Sara F L

    2017-04-01

    Health-promoting schools (HPS) is an effective approach to enhance the health and well-being of children and youth, but its measurement remains a challenge considering contextual differences across school environments. The purpose of this study was to qualitatively explore the physical features of the school environment through photographs of schools that had implemented an HPS approach compared with schools that had not. This study used a descriptive approach, wherein physical features of the school environment were distilled through visual images and qualitatively analyzed. School environment data were collected from 18 elementary schools (10 HPS, 8 comparison schools) from a school board in rural Nova Scotia (Canada). Evaluation assistants captured photographs of the physical school environment as part of a broader environment audit. Overarching themes included the promotion, access and availability of opportunities for healthy eating and physical activity, healthy school climate and safety and accessibility of the school. The photographs characterized diverse aspects of the school environment and revealed differences between schools that had implemented an HPS approach compared with schools that had not. There were increased visual cues to support healthy eating, physical activity and mental well-being, and indications of a holistic approach to health among schools that implemented an HPS approach. This research adds to understanding the environmental elements of HPS. The use of photographic data to understand school environments provided an innovative method to explore the physical features of schools that had implemented an HPS approach. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. An Examination of the Sociodemographic and Health Determinants of Major Depressive Disorder Among Black Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amutah-Onukagha, Ndidiamaka N; Doamekpor, Lauren A; Gardner, Michelle

    2017-12-01

    Black women disproportionately share the distribution of risk factors for physical and mental illnesses. The goal of this study was to examine the sociodemographic and health correlates of major depressive disorder (MDD) symptoms among black women. Pooled data from the 2005-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) were used to assess the sociodemographic and health correlates of MDD symptoms among black women (n = 227). Multivariate logistic regression techniques assessed the association between MDD symptoms and age, socioeconomic status, health status, and health behaviors. Poverty income ratio and smoking status were significantly associated with the likelihood of having MDD symptoms. Black women who were smokers were also more likely to have MDD symptoms compared to non-smokers [OR = 8.05, 95% CI = (4.56, 14.23)]. After controlling for all other socioeconomic and health variables, this association remained statistically significant. In addition, after controlling for all other variables, the multivariate analyses showed that black women below 299% federal poverty level (FPL) were nearly three times more likely to have MDD symptoms compared to women above 300% FPL [OR = 2.82, 95% CI = (1.02, 7.96)]. These analyses suggest that poverty and smoking status are associated with MDD symptoms among black women. A deeper understanding of the underlying mechanisms and key factors which influence MDD symptoms are needed in order to develop and create mental health programs targeting women of color.

  1. A tale of two cultures: examining patient-centered care in a forensic mental health hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, James D.; Nijdam-Jones, Alicia; Brink, Johann

    2012-01-01

    Several questions remain unanswered regarding the extent to which the principles and practices of patient-centered care are achievable in the context of a forensic mental health hospital. This study examined patient-centered care from the perspectives of patients and providers in a forensic mental health hospital. Patient-centered care was assessed using several measures of complementary constructs. Interviews were conducted with 30 patients and surveys were completed by 28 service providers in a forensic mental health hospital. Patients and providers shared similar views of the therapeutic milieu and recovery orientation of services; however, providers were more likely to perceive the hospital as being potentially unsafe. Overall, the findings indicated that characteristics of patient-centered care may be found within a forensic mental health hospital. The principles of patient-centered care can be integrated into service delivery in forensic mental health hospitals, though special attention to providers’ perceptions of safety is needed. PMID:22815648

  2. Rural health in Jamaica: examining and refining the predictive factors of good health status of rural residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, Paul A; McGrowder, Donovan A

    2009-01-01

    Poverty is mainly concentrated in rural areas. Rural populations also generally experience excessive deficiencies in healthcare access, social services, and other goods and services needed for healthy living. This study investigated the health status and determining factors of Jamaican rural residents in order to provide healthcare practitioners and policy makers with research findings to assist in effectively addressing health in rural Jamaica. The current research used a sub-sample of 15 260 respondents. The sub-sample was taken from a national cross-sectional study of 25 018 respondents from the 14 parishes of the island. The survey from which the present study is drawn used a stratified random probability sampling technique to draw the 25 018 respondents. Descriptive statistics were used to provide background information on the demographic characteristics of the sub-sample population. The model will be established using logistic regression using statistically significant (p health (n = 2554), 82.8% (n = 12 285) reported good health and 5.9% (n = 873) reported private health insurance coverage. The model used had statistically significant predictive power (model chi2 = 15939.9, p goodness of fit, chi2 = 14.46, p = 0.71). It was found that 85.1% (n = 4738) of the data were correctly classified. Of those with good health, 97.2% (n = 4387) were correctly classified, while of those with poor health, 38.6% (n = 451) were correctly classified. Some 12 factors can be used to predict the health status of rural residents in Jamaica with chi2(28) = 1595.03, p health status. An examination of the predictors revealed that the six most influential in descending order were: health insurance coverage (Wald statistic = 492.556; OR = 0.044, 95% CI: 0.033-0.058, p good health, and the 12 factors accounted for 38% of the variability in good health. Of the 12 factors, ownership of health insurance was the most significant and this is negatively associated with good health status

  3. Five-year incidence of angle closure among glaucoma health examination participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwagi, Kenji; Chiba, Tatsuya; Mabuchi, Fumihiko; Furuya, Toshie; Tsukahara, Shigeo

    2013-04-01

    To investigate incidence of angle closure (AC) and its associated factors through a community-based longitudinal study over a 5-year period. Japanese residents aged 40 years or over who underwent two glaucoma health examinations held in 2005 and 2010 were enrolled. Of the participants of the first glaucoma health examination (first examination), those who satisfied exclusion criteria such as having eyes with angle closure, glaucoma, incisional ocular surgery, or other conditions that could influence the results were eliminated from the second glaucoma health examination (second examination). In addition to routine ophthalmic examination, a scanning peripheral anterior chamber depth analyzer (SPAC) was employed to investigate the anterior chamber configuration. The incidence of angle closure over the 5-year period and its associated factors were investigated. Of the 754 participants of the first examination, 569 participants were invited for the second examination and 331 participants (87 males and 244 females, age: 62.6 ± 12.7 years), or 619 eyes, were analyzed after eliminating eyes matching exclusion criteria. In the 5-year period, the incidence of AC was 5.4 % (95 % CI: 3.5-8.4 %) of participants or 5.5 % (95 % CI: 4.0-7.6 %) of eyes, including eight eyes (1.3 %) with primary angle-closure glaucoma. Eyes that developed AC had a much smaller SPAC grade at the first examination and a greater decrease in SPAC grade than those that did not develop AC, whereas age and sex were not associated. AC was developed by 5.4 % of senior Japanese residents over the 5-year period. The shallow anterior chamber and the marked decrease in anterior chamber depth were associated with AC development.

  4. Developing the protocol for the evaluation of the health foundation's 'engaging with quality initiative' – an emergent approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scoggins Amanda

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In 2004 a UK charity, The Health Foundation, established the 'Engaging with Quality Initiative' to explore and evaluate the benefits of engaging clinicians in quality improvement in healthcare. Eight projects run by professional bodies or specialist societies were commissioned in various areas of acute care. A developmental approach to the initiative was adopted, accompanied by a two level evaluation: eight project self-evaluations and a related external evaluation. This paper describes how the protocol for the external evaluation was developed. The challenges faced included large variation between and within the projects (in approach, scope and context, and in understanding of quality improvement, the need to support the project teams in their self-evaluations while retaining a necessary objectivity, and the difficulty of evaluating the moving target created by the developmental approach adopted in the initiative. An initial period to develop the evaluation protocol proved invaluable in helping us to explore these issues.

  5. Health-related quality of life among colorectal cancer patients in Malaysia: a study protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer is a major public health problem in Malaysia. However, it is also one of the most treatable cancers, resulting in significant numbers of survivors. Therefore, the impact of surviving treatment for colorectal cancer on health related quality of life is important for the patients, clinicians and policy makers, and may differ in different cultures and populations. The aim of this study was to validate the Malaysian versions of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer quality of life instruments among colorectal cancers patients. Methods/design This is a cross sectional multi centre study. Three hospitals were included, the University of Malaya Medical Centre, the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre and Hospital Tuanku Jaafar Seremban. Malaysian citizens and permanent residence were studied and demographic and clinical information obtained from hospital records. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of life Core 30, colorectal cancer CR29, and the colorectal cancer liver metastasis LMC 21 were used and an observer assessment of performance obtained with the Karnofsky Performance Scale. Questionnaires were translated into three most commonly spoken languages in Malaysia (Bahasa Malaysia, Chinese and Tamil), then administered, scored and analyzed following the developers’ guidelines. Ethical approval was obtained from the participating centres. Tests of reliability and validity were performed to examine the validity of these instruments. Conclusion The result of pilot testing shows that the use of the Malaysian versions of EORTC QLQ C30, CR29 instruments is feasible in our sample of colorectal cancer patients. Instructions for completion as well as questions were well understood except the questions on the overall quality of life, overall health status and sexual activity. Thus we anticipate obtaining good psychometric properties for the instruments at the end of the study

  6. Health-related quality of life among colorectal cancer patients in Malaysia: a study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magaji Bello

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colorectal cancer is a major public health problem in Malaysia. However, it is also one of the most treatable cancers, resulting in significant numbers of survivors. Therefore, the impact of surviving treatment for colorectal cancer on health related quality of life is important for the patients, clinicians and policy makers, and may differ in different cultures and populations. The aim of this study was to validate the Malaysian versions of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer quality of life instruments among colorectal cancers patients. Methods/design This is a cross sectional multi centre study. Three hospitals were included, the University of Malaya Medical Centre, the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre and Hospital Tuanku Jaafar Seremban. Malaysian citizens and permanent residence were studied and demographic and clinical information obtained from hospital records. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of life Core 30, colorectal cancer CR29, and the colorectal cancer liver metastasis LMC 21 were used and an observer assessment of performance obtained with the Karnofsky Performance Scale. Questionnaires were translated into three most commonly spoken languages in Malaysia (Bahasa Malaysia, Chinese and Tamil, then administered, scored and analyzed following the developers’ guidelines. Ethical approval was obtained from the participating centres. Tests of reliability and validity were performed to examine the validity of these instruments. Conclusion The result of pilot testing shows that the use of the Malaysian versions of EORTC QLQ C30, CR29 instruments is feasible in our sample of colorectal cancer patients. Instructions for completion as well as questions were well understood except the questions on the overall quality of life, overall health status and sexual activity. Thus we anticipate obtaining good psychometric properties for the instruments

  7. Health-related quality of life among colorectal cancer patients in Malaysia: a study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaji, Bello Arkilla; Moy, Foong Ming; Roslani, April Camilla; Sagap, Ismail; Zakaria, Jasiah; Blazeby, Jane M; Law, Chee Wei

    2012-09-03

    Colorectal cancer is a major public health problem in Malaysia. However, it is also one of the most treatable cancers, resulting in significant numbers of survivors. Therefore, the impact of surviving treatment for colorectal cancer on health related quality of life is important for the patients, clinicians and policy makers, and may differ in different cultures and populations. The aim of this study was to validate the Malaysian versions of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer quality of life instruments among colorectal cancers patients. This is a cross sectional multi centre study. Three hospitals were included, the University of Malaya Medical Centre, the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre and Hospital Tuanku Jaafar Seremban. Malaysian citizens and permanent residence were studied and demographic and clinical information obtained from hospital records. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of life Core 30, colorectal cancer CR29, and the colorectal cancer liver metastasis LMC 21 were used and an observer assessment of performance obtained with the Karnofsky Performance Scale. Questionnaires were translated into three most commonly spoken languages in Malaysia (Bahasa Malaysia, Chinese and Tamil), then administered, scored and analyzed following the developers' guidelines. Ethical approval was obtained from the participating centres. Tests of reliability and validity were performed to examine the validity of these instruments. The result of pilot testing shows that the use of the Malaysian versions of EORTC QLQ C30, CR29 instruments is feasible in our sample of colorectal cancer patients. Instructions for completion as well as questions were well understood except the questions on the overall quality of life, overall health status and sexual activity. Thus we anticipate obtaining good psychometric properties for the instruments at the end of the study.

  8. Changes in health selection of obesity among Mexican immigrants: a binational examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ro, Annie; Fleischer, Nancy

    2014-12-01

    Health selection is often measured by comparing the health of more recent immigrants to the native born of their new host country. However, this comparison fails to take into account two important factors: (1) that changes in the health profile of sending countries may impact the health of immigrants over time, and (2) that the best comparison group for health selection would be people who remain in the country of origin. Obesity represents an important health outcome that may be best understood by taking into account these two factors. Using nationally-representative datasets from Mexico and the US, we examined differences in obesity-related health selection, by gender, in 2000 and 2012. We calculated prevalence ratios from log-binomial models to compare the risk of obesity among recent immigrants to the US to Mexican nationals with varying likelihood of migration, in order to determine changes in health selection over time. Among men in 2000, we found little difference in obesity status between recent immigrants to the US and Mexican non-migrants. However, in 2012, Mexican men who were the least likely to migrate had higher obesity prevalence than recent immigrants, which may reflect emerging health selection. The trends for women, however, indicated differences in obesity status between recent Mexican immigrants and non-migrants at both time points. In both 2000 and 2012, Mexican national women had significantly higher obesity prevalence than recent immigrant women, with the biggest difference between recent immigrants and Mexican women who were least likely to migrate. There was also indication that selection increased with time for women, as the differences between Mexican nationals and recent immigrants to the US grew from 2000 to 2012. Our study is among the first to use a binational dataset to examine the impact of health selectivity, over time, on obesity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Periodic health examination by Austrian general practioners: developing Patient Information Forms and health summary sheets: technical report.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Devillé, W.; Bij, S. van der; Groenewegen, P.

    2004-01-01

    In Austria, people have a right to a free yearly health examination by a General practitioner. This system dates from the 1970's. NIVEL was asked by the Organization of Austrian Social Insurance Carriers to help them modernize the system, according to the latest evidence-based insights in

  10. 76 FR 11187 - Examinations of Work Areas in Underground Coal Mines for Violations of Mandatory Health or Safety...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    ... Safety and Health Administration 30 CFR Part 75 RIN 1219-AB75 Examinations of Work Areas in Underground Coal Mines for Violations of Mandatory Health or Safety Standards AGENCY: Mine Safety and Health... rule, Examinations of Work Areas in Underground Coal Mines for Violations of Mandatory Health or Safety...

  11. Identifying the content of home-based health behaviour change interventions for frail older people: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovicic, Ana; Gardner, Benjamin; Belk, Celia; Kharicha, Kalpa; Iliffe, Steve; Manthorpe, Jill; Goodman, Claire; Drennan, Vari; Walters, Kate

    2015-11-04

    Meeting the needs of the growing number of older people is a challenge for health and social care services. Home-based interventions aiming to modify health-related behaviours of frail older people have the potential to improve functioning and well-being. Previous reviews have focused on whether such interventions are effective, rather than what might make them effective. Recent advances in behavioural science make possible the identification of potential 'active ingredients' of effective interventions, such as component behaviour change techniques (BCTs), and intended intervention functions (IFs; e.g. to educate, to impart skills). This paper reports a protocol for a systematic review that seeks to (a) identify health behaviour change interventions for older frail people, (b) describe the content of these interventions, and (c) explore links between intervention content and effectiveness. The protocol is reported in accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Protocols (PRISMA-P) 2015 guidelines. Studies will be identified through a systematic search of 15 electronic databases, supplemented by citation tracking. Studies will be retained for review where they report randomised controlled trials focusing on home-based health promotion delivered by a health professional for frail older people in community settings, written in English, and either published from 1980 onwards, or, for registered trials only, unpublished but completed with results obtainable from authors. Interventions will be coded for their content (BCTs, IFs) and for evidence of effectiveness (outcome data relating to behavioural and health outcomes). Analyses will describe characteristics of all interventions. Interventions for which effectiveness data are available will be categorised into those showing evidence of effectiveness versus those showing no such evidence. The potential for each intervention characteristic to contribute to change in behaviour or

  12. The Shared Health Appointments and Reciprocal Enhanced Support (SHARES) study: study protocol for a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisler, Michele; Burgess, Jennifer; Cass, Jeffrey; Chardos, John F; Guirguis, Alexander B; Jeffery, Sean M; Strohecker, Lorrie A; Tremblay, Adam S; Wu, Wen-Chih; Zulman, Donna M

    2017-05-26

    Diabetes shared medical appointments (SMAs) and reciprocal peer support programs have been found in efficacy trials to help adults with diabetes improve their self-management and achieve short-term gains in clinical and patient-centered outcomes. In order to translate this evidence to system-level interventions, there is a need for large-scale, pragmatic trials that examine the effectiveness, implementation, and costs of SMAs and reciprocal peer support across diverse settings. The Shared Health Appointments and Reciprocal Enhanced Support (SHARES) study is a multisite, cluster randomized trial that is evaluating the effectiveness and implementation of SMAs with and without an additional reciprocal Peer-to-Peer (P2P) support program, when compared to usual care. The P2P program comprises periodic peer support group sessions and telephone contact between SMA participant pairs to promote more effective diabetes self-management. We will examine outcomes across three different treatment groups: (1) SMAs, (2) SMAs plus P2P, and (3) usual care. We will collect and analyze data over a 2.5-year implementation period at five geographically diverse Veterans Affairs (VA) health systems. The primary outcome is the relative change in hemoglobin A1c over time. Secondary outcomes are changes in systolic blood pressure, antihypertensive medication use, statin use, and insulin initiation over the study period. The unit of analysis is the individual, adjusted by the individual's SMA group (the cluster). We will use mixed methods to rigorously evaluate processes and costs of implementing these programs in each of the clinic settings. We hypothesize that patients will experience improved outcomes immediately following participation in SMAs and that augmenting SMAs with reciprocal peer support will help to maintain these gains over time. The results of this study will be among the first to examine the effects of diabetes SMAs alone and in conjunction with P2P in a range of real

  13. An evaluation of two large scale demand side financing programs for maternal health in India: the MATIND study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidney, Kristi; de Costa, Ayesha; Diwan, Vishal; Mavalankar, Dileep V; Smith, Helen

    2012-08-27

    High maternal mortality in India is a serious public health challenge. Demand side financing interventions have emerged as a strategy to promote access to emergency obstetric care. Two such state run programs, Janani Suraksha Yojana (JSY)and Chiranjeevi Yojana (CY), were designed and implemented to reduce financial access barriers that preclude women from obtaining emergency obstetric care. JSY, a conditional cash transfer, awards money directly to a woman who delivers in a public health facility. This will be studied in Madhya Pradesh province. CY, a voucher based program, empanels private obstetricians in Gujarat province, who are reimbursed by the government to perform deliveries of socioeconomically disadvantaged women. The programs have been in operation for the last seven years. The study outlined in this protocol will assess and compare the influence of the two programs on various aspects of maternal health care including trends in program uptake, institutional delivery rates, maternal and neonatal outcomes, quality of care, experiences of service providers and users, and cost effectiveness. The study will collect primary data using a combination of qualitative and quantitative methods, including facility level questionnaires, observations, a population based survey, in-depth interviews, and focus group discussions. Primary data will be collected in three districts of each province. The research will take place at three levels: the state health departments, obstetric facilities in the districts and among recently delivered mothers in the community. The protocol is a comprehensive assessment of the performance and impact of the programs and an economic analysis. It will fill existing evidence gaps in the scientific literature including access and quality to services, utilization, coverage and impact. The implementation of the protocol will also generate evidence to facilitate decision making among policy makers and program managers who currently work with or

  14. An evaluation of two large scale demand side financing programs for maternal health in India: the MATIND study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidney Kristi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High maternal mortality in India is a serious public health challenge. Demand side financing interventions have emerged as a strategy to promote access to emergency obstetric care. Two such state run programs, Janani Suraksha Yojana (JSYand Chiranjeevi Yojana (CY, were designed and implemented to reduce financial access barriers that preclude women from obtaining emergency obstetric care. JSY, a conditional cash transfer, awards money directly to a woman who delivers in a public health facility. This will be studied in Madhya Pradesh province. CY, a voucher based program, empanels private obstetricians in Gujarat province, who are reimbursed by the government to perform deliveries of socioeconomically disadvantaged women. The programs have been in operation for the last seven years. Methods/designs The study outlined in this protocol will assess and compare the influence of the two programs on various aspects of maternal health care including trends in program uptake, institutional delivery rates, maternal and neonatal outcomes, quality of care, experiences of service providers and users, and cost effectiveness. The study will collect primary data using a combination of qualitative and quantitative methods, including facility level questionnaires, observations, a population based survey, in-depth interviews, and focus group discussions. Primary data will be collected in three districts of each province. The research will take place at three levels: the state health departments, obstetric facilities in the districts and among recently delivered mothers in the community. Discussion The protocol is a comprehensive assessment of the performance and impact of the programs and an economic analysis. It will fill existing evidence gaps in the scientific literature including access and quality to services, utilization, coverage and impact. The implementation of the protocol will also generate evidence to facilitate decision making

  15. Health-social partnership intervention programme for community-dwelling older adults: a research protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kwan Ching; Wong, Frances Kam Yuet; Chang, Katherine Ka Pik

    2015-11-01

    This paper aims to describe the research protocol that will be used to determine the effectiveness of a health-social partnership intervention programme among community-dwelling older adults. Ageing in place is a preferred option for overcoming challenges of the increasing prevalence of chronic diseases and the risk for hospitalization associated with the ageing population. Nevertheless, our knowledge of how to implement this concept is limited. The integrated efforts of health and social services may help to enable older adults to live with a sense of control over their daily life and to be independent to the fullest extent possible in the community. This is a randomized, controlled trial. Participants are community-dwelling older adults referred from a community centre. Sample size calculation was based on power analysis. The intervention group will receive the programme with the standard protocols guided by a comprehensive assessment-intervention-evaluation framework. Home visits and telephones follow-up will be employed as means of conducting the interventions and monitoring their progress. The customary care group will receive placebo social calls. The duration of the interventions will be 3 months. The study was funded by the School of Nursing in Hong Kong. Research Ethics Committee approval was obtained in September 2014. The results of this research are expected to enable older adults to stay in the community with optimal health and well-being. Health and social sciences are integrated into the practice in this research protocol. The scarce literature on this topic means that this study can also provide an opportunity to bridge the caring gap among older adults. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. A Scoping Review of Observational Studies Examining Relationships between Environmental Behaviors and Health Behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayne Hutchinson

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Individual lifestyles are key drivers of both environmental change and chronic disease. We undertook a scoping review of peer-reviewed studies which examined associations between environmental and health behaviors of individuals in high-income countries. We searched EconLit, Medline, BIOSIS and the Social Science Citation Index. A total of 136 studies were included. The majority were USA-based cross-sectional studies using self-reported measures. Most of the evidence related to travel behavior, particularly active travel (walking and cycling and physical activity (92 studies or sedentary behaviors (19 studies. Associations of public transport use with physical activity were examined in 18 studies, and with sedentary behavior in one study. Four studies examined associations between car use and physical activity. A small number included other environmental behaviors (food-related behaviors (n = 14, including organic food, locally-sourced food and plate waste and other health behaviors ((n = 20 smoking, dietary intake, alcohol. These results suggest that research on individual environmental and health behaviors consists largely of studies examining associations between travel mode and levels of physical activity. There appears to be less research on associations between other behaviors with environmental and health impacts, and very few longitudinal studies in any domain.

  17. Examining Attachment to God and Health Risk-Taking Behaviors in College Students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barrett, J.; Horton, K.D.; Ellison, Ch.G.; Loukas, A.; Downey, D.L.

    2012-01-01

    Drawing on insights from attachment theory, this study examined whether three types of attachment to God—secure, avoidant, and anxious—were associated with health-risk behaviors, over and above the effects of religious attendance, peer support, and demographic covariates, in a sample of 328

  18. 249 The study examined the effect of climate change on the health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Osondu

    The study examined the effect of climate change on the health of rural farmers in Offa, Kwara. State. Nigeria. For the purpose of achieving the objectives of the study Ninety-eight (98) respondents were randomly sampled from ten wards. Data were collected through interview scheduled couple with a well structured ...

  19. Neighbourhood green space, social environment and mental health: an examination in four European cities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijsbroek, Annemarie; Mohnen, Sigrid M.; Droomers, Mariël; Kruize, Hanneke; Gidlow, Christopher; Gražulevičiene, Regina; Andrusaityte, Sandra; Maas, Jolanda; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J.; Triguero-Mas, Margarita; Masterson, Daniel; Ellis, Naomi; van Kempen, Elise; Hardyns, Wim; Stronks, Karien; Groenewegen, Peter P.

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between neighbourhood green space, the neighbourhood social environment (social cohesion, neighbourhood attachment, social contacts), and mental health in four European cities. The PHENOTYPE study was carried out in 2013 in Barcelona (Spain), Stoke-on-Trent

  20. Evaluation of Psychological Measures Used in the Health Examination Survey of Children Ages 6-11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sells, S. B.

    In this report the psychological procedures used in the Health Examination Survey conducted between June 1963 and December 1965 for children ages 6 through 11 are critically evaluated. In his analysis, the author combines his own professional competence with the information obtained in an extensive survey of literature pertaining to the four…

  1. Multiple physical healthcare needs among outpatients with schizophrenia: findings from a health examination study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskelinen, Saana; Sailas, Eila; Joutsenniemi, Kaisla; Holi, Matti; Koskela, Tuomas H; Suvisaari, Jaana

    2017-08-01

    Despite the abundant literature on physical comorbidity, the full range of the concurrent somatic healthcare needs among individuals with schizophrenia has rarely been studied. This observational study aimed to assess the distressing somatic symptoms and needs for physical health interventions in outpatients with schizophrenia, and factors predicting those needs. A structured, comprehensive health examination was carried out, including a visit to a nurse and a general practitioner on 275 outpatients with schizophrenia. The required interventions were classified by type of disease. Logistic regression was used to assess the influence of sociodemographic factors, lifestyle, functional limitations, factors related to psychiatric disorder, and healthcare use on the need for interventions. In total, 44.9% of the patients (mean age 44.9 years) reported somatic symptoms affecting daily life; 87.6% needed specific interventions for a disease or condition, most commonly for cardiovascular, dermatological, dental, ophthalmological, and gastrointestinal conditions, and for altered glucose homeostasis. Smoking and obesity predicted significantly a need of any intervention, but the predictors varied in each disease category. Strikingly, use of general practitioner services during the previous year did not reduce the need for interventions. Health examinations for outpatients with schizophrenia revealed numerous physical healthcare needs. The health examinations for patients with schizophrenia should contain a medical history taking and a physical examination, in addition to basic measurements and laboratory tests. Prevention and treatment of obesity and smoking should be given priority in order to diminish somatic comorbidities in schizophrenia.

  2. Examining Health Information Technology Implementations: Case of the Patient-Centered Medical Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behkami, Nima A.

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown that the use of Health Information Technology (HIT) is associated with reduced cost and increased quality of care. This dissertation examined the use of registries in Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) practices. A survey questionnaire was sent to a nationwide group of clinics certified for being a PCMH. They were asked to…

  3. Examining the accuracy of caregivers' assessments of young children's oral health status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divaris, Kimon; Vann, William F; Baker, A Diane; Lee, Jessica Y

    2012-11-01

    Caregivers' perceptions of their young children's oral health status (OHS) are a strong determinant of whether the children visit a dentist. Our aims were to quantify the correlation between caregivers' assessments and their children's clinically determined restorative treatment needs, while investigating factors related to this association. One hundred eight caregivers assessed their children's OHS by answering a question on the self-reported National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III instrument. Children underwent clinical oral examinations at one of two study sites of the Carolina Oral Health Literacy Project: a dental school-based clinic and a community-based health clinic. Examiners recorded the children's clinical treatment needs by using a modification of the caries severity index. The authors quantified concordance between the two measures with use of the Spearman rank correlation (ρ) and Kendall τ rank correlation, whereas they assessed differences in sociodemographic factors and oral health literacy (OHL) levels by using a homogeneity χ(2) test (P university clinic. Caregivers' age, education and OHL did not influence the accuracy of self-reports. For children younger than 2 years, caregivers' assessments correlated poorly with clinical needs, which routinely were underestimated. Practice Implications. These findings underscore the importance of preventive dental visits at a young age and the early establishment of a dental home.

  4. Health behaviors among short- and long- term ex-smokers: results from the Thai National Health Examination Survey IV, 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangthong, Rassamee; Wichaidit, Wit; McNeil, Edward; Chongsuvivatwong, Virasakdi; Chariyalertsak, Suwat; Kessomboon, Pattapong; Taneepanichskul, Surasak; Putwatana, Panwadee; Aekplakorn, Wichai

    2012-07-01

    Although numerous studies have shown the health behaviors of ex-smokers to be better than those in regular smokers, the differences in health behaviors among ex-smokers at varying durations of cessation have not been investigated. This study aims to examine the relationship between different durations of smoking cessation and health behaviors. Data on dietary intake, alcohol consumption, physical activity, and smoking behavior from the Thai National Health Examination Survey IV for subjects aged 15-98 years (n=19 371) were included in the analysis. Trends between health behaviors among regular smokers, ex-smokers with different durations of smoking (10 years), and never smokers were tested. Logistic regression models adjusted for sex, age, and economic status were used. The prevalences of regular smoking, ex-smoking, and never smoking were 22.3%, 12% , and 65.7%, respectively. A trend was found for consumption of fruit, beans and meats, dairy and soy milk, whole-grain products, nutritional supplements, and eating habits. Average daily alcohol consumption (g) was lowest among ex-smokers who had quit for>10 years ex-smokers (16.4) followed by 1-10 years ex-smokers (27.2), and <1 year ex-smokers (33.7). A longer duration of smoking cessation correlated with better health behaviors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Detection of adrenal and retroperitoneal masses in a general health examination system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masumori, N; Adachi, H; Noda, Y; Tsukamoto, T

    1998-10-01

    To investigate the detection rate of adrenal and retroperitoneal masses other than kidney diseases in a general health examination system. From May 1991 through February 1996, 41,357 subjects participated in the general health examination system in our hospital. Approximately 80% of participants were 40 to 59 years old. For all participants, transabdominal ultrasound (US) was performed by five expert examiners using an Aloka SSD-650 with a 3.5-MHz convex-type transducer. When US revealed abnormal lesions on the adrenal gland and in the retroperitoneal space, we recommended that participants be examined with computed tomography (CT), with a slice width of 5 mm. Forty-three participants (0.1%) had abnormal findings on US. Of the 28 of those who underwent CT examination to confirm the lesions, 12 had adrenal and retroperitoneal masses. The detection rate was 0.029% of total participants and 42.9% of those who underwent CT examination. Clinical diagnoses were primary aldosteronism (1), preclinical Cushing syndrome (2), nonfunctioning adrenocortical tumor (5), pheochromocytoma (1), ganglioneuroma (1), adrenal cyst (1), and retroperitoneal neurinoma (1). False-positive results were dominant on the left side of the body (right 3, left 13). A deformed or accessory spleen (3), a cyst on the upper pole of the kidney (2), bowel air (2), and a pancreatic cyst (1) were misdiagnosed as adrenal lesions on US. The low detection rate of adrenal and retroperitoneal masses by US does not support screening for the diseases in healthy subjects. However, if it is done as part of a general health examination, examiners should attentively observe not only the kidneys but also the adrenal gland and retroperitoneal space because clinically important diseases may be detected.

  6. Cluster randomized controlled trial protocol: addressing reproductive coercion in health settings (ARCHES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tancredi, Daniel J; Silverman, Jay G; Decker, Michele R; McCauley, Heather L; Anderson, Heather A; Jones, Kelley A; Ciaravino, Samantha; Hicks, Angela; Raible, Claire; Zelazny, Sarah; James, Lisa; Miller, Elizabeth

    2015-08-06

    Women ages 16-29 utilizing family planning clinics for medical services experience higher rates of intimate partner violence (IPV) and reproductive coercion (RC) than their same-age peers, increasing risk for unintended pregnancy and related poor reproductive health outcomes. Brief interventions integrated into routine family planning care have shown promise in reducing risk for RC, but longer-term intervention effects on partner violence victimization, RC, and unintended pregnancy have not been examined. The 'Addressing Reproductive Coercion in Health Settings (ARCHES)' Intervention Study is a cluster randomized controlled trial evaluating the effectiveness of a brief, clinician-delivered universal education and counseling intervention to reduce IPV, RC and unintended pregnancy compared to standard-of-care in family planning clinic settings. The ARCHES intervention was refined based on formative research. Twenty five family planning clinics were randomized (in 17 clusters) to either a three hour training for all family planning clinic staff on how to deliver the ARCHES intervention or to a standard-of-care control condition. All women ages 16-29 seeking care in these family planning clinics were eligible to participate. Consenting clients use laptop computers to answer survey questions immediately prior to their clinic visit, a brief exit survey immediately after the clinic visit, a first follow up survey 12-20 weeks after the baseline visit (T2), and a final survey 12 months after the baseline (T3). Medical record chart review provides additional data about IPV and RC assessment and disclosure, sexual and reproductive health diagnoses, and health care utilization. Of 4009 women approached and determined to be eligible based on age (16-29 years old), 3687 (92 % participation) completed the baseline survey and were included in the sample. The ARCHES Intervention Study is a community-partnered study designed to provide arigorous assessment of the short (3-4 months

  7. Treating PTSD in patients with psychosis: a within-group controlled feasibility study examining the efficacy and safety of evidence-based PE and EMDR protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bont, Paul A J M; van Minnen, Agnes; de Jongh, Ad

    2013-12-01

    The present study uses a within-group controlled design to examine the efficacy and safety of two psychological approaches to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in 10 patients with a concurrent psychotic disorder. Patients were randomly assigned either to prolonged exposure (PE; N=5) or eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR; N=5). Before, during, and after treatment, a total of 20 weekly assessments of PTSD symptoms, hallucinations, and delusions were carried out. Twelve weekly assessments of adverse events took place during the treatment phase. PTSD diagnosis, level of social functioning, psychosis-prone thinking, and general psychopathology were assessed pretreatment, posttreatment, and at three-month follow-up. Throughout the treatment, adverse events were monitored at each session. An intention-to-treat analysis of the 10 patients starting treatment showed that the PTSD treatment protocols of PE and EMDR significantly reduced PTSD symptom severity; PE and EMDR were equally effective and safe. Eight of the 10 patients completed the full intervention period. Seven of the 10 patients (70%) no longer met the diagnostic criteria for PTSD at follow-up. No serious adverse events occurred, nor did patients show any worsening of hallucinations, delusions, psychosis proneness, general psychopathology, or social functioning. The results of this feasibility trial suggest that PTSD patients with comorbid psychotic disorders benefit from trauma-focused treatment approaches such as PE and EMDR. © 2013.

  8. Validation of a standard forensic anthropology examination protocol by measurement of applicability and reliability on exhumed and archive samples of known biological attribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, Raffaela Arrabaça; Evison, Martin Paul; Costa Junior, Moacyr Lobo da; Silveira, Teresa Cristina Pantozzi; Secchieri, José Marcelo; Guimarães, Marco Aurelio

    2017-10-01

    Forensic anthropology makes an important contribution to human identification and assessment of the causes and mechanisms of death and body disposal in criminal and civil investigations, including those related to atrocity, disaster and trafficking victim identification. The methods used are comparative, relying on assignment of questioned material to categories observed in standard reference material of known attribution. Reference collections typically originate in Europe and North America, and are not necessarily representative of contemporary global populations. Methods based on them must be validated when applied to novel populations. This study describes the validation of a standardized forensic anthropology examination protocol by application to two contemporary Brazilian skeletal samples of known attribution. One sample (n=90) was collected from exhumations following 7-35 years of burial and the second (n=30) was collected following successful investigations following routine case work. The study presents measurement of (1) the applicability of each of the methods: used and (2) the reliability with which the biographic parameters were assigned in each case. The results are discussed with reference to published assessments of methodological reliability regarding sex, age and-in particular-ancestry estimation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Does improving sleep lead to better mental health? A protocol for a meta-analytic review of randomised controlled trials

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Alexander J; Webb, Thomas L; Rowse, Georgina

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Sleep and mental health go hand-in-hand, with many, if not all, mental health problems being associated with problems sleeping. Although sleep has been traditionally conceptualised as a secondary consequence of mental health problems, contemporary views prescribe a more influential, causal role of sleep in the formation and maintenance of mental health problems. One way to evaluate this assertion is to examine the extent to which interventions that improve sleep also improve men...

  10. [Evolution of worker's health in the social security medical examination in Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto Júnior, Afrânio Gomes; Braga, Ana Maria Cheble Bahia; Roselli-Cruz, Amadeu

    2012-10-01

    In order to analyze the practice of the social security medical examination starting from the introduction of the worker's health paradigms, data was gathered on the granting of social security disability benefits to assess worker illness based on notification of work-related accidents in the cement industries of Rio de Janeiro. From 2007 to 2009 there was only one notification, which involved a worker handling toxic waste instead of the energy matrix. However, the analysis revealed sources and mechanisms of illness overlooked in the social security medical examination, which is still focused on the one-cause-only logic of occupational medicine. To achieve the worker's health paradigms, changes are required to alter the way of conducting the social security medical examination, by re-establishing partnerships, training human resources, adopting epidemiological indicators, as well as setting and assessing social security goals that transcend the mere granting of disability benefits.

  11. Non-participation in preventive child health examinations at the general practitioner in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Grethe; Biering-Sørensen, Sofie; Michelsen, Susan Ishøy

    2008-01-01

    , and older siblings) and parental characteristics (age, educational level, attachment to labour market, ethnicity, household income, and number of adults in the household). Results. Children of young and single parents were less likely to receive a preventive child health examination. Increased odds ratios......Objective. To examine demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of parents and children in families not participating in preventive child health examinations at the general practitioner in a society with free and easy access to healthcare. Design. Population-covering register linkage study...... for non-participation were found for children of parents outside the labour market, with low educational level, and especially for the combination of these. Non-participation increased with decreasing household income and with the number of older siblings. Conclusion. Despite the fact that Denmark has...

  12. Health Examination Is Not a Priority for Less Acculturated Asian Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sunmin; Chae, David H; Jung, Mary Y; Chen, Lu; Juon, Hee-Soon

    2016-10-31

    This study examines the associations between acculturation and three health examination behaviors (physical, dental, and eye exams) among 846 Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese Americans. The study was part of a randomized, community-based trial on liver cancer prevention that targeted Asian Americans in Washington DC metropolitan area. Acculturation was assessed using Suinn-Lew Asian Self-Identity Acculturation (SL-ASIA) scale, acculturation clusters, and length of stay. Health examination behaviors in the last 2 years were self-reported. Potential confounders such as age, gender, ethnicity, income, marital status, self-rated health status, health insurance, and having a regular physician were adjusted. Increased acculturation was associated with greater receipt of preventive services when acculturation was measured by SL-ASIA and acculturation clusters. Compared to those in the "Asian" cluster, those in the "American" cluster and "bicultural" clusters were more likely to have physical exams (American odds ratio (OR) = 1.83, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.99, 3.88; bicultural OR = 1.11; 95 % CI 0.72, 1.70), dental exams (American OR = 1.99, 95 % CI 1.09, 3.65; bicultural OR = 1.83, 95 % CI 1.21, 2.78), and eye exams (American OR = 4.48, 95 % CI 2.67, 7.66; bicultural OR = 1.92, 95 % CI 1.31, 2.81). A gradient was observed in these associations with the American cluster having stronger associations than the bicultural cluster. Interaction was found between acculturation and gender for receipt of a physical exam. Future studies are needed to further explicate how access to health care impacts the association between acculturation and health examinations among Asian Americans.

  13. Neighbourhood green space, social environment and mental health: an examination in four European cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruijsbroek, Annemarie; Mohnen, Sigrid M; Droomers, Mariël; Kruize, Hanneke; Gidlow, Christopher; Gražulevičiene, Regina; Andrusaityte, Sandra; Maas, Jolanda; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J; Triguero-Mas, Margarita; Masterson, Daniel; Ellis, Naomi; van Kempen, Elise; Hardyns, Wim; Stronks, Karien; Groenewegen, Peter P

    2017-07-01

    This study examines the relationship between neighbourhood green space, the neighbourhood social environment (social cohesion, neighbourhood attachment, social contacts), and mental health in four European cities. The PHENOTYPE study was carried out in 2013 in Barcelona (Spain), Stoke-on-Trent (United Kingdom), Doetinchem (The Netherlands), and Kaunas (Lithuania). 3771 adults living in 124 neighbourhoods answered questions on mental health, neighbourhood social environment, and amount and quality of green space. Additionally, audit data on neighbourhood green space were collected. Multilevel regression analyses examined the relation between neighbourhood green space and individual mental health and the influence of neighbourhood social environment. Mental health was only related to green (audit) in Barcelona. The amount and quality of neighbourhood green space (audit and perceived) were related to social cohesion in Doetinchem and Stoke-on-Trent and to neighbourhood attachment in Doetinchem. In all four cities, mental health was associated with social contacts. Neighbourhood green was related to mental health only in Barcelona. Though neighbourhood green was related to social cohesion and attachment, the neighbourhood social environment seems not the underlying mechanism for this relationship.

  14. Development of a periodic health examination form for the frail elderly in long-term care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Henry Yu-Hin; White, Joy; Sergeant, Myles; Moore, Ainsley Elizabeth; Patterson, Christopher

    2016-02-01

    To create an evidence-based periodic health examination (PHE) form geared to long-term care (LTC) residents. Two-phase study: literature review to develop a quantitative, cross-sectional, self-administered survey, and administration of the survey followed by a focus group. A PHE form for LTC residents was developed based on participants' recommendations. Hamilton, Ont. A total of 106 health care professionals completed the survey; 10 LTC physicians participated in the focus group. The items deemed most important and most likely to be performed during a PHE; themes from focus group discussions. Respondents' top 4 most important PHE items were also the top 4 items they thought were most likely to be performed during a PHE in LTC: reviewing active health status, reviewing pain control, reviewing medications, and screening for falls. Thematic analysis from the focus group discussion generated 3 main themes: current physician perspectives on the existing annual health examination in LTC, conceptual ideas for the new PHE form, and physician perspectives on the optimization of care in LTC settings. The findings from the survey, along with the themes from the focus group, were incorporated to create a PHE form for LTC residents. The proposed PHE form emphasizes tracking a patient's functional course over time and combines evidence-based preventive health interventions and health assessments with what is clinically important for LTC.

  15. Using Facebook for Sexual Health Social Marketing in Conservative Asian Countries: A Systematic Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khawaja, Zain-Ul-Abdin; Ali, Khudejah Iqbal; Khan, Shanze

    2017-02-01

    Social marketing related to sexual health is a problematic task, especially in religiously and/or culturally conservative countries. Social media presents a possible alternative channel for sexual health efforts to disseminate information and engage new users. In an effort to understand how well sexual health campaigns and organizations have leveraged this opportunity, this study presents a systematic examination of ongoing Facebook-based sexual health efforts in conservative Asian countries. It was discovered that out of hundreds of sexual health organizations identified in the region, less than half had created a Facebook page. Of those that had, only 31 were found to have posted sexual health-relevant content at least once a month. Many of these 31 organizations were also unsuccessful in maintaining regular official and user activity on their page. In order to assess the quality of the Facebook pages as Web-based information resources, the sexual health-related official activity on each page was analyzed for information (a) value, (b) reliability, (c) currency, and (d) system accessibility. User responsiveness to official posts on the pages was also used to discuss the potential of Facebook as a sexual health information delivery platform.

  16. Minority stress and mental health among Dutch LGBs: examination of differences between sex and sexual orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuyper, Lisette; Fokkema, Tineke

    2011-04-01

    Minority stress is often cited as an explanation for greater mental health problems among lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) individuals than heterosexual individuals. However, studies focusing on sex or sexual orientation differences in level of minority stress and its impact on mental health are scarce, even more so outside the United States. Performing secondary analyses on the data of a Dutch population study on sexual health, the present study examines the robustness of the minority stress model by explaining mental health problems among men and women with mostly or only same-sex sexual attraction, and men and women who are equally attracted to same-sex and opposite-sex partners in the "gay-friendly" Netherlands (N = 389; 118 gay men, 40 bisexual men, 184 lesbian women, and 54 bisexual women). Results showed that minority stress is also related to mental health of Dutch LGBs. Participants with a higher level of internalized homonegativity and those who more often encountered negative reactions from other people on their same-sex sexual attraction reported more mental health problems. Such negative reactions from others, however, had a stronger link with mental health among lesbian/gay than among bisexual participants. Openness about one's sexual orientation was related to better mental health among sexual minority women, but not among their male counterparts. Suggestions for future research, implications for counseling, and other societal interventions are discussed. 2011 APA, all rights reserved

  17. Food Insecurity is Associated with Diabetes Mellitus: Results from the National Health Examination and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999–2002

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Seligman, Hilary K; Bindman, Andrew B; Vittinghoff, Eric; Kanaya, Alka M; Kushel, Margot B

    2007-01-01

    ... diabetes.To evaluate whether there is an independent association between food insecurity and diabetes.Cross-sectional analysis of the nationally representative, population-based National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1999–2002 waves...

  18. Smoking and physical activity: examining health behaviors and 15-year mortality among individuals with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Aaron P; Hartoonian, Narineh; Maynard, Charles; Leipertz, Steven L; Haselkorn, Jodie K

    2015-03-01

    To examine 2 modifiable health behaviors-smoking and physical activity-and their relationship to mortality among individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS). Secondary analysis of Large Health Survey. Data were obtained from a linkage of the Veterans Affairs (VA) MS National Data Repository, containing information on service provision to all individuals with MS receiving health services within the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs; the VA 1999 Large Health Survey, containing information on smoking and physical activity; and the VA Vital Status File. All-cause mortality was examined for the 15-year period from 1999 through 2013. Participants (N=2994) with MS who completed the Large Health Survey containing information on smoking and physical activity. Not applicable. Survival. There were 1500 deaths (50.1%) during the study period. Cox proportional hazard analyses were conducted to examine the association between smoking and physical activity and 15-year mortality. After adjusting for demographic factors, physical functioning, mental health, and comorbid medical conditions, baseline smoking was associated with greater mortality (hazard ratio [HR]=1.38; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.184-1.60). Higher levels of baseline physical activity were associated with lower mortality (activity 1-2 times/wk: HR=.64; 95% CI, .518-.798; activity ≥3 times/wk: HR=.53; 95% CI, .388-.715). Results suggest that modifiable health behaviors represent a promising opportunity for intervention to improve the lives of individuals with MS. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A protocol to examine vision and gait in Parkinson’s disease: impact of cognition and response to visual cues [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Stuart

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Cognitive and visual impairments are common in Parkinson’s disease (PD and contribute to gait deficit and falls. To date, cognition and vision in gait in PD have been assessed separately. Impact of both functions (which we term ‘visuo-cognition’ on gait however is likely interactive and can be tested using visual sampling (specifically saccadic eye movements to provide an online behavioural measure of performance. Although experiments using static paradigms show saccadic impairment in PD, few studies have quantified visual sampling during dynamic motor tasks such as gait. This article describes a protocol developed for testing visuo-cognition during gait in order to examine the: 1 independent roles of cognition and vision in gait in PD, 2 interaction between both functions, and 3 role of visuo-cognition in gait in PD. Methods Two groups of older adults (≥50 years old were recruited; non-demented people with PD (n=60 and age-matched controls (n=40. Participants attended one session and a sub-group (n=25 attended two further sessions in order to establish mobile eye-tracker reliability. Participants walked in a gait laboratory under different attentional (single and dual task, environmental (walk straight, through a door and turning, and cueing (no visual cues and visual cues conditions. Visual sampling was recorded using synchronised mobile eye-tracker and electrooculography systems, and gait was measured using 3D motion analysis. Discussion This exploratory study examined visuo-cognitive processes and their impact on gait in PD. Improved understanding of the influence of cognitive and visual functions on visual sampling during gait and gait in PD will assist in development of interventions to improve gait and reduce falls risk. This study will also help establish robust mobile eye-tracking methods in older adults and people with PD.

  20. Usability and eHealth Literacy Evaluation of a Mobile Health Application Prototype to Track Diagnostic Imaging Examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Janessa; Monkman, Helen

    2017-01-01

    In the absence of a pan-Canadian electronic health record, unnecessary duplicate diagnostic imaging (DI) examinations are sometimes ordered when a physician is not aware of prior DI or prior DI is not available. Research suggests that physicians may ask their patient to recall their DI history; however, patient recall of DI can be unreliable. As a potential solution, a patient-facing mobile health application (app) prototype was developed for users to record their DI. The app was designed to be usable and inclusive to users of all health literacy levels. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate how eHealth literacy and usability heuristics can be used during the design phases of app development.

  1. The EARN-Health Trial: protocol for a randomised controlled trial to identify health effects of a financial savings programme among low-income US adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Sanjay; Hamad, Rita; White, Justin S; Modrek, Sepideh; Rehkopf, David H; Cullen, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A theory within the social epidemiology field is that financial stress related to having inadequate financial savings may contribute to psychological stress, poor mental health and poor health-related behaviours among low-income US adults. Our objective is to test whether an intervention that encourages financial savings among low-income US adults improves health behaviours and mental health. Methods and analysis A parallel group two-arm controlled superiority trial will be performed in which 700 participants will be randomised to the intervention or a wait list. The intervention arm will be provided an online Individual Development Account (IDA) for 6 months, during which participants receive a $5 incentive (£3.2, €4.5) for every month they save $20 in their account (£12.8, €18), and an additional $5 if they save $20 for two consecutive months. Both groups will be provided links to standard online financial counselling materials. Online surveys in months 0 (prior to randomisation), 6 and 12 (6 months postintervention) will assess self-reported health behaviours and mental health among participants in both arms. The surveys items were tested previously in the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention national health interviews and related health studies, including self-reported overall health, health-related quality of life, alcohol and tobacco use, depression symptoms, financial stress, optimism and locus of control, and spending and savings behaviours. Trial data will be analysed on an intent-to-treat basis. Ethics and dissemination This protocol was approved by the Institutional Review Board of Stanford University (Protocol ID: 30641). The findings of the trial will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publication. Trial registration number Identifier NCT02185612; Pre-results. PMID:26443663

  2. The EARN-Health Trial: protocol for a randomised controlled trial to identify health effects of a financial savings programme among low-income US adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Sanjay; Hamad, Rita; White, Justin S; Modrek, Sepideh; Rehkopf, David H; Cullen, Mark R

    2015-10-06

    A theory within the social epidemiology field is that financial stress related to having inadequate financial savings may contribute to psychological stress, poor mental health and poor health-related behaviours among low-income US adults. Our objective is to test whether an intervention that encourages financial savings among low-income US adults improves health behaviours and mental health. A parallel group two-arm controlled superiority trial will be performed in which 700 participants will be randomised to the intervention or a wait list. The intervention arm will be provided an online Individual Development Account (IDA) for 6 months, during which participants receive a $5 incentive (£3.2, €4.5) for every month they save $20 in their account (£12.8, €18), and an additional $5 if they save $20 for two consecutive months. Both groups will be provided links to standard online financial counselling materials. Online surveys in months 0 (prior to randomisation), 6 and 12 (6 months postintervention) will assess self-reported health behaviours and mental health among participants in both arms. The surveys items were tested previously in the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention national health interviews and related health studies, including self-reported overall health, health-related quality of life, alcohol and tobacco use, depression symptoms, financial stress, optimism and locus of control, and spending and savings behaviours. Trial data will be analysed on an intent-to-treat basis. This protocol was approved by the Institutional Review Board of Stanford University (Protocol ID: 30641). The findings of the trial will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publication. Identifier NCT02185612; Pre-results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  3. Five-step protocol for carotid endarterectomy in the managed health care era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrek, J R; Calligaro, K D; Dougherty, M J; Doerr, K J; McAfee-Bennett, S; Raviola, C A; Rua, I; DeLaurentis, D A

    1999-01-01

    We developed a protocol combining 5 cost-effective strategies to determine whether elective carotid endarterectomy (CEA) could be performed safely without adversely affecting well-established low morbidity and mortality rates and with significant hospital cost savings. Between April 1, 1995, and December 31, 1996, 109 of 141 patients were prospectively enrolled as candidates into a 5-step CEA protocol: (1) duplex ultrasonography (DU) performed at an accredited vascular laboratory as the sole diagnostic carotid preoperative study, (2) admission the day of operation, (3) cervical block anesthesia to eliminate intraoperative electroencephalogram monitoring, (4) transfer from the recovery room after a 4-hour observation period to the vascular ward, and (5) discharge the first postoperative morning. The other 32 patients were excluded from analysis; 16 patients were treated by vascular surgeons not participating in the protocol, 9 were treated concomitantly for other medical problems, and 7 were admitted emergently. One patient died of carotid hemorrhage the first postoperative morning, and one had an intraoperative embolic stroke for a combined mortality-stroke rate of 1.8% (2 of 109). Of the 109 patients, 70% (76) underwent operation using DU as the sole diagnostic study, 95% (104) were admitted the day of operation, 76% (83) had cervical block anesthesia, 59% (64) were transferred to the floor the day of operation, and 83% (90) were discharged the morning after operation. None of the 109 patients were adversely affected by these 5 cost-saving strategies except potentially the patient who bled the first postoperative morning. The predicted charges of a patient treated with a perioperative protocol that many vascular surgeons currently use (preoperative arteriography, general anesthesia with intraoperative electroencephalogram monitoring, overnight intensive care unit stay, discharge on postoperative day 2) was $16,073 compared with $10,437 for a patient who completed

  4. The Knowledge of Lung Tuberculosis Suspects for Sputum Examination Attitude In The Kamoning Primary Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puteri Febriana Arivany

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis is an infectious disease caused by the Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Tuberculosis (TB is an infectious disease mostly attacks the lungs TB disease is transmitted by smear positive TB patients through the air when an infected person coughs or sneezes in the form of droplets. Sputum examination is an effort to enforce TB diagnose and to determine the potential of this transmission. The aims was conducted to determine the relationship between the respondents’ knowledge andthe sputum examination in the health center Kamoning Sampang. This research used analytic observational study with survey method using cross sectional. The research performed in 60 patients and sampling method used is imple random sampling. The independent variabel consist of education, occupation, income respondents, education and attitude of the respondent in conducting sputum examination. The strength of correlation was measured by Contingency Coefficient and Odd Ratio (OR were analyzed using chi-square test. Contingency Coefficient of respondents knowledge knowledge suspected pulmonary tuberculosis in sputum examination is 0,253 and OR = 3,600. The conclusion is there was a weak correlation between the respondents knowledge and sputum examination. Symptoms and treatment of pulmonary TB can be identified if the health workers in collaboration with religious leaders and community leaders to provide the Information according to age and education of the respondents. Keywords: knowledge, attitude, TB suspect, sputum examination

  5. Shared Decision Making via Personal Health Record Technology for Routine Use of Diabetic Youth: A Study Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Selena; Roudsari, Abdul; Courtney, Karen L

    2017-01-01

    Engaging patients in the self-management decision-making provides opportunities for positive health outcomes. The process of shared decision making (SDM) is touted as the pinnacle of patient-centred care, yet it has been difficult to implement in practice. Access to tools resulting from the integration of all health data and clinical evidence, and an ease of communications with care providers are needed to engage patients in decision making. Personal health record (PHR) technology is a promising approach for overcoming such barriers. Yet there is a scarcity of studies on system design for SDM via PHR. This paper describes a study protocol to identify functional requirements of PHR for facilitating SDM and factors that would influence the embedding of the proposed system in clinical practice.

  6. [The physical examination within the scope of The Child and Adolescent Health Survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dippelhofer, A; Bergmann, K E; Kahl, H; Lange, M

    2002-12-01

    The National Health Survey for Children and Adolescents intends a comprehensive description of the health status of children and adolescents. In this context physical examination of children and adolescents permits collection of objective data concerning physical development, certain body functions and selected performance parameters. Most important are indicators pointing towards increasing developmental and health problems in children and adolescents, which are partly predictive for the health status as an adult. Body measurements including stages of puberty will be taken, the blood pressure measured, vision tests carried out, coordination skills and endurance tested. Besides, if acute symptoms are detected, severity of atopic dermatitis is recorded. The methods and instruments have been tested in a pilot study over a period of one year and were optimised for the main study.

  7. Health status among urban residents living in proximity to petroleum coke storage: a first examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendryx, Michael; Entwhistle, Jennifer; Kenny, Emily; Illyn, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We conducted an in-person survey in neighborhoods in south Chicago to examine whether residence near outdoor petroleum coke storage piles was associated with poorer health status and illness symptoms. A total of 223 adults (≥18) completed the surveys in English or Spanish, including 136 from a neighborhood exposed to the petroleum coke and 87 from a nearby comparison neighborhood. Exposure was defined based on prevailing winds and distance. We conducted a propensity score regression analysis, and found that residents in the exposed neighborhood were significantly more likely to report poor self-rated health, more unhealthy physical and mental health days, more illness symptoms including in particular respiratory and neurological symptoms, and worse perceived environmental conditions. The survey is limited by the small sample and the self-report nature of the data, but provides initial quantitative evidence that residence near outdoor petroleum coke storage piles may pose a public health risk.

  8. Educational Intervention on Breast Self-Examination Behavior in Women Referred to Health Centers: Application of Health Belief Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khiyali, Zahra; Aliyan, Farzaneh; Kashfi, Seyyed Hannan; Mansourian, Morteza; Khani Jeihooni, Ali

    2017-10-26

    Introduction and aims: Screening can play a major role in reducing deaths associated with cancer. Breast selfexamination (BSE) is a cheap, non-complicated and non-invasive method for breast cancer screening. This study aimed to examine the effects of an educational intervention based on the health belief model (HBM) on BSE behavior in women referred to health centers in Fasa, Iran. Methods: This quasi-experimental study was conducted on 92 women, divided into an experimental and a control group. Data were collected using a validated questionnaire covering demographic characteristics, knowledge, HBM constructs and breast self-examination performance. An educational program was performed in five sessions through group discussion with questions and answers and training videos for participants in the experimental group. Questionnaires were filled before and three months after the intervention in the two groups. Data were analyzed with SPSS-22 software for descriptive and analytical statistics. Results: The results of this study showed that the mean scores for knowledge, HBM constructs and self-examination behavior in the experimental group were elevated compared to the control group after the intervention (PEducation based on the HBM is effective in promoting breast self-examination behavior. Thus development and implementation of training programs based on the model are proposed for officers involved in education and health promotion in Iran. Creative Commons Attribution License

  9. Built to last? The sustainability of health system improvements, interventions and change strategies: a study protocol for a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braithwaite, Jeffrey; Testa, Luke; Lamprell, Gina; Herkes, Jessica; Ludlow, Kristiana; McPherson, Elise; Campbell, Margie; Holt, Joanna

    2017-11-12

    The sustainability of healthcare interventions and change programmes is of increasing importance to researchers and healthcare stakeholders interested in creating sustainable health systems to cope with mounting stressors. The aim of this protocol is to extend earlier work and describe a systematic review to identify, synthesise and draw meaning from studies published within the last 5 years that measure the sustainability of interventions, improvement efforts and change strategies in the health system. The protocol outlines a method by which to execute a rigorous systematic review. The design includes applying primary and secondary data collection techniques, consisting of a comprehensive database search complemented by contact with experts, and searching secondary databases and reference lists, using snowballing techniques. The review and analysis process will occur via an abstract review followed by a full-text screening process. The inclusion criteria include English-language, peer-reviewed, primary, empirical research articles published after 2011 in scholarly journals, for which the full text is available. No restrictions on location will be applied. The review that results from this protocol will synthesise and compare characteristics of the included studies. Ultimately, it is intended that this will help make it easier to identify and design sustainable interventions, improvement efforts and change strategies. As no primary data were collected, ethical approval was not required. Results will be disseminated in conference presentations, peer-reviewed publications and among policymaker bodies interested in creating sustainable health systems. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. Health Disparities by Type of Disability: Health Examination Results of Adults (18-64 Years) with Disabilities in Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Qi; Chen, Gang; Lu, Jun; Yu, Huijiong

    2016-01-01

    There have been few studies on the disparities within the population with disabilities, especially in China. The aim of this study was to evaluate the differences in some health conditions among people with different types of disabilities in Shanghai. This study was conducted using data from the Shanghai Disabled Persons' Rehabilitation Comprehensive Information Platform. The records of 31,082 persons with disabilities who had undergone professional health examination were analyzed, and the prevalence and number of five diseases and five risk factors were examined. Logistic regression was used to explore disparities from two perspectives: 1) basic differences, unadjusted for other factors, and 2) differences after adjusting for key demographic covariates. A p-value < 0.05 was considered significant. Individuals with visual disability had a high rate of refractive error (60.0%), and averaged 1.75 diseases of interest, which was the highest value among all disability types. The mean number of risk factors we measured was greatest (1.96) in the population with mental disability. There were significant differences (p < 0.05) between the hearing and speech impairment group and the other groups with respect to most health outcomes, except chronic pharyngitis, hepatic cysts, and high blood pressure. Significant differences of selected health outcomes between groups with different types of disabilities remained after controlling for key demographic indicators. Further research is needed to explore the relationships between health conditions and disability types.

  11. Adherence to diabetic eye examination guidelines in Australia: the National Eye Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, Joshua; Keel, Stuart; Xie, Jing; Van Wijngaarden, Peter; Taylor, Hugh R; Dirani, Mohamed

    2017-05-15

    To determine adherence to NHMRC eye examination guidelines for Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australian people with diabetes. Cross-sectional survey using multistage, random cluster sampling. Thirty randomly selected geographic sites in the five mainland Australian states and the Northern Territory, stratified by remoteness. 1738 Indigenous Australians aged 40-92 years and 3098 non-Indigenous Australians aged 50-98 years were recruited and examined between March 2015 and April 2016 according to a standardised protocol that included a questionnaire (administered by an interviewer) and a series of standard eye tests. Adherence rates to NHMRC eye examination guidelines; factors influencing adherence. Adherence to screening recommendations was significantly greater among non-Indigenous Australians (biennial screening; 77.5%) than Indigenous Australians (annual screening; 52.7%; P < 0.001). Greater adherence by non-Indigenous Australians was associated with longer duration of diabetes (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.19 per 5 years; P = 0.018), while increasing age was associated with poorer adherence in non-Indigenous Australians (aOR, 0.70 per decade; P = 0.011). For Indigenous Australians, residing in inner regional areas (aOR, 1.66; P = 0.007) and being male (aOR, 1.46; P = 0.018) were significant factors positively associated with adherence. More than three-quarters of non-Indigenous Australians with diabetes and more than half of Indigenous Australians with diabetes adhere to the NHMRC eye examination guidelines. The discrepancy between the adherence rates may point to gaps in the provision or uptake of screening services in Indigenous communities, or a lack of awareness of the guidelines. A carefully integrated diabetic retinopathy screening service is needed, particularly in remote areas, to improve adherence rates.

  12. A systematic examination of the use of online social networking sites for sexual health promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Judy; Pedrana, Alisa E; Sacks-Davis, Rachel; Hellard, Margaret E; Chang, Shanton; Howard, Steve; Keogh, Louise; Hocking, Jane S; Stoove, Mark A

    2011-07-21

    In recent years social networking sites (SNSs) have grown rapidly in popularity. The popularity of these sites, along with their interactive functions, offer a novel environment in which to deliver health promotion messages. The aim of this paper is to examine the extent to which SNSs are currently being used for sexual health promotion and describe the breadth of these activities. We conducted a systematic search of published scientific literature, electronic sources (general and scientific search engines, blogs) and SNSs (Facebook, MySpace) to identify existing sexual health promotion activities using SNSs. Health promotion activities were eligible for inclusion if they related to sexual health or behaviour, utilised one or more SNSs, and involved some element of health promotion. Information regarding the source and type of health promotion activity, target population and site activity were extracted. 178 sexual health promotion activities met the inclusion criteria and were included in the review; only one activity was identified through a traditional systematic search of the published scientific literature. Activities most commonly used one SNS, were conducted by not-for-profit organisations, targeted young people and involved information delivery. Facebook was the most commonly used SNS (used by 71% of all health promotion activities identified), followed by MySpace and Twitter. Seventy nine percent of activities on MySpace were considered inactive as there had been no online posts within the past month, compared to 22% of activities using Facebook and 14% of activities using Twitter. The number of end-users and posts in the last seven days varied greatly between health promotion activities. SNSs are being used for sexual health promotion, although the extent to which they are utilised varies greatly, and the vast majority of activities are unreported in the scientific literature. Future studies should examine the key factors for success among those

  13. A systematic examination of the use of Online social networking sites for sexual health promotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hellard Margaret E

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years social networking sites (SNSs have grown rapidly in popularity. The popularity of these sites, along with their interactive functions, offer a novel environment in which to deliver health promotion messages. The aim of this paper is to examine the extent to which SNSs are currently being used for sexual health promotion and describe the breadth of these activities. Methods We conducted a systematic search of published scientific literature, electronic sources (general and scientific search engines, blogs and SNSs (Facebook, MySpace to identify existing sexual health promotion activities using SNSs. Health promotion activities were eligible for inclusion if they related to sexual health or behaviour, utilised one or more SNSs, and involved some element of health promotion. Information regarding the source and type of health promotion activity, target population and site activity were extracted. Results 178 sexual health promotion activities met the inclusion criteria and were included in the review; only one activity was identified through a traditional systematic search of the published scientific literature. Activities most commonly used one SNS, were conducted by not-for-profit organisations, targeted young people and involved information delivery. Facebook was the most commonly used SNS (used by 71% of all health promotion activities identified, followed by MySpace and Twitter. Seventy nine percent of activities on MySpace were considered inactive as there had been no online posts within the past month, compared to 22% of activities using Facebook and 14% of activities using Twitter. The number of end-users and posts in the last seven days varied greatly between health promotion activities. Conclusions SNSs are being used for sexual health promotion, although the extent to which they are utilised varies greatly, and the vast majority of activities are unreported in the scientific literature. Future studies

  14. [Prevalence of breast self-examination in health workers. Factors associated with its correct performance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Cruz, C; Sánchez, H; Escobar Rodríguez, A; Ponce Saavedra, A S; Rodríguez Guzmán, L M

    2001-04-01

    Determine the frequency of a breast self-examination (BSE), in health workers and the associated risk factors in its correct performance. From January 24 to February 24, 2000, a transversal analytical study was performed in the workers of the General Hospital Zone number 32, of the IMSS in Minatitlán, Veracruz. 106 women were included, who verbally accepted to participate in the study. A self-administered survey was applied which contained variables of the use and performance of the BSE, social demographic variables, information about BSE, and positive health attitudes and faces with breast cancer. A total of 92 (86.8%) of the workers have performed an BSE at least once in their life; 46.2% performed it adequately and 53.8% did not perform the technique adequately. The variables: profession, high social economical level, nulliparous after 25 years old, users of contraceptives, having visited a gynecologist for breast clinical examination, and if a family member recommended to perform a BSE, were related with the use adequately of BSE (p < 0.05). The frequency of the use of a breast self-examination is high, however, it is not performed adequately by the majority of the women studied. Its correct execution is associated with the following variables: medical background doctor or nurse, well informed about BSE, family support and a positive health attitude. It is necessary to perform educational interventions so that the breast self-examination can be performed correctly.

  15. Study protocol for examining job strain as a risk factor for severe unipolar depression in an individual participant meta-analysis of 14 European cohorts [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/30q

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida E. H. Madsen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Previous studies have shown that gainfully employed individuals with high work demands and low control at work (denoted “job strain” are at increased risk of common mental disorders, including depression. Most existing studies have, however, measured depression using self-rated symptom scales that do not necessarily correspond to clinically diagnosed depression. In addition, a meta-analysis from 2008 indicated publication bias in the field.   Methods: This study protocol describes the planned design and analyses of an individual participant data meta-analysis, to examine whether job strain is associated with an increased risk of clinically diagnosed unipolar depression based on hospital treatment registers.  The study will be based on data from approximately 120,000 individuals who participated in 14 studies on work environment and health in 4 European countries. The self-reported working conditions data will be merged with national registers on psychiatric hospital treatment, primarily hospital admissions. Study-specific risk estimates for the association between job strain and depression will be calculated using Cox regressions. The study-specific risk estimates will be pooled using random effects meta-analysis.   Discussion: The planned analyses will help clarify whether job strain is associated with an increased risk of clinically diagnosed unipolar depression. As the analysis is based on pre-planned study protocols and an individual participant data meta-analysis, the pooled risk estimates will not be influenced by selective reporting and publication bias. However, the results of the planned study may only pertain to severe cases of unipolar depression, because of the outcome measure applied.

  16. Study protocol for examining job strain as a risk factor for severe unipolar depression in an individual participant meta-analysis of 14 European cohorts [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/1yz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IPD-Work Consortium

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Previous studies have shown that gainfully employed individuals with high work demands and low control at work (denoted “job strain” are at increased risk of common mental disorders, including depression. Most existing studies have, however, measured depression using self-rated symptom scales that do not necessarily correspond to clinically diagnosed depression. In addition, a meta-analysis from 2008 indicated publication bias in the field.   Methods: This study protocol describes the planned design and analyses of an individual participant data meta-analysis, to examine whether job strain is associated with an increased risk of clinically diagnosed unipolar depression based on hospital treatment registers.  The study will be based on data from approximately 120,000 individuals who participated in 14 studies on work environment and health in 4 European countries. The self-reported working conditions data will be merged with national registers on psychiatric hospital treatment, primarily hospital admissions. Study-specific risk estimates for the association between job strain and depression will be calculated using Cox regressions. The study-specific risk estimates will be pooled using random effects meta-analysis.   Discussion: The planned analyses will help clarify whether job strain is associated with an increased risk of clinically diagnosed unipolar depression. As the analysis is based on pre-planned study protocols and an individual participant data meta-analysis, the pooled risk estimates will not be influenced by selective reporting and publication bias. However, the results of the planned study may only pertain to severe cases of unipolar depression, because of the outcome measure applied.

  17. What Makes Vietnamese (Not) Attend Periodic General Health Examinations? A 2016 Cross-sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuong, Quan-Hoang; Vu, Quang-Hoi; Vuong, Thu-Trang

    2017-04-01

    General health examinations (GHE) have become an increasingly common measure for preventive medicine in Vietnam. However, little is known about the factors among Viet-namese people who attend or miss GHE. Budget or time constraints remain to be evaluated for better-informed policy making. This study investigates factors affecting behaviors in attending periodic GHE. The main objectives are as follows: (1) to explore empirical relationships between influencing factors and periodic GHE frequencies, and (2) to predict the probabilities of attending GHE under associated conditions. The study used a 2,068-observational dataset, obtained from a Vietnamese survey in 2016. The analysis was then performed using the methods of baseline-category logits for establishing relationships between predictor and response variables. Significant relationships were found among the expenditure and time consumption, health priority and sensitivity to health data, insurance status, and frequency of GHE, with most p-values = 0.01. Generally, people attended the GHE when they had the resources and health priorities (72.7% probability). Expenditure and time remain key obstacles to the periodic GHE. Health priority and health data are important in improving rates for GHEs. Health insurance should play a positive role in promoting the GHE.

  18. Clinical relevance of routine semen analysis and controversies surrounding the 2010 World Health Organization criteria for semen examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, Sandro C

    2014-01-01

    Semen analysis is the corner stone of infertility evaluation as it provides information on the functional status of the seminiferous tubules, epididymis and accessory sex glands. The methods on how the human semen should be evaluated are provided by the World Health Organization, which periodically releases manuals that include specific protocols and reference standards. In 2010, the WHO published new criteria for human semen characteristics that were markedly lower than those previously reported. In this review initially it is discussed the limitations of semen analysis as a surrogate measure of a man's ability to father a pregnancy. Secondly, it is analyzed methodology issues that could explain why the newly released reference values were different from those earlier reported. Thirdly, it is speculated on the likely effects of the 2010 WHO criteria in the management of male infertility. Due to the several inherent limitations of semen analysis as a surrogate marker of male infertility, physicians should exercise caution when interpreting results. A template for semen analysis reports that incorporates the distribution of the semen characteristics of recent fathers in centiles rather than solely the minimum thresholds could aid clinicians to better understand how a given patient results compare with the reference population. Importantly, a male infertility evaluation must go far beyond a simple semen analysis, as it has to be complemented with a proper physical examination, a comprehensive history taking, and relevant endocrine, genetic, and other investigations.

  19. [Physical activity: results of the German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Adults (DEGS1)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug, S; Jordan, S; Mensink, G B M; Müters, S; Finger, J; Lampert, T

    2013-05-01

    Regular physical activity can have a positive effect on health at any age. Today's lifestyles, however, can often be characterised as sedentary. Therefore, the promotion of physical activity and sports has become an integral part of public health measures. The representative data of adults aged 18 to 79 years in Germany obtained from the "German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Adults" (DEGS1) provide an overview of self-estimated current physical activity behaviour. The results show that one third of the adult population claims to pay close attention to reaching a sufficient level of physical activity and one fourth participates in sports for at least 2 h/week on a regular basis. Thus, the percentage of adults regularly engaged in sports has increased compared to the previous "German National Health Interview and Examination Survey 1998". Still, four out of five adults do not achieve at least 2.5 h/week of moderate-intensity physical activity as recommended by the World Health Organisation. Consequently, future individual-level and population-level interventions should focus on target group-specific measures while continuing to promote regular physical activity in all segments of the population. An English full-text version of this article is available at SpringerLink as supplemental.

  20. Health examination and air monitoring evaluation for workers exposed to 2-nitropropane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, G N; Garrison, R P; McFee, D R

    1985-01-01

    Comprehensive employee health examinations along with work-place area and personal monitoring were conducted to evaluate potential exposure to 2-nitropropane. The employee cross section included in the study consisted of nearly all workers at the plant. The entire workforce was represented, including those who did not have contact with 2-nitropropane. No adverse health effects were found which could be connected with work experience. Body systems evaluated included: lungs, liver, kidney, blood, skin and cardiovascular. Work area levels at specific locations sometimes exceeded 25 ppm, but personal time-weighted average levels generally were below 25 ppm.

  1. Examining E-Loyalty in a Sexual Health Website: Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunn, Alexandra; Crutzen, Rik; Haag, Devon; Chabot, Cathy; Carson, Anna; Ogilvie, Gina; Shoveller, Jean; Gilbert, Mark

    2017-11-02

    Web-based sexual health resources are typically evaluated in terms of their efficacy. Information is lacking about how sexual health promotion websites are perceived and used. It is essential to understand website use to address challenges with adherence and attrition to Web-based health interventions. An existing theoretical framework for examining loyalty to electronic health (eHealth) interventions has been not yet been applied in the context of sexual health promotion nor has the association between e-loyalty and intended intervention efficacy outcomes been investigated. The objectives of this study were to investigate users' loyalty toward a sexual health website (ie, e-loyalty), measure user perceptions of the website, and measure the association between e-loyalty and perceived knowledge increase and intent to change behavior. Over 4 months, website users (clients and health care providers) participated in an open, online, cross-sectional survey about their user experiences that measured e-loyalty, user perceptions, and intended website efficacy outcomes. Relationships between user perceptions and e-loyalty were investigated using structural equation modeling (SEM). Associations between e-loyalty and website efficacy outcomes were tested using Spearman rank correlation. A total of 173 participants completed user perception questions and were included in the analysis. E-loyalty was high for both clients and providers and was significantly correlated with clients' perceived knowledge increase (ρ(171)=.30, Pe-loyalty. Finding the website "easy to understand" was significantly related to active trust (ie, participants' willingness to act upon information presented on the website). E-loyalty may be related to the efficacy of the selected website in improving one's sexual health and was significantly associated with all three intended knowledge and behavioral outcomes. To increase e-loyalty, trustworthiness and active trust are important user perceptions to

  2. Exploring digital divides: an examination of eHealth technology use in health information seeking, communication and personal health information management in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustria, Mia Liza A; Smith, Scott Alan; Hinnant, Charles C

    2011-09-01

    Recent government initiatives to deploy health information technology in the USA, coupled with a growing body of scholarly evidence linking online heath information and positive health-related behaviors, indicate a widespread belief that access to health information and health information technologies can help reduce healthcare inequalities. However, it is less clear whether the benefits of greater access to online health information and health information technologies is equitably distributed across population groups, particularly to those who are underserved. To examine this issue, this article employs the 2007 Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) to investigate relationships between a variety of socio-economic variables and the use of the web-based technologies for health information seeking, personal health information management and patient-provider communication within the context of the USA. This study reveals interesting patterns in technology adoption, some of which are in line with previous studies, while others are less clear. Whether these patterns indicate early evidence of a narrowing divide in eHealth technology use across population groups as a result of the narrowing divide in Internet access and computer ownership warrants further exploration. In particular, the findings emphasize the need to explore differences in the use of eHealth tools by medically underserved and disadvantaged groups. In so doing, it will be important to explore other psychosocial variables, such as health literacy, that may be better predictors of health consumers' eHealth technology adoption.

  3. Development of a Behavior Change Intervention to Improve Sexual Health Service Use Among University Undergraduate Students: Mixed Methods Study Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Christine; Steenbeek, Audrey; Langille, Donald; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Curran, Janet

    2017-11-02

    University students are at risk for acquiring sexually transmitted infections and suffering other negative health outcomes. Sexual health services offer preventive and treatment interventions that aim to reduce these infections and associated health consequences. However, university students often delay or avoid seeking sexual health services. An in-depth understanding of the factors that influence student use of sexual health services is needed to underpin effective sexual health interventions. In this study, we aim to design a behavior change intervention to address university undergraduate students' use of sexual health services at two universities in Nova Scotia, Canada. This mixed methods study consists of three phases that follow a systematic approach to intervention design outlined in the Behaviour Change Wheel. In Phase 1, we examine patterns of sexual health service use among university students in Nova Scotia, Canada, using an existing dataset. In Phase 2, we identify the perceived barriers and enablers to students' use of sexual health services. This will include focus groups with university undergraduate students, health care providers, and university administrators using a semistructured guide, informed by the Capability, Opportunity, Motivation-Behaviour Model and Theoretical Domains Framework. In Phase 3, we identify behavior change techniques and intervention components to develop a theory-based intervention to improve students' use of sexual health services. This study will be completed in March 2018. Results from each phase and the finalized intervention design will be reported in 2018. Previous intervention research to improve university students' use of sexual health services lacks a theoretical assessment of barriers. This study will employ a mixed methods research design to examine university students' use of sexual health service and apply behavior change theory to design a theory- and evidence-based sexual health service intervention. Our

  4. An examination of the factors that influence costs in medical patients with health anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Barbara; Tyrer, Peter; Tyrer, Helen; Cooper, Sylvia; Crawford, Mike J; Byford, Sarah

    2012-07-01

    To measure and document the total service cost of patients with health anxiety and to investigate the statistical association between costs and patient characteristics, levels of anxiety and other clinical characteristics. Data on services used by 444 people with high health anxiety from five types of secondary care medical outpatient clinics were collected in interview with patients by self-report for the preceding six months. Costs associated with these services were calculated and personal and clinical factors associated with these costs were explored. Mean total costs over six months were £2976 per participant and ranged from £146 to £25,200. The regression model found higher costs were significantly associated with poorer social functioning and self-reported health-related quality of life. No statistical association was found between severity of health anxiety and cost, and generalised anxiety was inversely related. The findings suggest that a re-examination of the simple causative relationship between health anxiety and cost in the health anxious is warranted. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome among Roma: a comparative health examination survey in Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kósa, Zsigmond; Moravcsik-Kornyicki, Ágota; Diószegi, Judit; Roberts, Bayard; Szabó, Zoltán; Sándor, János; Ádány, Róza

    2015-04-01

    The objective of our study was to compare the health status of the Roma people with that of the general population in Hungary. A health examination survey to define the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components was performed in a representative random sample (n = 646) of the Roma population aged 20-64 years living in segregated colonies, and data were compared with that obtained in a representative random sample (n = 1819) of the Hungarian population. The risks for central obesity, hypertension and raised triglyceride level among Roma adults were not different from the Hungarian references, while raised fasting plasma glucose or known type 2 diabetes mellitus (OR = 2.65, 95%CI 1.90-3.69), reduced HDL cholesterol level or treated lipid disorder (OR = 2.15, 95%CI 1.65-2.79) were significantly more frequent in all age groups in the Roma sample. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome (OR = 1.37, 95%CI 1.03-1.83) was also significantly higher among Roma than in the general Hungarian population. Besides tackling the socio-economic determinants of the poor health of Roma people, specific public health interventions considering increased genetic susceptibility to metabolic disturbances are needed to improve their health status. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  6. Multilevel Examination of Facility Characteristics, Social Integration, and Health for Older Adults Living in Nursing Homes

    OpenAIRE

    Skye N. Leedahl; Rosemary K. Chapin; Little, Todd D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Testing a model based on past research and theory, this study assessed relationships between facility characteristics (i.e., culture change efforts, social workers) and residents’ social networks and social support across nursing homes; and examined relationships between multiple aspects of social integration (i.e., social networks, social capital, social engagement, social support) and mental and functional health for older adults in nursing homes.

  7. Characteristics of Indigenous primary health care models of service delivery: a scoping review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harfield, Stephen; Davy, Carol; Kite, Elaine; McArthur, Alexa; Munn, Zachary; Brown, Ngiare; Brown, Alex

    2015-11-01

    The objective of the scoping review is to identify and describe within the existing literature the characteristics (values, principles, components and suggest practical applications) of primary health care models of service delivery for Indigenous people. More specifically, the review question is:What are the characteristics (values, principles, components and suggested practical applications) of primary health care models of service delivery for Indigenous people?Findings from this scoping review will inform two systematic reviews. One of these will explore the acceptability and the other the effectiveness of identified characteristics. The scoping review will follow the JBI Scoping Review methodology as outlined in the 2015 Joanna Briggs Institute Reviewers' Manual. Indigenous populations in colonized countries experience worse health outcomes relative to their non-Indigenous counterparts. In Australia, in the period 2010 to 2012 the estimated gap in life expectancy between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians compared to non-Indigenous Australians was 10 years Similar gaps in life expectancy between Indigenous and non-Indigenous have been demonstrated in other countries, such as New Zealand, Canada and the United StatesThe gap in life expectancy and the health disadvantage experienced by Indigenous people is in part the result of mainstream health services not adequately meeting the health needs of Indigenous people and Indigenous people's inability to access mainstream services Part of the solution has been the establishment of primary health care services for and in many cases run by Indigenous people. Indigenous primary health services have been developed to provide culturally appropriate services that meet the needs of local Indigenous communities.In Australia, the first Aboriginal medical service was established in 1971 in Redfern, New South Wales, by "community activists in response to ongoing discrimination against Aboriginal people within

  8. The relationships between work characteristics and mental health: Examining normal, reversed and reciprocal relationships in a 4-wave study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange, A.H. de; Taris, T.W.; Kompier, M.A.J.; Houtman, I.L.D.; Bongers, P.M.

    2004-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined the causal relationships between job demands, job control and supervisor support on the one hand and mental health on the other. Whereas we assumed that work characteristics affect mental health, we also examined reversed causal relationships (mental health

  9. 77 FR 43721 - Examinations of Work Areas in Underground Coal Mines for Violations of Mandatory Health or Safety...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-26

    ... Safety and Health Administration 30 CFR Part 75 RIN 1219-AB75 Examinations of Work Areas in Underground Coal Mines for Violations of Mandatory Health or Safety Standards AGENCY: Mine Safety and Health... requirements contained in the final rule on Examinations of Work Areas in Underground Coal Mines for Violations...

  10. Proposition of an aging indicator from general health examination in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guéguen, René

    2002-03-01

    We present an indicator of aging based on eight quantitative variables, measured during the periodical health examination offered by French social security to the general population in France. The used sample derived from the population examined each year. We selected a reference group of 24,510 adults older than 25 years (non-smokers, drinking less than 44 g alcohol per day, with body mass index less than 35, and not using medication). A multiple regression analysis by gender was used to select significant variables to predict age from all quantitative variables measured during the health examination. The resulting biological age could be calculated from the measured variables and the aging indicator was defined as the difference between the calculated age and the chronological age. By definition, this indicator is independent of age in the reference population and gives an indication of the difference between an individual's status in the process of aging and the mean status of people of the same chronological age. Associations between this indicator and life style habits such as tobacco and alcohol use, and occupational status were observed. A geographical analysis also exhibited significant variation over France. Such an indicator can be used at the individual level as a pedagogical tool to explain the observed individual health status. It is also of interest for the epidemiological studies, where it could contribute to a better understanding of the aging process and associated factors.

  11. Personality and coping: a context for examining celebrity worship and mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltby, John; Day, Liza; McCutcheon, Lynn E; Gillett, Raphael; Houran, James; Ashe, Diane D

    2004-11-01

    The adaptational-continuum model of personality and coping suggests a useful context for research areas that emphasize both personality and coping. The present paper used Ferguson's (2001) model integrating personality and coping factors to further conceptualize findings around celebrity worship. Three hundred and seventy-two respondents completed measures of celebrity worship, personality, coping style, general health, stress, positive and negative affect and life satisfaction. Celebrity worship for intense-personal reasons is associated with poorer mental heath and this relationship can be understood within the dimensions of neuroticism and a coping style that suggests disengagement. Such findings suggest the utility of examining the relationship between celebrity worship and mental health within both personality and coping variables, which have practical implications for understanding and addressing mental health problems that may occur as the result of engaging in celebrity worship for intense-personal reasons.

  12. Examination of factors associated with the mental health status of principals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewa, Carolyn S; Dermer, Stanley W; Chau, Nancy; Lowrey, Scott; Mawson, Susan; Bell, Judith

    2009-01-01

    The rise in globalization, new technologies and changes in workforce demographics have created new work environments. As a result, countries around the world are seeking to restructure their educational systems to better prepare future generations for the challenges that they will face in this new labour market. These trends have also introduced new and increased demands on the educational sector and especially school principals who are responsible for the quality of education in schools. This study examines the association between mental health status and self-reported working conditions of principals. Our findings highlight potential mental health problems among principals. The results provide evidence that their satisifaction with their work characteristics are associated with their mental health status. They also indicate areas in which school boards may be well positioned to address some of the potential organizational difficulties encountered by this group.

  13. Anger Expression and Ill-Health in Two Cultures: An Examination of Inflammation and Cardiovascular Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitayama, Shinobu; Park, Jiyoung; Boylan, Jennifer Morozink; Miyamoto, Yuri; Levine, Cynthia S.; Markus, Hazel Rose; Karasawa, Mayumi; Coe, Christopher L.; Kawakami, Norito; Love, Gayle D.; Ryff, Carol D.

    2014-01-01

    Expression of anger is associated with biological health risk (BHR) in Western cultures. However, recent evidence documenting culturally divergent functions of anger expression suggests that the link between anger expression and BHR may be moderated by culture. To test this prediction, we examined large probability samples of both Japanese and Americans with multiple measures of BHR including pro-inflammatory markers (Interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein) and indices of cardiovascular malfunction (systolic blood pressure and Total/HDL cholesterol ratio). We found that the positive link between anger expression and increased BHR was robust for Americans. As predicted, however, this association was diametrically reversed for Japanese, with anger expression predicting reduced BHR. The pattern was unique to the expressive facet of anger and remained after controlling for age, gender, health status, health behaviors, social status, and reported experience of negative emotions. Implications for socio-cultural modulation of bio-physiological responses are discussed. PMID:25564521

  14. [Measurement of socioeconomic status in the German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Adults (DEGS1)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampert, T; Kroll, L; Müters, S; Stolzenberg, H

    2013-05-01

    Socioeconomic status (SES) constitutes a central analysis category of epidemiological research and health reporting. As part of the German cardiovascular disease prevention study 1984-1991, a multi-dimensional aggregated index was developed for the purpose of measuring SES. This index continues to be used in numerous studies to this day. For the purpose of health monitoring at the Robert Koch Institute (RKI), the index was fundamentally revised following critical assessment. This article describes the basic concepts underlying the revision and how they were implemented in relation to the "German health interview and examination survey for adults" (DEGS1). In addition, the results of the age and sex-specific distribution of the values of the revised SES index and those relating to the connection with other measurements of socioeconomic status are reported. The results are based on the data of DEGS1 2012 and the German national health interview and examination survey 1998 (GNHIES98). An English full-text version of this article is available at SpringerLink as supplemental.

  15. Examining CAM use disclosure using the Behavioral Model of Health Services Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faith, Jennifer; Thorburn, Sheryl; Tippens, Kimberly M

    2013-10-01

    To improve understanding of factors that may influence disclosure of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use in the U.S. Cross-sectional survey. Data are from the 2001 Health Care Quality Survey (HCQS), a nationally representative study of adults aged 18 and older living in the continental United States. Using the Behavioral Model of Health Services Use, we conducted multivariate logistic regressions to identify factors associated with disclosing CAM use among the sub-sample of recent CAM users (n=1995). Disclosure of CAM use. Most CAM users (71.0%) disclosed their use of CAM to their doctors. Contextual, individual, and health behavior factors were associated with CAM use disclosure. Of particular interest, disclosure was significantly more likely among those who perceived high quality relationships with their providers (AOR=1.59, CI: 1.01, 2.49) and among those who had a regular source of medical care (AOR=1.54, CI: 1.03, 2.29). The odds of disclosure were also higher among those who used practitioner-provided CAM, with (AOR=2.02, CI: 1.34, 3.06) or without (AOR=1.52, CI: 1.05, 2.20) concurrent herbal medicine use, compared to those who used herbal medicines only. The Behavioral Model of Health Services Use is a useful framework for examining factors that may influence disclosure of CAM use. Further research should examine these relationships using more comprehensive measures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A Randomized Trial Examining Three Strategies for Supporting Health Insurance Decisions among the Uninsured.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politi, Mary C; Kaphingst, Kimberly A; Liu, Jingxia Esther; Perkins, Hannah; Furtado, Karishma; Kreuter, Matthew W; Shacham, Enbal; McBride, Timothy

    2016-10-01

    The Affordable Care Act allows uninsured individuals to select health insurance from numerous private plans, a challenging decision-making process. This study examined the effectiveness of strategies to support health insurance decisions among the uninsured. Participants (N = 343) from urban, suburban, and rural areas were randomized to 1 of 3 conditions: 1) a plain language table; 2) a visual condition where participants chose what information to view and in what order; and 3) a narrative condition. We administered measures assessing knowledge (true/false responses about key features of health insurance), confidence in choices (uncertainty subscale of the Decisional Conflict Scale), satisfaction (items from the Health Information National Trends Survey), preferences for insurance features (measured on a Likert scale from not at all important to very important), and plan choice. Although we did not find significant differences in knowledge, confidence in choice, or satisfaction across condition, participants across conditions made value-consistent choices, selecting plans that aligned with their preferences for key insurance features. In addition, those with adequate health literacy skills as measured by the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine-Short Form (REALM-SF) had higher knowledge overall ([Formula: see text] = 6.1 v. 4.8, P < 0.001) and preferred the plain language table to the visual (P = 0.04) and visual to narrative (P = 0.0002) conditions, while those with inadequate health literacy skills showed no preference for study condition. A similar pattern was seen for those with higher subjective numeracy skills and higher versus lower education with regard to health insurance knowledge. Individuals with higher income felt less confident in their choices ([Formula: see text] = 28.7 v. 10.0, where higher numbers indicate less confidence/more uncertainty; P = 0.004). Those developing materials about the health insurance marketplace to support health

  17. The characteristics of national health initiatives promoting earlier cancer diagnosis among adult populations: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calanzani, Natalia; Weller, David; Campbell, Christine

    2017-07-10

    The increasing burden of cancer morbidity and mortality has led to the development of national health initiatives to promote earlier cancer diagnosis and improve cancer survival. This protocol describes a systematic review aiming to identify the evidence about such initiatives among the adult population. We will describe their components, stakeholders and target populations, and summarise their outcomes. We will search databases and websites for peer-reviewed publications and grey literature on national health initiatives in high-income countries as defined by the World Bank. Quantitative, qualitative and mixed-methods studies will be included and assessed for their methodological quality. Study selection, quality assessment and data extraction will be carried out independently by two reviewers. Narrative synthesis will be used to analyse the findings. This systematic review analyses secondary data and ethical approval is not required. Review findings will be helpful to researchers, policy makers, governments and other key stakeholders developing similar initiatives and assessing cancer outcomes. The results will be submitted to a peer-reviewed journal in order to reach a diverse group of healthcare professionals, researchers and policy makers. This systematic review protocol is registered at PROSPERO (CRD42016047233). © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  18. Making sense of health information technology implementation: A qualitative study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McDaniel Reuben R

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Implementing new practices, such as health information technology (HIT, is often difficult due to the disruption of the highly coordinated, interdependent processes (e.g., information exchange, communication, relationships of providing care in hospitals. Thus, HIT implementation may occur slowly as staff members observe and make sense of unexpected disruptions in care. As a critical organizational function, sensemaking, defined as the social process of searching for answers and meaning which drive action, leads to unified understanding, learning, and effective problem solving -- strategies that studies have linked to successful change. Project teamwork is a change strategy increasingly used by hospitals that facilitates sensemaking by providing a formal mechanism for team members to share ideas, construct the meaning of events, and take next actions. Methods In this longitudinal case study, we aim to examine project teams' sensemaking and action as the team prepares to implement new information technology in a tiertiary care hospital. Based on management and healthcare literature on HIT implementation and project teamwork, we chose sensemaking as an alternative to traditional models for understanding organizational change and teamwork. Our methods choices are derived from this conceptual framework. Data on project team interactions will be prospectively collected through direct observation and organizational document review. Through qualitative methods, we will identify sensemaking patterns and explore variation in sensemaking across teams. Participant demographics will be used to explore variation in sensemaking patterns. Discussion Outcomes of this research will be new knowledge about sensemaking patterns of project teams, such as: the antecedents and consequences of the ongoing, evolutionary, social process of implementing HIT; the internal and external factors that influence the project team, including team composition

  19. From public health to international law: possible protocols for inclusion in the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joossens, L

    2000-01-01

    Faced with a difficult business environment in the United States and the falling demand for cigarettes in industrialized countries, multinational tobacco companies have been competing fiercely to expand their sales in developing countries. Because of the worldwide threat posed by smoking to health and the emphasis being placed by international tobacco companies on marketing in developing countries, an international regulatory strategy, such as the WHO proposed Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, is needed. This review describes from a public health perspective the possible scope and key considerations of protocols that should be included in the convention. The key international areas that should be considered in tobacco control are: prices, smuggling; tax-free tobacco products; advertising and sponsorship; the Internet; testing methods; package design and labelling; agriculture; and information sharing.

  20. Study Protocol - an exploratory trial on health promoting schools at Dutch secondary schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Busch

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recent studies show adolescent health-related behaviours to co-occur synergistically. This paper describes the study design for an exploratory trial on the effects of a comprehensive, whole-school health promoting school intervention. This intervention tackles seven different behavioural domains simultaneously via a combination of education, creating a healthy environment and introducing healthy behavioural policies. Additionally, extensive partnerships are formed between schools, parents, neighbourhoods and youth health authorities to coordinate health promotion efforts.Study design and data collection methods: The intervention will be implemented at two secondary schools. Results will be compared with two control schools (n≈1500. The intervention's effectiveness in changing student behaviours as well as physical and psychosocial health status along with qualitative lessons learned on the integration of youth health care services and school health education practices are the main aimed outcomes of this study. Data are collected via a mixed methods design combining an annual youth health (behaviour monitor with a qualitative process evaluation via interviews with key stakeholders.Data analysis: A multilevel analysis is performed combined with a systematic analysis of qualitative interview data.Conclusions: This study will produce an evaluation of a comprehensive health promoting school intervention that combines an integrated approach of schools, neighbourhoods, families and youth health services to improve adolescent health.

  1. Study protocol-an exploratory trial on health promoting schools at Dutch secondary schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Vincent; De Leeuw, Johannes Rob Josephus; Petrus Schrijvers, Augustinus Jacobus

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies show adolescent health-related behaviours to co-occur synergistically. This paper describes the study design for an exploratory trial on the effects of a comprehensive, whole-school health promoting school intervention. This intervention tackles seven different behavioural domains simultaneously via a combination of education, creating a healthy environment and introducing healthy behavioural policies. Additionally, extensive partnerships are formed between schools, parents, neighbourhoods and youth health authorities to coordinate health promotion efforts. The intervention will be implemented at two secondary schools. Results will be compared with two control schools (n≈1500). The intervention's effectiveness in changing student behaviours as well as physical and psychosocial health status along with qualitative lessons learned on the integration of youth health care services and school health education practices are the main aimed outcomes of this study. Data are collected via a mixed methods design combining an annual youth health (behaviour) monitor with a qualitative process evaluation via interviews with key stakeholders. A multilevel analysis is performed combined with a systematic analysis of qualitative interview data. This study will produce an evaluation of a comprehensive health promoting school intervention that combines an integrated approach of schools, neighbourhoods, families and youth health services to improve adolescent health.

  2. Weight Care Project: Health professionals' attitudes and ability to assess body weight status - Study protocol

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moorhead, Anne

    2011-03-31

    Abstract Background Health professionals working in primary care and public health have opportunities to address body weight status issues with their patients through face-to-face contact. The objectives of this all-Ireland project are: 1. to assess the attitudes, current practices\\/behaviours and knowledge of key health professional groups on body weight status; 2. to assess the health professional groups\\' ability to identify body weight status in both adults and children. The health professional groups are: (a) community related public health nurses; (b) school public health nurses; (c) GPs and practice nurses (primary care); and (d) occupational health nurses (workplace) from both Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. Methods\\/Design This all-Ireland multi-disciplinary project follows a mixed methods approach using both quantitative and qualitative methodologies, and consists of four components: 1. Literature review - to explore the role of health professionals in managing obesity through spontaneous intervention in a variety of health promotion settings. 2. Telephone interviews and focus groups - to gain an in-depth insight into the views of health professionals in assessing body weight status. 3. Survey (primarily online but also paper-based) - to determine the attitudes, current practices\\/behaviours and knowledge of health professionals in assessing body weight status. 4. Online evaluation study - an online interactive programme will be developed to assess health professionals\\' ability to identify the body weight status of adults and children. Discussion This project will assess and report the attitudes, current practices\\/behaviours and knowledge of key health professional groups within Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland on body weight status, and their ability to identify body weight status in both adults and children. The results of this project will generate recommendations for clinical practice in managing obesity, which may

  3. Weight Care Project: Health professionals' attitudes and ability to assess body weight status - Study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murphy Kathy

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health professionals working in primary care and public health have opportunities to address body weight status issues with their patients through face-to-face contact. The objectives of this all-Ireland project are: 1. to assess the attitudes, current practices/behaviours and knowledge of key health professional groups on body weight status; 2. to assess the health professional groups' ability to identify body weight status in both adults and children. The health professional groups are: (a community related public health nurses; (b school public health nurses; (c GPs and practice nurses (primary care; and (d occupational health nurses (workplace from both Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. Methods/Design This all-Ireland multi-disciplinary project follows a mixed methods approach using both quantitative and qualitative methodologies, and consists of four components: 1. Literature review - to explore the role of health professionals in managing obesity through spontaneous intervention in a variety of health promotion settings. 2. Telephone interviews and focus groups - to gain an in-depth insight into the views of health professionals in assessing body weight status. 3. Survey (primarily online but also paper-based - to determine the attitudes, current practices/behaviours and knowledge of health professionals in assessing body weight status. 4. Online evaluation study - an online interactive programme will be developed to assess health professionals' ability to identify the body weight status of adults and children. Discussion This project will assess and report the attitudes, current practices/behaviours and knowledge of key health professional groups within Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland on body weight status, and their ability to identify body weight status in both adults and children. The results of this project will generate recommendations for clinical practice in managing obesity, which may

  4. Racial differences in self-rated health at similar levels of physical functioning: an examination of health pessimism in the health, aging, and body composition study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, S Melinda; Schulz, Richard; Rooks, Ronica N; Albert, Steven M; Thorpe, Roland J; Brenes, Gretchen A; Harris, Tamara B; Koster, Annemarie; Satterfield, Suzanne; Ayonayon, Hilsa N; Newman, Anne B

    2009-01-01

    The health pessimism hypothesis suggests that Black elders are more pessimistic about health than Whites and therefore tend to report lower self-rated health (SRH) at comparable health status. The current analysis examined the factors associated with SRH and tested the health pessimism hypothesis among older adults at similar levels of physical functioning. The study example included 2,729 Health, Aging, and Body Composition study participants aged 70-79 years. We used hierarchical logistic regression to examine the association between race and SRH while adjusting for demographic, physical health, and psychosocial factors. The analyses were repeated for participants at similar levels of objective functioning to test the health pessimism hypothesis. The association between race and SRH remained independent of physical and psychosocial health variables, with Whites being 3.7 times more likely than Black elders to report favorable SRH. This association was significant at each level of physical functioning and greater at the higher (odds ratio [OR] = 5.5) versus lower (OR = 2.2) levels of functioning. The results suggest greater health pessimism among Black elders and expand previous work by including objective functioning in multidimensional models to deconstruct race variations in the SRH of older adults.

  5. Cardiovascular health metrics and accelerometer-measured physical activity levels: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2003-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreira, Tiago V; Harrington, Deirdre M; Katzmarzyk, Peter T

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether relationships exist between accelerometer-measured moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and other cardiovascular (CV) health metrics in a large sample. Data from the 2003-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) collected from January 1, 2003, through December 31, 2006, were used. Overall, 3454 nonpregnant adults 20 years or older who fasted for 6 hours or longer, with valid accelerometer data and with CV health metrics, were included in the study. Blood pressure (BP), body mass index (BMI), smoking status, diet, fasting plasma glucose level, and total cholesterol level were defined as ideal, intermediate, and poor on the basis of American Heart Association criteria. Results were weighted to account for sampling design, oversampling, and nonresponse. Significant increasing linear trends in mean daily MVPA were observed across CV health levels for BMI, BP, and fasting plasma glucose (Phealth metrics (Phealth metrics in this large sample. These results support the inclusion of physical activity in the overall definition of ideal CV health. Copyright © 2014 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Socioeconomic status and health: results of the German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Adults (DEGS1)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampert, T; Kroll, L E; von der Lippe, E; Müters, S; Stolzenberg, H

    2013-05-01

    The analysis focuses on the connection between socioeconomic status (SES) and five health outcomes in the 18 to 79-year-old population of Germany. It uses data from the "German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Adults" (DEGS1) which the Robert Koch Institute conducted in the period from 2008 to 2011 (n=8152). Socioeconomic status is recorded via a multidimensional index which includes information on education attainment, occupational status and household income. The results show that persons with a low socioeconomic status have a self-rated health status which is worse than that of persons with a medium or high socioeconomic status, and that they have diabetes more frequently. They also have a higher risk of depressive symptoms, obesity and physical inactivity. The results illustrate that health chances and the risk of illness are still very socially uneven distributed, thus emphasising the significance of political interventions to reduce health inequalities. An English full-text version of this article is available at SpringerLink as supplemental.

  7. An overview of the European Health Examination Survey Pilot Joint Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuulasmaa, Kari; Tolonen, Hanna; Koponen, Päivikki; Kilpeläinen, Katri; Avdicová, Mária; Broda, Grazyna; Calleja, Neville; Dias, Carlos; Gösswald, Antje; Kubinova, Ruzena; Mindell, Jennifer; Männistö, Satu; Palmieri, Luigi; Tell, Grethe S; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Verschuren, Wm Monique

    2012-08-28

    Health Examination Surveys (HESs) can provide essential information on the health and health determinants of a population, which is not available from other data sources. Nevertheless, only some European countries have systems of national HESs. A study conducted in 2006-2008 concluded that it is feasible to organize national HESs using standardized measurement procedures in nearly all EU countries. The feasibility study also outlined a structure for a European Health Examination Survey (EHES), which is a collaboration to organize standardized HESs in countries across Europe.To facilitate setting up national surveys and to gain experience in applying the EHES methods in different cultures, EHES Joint Action (2010-2011) planned and piloted standardized HESs in the working age population in 12 countries. This included countries with earlier national HESs and countries which were planning their first national HES. The core measurements included in all surveys were weight, height, waist circumference and blood pressure, and blood samples were taken to measure lipid profiles and glucose or glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c). These are modifiable determinants of major chronic diseases not identified in health interview surveys. There was a questionnaire to complement the data on the examination measurements. Evaluation of the pilot surveys was based on review of national manuals and evaluation reports of survey organizers; observations and discussions of survey procedures during site visits and training seminars; and other communication with the survey organizers. Despite unavoidable differences in the ways HESs are organized in the various countries, high quality and comparability of the data seems achievable. The biggest challenge in each country was obtaining high participation rate. Most of the pilot countries are now ready to start their full-size national HES, and six of them have already started. The EHES Pilot Project has set up the structure for obtaining comparable

  8. Defining features of the practice of global health research: an examination of 14 global health research teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Craig; Daibes, Ibrahim

    2010-07-09

    This paper strives to develop a pragmatic view of the scope of practice and core characteristics of global health research (GHR) by examining the activities of 14 Canadian-funded global health teams that were in the process of implementing research programs. Information was collected by a reflective exploration of team proposals and progress reports, a content analysis of the outputs from an all-team meeting and review of the literature. Teams adopted equity-centered, problem-focused, systems-based approaches intended to find upstream determinants that could make people more resilient to social and ecological factors impacting their health. Long-term visions and time frames were needed to develop and solidify fully functional interdisciplinary, multinational, multicultural partnerships. The implementation of research into practice was a motivating factor for all teams, but to do this, they recognized the need for evidence-based advice on how to best do this. Traditional measures of biomedical research excellence were necessary but not sufficient to encompass views of excellence of team-based interdisciplinary research, which includes features like originality, coherence and cumulative contributions to fields of study, acceptance by peers and success in translating research into gains in health status. An innovative and nuanced approached to GHR ethics was needed to deal with some unique ethical issues because the needs for GHR were not adequately addressed by institutional biomedical research ethics boards. Core competencies for GHR researchers were a blend of those needed for health promotion, population health, international development, sustainable development, and systems science. Developing acceptable and meaningful ways to evaluate the short-term contributions for GHR and forecast its long-term impacts is a strategic priority needed to defend decisions being made in GHR development. Planning and investing to support the underlying GHR elements and

  9. Occupational Stress and Mental Health Symptoms: Examining the Moderating Effect of Work Recovery Strategies in Firefighters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawhney, Gargi; Jennings, Kristen S; Britt, Thomas W; Sliter, Michael T

    2017-06-12

    The goal of this research was to examine the moderating effect of work recovery strategies on the relationship between occupational stress experienced by firefighters and mental health symptoms. Work recovery strategies were identified through semistructured interviews with 20 firefighters and a literature search on recovery strategies. A total of 7 work recovery strategies emerged using the 2 methods: work-related talks, stress-related talks, time with coworkers/supervisor, exercise, recreational activities, relaxation, and mastery experiences. Using a prospective study design with a 1-month time interval in a sample of 268 firefighters, experienced occupational stress at Time 1 was positively related to mental health symptoms at Time 2. In addition, with the exception of spending time with coworkers/supervisor, exercise and mastery experiences, recovery strategies at Time 1 were negatively related to mental health symptoms at Time 2. Lastly, all work recovery strategies, except stress-related talks and relaxation, moderated the relationship between experienced occupational stress at Time 1 and mental health symptoms at Time 2. Specifically, the positive relationship between experienced occupational stress and mental health symptoms was stronger when firefighters engaged in low, rather than high, work recovery strategies. Implications for research and practice are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Examining continuity of care for Medicaid-enrolled children receiving oral health services in medical offices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranz, Ashley M.; Rozier, R. Gary; Preisser, John S.; Stearns, Sally C.; Weinberger, Morris; Lee, Jessica Y.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Children living in poverty encounter barriers to dentist visits and disproportionally experience dental caries. To improve access, most state Medicaid programs reimburse pediatric primary care providers for delivering preventive oral health services. To understand continuity of oral health services for children utilizing the North Carolina (NC) Into the Mouths of Babes (IMB) preventive oral health program, we examined the time to a dentist visit after a child’s third birthday. Methods This retrospective cohort study used NC Medicaid claims from 2000–2006 for 95,578 Medicaid-enrolled children who received oral health services before age 3. We compared children having only dentist visits before age 3 to those with: (1) only IMB visits and (2) both IMB and dentist visits. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate the time to a dentist visit following a child’s third birthday. Propensity scores with inverse-probability-of-treatment-weights were used to address confounding. Results Children with only IMB visits compared to only dentist visits before age 3 had lower rates of dentist visits after their third birthday (adjusted hazard ratio[AHR]=0.41, 95% CI=0.39 to 0.43). No difference was observed for children having both IMB and dentist visits and only dentist visits (AHR=0.99, 95% CI=0.96 to 1.03). Conclusions Barriers to dental care remain as children age, hindering continuity of care for children receiving oral health services in medical offices. PMID:24802261

  11. The Mississippi Delta Cardiovascular Health Examination Survey: Study Design and Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Vanessa L.; Ivory-Walls, Tameka; Smith, Larry; Loustalot, Fleetwood

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality in subnational areas is limited. A model for regional CVD surveillance is needed, particularly among vulnerable populations underrepresented in current monitoring systems. The Mississippi Delta Cardiovascular Health Examination Survey (CHES) is a population-based, cross-sectional study on a representative sample of adults living in the 18-county Mississippi Delta region, a rural, impoverished area with high rates of poor health outcomes and marked health disparities. The primary objectives of Delta CHES are to (1) determine the prevalence and distribution of CVD and CVD risk factors using self-reported and directly measured health metrics and (2) to assess environmental perceptions and existing policies that support or deter healthy choices. An address-based sampling frame is used for household enumeration and participant recruitment and an in-home data collection model is used to collect survey data, anthropometric measures, and blood samples from participants. Data from all sources will be merged into one analytic dataset and sample weights developed to ensure data are representative of the Mississippi Delta region adult population. Information gathered will be used to assess the burden of CVD and guide the development, implementation, and evaluation of cardiovascular health promotion and risk factor control strategies. PMID:25844257

  12. Examining the front lines of local environmental public health practice: a Maryland case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Beth; Zablotsky, Joanna; Nachman, Keeve; Burke, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Local environmental public health (EPH) is the foundation of a nation's environmental protection infrastructure. With increasing pressure to demonstrate the ability of EPH activities to effectively protect health, the Johns Hopkins Center for Excellence in EPH Practice, as part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC's) EPH capacity-building effort, developed the Profile of Maryland Environmental Public Health Practice. This profile offers an examination of front-line local EPH strengths, needs, challenges, and provides recommendations to strengthen the EPH infrastructure. A multistep process was conducted, including site visits to all of Maryland's 24 local EPH agencies and a questionnaire addressing administrative structure, communication, funding, workforce, crisis management, technology, and legal authority, completed by local EPH directors. The Maryland Profile revealed a dedicated and responsive workforce limited by a neglected, fragmented, and underfunded EPH infrastructure. Recommendations regarding leadership, workforce, training, technology, communication, and legal authority are offered. This research has implications for the national EPH infrastructure. Recommendations offered are consistent with the CDC's findings in A National Strategy to Revitalize Environmental Public Health Services. These findings and recommendations offer opportunities to facilitate the advancement of an EPH system to better protect the nation's health.

  13. Participation inequality in the National General Health Examination based on enterprise size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Young Joong; Park, Jong Heun; Eom, Huisu; Choi, Bohwa; Lee, Seyoung; Lee, Ji-Won; Myong, Jun-Pyo

    2017-01-01

    Health examinations are performed so that diseases can be identified and treated earlier. Several studies have evaluated the determinants of participation in health examinations including cancer screening, but few have evaluated the relationship between the size of the enterprise and their participation in Workers' General Health Examinations (WGHE). The aim of the present study was to estimate the association of WGHE participation with the size of the enterprise and the type of policyholder. The eligible population from 2006 through 2013 was extracted from the National Health Insurance Service (NHIS) database. The population size ranged from 14-17 million. After adjustment for age and gender, multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to estimate the odds ratios of participating in the WGHE (by age group) based on the type of policyholder (reference: public officers) and the size of the enterprise (reference: enterprise size ≥300 employees), respectively. Workers employed at enterprises with <50 persons were less likely to participate in WGHEs than those employed at enterprises with ≥300 persons. After policyholders were stratified by type (non-office workers vs. public officers), a disparity in the WGHE participation rate was found between the different types of policyholders at enterprises with <50 employees (reference: those employed at enterprises with ≥300 employees); the odds ratios for subjects in their 40s and 50s were 0.2-0.3 for non-office workers vs. 0.8-2.0 for public officers. Workplace policyholders at small enterprises comprised a vulnerable group less likely to participate in WGHEs. Efforts should be made to raise the WGHE participation rate among the vulnerable employees belonging to small enterprises, as well as among their dependents.

  14. Intersectoral approaches and integrated services in achieving the right to health for refugees upon resettlement: a scoping review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadi, Dena; Langlois, Etienne V; Ho, Shirley; Friberg, Peter; Tomson, Göran

    2017-08-30

    Global insecurity and climate change are exacerbating the need for improved management of refugee resettlement services. International standards hold states responsible for the protection of the right of non-citizens to an adequate standard of physical and mental health while recognising the importance of social determinants of health. However, programmes to protect refugees' right to health often lack coordination and monitoring. This paper describes the protocol for a scoping review to explore barriers and facilitators to the integration of health services for refugees; the content, process and actors involved in protecting refugee health; and the extent to which intersectoral approaches are leveraged to protect refugees' right to health on resettlement, especially for vulnerable groups such as women and children. Peer-reviewed (through four databases including MEDLINE, Web of Science, Global Health and PsycINFO) and grey literature were searched to identify programmes and interventions designed to promote refugee health in receiving countries. Two reviewers will screen articles and abstract data. Two frameworks for integration and intersectoral action will be applied to understand how and why certain approaches work while others do not and to identify the actors involved in achieving success at different levels of integration as defined by these frameworks. Findings from the scoping review will be shared in relevant conferences and meetings. A brief will be created with lessons learnt from successful programmes to inform decision making in design of refugee programmes and services. Ethical approval is not required as human subjects are not involved. Registered on Open Science Framework at https://osf.io/gt9ck/. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  15. Protocol: A grounded theory of ‘recovery’—perspectives of adolescent users of mental health services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmquist, Lucianne; Patterson, Sue; O'Donovan, Analise; Bradley, Graham

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Policies internationally endorse the recovery paradigm as the appropriate foundation for youth mental health services. However, given that this paradigm is grounded in the views of adults with severe mental illness, applicability to youth services and relevance to young people is uncertain, particularly as little is known about young people’s views. A comprehensive understanding of the experiences and expectations of young people is critical to developing youth mental health services that are acceptable, accessible, effective and relevant. Aim To inform development of policy and youth services, the study described in this protocol aims to develop a comprehensive account of the experiences and expectations of 12–17 year olds as they encounter mental disorders and transition through specialist mental health services. Data will be analysed to model recovery from the adolescents’ perspective. Method and analysis This grounded theory study will use quantitative and qualitative data collected in interviews with 12–17 year olds engaged with specialist Child/Youth Mental Health Service in Queensland, Australia. Interviews will explore adolescents’ expectations and experiences of mental disorder, and of services, as they transition through specialist mental health services, including the meaning of their experiences and ideas of ‘recovery’ and how their experiences and expectations are shaped. Data collection and analysis will use grounded theory methods. Ethics and dissemination Adolescents’ experiences will be presented as a mid-range theory. The research will provide tangible recommendations for youth-focused mental health policy and practice. Findings will be disseminated within academic literature and beyond to participants, health professionals, mental health advocacy groups and policy and decision makers via publications, research summaries, conferences and workshops targeting different audiences. Ethical and research governance approvals

  16. 42 CFR 476.88 - Examination of the operations and records of health care facilities and practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Examination of the operations and records of health care facilities and practitioners. 476.88 Section 476.88 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) QUALITY IMPROVEMENT ORGANIZATIONS UTILIZATION...

  17. Managerial leadership for research use in nursing and allied health care professions: a narrative synthesis protocol

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gifford, Wendy A; Holyoke, Paul; Squires, Janet E; Angus, Douglas; Brosseau, Lucie; Egan, Mary; Graham, Ian D; Miller, Carol; Wallin, Lars

    2014-01-01

    .... However, the use of research evidence remains unpredictable and inconsistent. Leadership is consistently described in implementation research as critical to enhancing research use by health care professionals...

  18. A taxonomy of state public health preparedness units: an empirical examination of organizational structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menachemi, Nir; Yeager, Valerie A; Duncan, W Jack; Katholi, Charles R; Ginter, Peter M

    2012-01-01

    State public health preparedness units (SPHPUs) were developed in response to federal funding to improve response to disasters: a responsibility that had not traditionally been within the purview of public health. The SPHPUs were created within the existing public health organizational structure, and their placement may have implications for how the unit functions, how communication takes place, and ultimately how well the key responsibilities are performed. This study empirically identifies a taxonomy of similarly structured SPHPUs and examines whether this structure is associated with state geographic, demographic, and threat-vulnerability characteristics. Data representing each SPHPU were extracted from publically available sources, including organizational charts and emergency preparedness plans for 2009. A cross-sectional segmentation analysis was conducted of variables representing structural attributes. Fifty state public health departments. Variables representing "span of control" and "hierarchal levels" were extracted from organizational charts. Structural "complexity" and "centralization" were extracted from state emergency preparedness documents and other secondary sources. On average, 6.6 people report to the same manager as the SPHPU director; 2.1 levels separate the SPHPU director from the state health officer; and a mean of 13.5 agencies collaborate with SPHPU during a disaster. Despite considerable variability in how SPHPUs had been structured, results of the cluster and principal component analysis identified 7 similarly structured groups. Neither the taxonomic groups nor the individual variables representing structure were found to be associated with state characteristics, including threat vulnerabilities. Our finding supports the hypothesis that SPHPUs are seemingly inadvertently (eg, not strategically) organized. This taxonomy provides the basis for which future research can examine how SPHPU structure relates to performance measures and

  19. Attitudes toward Reports on General Health Examination Results by Age,Judgement of Findings and Work-Styles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Masaiwa INOUE; Yasue MINAMl; Saeko MASAKI; Tomiko KAWASHITA; Kenichi YOSHIOKA; Masanobu MAEDA

    2001-01-01

    In Japan, the Industrial Safety and Health Law and its related regulations were amended in 1996 regarding the professional position of occupational physicians, hearing of general health examination (GHE...

  20. Enhancing Mental and Physical Health of Women through Engagement and Retention (EMPOWER: a protocol for a program of research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison B. Hamilton

    2017-11-01

    (QUERI will constitute a major milestone for realizing women Veterans’ engagement and empowerment in the VA system. EMPOWER QUERI will be conducted in close partnership with key VA operations partners, such as the VA Office of Women’s Health, to disseminate and spread the programs nationally. Trial registration The two implementation research studies described in this protocol have been registered as required: Facilitating Cardiovascular Risk Screening and Risk Reduction in Women Veterans: Trial registration NCT02991534 , registered 9 December 2016. Implementation of Tailored Collaborative Care for Women Veterans: Trial registration NCT02950961 , registered 21 October 2016.

  1. Enhancing Mental and Physical Health of Women through Engagement and Retention (EMPOWER): a protocol for a program of research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Alison B; Farmer, Melissa M; Moin, Tannaz; Finley, Erin P; Lang, Ariel J; Oishi, Sabine M; Huynh, Alexis K; Zuchowski, Jessica; Haskell, Sally G; Bean-Mayberry, Bevanne

    2017-11-07

    ' engagement and empowerment in the VA system. EMPOWER QUERI will be conducted in close partnership with key VA operations partners, such as the VA Office of Women's Health, to disseminate and spread the programs nationally. The two implementation research studies described in this protocol have been registered as required: Facilitating Cardiovascular Risk Screening and Risk Reduction in Women Veterans: Trial registration NCT02991534 , registered 9 December 2016. Implementation of Tailored Collaborative Care for Women Veterans: Trial registration NCT02950961 , registered 21 October 2016.

  2. The importance of examining movements within the US health care system: sequential logit modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Chioun

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Utilization of specialty care may not be a discrete, isolated behavior but rather, a behavior of sequential movements within the health care system. Although patients may often visit their primary care physician and receive a referral before utilizing specialty care, prior studies have underestimated the importance of accounting for these sequential movements. Methods The sample included 6,772 adults aged 18 years and older who participated in the 2001 Survey on Disparities in Quality of Care, sponsored by the Commonwealth Fund. A sequential logit model was used to account for movement in all stages of utilization: use of any health services (i.e., first stage, having a perceived need for specialty care (i.e., second stage, and utilization of specialty care (i.e., third stage. In the sequential logit model, all stages are nested within the previous stage. Results Gender, race/ethnicity, education and poor health had significant explanatory effects with regard to use of any health services and having a perceived need for specialty care, however racial/ethnic, gender, and educational disparities were not present in utilization of specialty care. After controlling for use of any health services and having a perceived need for specialty care, inability to pay for specialty care via income (AOR = 1.334, CI = 1.10 to 1.62 or health insurance (unstable insurance: AOR = 0.26, CI = 0.14 to 0.48; no insurance: AOR = 0.12, CI = 0.07 to 0.20 were significant barriers to utilization of specialty care. Conclusions Use of a sequential logit model to examine utilization of specialty care resulted in a detailed representation of utilization behaviors and patient characteristics that impact these behaviors at all stages within the health care system. After controlling for sequential movements within the health care system, the biggest barrier to utilizing specialty care is the inability to pay, while racial, gender, and educational disparities

  3. The importance of examining movements within the US health care system: sequential logit modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chioun; Ayers, Stephanie L; Kronenfeld, Jennie Jacobs; Frimpong, Jemima A; Rivers, Patrick A; Kim, Sam S

    2010-09-10

    Utilization of specialty care may not be a discrete, isolated behavior but rather, a behavior of sequential movements within the health care system. Although patients may often visit their primary care physician and receive a referral before utilizing specialty care, prior studies have underestimated the importance of accounting for these sequential movements. The sample included 6,772 adults aged 18 years and older who participated in the 2001 Survey on Disparities in Quality of Care, sponsored by the Commonwealth Fund. A sequential logit model was used to account for movement in all stages of utilization: use of any health services (i.e., first stage), having a perceived need for specialty care (i.e., second stage), and utilization of specialty care (i.e., third stage). In the sequential logit model, all stages are nested within the previous stage. Gender, race/ethnicity, education and poor health had significant explanatory effects with regard to use of any health services and having a perceived need for specialty care, however racial/ethnic, gender, and educational disparities were not present in utilization of specialty care. After controlling for use of any health services and having a perceived need for specialty care, inability to pay for specialty care via income (AOR = 1.334, CI = 1.10 to 1.62) or health insurance (unstable insurance: AOR = 0.26, CI = 0.14 to 0.48; no insurance: AOR = 0.12, CI = 0.07 to 0.20) were significant barriers to utilization of specialty care. Use of a sequential logit model to examine utilization of specialty care resulted in a detailed representation of utilization behaviors and patient characteristics that impact these behaviors at all stages within the health care system. After controlling for sequential movements within the health care system, the biggest barrier to utilizing specialty care is the inability to pay, while racial, gender, and educational disparities diminish to non-significance. Findings from this study

  4. The effectiveness of a health promotion with group intervention by clinical trial. Study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campo Osaba Maria-Antonia

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The promotion of health and the interventions in community health continue to be one of the pending subjects of our health system. The most prevalent health problems (cardiovascular diseases, cancer, diabetes... are for the most part related to life habits. We propose a holistic and integral approach as the best option for tackling behavior and its determinants. The research team has elaborated the necessary educational material to realize group teaching, which we call "Health Workshops". The goal of the present study is to evaluate the effectiveness of these Health Workshops in the following terms: Health Related Quality of Life (HRQOL, incorporate and maintain a balanced diet, do physical activity regularly, maintain risk factors such as tension, weight, cholesterol within normal limits and diminish cardiovascular risk. Methods/Design Controlled and random clinical testing, comparing a group of persons who have participated in the Health Workshops with a control group of similar characteristics who have not participated in the Health Workshops. Field of study: the research is being done in Health Centers of the city of Barcelona, Spain. Population studied: The group is composed of 108 persons that are actually doing the Health Workshops, and 108 that are not and form the control group. They are assigned at random to one group or the other. Data Analysis: With Student's t-distribution test to compare the differences between numerical variables or their non parametric equivalent if the variable does not comply with the criteria of normality. (Kolmogorov-Smirnof test. Chi-square test to compare the differences between categorical variables and the Logistic Regression Model to analyze different meaningful variables by dichotomous analysis related to the intervention. Discussion The Health Workshop proposed in the present study constitutes an innovative approach in health promotion, placing the emphasis on the person's self

  5. The physical examination content of the Japanese National Health and Nutrition Survey: temporal changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hisako; Imai, Shino; Nakade, Makiko; Imai, Eri; Takimoto, Hidemi

    2016-12-01

    Survey items of the Japan National Nutrition Survey (J-NNS) have changed over time. Several papers on dietary surveys have been published; however, to date, there are no in-depth papers regarding physical examinations. Therefore, we investigated changes in the survey items in the physical examinations performed in the J-NNS and the National Health and Nutrition Survey (NHNS), with the aim of incorporating useful data for future policy decisions. We summarized the description of physical examinations and marshalled the changes of survey items from the J-NNS and NHNS from 1946 to 2012. The physical examination is roughly classified into the following six components: some are relevant to anthropometric measurements, clinical measurements, physical symptoms, blood tests, lifestyle and medication by interview, and others. Items related to nutritional deficiency, such as anaemia and tendon reflex disappearance, and body weight measurements were collected during the early period, according to the instructions of the General Headquarters. From 1989, blood tests and measurement of physical activity were added, and serum total protein, total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol, blood glucose, red blood corpuscles and haemoglobin measurements have been performed continuously for more than 20 years. This is the first report on the items of physical examination in the J-NNS and NHNS. Our research results provide basic information for the utilization of the J-NNS and NHNS, to researchers, clinicians or policy makers. Monitoring the current state correctly is essential for national health promotion, and also for improvement of the investigation methods to apply country-by-country comparisons.

  6. Psychological resilience and positive emotional granularity: examining the benefits of positive emotions on coping and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugade, Michele M; Fredrickson, Barbara L; Barrett, Lisa Feldman

    2004-12-01

    For centuries, folk theory has promoted the idea that positive emotions are good for your health. Accumulating empirical evidence is providing support for this anecdotal wisdom. We use the broaden-and-build theory of positive emotions (Fredrickson, 1998; 2001) as a framework to demonstrate that positive emotions contribute to psychological and physical well-being via more effective coping. We argue that the health benefits advanced by positive emotions may be instantiated in certain traits that are characterized by the experience of positive emotion. Towards this end, we examine individual differences in psychological resilience (the ability to bounce back from negative events by using positive emotions to cope) and positive emotional granularity (the tendency to represent experiences of positive emotion with precision and specificity). Individual differences in these traits are examined in two studies, one using psychophysiological evidence, the second using evidence from experience sampling, to demonstrate that positive emotions play a crucial role in enhancing coping resources in the face of negative events. Implications for research on coping and health are discussed.

  7. Bisphenol-A and Sleep Adequacy among Adults in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beydoun, Hind A; Beydoun, May A; Jeng, Hueiwang Anna; Zonderman, Alan B; Eid, Shaker M

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate bisphenol-A (BPA) level and its relationship to sleep adequacy in a nationally representative sample of U.S. adults. A population-based cross-sectional study was conducted using 2005-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey whereby data were collected using in-person interviews, physical examination and laboratory testing. BPA level was measured in urine samples and analyzed as loge-transformed variable and in quartiles (Sleep adequacy was operationalized with three questions: "How much sleep do you usually get at night on weekdays or workdays?", "Have you ever told a doctor or other health professionals that you have trouble sleeping?" and "Have you ever been told by a doctor or other health professional that you have a sleep disorder?" Sleep duration was further categorized as ( 8 h); (sleep duration defined, in hours, as a continuous variable, a dichotomous variable (≥ 6, sleep problems and diagnosis with sleep disorders were not significantly associated with loge-transformed BPA level in fully adjusted models. Loge-transformed BPA level may be associated with fewer hours of sleep among U.S. adults, with implications for prevention. Further research involving diverse populations are needed to confirm these study findings. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  8. Mixed methods study examining work reintegration experiences from perspectives of Veterans with mental health disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukla, Marina; Rattray, Nicholas A; Salyers, Michelle P

    2015-01-01

    Recent findings have demonstrated that reintegration for Veterans is often challenging. One difficult aspect of reintegration—transitioning into the civilian workplace—has not been fully explored in the literature. To address this gap and examine work reintegration, this mixed methods study examined the perspectives of Veterans with mental health disorders receiving Department of Veterans Affairs healthcare. Forty Veterans rated factors that affect work success; participants also provided narratives on their most and least successful work experiences. We used t-tests and qualitative analysis to compare participants who did and did not serve in combat. Several themes relevant to work reintegration emerged in the narratives, particularly for Veterans who served in combat. An array of work difficulties were reported in the months following military discharge. In addition, Veterans who served in combat reported significantly more work barriers than Veterans who did not serve in combat, particularly health-related barriers. In conclusion, Veterans with mental health disorders who served in combat experienced more work reintegration difficulty than their counterparts who did not serve in combat. The role of being a Veteran affected how combat Veterans formed their self-concept, which also shaped their work success and community reintegration, especially during the early transition period.

  9. Distributed Lag Models: Examining Associations Between the Built Environment and Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Jonggyu; Sánchez, Brisa N; Berrocal, Veronica J; Sanchez-Vaznaugh, Emma V

    2016-01-01

    Built environment factors constrain individual level behaviors and choices, and thus are receiving increasing attention to assess their influence on health. Traditional regression methods have been widely used to examine associations between built environment measures and health outcomes, where a fixed, prespecified spatial scale (e.g., 1 mile buffer) is used to construct environment measures. However, the spatial scale for these associations remains largely unknown and misspecifying it introduces bias. We propose the use of distributed lag models (DLMs) to describe the association between built environment features and health as a function of distance from the locations of interest and circumvent a-priori selection of a spatial scale. Based on simulation studies, we demonstrate that traditional regression models produce associations biased away from the null when there is spatial correlation among the built environment features. Inference based on DLMs is robust under a range of scenarios of the built environment. We use this innovative application of DLMs to examine the association between the availability of convenience stores near California public schools, which may affect children's dietary choices both through direct access to junk food and exposure to advertisement, and children's body mass index z scores.

  10. Further examination of predictors of turnover intention among mental health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanchus, N J; Periard, D; Osatuke, K

    2017-02-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: When mental health professionals leave organizations, detrimental effects on quality of patient care occur. Reasons for leaving include incivility, lack of autonomy, perceptions of unfair treatment and feeling psychologically unsafe at work. This paper sought to investigate additional reasons why mental health professionals intend to quit or to cognitively withdraw from their jobs. WHAT DOES THIS PAPER ADD TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: Past research on this topic is limited in its scope and data. Mainly fragmented evidence is available about predictors of job satisfaction and turnover intention (i.e. different mental health occupations examined in separate studies). Only two existing studies that examined broader mental health provider groups were limited by including few workforce settings, small sample sizes and insufficiently rigorous statistical analyses. We examined four occupations (mental health nurses, social workers, psychologists and psychiatrists), each represented through a large sample in multiple settings, all within one large healthcare network with complex patients. Our contribution is finding additional predictors (supervisory support, emotional exhaustion) of job satisfaction/turnover intention. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: Organizations can consider using culture change initiatives to increase civility at work; this includes leadership support and role modelling of workplace behaviours. Leaders should monitor staffing levels and high workloads to pre-empt emotional exhaustion, which predicts turnover. Hiring and training supervisors should involve not only technical expertise, but also 'soft skills' necessary for creating civil and supportive work environments. Leaders and managers should use employee feedback data (e.g. organizational surveys) to learn about the workplace environments, and address areas of employees' concern. Introduction Given the global shortage of mental health professionals, high turnover

  11. Study Protocol- An exploratory trial on health promoting schools at Dutch secondary schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busch, Vincent; Leeuw, Rob J. de; Schrijvers, A.J.P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Recent studies show adolescent health-related behaviours to co-occur synergistically. This paper describes the study design for an exploratory trial on the effects of a comprehensive, whole-school health promoting school intervention. This intervention tackles seven different behavioural

  12. Evaluation of Vitamin D Standardization Program protocols for standardizing serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D data: a case study of the program's potential for national nutrition and health surveys12345

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashman, Kevin D; Kiely, Mairead; Kinsella, Michael; Durazo-Arvizu, Ramón A; Tian, Lu; Zhang, Yue; Lucey, Alice; Flynn, Albert; Gibney, Michael J; Vesper, Hubert W; Phinney, Karen W; Coates, Paul M; Picciano, Mary F; Sempos, Christopher T

    2013-01-01

    Background: The Vitamin D Standardization Program (VDSP) has developed protocols for standardizing procedures of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] measurement in National Health/Nutrition Surveys to promote 25(OH)D measurements that are accurate and comparable over time, location, and laboratory procedure to improve public health practice. Objective: We applied VDSP protocols to existing ELISA-derived serum 25(OH)D data from the Irish National Adult Nutrition Survey (NANS) as a case-study survey and evaluated their effectiveness by comparison of the protocol-projected estimates with those from a reanalysis of survey serums by using liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC–tandem MS). Design: The VDSP reference system and protocols were applied to ELISA-based serum 25(OH)D data from the representative NANS sample (n = 1118). A reanalysis of 99 stored serums by using standardized LC–tandem MS and resulting regression equations yielded predicted standardized serum 25(OH)D values, which were then compared with LC–tandem MS reanalyzed values for all serums. Results: Year-round prevalence rates for serum 25(OH)D concentrations 125 nmol/L were 1.2%, 0.3%, and 0.6% by means of ELISA, VDSP protocols, and LC–tandem MS, respectively. Conclusion: VDSP protocols hold a major potential for national nutrition and health surveys in terms of the standardization of serum 25(OH)D data. PMID:23615829

  13. Evaluation of Vitamin D Standardization Program protocols for standardizing serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D data: a case study of the program's potential for national nutrition and health surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashman, Kevin D; Kiely, Mairead; Kinsella, Michael; Durazo-Arvizu, Ramón A; Tian, Lu; Zhang, Yue; Lucey, Alice; Flynn, Albert; Gibney, Michael J; Vesper, Hubert W; Phinney, Karen W; Coates, Paul M; Picciano, Mary F; Sempos, Christopher T

    2013-06-01

    The Vitamin D Standardization Program (VDSP) has developed protocols for standardizing procedures of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] measurement in National Health/Nutrition Surveys to promote 25(OH)D measurements that are accurate and comparable over time, location, and laboratory procedure to improve public health practice. We applied VDSP protocols to existing ELISA-derived serum 25(OH)D data from the Irish National Adult Nutrition Survey (NANS) as a case-study survey and evaluated their effectiveness by comparison of the protocol-projected estimates with those from a reanalysis of survey serums by using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-tandem MS). The VDSP reference system and protocols were applied to ELISA-based serum 25(OH)D data from the representative NANS sample (n = 1118). A reanalysis of 99 stored serums by using standardized LC-tandem MS and resulting regression equations yielded predicted standardized serum 25(OH)D values, which were then compared with LC-tandem MS reanalyzed values for all serums. Year-round prevalence rates for serum 25(OH)D concentrations 125 nmol/L were 1.2%, 0.3%, and 0.6% by means of ELISA, VDSP protocols, and LC-tandem MS, respectively. VDSP protocols hold a major potential for national nutrition and health surveys in terms of the standardization of serum 25(OH)D data.

  14. Organ doses, effective doses, and risk indices in adult CT: Comparison of four types of reference phantoms across different examination protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yakun; Li, Xiang; Paul Segars, W.; Samei, Ehsan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation exposure from computed tomography (CT) to the public has increased the concern among radiation protection professionals. Being able to accurately assess the radiation dose patients receive during CT procedures is a crucial step in the management of CT dose. Currently, various computational anthropomorphic phantoms are used to assess radiation dose by different research groups. It is desirable to better understand how the dose results are affected by different choices of phantoms. In this study, the authors assessed the uncertainties in CT dose and risk estimation associated with different types of computational phantoms for a selected group of representative CT protocols. Methods: Routinely used CT examinations were categorized into ten body and three neurological examination categories. Organ doses, effective doses, risk indices, and conversion coefficients to effective dose and risk index (k and q factors, respectively) were estimated for these examinations for a clinical CT system (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare). Four methods were used, each employing a different type of reference phantoms. The first and second methods employed a Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated in our laboratory. In the first method, the reference male and female extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantoms were used, which were initially created from the Visible Human data and later adjusted to match organ masses defined in ICRP publication 89. In the second method, the reference male and female phantoms described in ICRP publication 110 were used, which were initially developed from tomographic data of two patients and later modified to match ICRP 89 organ masses. The third method employed a commercial dosimetry spreadsheet (ImPACT group, London, England) with its own hermaphrodite stylized phantom. In the fourth method, another widely used dosimetry spreadsheet (CT-Expo, Medizinische Hochschule, Hannover, Germany) was employed together with its associated

  15. Improving a mother to child HIV transmission programme through health system redesign: quality improvement, protocol adjustment and resource addition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele S Youngleson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Health systems that deliver prevention of mother to child transmission (PMTCT services in low and middle income countries continue to underperform, resulting in thousands of unnecessary HIV infections of newborns each year. We used a combination of approaches to health systems strengthening to reduce transmission of HIV from mother to infant in a multi-facility public health system in South Africa. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: All primary care sites and specialized birthing centers in a resource constrained sub-district of Cape Metro District, South Africa, were enrolled in a quality improvement (QI programme. All pregnant women receiving antenatal, intrapartum and postnatal infant care in the sub-district between January 2006 and March 2009 were included in the intervention that had a prototype-innovation phase and a rapid spread phase. System changes were introduced to help frontline healthcare workers to identify and improve performance gaps at each step of the PMTCT pathway. Improvement was facilitated and spread through the use of a Breakthrough Series Collaborative that accelerated learning and the spread of successful changes. Protocol changes and additional resources were introduced by provincial and municipal government. The proportion of HIV-exposed infants testing positive declined from 7.6% to 5%. Key intermediate PMTCT processes improved (antenatal AZT increased from 74% to 86%, PMTCT clients on HAART at the time of labour increased from 10% to 25%, intrapartum AZT increased from 43% to 84%, and postnatal HIV testing from 79% to 95% compared to baseline. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: System improvement methods, protocol changes and addition/reallocation of resources contributed to improved PMTCT processes and outcomes in a resource constrained setting. The intervention requires a clear design, leadership buy-in, building local capacity to use systems improvement methods, and a reliable data system. A systems improvement

  16. Supportive Mental Health Self-Monitoring among Smartphone Users with Psychological Distress: Protocol for a Fully Mobile Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Till Beiwinkel

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Mobile health (mHealth could be widely used in the population to improve access to psychological treatment. In this paper, we describe the development of a mHealth intervention on the basis of supportive self-monitoring and describe the protocol for a randomized controlled trial to evaluate its effectiveness among smartphone users with psychological distress. Based on power analysis, a representative quota sample of N = 186 smartphone users will be recruited, with an over-sampling of persons with moderate to high distress. Over a 4-week period, the intervention will be compared to a self-monitoring without intervention group and a passive control group. Telephone interviews will be conducted at baseline, post-intervention (4 weeks, and 12-week follow-up to assess study outcomes. The primary outcome will be improvement of mental health. Secondary outcomes will include well-being, intentions toward help-seeking and help-seeking behavior, user activation, attitudes toward mental-health services, perceived stigmatization, smartphone app quality, user satisfaction, engagement, and adherence with the intervention. Additionally, data from the user’s daily life as collected during self-monitoring will be used to investigate risk and protective factors of mental health in real-world settings. Therefore, this study will allow us to demonstrate the effectiveness of a smartphone application as a widely accessible and low-cost intervention to improve mental health on a population level. It also allows to identify new assessment approaches in the field of psychiatric epidemiology.

  17. Supportive Mental Health Self-Monitoring among Smartphone Users with Psychological Distress: Protocol for a Fully Mobile Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiwinkel, Till; Hey, Stefan; Bock, Olaf; Rössler, Wulf

    2017-01-01

    Mobile health (mHealth) could be widely used in the population to improve access to psychological treatment. In this paper, we describe the development of a mHealth intervention on the basis of supportive self-monitoring and describe the protocol for a randomized controlled trial to evaluate its effectiveness among smartphone users with psychological distress. Based on power analysis, a representative quota sample of N = 186 smartphone users will be recruited, with an over-sampling of persons with moderate to high distress. Over a 4-week period, the intervention will be compared to a self-monitoring without intervention group and a passive control group. Telephone interviews will be conducted at baseline, post-intervention (4 weeks), and 12-week follow-up to assess study outcomes. The primary outcome will be improvement of mental health. Secondary outcomes will include well-being, intentions toward help-seeking and help-seeking behavior, user activation, attitudes toward mental-health services, perceived stigmatization, smartphone app quality, user satisfaction, engagement, and adherence with the intervention. Additionally, data from the user's daily life as collected during self-monitoring will be used to investigate risk and protective factors of mental health in real-world settings. Therefore, this study will allow us to demonstrate the effectiveness of a smartphone application as a widely accessible and low-cost intervention to improve mental health on a population level. It also allows to identify new assessment approaches in the field of psychiatric epidemiology.

  18. Risk and protective factors associated with being a victim of aggression in the health sector. Research protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Parmigiani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: aggression against healthcare workers is an alarming issue worldwide. However, there is lack of data on psychological vulnerability factors (such as personality traits, attachment style which can constitute a risk or a protective factor for being a victim of an episode of violence in the health sector. Methods/design: the present protocol is a cross-sectional study on prevalence and characteristics of violent episodes experienced by nursing students in the clinical setting. Its aim is to identify risk and protective factors for becoming a victim of verbal and/or physical aggression among healthcare workers. Participants will undergo an intensive battery of psychometric tests, dealing with episodes of aggression in the previous year, attachment style, personality traits, perceived stress, health related quality of life and job strain. Conclusions: the findings derived from this study may be of value in identifying vulnerability factors in experiencing an episode of aggression in the health sector. In this respect, it is a step towards the development of valid training and support focused on health workers, aimed at teaching them how to modulate and manage their vulnerability factors in an efficient way.

  19. Measurement of health system performance at district level: A study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Atul; Prinja, Shankar; Aggarwal, Arun Kumar

    2017-12-13

    Limited efforts have been observed in low and middle income countries to undertake health system performance assessment at district level. Absence of a comprehensive data collection tool and lack of a standardised single summary measure defining overall performance are some of the main problems. Present study has been undertaken to develop a summary composite health system performance index at district level. A broad range of indicators covering all six domains as per building block framework were finalized by an expert panel. The domains were classified into twenty sub-domains, with 70 input and process indicators to measure performance. Seven sub-domains for assessing health system outputs and outcomes were identified, with a total of 28 indicators. Districts in Haryana state from north India were selected for the study. Primary and secondary data will be collected from 378 health facilities, district and state health directorate headquarters. Indicators will be normalized, aggregated to generate composite performance index at district level. Domain specific scores will present the quality of individual building block domains in the public health system. Robustness of the results will be checked using sensitivity analysis. The study presents a methodology for comprehensive assessment of all health system domains on basis of input, process, output and outcome indicators which has never been reported from India. Generation of this index will help identify policy and implementation areas of concern and point towards potential solutions. Results may also help understand relationships between individual building blocks and their sub-components.

  20. Multilevel examination of facility characteristics, social integration, and health for older adults living in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leedahl, Skye N; Chapin, Rosemary K; Little, Todd D

    2015-01-01

    Testing a model based on past research and theory, this study assessed relationships between facility characteristics (i.e., culture change efforts, social workers) and residents' social networks and social support across nursing homes; and examined relationships between multiple aspects of social integration (i.e., social networks, social capital, social engagement, social support) and mental and functional health for older adults in nursing homes. Data were collected at nursing homes using a planned missing data design with random sampling techniques. Data collection occurred at the individual-level through in-person structured interviews with older adult nursing home residents (N = 140) and at the facility-level (N = 30) with nursing home staff. The best fitting multilevel structural equation model indicated that the culture change subscale for relationships significantly predicted differences in residents' social networks. Additionally, social networks had a positive indirect relationship with mental and functional health among residents primarily via social engagement. Social capital had a positive direct relationship with both health outcomes. To predict better social integration and mental and functional health outcomes for nursing homes residents, study findings support prioritizing that close relationships exist among staff, residents, and the community as well as increased resident social engagement and social trust. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Perspectives: Using Results from HRSA's Health Workforce Simulation Model to Examine the Geography of Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streeter, Robin A; Zangaro, George A; Chattopadhyay, Arpita

    2017-02-01

    Inform health planning and policy discussions by describing Health Resources and Services Administration's (HRSA's) Health Workforce Simulation Model (HWSM) and examining the HWSM's 2025 supply and demand projections for primary care physicians, nurse practitioners (NPs), and physician assistants (PAs). HRSA's recently published projections for primary care providers derive from an integrated microsimulation model that estimates health workforce supply and demand at national, regional, and state levels. Thirty-seven states are projected to have shortages of primary care physicians in 2025, and nine states are projected to have shortages of both primary care physicians and PAs. While no state is projected to have a 2025 shortage of primary care NPs, many states are expected to have only a small surplus. Primary care physician shortages are projected for all parts of the United States, while primary care PA shortages are generally confined to Midwestern and Southern states. No state is projected to have shortages of all three provider types. Projected shortages must be considered in the context of baseline assumptions regarding current supply, demand, provider-service ratios, and other factors. Still, these findings suggest geographies with possible primary care workforce shortages in 2025 and offer opportunities for targeting efforts to enhance workforce flexibility. © Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  2. Functional interactivity in social media: an examination of Chinese health care organizations' microblog profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shaohai

    2017-09-08

    Social media hold enormous potentials as a communication tool for health care due to its interactive nature. However, prior research mainly focused on contingency interactivity of social media, by examining messages sent from health care organizations to audiences, while little is known about functional interactivity, which refers to social media's presence of functions for facilitating communication between users and its interface. That is, how health care organizations use interactive features on social media to communicate with the public. Thus, with a general basis of the functional interactivity framework proposed by Waters et al. (Engaging stakeholders through social networking: how nonprofit organizations are using Facebook. Pub Relat Rev 2009;35:102-106), the current study investigated three aspects of functional interactivity in microblogging, and its subsequent effects. Specifically, this study analyzed 500 Chinese hospitals' profiles on Sina Weibo, the most popular microblogging platform in China. The results showed that the most common functional interactivity feature was organization disclosure, followed by information dissemination, and audience involvement. These interactive features all positively predicted the number of followers. Also, Chinese private hospitals scored significantly higher than public hospitals to use interactive features offered by social media. The findings of this study provide important implications for health care organizations to understand new communicative functions available on social media, incorporate more functions into their profiles and thus provide audiences with greater opportunity to interact with them via social media. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Perspectives of People Living with HIV on Access to Health Care: Protocol for a Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghari, Shabnam; Maybank, Allison; Hurley, Oliver; Modir, Hilary; Farrell, Alison; Marshall, Zack; Kendall, Claire; Johnston, Sharon; Hogel, Matthew; Rourke, Sean B; Liddy, Clare

    2016-05-18

    Strategies to improve access to health care for people living with human immunodeficiency virus (PLHIV) have demonstrated limited success. Whereas previous approaches have been informed by the views of health providers and decision-makers, it is believed that incorporating patient perspectives into the design and evaluations of health care programs will lead to improved access to health care services. We aim to map the literature on the perspectives of PLHIV concerning access to health care services, to identify gaps in evidence, and to produce an evidence-informed research action plan to guide the Living with HIV program of research. This scoping review includes peer-reviewed and grey literature from 1946 to May 2014 using double data extraction. Variations of the search terms "HIV", "patient satisfaction", and "health services accessibility" are used to identify relevant literature. The search strategy is being developed in consultation with content experts, review methodologists, and a librarian, and validated using gold standard studies identified by those stakeholders. The inclusion criteria are (1) the study includes the perspectives of PLHIV, (2) study design includes qualitative, quantitative, or mixed methods, and (3) outcome measures are limited to patient satisfaction, their implied needs, beliefs, and desires in relation to access to health care. The papers are extracted by two independent reviewers, including quality assessment. Data is then collated, summarized, and thematically analyzed. A total of 12,857 references were retrieved, of which 326 documents were identified as eligible in pre-screening, and 64 articles met the inclusion criteria (56% qualitative studies, 38% quantitative studies and 6% mixed-method studies). Only four studies were conducted in Canada. Data synthesis is in progress and full results are expected in June, 2016. This scoping review will record and characterize the extensive body of literature on perspectives of PLHIV

  4. The childbearing health and related service needs of newcomers (CHARSNN study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saucier Jean-François

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Refugee and asylum-seeking women in Canada may have significant harmful childbearing health outcomes and unmet health and social care needs. The most vulnerable of these women are: those who have left their countries by force (e.g., war, rape or abuse histories, are separated from their families, have limited knowledge of the host country languages, and are visible minorities. Asylum-seekers face additional stresses related to their unknown future status and are marginalized with regards to access to provincial health care systems. The prevalence and severity of health issues in this population is not known nor is the extent of response from social service and health care systems (including variation in provincial service delivery. Understanding the magnitude of health and social concerns of newcomers requires data from a representative sample of childbearing refugee and asylum-seeking women resettling in Canada to permit comparisons to be made with non-refugee immigrant and Canadian-born women. Our research questions are: (1 Do refugee or asylum-seeking women and their infants, experience a greater number or a different distribution of harmful health events during pregnancy, at birth, and during the postpartum period than non-refugee immigrant or Canadian-born women? (2 Are the harmful health events experienced postpartum by asylum-seeking women and their infants, addressed less often (compared to refugees, non-refugee immigrants, and Canadian-born women by the Canadian health care system as delivered in each of the three major receiving cities for newcomers? Methods/design This is a four-year multi-site prospective cohort study (pregnancy to 4 months postpartum. We will seek to recruit 2400 women [200 in each of 4 groups (refugees, asylum-seekers, non-refugee immigrants, and Canadian-born from 1 of 12 postpartum hospital units across the 3 largest receiving cities for newcomers to Canada – Montreal, Toronto, and Vancouver

  5. An mHealth Framework to Improve Birth Outcomes in Benue State, Nigeria: A Study Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezeanolue, Echezona Edozie; Gbadamosi, Semiu Olatunde; Olawepo, John Olajide; Iwelunmor, Juliet; Sarpong, Daniel; Eze, Chuka; Ogidi, Amaka; Patel, Dina; Onoka, Chima

    2017-05-26

    The unprecedented coverage of mobile technology across the globe has led to an increase in the use of mobile health apps and related strategies to make health information available at the point of care. These strategies have the potential to improve birth outcomes, but are limited by the availability of Internet services, especially in resource-limited settings such as Nigeria. Our primary objective is to determine the feasibility of developing an integrated mobile health platform that is able to collect data from community-based programs, embed collected data into a smart card, and read the smart card using a mobile phone-based app without the need for Internet access. Our secondary objectives are to determine (1) the acceptability of the smart card among pregnant women and (2) the usability of the smart card by pregnant women and health facilities in rural Nigeria. We will leverage existing technology to develop a platform that integrates a database, smart card technology, and a mobile phone-based app to read the smart cards. We will recruit 300 pregnant women with one of the three conditions-HIV, hepatitis B virus infection, and sickle cell trait or disease-and four health facilities in their community. We will use Glasgow's Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, and Maintenance framework as a guide to assess the implementation, acceptability, and usability of the mHealth platform. We have recruited four health facilities and 300 pregnant women with at least one of the eligible conditions. Over the course of 3 months, we will complete the development of the mobile health platform and each participant will be offered a smart card; staff in each health facility will receive training on the use of the mobile health platform. Findings from this study could offer a new approach to making health data from pregnant women available at the point of delivery without the need for an Internet connection. This would allow clinicians to implement evidence

  6. Care for overweight children attending the 5-year preventive child health examination in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Merethe Kousgaard; Christensen, Bo; Søndergaard, Jens

    2013-01-01

    -assessed overweight at the 5-year preventive child health examination (PCHE).Results. Out of 1135 children attending the 5-year PCHE, 171 were assessed overweight by the GP. According to the Danish body mass index (kg/m(2)) growth charts, 147 children were overweight. The GPs addressed their concern about the child......% of cases.Conclusion. Various care activities were carried out for most children with GP-assessed overweight at the 5-year PCHE. However, the GP did not raise concern about the child's weight with the parents in almost one third of the children. It seems that there is a potential for improving...

  7. Examining the Relationship between Choice, Therapeutic Alliance and Outcomes in Mental Health Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark S. Salzer

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Self-determination within mental health services is increasingly recognized as an ethical imperative, but we still know little about the impact of choice on outcomes among people with severe mental illnesses. This study examines whether choice predicts outcomes and whether this relationship is mediated by therapeutic alliance. Method: The study sample of 396 participants completed a survey measuring choice, therapeutic alliance, recovery, quality of life and functioning. Multivariate analyses examined choice as a predictor of outcomes, and Sobel tests assessed alliance as a mediator. Results: Choice variables predicted recovery, quality of life and perceived outcomes. Sobel tests indicated that the relationship between choice and outcome variables was mediated by therapeutic alliance. Implications: The study demonstrates that providing more choice and opportunities for collaboration within services does improve consumer outcomes. The results also show that collaboration is dependent on the quality of the relationship between the provider and consumer.

  8. eHealth Use Among First-Generation Immigrants From Pakistan in the Oslo Area, Norway, With Focus on Diabetes: Survey Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatara, Naoe; Kjøllesdal, Marte Karoline Råberg; Mirkovic, Jelena; Andreassen, Hege Kristin

    2016-04-25

    A variety of eHealth services are available and commonly used by the general public. eHealth has the potential to engage and empower people with managing their health. The prerequisite is, however, that eHealth services are adapted to the sociocultural heterogeneity of the user base and are available in a language and with contents that fit the users' preference, skills, and abilities. Pakistani immigrants in the Oslo area, Norway, have a much higher risk of Type-2 diabetes (T2D) than their Norwegian counterparts do. In spite of having access to information and communication technology (ICT) and the Internet, ICT skills in this population are reported to be relatively low. Further, there is insufficient information about their use of and attitudes toward eHealth services, necessitating investigation of this group in particular. This study targets first-generation immigrants from Pakistan living in the Oslo area and examines their use of and attitudes toward eHealth services, specifically: information searches, communication using ICT, and use of ICT for self-management or decision making, all concerning T2D. Due to a high prevalence of low literacy among the target population, we employed questionnaire-based individual interviews. The questionnaire was developed by implementing potentially relevant theoretical constructs (technology acceptance model (TAM) and health belief model (HBM)) as measures. To explore issues around language, culture, and general ICT skills, we also implemented questions that we assume were particularly relevant in the context studied but do not appear in any theoretical frameworks. The questionnaire was revised to reflect results of a pilot study involving 10 participants. We employed culturally sensitive sampling methods to reach informants who could otherwise fail to be included in the survey. This paper presents a survey protocol. The data collection is ongoing. The aim is to collect 200 responses in total by March 2016. For eHealth to

  9. Internet protocol television for personalized home-based health information: design-based research on a diabetes education system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Kathleen Mary; Clarke, Ken; Alzougool, Basil; Hines, Carolyn; Tidhar, Gil; Frukhtman, Feodor

    2014-03-10

    The use of Internet protocol television (IPTV) as a channel for consumer health information is a relatively under-explored area of medical Internet research. IPTV may afford new opportunities for health care service providers to provide health information and for consumers, patients, and caretakers to access health information. The technologies of Web 2.0 add a new and even less explored dimension to IPTV's potential. Our research explored an application of Web 2.0 integrated with IPTV for personalized home-based health information in diabetes education, particularly for people with diabetes who are not strong computer and Internet users, and thus may miss out on Web-based resources. We wanted to establish whether this system could enable diabetes educators to deliver personalized health information directly to people with diabetes in their homes; and whether this system could encourage people with diabetes who make little use of Web-based health information to build their health literacy via the interface of a home television screen and remote control. This project was undertaken as design-based research in two stages. Stage 1 comprised a feasibility study into the technical work required to integrate an existing Web 2.0 platform with an existing IPTV system, populated with content and implemented for user trials in a laboratory setting. Stage 2 comprised an evaluation of the system by consumers and providers of diabetes information. The project succeeded in developing a Web 2.0 IPTV system for people with diabetes and low literacies and their diabetes educators. The performance of the system in the laboratory setting gave them the confidence to engage seriously in thinking about the actual and potential features and benefits of a more widely-implemented system. In their feedback they pointed out a range of critical usability and usefulness issues related to Web 2.0 affordances and learning fundamentals. They also described their experiences with the system in

  10. Systematic reviews examining implementation of research into practice and impact on population health are needed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoong, Sze Lin; Clinton-McHarg, Tara; Wolfenden, Luke

    2015-07-01

    To examine the research translation phase focus (T1-T4) of systematic reviews published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) and Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE). Briefly, T1 includes reviews of basic science experiments; T2 includes reviews of human trials leading to guideline development; T3 includes reviews examining how to move guidelines into policy and practice; and T4 includes reviews describing the impact of changing health practices on population outcomes. A cross-sectional audit of randomly selected reviews from CDSR (n = 500) and DARE (n = 500) was undertaken. The research translation phase of reviews, overall and by communicable disease, noncommunicable disease, and injury subgroups, were coded by two researchers. A total of 898 reviews examined a communicable, noncommunicable, or injury-related condition. Of those, 98% of reviews within CDSR focused on T2, and the remaining 2% focused on T3. In DARE, 88% focused on T2, 8.7% focused on T1, 2.5% focused on T3, and 1.3% focused on T4. Almost all reviews examining communicable (CDSR 100%, DARE 93%), noncommunicable (CDSR 98%, DARE 87%), and injury (CDSR 95%, DARE 88%) were also T2 focused. Few reviews exist to guide practitioners and policy makers with implementing evidence-based treatments or programs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Ghana randomized air pollution and health study (GRAPHS): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Jack, Darby W.; Asante, Kwaku Poku; Blair J. Wylie; Chillrud, Steve N.; Whyatt, Robin M.; Ae-Ngibise, Kenneth A.; Quinn, Ashlinn K.; Yawson, Abena Konadu; Boamah, Ellen Abrafi; Agyei, Oscar; Mujtaba, Mohammed; Kaali, Seyram; Kinney, Patrick; Owusu-Agyei, Seth

    2015-01-01

    Background: Household air pollution exposure is a major health risk, but validated interventions remain elusive. Methods/Design The Ghana Randomized Air Pollution and Health Study (GRAPHS) is a cluster-randomized trial that evaluates the efficacy of clean fuels (liquefied petroleum gas, or LPG) and efficient biomass cookstoves in the Brong-Ahafo region of central Ghana. We recruit pregnant women into LPG, efficient cookstove, and control arms and track birth weight and physician-assessed seve...

  12. Measurement of health system performance at district level: A study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul Sharma

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Limited efforts have been observed in low and middle income countries to undertake health system performance assessment at district level. Absence of a comprehensive data collection tool and lack of a standardised single summary measure defining overall performance are some of the main problems. Present study has been undertaken to develop a summary composite health system performance index at district level. Methods: A broad range of indicators covering all six domains as per building block framework were finalized by an expert panel. The domains were classified into twenty sub-domains, with 70 input and process indicators to measure performance. Seven sub-domains for assessing health system outputs and outcomes were identified, with a total of 28 indicators. Districts in Haryana state from north India were selected for the study. Primary and secondary data will be collected from 378 health facilities, district and state health directorate headquarters. Indicators will be normalized, aggregated to generate composite performance index at district level. Domain specific scores will present the quality of individual building block domains in the public health system. Robustness of the results will be checked using sensitivity analysis. Expected impact for public health: The study presents a methodology for comprehensive assessment of all health system domains on basis of input, process, output and outcome indicators which has never been reported from India. Generation of this index will help identify policy and implementation areas of concern and point towards potential solutions. Results may also help understand relationships between individual building blocks and their sub-components.

  13. Cost-Effectiveness of Elderly Health Examination Program: The Example of Hypertension Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing-Hwa Deng

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The National Health Insurance (NHI and social welfare agencies have implemented the Elderly Health Examination Program (EHEP for years. No study has ever attempted to evaluate whether this program is cost-effective. The purposes of this study were, firstly, to understand the prevalence and incidence rates of hypertension and, secondly, to estimate the cost and effectiveness of the EHEP, focusing on hypertension screening. The data sources were: (1 hypertension and clinical information derived from the 1996 and 1997 EHEP, which was used to generate prevalence and incidence rates of hypertension; and (2 claim data of the NHI that included treatment costs of stroke patients (in-and outpatients. Hypothetical models were used to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the hypertension screening program in various conditions. Sensitivity analysis was also employed to evaluate the effect of each estimation indicator on the cost and effectiveness of the hypertension screening program. A total of 28.3% of the elderly population in Kaohsiung (25,174 of 88,812 participated in the 1996 EHEP; 14,915 of them participated in the following 1997 EHEP, with a retention rate of 59.3%. Criteria from the Sixth Report of the Joint National Committee on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC VI (systolic blood pressure/diastolic blood pressure ≥ 160/95mmHg or taking antihypertensive drugs were used; we found that prevalence and incidence rates of hypertension were 24.6% and 6.6%, respectively. Hypertension rates are increasing in the aging process as shown in both prevalence and incidence models. In comparison with non-participants, the prevalence model indicates that each hypertension patient who had attended the EHEP not only saved NT$34,570–34,890 in medical and associated costs, but also increased their lifespan by 128 days. The present findings suggest that the EHEP is a cost-effective program with health and social welfare policy

  14. Examination of value of the future and health beliefs to explain dietary and physical activity behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza, Kimberly Bosworth; Harris, Carole V; Bolding, Mark S

    2013-01-01

    Studies have shown a negative association between value of the future (preference for long-term vs. short-term rewards) and harmful addictive behaviors; however, research in the area of preventive behaviors is limited and has shown conflicting results. The primary objectives were: (1) to examine the association among value of the future and diet and physical activity (PA) behaviors, and (2) to assess whether value of the future explained additional variance in behaviors after controlling for theory-based health beliefs related to coronary heart disease (CHD). An online survey was conducted in adults (N = 172) with no prior history of CHD. A delay discounting task was administered to measure value of the future. Questionnaire items were based on the Health Belief Model (HBM) and included CHD knowledge, perceived risk, perceived severity, perceived benefits of and barriers to behavior change, self-efficacy, cues to action, diet and PA behaviors and demographic variables. High value of the future was associated with younger age, lower BMI, more healthful diet, and increased PA. After controlling for HBM components and demographics, value of the future did not explain any additional variance in diet or PA behaviors. Significant predictors of healthful diet included female gender (P = .013), increased age (P = .029), greater than high school education (P = .023), greater diet-related self-efficacy (P = .021), and not having received a healthcare provider recommendation to improve diet (P = .018). Significant predictors of PA level included income between $20,000 and $69,999 (P = .014), greater exercise-related self-efficacy (P health benefits. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Five heavy metallic elements and age-related macular degeneration: Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2008-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang Jun; Lee, Ju Hyun; Woo, Se Joon; Kang, Se Woong; Park, Kyu Hyung

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the association between age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and 5 heavy metallic elements (lead, mercury, cadmium, manganese, and zinc). A cross-sectional study using a complex, stratified, multistage, probability cluster survey. Participants of the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 2008 to 2011. Using a standardized protocol, AMD was determined by fundus photograph grading. Blood concentrations of lead, mercury, cadmium, manganese, and zinc were measured. Associations between AMD and these 5 elements were estimated using logistic regression analyses (LRAs). The distributions of the 5 metallic elements in blood were analyzed, and the same set of LRAs estimating the association between AMD and logarithmic-transformed blood concentrations of the 5 elements were also conducted. Association between AMD and 5 heavy metals. Lead was positively associated with both early AMD and late AMD in all LRAs. Mercury and cadmium also had a positive association with late AMD in all LRAs, but not with early AMD. In contrast, manganese and zinc had an inverse association with late AMD in all LRAs. Manganese and zinc were not associated with early AMD. Using logarithmic-transformed blood concentrations for each metallic element, the LRAs showed similar results compared with those of the LRAs using nontransformed blood concentrations, despite the skewed distribution of these metallic elements in the blood. This study suggests that the toxic heavy metals (lead, mercury, and cadmium) may negatively influence late AMD, whereas essential heavy metals (manganese and zinc) may favorably influence late AMD. Lead may widely affect the pathogenesis of both early and late AMD. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A theory-based online health behavior intervention for new university students: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Epton Tracy

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Too few young people engage in behaviors that reduce the risk of morbidity and premature mortality, such as eating healthily, being physically active, drinking sensibly and not smoking. The present research developed an online intervention to target these health behaviors during the significant life transition from school to university when health beliefs and behaviors may be more open to change. This paper describes the intervention and the proposed approach to its evaluation. Methods/design Potential participants (all undergraduates about to enter the University of Sheffield will be emailed an online questionnaire two weeks before starting university. On completion of the questionnaire, respondents will be randomly assigned to receive either an online health behavior intervention (U@Uni or a control condition. The intervention employs three behavior change techniques (self-affirmation, theory-based messages, and implementation intentions to target four heath behaviors (alcohol consumption, physical activity, fruit and vegetable intake, and smoking. Subsequently, all participants will be emailed follow-up questionnaires approximately one and six months after starting university. The questionnaires will assess the four targeted behaviors and associated cognitions (e.g., intentions, self-efficacy as well as socio-demographic variables, health status, Body Mass Index (BMI, health service use and recreational drug use. A sub-sample of participants will provide a sample of hair to assess changes in biochemical markers of health behavior. A health economic evaluation of the cost effectiveness of the intervention will also be conducted. Discussion The findings will provide evidence on the effectiveness of online interventions as well as the potential for intervening during significant life transitions, such as the move from school to university. If successful, the intervention could be employed at other universities to promote

  17. A theory-based online health behavior intervention for new university students: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epton, Tracy; Norman, Paul; Sheeran, Paschal; Harris, Peter R; Webb, Thomas L; Ciravegna, Fabio; Brennan, Alan; Meier, Petra; Julious, Steven A; Naughton, Declan; Petroczi, Andrea; Dadzie, Aba-Sah; Kruger, Jen

    2013-02-05

    Too few young people engage in behaviors that reduce the risk of morbidity and premature mortality, such as eating healthily, being physically active, drinking sensibly and not smoking. The present research developed an online intervention to target these health behaviors during the significant life transition from school to university when health beliefs and behaviors may be more open to change. This paper describes the intervention and the proposed approach to its evaluation. Potential participants (all undergraduates about to enter the University of Sheffield) will be emailed an online questionnaire two weeks before starting university. On completion of the questionnaire, respondents will be randomly assigned to receive either an online health behavior intervention (U@Uni) or a control condition. The intervention employs three behavior change techniques (self-affirmation, theory-based messages, and implementation intentions) to target four heath behaviors (alcohol consumption, physical activity, fruit and vegetable intake, and smoking). Subsequently, all participants will be emailed follow-up questionnaires approximately one and six months after starting university. The questionnaires will assess the four targeted behaviors and associated cognitions (e.g., intentions, self-efficacy) as well as socio-demographic variables, health status, Body Mass Index (BMI), health service use and recreational drug use. A sub-sample of participants will provide a sample of hair to assess changes in biochemical markers of health behavior. A health economic evaluation of the cost effectiveness of the intervention will also be conducted. The findings will provide evidence on the effectiveness of online interventions as well as the potential for intervening during significant life transitions, such as the move from school to university. If successful, the intervention could be employed at other universities to promote healthy behaviors among new undergraduates. Current Controlled

  18. Influence of societal and practice contexts on health professionals’ clinical reasoning: a scoping study protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrier, Annie; Levasseur, Mélanie; Freeman, Andrew; Mullins, Gary; Quénec'hdu, Suzanne; Lalonde, Louise; Gagnon, Michaël; Lacasse, Francis

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In a context of constrained resources, the efficacy of interventions is a pivotal aim of healthcare systems worldwide. Efficacy of healthcare interventions is highly compromised if clinical reasoning (CR), the process that practitioners use to plan, direct, perform and reflect on client care, is not optimal. The CR process of health professionals is influenced by the institutional dimension (ie, legal, regulatory, administrative and organisational aspects) of their societal and practice contexts. Although several studies have been conducted with respect to the institutional dimension influencing health professionals’ CR, no clear integration of their results is yet available. The aim of this study is to synthesise and disseminate current knowledge on the influence of the institutional dimension of contexts on health professionals’ CR. Methods and analysis A scoping study of the scientific literature from January 1980 to March 2013 will be undertaken to summarise and disseminate research findings about the influence of the institutional dimension on CR. Numerous databases (n=18) from three relevant fields (healthcare, health law and politics and management) will be searched. Extended search strategies will include the manual search of bibliographies, health-related websites, public registries and journals of interest. Data will be collected and analysed using a thematic chart and content analysis. A systematic multidisciplinary team approach will allow optimal identification of relevant studies, as well as effective and valid content analysis and dissemination of the results. Discussion This scoping study will provide a rigorous, accurate and up-to-date synthesis of existing knowledge regarding: (1) those aspects of the institutional dimension of health professionals’ societal and practice contexts that impact their CR and (2) how these aspects influence health professionals’ CR. Through the synergy of a multidisciplinary research team from a

  19. The serious mental illness health improvement profile [HIP]: study protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swift Louise

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The serious mental illness Health Improvement Profile [HIP] is a brief pragmatic tool, which enables mental health nurses to work together with patients to screen physical health and take evidence-based action when variables are identified to be at risk. Piloting has demonstrated clinical utility and acceptability. Methods/Design A single blind parallel group cluster randomised controlled trial with secondary economic analysis and process observation. Unit of randomisation: mental health nurses [MHNs] working in adult community mental health teams across two NHS Trusts. Subjects: Patients over 18 years with a diagnosis of schizophrenia, schizoaffective or bipolar disorder on the caseload of participating MHNs. Primary objective: To determine the effects of the HIP programme on patients' physical wellbeing assessed by the physical component score of the Medical Outcome Study (MOS 36 Item Short Form Health Survey version 2 [SF-36v2]. Secondary objectives: To determine the effects of the HIP programme on: cost effectiveness, mental wellbeing, cardiovascular risk, physical health care attitudes and knowledge of MHNs and to determine the acceptability of the HIP Programme in the NHS. Consented nurses (and patients will be randomised to receive the HIP Programme or treatment as usual. Outcomes will be measured at baseline and 12 months with a process observation after 12 months to include evaluation of patients' and professionals' experience and observation of any effect on care plans and primary-secondary care interface communication. Outcomes will be analysed on an intention-to-treat (ITT basis. Discussion The results of the trial and process observation will provide information about the effectiveness of the HIP Programme in supporting MHNs to address physical comorbidity in serious mental illness. Given the current unacceptable prevalence of physical comorbidity and mortality in the serious mental illness population, it is

  20. Managerial leadership for research use in nursing and allied health care professions: a narrative synthesis protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, Wendy A; Holyoke, Paul; Squires, Janet E; Angus, Douglas; Brosseau, Lucie; Egan, Mary; Graham, Ian D; Miller, Carol; Wallin, Lars

    2014-06-05

    Nurses and allied health care professionals (physiotherapists, occupational therapists, speech and language pathologists, dietitians) form more than half of the clinical health care workforce and play a central role in health service delivery. There is a potential to improve the quality of health care if these professionals routinely use research evidence to guide their clinical practice. However, the use of research evidence remains unpredictable and inconsistent. Leadership is consistently described in implementation research as critical to enhancing research use by health care professionals. However, this important literature has not yet been synthesized and there is a lack of clarity on what constitutes effective leadership for research use, or what kinds of intervention effectively develop leadership for the purpose of enabling and enhancing research use in clinical practice. We propose to synthesize the evidence on leadership behaviours amongst front line and senior managers that are associated with research evidence by nurses and allied health care professionals, and then determine the effectiveness of interventions that promote these behaviours. Using an integrated knowledge translation approach that supports a partnership between researchers and knowledge users throughout the research process, we will follow principles of knowledge synthesis using a systematic method to synthesize different types of evidence involving: searching the literature, study selection, data extraction and quality assessment, and analysis. A narrative synthesis will be conducted to explore relationships within and across studies and meta-analysis will be performed if sufficient homogeneity exists across studies employing experimental randomized control trial designs. With the engagement of knowledge users in leadership and practice, we will synthesize the research from a broad range of disciplines to understand the key elements of leadership that supports and enables research use

  1. Climate change and human health: what are the research trends? A scoping review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herlihy, Niamh; Bar-Hen, Avner; Verner, Glenn; Fischer, Helen; Sauerborn, Rainer; Depoux, Anneliese; Flahault, Antoine; Schütte, Stefanie

    2016-12-23

    For 28 years, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has been assessing the potential risks associated with anthropogenic climate change. Although interest in climate change and health is growing, the implications arising from their interaction remain understudied. Generating a greater understanding of the health impacts of climate change could be key step in inciting some of the changes necessary to decelerate global warming. A long-term and broad overview of the existing scientific literature in the field of climate change and health is currently missing in order to ensure that all priority areas are being adequately addressed. In this paper we outline our methods to conduct a scoping review of the published peer-reviewed literature on climate change and health between 1990 and 2015. A detailed search strategy will be used to search the PubMed and Web of Science databases. Specific inclusion and exclusion criteria will be applied in order to capture the most relevant literature in the time frame chosen. Data will be extracted, categorised and coded to allow for statistical analysis of the results. No ethical approval was required for this study. A searchable database of climate change and health publications will be developed and a manuscript will be complied for publication and dissemination of the findings. We anticipate that this study will allow us to map the trends observed in publications over the 25-year time period in climate change and health research. It will also identify the research areas with the highest volume of publications as well as highlight the research trends in climate change and health. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  2. Wildcat wellness coaching feasibility trial: protocol for home-based health behavior mentoring in girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cull, Brooke J; Rosenkranz, Sara K; Dzewaltowski, David A; Teeman, Colby S; Knutson, Cassandra K; Rosenkranz, Richard R

    2016-01-01

    Childhood obesity is a major public health problem, with one third of America's children classified as either overweight or obese. Obesity prevention and health promotion programs using components such as wellness coaching and home-based interventions have shown promise, but there is a lack of published research evaluating the impact of a combined home-based and wellness coaching intervention for obesity prevention and health promotion in young girls. The main objective of this study is to test the feasibility of such an intervention on metrics related to recruitment, intervention delivery, and health-related outcome assessments. The secondary outcome is to evaluate the possibility of change in health-related psychosocial, behavioral, and biomedical outcomes in our sample of participants. Forty girls who are overweight or obese (aged 8-13 years) will be recruited from a Midwestern college town. Participants will be recruited through posted flyers, newspaper advertisements, email, and social media. The volunteer convenience sample of girls will be randomized to one of two home-based wellness coaching interventions: a general health education condition or a healthy eating physical activity skills condition. Trained female wellness coaches will conduct weekly hour-long home visits for 12 consecutive weeks. Assessments will occur at baseline, post-intervention (3 months after baseline), and follow-up (6 months after baseline) and will include height, weight, waist circumference, body composition, pulmonary function, blood pressure, systemic inflammation, physical activity (Actical accelerometer), and self-reported survey measures (relevant to fruit and vegetable consumption, physical activity, and quality of life). This study will evaluate the feasibility of home-based wellness coaching interventions for overweight and obese girls and secondarily assess the preliminary impact on health-related psychosocial, behavioral, and biomedical outcomes. Results will provide

  3. Barriers and facilitators to the integration of mental health services into primary health care: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakida, Edith K; Akena, Dickens; Okello, Elialilia S; Kinengyere, Alison; Kamoga, Ronald; Mindra, Arnold; Obua, Celestino; Talib, Zohray M

    2017-08-25

    Mental health is an integral part of health and well-being and yet health systems have not adequately responded to the burden of mental disorders. Integrating mental health services into primary health care (PHC) is the most viable way of closing the treatment gap and ensuring that people get the mental health care they need. PHC was formally adapted by the World Health Organization (WHO), and they have since invested enormous amounts of resources across the globe to ensure that integration of mental health services into PHC works. This review will use the SPIDER (Sample, Phenomenon of Interest, Design, Evaluation, Research type) framework approach to identify experiences of mental health integration into PHC; the findings will be reported using the "Best fit" framework synthesis. PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled trials (CENTRAL) will be searched including other sources like the WHO website and OpenGrey database. Assessment of bias and quality will be done at study level using two separate tools to check for the quality of evidence presented. Data synthesis will take on two synergistic approaches (qualitative and quantitative studies). Synthesizing evidence from countries across the globe will provide useful insights into the experiences of integrating mental health services into PHC and how the barriers and challenges have been handled. The findings will be useful to a wide array of stakeholders involved in the implementation of the mental health integration into PHC. The SPIDER framework has been chosen for this review because of its suitable application to qualitative and mixed methods research and will be used as a guide when selecting articles for inclusion. Data extracted will be synthesized using the "Best fit" framework because it has been used before and proved its suitability in producing new conceptual models for explaining decision-making and possible behaviors. Synthesizing evidence from countries across the globe

  4. How do primary health care teams learn to integrate intimate partner violence (IPV) management? A realist evaluation protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goicolea, Isabel; Vives-Cases, Carmen; San Sebastian, Miguel; Marchal, Bruno; Kegels, Guy; Hurtig, Anna-Karin

    2013-03-23

    Despite the existence of ample literature dealing, on the one hand, with the integration of innovations within health systems and team learning, and, on the other hand, with different aspects of the detection and management of intimate partner violence (IPV) within healthcare facilities, research that explores how health innovations that go beyond biomedical issues-such as IPV management-get integrated into health systems, and that focuses on healthcare teams' learning processes is, to the best of our knowledge, very scarce if not absent. This realist evaluation protocol aims to ascertain: why, how, and under what circumstances primary healthcare teams engage (if at all) in a learning process to integrate IPV management in their practices; and why, how, and under what circumstances team learning processes lead to the development of organizational culture and values regarding IPV management, and the delivery of IPV management services. This study will be conducted in Spain using a multiple-case study design. Data will be collected from selected cases (primary healthcare teams) through different methods: individual and group interviews, routinely collected statistical data, documentary review, and observation. Cases will be purposively selected in order to enable testing the initial middle-range theory (MRT). After in-depth exploration of a limited number of cases, additional cases will be chosen for their ability to contribute to refining the emerging MRT to explain how primary healthcare learn to integrate intimate partner violence management. Evaluations of health sector responses to IPV are scarce, and even fewer focus on why, how, and when the healthcare services integrate IPV management. There is a consensus that healthcare professionals and healthcare teams play a key role in this integration, and that training is important in order to realize changes. However, little is known about team learning of IPV management, both in terms of how to trigger such learning

  5. Examining the Scope of Multibusiness Health Care Firms: Implications for Strategy and Financial Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noorein Inamdar, S

    2007-01-01

    Objective Use theory and data to examine the scope of corporate strategies for multibusiness health care firms, also known as organized or integrated health care delivery systems. Data Sources Data are from the 2000 HIMSS Analytics Annual Survey of integrated health care delivery systems (IHDS), which provides complete information on businesses owned by IHDS. Study Design Scope defined as the breadth and type of businesses in which a firm chooses to compete is measured across seven separate business areas: (1) health plans, (2) ambulatory, (3) acute, (4) subacute, (5) home health, (6) other related nonpatient care businesses, and (7) external collaborations. Theories on strategy and organizational configurations along with measures of scope and a novel dataset were used to classify 796 firms into five mutually exclusive groups. The bases for classification were two competitive dimensions of scope: (1) breadth of businesses and (2) mix of existing core businesses versus new noncore businesses. Data Extraction Methods Unit of analysis is the multibusiness health care firm. Sample consists of 796 firms, defined as nonprofit organizations that own two or more direct patient care businesses in two or more separate areas across the health care value chain. Firms were clustered into five mutually exclusive organizational configurations with unique scope characteristics revealing a new taxonomy of corporate strategies. Principal Findings Analysis of the scope variables revealed five strategic types (along with the number of firms and distinguishing features of each strategy) defined as follows: (1) Core Service Provider (340 firms with the smallest scope providing core set of patient care services), (2) Mission Based (52 firms with the next smallest scope offering core set of services to underserved populations), (3) Contractor (266 firms with medium scope and contracting with physician groups), (4) Health Plan Focus (83 firms with large scope and providing health plans

  6. Professionalisation and social attitude: a protocol for measuring HIV/AIDS-related stigma among health care students.

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmadi, Keivan; Daniel D Reidpath; Allotey, Pascale; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Introduction HIV/AIDS-related stigma affects the access and utilisation of health services. Although HIV/AIDS-related stigma in the health services has been studied, little work has attended to the relationship between professional development and stigmatising attitudes. Hence, in this study, we will extend earlier research by examining the relationship between the stage of professional development and the kinds of stigmatising attitudes held about people living with HIV/AIDS. Methods and...

  7. Defining features of the practice of global health research: an examination of 14 global health research teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Stephen

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This paper strives to develop a pragmatic view of the scope of practice and core characteristics of global health research (GHR by examining the activities of 14 Canadian-funded global health teams that were in the process of implementing research programs. Methods: Information was collected by a reflective exploration of team proposals and progress reports, a content analysis of the outputs from an all-team meeting and review of the literature. Results: Teams adopted equity-centered, problem-focused, systems-based approaches intended to find upstream determinants that could make people more resilient to social and ecological factors impacting their health. Long-term visions and time frames were needed to develop and solidify fully functional interdisciplinary, multinational, multicultural partnerships. The implementation of research into practice was a motivating factor for all teams, but to do this, they recognized the need for evidence-based advice on how to best do this. Traditional measures of biomedical research excellence were necessary but not sufficient to encompass views of excellence of team-based interdisciplinary research, which includes features like originality, coherence and cumulative contributions to fields of study, acceptance by peers and success in translating research into gains in health status. An innovative and nuanced approached to GHR ethics was needed to deal with some unique ethical issues because the needs for GHR were not adequately addressed by institutional biomedical research ethics boards. Core competencies for GHR researchers were a blend of those needed for health promotion, population health, international development, sustainable development, and systems science. Discussion: Developing acceptable and meaningful ways to evaluate the short-term contributions for GHR and forecast its long-term impacts is a strategic priority needed to defend decisions being made in GHR development. Planning and

  8. Factors influencing social and health outcomes after motor vehicle crash injury: an inception cohort study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagnoor, Jagnoor; Blyth, Fiona; Gabbe, Belinda; Derrett, Sarah; Boufous, Soufiane; Dinh, Michael; Day, Robert; Button, Gregory; Gillett, Mark; Joseph, Tony; Nicholas, Michael; Ivers, Rebecca; Maher, Chris G; Willcock, Simon; Kenardy, Justin; Collie, Alex; Cameron, Ian D

    2014-02-25

    There is growing evidence that health and social outcomes following motor vehicle crash injury are related to cognitive and emotional responses of the injured individual, as well as relationships between the injured individual and the compensation systems with which they interact. As most of this evidence comes from other states in Australia or overseas, investigation is therefore warranted to identify the key determinants of health and social outcomes following injury in the context of the New South Wales motor accident insurance scheme. In this inception cohort study, 2400 participants, aged 17 years or more, injured in a motor vehicle crash in New South Wales will be identified though hospital emergency departments, general and physiotherapy practitioners, police records and a government insurance regulator database. Participants will be initially contacted through mail. Baseline interviews will be conducted by telephone within 28 days of the injury and participants will be followed up with interviews at 6, 12 and 24 months post-injury. Health insurance and pharmaceutical prescription data will also be collected. The study results will report short and long term health and social outcomes in the study sample. Identification of factors associated with health and social outcomes following injury, including related compensation factors will provide evidence for improved service delivery, post-injury management, and inform policy development and reforms. Australia New Zealand Clinical trial registry identification number--ACTRN12613000889752. Available at: ANZCTR Registered FISH Study.

  9. Ghana randomized air pollution and health study (GRAPHS): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Darby W; Asante, Kwaku Poku; Wylie, Blair J; Chillrud, Steve N; Whyatt, Robin M; Ae-Ngibise, Kenneth A; Quinn, Ashlinn K; Yawson, Abena Konadu; Boamah, Ellen Abrafi; Agyei, Oscar; Mujtaba, Mohammed; Kaali, Seyram; Kinney, Patrick; Owusu-Agyei, Seth

    2015-09-22

    Household air pollution exposure is a major health risk, but validated interventions remain elusive. The Ghana Randomized Air Pollution and Health Study (GRAPHS) is a cluster-randomized trial that evaluates the efficacy of clean fuels (liquefied petroleum gas, or LPG) and efficient biomass cookstoves in the Brong-Ahafo region of central Ghana. We recruit pregnant women into LPG, efficient cookstove, and control arms and track birth weight and physician-assessed severe pneumonia incidence in the first year of life. A woman is eligible to participate if she is in the first or second trimester of pregnancy and carrying a live singleton fetus, if she is the primary cook, and if she does not smoke. We hypothesize that babies born to intervention mothers will weigh more and will have fewer cases of physician-assessed severe pneumonia in the first year of life. Additionally, an extensive personal air pollution exposure monitoring effort opens the way for exposure-response analyses, which we will present alongside intention-to-treat analyses. Major funding was provided by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, The Thrasher Research Fund, and the Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves. Household air pollution exposure is a major health risk that requires well-tested interventions. GRAPHS will provide important new evidence on the efficacy of both efficient biomass cookstoves and LPG, and will thus help inform health and energy policies in developing countries. The trial was registered with clinicaltrials.gov on 13 April 2011 with the identifier NCT01335490 .

  10. System-wide analysis of health financing equity in Cambodia: a study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, Virginia; Asante, Augustine; Ir, Por; Limwattananon, Supon; Jacobs, Bart; Liverani, Marco; Hayen, Andrew; Jan, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    To assess progress towards universal health coverage, countries like Cambodia require evidence on equity in the financing and distribution of healthcare benefits. This evidence must be based on a system-wide perspective that recognises the complex roles played by the public and private sectors in many contemporary healthcare systems. To undertake a system-wide assessment of who pays and who benefits from healthcare in Cambodia and to understand the factors influencing this. Financing and benefit incidence analysis will be used to calculate the financing burden and distribution of healthcare benefits across socioeconomic groups. Data on healthcare usage, living standards and self-assessed health status will be derived from a cross-sectional household survey designed for this study involving a random sample of 5000 households. This will be supplemented by secondary data from the Cambodian National Health Accounts 2014 and the Cambodian Socioeconomic Survey (CSES) 2014. We will also collect qualitative data through focus group discussions and in-depth interviews to inform the interpretation of the quantitative analyses. This study will produce previously unavailable information on who pays for, and who benefits from, health services across the entire health system of Cambodia. This evidence comes at a critical juncture in healthcare reform in South-East Asia with so many countries seeking guidance on the equity impact of their current financing arrangements that include a complex mix of public and private providers.

  11. Coffee and depression in Korea: the fifth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, R J; Moon, J D

    2015-04-01

    There is substantial interest in the health effects of coffee because it is the leading worldwide beverage after water. Existing literature on the connection between depression and coffee is scarce, and studies have yielded inconsistent results. The aim of this study was to examine the association between coffee consumption and depression in the Korean population. We conducted a cross-sectional study in 10,177 Korean individuals aged 20-97 years who participated in the fifth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Consumption of coffee and depression were assessed using a questionnaire. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to compute odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for depression. The lifetime prevalence of self-reported depression was 14.0% and that of self-reported clinical depression was 3.7%. After adjustment for potential confounders, the adjusted ORs for self-reported depression across coffee consumption categories were 1.00 (reference) for less than one cup/week, 0.84 (95% CI: 0.66, 1.07) for one to six cups/week, 0.63 (95% CI: 0.51, 0.79) for one cup/day, 0.69 (95% CI: 0.54, 0.88) for two cups/day and 0.58 (95% CI: 0.44, 0.76) for three or more cups/day (P for trend, coffee on the risk of depression.

  12. Analysis of blood glucose distribution characteristics in a health examination population in Chengdu (2007-2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wenxia; Xu, Wangdong; Zhu, Ping; Yang, Hanwei; Su, Linchong; Tang, Huairong; Liu, Yi

    2017-12-01

    With socioeconomic growth and cultural changes in China, the level of blood glucose may have changed in recent years. This study aims to detect the blood glucose distribution characteristics with a large size of health examination population.A total of 641,311 cases (360,259 males and 281,052 females) more than 18 years old during 2007 to 2015 were recruited from the Health Examination Center at West China hospital, Sichuan University.The percentage of cases with abnormal glucose level and the mean level of glucose were significantly increased since 2007 to 2015 overall. The percentage of cases with abnormal glucose level in males was significantly higher than that in females every year, and the percentage of cases with abnormal glucose level in aged population was higher than the young population. In addition, the mean level of glucose was higher in aged population with normal level of glucose than the young population with normal level of glucose, and the mean level of glucose was higher in males with normal level of glucose than the females with normal level of glucose.The population showed an increased level of blood glucose. Some preventive action may be adopted early and more attention can be paid to them.

  13. Analysis of blood glucose distribution characteristics in a health examination population in Chengdu (2007–2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wenxia; Xu, Wangdong; Zhu, Ping; Yang, Hanwei; Su, Linchong; Tang, Huairong; Liu, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract With socioeconomic growth and cultural changes in China, the level of blood glucose may have changed in recent years. This study aims to detect the blood glucose distribution characteristics with a large size of health examination population. A total of 641,311 cases (360,259 males and 281,052 females) more than 18 years old during 2007 to 2015 were recruited from the Health Examination Center at West China hospital, Sichuan University. The percentage of cases with abnormal glucose level and the mean level of glucose were significantly increased since 2007 to 2015 overall. The percentage of cases with abnormal glucose level in males was significantly higher than that in females every year, and the percentage of cases with abnormal glucose level in aged population was higher than the young population. In addition, the mean level of glucose was higher in aged population with normal level of glucose than the young population with normal level of glucose, and the mean level of glucose was higher in males with normal level of glucose than the females with normal level of glucose. The population showed an increased level of blood glucose. Some preventive action may be adopted early and more attention can be paid to them. PMID:29245232

  14. Health communication, information technology and the public’s attitude toward periodic general health examinations [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan-Hoang Vuong

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Periodic general health examinations (GHEs are gradually becoming more popular as they employ subclinical screenings, as a means of early detection. This study considers the effect of information technology (IT, health communications and the public’s attitude towards GHEs in Vietnam. Methods: A total of 2,068 valid observations were obtained from a survey in Hanoi and its surrounding areas. Results: In total, 42.12% of participants stated that they were willing to use IT applications to recognise illness symptoms, and nearly 2/3 of them rated the healthcare quality at average level or below. Discussion: The data, which was processed by the BCL model, showed that IT applications (apps reduce hesitation toward GHEs; however, older people seem to have less confidence in using these apps. Health communications and government’s subsidy also increased the likelihood of people attending periodic GHEs. The probability of early check-ups where there is a cash subsidy could reach approximately 80%.

  15. Variation in Patients' Travel Times among Imaging Examination Types at a Large Academic Health System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Liang, Yu; Duszak, Richard; Recht, Michael P

    2017-08-01

    Patients' willingness to travel farther distances for certain imaging services may reflect their perceptions of the degree of differentiation of such services. We compare patients' travel times for a range of imaging examinations performed across a large academic health system. We searched the NYU Langone Medical Center Enterprise Data Warehouse to identify 442,990 adult outpatient imaging examinations performed over a recent 3.5-year period. Geocoding software was used to estimate typical driving times from patients' residences to imaging facilities. Variation in travel times was assessed among examination types. The mean expected travel time was 29.2 ± 20.6 minutes, but this varied significantly (p travel times were shortest for ultrasound (26.8 ± 18.9) and longest for positron emission tomography-computed tomography (31.9 ± 21.5). For magnetic resonance imaging, travel times were shortest for musculoskeletal extremity (26.4 ± 19.2) and spine (28.6 ± 21.0) examinations and longest for prostate (35.9 ± 25.6) and breast (32.4 ± 22.3) examinations. For computed tomography, travel times were shortest for a range of screening examinations [colonography (25.5 ± 20.8), coronary artery calcium scoring (26.1 ± 19.2), and lung cancer screening (26.4 ± 14.9)] and longest for angiography (32.0 ± 22.6). For ultrasound, travel times were shortest for aortic aneurysm screening (22.3 ± 18.4) and longest for breast (30.1 ± 19.2) examinations. Overall, men (29.9 ± 21.6) had longer (p travel times than women (27.8 ± 20.3); this difference persisted for each modality individually (p ≤ 0.006). Patients' willingness to travel longer times for certain imaging examination types (particularly breast and prostate imaging) supports the role of specialized services in combating potential commoditization of imaging services. Disparities in travel times by gender warrant further investigation. Copyright

  16. The unbearable lightness of health science reporting: a week examining Italian print media.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Iaboli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although being an important source of science news information to the public, print news media have often been criticized in their credibility. Health-related content of press media articles has been examined by many studies underlining that information about benefits, risks and costs are often incomplete or inadequate and financial conflicts of interest are rarely reported. However, these studies have focused their analysis on very selected science articles. The present research aimed at adopting a wider explorative approach, by analysing all types of health science information appearing on the Italian national press in one-week period. Moreover, we attempted to score the balance of the articles. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We collected 146 health science communication articles defined as articles aiming at improving the reader's knowledge on health from a scientific perspective. Articles were evaluated by 3 independent physicians with respect to different divulgation parameters: benefits, costs, risks, sources of information, disclosure of financial conflicts of interest and balance. Balance was evaluated with regard to exaggerated or non correct claims. The selected articles appeared on 41 Italian national daily newspapers and 41 weekly magazines, representing 89% of national circulation copies: 97 articles (66% covered common medical treatments or basic scientific research and 49 (34% were about new medical treatments, procedures, tests or products. We found that only 6/49 (12% articles on new treatments, procedures, tests or products mentioned costs or risks to patients. Moreover, benefits were always maximized and in 16/49 cases (33% they were presented in relative rather than absolute terms. The majority of stories (133/146, 91% did not report any financial conflict of interest. Among these, 15 were shown to underreport them (15/146, 9.5%, as we demonstrated that conflicts of interest did actually exist. Unbalanced

  17. The unbearable lightness of health science reporting: a week examining Italian print media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaboli, Luca; Caselli, Luana; Filice, Angelina; Russi, Gianpaolo; Belletti, Eleonora

    2010-03-24

    Although being an important source of science news information to the public, print news media have often been criticized in their credibility. Health-related content of press media articles has been examined by many studies underlining that information about benefits, risks and costs are often incomplete or inadequate and financial conflicts of interest are rarely reported. However, these studies have focused their analysis on very selected science articles. The present research aimed at adopting a wider explorative approach, by analysing all types of health science information appearing on the Italian national press in one-week period. Moreover, we attempted to score the balance of the articles. We collected 146 health science communication articles defined as articles aiming at improving the reader's knowledge on health from a scientific perspective. Articles were evaluated by 3 independent physicians with respect to different divulgation parameters: benefits, costs, risks, sources of information, disclosure of financial conflicts of interest and balance. Balance was evaluated with regard to exaggerated or non correct claims. The selected articles appeared on 41 Italian national daily newspapers and 41 weekly magazines, representing 89% of national circulation copies: 97 articles (66%) covered common medical treatments or basic scientific research and 49 (34%) were about new medical treatments, procedures, tests or products. We found that only 6/49 (12%) articles on new treatments, procedures, tests or products mentioned costs or risks to patients. Moreover, benefits were always maximized and in 16/49 cases (33%) they were presented in relative rather than absolute terms. The majority of stories (133/146, 91%) did not report any financial conflict of interest. Among these, 15 were shown to underreport them (15/146, 9.5%), as we demonstrated that conflicts of interest did actually exist. Unbalanced articles were 27/146 (18%). Specifically, the probability of

  18. The periodic health examination provided to asymptomatic older women: an assessment using standardized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, P A; Dietrich, A J; Freeman, D H; Mott, L A

    1993-07-15

    patients is a feasible method for assessing physician performance of the periodic health examination while controlling for case mix.

  19. Environment and Health in Children Day Care Centres (ENVIRH) - Study rationale and protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo-Martins, J; Carreiro Martins, P; Viegas, J; Aelenei, D; Cano, M M; Teixeira, J P; Paixão, P; Papoila, A L; Leiria-Pinto, P; Pedro, C; Rosado-Pinto, J; Annesi-Maesano, I; Neuparth, N

    2014-01-01

    Indoor air quality (IAQ) is considered an important determinant of human health. The association between exposure to volatile organic compounds, particulate matter, house dust mite, molds and bacteria in day care centers (DCC) is not completely clear. The aim of this project was to study these effects. This study comprised two phases. Phase I included an evaluation of 45 DCCs (25 from Lisbon and 20 from Oporto, targeting 5161 children). In this phase, building characteristics, indoor CO2 and air temperature/relative humidity, were assessed. A children's respiratory health questionnaire derived from the ISAAC (International Study on Asthma and Allergies in Children) was also distributed. Phase II encompassed two evaluations and included 20 DCCs selected from phase I after a cluster analysis (11 from Lisbon and 9 from Oporto, targeting 2287 children). In this phase, data on ventilation, IAQ, thermal comfort parameters, respiratory and allergic health, airway inflammation biomarkers, respiratory virus infection patterns and parental and child stress were collected. In Phase I, building characteristics, occupant behavior and ventilation surrogates were collected from all DCCs. The response rate of the questionnaire was 61.7% (3186 children). Phase II included 1221 children. Association results between DCC characteristics, IAQ and health outcomes will be provided in order to support recommendations on IAQ and children's health. A building ventilation model will also be developed. This paper outlines methods that might be implemented by other investigators conducting studies on the association between respiratory health and indoor air quality at DCC. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Pneumologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  20. Improving health-related fitness in children: the fit-4-Fun randomized controlled trial study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eather Narelle

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Declining levels of physical fitness in children are linked to an increased risk of developing poor physical and mental health. Physical activity programs for children that involve regular high intensity physical activity, along with muscle and bone strengthening activities, have been identified by the World Health Organisation as a key strategy to reduce the escalating burden of ill health caused by non-communicable diseases. This paper reports the rationale and methods for a school-based intervention designed to improve physical fitness and physical activity levels of Grades 5 and 6 primary school children. Methods/Design Fit-4-Fun is an 8-week multi-component school-based health-related fitness education intervention and will be evaluated using a group randomized controlled trial. Primary schools from the Hunter Region in NSW, Australia, will be invited to participate in the program in 2011 with a target sample size of 128 primary schools children (age 10-13. The Fit-4-Fun program is theoretically grounded and will be implemented applying the Health Promoting Schools framework. Students will participate in weekly curriculum-based health and physical education lessons, daily break-time physical activities during recess and lunch, and will complete an 8-week (3 × per week home activity program with their parents and/or family members. A battery of six health-related fitness assessments, four days of pedometery-assessed physical activity and a questionnaire, will be administered at baseline, immediate post-intervention (2-months and at 6-months (from baseline to determine intervention effects. Details of the methodological aspects of recruitment, inclusion criteria, randomization, intervention program, assessments, process evaluation and statistical analyses are described. Discussion The Fit-4-Fun program is an innovative school-based intervention targeting fitness improvements in primary school children. The program will

  1. The Study of Environment on Aboriginal Resilience and Child Health (SEARCH: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aboriginal Australians have a life expectancy more than ten years less than that of non-Aboriginal Australians, reflecting their disproportionate burden of both communicable and non-communicable disease throughout the lifespan. Little is known about the health and health trajectories of Aboriginal children and, although the majority of Aboriginal people live in urban areas, data are particularly sparse in relation to children living in urban areas. Methods/Design The Study of Environment on Aboriginal Resilience and Child Health (SEARCH is a cohort study of Aboriginal children aged 0-17 years, from urban and large regional centers in New South Wales, Australia. SEARCH focuses on Aboriginal community identified health priorities of: injury; otitis media; vaccine-preventable conditions; mental health problems; developmental delay; obesity; and risk factors for chronic disease. Parents/caregivers and their children are invited to participate in SEARCH at the time of presentation to one of the four participating Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations at Mount Druitt, Campbelltown, Wagga Wagga and Newcastle. Questionnaire data are obtained from parents/caregivers and children, along with signed permission for follow-up through repeat data collection and data linkage. All children have their height, weight, waist circumference and blood pressure measured and complete audiometry, otoscopy/pneumatic otoscopy and tympanometry. Children aged 1-7 years have speech and language assessed and their parents/caregivers complete the Parental Evaluation of Developmental Status. The Study aims to recruit 1700 children by the end of 2010 and to secure resources for long term follow up. From November 2008 to March 2010, 1010 children had joined the study. From those 446 children with complete data entry, participating children ranged in age from 2 weeks to 17 years old, with 144 aged 0-3, 147 aged 4-7, 75 aged 8-10 and 79 aged 11

  2. Examining Burnout, Depression, and Self-Compassion in Veterans Affairs Mental Health Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, David M; Rodman, John L; Thuras, Paul D; Shiroma, Paulo R; Lim, Kelvin O

    2017-07-01

    Burnout, a state of emotional exhaustion associated with negative personal and occupational outcomes, is prevalent among healthcare providers. A better understanding of the psychological factors that may be associated with resilience to burnout is essential to develop effective interventions. Self-compassion, which includes kindness toward oneself, recognition of suffering as part of shared human experience, mindfulness, and nonjudgment toward inadequacies and failures, may be one such factor. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between burnout, depression, and self-compassion in Veterans Affairs (VA) mental health staff. Cross-sectional study. VA medical center and affiliated community-based clinics. VA mental health staff. The 19-item Copenhagen Burnout Inventory, the 26-item Self-Compassion Scale, and the Patient Health Questionnaire 2-item depression screen. Demographic information included age, sex, years worked in current position, and number of staff supervised. One hundred and twenty-eight of a potential 379 individuals (33.8%) responded. Clerical support, nursing, social work, psychology, and psychiatry were the major professions represented. Self-compassion was inversely correlated with burnout (r = -0.41, p burnout remained significant even after accounting for depressive symptoms and demographic variables in a multiple linear regression model. Of all the variables examined, self-compassion was the strongest predictor of burnout. The results of this study support the hypothesis that self-compassion may be associated with resilience to burnout. Alternatively, decreased self-compassion may be a downstream effect of increased burnout. Prospective, longitudinal studies are needed to determine the directional relationship between these factors, and whether interventions that cultivate self-compassion may decrease burnout and/or protect against its negative personal and professional outcomes.

  3. Examining the Relationship Between Flexible Resources and Health Information Channel Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manierre, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    This study examines how variations in flexible resources influence where individuals begin their search for health information. Access to flexible resources such as money, power, and knowledge can alter the accessibility of channels for health information, such as doctors, the Internet, and print media. Using the HINTS 3 sample, whether information channel utilization is predicted by the same factors in two groups with distinct levels of access to flexible resources, as approximated by high and low levels of education, is investigated. Differences in access to flexible resources are hypothesized to produce variations in channel utilization in bivariate analyses, as well as changes in coefficient strength and statistical significance in multivariate models. Multinomial logit models were used to assess how a number of variables influence the probability of using a specific information channel first in either flexible resource group. Results suggest that individuals with higher levels of education, a proxy for flexible resources, are more likely to report seeking information from the Internet first, which is consistent with research on the digital divide. It appears that diminished access to flexible resources is also associated with heightened utilization of offline channels, including doctors. A handful of differences in predictors were found between the low and high flexible resource groups when multivariate models were compared. Future research should take into account the distinctions between different offline channels while also seeking to further understand how social inequality relates to the utilization of different channels and corresponding health outcomes.

  4. Expression of anger and ill health in two cultures: an examination of inflammation and cardiovascular risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitayama, Shinobu; Park, Jiyoung; Boylan, Jennifer Morozink; Miyamoto, Yuri; Levine, Cynthia S; Markus, Hazel Rose; Karasawa, Mayumi; Coe, Christopher L; Kawakami, Norito; Love, Gayle D; Ryff, Carol D

    2015-02-01

    Expression of anger is associated with biological health risk (BHR) in Western cultures. However, recent evidence documenting culturally divergent functions of the expression of anger suggests that its link with BHR may be moderated by culture. To test this prediction, we examined large probability samples of both Japanese and Americans using multiple measures of BHR, including pro-inflammatory markers (interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein) and indices of cardiovascular malfunction (systolic blood pressure and ratio of total to HDL cholesterol). We found that the link between greater expression of anger and increased BHR was robust for Americans. As predicted, however, this association was diametrically reversed for Japanese, among whom greater expression of anger predicted reduced BHR. These patterns were unique to the expressive facet of anger and remained after we controlled for age, gender, health status, health behaviors, social status, and reported experience of negative emotions. Implications for sociocultural modulation of bio-physiological responses are discussed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Participation rates by educational levels have diverged during 25 years in Finnish health examination surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinikainen, Jaakko; Tolonen, Hanna; Borodulin, Katja; Härkänen, Tommi; Jousilahti, Pekka; Karvanen, Juha; Koskinen, Seppo; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Männistö, Satu; Rissanen, Harri; Vartiainen, Erkki

    2017-10-03

    Declining participation rates in health examination surveys may impair the representativeness of surveys and introduce bias into the comparison of results between population groups if participation rates differ between them. Changes in the characteristics of non-participants over time may also limit comparability with earlier surveys. We studied the association of socio-economic position with participation, and its changes over the past 25 years. Occupational class and educational level are used as indicators of socio-economic position. Data from six cross-sectional FINRISK surveys conducted between 1987 and 2012 in Finland were linked to national administrative registers, which allowed investigation of the differences between survey participants and non-participants. Our results show that individuals with low occupational class or low level of education were less likely to participate than individuals with high occupational class or high level of education. Participation rates decreased in all subgroups of the population but the decline was fastest among those with low level of education. The differences in participation rates must be taken into account to avoid biased estimates because socio-economic position has also been shown to be strongly related to health, health behaviour and biological risk factors. Particular attention should be paid to the recruitment of the less-educated population groups.

  6. Health maintenance in school-aged children: Part I. History, physical examination, screening, and immunizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Margaret; Locke, Amy B; Skye, Eric P

    2011-03-15

    The goals of the well-child examination in school-aged children (kindergarten through early adolescence) are promoting health, detecting disease, and counseling to prevent injury and future health problems. A complete history should address any concerns from the patient and family and screen for lifestyle habits, including diet, physical activity, daily screen time (e.g., television, computer, video games), hours of sleep per night, dental care, and safety habits. School performance can be used for developmental surveillance. A full physical examination should be performed; however, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends against routine scoliosis screening and testicular examination. Children should be screened for obesity, which is defined as a body mass index at or above the 95th percentile for age and sex, and resources for comprehensive, intensive behavioral interventions should be provided to children with obesity. Although the evidence is mixed regarding screening for hypertension before 18 years of age, many experts recommend checking blood pressure annually beginning at three years of age. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends vision and hearing screening annually or every two years in school-aged children. There is insufficient evidence to recommend screening for dyslipidemia in children of any age, or screening for depression before 12 years of age. All children should receive at least 400 IU of vitamin D daily, with higher doses indicated in children with vitamin D deficiency. Children who live in areas with inadequate fluoride in the water (less than 0.6 ppm) should receive a daily fluoride supplement. Age-appropriate immunizations should be given, as well as any missed immunizations.

  7. The Stroke and Carer Optimal Health Program (SCOHP) to enhance psychosocial health: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasier, Catherine; Ski, Chantal F; Thompson, David R; Cameron, Jan; O'Brien, Casey L; Lautenschlager, Nicola T; Gonzales, Graeme; Hsueh, Ya-Seng Arthur; Moore, Gaye; Knowles, Simon R; Rossell, Susan L; Haselden, Rachel; Castle, David J

    2016-09-09

    Stroke is a leading cause of disability and distress, and often profoundly affects the quality of life of stroke survivors and their carers. With the support of carers, many stroke survivors are returning to live in the community despite the presence of disability and ongoing challenges. The sudden and catastrophic changes caused by stroke affects the mental, emotional and social health of both stroke survivors and carers. The aim of this study is to evaluate a Stroke and Carer Optimal Health Program (SCOHP) that adopts a person-centred approach and engages collaborative therapy to educate, support and improve the psychosocial health of stroke survivors and their carers. This study is a prospective randomised controlled trial. It will include a total of 168 stroke survivors and carers randomly allocated into an intervention group (SCOHP) or a control group (usual care). Participants randomised to the intervention group will receive nine (8 + 1 booster) sessions guided by a structured workbook. The primary outcome measures for stroke survivors and carers will be health-related quality of life (AQoL-6D and EQ-5D) and self-efficacy (GSE). Secondary outcome measures will include: anxiety and depression (HADS); coping (Brief COPE); work and social adjustment (WSAS); carer strain (MCSI); carer satisfaction (CASI); and treatment evaluation (TEI-SF and CEQ). Process evaluation and a health economic cost analysis will also be conducted. We believe that this is an innovative intervention that engages the stroke survivor and carer and will be significant in improving the psychosocial health, increasing independence and reducing treatment-related costs in this vulnerable patient-carer dyad. In addition, we expect that the intervention will assist carers and stroke survivors to negotiate the complexity of health services across the trajectory of care and provide practical skills to improve self-management. ACTRN12615001046594 . Registered on 7 October 2015.

  8. Barriers and facilitators to health information exchange in low- and middleincome country settings: a systematic review protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ather Akhlaq

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThe ability to capture, exchange and use accurate information about patients and services is vital for building strong health systems, providing comprehensive and integrated patient c