WorldWideScience

Sample records for health care student

  1. Health promotion in connection to the health care students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kyuchukova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The activities of health promotion for the students in health care specialties is organized and managed by the teacher process. During the training communication skills are acquired. It is the time for preparing students for work in counseling and patient education, collecting and providing health information - promotive function in the process of care (1. We assumed that these opportunities could be used in our work with children deprived of parental care. We set a goal to explore experiences, attitudes and ideas about students’ participation in health care in health promotion in the community of children and individuals. The study found that students are aware of the social importance of the knowledge acquired during the training and are convinced of the need to support adolescents to develop a responsible attitude towards their own health.

  2. [Vaccinations among students in health care professions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Lindeman, Katharina; Kugler, Joachim; Klewer, Jörg

    2011-12-01

    Incomplete vaccinations among students in health care professions lead to an increased risk for infections. Until now, only few studies related to this issue do exist. Therefore vaccinations and awareness regarding the importance of vaccinations among students in health care professions should be investigated. All 433 students of a regional college for health care professionals were asked to complete a standardized and anonymous questionnaire. Altogether 301 nursing students and 131 students of the other health care professions participated. About 66.1 percent of nursing students and 50.4 percent of students of other health care professions rated vaccination as "absolutely necessary". Different percentages of completed vaccinations were reported for tetanus (79.1 percent versus 64.4 percent), hepatitis B (78.7 percent versus 77.5 percent) and hepatitis A (74.1 percent versus 68.5 percent). 6.3 percent versus 15.4 percent did not know if they were vaccinated against tetanus, hepatitis B (5.3 percent versus 7.7 percent) and hepatitis A (5.6 percent versus 9.2 percent). While approximately half of the students reported "primary vaccination and booster" against mumps (59.5 percent versus 53.5 percent), measles (58.8 percent versus 54.6 percent) and rubella (58.3 percent versus 55.4 percent), this was reported less for pertussis (43.8 percent versus 39.8 percent) and varicella (32.4 percent versus 25.2 percent). The results indicate inadequate vaccination status in the investigated students. In addition, a gap between the awareness of the importance of vaccinations and personal preventive behavior became obvious. Therefore, education of these future health professionals still requires issues related to vaccinations.

  3. College students' preferences for health care providers when accessing sexual health resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Carolyn M; Lechner, Kate E; Frerich, Ellen A; Lust, Katherine A; Eisenberg, Marla E

    2014-01-01

    Many emerging adults (18-25 year olds) report unmet health needs and disproportionately experience problems such as sexually transmitted infections. This study was conducted to examine college students' perceptions of health care providers, specifically in the context of accessing sexual health resources. Students (N = 52) were recruited from five diverse colleges in one state to participate in a one-to-one interview that involved walking and virtually exploring resources on and near campus. Interviews were conducted from May to November 2010. Open-ended one-to-one interview questions. Inductive qualitative analysis yielded six themes summarizing students' perceptions of provider characteristics, health care resources, the role of their peers, and students' suggestions for strengthening health care services. Importantly, students consider a variety of staff-and their student peers-to be resources for sexual health information and services. Findings emphasize the importance of collaboration between health service staff and broader campus staff because students often turn to campus staff initially. Postsecondary students welcome opportunities to know a provider through interactive websites that include details about providers on campus; their decisions to seek sexual health care services are influenced by their perceptions of providers' characteristics and interpersonal skills. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Health Care for the International Student: Asia and the Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naughton, June C., Ed.; And Others

    This handbook consists of 24 papers addressing various aspects on health care and health care systems and services for foreign students from the Asia Pacific Region. The papers are: "Providing Health Care for International Students" (Donald F. B. Char); "Major Health Care Systems in Asia and the Pacific: Mainland China, Taiwan, Hong…

  5. Students' perspectives to health care services in lithuania

    OpenAIRE

    Brancevič, Jolita

    2016-01-01

    Students' Perspectives to Health Care Services in Lithuania Introduction. The Rights of Patients and Compensation for the Damage to Their Health Act defines health care services as safe and effective means to take care of health, identify, diagnose and treat diseases and provide nursing services. The aims set out in a policy of health care services are fairly broad and, among others, include the improvement of both the quality and the availability of health care services. The issues of increa...

  6. Using expanded individualized health care plans to assist teachers of students with complex health care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Kathryn Wolff; Tumlin, Jennifer

    2004-06-01

    As special education teachers have increasing numbers of students requiring health care procedures in their classrooms, school nurses need to help these teachers maintain a safe, healthy environment for their students. Part of this consists of having teachers know the steps to take should certain problems arise. This article examines the receptivity of using an expanded version of an individualized health care plan (IHP) to provide critical information to address health care problems, as well as having individualized education program (IEP) objectives for instructional targets identified in the IHP. The findings of this study indicate that a high percentage of school nurses and special education teachers were in favor of an expanded version of the IHP. There was also support for teaching students to independently or partially participate in performing their own health care procedures and having this instruction formalized as IEP objectives.

  7. Evaluation of Student Care Process in Urban and Rural Health Care Centers and Health House in Tabriz Using Tracer Methodology

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    Neda Kabiri

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives : Tracer methodology is a novel evaluation method which its purpose is to provide an accurate assessment of systems and processes for the delivery of care, treatment, and services at a health care organization. This study aimed to assess student care process in Tabriz using Tracer methodology. Material and Methods : This cross-sectional study was conducted in autumn 1391. Population study consisted of all the students who were covered by Tabriz health care center and study sample included an urban health care center, a rural health care center, a health house, and two schools in urban and rural areas which were selected by simple sampling method. Also, all the complicated and problematic processes were chosen to be assessed. Data were collected by interviewing, observing, and surveying documents and were compared with current standards. Results : The results of this study declared the percentage of points that each target group gained from tracer evaluation in student care process was 77% in health house, 90% in rural health care center and 83% in urban health care center. Findings indicated that documentation was the main weak point. Conclusion : According to the results of this study, student care process is sufficient; despite the fact that there are some deficiencies in caring process, as it may be improved through appropriate strategies. Furthermore, tracer methodology seems to be a proper method to evaluate various levels of health care system. ​

  8. Behaviour of medical students in seeking mental and physical health care: exploration and comparison with psychology students.

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    Brimstone, Renee; Thistlethwaite, Jill E; Quirk, Frances

    2007-01-01

    Doctors are often reluctant to seek health care through the usual channels and tend to self-diagnose and prescribe. Medical students learn attitudes and values from clinician role models and may also adopt behaviour patterns that lead them to seek help for physical and mental health problems from informal sources. This study aimed to explore the behaviour of students in seeking health care for physical and mental health problems, comparing medical with psychology students, and to understand what barriers to conventional routes of seeking health care may affect this. We administered a questionnaire asking for demographic details and responses to 2 vignettes in which a student from the respondent's discipline was experiencing firstly symptoms of a mental health problem and secondly symptoms of a physical health problem. Data were analysed with spss and univariate anovas to examine differences between respondents. A total of 172 students at the psychology and medical schools at James Cook University in Australia participated. We identified a number of barriers affecting student behaviour in seeking help, which included worries about knowing the doctor they could consult at the university health centre or having future dealings with him or her, and cost of treatment. There were differences between the 2 groups of students. There are several barriers for both psychology and medical students to accessing appropriate professional mental health care. Medical students also experience barriers to attaining appropriate physical health care when needed. Psychology and medical students were more likely to seek advice informally from friends and/or family with regard to mental health care.

  9. Illness and risk behaviour in health care students studying abroad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelin, Martin; Evengård, Birgitta; Palmgren, Helena

    2015-07-01

    The numbers of university students studying abroad increase every year. These students are not tourists as their studies require different types of travel that expose them to different risks. Moreover, health care students (HCSs) may be exposed to even greater risks according to their travel destinations and itineraries. Clearly, research-based pre-travel advice is needed. This study reports on a prospective survey conducted from April 2010 to January 2014 of health care and non-health care students from Swedish universities in Umeå, Stockholm and Gothenburg studying abroad. Of the 393 students included in the study, 85% responded. Over half (55%) were HCSs. Pre-travel health information was received by 79% and information on personal safety by 49% of HCSs. The rate of illness during travel was 52%. Health care students more often travelled to developing regions and were at increased risk for travellers' diarrhoea. One in 10 experienced theft and 3% were involved in traffic accidents. One in five met a new sexual partner during travel and 65% of these practised safe sex. Half of all participants increased their alcohol consumption while abroad; high alcohol consumption was associated with increased risk for being a victim of theft, as well as for meeting a new sexual partner during travel. University authorities are responsible for the safety and well-being of students studying abroad. This study supplies organisers and students with epidemiological data that will help improve pre-travel preparation and increase student awareness of the potential risks associated with studying abroad. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Breaking down silos: engaging students to help fix the US health care system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumarasamy MA

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Mathu A Kumarasamy,1 Fred P Sanfilippo1–3 1Emory–Georgia Tech Healthcare Innovation Program, 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, School of Medicine, 3Department of Health Policy and Management, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA Problem: The field of health care is becoming a team effort as patient care becomes increasingly complex and multifaceted. Despite the need for multidisciplinary education, there persists a lack of student engagement and collaboration among health care disciplines, which presents a growing concern as students join the workforce. Approach: In October 2013, the Emory–Georgia Tech Healthcare Innovation Program organized a student driven symposium entitled “US Healthcare: What's Broken and How to Fix It: The Student Perspective”. The symposium engaged students from multiple disciplines to work together in addressing problems associated with US health care delivery. The symposium was organized and carried out by a diverse group of student leaders from local institutions who adopted a multidisciplinary approach throughout the planning process. Outcomes: The innovative planning process leading up to the symposium revealed that many of the student-discipline groups lacked an understanding of one another's role in health care, and that students were interested in learning how to work together to leverage each other's profession. The symposium was widely attended and positively received by students and faculty from the Atlanta metropolitan area, and has since helped to promote interdepartmental collaboration and multidisciplinary education across institutions. Next steps: The student symposium will become an annual event and incorporate broader discipline representation, as well as a patient perspective. Proposals for additional institution-wide, multidisciplinary educational offerings are being addressed with the help of faculty and health care providers across the network

  11. Mental health self-care in medical students: a comprehensive look at help-seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Jessica A; Johnson, Benjamin; Leydon, Gary; Rohrbaugh, Robert M; Wilkins, Kirsten M

    2015-02-01

    The authors characterize medical student help-seeking behaviors and examine the relationship with stress, burnout, stigma, depression, and personal health behaviors. In 2013, the authors administered an electronic survey of all enrolled students at Yale School of Medicine (183 responders, response rate=35 %), inquiring about students' primary medical and mental health care, personal health behaviors, support systems, and help-seeking behaviors. Students completed the Attitudes to Mental Health Questionnaire, the Patient Health Questionnaire-2, and a modified Maslach Burnout Inventory. The authors analyzed the results with logistic regression, the Wilcoxon rank-sum test, the Kruskal-Wallis test, or a test for significance of Kendall rank correlation. Most students reported having a primary care provider (PCP), yet few reported seeking care when sick (33 %). Nineteen percent of students reported having a mental health provider, fewer than reported having a PCP (pstudents reported increased mental health needs since beginning medical school, and these students were more likely to agree that their needs were untreated. The majority of students endorsed stress, which correlated with increased and unmet mental health needs (pstudents and correlated with stress and increased and untreated needs. Most students reported comfort with asking for academic help; those uncomfortable were more likely to have mental health needs for which they did not seek treatment (p=0.004). Mental health stigma was low. Medical students had a significant unmet need for health care, influenced by barriers to accessing care, stress, burnout, and depression. Academic help seeking and supportive faculty relationships appear related to mental health treatment seeking. Targeted interventions for stress and burnout reduction, as well as incorporation of reflective practice, may have an impact on overall care seeking among medical students. Future studies should expand to other medical and professional

  12. The Sensitiveness and Fulfillment of Psychological Needs: Medical, Health Care and Students.

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    Rakovec-Felser, Zlatka

    2015-09-01

    As health was defined as a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being, and not merely an absence of disease or infirmity, the bio-psychosocial paradigm of health and illness attests that curing occurs when the science of medicine (the biomedical and pathos-physiological aspects of disease) and the art of medicine (the psychological, social, and interpersonal aspects of illness) merge into one unified holistic approach to patient care (Hojat, 2007). In this context the relationship between health care professionals and patients also become an indispensable tool in clinical situations to achieve better patient outcomes (Engel, 1990). In our pilot study in year 2009 we try to verify how are the medical students and students of health care (University of Maribor, Faculty of Medicine and Faculty of Health Care) prepared for their sensitive professional relationship in their future. Testing together 211 students (N=157 women, N=57 men), we compared the level of emotional empathy, altruistic love, values, and behaviorof 40 medical students, 118 students of health care and the group of 53 students of economics. Because of their professional choice, we expected that the medical and health care students would have higher empathy and altruism scores than the students of economics. Following the self-determination behavioral theory and its concept of autonomy support (Deci, Ryan, 2000), we anticipated also that the fulfilment of basic psychological needs could be important factor in everyday health care clinical practice. As the fulfilment of needs of autonomy, competence and relatedness could lead to increased autonomy supportive orientation in interactions with other subjects, and can be useful factor that prepare doctors or nurses for active participation in relationship with patients, we verified and compared the included groups also in this way.

  13. Breaking down silos: engaging students to help fix the US health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumarasamy, Mathu A; Sanfilippo, Fred P

    2015-01-01

    The field of health care is becoming a team effort as patient care becomes increasingly complex and multifaceted. Despite the need for multidisciplinary education, there persists a lack of student engagement and collaboration among health care disciplines, which presents a growing concern as students join the workforce. In October 2013, the Emory-Georgia Tech Healthcare Innovation Program organized a student driven symposium entitled "US Healthcare: What's Broken and How to Fix It: The Student Perspective". The symposium engaged students from multiple disciplines to work together in addressing problems associated with US health care delivery. The symposium was organized and carried out by a diverse group of student leaders from local institutions who adopted a multidisciplinary approach throughout the planning process. The innovative planning process leading up to the symposium revealed that many of the student-discipline groups lacked an understanding of one another's role in health care, and that students were interested in learning how to work together to leverage each other's profession. The symposium was widely attended and positively received by students and faculty from the Atlanta metropolitan area, and has since helped to promote interdepartmental collaboration and multidisciplinary education across institutions. The student symposium will become an annual event and incorporate broader discipline representation, as well as a patient perspective. Proposals for additional institution-wide, multidisciplinary educational offerings are being addressed with the help of faculty and health care providers across the network. Accordingly, the implementation of student-driven symposia to engage students and stimulate institution-wide changes may be a beneficial and cost-effective means for academic health centers looking to facilitate multidisciplinary health care education.

  14. Active Involvement of Students in the Learning Process of the American Health Care System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, Sylvie

    1997-01-01

    Over 200 pharmacy students in a University of Georgia class on the American health care system engaged in debates on health care issues, discussed newspaper articles, conducted client home visits, analyzed county health statistics, and completed exercises on pharmacists' compensation and health care planning. Most participating students responded…

  15. Knowledge of medical students on National Health Care System: A French multicentric survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feral-Pierssens, A-L; Jannot, A-S

    2017-09-01

    Education on national health care policy and costs is part of our medical curriculum explaining how our health care system works. Our aim was to measure French medical students' knowledge about national health care funding, costs and access and explore association with their educational and personal background. We developed a web-based survey exploring knowledge on national health care funding, access and costs through 19 items and measured success score as the number of correct answers. We also collected students' characteristics and public health training. The survey was sent to undergraduate medical students and residents from five medical universities between July and November 2015. A total of 1195 students from 5 medical universities responded to the survey. Most students underestimated the total amount of annual medical expenses, hospitalization costs and the proportion of the general population not benefiting from a complementary insurance. The knowledge score was not associated with medical education level. Three students' characteristics were significantly associated with a better knowledge score: male gender, older age, and underprivileged status. Medical students have important gaps in knowledge regarding national health care funding, coverage and costs. This knowledge was not associated with medical education level but with some of the students' personal characteristics. All these results are of great concern and should lead us to discussion and reflection about medical and public health training. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Health care voluntourism: addressing ethical concerns of undergraduate student participation in global health volunteer work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Daniel; Iltis, Ana S

    2014-12-01

    The popularity and availability of global health experiences has increased, with organizations helping groups plan service trips and companies specializing in "voluntourism," health care professionals volunteering their services through different organizations, and medical students participating in global health electives. Much has been written about global health experiences in resource poor settings, but the literature focuses primarily on the work of health care professionals and medical students. This paper focuses on undergraduate student involvement in short term medical volunteer work in resource poor countries, a practice that has become popular among pre-health professions students. We argue that the participation of undergraduate students in global health experiences raises many of the ethical concerns associated with voluntourism and global health experiences for medical students. Some of these may be exacerbated by or emerge in unique ways when undergraduates volunteer. Guidelines and curricula for medical student engagement in global health experiences have been developed. Guidelines specific to undergraduate involvement in such trips and pre-departure curricula to prepare students should be developed and such training should be required of volunteers. We propose a framework for such guidelines and curricula, argue that universities should be the primary point of delivery even when universities are not organizing the trips, and recommend that curricula should be developed in light of additional data.

  17. Attitudes of health care students about computer-aided neuroanatomy instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeough, D Michael; Bagatell, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    This study examined students' attitudes toward computer-aided instruction (CAI), specifically neuroanatomy learning modules, to assess which components were primary in establishing these attitudes and to discuss the implications of these attitudes for successfully incorporating CAI in the preparation of health care providers. Seventy-seven masters degree, entry-level, health care professional students matriculated in an introductory neuroanatomy course volunteered as subjects for this study. Students independently reviewed the modules as supplements to lecture and completed a survey to evaluate teaching effectiveness. Responses to survey statements were compared across the learning modules to determine if students viewed the modules differently. Responses to individual survey statements were averaged to measure the strength of agreement or disagreement with the statement. Responses to open-ended questions were theme coded, and frequencies and percentages were calculated for each. Students saw no differences between the learning modules. Students perceived the learning modules as valuable; they enjoyed using the modules but did not prefer CAI over traditional lecture format. The modules were useful in learning or reinforcing neuroanatomical concepts and improving clinical problem-solving skills. Students reported that the visual representation of the neuroanatomical systems, computer animation, ability to control the use of the modules, and navigational fidelity were key factors in determining attitudes. The computer-based learning modules examined in this study were effective as adjuncts to lecture in helping entry-level health care students learn and make clinical applications of neuroanatomy information.

  18. Using simulation to improve the capability of undergraduate nursing students in mental health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunst, Elicia L; Mitchell, Marion; Johnston, Amy N B

    2017-03-01

    Mental health care is an increasing component of acute patient care and yet mental health care education can be limited in undergraduate nursing programs. The aim of this study was to establish if simulation learning can be an effective method of improving undergraduate nurses' capability in mental health care in an acute care environment. Undergraduate nursing students at an Australian university were exposed to several high-fidelity high-technology simulation activities that incorporated elements of acute emergency nursing practice and acute mental health intervention, scaffolded by theories of learning. This approach provided a safe environment for students to experience clinical practice, and develop their skills for dealing with complex clinical challenges. Using a mixed method approach, the primary domains of interest in this study were student confidence, knowledge and ability. These were self-reported and assessed before and after the simulation activities (intervention) using a pre-validated survey, to gauge the self-rated capacity of students to initiate and complete effective care episodes. Focus group interviews were subsequently held with students who attended placement in the emergency department to explore the impact of the intervention on student performance in this clinical setting. Students who participated in the simulation activity identified and reported significantly increased confidence, knowledge and ability in mental health care post-intervention. They identified key features of the intervention included the impact of its realism on the quality of learning. There is some evidence to suggest that the intervention had an impact on the performance and reflection of students in the clinical setting. This study provides evidence to support the use of simulation to enhance student nurses' clinical capabilities in providing mental health care in acute care environments. Nursing curriculum development should be based on best-evidence to ensure that

  19. KNOWLEDGE AND ATTITUDES OF HEALTH CARE SCIENCE STUDENTS TOWARD OLDER PEOPLE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milutinović, Dragana; Simin, Dragana; Kacavendić, Jelena; Turkulov, Vesna

    2015-01-01

    Education of health science students in geriatrics is important in order to provide optimal care for the growing number of elderly people because it is the attitudes of health professionals toward the elderly that play the key role in the quality of care provided. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the knowledge and attitudes of health care science students towards ageing and care for the elderly. The present cross-sectional study was carried out on a sample of 130 students (medical, nursing and special education and rehabilitation) of the Faculty of Medicine, University of Novi Sad. The students were divided into two groups. The first group (E) included students having been taught geriatrics and nursing older adults and the other group (C) included students who had not been trained in this subject. The authors used Palmore's facts on Ageing Quiz for the knowledge evaluation and Kogan's Attitude toward Older People Scale for the attitude evaluation. The results of Facts on Aging Quiz showed the average level of students' knowledge and statistically significant difference between E and C group. The analysis of Kogan's Attitudes toward Old People Scale showed that both groups had neutral attitudes toward older people. Furthermore, a positive correlation between students' knowledge and attitudes was found. There is increasing evidence on the correlation between education, knowledge and attitudes toward older people which suggests that by acquiring better insights into all aspects of ageing through their education the students develop more positive attitudes and interest in working with older adults.

  20. Predictors of Saudi nursing students' attitudes towards environment and sustainability in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, J P; Alshammari, F; Felicilda-Reynaldo, R F D

    2018-02-09

    This study aimed to investigate the predictors of Saudi nursing students' attitudes towards the environment and sustainability in health care. With rising temperature and decreasing annual rainfall, Saudi Arabia is threatened by the harmful effects of climate change on its population. In response to these threats, the Ministry of Health adapted sustainable development and environmental preservation in their National E-Health strategy. To implement these policies successfully, healthcare practitioners should be educated on how climate change could impact human health negatively. A secondary analysis of 280 questionnaires from baccalaureate nursing students of a university in Hail City, Saudi Arabia, was completed. The New Ecological Paradigm (NEP) Scale and Sustainability Attitudes in Nursing Survey 2 (SANS-2) were used to investigate the predictors of student attitudes towards the environment and sustainable development in health care. The NEP score indicated moderate pro-environment attitudes, whereas the SANS-2 mean score showed very positive attitudes towards sustainability in health care. Learning about the environment and related issues in the nursing programme, raising climate change awareness and attending environment-related seminars and training positively influenced the environmental and sustainability attitudes of nursing students. Saudi nursing students moderately manifested pro-environment attitudes but exhibited extremely positive attitudes towards sustainability in health care. The results support the need to strengthen the education of nursing students about environmental and sustainability concepts and the inclusion of these topics in the nursing curricula. The study underscores the critical role of enriching the awareness of nursing students on environmental issues and concerns and sustainability in health care. The findings of this study can support the inclusion of course contents, which deal specifically with environmental health and

  1. Career dreams among health care students: 'I want to make a difference.'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øster, Inge; Munk, Karen; Henriksen, Jette

    2017-01-01

    . Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate career dreams among undergraduate students in health care majors in order to understand what motivates them. Method: Eighteen focus group interviews were carried out with students at health care education institutions at the beginning and end...... of their study period. Narrative analysis was performed within a sociological frame. Findings: Four narratives emerged: The students do not consider working with elderly people; they dream of making a difference; they want a lot of activity in their future jobs; and, finally, during education the clinical...... location has a big impact in stimulating the interest in the elderly. Discussion: There is a need for changing the way we talk about older adults everywhere, not just in health care education. Attention must be drawn to the fact that geriatrics and gerontology do not cover the components students...

  2. Chilean midwives and midwifery students' views of women's midlife health-care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binfa, Lorena; Pantoja, Loreto; Gonzalez, Hilda; Ransjö-Arvidson, Anna-Berit; Robertson, Eva

    2011-08-01

    to determine Chilean midwives' views with regard to Chilean women's health-care needs in midlife. The aim was also to explore Chilean midwifery students' views on the clinical care provided to women in midlife. a qualitative study using focus group discussions and narratives which were analysed using thematic manifest and latent content analysis. 10 different primary health care (PHC) centres in Santiago, Chile. 22 midwives, working in PHC clinics and 13 (n = 13) midwifery students with PHC clinical experience, attending their fourth or fifth year of midwifery education at the School of Midwifery in Santiago. the midwives felt that women in midlife have special health-care service needs. They also considered themselves to be the most appropriate health staff to provide health care for women in midlife, but recognised that they lacked competence in attending psychological and social health-care needs of women in midlife such as violence, abuse and sexuality issues. The midwifery students remarked that many midwives focused their attention on fulfilling the biomedical requirements. Even if the midwives had knowledge about recent research on menopause, they had difficulties in approaching this issue and including it in their counselling. Some students also questioned the sometimes disrespectful attitude shown, especially towards Peruvian immigrants and women with psychosocial problems. the findings suggest that midwives need more education about women's health-care needs in midlife, and that more focus should be placed on the psychosocial aspects of midwifery. More reflections about the quality of the client-provider relationship in clinical practice are needed. Gender issues, the structure of power relationships, and empowerment should be incorporated and critically discussed during midwifery education and training, and also in clinics. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparisons between the attitudes of student nurses and other health and social care students toward illicit drug use: An attitudinal survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harling, Martyn R

    2017-01-01

    In the context of a recent emphasis on compassion in the delivery of health care, the current study set out to measure the attitudes of different groups of health and social care students toward illicit drug users. Previous research has identified variations in the attitudes of different groups of health and social care professionals toward working with illicit drug users. Nurses, in particular, have been reported as holding moralistic or stereotypical views of illicit drug users. However, few studies have measured the attitudes of student nurses or compared their attitudes to other health and social care students. This article describes the use of a bespoke attitude scale to measure the attitudes of cohorts of student nurses, clinical psychology trainees, health and social care, social work and midwifery students at the start of their course (N=308). Results indicated that student nurses had the least tolerant attitudes, reinforcing the need for a specific educational focus on working with illicit drug users in nurse education. Variations between student groups indicate that Interprofessional Education can provide an opportunity to improve attitudes toward illicit drug users, particularly amongst student nurses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Internet-generation nursing students' view of technology-based health care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Houwelingen, C.T.M.; Ettema, R.G.A.; Kort, H.S.M.; ten Cate, O.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Today's nursing school applicants are considered “digital natives.” This study investigated students' views of new health care technologies. METHOD: In a cross-sectional survey among first-year nursing students, 23 common nursing activities and five telehealth nursing activities were

  5. A Chronic Disease Management Student-Faculty Collaborative Practice: Educating Students on Innovation in Health Care Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remus, Kristin E; Honigberg, Michael; Tummalapalli, Sri Lekha; Cohen, Laura P; Fazio, Sara; Weinstein, Amy R

    2016-07-01

    In the current transformative health care landscape, it is imperative that clinician educators inspire future clinicians to practice primary care in a dynamic environment. A focus on patient-centered, goal-oriented care for patients with chronic conditions is critical. In 2009, Harvard Medical School founded the Crimson Care Collaborative, a student-faculty collaborative practice (SFCP) network. With the aim of expanding clinical and educational opportunities for medical students and improving patient control of chronic disease (i.e., hypertension, obesity, and diabetes) in an innovative learning environment, in 2012, the authors developed a novel SFCP at their hospital-based academic primary care practice. In this SFCP, students learn to explore patient priorities, provide focused counseling and education, and assist patients with self-management goals during clinical visits. From 2012 to 2014, 250 student volunteers participated in the SFCP as clinicians, innovators, educators, and leaders, with between 80 and 95 medical students engaging each semester. Between January 2012 and March 2014, there were 476 urgent care or chronic disease management visits. Patients with chronic diseases were seen at least twice on average, and by 2014, chronic disease management visits accounted for approximately 74% of visits. Work is under way to create assessment tools to evaluate the practice's educa tional impact and student understanding of the current health care system, develop interdisciplinary care teams, expand efforts in registry management and broaden the patient recruitment scope, further emphasize patient engage ment and retention, and evaluate chronic disease management and patient satisfaction effectiveness.

  6. The value of community-focused interprofessional care in peru for developing cultural competency in health professions students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Carol B; Smart, Denise A; Odom-Maryon, Tamara; Swain, Deborah

    2013-07-04

    International immersion experiences for health-care students have increased over the past 10 years. Students and faculty expect these experiences to increase cultural competency; however, research on outcomes of these programs has lacked rigor. Over a 4-year period, groups of nursing and other health professions students spent 3 weeks in Peru providing primary care and health education. Students attended pre-departure seminars addressing personal travel health and safety, culture and health care in Peru, working with interpreters, and ethics of international health care. Student participants (N=77) completed an instrument assessing self-perceived cultural competency before and after the experience. Results of pre- and post-immersion scores showed significant increases in perceived cultural competency and increased self-efficacy in cultural knowledge, skills, and attitudes for four groups of students. Implications and future directions are discussed and recommended.

  7. Doctor-patient interaction in Finnish primary health care as perceived by first year medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mäntyselkä Pekka

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Finland, public health care is the responsibility of primary health care centres, which render a wide range of community level preventive, curative and rehabilitative medical care. Since 1990's, medical studies have involved early familiarization of medical students with general practice from the beginning of the studies, as this pre-clinical familiarisation helps medical students understand patients as human beings, recognise the importance of the doctor-patient relationship and identify practicing general practitioners (GPs as role models for their professional development. Focused on doctor-patient relationship, we analysed the reports of 2002 first year medical students in the University of Kuopio. The students observed GPs' work during their 2-day visit to primary health care centres. Methods We analysed systematically the texts of 127 written reports of 2002, which represents 95.5% of the 133 first year pre-clinical medical students reports. The reports of 2003 (N = 118 and 2004 (N = 130 were used as reference material. Results Majority of the students reported GPs as positive role models. Some students reported GPs' poor attitudes, which they, however, regarded as a learning opportunity. Students generally observed a great variety of responsibilities in general practice, and expressed admiration for the skills and abilities required. They appreciated the GPs' interest in patients concerns. GPs' communication styles were found to vary considerably. Students reported some factors disturbing the consultation session, such as the GP staring at the computer screen and other team members entering the room. Working with marginalized groups, the chronically and terminally ill, and dying patients was seen as an area for development in the busy Finnish primary health care centres. Conclusion During the analysis, we discovered that medical students' perceptions in this study are in line with the previous findings about the

  8. Oral health attitude and behavior among health-care students in a teaching hospital, Telangana State: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Kiran Jella

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The behavior of health-care students and their attitudes toward their own oral health reflect not only understanding of the importance of preventive dental procedures but also in improving the oral health of their patients. Thus, the aim of the study is to enlighten self-reported attitude and behavior among dental and medical undergraduate students. Methodology: A cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study was conducted among undergraduate students of a tertiary care teaching hospital in Telangana state. The information regarding demographic data, attitude, and behavior toward oral health was collected using the Hiroshima University-Dental Behavioral Inventory questionnaire. Data were analyzed using the analysis of variance. Results: The study subjects consisted of 361 dental and 315 medical undergraduate students. The present study revealed that oral health attitudes and behavior improved significantly with increasing levels of education in both dental and medical students. The dental undergraduates have better attitude and behavior than medical students, which was statistically significant regarding oral hygiene practices, gingival health, and visit to the dentist. Conclusions: Significant improvement was found regarding oral health attitude and behavior among both dental and medical students, with increase in their academic year. The overall attitude and behavior were better in dental students than medical students; however, both dental and medical undergraduates should have a comprehensive program, self-care regimen practices starting from their 1st year of education.

  9. Health and Health Care Issues among Upper-Level College Students and Relationships to Age, Race, Gender, and Living Arrangements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Brian; Cormier, Corinne; Hebert, Edward; Naquin, Mildred; Wood, Ralph

    2018-01-01

    Health and health-related behavior play a significant role in college students' academic performance. Unhealthy students and those who engage in risky health behaviors can have problems resulting in missed classes and lower grades. This study explored college students' health perceptions and behaviors, illness, and access to health care, and…

  10. Students' response to disaster: a lesson for health care professional schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Humberto

    2010-11-16

    The response of medical students, young physicians, and other health professionals to the February 2010 earthquake and tsunami in Chile provides important lessons about health care delivery during disasters and about the development of professionalism. Tertiary and secondary care of victims of these disasters was possible because local and national resources were available and field hospitals provided by Chile's armed forces and foreign countries replaced damaged hospitals. However, primary care of persons living on the outskirts of towns and in small villages and coves that were destroyed and isolated by the disaster required the involvement of volunteer groups that were largely composed of students and other young members of the health professions, all of whom were motivated by solidarity, compassion, and social commitment. This experience, similar to previous catastrophes in Chile and elsewhere, reinforces that medical and other health professional schools must instill in graduates an understanding that the privileges of being a health professional come with responsibilities to society. Beyond providing high-quality scientific and technological education, curricula in these schools should include training that enables graduates to meaningfully contribute in the setting of unexpected disasters and that nurtures a sense of responsibility to do so.

  11. Knowledge of Alzheimer's Disease among Norwegian Undergraduate Health and Social Care Students: A Survey Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kada, Sundaran

    2015-01-01

    With an aging general population and a concurrent increase in the prevalence of dementia, health and social care professional students are increasingly exposed to this group of patients during their clinical placements and after graduation. A sound dementia-related knowledge base among health and social care students is important in providing…

  12. Medical Students' Death Anxiety: Severity and Association With Psychological Health and Attitudes Toward Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiemann, Pia; Quince, Thelma; Benson, John; Wood, Diana; Barclay, Stephen

    2015-09-01

    Death anxiety (DA) is related to awareness of the reality of dying and death and can be negatively related to a person's psychological health. Physicians' DA also may influence their care for patients approaching death. Doctors face death in a professional context for the first time at medical school, but knowledge about DA among medical students is limited. This study examined medical students' DA in relation to: 1) its severity, gender differences, and trajectory during medical education and 2) its associations with students' attitudes toward palliative care and their psychological health. Four cohorts of core science and four cohorts of clinical students at the University of Cambridge Medical School took part in a questionnaire survey with longitudinal follow-up. Students who provided data on the revised Collett-Lester Fear of Death Scale were included in the analysis (n = 790). Medical students' DA was moderate, with no gender differences and remained very stable over time. High DA was associated with higher depression and anxiety levels and greater concerns about the personal impact of providing palliative care. The associations between high DA and lower psychological health and negative attitudes toward palliative care are concerning. It is important to address DA during medical education to enhance student's psychological health and the quality of their future palliative care provision. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Care Provided by Students in Community-Based Dental Education: Helping Meet Oral Health Needs in Underserved Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mays, Keith A; Maguire, Meghan

    2018-01-01

    Since 2000, reports have documented the challenges faced by many Americans in receiving oral health care and the consequences of inadequate care such as high levels of dental caries among many U.S. children. To help address this problem, many dental schools now include community-based dental education (CBDE) in their curricula, placing students in extramural clinics where they provide care in underserved communities. CBDE is intended to both broaden the education of future oral health professionals and expand care for patients in community clinics. The aim of this study was to develop a three-year profile of the patients seen and the care provided by students at extramural clinics associated with one U.S. dental school. Three student cohorts participated in the rotations: final-year students in the Doctor of Dental Surgery, Bachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene, and Master of Dental Therapy programs. The study was a retrospective analysis of data retrieved from the school's database for three consecutive academic years. The data included patients' demographics and special health care needs status (based on information collected by students from their patients) and procedures students performed while on rotations. For the three-year period, the results showed a total of 43,128 patients were treated by 418 student providers. Approximately 25% of all encounters were with pediatric patients. Students completed 5,908 child prophylaxis, 5,386 topical fluoride varnish, and 7,678 sealant procedures on pediatric patients. Annually, 7% of the total patients treated had special health care needs. The results show that these students in CBDE rotations provided a substantial amount of oral health care at extramural sites and gained additional experience in caring for a diverse population of patients and performing a wide range of procedures.

  14. [Knowledge about AIDS prevention among professionals and students in health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, A D; Viegas, C R; Sabka, E; Guerra, M; Baltazar, R

    1996-07-01

    This work is a exploratory research based on the analysis of the answers to the questionnaires of 52 students and health care professionals knowledge about AIDS sexual prevention, biosecurity, diagnosis tests, patients and workers rights and the modifications of nursing and medical care to this kind of disease.

  15. Teaching teamwork: an evaluation of an interprofessional training ward placement for health care students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morphet, Julia; Hood, Kerry; Cant, Robyn; Baulch, Julie; Gilbee, Alana; Sandry, Kate

    2014-01-01

    The establishment of interprofessional teamwork training in the preprofessional health care curriculum is a major challenge for teaching faculties. Interprofessional clinical placements offer an opportunity for teamwork education, as students in various professions can work and learn together. In this sequential, mixed-method study, focus group and survey techniques were used to evaluate students' educational experiences after 2-week ward-based interprofessional clinical placements. Forty-five senior nursing, medicine, and other health care students cared for patients in hospital wards under professional supervision, with nursing-medicine student "teams" leading care. Thirty-six students attended nine exit focus groups. Five central themes that emerged about training were student autonomy and workload, understanding of other professional roles, communication and shared knowledge, interprofessional teamwork/collaboration, and the "inner circle", or being part of the unit team. The learning environment was described as positive. In a postplacement satisfaction survey (n=38), students likewise rated the educational experience highly. In practicing teamwork and collaboration, students were able to rehearse their future professional role. We suggest that interprofessional clinical placements be regarded as an essential learning experience for senior preprofessional students. More work is needed to fully understand the effect of this interactive program on students' clinical learning and preparation for practice.

  16. Teaching teamwork: an evaluation of an interprofessional training ward placement for health care students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morphet J

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Julia Morphet,1 Kerry Hood,2 Robyn Cant,2 Julie Baulch,3 Alana Gilbee,3 Kate Sandry4 1School of Nursing and Midwifery, Monash University, Frankston, Victoria, Australia; 2School of Nursing and Midwifery, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia; 3Southern Clinical School, Monash University, Monash Health, Clayton, Victoria, Australia; 4Dandenong Emergency Department, Monash Health, David St, Dandenong, Victoria, Australia Abstract: The establishment of interprofessional teamwork training in the preprofessional health care curriculum is a major challenge for teaching faculties. Interprofessional clinical placements offer an opportunity for teamwork education, as students in various professions can work and learn together. In this sequential, mixed-method study, focus group and survey techniques were used to evaluate students' educational experiences after 2-week ward-based interprofessional clinical placements. Forty-five senior nursing, medicine, and other health care students cared for patients in hospital wards under professional supervision, with nursing-medicine student "teams" leading care. Thirty-six students attended nine exit focus groups. Five central themes that emerged about training were student autonomy and workload, understanding of other professional roles, communication and shared knowledge, interprofessional teamwork/collaboration, and the "inner circle", or being part of the unit team. The learning environment was described as positive. In a postplacement satisfaction survey (n=38, students likewise rated the educational experience highly. In practicing teamwork and collaboration, students were able to rehearse their future professional role. We suggest that interprofessional clinical placements be regarded as an essential learning experience for senior preprofessional students. More work is needed to fully understand the effect of this interactive program on students' clinical learning and preparation for practice

  17. Australian student nurse's knowledge of and attitudes toward primary health care: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Sandra; Kwok, Cannas; Anderson, Judith; Hatcher, Deborah; Laver, Sharon; Dickson, Cathy; Stewart, Lyn

    2018-01-01

    Nurses have a pivotal role in changing the focus of the health system toward a primary health care approach, yet little is known about the effectiveness of nursing students' educational preparation for this role. The aim of the study was to investigate undergraduate Australian nursing students' knowledge of and attitudes toward the primary health care approach. A cross-sectional, descriptive research design was applied. Two Australian universities, one with a rural base and one in the metropolitan area of Sydney, were involved. Both universities offer undergraduate and postgraduate nursing courses on multiple campuses. A convenience sample of 286 undergraduate nursing students, each of whom had completed a unit of study on PHC. All provided consent to participate in the study. Data was collected using the Primary Health Care Questionnaire via online survey platform SurveyMonkey for a period of three weeks in June 2015. Total knowledge scores ranged from 19.68 to 95.78 with the mean knowledge score being 69.19. Total attitude scores ranged from 33.12 to 93.88 with a mean score of 70.45. Comparison of knowledge scores showed mean scores of students born in Australia were significantly higher than those of students who were born overseas (p=0.01), and mean scores of students enrolled in the metropolitan university were also significantly higher than mean scores of students' enrolled in the rural university (p=0.002). In terms of attitudes scores, mean scores of Australian-born students were significantly higher than those of students born overseas (p=0.001), and older students' mean attitude scores were shown to be significantly higher than younger students' (pattitudes toward primary health care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A Study on Scalp Hair Health and Hair Care Practices among Malaysian Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, B Satheesha; Ann, Chua Yuet; Azhar, Azeldeen Bin; Ling, Emily Chan Su; Yen, Wong Hui; Aithal, P Ashwini

    2017-01-01

    Scalp care is essential because it determines the health and condition of the hair and prevents the diseases of scalp and hair. The objectives of our study were to correlate race and hair types, to determine the awareness of hair care among Malaysian medical students, and to distinguish the factors that affect the health of hair and scalp. It was a cross-sectional study wherein validated questionnaires were given to 240 medical undergraduate students who belonged to three ethnic races of Malaysia, i.e., Chinese, Malay, and Malaysian Indians after their informed consent. The results were then analyzed using percentage statistics. Chinese students had comparatively healthier scalp without dandruff. Most Chinese and Indians had silky type of hair while Malay had dry, rough hair. Chinese and Indians colored their hair and used various styling methods; while among the Malays, this percentage was very less. Regarding hair care practices, males used only shampoo and females used shampoo and conditioner for hair wash. Students also faced dietary and examination-related stress. Results indicate that there exist morphological differences in hair among the studied population. Since most students color their hair and employ various hairstyling methods, they should be educated regarding best hair care practices to improve their scalp hair condition and health.

  19. A cross-sectional analysis of barriers to health-care seeking among medical students across training period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas Menon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Very little information is available on how needs and perceptions to service utilization may change with duration of medical training. Our objective was to compare the self-reported barriers to health-care seeking for mental and physical health services separately between 1st year and final year medical students. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, we invited all medical students of the concerned cohorts to complete a prevalidated checklist and 28-item self-reported questionnaire about perceived barriers to health-care seeking. The questionnaire had separate items pertaining to usage of mental and physical health-care services. Results: The response rate of the 1st year and final year cohorts were 83.8% and 86.6%, respectively. Lack of time, unawareness about where to seek help, cost issues, and fear of future academic jeopardy were more common concerns among 1st year students to the usage of mental health services (odds ratio [OR] 0.27, 0.45,0.09, and 0.49, respectively whereas issues of stigma were more commonly reported by final year students for using mental health services (OR = 2.87. In contrast, the barriers in using physical health services were broadly comparable between the two cohorts. Conclusion: Differences exist between medical students in various years of training particularly with regard to self-reported barriers and perceptions particularly about using mental health-care services. This may have key implications for designing and delivery of service provisions in this group.

  20. Standing on the Precipice: Evaluating Final-Year Physiotherapy Students' Perspectives of Their Curriculum as Preparation for Primary Health Care Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donoghue, Grainne; Doody, Catherine; O'Neill, Geraldine; Barrett, Terry; Cusack, Tara

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To explore final-year physiotherapy students' perceptions of primary health care practice to determine (1) aspects of their curriculum that support their learning, (2) deficiencies in their curriculum, and (3) areas that they believe should be changed to adequately equip them to make the transition from student to primary health care professional. Methods: Framework analysis methodology was used to analyze group opinion obtained using structured group feedback sessions. Sixty-eight final-year physiotherapy students from the four higher education institutions in Ireland participated. Results: The students identified several key areas that (1) supported their learning (exposure to evidence-based practice, opportunities to practise with problem-based learning, and interdisciplinary learning experiences); (2) were deficient (primary health care placements, additional active learning sessions, and further education and practice opportunities for communication and health promotion), and (3) required change (practice placements in primary health care, better curriculum organization to accommodate primary health care throughout the programme with the suggestion of a specific primary health care module). Conclusion: This study provides important insights into physiotherapy students' perceptions of primary health care. It also provides important indicators of the curriculum changes needed to increase graduates' confidence in their ability to take up employment in primary health care. PMID:27909366

  1. Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Mental Health Care Utilization among U.S. College Students: Applying the Institution of Medicine Definition of Health Care Disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Justin B; Eisenberg, Daniel; Lu, Liya; Gathright, Molly

    2015-10-01

    The authors apply the Institute of Medicine's definition of health care disparities to college students. The analysis pools data from the first two waves of the Healthy Minds Study, a multicampus survey of students' mental health (N = 13,028). A probit model was used for any past-year service utilization, and group differences in health status were adjusted by transforming the entire distribution for each minority population to approximate the white distribution. Disparities existed between whites and all minority groups. Compared to other approaches, the predicted service disparities were greater because this method included the effects of mediating SES variables. Health care disparities persist in the college setting despite improved access and nearly universal insurance coverage. Our findings emphasize the importance of investigating potential sources of disparities beyond geography and coverage.

  2. Co-creating and Evaluating a Web-app Mapping Real-World Health Care Services for Students: The servi-Share Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagni, Ilaria; Langlois, Emmanuel; Wittwer, Jérôme; Tzourio, Christophe

    2017-02-16

    University students aged 18-30 years are a population group reporting low access to health care services, with high rates of avoidance and delay of medical care. This group also reports not having appropriate information about available health care services. However, university students are at risk for several health problems, and regular medical consultations are recommended in this period of life. New digital devices are popular among the young, and Web-apps can be used to facilitate easy access to information regarding health care services. A small number of electronic health (eHealth) tools have been developed with the purpose of displaying real-world health care services, and little is known about how such eHealth tools can improve access to care. This paper describes the processes of co-creating and evaluating the beta version of a Web-app aimed at mapping and describing free or low-cost real-world health care services available in the Bordeaux area of France, which is specifically targeted to university students. The co-creation process involves: (1) exploring the needs of students to know and access real-world health care services; (2) identifying the real-world health care services of interest for students; and (3) deciding on a user interface, and developing the beta version of the Web-app. Finally, the evaluation process involves: (1) testing the beta version of the Web-app with the target audience (university students aged 18-30 years); (2) collecting their feedback via a satisfaction survey; and (3) planning a long-term evaluation. The co-creation process of the beta version of the Web-app was completed in August 2016 and is described in this paper. The evaluation process started on September 7, 2016. The project was completed in December 2016 and implementation of the Web-app is ongoing. Web-apps are an innovative way to increase the health literacy of young people in terms of delivery of and access to health care. The creation of Web-apps benefits

  3. Primary health care in the South African context – medical students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background Both the South African Department of Health and the University of Cape Town (UCT) have committed to the primary health care (PHC) approach, which is best captured in the Declaration of Alma Ata. If medical students are to be trained in the PHC approach, it is important that they not only have a good ...

  4. Supporting Student Mental Health: The Role of the School Nurse in Coordinated School Mental Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnenkamp, Jill H.; Stephan, Sharon H.; Bobo, Nichole

    2015-01-01

    School nurses play a critical role in the provision of mental health services in the school environment and are valuable members of the coordinated student mental health team. They possess expertise to navigate in today's complicated educational and health care systems, and it is estimated that school nurses spend 33% of their time addressing…

  5. Advances in health informatics education: educating students at the intersection of health care and information technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushniruk, Andre; Borycki, Elizabeth; Armstrong, Brian; Kuo, Mu-Hsing

    2012-01-01

    The paper describes the authors' work in the area of health informatics (HI) education involving emerging health information technologies. A range of information technologies promise to modernize health care. Foremost among these are electronic health records (EHRs), which are expected to significantly improve and streamline health care practice. Major national and international efforts are currently underway to increase EHR adoption. However, there have been numerous issues affecting the widespread use of such information technology, ranging from a complex array of technical problems to social issues. This paper describes work in the integration of information technologies directly into the education and training of HI students at both the undergraduate and graduate level. This has included work in (a) the development of Web-based computer tools and platforms to allow students to have hands-on access to the latest technologies and (b) development of interdisciplinary educational models that can be used to guide integrating information technologies into HI education. The paper describes approaches that allow for remote hands-on access by HI students to a range of EHRs and related technology. To date, this work has been applied in HI education in a variety of ways. Several approaches for integration of this essential technology into HI education and training are discussed, along with future directions for the integration of EHR technology into improving and informing the education of future health and HI professionals.

  6. Health behaviors, care needs and attitudes towards self-prescription: a cross-sectional survey among Dutch medical students.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjeerd Van der Veer

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: There is a growing awareness of the potent ways in which the wellbeing of physicians impacts the health of their patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate the health behaviors, care needs and attitudes towards self-prescription of Dutch medical students, and any differences between junior preclinical and senior clinically active students. METHODS: All students (n = 2695 of a major Dutch medical school were invited for an online survey. Physical activity, eating habits, alcohol consumption, smoking, Body Mass Index, substance use and amount of sleep per night were inquired, as well as their need for different forms of care and their attitude towards self-prescription. RESULTS: Data of 902 students were used. Physical activity levels (90% sufficient and smoking prevalence (94% non-smokers were satisfying. Healthy eating habits (51% insufficient and alcohol consumption (46% excessive were worrying. Body Mass Indexes were acceptable (20% unhealthy. We found no significant differences in health behaviors between preclinical and clinically active students. Care needs were significantly lower among clinically active students. (p<0.05 Student acceptance of self-prescription was significantly higher among clinically active students. (p<0.001 CONCLUSIONS: Unhealthy behaviors are prevalent among medical students, but are no more prevalent during the clinical study phase. The need for specific forms of care appears lower with study progression. This could be worrying as the acceptance of self-care and self-prescription is higher among senior clinical students. Medical faculties need to address students' unhealthy behaviors and meet their care needs for the benefit of both the future physicians as well as their patients.

  7. Repeated cross-sectional study of the longitudinal changes in attitudes toward interprofessional health care teams amongst undergraduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kururi, Nana; Makino, Takatoshi; Kazama, Hiroko; Tokita, Yoshiharu; Matsui, Hiroki; Lee, Bumsuk; Kanaizumi, Shiomi; Abe, Yumiko; Uchida, Yoko; Asakawa, Yasuyoshi; Shinozaki, Hiromitsu; Tozato, Fusae; Watanabe, Hideomi

    2014-07-01

    The interprofessional education (IPE) program at Gunma University, Maebashi, Japan, uses a lecture style for first-year students and a training style for third-year students. To investigate the comprehensive implications of IPE, the change pattern of attitudes toward health care teams was examined longitudinally in pre-qualified students. The modified Attitudes Toward Health Care Teams Scale (mATHCTS) was used. The overall mean score of the mATHCTS improved significantly after the training-style IPE in their third year. Two individual items in the factor "quality of care delivery" decreased significantly during the first year. In contrast, two individual items in the factor "patient-centered care" increased significantly during the third year. These changes over time were confirmed by analyses using regression factor scores. There are at least two independent attitudes toward collaborative practice (CP) or IPE in response to IPE interventions: the attitude toward "value of IPE for health care providers" may response negatively to IPE in the early stages, and the attitude toward "value of IPE for health care receivers" positively in the later stages. These findings suggest that the continuation of mandatory IPE, which must be designed on the basis of students' high expectations for IPE and CP on entry, may result in profound changes in attitudes amongst participating students.

  8. Psychometric evaluation of the perceived prejudice in health care scale-modified (PPHC-M) among baccalaureate student nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohm, Ruth; Rosen, Libby

    2011-07-01

    Discrepancy in quality of health care for patients with diverse backgrounds contributes to health outcome disparities. BSN students reveal surprise regarding the presence of health care disparities. Critical social theory guided this study. The psychometric properties of the Perception of Prejudice in Health Care Scale–Modified (PPHC-M) were evaluated,and the relationship between perceived discrimination in health care delivery and cultural sensitivity awareness was explored. A descriptive, cross-sectional survey of 146 Midwest BSN students was conducted using Cultural Competence Assessment (CCA), PPHC-M, and the Marlowe–Crowne Social Desirability Scale. PPHC-M demonstrated reliability(α = .781.) Cronbach’s alphas for General Perception of Prejudice (GPP) and Personal Experience of Prejudice (PEP) were.759 and .756, respectively. Construct validity was supported by contrasted groups. The PPHC was not significantly correlated with the CCA scores. PPHC-M shows promise in measuring perceived prejudice in health care.

  9. Structural Intervention With School Nurses Increases Receipt of Sexual Health Care Among Male High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittus, Patricia J; Harper, Christopher R; Becasen, Jeffrey S; Donatello, Robin A; Ethier, Kathleen A

    2018-01-01

    Adolescent males are less likely to receive health care and have lower levels of sexual and reproductive health (SRH) knowledge than adolescent females. The purpose of this study was to determine if a school-based structural intervention focused on school nurses increases receipt of condoms and SRH information among male students. Interventions to improve student access to sexual and reproductive health care were implemented in six urban high schools with a matched set of comparison schools. Interventions included working with school nurses to improve access to sexual and reproductive health care, including the provision of condoms and information about pregnancy and sexually transmitted disease prevention and services. Intervention effects were assessed through five cross-sectional yearly surveys, and analyses include data from 13,740 male students. Nurses in intervention schools changed their interactions with male students who visited them for services, such that, among those who reported they went to the school nurse for any reason in the previous year, those in intervention schools reported significant increases in receipt of sexual health services over the course of the study compared with students in comparison schools. Further, these results translated into population-level effects. Among all male students surveyed, those in intervention schools were more likely than those in comparison schools to report increases in receipt of sexual health services from school nurses. With a minimal investment of resources, school nurses can become important sources of SRH information and condoms for male high school students. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Student nurses' perceptions of mental health care: Validation of a questionnaire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corine Latour; Hanneke Hoekstra; Alex van der Heijden; prof Berno van Meijel; Jaap van der Bijl

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the results of a study into the psychometric properties of a questionnaire about student nurses' perceptions of mental health care. The questionnaire was constructed in 2008, but has not yet been tested in terms of construct validity and reliability. A validated questionnaire

  11. Impact of a collaborative interprofessional learning experience upon medical and social work students in geriatric health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Paul Robert; Lee, Youjung; Berkowitz, Shawn; Bronstein, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Interprofessional collaborative practice is increasingly recognized as an essential model in health care. This study lends preliminary support to the notion that medical students (including residents) and social work students develop a broader understanding of one another's roles and contributions to enhancing community-dwelling geriatric patients' health, and develop a more thorough understanding of the inherent complexities and unique aspects of geriatric health care. Wilcoxon Signed Rank Tests of participants' scores on the Index of Interdisciplinary Collaboration (IIC) indicated the training made significant changes to the students' perception of interprofessional collaboration. Qualitative analysis of participants' statements illustrated (1) benefits of the IPE experience, including complementary roles in holistic interventions; and (2) challenges to collaboration. The findings suggest that interprofessional educational experiences have a positive impact upon students' learning and strategies for enhanced care of geriatric patients.

  12. The effects of mindfulness-based interventions for health and social care undergraduate students - a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Driscoll, Michelle; Byrne, Stephen; Mc Gillicuddy, Aoife; Lambert, Sharon; Sahm, Laura J

    2017-08-01

    Health and social care undergraduate students experience stress due to high workloads and pressure to perform. Consequences include depression and burnout. Mindfulness may be a suitable way to reduce stress in health and social care degree courses. The objective of this systematic review is to identify and critically appraise the literature on the effects of Mindfulness-Based Interventions for health and social care undergraduate students. PubMed, EMBASE, Psych Info, CINAHL, The Cochrane Library and Academic Search Complete were searched from inception to 21st November 2016. Studies that delivered Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction, Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy, or an intervention modelled closely on these, to health or social care undergraduate students were included. Eleven studies, representing medicine, nursing and psychology students met the inclusion criteria. The most commonly used measurement tools were; the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire and the General Health Questionnaire. Short term benefits relating to stress and mood were reported, despite all but one study condensing the curriculum. Gender and personality emerged as factors likely to affect intervention results. Further research with long-term follow-up is required to definitively conclude that mindfulness is an appropriate intervention to mentally prepare health and social care undergraduate students for their future careers.

  13. Health care professionals' and students' attitude toward collaboration between pharmacists and physicians in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seselja-Perisin, Ana; Mestrovic, Arijana; Klinar, Ivana; Modun, Darko

    2016-02-01

    As traditional roles of pharmacists and physicians seem nowadays insufficient to ensure patient safety and therapy effectiveness, interprofessional collaboration has been suggested to improve health outcomes. To assess and compare the attitudes of physicians and pharmacists, as well as medical and pharmacy students in Croatia, toward interprofessional collaboration in primary health care. The study included 513 pharmacists and physicians, and 365 students of pharmacy and medicine from Croatia. The validated questionnaire, Scale of Attitudes Toward Physician–Pharmacist Collaboration, was translated in Croatian and completed, anonymously and voluntarily, by all participants. Results Pharmacists showed a more positive attitude toward collaboration than physicians (53.8 ± 4.8 vs. 50.7 ± 5.0). Pharmacy students expressed the most positive attitude (56.2 ± 4.9), while medical students showed the remarkably lowest attitude toward collaboration (44.6 ± 6.2). Pharmacists and physicians in Croatia expressed a relatively positive attitude toward their collaboration, comparable with their colleges in the USA. On the other hand, medical students expressed a 21 % less positive attitude than pharmacy students which could have an effect on interprofessional collaboration in the future when those students start working as health care professionals. Future studies, focusing on the promotion of this collaboration, on both under-graduated and post-graduated level, are warranted.

  14. The Relationship between Health Literacy, Perceived Self-efficacy and Self-care Performance of Female Senior High School Students in Health Promoting Schools of Miyaneh, 2016-2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Khodabandeh

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Self-care in adolescents is considered as an effective measure in line with the promotion of health in each community. In this regard, the role of health promoting schools is of great importance. Furthermore, health literacy, as one of the basic tools for promoting community health, has been given much attention by policymakers. The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between the health literacy, perceived self-efficacy and self-care performance of female senior high school students in the health promoting schools of Miyaneh in 2016-2017. Methods: In this descriptive-correlational study, 320 female senior high school students were selected randomly using the multi –stage cluster sampling method. Data were collected by using the questionnaires of Health Literacy Measure for Adolescents (HELMA, General Self-efficacy Scale, and the Adolescent Health Promotion (AHP scale. Data were analyzed by SPSS software (version 21 using the statistical tests of Pearson correlation coefficient and Multiple Regression (ENTER method. Results: The results showed that there is a positive and significant relationship between the health literacy and perceived self-efficacy and the self-care performance of female students in the health promoting schools, as well as between the components of health literacy and self-care components. No significant relationship was found between the component of health literacy calculation and the self-care components of nutrition, responsibility for health, spiritual growth, and physical activity. The results of regression analysis indicated that the dimensions of self-efficacy, use and correlation of health literacy are good predictors of self-care performance (R2 = 0.605. Moreover, the health literacy and the perceived self-efficacy can predict the self-care performance of students by 51 percent. Conclusion: The results of the present study indicated that a student with high levels of

  15. Promoting careers in health care for urban youth: What students, parents and educators can teach us.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Lynne; Rumala, Bernice; Carson, Patricia; Siegel, Elliot

    2014-01-01

    There are many obstacles that urban youth experience in pursuing health careers, but the benefits of diversifying the classroom and workforce are clear. This is especially true today as educators and policymakers seek to enhance underrepresented minority students' access to health careers, and also achieve the health workforce needed to support the Affordable Care Act. The creation of student pipeline programs began more than 40 years ago, but success has been equivocal. In 2008, Mentoring in Medicine (MIM) conducted a research project to identify how students learn about health careers; develop strategies for an integrated, experiential learning program that encourages underrepresented minority students to pursue careers in health; and translate these into best practices for supporting students through their entire preparatory journey. Six focus groups were conducted with educators, students, and their parents. The inclusion of parents was unusual in studies of this kind. The outcome yielded important and surprising differences between student and parent knowledge, attitudes and beliefs. They informed our understanding of the factors that motivate and deter underrepresented minority students to pursue careers in health care. Specific programmatic strategies emerged that found their place in the subsequent development of new MIM programming that falls into the following three categories: community-based, school-based and Internet based. Best practices derived from these MIM programs are summarized and offered for consideration by other health career education program developers targeting underrepresented minority students, particularly those located in urban settings.

  16. Medical Students' Attitudes towards Health Care for People with Intellectual Disabilities: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Travis A.; Scior, Katrina

    2016-01-01

    Background: People with intellectual disabilities experience serious health inequalities (e.g. they die younger than people without intellectual disabilities). Medical students' attitudes towards health care for this population warrant empirical attention because, as tomorrow's doctors, they will affect the health inequalities that people with…

  17. Educating future physicians to track health care quality: feasibility and perceived impact of a health care quality report card for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Sean M; Henschen, Bruce L; Unger, Erin D; Jansson, Paul S; Unti, Kristen; Bortoletto, Pietro; Gleason, Kristine M; Woods, Donna M; Evans, Daniel B

    2013-10-01

    Quality improvement (QI) requires measurement, but medical schools rarely provide opportunities for students to measure their patient outcomes. The authors tested the feasibility and perceived impact of a quality metric report card as part of an Education-Centered Medical Home longitudinal curriculum. Student teams were embedded into faculty practices and assigned a panel of patients to follow longitudinally. Students performed retrospective chart reviews and reported deidentified data on 30 nationally endorsed QI metrics for their assigned patients. Scorecards were created for each clinic team. Students completed pre/post surveys on self-perceived QI skills. A total of 405 of their patients' charts were abstracted by 149 students (76% response rate; mean 2.7 charts/student). Median abstraction time was 21.8 (range: 13.1-37.1) minutes. Abstracted data confirmed that the students had successfully recruited a "high-risk" patient panel. Initial performance on abstracted quality measures ranged from 100% adherence on the use of beta-blockers in postmyocardial infarction patients to 24% on documentation of dilated diabetic eye exams. After the chart abstraction assignment, grand rounds, and background readings, student self-assessment of their perceived QI skills significantly increased for all metrics, though it remained low. Creation of an actionable health care quality report card as part of an ambulatory longitudinal experience is feasible, and it improves student perception of QI skills. Future research will aim to use statistical process control methods to track health care quality prospectively as our students use their scorecards to drive clinic-level improvement efforts.

  18. Managing HIV/hepatitis positive patients: present approach of dental health care workers and students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, Nagesh; Baad, Rajendra; Nagpal, Deepak Kumar J; Prabhu, Prashant R; Surekha, L Chavan; Karande, Prasad

    2012-11-01

    People with HIV/HBsAg in India frequently encounter discrimination while seeking and receiving health care services. The knowledge and attitudes of health care workers (HCWs) influences the willingness and ability of people with HIV/HBsAg to access care, and the quality of the care they receive. The objective of this study was to asses HIV/HBsAg-related knowledge, attitudes and risk perception among students and dental HCWs. A cross-sectional survey was conducted on 250 students and 120 dental HCWs in the form of objective questionnaire. Information was gathered regarding demographic details (age, sex, duration of employment, job category); HIV/ HBsAg-related knowledge and attitudes; risk perception; and previous experience caring for HIV-positive patients. The HCWs in this study generally had a positive attitude to care for the people with HIV/HBsAg. However, this was tempered by substantial concerns about providing care, and the fear of occupational infection with HIV/HBsAg. A continuing dental education program was conducted to resolve all the queries found interfering to provide care to HIV/HBsAg patients. But even after the queries were resolved the care providing capability was not attained. These findings show that even with advanced knowledge and facilities the attitude of dental HCWs and students require more strategic training with regards to the ethics and moral stigma associated with the dreaded infectious diseases (HIV/HBsAg).

  19. Perceived need for care and mental health service utilization among college students with suicidal ideation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Boyoung; Wilcox, Holly C; Hilimire, Matthew; DeVylder, Jordan E

    2018-01-31

    This study aimed to identify correlates of service utilization and perceived need for care among college students with suicidal ideation. Respondents were recruited from introductory psychology courses at an undergraduate college during the Fall 2014 semester. Independent correlates of (1) mental health service utilization, (2) self-perceived need, and (3) other-perceived need for mental health services among college students (N = 190) with suicidal ideation were identified. Service utilization was associated with need for care as perceived by others. Perceived need for care by others was associated with suicidal ideation intensity and suicide attempt history. Perceived need by the respondents themselves was correlated with depression severity, sex, and race but was not independently associated with actual service utilization. Perceived need by others was the sole significant correlate of service utilization, suggesting it is an important target for public health interventions aimed at facilitating pathways into mental health treatment.

  20. PERCEPTIONS OF CULTURE CARE IN HUMANITARIAN WORK BY THE STUDENTS OF MASTERS' DEGREE IN GLOBAL HEALTH CARE

    OpenAIRE

    Kering, Naomy

    2016-01-01

    As the world is increasingly becoming multicultural, the need for cultural competence education to students of health care is essential to ensure a culturally competent workforce. The main purpose of this study is to determine the students’ perceptions of culture care and its importance in their work contexts. The main aim is to identify how students’ worldview, cultural and socio-cultural factors influence the way of care to people of diverse cultures. Qualitative method was used in this stu...

  1. Interprofessional Workplace Learning in Primary Care: Students from Different Health Professions Work in Teams in Real-Life Settings

    OpenAIRE

    Bondevik, Gunnar Tschudi; Holst, Lone; Haugland, Mildrid; Bærheim, Anders; Raaheim, Arild

    2015-01-01

    Interprofessional education may be defined as an occasion when two or more professions learn with, from, and about each other in order to improve collaboration and quality of care. We studied the self-reported experiences from Norwegian health care students participating in interprofessional workplace learning in primary care. We discuss the results particularly in light of self-determination theory. During 2012, 24 students from eight different health educations at the University of Bergen a...

  2. The understanding of core pharmacological concepts among health care students in their final semester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronsson, Patrik; Booth, Shirley; Hägg, Staffan; Kjellgren, Karin; Zetterqvist, Ann; Tobin, Gunnar; Reis, Margareta

    2015-12-29

    The overall aim of the study was to explore health care students´ understanding of core concepts in pharmacology. An interview study was conducted among twelve students in their final semester of the medical program (n = 4), the nursing program (n = 4), and the specialist nursing program in primary health care (n = 4) from two Swedish universities. The participants were individually presented with two pharmacological clinically relevant written patient cases, which they were to analyze and propose a solution to. Participants were allowed to use the Swedish national drug formulary. Immediately thereafter the students were interviewed about their assessments. The interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. A thematic analysis was used to identify units of meaning in each interview. The units were organized into three clusters: pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, and drug interactions. Subsequent procedure consisted of scoring the quality of students´ understanding of core concepts. Non-parametric statistics were employed. The study participants were in general able to define pharmacological concepts, but showed less ability to discuss the meaning of the concepts in depth and to implement these in a clinical context. The participants found it easier to grasp concepts related to pharmacodynamics than pharmacokinetics and drug interactions. These results indicate that education aiming to prepare future health care professionals for understanding of more complex pharmacological reasoning and decision-making needs to be more focused and effective.

  3. Service learning in Guatemala: using qualitative content analysis to explore an interdisciplinary learning experience among students in health care professional programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, Kathleen S; Bowers, Donna M; Gross, Margo; Frost, Lenore

    2013-01-01

    Interprofessional collaboration among health care professionals yields improved patient outcomes, yet many students in health care programs have limited exposure to interprofessional collaboration in the classroom and in clinical and service-learning experiences. This practice gap implies that students enter their professions without valuing interprofessional collaboration and the impact it has on promoting positive patient outcomes. The aim of this study was to describe the interprofessional experiences of students in health care professional programs as they collaborated to provide health care to Guatemalan citizens over a 7-day period. In light of the identified practice gap and a commitment by college administration to fund interprofessional initiatives, faculty educators from nursing, occupational therapy, and physical therapy conducted a qualitative study to explore a service-learning initiative focused on promoting interprofessional collaboration. Students collaborated in triads (one student from each of the three disciplines) to provide supervised health care to underserved Guatemalan men, women, children, and infants across a variety of community and health care settings. Eighteen students participated in a qualitative research project by describing their experience of interprofessional collaboration in a service-learning environment. Twice before arriving in Guatemala, and on three occasions during the trip, participants reflected on their experiences and provided narrative responses to open-ended questions. Qualitative content analysis methodology was used to describe their experiences of interprofessional collaboration. An interprofessional service-learning experience positively affected students' learning, their growth in interprofessional collaboration, and their understanding and appreciation of health care professions besides their own. The experience also generated feelings of gratitude for the opportunity to be a member of an interprofessional

  4. Learning from Primary Health Care Centers in Nepal: reflective writings on experiential learning of third year Nepalese medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Dhital, Rolina; Subedi, Madhusudan; Prasai, Neeti; Shrestha, Karun; Malla, Milan; Upadhyay, Shambhu

    2015-01-01

    Background Medical education can play important role in cultivating the willingness among the medical students to work in underprivileged areas after their graduation. Experiential learning through early exposure to primary health care centers could help students better understand the opportunities and challenges of such settings. However, the information on the real experiences and reflections of medical students on the rural primary health care settings from low-income countries like Nepal ...

  5. Perceptions of the Veterinary Profession among Human Health Care Students before an Inter-Professional Education Course at Midwestern University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englar, Ryane E; Show-Ridgway, Alyssa; Noah, Donald L; Appelt, Erin; Kosinski, Ross

    2017-11-03

    Conflicts among health care professionals often stem from misperceptions about each profession's role in the health care industry. These divisive tendencies impede progress in multidisciplinary collaborations to improve human, animal, and environmental health. Inter-professional education (IPE) may repair rifts between health care professions by encouraging students to share their professional identities with colleagues in unrelated health care disciplines. An online survey was conducted at Midwestern University (MWU) to identify baseline perceptions about veterinary medicine among entry-level human health care students before their enrollment in an inter-professional course. Participation was anonymous and voluntary. The survey included Likert-type scales and free-text questions. Survey participants expressed their interest in and respect for the discipline of veterinary medicine, but indicated that their unfamiliarity with the profession hindered their ability to collaborate. Twenty percent of human health care students did not know the length of a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) program and 27.6% were unaware that veterinarians could specialize. Although 83.2% of participants agreed that maintaining the human-animal bond is a central role of the veterinary profession, veterinary contributions to stem cell research, food and water safety, public health, environmental conservation, and the military were infrequently recognized. If IPE is to successfully pave the way for multidisciplinary collaboration, it needs to address these gaps in knowledge and broaden the definition of veterinary practice for future human health care providers.

  6. 25 CFR 36.90 - What recreation, academic tutoring, student safety, and health care services must homeliving...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What recreation, academic tutoring, student safety, and... What recreation, academic tutoring, student safety, and health care services must homeliving programs provide? All homeliving programs must provide for appropriate student safety, academic tutoring...

  7. Evaluation of uptake and attitude to voluntary counseling and testing among health care professional students in Kilimanjaro region, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nkya Hassan M

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Voluntary counseling and testing (VCT is a corner stone for successful implementation of prevention, care and support services among HIV negative and positive individuals. VCT is also perceived to be an effective strategy in risk reduction among sexually active young people.. This study aimed to assess the acceptability of VCT and its actual uptake among young health care professional students at KCM College of Tumaini University and Allied health schools. Methods This was a cross-sectional study. A structured questionnaire was used among health care professional students aged 18–25 years who were enrolled in degrees, diplomas and certificates courses at Kilimanjaro Christian Medical College and all other Allied health schools Results A total of 309 students were recruited, among these 197 (63.8% were females. All respondents were aware of the benefits of VCT. Only 107 (34.6% of students have had VCT done previously. About 59 (19.1% of the students had negative for health care professional to attend VCT. Risk perception among the students was low (37.2% even though they were found to have higher risk behaviors that predispose them to get HIV infection. Conclusion Awareness of VCT services and willingness to test is high among students; however its uptake is low. In order to promote these services, a comprehensive training module on VCT needs to be included in their training curricula. In particular, more emphasis should focus on the benefits of VCT and to help the students to internalize the risk of HIV so that they can take preventive measures.

  8. Service learning in Guatemala: using qualitative content analysis to explore an interdisciplinary learning experience among students in health care professional programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fries KS

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Kathleen S Fries,1 Donna M Bowers,2 Margo Gross,3 Lenore Frost31Nursing Program, 2Department of Physical Therapy and Human Movement Science, 3Graduate Program in Occupational Therapy, College of Health Professions, Sacred Heart University, Fairfield, CT, USAIntroduction: Interprofessional collaboration among health care professionals yields improved patient outcomes, yet many students in health care programs have limited exposure to interprofessional collaboration in the classroom and in clinical and service-learning experiences. This practice gap implies that students enter their professions without valuing interprofessional collaboration and the impact it has on promoting positive patient outcomes.Aim: The aim of this study was to describe the interprofessional experiences of students in health care professional programs as they collaborated to provide health care to Guatemalan citizens over a 7-day period.Methods: In light of the identified practice gap and a commitment by college administration to fund interprofessional initiatives, faculty educators from nursing, occupational therapy, and physical therapy conducted a qualitative study to explore a service-learning initiative focused on promoting interprofessional collaboration. Students collaborated in triads (one student from each of the three disciplines to provide supervised health care to underserved Guatemalan men, women, children, and infants across a variety of community and health care settings. Eighteen students participated in a qualitative research project by describing their experience of interprofessional collaboration in a service-learning environment. Twice before arriving in Guatemala, and on three occasions during the trip, participants reflected on their experiences and provided narrative responses to open-ended questions. Qualitative content analysis methodology was used to describe their experiences of interprofessional collaboration.Results: An interprofessional service

  9. Medical Education in Decentralized Settings: How Medical Students Contribute to Health Care in 10 Sub-Saharan African Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talib, Zohray; van Schalkwyk, Susan; Couper, Ian; Pattanaik, Swaha; Turay, Khadija; Sagay, Atiene S; Baingana, Rhona; Baird, Sarah; Gaede, Bernhard; Iputo, Jehu; Kibore, Minnie; Manongi, Rachel; Matsika, Antony; Mogodi, Mpho; Ramucesse, Jeremais; Ross, Heather; Simuyeba, Moses; Haile-Mariam, Damen

    2017-12-01

    African medical schools are expanding, straining resources at tertiary health facilities. Decentralizing clinical training can alleviate this tension. This study assessed the impact of decentralized training and contribution of undergraduate medical students at health facilities. Participants were from 11 Medical Education Partnership Initiative-funded medical schools in 10 African countries. Each school identified two clinical training sites-one rural and the other either peri-urban or urban. Qualitative and quantitative data collection tools were used to gather information about the sites, student activities, and staff perspectives between March 2015 and February 2016. Interviews with site staff were analyzed using a collaborative directed approach to content analysis, and frequencies were generated to describe site characteristics and student experiences. The clinical sites varied in level of care but were similar in scope of clinical services and types of clinical and nonclinical student activities. Staff indicated that students have a positive effect on job satisfaction and workload. Respondents reported that students improved the work environment, institutional reputation, and introduced evidence-based approaches. Students also contributed to perceived improvements in quality of care, patient experience, and community outreach. Staff highlighted the need for resources to support students. Students were seen as valuable resources for health facilities. They strengthened health care quality by supporting overburdened staff and by bringing rigor and accountability into the work environment. As medical schools expand, especially in low-resource settings, mobilizing new and existing resources for decentralized clinical training could transform health facilities into vibrant service and learning environments.

  10. A student-initiated and student-facilitated international health elective for preclinical medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vora, Nirali; Chang, Mina; Pandya, Hemang; Hasham, Aliya; Lazarus, Cathy

    2010-02-15

    Global health education is becoming more important for developing well-rounded physicians and may encourage students toward a career in primary care. Many medical schools, however, lack adequate and structured opportunities for students beginning the curriculum. Second-year medical students initiated, designed, and facilitated a pass-fail international health elective, providing a curricular framework for preclinical medical students wishing to gain exposure to the clinical and cultural practices of a developing country. All course participants (N=30) completed a post-travel questionnaire within one week of sharing their experiences. Screening reflection essays for common themes that fulfill university core competencies yielded specific global health learning outcomes, including analysis of health care determinants. Medical students successfully implemented a sustainable global health curriculum for preclinical student peers. Financial constraints, language, and organizational burdens limit student participation. In future, long-term studies should analyze career impact and benefits to the host country.

  11. Knowledge and Attitudes Toward Organ Donation in Health Care Undergraduate Students in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, F; Massari, M; Giovannini, L; Alfano, G; Cappelli, G

    2017-11-01

    The number of organ donors in Italy is increasing, but with still disappointing living donation activity and relatively frequent objection by potential deceased donors' relatives to organ recovery. Few studies have assessed health care students' knowledge and attitude on donation. We administered a questionnaire to medical (MS) and nursing students (NS) at University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy, and 749 students (406 MS and 343 NS) completed the questionnaire. Although 95% of students were in favor of donation, only 21.9% of NS and 24.9% of MS were registered as donors. One quarter of students reported family disagreement. MS appeared more confident with personnel involved in donation. Overall, 60% of students knew the term donation after brain death but only 40% were aware of the criteria used to define it. Barely 27.1% of NS and 15.3% of MS believed they had received sufficient information in lessons. Backward logistic regression demonstrated that students whose families agree with them and who knew the definition of donation after brain death were more likely to express the disposition of registering, and those who showed distrust in the declaration of brain death were half as likely to register as donors. Students expressed a lack of knowledge, controversial attitudes on donation, and strong need for education; increased awareness may help increase donation rates. The majority of educational institutions in Italy do not directly address training on organ donation and transplantation for health care students; an integrated curriculum favoring interpersonal discussion including practical aspects is urgently required. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. CONCEPT OF HEALTH: A STUDY WITH HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONALS AND STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Bosco Oliveira Ribeiro da Silva

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate, by means of a questionnaire, the degree of knowledge that pediatricians, maternal-infant health nurses and medical and nursing students have of the concept of health. Methods: It was a cross-sectional and prospective study, previously approved by UNIFENAS Committee on Ethics in Research, having been carried out with pediatricians (n=42, maternal-infant health nurses (n=69, medical students (n=118, and nursing students (n=68 from two southern towns of the State of Minas Gerais, Brazil, which have medical and nursing schools. A survey was done in hospitals, medical clinics, City Health Bureaus and universities to reach the total number of students and professionals, weighing the possibility of a professional working in more than a job. The replies were qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed. For the open questions the contents analysis was used, according to BARDIN (1977. The data were presented in table. Results: According to the answer of 71,74% of the pediatricians 72,60% of the maternal-infant unit nurses, 77,77% of the medical school students and 63,76% of the nursing school students, health is a total physical, mental and social well-being. Health was also found to be a balance between the body and its environment by 10,87% of the pediatricians, 10,95% of the maternal-infant unit nurses, 15.07% of the medical school students and 18,84% of the nursing school students. Conclusions: The difficulty to define health is well known, once it is a condition with different meanings. The notions of health and disease are strongly influenced by the cultural context in which they occur. The binomial health / disease is not related only to microorganisms, but also to socioeconomic, political and educational issue, and, the students as well as the health professionals are committed with this new health concept.

  13. College Students’ Preferences for Health Care Providers when Accessing Sexual Health Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Carolyn M.; Lechner, Kate E.; Frerich, Ellen A.; Lust, Katherine A.; Eisenberg, Marla E.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Many emerging adults (18–25 year olds) report unmet health needs and disproportionately experience problems such as sexually transmitted infections. This study was conducted to examine college students’ perceptions of health care providers, specifically in the context of accessing sexual health resources. Design and Sample Students (N=52) were recruited from five diverse colleges in one state to participate in a one-to-one interview that involved walking and virtually exploring resources on and near campus. Interviews were conducted from May to November 2010. Results Inductive qualitative analysis yielded six themes summarizing students’ perceptions of provider characteristics, health care resources, the role of their peers, and students’ suggestions for strengthening health care services. Importantly, students consider a variety of staff—and their student peers—to be resources for sexual health information and services. Conclusions Findings emphasize the importance of collaboration between health service staff and broader campus staff because students often turn to campus staff initially. Post-secondary students welcome opportunities to know a provider through interactive websites that include details about providers on campus; their decisions to seek sexual health care services are influenced by their perceptions of providers’ characteristics and interpersonal skills. PMID:25159532

  14. Comparing Dental and Pharmacy Students’ Perceptions on Public Health and Preventive Health Care Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandiracioglu, Aliye; Dogan, Fethi

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: A Public health course has an important role in the undergraduate education of pharmacy and dentistry in terms of emphasizing preventive care. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the views of pharmacy and dentistry students on a public health course and preventive health care. Methods: 173 students enrolled at Ege University, Faculties of Pharmacy and Dentistry completed a SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats) analysis and replied to 18 Likert type question to determine their perceptions on a public health course and preventive health care. The comments of the students were reviewed and categorized into key themes. Results: SWOT analysis and the results of quantitative Likert type questions supported each other. According to the quantitative results, there was no significant difference between the scores of students from both schools in terms of their statements about the public health course and preventive care. Both groups of students mentioned the contribution of the public health course to their professions in the future. They also appreciated the importance of preventive care in the health services. PMID:22347604

  15. A student-initiated and student-facilitated international health elective for preclinical medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirali Vora

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Global health education is becoming more important for developing well-rounded physicians and may encourage students toward a career in primary care. Many medical schools, however, lack adequate and structured opportunities for students beginning the curriculum. Methods: Second-year medical students initiated, designed, and facilitated a pass–fail international health elective, providing a curricular framework for preclinical medical students wishing to gain exposure to the clinical and cultural practices of a developing country. Results: All course participants (N=30 completed a post-travel questionnaire within one week of sharing their experiences. Screening reflection essays for common themes that fulfill university core competencies yielded specific global health learning outcomes, including analysis of health care determinants. Conclusion: Medical students successfully implemented a sustainable global health curriculum for preclinical student peers. Financial constraints, language, and organizational burdens limit student participation. In future, long-term studies should analyze career impact and benefits to the host country.

  16. Teaching About the Health Care Industry Through Gamification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Collin; Bott, Samuel; Hernandez, Inmaculada; Grieve, Lorin

    2018-05-01

    Objective. To describe and evaluate the impact of a competition on investment financial acumen, and its relationship with improved health care industry knowledge. Methods. Students' confidence on 19 specific areas was assessed by a survey before and after participation in the health care investment competition. Their performance was also compared to that of Standard & Poor's 500 Index for Healthcare. Results. Students' self-perception on their knowledge of all 19 domains significantly increased after they participated in the health care investment competition. The average score to questions increased from 1.9 to 3.8. Thirty-eight percent of the students who participated in the competition outperformed Standard & Poor's 500 Index for Healthcare in the duration of the competition. Conclusion. Students at the University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy designed and implemented a novel way to teach students and faculty members about the business side of health care. The competition took the form of a competitive "mock stock market" style game and resulted in a marked increase in confidence in all observed areas. This increased confidence relates to the students' increased knowledge in how the health care industry works from a business perspective.

  17. Factors associated with student learning processes in primary health care units: a questionnaire study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Elisabeth; Alinaghizadeh, Hassan; Saarikoski, Mikko; Kaila, Päivi

    2015-01-01

    Clinical placement plays a key role in education intended to develop nursing and caregiving skills. Studies of nursing students' clinical learning experiences show that these dimensions affect learning processes: (i) supervisory relationship, (ii) pedagogical atmosphere, (iii) management leadership style, (iv) premises of nursing care on the ward, and (v) nursing teachers' roles. Few empirical studies address the probability of an association between these dimensions and factors such as student (a) motivation, (b) satisfaction with clinical placement, and (c) experiences with professional role models. The study aimed to investigate factors associated with the five dimensions in clinical learning environments within primary health care units. The Swedish version of Clinical Learning Environment, Supervision and Teacher, a validated evaluation scale, was administered to 356 graduating nursing students after four or five weeks clinical placement in primary health care units. Response rate was 84%. Multivariate analysis of variance is determined if the five dimensions are associated with factors a, b, and c above. The analysis revealed a statistically significant association with the five dimensions and two factors: students' motivation and experiences with professional role models. The satisfaction factor had a statistically significant association (effect size was high) with all dimensions; this clearly indicates that students experienced satisfaction. These questionnaire results show that a good clinical learning experience constitutes a complex whole (totality) that involves several interacting factors. Supervisory relationship and pedagogical atmosphere particularly influenced students' satisfaction and motivation. These results provide valuable decision-support material for clinical education planning, implementation, and management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Refugee health and medical student training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griswold, Kim S

    2003-10-01

    Cultural awareness training is an increasingly important priority within medical curricula. This article describes an academic family practice-community partnership focusing on health care needs of refugees that became the model for a medical school selective on cultural sensitivity training. The monthly Refugee Health Night program featured dinner with preceptors and patients, international sessions on special medical needs of refugees, and actual clinical encounters with patients. Students were not expected to become culturally competent experts but, rather, health care providers sensitive to and appreciative of cultural context, experience, and expectations. We worked with students to develop sensitive methods of inquiry about mental health, especially around issues of war and torture. We used problem-based cases to emphasize primary care continuity and the benefit of establishing trust over time. Over 2 years, 50 students and nearly 300 refugees (more than 73 families) participated. Students reported that their interactions with the refugees provided positive learning experiences, including expanded knowledge of diverse cultures and enhanced skills for overcoming communication barriers. Patients of refugee status were able to have emergent health care needs met in a timely fashion. Providing health care for refugee individuals and families presents many challenges as well as extraordinary opportunities for patients and practitioners to learn from one another.

  19. Enhancing the relationship and improving communication between adolescents and their health care providers: a school based intervention by medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towle, Angela; Godolphin, William; Van Staalduinen, Samantha

    2006-08-01

    To develop, implement and evaluate a workshop to help adolescents develop independent and active relationships with their physicians. A needs-assessment survey informed the development of a workshop delivered by medical student volunteers and incorporated into the career and personal planning curriculum of high schools in Vancouver, Canada. Over a 6-year period, 64 workshops were delivered by 181 medical students to 1651 high school students in six schools. The workshop is acceptable, do-able, effective and sustainable, characteristics that arise from the mutual benefits to all the groups involved: the medical school, the school board, the medical students, the high school teachers and students. The workshop provides a model for providing health care education to adolescents in the community. Teaching adolescents the importance of good doctor-patient communication encourages them to take ongoing responsibility for their health care and is an alternative route to direct health care education.

  20. Brief multiple behavior interventions in a college student health care clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werch, Chudley E Chad; Bian, Hui; Moore, Michele J; Ames, Steve; DiClemente, Carlo C; Weiler, Robert M

    2007-12-01

    This study examined the effects of brief image-based interventions, including a multiple behavior health contract, a one-on-one tailored consultation, and a combined consultation plus contract intervention, for impacting multiple health behaviors of students in a university health clinic. A total of 155 college students attending a major southern university were recruited to participate in a study evaluating a health promotion program titled Project Fitness during the fall 2005 and spring 2006. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three treatments as they presented at the clinic: 1) a multiple behavior health contract, 2) a one-on-one tailored consultation, or 3) a combined consultation plus contract intervention. Baseline and 1-month post-intervention data were collected using computer-assisted questionnaires in a quiet office within the student health clinic. Omnibus repeated-measures analyses of variance were significant for drinking driving behaviors, F(2,136) = 4.43, p = .01, exercise behaviors, F(5,140) = 6.12, p = .00, nutrition habits, F(3,143) = 5.37, p = .00, sleep habits, F(2,144) = 5.03, p = .01, and health quality of life, F(5,140) = 3.09, p = .01, with improvements on each behavior across time. Analysis of group-by-time interaction effects showed an increase in the use of techniques to manage stress, F(2,144) = 5.48, p = .01, and the number of health behavior goals set in the last 30 days, F(2,143) = 5.35, p = .01, but only among adolescents receiving the consultation, or consultation plus contract. Effect sizes were consistently larger across health behaviors, and medium in size, when both consult and contract were used together. Brief interventions using a positive goal image of fitness, and addressing a number of health habits using a contract and consultation strategy alone, or in combination, have the potential to influence positive changes in multiple health behaviors of college students attending a university primary health care clinic.

  1. Assessment of psychiatric morbidity among health-care students in a teaching hospital, Telangana state: A cross-sectional questionnaire-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udai Kiran

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Professional education can be a stressful experience for health-care students and may impact negatively on emotional well-being and academic performance which leads to psychiatric morbidity. The aim of this study is to assess the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity among the professional health-care students. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among professional health-care students in a tertiary care teaching hospital of Telangana state. The information regarding demographic data, academic achievements, and positive and negative events in the recent past was collected using semi-structured pro forma, and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28 is used to assess the psychiatric morbidity. Descriptive analysis and Pearson's correlation analysis were done to analyze the data. Results: A total of 836 students participated in the study, and the overall mean GHQ total score in the study population was 26.8, which is above the cutoff (24 score. The prevalence of psychiatric morbidity among study population is about 58.7%. Academic achievement and negative events in the recent past had effect on psychological morbidity and showed high GHQ scores among study population which was found to be statistically significant. Conclusion: The poor academic performance and negative events had a strong impact on psychological morbidity of students. The higher level of psychological morbidity warrants need for intervention such as social and psychological support to improve the quality of life for the health-care students. Further, a creation of positive academic environment as a teamwork of faculty, administration, educational experts, and students helps to develop psychological healthy dental and medical professionals who can perform better in a coming future.

  2. Knowledge of primary health care and career choice at primary health care settings among final year medical students - challenges to human resources for health in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giang, Kim Bao; Minh, Hoang Van; Hien, Nguyen Van; Ngoc, Nguyen Minh; Hinh, Nguyen Duc

    2015-01-01

    There is a shortage of medical doctors in primary health care (PHC) settings in Vietnam. Evidence about the knowledge medical students have about PHC and their career decision-making is important for making policy in human resources for health. The objective of this study was to analyse knowledge and attitudes about PHC among medical students in their final year and their choice to work in PHC after graduation. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 400 final year general medical students from Hanoi Medical University. Self-administered interviews were conducted. Key variables were knowledge, awareness of the importance of PHC and PHC career choices. Descriptive and analytic statistics were performed. Students had essential knowledge of the concept and elements of PHC and were well aware of its importance. However, only one-third to one half of them valued PHC with regard to their professional development or management opportunities. Less than 1% of students would work at commune or district health facilities after graduation. This study evidences challenges related to increasing the number of medical doctors working in PHC settings. Immediate and effective interventions are needed to make PHC settings more attractive and to encourage medical graduates to start and continue a career in PHC.

  3. Understanding the information and resource needs of UK health and social care placement students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaghan, Lynne; Doherty, Alan; Lea, Susan J; Webster, Daniel

    2008-12-01

    Students on health and social care degree programmes spend 50% of their time on practice placements. Because of the diversity of settings and the need to evidence their work, it is vital to understand the information and resource needs of placement students. The aim of this investigation was to understand the needs of placement students in terms of accessing resources whilst they are in the field in order to inform a guide to meet these needs. Focus groups were conducted with students on midwifery, social work and post-registration health professions degree programmes on three different sites across the region. Data were analysed using Thematic Content Analysis. Three themes emerged from the data: inequality, user education needs and students' solutions and strategies. It is essential to speak to placement students in order to understand their needs in terms of accessing and using library resources. The timing and content of information skills training is key to meeting student needs while on placement.

  4. Educational impact of an assessment of medical students' collaboration in health care teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olupeliyawa, Asela; Balasooriya, Chinthaka; Hughes, Chris; O'Sullivan, Anthony

    2014-02-01

    This paper explores how structured feedback and other features of workplace-based assessment (WBA) impact on medical students' learning in the context of an evaluation of a workplace-based performance assessment: the teamwork mini-clinical evaluation exercise (T-MEX). The T-MEX enables observation-based measurement of and feedback on the behaviours required to collaborate effectively as a junior doctor within the health care team. The instrument is based on the mini-clinical evaluation exercise (mini-CEX) format and focuses on clinical encounters such as consultations with medical and allied health professionals, discharge plan preparation, handovers and team meetings. The assessment was implemented during a 6-week period in 2010 with 25 medical students during their final clinical rotation. Content analysis was conducted on the written feedback provided by 23 assessors and the written reflections and action plans proposed by the 25 student participants (in 88 T-MEX forms). Semi-structured interviews with seven assessors and three focus groups with 14 student participants were conducted and the educational impact was explored through thematic analysis. The study enabled the identification of features of WBA that promote the development of collaborative competencies. The focus of the assessment on clinical encounters and behaviours important for collaboration provided opportunities for students to engage with the health care team and highlighted the role of teamwork in these encounters. The focus on specific behaviours and a stage-appropriate response scale helped students identify learning goals and facilitated the provision of focused feedback. Incorporating these features within an established format helped students and supervisors to engage with the instrument. Extending the format to include structured reflection enabled students to self-evaluate and develop plans for improvement. The findings illuminate the mechanisms by which WBA facilitates learning. The

  5. [Community health course--student's evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juresa, Vesna; Musil, Vera; Sosić, Zvonko; Majer, Marjeta; Pavleković, Gordana

    2010-12-01

    , 63% with field research, and 49% with water sampling. At some medical schools, there are similar attempts to bring students more closely to life conditions, especially to rural communities. Different schools of medicine in the world have attempted to improve and adapt current curricula towards community-oriented education of medical students during undergraduate study and residency. In some countries, there is also the need of improvement of health care in rural areas. Results of the course evaluation showed that students had recognized the exceptional value of community health course as a whole. They perceived it as the most valuable and most useful experience in their medical study. By participating in local health care and social care activities in rural area, they got an insight into both the health care system and socio-medical determinants of health.

  6. A qualitative study exploring the impact of student nurses working part time as a health care assistant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasson, Felicity; McKenna, Hugh P; Keeney, Sinead

    2013-08-01

    National and international evidence indicates that university students engage in employment whilst studying. Research has suggested that nursing students either enter training with previous care experience or tend to work part time in a health related area whilst undertaking higher education. The impact of this on the socialisation process remains unclear. Based on the symbolic interactionist framework, this paper reports on a theme from a large mixed methods study - the extent and implications of student nurses' work experience on learning and training. One qualitative stage from a sequential exploratory mixed methods design. One higher education institution in the United Kingdom. Forty-five pre-registration nursing students. Thirty-two students took part in four focus groups and 13 took part in individual interviews. Findings revealed that 27 (60%) of students were in paid nursing related employment. This was reported to be advantageous by most participants with regards to enhancing confidence, skills and time spent in the clinical setting. However, it was also perceived by a small number of participants as being detrimental to subsequent learning resulting in role confusion, influencing placement behaviour, and preferences for future nursing practice. Student participants with no prior work experience believed this placed them at a disadvantage, negatively influencing their learning, ability to fit in, and adjustment on placement. Findings have suggested that student participants desire more recognition of the experience and skills they have gained from their employment. Whilst care experience among the student nursing population is advocated, the results of this study show that it is perceived to impinged on their learning and educational journey. Policy makers, educationalists and health service providers need to be aware of the students who operate within the dual roles of student and health care worker so as to provide guidance and appropriate direction

  7. Using peer-assisted learning and role-playing to teach generic skills to dental students: the health care simulation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Tantawi, Maha M A; Abdelaziz, Hytham; AbdelRaheem, Amira S; Mahrous, Ahmed A

    2014-01-01

    Increasing importance is attached to teaching generic skills to undergraduate students in various disciplines. This article describes an extracurricular, student-led activity for teaching generic skills using the Model United Nations over three months. The activity used the Health Care Simulation Model (HCSM) with peer learning and role-playing to accomplish its objectives. An interview was used to select from undergraduate and postgraduate dental students at Alexandria University, Alexandria, Egypt, to develop a group of staff to act as peer teachers after receiving training (n=77). These peer teachers provided training for 123 undergraduate dental students to serve as delegates who acted as trainees or peer learners. At the end of the training sessions, a conference was held in which the students played the roles of delegates representing officials responsible for health care systems in ten countries. The students reported improvement in generic skills, enjoyed several aspects of the experience, and disliked other aspects of the model to a lesser extent. In multivariate analysis, perceived usefulness of the HCSM was significantly greater for staff than delegates and increased as self-reported improvement in knowledge of health care systems increased. This study suggests that innovative, student-centered educational methods can be effective for teaching generic skills and factual information.

  8. Perceived Preparedness of Health Care Students for Providing Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolezzi, Monica; Abdallah, Oraib; Aden, Suad; Major, Stella; White, Diana; El-Awaisi, Alla

    2017-02-21

    Early assessment and management of risk factors is known to have significant impact in preventing cardiovascular disease (CVD) and its associated burden. Cardiovascular disease risk assessment and management (CVDRAM) is best approached by teamwork across health care professionals. This study aimed at assessing health care students' (HCSs) knowledge about the parameters needed for estimating CVD risk, their self-assessed preparedness/confidence and perceived barriers for the provision of CVDRAM services through a survey administered to third and fourth year pharmacy, medical, and nursing students in Qatar. Although all student cohorts achieved similar knowledge scores, less than half ( n = 38, 47%) were able to identify all of the six main risk factors necessary to estimate absolute CVD risk, and a third (32%) were unable to identify total cholesterol as an independent risk factor necessary to estimate CVD risk. Training on the use of CVD risk assessment tools differed among the three student cohorts. All student cohorts also perceived similar levels of preparedness in CVDRAM. However, pharmacy students reported the highest preparedness/confidence with the use of the latest CVDRAM guidelines. The majority of statements listed under the barriers scale were perceived by the students as being moderate (median score = 3). Poor public acceptance or unawareness of importance of estimating CVD risk was the only barrier perceived as a major by nursing students. Future integration of interprofessional educational (IPE) activities in the CVDRAM curricula of HCSs may be a suitable strategy to minimize barriers and foster collaborative practice for the provision of CVDRAM services in Qatar.

  9. FACTORS THAT INFLUENCE THE SELECTION OF LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES FOR STUDENT NURSES IN PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. lita

    2002-11-01

    The study therefore focused on the following objective: To identify the factors that influence the selection of learning opportunities for primary health care in hospital units. A qualitative research design utilising focus group discussions were used. The population consisted of conveniently selected lecturers, student nurses and registered nurses. The same initial question was asked in each focus group to initiate the discussions. The data were analysed according to Tesch's method. The results indicated that there is positive commitment from the lecturers and registered nurses to be involved in selecting appropriate learning opportunities. The student nurses also demonstrated a willingness to learn and to be exposed to learning opportunities in primary health care. There were however certain constraints that emerged as themes, namely: • Managerial constraints • Educational constraints Under the theme "managerial constraints" categories such as workload, nursing staff shortages and communication problems were identified. Under the theme "educational constraints" categories such as a lack of guidance, and the correlation of theory and practice emerged. Recommendations based on this research report include improvement of in-service education on managerial and educational aspects to facilitate the primary health care approach in hospitals.

  10. Nosocomial infections: knowledge and source of information among clinical health care students in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bello AI

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Ajediran I Bello1, Eunice N Asiedu1, Babatunde OA Adegoke2, Jonathan NA Quartey1, Kwadwo O Appiah-Kubi1, Bertha Owusu-Ansah11Department of Physiotherapy, School of Allied Health Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of Ghana, Accra, Ghana; 2Department of Physiotherapy, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, NigeriaBackground: This study determined and compared the knowledge of nosocomial infections among clinical health care students at the College of Health Sciences, University of Ghana.Methods: Two hundred undergraduate health care students from four academic programs participated in the study. The study sample was drawn from each academic program by a simple random sampling technique using the class directory from each course. The Infection Control Standardized Questionnaire (ICSQ was used to assess the knowledge of students about three main domains, ie, hand hygiene, nosocomial infections, and standard precautions. A maximum score of 50 was obtainable, and respondents with scores ≥70% were classified as having a satisfactory knowledge. The response on each item was coded numerically to generate data for statistical analysis. Comparison of knowledge on the domains among categories of students was assessed using the Kruskal–Wallis test, while associations between courses of study and knowledge about nosocomial infections were determined using the Chi-square test. All statistical tests had a significant level of 5% (P < 0.05Results: Overall mean percentage score of the participants on ICSQ was 65.4 ± 2.58, with medical, physiotherapy, radiography, and nursing students recording mean percentage scores of 70.58 ± 0.62, 65.02 ± 2.00, 64.74 ± 1.19, and 61.31 ± 2.35, respectively. The main source of information about the prevention of nosocomial infections as cited by participants was their routine formal training in class. There was no significant association (P > 0.05 between course of study and knowledge of

  11. 76 FR 7767 - Student Health Insurance Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-11

    ... Student Health Insurance Coverage AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), HHS. ACTION... health insurance coverage under the Public Health Service Act and the Affordable Care Act. The proposed rule would define ``student health insurance [[Page 7768

  12. Perceived Preparedness of Health Care Students for Providing Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Zolezzi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Early assessment and management of risk factors is known to have significant impact in preventing cardiovascular disease (CVD and its associated burden. Cardiovascular disease risk assessment and management (CVDRAM is best approached by teamwork across health care professionals. This study aimed at assessing health care students’ (HCSs knowledge about the parameters needed for estimating CVD risk, their self-assessed preparedness/confidence and perceived barriers for the provision of CVDRAM services through a survey administered to third and fourth year pharmacy, medical, and nursing students in Qatar. Although all student cohorst achieved similar knowledge scores, less than half (n = 38, 47% were able to identify all of the six main risk factors necessary to estimate absolute CVD risk, and a third (32% were unable to identify total cholesterol as an independent risk factor necessary to estimate CVD risk. Training on the use of CVD risk assessment tools differed among the three student cohorts. All student cohorts also perceived similar levels of preparedness in CVDRAM. However, pharmacy students reported the highest preparedness/confidence with the use of the latest CVDRAM guidelines. The majority of statements listed under the barriers scale were perceived by the students as being moderate (median score = 3. Poor public acceptance or unawareness of importance of estimating CVD risk was the only barrier perceived as major by nursing students. Future integration of interprofessional educational (IPE activities in the CVDRAM curricula of HCSs may be a suitable strategy to minimize barriers and foster collaborative practice for the provision of CVDRAM services in Qatar.

  13. Blending Community Service and Teaching to Open Vision Care and Eye Health Awareness to University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Chi-wai; Chan, Lily Y. L.; Wong, Horace H. Y.; Chu, Geoffrey; Yu, Wing Yan; Pang, Peter C. K.; Cheong, Allen M. Y.; Ting, Patrick Wai-ki; Lam, Thomas Chuen; Kee, Chea-su; Lam, Andrew; Chan, Henry H. L.

    2016-01-01

    A vision care-based community service subject is offered to general university students for fulfillment of a service-learning compulsory credit requirement. Here, a professional health subject is taught in a way that caters to generalist learners. Students gain basic skills they can apply to provide vision screenings for the needy population. All…

  14. Attitudes of Korean Dental Students Toward Individuals with Special Health Care Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyo-Seol; Jung, Hoi In; Kim, Seon-Mi; Kim, Jiyoen; Doh, Re Mee; Lee, Jae-Ho

    2015-09-01

    The purposes of this study were to ascertain the attitudes of dental students toward individuals with special health care needs (SHCNs) in Korea and to elucidate the characteristics associated with these attitudes. The authors recruited students from four of the 11 dental schools in Korea to participate in a survey; these schools were selected for regional balance. The Scale of Attitudes toward Disabled Persons (SADP) was used as the primary survey instrument, and ten independent variables were included. Of the 1,100 possible participants, 1,057 responded to the survey, for a response rate of 96.1%. The results showed that although the students' attitudes did not differ significantly by gender, their attitudes did show statistically significant differences on nine other variables: age, year, religion, self-esteem, friends with a disability, volunteering, admission course, concern for individuals with SHCNs, and intention to treat individuals with SHCNs (all p<0.05). The attitudes of these Korean dental students toward individuals with SHCNs were relatively unfavorable, showing lower SADP scores than reported in Western countries and likely reflecting Eastern cultural values in general. Future efforts should place greater emphasis on special care dentistry education and encourage the development of more favorable attitudes regarding the treatment of individuals with SHCNs.

  15. How Can Medical Students Add Value? Identifying Roles, Barriers, and Strategies to Advance the Value of Undergraduate Medical Education to Patient Care and the Health System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalo, Jed D; Dekhtyar, Michael; Hawkins, Richard E; Wolpaw, Daniel R

    2017-09-01

    As health systems evolve, the education community is seeking to reimagine student roles that combine learning with meaningful contributions to patient care. The authors sought to identify potential stakeholders regarding the value of student work, and roles and tasks students could perform to add value to the health system, including key barriers and associated strategies to promote value-added roles in undergraduate medical education. In 2016, 32 U.S. medical schools in the American Medical Association's (AMA's) Accelerating Change in Education Consortium met for a two-day national meeting to explore value-added medical education; 121 educators, systems leaders, clinical mentors, AMA staff leadership and advisory board members, and medical students were included. A thematic qualitative analysis of workshop discussions and written responses was performed, which extracted key themes. In current clinical roles, students can enhance value by performing detailed patient histories to identify social determinants of health and care barriers, providing evidence-based medicine contributions at the point-of-care, and undertaking health system research projects. Novel value-added roles include students serving as patient navigators/health coaches, care transition facilitators, population health managers, and quality improvement team extenders. Six priority areas for advancing value-added roles are student engagement, skills, and assessments; balance of service versus learning; resources, logistics, and supervision; productivity/billing pressures; current health systems design and culture; and faculty factors. These findings provide a starting point for collaborative work to positively impact clinical care and medical education through the enhanced integration of value-added medical student roles into care delivery systems.

  16. An assessment of health-care students' attitudes toward patients with or at high risk for HIV: implications for education and cultural competency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Harry; Earnshaw, Valerie A; Wickersham, Jeffrey A; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Desai, Mayur M; John, Jacob; Altice, Frederick L

    2014-01-01

    Stigma perpetuated by health-care providers has been found to be a barrier to care for vulnerable populations, including HIV-infected, people who inject drugs (PWIDs), and men who have sex with men (MSM) in multiple clinical contexts and remains unexamined among professional health-care students in Malaysia. This cross-sectional, anonymous, and Internet-based survey assessed the attitudes of medical and dental students toward HIV-infected, PWID, and MSM patients. Survey invitation was emailed to 3191 students at 8 professional schools; 1296 (40.6%) responded and scored their attitudes toward these patient groups using a feeling thermometer, indicating their attitudes on a sliding scale from 0 (most negative) to 100 (most positive). Compared to general patients (mean = 76.50), the mean scores for HIV-infected (mean = 54.04; p religion, ethnicity, and personally knowing someone from these populations were associated with significant differences in attitudes. No differences were noted between pre-clinical and clinical year of training. Health-care students represent the next generation of clinicians who will be responsible for future HIV prevention and treatment efforts. Our findings suggest alarmingly negative attitudes toward these patients, especially MSM, necessitating prompt and effective interventions designed to ameliorate the negative attitudes of health-care students toward vulnerable populations, specifically HIV-infected, PWID, and MSM patients in Malaysia.

  17. Health literacy among Danish university students enrolled in health-related study programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsborg, Lea; Krossdal, Fie; Kayser, Lars

    2017-12-01

    It is important to address people's health literacy when providing health care. Health professionals should be aware of, and have insight into, people's health literacy when they provide health services. Health professionals need to be health literate themselves. We examined the level of health literacy in students in Denmark attending one of four full university programmes related to health and investigated how their health literacy was associated with their sociodemographic background. The health literacy level of the students was measured using the multi-dimensional Health Literacy Questionnaire (HLQ) supplemented with sociodemographic questions. The questionnaire was administrated through the students' Facebook groups. The students were enrolled in courses on health informatics, medicine, molecular biomedicine or public health. Out of a total of 7663 students, 630 responded to the questionnaire. No sex difference was found although female students scored higher than male students in domain 4 (social support for health). Students attending the public health programme tended to score higher and those attending molecular biomedicine tended to score lower in the HLQ. There was a positive correlation between HLQ scores and the educational level of the students' parents. If one of their parents was employed in the health care sector, the HLQ score tended to be higher in domains 1 and 4. Students who had been hospitalized also tended to score higher in domains 1, 5 and 6. Students' health literacy relates to their personal background and educational path. This may be of importance when planning curricula and educational activities, including cross-disciplinary courses.

  18. How frequent are non-evidence-based health care beliefs in chiropractic students and do they vary across the pre-professional educational years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innes, Stanley I; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte; Walker, Bruce F

    2018-01-01

    Evidence suggests that a students' beliefs already prior to entering a program may be important as a determinant in sustaining unsuitable health care beliefs. Our objectives were to investigate the proportion of Australian chiropractic students who hold non-evidence-based beliefs in the first year of study and the extent to which they may be involved in non-musculoskeletal health conditions. Finally, to see if this proportion varies over the course of the chiropractic program. In 2016, students from two Australian chiropractic programs answered a questionnaire on how often they would give advice on five common health conditions in their future practices as well as their opinion on whether chiropractic spinal adjustments could prevent or help seven health-related conditions. From a possible 831 students, 444 responded (53%). Students were highly likely to offer advice (often/quite often) on a range of non-musculoskeletal conditions. The proportions were lowest in first year and highest the final year. Also, high numbers of students held non-evidence-based beliefs about 'chiropractic spinal adjustments' which tended to occur in gradually decreasing in numbers in sequential years, except for fifth year when a reversal of the pattern occurred. New strategies are required for chiropractic educators if they are to produce graduates who understand and deliver evidence-based health care and able to be part of the mainstream health care system.

  19. An Innovative Program in the Science of Health Care Delivery: Workforce Diversity in the Business of Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essary, Alison C; Wade, Nathaniel L

    2016-01-01

    According to the most recent statistics from the National Center for Education Statistics, disparities in enrollment in undergraduate and graduate education are significant and not improving commensurate with the national population. Similarly, only 12% of graduating medical students and 13% of graduating physician assistant students are from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups. Established in 2012 to promote health care transformation at the organization and system levels, the School for the Science of Health Care Delivery is aligned with the university and college missions to create innovative, interdisciplinary curricula that meet the needs of our diverse patient and community populations. Three-year enrollment trends in the program exceed most national benchmarks, particularly among students who identify as Hispanic and American Indian/Alaska Native. The Science of Health Care Delivery program provides students a seamless learning experience that prepares them to be solutions-oriented leaders proficient in the business of health care, change management, innovation, and data-driven decision making. Defined as the study and design of systems, processes, leadership and management used to optimize health care delivery and health for all, the Science of Health Care Delivery will prepare the next generation of creative, diverse, pioneering leaders in health care.

  20. Meanings of care in health promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcón, Gladys Carmela Santos; Erdmann, Alacoque Lorenzini; Backes, Dirce Stein

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the study is to understand the meaning built by students and professors on health promotion in the teaching and learning process of health care in Nursing. It is a qualitative study using ground theory as a methodological reference. Data was collected through interviews, with three samples groups, 13 students and four professors, by classroom observation, and through meetings with nursing professors. The central subject resulting from this analysis was: constructing teaching and learning in order, disorder and self organization for a new way of caring promoting health. The teaching/learning process directed at health promotion develops in a stage of crisis, going from a state of order to a state of disorder that is uncertain and contradictory regarding what society understands about health.

  1. Trainer-to-student ratios for teaching psychomotor skills in health care fields, as applied to osteopathic manipulative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, Karen T; Seffinger, Michael A; Ferrill, Heather P; Gish, Eric E

    2012-04-01

    The hallmark of osteopathic medical education is the inclusion of hands-on instruction in osteopathic manipulative medicine (OMM), which includes palpatory diagnosis and osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT). This OMM training typically involves a primary instructor presenting theory and techniques with step-by-step demonstrations to a large group of first- and second-year osteopathic medical students. Additional instructors, referred to as table trainers, assist the primary instructor by supervising the students as they practice the presented techniques. To the authors' knowledge, there is no currently accepted standard for a table trainer-to-student ratio in OMM skills laboratories within osteopathic medical schools in the United States. However, through a Google Web search and PubMed literature review, the authors identified published trainer-to-student ratios used in other health care skills training curricula. Psychomotor skills training courses in health care fields typically have a table trainer-to-student ratio of 1 trainer to 8 or fewer students. On the basis of these findings and psychomotor skills learning theory, the authors conclude that this ratio is likely sufficient for OMM skills training.

  2. Care of the college student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unwin, Brian K; Goodie, Jeffrey; Reamy, Brian V; Quinlan, Jeffrey

    2013-11-01

    There are approximately 20 million students in U.S. colleges and universities. Although this population is characterized as having good health, 600,000 students report some form of disability or some type of medical problem, including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, learning disabilities, psychiatric disorders, and chronic illnesses, among others. Physicians can enhance youth transition to an adult model of health care; the use of self-care skills checklists is one recommended method to assist with the transition. Stimulant medications are effective for treating adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, but physicians should use caution when prescribing stimulants to college students because of the high rates of medication diversion in this population. Depression, anxiety, posttraumatic stress disorder, sleep problems, and eating disorders are common in college students and can significantly impact performance. Emphasis on immunization of students for influenza, meningococcus, and pertussis is necessary because of the low rates of compliance. Screening and interventions for obesity, tobacco use, and substance abuse are important because of the high prevalence of these problems in college students. Screening for alcohol abuse facilitates identification of students with problem drinking behaviors. Students who are war veterans should be monitored for suicidal ideation and posttraumatic stress disorder. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning students are at risk of harassment and discrimination. Caution should be exercised when prescribing medications to college athletes to avoid violation of National Collegiate Athletic Association eligibility rules.

  3. An investigation on nursing, midwifery and health care students' learning motivation in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosgeroglu, Nedime; Acat, M Bahaddin; Ayranci, Unal; Ozabaci, Nilufer; Erkal, Sibel

    2009-09-01

    The aim was to determine differences between the dimensions of motivational learning and sociodemographic characteristics of nursing, midwifery and health care students. For the purpose of collecting data on learning-oriented motivations, occupational learning motivation scale (OLMS) was used. The OLMS was designed to assess the constructs of extrinsic, intrinsic and negative factors for learning, cognitive and lifelong learning goals. The mean levels of the items "willingness to help people", "fear of making mistakes" and "willingness to work with those likely to motivate them" were all determined to be high. Significant differences were revealed for the sex of the students (p<0.05).

  4. Teaching and Practicing Caring in the Classroom: Students' Responses to a Self-Awareness Intervention in Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Shik; Patterson, Kathleen T

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the assumption that caring could be taught by nurse educators in the classroom environment and that learning to be self-aware in a mindful state would facilitate students to listen more closely to their inner spirit, which would affect caring behaviors. A convenience sample of 238 students in the Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing course in a baccalaureate program was obtained from 2007 to 2011. At the beginning of each class and throughout the semester, self-awareness was explained to the students, a reflection statement was read, and students were asked to take two minutes of quiet time, with their eyes closed. At the end of each semester, an author-composed Self-Awareness Questionnaire and Measurement Scale was administered to consenting students to assess whether self-awareness led to caring behaviors. Students' responses were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Findings were positive and supported the assumption that self-awareness and silence positively affected caring behaviors in nursing students in their psychiatric nursing rotation.

  5. Call to action: Better care, better health, and greater value in college health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciotoli, Carlo; Smith, Allison J; Keeling, Richard P

    2018-03-05

    It is time for action by leaders across higher education to strengthen quality improvement (QI) in college health, in pursuit of better care, better health, and increased value - goals closely linked to students' learning and success. The size and importance of the college student population; the connections between wellbeing, and therefore QI, and student success; the need for improved standards and greater accountability; and the positive contributions of QI to employee satisfaction and professionalism all warrant a widespread commitment to building greater capacity and capability for QI in college health. This report aims to inspire, motivate, and challenge college health professionals and their colleagues, campus leaders, and national entities to take both immediate and sustainable steps to bring QI to the forefront of college health practice - and, by doing so, to elevate care, health, and value of college health as a key pathway to advancing student success.

  6. [Health care, needs and barriers in seeking medical care for global health and sexual and reproductive health, among students from Félix Houphouët-Boigny University, Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inghels, M; Coffie, P A; Larmarange, J

    2017-09-01

    In Ivory Coast, little is known about health needs and health access barriers among young people. The aim of this study was to describe health provision, health needs and barriers when seeking medical care, with an emphasis on sexual and reproductive health, and the acceptability of a medical examination for students attending their first year at the Houphouët-Boigny University, Abidjan, Ivory Coast. We conducted a representative cross-sectional study among second year students who were selected by two-stage equiprobable random sampling. In-depth interviews were conducted among students and the university health center staff. Five hundred and forty three students (322 men and 221 women) answered a questionnaire (participation rate 98.4%). Among women who ever had sex, 38.4% (95%CI [30.5%-47.0%]) had unmet contraception needs and 31.2% [23.7%-40.0%] had experienced an unwanted pregnancy. Fear about impaired fertility was the leading reason for non-use of hormonal contraception, the method of choice among most students. The main health problems among students, by order of frequency were malaria (54.3%), respiratory infection (44.6%), constipation (28.0%) and psychological problems (25.9%). High cost perception of services offered, despite their gratuity, were the main barriers against access to the university health center, indicating a lack of communication about this structure and its services. The majority of students favored the establishment of a medical examination during the first year at the university. Establishing a medical examination would improve health center visibility. The following services could be offered: (i) HIV, chlamydia and gonorrhea screening, (ii) hepatitis B virus screening and vaccination, (iii) provision and information about contraceptive methods, (iv) presentation of the university health center services. Dedicated spaces where students could have access to information about health-related topics (e.g. sexuality, nutrition, depression

  7. Russia's College Students: Work and Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, L. Iu.

    2014-01-01

    Research on the effect of secondary employment on the sense of well-being of students in full-time education shows that the degree of fatigue and emotional stress on the job is affected by gender, the students' assessment of their own health, and their disposition to take care of their health.

  8. Factors Associated with Student Stress in the U.S. Army - Baylor University Graduate Program in Health Care Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-07-01

    highly-competitive military system. Academic probation is imposed on any now student who did not have an undergraduate grade point average (GPA) of...DF), and depersonalization intensity (DI). This suggests that students with higher GRE scores exhibited a lower degree of feelings related to these...characteristics, and the levels of stress during the US Army - Baylor University Graduate Program in Health Care Administration. The students were administered

  9. Educational outcomes associated with early immersion of second-year student pharmacists into direct patient care roles in health-system practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Kimberly A; McLaughlin, Jacqueline E; Waldron, Kayla M; Willoughby, Ian; Pinelli, Nicole R

    2018-02-01

    To assess the educational impact of engaging second professional year student pharmacists in active, direct patient care experiences in health system practice. Student pharmacists in their second professional year completed a redesigned, skill-based four-week introductory pharmacy practice experience in health system practice. The immersion consisted of experiences in both operational and clinical pharmacy environments. Students were assessed with skill development checklist assessments. Pre-post surveys were also collected. Data were analyzed using a mixed methods approach. Twenty-eight student pharmacists were included; of those, 26 completed both surveys (92.9% response rate). Survey results revealed significant increases in 81.8% of operational and 100% of clinical self-efficacy statements (psystem practice while identifying additional areas for emphasized learning. Student pharmacists engaged in early, hands-on, direct patient care experiences enhanced their skill development in operational and clinical pharmacy practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Investigation of Health Care Components in Transition IEPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repetto, Jeanne B.; Jaress, Jennifer; Lindsey, Jenna; Bae, Jungah

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the inclusion of health care components in transition Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) for students diagnosed with Other Health Impaired (OHI). In this study, we analyzed 50 IEPs of students with an OHI diagnosis to establish whether there are health-related components or other common health care…

  11. A study of communication skills in health care management students and its association with demographic characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiva Karimzadeh

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Communication skills are one of the most important skills for health care managers and play an important role in their personal life and future occupation. The present study aimed to evaluate the students’ communication skills as well as its relationship with the students’ demographic characteristics. Method: This descriptive-analytical study was performed on 153 university students majoring in healthcare management in 2014. A self-administered communication skills questionnaire and demographic information form were used to collect the data. Then, the data were analyzed by using SPSS software and appropriate statistical tests including T-Test and ANOVA. Results: The results showed that the students on average got 77.60 out of possible 100 in communication skills. The relationship between communication skills and demographic characteristics, except age, was not statistically significant (p<0.001. The total Cronbach’s alpha was estimated 0.7. There was a statistically significant difference between the communication skills scores of participants in terms of different age groups (p<0.05. Conclusion: The present findings showed a moderate score in communicative skills in students of health care management. Although the communication skill levels in these students were not low, due to the importance of these skills in their future occupation, serious attention is needed to improve their communication skills.

  12. Preparing Students for Practice in a Managed Care Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claiborne, Nancy; Fortune, Anne

    2005-01-01

    Managed care has profound effects on health and mental health service delivery in the United States. This article describes the knowledge that students need for effective social work practice within a managed care environment and evaluates a course to deliver the content. (Contains 3 tables.)

  13. Developing Dental Students' Awareness of Health Care Disparities and Desire to Serve Vulnerable Populations Through Service-Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar-Horenstein, Linda S; Feng, Xiaoying; Roberts, Kellie W; Gibbs, Micaela; Catalanotto, Frank A; Hudson-Vassell, Charisse M

    2015-10-01

    Service-learning in dental education helps students integrate knowledge with practice in an underserved community setting. The aim of this study was to explore how a service-learning experience affected a small group of dental students' beliefs about cultural competence, professionalism, career development, desire to practice in a community service setting, and perceptions about access and disparities issues. Prior to beginning their first year of dental school, five first-year dental students at one U.S. dental school participated in a six-week service-learning program in which they interned at one of three at-risk settings in order to experience health care delivery there. After the program, 60 reflective writing assignments completed by the participants were analyzed using grounded theory methods; interviews with the students were used to corroborate the findings from that analysis. Seven themes identified in the journal reflections and interview findings showed enhanced awareness of social health care issues and patient differences, as well as a social justice orientation and desire to address disparities. Building on this study, future research should explore the curricular components of service-learning programs to ensure students receive ample opportunity to reflect upon their experiences in order to integrate previously held assumptions with their newfound knowledge.

  14. Characteristics of internet use as a means of perceived stress reduction in health care students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinić Darko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies suggest that people use media for instrumental needs, entertainment/leisure or for social gratification. The aim of this study is to identify specific characteristics of Internet use in health care students who use the Internet as a means of perceived stress reduction. The sample included 231 students (m=34%; f=66%, aged (M=22.44; SD=2.09, who were subsequently categorised into two groups according to whether they consciously use the Internet to alleviate the consequences of stressful experiences. The individuals reporting the Internet as a means of perceived stress reduction spend considerably more time online than other Internet users. They also use contents related to entertainment, culture and sex more frequently, as well as social applications and networks. In comparison to others, these participants meet new people and potential partners more often via the Internet, spend more time on their friends' profiles, while using different entertainment applications, most commonly games. The Internet may play a significant role in reducing negative reactions to stressful events; therefore, we may regard cyberspace as a fertile ground for educational, preventive and counselling services. The main limitation to the current study is the sample (only health care students. Future studies should include assessment of perceived stress levels and their relation to study variables.

  15. Moderating the stereotypical views of health and social care students: the role of interprofessional education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Rebecca; Macleod Clark, Jill

    2015-01-01

    The potential of interprofessional education (IPE) to influence the perceptions and attitudes of health and social care professionals towards their colleagues in other disciplines is well recognized. However, empirical evidence for the positive impact of IPE on stereotypical beliefs has been limited. We report the findings of a pioneering, large scale study designed to assess the influence of IPE on these beliefs. A pre-test, post-test, quasi experimental design compared students' stereotypical views at the beginning and end of undergraduate studies. 580 students from 10 health and social care professional groups undertook assessed IPE modules over 3 years (the intervention group). Baseline and post-course stereotype ratings were compared with those of 672 students in a comparison group, not exposed to IPE modules. Baseline stereotype profiles showed clear variations in the way different professions were perceived, indicating stereotypical beliefs about the characteristics of each profession. Rating patterns were similar for intervention and comparison groups. At graduation, only minor changes were observed in the overall rating patterns for both groups. However, more ratings had decreased in the intervention group than the comparison group, suggesting that IPE may play a role in moderating more extreme stereotyping of colleagues in other professions.

  16. Utilizing Team Debate to Increase Student Abilities for Mentoring and Critical Appraisal of Global Health Care in Doctor of Nursing Practice Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Naomi; Farnum, Karen; Beauchesne, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Although graduates of doctor of nursing practice (DNP) programs are expected to demonstrate competence in advanced clinical scholarship, mentoring, and leadership, little is published about how team debate on a global health care topic supports DNP student learning and skill development. This article reports on an illuminative evaluation of DNP student learning experiences of team debate in the context of a 2-week international school program in Ireland. A focused illuminative evaluation approach involving a cohort of seven DNP students, who had participated in an international school team debate, was used. Data were collected using a Web-based qualitative questionnaire designed to elicit in-depth reflective accounts of DNP students' learning experiences. Content analysis revealed that team debate on a global health care topic enhanced learning in relation to fostering critical thinking and critical appraisal skills; encouraging teamwork; providing opportunities for mentoring, relationship building, and socialization into profession; and, from the DNP student perspective, increasing knowledge and global understanding of health care. This evaluation provides insights for nurse educators into the benefits of introducing team debate as a group activity to enhancing scholarly inquiry and mentoring skills of DNP students. Further research to evaluate team debate in other nurse education programs is needed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Supporting the library and information needs of UWE health and social care students on placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaice, Caroline; Lloyd, Jon; Shaw, Pauline

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this research was to explore the library and information needs of health and social care students whilst on placement. Both desk and primary research were conducted and included an online questionnaire to students and semi-structured interviews. The questionnaire was completed by 252 students from a variety of programmes, equivalent to a 10% response rate. The results indicate a wide range of factors impacting on the library and information experiences of students. Whilst differences in the availability of a physical library in hospital or community locations still exist, these are mitigated by technology and a preference for home study. A significant result is that 77% (n = 193) of students on placement study at home, using a variety of Internet-connected devices. This highlights a marked change in practice and underlines the need for mobile-compliant e-resources and accessible at-a-distance services. As a result of this research, practical recommendations on how library support can be improved were developed including enhanced collaboration and learning with NHS colleagues, and knowledge sharing with other departments within the University who support our students. © 2017 Health Libraries Group.

  18. District nurses' experience of supervising nursing students in primary health care: A pre- and post-implementation questionnaire study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Elisabeth; Löfmark, Anna; Törnkvist, Lena

    2009-11-01

    Nursing students go through clinical supervision in primary health care settings but district nurses' (DNs) circumstances when supervising them are only briefly described in the literature. The aim of this study was to investigate DNs experience of supervising nursing students before and after the implementation of a new supervision model. Ninety-eight (74%) DNs answered a questionnaire before and 84 (65%) after implementation of the new supervision model. The study showed that DNs in most cases felt that conditions for supervision in the workplace were adequate. But about 70% lacked training for the supervisory role and 20% had no specialist district nurse training. They also experienced difficulty in keeping up-to-date with changes in nurse education programmes, in receiving support from the university and from their clinic managers, and in setting aside time for supervision. Improvements after the implementation of a new model chiefly concerned organisation; more DNs stated that one person had primary responsibility for students' clinical practice, that information packages for supervisors and students were available at the health care centres, and that conditions were in place for increasing the number of students they supervised. DNs also stated that supervisors and students benefited from supervision by more than one supervisor. To conclude, implementation of a new supervision model resulted in some improvements.

  19. Nursing students' attitudes about home health nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestia, Mindy; Murphy, Susan; Yoder, Marian

    2008-09-01

    In an effort to address the home care nursing shortage, this pilot study was designed to measure nursing students' attitudes toward home health nursing and to test the Home Health Attitude Questionnaire developed specifically for this study based on the Theory of Planned Behavior. Senior undergraduate nursing students and registered nursing to bachelor of science in nursing students completed the questionnaire.

  20. Handling Internet-Based Health Information: Improving Health Information Web Site Literacy Among Undergraduate Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiwen; Sun, Ran; Mulvehill, Alice M; Gilson, Courtney C; Huang, Linda L

    2017-02-01

    Patient care problems arise when health care consumers and professionals find health information on the Internet because that information is often inaccurate. To mitigate this problem, nurses can develop Web literacy and share that skill with health care consumers. This study evaluated a Web-literacy intervention for undergraduate nursing students to find reliable Web-based health information. A pre- and postsurvey queried undergraduate nursing students in an informatics course; the intervention comprised lecture, in-class practice, and assignments about health Web site evaluation tools. Data were analyzed using Wilcoxon and ANOVA signed-rank tests. Pre-intervention, 75.9% of participants reported using Web sites to obtain health information. Postintervention, 87.9% displayed confidence in using an evaluation tool. Both the ability to critique health Web sites (p = .005) and confidence in finding reliable Internet-based health information (p = .058) increased. Web-literacy education guides nursing students to find, evaluate, and use reliable Web sites, which improves their ability to deliver safer patient care. [J Nurs Educ. 2017;56(2):110-114.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Pharmacy Students' Attitudes Toward Death and End-of-life Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broeseker, Amy E.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To assess pharmacy students' attitudes toward death and end-of-life care. Methods Third-year pharmacy students enrolled in the Ethics in Christianity and Health Care course were administered a survey instrument prior to introduction of the topic of end-of-life care. Students' attitudes toward different professions' roles in end-of-life care and their comfort in discussing end-of-life issues were assessed. The survey instrument was readministered to the same students at the end of their fourth year. Results On most survey items, female students responded more favorably toward death and end-of-life care than male students. One exception was the perceived emotional ability to be in the room of a dying patient or loved one. Post-experiential survey responses were generally more favorable toward death and end-of-life care than were pre-discussion responses. Conclusions In general, when surveyed concerning death and end-of-life care, female students responded more favorably than male students, and responses at the end of the fourth year were more favorable than at the beginning of the course. PMID:21045946

  2. Service learning in Guatemala: using qualitative content analysis to explore an interdisciplinary learning experience among students in health care professional programs

    OpenAIRE

    Fries, Kathleen S; Bowers, Donna M; Gross, Margo; Frost, Lenore

    2013-01-01

    Kathleen S Fries,1 Donna M Bowers,2 Margo Gross,3 Lenore Frost31Nursing Program, 2Department of Physical Therapy and Human Movement Science, 3Graduate Program in Occupational Therapy, College of Health Professions, Sacred Heart University, Fairfield, CT, USAIntroduction: Interprofessional collaboration among health care professionals yields improved patient outcomes, yet many students in health care programs have limited exposure to interprofessional collaboration in the classroom and in clin...

  3. Medication Abortion within a Student Health Care Clinic: A Review of the First 46 Consecutive Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, Emily M.; Bordoloi, Anita; Moorthie, Mydhili; Pela, Emily

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Medication abortion with mifepristone and misoprostol has been available in the United States since 2000. The authors reviewed the first 46 medication abortion cases conducted at a university-based student health care clinic to determine the safety and feasibility of medication abortion in this type of clinical setting. Participants:…

  4. Students Left behind: The Limitations of University-Based Health Insurance for Students with Mental Illnesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Belinda J.; Compton, Michael T.; Druss, Benjamin G.

    2012-01-01

    A growing trend in college and university health care is the requirement that students demonstrate proof of health insurance prior to enrollment. An increasing number of schools are contracting with insurance companies to provide students with school-based options for health insurance. Although this is advantageous to students in some ways, tying…

  5. Integral Health Care As A Guiding Axis Of Medical Training: Case Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alcides Viana de Lima Neto

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim is to report the experiences during the practical experiences in the territory assigned to a basic health unit provided by the module of Integral Health Care I. Methods: Case studies resulting from a process of critical reflections about practical experiences by medical students in a basic health unit from August to December 2015. Results: Through the module of Integral Health Care I, students were allowed to recognize the assigned area of a family health team, as well as to develop the territorialization process and to classify the demographic, epidemiological, socioeconomic and environmental profile in that place; in addition to perform other activities as a singular therapeutic project and intervention project. Conclusion: The activities developed motivated the students to be able to apply the concepts of family and community medicine in primary health care, in addition to bringing them closer to the reality of this work process. Descriptors: Integral Health Care; Family Health Strategy; Physician-Patient Relationship; Basic Health Unit.

  6. Health risks encountered by Dutch medical students during an elective in the tropics and the quality and comprehensiveness of pre-and post-travel care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandenbroucke Jan P

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical and research electives abroad offer medical students many unique experiences. However, participating in an unfamiliar health-care setting combined with limited medical experience may place students at risk of illness. To improve pre-and post-travel care, we assessed the health risks and the quality and comprehensiveness of pre-and post-travel care in a cohort of Dutch medical students returning form an elective abroad. Methods All medical students who had performed an elective in the tropics between July 2006 and December 2008 were sent an informative email asking them to complete a web-based questionnaire. Results 180 of 242 (74% students completed the questionnaire. Regarding the risk of bloodborne viral infection: 67% of all students and 32% of junior students engaged in procedures that constitute a risk of exposure to bloodborne viral infection, often in countries with high HIV prevalence rates. None of nine students who experienced possible or certain mucosal or percutaneous exposure to potentially infectious body fluids reported the exposure at the time it occurred and none used PEP. Regarding other health risks: 8 of 40 (20% students stopped using mefloquine due to adverse effects. This left a sizeable proportion unprotected in countries that are hyperendemic for malaria. Post-travel screening for schistosomiasis, tuberculosis (tuberculin skin test and carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA encompassed approximately half of all students who should have been screened. Conclusions Based on the results of this study we have adopted an integral set of measures to reduce the health risks associated with an elective abroad. The pre and post-travel consult has been centralized and standardized as well as the distribution of PEP. In addition we have developed a mandatory module on Global Health for all medical students planning an elective abroad.

  7. Health risks encountered by Dutch medical students during an elective in the tropics and the quality and comprehensiveness of pre-and post-travel care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharafeldin, Elhadi; Soonawala, Darius; Vandenbroucke, Jan P; Hack, Evelien; Visser, Leo G

    2010-12-02

    Clinical and research electives abroad offer medical students many unique experiences. However, participating in an unfamiliar health-care setting combined with limited medical experience may place students at risk of illness. To improve pre-and post-travel care, we assessed the health risks and the quality and comprehensiveness of pre-and post-travel care in a cohort of Dutch medical students returning form an elective abroad. All medical students who had performed an elective in the tropics between July 2006 and December 2008 were sent an informative email asking them to complete a web-based questionnaire. 180 of 242 (74%) students completed the questionnaire. Regarding the risk of bloodborne viral infection: 67% of all students and 32% of junior students engaged in procedures that constitute a risk of exposure to bloodborne viral infection, often in countries with high HIV prevalence rates. None of nine students who experienced possible or certain mucosal or percutaneous exposure to potentially infectious body fluids reported the exposure at the time it occurred and none used PEP. Regarding other health risks: 8 of 40 (20%) students stopped using mefloquine due to adverse effects. This left a sizeable proportion unprotected in countries that are hyperendemic for malaria. Post-travel screening for schistosomiasis, tuberculosis (tuberculin skin test) and carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) encompassed approximately half of all students who should have been screened. Based on the results of this study we have adopted an integral set of measures to reduce the health risks associated with an elective abroad. The pre and post-travel consult has been centralized and standardized as well as the distribution of PEP. In addition we have developed a mandatory module on Global Health for all medical students planning an elective abroad.

  8. The office of student wellness: innovating to improve student mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seritan, Andreea L; Rai, Gurmeet; Servis, Mark; Pomeroy, Claire

    2015-02-01

    Despite increasing mental health needs among medical students, few models for effective preventive student wellness programs exist. This paper describes a novel approach developed at the University of California (UC) Davis School of Medicine: the Office of Student Wellness (OSW). Improved access and mental health service utilization have been documented, with over half of all students receiving support and clinical care. UC Davis student satisfaction mean scores on the Association of American Medical Colleges Graduation Questionnaire wellness questions have reached or exceeded national average over the last 4 years, since the OSW was founded. This program may serve as a blueprint for other medical schools in developing effective student wellness programs.

  9. Palliative care awareness among Indian undergraduate health care students: A needs-assessment study to determine incorporation of palliative care education in undergraduate medical, nursing and allied health education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakshi Sadhu

    2010-01-01

    Conclusion: The outcomes of the study showed that the basic knowledge of palliative care among students was inadequate, and students are unprepared and uncertain in their approach of delivering end-of-life care.

  10. Perspectives on enhancing international practical training of students in health and social care study programs - A qualitative descriptive case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hvalič-Touzery, Simona; Hopia, Hanna; Sihvonen, Sanna; Diwan, Sadhna; Sen, Soma; Skela-Savič, Brigita

    2017-01-01

    Internationalization of practical training in health and social care study programs is an important aspect of higher education. However, field mentors' and classroom teachers' competence in guiding culturally diverse students varies widely in European countries, and the majority does not have enough training in guiding foreign students. This study aimed to examine which factors enhance the efficacy of international practical placement experiences in health and social care study programs. A qualitative descriptive case study design was used. The study was conducted at six higher education institutions-two in Finland and one in Croatia, Estonia, the Netherlands and Slovenia. A convenience sample of 14 mentors, 15 teachers and 14 students with international experiences from six higher education institutions which are part of the Bologna Process was recruited. The data were collected from six focus groups using a semi-structured questionnaire based on a literature review. Each higher education institution conducted one group interview that was tape-recorded, transcribed and analysed for themes. Participants made several recommendations for enhancing the practical placement experience of students, teachers, and mentors. Most recommendations dealt with practical supervision of students. Three major themes noted were: 'Attitudes towards internationalization of practical placements', 'Factors impacting the international placement experience', and 'Pedagogical methods used and structural support available for internationalization.' The study highlights the need for strengthening the multicultural knowledge and skills of mentors and teachers. The findings provide practical guidelines for improving the international placement experience across health and social care fields. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Pharmacy Students as Health Coaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominick P Trombetta, Pharm.D

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic diseases are the main contributor to both health care costs and mortality in the United States, with medication non-adherence and lifestyle modifications being leading causes. To motivate patients with several co-morbidities, the longitudinal care class was used to educate on maintaining adherence to prescribed regimens. Twenty pharmacy students were trained in health coaching and motivational interviewing methods. Specifically, students were to provide patients with education sheets, apply the teach-back method, and motivate the patient to develop and reach SMART goals made with the pharmacy student over a course of one academic school year. Conflict of Interest We declare no conflicts of interest or financial interests that the authors or members of their immediate families have in any product or service discussed in the manuscript, including grants (pending or received, employment, gifts, stock holdings or options, honoraria, consultancies, expert testimony, patents and royalties.   Type: Note

  12. Interprofessional practice in health care: an educational project with four learning sequences for students from six study programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Anna Christina; Klimke-Jung, Kathrin; Schäfer, Thorsten; Reif, Karl

    2016-01-01

    In response to demographic changes and the growing complexity of healthcare demands, national and international organizations are requiring greater cooperation among the health professions. Implementation of interprofessional learning programs within study programs in medicine, midwifery, nursing, and therapy is still rare. The first projects are currently underway in Germany. This paper presents the experience gathered by the organizers as interprofessional courses for six study programs were implemented. As part of the collaborative project "Interprofessional Practice in Health Care" between the Medical School at the Ruhr University in Bochum and the Department for Applied Health Sciences at the Hochschule für Gesundheit, interprofessional curricular units were developed, taught and evaluated with the aim of establishing permanent and joint curricular structures at the two German universities. Imparting communication skills, knowledge of and appreciation for the work performed by the other health professions, as well as having students reflect on their own professional roles and responsibilities, were the focus of four curricular units. Students worked together in small interprofessional groups. A total of 220 students enrolled in occupational therapy, midwifery, speech therapy, medicine, nursing, and physiotherapy participated in small-group seminars. When conducting and implementing the seminars, administrative and methodological challenges became apparent, and this should be taken into consideration in regard to any future development of interprofessional courses. Integration into existing curricula, along with finding time in the various schedules and appropriate classroom space for small groups, were among the challenges faced. For over 86% of the students it was important that students from all six of the degree programs involved participated in the project. A detailed analysis of the content and evaluation will follow. The value of the project's aim to

  13. Adolescent health care: improving access by school-based service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, C; Mulligan, D; Kaufman, A; Davis, S; Hunt, K; Kalishman, N; Wallerstein, N

    1985-10-01

    Participants in this discussion of the potential of school-based health care services for adolescents included family medicine physicians, school health coordinators, a school nurse, and a community worker. It was noted that health care for adolescents tends to be either inaccessible or underutilized, largely because of a lack of sensitivity to adolescent culture and values. An ideal service for adolescents would offer immediate services for crises, strict confidentiality, ready access to prescribed medications, a sliding-scale scheme, and a staff that is tolerant of divergent values and life-styles. School-based pilot adolescent clinics have been established by the University of New Mexico's Department of Family, Community, and Emergency Medicine to test the community-oriented health care model. On-site clinics provide urgent medical care, family planning, pregnancy testing, psychological counseling, alcohol and drug counseling, and classroom health education. Experience with these programs has demonstrated the necessity for an alliance among the health team and the school administration, parents, and students. Financial, ethical, and political factors can serve as constraints to school-based programs. In some cases, school administrators have been resistant to the provision of contraception to students on school grounds and parents have been unwilling to accept the adolescent's right to confidentiality. These problems in part stem from having 2 separate systems, each with its own values, orientation, and responsibilities, housed in 1 facility. In addition, there have been problems generating awareness of the school-based clinic among students. Health education theater groups, peer counseling, and student-run community services have been effective, however, in increasing student participation. It has been helpful to mold clinic services to meet the needs identified by teenagers themselves. There is an interest not only in curative services, but in services focused

  14. Increasing Equitable Care for Youth through Coordinated School Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanetti, Lisa M. Hagermoser

    2017-01-01

    Nearly a quarter of the students in the U.S. education system have a chronic health condition, disability, or special healthcare need. Students living in poverty and those at risk for or with disabilities have higher rates of health issues and encounter more barriers to accessing appropriate health care than their peers. The reciprocal influences…

  15. Facilitating access to prenatal care through an interprofessional student-run free clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danhausen, Kathleen; Joshi, Deepa; Quirk, Sarah; Miller, Robert; Fowler, Michael; Schorn, Mavis N

    2015-01-01

    Addressing the persistent challenge of inadequate prenatal care requires innovative solutions. Student-run free health centers are poised to rise to this challenge. The Shade Tree Clinic Early Pregnancy Program, jointly operated by university medical and nursing programs, functions as an ongoing access-to-care portal for pregnant women without health insurance. The clinic is run by medical students and nurse-midwifery students and uses a service-based learning model that allows students to work and learn in supervised, interprofessional teams while providing evidence-based prenatal care. All data reported in this paper were obtained from a retrospective chart review of women served by the prenatal clinic. These data are descriptive in nature, and include the patient demographics and services provided by the clinic to 152 women between the years of 2010-2013. During this time period, the clinic served a demographically diverse clientele. Approximately half lacked documentation of legal immigration status. The majority of women seeking care were in their first trimester of pregnancy and had previously given birth. Several women had medical or obstetric complications that required timely referral to specialist care; and many women received treatment for infection and other primary care concerns. Shade Tree Clinic provides the basic components of prenatal care and assists women with other medical needs. Women also receive help when applying for and accessing public maternity insurance, and the clinic facilitates entry to any necessary specialist care while that insurance is processed. In many cases, necessary and time-sensitive care would be delayed if Shade Tree Clinic's prenatal services were not available. In addition, the clinic presents a valuable opportunity for interprofessional socialization, increased respect, and improved collaboration between students in different but complementary professions, which is an important experience while we move to meet national

  16. Prevalence of common mental disorders among Dutch medical students and related use and need of mental health care: a cross-sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaspersz, Roxanne; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.; Sluiter, Judith K.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess common mental disorders and the related use and need for mental health care among clinically not yet active and clinically active medical students. All medical students (n=2266) at one Dutch medical university were approached. Students from study years 1-4 were

  17. The current status of the Korean student health examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye-Jung Shin

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent trends place an emphasis on school health care, the ultimate goal of which is to protect,maintain, and promote students’ health. School health care is a program that integrates health careservices, health education, health counseling, and local social health services. The student healthexamination (SHE system is a part of school health care and schools and communities must beavailable to provide professional health services. Pediatricians also have important roles as experts inboth school health care and the SHE system. In this article, the history of school health care, its legalbasis, and the current status of the SHE system in Korea are reviewed. Furthermore, sample surveysfrom the past few years are reviewed. Through this holistic approach, future directions are proposed forthe improvement of SHE and school health care.

  18. Transgender Health Care for Nurses: An Innovative Approach to Diversifying Nursing Curricula to Address Health Inequities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Alex; Bower, Kelly M

    2016-08-01

    Transgender people experience high rates of discrimination in health care settings, which is linked to decreases in physical and mental wellness. By increasing the number of nurses who are trained to deliver high-quality care to transgender patients, health inequities associated with provider discrimination can be mitigated. At present, baccalaureate nursing curricula do not adequately prepare nurses to care for transgender people, which is a shortcoming that has been attributed to limited teaching time and lack of guidance regarding new topics. We developed transgender health content for students in a baccalaureate nursing program and used a student-faculty partnership model to integrate new content into the curriculum. We incorporated new transgender health content into five required courses over three semesters. We mitigated common barriers to developing and integrating new, diversity-related topics into a baccalaureate nursing curriculum. Added transgender health content was well received by students and faculty. [J Nurs Educ. 2016;55(8):476-479.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Residents with mild cognitive decline and family members report health students 'enhance capacity of care' and bring 'a new breath of life' in two aged care facilities in Tasmania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Kate-Ellen J; Annear, Michael J; Bell, Erica J; Palmer, Andrew J; Robinson, Andrew L

    2015-12-01

    Care provided by student doctors and nurses is well received by patients in hospital and primary care settings. Whether the same is true for aged care residents of nursing homes with mild cognitive decline and their family members is unknown. To investigate the perspectives of aged care residents with mild cognitive decline and their family members on interdisciplinary student placements in two residential aged care facilities (RACF) in Tasmania. A mixed methods design was employed with both qualitative and quantitative data collected. All participants were interviewed and completed a questionnaire on residents' quality of life, during or after a period of student placements in each facility (October-November, 2012). Qualitative data were coded for themes following a grounded theory approach, and quantitative data were analysed using SPSS. Twenty-one participants (13 residents and 8 family members) were recruited. Four themes were identified from the qualitative data and included (i) increased social interaction and facility vibrancy; (ii) community service and personal development, (iii) vulnerability and sensitivity (learning to care) and (iv) increased capacity and the confidence of enhanced care. Residents' quality of life was reported to be mostly good in the presence of the students, despite their high care needs. Residents with mild cognitive decline and their family members perceive a wide array of benefits of student provided care in RACFs including increased social interaction. Future quantitative research should focus on whether changes in care occur for residents as a result of student involvement. © 2014 The Authors Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Ensuring the Health, Safety and Preparedness of U.S. Medical Students Participating in Global Health Electives Overseas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imperato, Pascal James; Bruno, Denise M; Monica Sweeney, M

    2016-04-01

    Global health electives based in resource-poor countries have become extremely popular with medical students from resource rich ones. As the number of such programs and participants increase, so too do the absolute health and safety risks. It is clear from a number of published reports that many institutions provide little or no meaningful preparedness for students and do little to ensure their health and safety. These deficiencies together can affect students, their foreign hosts, and sponsoring institutions. The School of Public Health at the State University of New York, Downstate Medical Center, and its predecessor, the Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health, have sponsored a 6-8 week global health elective for fourth year medical students since 1980. The purposes of this elective are to provide students with an opportunity to observe the health care and public health systems in resource-poor countries, provide medical service, and have a cross-cultural experience. Over the course of the past 35 years, 386 students have participated in this global health elective in more than 41 resource-poor countries. Recent annual applications for this elective have been as high as 44 out of a class of 200 students. Over the past 10 years, annual acceptance rates have varied, ranging from a low of 32 % in 2007-2008 to a high of 74 % in 2010-2011 and 2013-2014. Careful screening, including a written application, review of academic records and personal interviews, has resulted in the selection of highly mature, adaptable, and dedicated students who have performed well at overseas sites. Appropriately preparing students for an overseas global health experience in resource-poor countries requires the investment of much professional and staff time and effort. At the SUNY Downstate School of Public Health, these resources have underpinned our Global Health in Developing Countries elective for many years. As a result, the elective is characterized by meticulous

  1. Experiences of a student-run clinic in primary care: a mixed-method study with students, patients and supervisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröberg, Maria; Leanderson, Charlotte; Fläckman, Birgitta; Hedman-Lagerlöf, Erik; Björklund, Karin; Nilsson, Gunnar H; Stenfors, Terese

    2018-03-01

    To explore how a student-run clinic (SRC) in primary health care (PHC) was perceived by students, patients and supervisors. A mixed methods study. Clinical learning environment, supervision and nurse teacher evaluation scale (CLES + T) assessed student satisfaction. Client satisfaction questionnaire-8 (CSQ-8) assessed patient satisfaction. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with supervisors. Gustavsberg PHC Center, Stockholm County, Sweden. Students in medicine, nursing, physiotherapy, occupational therapy and psychology and their patients filled in questionnaires. Supervisors in medicine, nursing and physiotherapy were interviewed. Mean values and medians of CLES + T and CSQ-8 were calculated. Interviews were analyzed using content analysis. A majority of 199 out of 227 student respondents reported satisfaction with the pedagogical atmosphere and the supervisory relationship. Most of the 938 patient respondents reported satisfaction with the care given. Interviews with 35 supervisors showed that the organization of the SRC provided time and support to focus on the tutorial assignment. Also, the pedagogical role became more visible and targeted toward the student's individual needs. However, balancing the student's level of autonomy and the own control over care was described as a challenge. Many expressed the need for further pedagogical education. High student and patient satisfaction reported from five disciplines indicate that a SRC in PHC can be adapted for heterogeneous student groups. Supervisors experienced that the SRC facilitated and clarified their pedagogical role. Simultaneously their need for continuous pedagogical education was highlighted. The SRC model has the potential to enhance student-centered tuition in PHC. Key Points Knowledge of student-run clinics (SRCs) as learning environments within standard primary health care (PHC) is limited. We report experiences from the perspectives of students, their patients and supervisors

  2. Medical Student Perceptions of Global Surgery at an Academic Institution: Identifying Gaps in Global Health Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Ambar; Xu, Tim; Murray, Matthew; Casey, Kathleen M

    2017-12-01

    Robust global health demands access to safe, affordable, timely surgical care for all. The long-term success of global surgery requires medical students to understand and engage with this emerging field. The authors characterized medical students' perceptions of surgical care relative to other fields within global health. An optional, anonymous survey was given to all Johns Hopkins medical students from February to March 2016 to assess perceptions of surgical care and its role in global health. Of 480 students, 365 (76%) completed the survey, with 150 (41%) reporting global health interests. One-third (34%) of responding students felt that surgical care is one of two fields with the greatest potential global health impact in the future, second to infectious disease (49%). A minority (28%) correctly identified that trauma results in more deaths worldwide than obstetric complications or HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria combined. Relative to other examined fields, students perceived surgical care as the least preventive and cost-effective, and few students (3%) considered adequate surgical care the best indicator of a robust health care system. Students believed that practicing in a surgical field was least amenable to pursuing a global health career, citing several barriers. Medical students have several perceptions of global surgery that contradict current evidence and literature, which may have implications for their career choices. Opportunities to improve students' global health knowledge and awareness of global surgery career paths include updating curricula, fostering meaningful international academic opportunities, and creating centers of global surgery and global health consortia.

  3. Experiences of a student-run clinic in primary care: a mixed-method study with students, patients and supervisors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröberg, Maria; Leanderson, Charlotte; Fläckman, Birgitta; Hedman-Lagerlöf, Erik; Björklund, Karin; Nilsson, Gunnar H.; Stenfors, Terese

    2018-01-01

    Objective To explore how a student-run clinic (SRC) in primary health care (PHC) was perceived by students, patients and supervisors. Design A mixed methods study. Clinical learning environment, supervision and nurse teacher evaluation scale (CLES + T) assessed student satisfaction. Client satisfaction questionnaire-8 (CSQ-8) assessed patient satisfaction. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with supervisors. Setting Gustavsberg PHC Center, Stockholm County, Sweden. Subjects Students in medicine, nursing, physiotherapy, occupational therapy and psychology and their patients filled in questionnaires. Supervisors in medicine, nursing and physiotherapy were interviewed. Main outcome measures Mean values and medians of CLES + T and CSQ-8 were calculated. Interviews were analyzed using content analysis. Results A majority of 199 out of 227 student respondents reported satisfaction with the pedagogical atmosphere and the supervisory relationship. Most of the 938 patient respondents reported satisfaction with the care given. Interviews with 35 supervisors showed that the organization of the SRC provided time and support to focus on the tutorial assignment. Also, the pedagogical role became more visible and targeted toward the student’s individual needs. However, balancing the student’s level of autonomy and the own control over care was described as a challenge. Many expressed the need for further pedagogical education. Conclusions High student and patient satisfaction reported from five disciplines indicate that a SRC in PHC can be adapted for heterogeneous student groups. Supervisors experienced that the SRC facilitated and clarified their pedagogical role. Simultaneously their need for continuous pedagogical education was highlighted. The SRC model has the potential to enhance student-centered tuition in PHC. Key Points Knowledge of student-run clinics (SRCs) as learning environments within standard primary health care (PHC) is limited. We report

  4. Implementation of teaching on LGBT health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Anna K; Condry, Hannah; Cahill, David

    2018-04-01

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) patients represent an important proportion of the population. Despite the health inequalities and barriers to health care noted within this group, there is little evidence of LGBT-focused education within medicine, dentistry or nursing. We introduced and evaluated the effect of a half-day teaching session focused on LGBT health care, delivered to year-2 students. Initial informal discussion with year-2 and year-3 students suggested that the awareness of health inequalities other than sexual health was limited, and that students had little awareness of other issues such as gender dysphoria and heterosexism. We therefore targeted these areas when developing the material. There is little evidence of LGBT-focused education within medicine, dentistry or nursing INNOVATION: The session was divided into two sections: a lecture and a workshop. The lecture provided an introduction to issues around legislation, transgender health and health inequalities, whereas the workshops involved a role-play focused on gender dysphoria, followed by small group discussions on topics such as heterosexism and sexual identity. Volunteer peer facilitators, some of whom identified as LGBT, undertook a 2-hour training session to ensure that they were comfortable with both the material and the group facilitation. Students completed a short questionnaire before and after the session. Feedback was gathered from 350 students between 2012 and 2015. Sixty-nine per cent of students rated their competency level higher after the workshop, suggesting that they felt better prepared to consult with LGBT patients. Written comments suggested that the sessions are useful for students in terms of improving awareness of health inequalities and enabling consultation skills practice in an informal environment. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  5. Students experienced help from preservative care. A reflective case study of two nursing students caring from a nursing framework on good care for older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan S. Jukema

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The practice of nursing is shaped partly by nurses’ professional perspective of good care, guided by a nursing framework. An example is the framework of preservative care, which defines good nursing care for vulnerable older people in nursing homes. Currently we lack an understanding of how this framework could help nurses in training; it may be a useful developmental aid for undergraduate nursing students but so far there are no empirical data to support this. Aim: The purpose of this study is to explore how helpful a particular framework can be in the learning journey of two undergraduate nursing students. The study draws on narrative and reflective accounts, guided by the question: ‘How does preservative care as a framework of good care help two undergraduate nursing students develop their caring for older people?’ Methods: This was a reflective case study, in which two students – experienced registered nurses (non-graduates following a part-time education programme – reflected on their practices, using preservative care as a framework for taking care of older people. They kept reflective journals and received constructive feedback from the author of the preservative care framework (the first author. Their data were analysed in three steps. Findings: Both students reported gaining profound help from the framework in their evaluations of daily practices, although they rated the help differently in terms of demanding and rewarding experiences. The framework was particularly helpful in developing qualities in three domains: person-centredness, professional role and specific nursing competencies. Conclusions: The results of our study indicate how using a particular nursing framework made a difference to the practice of two undergraduate nursing students. Exploring the meaning and place of particular nursing frameworks in nursing education is necessary to establish their potential benefits for students. Implications for

  6. Infusing Oral Health Care into Nursing Curriculum: Addressing Preventive Health in Aging and Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Joan Earle; FitzGerald, Leah; Markham, Young Kee; Glassman, Paul; Guenther, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Access to oral health care is essential for promoting and maintaining overall health and well-being, yet oral health disparities exist among vulnerable and underserved populations. While nurses make up the largest portion of the health care work force, educational preparation to address oral health needs of elders and persons with disabilities is limited across nursing curricula. This descriptive study reports on the interdisciplinary development, implementation, and testing of an oral health module that was included and infused into a graduate nursing curriculum in a three-phase plan. Phase 1 includes evaluation of a lecture presented to eight gerontological nurse practitioner (GNP) students. Phase 2 includes evaluation of GNP students' perceptions of learning, skills, and confidence following a one-time 8-hour practicum infused into 80 required practicum hours. The evaluation data show promise in preparing nurse practitioner students to assess and address preventive oral health needs of persons aging with disabilities such that further infusion and inclusion in a course for nurse practitioners across five specialties will implemented and tested in Phase 3. PMID:22619708

  7. Interpersonal relations between health care workers and young clients: barriers to accessing sexual and reproductive health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alli, Farzana; Maharaj, Pranitha; Vawda, Mohammed Yacoob

    2013-02-01

    Interpersonal relations between health care providers and young clients have long being cited as an important element for improving client up take of services, satisfaction and overall health outcomes. In an era of HIV and AIDS this forms a critical determinant to young people accessing sexual and reproductive health care. This study explores to what extent interpersonal relations form a barrier to young peoples access to and satisfaction of health services. The study draws on data from 200 client exit interviews and four in-depth interviews conducted with university students and university health care staff in Kwazulu-Natal, South Africa. While young people are aware of the importance of utilising STI, HIV and family planning services they experienced barriers in their relationship with providers. This served as a deterrent to their use of the health facility. Adequate training in interpersonal relations for youth-friendly service provision is essential in helping overcome communication problems and enabling providers to interact with young clients at a more personal level.

  8. Serious gaming: A tool to educate health care providers about domestic violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Robin; Turner, Linda

    2018-05-10

    Due to many adverse health effects, victims of domestic violence are frequently seen in the health care system. Yet, health care providers may lack the training to assist them. Online curricula can be an effective instructional tool. Our competency-based, serious video game, Responding to Domestic Violence in Clinical Settings, was designed to address health care providers' knowledge gaps through 17 modules, each a half hour in length. Nearly 9,000 participants completed at least one module; nursing students completed the most modules, approximately five hours of instruction. This serious video game-based curriculum is useful in helping health providers and students learn about Domestic Violence.

  9. The home care teaching and learning process in undergraduate health care degree courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Ana Paula; Lacerda, Maria Ribeiro; Maftum, Mariluci Alves; Bernardino, Elizabeth; Mello, Ana Lúcia Schaefer Ferreira de

    2017-07-01

    Home care, one of the services provided by the health system, requires health practitioners who are capable of understanding its specificities. This study aimed to build a substantive theory that describes experiences of home care teaching and learning during undergraduate degree courses in nursing, pharmacy, medicine, nutrition, dentistry and occupational therapy. A qualitative analysis was performed using the grounded theory approach based on the results of 63 semistructured interviews conducted with final year students, professors who taught subjects related to home care, and recent graduates working with home care, all participants in the above courses. The data was analyzed in three stages - open coding, axial coding and selective coding - resulting in the phenomenon Experiences of home care teaching and learning during the undergraduate health care degree courses. Its causes were described in the category Articulating knowledge of home care, strategies in the category Experiencing the unique nature of home care, intervening conditions in the category Understanding the multidimensional characteristics of home care, consequences in the category Changing thinking about home care training, and context in the category Understanding home care in the health system. Home care contributes towards the decentralization of hospital care.

  10. "Bringing the outside world in": Enriching social connection through health student placements in a teaching aged care facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annear, Michael J; Elliott, Kate-Ellen J; Tierney, Laura T; Lea, Emma J; Robinson, Andrew

    2017-10-01

    Older adults living in residential aged care facilities (RACFs) often experience limited opportunities for social connection despite close proximity to peers, which has implications for mental health and quality of life (QoL). The introduction of large-scale undergraduate health student placements in RACFs may enhance opportunities for meaningful engagement through social connection, although this remains unexplored. This research explores whether interpersonal encounters between health students and RACF residents influence residents' opportunities for social connection and QoL. A mixed methods design was employed which included questionnaire data from residents, and qualitative interview data from residents, family members and RACF staff. Data were collected during and after student placements to allow for an in-depth exploration of residents, family members and staff perspectives. Forty-three participants (28 residents, 10 staff and five family members) were recruited during 2014. Overall, many residents had clinical levels of depression, mild cognitive impairment and multiple morbidities, however reported moderate-to-good QoL. Thematic analysis was undertaken on interview transcripts, and three themes emerged: (i) social isolation and loneliness fostered by residents' age-related conditions, (ii) students expand socially supportive connections beyond the RACF and (iii) meaning making by sharing health experiences, which was found to help renegotiate older adults' pervasive narrative of vulnerability. Supported and structured health student placements in RACFs enable older adults to participate in meaningful encounters with younger people. These encounters focus on sharing health experiences and address long-standing issues of isolation and loneliness by providing opportunities for social connection. © 2017 The Authors Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Aristotle, nursing and health care ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, P A

    1995-12-01

    Even a brief consideration of the nature of nursing will indicate that an ethical dimension underlies much, if not all, of nursing practice. It is therefore important that students and practitioners are facilitated in developing an ethical awareness and sensitivity from early in their professional development. This paper argues that Aristotelian virtue theory provides a practice-based focus for health care ethics for a number of reasons. Also, because of his emphasis on the character of the moral agent, and on the importance of perception and emotion in moral decision-making, Aristotelian virtue theory provides a useful supplement to the traditional duty-based approaches to health care ethics analysis, which are increasingly being identified in the literature as having limits to their application within the health care context.

  12. Can Completing a Mental Health Nursing Course Change Students' Attitudes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Todd; Kroposki, Margaret; Williams, Gail

    2017-05-01

    Nursing program graduates rarely choose mental health nursing as a career. A quasi-experimental study was conducted to examine attitudes of 310 nursing students towards persons with mental illness. Students completed surveys on the first and last days of their program's psychiatric mental health nursing course. The pre- and post-test survey analysis indicated that students improved their attitude, knowledge and preparedness to care for persons with mental illness. However, students maintained little interest in working as a mental health nurse. Modifications in mental health nursing courses could be made to improve students' interest in choosing a career in mental health nursing.

  13. A study of automated self-assessment in a primary care student health centre setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poote, Aimee E; French, David P; Dale, Jeremy; Powell, John

    2014-04-01

    We evaluated the advice given by a prototype self-assessment triage system in a university student health centre. Students attending the health centre with a new problem used the automated self-assessment system prior to a face-to-face consultation with the general practitioner (GP). The system's rating of urgency was available to the GP, and following the consultation, the GP recorded their own rating of the urgency of the patient's presentation. Full data were available for 154 of the 207 consultations. Perfect agreement, where both the GP and the self-assessment system selected the same category of advice, occurred in 39% of consultations. The association between the GP assessment and the self-assessment rankings of urgency was low but significant (rho = 0.19, P = 0.016). The self-assessment system tended to be risk averse compared to the GP assessments, with advice for more urgent level of care seeking being recommended in 86 consultations (56%) and less urgent advice in only 8 (5%). This difference in assessment of urgency was significant (P self-assessment system was more risk averse than the GPs, which resulted in a high proportion of patients being triaged as needing emergency or immediate care, the self-assessment system successfully identified a proportion of patients who were felt by the GP to have a self-limiting condition that did not need a consultation. In its prototype form, the self-assessment system was not a replacement for clinician assessment and further refinement is necessary.

  14. Nurses' use of mobile devices to access information in health care environments in australia: a survey of undergraduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Carey; Cummings, Elizabeth; Allen, Penny

    2014-12-10

    The growth of digital technology has created challenges for safe and appropriate use of mobile or portable devices during work-integrated learning (WIL) in health care environments. Personal and professional use of technology has outpaced the development of policy or codes of practice for guiding its use at the workplace. There is a perceived risk that portable devices may distract from provision of patient or client care if used by health professionals or students during employment or WIL. This study aimed to identify differences in behavior of undergraduate nurses in accessing information, using a portable or mobile device, when undertaking WIL compared to other non-work situations. A validated online survey was administered to students while on placement in a range of health care settings in two Australian states. There were 84 respondents, with 56% (n=47) reporting access to a mobile or portable device. Differences in use of a mobile device away from, compared with during WIL, were observed for non-work related activities such as messaging (PStudents continued to access nursing, medical, professional development, and study-related information away from the workplace. Undergraduate nurses limit their access to non-work or non-patient centered information while undertaking WIL. Work-related mobile learning is being undertaken, in situ, by the next generation of nurses who expect easy access to mobile or portable devices at the workplace, to ensure safe and competent care is delivered to their patients.

  15. [Gender perspective in health care teaching: a pending task].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcos, Estela; Poblete, Johanna; Molina Vega, Irma; Miranda, Christian; Zúñiga, Yanira; Fecci, Ester; Rodríguez, Laura; Márquez, Myriam; Ramírez, Miguel

    2007-06-01

    Gender must be considered in the design and implementation of health policies to safeguard equity and accomplish sanitary objectives. To identify gender perspective in the curricula of five health care careers in the Universidad Austral de Chile. To identify the situation of women in the teaching profile of such curricula. An exploratory and descriptive study with a critical reading of the structure of the programs of 217 courses. Revision of official academic registries. Gender is usually not included in the curricula of health care careers. The generic language conceals female academics and students. There was a scarce inclusion of cross sectional issues such as collaborative work, interpersonal and democratic relationship, equity and critical analysis. There were no differences in academic achievements between female and male students. The contractual profile of female academics reproduces the gender inequity of the work market. The inclusion of gender is a pending task in the training of health care professionals.

  16. A study of communication skills in health care management students and its association with demographic characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Shiva Karimzadeh; Rita Rezaee; Peivand Bastani

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Communication skills are one of the most important skills for health care managers and play an important role in their personal life and future occupation. The present study aimed to evaluate the students’ communication skills as well as its relationship with the students’ demographic characteristics. Method: This descriptive-analytical study was performed on 153 university students majoring in healthcare management in 2014. A self-administered communication skills questionna...

  17. Adaptation and validation of the instrument Clinical Learning Environment and Supervision for medical students in primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Öhman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical learning takes place in complex socio-cultural environments that are workplaces for the staff and learning places for the students. In the clinical context, the students learn by active participation and in interaction with the rest of the community at the workplace. Clinical learning occurs outside the university, therefore is it important for both the university and the student that the student is given opportunities to evaluate the clinical placements with an instrument that allows evaluation from many perspectives. The instrument Clinical Learning Environment and Supervision (CLES was originally developed for evaluation of nursing students’ clinical learning environment. The aim of this study was to adapt and validate the CLES instrument to measure medical students’ perceptions of their learning environment in primary health care. Methods In the adaptation process the face validity was tested by an expert panel of primary care physicians, who were also active clinical supervisors. The adapted CLES instrument with 25 items and six background questions was sent electronically to 1,256 medical students from one university. Answers from 394 students were eligible for inclusion. Exploratory factor analysis based on principal component methods followed by oblique rotation was used to confirm the adequate number of factors in the data. Construct validity was assessed by factor analysis. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to confirm the dimensions of CLES instrument. Results The construct validity showed a clearly indicated four-factor model. The cumulative variance explanation was 0.65, and the overall Cronbach’s alpha was 0.95. All items loaded similarly with the dimensions in the non-adapted CLES except for one item that loaded to another dimension. The CLES instrument in its adapted form had high construct validity and high reliability and internal consistency. Conclusion CLES, in its adapted form, appears

  18. Periodontic course effects on knowledge, attitude, and practice of dentistry students and its impact on mouth and dental care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Shamaiee

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Background In the field of education, a great deal of quality improvement is remained to be achieved Assessment of educational courses appears to be necessary for quality improvement in all curriculums, therefore studies for assessment of educational outcomes and impacts are of high priority. In a dentistry faculty, the mouth and dental health care among dentistry students can be considered as a potential indicator of students' educational achievement. Purpose To study knowledge, attitude and practice impact on mouth and dental health care among dentistry faculty students both before and after passing practical periodontic courses in Shaheed University of Medical Sciences during academic year 2001-2002 Methods In this cross-sectional study 140 students of dentistry faculty of Shaheed University of Medical Sciences took part. Necessary data were collected by means of a questionnaire. Knowledge of the subjects on mouth and dental health care were assessed by 10 close-ended questions and their altitude on mouth and dental health care were assessed by 5 Likert scale questions. Assessment of practice was performed in a 3-step researcher-administrated interview. Results Demographic data gathered via questionnaires indicated that 49.6 % {6-1 students of the students who took part in the study were male and 50.4% (65 students were female. of our participants, 59.7% were admitted through Shahed quota, while the rest were admitted through free quota. There was no significant difference in students' knowledge, attitude and practice on mouth and dental health care between the students who had not passed practical courses in periodontics and those who had passed these courses. Conclusions There was no significant association between knowledge, altitude and practice on mouth and dental health care and passing practical courses in periodontics among dentistry faculty students in Shahed University of Medical Science. Our results suggest that students' practice

  19. Meeting the Health Care Needs of Students with Severe Disabilities in the School Setting: Collaboration between School Nurses and Special Education Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pufpaff, Lisa A.; Mcintosh, Constance E.; Thomas, Cynthia; Elam, Megan; Irwin, Mary Kay

    2015-01-01

    The number of students with special healthcare needs (SHCN) and severe disabilities in public schools in the United States has steadily increased in recent years, largely due to the changing landscape of public health relative to advances in medicine and medical technology. The specialized care required for these students often necessitates…

  20. Co-Creating an Expansive Health Care Learning System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cribb, Alan; Owens, John; Singh, Guddi

    2017-11-01

    How should practices of co-creation be integrated into health professions education? Although co-creation permits a variety of interpretations, we argue that realizing a transformative vision of co-creation-one that invites professionals to genuinely reconsider the purposes, relationships, norms, and priorities of health care systems through new forms of collaborative thought and practice-will require radically rethinking existing approaches to professional education. The meaningful enactment of co-creative roles and practices requires health professionals and students to negotiate competing traditions, pressures, and expectations. We therefore suggest that the development of what we call an "expansive health care learning system" is crucial for supporting learners in meeting the challenges of establishing genuinely co-creative health care systems. © 2017 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.

  1. A student paper: music in critical care setting for clients on mechanical ventilators: a student perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Van; Chang, Sue; Olivas, Rosa; Almacen, Catherine; Dimanlig, Marbert; Rodriguez, Heather

    2012-01-01

    This article written by baccalaureate nursing students briefly discusses the use of music therapy in clients on mechanical ventilation in intensive care units. The article explores the possible benefits of music therapy and its use in other aspects of health care.

  2. BARRIERS TO THE UTILIZATION OF PRIMARY CARE SERVICES FOR MENTAL HEALTH PROLEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KHAIRANI O

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the barriers toward the utilization of primary care services for mental health problems among adolescents in a secondary school in Hulu Langat, Selangor, Malaysia. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted in July 2008 at a secondary school in Hulu Langat, Selangor. The respondents were selected using randomised cluster sampling among Form Four and Form Five students. Students were given self-administered questionnaire, consisting socio-demographic data and questions on their help-seeking barrier and behaviour. Help-seeking behaviour questions assess the use of medical facility and help-seeking sources. The formal help seeking sources include from teachers, counsellors and doctors. The informal help-seeking sources include from friends,parents and siblings. Results: A total of 175 students were included in the study. None of the students admitted of using the primary health care services for their mental health problems. Majority of the students were not aware of the services availability in the primary health care (97.1%. More than half of them thought the problems were due to their own mistakes (55.4% and the problems were not that serious (49.1%. With regard to perception of the primary health care services, (43.2% of the students were worried about confidentiality, half of them were concerned about other people’s perception especially from their family members(44.6% and friends (48.6%. Minority of them (10.8% thought that nobody can help them. Few of them thought smoking(3.4%, alcohol (3.4% and recreational drugs (1.1% can solve their emotional problems. Conclusion: One of the major barriers identified in the students’ failure to use the health care facilities was their unawarenessof the availability of the service for them in the community. Thus there is a need to promote and increase their awareness onthis issue.

  3. Millennial health care: change you can believe in.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingleton, Susan K

    2012-07-01

    A millennium is 1,000 years. In little over a decade after the beginning of the new millennium in 2000, remarkable changes have occurred in health-care education and health-care delivery. A new millennial generation of students, trainees, junior faculty, and young practicing physicians has come of age. The numbers of women in medicine have vastly increased. Technology has impacted education with an array of educational content-delivery techniques vastly different from the usual broadcast method of teaching. New curricula have expanded to encompass teamwork with interprofessional education of the entire team. Outcomes of educational efforts now include not only knowledge transfer but also performance improvement. Delivery of health care is also dramatically different. The sentinel driver of the quality and patient safety moment, To Err Is Human, was published only 12 years ago, yet fundamental changes in expectations and measurement for health-care quality and safety have occurred to alter the health-care landscape. Financing health care has become a prime issue in the current state of the US economy. New themes in health-care delivery include teamwork and highly functioning teams to improve patient safety, the dramatic increase in palliative care and end-of-life care, and the expanded role of nursing in health-care delivery. Each issue emanating since the beginning of the millennium does not have a right vs wrong implication. This discussion is an apolitical "environmental scan" with the purpose of illuminating these dramatic changes and then outlining the implications for health-care education and health-care delivery in the coming years.

  4. Precautions used by occupational health nursing students during clinical placements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.M.M. Maja

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Protection of health care workers including students from being infected when caring for high risk patients is a major cause for concern to all promoting occupational health. Safety of every employee is mandatory. Furthermore, universal guidelines for precautions must be used by all interacting with high risk patients and clients to protect themselves and prevent the spread of infection. The aim of this paper was to ascertain the availability of universal guidelines for precautions against the spread of infection in clinical settings and determine the precautions used by OHN students during their clinical placements. To realise these objectives, a quantitative and descriptive design was followed. A purposive sampling method was used to select 45 Occupational health nursing students who participated in the study. Data was collected with the use of a structured questionnaire and the results revealed that: most units where OHN students were placed for clinical experience had guidelines for universal precautions although these were not always accessible to them; regarding compliance to universal precautions, OHN students were reportedly aware of the hazards of failure to comply although in some emergencies and where personal protective material was not available, they had to provide care without using protective equipments. Recommendations made include that employers and staff at all occupational settings must ensure that updated guidelines for universal precautions are available and accessible to every body interacting with high risk patients; health care providers and students must be fully informed about and should always adhere to universal precautions.

  5. Population-based initiatives in college mental health: students helping students to overcome obstacles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Daniel J; Pinder-Amaker, Stephanie L; Morse, Charles; Ellison, Marsha L; Doerfler, Leonard A; Riba, Michelle B

    2014-12-01

    College students' need for mental health care has increased dramatically, leaving campus counseling and mental health centers struggling to meet the demand. This has led to the investigation and development of extra-center, population-based interventions. Student-to-student support programs are but one example. Students themselves are a plentiful, often-untapped resource that extends the reach of mental health services on campus. Student-to-student programs capitalize on students' natural inclination to assist their peers. A brief review of the prevalence and effects of mental disorders in the college population is provided, followed by a broad overview of the range of peer-to-peer programs that can be available on college campuses. Two innovative programs are highlighted: (1) a hospital- and community-based program, the College Mental Health Program (CMHP) at McLean Hospital, and 2) the Student Support Network (SSN) at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. The subsequent section reviews the literature on peer-to-peer programs for students with serious and persistent mental illness for which there is a small but generally positive body of research. This lack of an empirical basis in college mental health leads the authors to argue for development of broad practice-research networks.

  6. Abstract: Promotion of Primary Health Care Philosophy in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Learning experiences in community-based settings provide the students with opportunities to learn by means of being actively engaged in primary health care associated activities to under-resourced communities (Mtshali, 2009, 2005; World Health Organization ,2011a; World Health Organization, 2011b). International ...

  7. Barriers to health education in adolescents: health care providers' perspectives compared to high school adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedian, Kobra; Shahhosseini, Zohreh

    2015-11-01

    Although adolescence is marked by profound and dynamic changes, it is virtually neglected by health care providers, by society, and even by most parents, teachers, and health professionals. The aim of this study was to investigate barriers to health education in adolescents from health care providers' views compared to teens. The study population consisted of 72 health care providers and 402 high school female students in Northern Iran in 2012. They completed a self-administered questionnaire about their views on barriers to adolescents' health education. It is revealed that the major barrier to adolescents' health education from a health care providers' perspective is "Lack of private room for adolescents' health education", while "Lack of adolescents' interest to content of educational programs" is a significantly greater barrier to health education among adolescents. The results suggest that for adolescent health education, specific strategies should be used in adolescent health promotion programs.

  8. Master of Primary Health Care degree: who wants it and why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Abby; Wallis, Katharine A; Goodyear-Smith, Felicity

    2016-06-01

    INTRODUCTION The Department of General Practice and Primary Health Care at the University of Auckland is considering developing a Master of Primary Health Care (MPHC) programme. Masters level study entails considerable investment of both university and student time and money. AIM To explore the views of potential students and possible employers of future graduates to discover whether there is a market for such a programme and to inform the development of the programme. METHODS Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 30 primary health care stakeholders. Interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed and analysed using a general inductive approach to identify themes. FINDINGS Primary care practitioners might embark on MPHC studies to develop health management and leadership skills, to develop and/or enhance clinical skills, to enhance teaching and research skills, or for reasons of personal interest. Barriers to MPHC study were identified as cost and a lack of funding, time constraints and clinical workload. Study participants favoured inter-professional learning and a flexible delivery format. Pre-existing courses may already satisfy the post-graduate educational needs of primary care practitioners. Masters level study may be superfluous to the needs of the primary care workforce. CONCLUSIONS Any successful MPHC programme would need to provide value for PHC practitioner students and be unique. The postgraduate educational needs of New Zealand primary care practitioners may be already catered for. The international market for a MPHC programme is yet to be explored.

  9. Exploring the Climate for Overweight and Obese Students in a Student Health Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Peggy J.; Ketcham, Patricia L.

    2009-01-01

    Attitudes and beliefs of health care providers, in conjunction with a nonthreatening physical environment, are important components in establishing a constructive and supportive climate for care of overweight and obese students. Objective: The authors explored providers' attitudes about obesity and assessed the physical environment in a student…

  10. Health and Care Utilization of Transgender and Gender Nonconforming Youth: A Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, G Nicole; McMorris, Barbara J; Gower, Amy L; Coleman, Eli; Eisenberg, Marla E

    2018-02-05

    Transgender and gender nonconforming (TGNC) adolescents have difficulty accessing and receiving health care compared with cisgender youth, yet research is limited by a reliance on small and nonrepresentative samples. This study's purpose was to examine mental and physical health characteristics and care utilization between youth who are TGNC and cisgender and across perceived gender expressions within the TGNC sample. Data came from the 2016 Minnesota Student Survey, which consisted of 80 929 students in ninth and 11th grade ( n = 2168 TGNC, 2.7%). Students self-reported gender identity, perceived gender expression, 4 health status measures, and 3 care utilization measures. Chi-squares and multiple analysis of covariance tests (controlling for demographic covariates) were used to compare groups. We found that students who are TGNC reported significantly poorer health, lower rates of preventive health checkups, and more nurse office visits than cisgender youth. For example, 62.1% of youth who are TGNC reported their general health as poor, fair, or good versus very good or excellent, compared with 33.1% of cisgender youth (χ 2 = 763.7, P presentation was perceived as very congruent with their birth-assigned sex were less likely to report poorer health and long-term mental health problems compared with those with other gender presentations. Health care utilization differs between TGNC versus cisgender youth and across gender presentations within TGNC youth. With our results, we suggest that health care providers should screen for health risks and identify barriers to care for TGNC youth while promoting and bolstering wellness within this community. Copyright © 2018 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  11. Collaborative and Bidirectional Feedback Between Students and Clinical Preceptors: Promoting Effective Communication Skills on Health Care Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Kara; Chou, Calvin L

    2016-11-01

    Current literature on feedback suggests that clinical preceptors lead feedback conversations that are primarily unidirectional, from preceptor to student. While this approach may promote clinical competency, it does not actively develop students' competency in facilitating feedback discussions and providing feedback across power differentials (ie, from student to preceptor). This latter competency warrants particular attention given its fundamental role in effective health care team communication and its related influence on patient safety. Reframing the feedback process as collaborative and bidirectional, where both preceptors and students provide and receive feedback, maximizes opportunities for role modeling and skills practice in the context of a supportive relationship, thereby enhancing team preparedness. We describe an initiative to introduce these fundamental skills of collaborative, bidirectional feedback in the nurse-midwifery education program at the University of California, San Francisco. © 2016 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  12. Dental students' beliefs about culture in patient care: self-reported knowledge and importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Julie A; Redford-Badwal, Deborah

    2008-05-01

    In order to decrease the well-documented disparities in oral health and oral health care, the next generation of dentists must be prepared to serve a diverse patient population. This article describes dental students' self-reported knowledge of culture and importance of using culturally sensitive dental practices. Three consecutive graduating classes (n=111) were surveyed anonymously in their sophomore years. Students indicated their self-rated knowledge of oral health and oral health care for their own culture and the cultures of patients they are likely to see in dental practice. Students also rated their perceived importance of culturally sensitive dental practice. Overall, students reported low knowledge of the cultures of the patients they will see in practice. Few students could identify any cultural group that they knew well. However, students as a group indicated that using culturally sensitive practices in dentistry is important. Students who could identify at least one cultural group they knew well perceived cultural sensitivity in dental practice as more important than students who could not. These results suggest that students need cross-cultural training and believe that such training is important. The results also suggest that a specific curriculum that increases knowledge of other cultures may have the potential to ultimately increase the use of culturally sensitive practices.

  13. Undergraduate nursing students' attitudes toward mental health nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongpriwan, Vipavee; Leuck, Susan E; Powell, Rhonda L; Young, Staci; Schuler, Suzanne G; Hughes, Ronda G

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe undergraduate nursing students' attitudes toward mental health nursing and how these attitudes influenced their professional career choices in mental health nursing. A descriptive, online survey was utilized to examine students' perceptions of mental health nursing. A total of 229 junior and senior nursing students were recruited from eight nursing colleges in Midwestern United States to participate in this survey. Students of different ages, genders, ethnicities, and nursing programs did not report significantly different perceptions of: (a) knowledge of mental illness; (b) negative stereotypes; (c) interest in mental health nursing as a future career; and (d), and beliefs that psychiatric nurses provide a valuable contribution to consumers and the community. Negative stereotypes were significantly different between students who had mental health nursing preparation either in class (p=0.0147) or in clinical practice (p=0.0018) and students who had not. There were significant differences in anxiety about mental illness between students who had classes on mental health nursing (p=.0005), clinical experience (p=0.0035), and work experience in the mental health field (p=0.0012). Significant differences in an interest in a future career in mental health nursing emerged between students with and without prior mental health experience and between students with and without an interest in an externship program with p-values of 0.0012 and students have to mental health nursing through clinical experiences, theory classes, and previous work in the field, the more prepared they feel about caring for persons with mental health issues. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Effects of Service-Learning on Graduate Nursing Students: Care and Advocacy for the Impoverished.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBonis, Ruselle

    2016-01-01

    Service-learning is a widely used teaching method that appears to be a good fit for graduate nurses, with essential outcomes of advocacy and culturally responsive health care in special populations. However, quantitative evidence to support its effectiveness is minimal. This study evaluated the impact of service-learning on graduate nursing students' cultural competence, civic engagement, and knowledge and understanding of the effects of poverty on health care. Students are required to serve 16 to 20 hours in a nurse-run free clinic as part of their clinical experience. Students (N = 152) completed pre- and postservice surveys. Statistically significant increases were noted in graduate students' civic engagement (p = .0001 to .0495), knowledge and understanding of health care issues (p < .0001), and in three of six statements related to cultural competence (p = .0001 to 9.662). Patient-reported outcomes and community impact is also positive. Service-learning appears to be an effective tool with graduate nurses. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Student nurses' experiences of undignified caring in perioperative practice - Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willassen, Elin; Blomberg, Ann-Catrin; von Post, Iréne; Lindwall, Lillemor

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, operating theatre nurse students' education focused on ethics, basic values and protecting and promoting the patients' dignity in perioperative practice. Health professionals are frequently confronted with ethical issues that can impact on patient's care during surgery. The objective of this study was to present what operating theatre nursing students perceived and interpreted as undignified caring in perioperative practice. The study has a descriptive design with a hermeneutic approach. Data were collected using Flanagan's critical incident technique. Operating theatre nurse students from Sweden and Norway participated and collected data in 2011, after education in ethics and dignity. Data consisting of 47 written stories and the text were analysed with hermeneutical text interpretation. The study was approved by the Karlstad University's Research Ethics Committee. The findings show careless behaviour and humiliating actions among health professionals. Health professionals commit careless acts by rendering the patient invisible, ignoring the patient's worry and pain and treating the patient as an object. They also humiliate the patient when speaking in negative terms about the patient's body, and certain health professionals blame the patients for the situation they are in. Health professionals lack the willingness and courage to protect the patient's dignity in perioperative practice. In the discussion, we have illuminated how professional ethics may be threatened by more pragmatic and utilitarian arguments contained in regulations and transplant act. The findings reveal that patients were exposed to unnecessary suffering; furthermore, the operating theatre nurse students suffered an inner ethical conflict due to the undignified caring situations they had witnessed. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. The Primary Care Leadership Track at the Duke University School of Medicine: creating change agents to improve population health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheline, Barbara; Tran, Anh N; Jackson, Joseph; Peyser, Bruce; Rogers, Susan; Engle, Deborah

    2014-10-01

    Physicians need training in community engagement, leadership, and population health to prepare them to work with partners within the community and to adapt medical care to address population health needs. With an overall goal of training primary care practitioners to be change agents for improving population health, the Duke University School of Medicine launched the Primary Care Leadership Track (PCLT) in 2011. The four-year PCLT curriculum requires students to contribute to existing community health initiatives, perform community-engaged research, and participate in leadership training. The clinical curriculum incorporates a longitudinal approach to allow students to follow patient outcomes. In addition, students regularly interact with faculty to explore population health issues, review patient cases, and adjust individual learning opportunities as needed. The first cohort of PCLT students will graduate in 2015. Prospective comparisons with traditional track students are planned on performance on standardized tests and career choices. The authors created the PCLT as a laboratory in which students can engage with the community and explore solutions to address the health of the public and the future delivery of health care. To meet the goal of training change agents, PCLT leaders need to expand opportunities for students to learn from providers and organizations that are successfully bridging the gap between medical care and public health.

  17. Holistic Health Care: A Challenge to Podiatric Medical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Leonard A.; Levine, Peter M.

    1980-01-01

    As the profession of podiatric medicine becomes more closely identified with the delivery of primary care, it is suggested that it is essential for practicing podiatrists and students to have more educational opportunities in the field of holistic health care, psychiatry, and the behavioral sciences. (Author/MLW)

  18. Oral Health on Wheels: A Service Learning Project for Dental Hygiene Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flick, Heather; Barrett, Sheri; Carter-Hanson, Carrie

    2016-08-01

    To provide dental hygiene students with a service learning opportunity to work with special needs and culturally diverse underserved populations through the Oral Health on Wheels (OHOW) community based mobile dental hygiene clinic. A student feedback survey was administered between the years of 2009 and 2013 to 90 students in order to gather and identify significant satisfaction, skills acquisition and personal growth information after the student's clinical experience on the OHOW. ANOVA and Pearson correlation coefficient statistical analysis were utilized to investigate relationships between student responses to key questions in the survey. An analysis of 85 student responses (94.44%) demonstrated statistically significant correlations between student learning and their understanding of underserved populations, building confidence in skills, participation as a dental team member and understanding their role in total patient care. The strong correlations between these key questions related to the clinical experience and students confidence, skills integration into the dental team, and understanding of both total patient care, and the increased understanding of the oral health care needs of special populations. All questions directly link to the core mission of the OHOW program. The OHOW clinical experience allows dental hygiene students a unique opportunity to engage in their community while acquiring necessary clinical competencies required by national accreditation and providing access to oral health care services to underserved patients who would otherwise go without treatment. Copyright © 2016 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  19. Community oriented interprofessional health education in Mozambique: one student/one family program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrão, L J; Fernandes, Tito H

    2014-01-01

    In the remote northern region of Mozambique the ratio of doctors to patients is 1:50,000. In 2007, Lúrio University initiated an innovative, "One Student/One Family" program of teaching and learning for health professions students, to complement their traditional core curriculum. All students of each of the school's six health degree programs complete a curriculum in "Family and Community Health" in each year of their training. Groups of six students from six different health professions training programs make weekly visits to communities, where each student is allocated to a family. Students learn from their families about community life and health issues, within a community where 80% of the population still lacks access to modern health care and rely on indigenous doctors and traditional remedies. In turn, students transmit information to families about modern health care and report to the faculty any major health problems they find. The educational/experiential approach is interprofessional and community-oriented. The main perceived advantages of the program are that it is applied and problem-based learning for students, while simultaneously providing needed healthcare services to the community. The major disadvantages include the complexity of coordinating multidisciplinary groups, the time and distance required of students in traveling to communities, and interpretation of multiple reports with variable data. This community-oriented education program involving students from six disciplines uses nontraditional teaching/learning methods is the basis of the ex libris of Lúrio University.

  20. Care for the Caregiver: Evaluation of Mind-Body Self-Care for Accelerated Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Barbara L; Motter, Tracey; Ross, Ratchneewan; Goliat, Laura M; Sharpnack, Patricia A; Govoni, Amy L; Bozeman, Michelle C; Rababah, Jehad

    2016-01-01

    Stress affects the well-being of both nursing students and the individuals with whom they work. With the theory of cognitive appraisal as a framework for this study, it is proposed that mind-body self-care strategies promote stress management by stabilization of emotions. Outcomes will be a perception of less stress and more mindful engagement with the environment. Objective of the study was to describe an evaluation of student perceived stress and mindfulness to 1-hour per week of class time dedicated to mind-body self-care (yoga, mindful breathing, Reiki, and essential oil therapy). It was a quasi-experimental study; data collection took place at 4 time points. Participants were entry-level accelerated nursing students from 3 US universities: 50 in the treatment group, 64 in the comparison group. Data included health-promoting practices using Health-Promoting Promotion Lifestyle Profile II as a control variable, stress and mindfulness (Perceived Stress Scale [PSS] and Mindful Attention Awareness Scale [MAAS]), and demographic information; analysis using mixed-design repeated-measures analysis of variances. There was a statistically significant interaction between intervention and time on PSS scores, F(3, 264) = 3.95, P = .009, partial η(2) = 0.043, with PSS scores of the intervention group decreasing from baseline to T3 when intervention ended whereas PSS scores of the comparison group increased from baseline. The average scores on the MAAS did not differ significantly. Evaluation of an embedded mind-body self-care module in the first nursing course demonstrated promising improvements in stress management. The findings support the appropriateness of integrating mind-body self-care content into nursing curricula to enhance students' ability to regulate stress.

  1. Infusing Oral Health Care into Nursing Curriculum: Addressing Preventive Health in Aging and Disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Earle Hahn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Access to oral health care is essential for promoting and maintaining overall health and well-being, yet oral health disparities exist among vulnerable and underserved populations. While nurses make up the largest portion of the health care work force, educational preparation to address oral health needs of elders and persons with disabilities is limited across nursing curricula. This descriptive study reports on the interdisciplinary development, implementation, and testing of an oral health module that was included and infused into a graduate nursing curriculum in a three-phase plan. Phase 1 includes evaluation of a lecture presented to eight gerontological nurse practitioner (GNP students. Phase 2 includes evaluation of GNP students’ perceptions of learning, skills, and confidence following a one-time 8-hour practicum infused into 80 required practicum hours. The evaluation data show promise in preparing nurse practitioner students to assess and address preventive oral health needs of persons aging with disabilities such that further infusion and inclusion in a course for nurse practitioners across five specialties will implemented and tested in Phase 3.

  2. Awareness on organ transplantation among health care professionals and medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahedul Karim Ahmad

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This cross sectional study was conducted in different medical college hospitals of Dhaka city during the months of Jan-March 2009. The objective of this study was to find out the awareness level on organ transplantation amongst the teachers, doctors and nurses working in these medical college hospitals and 1st to 5th year students. A structured questionnaire was given to the respondents. The total number of respondents was 462 of which 103 (22.3% were doctors, 268 (58% were medical students and 91 (19.7% were nurses. Among the study group 31.4% knew that there was an organ transplantation law in Bangladesh and 16.5% said that there was no such law whereas 52.2% had no idea whatsoever about the law. Of the respondents 33.8% were willing to donate their organs after death, 41.6% did not want to donate and 24.2% were not sure. This study revealed that there was a lack of understanding regarding the religious views on organ transplantation. Only 37.1% of respondents thought that were was no religious objection to organ transplantation whereas 27.1% felt that there was religious objection while 35.7% were not sure. The study shows that there is significant lack of awareness regarding organ transplantation issues among the health care professionals and medical students in Bangladesh. The dictates of religion on this matter were also not clear to most of the respondents. Ibrahim Med. Coll. J. 2009; 3(2: 55-58

  3. Sexual behaviours and preconception health in Italian university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Poscia

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Risky sexual behaviours have been recognized as a threat for sexual and reproductive health. AIM: This article shows the results of the "Sportello Salute Giovani" project ("Youth Health Information Desk" in relation to determining how a large sample of university students in Italy cope with preconception health, especially in the domains of sexual transmitted infections (STIs, fertility and vaccination preventable disease. METHODS: Twentythree questions of the "Sportello Salute Giovani" survey about sexual behaviour and reproductive health were analysed. Besides, results were stratified for sex, age class and socio-economic status. RESULTS: 19.7% of students have had first sexual intercourse before age 15. 21.8% of female students used emergency contraception. 66.4% of the 74.0% sexual active students reported using contraceptives, but about 32% of them used methods ineffective against STIs. A general low coverage for rubella, measles and mumps vaccination was revealed. 63.7% of men and 30.9% of woman never had urologic or gynaecological examinations. DISCUSSION: Overall, young adults in Italy are not still enough sensitized on fertility and preconception care. High schools and universities should increase awareness towards preservation of male and female fertility and preconception care.

  4. Reimbursement for school nursing health care services: position statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Janet; Cagginello, Joan; Compton, Linda

    2014-09-01

    Children come to school with a variety of health conditions, varying from moderate health issues to multiple, severe chronic health illnesses that have a profound and direct impact on their ability to learn. The registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse) provides medically necessary services in the school setting to improve health outcomes and promote academic achievement. The nursing services provided are reimbursable services in other health care settings, such as hospitals, clinics, and home care settings. The National Association of School Nurses (NASN) believes that school nursing services that are reimbursable nursing services in other health care systems should also be reimbursable services in the school setting, while maintaining the same high quality care delivery standards. Traditionally, local and state tax revenues targeted to fund education programs have paid for school nursing health services. School nurses are in a strategic position to advocate for improving clinical processes to better fit with community health care providers and to align reimbursements with proposed changes. Restructuring reimbursement programs will enable health care funding streams to assist in paying for school nursing services delivered to students in the school setting. Developing new innovative health financing opportunities will help to increase access, improve quality, and reduce costs. The goal is to promote a comprehensive and cost-effective health care delivery model that integrates schools, families, providers, and communities.

  5. CARES: AACN's New Competencies and Recommendations for Educating Undergraduate Nursing Students to Improve Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrell, Betty; Malloy, Pam; Mazanec, Polly; Virani, Rose

    2016-01-01

    Nurses spend the most time of any health care professional caring for patients and families dealing with the challenges of serious illness. The demand for nursing expertise in palliative care is growing as more people are living with chronic, life-limiting illnesses. Nursing faculty must prepare future nurses to meet this demand. The new American Association of Colleges of Nursing Palliative Competencies And Recommendations for Educating undergraduate nursing Students document, released February 2016, identifies the 17 competencies that all undergraduate nursing students should achieve by the time of graduation. This historic document is a revision of the 1998 American Association of Colleges of Nursing Peaceful Death document and is now the guiding framework for undergraduate nursing education. In an effort to support nursing faculty and prepare nursing students to deliver quality palliative care, an innovative, interactive on-line undergraduate End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium (ELNEC) curriculum is under development and will be released in January 2017. This new curriculum will meet the competencies and recommendations for achieving those competencies outlined in the Competencies And Recommendations for Educating undergraduate nursing Students document. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Will opposites attract? Similarities and differences in students' perceptions of the stereotype profiles of other health and social care professional groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hean, Sarah; Clark, Jill Macleod; Adams, Kim; Humphris, Debra

    2006-03-01

    The extent to which health and social care (HSC) students hold stereotypical views of other HSC professional groups is of great potential importance to team working in health care. This paper explores students' perceptions of different HSC professional groups at the beginning of their university programmes. Findings are presented from an analysis of baseline data collected as part of the New Generation Project longitudinal cohort study which is assessing the impact of interprofessional education over time on a range of variables including stereotyping. Questionnaires were administered to a cohort of over 1200 students from 10 different HSC professional groups entering their first year of university. Stereotypes were measured using a tool adapted from Barnes et al. (2000) designed to elicit stereotype ratings on a range of nine characteristics. The findings confirm that students arrive at university with an established and consistent set of stereotypes about other health and social care professional groups. Stereotypical profiles were compiled for each professional group indicating the distinctive characteristics of the groups as well as the similarities and differences between groups.Midwives, social workers and nurses were rated most highly on interpersonal skills and on being a team player whilst doctors were rated most highly on academic ability. Doctors, midwives and social workers were perceived as having the strongest leadership role, whilst doctors were also rated most highly on decision making. All professions were rated highly on confidence and professional competence and, with the exception of social workers, on practical skills. A comparison of profiles for each professional group reveals that, for example, pharmacists and doctors were perceived as having very similar characteristics as were social workers, midwives and nurses. However, the profiles of nurses and doctors were perceived to be very different. The implications of these similarities and

  7. Perceptions of Health Students of the Lagos University Teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gender equity, equality and mainstreaming are very topical issues presently and most components of reproductive health require gender equity to succeed. Health care workers are constantly going to have to be involved in gender related issues in health. This study was conducted among health students of the College of ...

  8. Attitude of Palestinian Nursing Students Toward Caring for Dying Patients: A Call for Change in Health Education Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-El-Noor, Nasser Ibrahim; Abu-El-Noor, Mysoon Khalikl

    2016-06-01

    Death is a natural process that occurs each day. Some nursing students may encounter the experience of taking care of a dying patient while others do not. Therefore, their attitude toward death and caring for dying patients may vary. The purpose of this study was to assess Palestinian student nurses' attitudes toward death and caring for dying patients and their families. In a cross-sectional, descriptive study, all fourth-year students at the College of Nursing, Islamic University of Gaza, Palestine, were invited to participate in this study. A total of 141 students completed the Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying Scale Form B (FATCOD-B). Results revealed that the mean score on the FATCOD-B was (96.96 ± 8.30). Overall, nursing students in the sample demonstrated a relatively low attitude toward caring for dying patients and their families. No statistically significant differences of students' attitudes toward caring for dying patients were found between male and female students nor between students who attended death cases and those who did not. The results suggest that theoretical nursing education should place more emphasis on palliative care to improve the quality of care at the end of life. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Health Care Ergonomics: Contributions of Thomas Waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole Wilson, Tiffany; Davis, Kermit G

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the contributions of Thomas Waters's work in the field of health care ergonomics and beyond. Waters's research of safe patient handling with a focus on reducing musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) in health care workers contributed to current studies and prevention strategies. He worked with several groups to share his research and assist in developing safe patient handling guidelines and curriculum for nursing students and health care workers. The citations of articles that were published by Waters in health care ergonomics were evaluated for quality and themes of conclusions. Quality was assessed using the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool and centrality to original research rating. Themes were documented by the type of population the citing articles were investigating. In total, 266 articles that referenced the top seven cited articles were evaluated. More than 95% of them were rated either medium or high quality. The important themes of these citing articles were as follows: (a) Safe patient handling is effective in reducing MSDs in health care workers. (b) Shift work has negative impact on nurses. (c) There is no safe way to manually lift a patient. (d) Nurse curriculums should contain safe patient handling. The research of Waters has contributed significantly to the health care ergonomics and beyond. His work, in combination with other pioneers in the field, has generated multiple initiatives, such as a standard safe patient-handling curriculum and safe patient-handling programs. © 2016, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  10. How students deal with inconsistencies in health knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bientzle, Martina; Cress, Ulrike; Kimmerle, Joachim

    2013-07-01

    In their work, health care professionals have to deal daily with inconsistent health information and are confronted with differing therapeutic health concepts. Medical education should prepare students to handle these challenges adequately. The aim of this study was to contribute to a better understanding of how students deal with inconsistencies in health knowledge when they are presented with either a therapeutic concept they accept or one they reject. Seventy-six students of physiotherapy participated in this 2 × 2 experiment with health information (consistent versus inconsistent information) and therapeutic concept (congruent versus contradictory therapeutic concept) as between-group factors. The participants' task was to improve the quality of a text about the effectiveness of stretching; participants were randomly assigned to one of four texts. Knowledge acquisition and text modification were measured as dependent variables. Students acquired more knowledge when they worked with a text containing inconsistent information. Medical information that was presented in agreement with a student's therapeutic concept was also more readily acquired than the same information presented posing a contradictory therapeutic concept. Participants modified the contradictory text in order to adapt it to their own point of view. Disagreement resulted in a disregard or devaluation of the information itself, which in turn was detrimental to learning. It is a problem when prospective health care professionals turn a blind eye to discrepancies that do not fit their view of the world. It may be useful for educational purposes to include a knowledge conflict caused by a combination of conviction and inconsistent information to facilitate learning processes. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. The health-related behaviors and attitudes of student nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vowell, Maribeth

    Nurses are an important component of primary medical care, and patient education is a common and important role of most nurses. Patient education and positive role modeling by nurses have the potential to influence patients' life style choices and the serious diseases that may be affected by those choices. A greater understanding of the ways nurses think about their own health could help facilitate healthier choices for them and in their patients. The purpose of this inquiry was to examine the experiences, attitudes and beliefs of student nurses related to their personal health, and to investigate those experiences, attitudes and beliefs as they relate to their education, relationships, values and career choice. The purpose was achieved through phenomenological interviews with eleven senior nursing students, nine females and two males, encouraging them to provide in as much detail as possible their attitudes and values about their personal health. The interviews were tape recorded, transcribed verbatim, and phenomenologically analyzed. A thematic structure emerged such that the nursing students experiences were represented by the four interrelated themes of caring for myself/caring for others ; I control my health/my world controls my health; I have energy/I'm tired; and feeling good/looking good. The contextual grounds for the themes that emerged during the analysis were the Body and Time. This structure was presented in terms of its relationship to health education, other research and to current theory.

  12. Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices towards Medication Use among Health Care Students in King Saud University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah T. Eissa

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Health sciences students are expected to have appropriate knowledge and attitudes toward medication use. However, literary evidence of such expertise among health sciences students of King Saud University is unknown. This study was completed to assess the knowledge about medicines and behavior of health science students towards safe use of medications. It also aims to assess the health knowledge, attitude and practices of the students. Methods: This cross-sectional study used a questionnaire consisting of 24 questions. This was administered by the researcher between October and December 2009 in the colleges of medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, applied medical science and nursing of the King Saud University. The survey consisted of three parts: Ten questions assessed the students’ knowledge on drug safety (Part 1. Four questions assessed student attitude toward medication consultations by the pharmacist (Part 2 and ten questions involved medication use practices and consultation with pharmacists (Part 3. A stratified sampling method was used to select participants. Results: Pharmacy students had better medication knowledge compared to other health sciences students especially regarding antihypertensive drugs, antibiotics, paracetamol and antacids (p<0.05. Pharmacy students showed a positive attitude regarding the trustworthiness of a pharmacist to give a consultation. Nearly all other health science students showed a negative attitude about dispensing and consultation concerning nutritional supplements by a pharmacist. All health sciences students had a similar perception toward medication use and practice. Conclusion Pharmacy students had better knowledge about medication practice compared to other health sciences students. All other health sciences students lacked the appropriate attitude and practice related to the safe use of medications.

  13. Attitudes of Students Studying In Health Related Departments towards the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sercan Özbek YAZICI

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Negative attitudes towards the elderly may cause decreases in quality health service provided to the elderly. In the study, the aim was to determine attitudes of students studying in health related departments towards the elderly and relationships between the attitudes and various variables were analyzed. In a descriptive study, the sample included nursing, physiotherapy, and elderly care students. Kogan’s attitude towards old people scale (KAOP was used to measure attitudes towards the elderly and Stanley Coopersmith Self Esteem Inventory (SEI was used to assess the level of students’ self-esteem. The KOAP mean attitude score of the students was 125.6 ± 14.38 and the students had slightly positive attitudes towards the elderly. Students who were at the age of 20 or over and who were living in the city showed more positive attitudes. The students of the Elderly Care Department had the lowest mean score and there was a significant difference between mean KAOP scores of students at Nursing and Elderly Care Department. Also, weak positive correlation was found between the KAOP and SEI mean scores of students. The results implies that the students are required to enhance their positive attitudes towards the elderly. Therefore, students should be provided a training program that improves the positive attitudes

  14. What and how do students learn in an interprofessional student-run clinic? An educational framework for teambased care

    OpenAIRE

    Lie, Désirée A.; Forest, Christopher P.; Walsh, Anne; Banzali, Yvonne; Lohenry, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Background: The student-run clinic (SRC) has the potential to address interprofessional learning among health professions students.Purpose: To derive a framework for understanding student learning during team-based care provided in an interprofessional SRC serving underserved patients.Methods: The authors recruited students for a focus group study by purposive sampling and snowballing. They constructed two sets of semi-structured questions for uniprofessional and multiprofessional groups. Ses...

  15. Advancing health equity for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people through sexual health education and LGBT-affirming health care environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keuroghlian, Alex S; Ard, Kevin L; Makadon, Harvey J

    2017-02-01

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people face pervasive health disparities and barriers to high-quality care. Adequate LGBT sexual health education for emerging health professionals is currently lacking. Clinical training programs and healthcare organisations are well poised to start addressing these disparities and affirming LGBT patients through curricula designed to cultivate core competencies in LBGT health as well as health care environments that welcome, include and protect LGBT patients, students and staff. Health education programs can emphasise mastery of basic LGBT concepts and terminology, as well as openness towards and acceptance of LGBT people. Core concepts, language and positive attitudes can be instilled alongside clinical skill in delivering inclusive sexual health care, through novel educational strategies and paradigms for clinical implementation. Caring for the health needs of LGBT patients also involves the creation of health care settings that affirm LGBT communities in a manner that is responsive to culturally specific needs, sensitivities and challenges that vary across the globe.

  16. Reforming the health care system: implications for health care marketers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrochuk, M A; Javalgi, R G

    1996-01-01

    Health care reform has become the dominant domestic policy issue in the United States. President Clinton, and the Democratic leaders in the House and Senate have all proposed legislation to reform the system. Regardless of the plan which is ultimately enacted, health care delivery will be radically changed. Health care marketers, given their perspective, have a unique opportunity to ensure their own institutions' success. Organizational, managerial, and marketing strategies can be employed to deal with the changes which will occur. Marketers can utilize personal strategies to remain proactive and successful during an era of health care reform. As outlined in this article, responding to the health care reform changes requires strategic urgency and action. However, the strategies proposed are practical regardless of the version of health care reform legislation which is ultimately enacted.

  17. Empathy in health professional students: A comparative cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrucci, Cristina; La Cerra, Carmen; Aloisio, Federica; Montanari, Paola; Lancia, Loreto

    2016-06-01

    It has been shown that empathy strengthens the relationship between patients and health professionals and also improves patient and health professional satisfaction, which helps promote the best clinical outcomes. Empathy is considered an essential prerequisite for a nurse to effectively care for a patient and for a holistic understanding of a patient's perspective in a student population. The main aim was to compare empathy levels between health professional students attending different university courses. A comparative study with a cross-sectional approach was conducted in two successive academic year cohorts of 1st year health professional students at a public Italian university. A sample of 1st year health professional students at a public Italian university was investigated using the Jefferson Scale of Empathy Health Professional Students version (JSE-HPS). Overall, 502 health professional students were included in the study. The students in nursing showed significantly higher empathy levels than the students in other health professions. Furthermore, the female students were found to exhibit significantly more overall empathy than the male students were. The undergraduate nursing students showed a significantly higher mean score of empathy measured by the Jefferson Scale of Empathy Health Professional Students version (JSE-HPS) than the students attending other health undergraduate courses. This could mean that a particular aptitude in establishing a help-relationship with other people exists among the students that choose to become a nurse. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    care policy which was intended to make health care which of the two alternative methods of health care available to individuals and families in the financing options of free health or DRF was community at very little or no cost at all. However, preferred by the community members within most health facilities would appear to ...

  19. Medical student attitudes before and after participation in rural health fairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C Landy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite an increased need, residents of rural communities have decreased access to healthcare and oftenpresentuniquehealthcare challenges associated with their rurality. Ensuring medical students receive adequate exposure to these issues is complicated by the urban location of most medical schools. Health fairs (fairs conducted in rural communities can provide students exposure to ruralhealth;however, it is unknown how participation affects attitudes regarding these issues. Materials and Methods: During the 2010-2011 academic year, first-year medical students were surveyed before and after participating in a rural fair regarding the importance of rural health issues, the need for exposure to rural healthcare, their plans to practice in a rural community,andthe educational impact of fairs. Results : Of the 121participating students, 77% and 61% completed pre- and post-fair surveys, respectively. Few had lived in a rural area or planned to practice primary care. Participants strongly agreed that the delivery of healthcare in rural areas was important, and that all physicians should receive rural health training (4.8 and 3.7 out of 5, respectively despite less than halfplanning to practice in a rural community.After participating in a rural fair, student attitudes were unchanged, although 87% of participants strongly agreed their involvement had contributed to improving patient health and 70% that the fairs provided rural medicine experience. Conclusions : Among urban medical school students with varied interests in primary care, there was strong interest in volunteering at rural fairs and appreciation for the importance of rural health. Fairs provided interested students with rural medicine experience that reinforced student attitudes regarding rural health. Further, students felt their participation improved patient health.

  20. The South Dakota Model: Health Care Professions Student Disaster Preparedness and Deployment Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Matt P; Buffington, Cheri; Frost, Michael P; Waldner, Randall J

    2017-12-01

    The Association of American Medical Colleges recommended an increase in medical education for public health emergencies, bioterrorism, and weapons of mass destruction in 2003. The University of South Dakota Sanford School of Medicine (USD SSOM) implemented a 1-day training event to provide disaster preparedness training and deployment organization for health professions students called Disaster Training Day (DTD). Hospital staff and emergency medical services personnel provided the lecture portion of DTD using Core Disaster Life Support (CDLS; National Disaster Life Support Foundation) as the framework. Pre-test and post-test analyses were presented to the students. Small group activities covered leadership, anaphylaxis, mass fatality, points of dispensing deployment training, psychological first aid, triage, and personal protective equipment. Students were given the option to sign up for statewide deployment through the South Dakota Statewide Emergency Registry of Volunteers (SERV SD). DTD data and student satisfaction surveys from 2009 to 2016 were reviewed. Since 2004, DTD has provided disaster preparedness training to 2246 students across 13 health professions. Significant improvement was shown on CDLS post-test performance with a t-score of -14.24 and a resulting P value of training, small group sessions, and perceived self-competency relating to disaster response. SERV SD registration increased in 2015, and 77.5% of the participants registered in 2016. DTD at the USD SSOM provides for an effective 1-day disaster training course for health professions students. Resources from around the state were coordinated to provide training, liability coverage, and deployment organization for hundreds of students representing multiple health professions. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2017;11:735-740).

  1. Cost Benefit of Comprehensive Primary and Preventive School-Based Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, William V; Connor, Katherine A; Mueller, Josiah M; Hong, Jonathan C; Velazquez, Gabriela Calderon; Johnson, Sara B

    2018-01-01

    The Rales Health Center is a comprehensive school-based health center at an urban elementary/middle school. Rales Health Center provides a full range of pediatric services using an enriched staffing model consisting of pediatrician, nurse practitioner, registered nurses, and medical office assistant. This staffing model provides greater care but costs more than traditional school-based health centers staffed by part-time nurses. The objective was to analyze the cost benefit of Rales Health Center enhanced staffing model compared with a traditional school-based health center (standard care), focusing on asthma care, which is among the most prevalent chronic conditions of childhood. In 2016, cost-benefit analysis using a decision tree determined the net social benefit of Rales Health Center compared with standard care from the U.S. societal perspective based on the 2015-2016 academic year. It was assumed that Rales Health Center could handle greater patient throughput related to asthma, decreased prescription costs, reduced parental resources in terms of missed work time, and improved student attendance. Univariate and multivariate probabilistic sensitivity analyses were conducted. The expected cost to operate Rales Health Center was $409,120, compared with standard care cost of $172,643. Total monetized incremental benefits of Rales Health Center were estimated to be $993,414. The expected net social benefit for Rales Health Center was $756,937, which demonstrated substantial societal benefit at a return of $4.20 for every dollar invested. This net social benefit estimate was robust to sensitivity analyses. Despite the greater cost associated with the Rales Health Center's enhanced staffing model, the results of this analysis highlight the cost benefit of providing comprehensive, high-quality pediatric care in schools, particularly schools with a large proportion of underserved students. Copyright © 2018 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by

  2. Influencing College and Higher Education Choices in Disadvantaged Hispanic High School Students Through a School-Based Health Club.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harsimran; Matza, Maria; Latham, Christine

    2017-06-01

    Statistics representing professional health care providers do not adequately reflect the shift in the nation's diverse population. Latinos are significantly underrepresented at all levels of appropriate academic programs critical for entry to health profession careers. This project describes the implementation of a student-run, faculty-facilitated Future Nurse and Health Club at a school (with majority Latino students) to emphasize the importance of higher education in health care. Demographic and psychosocial profiles of club members were also developed to understand community needs. The Future Nurse and Health Club was established in partnership with faculty and researchers representing a university-based nursing program, school officials, and community leaders. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected from club members and their parents using a variety of techniques including questionnaires and focus groups. The findings of the study highlighted a variety of student- and parent-related factors including poor lifestyle habits and perceptions of support that could potentially influence Latino high school students' interest and progress in health care-related higher education. A school-based health career club involving active participation of parents and students with support from health care professionals such as academic nursing faculty has the potential to simultaneously raise student interest in health-related careers and health needs of their community.

  3. Meeting the mental health needs of today's college student: Reinventing services through Stepped Care 2.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornish, Peter A; Berry, Gillian; Benton, Sherry; Barros-Gomes, Patricia; Johnson, Dawn; Ginsburg, Rebecca; Whelan, Beth; Fawcett, Emily; Romano, Vera

    2017-11-01

    A new stepped care model developed in North America reimagines the original United Kingdom model for the modern university campus environment. It integrates a range of established and emerging online mental health programs systematically along dimensions of treatment intensity and associated student autonomy. Program intensity can be either stepped up or down depending on level of client need. Because monitoring is configured to give both provider and client feedback on progress, the model empowers clients to participate actively in care options, decisions, and delivery. Not only is stepped care designed to be more efficient than traditional counseling services, early observations suggest it improves outcomes and access, including the elimination of service waitlists. This paper describes the new model in detail and outlines implementation experiences at 3 North American universities. While the experiences implementing the model have been positive, there is a need for development of technology that would facilitate more thorough evaluation. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. [Clinical treatment adherence of health care workers and students exposed to potentially infectious biological material].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Maria Cristina Mendes de; Canini, Silvia Rita Marin da Silva; Reis, Renata Karina; Toffano, Silmara Elaine Malaguti; Pereira, Fernanda Maria Vieira; Gir, Elucir

    2015-04-01

    To assess adherence to clinical appointments by health care workers (HCW) and students who suffered accidents with potentially infectious biological material. A retrospective cross-sectional study that assessed clinical records of accidents involving biological material between 2005 and 2010 in a specialized unit. A total of 461 individuals exposed to biological material were treated, of which 389 (84.4%) were HCWs and 72 (15.6%) students. Of the 461 exposed individuals, 307 (66.6%) attended a follow-up appointment. Individuals who had suffered an accident with a known source patient were 29 times more likely to show up to their scheduled follow-up appointments (OR: 29.98; CI95%: 16.09-55.83). The predictor in both univariate and multivariate analyses for adherence to clinical follow-up appointment was having a known source patient with nonreactive serology for the human immunodeficiency virus and/or hepatitis B and C.

  5. Oral Health Education for Medical Students: Malaysian and Australian Students' Perceptions of Educational Experience and Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Mas S; Abuzar, Menaka A; Razak, Ishak A; Rahman, Sabariah A; Borromeo, Gelsomina L

    2017-09-01

    Education in oral health is important to prepare future medical professionals for collaborative roles in maintaining patients' oral health, an important component of general health and well-being. The aims of this study were to determine the perceptions of medical students in Malaysia and Australia of the quality of their training in oral health care and their perceptions of their professional role in maintaining the oral health of their patients. A survey was administered in the classroom with final-year Malaysian (n=527; response rate=79.3%) and Australian (n=455; response rate: 60%) medical students at selected institutions in those countries. In the results, most of these medical students reported encountering patients with oral health conditions including ulcers, halitosis, and edentulism. A majority in both countries reported believing they should advise patients to obtain regular dental check-ups and eat a healthy diet, although they reported feeling less than comfortable in managing emergency dental cases. A high percentage reported they received a good education in smoking cessation but not in managing dental trauma, detecting cancerous lesions, or providing dietary advice in oral disease prevention. They expressed support for inclusion of oral health education in medical curricula. These students' experience with and perceptions of oral health care provide valuable information for medical curriculum development in these two countries as well as increasing understanding of this aspect of interprofessional education and practice now in development around the world.

  6. What and how do students learn in an interprofessional student-run clinic? An educational framework for team-based care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lie, Désirée A.; Forest, Christopher P.; Walsh, Anne; Banzali, Yvonne; Lohenry, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Background The student-run clinic (SRC) has the potential to address interprofessional learning among health professions students. Purpose To derive a framework for understanding student learning during team-based care provided in an interprofessional SRC serving underserved patients. Methods The authors recruited students for a focus group study by purposive sampling and snowballing. They constructed two sets of semi-structured questions for uniprofessional and multiprofessional groups. Sessions were audiotaped, and transcripts were independently coded and adjudicated. Major themes about learning content and processes were extracted. Grounded theory was followed after data synthesis and interpretation to establish a framework for interprofessional learning. Results Thirty-six students from four professions (medicine, physician assistant, occupational therapy, and pharmacy) participated in eight uniprofessional groups; 14 students participated in three multiprofessional groups (N = 50). Theme saturation was achieved. Six common themes about learning content from uniprofessional groups were role recognition, team-based care appreciation, patient experience, advocacy-/systems-based models, personal skills, and career choices. Occupational therapy students expressed self-advocacy, and medical students expressed humility and self-discovery. Synthesis of themes from all groups suggests a learning continuum that begins with the team huddle and continues with shared patient care and social interactions. Opportunity to observe and interact with other professions in action is key to the learning process. Discussion Interprofessional SRC participation promotes learning ‘with, from, and about’ each other. Participation challenges misconceptions and sensitizes students to patient experiences, health systems, advocacy, and social responsibility. Learning involves interprofessional interactions in the patient encounter, reinforced by formal and informal communications

  7. Preparing Social Work Students for Integrated Health Care: Results from a National Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Mary Lehman; Mallory, Kim Crane; Cummings, Sherry

    2017-01-01

    Integrated health care serves a vital role in addressing interrelated physical and behavioral health conditions, but social work graduates often lack sufficient training to work on integrated teams. We surveyed 94 deans of master's of social work programs to assess the current and planned integrated health care curricula and the aptitude of…

  8. Who wants to work with older people? Swedish student nurses' willingness to work in elderly care--a questionnaire study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Elisabeth; Idvall, Ewa

    2015-07-01

    The aging population is a globally recognized challenge for the health care service. The growing number of older people will probably lead to increased demands for nurses working in elderly care. Clinical practice has been shown to have an impact on how student nurses perceive a particular field of nursing. To compare perceptions of the clinical learning environment in nursing homes among students considering a career in aged care or not, and to examine the difference in age, gender and previous working experience as health care assistants in elderly care between the two groups. This was a cross-sectional study using the Swedish version of the Clinical Learning Environment and Nurse Teacher evaluation scale. Consecutive sampling was performed over three semesters from September 2011 to December 2012. The survey was conducted with 183 student nurses. Mann-Whitney U-test was used to examine differences in relation to two groups namely student nurses who did or did not consider to work in elderly care. A chi-square test of independence was performed to examine the difference in age, gender and previous working experience between the two groups. The analysis leaned towards an overall positive evaluation of the clinical learning environment with more positive values for students considering a career. There were no significant differences between younger students (18-23) and older students (24-50) regarding willingness to work in elderly care or not. Neither was any significant difference displayed between students, based on gender nor for previous work experience. Age, gender and previous work experiences as health care assistants did not impact on students' willingness to work in elderly care. Future studies need to acknowledge the complexity of why student nurses choose a particular pathway in nursing by longitudinal studies following cohorts of students during the course of the nursing programme. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Transgender health care: improving medical students' and residents' training and awareness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubin SN

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Samuel N Dubin,1,* Ian T Nolan,1,* Carl G Streed Jr,2 Richard E Greene,3 Asa E Radix,4 Shane D Morrison5 1NYU School of Medicine, New York, NY, 2Department of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine and Primary Care, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA, 3Department of Internal Medicine, NYU School of Medicine, 4Callen-Lorde Community Health Center, New York, NY, 5Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic Surgery, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: A growing body of research continues to elucidate health inequities experienced by transgender individuals and further underscores the need for medical providers to be appropriately trained to deliver care to this population. Medical education in transgender health can empower physicians to identify and change the systemic barriers to care that cause transgender health inequities as well as improve knowledge about transgender-specific care. Methods: We conducted structured searches of five databases to identify literature related to medical education and transgender health. Of the 1272 papers reviewed, 119 papers were deemed relevant to predefined criteria, medical education, and transgender health topics. Citation tracking was conducted on the 119 papers using Scopus to identify an additional 12 relevant citations (a total of 131 papers. Searches were completed on October 15, 2017 and updated on December 11, 2017. Results: Transgender health has yet to gain widespread curricular exposure, but efforts toward incorporating transgender health into both undergraduate and graduate medical educations are nascent. There is no consensus on the exact educational interventions that should be used to address transgender health. Barriers to increased transgender health exposure include limited curricular time, lack of topic-specific competency among faculty, and underwhelming institutional support. All published

  10. Innovation in Health Policy Education: Project-Based Service Learning at a Distance for Graduate Midwifery Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoover, Cheri

    2015-01-01

    Core competencies for midwifery practice include an understanding of systems of health care delivery and advocacy for legislation and policy initiatives that promote quality in health care. Today's rapidly changing health care environment, due in part to the implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, mandates that midwives possess greater literacy in health policy and comfort with political action than ever before. Frequently disinterested in politics and intimidated by the policymaking process, student midwives lack the foundational knowledge and practical skills needed to meet this professional obligation. The Midwifery Institute of Philadelphia University graduate program educates both student nurse-midwives and student midwives in health policy using an innovative, project-based service-learning approach featuring real-world collaborative experiences. This novel teaching style is ideally suited for instruction at a distance because of the diversity of experience brought to the virtual classroom by students in widely disparate geopolitical locations. As students accomplish measurable objectives within their individually developed projects and reflect with classmates about their experiences, they feel empowered to effect change and report lower perceived barriers to future political engagement. © 2015 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  11. School outcomes of children with special health care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Christopher B; Bevans, Katherine B; Riley, Anne W; Crespo, Richard; Louis, Thomas A

    2011-08-01

    To examine the associations between having a special health care need and school outcomes measured as attendance, student engagement, behavioral threats to achievement, and academic achievement. A total of 1457 children in the fourth through sixth grades from 34 schools in 3 school districts and their parents provided survey data; parents completed the Children With Special Health Care Needs Screener. School records were abstracted for attendance, grades, and standardized achievement test scores. Across 34 schools, 33% of children screened positive for special health care needs. After adjusting for sociodemographic and school effects, children with special health care needs had lower motivation to do well in school, more disruptive behaviors, and more frequent experiences as a bully victim. They experienced significantly lower academic achievement, as measured by grades, standardized testing, and parental-assessed academic performance. These findings were observed for children who qualified as having a special health care need because they had functional limitations attributed to a chronic illness or a behavioral health problem but not for those who qualified only because they took prescription medications. Specific subgroups of children with special health care needs are at increased risk for poor school outcomes. Health and school professionals will need to collaborate to identify these children early, intervene with appropriate medical and educational services, and monitor long-term outcomes.

  12. School Outcomes of Children With Special Health Care Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevans, Katherine B.; Riley, Anne W.; Crespo, Richard; Louis, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the associations between having a special health care need and school outcomes measured as attendance, student engagement, behavioral threats to achievement, and academic achievement. PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS: A total of 1457 children in the fourth through sixth grades from 34 schools in 3 school districts and their parents provided survey data; parents completed the Children With Special Health Care Needs Screener. School records were abstracted for attendance, grades, and standardized achievement test scores. RESULTS: Across 34 schools, 33% of children screened positive for special health care needs. After adjusting for sociodemographic and school effects, children with special health care needs had lower motivation to do well in school, more disruptive behaviors, and more frequent experiences as a bully victim. They experienced significantly lower academic achievement, as measured by grades, standardized testing, and parental-assessed academic performance. These findings were observed for children who qualified as having a special health care need because they had functional limitations attributed to a chronic illness or a behavioral health problem but not for those who qualified only because they took prescription medications. CONCLUSIONS: Specific subgroups of children with special health care needs are at increased risk for poor school outcomes. Health and school professionals will need to collaborate to identify these children early, intervene with appropriate medical and educational services, and monitor long-term outcomes. PMID:21788226

  13. What Makes Health Care Special?: An Argument for Health Care Insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, L Chad

    2017-01-01

    While citizens in a liberal democracy are generally expected to see to their basic needs out of their own income shares, health care is treated differently. Most rich liberal democracies provide their citizens with health care or health care insurance in kind. Is this "special" treatment justified? The predominant liberal account of justice in health care holds that the moral importance of health justifies treating health care as special in this way. I reject this approach and offer an alternative account. Health needs are not more important than other basic needs, but they are more unpredictable. I argue that citizens are owed access to insurance against health risks to provide stability in their future expectations and thus to protect their capacities for self-determination.

  14. A Required Online Course with a Public Health Focus for Third Professional Year Pharmacy Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Amber E; Egras, Amy M

    2015-06-25

    To design, deliver, and evaluate the impact of a required course on student knowledge acquisition and ability to evaluate contemporary public health issues. A 2-credit course was implemented using asynchronous, online delivery. Learning activities included literature retrieval and assessment, analytic writing, quizzes, and creation of a group wiki evaluating a current public health issue. Course topics included health care reform, social determinants of health, health disparities, evidence-based medicine, end-of-life care, patient safety, and research ethics. Strong student performance on assessments indicated an ability to use higher-order cognitive domains. Online delivery provided students with the flexibility to complete assignments at their convenience, allowed participation by all students, and encouraged self-directed learning. Completion of a required, online, asynchronous course with a public health focus allowed pharmacy students to increase their knowledge of and ability to evaluate contemporary ethical, social, cultural, and governmental issues affecting pharmacy practice.

  15. Teaching home care electronic documentation skills to undergraduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nokes, Kathleen M; Aponte, Judith; Nickitas, Donna M; Mahon, Pamela Y; Rodgers, Betsy; Reyes, Nancy; Chaya, Joan; Dornbaum, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Although there is general consensus that nursing students need knowledge and significant skill to document clinical findings electronically, nursing faculty face many barriers in ensuring that undergraduate students can practice on electronic health record systems (EHRS). External funding supported the development of an educational innovation through a partnership between a home care agency staff and nursing faculty. Modules were developed to teach EHRS skills using a case study of a homebound person requiring wound care and the Medicare-required OASIS documentation system. This article describes the development and implementation of the module for an upper-level baccalaureate nursing program located in New York City. Nursing faculty are being challenged to develop creative and economical solutions to expose nursing students to EHRSs in nonclinical settings.

  16. Promoting women's health in remote Aboriginal settings: Midwifery students' insights for practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackrah, Rosalie D; Thompson, Sandra C; Durey, Angela

    2015-12-01

    To describe midwifery students' insights on promoting health to Aboriginal women in remote Australia following a supervised clinical placement. Semistructured, in-depth interviews were conducted with all midwifery students who undertook the placement between 2010 and 2013. Aboriginal communities on the Ngaanyatjarra Lands, Western Australia. Undergraduate and postgraduate midwifery students from a Western Australian university. Remote cultural immersion clinical placement. Student learning related to culturally respectful health care delivery and promotion of health. Students observed that, despite vast distances, high rates of participation in a breast screening program were achieved due to the informal provision of culturally relevant information and support. Opportunistic encounters in communities also enabled sexual health messages to be delivered more widely and in less formal settings. The role played by Aboriginal Health Workers and female family members was vital. The importance of culturally respectful approaches to sensitive women's business, including discretion, the use of local language and pictorial representations of information, was recognised as was the socio-cultural context and its impact on the health and well-being of the community. Although short in duration, the Ngaanyatjarra Lands clinical placement provided midwifery students with a rare opportunity to observe the importance of local contexts and cultural protocols in Aboriginal communities, and to adapt health promotion strategies to meet local needs and ways of doing things. These strategies embraced the strengths, assets and capacities of communities, yet students also witnessed challenges associated with access, delivery and acceptance of health care in remote settings. © 2015 National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  17. A service-learning project to eliminate barriers to oral care for children with special health care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMattei, Ronda R; Allen, Jessica; Goss, Breanna

    2012-06-01

    Children with special health care needs face many barriers to oral care and are at high risk for oral disease. School nurses are in a unique position to promote oral wellness in this vulnerable population. Collaboration between school nurses and dental hygiene faculty resulted in the formation of a partnership between a university-based dental hygiene program and two special education districts in rural southern Illinois. Senior dental hygiene students participated in a school-based service-learning project that provided dental examinations, preventive services, and education to children with special health care needs. Evidence-based behavioral interventions were used to teach children to comply with oral procedures. School nurses mentored dental hygiene students in behavior management of children. Dental exams were provided to 234 children from four special education schools with the majority receiving cleanings and fluoride.

  18. Primary health eye care: evaluation of the competence of medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-10-17

    Oct 17, 2009 ... The ability of fifth-year medical students to perform fundoscopy on ... Keywords: primary health eye care; teaching fundoscopy; essential basic ... treatment is implemented at an early stage in the disease.3-5. Such screening and early treatment can reduce the risk of ... Students with a refractive error were.

  19. Online Collaborative Learning in Health Care Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    At our University, the Faculty of Health, Social Care and Education has delivered a variety of undergraduate and postgraduate courses via flexible distance learning for many years. Distance learning can be a lonely experience for students who may feel isolated and unsupported. However e-learning provides an opportunity to use technology to…

  20. Students' perspectives on basic nursing care education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huisman-de Waal, Getty; Feo, Rebecca; Vermeulen, Hester; Heinen, Maud

    2018-02-05

    The aim of the study is to explore the perspectives of nursing students on their education concerning basic nursing care, learned either during theoretical education or clinical placement, with a specific focus on nutrition and communication. Basic care activities lie at the core of nursing, but are ill-informed by evidence and often poorly delivered. Nursing students' education on basic care might be lacking, and the question remains how they learn to deliver basic care in clinical practice. Descriptive study, using an online questionnaire. Nursing students at the vocational and bachelor level of six nursing schools in the Netherlands were invited to complete an online questionnaire regarding their perception of basic nursing care education in general (both theoretical education and clinical placement), and specifically in relation to nutrition and communication. Nursing students (n=226 bachelor students, n=30 vocational students) completed the questionnaire. Most students reported that they learned more about basic nursing care during clinical placement than during theoretical education. Vocational students also reported learning more about basic nursing care in both theoretical education and clinical practice than bachelor students. In terms of nutrition, low numbers of students from both education levels reported learning about nutrition protocols and guidelines during theoretical education. In terms of communication, vocational students indicated that they learned more about different aspects of communication during clinical practice than theoretical education, and were also more likely to learn about communication (in both theoretical education and clinical practice) than were bachelor students. Basic nursing care seems to be largely invisible in nursing education, especially at the bachelor level and during theoretical education. Improved basic nursing care will enhance nurse sensitive outcomes and patient satisfaction and will contribute to lower healthcare

  1. Evaluation of a Behavioral Self-Care Intervention for Public Health Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Marney A.; Mayer, Margaret; Vanderlind, W. Michael; Allswede, Dana

    2018-01-01

    Background: Postgraduate education is recognized as a time of intense stress. Rates of anxiety and depression are elevated among graduate students, and longitudinal studies have documented increases in clinical symptoms over the course of training. Purpose: The current study was to evaluate whether an academically sponsored self-care intervention…

  2. The legacy of altruism in health care: the promotion of empathy, prosociality and humanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burks, Derek J; Kobus, Amy M

    2012-03-01

    This study aimed to examine concepts of altruism and empathy among medical students and professionals in conjunction with health care initiatives designed to support the maintenance of these qualities. We searched for the terms 'altruism', 'altruistic', 'helping', 'prosocial behaviour' and 'empathy' in the English-language literature published from 1980 to the present within the Ovid MEDLINE, PsycInfo and PubMed databases. We used conceptual analysis to examine the relationships among altruism, empathy and related prosocial concepts in health care in order to understand how such factors may relate to emotional and career burnout, cynicism, decreased helping and decreased patient-centredness in care. Altruistic ideals and qualities of empathy appear to decrease among some medical students as they progress through their education. During this process, students face increasingly heavy workloads, deal with strenuous demands and become more acquainted with non-humanistic informal practices inherent in the culture of medicine. In combination, these factors increase the likelihood that emotional suppression, detachment from patients, burnout and other negative consequences may result, perhaps as a means of self-preservation. Alternatively, by making a mindful and intentional choice to endeavour for self-care and a healthy work-life balance, medical students can uphold humanistic and prosocial attitudes and behaviours. Promoting altruism in the context of a compensated health care career is contradictory and misguided. Instead, an approach to clinical care that is prosocial and empathic is recommended. Training in mindfulness, self-reflection and emotion skills may help medical students and professionals to recognise, regulate and behaviourally demonstrate empathy within clinical and professional encounters. However, health care initiatives to increase empathy and other humanistic qualities will be limited unless more practical and feasible emotion skills training is

  3. Clinical treatment adherence of health care workers and students exposed to potentially infectious biological material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Mendes de Almeida

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To assess adherence to clinical appointments by health care workers (HCW and students who suffered accidents with potentially infectious biological material. METHOD A retrospective cross-sectional study that assessed clinical records of accidents involving biological material between 2005 and 2010 in a specialized unit. RESULTS A total of 461 individuals exposed to biological material were treated, of which 389 (84.4% were HCWs and 72 (15.6% students. Of the 461 exposed individuals, 307 (66.6% attended a follow-up appointment. Individuals who had suffered an accident with a known source patient were 29 times more likely to show up to their scheduled follow-up appointments (OR: 29.98; CI95%: 16.09-55.83. CONCLUSION The predictor in both univariate and multivariate analyses for adherence to clinical follow-up appointment was having a known source patient with nonreactive serology for the human immunodeficiency virus and/or hepatitis B and C.

  4. Current and future health care professionals attitudes toward and knowledge of statistics: How confidence influences learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghi, Heibatollah; Kornides, Melanie L

    2013-01-01

    Health care professionals require some understanding of statistics to successfully implement evidence based practice. Developing competency in statistical reasoning is necessary for students training in health care administration, research, and clinical care. Recently, the interest in healthcare professional's attitudes toward statistics has increased substantially due to evidence that these attitudes can hinder professionalism developing an understanding of statistical concepts. In this study, we analyzed pre- and post-instruction attitudes towards and knowledge of statistics obtained from health science graduate students, including nurses and nurse practitioners, enrolled in an introductory graduate course in statistics (n = 165). Results show that the students already held generally positive attitudes toward statistics at the beginning of course. However, these attitudes-along with the students' statistical proficiency-improved after 10 weeks of instruction. The results have implications for curriculum design and delivery methods as well as for health professionals' effective use of statistics in critically evaluating and utilizing research in their practices.

  5. Development of a culture of sustainability in health care organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Bernardo; West, Daniel J; Costell, Michael M

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to examine the concept of sustainability in health care organizations and the key managerial competencies and change management strategies needed to implant a culture of sustainability. Competencies and management development strategies needed to engrain this corporate culture of sustainability are analyzed in this document. This paper draws on the experience of the authors as health care executives and educators developing managerial competencies with interdisciplinary and international groups of executives in the last 25 years, using direct observation, interviews, discussions and bibliographic evidence. With a holistic framework for sustainability, health care managers can implement strategies for multidisciplinary teams to respond to the constant change, fine-tune operations and successfully manage quality of care. Managers can mentor students and provide in-service learning experiences that integrate knowledge, skills, and abilities. Further empirical research needs to be conducted on these interrelated innovative topics. Health care organizations around the world are under stakeholders' pressure to provide high quality, cost-effective, accessible and sustainable services. Professional organizations and health care providers can collaborate with university graduate health management education programs to prepare competent managers in all the dimensions of sustainability. The newly designated accountable care organizations represent an opportunity for managers to address the need for sustainability. Sustainability of health care organizations with the holistic approach discussed in this paper is an innovative and practical approach to quality improvement that merits further development.

  6. Knowledge translation in health care as a multimodal interactional accomplishment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Malene

    2014-01-01

    of their education where they are in clinical practice. The analysis is made possible through video recordings of how student nurses translate their theoretical knowledge into a professional situational conduct in everyday interactional accomplishments among supervisors and patients. The analysis shows how some......In the theory of health care, knowledge translation is regarded as a crucial phenomenon that makes the whole health care system work in a desired manner. The present paper studies knowledge translation from the student nurses’ perspective and does that through a close analysis of the part...... knowledge gets translated through the use of rich multimodal embodied interactions, whereas the more abstract aspects of knowledge remain untranslated. Overall, the study contributes to the understanding of knowledge translation as a multimodal, locally situated accomplishment....

  7. Nursing students' experiences with refugees with mental health problems in Jordan: A qualitative content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotevall, Camilla; Winberg, Elin; Rosengren, Kristina

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to describe Jordanian nursing students' experience of caring for refugees with mental health problems. According to refugees' experiences of crisis, a well-educated staff is needed to provide high quality of care due to mental health problems. Therefore, health professionals play an important role in creating an environment that promotes human rights regardless of ethnic origin. The study comprised eight interviews and was analysed using content analysis, a qualitative method that involves an inductive approach, to increase our understanding of nursing students' perspective and thoughts regarding caring for refugees with mental health problems. The results formed one category: to be challenged by refugees' mental health issues and three subcategories: managing refugees' mental health needs, affected by refugees' mental health, and improve mental healthcare for refugees. Language problems could be managed by using interpreters to decrease cultural clashes to facilitate equal healthcare. In addition, well-educated (theoretical knowledge) and trained (practical knowledge) nursing students have potential to fulfil refugees' care needs regardless of ethnicity or background by using nursing interventions built on communication skills and cultural competences (theory, practice) to facilitate high quality of healthcare. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The community health worker cultural mentoring project: preparing professional students for team work with health workers from urban communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwen, Laurie N; Schwolsky-Fitch, Elena; Rodriquez, Romelia; Horta, Greg; Lopez, Ivanna

    2007-01-01

    Community Health Workers or CHWs (also known by a variety of alternative titles) are health workers drawn from communities to provide access to care for members of their communities. CHWs have been documented as effective in delivering a variety of services in a culturally-sensitive manner, and in providing a bridge between health professionals and underserved or minority communities. Yet, CHWs have not been well incorporated into interdisciplinary health care teams. The majority of health professionals are not even aware of the possible role and skills of CHWs. Believing that the best time to educate professionals about this valuable health worker and ensure that CHWs become part of interdisciplinary health care teams is during the student years, the Hunter College Schools of the Health Professions, and the Community Health Worker Network of New York City developed a pilot project, the Community Health Worker Cultural Mentoring Project. Community Health Workers, who were members of the Network, served as "community mentors" for health professions students drawn from the programs of community health education, nursing, and nutrition. CHWs worked with faculty of selected courses in each of the professional programs, and served as panelists in these courses, presenting information about health beliefs and alternative health practices of diverse cultural groups in communities of New York City. Class sessions were first held in the fall of 2004; subsequent sessions were held in following semesters. Approximately 40 students participated in 7 classes, with 6 CHWs serving as mentors - two per class. At the end of the classroom presentations, students wrote reflections relating to their understanding of the CHW role and relevance for their future interdisciplinary practice. The majority of reflections met the goal of increasing professional students' understanding of the CHW role and skills. At this point, quantitative and qualitative data will need to be collected to

  9. Clinical undergraduate training and assessment in primary health care: Experiences gained from Crete, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fioretos Michael

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary Health Care (PHC is increasingly being introduced into undergraduate medical education. In Greece, the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Crete was the first to introduce a 4-week long training in primary health care. This paper presents the experiences gained from the initial implementation of the teaching of practice-based primary care in rural Crete and reports on the assessment scale that was developed. Methods 284 students' case write-ups from the 6 primary care units (PCUs where they were allocated for the period 1990 to 1994 were analysed. The demographic data of the students and patients and the number of home visits were studied. Content analysis of the students' write-ups was carried out, using an assessment scale consisting of 10 dichotomous variables, in order to quantify eight (8 primary qualitative criteria. Results Internal reliability was estimated by the index KR20 = 0.67. Face and content validity was found to conform to the standards set for the course, while logistic linear regression analysis showed that the quality criteria could be used as an assessment scale. The number of home visits carried out varied between the various different PCUs (p Conclusion The primary health care course achieved the objectives of introducing students to comprehensive, community oriented care, although there was variation between the PCUs. The assessment scale that was developed to analyse the case-write ups of the students provided data that can be used to evaluate the course.

  10. The Readiness of Students to Learn Interprofessional Teamwork in Antenatal Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Zakiyyatul Fuadah

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Indonesia as a developing country have a higher Maternal Mortality Rate (MMR. The prevention efforts is developing interprofessional collaborative practice (IPCP in the level of health care. Collaboration attitudes should start from education level through interprofessional education training and simulation for student. The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of interprofessional education training toward the readiness of students to learn interprofessional teamwork in antenatal care. Methods: Quasi-experimental design (pre test and post test without control with Time-Series Design. Participants used in this study were students of five semester in STIKes Karya Husada Kediri year of 2011/2012 and the number of samples are 60 students. Technique sampling using simple random. The data collected by used questionnaires Readiness Interprofessional Learning Scale (RIPLS and checklist observations using Teamwork Score (TWS. Anova, Friedman test, and Kruskal Wallis was used to statistically analyzed the data. Results: Readiness to learn interprofessional teamwork indicates the value of p = 0.001 thats means there are significant differences between the readiness before and after training IPE. Delta test showed that p value > 0.05 so there is no difference between the three programs study on readiness to learn interprofessional teamwork in antenatal care. Discussion: Interprofessional education training using simulation methods can affect the readiness of nursing, midwifery and nutritionist students for learning interprofessional teamwork in antenatal care. Keywords: interprofessional education, readiness, training and simulations, pre clinics students, antenatal care.

  11. Associations of family-centered care with health care outcomes for children with special health care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Dennis Z; Bird, T Mac; Tilford, J Mick

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the association of family-centered care (FCC) with specific health care service outcomes for children with special health care needs (CSHCN). The study is a secondary analysis of the 2005-2006 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs. Receipt of FCC was determined by five questions regarding how well health care providers addressed family concerns in the prior 12 months. We measured family burden by reports of delayed health care, unmet need, financial costs, and time devoted to care; health status, by stability of health care needs; and emergency department and outpatient service use. All statistical analyses used propensity score-based matching models to address selection bias. FCC was reported by 65.6% of respondents (N = 38,915). FCC was associated with less delayed health care (AOR: 0.56; 95% CI: 0.48, 0.66), fewer unmet service needs (AOR: 0.53; 95% CI: 0.47, 0.60), reduced odds of ≥1 h/week coordinating care (AOR: 0.83; 95% CI: 0.74, 0.93) and reductions in out of pocket costs (AOR: 0.88; 95% CI: 0.80, 0.96). FCC was associated with more stable health care needs (AOR: 1.11; 95% CI: 1.01, 1.21), reduced odds of emergency room visits (AOR: 0.90; 95% CI: 0.82, 0.99) and increased odds of doctor visits (AOR: 1.25; 95% CI: 1.14, 1.37). Our study demonstrates associations of positive health and family outcomes with FCC. Realizing the health care delivery benefits of FCC may require additional encounters to build key elements of trust and partnership.

  12. Training socially responsive health care graduates: is service learning an effective educational approach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mc Menamin, Ruth; Mc Grath, Margaret; Cantillon, Peter; Mac Farlane, Anne

    2014-04-01

    Health care educators strive to train graduates who are socially responsive and can act as "change agents" for communities they serve. Service learning (SL) is increasingly being used to teach the social aspects of health care and develop students' social responsiveness. However, the effectiveness of SL as an educational intervention has not been established. To assess the evidence for the effectiveness of SL. Seven electronic databases were searched up to 2012 and included all articles on SL for pre-professional health care students. Hand searching was also conducted. A total of 1485 articles were identified, 53 fulfilled the search and quality appraisal criteria and were reviewed across six domains of potential SL effects: (i) personal and interpersonal development; (ii) understanding and applying knowledge; (iii) engagement, curiosity and reflective practice; (iv) critical thinking; (v) perspective transformation and (vi) citizenship. While SL experiences appear highly valued by educators and students the effectiveness of SL remains unclear. SL is different from other forms of experiential learning because it explicitly aims to establish reciprocity between all partners and increase students' social responsiveness. Impact studies based on the interpretative paradigm, aligned with the principles of social accountability and including all stakeholder perspectives are necessary.

  13. Participatory action inquiry using baccalaureate nursing students: The inclusion of integrative health care modalities in nursing core curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Roxane Raffin; Schaffrath, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    Nurses, nursing educators and students support the inclusion of integrative health care (IHC) into nursing core curriculum as a way to create nurses who deliver nursing care to the full extent of their scope of practice and advance evidenced based IHC. Because of the holistic nature of IHC modalities, research to investigate appropriate teaching strategies and potential efficacy of learning IHC in the baccalaureate core curriculum requires a holistic approach. Therefore a phenomenological exploration using participatory action inquiry was conducted at a large Midwestern university. Eighteen first year nursing students were selected as co-researchers. Their experiences in learning and delivering three 15 min IHC interventions (foot reflexology, lavender aromatherapy and mindful breathing) in an acute care setting were captured using reflexive journaling and participation in structured and organic communicative spaces. Of the patients approached, 67% accepted to receive one or more IHC modalities (147/219). Using van Manen's model for holistic data reduction three themes emerged: The experience of presence, competency and unexpected results. Learning IHC modalities is best supported by a self-reflective process that is constructed and modeled by a nurse faculty member with experience in delivering IHC modalities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Exposing Pharmacy Students to Challenges Surrounding Care of Young Children via a Novel Role-Emerging Placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantzourani, Efi; Deslandes, Rhian; Ellis, Laura; Williams, Greg

    2016-01-01

    Embedding opportunities for undergraduate pharmacy students to move between academic and practice environments is key to transform their perception of patient care and to facilitate learning of the skills required for the changing profession (Smith and Darracott, 2011). An approach adopted by many health care professions to prepare students for…

  15. Outcome and Impact Evaluation of a Transgender Health Course for Health Profession Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Hannan M; Garcia-Grossman, Ilana R; Quiñones-Rivera, Andrea; Deutsch, Madeline B

    2017-02-01

    Being transgender is associated with numerous health disparities, and transgender individuals face mistreatment and discrimination in healthcare settings. At the same time, healthcare professionals report inadequate preparation to care for transgender people, and patients often have to teach their own medical providers about transgender care. Our study aimed to evaluate the impact of an elective course for health profession students in transgender health that was implemented to address these gaps in provider knowledge. Students participated in a 10-session, lunch-hour elective course during the spring of 2015. To evaluate impact, course participants completed pre-, immediately post-, and 3-month postcourse questionnaires, including a previously validated nine-item transphobia scale, to determine the course's effect on knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about transgender health. Forty-six students completed the pre- and immediately postelective questionnaire (74% response rate). Compared with pre-elective surveys, immediately postelective scores demonstrated increased knowledge in most domains and reduced transphobia. Specific knowledge domains with improvements included terminology, best practices for collecting gender identity, awareness of the DSM-V gender dysphoria diagnosis, medications used for gender affirmation, and relevant federal policies. A previously validated transphobia scale was found to have good reliability in the current sample. This elective course led to positive short-term changes in measures of multiple knowledge domains and reduced measures of transphobia among health profession students. Further study is needed to assess the long-term impact. Our methods and findings, including the demonstration of reliability of a previously validated nine-item transphobia scale, serve as formative data for the future development of theory-based transgender medicine curricula and measures.

  16. Evaluation of School of health students' ethics position in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şen, Emine; Dal, Nursel Alp; Üstün, Çağatay; Okursoy, Algın

    2017-03-01

    The advances in science and technology increasingly lead to the appearance of ethical issues and to the complexity of care. Therefore, it is important to define the ethics position of students studying in health departments so that high quality patient care can be achieved. The aim of this study was to examine the ethics position of the students at Shool of Health of an University in western Turkey. The study design was descriptive and cross-sectional. The study population included 540 first, second, third, and fourth year students from the Departments of Nursing, Midwifery, and Rescue and Disaster Management in the 2013-2014 academic year. Data were collected with a Personal Identification Form and The Ethics Position Questionnaire. Obtained data were analyzed with Chi-square test, Confirmatory Factor Analysis, and Nested Analysis of Variance. Ethical considerations: Before conducting the research, approval was obtained from Ege University Clinical Research Ethics Committee in İzmir and written informed consent was taken from all the participants. There was no significant difference in the mean scores for the Ethics Position Questionnaire between the students in terms of years and fields of study. Although the mean scores for the subscale idealism did not differ between fields of study, the mean scores significantly differed between years of study. However, the mean scores for the subscale relativism did not differ in terms of years and fields of study. Whether students are idealistic or relativistic in terms of ethical judgment will be effective in ethical decision-making skills during patient care. Therefore, we need to define the factors that influence students' ethics position in the future. It is suggested that the courses and practices that teach students to be aware of their ethics position to create an ethical outlook can be placed in the curriculum in health schools.

  17. Developing graduate student competency in providing culturally sensitive end of life care in critical care environments - a pilot study of a teaching innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northam, Holly L; Hercelinskyj, Gylo; Grealish, Laurie; Mak, Anita S

    2015-11-01

    development and competence to manage culturally complex clinical issues such as end of life care, and is recommended as a framework for health care students to learn the skills required to provide culturally competent care in a range of culturally complex health care settings. Copyright © 2015 Australian College of Critical Care Nurses Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. "A constant struggle to receive mental health care": health care professionals' acquired experience of barriers to mental health care services in Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugema, Lawrence; Krantz, Gunilla; Mogren, Ingrid; Ntaganira, Joseph; Persson, Margareta

    2015-12-16

    In Rwanda, many people are still mentally affected by the consequences of the genocide and yet mental health care facilities are scarce. While available literature explains the prevalence and consequences of mental disorders, there is lack of knowledge from low-income countries on health care seeking behavior due to common mental disorders. Therefore, this study sought to explore health care professionals' acquired experiences of barriers and facilitators that people with common mental disorders face when seeking mental health care services in Rwanda. A qualitative approach was applied and data was collected from six focus group discussions (FGDs) conducted in October 2012, including a total of 43 health care professionals, men and women in different health professions. The FGDs were performed at health facilities at different care levels. Data was analyzed using manifest and latent content analysis. The emerging theme "A constant struggle to receive mental health care for mental disorders" embraced a number of barriers and few facilitators at individual, family, community and structural levels that people faced when seeking mental health care services. Identified barriers people needed to overcome were: Poverty and lack of family support, Fear of stigmatization, Poor community awareness of mental disorders, Societal beliefs in traditional healers and prayers, Scarce resources in mental health care and Gender imbalance in care seeking behavior. The few facilitators to receive mental health care were: Collaboration between authorities and organizations in mental health and having a Family with awareness of mental disorders and health insurance. From a public health perspective, this study revealed important findings of the numerous barriers and the few facilitating factors available to people seeking health for mental disorders. Having a supportive family with awareness of mental disorders who also were equipped with a health insurance was perceived as vital for

  19. Knowledge and practices of oral health care in final year undergraduate nursing students: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suryakant C Deogade

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nursing personnel plays a crucial role in promoting health and preventing information dissemination in the community. Aim: to assess and evaluate the oral health knowledge and practices of final year nursing students of Jabalpur, Madhya Pradesh (India. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in five nursing colleges of Jabalpur. A total of 172 students participated in the survey, which were given a questionnaire that comprised 26 questions. The questionnaire were evaluated under four parts such as information on dental and oral health, oral hygiene practices, attitude toward dentist and dentistry, and interest to improve knowledge, after which the data were analyzed to compare the statistical significance among the variables. Results: 84.3% of the participants knew how many teeth we have in our mouth. Many of them were not aware of proper brushing method. However, they revealed an adequate knowledge toward the identification of disease and its relation to general health. They also showed knowledge regarding the effect of diet on oral health, but 83.1% of them were confused with the identification of tooth decay. Approximately 51.7% of participants were unsure about the number of visits a person should make to a dentist. Conclusion: Nursing undergraduates have adequate knowledge on the basic oral structure and identifying oral diseases. However, they are little puzzled with the brushing method, number of visits a person should make to a dentist. They were not updated with the specialties in dentistry. Many of them showed interest toward camps and clinical postings to enhance their knowledge toward oral health care.

  20. School nurses’ experiences working with students with mental health problems : A qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Jönsson, Julia; Maltestam, Malin; Bengtsson-Tops, Anita; Garmy, Pernilla

    2017-01-01

    The aim was to describe school nurses’ experiences working with students with mental health problems. In this inductive qualitative study, interviews were conducted with 14 school nurses in Sweden. The content analysis revealed three themes:(1) sense of worriedness about working with students with mental health problems, (2) taking care of students with mental health issues was an opportunity for personal and professional development, and (3) the experience of making a difference for young pe...

  1. [National Policy of Humanization and education of health care professionals: integrative review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Guilherme Correa; Meneguim, Silmara; Lima, Silvana Andréa Molina; Moreno, Vania

    2013-01-01

    The National Policy of Humanization aims at innovations in health production, management and care with emphasis on permanent education for workers in the Unified Public Health System and training of university students in the health care field. This study aimed to know, through an integrative review of the literature, the scientific production about the National Policy of Humanization and education of health care professionals, from 2002 to 2010. Ten articles were analyzed in thematic strand through three axes: humanization and users caring, humanization and the work process, humanization and training. The articles point to the need to overcome the biological conception, valuing cultural aspects of users. The work process is marked by the devaluation of workers and by users deprived of their rights. The training of health professionals is grounded in health services where the prevailing standards are practices that hinder innovative attitudes.

  2. Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Patient Care: Medical Students' Preparedness and Comfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, William; Brenman, Stephanie; Paradis, Elise; Goldsmith, Elizabeth S; Lunn, Mitchell R; Obedin-Maliver, Juno; Stewart, Leslie; Tran, Eric; Wells, Maggie; Chamberlain, Lisa J; Fetterman, David M; Garcia, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Phenomenon: Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals face significant barriers in accessing appropriate and comprehensive medical care. Medical students' level of preparedness and comfort caring for LGBT patients is unknown. An online questionnaire (2009-2010) was distributed to students (n = 9,522) at 176 allopathic and osteopathic medical schools in Canada and the United States, followed by focus groups (2010) with students (n = 35) at five medical schools. The objective of this study was to characterize LGBT-related medical curricula, to determine medical students' assessments of their institutions' LGBT-related curricular content, and to evaluate their comfort and preparedness in caring for LGBT patients. Of 9,522 survey respondents, 4,262 from 170 schools were included in the final analysis. Most medical students (2,866/4,262; 67.3%) evaluated their LGBT-related curriculum as "fair" or worse. Students most often felt prepared addressing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV; 3,254/4,147; 78.5%) and non-HIV sexually transmitted infections (2,851/4,136; 68.9%). They felt least prepared discussing sex reassignment surgery (1,061/4,070; 26.1%) and gender transitioning (1,141/4,068; 28.0%). Medical education helped 62.6% (2,669/4,262) of students feel "more prepared" and 46.3% (1,972/4,262) of students feel "more comfortable" to care for LGBT patients. Four focus group sessions with 29 students were transcribed and analyzed. Qualitative analysis suggested students have significant concerns in addressing certain aspects of LGBT health, specifically with transgender patients. Insights: Medical students thought LGBT-specific curricula could be improved, consistent with the findings from a survey of deans of medical education. They felt comfortable, but not fully prepared, to care for LGBT patients. Increasing curricular coverage of LGBT-related topics is indicated with emphasis on exposing students to LGBT patients in clinical settings.

  3. Innovating in health care management education: development of an accelerated MBA and MPH degree program at Yale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettigrew, Melinda M; Forman, Howard P; Pistell, Anne F; Nembhard, Ingrid M

    2015-03-01

    Increasingly, there is recognition of the need for individuals with expertise in both management and public health to help health care organizations deliver high-quality and cost-effective care. The Yale School of Public Health and Yale School of Management began offering an accelerated Master of Business Administration (MBA) and Master of Public Health (MPH) joint degree program in the summer of 2014. This new program enables students to earn MBA and MPH degrees simultaneously from 2 fully accredited schools in 22 months. Students will graduate with the knowledge and skills needed to become innovative leaders of health care organizations. We discuss the rationale for the program, the developmental process, the curriculum, benefits of the program, and potential challenges.

  4. Pharmaceutical care education in Kuwait: pharmacy students' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoue, Maram G; Awad, Abdelmoneim I; Schwinghammer, Terry L; Kombian, Samuel B

    2014-07-01

    Pharmaceutical care is defined as the responsible provision of medication therapy to achieve definite outcomes that improve patients' quality of life. Pharmacy education should equip students with the knowledge, skills, and attitudes they need to practise pharmaceutical care competently. To investigate pharmacy students' attitudes towards pharmaceutical care, perceptions of their preparedness to perform pharmaceutical care competencies, opinions about the importance of the various pharmaceutical care activities, and the barriers to its implementation in Kuwait. A descriptive, cross-sectional survey of pharmacy students (n=126) was conducted at Faculty of Pharmacy, Kuwait University. Data were collected via a pre-tested self-administered questionnaire. Descriptive statistics including percentages, medians and means Likert scale rating (SD) were calculated and compared using SPSS, version 19. Statistical significance was accepted at a p value of 0.05 or lower. The response rate was 99.2%. Pharmacy students expressed overall positive attitudes towards pharmaceutical care. They felt prepared to implement the various aspects of pharmaceutical care, with the least preparedness in the administrative/management aspects. Perceived pharmaceutical care competencies grew as students progressed through the curriculum. The students also appreciated the importance of the various pharmaceutical care competencies. They agreed/strongly agreed that the major barriers to the integration of pharmaceutical care into practice were lack of private counseling areas or inappropriate pharmacy layout (95.2%), lack of pharmacist time (83.3%), organizational obstacles (82.6%), and pharmacists' physical separation from patient care areas (82.6%). Pharmacy students' attitudes and perceived preparedness can serve as needs assessment tools to guide curricular change and improvement. Student pharmacists at Kuwait University understand and advocate implementation of pharmaceutical care while also

  5. Detection of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease by student nurses in primary health care: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleoniki Linariti

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Early detection of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseases (COPD is the key for its control and management in Primary Health Care. Nurses could significantly contribute to the early detection of COPD if they receive appropriate training and develop skills such as performing spirometry tests and assess early COPD’s signs and symptoms. Aim: To assess the ability of nursing students to detect undiagnosed cases of COPD through a designed spirometry program. Methods: Participants were approached following an open invitation by the local municipal authorities during January-June 2015 in 4 primary health care centres of the island of Crete, Greece. A screening program was conducted using two different diagnostic methods of COPD. All participants completed the ‘International Primary Care Airways Guidelines’ (IPAG questionnaire, a validated instrument for COPD cases identification and performed a spirometry, a gold standard method for the diagnosis of COPD. Nursing students were trained for one month.Two different diagnoses of COPD were given using the interpretations of the spirometry tests and IPAG results for each individual participant (IPAG & GOLD standards. Diagnosis of COPD was based on the spirometry values using the GOLD recommendations (fixed ratio FEV1/FVC<70%. The capacity of nursing students in detecting COPD was based on the degree of agreement (Kappa test and ROC curve between the two diagnoses of COPD (IPAG & GOLD. P-values <0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: The mean age of the 390 participants was 55.6 (12.7 years old and 46.9% were male. The prevalence of COPD was 20% (78 cases according to IPAG questionnaire and 12.1% (47 cases according to spirometry. However, 31 cases of COPD that were detected using the IPAG, were classified as normal in spirometry, showing middle level of agreement (Kappa=0.71, p<0.001, 47/78 cases. Consequently, a sensitivity and specificity analysis was performed reported

  6. Disability studies and health care curriculum: the great divide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Sandra

    2004-01-01

    Models or paradigms of disability are used to guide health care professionals' perceptions so that they can serve people with disabilities, enhance their futures, and facilitate the resources they need. Health care curricula, which in essence train students to make such decisions, are influenced by these models. The medical model, which locates disability within the individual, assumes the individual with a disability is a victim who must be cured or made more normal. The functional-limitation paradigm expands on the medical model, focusing on the interaction of physical or mental limitations with social and environmental factors. The economic model, based on the concept of employability, emphasizes a health-related inability (or limited ability) to work rather than physical functioning of the individual. The sociopolitical model views disability as a policy and civil rights issue. Health care professionals face a dilemma as the disability rights movement demands a shift in social power from the paternalistic view of the medical model to the autonomist view of the sociopolitical model. The question is asked if curricula are preparing our future health care professionals to distinguish how to view each situation and each individual through the lens of the appropriate model.

  7. Advancing LGBT Health Care Policies and Clinical Care Within a Large Academic Health Care System: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruben, Mollie A; Shipherd, Jillian C; Topor, David; AhnAllen, Christopher G; Sloan, Colleen A; Walton, Heather M; Matza, Alexis R; Trezza, Glenn R

    2017-01-01

    Culturally competent health care is especially important among sexual and gender minority patients because poor cultural competence contributes to health disparities. There is a need to understand how to improve health care quality and delivery for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) veterans in particular, because they have unique physical and mental health needs as both LGBT individuals and veterans. The following article is a case study that focuses on the policy and clinical care practices related to LGBT clinical competency, professional training, and ethical provision of care for veteran patients in the VA Boston Healthcare System. We apply Betancourt et al.'s (2003) cultural competence framework to outline the steps that VA Boston Healthcare System took to increase cultural competency at the organizational, structural, and clinical level. By sharing our experiences, we aim to provide a model and steps for other health care systems and programs, including other VA health care systems, large academic health care systems, community health care systems, and mental health care systems, interested in developing LGBT health initiatives.

  8. Diagnosis of compliance of health care product processing in Primary Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Eugenia Roseira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: identify the compliance of health care product processing in Primary Health Care and assess possible differences in the compliance among the services characterized as Primary Health Care Service and Family Health Service. Method: quantitative, observational, descriptive and inferential study with the application of structure, process and outcome indicators of the health care product processing at ten services in an interior city of the State of São Paulo - Brazil. Results: for all indicators, the compliance indices were inferior to the ideal levels. No statistically significant difference was found in the indicators between the two types of services investigated. The health care product cleaning indicators obtained the lowest compliance index, while the indicator technical-operational resources for the preparation, conditioning, disinfection/sterilization, storage and distribution of health care products obtained the best index. Conclusion: the diagnosis of compliance of health care product processing at the services assessed indicates that the quality of the process is jeopardized, as no results close to ideal levels were obtained at any service. In addition, no statistically significant difference in these indicators was found between the two types of services studied.

  9. Testing a bedside personal computer Clinical Care Classification System for nursing students using Microsoft Access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeg, Veronica D; Saba, Virginia K; Feeg, Alan N

    2008-01-01

    This study tested a personal computer-based version of the Sabacare Clinical Care Classification System on students' performance of charting patient care plans. The application was designed as an inexpensive alternative to teach electronic charting for use on any laptop or personal computer with Windows and Microsoft Access. The data-based system was tested in a randomized trial with the control group using a type-in text-based-only system also mounted on a laptop at the bedside in the laboratory. Student care plans were more complete using the data-based system over the type-in text version. Students were more positive but not necessarily more efficient with the data-based system. The results demonstrate that the application is effective for improving student nursing care charting using the nursing process and capturing patient care information with a language that is standardized and ready for integration with other patient electronic health record data. It can be implemented on a bedside stand in the clinical laboratory or used to aggregate care planning over a student's clinical experience.

  10. Educating Medical Laboratory Technologists: Revisiting Our Assumptions in the Current Economic and Health-Care Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Linder

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Health care occupies a distinct niche in an economy struggling to recover from recession. Professions related to the care of patients are thought to be relatively resistant to downturns, and thus become attractive to students typically drawn to more lucrative pursuits. Currently, a higher profile for clinical laboratory technology among college students and those considering career change results in larger and better prepared applicant pools. However, after decades of contraction marked by closing of programs, prospective students encounter an educational system without the capacity or vigor to meet their needs. Here discussed are some principles and proposals to allow universities, partnering with health-care providers, government agencies, and other stakeholders to develop new programs, or reenergize existing ones to serve our students and patients. Principles include academic rigor in biomedical and clinical science, multiple points of entry for students, flexibility in format, cost effectiveness, career ladders and robust partnerships.

  11. Applying the Health Belief Model to college students' health behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hak-Seon; Ahn, Joo

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate how university students' nutrition beliefs influence their health behavioral intention. This study used an online survey engine (Qulatrics.com) to collect data from college students. Out of 253 questionnaires collected, 251 questionnaires (99.2%) were used for the statistical analysis. Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) revealed that six dimensions, "Nutrition Confidence," "Susceptibility," "Severity," "Barrier," "Benefit," "Behavioral Intention to Eat Healthy Food," and "Behavioral Intention to do Physical Activity," had construct validity; Cronbach's alpha coefficient and composite reliabilities were tested for item reliability. The results validate that objective nutrition knowledge was a good predictor of college students' nutrition confidence. The results also clearly showed that two direct measures were significant predictors of behavioral intentions as hypothesized. Perceived benefit of eating healthy food and perceived barrier for eat healthy food to had significant effects on Behavioral Intentions and was a valid measurement to use to determine Behavioral Intentions. These findings can enhance the extant literature on the universal applicability of the model and serve as useful references for further investigations of the validity of the model within other health care or foodservice settings and for other health behavioral categories. PMID:23346306

  12. Social marketing meets health literacy: Innovative improvement of health care providers’ comfort with patient interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primack, Brian A.; Bui, Thuy; Fertman, Carl I.

    2010-01-01

    Objective It is essential to train health care providers to deliver care sensitive to the needs of diverse individuals with varying degrees of health literacy. We aimed to evaluate an innovative, theory-based, educational intervention involving social marketing and health literacy. Methods In 2006 at a large medical school, all first-year students were exposed to the intervention. They completed pre- and post-test anonymous surveys including demographic data, covariates, and key outcome variables. Paired t-tests and multiple linear regression were used to evaluate the intervention and to determine independent associations among the key outcome variables. Results Post-intervention scores were significantly higher than pre-intervention scores for social marketing (3.31 versus 1.90, p marketing and health literacy can improve skills that improve medical students’ comfort with patients of diverse backgrounds. Practice implications Health care providers can be taught educational principles and skills involved in developing effective patient education materials. These skills may improve providers’ comfort with direct patient interaction. PMID:17418522

  13. Health care operations management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carter, M.W.; Hans, Elias W.; Kolisch, R.

    2012-01-01

    Health care operations management has become a major topic for health care service providers and society. Operations research already has and further will make considerable contributions for the effective and efficient delivery of health care services. This special issue collects seven carefully

  14. A unique strategy for pediatric community health nursing for ADN students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janvier, K A

    1999-01-01

    Students were overwhelmingly positive when given the opportunity to evaluate the pilot project and the model of pediatric community health nursing. According to the students, the strong points of the model were the orientation before the community experience, the presence of faculty of the community, the ability to contact faculty when needed, and the postclinical conference. The students' comments confirmed the faculty's belief that a clinical experience in community health nursing must place more emphasis on the specialty of community health nursing to be meaningful for students. To do the of job of educating tomorrow's nurses, ADN faculty should develop new strategies for teaching the pediatric clinical component of community health nursing. Clearly, hospitals are no longer the exclusive sites where students learn about patient and family needs and nursing care delivery. Community-based and community-focused experiences will continue to be required so that nursing students are prepared to practice in a dynamic and changing healthcare environment.

  15. The role that graduate medical education must play in ensuring health equity and eliminating health care disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Maria E; Fried, Ethan D; DuBose, Thomas D; Nelson, Consuelo; Breida, Margaret

    2014-05-01

    Despite the 2002 Institute of Medicine report that described the moral and financial impact of health care disparities and the need to address them, it is evident that health care disparities persist. Recommendations for addressing disparities include collecting and reporting data on patient race and ethnicity, supporting language interpretation services, increasing awareness of health care disparities through education, requiring cultural competency training for all health care professionals, and increasing diversity among those delivering health care. The Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education places strong emphasis on graduate medical education's role in eliminating health care disparities by asking medical educators to objectively evaluate and report on their trainees' ability to practice patient-centered, culturally competent care. Moreover, one of the objectives of the Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education Clinical Learning Environment Review visits as part of the Next Accreditation System is to identify how sponsoring institutions engage residents and fellows in the use of data to improve systems of care, reduce health care disparities, and improve patient outcomes. Residency and fellowship programs should ensure the delivery of meaningful curricula on cultural competency and health care disparities, for which there are numerous resources, and ensure resident assessment of culturally competent care. Moreover, training programs and institutional leadership need to collaborate on ensuring data collection on patient satisfaction, outcomes, and quality measures that are broken down by patient race, cultural identification, and language. A diverse physician workforce is another strategy for mitigating health care disparities, and using strategies to enhance faculty diversity should also be a priority of graduate medical education. Transparent data about institutional diversity efforts should be provided to interested medical students

  16. Holistic health care: Patients' experiences of health care provided by an Advanced Practice Nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Irene; Lindblad, Monica; Möller, Ulrika; Gillsjö, Catharina

    2018-02-01

    Advanced Practice Nurse (APN) is a fairly new role in the Swedish health care system. To describe patients' experiences of health care provided by an APN in primary health care. An inductive, descriptive qualitative approach with qualitative open-ended interviews was chosen to obtain descriptions from 10 participants regarding their experiences of health care provided by an APN. The data were collected during the spring 2012, and a qualitative approach was used for analyze. The APNs had knowledge and skills to provide safe and secure individual and holistic health care with high quality, and a respectful and flexible approach. The APNs conveyed trust and safety and provided health care that satisfied the patients' needs of accessibility and appropriateness in level of care. The APNs way of providing health care and promoting health seems beneficial in many ways for the patients. The individual and holistic approach that characterizes the health care provided by the APNs is a key aspect in the prevailing change of health care practice. The transfer of care and the increasing number of older adults, often with a variety of complex health problems, call for development of the new role in this context. © 2017 The Authors. International Journal of Nursing Practice Published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  17. Income Disparities in the Use of Health Screening Services Among University Students in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Su Hyun; Joh, Hee-Kyung; Kim, Soojin; Oh, Seung-Won; Lee, Cheol Min; Kwon, Hyuktae

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Public health insurance coverage for preventive care in young adults is incomplete in Korea. Few studies have focused on young adults’ socioeconomic disparities in preventive care utilization. We aimed to explore household income disparities in the use of different types of health screening services among university students in Korea. This cross-sectional study used a web-based self-administered survey of students at a university in Korea from January to February 2013. To examine the associations between household income levels and health screening service use within the past 2 years, odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using logistic regression with adjustment for various covariables. Of 2479 participants, 45.5% reported using health screening services within 2 years (university-provided screening 32.9%, private sector screening 16.7%, and both 4.1%). Household income levels were not significantly associated with overall rates of health screening service use with a multivariable-adjusted OR (95% CI) in the lowest versus highest income group of 1.12 (0.87–1.45, Ptrend = 0.35). However, we found significantly different associations in specific types of utilized screening services by household income levels. The multivariable-adjusted OR (95% CI) of university-provided health screening service use in the lowest versus highest income level was 1.74 (1.30–2.34; Ptrend income level was 0.45 (0.31–0.66; Ptrend income groups among university students in Korea, although overall rates of health screening service use were similar across income levels. Low-income students were more likely to use university-provided health screening services, and less likely to use private sector screening services. To ensure appropriate preventive care delivery for young adults and to address disparities in disadvantaged groups, the expansion of medical insurance coverage for preventive health care, establishment of a usual source of

  18. Career mobility: equipping nurses for health care beyond the year 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doswell, W M

    1996-01-01

    Nurses are faced with uncertain employment in today's rapidly changing work place. The key to survival in this environment is to provide innovative, cost-effective, yet outcome-oriented methods of patient care delivery. Professional nurses and nursing students should make career mobility their watchword. Career mobility defines a planned trajectory which is flexible, role-expandable, and capable of adjusting to the sudden changes in direction which arise as nurses progress through their professional career. Nursing students must carefully examine the educational program they chose, and, once graduated, should use an innovative approach to the health care job market, with emphasis on professional nursing careers outside the traditional employment roles.

  19. Oral Health Care Delivery Within the Accountable Care Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Christine; Riggs, Sheila

    2016-06-01

    The accountable care organization (ACO) provides an opportunity to strategically design a comprehensive health system in which oral health works within primary care. A dental hygienist/therapist within the ACO represents value-based health care in action. Inspired by health care reform efforts in Minnesota, a vision of an accountable care organization that integrates oral health into primary health care was developed. Dental hygienists and dental therapists can help accelerate the integration of oral health into primary care, particularly in light of the compelling evidence confirming the cost-effectiveness of care delivered by an allied workforce. A dental insurance Chief Operating Officer and a dental hygiene educator used their unique perspectives and experience to describe the potential of an interdisciplinary team-based approach to individual and population health, including oral health, via an accountable care community. The principles of the patient-centered medical home and the vision for accountable care communities present a paradigm shift from a curative system of care to a prevention-based system that encompasses the behavioral, social, nutritional, economic, and environmental factors that impact health and well-being. Oral health measures embedded in the spectrum of general health care have the potential to ensure a truly comprehensive healthcare system. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. The Role of Grit in College Student Health Care Management Skills and Health-Related Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkey, Christina M; Bakula, Dana M; Gamwell, Kaitlyn L; Mullins, Alexandria J; Chaney, John M; Mullins, Larry L

    2017-10-01

    To examine the relationship of grit, an intrapersonal characteristic defined by perseverance and passion for long-term goals, to health care management skills and adolescent and young adult (AYA) health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Higher levels of grit were expected to relate to greater health care management skills and HRQoL, and skills were predicted to mediate the relationship between grit and HRQoL. Four hundred seventy undergraduates (Mdnage=19, interquartile range = 2) completed online questionnaires, including the short Grit Scale, Transition Readiness Assessment Questionnaire, and 36-Item Short Form Survey (SF-36) (HRQoL). Higher grit related to greater health care management skills (R2=0.15 p.05). This preliminary investigation illustrates the role of grit in AYA health, suggesting that it may be a target for interventions aimed at improving skills and HRQoL outcomes. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  1. Health Care Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starfield, Barbara

    1987-01-01

    The article reviews emerging health care delivery options for handicapped children. Cost structures, quality of care, and future prospects are considered for Health Maintenance Organizations, Preferred Provider Organizations, Tax Supported Direct Service Programs, Hospital-Based Services, and Ambulatory Care Organizations. (Author/DB)

  2. Health information technology and health care activists: Where is the place of Iranians?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoochani, Mobina; Kahouei, Mehdi; Hemmat, Morteza; Majdabadi, Hesamedin Askari; Valinejadi, Ali

    2017-10-01

    The level of knowledge and using health information technology by clinicians, students and staff has always been one of the essential issues in the field of health. The objective of the present study was to evaluate HIT knowledge, attitude, and practice habits among health care professionals and students in educational hospitals in Iran. This case study was carried out in 2016 on 539 personnel of 65 educational hospitals in Iran entailing three subgroups of physicians (n=128), medical students (n=97), and health record staff (n=314). A pretested self-administered questionnaire was designed to evaluate the knowledge, attitude and practice of health information technology. It was comprised of three parts of "baseline general characteristics", "knowledge categories", and "attitude and practice". In total, 28.8% of participants had a good level of knowledge about computer science, whereas 37.7% had a poor level of knowledge. A total of 40% showed good attitude and practice, while 25.6% had poor attitude and practice. Furthermore, 16.4% of physicians, 32% of students and 33.1% of health record staff had good knowledge, while poor knowledge was reported in 45.3% of physicians, 25.8% of students, and 37.6% of staff (p=0.304). The trend of good attitude and practice habits were respectively 28.9%, 50.5%, and 40.8% in physicians, students, and staff, whereas these trends were respectively 30.5%, 4.1%, and 29.9% for poor attitude and practice (p=0.163). Generally, the knowledge level of participants was positively related to the rate of attitude and practice (r=0.847, pinformation on practice of HIT.

  3. Knowledge and occupational exposure to blood and body fluids among health care workers and medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denić, Ljiljana Marković; Ostrić, Irena; Pavlović, Andrija; Dimitra, Kalimanovska Ostrić

    2012-01-01

    Health workers and medical students are at occupational risk of blood-borne diseases during the accidents, that is, via percutaneous injury or entry of blood or body fluids through the mucosa or injured skin. to review and analyze the knowledge, attitudes and perception of risks of bloodborne diseases of the clinical course students and health workers as well as the frequency of accidents. Cross-sectional study was carried out among the students of the Faculty of Medicine in Belgrade, and health workers of the Clinical Center of Serbia. The subjects responded anonymously to questionnaire specially designed for the study. Both students and health workers were aware, in a high percentage, of the fact that the risk of hepatitis B spread was about 30%. Significantly more students gave affirmative reply that blood as biological material was a potential hazard of HIV infection spread (p = 0.001), and significantly more students knew that HIV would not be spread by sweat (p = 0.001). Hepatitis B vacci-nation was administered only to 24.1% of students and 71.4% of health workers. About 10% of students and 65.5% of health workers experienced some accident. There was no significant difference of accidents bet-ween nurses/technicians and physicians (p > 0.05), as well as of accidents and a total length of service (p > 0.05). The majority of accidents occurred during the use of needle/sharp object (in 27.3% of students and 33.1% of health workers). About 40% of students and slightly over a half of the workers reported the accidents to appropriate authorities. Additional education in this field is considered necessary by 73% of students. During the studies and via continuous medical education it is necessary to upgrade the level of knowledge on prevention of accidents, what would, at least partially, influence their reduction.

  4. An Integrative Behavioral Health Care Model Using Automated SBIRT and Care Coordination in Community Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwinnells, Ronald; Misik, Lauren

    2017-10-01

    Efficient and effective integration of behavioral health programs in a community health care practice emphasizes patient-centered medical home principles to improve quality of care. A prospective, 3-period, interrupted time series study was used to explore which of 3 different integrative behavioral health care screening and management processes were the most efficient and effective in prompting behavioral health screening, identification, interventions, and referrals in a community health practice. A total of 99.5% ( P < .001) of medical patients completed behavioral health screenings; brief intervention rates nearly doubled to 83% ( P < .001) and 100% ( P < .001) of identified at-risk patients had referrals made using a combination of electronic tablets, electronic medical record, and behavioral health care coordination.

  5. Exploring undergraduate midwifery students' readiness to deliver culturally secure care for pregnant and birthing Aboriginal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackrah, Rosalie D; Thompson, Sandra C; Durey, Angela

    2015-04-16

    Culturally secure health care settings enhance accessibility by Aboriginal Australians and improve their satisfaction with service delivery. A culturally secure health service recognises and responds to the legitimate cultural rights of the recipients of care. Focus is upon the health care system as well as the practice and behaviours of the individuals within it. In an attempt to produce culturally secure practitioners, the inclusion of Aboriginal content in health professional programs at Australian universities is now widespread. Studies of medical students have identified the positive impact of this content on knowledge and attitudes towards Aboriginal people but relatively little is known about the responses of students in other health professional education programs. This study explored undergraduate midwifery students' knowledge and attitudes towards Aboriginal people, and the impact of Aboriginal content in their program. The study surveyed 44 students who were in their first, second and third years of a direct entry, undergraduate midwifery program at a Western Australian (WA) university. The first year students were surveyed before and after completion of a compulsory Aboriginal health unit. Second and third year students who had already completed the unit were surveyed at the end of their academic year. Pre- and post-unit responses revealed a positive shift in first year students' knowledge and attitudes towards Aboriginal people and evidence that teaching in the unit was largely responsible for this shift. A comparison of post-unit responses with those from students in subsequent years of their program revealed a significant decline in knowledge about Aboriginal issues, attitudes towards Aboriginal people and the influence of the unit on their views. Despite this, all students indicated a strong interest in more clinical exposure to Aboriginal settings. The inclusion of a unit on Aboriginal health in an undergraduate midwifery program has been shown to

  6. The Shifting Landscape of Health Care: Toward a Model of Health Care Empowerment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    In a rapidly changing world of health care information access and patients’ rights, there is limited conceptual infrastructure available to understand how people approach and engage in treatment of medical conditions. The construct of health care empowerment is defined as the process and state of being engaged, informed, collaborative, committed, and tolerant of uncertainty regarding health care. I present a model in which health care empowerment is influenced by an interplay of cultural, social, and environmental factors; personal resources; and intrapersonal factors. The model offers a framework to understand patient and provider roles in facilitating health care empowerment and presents opportunities for investigation into the role of health care empowerment in multiple outcomes across populations and settings, including inquiries into the sources and consequences of health disparities. PMID:21164096

  7. Attitudes Toward Autism Spectrum Disorders Among Students of Allied Health Professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonstein, Frida; Mashiach-Eizenberg, Michal

    2016-12-01

    The prevalence of autism has increased dramatically. The objectives of this study were to explore attitudes toward prenatal diagnosis to detect autism prenatally and avoid having an affected child and to understand social acceptability of these disorders among students of allied health professions. In this study, college students of nursing and health systems management answered a structured self-report questionnaire (n = 305). The first part addressed the respondent's personal data. The second part targeted the respondent's attitudes toward prenatal diagnosis of non-life-threatening disorders, including autism spectrum disorders. We found that almost two thirds of the students responded that they would not proceed with a pregnancy if the child were diagnosed with autism, and more than half thought that they would not continue with a pregnancy if the fetus were diagnosed with Asperger's. Age, level of religiosity, and years of education were influential. This study is limited in scope; however, the positive attitude of the students toward prenatal diagnosis to avoid having an affected child might also reflect a negative view of autism spectrum disorders in future health care professionals. Further research of attitudes and the social acceptability of autism spectrum disorders, particularly among health care professionals, is required.

  8. [Health care networks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Eugênio Vilaça

    2010-08-01

    The demographic and epidemiologic transition resulting from aging and the increase of life expectation means an increment related to chronic conditions. The healthcare systems contemporary crisis is characterized by the organization of the focus on fragmented systems turned to the acute conditions care, in spite of the chronic conditions prevalence, and by the hierarchical structure without communication flow among the different health care levels. Brazil health care situation profile is now presenting a triple burden of diseases, due to the concomitant presence of infectious diseases, external causes and chronic diseases. The solution is to restore the consistence between the triple burden of diseases on the health situation and the current system of healthcare practice, with the implantation of health care networks. The conclusion is that there are evidences in the international literature on health care networks that these networks may improve the clinical quality, the sanitation results and the user's satisfaction and the reduction of healthcare systems costs.

  9. Innovating in Health Care Management Education: Development of an Accelerated MBA and MPH Degree Program at Yale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, Howard P.; Pistell, Anne F.; Nembhard, Ingrid M.

    2015-01-01

    Increasingly, there is recognition of the need for individuals with expertise in both management and public health to help health care organizations deliver high-quality and cost-effective care. The Yale School of Public Health and Yale School of Management began offering an accelerated Master of Business Administration (MBA) and Master of Public Health (MPH) joint degree program in the summer of 2014. This new program enables students to earn MBA and MPH degrees simultaneously from 2 fully accredited schools in 22 months. Students will graduate with the knowledge and skills needed to become innovative leaders of health care organizations. We discuss the rationale for the program, the developmental process, the curriculum, benefits of the program, and potential challenges. PMID:25706023

  10. Strategies for oral health care for people with disabilities in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Li Jeng

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Oral health care for disabled patients is an important health issue in Taiwan. Disabled patients seeking dental care include those with mental retardation, cerebral palsy, epilepsy, Down syndrome, autism, xerostomia, AIDS, loss of function of major organs, and neurologic diseases. Current dental health care policies do not completely address this critical oral health issue. Most of these physically or mentally disabled patients cannot find suitable or qualified dental services in local dental clinics or even hospitals. Our current health care insurance system should provide greater benefits for dental practitioners who are willing to care for such disabled patients. The Department of Health (DOH should legislate policies to provide greater financial support and equipment and encourage hospital dental clinics and dentists to join this special oral care program. Dental schools, hospitals, and the DOH can also provide curricula and special training programs for both dentists and undergraduate dental students so that they can learn about diseases and dental care of these patients. The government and DOH should cover the fees of lawsuits if dentists have medical legal problems while treating patients with disabilities. Questions on special care dentistry can possibly be included in the National Board Dental Examination. The government can establish some national oral health care centers to treat these disabled patients. Through the development of effective preventive and treatment strategies, the incidence of oral diseases in these patients can be reduced in the future.

  11. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the_monk

    Journal of Community Medicine and Primary Health Care. 26 (1) 12-20 .... large proportions of the population work in the poor people use health care services far less than. 19 ... hypertension, cancers and road traffic accidents) below 1 dollar ...

  12. Supporting the Health and Well-Being of Transgender Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicero, Ethan C; Wesp, Linda M

    2017-04-01

    Throughout the United States, there has been a rise in public discourse about transgender people and transgender issues. Much of this attention stems from passed and proposed anti-LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer or questioning) legislation, including "bathroom bills" that would require transgender people to use public facilities corresponding with the sex designated on their birth certificates. With the recent discussion and legislation impacting school-aged children and adolescents, what does this mean for school nurses and how can they care and advocate for their transgender students? In this article, we aim to empower school nurses to join the discussion, advocate for inclusive and equitable school policies, and deliver gender-affirming care to transgender students. We will explain transgender identities; transgender-related stigma, prejudice, discrimination, and health concerns; gender-affirming approaches in caring for transgender youth; and implications for school nurses. School nurses play a key role in creating a space that is welcoming and affirming where transgender students can thrive.

  13. Do emotional intelligence and previous caring experience influence student nurse performance? A comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenhouse, Rosie; Snowden, Austyn; Young, Jenny; Carver, Fiona; Carver, Hannah; Brown, Norrie

    2016-08-01

    Reports of poor nursing care have focused attention on values based selection of candidates onto nursing programmes. Values based selection lacks clarity and valid measures. Previous caring experience might lead to better care. Emotional intelligence (EI) might be associated with performance, is conceptualised and measurable. To examine the impact of 1) previous caring experience, 2) emotional intelligence 3) social connection scores on performance and retention in a cohort of first year nursing and midwifery students in Scotland. A longitudinal, quasi experimental design. Adult and mental health nursing, and midwifery programmes in a Scottish University. Adult, mental health and midwifery students (n=598) completed the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire-short form and Schutte's Emotional Intelligence Scale on entry to their programmes at a Scottish University, alongside demographic and previous caring experience data. Social connection was calculated from a subset of questions identified within the TEIQue-SF in a prior factor and Rasch analysis. Student performance was calculated as the mean mark across the year. Withdrawal data were gathered. 598 students completed baseline measures. 315 students declared previous caring experience, 277 not. An independent-samples t-test identified that those without previous caring experience scored higher on performance (57.33±11.38) than those with previous caring experience (54.87±11.19), a statistically significant difference of 2.47 (95% CI, 0.54 to 4.38), t(533)=2.52, p=.012. Emotional intelligence scores were not associated with performance. Social connection scores for those withdrawing (mean rank=249) and those remaining (mean rank=304.75) were statistically significantly different, U=15,300, z=-2.61, p$_amp_$lt;0.009. Previous caring experience led to worse performance in this cohort. Emotional intelligence was not a useful indicator of performance. Lower scores on the social connection factor were associated

  14. Investigating Health Belief model component about sexual and reproductive health in college female students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Aslani

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: One of the critical steps in providing social and family health by concentrating on women's health is expanding sexual and reproductive health and addressing it in various aspects of the national and international level. Therefore in this study the goal is analyzing the components of the health belief model about sexual and reproductive health of female students of University of Medical Sciences of Shahroud. Methods: The present study is a cross-sectional analysis which conducted by participation of 397 female students of University of Medical Sciences of Shahroud in 2014. The data collecting tool was a questionnaire that was consisted of demographic information, knowledge and structures of health belief model. The data was analyzed by SPSS software and t-test and chi-square test. Results: The results showed that students had high self-efficacy (17.7 ± 2 in reproductive health care but the rate of their perceived barriers (3.02± 1.37 that was reported was almost high. Also there was a direct relation between demographic variable of age and the knowledge of students. The average score of students' awareness of sexually transmitted disease that was obtained was 9.97 ± 2.62. There was no significant relationship between age, marital status and their study major with structures of health belief model about sexually transmitted diseases and AIDS and its preventive behaviors. Conclusion: The findings of this study show that the self-efficacy of students about preventive behaviors of unwanted pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases and AIDS is high. In other hand the average of perceived barriers in students is relatively high. Considering the findings it is recommended that sexual and reproductive health programs should be applied in order to reduce the barriers and to further increase the ability of young people. Paper Type: Research Article.

  15. Digital health care--the convergence of health care and the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, S R

    2000-04-01

    The author believes that interactive media (the Internet and the World Wide Web) and associated applications used to access those media (portals, browsers, specialized Web-based applications) will result in a substantial, positive, and measurable impact on medical care faster than any previous information technology or communications tool. Acknowledging the dynamic environment, the author classifies "pure" digital health care companies into three business service areas: content, connectivity, and commerce. Companies offering these services are attempting to tap into a host of different markets within the health care industry including providers, payers, pharmaceutical and medical products companies, employers, distributors, and consumers. As the fastest growing medium in history, and given the unique nature of health care information and the tremendous demand for content among industry professionals and consumers, the Internet offers a more robust and targeted direct marketing opportunity than traditional media. From the medical consumer's standpoint (i.e., the patient) the author sees the Internet as performing five critical functions: (1) Disseminate information, (2) Aid informed decision making, (3) Promote health, (4) Provide a means for information exchange and support--the community concept, and (5) Increase self-care and manage demand for health services, lowering direct medical costs. The author firmly submits the Web will provide overall benefits to the health care economy as health information consumers manage their own health problems that might not directly benefit from an encounter with a health professional. Marrying the Internet to other interactive technologies, including voice recognition systems and telephone-based triage lines among others, holds the promise of reducing unnecessary medical services.

  16. 'Have a nice day': consumerism, compassion and health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturgeon, David

    Plans to implement a quality measurement framework that will rate nurses according to the level of care and compassion they demonstrate have been proposed and discussed in a number of Department of Health documents. From September 2010 degree-level nursing students in Wales will receive regular feedback on their communication skills and whether they are exhibiting sufficient levels of compassion. This article examines the reasons why there have been such moves by both politicians and health professionals to demonstrate, in quantifiable terms, that they are able to measure something that is frequently contextual and subject to individual interpretation. It explores how these moves have been influenced by the disclosure of unacceptable standards of care by the Patients Association report and the enquiry into Mid-Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust. It also discusses how the adoption of targets to evaluate care and compassion seems to reflect a market-driven and bureaucratic approach to health care that has resulted in a system in which measurability and outcome are considered the most important indicator of quality.

  17. Helping students with learning difficulties in medical and health-care education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, C R

    1990-05-01

    In health profession education many more students than is currently acknowledged experience often extreme difficulties with their studying. This booklet is intended to help them. It outlines an approach being adopted in the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Southampton by which students are encouraged to reflect on and discuss their approaches to studying, identifying their perception of their task and where necessary changing this. It is shown that students need to elaborate their knowledge, that is to structure the factual information they are receiving and to relate it to their practical experiences. A number of suggestions are made to encourage this, and their theoretical underpinnings are discussed. It is concluded that while inappropriate curricula and teaching methods and not some weakness on the part of students are largely the cause of learning difficulties, it will take time to change these. Establishing a kind of 'clinic' for helping students cope can be of value immediately.

  18. A needs analysis for a non-abusive intervention programme in the School of Health Care Sciences at the University of Pretoria

    OpenAIRE

    LO Fouché; R du Toit

    2006-01-01

    Due to feedback from students, student abuse during fieldwork, was brought to the attention of the researchers. The study aimed to determine whether a need for a nonabusive intervention programme (NIP) existed amongst the School of Health Care Science students at the University of Pretoria. All students enrolled at the School of Health Care Sciences completed a questionnaire. An overwhelming response indicated that the majority of students (95.85%) have a need for a non-abusive intervention p...

  19. Consumer Directed Health Care

    OpenAIRE

    John Goodman

    2006-01-01

    Consumer driven health care (CDHC) is a potential solution to two perplexing problems: (1) How to choose between health care and other uses of money, and (2) how to allocate resources in an industry where normal market forces have been systemically suppressed. In the consumer-driven model, consumers occupy the primary decision-making role regarding the health care that they receive. From an employee benefits perspective, consumer driven health care in the broadest sense may refer to limited e...

  20. Mental health care roles of non-medical primary health and social care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Penny

    2009-02-01

    Changes in patterns of delivery of mental health care over several decades are putting pressure on primary health and social care services to increase their involvement. Mental health policy in countries like the UK, Australia and New Zealand recognises the need for these services to make a greater contribution and calls for increased intersectoral collaboration. In Australia, most investment to date has focused on the development and integration of specialist mental health services and primary medical care, and evaluation research suggests some progress. Substantial inadequacies remain, however, in the comprehensiveness and continuity of care received by people affected by mental health problems, particularly in relation to social and psychosocial interventions. Very little research has examined the nature of the roles that non-medical primary health and social care services actually or potentially play in mental health care. Lack of information about these roles could have inhibited development of service improvement initiatives targeting these services. The present paper reports the results of an exploratory study that examined the mental health care roles of 41 diverse non-medical primary health and social care services in the state of Victoria, Australia. Data were collected in 2004 using a purposive sampling strategy. A novel method of surveying providers was employed whereby respondents within each agency worked as a group to complete a structured survey that collected quantitative and qualitative data simultaneously. This paper reports results of quantitative analyses including a tentative principal components analysis that examined the structure of roles. Non-medical primary health and social care services are currently performing a wide variety of mental health care roles and they aspire to increase their involvement in this work. However, these providers do not favour approaches involving selective targeting of clients with mental disorders.

  1. Investigation into health science students' awareness of occupational therapy: implications for interprofessional education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alotaibi, Naser; Shayea, Abdulaziz; Nadar, Mohammed; Abu Tariah, Hashem

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the level of awareness of the occupational therapy profession among final-year health sciences students at Kuwait University. This study utilized a survey targeting final-year students in the Health Sciences Center at Kuwait University schools of medicine, pharmacy, dentistry, and allied health sciences. The survey addressed awareness of occupational therapy, its scope of practice, work environments, and preference for learning more about the profession. Of the 244 surveys distributed, 132 were returned, for a 54% response rate. The proportion of those who knew about occupational therapy ranged from 94% (radiologic science) to a low of 17% (medicine). Most respondents learned about occupational therapy from colleagues (77.1%), rather than from their academic programs (28.1%). RESULTS indicated that about one fifth of students (21.4%) were unsure about the role of occupational therapists as members of the health care team. Preferences for learning more about the profession were consistent with interprofessional opportunities, such as observing an occupational therapy session (64.5%) and attending a workshop (63.6%) or presentation (59.8%). Although most respondents had some awareness of occupational therapy, specifics about its scope of practice and relevance to the health care team were lacking. Preferences for learning more about occupational therapy were consistent with the current trend for interprofessional education in health care. Implications for interprofessional education are presented.

  2. How do student nurses learn to care? An analysis of pre-registration adult nursing practice assessment documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Kate; Godbold, Rosemary; Wood, Pat

    2018-01-01

    There is international concern about the quality of nursing in resource constrained, high technology health care settings. This paper reports findings from a research study which explored the experiences and views of those involved in the education and learning of 'caring' with adult pre-registration students. A novel dataset of 39 practice assessment documents (PADs) were randomly sampled and analysed across both bachelors and masters programmes from September 2014-July 2015. Using an appreciative enquiry approach, the Caring Behaviours Inventory aided analysis of qualitative text from both mentors and students within the PADs to identify how student nurses learn to care and to establish whether there were any differences between Masters and Bachelors students. In contrast with existing research, we found a holistic, melded approach to caring. This combined softer skills with highly technologized care, and flexible, tailored approaches to optimise individualised care delivery. Both of these were highly valued by both students and mentors. Pre-registration MSc students tended to have higher perceptual skills and be more analytical than their BSc counterparts. We found no evidence to suggest that caring behaviour or attitudes diminish over the course of either programme. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Operations management in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, M D

    1995-01-01

    Health care operations encompass the totality of those health care functions that allow those who practice health care delivery to do so. As the health care industry undergoes dramatic reform, so will the jobs of those who manage health care delivery systems. Although health care operations managers play one of the most vital and substantial roles in the new delivery system, the criteria for their success (or failure) are being defined now. Yet, the new and vital role of the operations manager has been stunted in its development, which is primarily because of old and outdated antipathy between hospital administrators and physicians. This article defines the skills and characteristics of today's health care operations managers.

  4. Petroleum and Health Care: Evaluating and Managing Health Care's Vulnerability to Petroleum Supply Shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarz, Daniel; Bae, Jaeyong; Pierce, Jessica

    2011-01-01

    Petroleum is used widely in health care—primarily as a transport fuel and feedstock for pharmaceuticals, plastics, and medical supplies—and few substitutes for it are available. This dependence theoretically makes health care vulnerable to petroleum supply shifts, but this vulnerability has not been empirically assessed. We quantify key aspects of petroleum use in health care and explore historical associations between petroleum supply shocks and health care prices. These analyses confirm that petroleum products are intrinsic to modern health care and that petroleum supply shifts can affect health care prices. In anticipation of future supply contractions lasting longer than previous shifts and potentially disrupting health care delivery, we propose an adaptive management approach and outline its application to the example of emergency medical services. PMID:21778473

  5. The public health leadership certificate: a public health and primary care interprofessional training opportunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Christine C; Lake, Jeffrey L; Bradshaw, R Dana; Matson, David O

    2014-03-01

    This article describes a public health leadership certificate curriculum developed by the Commonwealth Public Health Training Center for employees in public health and medical trainees in primary care to share didactic and experiential learning. As part of the program, trainees are involved in improving the health of their communities and thus gain a blended perspective on the effectiveness of interprofessional teams in improving population health. The certificate curriculum includes eight one-credit-hour didactic courses offered through an MPH program and a two-credit-hour, community-based participatory research project conducted by teams of trainees under the mentorship of health district directors. Fiscal sustainability is achieved by sharing didactic courses with MPH degree students, thereby enabling trainees to take advantage of a reduced, continuing education tuition rate. Public health employee and primary care trainees jointly learn knowledge and skills required for community health improvement in interprofessional teams and gain an integrated perspective through opportunities to question assumptions and broaden disciplinary approaches. At the same time, the required community projects have benefited public health in Virginia.

  6. Nursing students' alternative beliefs regarding care for patients suffering from depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrue, Marta; Zarandona, Jagoba; Hoyos Cillero, Itziar

    2018-03-01

    Depression is an illness that constitutes a major challenge for Public Health worldwide. Therefore, there is a clear need to receive training to care for this type of patient. This study sets out to identify alternative non-scientific beliefs among nursing students regarding the topic of depression after studying the module of Psychopathology. This study enrolled 102 third year undergraduate nursing students. The students resolved a case on an individual basis in written form which was analysed qualitatively. In this study, we have found that, despite having undergone information-transfer educational training in relation to the physiopathology of depression, nursing students persist in holding unscientific beliefs about this condition. On the basis that the opinions of nurses about depression can influence the care of their future patients, it is important to consider these alternative beliefs as learning difficulties in order to design an effective teaching instruction. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. The Assessment of Athletic Training Students' Knowledge and Behavior to Provide Culturally Competent Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nynas, Suzette Marie

    2015-01-01

    Context: Culturally competent knowledge and skills are critical for all healthcare professionals to possess in order to provide the most appropriate health care for their patients and clients. Objective: To investigate athletic training students' knowledge of culture and cultural differences, to assess the practice of culturally competent care,…

  8. The relationships among self-care, dispositional mindfulness, and psychological distress in medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Slonim

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Past research suggests that medical students experience high levels of psychological distress. Objective: The aim of the current study was to investigate the relationships among engagement in self-care behaviours, dispositional mindfulness, and psychological distress. Methods: The sample consisted of 139 female and 68 male Australian medical students (N=207 aged 17–41 years (M=21.82, SD=3.62 across the 5 years of the Monash University medical course. Participants completed an online survey comprising a demographics questionnaire, the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire, the Health-Promoting Lifestyle Profile II, and the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scales. Results: Results revealed significant and interpretable multivariate correlations between distress and both mindfulness and self-care. Furthermore, the dispositional mindfulness observation subscale was found to be a significant moderator of the relationship between several dimensions of self-care and psychological distress. Conclusions: The present study points to the potential of self-care and mindfulness to decrease medical student distress and enhance well-being.

  9. Metacognitive factors that impact student nurse use of point of care technology in clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuiper, RuthAnne

    2010-01-01

    The utility of personal digital assistants (PDA) as a point of care resource in health care practice and education presents new challenges for nursing faculty. While there is a plethora of PDA resources available, little is known about the variables that effect student learning and technology adoption. In this study nursing students used PDA software programs which included a drug guide, medical dictionary, laboratory manual and nursing diagnosis manual during acute care clinical experiences. Analysis of student journals comparative reflective statements about the PDA as an adjunct to other available resources in clinical practice are presented. The benefits of having a PDA included readily available data, validation of thinking processes, and facilitation of care plan re-evaluation. Students reported increased frequency of use and independence. Significant correlations between user perceptions and computer self-efficacy suggested greater confidence in abilities with technology resulting in increased self-awareness and achievement of learning outcomes.

  10. Caring Relationships: Perspectives from Middle School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alder, Nora I.; Moulton, Margaret R.

    1998-01-01

    A year-long interpretive study, framed by the theory of symbolic interactionism, examined the meanings of care to middle school students. Five themes emerged: care as control, equality, forgiveness, concern, and good teaching. Findings indicated not only some agreement between students and teachers on meanings and symbolic acts of care, but also…

  11. Resilient health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hollnagel, E.; Braithwaite, J.; Wears, R. L.

    Health care is everywhere under tremendous pressure with regard to efficiency, safety, and economic viability - to say nothing of having to meet various political agendas - and has responded by eagerly adopting techniques that have been useful in other industries, such as quality management, lean...... production, and high reliability. This has on the whole been met with limited success because health care as a non-trivial and multifaceted system differs significantly from most traditional industries. In order to allow health care systems to perform as expected and required, it is necessary to have...... engineering's unique approach emphasises the usefulness of performance variability, and that successes and failures have the same aetiology. This book contains contributions from acknowledged international experts in health care, organisational studies and patient safety, as well as resilience engineering...

  12. Does the perception of fairness and standard of care in the health system depend on the field of study? Results of an empirical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damm, Kathrin; Prenzler, Anne; Zuchandke, Andy

    2014-04-12

    The main challenge in the context of health care reforms and priority setting is the establishment and/or maintenance of fairness and standard of care. For the political process and interdisciplinary discussion, the subjective perception of the health care system might even be as important as potential objective criteria. Of special interest are the perceptions of academic disciplines, whose representatives act as decision makers in the health care sector. The aim of this study is to explore and compare the subjective perception of fairness and standard of care in the German health care system among students of medicine, law, economics, philosophy, and religion. Between October 2011 and January 2012, we asked freshmen and advanced students of the fields mentioned above to participate in a paper and pencil survey. Prior to this, we formulated hypotheses. The data were analysed by micro econometric regression techniques. Data from 1,088 students were included in the study. Medical students, freshmen, and advanced students perceive the standard of care significantly as being better than non-medical students. Differences in the perception of fairness are not significant between the freshmen of the academic disciplines; however, they increase with the number of study terms. Besides the field of study, further variables such as gender and health status have a significant impact on perceptions. Our results show that there are differences in the perception of fairness and standard of care between academic disciplines, which might influence the interdisciplinary discussion on health care reforms and priority setting.

  13. Intimate partner and sexual violence screening practices of college health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Melissa A; Hutchinson, M Katherine

    2018-02-01

    Female college students experience higher rates of intimate partner violence (IPV) and sexual violence (SV) compared to men of all ages, older women and young women who are not attending college. Experts and medical organizations have issued recommendations that health care providers should routinely screen women for IPV and SV. However, most female college students report they are not being screened for IPV and SV at college health centers. This exploratory study sought to examine the IPV and SV screening practices of college health care providers and identify individual and organizational influences using a cross-sectional, quantitative survey design. Sixty-four health care providers (physicians, nurse practitioners and registered nurses) from five colleges and universities in the northeastern U.S. were invited to participate in an anonymous, web-based survey about their IPV/SV-related screening practices and beliefs, and organizational characteristics of their college health centers. Twenty-six health care providers completed surveys (56% response rate). The median reported IPV/SV screening rate was 15%. More IPV/SV screening was reported by nurse practitioners, providers at state colleges, and by those in health centers that prioritized IPV/SV screening and had greater organizational capacity for change. College health centers represent unique, yet often missed, opportunities to screen for IPV/SV in a high-risk population. Provider- and organization-level influences should be incorporated into future interventions to improve IPV/SV screening in college health centers. Future studies with larger numbers of colleges and providers are needed to better understand organizational influences and identify mediators and moderators of effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Differences in Health Care Needs, Health Care Utilization, and Health Care Outcomes Among Children With Special Health Care Needs in Ohio: A Comparative Analysis Between Medicaid and Private Insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Madhurima; Earley, Elizabeth R; Asti, Lindsey; Chisolm, Deena J

    This study explores comparative differentials in health care needs, health care utilization, and health status between Medicaid and private/employer-sponsored insurance (ESI) among a statewide population of children with special health care needs (CSHCN) in Ohio. We used data from the 2012 Ohio Medicaid Assessment Survey to examine CSHCN's health care needs, utilization, status, and health outcomes by insurance type. Adjusted multivariable logistic regression models were used to explore associations between public and private health insurance, as well as the utilization and health outcome variables. Bivariate analyses indicate that the Medicaid population had higher care coordination needs (odds ratio [OR] = 1.6; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-2.2) as well as need for mental/educational health care services (OR = 1.5; 95% CI; 1.1-2.0). They also reported higher unmet dental care needs (OR = 2.2; 95% CI, 1.2-4.0), higher emergency department (ED) utilization (OR = 2.3; 95% CI, 1.7-3.2), and worse overall health (OR = 0.6; 95% CI, 0.4-0.7), oral health (OR = 0.4; 95% CI, 0.3-0.5), and vision health (OR = 0.4; 95% CI, 0.2-0.6). After controlling for demographic variables, CSHCN with Medicaid insurance coverage were more likely to need mental health and education services (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.8; 95% CI; 1.2-2.6), had significantly more ED visits (AOR = 2.3; 95% CI, 1.5-3.5), and were less likely to have excellent overall health (AOR = 0.64; 95% CI, 0.4-0.9), oral health (AOR = 0.43; 95% CI, 0.3-0.7), and vision health (AOR = 0.38; 95% CI, 0.2-0.6) than those with private insurance/ESI. The CSHCN population is a highly vulnerable population. While Ohio's Medicaid provides greater coverage to CSHCN, disparities continue to exist within access and services that Medicaid provides versus the ones provided by private insurance/ESI.

  15. Basic student nurse perceptions about clinical instructor caring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerda-Marie Meyer

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Caring is the core of nursing and should be cultivated in student nurses. However, there are serious concerns about the caring concern in the clinical environment and in nursing education. Clinical instructors are ideally positioned to care for student nurses so that they in turn, can learn to care for their patients. Methods: A descriptive, comparative, cross-sectional and correlational quantitative research design with convenience sampling was conducted to describe the perceptions of junior student nurses (n = 148 and senior student nurses (n = 168 regarding clinicalin structor caring. A structured self administered questionnaire using the Nursing Student Perceptions of Instructor Caring (NSPIC (Wade & Kasper, 2006 was used. Descriptive statistics and hypotheses testing using parametric and non parametric methods were conducted. The reliability of the NSPIC was determined. Results: Respondents had a positive perception of their clinical instructors' caring. No relationship could be found between the course the respondents were registered for, the frequency of contact with a clinical instructor, the ages of the respondents and their perceptions of clinical instructor caring. The NSPIC was found to be reliable if one item each from two of the subscales were omitted. Conclusions: Student nurses perceived most strongly that a caring clinical instructor made them feel confident, specifically when he/she showed genuine interest in the patients and their care, and when he/she made them feel that they could be successful.

  16. Teaching Medical Students About "The Conversation": An Interactive Value-Based Advance Care Planning Session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Hillary D; Dukes, Joanna; Church, Skotti; Abbott, Jean; Youngwerth, Jean M

    2018-02-01

    Advance care planning (ACP) promotes care consistent with patient wishes. Medical education should teach how to initiate value-based ACP conversations. To develop and evaluate an ACP educational session to teach medical students a value-based ACP process and to encourage students to take personal ACP action steps. Groups of third-year medical students participated in a 75-minute session using personal reflection and discussion framed by The Conversation Starter Kit. The Conversation Project is a free resource designed to help individuals and families express their wishes for end-of-life care. One hundred twenty-seven US third-year medical students participated in the session. Student evaluations immediately after the session and 1 month later via electronic survey. More than 90% of students positively evaluated the educational value of the session, including rating highly the opportunities to reflect on their own ACP and to use The Conversation Starter Kit. Many students (65%) reported prior ACP conversations. After the session, 73% reported plans to discuss ACP, 91% had thought about preferences for future medical care, and 39% had chosen a medical decision maker. Only a minority had completed an advance directive (14%) or talked with their health-care provider (1%). One month later, there was no evidence that the session increased students' actions regarding these same ACP action steps. A value-based ACP educational session using The Conversation Starter Kit successfully engaged medical students in learning about ACP conversations, both professionally and personally. This session may help students initiate conversations for themselves and their patients.

  17. Learning professional ethics: Student experiences in a health mentor program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlois, Sylvia; Lymer, Erin

    2016-01-01

    The use of patient centred approaches to healthcare education is evolving, yet the effectiveness of these approaches in relation to professional ethics education is not well understood. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences and learning of health profession students engaged in an ethics module as part of a Health Mentor Program at the University of Toronto. Students were assigned to interprofessional groups representing seven professional programs and matched with a health mentor. The health mentors, individuals living with chronic health conditions, shared their experiences of the healthcare system through 90 minute semi-structured interviews with the students. Following the interviews, students completed self-reflective papers and engaged in facilitated asynchronous online discussions. Thematic analysis of reflections and discussions was used to uncover pertaining to student experiences and learning regarding professional ethics. Five major themes emerged from the data: (1) Patient autonomy and expertise in care; (2) ethical complexity and its inevitable reality in the clinical practice setting; (3) patient advocacy as an essential component of day-to-day practice; (4) qualities of remarkable clinicians that informed personal ideals for future practice; (5) patients' perspectives on clinician error and how they enabled suggestions for improving future practice. The findings of a study in one university context suggest that engagement with the health mentor narratives facilitated students' critical reflection related to their understanding of the principles of healthcare ethics.

  18. Social Work Student and Practitioner Roles in Integrated Care Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraher, Erin P; Richman, Erica Lynn; Zerden, Lisa de Saxe; Lombardi, Brianna

    2018-06-01

    Social workers are increasingly being deployed in integrated medical and behavioral healthcare settings but information about the roles they fill in these settings is not well understood. This study sought to identify the functions that social workers perform in integrated settings and identify where they acquired the necessary skills to perform them. Master of social work students (n=21) and their field supervisors (n=21) who were part of a Health Resources and Services Administration-funded program to train and expand the behavioral health workforce in integrated settings were asked how often they engaged in 28 functions, where they learned to perform those functions, and the degree to which their roles overlapped with others on the healthcare team. The most frequent functions included employing cultural competency, documenting in the electronic health record, addressing patient social determinants of health, and participating in team-based care. Respondents were least likely to engage in case conferences; use Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment; use stepped care to determine necessary level of treatment; conduct functional assessments of daily living skills; use behavioral activation; and use problem-solving therapy. A total of 80% of respondents reported that their roles occasionally, often, very often, or always overlapped with others on the healthcare team. Students reported learning the majority of skills (76%) in their Master of Social Work programs. Supervisors attributed the majority (65%) of their skill development to on-the-job training. Study findings suggest the need to redesign education, regulatory, and payment to better support the deployment of social workers in integrated care settings. This article is part of a supplement entitled The Behavioral Health Workforce: Planning, Practice, and Preparation, which is sponsored by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration and the Health Resources and Services

  19. Articulation Matrix for Home Health Aide, Nursing Assistant, Patient Care Assistant, Practical Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Instructional Development and Services.

    This document demonstrates the relationships among four Florida nursing education programs (home health aide, nursing assistant, patient care assistant, and practical nursing) by listing student performance standards and indicating which ones are required in each program. The 268 student performance standards are arranged in 23 areas of…

  20. Behavioral health and health care reform models: patient-centered medical home, health home, and accountable care organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yuhua; Casalino, Lawrence P; Pincus, Harold Alan

    2013-01-01

    Discussions of health care delivery and payment reforms have largely been silent about how behavioral health could be incorporated into reform initiatives. This paper draws attention to four patient populations defined by the severity of their behavioral health conditions and insurance status. It discusses the potentials and limitations of three prominent models promoted by the Affordable Care Act to serve populations with behavioral health conditions: the Patient-Centered Medical Home, the Health Home initiative within Medicaid, and the Accountable Care Organization. To incorporate behavioral health into health reform, policymakers and practitioners may consider embedding in the reform efforts explicit tools-accountability measures and payment designs-to improve access to and quality of care for patients with behavioral health needs.

  1. An Educational Program for Underserved Middle School Students to Encourage Pursuit of Pharmacy and Other Health Science Careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Carroll-Ann; Tran, Thao T; Tran, Linh

    2014-11-15

    To develop and implement an active, hands-on program for underrepresented minority (URM) seventh grade students and to determine if participation in the program increased interest in health care careers and understanding of pharmacy and physician assistant (PA) professions. A hands-on educational program was developed in conjunction with local middle school administrators and staff for URM 7th grade students. The program was designed to be hands-on and focus on pharmacy and PA laboratory skills. A discussion component was included, allowing participants to interact personally with pharmacy and PA students and faculty members. Students' responses to survey questions about interest in health care careers and knowledge about health professions were compared before and after 2 separate offerings of the program. After the program, significant increases were seen in participants' understanding of the pharmacy and PA professions. An increased percentage of participants reported interest in health care careers after the program than before the program. Introducing middle school-aged URM students to the pharmacy and PA professions through a hands-on educational program increased interest in, and knowledge of, these professions.

  2. Obesity, Diet, and Physical Activity Behaviors of Students in Health- Related Professions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Cynthia M.; Nobrega, Cheryl; Dulfan, Faina

    2013-01-01

    Few studies have examined incidence of obesity and healthy lifestyle behaviors in college students in health-related (HM) compared to other majors (NH). Since individuals are more likely to follow health promotion advice if the health care professional lives a healthy lifestyle, this information may be important in determining compliance of…

  3. From primary care to public health: using Problem-based Learning and the ecological model to teach public health to first year medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Cora R; Wong, Candice C; Azzam, Amin

    2012-06-01

    We investigated whether a public health-oriented Problem-Based Learning case presented to first-year medical students conveyed 12 "Population Health Competencies for Medical Students," as recommended by the Association of American Medical Colleges and the Regional Medicine-Public Health Education Centers. A public health-oriented Problem-Based Learning case guided by the ecological model paradigm was developed and implemented among two groups of 8 students at the University of California, Berkeley-UCSF Joint Medical Program, in the Fall of 2010. Using directed content analysis, student-generated written reports were coded for the presence of the 12 population health content areas. Students generated a total of 29 reports, of which 20 (69%) contained information relevant to at least one of the 12 population health competencies. Each of the 12 content areas was addressed by at least one report. As physicians-in-training prepare to confront the challenges of integrating prevention and population health with clinical practice, Problem-Based Learning is a promising tool to enhance medical students' engagement with public health.

  4. Student-led leadership training for undergraduate healthcare students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheriff, Ibrahim Hasanyn Naim; Ahmed, Faheem; Jivraj, Naheed; Wan, Jonathan C M; Sampford, Jade; Ahmed, Na'eem

    2017-10-02

    Purpose Effective clinical leadership is crucial to avoid failings in the delivery of safe health care, particularly during a period of increasing scrutiny and cost-constraints for the National Health Service (NHS). However, there is a paucity of leadership training for health-care students, the future leaders of the NHS, which is due in part to overfilled curricula. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of student-led leadership training for the benefit of fellow students. Design/methodology/approach To address this training gap, a group of multiprofessional students organised a series of large-group seminars and small-group workshops given by notable health-care leaders at a London university over the course of two consecutive years. Findings The majority of students had not previously received any formal exposure to leadership training. Feedback post-events were almost universally positive, though students expressed a preference for experiential teaching of leadership. Working with university faculty, an inaugural essay prize was founded and student members were given the opportunity to complete internships in real-life quality improvement projects. Originality/value Student-led teaching interventions in leadership can help to fill an unmet teaching need and help to better equip the next generation of health-care workers for future roles as leaders within the NHS.

  5. Health care in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weel, C. van; Schers, H.J.; Timmermans, A.

    2012-01-01

    This article analyzes Dutch experiences of health care reform--in particular in primary care--with emphasis on lessons for current United States health care reforms. Recent major innovations were the introduction of private insurance based on the principles of primary care-led health care and

  6. Using Technology to Increase Physical Activity in Health Profession Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Ann Stark

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Health profession students may need help establishing and maintaining positive health behaviors when they are in college. This study explored the effectiveness of text messaging as an innovative method for promoting an increase in daily physical activity. A convenience sample (N = 134 was recruited from students at a college of Health and Human Services in Michigan. The participants were randomized into an intervention or control group (n = 67 each. The intervention group received daily affective text messages encouraging more physical activity by taking more steps. The control group received only messages reminding them to report their number of steps. All of the participants received a pedometer, completed a demographics and daily habits questionnaire, and completed the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS. There was no significant difference between the intervention and control groups in their number of daily steps. However, the most inactive participants had a significant increase in steps during the study period. Health profession students’ lifestyle behaviors have consequences, as they become caregivers in our dynamic, demanding health-care system. For those with the greatest need for physical activity, encouraging such activity via text messaging may improve their ability to care for themselves and their clients.

  7. The Obama health care plan: what it means for mental health care of older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrell, Jeanne M

    2009-01-01

    Health care was an important issue for both the Obama and McCain election campaigns. Now that Barack Obama is poised to serve as the 44th President of the United States, many health care providers are focused on what Obama's administration will mean for new health care initiatives. This article focuses specifically on aspects of the Obama and Biden health care plan that affects mental health care for older adults.

  8. [Psychological effects of preventive voice care training in student teachers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusseck, M; Richter, B; Echternach, M; Spahn, C

    2017-07-01

    Studies on the effectiveness of preventive voice care programs have focused mainly on voice parameters. Psychological parameters, however, have not been investigated in detail so far. The effect of a voice training program for German student teachers on psychological health parameters was investigated in a longitudinal study. The sample of 204 student teachers was divided into the intervention group (n = 123), who participated in the voice training program, and the control group (n = 81), who received no voice training. Voice training contained ten 90-min group courses and an individual visit by the voice trainer in a teaching situation with feedback afterwards. Participants were asked to fill out questionnaires (self-efficacy, Short-Form Health Survey, self-consciousness, voice self-concept, work-related behaviour and experience patterns) at the beginning and the end of their student teacher training period. The training program showed significant positive influences on psychological health, voice self-concept (i.e. more positive perception and increased awareness of one's own voice) and work-related coping behaviour in the intervention group. On average, the mental health status of all participants reduced over time, whereas the status in the trained group diminished significantly less than in the control group. Furthermore, the trained student teachers gained abilities to cope with work-related stress better than those without training. The training program clearly showed a positive impact on mental health. The results maintain the importance of such a training program not only for voice health, but also for wide-ranging aspects of constitutional health.

  9. The medical student as a patient: attitudes towards involvement in the quality and safety of health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Rachel E; Joshi, Devavrata; Patel, Krishan; Briggs, M; Vincent, Charles A

    2013-10-01

    In recent years, factors that affect patients' willingness and ability to participate in safety-relevant behaviours have been investigated. However, how trained healthcare professionals or medical students would feel participating in safety-relevant behaviours as a patient in hospital remains largely unexplored. To investigate medical students' willingness to participate in behaviours related to the quality and safety of their health care. A cross-sectional exploratory study using a survey that addressed willingness to participate in different behaviours recommended by current patient safety initiatives. Three types of interactional behaviours (asking factual or challenging questions, notifying doctors or nurses of errors/problems) and three non-interactional behaviours (choosing a hospital based on the safety record, bringing medicines and a list of allergies into hospital, and reporting an error to a national reporting system) were assessed. One hundred and seventy-nine medical students from an inner city London teaching hospital participated in the study. Students' willingness to participate was affected (P interactional behaviours) whether the patient was engaging in the specific action with a doctor or nurse. Students were least willing to ask 'challenging' questions to doctors and nurses and to report errors to a national reporting system. Doctors' and nurses' encouragement appeared to increase self-reported willingness to participate in behaviours where baseline willingness was low. Similar to research on lay patient populations; medical students do not view involvement in safety-related behaviours equally. Interventions should be tailored at encouraging students to participate in behaviours they are less inclined to take on an active role in. Future research is required to examine students' motivations for participation in this important but heavily under-researched area. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. [The analysis of language competence and students' needs in teaching English for medical purposes to students of medicine, dentistry and health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marković, Vuk; Marosan, Zoran

    2011-01-01

    The paper deals with the analysis of the language competence of the students of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Care at the Medical School of Novi Sad University at the level of their basic language skills of general English and English for Medical Purposes. It also presents the analysis of students' needs of these skills within the field of teaching English for Medical Purposes. The aim of the study was to determine the level of students' language skills, knowledge of general and medical vocabulary and of academic writing in English and to determine which of the skills have the greatest priority in teaching English for Medical Purposes. The students were given a questionnaire and were asked to grade their language skills and knowledge of general and medical vocabulary and of academic writing on the scale from one to five. For the same skills, the students had to determine the level of priority in teaching English for Medical Purposes. The results were given for each of the groups of students evaluated, and the average grade was calculated for all the skills. The students' needs in terms of the priority of the evaluated skills were also presented in the same manner. Analysis Students' skills were analyzed according to the average grade acquired through the students' self-evaluation. The distinction was made between the general language skills and the knowledge of medical vocabulary and academic writing. The analysis of needs was conducted with the same distinction in mind. The study groups were analyzed separately and the general common conclusions for all the groups were made. For a successful program of English for Medical Purposes, it is necessary to conduct "the level of general language competence" test and to test the students' needs beforehand. The difference in the level of knowledge between different study groups points to a need of a student oriented teaching program. The analysis of needs shows the importance of all language skills which have to be

  11. Antenatal and obstetric care in Afghanistan--a qualitative study among health care receivers and health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, Zuhal; Brekke, Mette

    2013-05-06

    Despite attempts from the government to improve ante- and perinatal care, Afghanistan has once again been labeled "the worst country in which to be a mom" in Save the Children's World's Mothers' Report. This study investigated how pregnant women and health care providers experience the existing antenatal and obstetric health care situation in Afghanistan. Data were obtained through one-to-one semi-structured interviews of 27 individuals, including 12 women who were pregnant or had recently given birth, seven doctors, five midwives, and three traditional birth attendants. The interviews were carried out in Kabul and the village of Ramak in Ghazni Province. Interviews were taped, transcribed, and analyzed according to the principles of Giorgi's phenomenological analysis. Antenatal care was reported to be underused, even when available. Several obstacles were identified, including a lack of knowledge regarding the importance of antenatal care among the women and their families, financial difficulties, and transportation problems. The women also reported significant dissatisfaction with the attitudes and behavior of health personnel, which included instances of verbal and physical abuse. According to the health professionals, poor working conditions, low salaries, and high stress levels contributed to this matter. Personal contacts inside the hospital were considered necessary for receiving high quality care, and bribery was customary. Despite these serious concerns, the women expressed gratitude for having even limited access to health care, especially treatment provided by a female doctor. Health professionals were proud of their work and enjoyed the opportunity to help their community. This study identified several obstacles which must be addressed to improve reproductive health in Afghanistan. There was limited understanding of the importance of antenatal care and a lack of family support. Financial and transportation problems led to underuse of available care

  12. Improving eye care in the primary health care setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M de Wet

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the challenges facing primary health care in South Africa is the delivery of quality eye care to all South Africans. In this regard the role of the primary health care worker, as the first point of contact, is crucial. This paper reports on the problems primary health care workers experience in providing quality eye care in Region B of the Free State. Problems identified by those involved in the study include the cumbersome referral system, the unavailability of appropriate medicine at clinics, the insufficient knowledge of primary health care workers regarding eye conditions and the lack of communication between the various eye care service providers. Suggestions to address the problems identified included more in-service training of primary health care workers regarding eye conditions, liaison with NGO’s providing eye care, decentralisation of services and the establishment of an eye care committee in the region.

  13. Respiratory Home Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Us Home > Healthy Living > Living With Lung Disease > Respiratory Home Health Care Font: Aerosol Delivery Oxygen Resources ... Teenagers Living With Lung Disease Articles written by Respiratory Experts Respiratory Home Health Care Respiratory care at ...

  14. Barriers to the utilization of primary care services for mental health prolems among adolescents in a secondary school in malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aida, J; Azimah, Mn; Mohd Radzniwan, Ar; Y Iryani, Md; Ramli, M; Khairani, O

    2010-01-01

    To study the barriers toward the utilization of primary care services for mental health problems among adolescents in a secondary school in Hulu Langat, Selangor, Malaysia. This was a cross-sectional study conducted in July 2008 at a secondary school in Hulu Langat, Selangor. The respondents were selected using randomised cluster sampling among Form Four and Form Five students. Students were given self-administered questionnaire, consisting socio-demographic data and questions on their help-seeking barrier and behaviour. Help-seeking behaviour questions assess the use of medical facility and help-seeking sources. The formal help-seeking sources include from teachers, counsellors and doctors. The informal help-seeking sources include from friends, parents and siblings. A total of 175 students were included in the study. None of the students admitted of using the primary health care services for their mental health problems. Majority of the students were not aware of the services availability in the primary health care (97.1%). More than half of them thought the problems were due to their own mistakes (55.4%) and the problems were not that serious (49.1%). With regard to perception of the primary health care services, (43.2%) of the students were worried about confidentiality, half of them were concerned about other people's perception especially from their family members (44.6%) and friends (48.6%). Minority of them (10.8%) thought that nobody can help them. Few of them thought smoking (3.4%), alcohol (3.4%) and recreational drugs (1.1%) can solve their emotional problems. One of the major barriers identified in the students' failure to use the health care facilities was their unawareness of the availability of the service for them in the community. Thus there is a need to promote and increase their awareness on this issue.

  15. An innovative approach study “Health students example”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akyurt Nuran

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Globalization; A process of international integration arising from the exchange of products, ideas, cultures and worldviews. Globalization is an economic as well as political, technological and cultural process. As in other areas, technological developments have brought innovations into the training of health care workers, as well as access to information and the use of this information. These developments necessitated new orientations in the education systems of health students. In this study, the effects of computer assisted instructions involving the topics of medical and vocational terminology course on the attitudes and academic achievement levels of students’ use of medical and vocational terms were investigated. Marmara University Health Services Vocational School Medical Imaging students constitute the sample of the research. In the experimental group, medical and vocational terminology topics were processed and tested by computer aided instruction method for 12 weeks.

  16. An Interprofessional Approach to Exploring the Social Determinants of Health with Dental Hygiene Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapidos, Adrienne; Gwozdek, Anne

    2016-01-01

    The University of Michigan (U-M) Dental Hygiene Program collaborated with the U-M School of Social Work in developing a course entitled "Skills for Patient- and Family-Centered Care with Diverse Populations." Drawing upon disciplines including dentistry, social work, psychology, and sociology, this course transformed mandatory outreach rotations in safety-net dental settings from a freestanding senior-year experience to an integrated part of the dental hygiene curriculum. The course provided a space in which to discuss the interpersonal aspects of patient care, particularly those related to the social determinants of health. Among the students, a broad range of emotions, frustrations, and hopes were evident, suggesting that there is a need for forums through which students can connect their affective experiences to their practice of patient-centered care. While the course was designed for bachelor's level dental hygiene students, the content and process presented in this paper may be of interest to faculty housed within any allied health professional program, because core themes such as social justice, service-learning, and self-reflection transcend all health professions.

  17. Awareness of palliative care among diploma nursing students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suja Karkada

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The goal of palliative care is not to cure, but to provide comfort and maintain the highest possible quality of life for as long as life remains. The knowledge of nurses influences the quality of care provided to these patients. The present study aimed at identifying the level of knowledge and attitude of nursing students who are the future caretakers of patients, which helps to make recommendations in incorporating palliative care concepts in the nursing curriculum. Objectives: (1 To assess the level of knowledge of nursing students on palliative care; (2 To identify the attitude of nursing students towards palliative care; (3 To find the correlation between the knowledge and attitude of nursing students; (4 To find the association between nursing students′ knowledge, attitude and selected demographic variables. Materials and Methods: A correlative survey was carried out among 83 third-year Diploma Nursing students by using cluster sampling method from selected nursing schools of Udupi district. Results: The data analyzed showed that the majority (51% of them was in the age group of 21years and 92% of them were females. Only 43.4% of them were aware of the term palliative care and it was during their training period. The data showed that 79.5% of students had poor knowledge (6.4± 1.64 on palliative care and 92.8% of them had favorable attitude (56.7± 8.5 towards palliative care. The chi-square showed a significant association between knowledge and age (χ2 =18.52,P<0.01 of the nursing students. Conclusion: Palliative care aspects should be incorporated in the diploma nursing curriculum.

  18. Nursing students' spiritual well-being, spirituality and spiritual care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Mojgan; Farahani-Nia, Marhamat; Mehrdad, Neda; Givari, Azam; Haghani, Hamid

    2014-05-01

    Spiritual care should be considered an important part of holistic and multidisciplinary care and it has not been given much importance so far. We should begin with student nurses, who will soon be clinicians, to find out about potentiality of the nursing profession to put spiritual care into practice. Little has been known about spiritual well-being, spirituality, and spiritual care perspectives among nursing students. In this study, a comparison has been made in spiritual well-being, spirituality, and spiritual care perspectives between the first and fourth year baccalaureate nursing students. This is a descriptive-comparative study that was carried out among 283 nursing students. All the students were Iranians studying in the universities of Iran, Tehran, and Shahid Beheshti medical sciences. They volunteered to participate in the study. There were 105 first year students and 178 fourth year students. The questionnaires used were on Spiritual Well-being (SWB) Scale, Spiritual Perspective Scale (SPS), and Nursing Spiritual Care Perspective Scale (NSCPS). The statistical analysis was performed using the SPSS software, version 10. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics (distribution frequency, mean, and standard deviation). Mann-Whitney test was to compare each item and independent t-test to compare the mean values of two groups. Regarding spiritual well-being, there were no significant differences between the two groups. 98.8% of the first year students and 100% of the fourth year students were in the category of moderate spiritual well-being. Neither were there any significant differences between the two groups in spiritual perspective and spiritual care perspectives. The scores of fourth year nursing students were similar to those of first year students in spiritual well-being, spirituality, and spiritual care perspectives, though the fourth year students had already undergone 4-year nursing course. Including spiritual care in the curriculum of

  19. Marketing health care to employees: the structure of employee health care plan satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarenhas, O A

    1993-01-01

    Providing cost-contained comprehensive quality health care to maintain healthy and productive employees is a challenging problem for all employers. Using a representative panel of metropolitan employees, the author investigates the internal and external structure of employee satisfaction with company-sponsored health care plans. Employee satisfaction is differentiated into four meaningful groups of health care benefits, whereas its external structure is supported by the traditional satisfaction paradigms of expectation-disconfirmation, attribution, and equity. Despite negative disconfirmation, employees register sufficiently high health care satisfaction levels, which suggests some useful strategies that employers may consider implementing.

  20. Rural health care bypass behavior: how community and spatial characteristics affect primary health care selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Scott R; Erickson, Lance D; Call, Vaughn R A; McKnight, Matthew L; Hedges, Dawson W

    2015-01-01

    (1) To assess the prevalence of rural primary care physician (PCP) bypass, a behavior in which residents travel farther than necessary to obtain health care, (2) To examine the role of community and non-health-care-related characteristics on bypass behavior, and (3) To analyze spatial bypass patterns to determine which rural communities are most affected by bypass. Data came from the Montana Health Matters survey, which gathered self-reported information from Montana residents on their health care utilization, satisfaction with health care services, and community and demographic characteristics. Logistic regression and spatial analysis were used to examine the probability and spatial patterns of bypass. Overall, 39% of respondents bypass local health care. Similar to previous studies, dissatisfaction with local health care was found to increase the likelihood of bypass. Dissatisfaction with local shopping also increases the likelihood of bypass, while the number of friends in a community, and commonality with community reduce the likelihood of bypass. Other significant factors associated with bypass include age, income, health, and living in a highly rural community or one with high commuting flows. Our results suggest that outshopping theory, in which patients bundle services and shopping for added convenience, extends to primary health care selection. This implies that rural health care selection is multifaceted, and that in addition to perceived satisfaction with local health care, the quality of local shopping and levels of community attachment also influence bypass behavior. © 2014 National Rural Health Association.

  1. Treat and Teach Our Students Well: College Mental Health and Collaborative Campus Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Nancy S; Alderman, Tracy; Schneiber, Katharina; Swerdlow, Neal R

    2016-09-01

    This article presents a selective review of best practices for the psychiatric care of college student populations. It describes psychiatric advances in evidence-based practice for college students and offers a brief compendium for college health practitioners. College mental health services are delivered in a specialized milieu, designed to address many of the unique needs of college students and to support their successful scholastic advancement and graduation. Practical steps for implementing these best practices within the college community setting are identified, with a focus on the initial student evaluation, risk assessment, treatment planning and goal setting, and steps to optimize academic functioning during psychopharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatment. At the center of these practices is the use of a collaborative team and psychoeducation that engages students to actively learn about their mental health. By applying common sense and evidence-based practices within interdisciplinary and student-centered services, college communities can effectively meet the mental health needs of their students and empower them to reach their educational goals.

  2. Developments in health care in Nicaragua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halperin, D C; Garfield, R

    1982-08-05

    The 4 year war that resulted in the overthrow of Nicaragua's Somoza dictatorship cost 50,000 lives. In 1972 an earthquake killed 20,000 with 10,000 injured. Under Somoza health conditions had been worse than in neighboring countries with 35% of the urban and 95% of the rural population lacking access to potable water and only about 10% of the population receiving adequate medical care. 1/3 of the people contracted malaria at least once in their lives and 46-83% of the children were malnourished. Life expectancy at the time of the revolution was 52.9 years, infant mortality was between 120-140/1000. Since July 1979, however, about 70% of the people have regular medical care and health care education campaigns are widespread. Public health programs have administered vaccinations to thousands of children and literacy programs have incorporated elementary health principles into their curricula. However, despite these efforts malaria continued to rise from 4.4 people/1000 in 1978 to 9.4/1000 in 1980. After an antimalarial drug campaign in 1981, a 98% decline was noted in new cases of malaria. Poliomyelitis and tuberculosis prevention campaigns are likewise effective and oral rehydration centers have been set up to combat infant diarrhea. Having recently experienced a baby boom, a campaign to disseminate family planning information is being planned. Technical and professional health training has been expanded as well with a second medical school opening in Managua in 1981 along with growth in the amount of nursing school students. International aid has been crucial in health care with more than 24 countries sending medical supplies and personnel. Lack of equipment and facilities is holding back medical advances and there is a dilemma concerning physicians' time spent at public versus their private practices. Drugs remain the largest health import for the country even though their pharmaceutical manufacturers have increased production. 5 new hospitals are being built with

  3. [A Maternal Health Care System Based on Mobile Health Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xin; Zeng, Weijie; Li, Chengwei; Xue, Junwei; Wu, Xiuyong; Liu, Yinjia; Wan, Yuxin; Zhang, Yiru; Ji, Yurong; Wu, Lei; Yang, Yongzhe; Zhang, Yue; Zhu, Bin; Huang, Yueshan; Wu, Kai

    2016-02-01

    Wearable devices are used in the new design of the maternal health care system to detect electrocardiogram and oxygen saturation signal while smart terminals are used to achieve assessments and input maternal clinical information. All the results combined with biochemical analysis from hospital are uploaded to cloud server by mobile Internet. Machine learning algorithms are used for data mining of all information of subjects. This system can achieve the assessment and care of maternal physical health as well as mental health. Moreover, the system can send the results and health guidance to smart terminals.

  4. Toward a 21st-century health care system: Recommendations for health care reform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Arrow (Kenneth); A. Auerbach (Alan); J. Bertko (John); L.P. Casalino (Lawrence Peter); F.J. Crosson (Francis); A. Enthoven (Alain); E. Falcone; R.C. Feldman; V.R. Fuchs (Victor); A.M. Garber (Alan); M.R. Gold (Marthe Rachel); D.A. Goldman; G.K. Hadfield (Gillian); M.A. Hall (Mark Ann); R.I. Horwitz (Ralph); M. Hooven; P.D. Jacobson (Peter); T.S. Jost (Timothy Stoltzfus); L.J. Kotlikoff; J. Levin (Jonathan); S. Levine (Sharon); R. Levy; K. Linscott; H.S. Luft; R. Mashal; D. McFadden (Daniel); D. Mechanic (David); D. Meltzer (David); J.P. Newhouse (Joseph); R.G. Noll (Roger); J.B. Pietzsch (Jan Benjamin); P. Pizzo (Philip); R.D. Reischauer (Robert); S. Rosenbaum (Sara); W. Sage (William); L.D. Schaeffer (Leonard Daniel); E. Sheen; B.N. Silber (Bernie Michael); J. Skinner (Jonathan Robert); S.M. Shortell (Stephen); S.O. Thier (Samuel); S. Tunis (Sean); L. Wulsin Jr.; P. Yock (Paul); G.B. Nun; S. Bryan (Stirling); O. Luxenburg (Osnat); W.P.M.M. van de Ven (Wynand); J. Cooper (Jim)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe coverage, cost, and quality problems of the U.S. health care system are evident. Sustainable health care reform must go beyond financing expanded access to care to substantially changing the organization and delivery of care. The FRESH-Thinking Project (www.fresh-thinking.org) held a

  5. Intraprofessional, team-based treatment planning for oral health students in the comprehensive care clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattheos, Nikos; Storrs, Mark; Foster, Lea; Oberholzer, Theunis

    2012-12-01

    In 2009, Griffith University School of Dentistry and Oral Health, in Queensland, Australia, introduced into its various curricula the concept of team-based treatment planning (TBTP), aiming to facilitate intraprofessional, interdisciplinary training and peer learning among its students. Fifty student teams were organized, each of which included students from three programs (Dental Science, Oral Health Therapy, and Dental Technology) and three years of study (third-, fourth-, and fifth-year students). This study prospectively evaluated the impact of TBTP on students' perceptions and attitudes towards teamwork and their role in a team of peers. A total of 202 students who participated in fifty TBTP teams were prospectively surveyed at baseline and at six and twelve months after introduction of TBTP. "Reliable" and "responsible" were reported to be the most important qualities of both an effective team leader and member. Fifth-year students identified "hard-working" as an important quality of the ideal leader as opposed to the fourth-year students who ranked "supportive" higher. Attitudes of the fifth-year students towards TBTP appeared to have declined significantly from the previous years, while fourth-year students remained consistently more positive. In addition, fourth-year students appeared more likely to enjoy working in a team and considered themselves more effective in a team. No gender differences were observed, other than female students' appearing less confident to lead a team. It was concluded that the function of student-directed interdisciplinary, intraprofessional treatment planning teams might pose disproportionate strain on fifth-year students, impacting their attitudes to such modes of work.

  6. Integrating Community Health Workers (CHWs) into Health Care Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Julianne; Razi, Sima; Emery, Kyle; Quattrone, Westleigh; Tardif-Douglin, Miriam

    2017-10-01

    Health care organizations increasingly employ community health workers (CHWs) to help address growing provider shortages, improve patient outcomes, and increase access to culturally sensitive care among traditionally inaccessible or disenfranchised patient populations. Scholarly interest in CHWs has grown in recent decades, but researchers tend to focus on how CHWs affect patient outcomes rather than whether and how CHWs fit into the existing health care workforce. This paper focuses on the factors that facilitate and impede the integration of the CHWs into health care organizations, and strategies that organizations and their staff develop to overcome barriers to CHW integration. We use qualitative evaluation data from 13 awardees that received Health Care Innovation Awards from the Centers of Medicare and Medicaid Innovation to enhance the quality of health care, improve health outcomes, and reduce the cost of care using programs involving CHWs. We find that organizational capacity, support for CHWs, clarity about health care roles, and clinical workflow drive CHW integration. We conclude with practical recommendations for health care organizations interested in employing CHWs.

  7. Developing health science students into integrated health professionals: a practical tool for learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan Madeleine

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An integrated sense of professionalism enables health professionals to draw on relevant knowledge in context and to apply a set of professional responsibilities and ethical principles in the midst of changing work environments 12. Inculcating professionalism is therefore a critical goal of health professional education. Two multi-professional courses for first year Health Science students at the University of Cape Town, South Africa aim to lay the foundation for becoming an integrated health professional 3. In these courses a diagram depicting the domains of the integrated health professional is used to focus the content of small group experiential exercises towards an appreciation of professionalism. The diagram serves as an organising framework for conceptualising an emerging professional identity and for directing learning towards the domains of 'self as professional' 45. Objective This paper describes how a diagrammatic representation of the core elements of an integrated health professional is used as a template for framing course content and for organising student learning. Based on the assumption that all health care professionals should be knowledgeable, empathic and reflective, the diagram provides students and educators with a visual tool for investigating the subjective and objective dimensions of professionalism. The use of the diagram as an integrating point of reference for individual and small group learning is described and substantiated with relevant literature. Conclusion The authors have applied the diagram with positive impact for the past six years with students and educators reporting that "it just makes sense". The article includes plans for formal evaluation. Evaluation to date is based on preliminary, informal feedback on the value of the diagram as a tool for capturing the domains of professionalism at an early stage in the undergraduate education of health professional students.

  8. Design and implementation of a software for teaching health related topics to deaf students: the first experience in iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Maryam; Abbasi, Masoomeh; Bahaadinbeigy, Kambiz

    2015-04-01

    Deaf are not able to communicate with other community members due to hearing impaired. Providing health care for deaf is more complex because of their communication problems. Multimedia tools can provide multiple tangible concepts (movie, subtitles, and sign language) for the deaf and hard of hearing. In this study, identify the priority health needs of deaf students in primary schools and health education software has been created. Priority health needs and software requirements were identified through interviews with teachers in primary schools in Tehran. After training videos recorded, videos edited and the required software has been created in stages. As a result, health care needs, including: health, dental, ear, nails, and hair care aids, washing hands and face, the corners of the bathroom. Expected Features of the software was including the use of sign language, lip reading, pictures, animations and simple and short subtitles. Based on the results of interviews and interest of educators and students to using of educational software for deaf health problems, we can use this software to help Teachers and student's families to education and promotion the health of deaf students for learn effectively.

  9. Health care employee perceptions of patient-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbale, Salva Najib; Turcios, Stephanie; LaVela, Sherri L

    2015-03-01

    Given the importance of health care employees in the delivery of patient-centered care, understanding their unique perspectives is essential for quality improvement. The purpose of this study was to use photovoice to evaluate perceptions and experiences around patient-centered care among U.S. Veterans Affairs (VA) health care employees. We asked participants to take photographs of salient features in their environment related to patient-centered care. We used the photographs to facilitate dialogue during follow-up interviews. Twelve VA health care employees across two VA sites participated in the project. Although most participants felt satisfied with their work environment and experiences at the VA, they identified several areas for improvement. These included a need for more employee health and wellness initiatives and a need for enhanced opportunities for training and professional growth. Application of photovoice enabled us to learn about employees' unique perspectives around patient-centered care while engaging them in an evaluation of care delivery. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Attitude of Medical Students towards Occupational Safety and Health: A Multi-National Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Bhardwaj

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Work-related diseases contribute immensely to the global burden of diseases. Better understanding of attitudes of health care workers towards occupational safety and health (OSH is important for planning. Objective: To assess the attitude of medical students towards OSH around the globe. Methods: A questionnaire assessing the attitude towards OSH was administered to medical and paramedical students of 21 Medical Universities across the globe. In the current study 1895 students, aged 18–36 years, from 17 countries were included. After having performed a principal components analysis, the associations of interest between the identified components and other socio demographic characteristics were assessed by multivariate linear regression. Results: Principal component analysis revealed 3 components. Students from lower and lower-middle-income countries had a more positive attitude towards OSH, but the importance of OSH was still rated higher by students from upper-income countries. Although students from Asian and African continents showed high interest for OSH, European and South-Central American students comparatively rated importance of OSH to be higher. Paramedical students had more positive attitude towards OSH than medical students. Conclusion: The attitude of students from lower-income and lower-middle-income countries towards importance of OSH is negative. This attitude could be changed by recommending modifications to OSH courses that reflect the importance of OSH. Since paramedical students showed more interest in OSH than medical students, modifications in existing health care system with major role of paramedics in OSH service delivery is recommended.

  11. Encountering aged care: a mixed methods investigation of medical students' clinical placement experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annear, Michael J; Lea, Emma; Lo, Amanda; Tierney, Laura; Robinson, Andrew

    2016-02-04

    Residential aged care is an increasingly important health setting due to population ageing and the increase in age-related conditions, such as dementia. However, medical education has limited engagement with this fast-growing sector and undergraduate training remains primarily focussed on acute presentations in hospital settings. Additionally, concerns have been raised about the adequacy of dementia-related content in undergraduate medical curricula, while research has found mixed attitudes among students towards the care of older people. This study explores how medical students engage with the learning experiences accessible in clinical placements in residential aged care facilities (RACFs), particularly exposure to multiple comorbidity, cognitive impairment, and palliative care. Fifth-year medical students (N = 61) completed five-day clinical placements at two Australian aged care facilities in 2013 and 2014. The placements were supported by an iterative yet structured program and academic teaching staff to ensure appropriate educational experiences and oversight. Mixed methods data were collected before and after the clinical placement. Quantitative data included surveys of dementia knowledge and questions about attitudes to the aged care sector and working with older adults. Qualitative data were collected from focus group discussions concerning medical student expectations, learning opportunities, and challenges to engagement. Pre-placement surveys identified good dementia knowledge, but poor attitudes towards aged care and older adults. Negative placement experiences were associated with a struggle to discern case complexity and a perception of an aged care placement as an opportunity cost associated with reduced hospital training time. Irrespective of negative sentiment, post-placement survey data showed significant improvements in attitudes to working with older people and dementia knowledge. Positive student experiences were explained by in

  12. First and Fourth-Year Student's Perceptions about Importance of Nursing Care Behaviors: Socialization toward Caring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Valizadeh, Leila; Azimzadeh, Roghaieh; Aminaie, Nasim; Yousefzadeh, Sedigeh

    2014-06-01

    The essence of professional nursing is caring and so, nursing education must make caring as a significant part of their curricula. In this regard, little research exists about how nursing students perceive caring. The aim of this study is to investigate the nursing students' perception toward caring and thus, the impact of socialization process on their perception of caring will be determined. A cross-sectional study was done among all first and fourth-year nursing students (n=230) in Tabriz and Urmia faculties of nursing, 2012. Data were collected using Larson's Caring Questionnaire that assessed the importance of nursing care behaviors (n=50) in six dimensions: "being accessible", "explains and facilitates", "comforts", "anticipates", "trusting relationship" and "monitors and follows through". The importance of caring behaviors was evaluated by the first and fourth-year nursing students in moderate to high level and also, the both groups considered higher ranks for "monitors and follows through" and "being accessible" and lower ranks for "anticipates" and "trusting relationships". The fourth-year students only ranked "explains and facilitates" higher than the first-year students, but the "comforts" dimension is not differed significantly between groups. The findings demonstrated that nursing education in this study has not likely succeeded in producing intended changes in the nursing students' perceptions. It is recommended to exactly find the perceptual changes or in principle the professional socialization process of nursing students, more research using longitudinal designs be conducted to examine the differences in students' perceptions of caring upon entering and completing the nursing program.

  13. Controversies in faith and health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomkins, Andrew; Duff, Jean; Fitzgibbon, Atallah; Karam, Azza; Mills, Edward J; Munnings, Keith; Smith, Sally; Seshadri, Shreelata Rao; Steinberg, Avraham; Vitillo, Robert; Yugi, Philemon

    2015-10-31

    Differences in religious faith-based viewpoints (controversies) on the sanctity of human life, acceptable behaviour, health-care technologies and health-care services contribute to the widespread variations in health care worldwide. Faith-linked controversies include family planning, child protection (especially child marriage, female genital mutilation, and immunisation), stigma and harm reduction, violence against women, sexual and reproductive health and HIV, gender, end-of-life issues, and faith activities including prayer. Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, and traditional beliefs have similarities and differences in their viewpoints. Improved understanding by health-care providers of the heterogeneity of viewpoints, both within and between faiths, and their effect on health care is important for clinical medicine, public-health programmes, and health-care policy. Increased appreciation in faith leaders of the effect of their teachings on health care is also crucial. This Series paper outlines some faith-related controversies, describes how they influence health-care provision and uptake, and identifies opportunities for research and increased interaction between faith leaders and health-care providers to improve health care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Health-care users, key community informants and primary health care workers' views on health, health promotion, health assets and deficits: qualitative study in seven Spanish regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons-Vigués, Mariona; Berenguera, Anna; Coma-Auli, Núria; Pombo-Ramos, Haizea; March, Sebastià; Asensio-Martínez, Angela; Moreno-Peral, Patricia; Mora-Simón, Sara; Martínez-Andrés, Maria; Pujol-Ribera, Enriqueta

    2017-06-13

    Although some articles have analysed the definitions of health and health promotion from the perspective of health-care users and health care professionals, no published studies include the simultaneous participation of health-care users, primary health care professionals and key community informants. Understanding the perception of health and health promotion amongst these different stakeholders is crucial for the design and implementation of successful, equitable and sustainable measures that improve the health and wellbeing of populations. Furthermore, the identification of different health assets and deficits by the different informants will generate new evidence to promote healthy behaviours, improve community health and wellbeing and reduce preventable inequalities. The objective of this study is to explore the concept of health and health promotion and to compare health assets and deficits as identified by health-care users, key community informants and primary health care workers with the ultimate purpose to collect the necessary data for the design and implementation of a successful health promotion intervention. A descriptive-interpretive qualitative research was conducted with 276 participants from 14 primary care centres of 7 Spanish regions. Theoretical sampling was used for selection. We organized 11 discussion groups and 2 triangular groups with health-care users; 30 semi-structured interviews with key community informants; and 14 discussion groups with primary health care workers. A thematic content analysis was carried out. Health-care users and key community informants agree that health is a complex, broad, multifactorial concept that encompasses several interrelated dimensions (physical, psychological-emotional, social, occupational, intellectual, spiritual and environmental). The three participants' profiles consider health promotion indispensable despite defining it as complex and vague. In fact, most health-care users admit to having

  15. Predictors of Osteopathic Medical Students' Readiness to Use Health Information Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Robin J; Iqbal, Hassan; Rana, Arif M; Rana, Zaid; Kane, Michael N

    2017-12-01

    The advent of health information technology (HIT) tools can affect the practice of modern medicine in many ways, ideally by improving quality of care and efficiency and reducing medical errors. Future physicians will play a key role in the successful implementation of HIT. However, osteopathic medical students' willingness to learn, adopt, and use technology in a health care setting is not well understood. To understand osteopathic medical students' knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors regarding HIT and to identify factors that may be related to their readiness to use HIT. Using a cross-sectional approach, quantitative surveys were collected from students attending a large osteopathic medical school. Multivariate regression modeling was used to determine whether knowledge, attitudes, behaviors, and personal characteristics were associated with students' readiness to use HIT in future clinical practice. Six hundred four students responded to at least 70% of the survey and were included in the analysis. Multivariate modeling successfully explained the 26% of variance in predicting students' readiness to use HIT (F8,506=22.6, Ptechnology use, younger age, being male, and prior exposure to technology were associated with readiness to use HIT. Understanding students' level of HIT readiness may help guide medical education intervention efforts to better prepare future osteopathic physicians for HIT engagement and use. Innovative approaches to HIT education in medical school curricula that include biomedical informatics may be necessary.

  16. Infections related to health care in nurses’ education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suellen Karina de Oliveira Giroti

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to analyze the introduction of the theme infections associated to health care in nurses’ education. Methods: this is a qualitative study, with documentary analysis of 16 interdisciplinary modules of a nursing integrated curriculum from a State University in Paraná, conducted in 2013. Results: in the first year of the course there were no references to infections. From the second to the fourth years there were 44 entries that approached: hand washing, actions to prevent infections in newborns, children, adults, pregnant women and surgical patients in different health environments, biosecurity, Regulatory Standard n. 32, dental-medical-hospital supplies processing, among others. One highlighted strengths and flaws on the approach of this theme in many moments of an integrated curriculum. Conclusion: the infections associated to health care, given their relevance and complexity, should be introduced in a transversal and continuous way in nurse’s education, providing nursing students with a reflexive and critical learning.

  17. Facilitating LGBT Medical, Health and Social Care Content in Higher Education Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zowie Davy

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Increasingly, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT health care is becoming an important quality assurance feature of primary, secondary and tertiary healthcare in Britain. While acknowledging these very positive developments, teaching LGBT curricula content is contingent upon having educators understand the complexity of LGBT lives. The study adopted a qualitative mixed method approach. The study investigated how and in what ways barriers and facilitators of providing LGBT medical, health and social care curricula content figure in the accreditation policies and within undergraduate and postgraduate medical and healthcare teaching. This paper illustrates opposing views about curricula inclusion. The evidence presented suggests that LGBT content teaching is often challenged at various points in its delivery. In this respect, we will focus on a number of resistances that sometimes prevents teachers from engaging with and providing the complexities of LGBT curricula content. These include the lack of collegiate, colleague and student cooperation. By investing some time on these often neglected areas of resistance, the difficulties and good practice met by educators will be explored. This focus will make visible how to support medical, health and social care students become aware and confident in tackling contemporaneous health issues for LGBT patients.

  18. Duty to speak up in the health care setting a professionalism and ethics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topazian, Rachel J; Hook, C Christopher; Mueller, Paul S

    2013-11-01

    Staff and students working in health care settings are sometimes reluctant to speak up when they perceive patients to be at risk for harm. In this article, we describe four incidents that occurred at our institution (Mayo Clinic). In two of them, health care professionals failed to speak up, which resulted in harm; in the other two, they did speak up, which prevented harm and improved patient care. We analyzed each scenario using the Physician's Charter on Medical Professionalism and prima facie ethics principles to determine whether principles were violated or upheld. We conclude that anyone who works in a health care setting has a duty to speak up when a patient faces harm. We also provide guidance for health care institutions on promoting a culture in which speaking up is encouraged and integrated into routine practice.

  19. Association of functional limitation with health care needs and experiences of children with special health care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nageswaran, Savithri; Silver, Ellen Johnson; Stein, Ruth E K

    2008-05-01

    The goal was to evaluate whether having a functional limitation was associated with health care needs and experiences of children with special health care needs. We used caregivers' responses in the National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs (2001). Functional limitation was categorized as severe, some, or no limitation. We performed analyses of the relationships of functional limitation to measures of health care needs and experiences. Children with special health care needs with severe functional limitation were more likely to have received specialized educational services, to have had physician visits, and to have needed health services, compared with those with no limitation. They had significantly greater odds of delayed care, unmet health care and care-coordination needs, referral problems, dissatisfaction, and difficulty using health services, compared with those without limitation. Caregivers of children with special health care needs with severe limitation were twice as likely as those with no limitation to report that providers did not spend enough time, listen carefully, provide needed information, and make family members partners in the child's care. Compared with children with special health care needs without limitation, those with severe limitation had worse health insurance experiences, in terms of insurance coverage, copayments, being able to see needed providers, and problems with health insurance. The impact on families (financial problems, need to provide home care, or need to stop or to cut work) of children with special health care needs with severe functional limitation was much greater than the impact on families of children with special health care needs without limitation. For most measures examined, results for some limitation were between those for severe limitation and no limitation. Functional limitation is significantly associated with the health care needs and experiences of children with special health care needs.

  20. Analysis of College Students' Personal Health Information Activities: Online Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sujin; Sinn, Donghee; Syn, Sue Yeon

    2018-04-20

    With abundant personal health information at hand, individuals are faced with a critical challenge in evaluating the informational value of health care records to keep useful information and discard that which is determined useless. Young, healthy college students who were previously dependents of adult parents or caregivers are less likely to be concerned with disease management. Personal health information management (PHIM) is a special case of personal information management (PIM) that is associated with multiple interactions among varying stakeholders and systems. However, there has been limited evidence to understand informational or behavioral underpinning of the college students' PHIM activities, which can influence their health in general throughout their lifetime. This study aimed to investigate demographic and academic profiles of college students with relevance to PHIM activities. Next, we sought to construct major PHIM-related activity components and perceptions among college students. Finally, we sought to discover major factors predicting core PHIM activities among college students we sampled. A Web survey was administered to collect responses about PHIM behaviors and perceptions among college students from the University of Kentucky from January through March 2017. A total of 1408 college students were included in the analysis. PHIM perceptions, demographics, and academic variations were used as independent variables to predict diverse PHIM activities using a principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical regression analyses (SPSS v.24, IBM Corp, Armonk, NY, USA). Majority of the participants were female (956/1408, 67.90%), and the age distribution of this population included an adequate representation of college students of all ages. The most preferred health information resources were family (612/1408, 43.47%), health care professionals (366/1408, 26.00%), friends (27/1408, 1.91%), and the internet (157/1408, 11.15%). Organizational or

  1. Health Care Efficiencies: Consolidation and Alternative Models vs. Health Care and Antitrust Regulation - Irreconcilable Differences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Michael W

    2017-11-01

    Despite the U.S. substantially outspending peer high income nations with almost 18% of GDP dedicated to health care, on any number of statistical measurements from life expectancy to birth rates to chronic disease, 1 the U.S. achieves inferior health outcomes. In short, Americans receive a very disappointing return on investment on their health care dollars, causing economic and social strain. 2 Accordingly, the debates rage on: what is the top driver of health care spending? Among the culprits: poor communication and coordination among disparate providers, paperwork required by payors and regulations, well-intentioned physicians overprescribing treatments, drugs and devices, outright fraud and abuse, and medical malpractice litigation. Fundamentally, what is the best way to reduce U.S. health care spending, while improving the patient experience of care in terms of quality and satisfaction, and driving better patient health outcomes? Mergers, partnerships, and consolidation in the health care industry, new care delivery models like Accountable Care Organizations and integrated care systems, bundled payments, information technology, innovation through new drugs and new medical devices, or some combination of the foregoing? More importantly, recent ambitious reform efforts fall short of a cohesive approach, leaving fundamental internal inconsistencies across divergent arms of the federal government, raising the issue of whether the U.S. health care system can drive sufficient efficiencies within the current health care and antitrust regulatory environments. While debate rages on Capitol Hill over "repeal and replace," only limited attention has been directed toward reforming the current "fee-for-service" model pursuant to which providers are paid for volume of care rather than quality or outcomes. Indeed, both the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act ("ACA") 3 and proposals for its replacement focus primarily on the reach and cost of providing coverage for

  2. Solving Interoperability in Translational Health. Perspectives of Students from the International Partnership in Health Informatics Education (IPHIE) 2016 Master Class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Anne M; Facelli, Julio C; Jaspers, Monique; Wetter, Thomas; Pfeifer, Daniel; Gatewood, Laël Cranmer; Adam, Terry; Li, Yu-Chuan; Lin, Ming-Chin; Evans, R Scott; Beukenhorst, Anna; van Mens, Hugo Johan Theodoore; Tensen, Esmee; Bock, Christian; Fendrich, Laura; Seitz, Peter; Suleder, Julian; Aldelkhyyel, Ranyah; Bridgeman, Kent; Hu, Zhen; Sattler, Aaron; Guo, Shin-Yi; Mohaimenul, Islam Md Mohaimenul; Anggraini Ningrum, Dina Nur; Tung, Hsin-Ru; Bian, Jiantano; Plasek, Joseph M; Rommel, Casey; Burke, Juandalyn; Sohih, Harkirat

    2017-06-20

    In the summer of 2016 an international group of biomedical and health informatics faculty and graduate students gathered for the 16th meeting of the International Partnership in Health Informatics Education (IPHIE) masterclass at the University of Utah campus in Salt Lake City, Utah. This international biomedical and health informatics workshop was created to share knowledge and explore issues in biomedical health informatics (BHI). The goal of this paper is to summarize the discussions of biomedical and health informatics graduate students who were asked to define interoperability, and make critical observations to gather insight on how to improve biomedical education. Students were assigned to one of four groups and asked to define interoperability and explore potential solutions to current problems of interoperability in health care. We summarize here the student reports on the importance and possible solutions to the "interoperability problem" in biomedical informatics. Reports are provided from each of the four groups of highly qualified graduate students from leading BHI programs in the US, Europe and Asia. International workshops such as IPHIE provide a unique opportunity for graduate student learning and knowledge sharing. BHI faculty are encouraged to incorporate into their curriculum opportunities to exercise and strengthen student critical thinking to prepare our students for solving health informatics problems in the future.

  3. Benchmarking HIV health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Podlekareva, Daria; Reekie, Joanne; Mocroft, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: State-of-the-art care involving the utilisation of multiple health care interventions is the basis for an optimal long-term clinical prognosis for HIV-patients. We evaluated health care for HIV-patients based on four key indicators. METHODS: Four indicators of health care we...... document pronounced regional differences in adherence to guidelines and can help to identify gaps and direct target interventions. It may serve as a tool for assessment and benchmarking the clinical management of HIV-patients in any setting worldwide....

  4. Costs of health care across primary care models in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laberge, Maude; Wodchis, Walter P; Barnsley, Jan; Laporte, Audrey

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the relationship between newly introduced primary care models in Ontario, Canada, and patients' primary care and total health care costs. A specific focus is on the payment mechanisms for primary care physicians, i.e. fee-for-service (FFS), enhanced-FFS, and blended capitation, and whether providers practiced as part of a multidisciplinary team. Utilization data for a one year period was measured using administrative databases for a 10% sample selected at random from the Ontario adult population. Primary care and total health care costs were calculated at the individual level and included costs from physician services, hospital visits and admissions, long term care, drugs, home care, lab tests, and visits to non-medical health care providers. Generalized linear model regressions were conducted to assess the differences in costs between primary care models. Patients not enrolled with a primary care physicians were younger, more likely to be males and of lower socio-economic status. Patients in blended capitation models were healthier and wealthier than FFS and enhanced-FFS patients. Primary care and total health care costs were significantly different across Ontario primary care models. Using the traditional FFS as the reference, we found that patients in the enhanced-FFS models had the lowest total health care costs, and also the lowest primary care costs. Patients in the blended capitation models had higher primary care costs but lower total health care costs. Patients that were in multidisciplinary teams (FHT), where physicians are also paid on a blended capitation basis, had higher total health care costs than non-FHT patients but still lower than the FFS reference group. Primary care and total health care costs increased with patients' age, morbidity, and lower income quintile across all primary care payment types. The new primary care models were associated with lower total health care costs for patients compared to the

  5. Values-based recruitment in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sam Louise

    2015-01-27

    Values-based recruitment is a process being introduced to student selection for nursing courses and appointment to registered nurse posts. This article discusses the process of values-based recruitment and demonstrates why it is important in health care today. It examines the implications of values-based recruitment for candidates applying to nursing courses and to newly qualified nurses applying for their first posts in England. To ensure the best chance of success, candidates should understand the principles and process of values-based recruitment and how to prepare for this type of interview.

  6. The retailing of health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, T; Wong, J

    1984-01-01

    A number of striking parallels between recent developments in health care marketing and changes in the retailing industry exist. The authors have compared retailing paradigms to the area on health care marketing so strategists in hospitals and other health care institutions can gain insight from these parallels. Many of the same economic, demographic, technological and lifestyle forces may be at work in both the health care and retail markets. While the services or products offered in health care are radically different from those of conventional retail markets, the manner in which the products and services are positioned, priced or distributed is surprisingly similar.

  7. The Military Health Care System May Have the Potential to Prevent Health Care Disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre-Louis, Bosny J; Moore, Angelo D; Hamilton, Jill B

    2015-09-01

    The existence of health disparities in military populations has become an important topic of research. However, to our knowledge, this is the first study to examine health disparities, as related to access to care and health status, among active duty soldiers and their families. Specifically, the purpose of this analysis was to evaluate whether health disparities exist in access to care and health outcomes of patient satisfaction, physical health status, and mental health status according to race, gender, and sponsor rank in the population of active duty soldiers and their family members. In this cross-sectional study, active duty army soldiers and family members were recruited from either one particular army health clinic where they received their health care or from an adjacent shopping center frequented by eligible participants. Data were collected using validated measures to assess concepts of access to care and health status. Statistical analysis, including one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed to investigate differences in study outcome measures across four key demographic subgroups: race, gender, sponsor rank, and component (active soldier or family member). A total of 200 participants completed the study questionnaires. The sample consisted of 45.5 % soldiers and 54.5 % family members, with 88.5 % reporting a sponsor rank in the category of junior or senior enlisted rank. Mean scores for access to care did not differ significantly for the groups race/ethnicity (p = 0.53), gender (p = 0.14), and sponsor rank (p = 0.10). Furthermore, no significant differences were observed whether respondents were active soldiers or their family members (p = 0.36). Similarly, there were no statistically significant subgroup (race/ethnicity, gender, sponsor rank, or component) differences in mean patient satisfaction, physical health, and mental health scores. In a health equity system of care such as the military health care system, active duty

  8. Characteristics of self-medication for pain relief among first-year health care students in Zagreb, Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brlić, Kristina Čuljak; Janev Holcer, Nataša; Sović, Slavica; Štimac, Danijela

    2014-12-01

    Taking over the responsibility for one's own health and active participation in eliminating the existing health problems is ever more widespread in the world. Self-medication in the form of using any kind of therapy without previous consultation with medical professionals has been ever more common among student populations in many countries. The aim of this study was to determine the attitudes about self-medication for pain relief and features of self-medication in first-year students of the University of Applied Health Studies in Zagreb. The study was conducted using an anonymous questionnaire, which was completed by 389 respondents. Taking painkillers in the past year was reported by 74.6% of respondents, significantly more by female students (80.8%); 62.6% of female students used painkillers once a month versus 45.7% of male students taking analgesics once a year. Ibuprofen was preferred by female students and acetylsalicylic acid by male students. Headache was the most common indication for taking painkillers (76.6%), followed by menstrual discomforts in female students (66.2%) and toothache (28.6%). Significant sex differences were recorded in the choice of drugs, indications for self-medication, and frequency of drug use. There were no differences between study courses. Appropriate student education and improved information transfer between professionals and students are the key elements to ensure judicious, quality and knowledge based use of drugs among students.

  9. Managed care: employers' influence on the health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corder, K T; Phoon, J; Barter, M

    1996-01-01

    Health care reform is a complex issue involving many key sectors including providers, consumers, insurers, employers, and the government. System changes must involve all sectors for reform to be effective. Each sector has a responsibility to understand not only its own role in the health care system, but the roles of others as well. The role of business employers is often not apparent to health care providers, especially nurses. Understanding the influence employers have on the health care system is vital if providers want to be proactive change agents ensuring quality care.

  10. Youth with special health care needs: transition to adult health care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Donald P; Gilles, Donna L; Cannady, Mariel S; Wenzel, Donna B; Willis, Janet H; Bodurtha, Joann N

    2013-12-01

    Transition to adult services for children and youth with special health care needs (CYSHCN) has emerged as an important event in the life course of individuals with disabilities. Issues that interfere with efficient transition to adult health care include the perspectives of stakeholders, age limits on pediatric service, complexity of health conditions, a lack of experienced healthcare professionals in the adult arena, and health care financing for chronic and complex conditions. The purposes of this study were to develop a definition of successful transition and to identify determinants that were associated with a successful transition. The 2007 Survey of Adult Transition and Health dataset was used to select variables to be considered for defining success and for identifying predictors of success. The results showed that a small percentage of young adults who participated in the 2007 survey had experienced a successful transition from their pediatric care.

  11. Strengthening of Oral Health Systems: Oral Health through Primary Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Poul Erik

    2014-01-01

    Around the globe many people are suffering from oral pain and other problems of the mouth or teeth. This public health problem is growing rapidly in developing countries where oral health services are limited. Significant proportions of people are underserved; insufficient oral health care is either due to low availability and accessibility of oral health care or because oral health care is costly. In all countries, the poor and disadvantaged population groups are heavily affected by a high burden of oral disease compared to well-off people. Promotion of oral health and prevention of oral diseases must be provided through financially fair primary health care and public health intervention. Integrated approaches are the most cost-effective and realistic way to close the gap in oral health between rich and poor. The World Health Organization (WHO) Oral Health Programme will work with the newly established WHO Collaborating Centre, Kuwait University, to strengthen the development of appropriate models for primary oral health care. PMID:24525450

  12. Mothers' health services utilization and health care seeking ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: data from different studies showed health care behaviour and estimated per capita health care expenditure for the general population, but the specific data for infants at different levels of care are lacking. The objectives of this study were to describe mothers' health service utilization during pregnancy and ...

  13. Educating Social Workers for Practice in Integrated Health Care: A Model Implemented in a Graduate Social Work Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattison, Debra; Weaver, Addie; Zebrack, Brad; Fischer, Dan; Dubin, Leslie

    2017-01-01

    This article introduces a curricular innovation, the Integrated Health Scholars Program (IHSP), developed to prepare master's-level social work students for practice in integrated health care settings, and presents preliminary findings related to students' self-reported program competencies and perceptions. IHSP, implemented in a…

  14. Beneficiaries of conflict: a qualitative study of people's trust in the private health care system in Mogadishu, Somalia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gele, Abdi A; Ahmed, Mohamed Yusuf; Kour, Prabhjot; Moallim, Sadiyo Ali; Salad, Abdulwahab Moallim; Kumar, Bernadette

    2017-01-01

    In 2005, the World Health Conference called for all nations to move toward universal health coverage, which is defined as "access to adequate health care for all at an affordable price". Despite this, an estimated 90% of Somalia's largely impoverished population use private health care. Therefore, considering that the private health care system is the dominant health care system in Mogadishu, Somalia, exploring the accessibility to, as well as people's trust in, the private sector is essential to help contribute an equitable and affordable health care system in the country. A qualitative study using unstructured interviews was conducted in Mogadishu from August to November of 2016. A purposive sampling approach was used to recruit 23 participants, including seven medical doctors who own private health centers, eight patients, five medical students and three senior officials who work for the Ministry of Health. Data were analyzed using a thematic analysis. Our findings show that the private health care system in Mogadishu is not only unregulated but also expensive, with the cost of health care often unaffordable for the majority of the country's citizens. There is evidence of prescription of inappropriate treatment, tendency to conduct unnecessary laboratory tests, excessive use of higher diagnostic technologies and overcharging - including the widespread practice of further appointments for follow-up - which inflates the costs. The study also found poor patient-provider relationship and widespread distrust of the private health care system. The study findings underline the need for the Somali government to develop regulatory mechanisms and guidelines with the potential to guide the private health care sector to provide equitable and affordable health care to people in Mogadishu. The doctor-patient relationship has been - and remains - a keystone of care; thus, there is an urgent need for guidelines for private health care providers to treat their patients with

  15. Hope for health and health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stempsey, William E

    2015-02-01

    Virtually all activities of health care are motivated at some level by hope. Patients hope for a cure; for relief from pain; for a return home. Physicians hope to prevent illness in their patients; to make the correct diagnosis when illness presents itself; that their prescribed treatments will be effective. Researchers hope to learn more about the causes of illness; to discover new and more effective treatments; to understand how treatments work. Ultimately, all who work in health care hope to offer their patients hope. In this paper, I offer a brief analysis of hope, considering the definitions of Hobbes, Locke, Hume and Thomas Aquinas. I then differentiate shallow and deep hope and show how hope in health care can remain shallow. Next, I explore what a philosophy of deep hope in health care might look like, drawing important points from Ernst Bloch and Gabriel Marcel. Finally, I suggest some implications of this philosophy of hope for patients, physicians, and researchers.

  16. Collaborative HIV care in primary health care: nurses' views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngunyulu, R N; Peu, M D; Mulaudzi, F M; Mataboge, M L S; Phiri, S S

    2017-12-01

    Collaborative HIV care between the nurses and traditional health practitioners is an important strategy to improve health care of people living with HIV. To explore and describe the views of nurses regarding collaborative HIV care in primary healthcare services in the City of Tshwane, South Africa. A qualitative, descriptive design was used to explore and describe the views of nurses who met the study's inclusion criteria. In-depth individual interviews were conducted to collect data from purposively selected nurses. Content analysis was used to analyse data. Two main categories were developed during the data analysis stage. The views of nurses and health system challenges regarding collaborative HIV care. The study findings revealed that there was inadequate collaborative HIV care between the nurses and the traditional health practitioners. It is evident that there is inadequate policy implementation, monitoring and evaluation regarding collaboration in HIV care. The study findings might influence policymakers to consider the importance of collaborative HIV care, and improve the quality of care by strengthening the referral system and follow-up of people living with HIV and AIDS, as a result the health outcomes as implied in the Sustainable Development Goals 2030 might be improved. Training and involvement of traditional health practitioners in the nursing and health policy should be considered to enhance and build a trustworthy working relationship between the nurses and the traditional health practitioners in HIV care. © 2017 International Council of Nurses.

  17. Associate Degree Nursing: Model Prerequisites Validation Study. California Community College Associate Degree Programs by The Center for Student Success, A Health Care Initiative Sponsored Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Brad C.; Spurling, Steven; Armstrong, William A.

    California faces a severe nursing shortage, with the number of registered nurses far below what is required to avert a potential state health care crisis. The Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) Project is a joint project involving scholars, educational researchers, and analysts from the Center for Student Success (CSS) housed at City College of San…

  18. Engaging men in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcher, Greg

    2009-03-01

    Engaging men in health care involves a multifaceted approach that has as its main principle the recognition that men consume health care differently to women. This article identifies barriers to engaging men in health care and offers potential and existing solutions to overcome these barriers in a range of health care settings. The concept of multiple masculinities recognises that not all men can be engaged via a particular technique or strategy. The perception that men are disinterested in their health is challenged and a range of approaches discussed, both in the community and in health care facilities. In the general practice setting opportunities exist for the engagement of men at the reception desk and waiting room, as well as during the consultation. Use of the workplace in engaging men is discussed. Future activities to build the capacity of health care providers to better engage men are identified and the role of policy and program development is addressed.

  19. Dental health status and oral health behavior among university students from five ASEAN countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltzer, Karl; Pengpid, Supa

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate dental health status and oral health behavior and associated factors among university students in five ASEAN countries (Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, Thailand and Vietnam). Using anonymous questionnaires, data were collected from 3,344 undergraduate university students (mean age 20.5, SD=1.6; 58.3% female) from five ASEAN countries. Results indicate that 27.7% of students reported to have sometimes, most of the time or always having tooth ache in the past 12 months, 39.4% reported to have one or more cavities, 20.3% did not brush their teeth twice or more times a day, and 30.9% had never been to a dentist (or did not know it). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, older age, living in a lower middle income country, consumption of chocolate or candy, having made a dental care visit, and poor mental health was associated with tooth ache in the past 12 months. Being male, being 20 to 21 years old, coming from a wealthier family background, living in a lower middle income country, frequent consumption of soft drinks, not having consulted with a dentist in the past 12 months and weak beliefs in the benefits of tooth brushing were associated with inadequate tooth brushing frequency (health status and oral health behaviors were found and various risk factors identified that can be utilized to guide interventions to improve oral health programs among university students.

  20. The Theory of Planned Behavior as it predicts potential intention to seek mental health services for depression among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohon, Lisa M; Cotter, Kelly A; Kravitz, Richard L; Cello, Philip C; Fernandez Y Garcia, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Between 9.5% and 31.3% of college students suffer from depression (American college health association national college health assessment II: reference group executive summary spring 2013. Amer. Coll. Health Assoc. 2013; Eagan K, Stolzenberg EB, Ramirez JJ, Aragon, MC, Suchard, RS, Hurtado S. The American freshman: national norms fall 2014. Higher Educ. Res. Inst.; 2015). Universities need to understand the factors that relate to care-seeking behavior. Across 3 studies, to relate attitudes, social norms, and perceived behavioral control to intention to seek mental health services, and to investigate barriers to care-seeking. University college students (N = 845, 64% female, 26% male, and 10% unspecified). New measures were created in Studies 1 and 2, and were examined using structural equation modeling in Study 3. Partially consistent with the Theory of Planned Behavior (Ajzen, I, Fishbein, M. Understanding Attitudes and Predicting Social Behavior. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall; 1980), a model with an excellent fit revealed that more positive attitudes about care and higher perceived behavioral control directly predicted higher intention to seek mental health services. Educating college students about mental health disorders and treatments, enhancing knowledge about available services, and addressing limited access to long-term care might improve treatment rates for students suffering from depression.

  1. Perceptions of health equity and subjective social status among baccalaureate nursing students engaged in service-learning activities in Hawai'i.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Lisa M; Jarvis, Sarah; Sparacino, Patricia; Kuo, Devina; Genz, Stephanie

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure undergraduate students' knowledge of social determinants of health, health equity, and subjective social status (SSS). A cross-sectional semi-structured survey was administered to 68 racially/ethnically diverse freshman students enrolled in a baccalaureate nursing program in O'ahu, Hawai'i. Students ranked the impact of 13 issues on Hawai'i residents' health and described how well the health care system addressed these issues. A 10-rung ladder was used to rank SSS; students marked an "X" on the ladder rung where they stand in society and explained what they would need to "move up or down" the ladder. The students identified three key issues that adversely impact health: substance abuse, diet/nutrition, and cancer. Sixty-nine percent of students stated that social determinants of health impact Hawai'i residents' health either "quite a bit" or "very much", while only 31% felt that the health care system adequately addressed these determinants. Students who ranked high on the ladder (rungs 6-10) cited family as the reason. The students who ranked low on the ladder (rungs 3-5) credited their position to lack of money. Students' perceptions of social determinants of health and health equity align with findings from public health studies in Hawai'i. These concepts were integrated into the 4-year nursing school curricula and findings inform future research and service-based learning activities conducted by the students. While findings presented here focus on nursing students in Hawai'i, this educational innovation could be replicated with students in other undergraduate health sciences programs.

  2. Impact of Home Health Care on Health Care Resource Utilization Following Hospital Discharge: A Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Roy; Miller, Jacob A; Zafirau, William J; Gorodeski, Eiran Z; Young, James B

    2018-04-01

    As healthcare costs rise, home health care represents an opportunity to reduce preventable adverse events and costs following hospital discharge. No studies have investigated the utility of home health care within the context of a large and diverse patient population. A retrospective cohort study was conducted between 1/1/2013 and 6/30/2015 at a single tertiary care institution to assess healthcare utilization after discharge with home health care. Control patients discharged with "self-care" were matched by propensity score to home health care patients. The primary outcome was total healthcare costs in the 365-day post-discharge period. Secondary outcomes included follow-up readmission and death. Multivariable linear and Cox proportional hazards regression were used to adjust for covariates. Among 64,541 total patients, 11,266 controls were matched to 6,363 home health care patients across 11 disease-based Institutes. During the 365-day post-discharge period, home health care was associated with a mean unadjusted savings of $15,233 per patient, or $6,433 after adjusting for covariates (p Home health care independently decreased the hazard of follow-up readmission (HR 0.82, p home health care most benefited patients discharged from the Digestive Disease (death HR 0.72, p home health care was associated with significant reduction in healthcare utilization and decreased hazard of readmission and death. These data inform development of value-based care plans. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Health care reforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marušič, Dorjan; Prevolnik Rupel, Valentina

    2016-09-01

    In large systems, such as health care, reforms are underway constantly. The article presents a definition of health care reform and factors that influence its success. The factors being discussed range from knowledgeable personnel, the role of involvement of international experts and all stakeholders in the country, the importance of electoral mandate and governmental support, leadership and clear and transparent communication. The goals set need to be clear, and it is helpful to have good data and analytical support in the process. Despite all debates and experiences, it is impossible to clearly define the best approach to tackle health care reform due to a different configuration of governance structure, political will and state of the economy in a country.

  4. Factors impacting on psychological wellbeing of international students in the health professions: A scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Lisa; Robinson, Eddie; Penman, Joy; Hills, Danny

    2017-09-01

    There are increasing numbers of international students undertaking health professional courses, particularly in Western countries. These courses not only expose students to the usual stresses and strains of academic learning, but also require students to undertake clinical placements and practice-based learning. While much is known about general issues facing international students, less is known about factors that impact on those studying in the health professions. To explore what is known about factors that influence the psychological wellbeing of international students in the health professions. A scoping review. A range of databases were searched, including CINAHL, Medline, Scopus, Proquest and ERIC, as well as grey literature, reference lists and Google Scholar. The review included qualitative or quantitative primary peer reviewed research studies that focused on international undergraduate or postgraduate students in the health professions. The core concept underpinning the review was psychological issues, with the outcome being psychological and/or social wellbeing. Thematic analysis across studies was used to identify key themes emerging. A total of 13 studies were included in the review, from the disciplines of nursing, medicine and speech-language pathology. Four key factor groups emerged from the review: negotiating structures and systems, communication and learning, quality of life and self-care, and facing discrimination and social isolation. International health professional students face similar issues to other international students. The nature of their courses, however, also requires negotiating different health care systems, and managing a range of clinical practice issues including with communication, and isolation and discrimination from clinical staff and patients. Further research is needed to specifically explore factors impacting on student well-being and how international students can be appropriately prepared and supported for their

  5. Influence of Parental Encouragement towards Health Care of Their Wards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sophia, R. Grace; Veliappan, A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to explore how parents are encouraging towards health care of their wards. A "Survey Method" was used in the present study. A standardized "Agarwal Parental Encouragement Scale (APES)" was used to collect information from the students. The sample consists of thousand and ninety five higher…

  6. Health promotion in supplementary health care: outsourcing, microregulation and implications for care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Kênia Lara; Sena, Roseni Rosângela; Rodrigues, Andreza Trevenzoli; Araújo, Fernanda Lopes; Belga, Stephanie Marques Moura Franco; Duarte, Elysângela Dittz

    2015-01-01

    to analyze health promotion programs in the supplementary health care. This was a multiple case study with a qualitative approach whose data were obtained from interviews with coordinators of providers contracted by the corporations of health insurance plans in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais. The data were submitted to Critical Discourse Analysis. Home care has been described as the main action in the field of health promotion transferred to the providers, followed by management of patients and cases, and the health education.groups. The existence of health promotion principles is questionable in all programs. Outsourcing is marked by a process with a division between cost and care management. Implications of this process occur within admission and interventions on the needs of the beneficiaries. Statements revealed rationalization of cost, restructuring of work, and reproduction of the dominant logic of capital accumulation by the health insurance companies.

  7. Organizing emotions in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Annabelle

    2005-01-01

    To introduce the articles in this special issue, discussing emotion in the in health-care organisations. Discusses such topics as what makes health care different, editorial perspectives, how health care has explored emotion so far, and the impact of emotion on patients and the consequences for staff. Health care provides a setting that juxtaposes emotion and rationality, the individual and the body corporate, the formal and the deeply personal, the public and the private, all of which must be understood better if changes in expectations and delivery are to remain coherent. The papers indicate a shared international desire to understand meaning in emotion that is now spreading across organizational process and into all professional roles within health care.

  8. The pipeline training program in maternal and child health: interdisciplinary preparation of undergraduate students from underrepresented groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizur-Barnekow, Kris; Rhyner, Paula M; Lund, Shelley

    2010-05-01

    The Preparing Academically Successful Students in Maternal and Child Health (MCH PASS) training program provided financial support and specialized training to occupational therapy (OT) and speech-language pathology (SLP) undergraduate students from underrepresented groups in maternal and child health. The project assisted undergraduate trainees to matriculate into graduate programs in their respective fields and facilitated application into long-term maternal and child health training programs. Sixteen trainees (8 OT and 8 SLP) participated in an undergraduate training program with an emphasis on interdisciplinary teaming, family mentoring, leadership development, public health and population-based research. Instruction occurred in community and classroom settings through didactic instruction and small group discussions. Fifteen of the trainees applied to and were accepted in graduate programs in their respective fields. Two trainees applied to a long-term MCH training program. Students reported increased knowledge about programs that serve women and children, the effects of poverty on health, interdisciplinary teaming and the daily routines of families who have a child with a special health care need. The MCH PASS program provided a unique opportunity for undergraduate students in OT and SLP to learn about public health with an emphasis on maternal and child health. The specialized preparation enabled students to understand better the health concerns of underserved families whose children have special health care needs.

  9. US health care crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirić, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    The United States health care is presently challenged by a significant economic crisis. The purpose of this report is to introduce the readers of Medicinski Pregled to the root causes of this crisis and to explain the steps undertaken to reform health care in order to solve the crisis. It is hoped that the information contained in this report will be of value, if only in small measure, to the shaping of health care in Serbia.

  10. Attitudes Toward Spirituality and Spiritual Care among Iranian Nurses and Nursing Students: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babamohamadi, Hassan; Ahmadpanah, Mahsa-Sadat; Ghorbani, Raheb

    2017-08-22

    Addressing spiritual needs is taken into account as an integral part of holistic health care and also an important component of nursing practice. The aim of present study is to evaluate attitudes toward spirituality and spiritual care among nurses and nursing students at Semnan University of Medical Sciences in Iran. In this cross-sectional study, all nurses (n = 180) working in the teaching hospitals affiliated to Semnan University of Medical Sciences as well as senior nursing students (n = 50) selected by the census method. Finally, 168 individuals meeting the inclusion criteria were evaluated as the study sample. The data collection instrument was the Spirituality and Spiritual Care Rating Scale. The mean and standard deviation scores of attitudes toward spirituality and spiritual care among nurses and nursing students were 59 ± 10.9, and the scores obtained by the majority of study population (64.3%) ranged between 32 and 62 which were at a moderate and relatively desirable level. Nurses and nursing students working in aforementioned hospitals reported positive attitudes to spirituality and spiritual care. Given the importance of spiritual care and also the moderate level of spirituality and spiritual care among nurses and nursing students in this study, institutionalization of the concept of spirituality, provision of an appropriate context to deliver such care, and also implementation of interventions in order to improve spiritual care along with other nursing skills were assumed of utmost importance.

  11. ?A constant struggle to receive mental health care?: health care professionals? acquired experience of barriers to mental health care services in Rwanda

    OpenAIRE

    Rugema, Lawrence; Krantz, Gunilla; Mogren, Ingrid; Ntaganira, Joseph; Persson, Margareta

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In Rwanda, many people are still mentally affected by the consequences of the genocide and yet mental health care facilities are scarce. While available literature explains the prevalence and consequences of mental disorders, there is lack of knowledge from low-income countries on health care seeking behavior due to common mental disorders. Therefore, this study sought to explore health care professionals' acquired experiences of barriers and facilitators that people with common m...

  12. Health Care Utilisation and Attitudes towards Health Care in Subjects Reporting Environmental Annoyance from Electricity and Chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frida Eek

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmentally intolerant persons report decreased self-rated health and daily functioning. However, it remains unclear whether this condition also results in increased health care costs. The aim of this study was to describe the health care consumption and attitudes towards health care in subjects presenting subjective environmental annoyance in relation to the general population, as well as to a group with a well-known disorder as treated hypertension (HT. Methods. Postal questionnaire (n = 13 604 and record linkage with population-based register on health care costs. Results. Despite significantly lower subjective well being and health than both the general population and HT group, the environmentally annoyed subjects had lower health care costs than the hypertension group. In contrast to the hypertension group, the environmentally annoyed subjects expressed more negative attitudes toward the health care than the general population. Conclusions. Despite their impaired subjective health and functional capacity, health care utilisation costs were not much increased for the environmentally annoyed group. This may partly depend on negative attitudes towards the health care in this group.

  13. Health Care Utilisation and Attitudes towards Health Care in Subjects Reporting Environmental Annoyance from Electricity and Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eek, Frida; Merlo, Juan; Gerdtham, Ulf; Lithman, Thor

    2009-01-01

    Environmentally intolerant persons report decreased self-rated health and daily functioning. However, it remains unclear whether this condition also results in increased health care costs. The aim of this study was to describe the health care consumption and attitudes towards health care in subjects presenting subjective environmental annoyance in relation to the general population, as well as to a group with a well-known disorder as treated hypertension (HT). Methods. Postal questionnaire (n = 13 604) and record linkage with population-based register on health care costs. Results. Despite significantly lower subjective well being and health than both the general population and HT group, the environmentally annoyed subjects had lower health care costs than the hypertension group. In contrast to the hypertension group, the environmentally annoyed subjects expressed more negative attitudes toward the health care than the general population. Conclusions. Despite their impaired subjective health and functional capacity, health care utilisation costs were not much increased for the environmentally annoyed group. This may partly depend on negative attitudes towards the health care in this group. PMID:19936124

  14. Health Care Utilisation and Attitudes towards Health Care in Subjects Reporting Environmental Annoyance from Electricity and Chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eek, F.; Merlo, J.; Gerdtham, U.; Lithman, T.

    2010-01-01

    Environmentally intolerant persons report decreased self-rated health and daily functioning. However, it remains unclear whether this condition also results in increased health care costs. The aim of this study was to describe the health care consumption and attitudes towards health care in subjects presenting subjective environmental annoyance in relation to the general population, as well as to a group with a well-known disorder as treated hypertension (HT). Methods. Postal questionnaire (n = 13 604) and record linkage with population-based register on health care costs. Results. Despite significantly lower subjective well being and health than both the general population and HT group, the environmentally annoyed subjects had lower health care costs than the hypertension group. In contrast to the hypertension group, the environmentally annoyed subjects expressed more negative attitudes toward the health care than the general population. Conclusions. Despite their impaired subjective health and functional capacity, health care utilisation costs were not much increased for the environmentally annoyed group. This may partly depend on negative attitudes towards the health care in this group.

  15. Baccalaureate Nursing Students' Abilities in Critically Identifying and Evaluating the Quality of Online Health Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theron, Maggie; Redmond, Anne; Borycki, Elizabeth M

    2017-01-01

    Both the Internet and social media have become important tools that patients and health professionals, including health professional students, use to obtain information and support their decision-making surrounding health care. Students in the health sciences require increased competence to select, appraise, and use online sources to adequately educate and support patients and advocate for patient needs and best practices. The purpose of this study was to ascertain if second year nursing students have the ability to critically identify and evaluate the quality of online health information through comparisons between student and expert assessments of selected online health information postings using an adapted Trust in Online Health Information scale. Interviews with experts provided understanding of how experts applied the selected criteria and what experts recommend for implementing nursing informatics literacy in curriculums. The difference between student and expert assessments of the quality of the online information is on average close to 40%. Themes from the interviews highlighted several possible factors that may influence informatics competency levels in students, specifically regarding the critical appraisal of the quality of online health information.

  16. An assessment of health-care students’ attitudes toward patients with or at high risk for HIV: implications for education and cultural competency

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Harry; Earnshaw, Valerie A.; Wickersham, Jeffrey A.; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Desai, Mayur M.; John, Jacob; Altice, Frederick L.

    2014-01-01

    Stigma perpetuated by health-care providers has been found to be a barrier to care for vulnerable populations, including HIV-infected, people who inject drugs (PWIDs), and men who have sex with men (MSM) in multiple clinical contexts and remains unexamined among professional health-care students in Malaysia. This cross-sectional, anonymous, and Internet-based survey assessed the attitudes of medical and dental students toward HIV-infected, PWID, and MSM patients. Survey invitation was emailed...

  17. Health care delivery systems.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevens, F.; Zee, J. van der

    2007-01-01

    A health care delivery system is the organized response of a society to the health problems of its inhabitants. Societies choose from alternative health care delivery models and, in doing so, they organize and set goals and priorities in such a way that the actions of different actors are effective,

  18. Advancing patient-centered care through transformative educational leadership: a critical review of health care professional preparation for patient-centered care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lévesque MC

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Martine C Lévesque,1,2 Richard Bruce Hovey,2,3 Christophe Bedos2,4 1Faculté de médecine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada; 2Division of Oral Health and Society, Faculty of Dentistry, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada; 3Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; 4Département de médecine sociale et préventive, Faculté de médicine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada Abstract: Following a historical brief on the development of patient-centered care (PCC, we discuss PCC's value and role in counterbalancing the evidence-based movement in health care. We in turn make a case for a philosophical shift in thinking about the PCC concept, one based on a consideration for how knowledge is produced, used, and valued within care provision processes. A “shared epistemology” foundation is presented, defined, and promoted as essential to the authentic and ethical realization of “shared decision making” between patient and health care provider, and, more generally, of PCC. In accordance with these views, this article critically reviews the literature on health care professional education for the development of PCC. We uncover the disturbing ways in which education frequently undermines the development of patient centeredness, despite curricular emphasis on professionalism and ethical PCC. We also establish the need to raise awareness of how dominant approaches to evaluating student or practitioner performance often fail to reinforce or promote patient centeredness. Finally, we identify successful and inspiring cases of teaching and learning experiences that have achieved perspective transformation on PCC and on new ways of providing care. The pertinence of adopting the theoretical foundations of adult transformative learning is argued, and a call to action is proposed to the leadership of health professional educators across all disciplines. Keywords: patient-centered care, health professional

  19. Assessment of attitudes for interprofessional team working and knowledge of health professions competencies for final year health professional students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Se Wong

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Inter-professional education (IPE contributes to the development of an ‘inter-professional, collaborative and practice-ready’ healthcare workforce that is well prepared to respond to local healthcare needs. Little is known about the extent, to which health professional students who are nearing graduation understand the competencies of diverse health professions. The aim of this study was to investigate the perception of final-year undergraduate students’ towards interprofessional team working and their knowledge of the competencies of 6 health professions. This study evaluated the final-year health professional students’ from six (6 health professions programmes namely medical, dental, nursing, pharmacy, dietetics and biomedical sciences programmes. Attitudes towards Health Care Team Scale (ATHCTS was used to measure students’ attitudes towards teamwork while a checklist was used measure students’ knowledge of 6 health professionals competencies. Construct validity was ascertain and findings from ATHCTS showed mean scores ranges from 48.57 to 54.23 indicating positive attitudes toward working within interprofessional health care teams. While the ACTHS findings were positive, the competencies checklist showed mixed findings in that students correctly identified some competencies and had misconceptions for others. For example, the majority of students regarded physicians as competent in ‘assessment and evaluation’ and ‘medication management’ while less than 50% of participants recognised the importance of assessment of patient’s health-illness as a competency for dieticians. Gaps identified in final year students’ knowledge of the roles and competencies of health professions has an impact on future interprofessional collaborative practice suggesting a need to further improve curriculum design and delivery of IPE.

  20. [Costs of maternal-infant care in an institutionalized health care system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal Ríos, E; Salinas Martínez, A M; Guzmán Padilla, J E; Garza Elizondo, M E; Tovar Castillo, N H; García Cornejo, M L

    1998-01-01

    Partial and total maternal and child health care costs were estimated. The study was developed in a Primary Care Health Clinic (PCHC) and a General Hospital (GH) of a social security health care system. Maternal and child health care services, type of activity and frequency utilization during 1995, were defined; cost examination was done separately for the PCHC and the GH. Estimation of fixed cost included departmentalization, determination of inputs, costs, basic services disbursements, and weighing. These data were related to depreciation, labor period and productivity. Estimation of variable costs required the participation of field experts; costs corresponded to those registered in billing records. The fixed cost plus the variable cost determined the unit cost, which multiplied by the of frequency of utilization generated the prenatal care, labor and delivery care, and postnatal care cost. The sum of these three equaled the maternal and child health care cost. The prenatal care cost was $1,205.33, the labor and delivery care cost was $3,313.98, and the postnatal care was $559.91. The total cost of the maternal and child health care corresponded to $5,079.22. Cost information is valuable for the health care personnel for health care planning activities.

  1. An evaluation of the effectiveness of a dedicated health and well being course on nursing students' health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mc Sharry, Patricia; Timmins, Fiona

    2016-09-01

    nursing students to ensure the health of our future professionals. Only in this way they can role model the behaviours required of clients in their care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Conception of undergraduate nursing students on the practice of health education on first aid

    OpenAIRE

    Marília Rosa de Oliveira; Ana Rita Arrigo Leonel; Juliana Helena Montezeli; Andréia Bendine Gastaldi; Eleine Aparecida Penha Martins; Cristiano Caveião

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to present the conception of undergraduate nursing students participating in an integrated project on health education on first aid. Methods: qualitative research conducted at the Universidade Estadual de Londrina with five senior nursing students, participating in the project “Nursing in clinical and surgical urgent and emergency care.” We applied semi-structured interviews with content analysis. Results: the following categories emerged: Health education as a facilitator for acad...

  3. Student midwives' views on maternity care just before their graduation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Kelst, Liesbeth; Spitz, Bernard; Sermeus, Walter; Thomson, Ann M

    2013-03-01

    To report a hermeneutic study of student midwives' views on maternity care just before their graduation. background: Woman-centred care, which is the hallmark of midwifery, is taught to midwifery students around the globe. Woman-centred care is advantageous for women at low obstetric risk. However, adopting this ideology might be a problem for student midwives whose clinical placements are mainly in a medicalized obstetric-led hospital setting. A hermeneutic phenomenological study was conducted. In 2010, three focus groups were held where 19 student midwives participated. Data were transcribed verbatim and analysed using van Manen's approach. The choice for midwifery was a 'positive' choice and not the result of an elimination process. Students' description of a midwife as a coach was in line with the international definition of a midwife. With regard to maternity care, midwifery students identified two types of care, factory-style care and tailored care, both of which were ascribed to caregivers and hospital culture. Furthermore, student midwives made the distinction between hierarchy and teamwork, referring to the professional relations in maternity care. Hierarchy was driven by tradition, it implied that decisions were made top-down, and it resulted in impersonal relations. Midwifery students felt it was unjust that midwives were not allowed to perform deliveries while having the legal autonomy to do so. In spite of the medicalized context, midwifery education succeeded in educating midwives who hold a woman-centred ideology. Midwifery students linked style of care to a person rather than to a profession. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. BOOK REVIEW - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH FOR HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VARIOUS AUTHORS

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This compendium of essays by 30 authors is a contribution to the Malaysian ever growing storehouse of medical publications. It is a worthwhile project for the Malaysian Medical Association to have undertaken to publish this long awaited book, because the content of the book involves the care of its own members. The health of the healthcare providers is often taken for granted while carrying out their duties of a doctor. They forget their own health and they expose themselves to the risk of disease every day of their lives. This book, with twenty-two chapters, covers in detail the occupational concerns of health care professionals. The chapters outline the common pitfalls in the healthcare system into which the professionals may fall into. All health care facilities are high risk venues for which not sufficient preventive systems are in place. The various risk factors are highlighted by the different authors both from the point of view of the professional and the patient. In support of preventive efforts the authors refer to the various statutory requirements in place. In spite of the provisions, the authors cite many instances of diseases and disasters the professional suffer from and are exposed to daily. This book will be of use both not only to the student of occupational health but also to every healthcare professional. It raises the awareness of personal protection and prevention since the chance of disaster awaits every morning. The dictum of “Physician, heal thyself” may come too late if this book does not evoke caution every day. It is well written with cases documenting poor infrastructure requirements to carry out their duties in a safe and efficient manner. References are well documented by all the authors to inspire further work in this area. Associate Professor Dr Jayakumar comes from the backgrounds of both academic and corporate sectors and therefore contributes his wealth of knowledge and experience while Associate Professor

  5. Personal protective equipment use among students with special health care needs reporting injuries in school-sponsored vocational, career, and technical education programs in New Jersey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubenstein, Eric; Shendell, Derek; Eggert, Brain C; Marcella, Stephen W

    2014-01-01

    Students with special health care needs (SHCNs) and individualized education plans (IEPs) may be injured more often in vocational, career, and technical education (CTE) programs. No research to date considers personal protective equipment (PPE) use among students with SHCNs in school-based programs reporting injuries to agencies. Data from 1999 to 2011 on PPE use among injured students in CTE programs in public schools and private secondary schools for the disabled were analyzed; students with SHCNs were distinguished by IEP status within New Jersey Safe Schools surveilance data. Among students with IEPs using PPE, 36% of injuries occurred to body parts PPE was meant to protect. Likely injury types were cuts-lacerations and burns for students with IEPs using PPE and cuts-lacerations and sprains for students with IEPs not using PPE. Females with IEPs using PPE were injured less often than males across ages. Results suggested students with SHCNs with IEPs need further job-related training with increased emphasis on properly selecting and fitting PPE.

  6. Health care reforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marušič Dorjan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In large systems, such as health care, reforms are underway constantly. The article presents a definition of health care reform and factors that influence its success. The factors being discussed range from knowledgeable personnel, the role of involvement of international experts and all stakeholders in the country, the importance of electoral mandate and governmental support, leadership and clear and transparent communication. The goals set need to be clear, and it is helpful to have good data and analytical support in the process. Despite all debates and experiences, it is impossible to clearly define the best approach to tackle health care reform due to a different configuration of governance structure, political will and state of the economy in a country.

  7. Children With Special Health Care Needs: Child Health and Functioning Outcomes and Health Care Service Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caicedo, Carmen

    This study describes health, functioning, and health care service use by medically complex technology-dependent children according to condition severity (moderately disabled, severely disabled, and vegetative state). Data were collected monthly for 5 months using the Pediatric Quality of Life Generic Core Module 4.0 Parent-Proxy Report. Health care service use measured the number of routine and acute care office visits (including primary and specialty physicians), emergency department visits, hospitalizations, nursing health care services, special therapies, medications, medical technology devices (MTDs), and assistive devices. Child physical health was different across the condition severity groups. The average age of the children was 10.1 years (SD, 6.2); the average number of medications used was 5.5 (SD, 3.7); the average number of MTDs used was 4.2 (SD, 2.9); and the average number of assistive devices used was 4.3 (SD, 2.7). Severely disabled and vegetative children were similar in age (older) and had a similar number of medications, MTDs, and assistive devices (greater) than moderately disabled children. The advanced practice nurse care coordinator role is necessary for the health and functioning of medically complex, technology-dependent children. Copyright © 2016 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Health Care Students’ Attitudes Towards Addressing Sexual Health in Their Future Professional Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerbild, H.; Larsen, C. M.; Rolander, B.

    2017-01-01

    Students’ attitudes and educational needs regarding sexual health are important, since their ability to promote sexual health in their future profession can be challenged by their attitudes and knowledge of sexuality and sexual health. There are no existing Danish instruments able to measure...... students’ attitudes towards working with and communicating about sexual health; thus, to be able to use the Students’ Attitudes Towards Addressing Sexual Health (SA-SH) questionnaire in a Danish context, it is necessary to translate and test the translated questionnaire psychometrically. The aim...... of the SA-SH (SA-SH-D) had a Cronbach’s alpha of 0.67. The content validity index showed high relevance (item context validity index 0.82–1.0), and item scale correlation was satisfactory. The SA-SH-D is a valid and reliable questionnaire, which can be used to measure health care professional students...

  9. The ethical self-fashioning of physicians and health care systems in culturally appropriate health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Susan J; Armin, Julie

    2011-06-01

    Diverse advocacy groups have pushed for the recognition of cultural differences in health care as a means to redress inequalities in the U.S., elaborating a form of biocitizenship that draws on evidence of racial and ethnic health disparities to make claims on both the state and health care providers. These efforts led to federal regulations developed by the U.S. Office of Minority Health requiring health care organizations to provide Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services. Based on ethnographic research at workshops and conferences, in-depth interviews with cultural competence trainers, and an analysis of postings to a moderated listserv with 2,000 members, we explore cultural competence trainings as a new type of social technology in which health care providers and institutions are urged to engage in ethical self-fashioning to eliminate prejudice and embody the values of cultural relativism. Health care providers are called on to re-orient their practice (such as habits of gaze, touch, and decision-making) and to act on their own subjectivities to develop an orientation toward Others that is "culturally competent." We explore the diverse methods that cultural competence trainings use to foster a health care provider's ability to be self-reflexive, including face-to-face workshops and classes and self-guided on-line modules. We argue that the hybrid formation of culturally appropriate health care is becoming detached from its social justice origins as it becomes rationalized by and more firmly embedded in the operations of the health care marketplace.

  10. Clinical interdisciplinary health team care: an educational experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, H; Beeston, J J; Yerxa, E J

    1979-09-01

    With increasing concern for teamwork in clinical practice in health care settings, the need to identify the concepts, methods, and learning processes for improving interdisciplinary team skills is apparent. This paper describes patient-centered, clinical-research-demonstration programs for teams of students, preceptors, and faculty members from six disciplines who provided patient care in a long-term rehabilitation setting. The teams were involved in the theory and practice of team-building, including weekly sessions on leadership styles, communication, group decision-making, and team effectiveness assessment. Objective and subjective measurements were administered throughout the program. The results indicate that task-oriented patient care favors the learning of team skills, especially when all levels of administration support and participate in the processes. Question are raised concerning the effect of clinical teams on the quality of patient care, their cost-effectiveness, and the low priority given to teaching interdisciplinary team skills in professional education.

  11. What is the health care product?

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, K R; Grover, R

    1992-06-01

    Because of the current competitive environment, health care providers (hospitals, HMOs, physicians, and others) are constantly searching for better products and better means for delivering them. The health care product is often loosely defined as a service. The authors develop a more precise definition of the health care product, product line, and product mix. A bundle-of-elements concept is presented for the health care product. These conceptualizations help to address how health care providers can segment their market and position, promote, and price their products. Though the authors focus on hospitals, the concepts and procedures developed are applicable to other health care organizations.

  12. Epistemological beliefs and therapeutic health concepts of physiotherapy students and professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bientzle, Martina; Cress, Ulrike; Kimmerle, Joachim

    2014-10-01

    Health knowledge develops fast and includes a lot of ambiguous or tentative information. In their daily routine, both health care students and professionals continuously have to make judgments about the viability of health knowledge. People's epistemological beliefs (EBs) and their therapeutic health concepts are factors that influence how they deal with health knowledge. However, very little is known about the occurrence of these factors at different stages of people's career. The present study examines the EBs and therapeutic health concepts of physiotherapy students in their vocational training and the EBs and therapeutic health concepts of professionals. In a cross-sectional study physiotherapy students and professional physiotherapists filled in a questionnaire that measured their personal EBs about physiotherapy and medicine, as well as their biomedical and biopsychosocial therapeutic health concepts. We compared the participants' EBs regarding both knowledge domains, and their therapeutic health concepts using paired samples t-tests. We also examined the differences between first-year students, advanced students, and professionals regarding their EBs and their therapeutic health concepts using ANOVAs. Eighty-three students and 84 professionals participated in this study, 114/167 (68%) participants were female. EBs as well as therapeutic health concepts differed depending upon the participants' training status. Professionals had more sophisticated EBs than students regarding both knowledge in physiotherapy (F(2, 164) = 6.74, P = 0.002, η(2)(p) = 0.08) and knowledge in medicine (F(2, 164) = 5.93, P = 0.003, η(2)(p) = 0.07). In addition, high values in a biopsychosocial therapeutic health concept already occurred in an early phase of training (F(2, 164) = 5.39, P = 0.005, η(2)(p) = 0.06), whereas increased values in a biomedical concept did not occur until people's professional life (F(2, 164) = 10.99, P students as

  13. Rotation placements help students' understanding of intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Lisa

    2011-07-01

    It is vital that children's nursing students are fit for practice when they qualify and are able to meet various essential skills as defined by the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC). To gain the knowledge and skills required, students need placements in areas where high dependency and potentially intensive care are delivered. Efforts to maximise the number of students experiencing intensive care as a placement have led to the development of the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) rotation, increasing placements on the PICU from 5 to 40 per cent of the student cohort per year. The lecturer practitioner organises the rotation, providing credible links between university and practice areas, while supporting students and staff in offering a high-quality placement experience. Students say the rotation offers a positive insight into PICU nursing, helping them develop knowledge and skills in a technical area and creating an interest in this specialty.

  14. Perceived facilitators of and barriers to healthful eating among university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Alicia C; Sykes, Lesley; Matthews, June; Martin, Noelle; Leipert, Beverly

    2010-01-01

    Photovoice, an innovative qualitative research method in health care, has not been used to its full potential in nutrition/dietetics. We explored the use of Photovoice to determine perceived facilitators of and barriers to healthful eating among university students. The study included 28 students enrolled in a 2008 introductory nutrition class. The students participated in a camera orientation session to review ethics and privacy issues. They took photographs and selected two for discussion in a focus group moderated by a graduate student who used a semi-structured facilitation guide. Researchers coded the transcripts, analyzed the pictures and students' written comments about the project, and ensured data trustworthiness through credibility, dependability, confirmability, and transferability of data and methods. Six major themes emerged as facilitators and/or barriers: environment, nutrition knowledge, convenience foods, time, media influence, and food cost. More than one-third of the students thought the study "stimulated their critical thinking." They felt more empowered in sharing their perceptions and "getting their voices heard." Photovoice was a useful, "motivating," and "engaging" method for research on nutrition knowledge and dietary patterns of university students. Registered dietitians and other health professionals may benefit from the use of the Photovoice method when they are working with students.

  15. Improving access to yoga: barriers to and motivators for practice among health professions students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brems, Christiane; Justice, Lauren; Sulenes, Kari; Girasa, Lisa; Ray, Julia; Davis, Madison; Freitas, Jillian; Shean, Margaret; Colgan, Dharmakaya

    2015-01-01

    Yoga is gaining momentum as a popular and evidence-based, integrative health care and self-care practice. The characteristics of yoga practitioners are not proportional to the demographics of the general population, especially with respect to gender and ethnicity. Several access barriers have been implicated (eg, time, cost, and access to teachers). No studies have explored the barriers to practice among health professions students. Their participation in yoga is deemed important because they are future health professionals who will make referrals to other services. Research has shown that providers who practice yoga refer more patients to yoga. To increase yoga practice among health professions students, an understanding must be developed of factors that interfere with or facilitate a regular yoga practice. The current study intended to identify such barriers and motivators. This study was a small population survey. The setting was a private university in the northwestern United States, including students in 3 of its colleges and 10 professional programs. All students (N = 1585) in the programs of the 10 health professions received e-mail requests for participation. The Acceptability of Yoga Survey was developed for purposes of a larger yoga perceptions study and implemented with health professions students. Participants were solicited via e-mail; the survey was administered online. The current study used data from that survey. Of the 498 usable, completed surveys (ie, a response rate of approximately 30%), 478 were relevant to the current study. The sample's demographics--78% women and 79% white--did not differ significantly from the population's demographics. The findings revealed the existence of common barriers that were related to (1) time; (2) cost; (3) lack of pragmatic information about access to yoga classes and teachers; and (4) stereotypes related to flexibility, athleticism, and typical yoga practitioners. Motivators included athleticism, health

  16. Optimizing Health Care Environmental Hygiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carling, Philip C

    2016-09-01

    This article presents a review and perspectives on aspects of optimizing health care environmental hygiene. The topics covered include the epidemiology of environmental surface contamination, a discussion of cleaning health care patient area surfaces, an overview of disinfecting health care surfaces, an overview of challenges in monitoring cleaning versus cleanliness, a description of an integrated approach to environmental hygiene and hand hygiene as interrelated disciplines, and an overview of the research opportunities and challenges related to health care environmental hygiene. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Medical Students and informed consent: A consensus statement prepared by the Faculties of Medical and Health Science of the Universities of Auckland and Otago, Chief Medical Officers of District Health Boards, New Zealand Medical Students' Association and the Medical Council of New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagg, Warwick; Adams, John; Anderson, Lynley; Malpas, Phillipa; Pidgeon, Grant; Thorn, Michael; Tulloch, David; Zhong, Cathy; Merry, Alan F

    2015-05-15

    To develop a national consensus statement to promote a pragmatic, appropriate and unified approach to seeking consent for medical student involvement in patient care. A modified Delphi technique was used to develop the consensus statement involving stakeholders. Feedback from consultation and each stakeholder helped to shape the final consensus statement. The consensus statement is a nationally-agreed statement concerning medical student involvement in patient care, which will be useful for medical students, health care professionals and patients.

  18. An assessment of health-care students’ attitudes toward patients with or at high risk for HIV: implications for education and cultural competency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Harry; Earnshaw, Valerie A.; Wickersham, Jeffrey A.; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Desai, Mayur M.; John, Jacob; Altice, Frederick L.

    2014-01-01

    Stigma perpetuated by health-care providers has been found to be a barrier to care for vulnerable populations, including HIV-infected, people who inject drugs (PWIDs), and men who have sex with men (MSM) in multiple clinical contexts and remains unexamined among professional health-care students in Malaysia. This cross-sectional, anonymous, and Internet-based survey assessed the attitudes of medical and dental students toward HIV-infected, PWID, and MSM patients. Survey invitation was emailed to 3191 students at 8 professional schools; 1296 (40.6%) responded and scored their attitudes toward these patient groups using a feeling thermometer, indicating their attitudes on a sliding scale from 0 (most negative) to 100 (most positive). Compared to general patients (mean = 76.50), the mean scores for HIV-infected (mean = 54.04; p religion, ethnicity, and personally knowing someone from these populations were associated with significant differences in attitudes. No differences were noted between pre-clinical and clinical year of training. Health-care students represent the next generation of clinicians who will be responsible for future HIV prevention and treatment efforts. Our findings suggest alarmingly negative attitudes toward these patients, especially MSM, necessitating prompt and effective interventions designed to ameliorate the negative attitudes of health-care students toward vulnerable populations, specifically HIV-infected, PWID, and MSM patients in Malaysia. PMID:24625279

  19. Self-care among Nursing Students: Determining Constructive Concepts of Self-care using Factor Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Shintani, Keiko

    2006-01-01

    In an effort to clearly defi ne the constructive concepts of self-care among nursing students, in the present study a survey was conducted a survey of 655 individuals, comprised of 260 college nursing students and 395 vocational school nursing students. We found four factors of constructive concepts of self-care among nursing students, which included maintaining diet, coping with stress, maintaining habits and regulating lifestyle patterns, and maintaining interpersonal relationships.

  20. Integrated primary health care in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gawaine Powell Davies

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To fulfil its role of coordinating health care, primary health care needs to be well integrated, internally and with other health and related services. In Australia, primary health care services are divided between public and private sectors, are responsible to different levels of government and work under a variety of funding arrangements, with no overarching policy to provide a common frame of reference for their activities. Description of policy: Over the past decade, coordination of service provision has been improved by changes to the funding of private medical and allied health services for chronic conditions, by the development in some states of voluntary networks of services and by local initiatives, although these have had little impact on coordination of planning. Integrated primary health care centres are being established nationally and in some states, but these are too recent for their impact to be assessed. Reforms being considered by the federal government include bringing primary health care under one level of government with a national primary health care policy, establishing regional organisations to coordinate health planning, trialling voluntary registration of patients with general practices and reforming funding systems. If adopted, these could greatly improve integration within primary health care. Discussion: Careful change management and realistic expectations will be needed. Also other challenges remain, in particular the need for developing a more population and community oriented primary health care.

  1. Integrated primary health care in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Gawaine Powell; Perkins, David; McDonald, Julie; Williams, Anna

    2009-10-14

    To fulfil its role of coordinating health care, primary health care needs to be well integrated, internally and with other health and related services. In Australia, primary health care services are divided between public and private sectors, are responsible to different levels of government and work under a variety of funding arrangements, with no overarching policy to provide a common frame of reference for their activities. Over the past decade, coordination of service provision has been improved by changes to the funding of private medical and allied health services for chronic conditions, by the development in some states of voluntary networks of services and by local initiatives, although these have had little impact on coordination of planning. Integrated primary health care centres are being established nationally and in some states, but these are too recent for their impact to be assessed. Reforms being considered by the federal government include bringing primary health care under one level of government with a national primary health care policy, establishing regional organisations to coordinate health planning, trialling voluntary registration of patients with general practices and reforming funding systems. If adopted, these could greatly improve integration within primary health care. Careful change management and realistic expectations will be needed. Also other challenges remain, in particular the need for developing a more population and community oriented primary health care.

  2. An interprofessional service-learning course: uniting students across educational levels and promoting patient-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacey, Marie; Murphy, Judy I; Anderson, Delia Castro; McCloskey, William W

    2010-12-01

    Recognizing the importance of interprofessional education, we developed a pilot interprofessional education course at our institution that included a total of 10 nursing, BS health psychology, premedical, and pharmacy students. Course goals were for students to: 1) learn about, practice, and enhance their skills as members of an interprofessional team, and 2) create and deliver a community-based service-learning program to help prevent or slow the progression of cardiovascular disease in older adults. Teaching methods included lecture, role-play, case studies, peer editing, oral and poster presentation, and discussion. Interprofessional student teams created and delivered two different health promotion programs at an older adult care facility. Despite barriers such as scheduling conflicts and various educational experiences, this course enabled students to gain greater respect for the contributions of other professions and made them more patient centered. In addition, inter-professional student teams positively influenced the health attitudes and behaviors of the older adults whom they encountered. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. The Health Sciences and Technology Academy: an educational pipeline to address health care disparities in West Virginia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKendall, Sherron Benson; Kasten, Kasandra; Hanks, Sara; Chester, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Health and educational disparities are national issues in the United States. Research has shown that health care professionals from underserved backgrounds are more likely than others to work in underserved areas. The Association of American Medical Colleges' Project 3000 by 2000, to increase the number of underrepresented minorities in medical schools, spurred the West Virginia School of Medicine to start the Health Sciences and Technology Academy (HSTA) in 1994 with the goal of supporting interested underrepresented high school students in pursuing college and health professions careers. The program was based on three beliefs: (1) if underrepresented high school students have potential and the desire to pursue a health professions career and are given the support, they can reach their goals, including obtaining a health professions degree; (2) underserved high school students are able to predict their own success if given the right resources; and (3) community engagement would be key to the program's success.In this Perspective, the authors describe the HSTA and its framework and philosophy, including the underlying theories and pedagogy from research in the fields of education and the behavioral/social sciences. They then offer evidence of the program's success, specifically for African American students, including graduates' high college-going rate and overwhelming intention to choose a health professions major. Finally, the authors describe the benefits of the HSTA's community partnerships, including providing mentors to students, adding legislative language providing tuition waivers and a budgetary line item devoted to the program, and securing program funding from outside sources.

  4. [Compassionate care for student nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cann, Lisa

    2016-05-01

    Nurses are practising in a work environment which is sometimes difficult and which can affect their capacity to supervise students. They may sometimes find themselves taking out their frustration on these students. By being better trained in the specificities of adult learning, frontline professionals and tutors could find it easier to adopt a compassionate care attitude towards nursing students, an essential condition for the development of their skills. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparison of oral health behavior among dental students, students of other disciplines, and fashion models in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchhoff, Julien; Filippi, Andreas

    Self-reliant oral health behavior exert great influence on the oral health of our society. The aim of the present study was to find out whether there is an occupation-related difference in the oral health behavior between dental students, students of other disciplines, and fashion models in German-speaking Switzerland. The survey comprised 19 questions which were asked using a web-based anonymous questionnaire. The investigation particularly inquired about employed auxiliaries and their application for an improvement of oral hygiene. In addition, the satisfaction with the own teeth and smile as well as the influence of the occupation or the study on oral hygiene were examined. Included in this evaluation were 204 dental students, 257 students of other disciplines, and 117 fashion models aged between 21 and 25 years. The evaluation reveals that the state of knowledge and the professional relationship affect the practice of oral hygiene, in particular among dental students. Fashion models, however, are most intensively concerned with body care and oral hygiene. Their attention is directed particularly to means supposed to improve the smile as well as to ensure fresh breath. Dental students and fashion models constitute a selected minority clearly demarcated from students of other disciplines regarding a higher awareness of self-reliant oral hygiene. The comparatively minor rating of oral health in a group of basically well-trained individuals suggests great need of educational work in the general population.

  6. Practices of depression care in home health care: Home health clinician perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yuhua; Eggman, Ashley A.; Richardson, Joshua E.; Sheeran, Thomas; Bruce, Martha L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess any gaps between published best practices and real-world practices of treating depression in home health care (HHC), and barriers to closing any gaps. Methods A qualitative study based on semi-structured interviews with HHC nurses and administrators from five home health agencies in five states (n=20). Audio-recorded interviews were transcribed and analyzed by a multi-disciplinary team using grounded theory method to identify themes. Results Routine home health nursing care overlapped with all functional areas of depression care. However, there were reported gaps between best practices and real-world practices. Gaps were associated with perceived scope of practice by HHC nurses, knowledge gaps and low self-efficacy in depression treatment, stigma attached to depression, poor quality of antidepressant management in primary care, and poor communication between HHC and primary care. Conclusions Strategies to close gaps between typical and best practices need to enhance HHC clinician knowledge and self-efficacy with depression treatment and improve the quality of antidepressant management and communication with primary care. PMID:26423098

  7. Development and testing of the Multidimensional Trust in Health Care Systems Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egede, Leonard E; Ellis, Charles

    2008-06-01

    To describe the development and psychometric testing of the Multidimensional Trust in Health Care Systems Scale (MTHCSS). Scale development occurred in 2 phases. In phase 1, a pilot instrument with 70 items was generated from the review of the trust literature, focus groups, and expert opinion. The 70 items were pilot tested in a sample of 256 students. Exploratory factor analysis was used to derive an orthogonal set of correlated factors. In phase 2, the final scale was administered to 301 primary care patients to assess reliability and validity. Phase 2 participants also completed validated measures of patient-centered care, health locus of control, medication nonadherence, social support, and patient satisfaction. In phase 1, a 17-item scale (MTHCSS) was developed with 10 items measuring trust in health care providers, 4 items measuring trust in health care payers, and 3 items measuring trust in health care institutions. In phase 2, the 17-item MTHCSS had a mean score of 63.0 (SD 8.8); the provider subscale had a mean of 40.0 (SD 6.2); the payers subscale had a mean of 12.8 (SD 3.0); and the institutions subscale had a mean of 10.3 (SD 2.1). Cronbach's alpha for the MTHCSS was 0.89 and 0.92, 0.74, and 0.64 for the 3 subscales. The MTHCSS was significantly correlated with patient-centered care (r = .22 to .62), locus of control-chance (r = .42), medication nonadherence (r = -.22), social support (r = .25), and patient satisfaction (r = .67). The MTHCSS is a valid and reliable instrument for measuring the 3 objects of trust in health care and is correlated with patient-level health outcomes.

  8. Towards Sustainable Health Care Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro ROMANELLI

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Health care organizations have to develop a sustainable path for creating public value by seeking legitimacy for building and maintaining public trust with patients as social and economic institutions creating value and sustaining both health and wealth for people and communities within society. Health care organizations having at disposal decreasing resources and meeting increasing demands of citizens are following an unsustainable path. Designing sustainable health care systems and organizations is emerging as a strategic goal for developing the wealth of people and communities over time. Building sustainable organizations relies on valuing human resources, designing efficient and effective processes, using technology for better managing the relationships within and outside organizations. Sustainable health care organizations tend to rediscover the importance of human resource management and policies for effectively improving communication with patients and building trust-based relationships. While processes of accreditation contribute to legitimizing effectiveness and quality of health care services and efficient processes, introducing and using new information and communication technologies (ICTs and informatics helps communication leading to restore trust-based relationships between health care institutions and patients for value creation within society.

  9. The effect of social interaction on mental health nurse student learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a phenomenological research study exploring the effect of social interaction upon mental health nurse student learning. Central to this study are ideas about Communities of Practice as described by Wenger et al. (2011). The researcher conducted two focus groups and four semi-structured interviews with mental health nurse students at various stages of their training. The study found that students understand personal progress by comparison with others and that there is a relationship between peer group membership and learning outcomes. Students interpret academic studies and theoretical knowledge in a dynamic relationship with clinical practice where successful learning depends upon careful negotiation of social boundaries. Whilst acknowledging limitations this paper concludes by tentatively suggesting some implications for future nurse education practice which recognises the socially mediated nature of learning. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Care plans using concept maps and their effects on the critical thinking dispositions of nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atay, Selma; Karabacak, Ukke

    2012-06-01

    It is expected that nursing education improves abilities of students in solving problems, decision making and critical thinking in different circumstances. This study was performed to analyse the effects of care plans prepared using concept maps on the critical thinking dispositions of students. An experimental group and a control group were made up of a total of 80 freshman and sophomore students from the nursing department of a health school. The study used a pre-test post-test control group design. The critical thinking dispositions of the groups were measured using the California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory. In addition, the care plans prepared by the experimental group students were evaluated using the criteria for evaluating care plans with concept maps. T-test was used in analysing the data. The results showed that there were no statistically significant differences in the total and sub-scale pre-test scores between the experimental group and control group students. There were also significant differences in the total and sub-scale post-test scores between the experimental group and control group students. There were significant differences between concept map care plan evaluation criteria mean scores of the experimental students. In the light of these findings, it could be argued that the concept mapping strategy improves critical thinking skills of students. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. Adherence and health care costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iuga AO

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Aurel O Iuga,1,2 Maura J McGuire3,4 1Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 2Johns Hopkins University, 3Johns Hopkins Community Physicians, 4Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Medication nonadherence is an important public health consideration, affecting health outcomes and overall health care costs. This review considers the most recent developments in adherence research with a focus on the impact of medication adherence on health care costs in the US health system. We describe the magnitude of the nonadherence problem and related costs, with an extensive discussion of the mechanisms underlying the impact of nonadherence on costs. Specifically, we summarize the impact of nonadherence on health care costs in several chronic diseases, such as diabetes and asthma. A brief analysis of existing research study designs, along with suggestions for future research focus, is provided. Finally, given the ongoing changes in the US health care system, we also address some of the most relevant and current trends in health care, including pharmacist-led medication therapy management and electronic (e-prescribing. Keywords: patient, medication, adherence, compliance, nonadherence, noncompliance, cost

  12. Using clinical caring journaling: nursing student and instructor experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chien-Lin; Turton, Michael; Cheng, Su-Fen; Lee-Hsieh, Jane

    2011-06-01

    Journaling has been incorporated into many nursing courses as an active reflective teaching strategy that can facilitate the learning process, personal growth, and professional development of students. There is limited research support of journaling as an appropriate tool to promote reflection for the purpose of learning caring in nursing education. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences and perceptions of student nurses and instructors who use clinical caring journaling (CCJ) in their clinical practicum. Researchers used a descriptive qualitative research design. The study population was 880 senior student nurses and 90 clinical instructors from a nursing program at a university in Taiwan who used CCJ. After completion of 1 year of clinical practicum, 16 students and 7 instructors participated voluntarily in focus group interviews. Researchers used content analysis to sort interview data into themes. Six themes were categorized that encapsulated student and instructor experiences and perceptions regarding using CCJ in their clinical practicum. These themes were guiding caring behavior toward patients, enabling students' reflective caring abilities, building up students' self-confidence, increasing interaction between students and instructors, enhancing students' self-development, and overcoming writing difficulty. Research findings may serve as a reference for nursing educators to use CCJ strategy in student nurses' clinical practicum.

  13. Advancing adolescent health and health services in Saudi Arabia: exploring health-care providers' training, interest, and perceptions of the health-care needs of young people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AlBuhairan FS

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Fadia S AlBuhairan,1–3 Tina M Olsson3,4 1Department of Pediatrics, King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 2King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 3King Abdullah International Medical Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 4School of Social Work, Lund University, Lund, Sweden Background: Adolescent health is regarded as central to global health goals. Investments made in adolescent health and health services protect the improvements witnessed in child health. Though Saudi Arabia has a large adolescent population, adolescent health-care only began to emerge in recent years, yet widespread uptake has been very limited. Health-care providers are key in addressing and providing the necessary health-care services for adolescents, and so this study was conducted with the aim of identifying opportunities for the advancement of knowledge transfer for adolescent health services in Saudi Arabia. Methods: This Web-based, cross-sectional study was carried out at four hospitals in Saudi Arabia. Physicians and nurses were invited to participate in an online survey addressing their contact with adolescent patients, and training, knowledge, and attitudes towards adolescent health-care. Results: A total of 232 professionals participated. The majority (82.3% reported sometimes or always coming into contact with adolescent patients. Less than half (44%, however, had received any sort of training on adolescent health during their undergraduate or postgraduate education, and only 53.9% reported having adequate knowledge about the health-care needs of adolescents. Nurses perceived themselves as having more knowledge in the health-care needs of adolescents and reported feeling more comfortable in communicating with adolescents as compared with physicians. The majority of participants were interested in gaining further skills and knowledge in adolescent health-care and agreed or strongly agreed that adolescents have

  14. Assessing Performance and Learning in Interprofessional Health Care Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekmekci, Ozgur; Sheingold, Brenda; Plack, Margaret; LeLacheur, Susan; Halvaksz, Jennifer; Lewis, Karen; Schlumpf, Karen; Greenberg, Larrie

    2015-01-01

    Teamwork has become an integral part of health care delivery. Such emphasis on teamwork has generated the need to systematically measure and improve the learning and performance of health care teams. The purpose of this study was to develop a comprehensive assessment instrument, the Interprofessional Education and Practice Inventory (IPEPI), to evaluate learning and performance in interprofessional health care teams. The 12-month study commenced in three 4-month phases: (1) a panel of 25 national and international experts participated in the Delphi process to identify factors influencing team learning and team performance; (2) the research team analyzed the findings from the two Delphi rounds to develop the IPEPI; and (3) a cohort of 27 students at the university engaged in clinical simulations to test and refine the IPEPI. Findings suggest key factors that significantly influence team learning and performance include whether the group is able to foster a climate of mutual respect, adopt effective communication strategies, develop a sense of trust, and invite contributions from others. Additionally, in assessing organizational factors, participants indicated those factors that significantly influence team learning and performance include whether the organization is patient-centered, creates a culture of safety (not blame), and supports individual and team learning. These findings highlight the critical role assessment plays in enhancing not just interprofessional education or interprofessional practice, but in essence advancing interprofessional education and practice--which requires an integrated examination of how health care professionals learn and perform in teams.

  15. [Strengthening primary health care: a strategy to maximize coordination of care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Patty Fidelis; Fausto, Márcia Cristina Rodrigues; Giovanella, Lígia

    2011-02-01

    To describe and analyze the actions developed in four large cities to strengthen the family health strategy (FHS) in Brazil. Case studies were carried out in Aracaju, Belo Horizonte, Florianópolis, and Vitória based on semi-structured interviews with health care managers. In addition, a cross-sectional study was conducted with questionnaires administered to a sample of FHS workers and services users. Actions needed to strengthen primary health care services were identified in all four cities. These include increasing the number of services offered at the primary health care level, removing barriers to access, restructuring primary services as the entry point to the health care system, enhancing problem-solving capacity (diagnostic and therapeutic support and networking between health units to organize the work process, training, and supervision), as well as improving articulation between surveillance and care actions. The cities studied have gained solid experience in the reorganization of the health care model based on a strengthening of health primary care and of the capacity to undertake the role of health care coordinator. However, to make the primary care level the customary entry point and first choice for users, additional actions are required to balance supplier-induced and consumer-driven demands. Consumer driven demand is the biggest challenge for the organization of teamwork processes. Support for and recognition of FHS as a basis for primary health care is still an issue. Initiatives to make FHS better known to the population, health care professionals at all levels, and civil society organizations are still needed.

  16. Reducing Ex-offender Health Disparities through the Affordable Care Act: Fostering Improved Health Care Access and Linkages to Integrated Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lacreisha Ejike-King

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite steadily declining incarceration rates overall, racial and ethnic minorities, namely African Americans, Latinos, and American Indians and Alaska Natives, continue to be disproportionately represented in the justice system. Ex-offenders commonly reenter communities with pressing health conditions but encounter obstacles to accessing care and remaining in care. The lack of health insurance coverage and medical treatment emerge as the some of the most reported reentry health needs and may contribute to observed health disparities. Linking ex-offenders to care and services upon release increases the likelihood that they will remain in care and practice successful disease management. The Affordable Care Act (ACA offers opportunities to address health disparities experienced by the reentry population that places them at risk for negative health outcomes and recidivism. Coordinated efforts to link ex-offenders with these newly available opportunities may result in a trajectory for positive health and overall well-being as they reintegrate into society.

  17. International Student Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto-Welch, Susan L.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes the mental health status of international students in institutions of higher education, unique challenges these students face and their impact on mental health, and suggestions for ways to address these challenges.

  18. How to achieve care coordination inside health care organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prætorius, Thim; C. Becker, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how health care organizations can achieve care coordination internally is essential because it is difficult to achieve, but essential for high quality and efficient health care delivery. This article offers an answer by providing a synthesis of knowledge about coordination from...

  19. Health Care Reform: a Socialist Vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Livingston

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available At first glance, it doesn't seem as though socialism and health-care reform have a whole lot to do with each other. After all, the most visible "left" position in the current discussion of health-care reform merely advocates for the government to assume the function of national insurer, leaving the delivery of health care - from its often-questionable content to its hierarchical relationships - firmly in place. As such, a single payer, Medicare-for-All insurance program is a modest, even tepid reform. Those of us on the left who have been active in the single payer movement have always seen it as a steppingstone toward health-care justice: until the question of access to care is solved, how do we even begin to address not only health care but also health inequities? How, for example, can working-class Americans, Americans of color, and women demand appropriate, respectful, humane, first-rate care when our ability to access any health-care services at all is so tightly constrained?

  20. Gender disparities in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Jennifer A; Patel, Vinisha; Varela, Natalie A

    2012-01-01

    The existence of disparities in delivery of health care has been the subject of increased empirical study in recent years. Some studies have suggested that disparities between men and women exist in the diagnoses and treatment of health conditions, and as a result measures have been taken to identify these differences. This article uses several examples to illustrate health care gender bias in medicine. These examples include surgery, peripheral artery disease, cardiovascular disease, critical care, and cardiovascular risk factors. Additionally, we discuss reasons why these issues still occur, trends in health care that may address these issues, and the need for acknowledgement of the current system's inequities in order to provide unbiased care for women in the future. © 2012 Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

  1. Gender and communication style in general practice: differences between women's health care and regular health care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink-Muinen, A. van den; Bensing, J.M.; Kerssens, J.J.

    1998-01-01

    Objectives: differences were investigated between general practitioners providing women's health care (4 women) and general practitioners providing regular health care (8 women and 8 men). Expectations were formulated on the basis of the principles of women's health care and literature about gender

  2. Health Promotion of University Students: contributions of community therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cintia Poleto Buzeli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available With this experience report of a master’s degree and two teachers of graduate Nursing School of Nursing Federal University of Mato Grosso, we sought to reflect on the Community Therapy (TC as a practice of collective care offered to students university students. Our goal is to report the experience of performing TC wheels in an academic environment, offer theoretical and methodological principles for the structuring and implementation of this practice care to college students at other universities. Was used for data collection direct observation of the wheels of TC the professional experiences as nurses and therapists community and appreciation of documents of such as the registration form filled out by the TC meetings and therapist co-therapist after each wheel TC. The reported experience has demonstrated the effectiveness of TC for the promotion of health thin this group, showing its importance as a practice for the creation and strengthening of ties between the community, the establishment of solidarity networks among students, as being a space speech and listening to their sufferings, their appreciation of life and its potential for promoting self-esteem and to encourage the development of a democract and civic consciousness.

  3. Health care law versus constitutional law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Mark A

    2013-04-01

    National Federation of Independent Business v. Sebelius, the Supreme Court's ruling on the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, is a landmark decision - both for constitutional law and for health care law and policy. Others will study its implications for constitutional limits on a range of federal powers beyond health care. This article considers to what extent the decision is also about health care law, properly conceived. Under one view, health care law is the subdiscipline that inquires how courts and government actors take account of the special features of medicine that make legal or policy issues especially problematic - rather than regarding health care delivery and finance more generically, like most any other economic or social enterprise. Viewed this way, the opinions from the Court's conservative justices are mainly about general constitutional law principles. In contrast, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's dissenting opinion for the four more liberal justices is just as much about health care law as it is about constitutional law. Her opinion gives detailed attention to the unique features of health care finance and delivery in order to inform her analysis of constitutional precedents and principles. Thus, the Court's multiple opinions give a vivid depiction of the compelling contrasts between communal versus individualistic conceptions of caring for those in need, and between health care and health insurance as ordinary commodities versus ones that merit special economic, social, and legal status.

  4. Quality Improvement in Athletic Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes Sauers, Andrea D; Sauers, Eric L; Valier, Alison R Snyder

    2017-11-01

      Quality improvement (QI) is a health care concept that ensures patients receive high-quality (safe, timely, effective, efficient, equitable, patient-centered) and affordable care. Despite its importance, the application of QI in athletic health care has been limited.   To describe the need for and define QI in health care, to describe how to measure quality in health care, and to present a QI case in athletic training.   As the athletic training profession continues to grow, a widespread engagement in QI efforts is necessary to establish the value of athletic training services for the patients that we serve. A review of the importance of QI in health care, historical perspectives of QI, tools to drive QI efforts, and examples of common QI initiatives is presented to assist clinicians in better understanding the value of QI for advancing athletic health care and the profession. Clinical and Research Advantages:  By engaging clinicians in strategies to measure outcomes and improve their patient care services, QI practice can help athletic trainers provide high-quality and affordable care to patients.

  5. Discrimination and Delayed Health Care Among Transgender Women and Men: Implications for Improving Medical Education and Health Care Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffee, Kim D; Shires, Deirdre A; Stroumsa, Daphna

    2016-11-01

    The transgender community experiences health care discrimination and approximately 1 in 4 transgender people were denied equal treatment in health care settings. Discrimination is one of the many factors significantly associated with health care utilization and delayed care. We assessed factors associated with delayed medical care due to discrimination among transgender patients, and evaluated the relationship between perceived provider knowledge and delayed care using Anderson's behavioral model of health services utilization. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to test whether predisposing, enabling, and health system factors were associated with delaying needed care for transgender women and transgender men. A sample of 3486 transgender participants who took part in the National Transgender Discrimination Survey in 2008 and 2009. Predisposing, enabling, and health system environment factors, and delayed needed health care. Overall, 30.8% of transgender participants delayed or did not seek needed health care due to discrimination. Respondents who had to teach health care providers about transgender people were 4 times more likely to delay needed health care due to discrimination. Transgender patients who need to teach their providers about transgender people are significantly more likely to postpone or not seek needed care. Systemic changes in provider education and training, along with health care system adaptations to ensure appropriate, safe, and respectful care, are necessary to close the knowledge and treatment gaps and prevent delayed care with its ensuing long-term health implications.

  6. Social Media and Population Health Virtual Exchange for Senior Nursing Students: An International Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procter, Paula M; Brixey, Juliana J; Honey, Michelle L L; Todhunter, Fern

    2016-01-01

    The authors have all engaged in using social media with students as a means for collaboration across national and international boundaries for various educational purposes. Following the explosion of big data in health the authors are now moving this concept forward within undergraduate and postgraduate nursing curricula for the development of population health virtual exchanges. Nursing has a global presence and yet it appears as though students have little knowledge of the health and social care needs and provision outside their local environment. This development will allow for explorative exchange amongst students in three countries, enhancing their understanding of their own and the selected international population health needs and solutions through asking and responding to questions amongst the learning community involved. The connection of the students will be recorded for their use in reflection; of particular interest will be the use of information included by the students to answer questions about their locality.

  7. Health care and equity in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balarajan, Y; Selvaraj, S; Subramanian, S V

    2011-02-05

    In India, despite improvements in access to health care, inequalities are related to socioeconomic status, geography, and gender, and are compounded by high out-of-pocket expenditures, with more than three-quarters of the increasing financial burden of health care being met by households. Health-care expenditures exacerbate poverty, with about 39 million additional people falling into poverty every year as a result of such expenditures. We identify key challenges for the achievement of equity in service provision, and equity in financing and financial risk protection in India. These challenges include an imbalance in resource allocation, inadequate physical access to high-quality health services and human resources for health, high out-of-pocket health expenditures, inflation in health spending, and behavioural factors that affect the demand for appropriate health care. Use of equity metrics in monitoring, assessment, and strategic planning; investment in development of a rigorous knowledge base of health-systems research; development of a refined equity-focused process of deliberative decision making in health reform; and redefinition of the specific responsibilities and accountabilities of key actors are needed to try to achieve equity in health care in India. The implementation of these principles with strengthened public health and primary-care services will help to ensure a more equitable health care for India's population. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Primary Care Screening of Depression and Treatment Engagement in a University Health Center: A Retrospective Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Michael C.; Ciotoli, Carlo; Chung, Henry

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This retrospective study analyzed a primary care depression screening initiative in a large urban university health center. Depression detection, treatment status, and engagement data are presented. Participants: Participants were 3,713 graduate and undergraduate students who presented consecutively for primary care services between…

  9. The impact of personal loss on the experience of health professions: graduate students in end-of-life and bereavement care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supiano, Katherine P; Vaughn-Cole, Beth

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the impact of prior personal experience with grief on self-reported personal and professional development of graduate students in nursing, social work, counseling, pastoral care, and genetic counseling involved as cofacilitators in bereavement support groups, and of medical students observing interdisciplinary inpatient palliative care. Personal experience with death of a family member or close friend was reported in 80% of the 35 participating students. Findings suggest that grief and the students' construction of the meaning of their loss can mediate the students' developing sense of self as a professional helper. Active engagement with suffering persons, the opportunity for self-disclosure and reflection, and teacher-facilitator provision of emotional guidance and modeling contributed positively to learning.

  10. Spanish students' use of the Internet for mental health information and support seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagni, Ilaria; Parizot, Isabelle; Horgan, Aine; Gonzalez-Caballero, Juan-Luis; Almenara-Barrios, José; Lagares-Franco, Carolina; Peralta-Sáez, Juan-Luis; Chauvin, Pierre; Amaddeo, Francesco

    2016-06-01

    The Internet is a growing source of information for health in general, with university student being online almost daily. Evaluating their use of the Internet for mental health information and support can help understanding if online tools and websites should be used for mental health promotion and, to some extent, care. A survey was conducted with more than 600 students of Law, Nursing and Computer Science of the University of Cadiz in Spain to determine their general use of the Internet and their perceptions and trust in using this medium for mental health information. Data were collected using a 25-item-questionnaire and findings indicated that students had a strong distrust in online mental health information, notwithstanding their daily use of the Internet. The frequency and methods of their research on the Internet correlated with their health status, their medical consultations and with certain socio-demographic characteristics. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Health care of youth aging out of foster care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Youth transitioning out of foster care face significant medical and mental health care needs. Unfortunately, these youth rarely receive the services they need because of lack of health insurance. Through many policies and programs, the federal government has taken steps to support older youth in foster care and those aging out. The Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act of 2008 (Pub L No. 110-354) requires states to work with youth to develop a transition plan that addresses issues such as health insurance. In addition, beginning in 2014, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (Pub L No. 111-148) makes youth aging out of foster care eligible for Medicaid coverage until age 26 years, regardless of income. Pediatricians can support youth aging out of foster care by working collaboratively with the child welfare agency in their state to ensure that the ongoing health needs of transitioning youth are met.

  12. The Impact of Health Insurance on Health Care Provision in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study assesses the impact of the NHIS scheme in promoting access to health care. It identifies a need for all stakeholders to engage in the active promotion of awareness on health insurance as option of health