WorldWideScience

Sample records for health care clinics

  1. Chinese health care system and clinical epidemiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuelian; Gregersen, Hans; Yuan, Wei

    2017-01-01

    China has gone through a comprehensive health care insurance reform since 2003 and achieved universal health insurance coverage in 2011. The new health care insurance system provides China with a huge opportunity for the development of health care and medical research when its rich medical resources are fully unfolded. In this study, we review the Chinese health care system and its implication for medical research, especially within clinical epidemiology. First, we briefly review the population register system, the distribution of the urban and rural population in China, and the development of the Chinese health care system after 1949. In the following sections, we describe the current Chinese health care delivery system and the current health insurance system. We then focus on the construction of the Chinese health information system as well as several existing registers and research projects on health data. Finally, we discuss the opportunities and challenges of the health care system in regard to clinical epidemiology research. China now has three main insurance schemes. The Urban Employee Basic Medical Insurance (UEBMI) covers urban employees and retired employees. The Urban Residence Basic Medical Insurance (URBMI) covers urban residents, including children, students, elderly people without previous employment, and unemployed people. The New Rural Cooperative Medical Scheme (NRCMS) covers rural residents. The Chinese Government has made efforts to build up health information data, including electronic medical records. The establishment of universal health care insurance with linkage to medical records will provide potentially huge research opportunities in the future. However, constructing a complete register system at a nationwide level is challenging. In the future, China will demand increased capacity of researchers and data managers, in particular within clinical epidemiology, to explore the rich resources. PMID:28356772

  2. Chinese health care system and clinical epidemiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Y

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Yuelian Sun,1 Hans Gregersen,2 Wei Yuan3 1Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; 2GIOME, Department of Surgery, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, 3Key Laboratory of Reproduction Regulation of NPFPC, SIPPR, IRD, Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Abstract: China has gone through a comprehensive health care insurance reform since 2003 and achieved universal health insurance coverage in 2011. The new health care insurance system provides China with a huge opportunity for the development of health care and medical research when its rich medical resources are fully unfolded. In this study, we review the Chinese health care system and its implication for medical research, especially within clinical epidemiology. First, we briefly review the population register system, the distribution of the urban and rural population in China, and the development of the Chinese health care system after 1949. In the following sections, we describe the current Chinese health care delivery system and the current health insurance system. We then focus on the construction of the Chinese health information system as well as several existing registers and research projects on health data. Finally, we discuss the opportunities and challenges of the health care system in regard to clinical epidemiology research. China now has three main insurance schemes. The Urban Employee Basic Medical Insurance (UEBMI covers urban employees and retired employees. The Urban Residence Basic Medical Insurance (URBMI covers urban residents, including children, students, elderly people without previous employment, and unemployed people. The New Rural Cooperative Medical Scheme (NRCMS covers rural residents. The Chinese Government has made efforts to build up health information data, including electronic medical records. The establishment of universal health care insurance with linkage to medical records will provide

  3. Patient satisfaction with health care services provided at HIV clinics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Since the establishment of free HIV/AIDS care and treatment services in Tanzania a lot of research has been done to assess how health care providers discharge their duties in these clinics. Little research however has been done regarding satisfaction of HIV patients with free health care services provided.

  4. Health profiles of foreigners attending primary care clinics in Malaysia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ab Rahman, Norazida; Sivasampu, Sheamini; Mohamad Noh, Kamaliah; Khoo, Ee Ming

    2016-01-01

    .... Little is known about the health profiles of foreign population in Malaysia. The aim of this study was to provide a detailed description of the health problems presented by foreigners attending primary care clinics in Malaysia...

  5. What is Clinical Safety in Electronic Health Care Record Systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, George

    There is mounting public awareness of an increasing number of adverse clinical incidents within the National Health Service (NHS), but at the same time, large health care projects like the National Programme for IT (NPFIT) are claiming that safer care is one of the benefits of the project and that health software systems in particular have the potential to reduce the likelihood of accidental or unintentional harm to patients. This paper outlines the approach to clinical safety management taken by CSC, a major supplier to NPFIT; discusses acceptable levels of risk and clinical safety as an end-to-end concept; and touches on the future for clinical safety in health systems software.

  6. [Clinical bioethics for primary health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-de Paz, L

    2013-01-01

    The clinical decision making process with ethical implications in the area of primary healthcare differs from other healthcare areas. From the ethical perspective it is important to include these issues in the decision making model. This dissertation explains the need for a process of bioethical deliberation for Primary Healthcare, as well as proposing a method for doing so. The decision process method, adapted to this healthcare area, is flexible and requires a more participative Healthcare System. This proposal involves professionals and the patient population equally, is intended to facilitate the acquisition of responsibility for personal and community health. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  7. Survey of scholastic athletic health care and sports medicine clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegerreis, S; Malone, T R; Greenwald, L; Knoeppel, D E

    1983-01-01

    The increasing number of athletes requiring health care has spurred the growth of the development of sports medicine clinics. The diversity of such clinics is readily apparent. These clinics primarily function to provide evaluative and rehabilitative measures to all groups of athletic participants. Scholastic health care for athletic participants has not proceeded in a similar pattern. Sports medicine clinics are not effectively meeting the needs of the scholastic athlete, primarily because of location and financial limitations. This survey was conducted to collect information to further delineate the problems associated with scholastic health care of athletic participants. It appears that sports medicine clinics are manned by several levels of health care professionals. Scholastic athletes are least adequately covered by insurance and also suffer from being within a somewhat isolated environment. The need for on-field care and follow-up care within the school system remains a key problem associated with scholastic health care. Further research into the relationship of insurance policies which will adequately meet the needs of the scholastic population must be pursued. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 1983;5(2):78-81.

  8. Teaching About Health Care Disparities in the Clinical Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Leonor; Irby, David M.; Harleman, Elizabeth; Fernandez, Alicia

    2010-01-01

    Clinical teachers often observe interactions that may contribute to health care disparities, yet may hesitate to teach about them. A pedagogical model could help faculty structure teaching about health care disparities in the clinical setting, but to our knowledge, none have been adapted for this purpose. In this paper, we adapt an established model, Time-Effective Strategies for Teaching (TEST), to the teaching of health care disparities. We use several case scenarios to illustrate the core components of the model: diagnose the learner, teach rapidly to the learner’s need, and provide feedback. The TEST model is straightforward, easy to use, and enables the incorporation of teaching about health care disparities into routine clinical teaching. PMID:20352501

  9. Advancing LGBT Health Care Policies and Clinical Care Within a Large Academic Health Care System: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruben, Mollie A; Shipherd, Jillian C; Topor, David; AhnAllen, Christopher G; Sloan, Colleen A; Walton, Heather M; Matza, Alexis R; Trezza, Glenn R

    2017-01-01

    Culturally competent health care is especially important among sexual and gender minority patients because poor cultural competence contributes to health disparities. There is a need to understand how to improve health care quality and delivery for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) veterans in particular, because they have unique physical and mental health needs as both LGBT individuals and veterans. The following article is a case study that focuses on the policy and clinical care practices related to LGBT clinical competency, professional training, and ethical provision of care for veteran patients in the VA Boston Healthcare System. We apply Betancourt et al.'s (2003) cultural competence framework to outline the steps that VA Boston Healthcare System took to increase cultural competency at the organizational, structural, and clinical level. By sharing our experiences, we aim to provide a model and steps for other health care systems and programs, including other VA health care systems, large academic health care systems, community health care systems, and mental health care systems, interested in developing LGBT health initiatives.

  10. Health profiles of foreigners attending primary care clinics in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ab Rahman, Norazida; Sivasampu, Sheamini; Mohamad Noh, Kamaliah; Khoo, Ee Ming

    2016-06-14

    The world population has become more globalised with increasing number of people residing in another country for work or other reasons. Little is known about the health profiles of foreign population in Malaysia. The aim of this study was to provide a detailed description of the health problems presented by foreigners attending primary care clinics in Malaysia. Data were derived from the 2012 National Medical Care Survey (NMCS), a cross sectional survey of primary care encounters from public and private primary care clinics sampled from five regions in Malaysia. Patients with foreign nationality were identified and analysed for demographic profiles, reasons for encounter (RFEs), diagnosis, and provision of care. Foreigners accounted for 7.7 % (10,830) of all patient encounters from NMCS. Most encounters were from private clinics (90.2 %). Median age was 28 years (IQR: 24.0, 34.8) and 69.9 % were male. Most visits to the primary care clinics were for symptom-based complaints (69.5 %), followed by procedures (23.0 %) and follow-up visit (7.4 %). The commonest diagnosis in public clinics was antenatal care (21.8 %), followed by high risk pregnancies (7.5 %) and upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) (6.8 %). Private clinics had more cases for general medical examination (13.5 %), URTI (13.1 %) and fever (3.9 %). Medications were prescribed to 76.5 % of these encounters. More foreigners were seeking primary medical care from private clinics and the encounters were for general medical examinations and acute minor ailments. Those who sought care from public clinics were for obstetric problems and chronic diseases. Medications were prescribed to two-thirds of the encounters while other interventions: laboratory investigations, medical procedures and follow-up appointment had lower rates in private clinics. Foreigners are generally of young working group and are expected to have mandatory medical checks. The preponderance of obstetrics seen in public

  11. Clinical leadership in health care: a position statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millward, Lynne J; Bryan, Karen

    2005-01-01

    This paper aims to briefly review leadership within the contemporary UK National Health Services (NHS) including Department of Health and Royal College of Nursing (RCN) initiatives. It is argued that the concept of clinical leadership is a viable and important one, and is theoretically consistent with the contemporary social psychological literature on the importance of "local" leadership to effective organizational functioning. Field theory proposes that local influences (e.g. local management) on attitudes and behaviour will to a large extent mediate the impact of the organization (e.g. organisational structure and values) on (in this instance) health care delivery. The reality of clinical leadership must involve a judicious blend effective management in the conventional sense with skill in transformational change in order to make real difference to the care delivery process. For leadership initiatives to become truly culturally embedded into the "way we do things around here", they require more than just individual training and development. A view is offered for the practical interpretation of the clinical leadership concept in relationship terms. This will involve management of the relationship between health care professionals, between health care professionals and the "organizations" to which they are accountable and between health care professionals and service users.

  12. Quality of care of nurse-led and allied health personnel-led primary care clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, W Y; Lam, Cindy L K; Lo, S V

    2011-06-01

    To review the literature regarding quality of care of nurse-led and allied health personnel-led primary care clinics with specific attention to the quality indicators for fall prevention, continence care, pulmonary rehabilitation, mental health, pharmaceutical care, and wound care services. Literature search from 1990 to 2010 including Ovid Medline, Cochrane Database, RAND (Research and Development) Corporation Health Database, the ACOVE (Assessing the Care of Vulnerable Elders) project and clinical guidelines from the United Kingdom, Australia, Canada, and the United States. This review was limited to studies involving adult, primary care patients. Where available, evidence from systematic reviews and meta-analyses were used to synthesise findings. Combinations of the following terms (and related terms) were used to identify studies: primary care, clinic, allied-health, nurse-led, fall prevention, continence care, incontinence, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, pulmonary disease, respiratory rehabilitation, mental health, mental wellbeing, depression, anxiety, wound care, leg ulcer, venous ulcer, dressings clinic, wound clinic, medication review, pharmacist-led, pharmaceutical care. A total of 21 international guidelines and 33 studies were selected for data synthesis. Despite a lack of consistent outcomes data, it is apparent that certain aspects of organisational structure and clinical care processes are important though not necessarily sufficient indicators of quality of care, because they themselves can influence care outcomes. Seven key factors were identified which seem important determinants of the quality of care provided by nurse- and allied health personnel-led clinics. Delivery of primary health care by nurse and allied health personnel-led teams is a well-established model, internationally. Evidence from the literature provides benchmarks for standards of good practice. Knowledge of factors influencing quality of care can assist the planning

  13. The normativity of clinical health care: perspectives on moral realism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nortvedt, Per

    2012-06-01

    The paper argues that a particular version of moral realism constitutes an important basis for ethics in medicine and health care. Moral realism is the position that moral value is a part of the fabric of relational and interpersonal reality. But even though moral values are subject to human interpretations, they are not themselves the sole product of these interpretations. Moral values are not invented but discovered by the subject. Moral realism argues that values are open to perception and experience and that moral subjectivity must be portrayed in how moral values are discovered and perceived by the human subject. Moral values may exist independent of the particular subject's interpretative evaluations as a part of reality. This epistemological point about normativity is particularly significant in medical care and in health care. The clinician perceives moral value in the clinical encounter in a way that is important for competent clinical understanding. Clinical understanding in medical care and health care bears on the encounter with moral values in the direct and embodied relations to patients, with their experiences of illness and their vulnerabilities. Good clinical care is then partly conditioned upon adequate understanding of such moral realities.

  14. Retail health clinics drive innovation into primary care practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissinger, Mark

    2008-01-01

    A myriad of patient dissatisfaction issues stemming from antiquated approaches to primary care access are resulting in the establishment of retail health clinics (RHCs) throughout the country. RHCs are usually located within retail stores or stand-alone pharmacies and are staffed by nurse practitioners (NPs). They offer treatment for colds, coughs, skin rashes, and ear infections along with offering preventive care and physicals. As disruptive innovations, or innovations that offer services to ignored markets, these clinics are siphoning patient care visits away from primary care physicians because of their attention to quick access, affordable prices, and consumer-friendly approaches. In response, family and internal medicine physicians must follow three strategies to secure their patient population as well as attract new patients: build relationships with RHCs through referral networks and NP supervisory agreements, transform the provision of patient access through the development of physician-owned RHCs, and support the concept of the advanced medical home.

  15. [Preventive health care and health promotion: Which models for supporting the evolution of clinical practice in primary health care?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanmeerbeek, Marc; Mathonet, Julien; Miermans, Marie-Christine; Lenoir, Anne-Laure; Vandoorne, Chantal

    2015-06-01

    Published operating models about preventive health care and health promotion in primary care were sought with the aim of (1) compiling a functional inventory; and (2) to formulate working hypotheses for the improvement of clinical practice towards more efficiency and more equity. Narrative literature review, using keywords related to the various prevention classes, health promotion, primary care, practice models and health care delivery. The diversity of models led to a multi-criteria analysis. Twelve models were selected. Their characteristics were unevenly distributed. The models, whose authors announce that they apply to prevention, mainly describe approaches that focus on individuals within physician-patient relationship, and take into account practice organization. Some socio-ecological and systems models illustrate health promotion: educational practice, group- or population-based targets, community environment and social determinants of health. There is little room for patients in elaborating the models, as they have little role in health care systems. The definitions of prevention, health promotion and patient education greatly differ from one model to another. Little is known about practical implementation of the models; assessment data are scarce. Some elements valued by health promotion could be integrated to health care: empowerment of citizens, addressing community environment; increased involvement in local health professionals' networks; integration of individual and collective approaches within the same health care facilities to address simultaneously individual customization, efficiency and equity objectives. These developments may call for adaptation in vocational training and continuous professional development: communication skills, awareness to public health concepts, and early and longitudinal exposure to community-based learning experiences for students. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  16. Evaluation of specialist referrals at a rural health care clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggerstaff, Mary Ellen; Short, Nancy

    2017-07-01

    Transition to a value-based care system involves reducing costs improving population health and enhancing the patient experience. Many rural hospitals must rely on specialist referrals because of a lack of an internal system of specialists on staff. This evaluation of the existing specialist referrals from primary care was conducted to better understand and improve the referral process and address costs, population health, and the patient experience. A 6-month retrospective chart review was conducted to evaluate quality and outcomes of specialty referrals submitted by 10 primary care providers. During a 6-month period in 2015, there was a total of 13,601 primary care patient visits and 3814 referrals, a referral rate of approximately 27%. The most striking result of this review was that nearly 50% of referred patients were not making the prescribed specialist appointment. Rather than finding a large number of unnecessary referrals, we found overall referral rates higher than expected, and a large percentage of our patients were not completing their referrals. The data and patterns emerging from this investigation would guide the development of referral protocols for a newly formed accountable care organization and lead to further quality improvement projects: a LEAN effort, dissemination of results to clinical and executive staff, protocols for orthopedic and neurosurgical referrals, and recommendations for future process improvements. ©2017 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  17. Integrated care through disease-oriented clinical care pathways: experience from Japan's regional health planning initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Etsuji; Miyamoto, Masaki; Hara, Kazuhiro; Yoshida, Jun; Muto, Masaki; Hirai, Aizan; Tatsumi, Haruyuki; Mizuno, Masaaki; Nagata, Hiroshi; Yamakata, Daisuke; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    In April 2008, Japan launched a radical reform in regional health planning that emphasized the development of disease-oriented clinical care pathways. These 'inter-provider critical paths' have sought to ensure effective integration of various providers ranging among primary care practitioners, acute care hospitals, rehabilitation hospitals, long-term care facilities and home care. All 47 prefectures in Japan developed their Regional Health Plans pursuant to the guideline requiring that these should include at least four diseases: diabetes, acute myocardial infarction, cerebrovascular accident and cancer. To illustrate the care pathways developed, this paper describes the guideline referring to strokes and provides examples of the new Regional Health Plans as well as examples of disease-oriented inter-provider clinical paths. In particular, the paper examines the development of information sharing through electronic health records (EHR) to enhance effective integration among providers is discussed. Japan's reform in 2008 is unique in that the concept of 'disease-oriented regional inter-provider critical paths' was adopted as a national policy and all 47 prefectures developed their Regional Health Plans simultaneously. How much the new regional health planning policy has improved the quality and outcome of care remains to be seen and will be evaluated in 2013 after the five-year planned period of implementation has concluded. Whilst electronic health records appear to be a useful tool in supporting care integration they do not guarantee success in the application of an inter-provider critical path.

  18. Global Health and Emergency Care: Overcoming Clinical Research Barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Adam C; Barry, Meagan A; Agrawal, Pooja; Duber, Herbert C; Chang, Mary P; Mackey, Joy M; Hansoti, Bhakti

    2017-04-01

    There are many barriers impeding the conduct of high-quality emergency care research, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. Several of these barriers were originally outlined in 2013 as part of the Academic Emergency Medicine Global Health and Emergency Care Consensus Conference. This paper seeks to establish a broader consensus on the barriers to emergency care research globally and proposes a comprehensive array of new recommendations to overcome these barriers. An electronic survey was conducted of a purposive sample of global emergency medicine research experts from around the world to describe the major challenges and solutions to conducting emergency care research in low-resource settings and rank them by importance. The Global Emergency Medicine Think Tank Clinical Research Working Group at the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine 2016 Annual Meeting utilized a modified Delphi technique for consensus-based decision making to categorize and expand upon these barriers and develop a comprehensive array of proposed solutions. The working group identified four broad categories of barriers to conducting emergency care research globally, including 1) the limited availability of research personnel, particularly those with prior research training; 2) logistic barriers and lack of standardization of data collection; 3) ethical barriers to conducting research in resource-limited settings, particularly when no local institutional review board is available; and 4) the relative dearth of funding for global emergency care research. Proposed solutions included building a diverse and interdisciplinary research team structured to promote mentorship of junior researchers, utilizing local research assistants or technologic tools such as telemedicine for language translation, making use of new tools such as mobile health (mHealth) to standardize and streamline data collection, identifying alternatives to local institutional review board approval and the use of

  19. Clinical Preventive Services for Older Adults: The Interface Between Personal Health Care and Public Health Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Chesley L.; Shenson, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    Healthy aging must become a priority objective for both population and personal health services, and will require innovative prevention programming to span those systems. Uptake of essential clinical preventive services is currently suboptimal among adults, owing to a number of system- and office-based care barriers. To achieve maximum health results, prevention must be integrated across community and clinical settings. Many preventive services are portable, deliverable in either clinical or community settings. Capitalizing on that flexibility can improve uptake and health outcomes. Significant reductions in health disparities, mortality, and morbidity, along with decreases in health spending, are achievable through improved collaboration and synergy between population health and personal health systems. PMID:22390505

  20. Event detection using population-based health care databases in randomized clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Leif; Jensen, Lisette Okkels; Tilsted, Hans Henrik

    2013-01-01

    To describe a new research tool, designed to reflect routine clinical practice and relying on population-based health care databases to detect clinical events in randomized clinical trials.......To describe a new research tool, designed to reflect routine clinical practice and relying on population-based health care databases to detect clinical events in randomized clinical trials....

  1. Characterizing Primary Care Visit Activities at Veterans Health Administration Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Jennifer C; Terwiesch, Christian; Pelak, Mary; Pettit, Amy R; Marcus, Steven C

    2015-01-01

    Medical home models seek to increase efficiency and maximize the use of resources by ensuring that all care team members work at the top of their licenses. We sought to break down primary care office visits into measurable activities to better under stand how primary care providers (PCPs) currently spend visit time and to provide insight into potential opportunities for revision or redistribution of healthcare tasks. We videotaped 27 PCPs during office visits with 121 patients at four Veterans Health Administration medical centers. Based on patterns emerging from the data, we identified a taxonomy of 12 provider activity categories that enabled us to quantify the frequency and duration of activities occurring during routine primary care visits. We conducted descriptive and multivariate analyses to examine associations between visit characteristics and provider and clinic characteristics. We found that PCPs spent the greatest percentage of their visit time discussing existing conditions (20%), discussing new conditions (18%), record keeping (13%), and examining patients (13%). Providers spent the smallest percentage of time on preventive care and coordination of care. Mean visit length was 22.9 minutes (range 7.9-58.0 minutes). Site-level ratings of medical home implementation were not associated with differences in how visit time was spent. These data provide a window into how PCPs are spending face-to-face time with patients. The methodology and taxonomy presented here may prove useful for future quality improvement and research endeavors, particularly those focused on opportunities to increase nonappointment care and to ensure that team members work at the top of their skill level.

  2. Marketing retail health clinics: challenges and controversies arising from a health care innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Cheryl-Ann N; Khanfar, Nile M; Harrington, Catherine; Loudon, David

    2011-01-01

    Since their founding in 2000, retail-based health care clinics, also called convenient care clinics, have flourished but continue to generate controversy. This article examines the literature with respect to the industry's background, establishment of industry standards, types of services offered, marketing of retail health clinics, industry growth with new target markets, and patient demographics. It also examines the growing relationship with insurers and third-party payers, quality-of-care concerns by medical associations, and legal regulations and their potential impact on industry growth nationwide.

  3. Global Health and Emergency Care: Defining Clinical Research Priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansoti, Bhakti; Aluisio, Adam R; Barry, Meagan A; Davey, Kevin; Lentz, Brian A; Modi, Payal; Newberry, Jennifer A; Patel, Melissa H; Smith, Tricia A; Vinograd, Alexandra M; Levine, Adam C

    2017-06-01

    Despite recent strides in the development of global emergency medicine (EM), the field continues to lag in applying a scientific approach to identifying critical knowledge gaps and advancing evidence-based solutions to clinical and public health problems seen in emergency departments (EDs) worldwide. Here, progress on the global EM research agenda created at the 2013 Academic Emergency Medicine Global Health and Emergency Care Consensus Conference is evaluated and critical areas for future development in emergency care research internationally are identified. A retrospective review of all studies compiled in the Global Emergency Medicine Literature Review (GEMLR) database from 2013 through 2015 was conducted. Articles were categorized and analyzed using descriptive quantitative measures and structured data matrices. The Global Emergency Medicine Think Tank Clinical Research Working Group at the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine 2016 Annual Meeting then further conceptualized and defined global EM research priorities utilizing consensus-based decision making. Research trends in global EM research published between 2013 and 2015 show a predominance of observational studies relative to interventional or descriptive studies, with the majority of research conducted in the inpatient setting in comparison to the ED or prehospital setting. Studies on communicable diseases and injury were the most prevalent, with a relative dearth of research on chronic noncommunicable diseases. The Global Emergency Medicine Think Tank Clinical Research Working Group identified conceptual frameworks to define high-impact research priorities, including the traditional approach of using global burden of disease to define priorities and the impact of EM on individual clinical care and public health opportunities. EM research is also described through a population lens approach, including gender, pediatrics, and migrant and refugee health. Despite recent strides in global EM research and

  4. New path for health-care leadership: clinical systems management. CLMA Clinical Systems Management Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, L; Lien, J; Snyder, J R; Teixeira, R; Vernon, M; Pomerantz, P

    1998-01-01

    This article sets forth a concept and an action plan to support the educational needs for the clinical systems manager. This article describes the roles, competencies, and tasks of the clinical systems manager and defines specific intermediate and long-term steps. Clinical systems management is umbrella terminology used to describe an array of related jobs including, but not necessarily limited to, multidepartmental or interdisciplinary management, regional or health system-wide laboratory management, and traditional laboratory management. In general, clinical systems management recognizes the emergence of new jobs, with the primary responsibility of leading the integration of clinical services within health-care systems.

  5. Perspectives on Clinical Informatics: Integrating Large-Scale Clinical, Genomic, and Health Information for Clinical Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In Young Choi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The advances in electronic medical records (EMRs and bioinformatics (BI represent two significant trends in healthcare. The widespread adoption of EMR systems and the completion of the Human Genome Project developed the technologies for data acquisition, analysis, and visualization in two different domains. The massive amount of data from both clinical and biology domains is expected to provide personalized, preventive, and predictive healthcare services in the near future. The integrated use of EMR and BI data needs to consider four key informatics areas: data modeling, analytics, standardization, and privacy. Bioclinical data warehouses integrating heterogeneous patient-related clinical or omics data should be considered. The representative standardization effort by the Clinical Bioinformatics Ontology (CBO aims to provide uniquely identified concepts to include molecular pathology terminologies. Since individual genome data are easily used to predict current and future health status, different safeguards to ensure confidentiality should be considered. In this paper, we focused on the informatics aspects of integrating the EMR community and BI community by identifying opportunities, challenges, and approaches to provide the best possible care service for our patients and the population.

  6. Role of pharmacogenetics in public health and clinical health care: a SWOT analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Ritika; Tan-Koi, Wei Chuen; Teo, Yik-Ying

    2016-12-01

    Pharmacogenomics has been lauded as an important innovation in clinical medicine as a result of advances in genomic science. As one of the cornerstones in precision medicine, the vision to determine the right medication in the right dosage for the right treatment with the use of genetic information has not exactly materialised, and few genetic tests have been implemented as the standard of care in health systems worldwide. Here we review the findings from a SWOT analysis to examine the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats around the role of pharmacogenetics in public health and clinical health care, at the micro, meso and macro levels corresponding to the perspectives of the individuals (scientists, patients and physicians), the health-care institutions and the health systems, respectively.

  7. Health economic analyses of domiciliary dental care and care at fixed clinics for elderly nursing home residents in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundqvist, M; Davidson, T; Ordell, S; Sjöström, O; Zimmerman, M; Sjögren, P

    2015-03-01

    Dental care for elderly nursing home residents is traditionally provided at fixed dental clinics, but domiciliary dental care is an emerging alternative. Longer life expectancy accompanied with increased morbidity, and hospitalisation or dependence on the care of others will contribute to a risk for rapid deterioration of oral health so alternative methods for delivering oral health care to vulnerable individuals for whom access to fixed dental clinics is an obstacle should be considered. The aim was to analyse health economic consequences of domiciliary dental care for elderly nursing home residents in Sweden, compared to dentistry at a fixed clinic. A review of relevant literature was undertaken complemented by interviews with nursing home staff, officials at county councils, and academic experts in geriatric dentistry. Domiciliary dental care and fixed clinic care were compared in cost analyses and cost-effectiveness analyses. The mean societal cost of domiciliary dental care for elderly nursing home residents was lower than dental care at a fixed clinic, and it was also considered cost-effective. Lower cost of dental care at a fixed dental clinic was only achieved in a scenario where dental care could not be completed in a domiciliary setting. Domiciliary dental care for elderly nursing home residents has a lower societal cost and is cost-effective compared to dental care at fixed clinics. To meet current and predicted need for oral health care in the ageing population alternative methods to deliver dental care should be available.

  8. A model linking clinical workforce skill mix planning to health and health care dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masnick, Keith; McDonnell, Geoff

    2010-04-30

    In an attempt to devise a simpler computable tool to assist workforce planners in determining what might be an appropriate mix of health service skills, our discussion led us to consider the implications of skill mixing and workforce composition beyond the 'stock and flow' approach of much workforce planning activity. Taking a dynamic systems approach, we were able to address the interactions, delays and feedbacks that influence the balance between the major components of health and health care. We linked clinical workforce requirements to clinical workforce workload, taking into account the requisite facilities, technologies, other material resources and their funding to support clinical care microsystems; gave recognition to productivity and quality issues; took cognisance of policies, governance and power concerns in the establishment and operation of the health care system; and, going back to the individual, gave due attention to personal behaviour and biology within the socio-political family environment. We have produced the broad endogenous systems model of health and health care which will enable human resource planners to operate within real world variables. We are now considering the development of simple, computable national versions of this model.

  9. A model linking clinical workforce skill mix planning to health and health care dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McDonnell Geoff

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In an attempt to devise a simpler computable tool to assist workforce planners in determining what might be an appropriate mix of health service skills, our discussion led us to consider the implications of skill mixing and workforce composition beyond the 'stock and flow' approach of much workforce planning activity. Methods Taking a dynamic systems approach, we were able to address the interactions, delays and feedbacks that influence the balance between the major components of health and health care. Results We linked clinical workforce requirements to clinical workforce workload, taking into account the requisite facilities, technologies, other material resources and their funding to support clinical care microsystems; gave recognition to productivity and quality issues; took cognisance of policies, governance and power concerns in the establishment and operation of the health care system; and, going back to the individual, gave due attention to personal behaviour and biology within the socio-political family environment. Conclusion We have produced the broad endogenous systems model of health and health care which will enable human resource planners to operate within real world variables. We are now considering the development of simple, computable national versions of this model.

  10. Planning oral health and clinical discharge in primary care: the comprehensive dental care protocol outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, Yuri Wanderley; Dantas de Almeida, Leopoldina de Fátima; Barbosa, Ailma de Souza; Nascimento Padilha, Wilton Wilney

    2015-03-01

    The dental care must be driven by preventive and curative measures that can contribute to the population's oral health promotion. To evaluate the impact of the actions proposed by a comprehensive dental care protocol (CDCP) on the oral health condition of primary care users. The sample consisted of 32 volunteers, assisted throughout the six phases proposed by the CDCP: diagnosis of dental needs; resolution of urgencies; restorative interventions; application of promotional measures; evaluation of the achieved health level; and periodic controls. Data were collected through clinical exams, which measured the simplified oral hygiene index (OHI-S), gingival bleeding index (GBI) and the decayed, missing and filled teeth (DMFT) Index, before and after the CDCP was implemented. Statistical analysis consisted of the Wilcoxon test, at 5% significance level (α = 0.05). The OHI-S and GBI indices showed a significant reduction (p 0.05), showing final values equal to 12.7 ± 9.6 and 5.6 ± 7.8, respectively. Decayed elements were fully converted into filled elements, and the final values of the decayed and filled elements were, respectively, 0.0 ± 0.0 and 7.3 ± 5.7 (p health of the population assisted by the dental services offered in primary care and this protocol seems to ft the public dental service demands. The CDCP can be useful to public dental service planning since it showed an efficient clinical outcome to the patients. We consider that this protocol should be employed in primary care oral health services in order to achieve overall upgrade, access enlargement and public oral health promotion.

  11. A Comparison of Collaborative Care Outcomes in Two Health Care Systems: VA Clinics and Federally Qualified Health Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubbs, Kathleen M; Fortney, John C; Pyne, Jeffrey; Mittal, Dinesh; Ray, John; Hudson, Teresa J

    2018-01-16

    Collaborative care for depression results in symptom reduction when compared with usual care. No studies have systematically compared collaborative care outcomes between veterans treated at Veterans Affairs (VA) clinics and civilians treated at publicly funded federally qualified health centers (FQHCs) after controlling for demographic and clinical characteristics. Data from two randomized controlled trials that used a similar collaborative care intervention for depression were combined to conduct post hoc analyses (N=759). The Telemedicine-Enhanced Antidepressant Management intervention was delivered in VA community-based outpatient clinics (CBOCs), and the Outreach Using Telemedicine for Rural Enhanced Access in Community Health intervention was delivered in FQHCs. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine whether veteran status moderated the effect of the intervention on treatment response (>50% reduction in symptoms). There was a significant main effect for intervention (odds ratio [OR]=5.23, p<.001) and a moderating effect for veteran status, with lower response rates among veterans compared with civilians (OR=.21, p=.01). The addition of variables representing medication dosage and number of mental health and general health appointments did not influence the moderating effect. A sensitivity analysis stratified by gender found a significant moderating effect of veteran status for men but not women. Veteran status was a significant moderator of collaborative care effectiveness for depression, indicating that veterans receiving collaborative care at a CBOC are at risk of nonresponse. Unmeasured patient- or system-level characteristics may contribute to poorer response among veterans.

  12. Strengthening primary health care teams with palliative care leaders: protocol for a cluster randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llobera, Joan; Sansó, Noemí; Ruiz, Amador; Llagostera, Merce; Serratusell, Estefania; Serrano, Carlos; Roselló, María Luisa Martín; Benito, Enric; Castaño, Eusebio J; Leiva, Alfonso

    2017-07-10

    The objective of the Balearic Islands Palliative Care (PC) Program is to improve the quality of PC through a shared model consisting of primary health care professionals, home-based PC teams, and PC units in hospitals. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), patients with advanced cancer and other terminal diseases benefit from early identification and proactive PC. We will evaluate the effectiveness of an intervention in which a PC leader is established in the primary health care center, and assess the effect of this intervention on the early identification of patients in need of PC, the efficient use of health care services, and direct health care costs. Design: A two-arm cluster randomized clinical trial of 30 Primary Health Care Centers (PHCC) in Mallorca (Spain), in which each center was randomized to an intervention arm or a usual care arm. We expect that the number of patients identified as suitable for PC (including non-oncological PC) is at least 5% greater in the intervention arm. A total of 4640 deceased patients. Outcomes will be assessed by a blinded external review of the electronic records. General practitioners (GPs) and nurse leaders in PC for each PHCC will be appointed. These leaders will help promote PC training of colleagues, improve symptom management and psychological support of patients, and evaluate the complexity of individual cases so that these cases receive assistance from PC home-based teams. Early identification (>90 days before death), evaluation of case complexity, level of case complexity (with referral to a home-based PC team), use and cost of hospital and primary care services, and quality of life during the last month of life (≥2 emergency room visits, ≥2 hospital admissions, ≥14 days of hospitalization). PC leaders in primary care teams will improve the early identification of patients eligible for PC. This initiative could improve the quality of end-of-life care and utilization of hospital resources. ISRCTN

  13. Frontline health care can be improved by bringing research into the clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinhausen, Kirsten; Berghmans, Stephane; Højgaard, Liselotte

    2011-01-01

    Progress in clinical research has played a huge role in the great improvements in frontline health care achieved over the last 50 years, both in general practice and in hospitals.......Progress in clinical research has played a huge role in the great improvements in frontline health care achieved over the last 50 years, both in general practice and in hospitals....

  14. What would it take? Stakeholders' views and preferences for implementing a health care manager program in community mental health clinics under health care reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabassa, Leopoldo J; Gomes, Arminda P; Lewis-Fernández, Roberto

    2015-02-01

    Health care manager interventions can improve the physical health of people with serious mental illness (SMI). In this study, we used concepts from the theory of diffusion of innovations, the consolidated framework for implementation research and a taxonomy of implementation strategies to examine stakeholders' recommendations for implementing a health care manager intervention in public mental health clinics serving Hispanics with SMI. A purposive sample of 20 stakeholders was recruited from mental health agencies, primary care clinics, and consumer advocacy organizations. We presented participants a vignette describing a health care manager intervention and used semistructured qualitative interviews to examine their views and recommendations for implementing this program. Interviews were recorded, professionally transcribed, and content analyzed. We found that a blend of implementation strategies that demonstrates local relative advantage, addresses cost concerns, and enhances compatibility to organizations and the client population is critical for moving health care manager interventions into practice. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Clinical reasoning and population health: decision making for an emerging paradigm of health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Ian; Richardson, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Chronic conditions now provide the major disease and disability burden facing humanity. This development has necessitated a reorientation in the practice skills of health care professions away from hospital-based inpatient and outpatient care toward community-based management of patients with chronic conditions. Part of this reorientation toward community-based management of chronic conditions involves practitioners' understanding and adoption of a concept of population health management based on appropriate theoretical models of health care. Drawing on recent studies of expertise in physiotherapy, this article proposes a clinical reasoning and decision-making framework to meet these challenges. The challenge of population and community-based management of chronic conditions also provides an opportunity for physiotherapists to further clarify a professional epistemology of practice that embraces the kinds of knowledge and clinical reasoning processes used in physiotherapy practice. Three case studies related to the management of chronic musculoskeletal pain in different populations are used to exemplify the range of epistemological perspectives that underpin community-based practice. They illustrate the link between conceptualizations of practice problems and knowledge sources that are used as a basis for clinical reasoning and decision making as practitioners are increasingly required to move between the clinic and the community.

  16. Birth cohort testing for hepatitis C virus: implications for clinical social workers in health care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Omar T; Whalen, Christopher C; Nackerud, Larry G; Bride, Brian E

    2013-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends one-time hepatitis C virus (HCV) testing for baby boomers born between 1945-1965 in the United States. This public health initiative is known as birth cohort (baby boomer) testing for HCV. The intent of birth cohort testing is to identify and mobilize undiagnosed HCV-infected persons into care and treatment. Subsequently, clinical social workers in health care settings can anticipate a substantial increase in the number of HCV-infected persons presenting for care and treatment. The purpose of this article is to inform clinical social workers in health care settings of HCV, the standard of care and treatment for HCV, and clinical dilemmas associated with HCV patient care. Epidemiology and natural history of HCV, the standard of care and treatment for HCV, and etiology and management of neuropsychiatric adverse effects associated with patient care are discussed.

  17. Cost and care of patients with Alzheimer's disease: clinical predictors in German health care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Jens Peter; Hessmann, Philipp; Seeberg, Greta; Henkel, Dajana; Hirzmann, Pamela; Rieke, Jürgen; Baum, Erika; Dannhoff, Frank; Müller, Matthias J; Jessen, Frank; Geldsetzer, Monika-Balzer; Dodel, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The study aims to report service use and costs for patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and to explore the incremental influence of sociodemographic and illness-related determinants in ambulatory and inpatient settings within the German health care system. 395 patients with dementia were recruited at the following sites: 1) University hospital, 2) general practitioners' offices, 3) office-based neurologists, 4) a regional psychiatric hospital, and 5) nursing homes. Sociodemographic, economic, and clinical parameters were assessed using a standardized questionnaire. Informal care was not evaluated. Disease severity was measured using the Mini-Mental Status Examination and the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale - Cognitive Subscale. Neuropsychiatric status was assessed using the Geriatric Depression Scale, the Neuropsychiatric Inventory, and the Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative-Study-Activities of Daily Living. Annual total costs were estimated to be €13,080 per patient. The most important cost component was (long-term) care, constituting about 43% of total costs. Indirect costs comprised about 18% of total costs and were mainly due to reductions in working time of caregivers. Poorer functional status was associated with higher total and caregiving costs. In multivariate analyses, we identified younger age, female gender, and impaired activities of daily living as independent predictors of higher costs. Given that care for patients with AD is complex and expensive, our models were only able to explain about 17-43% of the variability in total costs. This suggests that further social and individual factors considerably influence the costs associated with AD. Direct medical care costs and long-term care costs related differently to the patient's clinical characteristics. Longitudinal and population-based studies are necessary for thoroughly evaluating the burden of disease.

  18. Clinical and regulatory protocols for the management of impaired vision in the public health care network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayter Silva Paula

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To describe the procedures used in developing Clinical and Regulatory Protocols for primary care teams to use in the management of the most common scenarios of impaired vision in Southern Brazil. METHODS: A retrospective review of 1.333 referral forms from all primary care practitioners was performed in Ribeirão Preto city, during a 30-day period. The major ophthalmic diagnostic categories were evaluated from those referrals forms. The Clinical and Regulatory Protocols development process was held afterwards and involved scientific cooperation between a university and the health care system, in the form of workshops attended by primary care practitioners and regulatory system team members composed of health care administrators, ophthalmologists, and professors of ophthalmology and social medicine. RESULTS: The management of impaired vision was chosen as the theme, since it accounted for 43.6% of the ophthalmology-related referrals from primary care providers of Ribeirão Preto. The Clinical and Regulatory Protocols developed involve distinctive diagnostic and therapeutic interventions that can be performed at the primary care level and in different health care settings. The most relevant clinical and regulatory interventions were expressed as algorithms in order to facilitate the use of the Clinical and Regulatory Protocols by health care practitioners. CONCLUSIONS: These Clinical and Regulatory Protocols could represent a useful tool for health systems with universal access, as well as for health care networks based on primary care and for regulatory system teams. Implementation of these Clinical and Regulatory Protocols can minimize the disparity between the needs of patients with impaired vision and the treatment modalities offered, resulting in a more cooperative health care network.

  19. Serving transgender people: clinical care considerations and service delivery models in transgender health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, Kevan; Knudson, Gail; Khan, Sharful Islam; Bonierbale, Mireille; Watanyusakul, Suporn; Baral, Stefan

    2016-07-23

    The World Professional Association for Transgender Health (WPATH) standards of care for transsexual, transgender, and gender non-conforming people (version 7) represent international normative standards for clinical care for these populations. Standards for optimal individual clinical care are consistent around the world, although the implementation of services for transgender populations will depend on health system infrastructure and sociocultural contexts. Some clinical services for transgender people, including gender-affirming surgery, are best delivered in the context of more specialised facilities; however, the majority of health-care needs can be delivered by a primary care practitioner. Across high-income and low-income settings alike, there often remains a dearth of educational programming for health-care professionals in transgender health, although the best evidence supports introducing modules on transgender health early during clinical education of clinicians and allied health professionals. While these challenges remain, we review the increasing evidence and examples of the defined roles of the mental health professional in transgender health-care decisions, effective models of health service provision, and available surgical interventions for transgender people. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Child anxiety in mental health care: Closing the gaps between research and clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongerden, L.

    2015-01-01

    In this dissertation about child anxiety in mental health care, three gaps between research and everyday clinical practice were addressed. Despite the high prevalence of anxiety disorders in children, only a minority is referred to mental health care. It was found that more severe impairment in the

  1. Rural Health Clinics and Diabetes-Related Primary Care for Medicaid Beneficiaries in Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkbride, Kelly; Wallace, Neal

    2009-01-01

    Background: This study assessed whether Rural Health Clinics (RHCs) were associated with higher rates of recommended primary care services for adult beneficiaries diagnosed with diabetes in Oregon's Medicaid program, the Oregon Health Plan (OHP). Methods: OHP claims data from 2002 to 2003 were used to assess quality of diabetic care for…

  2. ACCESS TO HEALTH CARE IN THE OUTPATIENT CLINICS OF ST. PETERSBURG AT THE PRESENT STAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. Karaylanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The brief analysis of the organization of primary health care on an outpatient basis in the case ofSt. Petersburgis reflected. The structure of primary health care is described, namely healthcare organizations that provide outpatient care; the standards and the level of availability of primary health care, as well as the capacity of outpatient clinics are defined. An important criterion for the quality of care is its accessibility, taking into account the number of attached population. Reforming the ambulatory network in a large city is one of the most difficult health management problems, due to many factors, first of all determined by the needs of the population in primary health care, a variety of organizational forms of outpatient care, intensive changing residential area of the city, the need to ensure effective interactions with other social institutions.

  3. Seniors' perspectives on care: a case study of the Alex Seniors health clinic, Calgary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Marta; Rypien, Candace; Drummond, Neil; Harasym, Patricia; Nixon, Lara

    2015-02-25

    Primary care initiatives face an imperative to not only reduce barriers to care for their patients but also to uniquely accommodate the complex needs of at-risk patient populations. Patient-centered multidisciplinary care team models for primary care, like the Alex Seniors Clinic, are one approach for providing comprehensive care for marginalized seniors. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore patient perspectives on the responsiveness of the Alex Seniors Clinic to their stated health needs. Themes reflected participants' perspectives on factors impacting their health needs as vulnerable seniors as well as on the measures that the Alex Seniors Clinic has taken to meet those needs. Factors impacting health included: the nature of their relationships to the physical environment in which they lived, the nature of the relationships they had to others in that environment, and independence and autonomy. Participants identified accessibility, respect and support, and advocacy as the ways in which the clinic was working to address those health needs. While respect and support, as well as advocacy, effectively addressed some patient needs, participants felt that accessibility problems continue to be health-related barriers for clinic patients. This may be due to the fact that issues of accessibility reflect larger community and social problems. Nevertheless, it is only through engaging the patient community for input on clinic approaches that an understanding can be gained of how closely a clinic's care goals are currently aligning with patient perspectives of the care and services they receive.

  4. Design and analysis of a health care clinic for homeless people using simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Jared; Zeng, Zhen; Li, Jingshan; Chiang, Shu-Yin

    2010-01-01

    Improving quality of care is important in health care management. For health care clinics, reducing patient waiting time and improving throughput with efficient utilization of the workforce are important issues to achieve better quality of care. This paper seeks to introduce a simulation study on design and analysis of a health clinic for homeless patients in Lexington, Kentucky, USA. Using the simulation model, the patient flow of the clinic and analyze quality of care for different staffing levels is simulated. In addition, the dependence of distributions on service times is investigated. Moreover, the impact of service time variability on quality of care (e.g. patient waiting time) is analyzed. The necessary staffing level and utilizations to reduce patient waiting times and improve throughput to achieve better quality of care are obtained. In addition, it is shown that the system performance is primarily dependent on the mean and coefficients of variation, rather than a complete distribution, of service times. In addition, a piece-wise linear approximation formula is proposed so that patient waiting time in the clinic can be estimated for any variability with only two simulations. The simulation method may need long model development time and long simulation executing time for complex systems. The quality of care delivery in a health care clinic can be evaluated using simulations. The results presented in the paper provide an easier approach for medical practitioners to evaluate different scenarios, examine needed resources, and carry out what-if analysis to predictthe impact of any changes in the system, to determine an optimal system configuration. The paper shows that such models provide a quantitative tool for clinic operations and management to achieve better care quality. Moreover, it can be easily adapted to model other health care facilities, such as hospitals, emergency rooms, operating rooms, supply chain in health care industry.

  5. The experience of primary care providers with an integrated mental health care program in safety-net clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentham, Wayne D; Ratzliff, Anna; Harrison, David; Chan, Ya-Fen; Vannoy, Steven; Unützer, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Primary care providers participating in a statewide implementation of an integrated mental health care program for "safety-net" patients in primary care clinics were surveyed to elicit their experiences and level of satisfaction. Quantitative analyses were performed to identify respondent characteristics and satisfaction with the program. Qualitative analyses were done to identify common themes in response to the question "How could psychiatric consultation [in the program] be improved?" Primary care providers were generally satisfied with the integrated mental health care program and raised several concerns that suggest important principles for successful future implementations of these types of programs.

  6. An innovative capstone health care informatics clinical residency: Interprofessional team collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custis, Laura M; Hawkins, Shelley Y; Thomason, Tanna R

    2017-03-01

    Integrated information systems and wireless technology have been increasingly incorporated into health care organizations with the premise that information technology will promote safe, high-quality, cost-effective patient care. With the advancement of technology, the level of expertise necessary to assume health care information technology roles has escalated. The purpose of this article is to describe a clinical residency project whereby students in a graduate degree health care informatics program successfully fulfilled program competencies through a faculty-lead research project focused on the use of home telehealth with a group of heart failure patients. Through the use of Donabedian's framework of structure, process, and outcomes, the health care informatics students completed essential learning activities deemed essential for transition into the role of an informatics specialist. Health care informatics educational leaders are encouraged to adapt this template of applied learning into their practices.

  7. Depression in elderly primary health care clinic attendees in Ilorin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Depression in the elderly presenting at primary care settings is usually under- detected by primary care physicians. This study assessed the prevalence of depression and the utility of the Geriatric Depression Scale (Short Form) in detecting depression in elderly patients in primary care populations in Ilorin, Nigeria. This was ...

  8. Setting up a health care quality management system in a multidisciplinary clinical research center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Laktionova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the issues of setting up a quality management system in a multidisciplinary specialized clinical research center. It describes the experience with information technologies used in a prophylactic facility to set up effective out- and inpatient health care control. Measures to optimize work under present-day conditions to upgrade the quality of health care are given using the federal health facility as an example.

  9. The motivational needs of primary health care nurses in a mine clinic setting

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    M.Cur. (Nursing Management) Motivation is a process that influence and directs behaviour in order to satisfy a need. Motivation of nurses is important in the primary health care environment since low levels of motivation among Primary Health Care (PHC) nurses; who are in a critical position in health service delivery; could have a negative impact on the achievement of high standards in the nursing profession. This situation is also relevant in a mine clinic setting. The main factor in moti...

  10. Centers speak up: the clinical context for health information technology in the ambulatory care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leu, Michael G; Cheung, Ming; Webster, Tashonna R; Curry, Leslie; Bradley, Elizabeth H; Fifield, Judith; Burstin, Helen

    2008-04-01

    Clinicians in ambulatory care settings are increasingly called upon to use health information technology (health IT) to improve practice efficiency and performance. Successful adoption of health IT requires an understanding of how clinical tasks and workflows will be affected; yet this has not been well described. To describe how health IT functions within a clinical context. Qualitative study, using in-depth, semi-structured interviews. Executives and staff at 4 community health centers, 3 health center networks, and 1 large primary care organization. Transcribed audio-recorded interviews, analyzed using the constant comparative method. Systematic characterization of clinical context identified 6 primary clinical domains. These included results management, intra-clinic communication, patient education and outreach, inter-clinic coordination, medication management, and provider education and feedback. We generated clinical process diagrams to characterize these domains. Participants suggested that underlying workflows for these domains must be fully operational to ensure successful deployment of health IT. Understanding the clinical context is a necessary precursor to successful deployment of health IT. Process diagrams can serve as the basis for EHR certification, to identify challenges, to measure health IT adoption, or to develop curricular content regarding the role of health IT in clinical practice.

  11. Structural Vulnerability: Operationalizing the Concept to Address Health Disparities in Clinical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgois, Philippe; Holmes, Seth M; Sue, Kim; Quesada, James

    2017-03-01

    The authors propose reinvigorating and extending the traditional social history beyond its narrow range of risk behaviors to enable clinicians to address negative health outcomes imposed by social determinants of health. In this Perspective, they outline a novel, practical medical vulnerability assessment questionnaire that operationalizes for clinical practice the social science concept of "structural vulnerability." A structural vulnerability assessment tool designed to highlight the pathways through which specific local hierarchies and broader sets of power relationships exacerbate individual patients' health problems is presented to help clinicians identify patients likely to benefit from additional multidisciplinary health and social services. To illustrate how the tool could be implemented in time- and resource-limited settings (e.g., emergency department), the authors contrast two cases of structurally vulnerable patients with differing outcomes. Operationalizing structural vulnerability in clinical practice and introducing it in medical education can help health care practitioners think more clearly, critically, and practically about the ways social structures make people sick. Use of the assessment tool could promote "structural competency," a potential new medical education priority, to improve understanding of how social conditions and practical logistics undermine the capacities of patients to access health care, adhere to treatment, and modify lifestyles successfully. Adoption of a structural vulnerability framework in health care could also justify the mobilization of resources inside and outside clinical settings to improve a patient's immediate access to care and long-term health outcomes. Ultimately, the concept may orient health care providers toward policy leadership to reduce health disparities and foster health equity.

  12. The new production theory for health care through clinical reengineering: a study of clinical guidelines--Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, J R

    1995-01-01

    In Part I of this two-part article, in the December 1994 issue of the journal, the author discussed the manufacturing theories of Peter Drucker in terms of their applicability for the health care field. He concluded that Drucker's four principles and practices of manufacturing--statistical quality control, manufacturing accounting, modular organization, and systems approach--do have application to the health care system. Clinical guidelines, a variation on the Drucker theory, are a specific example of the manufacturing process in health. The performance to date of some guidelines and their implications for the health care reform debate are discussed in Part II of the article.

  13. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    vaccine for their children. journal of. COMMUNITY HEALTH. & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE. Journal of Community Medicine and Primary Health Care. 26(2) 46-58. Correspondence to: Ijadunola M.Y. Department of Community Health, Faculty of Clinical Sciences,. College of Health Sciences, Obafemi Awolowo University,.

  14. Free medical clinics: helping indigent patients and dealing with emerging health care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Herbert Y

    2009-10-01

    An innovative movement of free medical clinics, which began in the 1960s, has helped indigent people without access to traditional health care. In this article, the author relates his experiences at three free clinics. Aside from the delivery of good care to deserving people, these clinics also had an impact on other relevant issues in medicine: The first of these clinics became involved with a chronic illness that affected medical research, the second provided another venue for medical teaching, and the third increased volunteerism, especially among senior clinicians. These secondary features are the focus of this article. The first clinic, created in a time of troubling social change, cared for many young people with infections, probably including some who were part of an evolving epidemic that was only later recognized as HIV/AIDS. The second clinic began when the traditional hospital and outpatient clinic settings for teaching medical students-both in their preclinical years and during clerkship rotations-were not conducive to learning the skills of interviewing and physical examination of cooperative patients. The more informal, less frenetic pace of a free clinic appealed to students and some residents as a place to build clinical skills. The new Liaison Committee on Medical Education standard to provide student service learning may formalize the use of free clinics in medical schools. The third clinic, like any of the 1,200 or more free clinics in the United States, cares for indigent people who have no access to established health care. The free clinic movement, which can provide some of the needed care, relies on volunteer physicians, many of whom are older and retired clinicians, who find that their contribution to free clinic care can be both useful to the patients and most rewarding to themselves.

  15. Advance Care Planning: Understanding Clinical Routines and Experiences of Interprofessional Team Members in Diverse Health Care Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnett, Kelly; Sudore, Rebecca L; Nowels, David; Feng, Cindy X; Levy, Cari R; Lum, Hillary D

    2017-12-01

    Interprofessional health care team members consider advance care planning (ACP) to be important, yet gaps remain in systematic clinical routines to support ACP. A clearer understanding of the interprofessional team members' perspectives on ACP clinical routines in diverse settings is needed. One hundred eighteen health care team members from community-based clinics, long-term care facilities, academic clinics, federally qualified health centers, and hospitals participated in a 35-question, cross-sectional online survey to assess clinical routines, workflow processes, and policies relating to ACP. Respondents were 53% physicians, 18% advanced practice nurses, 11% nurses, and 18% other interprofessional team members including administrators, chaplains, social workers, and others. Regarding clinical routines, respondents reported that several interprofessional team members play a role in facilitating ACP (ie, physician, social worker, nurse, others). Most (62%) settings did not have, or did not know of, policies related to ACP documentation. Only 14% of settings had a patient education program. Two-thirds of the respondents said that addressing ACP is a high priority and 85% felt that nonphysicians could have ACP conversations with appropriate training. The clinical resources needed to improve clinical routines included training for providers and staff, dedicated staff to facilitate ACP, and availability of patient/family educational materials. Although interprofessional health care team members consider ACP a priority and several team members may be involved, clinical settings lack systematic clinical routines to support ACP. Patient educational materials, interprofessional team training, and policies to support ACP clinical workflows that do not rely solely on physicians could improve ACP across diverse clinical settings.

  16. Implementing and sustaining transformational change in health care: lessons learnt about clinical process redesign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Katherine M; Bennett, Denise M; Ben-Tovim, David I; Boyages, Steven C; Lyons, Nigel J; O'Connell, Tony J

    2008-03-17

    *Clinical process redesign has enabled significant improvements in the delivery of health care services in emergency departments and elective surgery programs in New South Wales and at Flinders Medical Centre in South Australia, with tangible benefits for patients and staff. *The principles used in clinical process redesign are not new; they have been applied in other industries with significant gains for many years, but have only recently been introduced into health care systems. *Through experience with clinical process redesign, we have learnt much about the factors critical to the success of implementing and sustaining this process in the health care setting. *The key elements for success are leadership by senior executives, clinical leadership, team-based problem solving, a focus on the patient journey, access to data, ambitious targets, strong performance management, and a process for maintaining improvement.

  17. Health care students' personal experiences and coping with bullying in clinical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakojärvi, Henna-Riikka; Salminen, Leena; Suhonen, Riitta

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies show that health care students have experienced bullying by nursing staff in clinical training. Although these studies provide plenty of information considering the manifestation and consequences of bullying on students, there is a gap of knowledge on how health care students' cope with bullying. In addition, previous studies seem to have focused only on the experiences of nursing and midwifery students. This paper presents the results of a qualitative study exploring the bullying experiences of Finnish health care students (n=41) representing two Universities of Applied Sciences. In order to provide information for faculties of health care on bullying intervention and prevention strategies, this study aimed at describing health care students' experiences and coping with bullying in clinical training. Based on previous study findings, an electronic semi-structured questionnaire was developed for the data collection. The qualitative data was analysed using inductive content analysis. The results show that the students experienced verbal and non-verbal bullying in clinical training. In addition to psychological and physical symptoms, bullying also decreased the students' learning, their studying motivation and their professional engagement. One reason why some students did not share their bullying experiences with their teachers and clinical instructors was their idea that sharing their experiences would be useless. On the other hand, students who did share their experiences with a teacher or a clinical instructor usually received emotional support, information, and help in the form of bullying intervention. The results of this study suggest that faculties of health care need to develop action plans against bullying in co-operation with clinical training sites in order to ensure students' learning and professional engagement. In the future, it is suggested that research is focused on factors preventing and contributing to bullying towards health care

  18. Medication Abortion within a Student Health Care Clinic: A Review of the First 46 Consecutive Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, Emily M.; Bordoloi, Anita; Moorthie, Mydhili; Pela, Emily

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Medication abortion with mifepristone and misoprostol has been available in the United States since 2000. The authors reviewed the first 46 medication abortion cases conducted at a university-based student health care clinic to determine the safety and feasibility of medication abortion in this type of clinical setting. Participants:…

  19. Combined thyroid eye clinic: the importance of a multidisciplinary health care in patients with Graves' orbitopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersinga, Wilmar M.

    2010-01-01

    A multidisciplinary approach to the management of Graves' orbitopathy is widely recommended. The optimal model for health care delivery to patients with Graves' orbitopathy is combined thyroid-eye clinics. Joint clinics by ophthalmologists and endocrinologists are likely to improve the quality of

  20. Comparison of 5 health care professionals’ratings of the clinical significance of drug related problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villesen, Christine; Hojsted, Jette; Kjeldsen, Lene Juel

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients have medicines reviews conducted by different health care professionals in different settings. Introducing a clinical panel to drug related problems (DRPs) to evaluate their clinical significance is common practice. The clinical panel discuss the potential consequences and come...... each profession. Take into account the profession and setting when clinical relevance of DRPs is discussed in the literature and when choosing a method for evaluating the clinical significance of DRPs.Acknowledgement Many thanks to Grünenthalfonden and Actavisfonden, participants in the project ‘Drug...... Related Problems in the Frontier between Primary and Secondary Health Care’.No conflict of interest....

  1. The future of retail clinics: in a volatile health care environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaissi, Amer

    2010-01-01

    Recent estimates put the total number of retail clinics at more than 1000 nationwide. Some forecasts estimate that explosive growth will continue in the future, whereas others suggest that the retail clinic boom might be ending. This article assesses the retail clinic trend and explores its future viability in the volatile health care environment. Eight administrative and clinical leaders in 7 health systems that are affiliated with or own retail clinics were asked specific questions about the future evolution of retail clinics. Respondents offered mixed opinions about the future of retail clinics, and most were skeptical about their growth potential. Some of the respondents believed that health care reform will be supportive of retail clinics, but there was uncertainty about the specific effects of expansion in insurance coverage. Respondents reacted differently to the prospect of retail clinics expanding their scope of practice to include chronic conditions. Some of them welcomed the trend, but the majority was critical of it for various reasons. At this turning point for the health care system, it is not clear whether retail clinics will represent a significant value proposition for the system or whether they are a fad that will soon pass and disappear.

  2. Clinical and translational research in global health and emergency care: a research agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runyon, Michael S; Sawe, Hendry R; Levine, Adam C; Pousson, Amelia; House, Darlene R; Agrawal, Pooja; Osei-Ampofo, Maxwell; Weiner, Scott G; Douglass, Katherine

    2013-12-01

    As policy-makers increasingly recognize emergency care to be a global health priority, the need for high-quality clinical and translational research in this area continues to grow. As part of the proceedings of the 2013 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference, this article discusses the importance of: 1) including clinical and translational research in the initial emergency care development plan, 2) defining the burden of acute disease and the barriers to conducting research in resource-limited settings, 3) assessing the appropriateness and effectiveness of local and global acute care guidelines within the local context, 4) studying the local research infrastructure needs to understand the best methods to build a sustainable research infrastructure, and 5) studying the long-term effects of clinical research programs on health care systems. © 2013 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  3. [Conflicts of interests in clinical research in primary health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-de Paz, L; Navarro-Rubio, M D; Sisó-Almirall, A

    2014-03-01

    Conflicts of interests between professionals and patients in biomedical research, is an ethical problem. None of the laws in Spain mention whether the clinical researcher has to clarify to participants the reasons why it proposes them to participate in a clinical trial. In this article, conflicts of interests in research are discussed in the context of primary healthcare. In this area conflicts of interests might alter the confidence between patients and healthcare professionals. Finally, we suggest some practical strategies that can help participants make the decision to participate in a clinical trial more willingly and freely. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  4. An additional cause of health care disparities: the variable clinical decisions of primary care doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinlay, John; Piccolo, Rebecca; Marceau, Lisa

    2013-08-01

    Decades of work on health disparities have culminated in identification of three contributors to variability in diagnosis and management of disease: (i) patient attributes; (ii) doctor's characteristics; and (iii) organizational factors. Understanding the relative influence of different contributors to variability in diagnosis and management of diabetes is important to improving quality and reducing disparities. This study was designed to examine the influence of patient, provider and organizational factors on the diagnosis and management of a major chronic disease - diabetes. A factorial experiment using video vignettes was conducted among n = 192 primary care doctors. Doctors were interviewed after viewing vignettes of (1) a 'patient' with symptoms strongly suggestive of diabetes and (2) an already diagnosed diabetes 'patient' with emerging peripheral neuropathy. A total of 60.9% of doctors identified diabetes as the correct diagnosis, with significant variations depending on the patients' race/ethnicity. Many doctors offered competing diagnoses with high levels of certainty. For the 'patient' with emerging peripheral neuropathy, 42.2% of doctors would do all essential components of a foot examination, while 21.9% would do none. That half of all diabetes in the United States remains undiagnosed is unsurprising given only 60.9% of doctors would diagnose it when the condition is strongly suggested, and nearly one-quarter suspecting diabetes would not order tests necessary to confirm it. The diagnosis of diabetes is significantly influenced by a patient's race/ethnicity, and clinical management (specifically for foot neuropathy) is influenced by patient socio-economic status (SES), doctor's gender and access to clinical guidelines. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. AN ADDITIONAL CAUSE OF HEALTH CARE DISPARITIES—THE VARIABLE CLINICAL DECISIONS OF PRIMARY CARE DOCTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinlay, John; Piccolo, Rebecca; Marceau, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Rationale, Aims and Objectives Decades of work on health disparities have culminated in identification of three contributors to variability in diagnosis and management of disease: 1) patient attributes, 2) physician characteristics, and 3) organizational. Understanding the relative influence of different contributors to variability in diagnosis and management of diabetes is important to improving quality and reducing disparities. This study was designed to examine the influence of patient, provider, and organizational factors on the diagnosis and management of a major chronic disease: diabetes. Method A factorial experiment using video vignettes was conducted among n=192 primary care physicians. Physicians were interviewed after viewing vignettes of (1) a “patient” with symptoms strongly suggestive of diabetes and (2) an already diagnosed diabetes “patient” with emerging peripheral neuropathy. Results 60.9 percent of physicians identified diabetes as the correct diagnosis, with significant variations depending on the patients’ race/ethnicity. Many physicians offered competing diagnoses with high levels of certainty. For the “patient” with emerging peripheral neuropathy, 42.2 percent of physicians would do all essential components of a foot examination, while 21.9 percent would do none. Conclusions That half of all diabetes in the US remains undiagnosed is unsurprising given only 60.9 percent of physicians would diagnose it when the condition is strongly suggested, and nearly one quarter suspecting diabetes would not order tests necessary to confirm it. The diagnosis of diabetes is significantly influenced by a patient’s race/ethnicity and clinical management (specifically for foot neuropathy), is influenced by patient SES, physician gender, and access to clinical guidelines. PMID:23216876

  6. Health Care Infrastructure for Financially Sustainable Clinical Genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennerz, Jochen K; McLaughlin, Heather M; Baron, Jason M; Rasmussen, David; Sumbada Shin, Meini; Berners-Lee, Nancy; Miller Batten, Julie; Swoboda, Kathryn J; Gala, Manish K; Winter, Harland S; Schmahmann, Jeremy D; Sweetser, David A; Boswell, Marianne; Pacula, Maciej; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Le, Long P; Hynes, William; Rehm, Heidi L; Klibanski, Anne; Black-Schaffer, Stephen W; Golden, Jeffrey A; Louis, David N; Weiss, Scott T; Iafrate, A John

    2016-09-01

    Next-generation sequencing has evolved technically and economically into the method of choice for interrogating the genome in cancer and inherited disorders. The introduction of procedural code sets for whole-exome and genome sequencing is a milestone toward financially sustainable clinical implementation; however, achieving reimbursement is currently a major challenge. As part of a prospective quality-improvement initiative to implement the new code sets, we adopted Agile, a development methodology originally devised in software development. We implemented eight functionally distinct modules (request review, cost estimation, preauthorization, accessioning, prebilling, testing, reporting, and reimbursement consultation) and obtained feedback via an anonymous survey. We managed 50 clinical requests (January to June 2015). The fraction of pursued-to-requested cases (n = 15/50; utilization management fraction, 0.3) aimed for a high rate of preauthorizations. In 13 of 15 patients the insurance plan required preauthorization, which we obtained in 70% and ultimately achieved reimbursement in 50%. Interoperability enabled assessment of 12 different combinations of modules that underline the importance of an adaptive workflow and policy tailoring to achieve higher yields of reimbursement. The survey confirmed a positive attitude toward self-organizing teams. We acknowledge the individuals and their interactions and termed the infrastructure: human pipeline. Nontechnical barriers currently are limiting the scope and availability of clinical genomic sequencing. The presented human pipeline is one approach toward long-term financial sustainability of clinical genomics. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Integrated care through disease-oriented clinical care pathways: experience from Japan’s regional health planning initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Etsuji; Miyamoto, Masaki; Hara, Kazuhiro; Yoshida, Jun; Muto, Masaki; Hirai, Aizan; Tatsumi, Haruyuki; Mizuno, Masaaki; Nagata, Hiroshi; Yamakata, Daisuke; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Introduction In April 2008, Japan launched a radical reform in regional health planning that emphasized the development of disease-oriented clinical care pathways. These ‘inter-provider critical paths’ have sought to ensure effective integration of various providers ranging among primary care practitioners, acute care hospitals, rehabilitation hospitals, long-term care facilities and home care. Description of policy practice All 47 prefectures in Japan developed their Regional Health Plans pursuant to the guideline requiring that these should include at least four diseases: diabetes, acute myocardial infarction, cerebrovascular accident and cancer. To illustrate the care pathways developed, this paper describes the guideline referring to strokes and provides examples of the new Regional Health Plans as well as examples of disease-oriented inter-provider clinical paths. In particular, the paper examines the development of information sharing through electronic health records (EHR) to enhance effective integration among providers is discussed. Discussion and conclusion Japan’s reform in 2008 is unique in that the concept of ‘disease-oriented regional inter-provider critical paths’ was adopted as a national policy and all 47 prefectures developed their Regional Health Plans simultaneously. How much the new regional health planning policy has improved the quality and outcome of care remains to be seen and will be evaluated in 2013 after the five-year planned period of implementation has concluded. Whilst electronic health records appear to be a useful tool in supporting care integration they do not guarantee success in the application of an inter-provider critical path. PMID:22128281

  8. Barriers to health care in rural Mozambique: a rapid ethnographic assessment of planned mobile health clinics for ART.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwitters, Amee; Lederer, Philip; Zilversmit, Leah; Gudo, Paula Samo; Ramiro, Isaias; Cumba, Luisa; Mahagaja, Epifanio; Jobarteh, Kebba

    2015-03-01

    In Mozambique, 1.6 million people are living with HIV, and over 60% of the population lives in rural areas lacking access to health services. Mobile health clinics, implemented in 2013 in 2 provinces, are beginning to offer antiretroviral therapy (ART) and basic primary care services. Prior to introduction of the mobile health clinics in the communities, we performed a rapid ethnographic assessment to understand barriers to accessing HIV care and treatment services and acceptability and potential use of the mobile health clinics as an alternative means of service delivery. We conducted assessments in Gaza province in January 2013 and in Zambezia Province in April-May 2013 in districts where mobile health clinic implementation was planned. Community leaders served as key informants, and chain-referral sampling was used to recruit participants. Interviews were conducted with community leaders, health care providers, traditional healers, national health system patients, and traditional healer patients. Interviewees were asked about barriers to health services and about mobile health clinic acceptance. In-depth interviews were conducted with 117 participants (Gaza province, n = 57; Zambezia Province, n = 60). Barriers to accessing health services included transportation and distance-related issues (reliability, cost, and travel time). Participants reported concurrent use of traditional and national health systems. The decision to use a particular health system depended on illness type, service distance, and lack of confidence in the national health system. Overall, participants were receptive to using mobile health clinics for their health care and ability to increase access to ART. Hesitations concerning mobile health clinics included potentially long wait times due to high patient loads. Participants emphasized the importance of regular and published visit schedules and inclusion of community members in planning mobile health clinic services. Mobile health clinics

  9. Clinical process improvement as a means of facilitating health care system integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brickman, R; Axelrod, R; Roberson, D; Flanagan, C

    1998-03-01

    In recent years many health care providers, physicians, hospitals, and managed care organizations have undergone significant reorganization in both delivery and financing systems. This has created new organizations called integrated or organized delivery systems. Sentara Health System (Norfolk, Va), one of these new integrated entities, developed a unified strategy for clinical process improvement for the entire organization. This system-wide approach had unanticipated problems and benefits. The Sentara Health System created a team responsible for coordinating clinical process improvement activities across its hospitals and ambulatory physician sites. A steering committee directed this team to improve the organization and delivery of care for specific high-cost, high-volume, or problem-prone disease for physicians to manage. A standardized approach aimed at coordinating care across sites was the cornerstone of these activities. Significant improvements in patient outcomes and a concomitant decrease in costs of care were accomplished for multiple diseases and procedures. These projects uncovered unanticipated barriers to implementing improvement projects in a complex health care system which make implementing these activities far more difficult than for an individual hospital with its medical staff. Coordinating clinical improvement activities across multiple hospitals and other sites of care in a complex integrated delivery system serves important purposes in addition to improving patient care. These projects were an important cultural change agent to transform the individual components of the system into one that is capable of delivering care continuously across multiple sites. Standardization of care practices, policies, and procedures is considerably enhanced by coordinating these activities across the entire system.

  10. The University Clinic as an Innovative Form of the Health Care Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oganezova Ganna V.

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The article proposes implementation of an innovative model of health care by creation of modern university clinics providing competitive advantages at the expense of effective introduction in medical practice of scientific developments and preparation of highly qualified personnel who would unite scientific knowledge and experience of practical activity. It has been substantiated that implementation of the «University clinic» project would allow to resolve contradictions of interests between different actors in the health care as a result of creation of the new system of their interaction: medical science and education, medical practice, patient, the State. Studying activities of foreign clinics allowed the author to conclude: a combination of clinical, scientific and educational activities of university clinic provides high quality medical care to the population and educational process in accordance with international standards. On the basis of analyzing and systematizing the international experience of investment in health infrastructure with the use of the public-private partnership mechanism, three models have been allocated and their ranking is presented in descending order of efficiency – the providing, the specialized, and the integrated. Expediency of introduction of both the providing and the specialized models has been substantiated, allowing to provide development of university clinics with attraction of resources and competencies of private investors and to satisfy demand of the population in offering the high-tech medical care.

  11. Using organizational and clinical performance data to increase the value of mental health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Eric M; Krahn, Dean D; McGuire, Marsden H; Tavakoli, Sara; Wright, David M; Solares, Hugo E; Lemke, Sonne; Trafton, Jodie

    2017-02-01

    U.S. health systems, policy makers, and patients increasingly demand high-value care that improves health outcomes at lower cost. This study describes the initial design and analysis of the Mental Health Management System (MHMS), a performance data and quality improvement tool used by the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) to increase the value of its mental health care. The MHMS evaluates access to and quality of mental health care, organizational structure and efficiency, implementation of innovative treatment options, and, in collaboration with management, resource needs for delivering care. Performance on 31 measures was calculated for all U.S. VHA facilities (N = 139). Pearson correlations revealed that better access to care was significantly associated with fewer mental health provider staffing vacancies (r = -.24) and higher staff-to-patient ratios for psychiatrists (r = .19) and other outpatient mental health providers (r = .27). Higher staff-to-patient ratios were significantly associated with higher performance on a number of patient and provider satisfaction measures (range of r = .18-.51) and continuity of care measures (range of r = .26-.43). Relationships observed between organizational and clinical performance measures suggest that the MHMS is a robust informatics and quality improvement tool that can serve as a model for health systems planning to adopt a value perspective. Future research should expand the MHMS framework to measure patient and health systems costs and psychosocial outcomes, as well as evaluate whether quality improvement solutions implemented as a result of using organizational information leads to higher-value mental health care. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Leadership and organization development in health-care: lessons from the Cleveland Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Margaret M; O'Neil, Deborah A; FitzSimons, Kathleen; Bailin, Philip L; Stoller, James K

    2011-01-01

    Leaders in health-care today are faced with a wide array of complex issues. This chapter describes an innovative physician leadership development program at the Cleveland Clinic intended to enhance the leadership capacities of individuals and the organization. Propositions regarding the program's impact on organizational innovation, organizational commitment, social capital, and the human element of physician practice are offered for future examination.

  13. Identifying US veterans who access services from health care for the homeless clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopf-Amelung, Sarah M; Jenkins, Darlene M

    2013-12-01

    Research on veterans experiencing homelessness is predominantly focused on the US Department of Veterans Affairs setting, despite the fact that substantial numbers receive services from Health Care for the Homeless (HCH) clinics. We explored how HCH clinics identified veteran patients through a survey of administrators (49% response rate). The majority (98%) identified veterans but used varied language and approaches. Implementing a streamlined, culturally competent identification process is vital to collecting accurate data, connecting veterans with benefits, and informing treatment plans.

  14. Community-based free clinics: opportunities for interprofessional collaboration, health promotion, and complex care management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeser, Martha A; Hawk, Cheryl; Anderson, Michelle L; Reinhardt, Richard

    2016-03-01

    Free or outreach clinics offer students the opportunity to work with diverse patient populations. The objective of this study was to describe the demographics and clinical characteristics of a sample of chiropractic patients at a free community-based clinic to assess clinical and educational opportunities for students to work with diverse populations, collaborate with other professions and practice health promotion through patient education. This was a prospective, descriptive cross-sectional study conducted over 2 months. Data on demographics, health status, and health risks were collected from patients and their interns. Of the 158 patients, 50.6% were women and 50.6% African-American, while only 20.9% were employed full-time. Of the 24.7% tobacco users, 48.7% expressed interest in cessation. Of 80.0% overweight or obese patients, 48.8% expressed interest in weight loss. By self-report, 16.5% were diabetic, 10.1% took hypertension medication, 36.7% used prescription pain medication (9.4% opiate use), 33.5% used nonprescription pain medication, and 9.4% were under the care of a mental health professional. This patient population is demographically diverse. A high proportion of patients who used tobacco, or were overweight or obese expressed interest in information on those topics. A substantial proportion reported being under care with a mental health professional. This clinic provides opportunities for students to work with diverse populations, collaborate with other professions, and practice health promotion.

  15. Clinical and economic efficacy of medical equipment at municipal health care institutions in megapolis

    OpenAIRE

    Gataullin M.R.; Mazitov M.R.; Shulaev А.V.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction of health insurance system provided modernization of medical facilities and equipment. High costs on medical equipment especially imported require economic analysis of its use. The aim of the study was to conduct clinical and economic analysis of efficacy of medical equipment use by municipal health care agencies in megapolis. Materials and methods: Annual reports on medical devices and anonymous questionnaires were included into the research. The study revealed the following res...

  16. Helping Health Care Providers and Clinical Scientists Understand Apparently Irrational Policy Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demeter, Sandor J

    2016-12-21

    Health care providers (HCP) and clinical scientists (CS) are generally most comfortable using evidence-based rational decision-making models. They become very frustrated when policymakers make decisions that, on the surface, seem irrational and unreasonable. However, such decisions usually make sense when analysed properly. The goal of this paper to provide a basic theoretical understanding of major policy models, to illustrate which models are most prevalent in publicly funded health care systems, and to propose a policy analysis framework to better understand the elements that drive policy decision-making. The proposed policy framework will also assist HCP and CS achieve greater success with their own proposals.

  17. The Great East Japan Earthquake: Analyses of Disaster Impacts on Health Care Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochi, Sae; Kato, Shigeaki; Kobayashi, Ken-Ichi; Kanatani, Yasuhiro

    2017-08-29

    Local health facilities play a critical role in mitigating the deterioration of health after catastrophic disasters. However, limited information is available on clinic damage. Therefore, the National Institute of Public Health conducted surveillance on clinic damage after the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake (GEJE) to identify risk factors. A cross-sectional study using a paper-based questionnaire was conducted that targeted 728 clinics located in coastal areas in the 3 prefectures most affected by the GEJE. The risk of building damage was inversely correlated with distance from the coast, whereas the risk of ceasing operations was significantly correlated with building damage and some specialties of clinics, namely, internal medicine and pediatrics. Discussion In mountainous countries like Japan, clinics often need to be built in coastal areas, where the majority of residents live. This surveillance revealed that clinics built in readily accessible locations and that provide care with high needs are more likely to get damaged by tsunamis. As clinics are often the frontline health facilities in disaster settings, local disaster plans need to include plans to reinforce disaster preparedness among clinics. For effective planning and resource allocation, nationwide hazard vulnerability analysis using a global standard will be helpful. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2017;page 1 of 5).

  18. Creating Conditions for Patients’ Values to Emerge in Clinical Conversations: Perspectives of Health Care Team Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Andrew B.L.; Lim, Catherine; Hartzler, Andrea L.; Hirsch, Tad; Ludman, Evette; Wagner, Edward H.; Ralston, James D.

    2017-01-01

    Eliciting, understanding, and honoring patients’ values— the things most important to them in daily life—is a cornerstone of patient-centered care. However, this rarely occurs explicitly as a routine part of clinical practice. This is particularly problematic for individuals with multiple chronic conditions (MCC) because they face difficult choices about how to balance competing demands for self-care in accordance with their values. In this study, we sought to inform the design of interventions to support conversations about patient values between patients with MCC and their health care providers. We conducted a field study that included observations of 21 clinic visits for patients who have MCC, and interviews with 16 care team members involved in those visits. This paper contributes a practice-based account of ways in which providers engage with patient values, and discusses how future work in interactive systems design might extend and enrich these engagements. PMID:28890950

  19. Clinical Updates in Women's Health Care Summary: Ischemic Heart Disease: Primary and Preventive Care Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Brittany S; Carlyle, Lynn; Voeltz, Michele D

    2017-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death among women in the United States. Obstetrician-gynecologists often are the sole health care providers for otherwise healthy women. Therefore, they must be aware of risk factors, signs, and symptoms of cardiovascular disease and be prepared to recognize and treat this condition in patients as well as provide referrals when specialized care is indicated. Women with cardiac problems typically present with chest discomfort; however, they also are more likely than healthy women to present with other common symptoms, such as shortness of breath, back pain, jaw pain, or nausea and vomiting. This monograph, with a primary focus on ischemic heart disease (IHD), discusses the basic anatomy of the heart and coronary arteries; vascular biology; pathogenesis of atherosclerosis; and the screening, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of IHD as well as the multiple risk factors associated with the development of IHD that contribute to both increased morbidity and mortality.

  20. System requirements for a computerised patient record information system at a busy primary health care clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PJ Blignaut

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available A prototyping approach was used to determine the essential system requirements of a computerised patient record information system for a typical township primary health care clinic. A pilot clinic was identified and the existing manual system and business processes in this clinic was studied intensively before the first prototype was implemented. Interviews with users, incidental observations and analysis of actual data entered were used as primary techniques to refine the prototype system iteratively until a system with an acceptable data set and adequate functionalities were in place. Several non-functional and user-related requirements were also discovered during the prototyping period.

  1. Public Health Clinic Based Hepatitis C Testing and Linkage to Care in Baltimore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falade-Nwulia, Oluwaseun; Mehta, Shruti H.; Lasola, Jackline; Latkin, Carl; Niculescu, Alex; O’Connor, Cristi; Chaulk, Patrick; Ghanem, Khalil; Page, Kathleen R; Sulkowski, Mark S.; Thomas, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Testing and linkage to care are important determinants of hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment effectiveness. Public health clinics serve populations at high risk for HCV. We investigated their potential to serve as sites for HCV testing, initiation of and linkage to HCV care. Methods Cross-sectional study of patients accessing Sexually Transmitted Infections (STI) care at the Baltimore City Health Department (BCHD) STI clinics, from June 2013 through April 2014. Logistic regression was used to assess factors associated with HCV infection and specialist linkage to care. Results Between June 24, 2013 and April 15, 2014, 2681 patients were screened for HCV infection. Overall, 189 (7%) were anti-HCV positive, of whom 185 (98%) received follow-up HCV RNA testing, with 155 (84%) testing RNA positive. Of 155 RNA positive individuals, 138 (89%) returned to the STI clinic for HCV RNA results and initial HCV care including counseling regarding transmission and harm reduction for alcohol, and 132 (85%) were referred to a specialist for HCV care. With provision of patient navigation services, 81(52%) attended an offsite HCV specialist appointment. Alcohol use and lack of insurance coverage were associated with lower rates of specialist linkage (OR 0.4 [95% CI 0.1–0.9] and OR 0.4 [95% CI 0.1–0.9] respectively). Conclusion We identified a high prevalence of HCV infection in BCHD STI clinics. With availability of patient navigation services a large proportion of HCV infected patients linked to off-site specialist care. PMID:26840570

  2. Public health clinic-based hepatitis C testing and linkage to care in Baltimore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falade-Nwulia, O; Mehta, S H; Lasola, J; Latkin, C; Niculescu, A; O'Connor, C; Chaulk, P; Ghanem, K; Page, K R; Sulkowski, M S; Thomas, D L

    2016-05-01

    Testing and linkage to care are important determinants of hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment effectiveness. Public health clinics serve populations at high risk of HCV. We investigated their potential to serve as sites for HCV testing, initiation of and linkage to HCV care. Cross-sectional study of patients accessing sexually transmitted infection (STI) care at the Baltimore City Health Department (BCHD) STI clinics, from June 2013 through April 2014 was conducted. Logistic regression was used to assess factors associated with HCV infection and specialist linkage to care. Between 24 June 2013 and 15 April 2014, 2681 patients were screened for HCV infection. Overall, 189 (7%) were anti-HCV positive, of whom 185 (98%) received follow-up HCV RNA testing, with 155 (84%) testing RNA positive. Of 155 RNA-positive individuals, 138 (89%) returned to the STI clinic for HCV RNA results and initial HCV care including counselling regarding transmission and harm reduction in alcohol, and 132 (85%) were referred to a specialist for HCV care. With provision of patient navigation services, 81 (52%) attended an offsite HCV specialist appointment. Alcohol use and lack of insurance coverage were associated with lower rates of specialist linkage (OR 0.4 [95% CI 0.1-0.9] and OR 0.4 [95% CI 0.1-0.9], respectively). We identified a high prevalence of HCV infection in BCHD STI clinics. With availability of patient navigation services, a large proportion of HCV-infected patients linked to off-site specialist care. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Effective strategies for global health research, training and clinical care: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Rebekah J; Campbell, Jennifer A; Egede, Leonard E

    2014-09-29

    The purpose of this narrative review was to synthesize the evidence on effective strategies for global health research, training and clinical care in order to identify common structures that have been used to guide program development. A Medline search from 2001 to 2011 produced 951 articles, which were reviewed and categorized. Thirty articles met criteria to be included in this review. Eleven articles discussed recommendations for research, 8 discussed training and 11 discussed clinical care. Global health program development should be completed within the framework of a larger institutional commitment or partnership. Support from leadership in the university or NGO, and an engaged local community are both integral to success and sustainability of efforts. It is also important for program development to engage local partners from the onset, jointly exploring issues and developing goals and objectives. Evaluation is a recommended way to determine if goals are being met, and should include considerations of sustainability, partnership building, and capacity. Global health research programs should consider details regarding the research process, context of research, partnerships, and community relationships. Training for global health should involve mentorship, pre-departure preparation of students, and elements developed to increase impact. Clinical care programs should focus on collaboration, sustainability, meeting local needs, and appropriate process considerations.

  4. Model for teaching population health and community-based care across diverse clinical experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dyk, Elizabeth J; Valentine-Maher, Sarah K; Tracy, Janet P

    2015-02-01

    The pillars constructivist model is designed to offer a unifying clinical paradigm to support consistent learning opportunities across diverse configurations of community and public health clinical sites. Thirty-six students and six faculty members participated in a mixed methods evaluation to assess the model after its inaugural semester of implementation. The evaluation methods included a rating scale that measures the model's ability to provide consistent learning opportunities at both population health and direct care sites, a case study to measure student growth within the five conceptual pillars, and a faculty focus group. Results revealed that the model served as an effective means of clinical education to support the use of multiple, small-scale public health sites. Although measurements of student growth within the pillars are inconclusive, the findings suggest efficacy. The authors recommend the continued use of the pillars constructivist model in baccalaureate programs, with further study of the author-designed evaluation tools. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. Academic psychiatry and health care reform: strategic initiatives for sustaining the clinical mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, O Lee; Gwon, Howard S; McHugh, Paul R; Breakey, William R; Schwartz, Joseph M; Clark, Michael R; Kaminsky, Michael J

    2003-02-01

    Health care reform has posed special challenges for departments of psychiatry in academic medical centers. This report describes one department's strategic responses to a marketplace with high penetration by managed care and provides examples of the kinds of faculty concerns that can arise when major departmental reorganizations are attempted. The department's successful adaptation to a radically altered professional environment is attributed to the following five initiatives: vertical integration and diversification of clinical programs, service line management, outcomes measurement, regional network development, and institutional managed care partnerships Although the authors did not design their adaptive efforts as a research study, they offer objective data to support their conclusion that the viability of their overall clinical enterprise has been sustained despite an external environment inhospitable to academic psychiatry.

  6. Diabetes mellitus and treatment outcomes in Palestine refugees in UNRWA primary health care clinics in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khader, A; Ballout, G; Shahin, Y; Hababeh, M; Farajallah, L; Zeidan, W; Abu-Zayed, I; Kochi, A; Harries, A D; Zachariah, R; Kapur, A; Shaikh, I; Seita, A

    2013-12-21

    Six primary health care clinics in Jordan, serving Palestine refugees diagnosed with diabetes mellitus (DM). To report on the number and characteristics of new DM patients registered in the second quarter of 2013 and of all DM patients ever registered by 30 June 2013, with treatment outcomes and cumulative burden of late-stage complications. A descriptive cohort study using routine data collected through e-Health. Of the 288 new patients in Q2 2013 and 12 548 patients ever registered with DM by 30 June 2013, smoking, physical inactivity and obesity were recorded in 19%, 50% and 47%, respectively. In Q2 2013, 9740 (78%) patients attended a clinic, with >99% having undergone disease control measures: of these, 72% had postprandial blood glucose ⩽ 180 mg/dl, 71% had blood cholesterol < 200 mg/dl, 82% had blood pressure < 140/90 and 40% had body mass index < 30 kg/m(2). Late-stage complications were present in 1130 (11.6%) patients who attended a clinic, with cardiovascular disease and stroke being the most common. Several differences in outcomes were found between males and females. There is a high burden of disease due to DM at primary health care clinics in Jordan. Cohort analysis using e-Health is a vital way to assess management and follow-up.

  7. Understanding utilization of outpatient clinics for children with special health care needs in southern Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peres, Hagit; Glazer, Yael; Landau, Daniella; Marks, Kyla; Abokaf, Hana'a; Belmaker, Ilana; Cohen, Arnon; Shoham-Vardi, Ilana

    2014-10-01

    To understand the pattern of utilization of ambulatory care by parents of children with special health care needs (CSHCN) and to explore parental challenges in coping with health maintenance of their infants after discharge from a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). CSHCN require frequent utilization of outpatient ambulatory clinics especially in their first years of life. Multiple barriers are faced by families in disadvantaged populations which might affect adherence to medical referrals. Our study attempts to go beyond quantitative assessment of adherence rates, and capture the influence of parental agency as a critical factor ensuring optimal utilization of healthcare for CSHCN. A prospective, mixed-methods, cohort study followed 158 Jewish and Bedouin-Arab infants in the first year post discharge from NICU in southern Israel. Rates of utilization of ambulatory clinics were obtained from medical records, and quantitative assessment of factors affecting it was based on structured interviews with parents at baseline. Qualitative analysis was based on home visits or telephone in-depth interviews conducted about 1 year post-discharge, to obtain a rich, multilayered, experiential perspectives and explained perceptions by parents. Adherence to post-discharge referrals was generally good, but environmental, cultural, and financial obstacles to healthcare, magnified by communication barriers, forced parents with limited resources to make difficult choices affecting utilization of healthcare services. Improving concordance between primary caregivers and health care providers is crucial, and further development of supportive healthcare for CSHCN in concordance with parental limitations and preferences is needed.

  8. Financial and clinical risk in health care reform: a view from below.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Pam; Mackintosh, Maureen; Ross, Fiona; Clayton, Julie; Price, Linnie; Christian, Sara; Byng, Richard; Allan, Helen

    2012-04-01

    This paper examines how the interaction between financial and clinical risk at two critical phases of health care reform in England has been experienced by frontline staff caring for vulnerable patients with long term conditions. The paper draws on contracting theory and two interdisciplinary and in-depth qualitative research studies undertaken in 1995 and 2007. Methods common to both studies included documentary analysis and interviews with managers and front line professionals. The 1995 study employed action-based research and included observation of community care; the 2007 study used realistic evaluation and included engagement with service user groups. In both reform processes, financial risk was increasingly devolved to frontline practitioners and smaller organizational units such as GP commissioning groups, with payment by unit of activity, aimed at changing professionals' behaviour. This financing increased perceived clinical risk and fragmented the delivery of health and social care services requiring staff efforts to improve collaboration and integration, and created some perverse incentives and staff demoralisation. Health services reform should only shift financial risk to frontline professionals to the extent that it can be efficiently borne. Where team work is required, contracts should reward collaborative multi-professional activity.

  9. The impact of clinical librarian services on patients and health care organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brettle, Alison; Maden, Michelle; Payne, Clare

    2016-06-01

    Systematic reviews have found limited evidence of effectiveness and impact of clinical librarians (CLs) due to the poor quality of reporting, scale and design of previous studies. To measure specific CL impact on organisational and patient outcomes using a robust approach that helps CLs develop research skills. Questionnaire and interviews. Clinical librarians contribute to a wide range of outcomes in the short and longer term reflecting organisational priorities and objectives. These include direct contributions to choice of intervention (36%) diagnosis (26%) quality of life (25%), increased patient involvement in decision making (26%) and cost savings and risk management including avoiding tests, referrals, readmissions and reducing length of stay (28%). Interventions provided by CL's are complex and each contributes to multiple outcomes of importance to health care organisations. This study is unique in taking a wide view of potential and specific impacts to which CLs contribute across health care organisations. It is the largest UK evaluation of CL services to date and demonstrates CLs affect direct patient care, improve quality and save money. Future researchers are urged to use the tools presented to collect data on the same outcomes to build a significant and comprehensive international evidence base about the effectiveness and impact of clinical librarian services. © 2016 Health Libraries Group.

  10. Teaching Emotional Intelligence to Intensive Care Unit Nurses and their General Health: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Sharif

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Emotion and how people manage it is an important part of personality that would immensely affect their health. Investigations showed that emotional intelligence is significantly related to and can predict psychological health. Objective: To determine the effect of teaching emotional intelligence to intensive care unit nurses on their general health. Methods: This randomized clinical trial (registered as IRCT201208022812N9 was conducted on 52 of 200 in intensive care unit nurses affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. They were recruited through purposeful convenience sampling and then randomly categorized into two groups. The intervention group members were trained in emotional intelligence. Bar-on emotional intelligence and Goldberg's general health questionnaires were administered to each participant before, immediately after, and one month after the intervention. Results: While the mean score of general health for the intervention group decreased from 25.4 before the intervention, to 18.1 immediately after the intervention and to 14.6 one month later, for the control group, it increased from 22.0, to 24.2 and to 26.5, respectively (p<0.001. Conclusion: Teaching emotional intelligence improved the general health of intensive care unit nurses.

  11. [Pertussis as health care workers infectious disease--the clinical case with a commentary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchar, Ernest; Nitsch-Osuch, Aneta; Szenborn, Leszek

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the changing epidemiological situation of pertussis observed in recent years, with a focus on the shift of cases from young children to older age groups, teenagers and adults. Whooping cough may affect healthcare workers who belong to a high-risk group and cause hospital infections. We present a case report of pertussis in a nurse and the recommended prophylactic measures in healthcare workers. The current definition and diagnosis of pertussis is also discussed. The clinical course of pertussis can be significantly alleviated and highly non-specific, with no typical coughing and vomiting in people vaccinated against whooping cough a few years earlier. Pertussis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cough lasting more than fourteen days. Improvement of the epidemiological situation requires, besides immunization of infants, regular and universal booster immunization for adolescents and adults. Vaccinations for health care workers of neonatal and pediatric wards are recommended in the National Program of Immunization for 2013. It seems that booster vaccination of health care workers with a triple vaccine against diphtheria, tetanus and acellular pertussis (dTpa) of the reduced quantity of antigens, particularly of health workers caring for infants, children and the elderly, may be the most effective way to reduce the risk of pertussis transmission in the health care environment.

  12. Pertussis as health care workers infectious disease – The clinical case with a commentary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest Kuchar

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the changing epidemiological situation of pertussis observed in recent years, with a focus on the shift of cases from young children to older age groups, teenagers and adults. Whooping cough may affect healthcare workers who belong to a high-risk group and cause hospital infections. We present a case report of pertussis in a nurse and the recommended prophylactic measures in healthcare workers. The current definition and diagnosis of pertussis is also discussed. The clinical course of pertussis can be significantly alleviated and highly non-specific, with no typical coughing and vomiting in people vaccinated against whooping cough a few years earlier. Pertussis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cough lasting more than fourteen days. Improvement of the epidemiological situation requires, besides immunization of infants, regular and universal booster immunization for adolescents and adults. Vaccinations for health care workers of neonatal and pediatric wards are recommended in the National Program of Immunization for 2013. It seems that booster vaccination of health care workers with a triple vaccine against diphtheria, tetanus and acellular pertussis (dTpa of the reduced quantity of antigens, particularly of health workers caring for infants, children and the elderly, may be the most effective way to reduce the risk of pertussis transmission in the health care environment. Med Pr 2013;64(5:731–739

  13. Mining electronic health records: towards better research applications and clinical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Peter B; Jensen, Lars J; Brunak, Søren

    2012-05-02

    Clinical data describing the phenotypes and treatment of patients represents an underused data source that has much greater research potential than is currently realized. Mining of electronic health records (EHRs) has the potential for establishing new patient-stratification principles and for revealing unknown disease correlations. Integrating EHR data with genetic data will also give a finer understanding of genotype-phenotype relationships. However, a broad range of ethical, legal and technical reasons currently hinder the systematic deposition of these data in EHRs and their mining. Here, we consider the potential for furthering medical research and clinical care using EHR data and the challenges that must be overcome before this is a reality.

  14. Initiation of antiretroviral therapy at rural primary health care clinics in KwaZulu Natal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilda Ganesen-Moothusamy

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available South Africa bears the greatest burden of HIV infection globally with the most infected people living in KwaZulu-Natal (KZN. Decentralised medical care for HIV positive patients and antiretroviral therapy (ART delivery to primary health care facilities were proposed nationally to achieve adequate ART coverage for patients in need of treatment. This study described the HIV positive patients who accessed medical care and were initiated on ART at two existing government Primary Health Care (PHC clinics with no added donor support, in Ilembe, KZN. This was an observational descriptive study of ART initiation from 01 April 2008 to 30 April 2009. Data were collected from clinical records kept on site. HIV Testing and the pre-ART programmes which consisted of medical care prior to ART initiation are briefly described. Socio-economic, demographic and clinical characteristics of patients who were initiated on ART were sampled and described. A minority (2.95% of the study population tested for HIV of which 36.0%tested positive. Majority (60.0% of patients who joined the pre-ART programme care did not return. The ART sample consisted of 375 patients of whom 65.0%were women, 85.9%were unmarried, 61.6%were unemployed and 50.4%had a secondary level of education. Tuberculosis (TB prevalence and incidence at ART initiation were 22.1%and 14.7%respectively. The prevalence of Syphilis and Hepatitis B co-infections were 13.1%and 8.6 %respectively. Two thirds of female patients (66.4% received a Pap smear result of which the majority (62.3% were abnormal. Uptake for HIV testing followed by relevant CD4 testing was poor. High TB, Hepatitis B and Syphilis co-infection was noted amongst patients initiated on ART. Cervical cancer screening must be intensified. Although ART initiation with no added external resources was successful, record keeping was suboptimal.

  15. The burden of chronic low back pain: clinical comorbidities, treatment patterns, and health care costs in usual care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Mugdha; Sadosky, Alesia; Stacey, Brett R; Tai, Kei-Sing; Leslie, Douglas

    2012-05-15

    Retrospective analysis of an insurance claims database. To examine the comorbidities, treatment patterns, health care resource utilization, and direct medical costs of patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP) in clinical practice. Although the socioeconomic impact of CLBP is substantial, characterization of comorbidities, pain-related pharmacotherapy, and health care resource use/costs of patients with CLBP relative to non-CLBP controls have been infrequently documented. Using the LifeLink Health Plan Claims Database (IMS Health Inc., Watertown, MA), patients with CLBP, defined using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification, were identified and matched (age, sex, and region) with non-CLBP individuals. Comorbidities, pain-related pharmacotherapy, and health care service use/costs (pharmacy, outpatient, inpatient, total) were compared for the 2 groups during 2008. A total of 101,294 patients with CLBP and controls were identified (55% women; mean age was 47.2 ± 11.6 years). Relative to controls, patients with CLBP had a greater comorbidity burden including a significantly higher (P pain conditions and common sequelae of pain such as depression (13.0% vs. 6.1%), anxiety (8.0% vs. 3.4%), and sleep disorders (10.0% vs. 3.4%). Pain-related pharmacotherapy was significantly greater (P pain (i.e., depression, anxiety, and insomnia) was also significantly greater (P comorbidity and economic burdens compared with those without CLBP. This economic burden can be attributed to greater prescribing of pain-related medications and increased health resource utilization.

  16. Selecting new health technologies for evaluation:Can clinical experts predict which new anticancer drugswill impact Danish health care?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Douw, Karla; Vondeling, Hindrik

    2007-01-01

    Several countries have systems in place to support the managed entry of new health technologies. The big challenge for these so-called horizon-scanning systems is to select those technologies that require decision support by means of an early evaluation. Clinical experts are considered a valuable...... source of information on new health technologies, but research on the relevance of their input is scarce. In 2000, we asked six Danish expert oncologists to predict whether a sample of 19 new anticancer drugs would impact Danish health care over the next 5 years. In 2005, we assessed the accuracy...

  17. A self-scaling, distributed information architecture for public health, research, and clinical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurry, Andrew J; Gilbert, Clint A; Reis, Ben Y; Chueh, Henry C; Kohane, Isaac S; Mandl, Kenneth D

    2007-01-01

    This study sought to define a scalable architecture to support the National Health Information Network (NHIN). This architecture must concurrently support a wide range of public health, research, and clinical care activities. The architecture fulfils five desiderata: (1) adopt a distributed approach to data storage to protect privacy, (2) enable strong institutional autonomy to engender participation, (3) provide oversight and transparency to ensure patient trust, (4) allow variable levels of access according to investigator needs and institutional policies, (5) define a self-scaling architecture that encourages voluntary regional collaborations that coalesce to form a nationwide network. Our model has been validated by a large-scale, multi-institution study involving seven medical centers for cancer research. It is the basis of one of four open architectures developed under funding from the Office of the National Coordinator of Health Information Technology, fulfilling the biosurveillance use case defined by the American Health Information Community. The model supports broad applicability for regional and national clinical information exchanges. This model shows the feasibility of an architecture wherein the requirements of care providers, investigators, and public health authorities are served by a distributed model that grants autonomy, protects privacy, and promotes participation.

  18. Postpartum home care and its effects on mothers' health: A clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hourieh Shamshiri Milani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Postpartum home care plays an important role in prevention of postpartum complications. Regular visits of mothers during this period are imperative. This study aimed to provide postpartum home care for mothers to assess its effects on mothers' health in Iran. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out in two phases. First, a comprehensive postpartum home care program was compiled by performing a comparative study, using the available guidelines in this regard in different countries and based on the opinions of the experts. Next, a clinical trial was carried out on 276 women who gave birth in the university hospitals affiliated to Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences. There were 92 mothers in the intervention and 184 in the control group. The intervention group mothers were provided with postpartum home care service while the control group did not receive such a service. Results: Outcome assessment at 60 days' postpartum revealed a significant difference between the two groups in terms of the use of supplements, birth control methods, postpartum depression, breastfeeding problems, constipation, and fatigue (P 0.05. Conclusion: The postpartum home care program had a positive effect on some aspects of the mothers' health status and their satisfaction in our society.

  19. Home Visiting and Use of Infant Health Care: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilburn, M Rebecca; Cannon, Jill S

    2017-01-01

    Evaluations of home visiting models have shown that they can reduce children's health care use in the first year of life. Models that exclusively use nurses as home visitors may cost more and be infeasible given nursing shortages in some locations. The goal of this study was to test whether a universal home visiting model employing a nurse-parent educator team as home visitors reduces health care use in the first year of life. This study was a randomized controlled clinical trial of an intensive home visiting program delivered in homes of primary caregivers and their first-born children in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Intention-to-treat and contamination-adjusted intention-to-treat models were estimated, and 244 primary caregivers participated in the survey. In their first year of life, treatment group children were one-third less likely to visit the emergency department (control group mean, MC = 0.42, treatment group mean, MT = 0.28, P = .02) and were also 41% less likely to have visited a primary care provider ≥9 times (MC = 0.49, MT = 0.29, P educator team can reduce infant health care use. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  20. Clinics and home-based care organisations: an interface between theformal and informal health sectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boros, Adam Kenneth

    2010-12-01

    The article outlines the findings of a study designed to explore the working relationship between home-based caregivers and clinic nurses at locations in two informal settlements in Johannesburg, South Africa. By considering the views and experiences of both sponsored and unsponsored caregivers, the research focused on how degrees of informality affect this relationship. The nurse/caregiver relationship represents a primary interface between the formal and informal health sectors and is an important part of the country's primary healthcare system. Despite the attention given to linking home-based care (HBC) with the formal health system, very little research has examined the functionality of this link at the ground level. Through a number of qualitative, semi-structured interviews with nurses, home-based caregivers, and staff from the Department of Health, information was collected to better understand what systems are in place to facilitate the relationship between clinics and HBC organisations, and whether these systems are helping to create the desired results. Do the formal and informal health sectors complement and strengthen or do they distract and damage each other? By examining the influence of degrees of informality, the research also lends insight into how this distinction plays a role in healthcare provision. For instance, how does state support impact the link between the formal and informal health sectors and the ultimate quality of care? And what steps can be taken to improve the health system in this regard, as a whole? The findings point to a number of problems and challenges with integrating HBC into the formal health sector. Degrees of informality are found to have a profound impact on the work of home-based caregivers in some respects, but a surprising lack of impact in others. These issues need to be confronted in order to improve the existing system and, ultimately, health outcomes in South Africa.

  1. Establishment of health clinics as mass screening and referral systems for chronic non-communicable diseases in primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Heidari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study aimed to establish a comprehensive screening and referral system for chronic non-communicable diseases (CNCD in the routine primary health care, and to determine the prevalence of diabetes, pre-diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and dyslipidemia in adult population invited by public announcement to the Health clinics in Isfahan, Iran. Methods: This survey was conducted from March 2010, and the current paper presents data obtained until November 2011. To provide health services for prevention and control of CNCDs, with priority of type2 diabetes mellitus, Health clinics were established in different parts of Isfahan city with a population of approximately 2,100,000 in Iran. The general populations aged 30 years and above were invited to the Health clinics by public announcement. Results: A total of 198972 participants were screened. The mean age of participants was 47.8 years (48.5 men, 47.3 women, with a range of 1 to 95 years old and standard deviation of 12.3 years (12.7 men, 12.1 women. Overall, 22% of participants had impaired fasting glucose, 25% had hypercholesterolemia, 31% had hypertriglyceridemia, and 20% had metabolic syndrome. Conclusion: The high prevalence of dysglycemia and diabetes in our survey may serve as confirmatory evidence about the importance of mass screening and early diagnosis of CNCDs′ risk factors. Our model of establishing Health clinics, as a comprehensive referral system in the routine primary health care can be adopted by Middle Eastern countries, where CNCDs notably diabetes are an emerging health problem.

  2. Targeting mental health care attributes by diagnosis and clinical stage: the views of youth mental health clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Matthew P; Hetrick, Sarah E; Mihalopoulos, Cathrine; Baker, David; Browne, Vivienne; Chanen, Andrew M; Pennell, Kerryn; Purcell, Rosemary; Stavely, Heather; McGorry, Patrick D

    2017-11-20

    To explore the potential utility of clinical stage and mental disorder categories as a basis for determining which attributes of youth mental health care should be offered to which groups of young people. In June 2017, we conducted an online survey of youth mental health clinicians that collected information on the participants' background and areas of expertise, then presented vignettes describing young people with different stages of six mental disorders (disorder-based vignettes were matched to participants' area of expertise). For each vignette, participants were asked to give a quantitative estimate of the proportion of young people with similar mental health problems they thought would clinically benefit from each of twelve attributes of mental health care (other than pharmacological or individual psychological therapies). Survey results were analysed as independent, disorder-based samples, using standard statistical tests of significance, and as a stratified sample using mixed-effects models. A total of 412 clinicians working in 32 countries participated in both parts of the survey. Respondents represented a broad range of clinical disciplines, settings and areas of expertise. Their estimated proportions of young people who would benefit from the mental health care attributes varied by clinical stage and disorder (eg, a mean of 93% [interquartile range (IQR), 90%-100%] of young people with Stage 2 psychosis were estimated to benefit from case management with a multidisciplinary team; while only 15% [IQR, 1%-25%] of young people with Stage 1b generalised anxiety disorder were estimated to benefit from collection and processing of biological samples). Neither the background of the respondents nor the sex of the characters in the vignettes significantly influenced the results. A combination of clinical stage and disorder information might be an appropriate basis for ensuring that the right attributes of early intervention mental health care are provided to the

  3. Use of Drop-In Clinic Versus Appointment-Based Care for LGBT Youth: Influences on the Likelihood to Access Different Health-Care Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Bernie S; Passidomo, Kim; Gormley, Kate; Manley, Alecia

    2014-06-01

    The structure of health-care service delivery can address barriers that make it difficult for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) adolescents to use health services. This study explores the differences among youth who access care in one of two service delivery structures in an LGBT health-care center: the drop-in clinic or the traditional appointment-based model. Analysis of 578 records of LGBT and straight youth (aged 14-24) who accessed health care either through a drop-in clinic or appointment-based care within the first year of offering the drop-in clinic reveals patterns of use when both models are available. We studied demographic variables previously shown to be associated with general health-care access to determine how each correlated with a tendency to use the drop-in structure versus routine appointments. Once the covariates were identified, we conducted a logistic regression analysis to identify its association with likelihood of using the drop-in clinic. Insurance status, housing stability, education, race, and gender identity were most strongly associated with the type of clinic used. Youth who relied on Medicaid, those in unstable housing, and African Americans were most likely to use the drop-in clinic. Transgender youth and those with higher education were more likely to use the appointment-based clinic. Although sexual orientation and HIV status were not related to type of clinic used, youth who were HIV positive used the appointment-based clinic more frequently. Both routes to health care served distinct populations who often experience barriers to accessible, affordable, and knowledgeable care. Further study of the factors related to accessing health care may clarify the extent to which drop-in hours in a youth-friendly context may increase the use of health care by the most socially marginalized youth.

  4. Integrated physical and mental health care at a nurse-managed clinic: report from the trenches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, Deena

    2011-07-01

    The Health and Wellness Center (HWC), located in Joliet, Illinois, is a nurse-managed universally accessible primary health care center funded by a grant from the Health Resources and Services Administration. The goals of the HWC are to improve access to quality primary health care services for all patients, including those who are uninsured and underserved, and to develop and implement a model of nurse-managed primary health care that integrates both physical and mental health assessment and treatment. After 5 years of developing and using this model, it is clear that integration requires strategic supports from the financial, political, and professional sectors to be considered a cost-effective model of health care delivery. Recommendations for policy and practice change are offered based on the author's experiences of providing integrated health care at the HWC and the health care industry's responses to uninsured or underinsured patients' needs. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. Amount of health care and self-care following a randomized clinical trial comparing flexion-distraction with exercise program for chronic low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keenum Michael

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous clinical trials have assessed the percentage of participants who utilized further health care after a period of conservative care for low back pain, however no chiropractic clinical trial has determined the total amount of care during this time and any differences based on assigned treatment group. The objective of this clinical trial follow-up was to assess if there was a difference in the total number of office visits for low back pain over one year after a four week clinical trial of either a form of physical therapy (Exercise Program or a form of chiropractic care (Flexion Distraction for chronic low back pain. Methods In this randomized clinical trial follow up study, 195 participants were followed for one year after a four-week period of either a form of chiropractic care (FD or a form of physical therapy (EP. Weekly structured telephone interview questions regarded visitation of various health care practitioners and the practice of self-care for low back pain. Results Participants in the physical therapy group demonstrated on average significantly more visits to any health care provider and to a general practitioner during the year after trial care (p Conclusion During a one-year follow-up, participants previously randomized to physical therapy attended significantly more health care visits than those participants who received chiropractic care.

  6. Bioinformatics Workflow for Clinical Whole Genome Sequencing at Partners HealthCare Personalized Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen A. Tsai

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Effective implementation of precision medicine will be enhanced by a thorough understanding of each patient’s genetic composition to better treat his or her presenting symptoms or mitigate the onset of disease. This ideally includes the sequence information of a complete genome for each individual. At Partners HealthCare Personalized Medicine, we have developed a clinical process for whole genome sequencing (WGS with application in both healthy individuals and those with disease. In this manuscript, we will describe our bioinformatics strategy to efficiently process and deliver genomic data to geneticists for clinical interpretation. We describe the handling of data from FASTQ to the final variant list for clinical review for the final report. We will also discuss our methodology for validating this workflow and the cost implications of running WGS.

  7. Mapping South African allied health primary care clinical guideline activity: establishing a stakeholder reference sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dizon, Janine Margarita; Grimmer, Karen; Machingaidze, Shingai; McLaren, Pam; Louw, Quinette

    2016-10-10

    Little is known about allied health (AH) clinical practice guideline (CPG) activity in South Africa, and particularly in relation to primary health care (PHC). This paper reports on a scoping study undertaken to establish a reference framework, from which a comprehensive maximum variation sample could be selected. This was required to underpin robust sampling for a qualitative study aimed at understanding South African primary care AH therapy CPG activities. This paper builds on findings from the South African Guidelines Evaluation (Project SAGE) Flagship grant. South African government websites were searched for structures of departments and portfolios, and available CPGs. Professional AH association websites were searched for CPGs, purposively-identified key informants were interviewed, and CPGs previously identified for priority South African primary care conditions were critiqued for AH therapy involvement. Key informants described potentially complex relationships between players who may be engaged in South African AH CPGs, in both public and private sectors. There were disability/rehabilitation portfolios at national and provincial governments, but no uniformity in provincial government organisation of, or support for, PHC AH services. There were no AH primary care therapy CPGs on government websites, although there was 'clinical guidance' in various forms on professional association websites. Only two CPGs of priority South African PHC conditions included mention of any AH therapy (physiotherapy for adult asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). A comprehensive and wide-reaching stakeholder reference framework would be required in order to capture the heterogeneity of AH primary care CPG activity in South Africa. This should involve the voices of national and purposively-selected provincial governments, academic institutions, consultants, public sector managers and clinicians, private practitioners, professional associations, and private sector

  8. Brief multiple behavior interventions in a college student health care clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werch, Chudley E Chad; Bian, Hui; Moore, Michele J; Ames, Steve; DiClemente, Carlo C; Weiler, Robert M

    2007-12-01

    This study examined the effects of brief image-based interventions, including a multiple behavior health contract, a one-on-one tailored consultation, and a combined consultation plus contract intervention, for impacting multiple health behaviors of students in a university health clinic. A total of 155 college students attending a major southern university were recruited to participate in a study evaluating a health promotion program titled Project Fitness during the fall 2005 and spring 2006. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three treatments as they presented at the clinic: 1) a multiple behavior health contract, 2) a one-on-one tailored consultation, or 3) a combined consultation plus contract intervention. Baseline and 1-month post-intervention data were collected using computer-assisted questionnaires in a quiet office within the student health clinic. Omnibus repeated-measures analyses of variance were significant for drinking driving behaviors, F(2,136) = 4.43, p = .01, exercise behaviors, F(5,140) = 6.12, p = .00, nutrition habits, F(3,143) = 5.37, p = .00, sleep habits, F(2,144) = 5.03, p = .01, and health quality of life, F(5,140) = 3.09, p = .01, with improvements on each behavior across time. Analysis of group-by-time interaction effects showed an increase in the use of techniques to manage stress, F(2,144) = 5.48, p = .01, and the number of health behavior goals set in the last 30 days, F(2,143) = 5.35, p = .01, but only among adolescents receiving the consultation, or consultation plus contract. Effect sizes were consistently larger across health behaviors, and medium in size, when both consult and contract were used together. Brief interventions using a positive goal image of fitness, and addressing a number of health habits using a contract and consultation strategy alone, or in combination, have the potential to influence positive changes in multiple health behaviors of college students attending a university primary health care clinic.

  9. Assessing the Use of Mobile Health Technology by Patients: An Observational Study in Primary Care Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Veronica; Johnson, Emily; Gonzalez, Cesar; Ramirez, Vanessa; Rubino, Barbara; Rossetti, Gina

    2016-04-19

    There is significant potential for mobile health technology to improve health outcomes for patients with chronic diseases. However, there is a need for further development of mobile health technology that would help to improve the health of lower-income communities. The study objective was to assess mobile phone and app usage among a culturally diverse patient population, and to determine whether patients would be interested in using mobile health technology to help manage their chronic diseases. An observational study was conducted with patients of the Internal Medicine resident primary care clinics of Los Angeles County and University of Southern California (LAC+USC) Medical Center. Self-reported information regarding demographics, current mobile phone usage, current mobile health app and social media usage, barriers to using mobile phones or mobile health apps, and interest in using a mobile health app was collected. Ninety-one percent of patients owned a mobile phone, with 76% (169/223) of these reporting having a mobile phone with Internet capability. Fifty-seven percent of subjects used mobile apps on their mobile phones, and 32% (41/130) of these used mobile apps related to their health. Eighty-six percent (207/241) of respondents voiced interest in using a mobile app to improve their health, and 40% (88/221) stated they would use such an app daily. Patients stated they would find the mobile health app most useful for nutrition, exercise, and obtaining general information on medical conditions. Despite the fact that the majority of our primary care patients were of lower socioeconomic status, they utilized mobile phones with Internet and mobile app capabilities to a great extent. There was substantial interest among our patients in using mobile health technology to both manage chronic disease and improve overall health. Given that cultural, educational, and socioeconomic disparities strongly correlate with higher rates of chronic diseases such as obesity

  10. Assessing the Use of Mobile Health Technology by Patients: An Observational Study in Primary Care Clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Emily; Gonzalez, Cesar; Ramirez, Vanessa; Rubino, Barbara; Rossetti, Gina

    2016-01-01

    Background There is significant potential for mobile health technology to improve health outcomes for patients with chronic diseases. However, there is a need for further development of mobile health technology that would help to improve the health of lower-income communities. Objective The study objective was to assess mobile phone and app usage among a culturally diverse patient population, and to determine whether patients would be interested in using mobile health technology to help manage their chronic diseases. Methods An observational study was conducted with patients of the Internal Medicine resident primary care clinics of Los Angeles County and University of Southern California (LAC+USC) Medical Center. Self-reported information regarding demographics, current mobile phone usage, current mobile health app and social media usage, barriers to using mobile phones or mobile health apps, and interest in using a mobile health app was collected. Results Ninety-one percent of patients owned a mobile phone, with 76% (169/223) of these reporting having a mobile phone with Internet capability. Fifty-seven percent of subjects used mobile apps on their mobile phones, and 32% (41/130) of these used mobile apps related to their health. Eighty-six percent (207/241) of respondents voiced interest in using a mobile app to improve their health, and 40% (88/221) stated they would use such an app daily. Patients stated they would find the mobile health app most useful for nutrition, exercise, and obtaining general information on medical conditions. Conclusions Despite the fact that the majority of our primary care patients were of lower socioeconomic status, they utilized mobile phones with Internet and mobile app capabilities to a great extent. There was substantial interest among our patients in using mobile health technology to both manage chronic disease and improve overall health. Given that cultural, educational, and socioeconomic disparities strongly correlate with

  11. The prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder and its clinical correlates in a VA primary care behavioral health clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Megan M; Zhang, Jinxin; Phillips, Katharine A

    2015-07-30

    We examined the prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) in a Veterans Affairs (VA) primary care behavioral health clinic. Of 100 Veterans, 11% (95% CI = 6.3-18.6%) had current BDD and 12% (95% CI = 7.0-19.8%) had lifetime BDD. However, only 8.3% of these Veterans had been diagnosed with BDD. BDD was significantly associated with a substantially elevated rate of suicide attempts, major depression, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. This severe disorder appears to be underdiagnosed in VA settings. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  12. The Determinants of Health Care Seeking Behaviour of Adolescents Attending STD Clinics in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Weitz, Anna; Reddy, Priscilla; Van Den Borne, H. W.; Kok, Gerjo; Pietersen, P.

    2000-01-01

    Investigates the determinants of delay behavior in health care seeking in a sample of 292 adolescent patients with STD symptoms. Early health care seeking was determined by perceived seriousness of STDs, an absence of self treatment prior to seeking care, and positive attitudes regarding personal autonomy in condom use behavior. (Contains 17…

  13. Perceptions of clinical utility of an Augmented Reality musical software among health care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, Ana Grasielle Dionísio; de Assis, Gilda Aparecida; do Nascimento, Marilena; de Deus Lopes, Roseli

    2017-04-01

    Augmented Reality musical software (GenVirtual) is a technology, which primarily allows users to develop music activities for rehabilitation. This study aimed to analyse the perceptions of health care professionals regarding the clinical utility of GenVirtual. A second objective was to identify improvements to GenVirtual software and similar technologies. Music therapists, occupational therapists, physiotherapists and speech and language therapist who assist people with physical and cognitive disabilities were enrolled in three focus groups. The quantitative and qualitative data were collected through inductive thematic analysis. Three main themes were identified: the use of GenVirtual in health care areas; opportunities for realistic application of GenVirtual; and limitations in the use of GenVirtual. The registration units identified were: motor stimulation, cognitive stimulation, verbal learning, recreation activity, musicality, accessibility, motivation, sonic accuracy, interference of lighting, poor sound, children and adults. This research suggested that the GenVirtual is a complementary tool to conventional clinical practice and has great potential to motor and cognitive rehabilitation of children and adults. Implications for Rehabilitation Gaining health professional' perceptions of the Augmented Reality musical game (GenVirtual) give valuable information as to the clinical utility of the software. GenVirtual was perceived as a tool that could be used as enhancing the motor and cognitive rehabilitation process. GenVirtual was viewed as a tool that could enhance clinical practice and communication among various agencies, but it was suggested that it should be used with caution to avoid confusion and replacement of important services.

  14. The effect of training in primary health care centers on medical students' clinical skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullatif Alnasir, Faisal; Jaradat, Ahmed Abdel-Karim

    2013-01-01

    Medical students' effective clinical skills training are an important goal of any medical school. When adequate, graduate doctors will have sufficient skills to consult a patient by taking proper history and conducting appropriate physical examination. The question under scrutiny is the optimal place for providing such training. Since the aim is to graduate general physicians, many literatures highlighted the importance of implementing such training in the primary health care centers. A special clinical skills training program was developed for the Year 4 pre-clerkship medical students of the Arabian Gulf University during the academic year 2011-2012. It was important for these students to acquire certain skills before transferring to the clerkship phase where they deal directly with patients. For the 130 students involved in this study, a self-assessment and clinical exam were conducted at the beginning and end of the program. The study showed that students benefited greatly from this training program with significant differences between their preexisting known skills and clinical skills acquired by the end of the program. Primary care centers are ideal places for optimal training because of small group training setting that is one tutor to two students and of the advantage that students face real patient environment.

  15. Electronic health records based phenotyping in next-generation clinical trials: a perspective from the NIH Health Care Systems Collaboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richesson, Rachel L; Hammond, W Ed; Nahm, Meredith; Wixted, Douglas; Simon, Gregory E; Robinson, Jennifer G; Bauck, Alan E; Cifelli, Denise; Smerek, Michelle M; Dickerson, John; Laws, Reesa L; Madigan, Rosemary A; Rusincovitch, Shelley A; Kluchar, Cynthia; Califf, Robert M

    2013-12-01

    Widespread sharing of data from electronic health records and patient-reported outcomes can strengthen the national capacity for conducting cost-effective clinical trials and allow research to be embedded within routine care delivery. While pragmatic clinical trials (PCTs) have been performed for decades, they now can draw on rich sources of clinical and operational data that are continuously fed back to inform research and practice. The Health Care Systems Collaboratory program, initiated by the NIH Common Fund in 2012, engages healthcare systems as partners in discussing and promoting activities, tools, and strategies for supporting active participation in PCTs. The NIH Collaboratory consists of seven demonstration projects, and seven problem-specific working group 'Cores', aimed at leveraging the data captured in heterogeneous 'real-world' environments for research, thereby improving the efficiency, relevance, and generalizability of trials. Here, we introduce the Collaboratory, focusing on its Phenotype, Data Standards, and Data Quality Core, and present early observations from researchers implementing PCTs within large healthcare systems. We also identify gaps in knowledge and present an informatics research agenda that includes identifying methods for the definition and appropriate application of phenotypes in diverse healthcare settings, and methods for validating both the definition and execution of electronic health records based phenotypes.

  16. Screening and diagnosing depression in women visiting GPs' drop in clinic in Primary Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johansson Sven-Erik

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Only half of all depressions are diagnosed in Primary Health Care (PHC. Depression can remain undetected for a long time and entail high costs for care and low quality of life for the individuals. Drop in clinic is a common form of organizing health care; however the visits are short and focus on solving the most urgent problems. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and severity of depression among women visiting the GPs' drop in clinic and to identify possible clues for depression among women. Methods The two-stage screening method with "high risk feedback" was used. Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI was used to screen 155 women visiting two GPs' drop in clinic. Women who screened positive (BDI score ≥10 were invited by the GP to a repeat visit. Major depression (MDD was diagnosed according to DSM-IV criteria and the severity was assessed with Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS. Women with BDI score Results The two-stage method worked well with a low rate of withdrawals in the second step, when the GP invited the women to a repeat visit. The prevalence of depression was 22.4% (95% CI 15.6–29.2. The severity was mild in 43%, moderate in 53% and severe in 3%. The depressed women mentioned mental symptoms significantly more often (69% than the controls (15% and were to a higher extent sick-listed for a longer period than 14 days. Nearly one third of the depressed women did not mention mental symptoms. The majority of the women who screened as false positive for depression had crisis reactions and needed further care from health professionals in PHC. Referrals to a psychiatrist were few and revealed often psychiatric co-morbidity. Conclusion The prevalence of previously undiagnosed depression among women visiting GPs' drop in clinic was high. Clues for depression were identified in the depressed women's symptom presentation; they often mention mental symptoms when they visit the GP for somatic

  17. The accuracy of clinical malaria case reporting at primary health care facilities in Honiara, Solomon Islands

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    Kunimitsu Ayano

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The accuracy of malaria case reporting is challenging due to restricted human and material resources in many countries. The reporting often depends on the clinical diagnosis because of the scarcity of microscopic examinations. Particularly, clinical malaria case reporting by primary health care facilities (local clinics, which constitutes the baseline data of surveillance, has never previously been sufficiently evaluated. In order to improve the malaria reporting system to the level required to eventually eliminate this disease, this study estimates the gaps between the records of clinics and government statistics regarding the incidence of clinical malaria, and then also examines some factors that might explain the data discrepancy, including such variables as clinic staffing and record keeping. Methods All medical records for outpatients in 2007, handwritten by nurses, were collected from local clinics in Honiara, the capital of the Solomon Islands. The all-monthly clinical malaria cases were then recalculated. The corresponding monthly data in official statistics were provided by the government. Next, in order to estimate any data discrepancy, the ratio of the cases recorded at clinics to the cases reported to the government was determined on the monthly basis. Finally, the associations between the monthly discrepancy and other variables were evaluated by a multiple regression analysis. Results The mean data discrepancy between the records of clinics and government statistics was 21.2% (n = 96. Significant associations were observed between the discrepancy and the average number of patients (coefficient: 0.05, 95%CI: 0.31, 0.07, illegible handwriting (coefficient: 0.09, 95%CI: 0.04, 0.15, the use of tally sheets (coefficient:-0.38, 95%CI: -0.54, -0.22, and the clinic level (coefficient:-0.48, 95%CI:-0.89,-0.06. Conclusion The findings of this study demonstrate the huge data discrepancy between the records of clinics and

  18. From cottage industry to a dominant mode of primary care: stages in the diffusion of a health care innovation (retail clinics).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinlay, John B; Marceau, Lisa D

    2012-09-01

    Primary health care is essential to population health and there is increasing need for it, especially with an aging population with multiple comorbidities. Primary health care in the U.S. is widely considered in an ever-deepening crisis. This paper presents a detailed case study of the recent rise of a "disruptive innovation" - retail clinics - which have the potential to transform the face of primary health care in the US. We describe six stages in the diffusion of retail clinics, from cottage industry to a dominant mode for the delivery of primary health care, and consider sociopolitical influences that facilitate and impede their emerging potential. Retail clinics may provide a strategic opportunity to re-engineer the primary health care system, although they may also produce worrisome unanticipated consequences. Discussion concerning the potential threats and opportunities posed by retail clinics occurs in the absence of sound evidence concerning their comparative effectiveness and quality-of-care. This case study identifies the sociopolitical influences and processes that determine whether health care innovations rise or fall, and highlights critically important points along the pathway to health system change. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Health-Care Hub

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Darcia Harris

    2004-01-01

    The Broad Acres clinic is one of 1,500 school-based health centers nationwide that bring a wide range of medical, nutritional, and mental-health care to millions of students and their families. The centers provide an important safety net for children and adolescents--particularly the more than 10 million today who lack health insurance, according…

  20. Managing and monitoring chronic non-communicable diseases in a primary health care clinic, Lilongwe, Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjomo, R C; Mwagomba, B; Ade, S; Ali, E; Ben-Smith, A; Khomani, P; Bondwe, P; Nkhoma, D; Douglas, G P; Tayler-Smith, K; Chikosi, L; Harries, A D; Gadabu, O J

    2016-06-21

    Patients with chronic non-communicable diseases attending a primary health care centre, Lilongwe, Malawi. Using an electronic medical record monitoring system, to describe the quarterly and cumulative disease burden, management and outcomes of patients registered between March 2014 and June 2015. A cross-sectional study. Of 1135 patients, with new registrations increasing each quarter, 66% were female, 21% were aged ⩾65 years, 20% were obese, 53% had hypertension alone, 18% had diabetes alone, 12% had asthma, 10% had epilepsy and 7% had both hypertension and diabetes. In every quarter, about 30% of patients did not attend the clinic and 19% were registered as lost to follow-up (not seen for ⩾1 year) in the last quarter. Of those attending, over 90% were prescribed medication, and 80-90% with hypertension and/or diabetes had blood pressure/blood glucose measured. Over 85% of those with epilepsy had no seizures and 60-75% with asthma had no severe attacks. Control of blood pressure (41-51%) and diabetes (15-38%) was poor. It is feasible to manage patients with non-communicable diseases in a primary health care setting in Malawi, although more attention is needed to improve clinic attendance and the control of hypertension and diabetes.

  1. [Clinic management of public social protection policy in primary health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcos-Griffiths, Estela; Muñoz-González, Luz Angélica; Vollrath-Ramírez, Antonia; Sánchez-Segura, Ximena

    2016-01-01

    Knowing the effectiveness of clinical management of primary care health in the field of Integral Protection System for Children "Chile Crece Contigo" and "Red Protege". Observational, descriptive, with information available from secondary sources of Chile Crece Contigo system in the district of Pudahuel, Santiago de Chile. The population was 1,656 pregnant women assigned to Chile Crece Contigo system in 2009. Social vulnerability was measured with the Social Protection Record. Sociodemographic and Chile Crece Contigo system performance variables were selected. It featured a raw and refined database. Processing and analysis of data was performed using the statistical program Statistical Package for Social Sciences and Excel. Descriptive statistics for frequency, position and dispersion were calculated. Certification of Scientific Ethics Committee of the School of Nursing was granted. A 91.4% of institutional social vulnerability detected by screening social protection record was observed. Psychosocial risk was higher in women with social vulnerability (42.0 vs. 28.2%) more often recognized as inadequate family support, depressive symptoms, domestic violence, substance abuse and conflicts with motherhood. In the universal, specific and integrated performance it was not met with 100% access to benefits. The invisibility of the social vulnerability and low effectiveness of the transfer of benefits to socially vulnerable women/children deserves skills development of contextualized and integrated clinical management professionals in primary health care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Alcohol problems among patients attending five primary health care clinics in Harare city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinyadza, E; Moyo, I M; Katsumbe, T M; Chisvo, D; Mahari, M; Cock, D E; Mbengeranwa, O L

    1993-02-01

    Modified versions of the CAGE and WHO AUDIT (Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test) questionnaires were used to investigate drinking habits of patients attending primary care clinics in Harare in 1989. The questionnaires were administered to 483 consecutive patients of whom 63 pc were male and 37 pc female. The results showed that 41 pc of the patients were current drinkers, and over 60 pc of them were drinking to and beyond "safe limits". Thirty nine pc of the current drinkers drank at least three or more times per week. On an average drinking day 66 pc of the male drinkers consume 10 or more units of alcohol per day. On heavy drinking days 38.5 pc of the drinkers or 16 pc of the total sample consume more than 21 units per day. These sessions occurred around paydays. Thirteen (13.2 pc) of those who consume more than 10 units per heavy drinking session exceeded the recommended frequency levels i.e. not more than three times per week. Seventy five pc of drinkers stated that they drink to socialize or for recreational purposes. About 60 pc of the current drinkers had tried unsuccessfully to cut down or stop drinking. The main reason for such an attempt reported by 92 pc of them was health problems. More current drinkers presented with STD and work-related injuries compared to non-drinkers. None of the current drinkers were asked about their drinking habits by the health workers who attended to them at the clinic. No diagnosis of alcohol dependence or an alcohol problem was made by the Primary Health Care worker at the clinic.

  3. [New clinical and organizational approaches to preventing cardiovascular diseases in the primary health care system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boĭtsov, S A; Kalinina, A M; Ipatov, P V

    2013-01-01

    The paper deals with the justification and description of clinical and organizational approaches to preventing cardiovascular diseases (CVD) in the primary health care system (PHCS) under the present conditions of health care modernization in Russia. It formulates the basic directions of systematic measures in integration strategies for the prevention of noncommunicable diseases (mainly CVD) at a federal level, in which practical measures are presented to improve a system for the early detection of high-risk individuals and to carry out measures for risk factor correction in PHCS, i.e. to implement high-risk strategies, including clinical and organizational approaches to reconstituting the medical prevention infrastructure in PHCS. This is favored by the new normative documents adopted by the Ministry of Health of Russia on the follow-up and prophylactic medical examinations of the adult population. The paper substantiates the objective need for such examinations and characterizes the main clinical and organizational approaches promoted in medical examinations, which is aimed at introducing the current science-based and economically expedient methods in the real practice of PHCS for the early identifications of atherosclerosis-induced major CVDs and, what is particularly important, a risk for their development. Prophylactic counseling as a compulsory component is first being introduced in medical examination procedures. The key clinical and organizational principle of effective CVD prevention in public health is the implementation of the relationship and continuity of preventive measures, which becomes realistic with the adoption of new regulations of clinical examinations, prophylactic medical examinations, and follow-ups. The improvement of CVD prevention is associated not only with the introduction of organizational innovation changes, but also with the need to create a prevention ideology in physicians at all levels. It is emphasized that a comprehensive

  4. Heart failure diagnosis in primary health care: clinical characteristics of problematic patients. A clinical judgement analysis study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ullman Bengt

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early detection of chronic heart failure has become increasingly important since the introduction of effective treatment. However, clinical diagnosis of heart failure is known to be difficult, especially in mild cases or early in the course of the disease. The purpose of this study is to analyse how patient characteristics contribute to difficulties in diagnosing systolic heart failure. Methods Design: A Clinical Judgement Analysis study of 40 case vignettes based on authentic patients, including relevant clinical data except echocardiography. Setting: Primary health care and two cardiology outpatient clinics in Stockholm. Subjects: 70 participants with different types of clinical experience; 27 specialists in general practice, 22 cardiologists, and 21 medical students. Main outcome measures: The assessed probability of heart failure for each case vignette, and the disagreement between the participants. The number of clinical variables (cues indicative of heart failure in the case vignettes. Results The ten case vignettes with the least diverging assessments more often had increased relative cardiac volume and atrial fibrillation. No further specific clinical patterns could be found in subgroups of the case vignettes. The ten case vignettes with the most diverging assessments were those with an intermediate number of clinical variables. The case vignettes with the least diverging assessments more often represented patients with cardiac enlargement and atrial fibrillation. Conclusion Diagnosing mild heart failure is difficult, as these patients are not easy to characterise. In our study, a larger number of positive cues resulted in more diagnostic conformity among the participants, and the most important information was cardiac enlargement. The importance of more objective diagnostic methods in diagnosing suspected cases of heart failure should be emphasised.

  5. A 10-Year Cross-Sectional Analysis of Air Force Flight and Operational Medicine Clinic Health Care Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tvaryanas, Anthony P; Maupin, Genny M; Fouts, Brittany L

    2016-05-01

    This study described the patient population and the health care services delivered in the Air Force Flight and Operational Medicine Clinics (FOMCs) over the past 10 years. A cross-sectional analysis was performed on the retrospective cohort of patients who received care at a FOMC from 2003 to 2012. A total of 714,157 individuals, generating 4,829,626 encounters, were included in the cohort. They were predominately male service members under the age of 41. One-fifth of individuals were retirees and family members, with one-third being in the pediatric age range. The cohort accessed health care services for three primary reasons: health examinations (28%), occupational dispositions (18%), and primary care (54%). When primary care was sought, the predominate health conditions were upper respiratory infections, back problems, and nontraumatic joint disorders. When services and procedures were a component of the care, they were predominately associated with health examinations involving ophthalmologic, auditory, and cardiac screening tests. Individuals accessing the FOMCs had relatively low need for access to health care services, requiring a median of two annual encounters. This study provided insight into the health care delivered in FOMCs and establishes a foundation for future planning and management of FOMC health care delivery. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  6. Identifying clinical features in primary care electronic health record studies: methods for codelist development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Jessica; Nicholson, Brian D; Hamilton, Willie; Price, Sarah

    2017-11-22

    Analysis of routinely collected electronic health record (EHR) data from primary care is reliant on the creation of codelists to define clinical features of interest. To improve scientific rigour, transparency and replicability, we describe and demonstrate a standardised reproducible methodology for clinical codelist development. We describe a three-stage process for developing clinical codelists. First, the clear definition a priori of the clinical feature of interest using reliable clinical resources. Second, development of a list of potential codes using statistical software to comprehensively search all available codes. Third, a modified Delphi process to reach consensus between primary care practitioners on the most relevant codes, including the generation of an 'uncertainty' variable to allow sensitivity analysis. These methods are illustrated by developing a codelist for shortness of breath in a primary care EHR sample, including modifiable syntax for commonly used statistical software. The codelist was used to estimate the frequency of shortness of breath in a cohort of 28 216 patients aged over 18 years who received an incident diagnosis of lung cancer between 1 January 2000 and 30 November 2016 in the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD). Of 78 candidate codes, 29 were excluded as inappropriate. Complete agreement was reached for 44 (90%) of the remaining codes, with partial disagreement over 5 (10%). 13 091 episodes of shortness of breath were identified in the cohort of 28 216 patients. Sensitivity analysis demonstrates that codes with the greatest uncertainty tend to be rarely used in clinical practice. Although initially time consuming, using a rigorous and reproducible method for codelist generation 'future-proofs' findings and an auditable, modifiable syntax for codelist generation enables sharing and replication of EHR studies. Published codelists should be badged by quality and report the methods of codelist generation including

  7. Enabling health care decisionmaking through clinical decision support and knowledge management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobach, David; Sanders, Gillian D; Bright, Tiffani J; Wong, Anthony; Dhurjati, Ravi; Bristow, Erin; Bastian, Lori; Coeytaux, Remy; Samsa, Gregory; Hasselblad, Vic; Williams, John W; Wing, Liz; Musty, Michael; Kendrick, Amy S

    2012-04-01

    To catalogue study designs used to assess the clinical effectiveness of CDSSs and KMSs, to identify features that impact the success of CDSSs/KMSs, to document the impact of CDSSs/KMSs on outcomes, and to identify knowledge types that can be integrated into CDSSs/KMSs. MEDLINE(®), CINAHL(®), PsycINFO(®), and Web of Science(®). We included studies published in English from January 1976 through December 2010. After screening titles and abstracts, full-text versions of articles were reviewed by two independent reviewers. Included articles were abstracted to evidence tables by two reviewers. Meta-analyses were performed for seven domains in which sufficient studies with common outcomes were included. We identified 15,176 articles, from which 323 articles describing 311 unique studies including 160 reports on 148 randomized control trials (RCTs) were selected for inclusion. RCTs comprised 47.5 percent of the comparative studies on CDSSs/KMSs. Both commercially and locally developed CDSSs effectively improved health care process measures related to performing preventive services (n = 25; OR 1.42, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.27 to 1.58), ordering clinical studies (n = 20; OR 1.72, 95% CI 1.47 to 2.00), and prescribing therapies (n = 46; OR 1.57, 95% CI 1.35 to 1.82). Fourteen CDSS/KMS features were assessed for correlation with success of CDSSs/KMSs across all endpoints. Meta-analyses identified six new success features: Integration with charting or order entry system. Promotion of action rather than inaction. No need for additional clinician data entry. Justification of decision support via research evidence. Local user involvement. Provision of decision support results to patients as well as providers. Three previously identified success features were confirmed: Automatic provision of decision support as part of clinician workflow. Provision of decision support at time and location of decisionmaking. Provision of a recommendation, not just an assessment. Only 29

  8. Challenges in Achieving Collaboration in Clinical Practice: The Case of Norwegian Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sissel Steihaug

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This article summarizes and synthesizes the findings of four separate but inter-linked empirical projects which explored challenges of collaboration in the Norwegian health system from the perspectives of providers and patients. The results of the four projects are summarised in eight articles. Methods: The eight articles constituted our empirical material. Meta-ethnography was used as a method to integrate, translate, and synthesize the themes and concepts contained in the articles in order to understand how challenges related to collaboration impact on clinical work. Results: Providers’ collaboration across all contexts was hampered by organizational and individual factors, including, differences in professional power, knowledge bases, and professional culture. The lack of appropriate collaboration between providers impeded clinical work. Mental health service users experienced fragmented services leading to insecurity and frustration. The lack of collaboration resulted in inadequate rehabilitation services and lengthened the institutional stay for older patients. Conclusion: Focusing on the different perspectives and the inequality in power between patients and healthcare providers and between different providers might contribute to a better environment for achieving appropriate collaboration. Organizational systems need to be redesigned to better nurture collaborative relationships and information sharing and support integrated working between providers, health care professionals and patients.

  9. Evidence-Based Clinical Significance in Health Care: Toward an Inferential Analysis of Clinical Relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahsa Dousti

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Evidence-based dental practice requires the developmment and evaluation of protocols that en-sure translational effectiveness: that is, the efficient incorporation of the best available efficacy and effec-tiveness findings in specific clinical dentistry settings and environments. Evidence-based dentistry predi-cates the synthesis of research for obtaining the best available evidence in a validated, stringent, systematic and unbiased fashion. Research synthesis is now established as a science in its own right, precisely because it adheres to the scientific process that is driven by a research question and a hypothesis, follows through clearly defined methodology and design, yielding quantifiable data that are analyzed statistically, and from which stringent statistical inferences are drawn. The conclusions from the protocol of research synthesis define the best available evidence, which is used in the process of evidence-based revision of clinical practice guidelines. One important hurdle of the process of applying research synthesis in evidence-based dentistry lies in the fact that the statistical inferences produced by research must be translated into clinical relevance. Here, we present a model to circumvent this limitation by means of text analysis/mining protocols, which could lead the path toward a novel, valid and reliable ap-proach for the inferential analysis of clinical relevance.

  10. Clinical evolution and nutritional status in asthmatic children and adolescents enrolled in Primary Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, Rosinha Yoko Matsubayaci; Strufaldi, Maria Wany Louzada; Puccini, Rosana Fiorini

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical evolution and the association between nutritional status and severity of asthma in children and adolescents enrolled in Primary Health Care. Methods: A retrospective cohort study of 219 asthmatic patients (3-17 years old) enrolled in Primary Care Services (PCSs) in Embu das Artes (SP), from 2007 to 2011. Secondary data: gender, age, diagnosis of asthma severity, other atopic diseases, family history of atopy, and body mass index. To evaluate the clinical outcome of asthma, data were collected on number of asthma exacerbations, number of emergency room consultations and doses of inhaled corticosteroids at follow-up visits in the 6th and 12th months. The statistical analysis included chi-square and Kappa agreement index, with 5% set as the significance level. Results: 50.5% of patients started wheezing before the age of 2 years, 99.5% had allergic rhinitis and 65.2% had a positive family history of atopy. Regarding severity, intermittent asthma was more frequent (51.6%) and, in relation to nutritional status, 65.8% of patients had normal weight. There was no association between nutritional status and asthma severity (p=0.409). After 1 year of follow-up, 25.2% of patients showed reduction in exacerbations and emergency room consultations, and 16.2% reduced the amount of inhaled corticosteroids. Conclusions: The monitoring of asthmatic patients in Primary Care Services showed improvement in clinical outcome, with a decreased number of exacerbations, emergency room consultations and doses of inhaled corticosteroids. No association between nutritional status and asthma severity was observed in this study. PMID:26316387

  11. Clinical evolution and nutritional status in asthmatic children and adolescents enrolled in Primary Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosinha Yoko Matsubayaci Morishita

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the clinical evolution and the association between nutritional status and severity of asthma in children and adolescents enrolled in Primary Health Care. Methods: A retrospective cohort study of 219 asthmatic patients (3-17 years old enrolled in Primary Care Services (PCSs in Embu das Artes (SP, from 2007 to 2011. Secondary data: gender, age, diagnosis of asthma severity, other atopic diseases, family history of atopy, and body mass index. To evaluate the clinical outcome of asthma, data were collected on number of asthma exacerbations, number of emergency room consultations and doses of inhaled corticosteroids at follow-up visits in the 6th and 12th months. The statistical analysis included chi-square and Kappa agreement index, with 5% set as the significance level. Results: 50.5% of patients started wheezing before the age of 2 years, 99.5% had allergic rhinitis and 65.2% had a positive family history of atopy. Regarding severity, intermittent asthma was more frequent (51.6% and, in relation to nutritional status, 65.8% of patients had normal weight. There was no association between nutritional status and asthma severity (p=0.409. After 1 year of follow-up, 25.2% of patients showed reduction in exacerbations and emergency room consultations, and 16.2% reduced the amount of inhaled corticosteroids. Conclusions: The monitoring of asthmatic patients in Primary Care Services showed improvement in clinical outcome, with a decreased number of exacerbations, emergency room consultations and doses of inhaled corticosteroids. No association between nutritional status and asthma severity was observed in this study.

  12. An ontology-based personalization of health-care knowledge to support clinical decisions for chronically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaño, David; Real, Francis; López-Vallverdú, Joan Albert; Campana, Fabio; Ercolani, Sara; Mecocci, Patrizia; Annicchiarico, Roberta; Caltagirone, Carlo

    2012-06-01

    Chronically ill patients are complex health care cases that require the coordinated interaction of multiple professionals. A correct intervention of these sort of patients entails the accurate analysis of the conditions of each concrete patient and the adaptation of evidence-based standard intervention plans to these conditions. There are some other clinical circumstances such as wrong diagnoses, unobserved comorbidities, missing information, unobserved related diseases or prevention, whose detection depends on the capacities of deduction of the professionals involved. In this paper, we introduce an ontology for the care of chronically ill patients and implement two personalization processes and a decision support tool. The first personalization process adapts the contents of the ontology to the particularities observed in the health-care record of a given concrete patient, automatically providing a personalized ontology containing only the clinical information that is relevant for health-care professionals to manage that patient. The second personalization process uses the personalized ontology of a patient to automatically transform intervention plans describing health-care general treatments into individual intervention plans. For comorbid patients, this process concludes with the semi-automatic integration of several individual plans into a single personalized plan. Finally, the ontology is also used as the knowledge base of a decision support tool that helps health-care professionals to detect anomalous circumstances such as wrong diagnoses, unobserved comorbidities, missing information, unobserved related diseases, or preventive actions. Seven health-care centers participating in the K4CARE project, together with the group SAGESA and the Local Health System in the town of Pollenza have served as the validation platform for these two processes and tool. Health-care professionals participating in the evaluation agree about the average quality 84% (5.9/7.0) and

  13. Impact of educational intervention on knowledge, attitude and awareness of good clinical practice among health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Divya; Walia, Rani; Sharma, Poonam; Kaur, Harmanjeet; Agnihotri, Pallak

    2017-01-01

    Clinical trials play an important role in the generation of evidence-based data in health care practices. To ensure the credibility of data and the safety and well-being of the patients Good clinical practice (GCP) guidelines play an important role. At present, we have little knowledge about awareness of GCP guidelines among health care providers in India. To assess the level of awareness, and perception of the health care providers toward GCP and subsequent change in these after a dayer training session on GCP guidelines. A cross-sectional descriptive questionnaire-based study was conducted amongst health care providers, that is, doctors, dentists, nurses of a Tertiary Health Care and Teaching Institute. Participants were given descriptive questionnaire; they completed the questionnaire before and after undergoing a day training program in GCP guidelines. The impact of the effectiveness of educational intervention among healthcare professionals was evaluated by two-tailed Z-test. Out of 120 participants, 80 were medical doctors, 20 dental doctors, and 20 nurses. A dayse training program on GCP guidelines was found to increase positive attitudes toward various aspects of clinical trials. A day's training program on GCP guidelines may help to increase the knowledge as well as awareness about principles and techniques of clinical research, which will increase the credibility of clinical research in the country.

  14. Clinical drug development using dynamic biomarkers to enable personalized health care in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bihlet, Asger R; Karsdal, Morten A; Bay-Jensen, Anne-Christine

    2015-01-01

    already in the clinical development of new compounds could offer a solution. In this review, we discuss past successes and failures in drug development and biomarker research in COPD. We describe research in COPD phenotypes, and the required characteristics of a suitable biomarker for identifying patients...... at higher risk of progression. We review the role of extra-cellular matrix proteins found to be upregulated in COPD. Novel biomarkers of connective tissue remodeling which may provide added value for a personalized approach by detecting subgroups of patients with active disease suitable for pharmacological......Despite massive investments in development of novel treatments for heterogeneous diseases such as Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), the resources spent have only benefitted a fraction of the population treated. Personalized Health Care to guide selection of a suitable patient population...

  15. Health care engineering management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarzembski, W B

    1980-01-01

    Today, health care engineering management is merely a concept of dreamers, with most engineering decisions in health care being made by nonengineers. It is the purpose of this paper to present a rationale for an integrated hospital engineering group, and to acquaint the clinical engineer with some of the salient features of management concepts. Included are general management concepts, organization, personnel management, and hospital engineering systems.

  16. Diagnostic accuracy of clinical examination features for identifying large rotator cuff tears in primary health care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadogan, Angela; McNair, Peter; Laslett, Mark; Hing, Wayne; Taylor, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Rotator cuff tears are a common and disabling complaint. The early diagnosis of medium and large size rotator cuff tears can enhance the prognosis of the patient. The aim of this study was to identify clinical features with the strongest ability to accurately predict the presence of a medium, large or multitendon (MLM) rotator cuff tear in a primary care cohort. Methods: Participants were consecutively recruited from primary health care practices (n = 203). All participants underwent a standardized history and physical examination, followed by a standardized X-ray series and diagnostic ultrasound scan. Clinical features associated with the presence of a MLM rotator cuff tear were identified (Protator cuff tear and thereafter diagnostic accuracy was calculated. Results: A MLM rotator cuff tear was identified in 24 participants (11.8%). Constant pain and a painful arc in abduction were the strongest predictors of a MLM tear (adjusted odds ratio 3.04 and 13.97 respectively). Combinations of ten history and physical examination variables demonstrated highest levels of sensitivity when five or fewer were positive [100%, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.86–1.00; negative likelihood ratio: 0.00, 95% CI: 0.00–0.28], and highest specificity when eight or more were positive (0.91, 95% CI: 0.86–0.95; positive likelihood ratio 4.66, 95% CI: 2.34–8.74). Discussion: Combinations of patient history and physical examination findings were able to accurately detect the presence of a MLM rotator cuff tear. These findings may aid the primary care clinician in more efficient and accurate identification of rotator cuff tears that may require further investigation or orthopedic consultation. PMID:24421626

  17. Nosocomial infections: knowledge and source of information among clinical health care students in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bello AI

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Ajediran I Bello1, Eunice N Asiedu1, Babatunde OA Adegoke2, Jonathan NA Quartey1, Kwadwo O Appiah-Kubi1, Bertha Owusu-Ansah11Department of Physiotherapy, School of Allied Health Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of Ghana, Accra, Ghana; 2Department of Physiotherapy, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, NigeriaBackground: This study determined and compared the knowledge of nosocomial infections among clinical health care students at the College of Health Sciences, University of Ghana.Methods: Two hundred undergraduate health care students from four academic programs participated in the study. The study sample was drawn from each academic program by a simple random sampling technique using the class directory from each course. The Infection Control Standardized Questionnaire (ICSQ was used to assess the knowledge of students about three main domains, ie, hand hygiene, nosocomial infections, and standard precautions. A maximum score of 50 was obtainable, and respondents with scores ≥70% were classified as having a satisfactory knowledge. The response on each item was coded numerically to generate data for statistical analysis. Comparison of knowledge on the domains among categories of students was assessed using the Kruskal–Wallis test, while associations between courses of study and knowledge about nosocomial infections were determined using the Chi-square test. All statistical tests had a significant level of 5% (P < 0.05Results: Overall mean percentage score of the participants on ICSQ was 65.4 ± 2.58, with medical, physiotherapy, radiography, and nursing students recording mean percentage scores of 70.58 ± 0.62, 65.02 ± 2.00, 64.74 ± 1.19, and 61.31 ± 2.35, respectively. The main source of information about the prevention of nosocomial infections as cited by participants was their routine formal training in class. There was no significant association (P > 0.05 between course of study and knowledge of

  18. Benchmarking HIV health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Podlekareva, Daria; Reekie, Joanne; Mocroft, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: State-of-the-art care involving the utilisation of multiple health care interventions is the basis for an optimal long-term clinical prognosis for HIV-patients. We evaluated health care for HIV-patients based on four key indicators. METHODS: Four indicators of health care were...... assessed: Compliance with current guidelines on initiation of 1) combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), 2) chemoprophylaxis, 3) frequency of laboratory monitoring, and 4) virological response to cART (proportion of patients with HIV-RNA 90% of time on cART). RESULTS: 7097 Euro...... to North, patients from other regions had significantly lower odds of virological response; the difference was most pronounced for East and Argentina (adjusted OR 0.16[95%CI 0.11-0.23, p HIV health care utilization...

  19. [Clinical evolution and nutritional status in asthmatic children and adolescents enrolled in Primary Health Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, Rosinha Yoko Matsubayaci; Strufaldi, Maria Wany Louzada; Puccini, Rosana Fiorini

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the clinical evolution and the association between nutritional status and severity of asthma in children and adolescents enrolled in Primary Health Care. A retrospective cohort study of 219 asthmatic patients (3 to 17 years old) enrolled in primary care services (PCSs) in Embu das Artes (SP), from 2007 to 2011. Secondary data: gender, age, diagnosis of asthma severity, other atopic diseases, family history of atopy, and body mass index. To evaluate the clinical outcome of asthma, data were collected on number of asthma exacerbations, number of emergency room consultations and doses of inhaled corticosteroids at follow-up visits in the 6th and 12th months. The statistical analysis included chi-square and Kappa agreement index, with 5% set as the significance level. 50.5% of patients started wheezing before the age of two years, 99.5% had allergic rhinitis and 65.2% had a positive family history of atopy. Regarding severity, intermittent asthma was more frequent (51.6%) and, in relation to nutritional status, 65.8% of patients had normal weight. There was no association between nutritional status and asthma severity (p=0,409). After one year of follow-up, 25.2% of patients showed reduction in exacerbations and emergency room consultations, and 16.2% reduced the amount of inhaled corticosteroids. The monitoring of asthmatic patients in PCSs showed improvement in clinical outcome, with a decreased number of exacerbations, emergency room consultations and doses of inhaled corticosteroids. No association between nutritional status and asthma severity was observed in this study. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. Severity of Mental Health Impairment and Trajectories of Improvement in an Integrated Primary Care Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Craig J.; Corso, Meghan L.; Corso, Kent A.; Morrow, Chad E.; Kanzler, Kathryn E.; Ray-Sannerud, Bobbie

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To model typical trajectories for improvement among patients treated in an integrated primary care behavioral health service, multilevel models were used to explore the relationship between baseline mental health impairment level and eventual mental health functioning across follow-up appointments. Method: Data from 495 primary care…

  1. Do patients and health care professionals view the communication processes of clinical research differently? A Rasch analysis from a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-de Paz, Luis; Kostov, Belchin; Solans-Julian, Pilar; Navarro-Rubio, M Dolores; Sisó-Almirall, Antoni

    2015-10-01

    The increasing amount of the clinical research conducted in the primary health care has enabled extending research beyond traditional settings, but this transfer has implied some trade-offs. Health care professionals who conduct research with trusted patients require assuming the ethical standards of research and communication skills to enable patients' autonomy and freedom of choice. This study aims to measure the opinions of health professionals and patients on issues of communication in clinical research. A cross-sectional study with health care professionals and patients from primary health care centres in Barcelona (Spain). Each group completed a similar self-administered questionnaire. A Rasch model was fitted to data. After examination of goodness-of-fit, differences between groups were compared using analysis of variance, and patients' measures were calibrated to professionals' measures to compare overall mean measures. Professionals and patients found the ethical attitudes most difficult to endorse related to trust in clinical researchers and conflicts of interest. Patients' perceptions of professional ethical behaviour were significantly lower than professionals'. Different item functioning between nurses and family doctors was found in the item on seeking ethical collaboration when collaborating in clinical research. Effective knowledge of ethical norms was associated with greater perceived ethical values in clinical research and confidence in health care professionals among patients. Differences in the views of the communication process between patients and professionals could alert research boards, health care institutions and researchers to the need for greater transparency, trust and ethical instruction when patients are involved in clinical research. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Excess Clinical Comorbidity Among HIV-Infected Patients Accessing Primary Care in US Community Health Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Kenneth H; Loo, Stephanie; Crawford, Phillip M; Crane, Heidi M; Leo, Michael; DenOuden, Paul; Houlberg, Magda; Schmidt, Mark; Quach, Thu; Ruhs, Sebastian; Vandermeer, Meredith; Grasso, Chris; McBurnie, Mary Ann

    2017-01-01

    As the life expectancy of people infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has increased, the spectrum of illness has evolved. We evaluated whether people living with HIV accessing primary care in US community health centers had higher morbidity compared with HIV-uninfected patients receiving care at the same sites. We compared data from electronic health records for 12 837 HIV-infected and 227 012 HIV-uninfected patients to evaluate the relative prevalence of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, chronic kidney disease, dyslipidemia, and malignancies by HIV serostatus. We used multivariable logistic regression to evaluate differences. Participants were patients aged ≥18 who were followed for ≥3 years (from January 2006 to December 2016) in 1 of 17 community health centers belonging to the Community Health Applied Research Network. Nearly two-thirds of HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected patients lived in poverty. Compared with HIV-uninfected patients, HIV-infected patients were significantly more likely to be diagnosed and/or treated for diabetes (odds ratio [OR] = 1.18; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.22-1.41), hypertension (OR = 1.38; 95% CI, 1.31-1.46), dyslipidemia (OR = 2.30; 95% CI, 2.17-2.43), chronic kidney disease (OR = 4.75; 95% CI, 4.23-5.34), lymphomas (OR = 4.02; 95% CI, 2.86-5.67), cancers related to human papillomavirus (OR = 5.05; 95% CI, 3.77-6.78), or other cancers (OR = 1.25; 95% CI, 1.10-1.42). The prevalence of stroke was higher among HIV-infected patients (OR = 1.32; 95% CI, 1.06-1.63) than among HIV-uninfected patients, but the prevalence of myocardial infarction or coronary artery disease did not differ between the 2 groups. As HIV-infected patients live longer, the increasing burden of noncommunicable diseases may complicate their clinical management, requiring primary care providers to be trained in chronic disease management for this population.

  3. Medical students' evolving perspectives on their personal health care: clinical and educational implications of a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, L W; Warner, T D; Trumpower, D

    2000-01-01

    The mental and physical health care issues of medical students are increasingly recognized as both prevalent and complex. Emotional distress, symptoms of mental illness, and maladaptive substance use are widespread and may often be driven by training-related stressors. The data suggest that nearly all medical students identify physical health concerns as well. The care of medical students as patients is complex because of problems associated with the stigma of various illnesses and the dual role of trainee and patient in medical school. A written confidential survey assessed students longitudinally near the end of their first and third years of training regarding their perceived health care needs, health concerns, attitudes toward care, access to services, and care-seeking practices (161 items). A subset of students (n = 33) were reassessed 1 month after the second survey to measure reliability. McNemar's chi-square (chi2) tests, repeated-measures multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA), and K and Pearson correlations were used to evaluate outcomes. Almost all students reported health care needs during both training phases, and their mental and physical health concerns were stable over time. However, the preference for obtaining health care at a site other than their training institution and concerns about confidentiality increased, although students were marginally more likely to obtain care at their medical school during clinical versus preclinical training. The students' tendency to seek informal care from colleagues remained consistent, as did their high level of concern about professional jeopardy relating to personal health issues. Their tendency to accept the dual patient-student role depended on the particular health care issue; they expressed a strong tendency to protect other students' confidentiality, even in cases of potential significant impairment. Responses were reliable across a 1-month retest interval. We conclude that medical students

  4. Critical reflections on a visit to an inner-city primary health care clinic in Rio de Janeiro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Louis S; Goldraich, Marcos A

    2017-07-27

    Brazil and South Africa share many sociodemographic and health features that provide many learning opportunities. Brazil's national health system, the Sistema Único de Saúde (SUS) prioritises primary health care since 1994, the year democracy came to South Africa. Two family physicians from these countries met in Rocinha favela in Rio de Janeiro, a densely populated area where poverty, danger, drugs, tuberculosis and mental illness are the focus of the health system.Maria do Socorro Family Clinic: Central to the SUS are the Family Health Teams, consisting of community health workers, nurses, doctors and allied health workers. This clinic in Rocinha has 11 teams, caring for 2700 people each, all visited monthly, preventing illness and promoting health. Patients with mental illness are cared for in a therapeutic residency, with an onsite psychiatrist, psychologist and social worker. The relationships between the health carers and the clinic and the community are collegial and equal, sharing care. Larger than life photos of patients from the community line the walls.Training: A culture of learning is evident, with 18 family medicine residents, student nurses, a small library and a learning centre at the clinic. Local authorities compensate trainees in family medicine more than traditional specialties. Brazil has made massive progress in providing universal health coverage over the last 20 years. South Africa, with not too dissimilar challenges, is embarking on this road more recently. The lessons learnt at clinic and community level in this inner-city clinic could be very useful for similar settings in South Africa and other countries.

  5. Translating shared decision-making into health care clinical practices: Proof of concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    St-Jacques Sylvie

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is considerable interest today in shared decision-making (SDM, defined as a decision-making process jointly shared by patients and their health care provider. However, the data show that SDM has not been broadly adopted yet. Consequently, the main goal of this proposal is to bring together the resources and the expertise needed to develop an interdisciplinary and international research team on the implementation of SDM in clinical practice using a theory-based dyadic perspective. Methods Participants include researchers from Canada, US, UK, and Netherlands, representing medicine, nursing, psychology, community health and epidemiology. In order to develop a collaborative research network that takes advantage of the expertise of the team members, the following research activities are planned: 1 establish networking and on-going communication through internet-based forum, conference calls, and a bi-weekly e-bulletin; 2 hold a two-day workshop with two key experts (one in theoretical underpinnings of behavioral change, and a second in dyadic data analysis, and invite all investigators to present their views on the challenges related to the implementation of SDM in clinical practices; 3 conduct a secondary analyses of existing dyadic datasets to ensure that discussion among team members is grounded in empirical data; 4 build capacity with involvement of graduate students in the workshop and online forum; and 5 elaborate a position paper and an international multi-site study protocol. Discussion This study protocol aims to inform researchers, educators, and clinicians interested in improving their understanding of effective strategies to implement shared decision-making in clinical practice using a theory-based dyadic perspective.

  6. The Clinical Nutrition Research Agenda in Indonesia and beyond: ecological strategy for food in health care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukito, Widjaja; Wibowo, Lindawati; Wahlqvist, Mark L

    2017-06-01

    Despite progress with the food-associated health agenda in the public health and clinical domains, much remains to be done in Indonesia. There are reasons to be optimistic which include economic development, increasing literacy, progress towards universal health coverage and community organizational arrangements across the archipelago which focus on health through some 10,000 puskesmas. These community health centres are variably staffed with voluntary cadres from the community, bidans (nurses) and general medical practitioners. For more effective prevention and management of nutritionally-related health problems, innovative community and clinical nutrition research and expertise is required. With rapid urbanisation, the growth of the digital economy, increasing socio-economic inequity and climate change, there are imperatives for ecologically sustainable, nonemployment dependent livelihoods which provide energy, food, water, education and health care security. A relevant health care workforce will include those who research and practice clinical nutrition. Here we gather together an account of an extensive body of published and emerging literature which makes a case collectively for a more ecological approach to nutrition and health and how it might revitalise the Indonesian and other health care systems.

  7. The effect of electronic health records on the use of clinical care guidelines for patients with medically complex conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricton, James; Rindal, D Brad; Rush, William; Flottemesch, Thomas; Vazquez, Gabriela; Thoele, Merry Jo; Durand, Emily; Enstad, Chris; Rhodus, Nelson

    2011-10-01

    The emergence of health information technology provides an opportunity for health care providers to improve the quality and safety of dental care, particularly for patients with medically complex conditions. The authors randomized each of 15 dental clinics (HealthPartners, Bloomington, Minn.) to one of three groups to evaluate the impact of two clinical decision support (CDS) approaches during an 18-month study period. In the first approach--provider activation through electronic dental records (EDRs)--a flashing alert was generated at the dental visit to identify patients with medically complex conditions and to direct the dental care provider to Web-based personalized care guidelines. In the second approach--patient activation through personal health records--a secure e-mail was generated or a letter was mailed to patients before dental visits encouraging them to ask their dental care provider to review the care guidelines specific to their medical conditions. The authors evaluated the rate of reviewing care guidelines among 102 providers. Participants in the provider and patient activation groups increased their use of the system during the first six months, which had a generalized effect of increasing use of the guidelines for all patients, even if they were not part of the study (P electronic alerts. The study results demonstrated that review of clinical care guidelines for patients with medically complex conditions can be improved with CDS systems that involve the use of electronic health records. As the U.S. population ages, dentists must be vigilant in adapting care for patients with medically complex conditions to ensure therapeutic safety and effectiveness. Expanded use of CDS via EDRs can help dental care providers achieve this objective.

  8. A clinical algorithm for triaging patients with significant lymphadenopathy in primary health care settings in Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eltahir A.G. Khalil

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tuberculosis is a major health problem in developing countries. The distinction between tuberculous lymphadenitis, non-specific lymphadenitis and malignant lymph node enlargement has to be made at primary health care levels using easy, simple and cheap methods.Objective: To develop a reliable clinical algorithm for primary care settings to triage cases ofnon-specific, tuberculous and malignant lymphadenopathies.Methods: Calculation of the odd ratios (OR of the chosen predictor variables was carried out using logistic regression. The numerical score values of the predictor variables were weighed against their respective OR. The performance of the score was evaluated by the ROC (ReceiverOperator Characteristic curve.Results: Four predictor variables; Mantoux reading, erythrocytes sedimentation rate (ESR,nocturnal fever and discharging sinuses correlated significantly with TB diagnosis and were included in the reduced model to establish score A. For score B, the reduced model included Mantoux reading, ESR, lymph-node size and lymph-node number as predictor variables for malignant lymph nodes. Score A ranged 0 to 12 and a cut-off point of 6 gave a best sensitivity and specificity of 91% and 90% respectively, whilst score B ranged -3 to 8 and a cut-off point of3 gave a best sensitivity and specificity of 83% and 76% respectively. The calculated area underthe ROC curve was 0.964 (95% CI, 0.949 – 0.980 and -0.856 (95% CI, 0.787 ‑ 0.925 for scores Aand B respectively, indicating good performance.Conclusion: The developed algorithm can efficiently triage cases with tuberculous andmalignant lymphadenopathies for treatment or referral to specialised centres for furtherwork-up.

  9. Differences in clinical and epidemiological features between tuberculosis cases notified in primary and tertiary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pâmela Curbani

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare, on the basis of clinical, radiological and epidemiological aspects, all cases of tuberculosis (TB diagnosed in the tertiary healthcare services to those diagnosed at the primary healthcare providers in the municipality of Vitória-ES. Methods: Cross- sectional, retrospective study, with analysis of the SINAN’s database, to identify all cases among residents of the municipality of Vitória-ES and diagnosed with TB in 2006 and 2007. Patients were divided into two groups: cases diagnosed in Primary Health Care (PHC and those diagnosed in Tertiary Health Care (THC. For statistical analysis, it was used the software STATA CORP 9.0. Results: 338 patients were identified; 207 (61.24% of these were diagnosed in PHC and 131 (38.76% in THC. The pulmonary form was predominant in both groups. However, the extrapulmonary form presented higher frequency in the THC group. When analyzing the results of sputum smear, the positivity was found in 114 (55.07% patients of the PHC and in 57 (43.51% of THC. Regarding the positive cultures, 119 (57.48% patients diagnosed in PHC and only 38 (29% in THC tested positive. Conclusion: There is evidence of high proportion of patients with TB communicated as “new cases” in THC in the city and it was observed a predominance of the pulmonary form in both groups - PHC and THC, although the extrapulmonary form was more frequent in the latter. doi:10.5020/18061230.2013.p251

  10. Clinical Updates in Women's Health Care Summary: Gynecologic and Obstetric Care for Breast Cancer Survivors: Primary and Preventive Care Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jennifer Griffin

    2017-07-01

    Breast cancer treatment has an impact on the physical, psychologic, sexual, and reproductive aspects of women's lives. Therefore, it is important for obstetrician-gynecologists to be well versed in the screening, diagnosis, and management of breast cancer. This monograph is an overview of critical issues related to the provision of ongoing care to breast cancer survivors.

  11. Dental anxiety and the use of oral health services among people attending two HIV primary care clinics in Miami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Richard; Cardenas, Gabriel; Xavier, Jessica; Jeanty, Yves; Pereyra, Margaret; Rodriguez, Allan; Metsch, Lisa R

    2012-05-01

    We examined factors associated with dental anxiety among a sample of HIV primary care patients and investigated the independent association of dental anxiety with oral health care. Cross-sectional data were collected in 2010 from 444 patients attending two HIV primary care clinics in Miami-Dade County, Florida. Corah Dental Anxiety Scores and use of oral health-care services were obtained from all HIV-positive patients in the survey. The prevalence of moderate to severe dental anxiety in this sample was 37.8%, while 7.9% of the sample was characterized with severe dental anxiety. The adjusted odds of having severe dental anxiety were 3.962 times greater for females than for males (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.688, 9.130). After controlling for age, ethnicity, gender, education, access to dental care, and HIV primary clinic experience, participants with severe dental anxiety had 69.3% lower adjusted odds of using oral health-care services within the past 12 months (vs. longer than 12 months ago) compared with participants with less-than-severe dental anxiety (adjusted odds ratio = 0.307, 95% CI 0.127, 0.742). A sizable number of patients living with HIV have anxiety associated with obtaining needed dental care. Routine screening for dental anxiety and counseling to reduce dental anxiety are supported by this study as a means of addressing the impact of dental anxiety on the use of oral health services among HIV-positive individuals.

  12. Health care consumers’ perspectives on pharmacist integration into private general practitioner clinics in Malaysia: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saw PS

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Pui San Saw,1 Lisa M Nissen,2,3 Christopher Freeman,2,4 Pei Se Wong,3 Vivienne Mak5 1School of Postgraduate Studies and Research, International Medical University, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 2School of Clinical Sciences, Queensland University Technology, Brisbane, QLD, Australia; 3School of Pharmacy, International Medical University, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 4School of Pharmacy, University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD, Australia; 5School of Pharmacy, Monash University Malaysia, Selangor, Malaysia Background: Pharmacists are considered medication experts but are underutilized and exist mainly at the periphery of the Malaysian primary health care team. Private general practitioners (GPs in Malaysia are granted rights under the Poison Act 1952 to prescribe and dispense medications at their primary care clinics. As most consumers obtain their medications from their GPs, community pharmacists’ involvement in ensuring safe use of medicines is limited. The integration of a pharmacist into private GP clinics has the potential to contribute to quality use of medicines. This study aims to explore health care consumers’ views on the integration of pharmacists within private GP clinics in Malaysia.Methods: A purposive sample of health care consumers in Selangor and Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, were invited to participate in focus groups and semi-structured interviews. Sessions were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim and thematically analyzed using NVivo 10. Results: A total of 24 health care consumers participated in two focus groups and six semi-structured interviews. Four major themes were identified: 1 pharmacists’ role viewed mainly as supplying medications, 2 readiness to accept pharmacists in private GP clinics, 3 willingness to pay for pharmacy services, and 4 concerns about GPs’ resistance to pharmacist integration. Consumers felt that a pharmacist integrated into a private GP clinic could offer potential benefits such as to provide trustworthy

  13. HIT or miss: the application of health care information technology to managing uncertainty in clinical decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazandjian, Vahé A; Lipitz-Snyderman, Allison

    2011-12-01

    To discuss the usefulness of health care information technology (HIT) in assisting care providers minimize uncertainty while simultaneously increasing efficiency of the care provided. An ongoing study of HIT, performance measurement (clinical and production efficiency) and their implications to the payment for care represents the design of this study. Since 2006, all Maryland hospitals have embarked on a multi-faceted study of performance measures and HIT adoption surveys, which will shape the health care payment model in Maryland, the last of the all-payor states, in 2011. This paper focuses on the HIT component of the Maryland care payment initiative. While the payment model is still under review and discussion, 'appropriateness' of care has been discussed as an important dimension of measurement. Within this dimension, the 'uncertainty' concept has been identified as associated with variation in care practices. Hence, the methods of this paper define how HIT can assist care providers in addressing the concept of uncertainty, and then provides findings from the first HIT survey in Maryland to infer the readiness of Maryland hospital in addressing uncertainty of care in part through the use of HIT. Maryland hospitals show noteworthy variation in their adoption and use of HIT. While computerized, electronic patient records are not commonly used among and across Maryland hospitals, many of the uses of HIT internally in each hospital could significantly assist in better communication about better practices to minimize uncertainty of care and enhance the efficiency of its production. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Out-of-Sync Cancer Care: Health Insurance Companies, Biomedical Practices, and Clinical Time in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Camilo

    2017-04-01

    I discuss the physical wearing out of low-income cancer patients in the aftermath of the neoliberal restructuring of the Colombian health care system in 1993. The settings for this struggle are the hospitals and the health insurance companies; the actors are bodies with cancer, the physicians who diagnose people with cancer, and the relatives who care for them. I show how most low-income patients, instead of accessing complete anticancer treatments in a timely fashion, have to negotiate and confront health insurance companies and profit-making. This results in a wait, where the time needs of the bureaucracy of the health care system and the time needs of patients' bodies are discordant, at a cost to patients.

  15. A Framework to Support the Sharing and Reuse of Computable Phenotype Definitions Across Health Care Delivery and Clinical Research Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richesson, Rachel L; Smerek, Michelle M; Blake Cameron, C

    2016-01-01

    The ability to reproducibly identify clinically equivalent patient populations is critical to the vision of learning health care systems that implement and evaluate evidence-based treatments. The use of common or semantically equivalent phenotype definitions across research and health care use cases will support this aim. Currently, there is no single consolidated repository for computable phenotype definitions, making it difficult to find all definitions that already exist, and also hindering the sharing of definitions between user groups. Drawing from our experience in an academic medical center that supports a number of multisite research projects and quality improvement studies, we articulate a framework that will support the sharing of phenotype definitions across research and health care use cases, and highlight gaps and areas that need attention and collaborative solutions. An infrastructure for re-using computable phenotype definitions and sharing experience across health care delivery and clinical research applications includes: access to a collection of existing phenotype definitions, information to evaluate their appropriateness for particular applications, a knowledge base of implementation guidance, supporting tools that are user-friendly and intuitive, and a willingness to use them. We encourage prospective researchers and health administrators to re-use existing EHR-based condition definitions where appropriate and share their results with others to support a national culture of learning health care. There are a number of federally funded resources to support these activities, and research sponsors should encourage their use.

  16. The contribution of traditional healers' clinics to public health care system in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birhan Wubet

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ethiopian people have been using traditional medicine since time immemorial with 80% of its population dependent on traditional medicines. However, the documentation of traditional healers' clinics contribution to modern public health system in cosmopolitan cities is scanty. Studies conducted so far are limited and focused on the perceptions and practices of modern and traditional health practitioners about traditional medicine. Thus, a cross sectional study was conducted from February to May 2010 to assess the contribution of traditional healers' clinics to public health care system in Addis Ababa. Materials and methods Ten traditional healers who were willing to participate in the study and 306 patients who were visiting these traditional healers' clinics were interviewed using two types of semi-structured questionnaires. Data were summarized using percentages, tables and bar chart. Results The diseases mostly treated by traditional healers were wound, inflammation, herpes zoster, hemorrhoids, fracture, paralysis, back-pain, liver diseases, cancer and eczema. This study showed that traditional healers' clinics considerably contribute to public health care in Addis Ababa. Fifty two percent of patients reported that traditional healers' clinics were their first choice when they faced health problems. The reasons for visiting these clinics were 175 (57.2% efficacy, 109 (35.6% dissatisfaction with modern medicine, 10 (3.3% dissatisfaction with modern medicine and efficacy, 6 (2.0% cost and 6 (2.0% dissatisfaction and cost. Females (55.2%, young age (20-40 years, 65.0%, never married (56.9%, orthodox (73.9%, Amhara (52.3%, educational status above grade 12 (34.6% and government employees (29.4% were frequent visitors. Healers reported that there was no form of cooperation with modern health professionals. The reasons were lack of motivation to collaborate and communicate with modern health service workers. Family based

  17. Educating residents in behavioral health care and collaboration: integrated clinical training of pediatric residents and psychology fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisani, Anthony R; leRoux, Pieter; Siegel, David M

    2011-02-01

    Pediatric residency practices face the challenge of providing both behavioral health (BH) training for pediatricians and psychosocial care for children. The University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry and Rochester General Hospital developed a joint training program and continuity clinic infrastructure in which pediatric residents and postdoctoral psychology fellows train and practice together. The integrated program provides children access to BH care in a primary care setting and gives trainees the opportunity to integrate collaborative BH care into their regular practice routines. During 1998-2008, 48 pediatric residents and 8 psychology fellows trained in this integrated clinical environment. The program's accomplishments include longevity, faculty and fiscal stability, sustained support from pediatric leadership and community payers, the development in residents and faculty of greater comfort in addressing BH problems and collaborating with BH specialists, and replication of the model in two other primary care settings. In addition to quantitative program outcomes data, the authors present a case example that illustrates how the integrated program works and achieves its goals. They propose that educating residents and psychology trainees side by side in collaborative BH care is clinically and educationally valuable and potentially applicable to other settings. A companion report published in this issue provides results from a study comparing the perceptions of pediatric residents whose primary care continuity clinic took place in this integrated setting with those of residents from the same pediatric residency who had their continuity clinic training in a nonintegrated setting.

  18. Clinical Practice Models for the Use of E-Mental Health Resources in Primary Health Care by Health Professionals and Peer Workers: A Conceptual Framework

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    Griffiths, Kathleen M; Cunningham, John A; Bennett, Kylie; Bennett, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Background Research into e-mental health technologies has developed rapidly in the last 15 years. Applications such as Internet-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy interventions have accumulated considerable evidence of efficacy and some evidence of effectiveness. These programs have achieved similar outcomes to face-to-face therapy, while requiring much less clinician time. There is now burgeoning interest in integrating e-mental health resources with the broader mental health delivery system, particularly in primary care. The Australian government has supported the development and deployment of e-mental health resources, including websites that provide information, peer-to-peer support, automated self-help, and guided interventions. An ambitious national project has been commissioned to promote key resources to clinicians, to provide training in their use, and to evaluate the impact of promotion and training upon clinical practice. Previous initiatives have trained clinicians to use a single e-mental health program or a suite of related programs. In contrast, the current initiative will support community-based service providers to access a diverse array of resources developed and provided by many different groups. Objective The objective of this paper was to develop a conceptual framework to support the use of e-mental health resources in routine primary health care. In particular, models of clinical practice are required to guide the use of the resources by diverse service providers and to inform professional training, promotional, and evaluation activities. Methods Information about service providers’ use of e-mental health resources was synthesized from a nonsystematic overview of published literature and the authors’ experience of training primary care service providers. Results Five emerging clinical practice models are proposed: (1) promotion; (2) case management; (3) coaching; (4) symptom-focused treatment; and (5) comprehensive therapy. We also

  19. Can clinical use of Social Media improve quality of care in mental Health? A Health Technology Assessment approach in an Italian mental health service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Napoli, Wilma Angela; Nollo, Giandomenico; Pace, Nicola; Torri, Emanuele

    2015-09-01

    Clinical use of modern Information and Communication Technologies such as Social Media (SM) can easily reach and empower groups of population at risk or affected by chronic diseases, and promote improvement of quality of care. In the paper we present an assessment of SM (i.e. e-mails, websites, on line social networks, apps) in the management of mental disorders, carried out in the Mental Health Service of Trento (Italy) according to Health Technology Assessment criteria. A systematic review of literature was performed to evaluate technical features, safety and effectiveness of SM. To understand usage rate and attitude towards new social technologies of patients and professionals, we performed a context analysis by a survey conducted over a group of 88 psychiatric patients and a group of 35 professionals. At last, we made recommendations for decision makers in order to promote SM for the management of mental disorders in a context of prioritization of investments in health care.

  20. Educating for the 21st-Century Health Care System: An Interdependent Framework of Basic, Clinical, and Systems Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalo, Jed D; Haidet, Paul; Papp, Klara K; Wolpaw, Daniel R; Moser, Eileen; Wittenstein, Robin D; Wolpaw, Terry

    2017-01-01

    In the face of a fragmented and poorly performing health care delivery system, medical education in the United States is poised for disruption. Despite broad-based recommendations to better align physician training with societal needs, adaptive change has been slow. Traditionally, medical education has focused on the basic and clinical sciences, largely removed from the newer systems sciences such as population health, policy, financing, health care delivery, and teamwork. In this article, authors examine the current state of medical education with respect to systems sciences and propose a new framework for educating physicians in adapting to and practicing in systems-based environments. Specifically, the authors propose an educational shift from a two-pillar framework to a three-pillar framework where basic, clinical, and systems sciences are interdependent. In this new three-pillar framework, students not only learn the interconnectivity in the basic, clinical, and systems sciences but also uncover relevance and meaning in their education through authentic, value-added, and patient-centered roles as navigators within the health care system. Authors describe the Systems Navigation Curriculum, currently implemented for all students at the Penn State College of Medicine, as an example of this three-pillar educational model. Simple adjustments, such as including occasional systems topics in medical curriculum, will not foster graduates prepared to practice in the 21st-century health care system. Adequate preparation requires an explicit focus on the systems sciences as a vital and equal component of physician education.

  1. Activation, self-management, engagement, and retention in behavioral health care: a randomized clinical trial of the DECIDE intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegría, Margarita; Carson, Nicholas; Flores, Michael; Li, Xinliang; Shi, Ping; Lessios, Anna Sophia; Polo, Antonio; Allen, Michele; Fierro, Mary; Interian, Alejandro; Jimenez, Aida; La Roche, Martin; Lee, Catherine; Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Livas-Stein, Gabriela; Safar, Laura; Schuman, Catherine; Storey, Joan; Shrout, Patrick E

    2014-05-01

    Given minority patients' unequal access to quality care, patient activation and self-management strategies have been suggested as a promising approach to improving mental health care. To determine whether the DECIDE (Decide the problem; Explore the questions; Closed or open-ended questions; Identify the who, why, or how of the problem; Direct questions to your health care professional; Enjoy a shared solution) intervention, an educational strategy that teaches patients to ask questions and make collaborative decisions with their health care professional, improves patient activation and self-management, as well as engagement and retention in behavioral health care. In this multisite randomized clinical trial performed from February 1, 2009, through October 9, 2011 (date of last follow-up interview), we recruited 647 English- or Spanish-speaking patients 18 to 70 years old from 13 outpatient community mental health clinics across 5 states and 1 US territory. A total of 722 patients were included in analyses of secondary outcomes. Three DECIDE training sessions delivered by a care manager vs giving patients a brochure on management of behavioral health. Primary outcomes were patient assessment of activation (Patient Activation Scale) and self-management (Perceived Efficacy in Patient-Physician Interactions). Secondary outcomes included patient engagement (proportion of visits attended of those scheduled) and retention (attending at least 4 visits in the 6 months after the baseline research assessment), collected through medical record review or electronic records. Patients assigned to DECIDE reported significant increases in activation (mean β = 1.74, SD = 0.58; P = .003) and self-management (mean β = 2.42, SD = 0.90; P = .008) relative to control patients, but there was no evidence of an effect on engagement or retention in care. The DECIDE intervention appears to help patients learn to effectively ask questions and participate in decisions

  2. Clinical undergraduate training and assessment in primary health care: Experiences gained from Crete, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fioretos Michael

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary Health Care (PHC is increasingly being introduced into undergraduate medical education. In Greece, the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Crete was the first to introduce a 4-week long training in primary health care. This paper presents the experiences gained from the initial implementation of the teaching of practice-based primary care in rural Crete and reports on the assessment scale that was developed. Methods 284 students' case write-ups from the 6 primary care units (PCUs where they were allocated for the period 1990 to 1994 were analysed. The demographic data of the students and patients and the number of home visits were studied. Content analysis of the students' write-ups was carried out, using an assessment scale consisting of 10 dichotomous variables, in order to quantify eight (8 primary qualitative criteria. Results Internal reliability was estimated by the index KR20 = 0.67. Face and content validity was found to conform to the standards set for the course, while logistic linear regression analysis showed that the quality criteria could be used as an assessment scale. The number of home visits carried out varied between the various different PCUs (p Conclusion The primary health care course achieved the objectives of introducing students to comprehensive, community oriented care, although there was variation between the PCUs. The assessment scale that was developed to analyse the case-write ups of the students provided data that can be used to evaluate the course.

  3. What elements of the work environment are most responsible for health worker dissatisfaction in rural primary care clinics in Tanzania?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbaruku, Godfrey M; Larson, Elysia; Kimweri, Angela; Kruk, Margaret E

    2014-08-03

    In countries with high maternal and newborn morbidity and mortality, reliable access to quality healthcare in rural areas is essential to save lives. Health workers who are satisfied with their jobs are more likely to remain in rural posts. Understanding what factors influence health workers' satisfaction can help determine where resources should be focused. Although there is a growing body of research assessing health worker satisfaction in hospitals, less is known about health worker satisfaction in rural, primary health clinics. This study explores the workplace satisfaction of health workers in primary health clinics in rural Tanzania. Overall, 70 health workers in rural Tanzania participated in a self-administered job satisfaction survey. We calculated mean ratings for 17 aspects of the work environment. We used principal components analysis (PCA) to identify groupings of these variables. We then examined the bivariate associations between health workers demographics and clinic characteristics and each of the satisfaction scales. Results showed that 73.9% of health workers strongly agreed that they were satisfied with their job; however, only 11.6% strongly agreed that they were satisfied with their level of pay and 2.9% with the availability of equipment and supplies. Two categories of factors emerged from the PCA: the tools and infrastructure to provide care, and supportive interpersonal environment. Nurses and medical attendants (compared to clinical officers) and older health workers had higher satisfaction scale ratings. Two dimensions of health workers' work environment, namely infrastructure and supportive interpersonal work environment, explained much of the variation in satisfaction among rural Tanzanian health workers in primary health clinics. Health workers were generally more satisfied with supportive interpersonal relationships than with the infrastructure. Human resource policies should consider how to improve these two aspects of work as a

  4. The impact of spiritual care on the general health of cancer patients in palliative care clinic of Sayed-o Shohada Hospital in the city of Isfahan, 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heydar Ali Abedi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In order for patients to relief cancer treatments effects and also to make an adaptation to medical problems, cancer seeks for some intervening things. The spiritual care is among these things. Due to the special condition and chronic disease of cancer patients, spiritual care is of a great importance. This study aims at finding the influence of spiritual care on general health of patients suffering from cancer in palliative care clinic of Sayed-o Shohada hospital. this study is a semi empirical study conducted in 2 phases with 2 groups in pretest and posttest design.60 cancer patients of Imam Reza clinic and the palliative medical center in there, in a statistical method in two intervening and control groups, were examined in this study for 3 months. The general health questionnaire filled before and after spiritual care for each group. All the obtained data of this study were coded and analyzed with SPSS18 software in descriptive and inferential statistical methods (qui square, paired t test and independent t test. The mean of pretest scores for general health of the intervening and control groups has got no meaningful statistical difference.(p=0.685 But mean for general health scores in intervening group has got a meaningful and considerable difference before and after spiritual cares.(p=0.001. Findings of this study shows that spiritual care of cancer patients decreases the physical sign problems, anxiety, sleep disorders, depression and disorders in their social functions. Also the research results have demonstrated that spiritual care increases the health rate of these patients. So nurses can exploit spiritual care in order for increasing the health rate of patients.

  5. Initiation of antiretroviral therapy at rural primary health care clinics in KwaZulu Natal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilda Ganesen-Moothusamy

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available South Africa bears the greatest burden of HIV infection globally with the most infected people living in KwaZulu-Natal (KZN. Decentralised medical care for HIV positive patients and antiretroviral therapy (ART delivery to primary health care facilities were proposed nationally to achieve adequate ART coverage for patients in need of treatment. This study described the HIV positive patients who accessed medical care and were initiated on ART at two existing government Primary Health Care (PHC clinics with no added donor support, in Ilembe, KZN. This was an observational descriptive study of ART initiation from 01 April 2008 to 30 April 2009. Data were collected from clinical records kept on site. HIV Testing and the pre-ART programmes which consisted of medical care prior to ART initiation are briefly described. Socio-economic, demographic and clinical characteristics of patients who were initiated on ART were sampled and described. A minority (2.95% of the study population tested for HIV of which 36.0% tested positive. Majority (60.0% of patients who joined the pre-ART programme care did not return. The ART sample consisted of 375 patients of whom 65.0% were women, 85.9% were unmarried, 61.6% were unemployed and 50.4% had a secondary level of education. Tuberculosis (TB prevalence and incidence at ART initiation were 22.1% and 14.7% respectively. The prevalence of Syphilis and Hepatitis B co-infections were 13.1% and 8.6 % respectively. Two thirds of female patients (66.4% received a Pap smear result of which the majority (62.3% were abnormal. Uptake for HIV testing followed by relevant CD4 testing was poor. High TB, Hepatitis B and Syphilis co-infection was noted amongst patients initiated on ART. Cervical cancer screening must be intensified. Although ART initiation with no added external resources was successful, record keeping was suboptimal. Suid-Afrika dra die grootste las van MIV-infeksie ter wêreld met die meeste besmette mense in Kwa

  6. Opportunities for multidisciplinary ASH clinical hypertension specialists in an era of population health and accountable care: ASH leadership message.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Brent M

    2014-07-01

    The ASH hypertension specialists and ASH clinical and comprehensive hypertension centers represent a continuum of expertise and capacity positioned to play a major role in advancing the Triple Aim, which includes improving the patient care experience, population health, and value in cardiovascular health promotion and disease prevention. The ASH hypertension specialists board is dedicated to testing and designating a broad range of qualified health care professionals as clinical hypertension specialists. A continuing partnership with ASH, recognizing the need for an appropriate firewall between education and testing, is essential in providing the education and training programs required to grow and sustain the specialized workforce required to translate current evidence and future advances in personalized medicine into better care for individuals, better health for populations, and better value for payers. Moreover, growth of the ASH hypertension registry has the potential to accelerate advances in education and patient care as noted previously. The ASH hypertension specialists board is excited about the opportunities available to a well-trained and collaborative multidisciplinary group of clinical hypertension specialists in an era of ACOs pursuing the Triple Aim.

  7. Translating shared decision-making into health care clinical practices: Proof of concepts.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Legare, F.; Elwyn, G.; Fishbein, M.; Fremont, P.; Frosch, D.; Gagnon, M.P.; Kenny, D.A.; Labrecque, M.; Stacey, D.; St-Jacques, S.; Weijden, T.T. van der

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: There is considerable interest today in shared decision-making (SDM), defined as a decision-making process jointly shared by patients and their health care provider. However, the data show that SDM has not been broadly adopted yet. Consequently, the main goal of this proposal

  8. Improving the Implementation of Evidence-Based Clinical Practices in Adolescent Reproductive Health Care Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Lisa M; Middleton, Dawn; Mueller, Trisha; Avellino, Lia; Hallum-Montes, Rachel

    2015-11-01

    The purposes of the study were to describe baseline data in the implementation of evidence-based clinical practices among health center partners as part of a community-wide teen pregnancy prevention initiative and to identify opportunities for health center improvement. Health center partner baseline data were collected in the first year (2011) and before program implementation of a 5-year community-wide teen pregnancy prevention initiative. A needs assessment on health center capacity and implementation of evidence-based clinical practices was administered with 51 health centers partners in 10 communities in the United States with high rates of teen pregnancy. Health centers reported inconsistent implementation of evidence-based clinical practices in providing reproductive health services to adolescents. Approximately 94.1% offered same-day appointments, 91.1% had infrastructure to reduce cost barriers, 90.2% offered after-school appointments, and 80.4% prescribed hormonal contraception without prerequisite examinations or testing. Approximately three quarters provided visual and audio privacy in examination rooms (76.5%) and counseling areas (74.5%). Fewer offered a wide range of contraceptive methods (67.8%) and took a sexual health history at every visit (54.9%). Only 45.1% reported Quick Start initiation of hormonal contraception, emergency contraception (43.1%), or intrauterine devices (12.5%) were "always" available to adolescents. The assessment highlighted opportunities for health center improvement. Strategies to build capacity of health center partners to implement evidence-based clinical practices may lead to accessibility and quality of reproductive health services for adolescents in the funded communities. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Health care technology assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Clifford

    1994-12-01

    The role of technology in the cost of health care is a primary issue in current debates concerning national health care reform. The broad scope of studies for understanding technological impacts is known as technology assessment. Technology policy makers can improve their decision making by becoming more aware, and taking greater advantage, of key trends in health care technology assessment (HCTA). HCTA is the systematic evaluation of the properties, impacts, and other attributes of health care technologies, including: technical performance; clinical safety and efficacy/effectiveness; cost-effectiveness and other economic attributes; appropriate circumstances/indications for use; and social, legal, ethical, and political impacts. The main purpose of HCTA is to inform technology-related policy making in health care. Among the important trends in HCTA are: (1) proliferation of HCTA groups in the public and private sectors; (2) higher standards for scientific evidence concerning technologies; (3) methodological development in cost analyses, health-related quality of life measurement, and consolidation of available scientific evidence (e.g., meta-analysis); (4) emphasis on improved data on how well technologies work in routine practice and for traditionally under-represented patient groups; (5) development of priority-setting methods; (6) greater reliance on medical informatics to support and disseminate HCTA findings.

  10. The value of structured data elements from electronic health records for identifying subjects for primary care clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ateya, Mohammad B; Delaney, Brendan C; Speedie, Stuart M

    2016-01-11

    An increasing number of clinical trials are conducted in primary care settings. Making better use of existing data in the electronic health records to identify eligible subjects can improve efficiency of such studies. Our study aims to quantify the proportion of eligibility criteria that can be addressed with data in electronic health records and to compare the content of eligibility criteria in primary care with previous work. Eligibility criteria were extracted from primary care studies downloaded from the UK Clinical Research Network Study Portfolio. Criteria were broken into elemental statements. Two expert independent raters classified each statement based on whether or not structured data items in the electronic health record can be used to determine if the statement was true for a specific patient. Disagreements in classification were discussed until 100 % agreement was reached. Statements were also classified based on content and the percentages of each category were compared to two similar studies reported in the literature. Eligibility criteria were retrieved from 228 studies and decomposed into 2619 criteria elemental statements. 74 % of the criteria elemental statements were considered likely associated with structured data in an electronic health record. 79 % of the studies had at least 60 % of their criteria statements addressable with structured data likely to be present in an electronic health record. Based on clinical content, most frequent categories were: "disease, symptom, and sign", "therapy or surgery", and "medication" (36 %, 13 %, and 10 % of total criteria statements respectively). We also identified new criteria categories related to provider and caregiver attributes (2.6 % and 1 % of total criteria statements respectively). Electronic health records readily contain much of the data needed to assess patients' eligibility for clinical trials enrollment. Eligibility criteria content categories identified by our study can be

  11. Building a global health education network for clinical care and research. The benefits and challenges of distance learning tools. Lessons learned from the Hopkins Center for Clinical Global Health Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollinger, Robert C; McKenzie-White, Jane; Gupta, Amita

    2011-06-01

    Expanding the capacity for clinical care and health research is a global priority and a global challenge. The Johns Hopkins Center for Clinical Global Health Education (CCGHE) was established in 2005 to provide access to high-quality training to health care providers in resource-limited settings. The CCGHE made a strategic decision to develop, use, and evaluate distance learning platforms to achieve its mission. In the initial years of this new program, several lessons have been learned that may be helpful to other programs considering the use of distance learning programs to expand global health clinical and research capacity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Examining chronic care patient preferences for involvement in health-care decision making: the case of Parkinson's disease patients in a patient-centred clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zizzo, Natalie; Bell, Emily; Lafontaine, Anne-Louise; Racine, Eric

    2017-08-01

    Patient-centred care is a recommended model of care for Parkinson's disease (PD). It aims to provide care that is respectful and responsive to patient preferences, values and perspectives. Provision of patient-centred care should entail considering how patients want to be involved in their care. To understand the participation preferences of patients with PD from a patient-centred care clinic in health-care decision-making processes. Mixed-methods study with early-stage Parkinson's disease patients from a patient-centred care clinic. Study involved a modified Autonomy Preference Index survey (N=65) and qualitative, semi-structured in-depth interviews, analysed using thematic qualitative content analysis (N=20, purposefully selected from survey participants). Interviews examined (i) the patient preferences for involvement in health-care decision making; (ii) patient perspectives on the patient-physician relationship; and (iii) patient preferences for communication of information relevant to decision making. Preferences for participation in decision making varied between individuals and also within individuals depending on decision type, relational and contextual factors. Patients had high preferences for communication of information, but with acknowledged limits. The importance of communication in the patient-physician relationship was emphasized. Patient preferences for involvement in decision making are dynamic and support shared decision making. Relational autonomy corresponds to how patients envision their participation in decision making. Clinicians may need to assess patient preferences on an on-going basis. Our results highlight the complexities of decision-making processes. Improved understanding of individual preferences could enhance respect for persons and make for patient-centred care that is truly respectful of individual patients' wants, needs and values. © 2016 The Authors. Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Guidance for the Clinical Management of Thirdhand Smoke Exposure in the Child Health Care Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drehmer, Jeremy E; Walters, Bethany Hipple; Nabi-Burza, Emara; Winickoff, Jonathan P

    2017-12-01

    To explain the concept of thirdhand smoke and how it can be used to protect the health of children and improve delivery of tobacco control interventions for parents in the child health care setting. Review of the literature and descriptive report. The thirdhand smoke concept has been used in the CEASE intervention to improve the delivery of tobacco control counseling and services to parents. Materials and techniques have been developed for the child health care setting that use the concept of thirdhand smoke. Scientific findings demonstrate that thirdhand smoke exposure is harmful and establishes the need for clinicians to communicate the cessation imperative: the only way to protect non-smoking household members from thirdhand smoke is for all household smokers to quit smoking completely. As the scientific knowledge of thirdhand smoke increases, advocates will likely rely on it to encourage completely smoke-free places. Recent scientific studies on thirdhand smoke are impelling further research on the topic, spurring the creation of tobacco control policies to protect people from thirdhand smoke and stimulating improvements to the delivery of tobacco control counseling and services to parents in child health care settings.

  14. Sustained improvement in clinical preventive service delivery among independent primary care practices after implementing electronic health record systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jason J; Sebek, Kimberly M; McCullough, Colleen M; Amirfar, Sam J; Parsons, Amanda S; Singer, Jesse; Shih, Sarah C

    2013-08-01

    Studies showing sustained improvements in the delivery of clinical preventive services are limited. Fewer studies demonstrate sustained improvements among independent practices that are not affiliated with hospitals or integrated health systems. This study examines the continued improvement in clinical quality measures for a group of independent primary care practices using electronic health records (EHRs) and receiving technical support from a local public health agency. We analyzed clinical quality measure performance data from a cohort of primary care practices that implemented an EHR at least 3 months before October 2009, the study baseline. We assessed trends for 4 key quality measures: antithrombotic therapy, blood pressure control, smoking cessation intervention, and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) testing based on monthly summary data transmitted by the practices. Of the 151 practices, 140 were small practices and 11 were community health centers; average time using an EHR was 13.7 months at baseline. From October 2009 through October 2011, average rates increased for antithrombotic therapy (from 58.4% to 74.8%), blood pressure control (from 55.3% to 64.1%), HbA1c testing (from 46.4% to 57.7%), and smoking cessation intervention (from 29.3% to 46.2%). All improvements were significant. During 2 years, practices showed significant improvement in the delivery of several key clinical preventive services after implementing EHRs and receiving support services from a public health agency.

  15. Costs of medically assisted reproduction treatment at specialized fertility clinics in the Danish public health care system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Terkel; Erb, Karin; Rizvanovic, Amra

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To examine the costs to the public health care system of couples in medically assisted reproduction. Design. Longitudinal cohort study of infertile couples initiating medically assisted reproduction treatment. Setting. Specialized public fertility clinics in Denmark. Sample. Seven...... hundred and thirty-nine couples having no child at study entry and with data on kind of treatment and live birth (yes/no) for each treatment attempt at the specialized public fertility clinic. Methods. Treatment data for medically assisted reproduction attempts conducted at the public fertility clinics...... or not – were estimated at 6607€. Costs per live birth of women assisted reproduction treatment are relatively modest. The results can be generalized...

  16. Dental Anxiety and the Use of Oral Health Services Among People Attending Two HIV Primary Care Clinics in Miami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Richard; Cardenas, Gabriel; Xavier, Jessica; Jeanty, Yves; Pereyra, Margaret; Rodriguez, Allan; Metsch, Lisa R.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives We examined factors associated with dental anxiety among a sample of HIV primary care patients and investigated the independent association of dental anxiety with oral health care. Methods Cross-sectional data were collected in 2010 from 444 patients attending two HIV primary care clinics in Miami-Dade County, Florida. Corah Dental Anxiety Scores and use of oral health-care services were obtained from all HIV-positive patients in the survey. Results The prevalence of moderate to severe dental anxiety in this sample was 37.8%, while 7.9% of the sample was characterized with severe dental anxiety. The adjusted odds of having severe dental anxiety were 3.962 times greater for females than for males (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.688, 9.130). After controlling for age, ethnicity, gender, education, access to dental care, and HIV primary clinic experience, participants with severe dental anxiety had 69.3% lower adjusted odds of using oral health-care services within the past 12 months (vs. longer than 12 months ago) compared with participants with less-than-severe dental anxiety (adjusted odds ratio = 0.307, 95% CI 0.127, 0.742). Conclusion A sizable number of patients living with HIV have anxiety associated with obtaining needed dental care. Routine screening for dental anxiety and counseling to reduce dental anxiety are supported by this study as a means of addressing the impact of dental anxiety on the use of oral health services among HIV-positive individuals. PMID:22547875

  17. Exploring the link between clinical managers involvement in budgeting and performance: Insights from the Italian public health care sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macinati, Manuela S; Rizzo, Marco G

    2016-01-01

    The public health care sector has had an increase in initiatives, mostly inspired by New Public Management principles, aimed at assigning financial accountability to clinical managers. However, clinical managers might experience a scarce alignment between professional values and organizational requirements, which is a potentially important phenomena that may result in negative consequences on clinical managers' job performance. Building on Psychological Ownership Theory and adopting a psychology-based management accounting research approach, we focus on the managerial (nonmedical) role the clinical manager fulfills and explore the budgetary participation-performance link via the indirect effects of job-based psychological ownership, role clarity, and clinical managers' affective commitment toward managerial roles. The data were collected by a survey conducted in an Italian hospital. The research hypotheses were tested employing a path model. Our study revealed new insights that shed some light on underexplored processes through which mental states mediate the participation-performance link. Among these latter, the findings demonstrate that (a) budgetary participation has a direct effect on job-based psychological ownership; (b) role clarity mediates participation- and job-based psychological ownership link; (c) role clarity and job-based psychological ownership partially mediate the participation-commitment link; and (d) job-based psychological ownership, role clarity, and commitment fully mediate the participation-performance link. From a managerial viewpoint, an understanding of how clinical managers' feelings of ownership toward managerial roles could be enhanced is imperative in health care because ownership accounts for important attitudinal and organizational consequences. Results suggest that health care organizations that invest in budgetary participation will directly and indirectly affect clinical managers' psychological ownership, and this, along with

  18. Successful Integration of Hepatitis C Virus Point-of-Care Tests into the Denver Metro Health Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jewett

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC recommends testing and linkage to care for persons most likely infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV, including persons with human immunodeficiency virus. We explored facilitators and barriers to integrating HCV point-of-care (POC testing into standard operations at an urban STD clinic. Methods. The OraQuick HCV rapid antibody test was integrated at the Denver Metro Health Clinic (DMHC. All clients with at least one risk factor were offered the POC test. Research staff conducted interviews with clients (three HCV positive and nine HCV negative. Focus groups were conducted with triage staff, providers, and linkage-to-care counselors. Results. Clients were pleased with the ease of use and rapid return of results from the HCV POC test. Integrating the test into this setting required more time but was not overly burdensome. While counseling messages were clear to staff, clients retained little knowledge of hepatitis C infection or factors related to risk. Barriers to integrating the HCV POC test into clinic operations were loss to follow-up and access to care. Conclusion. DMHC successfully integrated HCV POC testing and piloted a HCV linkage-to-care program. Providing testing opportunities at STD clinics could increase identification of persons with HCV infection.

  19. The role of the health care interpreter in a clinical setting--a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleptsova, Marina; Hofer, Gertrud; Morina, Naser; Langewitz, Wolf

    2014-01-01

    To examine published models of health care interpretation and associated roles, expectations, and outcomes. A literature search was conducted using the key words interpreter/translator, communication, and role and their combinations in PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and PSYNDEXPlus. References mentioned in articles identified with these search terms were then checked by hand in corresponding publications and books. We excluded articles if they were dealing with concepts of interpretation, role definitions, etc., without presenting any empirical evidence to support their recommendations. Thirty-four of 1,121 references that investigated the role of professional interpreters in health care were found to meet inclusion criteria. Out of 34 articles, only 2 recommend strict adherence to the conduit model in which interpreters are faithfully and exclusively transmitting information; the interpreter's role is in 32 studies defined in broader terms as the role of a cultural broker (n = 18), a manager or clarifier (n = 22), a patient advocate (n = 13), or a mediator (n = 6). There are no commonly accepted understandings of the interpreters' role; empirical data are lacking. The interpreter's function must be explicitly clarified before a health care encounter is conducted. There should be an agreement of some basic rules.

  20. Primary Care Clinics and Accountable Care Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Ortiz PhD

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Accountable Care Organization (ACO is one of the new models of health care delivery in the United States. To date, little is known about the characteristics of health care organizations that have joined ACOs. We report on the findings of a survey of primary care clinics, the objective of which was to investigate the opinions of clinic management about participation in ACOs and the characteristics of clinic organizational structure that may contribute to joining ACOs or be willing to do so. Methods: A 27-item survey questionnaire was developed and distributed by mail in 3 annual waves to all Rural Health Clinics (RHCs in 9 states. Two dependent variables—participation in ACOs and willingness to join ACOs—were created and analyzed using a generalized estimating equation approach. Results: A total of 257 RHCs responded to the survey. A small percentage (5.2% of the respondent clinics reported that they were participating in ACOs. Rural Health Clinics in isolated areas were 78% less likely to be in ACOs (odds ratio = 0.22, P = .059. Nonprofit RHCs indicated a higher willingness to join an ACO than for-profit RHCs (B = 1.271, P = .054. There is a positive relationship between RHC size and willingness to join an ACO (B = 0.402, P = .010. Conclusion: At this early stage of ACO development, many RHC personnel are unfamiliar with the ACO model. Rural providers’ limited technological and human resources, and the lack of ACO development in rural areas, may delay or prevent their participation in ACOs.

  1. Hypertension and treatment outcomes in Palestine refugees in United Nations Relief and Works Agency primary health care clinics in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khader, A; Farajallah, L; Shahin, Y; Hababeh, M; Abu-Zayed, I; Zachariah, R; Kochi, A; Kapur, A; Harries, A D; Shaikh, I; Seita, A

    2014-10-01

    In six United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA) primary health care clinics in Jordan serving Palestine refugees diagnosed with hypertension, to determine the number, characteristics, programme outcomes and measures of disease control for those registered up to 30 June, 2013, and in those who attended clinic in the second quarter of 2013, the prevalence of disease-related complications between those with hypertension only and hypertension combined with diabetes mellitus. Retrospective cohort study with programme and outcome data collected and analysed using E-Health. There were 18 881 patients registered with hypertension with females (64%) and persons aged ≥ 40 years (87%) predominating. At baseline, cigarette smoking was recorded in 17%, physical inactivity in 48% and obesity in 71% of patients. 77% of all registered patients attended clinic in the second quarter of 2013; of these, 50% had hypertension and diabetes and 50% had hypertension alone; 9% did not attend the clinics and 10% were lost to follow-up. Amongst those attending clinic, 92% had their blood pressure measured, of whom 83% had blood pressure hypertension and diabetes (N = 966, 13%) who had disease-related complications than patients who had hypertension alone (N = 472, 6%) [OR 2.2, 95% CI 2.0-2.5], and these differences were found for both males [18% vs. 10%, OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.6-2.2] and females [11% vs. 5%, OR 2.4, 95% CI 2.1-2.9]. Large numbers of Palestine refugees are being registered and treated for hypertension in UNRWA primary health care clinics in Jordan. Cohort analysis and E-Health can be used to regularly assess caseload, programme outcomes, clinic performance, blood pressure control and cumulative prevalence of disease-related complications. Current challenges include the need to increase clinic attendance and attain better control of blood pressure. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    COMMUNITY HEALTH. & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE. KEYWORDS ABSTRACT. Correspondence to: Journal of Community Medicine and Primary Health Care. 26 (2) 1-6. Facility User's Preference between the Free and the Bamako. Initiative (Drug Revolving Fund-Based) Health Services in Iwajowa Local Government, Oyo ...

  3. A Study of Children's Geographic Access to Health Services (Health Care Centers and Clinical Laboratories in Kermanshah City, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohyla Reshadat

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Given that the protection of children's health is of special importance due to their special age and physical conditions, the present study aimed to investigate the condition of children's Geographic access to health services (Health Centers and Clinical Laboratories in Kermanshah city, Iran. Materials and Methods: In this applied study, the research approach was descriptive-analytic using quantitative models in Geographic information system (GIS environment. The statistical population was the whole population of young girls aged 0-14 years old in Kermanshah, Iran. Moreover, to evaluate the spatial deployment pattern of health services and the correct and true access of this groupto such services, all data and information were collected through the Iranian Statistics Center and evaluated using the Arc-GIS Software. The latest published population statistics on the Population and Housing Census in 2011 were considered the basis for the analyses. Results: The results of the present study demonstrated that more than 40% and 60% of the young girls aged 0-14 years old in Kermanshah were deprived of proper access to health centers and clinical laboratories, respectively. In terms of the status of children’s access in the Second Scenario (access to health services by vehicles and during 5, 10, and 15 minutes, about 5.53%, 93.1% and 15.1% lacked access to health centers, respectively. In addition, in terms of the status of children’s access to clinical laboratories during 5, 10, and 15 minutes, 17.26%, 65.4% and 51% lacked access to clinical laboratories, respectively. Conclusion: The access of young girls aged 0-14 years old to health services in Kermanshah was undesirable in the access to health services through walking. Additionally, the access of this groupto health services in the access to health services by vehicles was far better than the first one.

  4. Health care operations management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carter, M.W.; Hans, Elias W.; Kolisch, R.

    2012-01-01

    Health care operations management has become a major topic for health care service providers and society. Operations research already has and further will make considerable contributions for the effective and efficient delivery of health care services. This special issue collects seven carefully

  5. Harmonizing and consolidating the measurement of patient-reported information at health care institutions: a position statement of the Mayo Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eton DT

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available David T Eton,1,2 Timothy J Beebe,1,2 Philip T Hagen,3 Michele Y Halyard,4 Victor M Montori,1,5 James M Naessens,1,2 Jeff A Sloan,6 Carrie A Thompson,7 Douglas L Wood1,81Division of Heath Care Policy and Research, Department of Health Sciences Research, 2Mayo Clinic Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, 3Department of Preventive, Occupational, and Aerospace Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, 4Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ, 5Knowledge and Evaluation Research Unit, 6Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Department of Health Sciences Research, 7Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, 8Center for Innovation, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USAAbstract: Patient-reported outcomes (PROs capture how patients perceive their health and their health care; their use in clinical research is longstanding. Today, however, PROs increasingly are being used to inform the care of individual patients, and document the performance of health care entities. We recently wrote and internally distributed an institutional position statement titled "Harmonizing and Consolidating the Measurement of Patient-Reported Outcomes at Mayo Clinic: A Position Statement for the Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery". The statement is meant to educate clinicians, clinical teams, and institutional administrators about the merits of using PROs in a systematic manner for clinical care and quality measurement throughout the institution. The present article summarizes the most important messages from the statement, describing PROs and their use, identifying practical considerations for implementing them in routine practice, elucidating potential barriers to their use, and formulating strategies to overcome these barriers. The lessons learned from our experience – including pitfalls, challenges, and successes – may inform other health care institutions that are interested in

  6. The role of noise in clinical environments with particular reference to mental health care: A narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Brian; Rutherford, Peter; Crawford, Paul

    2015-09-01

    There is a large literature suggesting that noise can be detrimental to health and numerous policy documents have promoted noise abatement in clinical settings. This paper documents the role of noise in clinical environments and its deleterious effects with a particular focus on mental health care. Our intention however, is to go beyond the notion that noise is simply undesirable and examine the extent to which researchers have explored the meaning of sound in hospital settings and identify new opportunities for research and practice. This is a narrative review which has grouped the literature and issues in the field into themes concerning the general issues of noise in health care; sleep noise and hospital environments; noise in intensive care units; implications for service users and staff; and suggestions for new ways of conceptualising and researching clinical soundscapes. Data sources comprised relevant UK policy documents and the results of a literature search of Pubmed, Scopus and Web of Knowledge using terms such as noise, health, hospital, soundscape and relevant additional terms derived from the papers retrieved. In addition the references of retrieved articles were scanned for additional relevant material and historical items significant in shaping the field. Excess unwanted noise can clearly be detrimental to health and impede recovery, and this is clearly recognised by policymakers especially in the UK context. We use the literature surveyed to argue that it is important also to see the noise in clinical environments in terms of the meaning it conveys and rather than merely containing unwanted sound, clinical environments have a 'soundscape'. This comprises noises which convey meaning, for example about the activities of other people, the rhythms of the day and the nature of the auditory community of the hospital. Unwanted sound may have unwanted effects, especially on those who are most vulnerable, yet this does not necessarily mean that silence is

  7. Evaluation of effectiveness and satisfaction outcomes of a mental health screening and referral clinical pathway for community nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J; Annells, M; Nunn, R; Petrie, E; Clark, E; Lang, L; Robins, A

    2011-06-01

    The study aimed to explore the effectiveness of a mental health screening and referral clinical pathway for generalist community nursing care of war veterans and war widow(er)s in Australia on outcomes of client self-reported mental health, quality of life, and client and carer satisfaction. The pathway was developed by literature review and consultation, then trialled and evaluated. Validated screening tools were embedded within the pathway to support generalist nurses' mental health decision making. Pre- and post-measures were applied. Clients on whom the pathway was trialled were invited to complete an evaluation survey questionnaire, as were their informal carers. Most clients and carers who responded to these questionnaires were highly satisfied or satisfied with care provided through application of the pathway. This study adds understanding about one way that community nurses might identify people with mental health difficulties. The trialled pathway, which was modified and refined following the study, is now available on the Internet as an evidence-based resource for community nurses in Australia to guide practice and maximize holistic care for war veterans and war widow(er)s where that care is funded by Department of Veterans' Affairs. © 2011 Commonwealth of Australia.

  8. Mining electronic health records: towards better research applications and clinical care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter B; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Brunak, Søren

    2012-01-01

    Clinical data describing the phenotypes and treatment of patients represents an underused data source that has much greater research potential than is currently realized. Mining of electronic health records (EHRs) has the potential for establishing new patient-stratification principles and for re......Clinical data describing the phenotypes and treatment of patients represents an underused data source that has much greater research potential than is currently realized. Mining of electronic health records (EHRs) has the potential for establishing new patient-stratification principles...... and for revealing unknown disease correlations. Integrating EHR data with genetic data will also give a finer understanding of genotype-phenotype relationships. However, a broad range of ethical, legal and technical reasons currently hinder the systematic deposition of these data in EHRs and their mining. Here, we...

  9. Next-generation long-term transplant clinics: improving resource utilization and the quality of care through health information technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rioth, M J; Warner, J; Savani, B N; Jagasia, M

    2016-01-01

    By the year 2020, potentially one-half a million hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients will need long-term follow-up care to address not only chronic GvHD but also multiple other late consequences of transplant. Despite this increase in patients, there will not be a concomitant increase in the HCT workforce. Thus, the future of long-term patient management will require a new 'next-generation' clinical model that utilizes technological solutions to make the care of the HCT patient efficient, safe and cost-effective. Guideline-based decision support will be embedded in clinical workflows. Documentation requirements will be reduced as automated data collection from electronic medical records (EMRs) will populate registries and provide feedback for a rapid learning health system. Interoperable EMRs will disseminate treatment protocols to multiple care providers in a distributed long-term clinic model, such that providers outside of the transplant center can provide services closer to the patient. Patients will increase their participatory role through patient portals and mobile devices. At Vanderbilt, we have responded to some of these future challenges by embedding guideline-based decision support, structuring clinical documentation and being early adopters of communication technology. This manuscript describes the current state of some of these innovations, and a vision for the future of the long-term transplant clinic.

  10. Using a self-service kiosk to identify behavioural health needs in a primary care clinic serving an urban, underserved population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenda Wrenn

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Integration of behavioural health into primary care clinics is an established model of care and important approach to eliminating mental health disparities, but demands on provider time is a barrier to mental health screening. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of using a kiosk placed in a primary care clinic to screen for multiple mental health disorders.Methods Quality improvement initiative with Plan-Do-Study-Act implementation and time series monitoring of utilisation outcomes.Results A total of 281 screens were completed identifying positive screens for depression (30% and bipolar disorder (17%. Post-traumatic stress disorder and concerning substance use were less common.Conclusions Development of health information technology to facilitate behavioural health assessment in primary care is a promising approach to integrated care and provides additional benefits of population health monitoring. 

  11. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    healthcare providers in south-east Nigerian. Malaria. National population commission and ORC Macro. Journal.2009;8:22. 6. Amaghionyeodiwe LA. Determinants of the. 15. World Health Organisation. The African choice of health care provider in Nigeria. Health malaria report 2003. Available at. Care Management Science.

  12. Implementation of a virtual vascular clinic with point-of-care ultrasound in an integrated health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Judith C; Crutchfield, Janelle M; Zurawski, Dana K; Stevens, Courtney

    2018-02-01

    Using secured videoconferencing technologies, telemedicine may replace traditional clinic visits, save patients' time and travel, and improve use of limited surgeon and facility resources. We report our initial experience of the remote clinical encounter (RCE) by evaluating vascular surgery patients. In this proof-of-concept pilot study, we conducted telemedicine evaluations of vascular patients at a tertiary care institution from October 2015 to August 2016. Patients were offered synchronous virtual visits from a surgical provider in lieu of an in-person visit. We used Skype for Business (Microsoft, Redmond, Wash) over secured networks for patient-provider interaction, clinical data entry in the Epic electronic medical record (Epic Systems Corporation, Verona, Wisc) for documentation, and established satellite facilities with existing vascular laboratories for imaging and laboratory testing. We evaluated feasibility, demographics, encounter type, and satisfaction of the patient through web-based questionnaires. During a 10-month period, 41 women and 14 men with an average age of 57 years (range, 29-79 years) underwent 82 RCEs. There were 43 white (78.1%), 9 black (16.3%), 1 Asian (1.8%), and 2 Middle Eastern (3.6%) patients. Diagnoses included both arterial (aneurysm, carotid, and occlusive disease) and venous (deep venous thrombosis and varicose vein) disease. Among the 82 RCEs, visit types included 15 new patients, 30 postoperative visits, and 37 follow-up visits. Ultrasound imaging was performed in conjunction with the RCE in 74 patients (90.2%). Most patients (57%) had multiple RCEs during the study period. All 55 patients responded to the satisfaction questionnaire; 91% stated that they would highly recommend a virtual physician encounter to a friend or colleague, and all of the respondents found their encounter more convenient than having a traditional office visit. All patients thought that they were able to communicate clearly with the provider, and

  13. [Modeling a clinical process for differentiated thyroid cancer health care in Hospital Base Valdivia, Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ávila-Schwerter, C; Torres-Andrade, M C; Méndez, C A; Márquez-Manzano, M

    2016-01-01

    To design a clinical process model in the management of differentiated thyroid cancer in order to improve accessibility to this treatment. Based on modified Participatory Action Research, a model design process was conducted using a literature review and meetings with organisations committed to the redesigning process, and to agree an improved and feasible process. The process map was constructed by participatory action including, characterisation of the value chain, fault detection in the flow of the process, relevant documents and process for proposing modifications and approvals necessary for this purpose. Links were established between the main process and the support and strategic processes. The participatory model helped to cut the waiting times for diagnosis and treatment of this disease from 12 to 4 months. For each unit to be able to fully visualise the map of the process and understand their contribution as a set of integrated contributions and not fragmented, helps in the comprehensive management of patients and operation processes based on the hierarchical and dominant organisational model in Chilean hospitals. To analyse and remodel clinical processes by participatory action helps to limit failures in the fluidity of care of the patients, by presenting each participating unit with a general view of the process, the problems, and the possible solutions. Furthermore, this approach helps to clarify the process in order to make it more efficient, to harmonise relationships, and to improve coordination in order to optimise patient care. Copyright © 2015 SECA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Impact of Patient-Centered Care Innovations on Access to Providers, Ambulatory Care Utilization, and Patient Clinical Indicators in the Veterans Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhart, Lisa; Sohn, Min-Woong; Jordan, Neil; Tarlov, Elizabeth; Gampetro, Pamela; LaVela, Sherri L

    2016-01-01

    The Veterans Health Administration piloted patient-centered care (PCC) innovations beginning in 2010 to improve patient and provider experience and environment in ambulatory care. We use secondary data to look at longitudinal trends, evaluate system redesign, and identify areas for further quality improvement. This was a retrospective, observational study using existing secondary data from multiple US Department of Veteran Affairs sources to evaluate changes in veteran and facility outcomes associated with PCC innovations at 2 innovation and matched comparison sites between FY 2008-2010 (pre-PCC innovations) and FY 2011-2012 (post-PCC innovations). Outcomes included access to primary care providers (PCPs); primary, specialty, and emergency care use; and clinical indicators for chronic disease. Longitudinal trends revealed a different story at each site. One site demonstrated better PCP access, decrease in emergency and primary care use, increase in specialty care use, and improvement in diabetic glucose control. The other site demonstrated a decrease in PCP access and primary care use, no change in specialty care use, and an increase in diastolic blood pressure in relation to the comparison site. Secondary data analysis can reveal longitudinal trends associated with system changes, thereby informing program evaluation and identifying opportunities for quality improvement.

  15. Costs of medically assisted reproduction treatment at specialized fertility clinics in the Danish public health care system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Terkel; Erb, Karin; Rizvanovic, Amra

    2014-01-01

    To examine the costs to the public health care system of couples in medically assisted reproduction.......To examine the costs to the public health care system of couples in medically assisted reproduction....

  16. Impact of Primary Language and Insurance on Pediatric Hearing Health Care in a Multidisciplinary Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Brooke M; Park, Jason S; Chan, Dylan K

    2017-10-01

    Objective This study aims to describe the effects of primary language and insurance status on care utilization among deaf or hard-of-hearing children under active otolaryngologic and audiologic care. Study Design Cross-sectional analysis. Setting Multidisciplinary hearing loss clinic at a tertiary center. Subjects and Methods Demographics, hearing loss data, and validated survey responses were collected from 206 patients aged 0 to 19 years. Two-sided t tests and χ2 tests were used to obtain descriptive statistics and hypothesis testing. Results Of the sample, 52.4% spoke primarily English at home. Non-English-speaking children and families were less likely to receive psychiatric counseling (12.2% vs 35.2% in the English group, P type or degree of their child's hearing loss (56.9% vs 75.4%, P = .022), and these children were older on presentation to the clinic (8.5 vs 6.5 years of age, P = .01) compared to privately insured children. Publicly insured children were less likely to receive cochlear implants ( P = .046) and reported increased difficulty obtaining hearing aids ( P = .047). While all patients reported impairment in hearing-related quality of life, publicly insured children aged 2 to 7 years were more likely to perform below minimum thresholds on measures of auditory/oral functioning. Conclusion Even when under active care, deaf or hard-of-hearing children from families who do not speak English at home or with public insurance face more difficulty obtaining educational services, cochlear implants, and hearing aids. These findings represent significant disparities in access to necessary interventions.

  17. Exploring Systems That Support Good Clinical Care in Indigenous Primary Health-care Services: A Retrospective Analysis of Longitudinal Systems Assessment Tool Data from High-Improving Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Cindy; Carlisle, Karen; Larkins, Sarah; Thompson, Sandra Claire; Tsey, Komla; Matthews, Veronica; Bailie, Ross

    2017-01-01

    Continuous Quality Improvement is a process for raising the quality of primary health care (PHC) across Indigenous PHC services. In addition to clinical auditing using plan, do, study, and act cycles, engaging staff in a process of reflecting on systems to support quality care is vital. The One21seventy Systems Assessment Tool (SAT) supports staff to assess systems performance in terms of five key components. This study examines quantitative and qualitative SAT data from five high-improving Indigenous PHC services in northern Australia to understand the systems used to support quality care. High-improving services selected for the study were determined by calculating quality of care indices for Indigenous health services participating in the Audit and Best Practice in Chronic Disease National Research Partnership. Services that reported continuing high improvement in quality of care delivered across two or more audit tools in three or more audits were selected for the study. Precollected SAT data (from annual team SAT meetings) are presented longitudinally using radar plots for quantitative scores for each component, and content analysis is used to describe strengths and weaknesses of performance in each systems' component. High-improving services were able to demonstrate strong processes for assessing system performance and consistent improvement in systems to support quality care across components. Key strengths in the quality support systems included adequate and orientated workforce, appropriate health system supports, and engagement with other organizations and community, while the weaknesses included lack of service infrastructure, recruitment, retention, and support for staff and additional costs. Qualitative data revealed clear voices from health service staff expressing concerns with performance, and subsequent SAT data provided evidence of changes made to address concerns. Learning from the processes and strengths of high-improving services may be useful

  18. Assessment of activities performed by clinical nurse practitioners and implications for staffing and patient care at primary health care level in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jude Igumbor

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The shortage of nurses in public healthcare facilities in South Africa is well documented; finding creative solutions to this problem remains a priority.Objective: This study sought to establish the amount of time that clinical nurse practitioners (CNPs in one district of the Western Cape spend on clinical services and the implications for staffing and skills mix in order to deliver quality patient care.Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted across 15 purposively selected clinics providing primary health services in 5 sub-districts. The frequency of activities and time CNPs spent on each activity in fixed and mobile clinics were recorded. Time spent on activities and health facility staff profiles were correlated and predictors of the total time spent by CNPs with patients were identified.Results: The time spent on clinical activities was associated with the number of CNPs in the facilities. CNPs in fixed clinics spent a median time of about 13 minutes with each patient whereas CNPs in mobile clinics spent 3 minutes. Fixed-clinic CNPs also spent more time on their non-core functions than their core functions, more time with patients, and saw fewer patients compared to mobile-clinic CNPs.Conclusions: The findings give insight into the time CNPs in rural fixed and mobile clinics spend with their patients, and how patient caseload may affect consultation times. Two promising strategies were identified – task shifting and adjustments in health workerd eployment – as ways to address staffing and skills mix, which skills mix creates the potential for using healthcare workers fully whilst enhancing the long-term health of these rural communities.

  19. Vacation health care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Vacation health care URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001937.htm Vacation health care To use the ...

  20. National Health Care Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    This survey encompasses a family of health care provider surveys, including information about the facilities that supply health care, the services rendered, and the characteristics of the patients served.

  1. Sound as a supportive design intervention for improving health care experience in the clinical ecosystem: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyendo, Timothy Onosahwo

    2017-11-01

    Most prior hospital noise research usually deals with sound in its noise facet and is based merely on sound level abatement, rather than as an informative or orientational element. This paper stimulates scientific research into the effect of sound interventions on physical and mental health care in the clinical environment. Data sources comprised relevant World Health Organization guidelines and the results of a literature search of ISI Web of Science, ProQuest Central, MEDLINE, PubMed, Scopus, JSTOR and Google Scholar. Noise induces stress and impedes the recovery process. Pleasant natural sound intervention which includes singing birds, gentle wind and ocean waves, revealed benefits that contribute to perceived restoration of attention and stress recovery in patients and staff. Clinicians should consider pleasant natural sounds perception as a low-risk non-pharmacological and unobtrusive intervention that should be implemented in their routine care for speedier recovery of patients undergoing medical procedures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A Fit between Clinical Workflow and Health Care Information Systems: Not waiting for Godot but making the journey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Z. Niazkhani (Zahra)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractHealth care has long suffered from inefficiencies due to the fragmentation of patient care information and the lack of coordination between health professionals [1]. Health care information systems (HISs) have been lauded as tools to remedy such inefficiencies [2, 3]. The primary idea

  3. Creonization of health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulger, R J

    1990-01-01

    As prefigured in the Greek tragedy Antigone, one of the primary conflicts in contemporary health care is that between humane concern for the individual and concern for society at large and administrative rules. The computerization of the health care system and development of large data bases will create new forms of this conflict that will challenge the self-definition of health care and health care professionals.

  4. National Institutes of Health Support for Clinical Emergency Care Research, 2011 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jeremy

    2016-08-01

    I report on the results of a portfolio analysis of National Institutes of Health (NIH) support for clinical emergency care research. A targeted query was created with data-mining techniques that accessed the NIH database for 2011 to 2014. The search was constructed to have a clinical focus; animal and bench research projects, as well as career development grants, were excluded. The search results were manually reviewed for appropriateness and then analyzed. Six-hundred eighty-eight applications were analyzed. During the study period, the number of new emergency care projects submitted to NIH increased from 62 in 2011 to 153 in 2014. A total of 112 new applications were funded for $100 million, with an overall success rate of 23%. The total amount of support for both new and existing projects during the 4-year study period was $263 million. One third of the funded principal investigators were emergency medicine faculty, and their success rate for R01 funding was twice the NIH average. Emergency care research makes up 0.7% of NIH spending on new research project grants. The success rate is high for emergency medicine principal investigators conducting clinical work. The overall success rate for emergency medicine R01s is similar to that of other clinical specialties. Copyright © 2016 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Neonatal convulsions in health care. I. Incidence, etiology and clinical aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrascosa, M C; Mariínez-Gutiérrez, A; Onsurbe, I; Vázquez, M S; Catalán, B; Tébar, R

    1996-10-01

    To determine the incidence, etiology and course of neonatal convulsions in the Albacete Health District between 1991 and 1993. A descriptive study of retrospective cohorts. 12,427 new born babies in the province of Albacete. The Hospital General de Albacete looks after a population of 376,071 inhabitants, attends 82% of the births in this area and its Neonatology Department is the only one in the province. Incidence: we found 25 new born babies (RN) with neonatal convulsions: absolute incidence (IA) in live RN0/00.; IA in live full-term RN (RNI) 1.4(0/00); IA in preterm RN (RNPT) 13.4(0/00) and in immature RN (with a gestational age of hipocalcemia and hypothermia, which do not leave sequelae after treatment. Also when methods of clinical inclusion/EEG are used, evaluating only the epileptic phenomena, convulsive crises with minimal clinical signs are observed.

  6. Integrating Correctional and Community Health Care: An Innovative Approach for Clinical Learning in a Baccalaureate Nursing Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchaud, Mary T; Swan, Beth Ann

    2017-01-01

    With an evolving focus on primary, community-based, and patient-centered care rather than acute, hospital-centric, disease-focused care, and recognition of the importance of coordinating care and managing transitions across providers and settings of care, registered nurses need to be prepared from a different and broader knowledge base and skills set. A culture change among nurse educators and administrators and in nursing education is needed to prepare competent registered nurses capable of practicing from a health promotion, disease prevention, community- and population-focused construct in caring for a population of patients who are presenting health problems and conditions that persist across decades and/or lifetimes. While healthcare delivery is moving from the hospital to ambulatory and community settings, community-based educational opportunities for nursing students are shrinking due to a variety of reasons, including but not limited to increased regulatory requirements, the presence of competing numbers of nursing schools and their increased enrollment of students, and decreasing availability of community resources capable and willing to precept students in an all-day interactive learning environment. A detailed discussion of one college of nursings' journey to find an innovative solution and approach to the dilemma of limited and decreasing available community clinical sites to prepare senior level prelicensure baccalaureate nursing students for healthcare practice in the twenty-first century. This article demonstrated how medium/maximum prisons can provide an ideal learning experience for not only technical nursing skills but more importantly for reinforcing key learning goals for community-based care, raising population-based awareness, and promoting cultural awareness and sensitivity. In addition, this college of nursing overcame the challenges of initiating and maintaining clinical placement in a prison facility, collaboratively developed strategies

  7. Multidisciplinary Point-of-Care Testing in South African Primary Health Care Clinics Accelerates HIV ART Initiation but Does Not Alter Retention in Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Wendy S; Gous, Natasha M; MacLeod, William B; Long, Lawrence C; Variava, Ebrahim; Martinson, Neil A; Sanne, Ian; Osih, Regina; Scott, Lesley E

    2017-09-01

    Lack of accessible laboratory infrastructure limits HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation, monitoring, and retention in many resource-limited settings. Point-of-care testing (POCT) is advocated as a mechanism to overcome these limitations. We executed a pragmatic, prospective, randomized, controlled trial comparing the impact of POCT vs. standard of care (SOC) on treatment initiation and retention in care. Selected POC technologies were embedded at 3 primary health clinics in South Africa. Confirmed HIV-positive participants were randomized to either SOC or POC: SOC participants were venesected and specimens referred to the laboratory with patient follow-up as per algorithm (∼3 visits); POC participants had phlebotomy and POCT immediately on-site using Pima CD4 to assess ART eligibility followed by hematology, chemistry, and tuberculosis screening with the goal of receiving same-day adherence counseling and treatment initiation. Participant outcomes measured at recruitment 6 and 12 months after initiation. Four hundred thirty-two of 717 treatment eligible participants enrolled between May 2012 and September 2013: 198 (56.7%) SOC; 234 (63.6%) POC. Mean age was 37.4 years; 60.5% were female. Significantly more participants were initiated using POC [adjusted prevalence ratio (aPR) 0.83; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.74 to 0.93; P ART was similar for both arms at 6 months (47 vs. 50%) (aPR 0.96; 95% CI: 0.79 to 1.16) and 12 months (32 vs. 32%) (aPR 1.05; 95% CI: 0.80 to 1.38), with similar mortality rates. Loss to follow-up at 12 months was higher for POC (36% vs. 51%) (aPR 0.82; 95% CI: 0.65 to 1.04). Adoption of POCT accelerated ART initiation but once on treatment, there was unexpectedly higher loss to follow-up on POC and no improvement in outcomes at 12 months over SOC.

  8. Master's level in primary health care education - students' and preceptors' perceptions and experiences of the alteration in the clinical areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamhidir Anna-Greta

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many Western European countries are undergoing reforms with changes in higher education according to the Bologna declaration for Higher European Education Area. In accordance with these changes, the Master's degree was introduced in specialist nurse education in Sweden in 2007, and as a result changed the curriculum and modified theoretical and clinical areas. The aim of this study was to investigate students' and preceptors' perceptions and experiences of Master's level education in primary health care with a focus on the clinical area. Methods A descriptive design and qualitative approach was used. Interviews with ten students and ten preceptors were performed twice, before and after the clinical practice period. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and themes formulated. Results Students perceived alteration in the content of the education at the Master's level such as more independence and additional assignments. The preceptors perceived benefits with the Master's level but were unsure of how to transform theoretical and abstract knowledge into practice. Writing the Master's thesis was seen by students to take time away from clinical practice. For some students and preceptors the content of the Master's level clinical practice area was experienced as vague and indistinct. The students had not expected supervision to be different from earlier experiences, while preceptors felt higher demands and requested more knowledge. Both students and preceptors perceived that education at the Master's level might lead to a higher status for the nurses' profession in primary health care. Conclusions Students and preceptors experienced both advantages and disadvantages concerning the change in specialist nurse education in primary health care at the Master's level. The altered educational content was experienced as a step forward, but they also questioned how the new knowledge could be used in practice. The relevance of

  9. Master's level in primary health care education - students' and preceptors' perceptions and experiences of the alteration in the clinical areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Many Western European countries are undergoing reforms with changes in higher education according to the Bologna declaration for Higher European Education Area. In accordance with these changes, the Master's degree was introduced in specialist nurse education in Sweden in 2007, and as a result changed the curriculum and modified theoretical and clinical areas. The aim of this study was to investigate students' and preceptors' perceptions and experiences of Master's level education in primary health care with a focus on the clinical area. Methods A descriptive design and qualitative approach was used. Interviews with ten students and ten preceptors were performed twice, before and after the clinical practice period. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and themes formulated. Results Students perceived alteration in the content of the education at the Master's level such as more independence and additional assignments. The preceptors perceived benefits with the Master's level but were unsure of how to transform theoretical and abstract knowledge into practice. Writing the Master's thesis was seen by students to take time away from clinical practice. For some students and preceptors the content of the Master's level clinical practice area was experienced as vague and indistinct. The students had not expected supervision to be different from earlier experiences, while preceptors felt higher demands and requested more knowledge. Both students and preceptors perceived that education at the Master's level might lead to a higher status for the nurses' profession in primary health care. Conclusions Students and preceptors experienced both advantages and disadvantages concerning the change in specialist nurse education in primary health care at the Master's level. The altered educational content was experienced as a step forward, but they also questioned how the new knowledge could be used in practice. The relevance of the Master's thesis was

  10. Master's level in primary health care education - students' and preceptors' perceptions and experiences of the alteration in the clinical areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löfmark, Anna; Mamhidir, Anna-Greta

    2010-06-16

    Many Western European countries are undergoing reforms with changes in higher education according to the Bologna declaration for Higher European Education Area. In accordance with these changes, the Master's degree was introduced in specialist nurse education in Sweden in 2007, and as a result changed the curriculum and modified theoretical and clinical areas. The aim of this study was to investigate students' and preceptors' perceptions and experiences of Master's level education in primary health care with a focus on the clinical area. A descriptive design and qualitative approach was used. Interviews with ten students and ten preceptors were performed twice, before and after the clinical practice period. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and themes formulated. Students perceived alteration in the content of the education at the Master's level such as more independence and additional assignments. The preceptors perceived benefits with the Master's level but were unsure of how to transform theoretical and abstract knowledge into practice. Writing the Master's thesis was seen by students to take time away from clinical practice. For some students and preceptors the content of the Master's level clinical practice area was experienced as vague and indistinct. The students had not expected supervision to be different from earlier experiences, while preceptors felt higher demands and requested more knowledge. Both students and preceptors perceived that education at the Master's level might lead to a higher status for the nurses' profession in primary health care. Students and preceptors experienced both advantages and disadvantages concerning the change in specialist nurse education in primary health care at the Master's level. The altered educational content was experienced as a step forward, but they also questioned how the new knowledge could be used in practice. The relevance of the Master's thesis was questioned. Supervision was seen by students

  11. Attitudes of Palestinian Health-Care Professionals in Gaza to Clinical Practice Guideline for Diagnosis and Treatment of Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Radwan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundDespite the huge numbers of the internationally produced and implemented Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs, the compliance with them is still low in health care. This study aimed at assessing the attitudes of Palestinian health-care professionals toward the most perceived factors influencing the adherence to the CPG for Diabetes Mellitus in the Primary Health-care centers of the Ministry of Health (PHC-MoH and the Primary Health-care centers of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees (PHC-UNRWA using a validated questionnaire.MethodsA cross-sectional design was employed with a census sample of all Palestinian family doctors and nurses (n = 323. The Cabana theoretical framework was used to develop a study questionnaire. A cross cultural adaptation framework was followed to develop the Arabic version questionnaire. The psychometric properties of Arabic version were finally assessed.ResultsThe Arabic version questionnaire showed a good construct validity and internal consistency reliability. The overall adherence level to the diabetic guideline was disappointingly suboptimal 51.5% (47.3% in the PHC-MoH and 55.5% in the PHC-UNRWA P = 0.000. The most frequently perceived barriers in the PHC-MoH were lack of incentives, lack of resources, and lack of guideline trustworthiness, whereas the lack of time and the lack of guideline trustworthiness were the most prominent barriers in the PHC-UNRWA. In spite of the lack of trustworthiness of the diabetic guideline, most respondents in both settings had a positive attitude toward guidelines in general, but this attitude was not a predictor of guideline adherence.ConclusionThe good validity and reliability of our questionnaire can provide support for the accuracy of our findings. Multifaceted implementation strategies targeting the main barriers elicited from this study are required for addressing the lack of incentives, organizational resources, lack of confidence

  12. Attitudes of Palestinian Health-Care Professionals in Gaza to Clinical Practice Guideline for Diagnosis and Treatment of Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwan, Mahmoud; Akbari Sari, Ali; Rashidian, Arash; Takian, Amirhossein; Abou-Dagga, Sanaa; Elsous, Aymen

    2017-01-01

    Despite the huge numbers of the internationally produced and implemented Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs), the compliance with them is still low in health care. This study aimed at assessing the attitudes of Palestinian health-care professionals toward the most perceived factors influencing the adherence to the CPG for Diabetes Mellitus in the Primary Health-care centers of the Ministry of Health (PHC-MoH) and the Primary Health-care centers of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees (PHC-UNRWA) using a validated questionnaire. A cross-sectional design was employed with a census sample of all Palestinian family doctors and nurses (n = 323). The Cabana theoretical framework was used to develop a study questionnaire. A cross cultural adaptation framework was followed to develop the Arabic version questionnaire. The psychometric properties of Arabic version were finally assessed. The Arabic version questionnaire showed a good construct validity and internal consistency reliability. The overall adherence level to the diabetic guideline was disappointingly suboptimal 51.5% (47.3% in the PHC-MoH and 55.5% in the PHC-UNRWA) P = 0.000. The most frequently perceived barriers in the PHC-MoH were lack of incentives, lack of resources, and lack of guideline trustworthiness, whereas the lack of time and the lack of guideline trustworthiness were the most prominent barriers in the PHC-UNRWA. In spite of the lack of trustworthiness of the diabetic guideline, most respondents in both settings had a positive attitude toward guidelines in general, but this attitude was not a predictor of guideline adherence. The good validity and reliability of our questionnaire can provide support for the accuracy of our findings. Multifaceted implementation strategies targeting the main barriers elicited from this study are required for addressing the lack of incentives, organizational resources, lack of confidence in the guideline, and time constraints.

  13. Interprofessional clinical training improves self-efficacy of health care students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nørgaard, Birgitte; Draborg, Eva; Vestergaard, Erik; Odgaard, Eva; Jensen, Didde Cramer; Sørensen, Jan

    2013-06-01

    Interprofessional collaboration potentially enhances patient safety and satisfaction, and reduces tensions and conflicts among health professionals. However, health professionals often lack sufficient knowledge of other professional roles and competences to engage in interprofessional teamwork. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of an interprofessional training programme on students' perceived self-efficacy. A quasi-experimental study with an intervention group (239 students) and a control group (405 students). The intervention was an interprofessional clinical study (ICS) unit including students from nursing, medicine, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, laboratory technology and radiography. Data on students' perceived self-efficacy were collected through web-based questionnaires. Aspects of self-efficacy measured were: (1) collaboration with other professions in planning goals and actions for patients; (2) collaboration with other professions for rehabilitation; (3) identifying the functions of other professions and (4) assessing and describing patients' needs and problems. All scores of perceived self-efficacy for the ICS group improved over time although one score change was non-significant (p = 0.08). After adjustment for baseline differences and the score change for the control group, the ICS group's self-efficacy score gain remained statistically significant. The study showed that interprofessional training improved students' perception of self-efficacy more than traditional clinical training.

  14. [Health care ethics committees in German university clinics. A survey of all medical directors and directors of nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmann, J; Burchardi, N; Weidtmann, A

    2004-05-28

    Health Care Ethics Committees (HEC) are new ways of implementing clinical ethics in hospitals and nursing homes. In the US all health care institutions must provide some structure to handle ethical conflicts in everyday patients' care. However, in Germany only a minority of hospitals, often members of the Protestant or Catholic Hospital Associations, have founded HEC. No studies exist in regard to the situation at German university hospitals. In November 2002 we posted a questionnaire with 13 items to all medical directors (M) and directors of nursing (N) of the 36 German university hospitals. The response rate was 82 %. Limitation of treatment, informed consent and the conflict between beneficience and autonomy are the most relevant ethical issues in everyday practice. N estimated the need for additional support of their staff in ethical issues higher than M. Improvement of interdisciplinary teamwork, further education in ethics and ethical guidelines have been identified in order to improve ethical professional performance. However, N mentioned the lack of time and the low priority of ethics more often than M as problems in implementing theses measures. Five German university hospitals are planning to establish a HEC and two hospitals want to employ a clinical ethicist. Our data show a high need for information about HEC in German university hospitals. The tasks, working methods and chances for further development of HEC are neither known nor used in the majority of German university hospitals.

  15. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    debut (20.8%), 40.8% had multiple sexual partners, 23.3% had sex under the influence of alcohol while. 34.2% didn't use ... PRIMARY HEALTH CARE. Journal of Community Medicine and Primary Health Care. 26(2) 97-106. KEYWORDS. Risky sexual behaviour, young people, ..... 2010;15(1): Art. #505[cited consistent with ...

  16. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    adedamla

    Up to 11 (7.2%) respondents in the non-BI LGA were not satisfied with the drug services in the health centers, compared ... improvement in primary health care services,. 8 ..... Naves J O, Silver LD. Evaluation of pharmaceutical assistance in public primary care in Brasilia, Brazil. Rev. Saude Publica. 2005; 39(2): 223-30. 21.

  17. Experiences of primary health care nurses in implementing integrated management of childhood illnesses strategy at selected clinics of Limpopo Province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vhuromu, E N; Davhana-Maselesele, M

    2009-09-01

    Treatment of the under five years is a national priority as an attempt in curbing deaths and deformities affecting children. Primary health care was implemented in the clinics in order to help in the treatment of illnesses affecting the community, including children. As a result of childhood illnesses; the World Health Organization (WHO) and United Nation Children's Fund (UNICEF) came up with Integrated Management of Childhood illnesses (IMCI) strategy to enhance treatment of such illnesses in developing countries. Primary health care nurses (PHCNS) in Limpopo Province were also trained to implement the strategy. This study is intended to explore and describe the experiences of PHCNS in implementing the IMCI strategy at selected clinics in Vhembe District in the Limpopo Province. A qualitative, explorative, descriptive and contextual design was used. In-depth interviews were conducted with PHCNS who are IMCI trained and have implemented the strategy for a period of not less than two years. Data analysis was done through using Tesch 's method of open coding for qualitative analysis. Findings revealed that PHCNS had difficulty in rendering IMCI services due to lack of resources and poor working conditions. Recommendations address the difficulties experienced by PHCNS when implementing the IMCI strategy.

  18. Health Care in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younger, David S

    2016-11-01

    China has recently emerged as an important global partner. However, like other developing nations, China has experienced dramatic demographic and epidemiologic changes in the past few decades. Population discontent with the health care system has led to major reforms. China's distinctive health care system, including its unique history, vast infrastructure, the speed of health reform, and economic capacity to make important advances in health care, nonetheless, has incomplete insurance coverage for urban and rural dwellers, uneven access, mixed quality of health care, increasing costs, and risk of catastrophic health expenditures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Health Care in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younger, David S

    2016-11-01

    Although a stated right for all Indians, equal access to health care in India is impeded by socioeconomic barriers. With its 3-tier system of public health care centers in villages, district hospitals, and tertiary care hospitals, government expenditure in India is inordinately low, with a disproportionate emphasis on private health spending. Accordingly, the poorest receive a minority of the available subsidies, whereas the richest obtain more than a third, fostering a divide in health care infrastructure across the rich and poor in urban and rural settings. This paradigm has implications for domestic Indian public health and global public health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Clinical information seeking in traumatic brain injury: a survey of Veterans Health Administration polytrauma care team members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Timothy; Martinez, Rachael; Evans, Charlesnika; Saban, Karen; Proescher, Eric; Steiner, Monica; Smith, Bridget

    2017-12-12

    The polytraumatic nature of traumatic brain injury (TBI) makes diagnosis and treatment difficult. To (1) characterise information needs among Veterans Health Administration (VHA) polytrauma care team members engaged in the diagnosis and treatment of TBI; (2) identify sources used for TBI related information; and (3) identify barriers to accessing TBI related information. Cross-sectional online survey of 236 VHA polytrauma care team members. Most respondents (95.8%) keep at least somewhat current regarding TBI, but 31.5% need more knowledge on diagnosing TBI and 51.3% need more knowledge on treating TBI. Respondents use VHA affiliated sources for information, including local colleagues (81.7%), VHA offsite conferences/meetings (78.3%) and onsite VHA educational offerings (73.6%); however, limited time due to administrative responsibilities (50.9%), limited financial resources (50.4%) and patient care (50.4%) were prominent barriers. Medical librarians are in a unique position to develop information services, resources and other electronic tools that reflect the clinical context in which polytrauma care team members practice, and the different tasks they perform. Polytrauma care team members could benefit from additional information regarding the diagnosis and treatment of TBI. Addressing their information needs and supporting their information seeking requires a mulit-pronged approach to time and financial constraints. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  1. Managing Cancer Care - Finding Health Care Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Caregivers Questions to Ask about Advanced Cancer Research Managing Cancer Care Finding Health Care Services Costs & Medical ... Feelings Planning for Advanced Cancer Advanced Cancer & Caregivers Managing Cancer Care Finding Health Care Services Managing Costs ...

  2. Health care engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Frize, Monique

    2013-01-01

    Part II of Health Care Engineering begins with statistics on the occurrence of medical errors and adverse events, and includes some technological solutions. A chapter on electronic medical records follows. The knowledge management process divided into four steps is described; this includes a discussion on data acquisition, storage, and retrieval. The next two chapters discuss the other three steps of the knowledge management process (knowledge discovery, knowledge translation, knowledge integration and sharing). The last chapter briefly discusses usability studies and clinical trials.This two-

  3. Impact of deploying multiple point-of-care tests with a ‘sample first’ approach on a sexual health clinical care pathway. A service evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nori, Achyuta V; Hegazi, Aseel; Pond, Marcus J; Okolo, Olanike; Nardone, Anthony; Lowndes, Catherine M; Hay, Phillip; Sadiq, S Tariq

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To assess clinical service value of STI point-of-care test (POCT) use in a ‘sample first’ clinical pathway (patients providing samples on arrival at clinic, before clinician consultation). Specific outcomes were: patient acceptability; whether a rapid nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT) for Chlamydia trachomatis/Neisseria gonorrhoeae (CT/NG) could be used as a POCT in practice; feasibility of non-NAAT POCT implementation for Trichomonas vaginalis (TV) and bacterial vaginosis (BV); impact on patient diagnosis and treatment. Methods Service evaluation in a south London sexual health clinic. Symptomatic female and male patients and sexual contacts of CT/NG-positive individuals provided samples for diagnostic testing on clinic arrival, prior to clinical consultation. Tests included routine culture and microscopy; CT/NG (GeneXpert) NAAT; non-NAAT POCTs for TV and BV. Results All 70 (35 males, 35 females) patients approached participated. The ‘sample first’ pathway was acceptable, with >90% reporting they were happy to give samples on arrival and receive results in the same visit. Non-NAAT POCT results were available for all patients prior to leaving clinic; rapid CT/NG results were available for only 21.4% (15/70; 5 males, 10 females) of patients prior to leaving clinic. Known negative CT/NG results led to two females avoiding presumptive treatment, and one male receiving treatment directed at possible Mycoplasma genitalium infection causing non-gonococcal urethritis. Non-NAAT POCTs detected more positives than routine microscopy (TV 3 vs 2; BV 24 vs 7), resulting in more patients receiving treatment. Conclusions A ‘sample first’ clinical pathway to enable multiple POCT use was acceptable to patients and feasible in a busy sexual health clinic, but rapid CT/NG processing time was too long to enable POCT use. There is need for further development to improve test processing times to enable POC use of rapid NAATs. PMID:28159916

  4. Spiritual Care Education of Health Care Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donia Baldacchino

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Nurses and health care professionals should have an active role in meeting the spiritual needs of patients in collaboration with the family and the chaplain. Literature criticizes the impaired holistic care because the spiritual dimension is often overlooked by health care professionals. This could be due to feelings of incompetence due to lack of education on spiritual care; lack of inter-professional education (IPE; work overload; lack of time; different cultures; lack of attention to personal spirituality; ethical issues and unwillingness to deliver spiritual care. Literature defines spiritual care as recognizing, respecting, and meeting patients’ spiritual needs; facilitating participation in religious rituals; communicating through listening and talking with clients; being with the patient by caring, supporting, and showing empathy; promoting a sense of well-being by helping them to find meaning and purpose in their illness and overall life; and referring them to other professionals, including the chaplain/pastor. This paper outlines the systematic mode of intra-professional theoretical education on spiritual care and its integration into their clinical practice; supported by role modeling. Examples will be given from the author’s creative and innovative ways of teaching spiritual care to undergraduate and post-graduate students. The essence of spiritual care is being in doing whereby personal spirituality and therapeutic use of self contribute towards effective holistic care. While taking into consideration the factors that may inhibit and enhance the delivery of spiritual care, recommendations are proposed to the education, clinical, and management sectors for further research and personal spirituality to ameliorate patient holistic care.

  5. Discussing Health Care Expenses in the Oncology Clinic: Analysis of Cost Conversations in Outpatient Encounters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Wynn G; Zafar, S Yousuf; Hesson, Ashley; Davis, J Kelly; Kirby, Christine; Barnett, Jamison A; Ubel, Peter A

    2017-11-01

    ASCO identified oncologist-patient conversations about cancer costs as an important component of high-quality care. However, limited data exist characterizing the content of these conversations. We sought to provide novel insight into oncologist-patient cost conversations by determining the content of cost conversations in breast cancer clinic visits. We performed content analysis of transcribed dialogue from 677 outpatient appointments for breast cancer management. Encounters featured 677 patients with breast cancer visiting 56 oncologists nationwide from 2010 to 2013. Cost conversations were identified in 22% of visits (95% CI, 19 to 25) and had a median duration of 33 seconds (interquartile range, 19 to 62). Fifty-nine percent of cost conversations were initiated by oncologists (95% CI, 51 to 67), who most commonly brought up costs for antineoplastic agents. By contrast, patients most frequently brought up costs for diagnostic tests. Thirty-eight percent of cost conversations mentioned cost-reducing strategies (95% CI, 30 to 46), which most commonly sought to lower patient costs for endocrine therapies and symptom-alleviating treatments. The three most commonly discussed cost-reducing strategies were: switching to a lower-cost therapy/diagnostic, changing logistics of the intervention, and facilitating copay assistance. We identified cost conversations in approximately one in five breast cancer visits. Cost conversations were mostly oncologist initiated, lasted Cost-reducing strategies were mentioned in more than one third of cost conversations and often involved switching antineoplastic agents for lower-cost alternatives or altering logistics of diagnostic tests.

  6. Innovation sustainability in challenging health-care contexts: embedding clinically led change in routine practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Graham P; Weaver, Simon; Currie, Graeme; Finn, Rachael; McDonald, Ruth

    2012-11-01

    The need for organizational innovation as a means of improving health-care quality and containing costs is widely recognized, but while a growing body of research has improved knowledge of implementation, very little has considered the challenges involved in sustaining change - especially organizational change led 'bottom-up' by frontline clinicians. This study addresses this lacuna, taking a longitudinal, qualitative case-study approach to understanding the paths to sustainability of four organizational innovations. It highlights the importance of the interaction between organizational context, nature of the innovation and strategies deployed in achieving sustainability. It discusses how positional influence of service leads, complexity of innovation, networks of support, embedding in existing systems, and proactive responses to changing circumstances can interact to sustain change. In the absence of cast-iron evidence of effectiveness, wider notions of value may be successfully invoked to sustain innovation. Sustainability requires continuing effort through time, rather than representing a final state to be achieved. Our study offers new insights into the process of sustainability of organizational change, and elucidates the complement of strategies needed to make bottom-up change last in challenging contexts replete with competing priorities.

  7. Gender-specific mental health care needs of women veterans treated for psychiatric disorders in a Veterans Administration Women's Health Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Laura J; Ghadiali, Nafisa Y

    2015-04-01

    This pilot study aims to ascertain the prevalence of self-reported premenstrual, perinatal, and perimenopausal influences on mental health, and of gynecologic conditions that could interact with psychiatric conditions, among women veterans receiving psychiatric care within a Veterans Administration (VA) Women's Health Clinic (WHC). Participants included all women veterans (N=68) who received psychiatric evaluations within a VA WHC over a 5-month period. This setting encompasses colocated and coordinated primary care, gynecologic and mental health services. Evaluations included a Women's Mental Health Questionnaire, a psychiatric interview, and medical record review. Deidentified data were extracted from a clinical data repository for this descriptive study. High proportions of study participants reported that their emotional problems intensified premenstrually (42.6%), during pregnancy (33.3%), in the postpartum period (33.3%), or during perimenopause (18.2%). Unintended pregnancy (70.0% of pregnancies) and pregnancy loss (63.5% of women who had been pregnant) were prominent sex-linked stressors. Dyspareunia (22.1% of participants) and pelvic pain (17.6% of participants) were frequent comorbidities. Among women veterans receiving psychiatric care within a VA WHC, there are high rates of self-reported premenstrual, perinatal, and perimenopausal influences on mental health. This population also has substantial comorbidity of psychiatric disorders with dyspareunia and pelvic pain. This underscores the importance of recognizing and addressing women veterans' sex-specific care needs, including interactions among reproductive cycle phases, gynecologic pain, and psychiatric symptoms. The findings support the need for greater awareness of the sex-specific mental health needs of women veterans, and for more definitive studies to further characterize these needs.

  8. Health care professionals' comprehension of the legal status of end-of-life practices in Quebec: study of clinical scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcoux, Isabelle; Boivin, Antoine; Arsenault, Claude; Toupin, Mélanie; Youssef, Joseph

    2015-04-01

    To determine health care professionals' understanding of the current legal status of different end-of-life practices and their future legal status if medical aid in dying were legalized, and to identify factors associated with misunderstanding surrounding the current legal status. Cross-sectional survey using 6 clinical scenarios developed from a validated European questionnaire and from a validated classification of end-of-life practices. Quebec. Health care professionals (physicians and nurses). Perceptions of the current legal status of the given scenarios and whether or not the practices would be authorized in the event that medical aid in dying were legalized. Among the respondents (n = 271, response rate 88.0%), more than 98% knew that the administration or prescription of lethal medication was currently illegal. However, 45.8% wrongly thought that it was not permitted to withdraw a potentially life-prolonging treatment at the patient's request, and this misconception was more common among nurses and professionals who had received their diplomas longer ago. Only 39.5% believed that, in the event that medical aid in dying were legalized, the use of lethal medication would be permitted at the patient's request, and 34.6% believed they would be able to give such medication to an incompetent patient upon a relative's request. Health care professionals knew which medical practices were illegal, but some wrongly believed that current permitted practices were not legal. There were various interpretations of what would or would not be allowed if medical aid in dying were legalized. Education on the clinical implications of end-of-life practice legislation should be promoted.

  9. HIV testing and clinical status upon admission to a specialized health care unit in Pará, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Afonso Martins Abati

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To analyze the clinical and laboratory characteristics of HIV-infected individuals upon admission to a reference health care center. METHODS This cross-sectional study was conducted between 1999 and 2010 on 527 individuals with confirmed serological diagnosis of HIV infection who were enrolled in an outpatient health care service in Santarém, PA, Northern Brazil. Data were collected from medical records and included the reason for HIV testing, clinical status, and count of peripheral CD4+ T lymphocytes upon enrollment. The data were divided into three groups, according to the patient’s year of admission – P1 (1999-2002, P2 (2003-2006, and P3 (2007-2010 – for comparative analysis of the variables of interest. RESULTS In the study group, 62.0% of the patients were assigned to the P3 group. The reason for undergoing HIV testing differed between genders. In the male population, most tests were conducted because of the presence of symptoms suggesting infection. Among women, tests were the result of knowledge of the partner’s seropositive status in groups P1 and P2. Higher proportion of women undergoing testing because of symptoms of HIV/AIDS infection abolished the difference between genders in the most recent period. A higher percentage of patients enrolling at a more advanced stage of the disease was observed in P3. CONCLUSIONS Despite the increased awareness of the number of HIV/AIDS cases, these patients have identified their serological status late and were admitted to health care units with active disease. The HIV/AIDS epidemic in Pará presents specificities in its progression that indicate the complex characteristics of the epidemic in the Northern region of Brazil and across the country.

  10. Creating an integrated clinical enterprise at the University of Kentucky: the emergence of UK HealthCare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpf, Michael; Perman, Jay; Lofgren, Richard; Melgar, Sergio; Butler, Frank; Day, Zed; Clark, Murray; Claypool, Joseph O; Gilbert, Peter; Gombeski, William; Higdon, Courtney M

    2007-12-01

    If the medical system in the United States is to change, as has been recommended, academic medical centers must, in fact, lead this change process. To prepare for the future, the University of Kentucky decided to move aggressively toward developing an integrated clinical enterprise branded as UK HealthCare, where leadership of the various components of the academic medical center make strategic and financial decisions together to achieve common organizational goals. The authors discuss senior leadership's development of the vision for the enterprise and the governance structure that was established to engage board members and faculty of the institution. They examine the rigorous strategic, facilities, financial, and academic planning that ensued, and the early successes achieved. The authors introduce some of the lessons learned by the organization during the emergence of UK HealthCare and describe the corporate structure and senior management team that was established to support the quick and efficient implementation of the planning strategies. It was this corporate structure and senior management team which has proven to be an effective agent of change and a key to the successful development of a truly integrated clinical enterprise.

  11. Collaborative and Bidirectional Feedback Between Students and Clinical Preceptors: Promoting Effective Communication Skills on Health Care Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Kara; Chou, Calvin L

    2016-11-01

    Current literature on feedback suggests that clinical preceptors lead feedback conversations that are primarily unidirectional, from preceptor to student. While this approach may promote clinical competency, it does not actively develop students' competency in facilitating feedback discussions and providing feedback across power differentials (ie, from student to preceptor). This latter competency warrants particular attention given its fundamental role in effective health care team communication and its related influence on patient safety. Reframing the feedback process as collaborative and bidirectional, where both preceptors and students provide and receive feedback, maximizes opportunities for role modeling and skills practice in the context of a supportive relationship, thereby enhancing team preparedness. We describe an initiative to introduce these fundamental skills of collaborative, bidirectional feedback in the nurse-midwifery education program at the University of California, San Francisco. © 2016 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  12. Clinical confidence following an interprofessional educational program on eating disorders for health care professionals: a qualitative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pettersen G

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Gunn Pettersen,1 Jan H Rosenvinge,1 Kari-Brith Thune-Larsen,2 Rolf Wynn1,31Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway; 2Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway; 3Division of Addictions and Specialized Services, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, NorwayAbstract: There are an increasing number of educational programs to improve clinical competence and skills to treat mental disorders. For complex disorders there is also a focus on improving the quality of interprofessional work. This paper reports on interprofessional outputs of an educational program on eating disorders. A total of 207 professionals who completed the program were requested to describe up to 12 possible scenarios depicted as realistic prospects for their future work within this field. Analyzing the scenarios resulted in three categories of describing the participants' preferences: (1 interprofessional interventions and treatment; (2 the further development of competence; and (3 organization of the health care system. The findings showed that the participants were considering working across new lines in their current workplaces or crossing borders to new frontiers in the execution of competence. Our findings may be summarized into the concept of "clinical confidence." This concept has so far been understood as some kind of personal trait, disposition, or attitude. The present findings add nuances to this concept in terms of state-dependent encouragement, engagement, and a potential to act and to cross professional borders in order to better treat complex mental disorders.Keywords: interprofessional educational programs, interprofessional work, clinical confidence, eating disorders program, health care professional

  13. Using the eSexual Health Clinic to access chlamydia treatment and care via the internet: a qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aicken, Catherine R H; Sutcliffe, Lorna J; Gibbs, Jo; Tickle, Laura J; Hone, Kate; Harding-Esch, Emma M; Mercer, Catherine H; Sonnenberg, Pam; Sadiq, S Tariq; Estcourt, Claudia S; Shahmanesh, Maryam

    2017-10-07

    We developed the eSexual Health Clinic (eSHC), an innovative, complex clinical and public health intervention, embedded within a specialist sexual health service. Patients with genital chlamydia access their results online and are offered medical management via an automated online clinical consultation, leading to antibiotic collection from community pharmacy. A telephone helpline, staffed by Sexual Health Advisers, is available to support patients and direct them to conventional services if appropriate. We sought to understand how patients used this ehealth intervention. Within exploratory studies of the eSHC (2014-2015), we conducted in-depth interviews with a purposive sample of 36 patients diagnosed with chlamydia, who had chosen to use the eSHC (age 18-35, 20 female, 16 male). Thematic analysis was conducted. Participants described choosing to use this ehealth intervention to obtain treatment rapidly, conveniently and privately, within busy lifestyles that hindered clinic access. They described completing the online consultation promptly, discreetly and with ease. The information provided online was considered comprehensive, reassuring and helpful, but some overlooked it in their haste to obtain treatment. Participants generally described being able to collect treatment from pharmacies discreetly and promptly, but for some, poor awareness of the eSHC by pharmacy staff undermined their ability to do this. Those unsuitable for remote management, who were directed to clinic, described frustration and concern about health implications and clinic attendance. However, the helpline was a highly valued source of information, assistance and support. The eSHC is a promising adjunct to traditional care. Its users have high expectations for convenience, speed and privacy, which may be compromised when transitioning from online to face-to-face elements of the eSHC. Managing expectations and improving implementation of the pharmacy process, could improve their experiences

  14. Modelling Conditions and Health Care Processes in Electronic Health Records: An Application to Severe Mental Illness with the Clinical Practice Research Datalink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olier, Ivan; Springate, David A.; Ashcroft, Darren M.; Doran, Tim; Reeves, David; Planner, Claire; Reilly, Siobhan; Kontopantelis, Evangelos

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of Electronic Health Records databases for medical research has become mainstream. In the UK, increasing use of Primary Care Databases is largely driven by almost complete computerisation and uniform standards within the National Health Service. Electronic Health Records research often begins with the development of a list of clinical codes with which to identify cases with a specific condition. We present a methodology and accompanying Stata and R commands (pcdsearch/Rpcdsearch) to help researchers in this task. We present severe mental illness as an example. Methods We used the Clinical Practice Research Datalink, a UK Primary Care Database in which clinical information is largely organised using Read codes, a hierarchical clinical coding system. Pcdsearch is used to identify potentially relevant clinical codes and/or product codes from word-stubs and code-stubs suggested by clinicians. The returned code-lists are reviewed and codes relevant to the condition of interest are selected. The final code-list is then used to identify patients. Results We identified 270 Read codes linked to SMI and used them to identify cases in the database. We observed that our approach identified cases that would have been missed with a simpler approach using SMI registers defined within the UK Quality and Outcomes Framework. Conclusion We described a framework for researchers of Electronic Health Records databases, for identifying patients with a particular condition or matching certain clinical criteria. The method is invariant to coding system or database and can be used with SNOMED CT, ICD or other medical classification code-lists. PMID:26918439

  15. Positive practice environments influence job satisfaction of primary health care clinic nursing managers in two South African provinces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Nurses constitute the majority of the health workforce in South Africa and they play a major role in providing primary health care (PHC) services. Job satisfaction influences nurse retention and successful implementation of health system reforms. This study was conducted in light of renewed government commitment to reforms at the PHC level, and to contribute to the development of solutions to the challenges faced by the South African nursing workforce. The objective of the study was to determine overall job satisfaction of PHC clinic nursing managers and the predictors of their job satisfaction in two South African provinces. Methods During 2012, a cross-sectional study was conducted in two South African provinces. Stratified random sampling was used to survey a total of 111 nursing managers working in PHC clinics. These managers completed a pre-tested Measure of Job Satisfaction questionnaire with subscales on personal satisfaction, workload, professional support, training, pay, career prospects and standards of care. Mean scores were used to measure overall job satisfaction and various subscales. Predictors of job satisfaction were determined through multiple logistic regression analysis. Results A total of 108 nursing managers completed the survey representing a 97% response rate. The mean age of respondents was 49 years (SD = 7.9) and the majority of them (92%) were female. Seventy-six percent had a PHC clinical training qualification. Overall mean job satisfaction scores were 142.80 (SD = 24.3) and 143.41 (SD = 25.6) for Gauteng and Free State provinces respectively out of a maximum possible score of 215. Predictors of job satisfaction were: working in a clinic of choice (RRR = 3.10 (95% CI: 1.11 to 8.62, P = 0.030)), being tired at work (RRR = 0.19 (95% CI: 0.08 to 0.50, P = 0.001)) and experience of verbal abuse (RRR = 0.18 (95% CI: 0.06 to 0.55, P = 0.001). Conclusion Allowing nurses greater choice of clinic

  16. Positive practice environments influence job satisfaction of primary health care clinic nursing managers in two South African provinces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munyewende, Pascalia Ozida; Rispel, Laetitia Charmaine; Chirwa, Tobias

    2014-05-15

    Nurses constitute the majority of the health workforce in South Africa and they play a major role in providing primary health care (PHC) services. Job satisfaction influences nurse retention and successful implementation of health system reforms. This study was conducted in light of renewed government commitment to reforms at the PHC level, and to contribute to the development of solutions to the challenges faced by the South African nursing workforce. The objective of the study was to determine overall job satisfaction of PHC clinic nursing managers and the predictors of their job satisfaction in two South African provinces. During 2012, a cross-sectional study was conducted in two South African provinces. Stratified random sampling was used to survey a total of 111 nursing managers working in PHC clinics. These managers completed a pre-tested Measure of Job Satisfaction questionnaire with subscales on personal satisfaction, workload, professional support, training, pay, career prospects and standards of care. Mean scores were used to measure overall job satisfaction and various subscales. Predictors of job satisfaction were determined through multiple logistic regression analysis. A total of 108 nursing managers completed the survey representing a 97% response rate. The mean age of respondents was 49 years (SD = 7.9) and the majority of them (92%) were female. Seventy-six percent had a PHC clinical training qualification. Overall mean job satisfaction scores were 142.80 (SD = 24.3) and 143.41 (SD = 25.6) for Gauteng and Free State provinces respectively out of a maximum possible score of 215. Predictors of job satisfaction were: working in a clinic of choice (RRR = 3.10 (95% CI: 1.11 to 8.62, P = 0.030)), being tired at work (RRR = 0.19 (95% CI: 0.08 to 0.50, P = 0.001)) and experience of verbal abuse (RRR = 0.18 (95% CI: 0.06 to 0.55, P = 0.001). Allowing nurses greater choice of clinic to work in, the prevention of violence

  17. Assessing the Use of Mobile Health Technology by Patients: An Observational Study in Primary Care Clinics

    OpenAIRE

    Ramirez, Veronica; Johnson, Emily; Gonzalez, Cesar; Ramirez, Vanessa; Rubino, Barbara; Rossetti, Gina

    2016-01-01

    Background There is significant potential for mobile health technology to improve health outcomes for patients with chronic diseases. However, there is a need for further development of mobile health technology that would help to improve the health of lower-income communities. Objective The study objective was to assess mobile phone and app usage among a culturally diverse patient population, and to determine whether patients would be interested in using mobile health technology to help manag...

  18. Electronic Patient Registries Improve Diabetes Care and Clinical Outcomes in Rural Community Health Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Cecil; Bailey, Kelly A.; Petitte, Trisha; Baus, Adam; Swim, Mary; Hendryx, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Context: Diabetes care is challenging in rural areas. Research has shown that the utilization of electronic patient registries improves care; however, improvements generally have been described in combination with other ongoing interventions. The level of basic registry utilization sufficient for positive change is unknown. Purpose: The goal of…

  19. Clinical audit of intra-partum care at secondary health facilities in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osungbade, K O; Oginni, S A; Olumide, E A A; Owoaje, E T

    2010-06-01

    Intra-partum care has a significant influence on birth outcomes. Gap however exists between evidence and practice. This study documented pattern of intra-partum monitoring among birth attendants in public secondary healthcare facilities and related findings to quality of care provided. Intra-partum monitoring records of vaginal examination, fetal heart and blood pressure were reviewed. Research assistants extracted information and documented same in appropriate section of Safe Motherhood Needs Assessment forms. Monitoring records were categorized into optimal and sub-optimal care. Proportions were calculated for parturients who received either optimal or sub-optimal care. Chi-square test of statistics was used to explore differences. Level of significance was p labour progressed. Intra-partum care provided by birth attendants was generally sub-optimal and use of the monitoring records to influence birth outcome is doubtful. Improvement in record keeping practices and skills in intra-partum monitoring for decision making, are suggested.

  20. Cost of installing and operating an electronic clinical decision support system for maternal health care: case of Tanzania rural primary health centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saronga, Happiness Pius; Dalaba, Maxwell Ayindenaba; Dong, Hengjin; Leshabari, Melkizedeck; Sauerborn, Rainer; Sukums, Felix; Blank, Antje; Kaltschmidt, Jens; Loukanova, Svetla

    2015-04-02

    Poor quality of care is among the causes of high maternal and newborn disease burden in Tanzania. Potential reason for poor quality of care is the existence of a "know-do gap" where by health workers do not perform to the best of their knowledge. An electronic clinical decision support system (CDSS) for maternal health care was piloted in six rural primary health centers of Tanzania to improve performance of health workers by facilitating adherence to World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines and ultimately improve quality of maternal health care. This study aimed at assessing the cost of installing and operating the system in the health centers. This retrospective study was conducted in Lindi, Tanzania. Costs incurred by the project were analyzed using Ingredients approach. These costs broadly included vehicle, computers, furniture, facility, CDSS software, transport, personnel, training, supplies and communication. These were grouped into installation and operation cost; recurrent and capital cost; and fixed and variable cost. We assessed the CDSS in terms of its financial and economic cost implications. We also conducted a sensitivity analysis on the estimations. Total financial cost of CDSS intervention amounted to 185,927.78 USD. 77% of these costs were incurred in the installation phase and included all the activities in preparation for the actual operation of the system for client care. Generally, training made the largest share of costs (33% of total cost and more than half of the recurrent cost) followed by CDSS software- 32% of total cost. There was a difference of 31.4% between the economic and financial costs. 92.5% of economic costs were fixed costs consisting of inputs whose costs do not vary with the volume of activity within a given range. Economic cost per CDSS contact was 52.7 USD but sensitive to discount rate, asset useful life and input cost variations. Our study presents financial and economic cost estimates of installing and operating an

  1. Health care's service fanatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlino, James I; Raman, Ananth

    2013-05-01

    The Cleveland Clinic has long had a reputation for medical excellence. But in 2009 the CEO acknowledged that patients did not think much of their experience there and decided to act. Since then the Clinic has leaped to the top tier of patient-satisfaction surveys, and it now draws hospital executives from around the world who want to study its practices. The Clinic's journey also holds Lessons for organizations outside health care that must suddenly compete by creating a superior customer experience. The authors, one of whom was critical to steering the hospital's transformation, detail the processes that allowed the Clinic to excel at patient satisfaction without jeopardizing its traditional strengths. Hospital leaders: Publicized the problem internally. Seeing the hospital's dismal service scores shocked employees into recognizing that serious flaws existed. Worked to understand patients' needs. Management commissioned studies to get at the root causes of dissatisfaction. Made everyone a caregiver. An enterprisewide program trained everyone, from physicians to janitors, to put the patient first. Increased employee engagement. The Clinic instituted a "caregiver celebration" program and redoubled other motivational efforts. Established new processes. For example, any patient, for any reason, can now make a same-day appointment with a single call. Set patients' expectations. Printed and online materials educate patients about their stays--before they're admitted. Operating a truly patient-centered organization, the authors conclude, isn't a program; it's a way of life.

  2. Incidence of dog bite injuries and clinical rabies in a tertiary health care institution: a 10-year retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abubakar, S A; Bakari, A G

    2012-01-01

    It is widely recognized that rabies is grossly under-reported even though it is a notifiable disease and a lack of accurate figures has rendered rabies a low public health and veterinary priority. This study aimed at determining the incidence of dog bite injuries and clinical rabies in a tertiary health care centre. Case records of patients managed at the accident and emergency unit of Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Zaria, between June 2000 and May 2010 with diagnosis of dog bite and rabies were retrieved. Relevant clinical data were extracted using a structured questionnaire designed for the study. Eighty-one persons out of 24,683 consultations in the accident and emergency unit presented with dog bite injuries with two clinical cases of human rabies. Mean age of victims of dog bite injuries was 21.1 ± 14.3 years and the majority (55.6%) were children. Males were more affected than females with a male:female ratio of 4.8:1, lower limb/buttock injuries were significantly higher in children than adults, but the adults sustained significantly more severe (type III) injury. The majority of dog bite injuries were washed with soap and irrigated with water or saline and 87.7% of the victim of dog bite received postexposure anti-rabies vaccine. Hospital incidence of dog bite injuries was low, but the use of postexposure prophylaxis was high.

  3. Cozy landscapes in a time of subtleties: Resonance of dance in a body treatment clinic in mental health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Bergma da Silva Oliveira

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The quest to build cozy landscapes in times of subtleties in mental health care is based on an ethical and poetic choice to build a clinic. This study deals with research aimed at the cartography of a body treatment clinic in mental health that has used various practices in this perspective of coziness and subtleties within a Psychosocial Attendance Center (PSAC - type II in Belém, Para state, Brazil. In the methodological path we have traveled in these practices, we would like to highlight the work with Sacred Circle Dances (SCD in the experience of a Body Work Group involving 14 service users between 2010 and 2012. We resorted to participant observation and records in field notebook to find highlights in the intensity of meetings, especially regarding the experiments with dance. The results showed that, in Sacred Circle Dances, service users battled for their spaces, shared their stories, gave in and demanded, pulling away from any stereotype of passivity, and possible lack of motivation, or victimization In conclusion, SCD subscribe the emancipation of dancers of “expected” acting to the dance, in a territory that comprises dance together and do with others, which enriches experience and sustains differences. SCD in the daily routine of PSACs reaffirm that those centers are not a place of mental illness, but of mental health, where the relief is life and the disorder is only a part of existence. SCD are configured as a potential place of exchange.

  4. Preventive health care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medicines or supplements that you are taking WHY PREVENTIVE HEALTH CARE IS IMPORTANT Even if you feel ... want to schedule a visit . Another part of preventive health is learning to recognize changes in your ...

  5. Genes, Race, and Culture in Clinical Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Linda M.; Truesdell, Nicole D.; Kreiner, Meta J.

    2015-01-01

    Race, although an unscientific concept, remains prominent in health research and clinical guidelines, and is routinely invoked in clinical practice. In interviews with 58 primary care clinicians we explored how they understand and apply concepts of racial difference. We found wide agreement that race is important to consider in clinical care. They explained the effect of race on health, drawing on common assumptions about the biological, class, and cultural characteristics of racial minorities. They identified specific race-based clinical strategies for only a handful of conditions and were inconsistent in the details of what they said should be done for minority patients. We conclude that using race in clinical medicine promotes and maintains the illusion of inherent racial differences and may result in minority patients receiving care aimed at presumed racial group characteristics, rather than care selected as specifically appropriate for them as individuals. [race and genetics, primary care, health disparities, racial profiling] PMID:23804331

  6. Catalog of Completed Studies, US Army Health Care Studies and Clinical Investigation Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-10

    698. 8 Tschen, E. H., Jessen, R. T., Robertson, G., Becker, L. E., Erythema multiforme as a complication of 8CG scarification tech- nique, Arch...Report #79-003) 5 .. :I T 5 L -’- °... DATE TITLE ACCESSION # Jun 79 Effect of the Army Oral Health Maintenance Program (AOHMP) on the Dental Health...Active Duty AD A080536 Army Personnel, 1978 Part D - Effect of the Army Oral Health Maintenance AD A080182 Program on Dental Health Status of Army

  7. The motivational needs of primary health care nurses to acquire power as leaders in a mine clinic setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karien Jooste

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Motivation is a process that influences and directs behaviour in order to satisfy a need. It links with goal 3 of the sustainable development goals that focus on ensuring healthy lives and promoting well-being at all ages. Motivation of nurses is important in the primary health care environment of, for instance, mine settings; since low levels of motivation among Primary Health Care (PHC nurses could have a negative effect on the achievement of high standards in health service delivery. The study was conducted within the theoretical framework of McClelland's Acquired Motivation Theory which consists of three basic needs, – the need for achievement, the need for power, and the need for affiliation. One of the research questions posed was “What are the motivational needs of PHC nurses to acquire power in the workplace at mine clinic settings?” A quantitative, explorative, descriptive design was followed. The accessible population in this study was PHC nurses (N = 30 working at 13 mine clinics, that also served as the total sample. A 7 point Likert scale was used in a self-administered structured questionnaire that was developed from a literature review. Ethical considerations were adhered to and respondents gave written informed consent. Data was analysed by using descriptive and inferential statistics. TheManne Whitney test compared the mean ranks and a p-value of p < 0.05 was indicative of a significant difference between male and female groups. Validity and reliability principles were applied during the entire research process. The results indicated that PHC nurses needed acknowledgement, organisational responsibility, strategic planning and promotion, as well as support. Significant differences between gender were not found in relation to the need to acquire power.

  8. A systematic literature review assessing the directional impact of managed care formulary restrictions on medication adherence, clinical outcomes, economic outcomes, and health care resource utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happe, Laura E; Clark, Deanna; Holliday, Edana; Young, Tramaine

    2014-07-01

    There is extensive literature demonstrating that formulary restrictions reduce the pharmacy costs and utilization of restricted drugs. However, some research suggests that there may be unintended consequences of formulary restrictions on other patient outcomes. While several literature reviews have assessed the relationship between formulary restrictions and medication adherence, clinical outcomes, economic outcomes, or health care resource utilization, these reviews were either not systematic, were conducted more than 5 years ago, or did not assess the aggregate directional impact of the relationships. To conduct a systematic literature review assessing the direction (positive, negative, or neutral) of the relationship between managed care formulary restrictions (including step therapy, cost sharing, prior authorization, preferred drug lists, and quantity limits) on medication adherence, clinical outcomes, economic outcomes, and health care resource utilization.  Articles published in 1993 or later were identified from PubMed using 2 lists of search terms. List A included 12 formulary restriction terms and List B included 12 patient outcomes terms, resulting in 144 unique search term combinations. Each article was evaluated by 2 investigators against the following exclusion criteria using a stepwise approach: (a) the article was a commentary or review article; (b) the article did not assess the impact of managed care formulary restrictions on outcomes; and (c) the study was conducted outside the United States. The total number of studies was reported by formulary restriction type. Next, the total number of outcomes reported in each study was summed to conduct an outcomes-level analysis. The outcomes were categorized by type of outcome (medication adherence, clinical, economic, or health care resource utilization) and direction of association (positive, negative, or neutral/not significant) based on the relationship reported in each study. The frequencies of each

  9. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Early detection and treatment of these morbidities could prevent deterioration. The aim of the survey was to determine and compare the prevalence of ..... interventions. Increasing the detection rate of mental morbidity in the community is fundamental. The inclusion of mental health care as a component of primary health ...

  10. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the_monk

    large extent can reduce financial barriers to options; including government budgetary health care access ..... managers and demand-side factors, such as. International Health Conference. New adverse selection in ... patients in the scheme, and patient demand for. Information Centre. 1995. insured services. Many previous ...

  11. Telehealth: When Technology Meets Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... available at a drop-in clinic. Some large companies provide access to virtual doctors' offices as a ... https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/health-communication-programs/ndep/health-care-professionals/practice-transformation/information- ...

  12. Modelling health care processes for eliciting user requirements: a way to link a quality paradigm and clinical information system design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staccini, P; Joubert, M; Quaranta, J F; Fieschi, D; Fieschi, M

    2001-12-01

    Healthcare institutions are looking at ways to increase their efficiency by reducing costs while providing care services with a high level of safety. Thus, hospital information systems have to support quality improvement objectives. The elicitation of the requirements has to meet users' needs in relation to both the quality (efficacy, safety) and the monitoring of all health care activities (traceability). Information analysts need methods to conceptualise clinical information systems that provide actors with individual benefits and guide behavioural changes. A methodology is proposed to elicit and structure users' requirements using a process-oriented analysis, and it is applied to the blood transfusion process. An object-oriented data model of a process has been defined in order to organise the data dictionary. Although some aspects of activity, such as 'where', 'what else', and 'why' are poorly represented by the data model alone, this method of requirement elicitation fits the dynamic of data input for the process to be traced. A hierarchical representation of hospital activities has to be found for the processes to be interrelated, and for their characteristics to be shared, in order to avoid data redundancy and to fit the gathering of data with the provision of care.

  13. Clinical Effectiveness of Integrating Depression Care Management into Medicare Home Health: The Depression CAREPATH Cluster-Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Martha L.; Raue, Patrick J.; Reilly, Catherine F.; Greenberg, Rebecca L.; Meyers, Barnett S.; Banerjee, Samprit; Pickett, Yolonda R.; Sheeran, Thomas F.; Ghesquiere, Angela; Zukowski, Diane; Rosas, Vianca H.; McLaughlin, Jeanne; Pledger, Lori; Doyle, Joan; Joachim, Pamela; Leon, Andrew C.

    2015-01-01

    at any follow-up. Among 208 participants with HDRS≥10, CAREPATH demonstrated effectiveness (P=0.02) with lower HDRS at three (14.1 vs 16.1; P=0.04), six (12.0 vs 14.7; P=0.02) and twelve months (11.8 vs 15.7; P=0.005). Exploratory analyses found no differences in number or length of home visits. Conclusion and Relevance Home health nurses can effectively integrate depression care management into routine practice. However, clinical benefit appears limited to only patients with moderate to severe depression. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01979302 http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01979302 PMID:25384017

  14. Effect of Health Care Professionals' Continuing Education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of educational intervention by health care providers on clinical outcomes in type 2 diabetes patients in a Yemeni health facility. Methods: A prospective, one-group and pre- and post-test design to assess the effects of health care providers' education on clinical patient outcomes was ...

  15. The Adolescent "Expanded Medical Home": School-Based Health Centers Partner with a Primary Care Clinic to Improve Population Health and Mitigate Social Determinants of Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Margaret; Laurie, Anna R; Plegue, Melissa A; Richarson, Caroline R

    2016-01-01

    Access to high-quality health care is a crucial social determinant of health. We describe the implementation of an "expanded medical home" partnering a primary care practice (the Ypsilanti Health Center [YHC]) with local school-based health centers (the Regional Alliance for Healthy Schools [RAHS]), and to assess whether this model improves access to and quality of care for shared patients. Using the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research, we define the steps in, barriers to, and facilitating factors in implementing the expanded medical home model. Visits and quality measures were assessed for patients seen by YHC only versus YHC/RAHS at baseline and during the intervention. At baseline, patients seen at YHC/RAHS had higher compliance with most quality metrics compared with those seen at YHC only. The proportion of shared patients significantly increased because of the intervention (P < .001). Overall, patients seen in the expanded medical home had a higher likelihood of receiving quality metric services than patients in YHC only (odds ratio, 1.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.57-2.05) across all measures. Thoughtful and intentional implementation of an expanded medical home partnership between primary care physicians and school-based health centers increases the number of shared high-risk adolescent patients. Shared patients have improved compliance with quality measures, which may lead to long-term improved health equity. © Copyright 2016 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  16. Clinical trial on the efficacy of exhaled carbon monoxide measurement in smoking cessation in primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripoll, Joana; Girauta, Helena; Ramos, Maria; Medina-Bombardó, David; Pastor, Agnès; Alvarez-Ossorio, Cristina; Gorreto, Lucía; Esteva, Maria; García, Elena; Uréndez, Ana; Buades, Ana; Torres, Elena

    2012-07-04

    Smoking cessation is beneficial for our health at any point in life, both in healthy people and in people already suffering from a smoking-related disease. Any help to quit smoking can produce considerable benefits for Public Health. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the efficacy of the CO-oximetry technique together with brief advice in smoking cessation, in terms of reduction of the number of cigarettes or in the variation of the motivation to quit smoking at month 12 compared with brief advice alone. Randomised, parallel, single-blind clinical trial in a primary health care setting in Majorca (Spain). Smokers in contemplation or pre-contemplation phase will be included in the study. Smokers in preparation phase, subjects with a terminal illness or whose health status does not allow them to understand the study or complete the informed consent, and pregnant or breastfeeding women. The subjects will be randomly assigned to the control group (CG) or the intervention group (IG). The CG will receive brief advice, and the IG will receive brief advice together with a measurement of exhaled CO. There will be follow-up evaluations at 6 and 12 months after inclusion. 471 subjects will be needed per group in order to detect a difference between groups ≥ 5%. sustained smoking cessation (at 6 and 12 months) confirmed by urine cotinine test. point smoking cessation at 6 and 12 months both confirmed by urine cotinine analysis and self-reported, reduction in cigarette consumption, and variation in phase of smoking cessation. CO-oximetry is an inexpensive, non-invasive, fast technique that requires little technical training; making it a technique for risk assessment in smokers that can be easily applied in primary care and, if proven effective, could serve as a reinforcement aid in smoking cessation intervention activities. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN67499921.

  17. A model to facilitate collaboration between institutions of higher education and psychiatric health care services to promote psychiatric clinical nursing education

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    D.Cur. The purpose of this research study was to describe a model to facilitate collaboration between the institutions of higher education and psychiatric health care services in order to promote psychiatric clinical nursing education, with guidelines to operationalise the model. In spite of the calls by statutory bodies and contemporary legislation for collaboration between institutions of higher education and psychiatric health care services, there are few instances where formalised coll...

  18. First-line managers' views of the long-term effects of clinical supervision: how does clinical supervision support and develop leadership in health care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyrkäs, Kristiina; Appelqvist-Schmidlechner, Kaija; Kivimäki, Kirsti

    2005-05-01

    There have recently been several organizational changes that have challenged nursing managers in the Finnish health care system. First-line managers need support in their work because of organizational changes and scarce economic resources. One of these supportive measures is clinical supervision. A group of first-line managers in a Finnish University hospital participated in a 2-year clinical supervision intervention in 1999-2000. The managers' perceptions of the clinical supervision were followed up twice during the intervention and 1 year after (2001). The aim of this study is to describe how the first-line managers saw the future effects of the clinical supervision intervention 1 year after its termination. At the beginning of the intervention, the number of participating nursing managers was 32. The number of respondents in this study 1 year (2001) after the clinical supervision was 11. Data was collected using empathy-based stories, which involved writing short essays. The respondents received orientation and a script to assist them in the writing of essays. The stories were analysed qualitatively by categorizing the responses by themes. The managers deemed that clinical supervision had, in the 3-year time frame, positive long-term effects on their leadership and communication skills, the desire for self-development, self-knowledge and coping. Managers believed that in the long run, clinical supervision would provide them with a broader perspective on work and would enhance the use of clinical supervision as a supportive measure among co-workers. First-line managers expect clinical supervision to have long-term positive effects on their work and coping. Empathy-based stories, as a method, were found suited to studies, which aim to obtaining future-oriented knowledge.

  19. VA Health Care Facilities Locator

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... map [a-z] More VA More VA Health Health Care Information A-Z Health Topic Finder My Health ... General QUICK LIST Apply for Benefits Apply for Health Care Prescriptions My Health e Vet eBenefits Life Insurance ...

  20. Knowledge Systems, Health Care Teams, and Clinical Practice: A Study of Successful Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Curtis A.; Tooman, Tricia R.; Alvarado, Carla J.

    2010-01-01

    Clinical teams are of growing importance to healthcare delivery, but little is known about how teams learn and change their clinical practice. We examined how teams in three US hospitals succeeded in making significant practice improvements in the area of antimicrobial resistance. This was a qualitative cross-case study employing Soft Knowledge…

  1. Comparative costs of mobile and fixed-clinic primary health care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These include, for mobile clinic services, the total staff costs. (including salaries, benefrts and subsistence payments). transport costs. medicines, furniture, equipment and value- added tax. For fixed clinics the costs of electricity. stationery, water. sanitation, refuse removal, repairs and maintenance of buildings and furniture, ...

  2. Abstract: A Simple Clinical Guide for Health Care Students to Assess ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The clinical faculty also found that using this guide helped them to give the students daily feedback and students were then improving their knowledge and skills more effectively. Lessons Learned Students ability to perform well clinically can be vastly improved with a simple guide. There is some minimal cost in reproducing ...

  3. High-risk alcohol use and associated socio-demographic, health and psychosocial factors in patients with HIV infection in three primary health care clinics in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veld, Diana Huis In 't; Pengpid, Supa; Colebunders, Robert; Skaal, Linda; Peltzer, Karl

    2017-06-01

    Alcohol use may have a negative impact on the course of HIV disease and the effectiveness of its treatment. We studied patients with HIV who use alcohol and associated socio-demographic, health and psychosocial factors. Outcomes from this study may help in selecting patients from clinical practice with high-risk alcohol use and who are likely to benefit most from alcohol reduction interventions. In a cross sectional study in three primary health care clinics in Pretoria, South Africa, from January 2012 to June 2012, patients with HIV infection were interviewed and patients' medical files were reviewed to obtain data on levels of alcohol use (Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test), patients' socio-demographic characteristics, HIV-related information, health related quality of life (WHOQoL-HIVBref), internalized AIDS stigma, symptoms of depression and adherence to antiretroviral therapy. Analyses consisted of descriptive statistics, bi- and multivariate logistic regression models. A total of 2230 patients (1483 [66.5%] female) were included. The median age was 37 years (interquartile range 31-43), 99.5% were black Africans, 1975 (88.6%) had started ART and the median time on ART was 22 months (interquartile range 9-40). No alcohol was used by 64% of patients, 8.9% were low risk drinkers, 25.1% of patients were hazardous or harmful drinkers and 2.0% had possible alcohol dependence. In multivariate analysis high-risk drinking was positively associated with male gender, never being married, tobacco use, a higher score for the 'level of independence'-domain measured with the WHOQoL-HIVBref questionnaire, and with more depressive symptoms compared to low-risk drinking. This study shows a high prevalence of hazardous or harmful drinking in patients with HIV infection (especially men) attending primary health care clinics in South Africa. Routine screening for alcohol use should be introduced in these clinics and harm reduction interventions should be evaluated, taking

  4. Value in Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery Health Care: the Role of Time-driven Activity-based Cost Accounting (TDABC) and Standardized Clinical Assessment and Management Plans (SCAMPs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    The continuing increases in health care expenditures as well as the importance of providing safe, effective, timely, patient-centered care has brought government and commercial payer pressure on hospitals and providers to document the value of the care they deliver. This article introduces work at Boston Children's Hospital on time-driven activity-based accounting to determine cost of care delivery; combined with Systemic Clinical Assessment and Management Plans to reduce variation and improve outcomes. The focus so far has been on distal radius fracture care for children and adolescents.

  5. Clinical outcomes and health care costs combining metformin with sitagliptin or sulphonylureas or thiazolidinediones in uncontrolled type 2 diabetes patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Degli Esposti L

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Luca Degli Esposti, Stefania Saragoni, Stefano Buda, Ezio Degli Esposti Health, Economics and Outcome Research, Clicon Srl, Ravenna, ItalyObjectives: To compare clinical outcomes and health care costs across three cohorts of uncontrolled diabetic patients who initiated treatment with one of the following: sulphonylureas (SU, thiazolidinediones (TZD or sitagliptin (SITA.Materials and methods: We performed a retrospective study based on a linkage between administrative and laboratory databases maintained by three Italian local health units. The index period ranged from July 2008–June 2010. Patients were treatment-naïve to either SU, TZD, or SITA, but they were already treated with other oral hypoglycemic agents. Demographics and clinical characteristics were assessed at baseline. Adherence was measured by the medication possession ratio and adherent was defined a patient with a medication possession ratio of 80% or greater. We used a Poisson regression model to estimate the risk ratios for disease-related hospitalizations that occurred during the 18-month follow-up period. The total annual costs included all the pharmacological treatments and the direct costs due to hospitalizations and outpatient services.Results: We identified 928 patients treated with SU, 330 patients treated with TZD, and 83 patients treated with SITA. SITA patients were significantly younger and with fewer previous hospital discharges. The baseline mean glycated hemoglobin level was 8.1% for SU, 8.0% for TZD, and 8.3% for SITA patients. SITA-naïve patients resulted more adherent than the SU- and TZD-naïve patients (79.5% versus 53.2% and 62.8%, respectively; P<0.001. The SU and TZD group showed a significant increased risk of disease-related hospitalizations compared with the SITA group (the unadjusted rate was 10.42 and 7.16 per 100 person-years versus 1.64 per 100 person-years, P=0.003; compared with SU, the adjusted incidence rate ratio for SITA was 0.21, P=0.030. The

  6. A clinical training unit for diarrhoea and acute respiratory infections: an intervention for primary health care physicians in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojalil, R; Guiscafré, H; Espinosa, P; Viniegra, L; Martínez, H; Palafox, M; Gutiérrez, G

    1999-01-01

    In Tlaxcala State, Mexico, we determined that 80% of children who died from diarrhoea or acute respiratory infections (ARI) received medical care before death; in more than 70% of the cases this care was provided by a private physician. Several strategies have been developed to improve physicians' primary health care practices but private practitioners have only rarely been included. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the impact of in-service training on the case management of diarrhoea and ARI among under-5-year-olds provided by private and public primary physicians. The training consisted of a five-day course of in-service practice during which physicians diagnosed and treated sick children attending a centre and conducted clinical discussions of cases under guidance. Each training course was limited to six physicians. Clinical performance was evaluated by observation before and after the courses. The evaluation of diarrhoea case management covered assessment of dehydration, hydration therapy, prescription of antimicrobial and other drugs, advice on diet, and counselling for mothers; that of ARI case management covered diagnosis, decisions on antimicrobial therapy, use of symptomatic drugs, and counselling for mothers. In general the performance of public physicians both before and after the intervention was better than that of private doctors. Most aspects of the case management of children with diarrhoea improved among both groups of physicians after the course; the proportion of private physicians who had five or six correct elements out of six increased from 14% to 37%: for public physicians the corresponding increase was from 53% to 73%. In ARI case management, decisions taken on antimicrobial therapy and symptomatic drug use improved in both groups; the proportion of private physicians with at least three correct elements out of four increased from 13% to 42%, while among public doctors the corresponding increase was from 43% to 78%. Hands

  7. Implementation of the 2013 amended Patients' Rights Act in Norway: Clinical priority guidelines and access to specialised health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Kjell Arne; Nygaard, Elizabeth; Herlofsen, Berit; Lindemark, Frode

    2017-04-01

    In 2013, the Norwegian Patient Rights' Act was amended in order to simplify the priority setting process for specialized elective health care and to improve access to care. As a result of the amendment, priority for treatment is now determined by only two criteria: 1) clinical effectiveness; and 2) cost-effectiveness of the intervention. There are 33 clinical priority-setting guidelines organised by medical specialty, which help hospitals evaluate whether individual patients have a right to access care. Following the amendment of the Patient Rights' Act, these guidelines had to be revised in order to assure coherence with the new legislation. The revised guidelines define and score a total of 556 condition-intervention pairs, and will give all patients who are evaluated as having a need for specialist elective healthcare the right to access these services. This is different from the old guidelines, where patients could be evaluated as having a need but no right for treatment. According to the new guidelines, a much larger share of patients will be granted a right to necessary specialist healthcare service (93% of condition-intervention pairs versus 77% of condition-intervention pairs in the old guidelines). One reason for this is that the severity of the condition is no longer considered as part of the evaluation process, which means that patients with low levels of severity now have a right to receive treatment. In addition, a new "don't do" list of 40 conditions was created, which may prevent unnecessary treatment. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Impact of diabetes mellitus (DM) on the health-care utilization and clinical outcomes of patients with stroke in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan; Toh, Matthias Paul Han Sim

    2009-01-01

    This study aims to assess the impact of diabetes mellitus (DM) on the health-care utilization and clinical outcomes of patients with acute stroke. This is a retrospective cohort study. All patients who were admitted for the first time to one of the three public hospitals in the National Healthcare Group in Singapore from January 2005 to June 2007 with a primary diagnosis of acute stroke were included and were followed up for 1 year after the index hospitalization. The study population was divided into two groups: with DM and without DM. Both univariate and multivariate analyses were applied to compare the hospital length of stay (LOS), hospitalization costs, mortality, as well as the 1-year hospital readmissions between the DM and non-DM groups. There were 9766 study patients, and 38.5% of them had DM. DM patients with ischemic stroke (IS) and transient ischemic attack (TIA) stayed 1-day and 0.6-day longer, and incurred 10% and 26% higher hospital cost during index admission, respectively, compared with their counterparts in the non-DM group. They also had more hospital readmission within 1 year. The mortality rate in IS patients with diabetes was 24% higher. After risk adjustment, subarachnoid hemorrhage patients with diabetes had more hospitalizations. Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and IS patients in the DM group had all worse outcomes but the 1-year stroke recurrence; TIA patients with DM incurred longer LOS and hospital costs. DM predicts worse clinical outcomes and higher health-care expenditures in the 1-year poststroke especially for the IS, ICH, and TIA stroke subtypes.

  9. Public health care system, a quasi-experimental study: Acceptance and attitude to implicate clinical services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillani Syed Wasif

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A six-month longitudinal intervention arm study with a pre-post cross-sectional questionnaire-based survey was performed. A 3-phase objective structured clinical examination (OSCE design was utilized for evaluation of acceptance and attitude of pharmacy students towards clinical pharmacy services. The pre-OSCE survey showed increased disagreement with the role of clinical pharmacists, compared to a significant positive shift in attitude towards their services in the healthcare team after 6 months of the trial. Responses improved for awareness (the current healthcare system could be improved by involving pharmacists, p < 0.02 and positive attitude categories (doctors and nurses would be happy to welcome the services of competent clinical pharmacists as part of their team, p < 0.01 in addition to competency (pharmacists have sufficient clinical training to advise doctors and nurses, p < 0.01. The predictive model suggested a strong positive effect on patient interaction, medical information tasks, clinical decisions on drug-related problems (DRPs, and communication with healthcare professionals (R2 = 0.41, F = 1.51, p < 0.001.

  10. Clinical Updates in Women's Health Care Summary: Liver Disease: Reproductive Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    All women are at risk of acute and chronic liver diseases. Of particular importance are those diseases that exclusively affect pregnant women and have adverse effects on maternal, fetal, or neonatal outcomes. Acute viral hepatitis is an important cause of liver disease in pregnant women, and hepatitis E infection is associated with substantial mortality. An increasing number of women have chronic liver diseases caused by viral hepatitis, alcoholic liver disease and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, autoimmune liver diseases, and genetic liver diseases. The presence of chronic liver diseases or cirrhosis in pregnant or nonpregnant women requires alterations in gynecologic care, including contraception, pregnancy planning, cervical cancer screening, human papillomavirus vaccination, and postmenopausal hormone therapy. Women who have had liver and other solid organ transplantation require gynecologic care tailored to their immunosuppressed status. Collaboration between obstetrician-gynecologists and hepatologists is essential to provide optimal care to women with acute or chronic liver diseases. Timely referral for evaluation for liver transplantation is mandatory for all women with acute liver failure.

  11. From Systematic Reviews to Clinical Recommendations for Evidence-Based Health Care: Validation of Revised Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (R-AMSTAR) for Grading of Clinical Relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Jason; Chiappelli, Francesco; Cajulis, Olivia O; Avezova, Raisa; Kossan, George; Chew, Laura; Maida, Carl A

    2010-07-16

    Research synthesis seeks to gather, examine and evaluate systematically research reports that converge toward answering a carefully crafted research question, which states the problem patient population, the intervention under consideration, and the clinical outcome of interest. The product of the process of systematically reviewing the research literature pertinent to the research question thusly stated is the "systematic review".The objective and transparent approach of the systematic review aims to minimize bias. Most systematic reviews yield quantitative analyses of measurable data (e.g., acceptable sampling analysis, meta-analysis). Systematic reviews may also be qualitative, while adhering to accepted standards for gathering, evaluating, and reporting evidence. Systematic reviews provide highly rated recommendations for evidence-based health care; but, systematic reviews are not equally reliable and successful in minimizing bias.Several instruments are available to evaluate the quality of systematic reviews. The 'assessment of multiple systematic reviews' (AMSTAR) was derived from factor analysis of the most relevant items among them. AMSTAR consists of eleven items with good face and content validity for measuring the methodological quality of systematic reviews, has been widely accepted and utilized, and has gained in reliability, reproducibility. AMSTAR does not produce quantifiable assessments of systematic review quality and clinical relevance. In this study, we have revised the AMSTAR instrument, detracting nothing from its content and construct validity, and utilizing the very criteria employed in the development of the original tool, with the aim of yielding an instrument that can quantify the quality of systematic reviews. We present validation data of the revised AMSTAR (R-AMSTAR), and discuss its implications and application in evidence-based health care.

  12. Preventive health care among HIV positive women in a Utah HIV/AIDS clinic: a retrospective cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    preventive care services, including those with fewer socio-demographic risk factors (i.e., insured, stable housing etc.). In addition, failure to provide STI testing, cancer screening, or safe sex counseling to all patients represents a missed opportunity for provision of services that are important from both a clinical and public health perspective. PMID:24592813

  13. Global Health Care-seeking Discourses Facing Local Clinical Realities: Exploring the Case of Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Rikke Sand; Tørring, Marie Louise; Vedsted, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Using cancer as an example and drawing on Pierre Bourdieu's concepts of field and on prolonged fieldwork in Danish general medical practice settings, we examine how discourses about what counts as legitimate help-seeking practices are negotiated in local clinical encounters. Overall, we identify competition between two discourses on help-seeking practices. This competition is present most when people seek help with unspecific, vague, or diffuse illness complaints, voicing uncertainty as to what counts as signs of illness, characteristic of proactive discourses emanating from global, scientific biomedicine. Such indistinct help-seeking conflicts with the dominant discourse in the local clinical setting and is characterized by an overt focus on identification of the chief complaint. The analysis illustrates how competing discourses may result in conflicting expectations to the clinical encounter and prove counterproductive to ensuring early diagnosis of cancer. © 2014 by the American Anthropological Association.

  14. An evaluation of the competencies of primary health care clinic nursing managers in two South African provinces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munyewende, Pascalia O; Levin, Jonathan; Rispel, Laetitia C

    2016-01-01

    Managerial competencies to enhance individual and organisational performance have gained currency in global efforts to strengthen health systems. Competent managers are essential in the implementation of primary health care (PHC) reforms that aim to achieve universal health coverage. To evaluate the competencies of PHC clinic nursing managers in two South African provinces. A cross-sectional study was conducted in two South African provinces. Using stratified random sampling, 111 PHC clinic nursing managers were selected. All supervisors (n=104) and subordinate nurses (n=383) were invited to participate in the survey on the day of data collection. Following informed consent, the nursing managers, their supervisors, and subordinate nurses completed a 40-item, 360-degree competency assessment questionnaire, with six domains: communication, leadership and management, staff management, financial management, planning and priority setting, and problem-solving. Standard deviations, medians, and inter-quartile ranges (IQRs) were computed separately for PHC nursing managers, supervisors, and subordinate nurses for competencies in the six domains. The Tinsley and Weiss index was used to assess agreement between each of the three possible pairs of raters. A 95.4% response rate was obtained, with 105 nursing managers in Gauteng and Free State completing the questionnaires. There was a lack of agreement about nursing managers' competencies among the three groups of raters. Overall, clinic nursing managers rated themselves high on the five domains of communication (8.6), leadership and management (8.67), staff management (8.75), planning and priority setting (8.6), and problem-solving (8.83). The exception was financial management with a median score of 7.94 (IQR 6.33-9.11). Compared to the PHC clinic managers, the supervisors and subordinate nurses gave PHC nursing managers lower ratings on all six competency domains, with the lowest rating for financial management (supervisor

  15. An evaluation of the competencies of primary health care clinic nursing managers in two South African provinces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascalia O. Munyewende

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Managerial competencies to enhance individual and organisational performance have gained currency in global efforts to strengthen health systems. Competent managers are essential in the implementation of primary health care (PHC reforms that aim to achieve universal health coverage. Objective: To evaluate the competencies of PHC clinic nursing managers in two South African provinces. Design: A cross-sectional study was conducted in two South African provinces. Using stratified random sampling, 111 PHC clinic nursing managers were selected. All supervisors (n=104 and subordinate nurses (n=383 were invited to participate in the survey on the day of data collection. Following informed consent, the nursing managers, their supervisors, and subordinate nurses completed a 40-item, 360-degree competency assessment questionnaire, with six domains: communication, leadership and management, staff management, financial management, planning and priority setting, and problem-solving. Standard deviations, medians, and inter-quartile ranges (IQRs were computed separately for PHC nursing managers, supervisors, and subordinate nurses for competencies in the six domains. The Tinsley and Weiss index was used to assess agreement between each of the three possible pairs of raters. Results: A 95.4% response rate was obtained, with 105 nursing managers in Gauteng and Free State completing the questionnaires. There was a lack of agreement about nursing managers’ competencies among the three groups of raters. Overall, clinic nursing managers rated themselves high on the five domains of communication (8.6, leadership and management (8.67, staff management (8.75, planning and priority setting (8.6, and problem-solving (8.83. The exception was financial management with a median score of 7.94 (IQR 6.33–9.11. Compared to the PHC clinic managers, the supervisors and subordinate nurses gave PHC nursing managers lower ratings on all six competency domains, with

  16. Unrecognized norovirus infections in health care institutions and their clinical impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.F.C. Beersma (Thijs); F.H.A. Sukhrie (Faizel); J. Bogerman (Jolanda); L. Verhoef; M.M. de Melo (Mariana ); A.G. Vonk (Alieke); M.P.G. Koopmans D.V.M. (Marion)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractNoroviruses (NoVs) have emerged as the leading cause of acute viral gastroenteritis (GE) in humans. Although diagnostic facilities have greatly improved, significant underdiagnosis of NoV in hospitals may still occur, thereby increasing clinical burden and nosocomial spread. We evaluated

  17. Organizing Rural Health Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunkenborg, Mikkel

    2012-01-01

    The liberalization of health care in the course of three decades of ‘reform and opening up’ has given people in rural China access to a diverse range of treatment options, but the health care system has also been marred by accusations of price hikes, fake pharmaceuticals, and medical malpractice...... roads to healing. The recent introduction of new rural cooperative medicine in the township represents an attempt to bring the state back in and address popular concern with the cost and quality of health care. While superficially reminiscent of the traditional socialist system, this new state attempt...

  18. Clinical and psycho-social profile of child and adolescent mental health care users and services at an urban child mental health clinic in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, N; Janse van Rensburg, A B

    2013-09-01

    National and international child and adolescent mental healthcare policy and action advocate that the health and well being of children should be increasingly given greater attention. The purpose of this study was to describe the demographic, socio economic and clinical profile of the users at the child and adolescent mental health clinic of the Rahima Moosa Mother and Child Hospital (RMMCH). A descriptive, retrospective clinical audit from users' clinical files was performed over a one-year period from January to December 2007. Descriptive statistical analyses of demographic and socio-economic variables were made and these variables were compared with the presenting clinical problems. Odds ratios were calculated for variables that showed a statistically significant association (p-value less than 0.05). A total of 303 users attended this clinic. Statistical comparisons between demographic data and disorders revealed that being male increased the likelihood of presenting with AHDH and disruptive behaviour disorders; being female increased the likelihood of being sexually abused. Race showed a significant association with parent-child relationship difficulties. Regarding socio-economic variables, the identity of the caregiver of the child influenced the risk of disruptive behaviour disorders, sexual abuse, neglect and academic problems. Where the child was placed was a risk factor for disruptive behaviour disorders, sexual abuse, neglect and academic problems. Whether the mother of a user was alive or deceased, was found to be related to ADHD and disruptive behaviour and whether the father of a user was alive or deceased, was found to be related to sexual abuse and academic problems. The education level of the caregiver showed a significant association with sexual abuse, neglect and academic problems; the marital status of the parent (widowed mother) showed a significant association with bereavement. Household income was associated with sexual abuse, neglect and

  19. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Faculty of Clinical Sciences, College of Health Sciences,. Obafemi Awolowo ... Younger parents less than 35years, parents with lower educational attainments and low .... staffing, availability of immunization consumables was estimated using the Computer Programme for.

  20. Correlation of Internet Use for Health Care Engagement Purposes and HIV Clinical Outcomes Among HIV-Positive Individuals Using Online Social Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saberi, Parya; Johnson, Mallory O

    2015-01-01

    The authors aimed to describe cell phone and Internet use and assess the correlation of Internet use for health care engagement purposes and HIV clinical outcomes among HIV-positive individuals. The authors conducted a national survey using online social media to examine cell phone and Internet use, self-reported HIV viral load (detectable vs. undetectable), and antiretroviral adherence rating (excellent vs. less than excellent). Participants (N = 1,494) were asked about their Internet use for health care engagement purposes (including e-mailing health care providers, refilling medications online, and making medical appointments online). Approximately 95% of participants accessed the Internet nearly daily or daily in the past month (mean hours on Internet use per day = 5.2) and 55.5% used the Internet for health care engagement purposes. Those who used the Internet for any health care engagement purposes had a 1.52-fold odds of reporting an undetectable viral load (p = .009) and a 1.49-fold odds of reporting excellent adherence (p = .001). Although Internet access and use were similar across racial/ethnic, educational, and socioeconomic groups, disparities existed with the use of the Internet for health care engagement purposes among racial/ethnic minorities, those with low to moderate financial stability, lower education, and history of incarceration. The authors' data reveal that among HIV-positive users of online social media, use of the Internet for health care engagement purposes is associated with better self-reported virologic and adherence outcomes.

  1. Interprofessional clinical training improves self-efficacy of health care students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Birgitte; Draborg, Eva; Vestergaard, Erik

    2013-01-01

    ) and a comparison group (405 students). The intervention was provided by an interprofessional clinical study unit (ICS) and included students from nursing, medicine, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, laboratory technology and radiography. Self-efficacy data were collected through web-based questionnaires...... and competences to engage in fruitful interprofessional teamwork. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of an interprofessional training program on students’ self-efficacy in interprofessional collaboration. Methods: The study was designed as a quasi-experiment with an intervention group (239 students...... completed before and after the students’ clinical training. Results: In the simple statistical analysis, all four self-efficacy scores for the ICS group improved over time although one score (Q4) change did not reach statistical significance (p=0.08). After adjustment for profession, gender, baseline...

  2. Yoga for Health Care in Korea: A Protocol for Systematic Review of Clinical Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiae Choi

    2016-08-01

    Sixteen electronic databases will be searched from the inception of the study until January 2016. All clinical evidences that evaluate any type of yoga and any type of control in individuals with any type of condition will be eligible. The methodological quality will be assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool for randomized clinical trials and the Newcastle–Ottawa scale for nonrandomized studies. Two authors will independently assess each study for eligibility and the risk of bias, and then they will extract the data. With its extensive, unbiased search of the Korean literature from various databases without any language restrictions, this systematic review will be useful for both practitioners in the field of yoga research as well as for patients.

  3. Symptomatic identification of malaria in the home and in the primary health care clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, M; Espino, F E; Abaquin, J; Realon, C; Salazar, N P

    1994-01-01

    In endemic areas in the absence of microscopy, the WHO case definition of malaria is the presence or a history of fever without other obvious cause. Yet there is little empirical evidence on the accuracy, predictability and reliability of clinical signs and symptoms for diagnosing malaria within different endemic settings. Studying patients in endemic communities in the Philippines, we found that fever alone did not discriminate well for malaria. In contrast, a sequential occurrence of fever, chills and/or sweating, or a combination of all three symptoms was a good general predictor of the disease. However, the place of diagnosis and observation (home or clinic), age, and season affected the positive predictive values obtained. Specificities and positive predictive values were greatest (over 80%) for those at most risk--children under 9 years of age in highly endemic communities--and were most reliable when the diagnosis was made at home. Predictive values were also greatest during the season when childhood acute lower respiratory infections in the study area increase. The good predictability of clinical signs and symptoms for high-risk groups suggests that simple protocols can be developed for the management of malaria in endemic areas of the Philippines.

  4. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methodology. A cross-sectional survey of patients at the antiretroviral clinic of the Federal Medical Centre,. Makurdi, Nigeria, was conducted between June and August 2008. An adapted version of the RAND. Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire Long Form was used to assess seven dimensions of care: general satisfaction ...

  5. Maintenance of health care providers clinical proficiency: Transdisciplinary analysis, modeling and intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-13

    and those that do, we added an analytical step to classify those metrics prior to model inclusion . A dynamic measure of time (t) was constructed...60, March 30, 2015. 2. Institute of Medicine. Digital infrastructure for the Learning Health System: The foundation of continuous improvement in...Prescribing Safety in Ambulatory Elderly Patients. Journal American Geriatric Society, Vol. 55(7), 977-985. Reed, D., & Price E.G., W. D. (2005). Challenges

  6. The effect of relational continuity of care in maternity and child health clinics on parenting self-efficacy of mothers and fathers with loneliness and depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuominen, Miia; Junttila, Niina; Ahonen, Pia; Rautava, Päivi

    2016-06-01

    This study explored the parenting self-efficacy of the parents of 18-month-old children in the context of Finnish maternity and child health clinics. This parenting self-efficacy was observed in relation with the relational continuity of care and parents' experienced loneliness and depressive symptoms. The relational continuity of care was provided by a public health nurse in maternity and child health clinics. The participating parents were drawn from the STEPS study that is being carried out by the Institute for Child and Youth Research at the University of Turku. The results showed that relational continuity of care provided by the same public health nurse in the maternity and child health clinics was associated with mothers' higher emotional loneliness and with lower scores on three dimensions of parents' parenting self-efficacy. Loneliness and depressive symptoms negatively influenced parents' parenting self-efficacy - however, in the case where the family had experienced relational continuity of care, the parents' higher levels of depressive symptoms had not weakened their parenting self-efficacy beliefs. These results are discussed in terms of organizing maternity and child health clinic services. © 2016 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Health advance directives, policy and clinical practice: a perspective on the synergy of an effective advance care planning framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seal, Marion

    2010-03-01

    The delivery of quality care at the end of life should be seamless across all health care settings and independent from variables such as institutional largeness, charismatic leadership, funding sources and blind luck ... People have come to fear the prospect of a technologically protracted death or abandonment with untreated emotional and physical stress.

  8. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2Primary Health Care Department, Ikpoba Okha Local Government Area, Benin City, Nigeria. 1. 2. Adam V.Y , Iseh A.E. ABSTRACT. Introduction. The level of accurate knowledge adolescents have about HIV/AIDS, is important to enhance effective preventive actions, which ultimately result in a decrease in the incidence of ...

  9. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enterobacter spp. 1. 0.6. Table V: Proportion of Respondent that enter the Ward with Handheld Device. Table VI: Proportion of Respondent that Disinfect Phones and what they Disinfect with. Table VII: Hand Hygiene Practices. JOURNAL OF COMMUNITY MEDICINE AND PRIMARY HEALTH CARE VOL. 27, NO 1, MARCH ...

  10. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the_monk

    globally, (Ischaemic heart diseases, Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC), which. 5 cerebrovascular diseases, lower ... tract infections, chronic obstructive than 86% of the world's population. Tobacco pulmonary diseases ... and delivery of smoking cessation services among health care workers in Abuja. A cross sectional ...

  11. Managing conflicts of interest in the UK National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE clinical guidelines programme: qualitative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya Graham

    Full Text Available There is international concern that conflicts of interest (COI may bias clinical guideline development and render it untrustworthy. Guideline COI policies exist with the aim of reducing this bias but it is not known how such policies are interpreted and used by guideline producing organisations. This study sought to determine how conflicts of interest (COIs are disclosed and managed by a national clinical guideline developer (NICE: the UK National Institute for Health and Care Excellence.Qualitative study using semi-structured telephone interviews with 14 key informants: 8 senior staff of NICE's guideline development centres and 6 chairs of guideline development groups (GDGs. We conducted a thematic analysis.Participants regard the NICE COI policy as comprehensive leading to transparent and independent guidance. The application of the NICE COI policy is, however, not straightforward and clarity could be improved. Disclosure of COI relies on self reporting and guideline developers have to take "on trust" the information they receive, certain types of COI (non-financial are difficult to categorise and manage and disclosed COI can impact on the ability to recruit clinical experts to GDGs. Participants considered it both disruptive and stressful to exclude members from GDG meetings when required by the COI policy. Nonetheless the impact of this disruption can be minimised with good group chairing skills.We consider that the successful implementation of a COI policy in clinical guideline development requires clear policies and procedures, appropriate training of GDG chairs and an evaluation of how the policy is used in practice.

  12. Resilient health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hollnagel, E.; Braithwaite, J.; Wears, R. L.

    Health care is everywhere under tremendous pressure with regard to efficiency, safety, and economic viability - to say nothing of having to meet various political agendas - and has responded by eagerly adopting techniques that have been useful in other industries, such as quality management, lean...... production, and high reliability. This has on the whole been met with limited success because health care as a non-trivial and multifaceted system differs significantly from most traditional industries. In order to allow health care systems to perform as expected and required, it is necessary to have...... engineering's unique approach emphasises the usefulness of performance variability, and that successes and failures have the same aetiology. This book contains contributions from acknowledged international experts in health care, organisational studies and patient safety, as well as resilience engineering...

  13. Knowledge systems, health care teams, and clinical practice: a study of successful change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Curtis A; Tooman, Tricia R; Alvarado, Carla J

    2010-10-01

    Clinical teams are of growing importance to healthcare delivery, but little is known about how teams learn and change their clinical practice. We examined how teams in three US hospitals succeeded in making significant practice improvements in the area of antimicrobial resistance. This was a qualitative cross-case study employing Soft Knowledge Systems as a conceptual framework. The purpose was to describe how teams produced, obtained, and used knowledge and information to bring about successful change. A purposeful sampling strategy was used to maximize variation between cases. Data were collected through interviews, archival document review, and direct observation. Individual case data were analyzed through a two-phase coding process followed by the cross-case analysis. Project teams varied in size and were multidisciplinary. Each project had more than one champion, only some of whom were physicians. Team members obtained relevant knowledge and information from multiple sources including the scientific literature, experts, external organizations, and their own experience. The success of these projects hinged on the teams' ability to blend scientific evidence, practical knowledge, and clinical data. Practice change was a longitudinal, iterative learning process during which teams continued to acquire, produce, and synthesize relevant knowledge and information and test different strategies until they found a workable solution to their problem. This study adds to our understanding of how teams learn and change, showing that innovation can take the form of an iterative, ongoing process in which bits of K&I are assembled from multiple sources into potential solutions that are then tested. It suggests that existing approaches to assessing the impact of continuing education activities may overlook significant contributions and more attention should be given to the role that practical knowledge plays in the change process in addition to scientific knowledge.

  14. Health Clinic Cost Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Healthcare Cost Report Information System (HCRIS) Dataset - Independent Rural Health Clinic and Freestanding Federally Qualified Health Center (HCLINIC).This data...

  15. Supervised versus non-supervised implementation of an oral health care guideline in (residential) care homes: a cluster randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Putten, Gert-Jan; De Visschere, Luc; Schols, Jos; de Baat, Cees; Vanobbergen, Jacques

    2010-07-02

    The increase of the proportion of elderly people has implications for health care services. Advances in oral health care and treatment have resulted in a reduced number of edentulous individuals. An increasing number of dentate elderly people have tooth wear, periodontal disease, oral implants, and sophisticated restorations and prostheses. Hence, they are in need of both preventive and curative oral health care continuously. Weakened oral health due to neglect of self care and professional care and due to reduced oral health care utilization is already present when elderly people are still community-dwelling. At the moment of (residential) care home admittance, many elderly people are in need of oral health care urgently. The key factor in realizing and maintaining good oral health is daily oral hygiene care. For proper daily oral hygiene care, many residents are dependent on nurses and nurse aides. In 2007, the Dutch guideline "Oral health care in (residential) care homes for elderly people" was developed. Previous implementation research studies have revealed that implementation of a guideline is very complicated. The overall aim of this study is to compare a supervised versus a non-supervised implementation of the guideline in The Netherlands and Flanders (Belgium). The study is a cluster randomized intervention trial with an institution as unit of randomization. A random sample of 12 (residential) care homes accommodating somatic as well as psycho-geriatric residents in The Netherlands as well as in Flanders (Belgium) are randomly allocated to an intervention or control group. Representative samples of 30 residents in each of the 24 (residential) care homes are monitored during a 6-months period. The intervention consists of supervised implementation of the guideline and a daily oral health care protocol. Primary outcome variable is the oral hygiene level of the participating residents. To determine the stimulating or inhibiting factors of the implementation

  16. Development of training-related health care software by a team of clinical educators: their experience, from conception to piloting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ap Dafydd D

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Derfel ap Dafydd,1 Ruth Williamson,2 Philip Blunt,3 Dominic M Blunt4 1Department of Radiology, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London, 2Imaging Department, Royal Bornemouth Hospital, Bornemouth, 3Savernake IT Ltd, Marlborough, 4Imaging Department, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London, UK Abstract: The difficulties of producing useful, bespoke, and affordable information technology systems for large health care organizations are well publicized, following several high-profile endeavors in the UK. This article describes the experience of a small group of clinical radiologists and their collaborators in producing an information technology system – from conception to piloting. This system, called Trainee Tracker, enables automated target date recalculation of trainee milestones, depending on their work patterns and other individual circumstances. It utilizes an automated email alert system to notify the educational supervisors and trainees of approaching and elapsed target dates, in order to identify trainees in difficulty early and address their training needs accordingly. The challenges and advantages, both common to and contrasting with larger-scale projects, are also considered. The benefits of the development team’s “agile” approach to software development and the lessons learned will be of interest to medical educators, particularly those with expertise in e-portfolios and other training-related software. Keywords: training, appraisal, ARCP, Annual Review of Clinical Progression, portfolio, trainer

  17. Psychological needs, service utilization and provision of care in a specialist mental health clinic for young refugees: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelson, Daniel; Sclare, Irene

    2009-04-01

    This study addressed psychological needs, patterns of service utilization and provision of care in a specialist mental health service for young refugees and asylum seekers in London. Comparisons were made between two groups with different levels of postulated mental health need: unaccompanied minors (UAMs; n = 49) and children accompanied to the UK by one or more primary caregivers (n = 29). Significant differences were observed in referral pathways, with UAMs more likely to be referred by social services and less likely to be referred from medical agencies. UAMs also attended fewer sessions during treatment, and missed a greater proportion of scheduled appointments. Contrary to prediction, group comparisons revealed similar levels of post-migration stress and overall psychological morbidity. However, UAMs experienced significantly more traumatic events prior to resettlement, and were more likely to exhibit symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) than their accompanied peers. Despite their elevated risk of PTSD, UAMs were less likely than accompanied children to have received trauma-focused interventions. UAMs were also significantly less likely to have been treated using cognitive therapy, anxiety management and parent/carer training, as well as receiving fewer types of practical assistance with basic social needs. The clinical and service implications of these findings are discussed.

  18. Evaluation of Viewpoints of Health Care Professionals on the Role of Ethics Committees and Hospitals in the Resolution of Clinical Ethical Dilemmas Based on Practice Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Brian S; Carlson, Jestin N; Hegde, Gajanan G; Shang, Jennifer; Venkat, Arvind

    2016-03-01

    We sought to evaluate whether health care professionals' viewpoints differed on the role of ethics committees and hospitals in the resolution of clinical ethical dilemmas based on practice location. We conducted a survey study from December 21, 2013 to March 15, 2014 of health care professionals at six hospitals (one tertiary care academic medical center, three large community hospitals and two small community hospitals). The survey consisted of eight clinical ethics cases followed by statements on whether there was a role for the ethics committee or hospital in their resolution, what that role might be and case specific queries. Respondents used a 5-point Likert scale to express their degree of agreement with the premises posed. We used the ANOVA test to evaluate whether respondent views significantly varied based on practice location. 240 health care professionals (108-tertiary care center, 92-large community hospitals, 40-small community hospitals) completed the survey (response rate: 63.6 %). Only three individual queries of 32 showed any significant response variations across practice locations. Overall, viewpoints did not vary across practice locations within question categories on whether the ethics committee or hospital had a role in case resolution, what that role might be and case specific queries. In this multicenter survey study, the viewpoints of health care professionals on the role of ethics committees or hospitals in the resolution of clinical ethics cases varied little based on practice location.

  19. The Social Media DNA of Mayo Clinic-and Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsenas, Amy L; Aase, Lee; Arce, Makala; Timimi, Farris K; Dacy, Matthew; Young, Colleen; Wald, John T

    2017-11-08

    Hippocrates' admonition and the medical community's aversion to risk have caused many physicians and institutions to resist participation in modern social media sites such as Facebook (Facebook, Inc, Menlo Park, California, USA), Twitter (Twitter Inc, San Francisco, California, USA), and YouTube (San Mateo, California, USA). However, because Mayo Clinic's founders were champions of analog social networking, it was among the earliest hospitals worldwide to create official accounts on these digital platforms. A proper understanding of the traditional mechanisms of knowledge diffusion in medicine and of the nature of social media sites should help professionals see and embrace the opportunities for positive engagement in social media. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Humanization in health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Beatriz Rosana Gonçalves de; Collet, Neusa; Viera, Cláudia Silveira

    2006-01-01

    This study aims to reflect on humanization in health care, recovering the history of understanding about mankind, the human and humanity, until humanization in humanity and health. We discuss the national humanization program in hospital care and reflect on this proposal and on the issue of humanization in Brazilian health care nowadays. Communication is indispensable to establish humanization, as well as technical and material conditions. Both users and health professionals need to be heard, building a network of dialogues to think and promote singular humanization actions. For this process to take effect, there is a need to involve the whole that makes up the health service. This group involves different professionals, such as managers, public policy makers, professional councils and education institutions.

  1. Primary health care models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Judith Belle; French, Reta; McCulloch, Amy; Clendinning, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore the knowledge and perceptions of fourth-year medical students regarding the new models of primary health care (PHC) and to ascertain whether that knowledge influenced their decisions to pursue careers in family medicine. Design Qualitative study using semistructured interviews. Setting The Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry at The University of Western Ontario in London. Participants Fourth-year medical students graduating in 2009 who indicated family medicine as a possible career choice on their Canadian Residency Matching Service applications. Methods Eleven semistructured interviews were conducted between January and April of 2009. Data were analyzed using an iterative and interpretive approach. The analysis strategy of immersion and crystallization assisted in synthesizing the data to provide a comprehensive view of key themes and overarching concepts. Main findings Four key themes were identified: the level of students’ knowledge regarding PHC models varied; the knowledge was generally obtained from practical experiences rather than classroom learning; students could identify both advantages and disadvantages of working within the new PHC models; and although students regarded the new PHC models positively, these models did not influence their decisions to pursue careers in family medicine. Conclusion Knowledge of the new PHC models varies among fourth-year students, indicating a need for improved education strategies in the years before clinical training. Being able to identify advantages and disadvantages of the PHC models was not enough to influence participants’ choice of specialty. Educators and health care policy makers need to determine the best methods to promote and facilitate knowledge transfer about these PHC models. PMID:22518904

  2. A Retrospective Review of Clinical Admissions to Afghan National Security Forces Health Care Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertl, Christian W; Royal, David; Espinosa, Jairo

    2017-07-01

    Few published reports have examined the numbers of civilian injuries treated at Military Treatment Facilities in the Afghan Theater of Operations. However, review of Department of Defense Trauma Registry revealed a persistent percentage of civilians treated by NATO, and this study compares the proportion of civilians served by Afghan and Coalition military hospitals between 2009 and 2013. A retrospective review of records from Department of Defense trauma Registry for Coalition data, and Afghan data from the Office of the Inspector General. We assessed changes in the proportion of civilians served between 2009 and 2013 at Afghan and Coalition hospitals. There was a significant percentage (≥21.55%) of civilians served at both Afghan and Coalition hospitals. Although the total population of Afghan Nationals treated remained steady, the number of total civilians decreased over this time period. To account for this, the percentage of military personnel increased at Afghan military hospitals. In Coalition hospitals, the civilian population increased between 2009 and 2011 and then decreased between 2011 and 2013. For all hospitals, whether Afghan or Coalition hospitals, there was a persistent level of civilian admissions. A downward trend for civilian patients in the Coalition hospitals and a similar increase in Afghan hospitals was expected. However, the numbers for Afghan hospitals instead showed a downward trend, potentially from the loss of logistical assistance provided by Coalition forces in transferring patients to Afghan hospitals. As evidenced by our data, future missions should plan to provide care for this civilian population, by allocating funding and appropriately training personnel. Additionally, logistical concerns of transferring to host-nation facilities and training host-nation providers will require foresight, planning, and diplomatic overtures, not always included in tactical decision-making. Reprint & Copyright © 2017 Association of Military

  3. Clinical trial on the efficacy of exhaled carbon monoxide measurement in smoking cessation in primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ripoll Joana

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Smoking cessation is beneficial for our health at any point in life, both in healthy people and in people already suffering from a smoking-related disease. Any help to quit smoking can produce considerable benefits for Public Health. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the efficacy of the CO-oximetry technique together with brief advice in smoking cessation, in terms of reduction of the number of cigarettes or in the variation of the motivation to quit smoking at month 12 compared with brief advice alone. Methods/Design Randomised, parallel, single-blind clinical trial in a primary health care setting in Majorca (Spain. Smokers in contemplation or pre-contemplation phase will be included in the study. Exclusion criteria: Smokers in preparation phase, subjects with a terminal illness or whose health status does not allow them to understand the study or complete the informed consent, and pregnant or breastfeeding women. The subjects will be randomly assigned to the control group (CG or the intervention group (IG. The CG will receive brief advice, and the IG will receive brief advice together with a measurement of exhaled CO. There will be follow-up evaluations at 6 and 12 months after inclusion. 471 subjects will be needed per group in order to detect a difference between groups ≥ 5%. Primary outcome: sustained smoking cessation (at 6 and 12 months confirmed by urine cotinine test. Secondary outcomes: point smoking cessation at 6 and 12 months both confirmed by urine cotinine analysis and self-reported, reduction in cigarette consumption, and variation in phase of smoking cessation. Discussion CO-oximetry is an inexpensive, non-invasive, fast technique that requires little technical training; making it a technique for risk assessment in smokers that can be easily applied in primary care and, if proven effective, could serve as a reinforcement aid in smoking cessation intervention activities. Trial

  4. Continuity of clinical management and information across care levels: perceptions of users of different healthcare areas in the Catalan national health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waibel, Sina; Vargas, Ingrid; Aller, Marta-Beatriz; Coderch, Jordi; Farré, Joan; Vázquez, M Luisa

    2016-09-02

    The integration of health care has become a priority in most health systems, as patients increasingly receive care from several professionals in various different settings and institutions, particularly those with chronic conditions and multi-morbidities. Continuity of care is defined as one patient experiencing care over time as connected and coherent with his or her health needs and personal circumstances. The objective is to analyse perceptions of continuity of clinical management and information across care levels and the factors influencing it, from the viewpoint of users of the Catalan national health system. A descriptive-interpretative qualitative study was conducted using a phenomenological approach. A two-stage theoretical sample was selected: (i) the study contexts: healthcare areas in Catalonia with different services management models; (ii) users ≥ 18 years of age who were attended to at both care levels for the same health problem. Data were collected by means of individual semi-structured interviews with patients (n = 49). All interviews were recorded and transcribed. A thematic content analysis was conducted segmented by study area, with a mixed generation of categories and triangulation of analysts. Patients in all three areas generally perceived that continuity of clinical management across levels existed, on referring to consistent care (same diagnosis and treatment by doctors of both care levels, no incompatibilities of prescribed medications, referrals across levels when needed) and accessibility across levels (timeliness of appointments). In terms of continuity of information, patients in most areas mentioned the existence of information sharing via computer and its adequate usage. Only a few discontinuity elements were reported such as long waiting times for specific tests performed in secondary care or insufficient use of electronic medical records by locum doctors. Different factors influencing continuity were identified by

  5. Non-pharmacological treatment of hypertension in primary health care: A comparative clinical trial of two education strategies in health and nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribeiro Andréia Q

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poor adherence to non-pharmacological treatment of hypertension represents a serious challenge for public health policies in several countries. This study was conducted to compare two intervention strategies regarding the adherence of adult women to dietary changes recommended for the treatment of hypertension in a community covered by Primary Health Care Unit. Methods This study is a randomized controlled trial of a sample composed of 28 women with hypertension enrolled in the Primary Health Care Unit located in the urban area of southeastern Brazil. The participants were already undergoing treatment for hypertension but devoid of nutritional care; and were divided into two groups, each composed of 14 individuals, who received interventions that consisted of two different strategies of nutritional guidance: monthly health education workshops alone (Group 1 and combined with family orientation through home visits (Group 2. Adherence to nutritional guidelines was evaluated by dietary, anthropometric, clinical and serum biochemical parameters, measured before and after the interventions. Knowledge on control and risk of hypertension was also investigated. The study lasted five months. Results Mean age was 55.6 (± 2.8 and 50.7 (± 6.5 in the groups 1 and 2, respectively. The home orientation strategy promoted greater adherence to dietary changes, leading to a statistically significant improvement in the clinical, anthropometric, biochemical and dietary parameters. The group 2 reduced the consumption of risk foods (p = 0.01, oil (p = 0.002 and sugar (p = 0.02, and decreased body mass index (-0.7 kg/m2; p = 0.01; waist circumference (-4.2 cm; p = 0.001, systolic blood pressure (-13 mm HG; p = 0.004 and glycemia (-18.9 mg/dl; p = 0. 01. In group 1 only waist circumference (-2 cm; p = 0.01 changed significantly. Conclusion Nutritional orientations at the household level were more effective with regard to the adherence of

  6. Non-pharmacological treatment of hypertension in primary health care: a comparative clinical trial of two education strategies in health and nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Amanda G; Ribeiro, Sônia M R; Dias, Cristina M G C; Ribeiro, Andréia Q; Castro, Fátima A F; Suárez-Varela, Maria M; Cotta, Rosângela M M

    2011-08-10

    Poor adherence to non-pharmacological treatment of hypertension represents a serious challenge for public health policies in several countries. This study was conducted to compare two intervention strategies regarding the adherence of adult women to dietary changes recommended for the treatment of hypertension in a community covered by Primary Health Care Unit. This study is a randomized controlled trial of a sample composed of 28 women with hypertension enrolled in the Primary Health Care Unit located in the urban area of southeastern Brazil. The participants were already undergoing treatment for hypertension but devoid of nutritional care; and were divided into two groups, each composed of 14 individuals, who received interventions that consisted of two different strategies of nutritional guidance: monthly health education workshops alone (Group 1) and combined with family orientation through home visits (Group 2). Adherence to nutritional guidelines was evaluated by dietary, anthropometric, clinical and serum biochemical parameters, measured before and after the interventions. Knowledge on control and risk of hypertension was also investigated. The study lasted five months. Mean age was 55.6 (± 2.8) and 50.7 (± 6.5) in the groups 1 and 2, respectively. The home orientation strategy promoted greater adherence to dietary changes, leading to a statistically significant improvement in the clinical, anthropometric, biochemical and dietary parameters. The group 2 reduced the consumption of risk foods (p = 0.01), oil (p = 0.002) and sugar (p = 0.02), and decreased body mass index (-0.7 kg/m2; p = 0.01); waist circumference (-4.2 cm; p = 0.001), systolic blood pressure (-13 mm HG; p = 0.004) and glycemia (-18.9 mg/dl; p = 0. 01). In group 1 only waist circumference (-2 cm; p = 0.01) changed significantly. Nutritional orientations at the household level were more effective with regard to the adherence of individuals to non-pharmacological treatment of hypertension

  7. Health care workers and researchers traveling to developing-world clinical settings: disease transmission risk and mitigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortepeter, Mark G; Seaworth, Barbara J; Tasker, Sybil A; Burgess, Timothy H; Coldren, Rodney L; Aronson, Naomi E

    2010-12-01

    With the recent emphasis on funding and training opportunities for global health and humanitarian aid and the increased interest in the field, many health care workers and medical researchers are traveling from resource-replete to resource-limited settings. This type of travel brings unique disease risks not routinely considered for the business or vacationing traveler. This review provides practical advice for this special population of travelers, targeted to specific health care-related risks (needlestick, hemorrhagic fever viruses, severe viral respiratory disease, and tuberculosis), with suggestions for risk mitigation.

  8. Illness, disease, sickness : Clinical factors, concepts of pain and sick leave patterns among immigrants in primary health care. Effects of different therapeutic approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Löfvander, Monica

    1997-01-01

    Illness, disease, sickness. Clinical factors, concepts of pain and sick leave patterns amongimmigrants in primary health care. Effects of different therapeutic approaches Monica Löfvander The outer framework for this thesis is the high rate of disability pensions amongsome immigrant groups in Sweden. The general aim for the research has been to understandthe phenomena of illness, disease and sickness certification in immigrants from aprimary care perspective and ...

  9. Walking down 'Via Dolorosa' from primary health care to the specialty pain clinic - patient and professional perceptions of inequity in rehabilitation of chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehti, Arja; Fjellman-Wiklund, Anncristine; Stålnacke, Britt-Marie; Hammarström, Anne; Wiklund, Maria

    2017-03-01

    To analyse patient and professional perceptions about (in)equity of care and rehabilitation of chronic pain patients from primary health care to assessment at a specialty rehabilitation clinic. This qualitative study consists one focus group interview with eight general practitioners who refer patients to pain rehabilitation clinics, 10 individual interviews with patients who were assessed at a pain rehabilitation clinic and seven interviews with professionals participating in multimodal assessment teams at a pain rehabilitation clinic. Interview analysis was conducted by the grounded theory method. The core category Via Dolorosa, the way of suffering and pain, captured how gender and sociocultural context may contribute to advantages and disadvantages during patient journeys from primary health care to a pain rehabilitation clinic. Patients and professionals perceived pain as a low-ranking illness, and women and men used different gendered strategies to legitimise the pain and to be taken seriously. Being 'a proper patient ready to change' and having 'likeness' between patients and professionals were viewed as advantageous in rehabilitation of pain patients. Patients with higher educational levels were perceived as easier to interact with and had better access to health care. Professional thoughts about gender norms influenced the rehabilitation options. The rehabilitation programme was seen by several professionals to be better suited for women than men, which could lead to unequal care. From an equity and gender perspective, our study highlights the complexity in rehabilitation of chronic pain patients - both from patient and professional perspectives. Awareness of gendered and the biased preconceptions and norms is crucial when professionals struggle to offer equitable health care and rehabilitation. © 2016 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  10. Crossing the "digital divide:" implementing an electronic medical record system in a rural Kenyan health center to support clinical care and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, William M; Rotich, Joseph K; Smith, Faye E; Bii, John; Einterz, Robert M; Hannan, Terry J

    2002-01-01

    To improve care, one must measure it. In the US, electronic medical record systems have been installed in many institutions to support health care management, quality improvement, and research. Developing countries lack such systems and thus have difficulties managing scarce resources and investigating means of improving health care delivery and outcomes. We describe the implementation and use of the first documented electronic medical record system in ambulatory care in sub-Saharan Africa. After one year, it has captured data for more than 13,000 patients making more than 26,000 visits. We present lessons learned and modifications made to this system to improve its capture of data and ability to support a comprehensive clinical care and research agenda.

  11. Association between shift work and being overweight or obese among health care workers in a clinical setting in Medellin, Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Parra, Myrna; Romero-Arrieta, Lydis; Vasquez-Trespalacios, Elsa Maria; Palacio-Jaramillo, Veronica; Valencia-Martinez, Andrea

    2016-11-22

    Shift work is common in health care settings and has been hypothesized as a risk factor for being overweight or obese. We examined the relation between shift work and being overweight or obese, adjusting for stress and lifestyle habits in Colombian health care workers. The aim of this study was to assess the association between shift work and being overweight/obese in employees of a health care setting in Medellin, Colombia. This cross-sectional study was carried out among 200 workers in a health care setting. Participants completed a demographic, occupational, work-related stress and life style questionnaire. Their Body Mass Index (BMI) and waist to hip ratio were also measured. The study sample consisted of 160 (80%) females and 40 (20%) males. Mean age was 35.1±9.1 years and mean BMI was 25±3.9. After adjusting for potential confounders, multivariate logistic regression revealed no statistically significant association between being overweight, being obese or waist to hip ratio and shift work; 95% CI OR: 1.08 (0.62-1.89), 1.33 (0.44-3.99) and 1.2 (0.8-1.9), respectively. Day workers were statistically more likely to smoke, work more hours, and have a higher educational level than shift workers. No significant associations between shift work and being overweight/obese were observed in health care workers in a Colombian setting. These findings need to be confirmed through longitudinal studies.

  12. Infection prevention in alternative health care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Elaine; Chopra, Teena; Mody, Lona

    2011-03-01

    With the changing health care delivery, patients receive care at various settings, including acute care hospitals, skilled nursing facilities (SNFs), and ambulatory clinics, thus becoming exposed to pathogens. Various health care settings face unique challenges requiring individualized infection control programs. The programs in SNFs should address surveillance for infections and antimicrobial resistance, outbreak investigation and control plan for epidemics, isolation precautions, hand hygiene, staff education, and employee and resident health programs. In ambulatory clinics, the program should address triage and standard transmission-based precautions; cleaning, disinfection, and sterilization principles; surveillance in surgical clinics; safe injection practices; and bioterrorism and disaster planning. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Value as the key concept in the health care system: how it has influenced medical practice and clinical decision-making processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzorati C

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Chiara Marzorati,1,2 Gabriella Pravettoni2,3 1Foundations of the Life Sciences, Bioethics and Cognitive Science, European School of Molecular Medicine (SEMM, 2Applied Research Division for Cognitive and Psychological Science, European Institute of Oncology, 3Department of Oncology and Hemato-Oncology, University of Milan, Milan, Italy Abstract: In the last 10 years, value has played a key role in the health care system. In this concept, innovations in medical practice and the increasing importance of patient centeredness have contributed to draw the attention of the medical community. Nonetheless, a large consensus on the meaning of “value” is still lacking: patients, physicians, policy makers, and other health care professionals have different ideas on which component of value may play a prominent role. Yet, shared clinical decision-making and patient empowerment have been recognized as fundamental features of the concept of value. Different paradigms of health care system embrace different meanings of value, and the absence of common and widely accepted definition does not help to identify a unique model of care in health care system. Our aim is to provide an overview of those paradigms that have considered value as a key theoretical concept and to investigate how the presence of value can influence the medical practice. This article may contribute to draw attention toward patients and propose a possible link between health care system based on “value” and new paradigms such as patient-centered system (PCS, patient empowerment, and P5 medicine, in order to create a predictive, personalized, preventive, participatory, and psycho-cognitive model to treat patients. Indeed, patient empowerment, value-based system, and P5 medicine seem to shed light on different aspects of a PCS, and this allows a better understanding of people under care. Keywords: health care system, value, value-based medicine, patient empowerment, clinical decision

  14. Mental health service utilization is associated with retention in care among persons living with HIV at a university-affiliated HIV clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saag, Lauren A; Tamhane, Ashutosh R; Batey, D Scott; Mugavero, Michael J; Eaton, Ellen F

    2018-01-16

    Mental health (MH) comorbidities reduce retention in care for persons living with HIV (PLWH) and are associated with poor health outcomes. Optimizing retention in primary care is vital, as poor retention is associated with delayed receipt of antiretroviral (ARV) therapy, ARV non-adherence, and poor health outcomes, including failure to suppress viral load, decreased CD4 counts, and clinically significant ARV drug resistance. We hypothesized that MH service utilization would be associated with improved retention in care for patients with HIV and MH comorbidities. This is a retrospective analysis of PLWH initiating outpatient HIV health care at a university-affiliated HIV clinic between January 2007 and December 2013. We examined the association between MH service utilization and retention in care, the outcome of interest, using univariate and multivariable logistic regression. Overall, 627 (84.4%) out of 743 patients were retained in care using the Health Resources & Services Administration HIV/AIDS Bureau (HRSA/HAB) metric. A multivariable model adjusted for several sociodemographic factors, MH comorbidities, and MH service utilization. The results suggest that lack of health insurance (public ORadj = 0.3, p  45 years, ORadj. = 1.6, p = 0.14) and ≥ 3 MH service utilization visits (ORadj. = 6.8, p service utilization. In order to achieve the US-based National HIV/AIDS Strategy goal of 90% retention in care for PLWH, MH service utilization should be considered along with other evidence-based interventions to improve retention for PLWH newly engaged in care.

  15. Group Patient Education: Effectiveness of a Brief Intervention in People with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Primary Health Care in Greece: A Clinically Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merakou, K.; Knithaki, A.; Karageorgos, G.; Theodoridis, D.; Barbouni, A.

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to assess the impact of a brief patient group education intervention in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The sample, 193 people with type 2 diabetes mellitus who were patients at the diabetic clinic of a primary health care setting in Attica, was assigned to two groups, intervention (138 individuals) and control group (55…

  16. Nurses' and patients' communication in smoking cessation at nurse-led COPD clinics in primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efraimsson, Eva Österlund; Klang, Birgitta; Ehrenberg, Anna; Larsson, Kjell; Fossum, Bjöörn; Olai, Lena

    2015-01-01

    Smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have high nicotine dependence making it difficult to quit smoking. Motivational interviewing (MI) is a method that is used in stimulating motivation and behavioral changes. To describe smoking cessation communication between patients and registered nurses trained in MI in COPD nurse-led clinics in Swedish primary health care. A prospective observational study with structured quantitative content analyses of the communication between six nurses with basic education in MI and 13 patients in non-smoking consultations. Only to a small extent did nurses' evoke patients' reasons for change, stimulate collaboration, and support patients' autonomy. Nurses provided information, asked closed questions, and made simple reflections. Patients' communication was mainly neutral and focusing on reasons for and against smoking. It was uncommon for patients to be committed and take steps toward smoking cessation. The nurses did not adhere to the principles of MI in smoking cessation, and the patients focused to a limited extent on how to quit smoking. To make patients more active, the nurses need more education and continuous training in motivational communication.

  17. Randomized clinical trials on Eastern-Western integrative medicine for health care in Korean literature: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myeong Soo; Shin, Byung-Cheul; Choi, Tae-Young; Kim, Jong-In

    2011-01-01

    To summarize and critically evaluate the evidence for and against the effectiveness of Eastern-Western integrative medicine (EWIM) for health care compared to Eastern medicine (EM) or Western medicine (WM) alone. Systematic searches were conducted on five Korean medical databases. Manual searches were also conducted through nine major Korean medical journals. Prospective randomized clinical trials (RCTs) were included if EWIM was tested for any type of conditions compared to EM or WM. There were one hundred forty-one possibly relevant studies were identified, and seven RCTs were included. The risk of bias was high in most studies. The EWIM methods were compared with EM or WM in patients with pain conditions in four studies. These studies showed favorable effects of EWIM on pain reduction in patients with shoulder pain and chronic headache compared with EM, while the other RCTs failed to do so in traffic injury patients. Two studies tested EWIM in patients with Bell's palsy compared with EM and found acute functional improvement. An RCT comparing EWIM with WM in patients with acne showed a significant difference. The results of our systematic review suggest that there is limited evidence for the superiority of EWIM over EM or WM in the treatment of pain and acute symptom improvement in patients with Bell's palsy. The evidence from our analysis was limited from the low number of RCTs included and the high risk of bias. Future RCTs appear to be warranted.

  18. Primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romualdez, A

    1980-01-01

    This paper presents a short discussion of essential concepts in primary health care based on the Alma Ata Declaration of 1978 and a brief description of the Philippine Ministry of Health primary health program. The phrase primary health care implies that PHC is a package of goods to be delivered to people, whereas in fact it is an approach to health care which emphasizes community involvement and participation in health development. Community participation is too often taken to mean that communities should participate in programs designed, implemented, and run by health professionals. PHC however requires that health programs be designed, implemented, run by, and belong to the people of the community. External agencies and health professionals must find ways of becoming involved and participating in the community's programs. A thorough reorientation of health professionals, particularly doctors and nurses, away from technology and toward the ideals and wisdom of the people is needed if PHC is to succeed. PHC should provide the bridge between technological knowledge and indigenous wisdom. The national government is embarking on a nationwide PHC program, with structures being organized at national, regional, provincial, municipal, and barangay levels for PHC. The higher organizational levels are intended to ensure access to their available resources to complement resources at the lower levels, especially at the critical barangay level. Because over 70% of the national population lives in rural areas, the national government's effort through the Ministry of Health will stress rural needs and approaches. Different approaches will be needed for poor urban communities, and the Manila Health Department may be able to provide leadership for developing the new ideas needed to tailor health development programs to Filipino urban communities.

  19. Health care in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weel, C. van; Schers, H.J.; Timmermans, A.

    2012-01-01

    This article analyzes Dutch experiences of health care reform--in particular in primary care--with emphasis on lessons for current United States health care reforms. Recent major innovations were the introduction of private insurance based on the principles of primary care-led health care and

  20. Health care utilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Christian Bøtcher; Andersen, Lotte Bøgh; Serritzlew, Søren

    An important task in governing health services is to control costs. The literatures on both costcontainment and supplier induced demand focus on the effects of economic incentives on health care costs, but insights from these literatures have never been integrated. This paper asks how economic cost...... containment measures affect the utilization of health services, and how these measures interact with the number of patients per provider. Based on very valid register data, this is investigated for 9.556 Danish physiotherapists between 2001 and 2008. We find that higher (relative) fees for a given service...... make health professionals provide more of this service to each patient, but that lower user payment (unexpectedly) does not necessarily mean higher total cost or a stronger association between the number of patients per supplier and the health care utilization. This implies that incentives...

  1. Health Care Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    and people of all ages with End-Stage Renal Disease (permanent kidney failure requiring dialysis or a kidney transplant). Medicaid is a federal and...living care. “Medicine has been slow to confront the very changes that it has been responsible for – or to apply the knowledge we already have about how...challenge to the nation. Challenges of the Industry As already outlined, a number of challenges confront the U.S. health care industry. Below are six

  2. System light-loading technology for mHealth: Manifold-learning-based medical data cleansing and clinical trials in WE-CARE Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Anpeng; Xu, Wenyao; Li, Zhinan; Xie, Linzhen; Sarrafzadeh, Majid; Li, Xiaoming; Cong, Jason

    2014-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major issue to public health. It contributes 41% to the Chinese death rate each year. This huge loss encouraged us to develop a Wearable Efficient teleCARdiology systEm (WE-CARE) for early warning and prevention of CVD risks in real time. WE-CARE is expected to work 24/7 online for mobile health (mHealth) applications. Unfortunately, this purpose is often disrupted in system experiments and clinical trials, even if related enabling technologies work properly. This phenomenon is rooted in the overload issue of complex Electrocardiogram (ECG) data in terms of system integration. In this study, our main objective is to get a system light-loading technology to enable mHealth with a benchmarked ECG anomaly recognition rate. To achieve this objective, we propose an approach to purify clinical features from ECG raw data based on manifold learning, called the Manifold-based ECG-feature Purification algorithm. Our clinical trials verify that our proposal can detect anomalies with a recognition rate of up to 94% which is highly valuable in daily public health-risk alert applications based on clinical criteria. Most importantly, the experiment results demonstrate that the WE-CARE system enabled by our proposal can enhance system reliability by at least two times and reduce false negative rates to 0.76%, and extend the battery life by 40.54%, in the system integration level.

  3. Health care reforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marušič, Dorjan; Prevolnik Rupel, Valentina

    2016-09-01

    In large systems, such as health care, reforms are underway constantly. The article presents a definition of health care reform and factors that influence its success. The factors being discussed range from knowledgeable personnel, the role of involvement of international experts and all stakeholders in the country, the importance of electoral mandate and governmental support, leadership and clear and transparent communication. The goals set need to be clear, and it is helpful to have good data and analytical support in the process. Despite all debates and experiences, it is impossible to clearly define the best approach to tackle health care reform due to a different configuration of governance structure, political will and state of the economy in a country.

  4. Health care reforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marušič Dorjan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In large systems, such as health care, reforms are underway constantly. The article presents a definition of health care reform and factors that influence its success. The factors being discussed range from knowledgeable personnel, the role of involvement of international experts and all stakeholders in the country, the importance of electoral mandate and governmental support, leadership and clear and transparent communication. The goals set need to be clear, and it is helpful to have good data and analytical support in the process. Despite all debates and experiences, it is impossible to clearly define the best approach to tackle health care reform due to a different configuration of governance structure, political will and state of the economy in a country.

  5. Catalog of Completed Health Care and Dental Care Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-01

    3 Austin, V. Medical Data Bases Patient Administration Systems and Biostatistics Activity (PAS&BA) (1986). In Proceedings, 198 AMEDD Forensic ...Health Care Administration, Baylor University, Waco , TX MEMBERSHIP: American Dietetic Association Phi Kappa Phi CERTIFICATION: Registered Dietitian...1986). Proceedings, 1985 AMEDD Forensic Psychology Symrosium, San Antonio, TX: U.S. Army Health Care Studies and Clinical Investigation Activity

  6. Pharmaceutical care in Brazil's primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Patricia Sodré; Costa, Ediná Alves; Guerra, Augusto Afonso; Acurcio, Francisco de Assis; Guibu, Ione Aquemi; Álvares, Juliana; Costa, Karen Sarmento; Karnikowski, Margô Gomes de Oliveira; Soeiro, Orlando Mario; Leite, Silvana Nair

    2017-11-13

    To characterize the activities of clinical nature developed by pharmacists in basic health units and their participation in educational activities aiming at health promotion. This article is part of the Pesquisa Nacional sobre Acesso, Utilização e Promoção do Uso Racional de Medicamentos - Serviços, 2015 (PNAUM - National Survey on Access, Use and Promotion of Rational Use of Medicines - Services, 2015), a cross-sectional and exploratory study, of evaluative nature, consisting of a survey of information in a representative sample of cities, stratified by the Brazilian regions that constitute domains of study, and a subsample of primary health care services. The interviewed pharmacists (n=285) were responsible for the delivery of medicines and were interviewed in person with the use of a script. The characterization of the activities of clinical nature was based on information from pharmacists who declared to perform them, and on participation in educational activities aiming at health promotion, according to information from all pharmacists. The results are presented in frequency and their 95% confidence intervals. From the interviewed subjects, 21.3% said they perform activities of clinical nature. Of these, more than 80% considered them very important; the majority does not dispose of specific places to perform them, which hinders privacy and confidentiality in these activities. The main denominations were "pharmaceutical guidance" and "pharmaceutical care." The registration of activities is mainly made in the users' medical records, computerized system, and in a specific document filed at the pharmacy, impairing the circulation of information among professionals. Most pharmacists performed these activities mainly along with physicians and nurses; 24.7% rarely participated in meetings with the health team, and 19.7% have never participated. Activities of clinical nature performed by pharmacists in Brazil are still incipient. The difficulties found point out

  7. Preventing HIV among U.S. women of color with severe mental illness: perceptions of mental health care providers working in urban community clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agénor, Madina; Collins, Pamela Y

    2013-01-01

    Given their knowledge of the behavioral issues related to psychiatric illness, mental health care providers are in a unique position to help prevent HIV among women with severe mental illness (SMI). We conducted in-depth interviews with providers at two New York City community clinics. We identified three major, interrelated themes pertaining to HIV prevention among women of color with SMI. Interventions that address the barriers that clinicians face in discussing sex, sexuality, and HIV with patients and train providers in the cultural considerations of cross-cultural mental health care are needed to help prevent HIV among women of color with SMI.

  8. Preventing HIV Among U.S. Women of Color With Severe Mental Illness: Perceptions of Mental Health Care Providers Working in Urban Community Clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agénor, Madina; Collins, Pamela Y.

    2013-01-01

    Given their knowledge of the behavioral issues related to psychiatric illness, mental health care providers are in a unique position to help prevent HIV among women with severe mental illness (SMI). We conducted in-depth interviews with providers at two New York City community clinics. We identified three major, interrelated themes pertaining to HIV prevention among women of color with SMI. Interventions that address the barriers that clinicians face in discussing sex, sexuality, and HIV with patients and train providers in the cultural considerations of cross-cultural mental health care are needed to help prevent HIV among women of color with SMI. PMID:23394326

  9. Privatizing health care: caveat emptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, D W

    1990-01-01

    Many Western European countries are moving toward privatization of their health care systems. The United States' health care system, since it is almost entirely privatized, is therefore worthy of study. Doing so raises several questions. How is privatization being managed in the US? How could its management be improved? What management lessons must be kept in mind if it is to be used effectively? What potential pitfalls should European countries consider as they move toward greater privatization? With operating costs, European countries must avoid the mistakes that have led to dramatic increases in annual health care costs in the US, simultaneous with reductions in access and quality. Doing so requires designing systems that promote hospital behavior consistent with a country's health objectives. With capital costs, an approach must be designed that allows policy-makers to work closely with both managers and physicians in order to make strategically sound choices about access and quality. Such an approach will require physicians to incorporate their clinical judgments into community standards of care, and to adopt a regional (rather than an institutional or personal) perspective in the determination of any incremental capital expenditures. By making regulation proactive and strategic, rather than punitive, health policymakers in Western Europe can achieve the best privatization has to offer without feeling the sting of its unintended consequences. In so doing they can help to move their health systems toward achieving the multiple and illusive goals of access, quality and reasonable cost.

  10. Managed consumerism in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, James C

    2005-01-01

    The future of market-oriented health policy and practice lies in "managed consumerism," a blend of the patient-centric focus of consumer-driven health care and the provider-centric focus of managed competition. The optimal locus of incentives will vary among health services according to the nature of the illness, the clinical technology, and the extent of discretion in utilization. A competitive market will manifest a variety of comprehensive and limited benefit designs, broad and narrow contractual networks, and single-and multispecialty provider organizations.

  11. Achieving appropriate design for developing world heath care: the case of a low-cost autoclave for primary health clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hallie S; Tao, Gregory D; Winter, Amos

    2012-01-01

    In developing world health clinics, incidence of surgical site infection is 2 to 10 times higher than in developed world hospitals. This paper identifies lack of availability of appropriately designed, low-cost autoclaves in developing world health clinics as a major contributing factor to the dramatic gap in surgical site infection rates. The paper describes the process of developing a low-cost autoclave that addresses the unique challenges faced by developing world primary health clinics and discusses how appropriateness of design was determined. The resulting pressure cooker-based autoclave design was fabricated and tested against the CDC specifications. Twelve partnering clinics in Nepal trialed these autoclaves from July until December 2012.

  12. Health care professionals' comprehension of the legal status of end-of-life practices in Quebec: study of clinical scenarios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcoux, I.; Boivin, A.; Arsenault, C.; Toupin, M.; Youssef, J.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine health care professionals' understanding of the current legal status of different end-of-life practices and their future legal status if medical aid in dying were legalized, and to identify factors associated with misunderstanding surrounding the current legal status. DESIGN:

  13. Systematic Review of Integrative Health Care Research: Randomized Control Trials, Clinical Controlled Trials, and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    strategies for integrative health care • 157 practice mode studies • 6 database • 14 conference proceedings • 56 editorial • 107 animal study • 10859 not...and R. R. Coeytaux, “Patient-based outcome assessment instruments in acupuncture research,” Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, vol

  14. Newly diagnosed psychogenic nonepileptic seizures: health care demand prior to and following diagnosis at a first seizure clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razvi, Saif; Mulhern, Sharon; Duncan, Roderick

    2012-01-01

    Patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) are heavy users of emergency and nonemergency health care. We performed a 1-year prospective audit of use of a group of PNES-related health care items in patients with newly diagnosed (mean duration: 7.3 months) PNES from PNES onset to diagnosis and from diagnosis to 6 months postdiagnosis. Twenty-eight patients (20 women, age: 34±16 years) were responsible for 14 general practitioner home visits, 31 ambulance calls, 34 emergency department visits, 21 hospital admissions (66 inpatient days), 8 MRI scans, 24 CT scans, 2 standard EEGs, 28 short video EEG recordings, and 5 ambulatory EEG recordings. In the 6 months following diagnosis, there were 2 emergency department visits (94.1% reduction), no hospital admissions (100% reduction), 2 ambulance calls, no general practitioner visits, 1 MRI scan, and no CT scans or EEGs. The immediacy of this marked health care demand reduction suggests that the relationship between presentation of diagnosis and health care demand reduction is causal. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Cancer Survivorship Care Plan Utilization and Impact on Clinical Decision-Making at Point-of-Care Visits with Primary Care: Results from an Engineering, Primary Care, and Oncology Collaborative for Survivorship Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohue, SarahMaria; Haine, James E; Li, Zhanhai; Feldstein, David A; Micek, Mark; Trowbridge, Elizabeth R; Kamnetz, Sandra A; Sosman, James M; Wilke, Lee G; Sesto, Mary E; Tevaarwerk, Amye J

    2017-11-02

    Every cancer survivor and his/her primary care provider should receive an individualized survivorship care plan (SCP) following curative treatment. Little is known regarding point-of-care utilization at primary care visits. We assessed SCP utilization in the clinical context of primary care visits. Primary care physicians and advanced practice providers (APPs) who had seen survivors following provision of an SCP were identified. Eligible primary care physicians and APPs were sent an online survey, evaluating SCP utilization and influence on decision-making at the point-of-care, accompanied by copies of the survivor's SCP and the clinic note. Eighty-eight primary care physicians and APPs were surveyed November 2016, with 40 (45%) responding. Most respondents (60%) reported discussing cancer or related issues during the visit. Information needed included treatment (66%) and follow-up visits, and the cancer team was responsible for (58%) vs primary care (58%). Respondents acquired this information by asking the patient (79%), checking oncology notes (75%), the SCP (17%), or online resources (8%). Barriers to SCP use included being unaware of the SCP (73%), difficulty locating it (30%), and finding needed information faster via another mechanism (15%). Despite largely not using the SCP for the visit (90%), most respondents (61%) believed one would be quite or very helpful for future visits. Most primary care visits included discussion of cancer or cancer-related issues. SCPs may provide the information necessary to deliver optimal survivor care but efforts are needed to reduce barriers and design SCPs for primary care use.

  16. Nursing care community health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Acosta-Salazar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Process Nursing Care (PAE is a systematic tool that facilitates the scientificity of care in community practice nurse, the application of scientific method in community practice, allows nursing to provide care in logical, systematic and comprehensive reassessing interventions to achieve the proposed results. It began with the valuation of Marjory Gordon Functional Patterns and then at the stage of diagnosis and planning North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA, Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC and Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC is interrelate. It is a descriptive and prospective study. Diagnosis was made by applying the instruments measuring scale of the socio-demographic characteristics, symptom questionnaire for early detection of mental disorders in the community and appreciation for functional patterns. The PAE includes more frequent diagnoses, criteria outcomes, indicators, interventions and activities to manage community issues. alteration was evidenced in patterns: Adaptation and Stress Tolerance, Self-perception-Self-concept-, Role-Relationships, sleep and rest and Perception and Health Management. A standardized NANDA-NIC-NOC can provide inter care holistic care from the perspective of community mental health with a degree of scientific nature that frames the professional work projecting the individual, family and community care.

  17. American Health Care Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Program SNF Requirements of Participation SNF Value-Based Purchasing (SNF VBP) Survey and Regulatory Therapy Services Workforce ... out, stay informed and spread. Looking for more information reguarding Prefered Provider Program Quality Care Book Store ... ​ ​​​ ​ Nursing Home Administrator | Benedictine Health System US - MO - St. Louis, Qualifications Required: Bachelor’s degree ...

  18. Home health care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Board Certified in Internal Medicine and Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Atlanta, GA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Home Care Services Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., ...

  19. Accountability in Health Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vrangbæk, Karsten; Byrkjeflot, Haldor

    2016-01-01

    adjustment of such frameworks. In this article we present a framework for analyzing accountability within health care. The paper makes use of the concept of "accountability regime" to signify the combination of different accountability forms, directions and functions at any given point in time. We show...

  20. Ethnic differences in blood pressure control among men at Veterans Affairs clinics and other health care sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Shakaib U; Hutchison, Florence N; Hendrix, Katharine; Okonofua, Eni C; Egan, Brent M

    2005-05-09

    Differential access to health care may contribute to lower blood pressure (BP) control rates to under 140/90 mm Hg in African American compared with white hypertensive patients, especially men (26.5% vs 36.5% of all hypertensive patients in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2000). The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) system, which provides access to health care and medications across ethnic and economic boundaries, may reduce disparities in BP control. To test this hypothesis, BP treatment and control groups were compared between African American (VA, n = 4379; non-VA, n = 2754) and white (VA, n = 7987; non-VA, n = 4980) hypertensive men. In both groups, whites were older than African Americans (Pcardiovascular risk.

  1. Factors associated to clinical learning in nursing students in primary health care: an analytical cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Gallardo, Pilar; Martínez-Marcos, Mercedes; Espejo-Matorrales, Flora; Arakawa, Tiemi; Magnabosco, Gabriela Tavares; Pinto, Ione Carvalho

    2016-09-09

    to identify the students' perception about the quality of clinical placements and asses the influence of the different tutoring processes in clinical learning. analytical cross-sectional study on second and third year nursing students (n=122) about clinical learning in primary health care. The Clinical Placement Evaluation Tool and a synthetic index of attitudes and skills were computed to give scores to the clinical learning (scale 0-10). Univariate, bivariate and multivariate (multiple linear regression) analyses were performed. the response rate was 91.8%. The most commonly identified tutoring process was "preceptor-professor" (45.2%). The clinical placement was assessed as "optimal" by 55.1%, relationship with team-preceptor was considered good by 80.4% of the cases and the average grade for clinical learning was 7.89. The multiple linear regression model with more explanatory capacity included the variables "Academic year" (beta coefficient = 1.042 for third-year students), "Primary Health Care Area (PHC)" (beta coefficient = 0.308 for Area B) and "Clinical placement perception" (beta coefficient = - 0.204 for a suboptimal perception). timeframe within the academic program, location and clinical placement perception were associated with students' clinical learning. Students' perceptions of setting quality were positive and a good team-preceptor relationship is a matter of relevance. identificar a percepção dos estudantes de enfermagem sobre a qualidade das Práticas Clínicas em Atenção Primária à Saúde e avaliar a influência dos diferentes processos de tutoria na aprendizagem clínica. um estudo analítico transversal realizado com alunos do segundo e do terceiro ano de enfermagem (n = 122) na aprendizagem clínica nos serviços de Atenção Primária à Saúde. A Ferramenta de Avaliação de Práticas Clínicas (Clinical Placement Evaluation Tool) e um índice sintético de atitudes e habilidades (escala de 0 a 10) foram calculados para marcar a

  2. Sex differences in the relative contribution of social and clinical factors to the Health Utilities Index Mark 2 measure of health-related quality of life in older home care clients

    OpenAIRE

    Hogan David B; Zhang Jenny X; Walker Jennifer D; Kang Jian; Maxwell Colleen J; Feeny David H; Wodchis Walter P

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The heterogeneity evident among home care clients highlights the need for greater understanding of the clinical and social determinants of multi-dimensional health-related quality of life (HRQL) indices and of potential sex-differences in these determinants. We examined the relative contribution of social and clinical factors to HRQL among older home care clients and explored whether any of the observed associations varied by sex. Methods The Canadian-US sample included 51...

  3. Day-care management of children with severe malnutrition in an urban health clinic in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, H; Ahmed, T; Hossain, M I; Alam, N H; Mahmud, R; Kamal, S M; Salam, M A; Fuchs, G J

    2007-06-01

    Management of severely malnourished children with associated complications relies on hospital-based treatment. Implementation of a standardized protocol at the Dhaka Hospital, ICDDR,B reduced case fatality approximately 50%. We developed and prospectively evaluated a day-care clinic approach that provided antibiotics, micronutrients and feeding during the day with continued care by parents at home at night as an alternative to hospitalization. Severely malnourished children aged 6-23 months denied admission to hospital were enrolled at Radda Clinic, Dhaka and received protocolized management with antibiotics, micronutrients and milk-based diet from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm each day, while mothers were educated on continuation of care at home. They were transitioned to the day-care nutrition rehabilitation (NR) unit of Radda Clinic following resolution of acute illness, received NR diet (Khichuri, halwa and milk-based) daily until children attained 80% weight-for-length. From February 2001 to November 2003, 264 children were enrolled; 52% were boys and 78%, 21% and 1% had marasmus, marasmus-kwashiorkor and kwashiorkor, respectively. Only 13% had severe malnutrition alone while 35% had pneumonia, 35% had diarrhea and 17% had both pneumonia and diarrhea. The mean (SD) duration of acute and NR phases were 8 (4) and 14 (13) days, respectively. Children gained weight [mean (SD) g/kg day] more rapidly during acute 10 (7) than NR phase 6 (5). Successful management was possible in 82% (95% CI 77-86%) children, 12% discontinued treatment and 6% referred to hospitals. Only one child died during NR phase. Severely malnourished children can be successfully managed at existing day-care clinics using a protocolized approach.

  4. Implementing health research through academic and clinical partnerships: a realistic evaluation of the Collaborations for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (CLAHRC)

    OpenAIRE

    Rycroft-Malone, J; Wilkinson, J. E.; Burton, C R; Andrews, G.; Ariss, S; Baker, R.; Dopson, S.; Graham, I; Harvey, G.; Martin, G.; McCormack, B.G.; Staniszewska, S.; Thompson, C.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The English National Health Service has made a major investment in nine partnerships between higher education institutions and local health services called Collaborations for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (CLAHRC). They have been funded to increase capacity and capability to produce and implement research through sustained interactions between academics and health services. CLAHRCs provide a natural 'test bed' for exploring questions about research impleme...

  5. Decentralised paediatric HIV care in Ethiopia: a comparison between outcomes of patients managed in health centres and in a hospital clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oskar Hagströmer

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: In order to increase access to antiretroviral therapy (ART in HIV-infected children, paediatric HIV care has been introduced in health centres in Ethiopia, where patients are managed by health professionals with limited training. Objective: To compare outcomes of paediatric HIV care in hospital and health centre clinics and to determine risk factors for death and loss to follow-up (LTFU. Design: Retrospective comparison of patient characteristics and outcomes among children managed in a public hospital and all five public health centres in the uptake area. Results: Among 1,960 patients (health centres 572, hospital clinic 1,388, 34% were lost to follow-up, 2% died, 14% were transferred out, and 46% remained in care. Children initiating ART in the hospital clinic had lower median CD4 cell counts (age <1 year: 575 vs. 1,183 cells/mm3, p=0.024; age 1–5 years: 370 vs. 598 cells/mm3, p<0.001; age >5 years: 186 vs. 259 cells/mm3, p<0.001, and a higher proportion were <1 year of age (22% vs. 15%, p=0.025. ART initiation rates and retention in care were similar between children managed in health centres and in the hospital clinic (36% vs. 37% and 47% vs. 46%, respectively. Among patients starting ART, mortality was associated with age <1 year [hazard ratio (HR 12.0; 95% confidence interval (CI: 3.5, 41]. LTFU was associated with CD4 cell counts <350 cells/mm3 (HR 1.8; 95% CI: 1.2, 3.0, weight-for-age z-scores below −4 (HR 2.8; 95% CI: 1.4, 5.6, and age <5 years (1–5 years: HR 1.6; 95% CI: 1.0, 2.5; <1 year: HR 3.3; 95% CI: 1.6, 6.6. Conclusions: Outcomes of HIV care were similar for Ethiopian children managed in a hospital clinic or in health centres. However, patients treated at the hospital clinic had characteristics of more advanced disease. Rates of LTFU were high in both types of health facility.

  6. Resistant hypertension: demography and clinical characteristics in 6,292 patients in a primary health care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gijón-Conde, Teresa; Graciani, Auxiliadora; Banegas, José R

    2014-04-01

    The prevalence of resistant hypertension has recently been reported, but there are no studies on its demography. This study aimed to examine the demography and clinical characteristics of resistant hypertension in a large sample of primary care patients. A cross-sectional study was performed of all computerized medical records of hypertensive patients in Health Area 6 of Madrid (Spain). Of 63 167 hypertensive patients, we selected 48 744 with prescription of antihypertensive medication; of these, we selected those who met the American Heart Association criteria for resistant hypertension. A total of 6292 patients had resistant hypertension, representing 9.9% of all hypertensive patients and 12.9% of those treated. A total of 5.5% were 80 years (15.8% men and 31.4% women) (P hypertension was associated with male sex (odds ratio female/male = 0.006; 95% confidence interval, 0.000-0.042; P 80 years, resistant hypertension was associated with female sex (odds ratio female/male = 1.27; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-1,10; P = .004), systolic blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, obesity, chronic kidney disease, coronary heart disease, and atrial fibrillation (P 80 years with resistant hypertension had cardiovascular disease. One in 4 patients with resistant hypertension is > 80 years. Resistant hypertension is associated with cardiovascular disease, age 80 years in women. There is a high proportion of cardiovascular disease in elderly patients with resistant hypertension. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluating a streamlined clinical tool and educational outreach intervention for health care workers in Malawi: the PALM PLUS case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martiniuk Alexandra

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nearly 3 million people in resource-poor countries receive antiretrovirals for the treatment of HIV/AIDS, yet millions more require treatment. Key barriers to treatment scale up are shortages of trained health care workers, and challenges integrating HIV/AIDS care with primary care. The research PALM PLUS (Practical Approach to Lung Health and HIV/AIDS in Malawi is an intervention designed to simplify and integrate existing Malawian national guidelines into a single, simple, user-friendly guideline for mid-level health care workers. Training utilizes a peer-to-peer educational outreach approach. Research is being undertaken to evaluate this intervention to generate evidence that will guide future decision-making for consideration of roll out in Malawi. The research consists of a cluster randomized trial in 30 public health centres in Zomba District that measures the effect of the intervention on staff satisfaction and retention, quality of patient care, and costs through quantitative, qualitative and health economics methods. Results and outcomes In the first phase of qualitative inquiry respondents from intervention sites demonstrated in-depth knowledge of PALM PLUS compared to those from control sites. Participants in intervention sites felt that the PALM PLUS tool empowered them to provide better health services to patients. Interim staff retention data shows that there were, on average, 3 to 4 staff departing from the control and intervention sites per month. Additional qualitative, quantitative and economic analyses are planned. The partnership Dignitas International and the Knowledge Translation Unit at the University of Cape Town Lung Institute have led the adaptation and development of the PALM PLUS intervention, using experience gained through the implementation of the South African precursor, PALSA PLUS. The Malawian partners, REACH Trust and the Research Unit at the Ministry of Health, have led the qualitative and

  8. Controversies in faith and health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomkins, Andrew; Duff, Jean; Fitzgibbon, Atallah; Karam, Azza; Mills, Edward J; Munnings, Keith; Smith, Sally; Seshadri, Shreelata Rao; Steinberg, Avraham; Vitillo, Robert; Yugi, Philemon

    2015-10-31

    Differences in religious faith-based viewpoints (controversies) on the sanctity of human life, acceptable behaviour, health-care technologies and health-care services contribute to the widespread variations in health care worldwide. Faith-linked controversies include family planning, child protection (especially child marriage, female genital mutilation, and immunisation), stigma and harm reduction, violence against women, sexual and reproductive health and HIV, gender, end-of-life issues, and faith activities including prayer. Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, and traditional beliefs have similarities and differences in their viewpoints. Improved understanding by health-care providers of the heterogeneity of viewpoints, both within and between faiths, and their effect on health care is important for clinical medicine, public-health programmes, and health-care policy. Increased appreciation in faith leaders of the effect of their teachings on health care is also crucial. This Series paper outlines some faith-related controversies, describes how they influence health-care provision and uptake, and identifies opportunities for research and increased interaction between faith leaders and health-care providers to improve health care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Empowering self-care ability - a follow-up study of clinical-based perimenopausal women personal health counselling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Chi; Yu, Yen-Yen; Chou, Bee-Chin; Szu, Li-Yun; Tsao, Lee-Ing

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the longitudinal effects of a personal counselling intervention for perimenopausal women in northern Taiwan. Women face a variety of physical changes during menopause. Counselling intervention could enrich individual health education for menopausal women. Quasi-experimental design. The study used one-on-one personal health counselling with a 'menopausal health passport' for perimenopausal women. The Perceived Perimenopausal Disturbances scale, the Practice of Health Behavior scale and the Perceived Uncertainty scale were used to measure the intervention effects. Results were estimated by a Generalized Estimating Equation procedure at one and a half months, three months and six months post intervention. In addition, data regarding perceived health changes were collected qualitatively through interviews in the experimental group at the sixth month. A total of 34 women were included in the experimental group, while 33 were in the control group. Interaction effect results showed that personal health counselling significantly increased the practice of health behaviours at one and a half months and extended to three months post intervention. Additionally, content categories, including 'relief of symptoms', 'establishment of health behaviors', 'interaction with others' and 'consideration from others' were identified in quantitative analysis. The results suggest that perimenopausal personal health counselling can effectively improve healthy behaviours. This study can also serve as a future reference for effective perimenopausal counselling. It is crucial to set up personal health counselling for perimenopausal women in clinics and develop information technology systems to support menopausal women in the technological era. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. A randomised clinical trial of the effectiveness of home-based health care with telemonitoring in patients with COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Janet E; McClean, Sally; FitzGibbon, Francis; Tate, Stephen

    2015-03-01

    We studied the effect of telemonitoring in addition to usual care compared to usual care alone in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). A total of 110 patients with moderate to severe COPD were recruited from a specialist respiratory service in Northern Ireland. Patients had at least two of: emergency department admissions, hospital admissions or emergency general practitioner (GP) contacts in the 12 months before the study. Exclusion criteria were patients who had any respiratory disorder other than COPD, or were cognitively unable to learn the process of monitoring. Patients were randomised to receive six months of home telemonitoring with usual care, or six months of usual care. The primary outcome measure was disease-specific quality of life, as measured by the St George's Respiratory Questionnaire for COPD patients (SGRQ-C). Of 100 patients completing the study, 48 patients were randomised to telemonitoring and 52 patients were randomised to the control group. The SGRQ-C scores improved significantly in the intervention group compared to usual care (P = 0.001). The HADS anxiety score was significantly higher in the telehealth group compared to the usual care group (P = 0.01). There were significantly more contacts with the Community Respiratory Team in the telemonitoring group compared to the control group (P = 0.029). There were no significant between group differences in EQ-5D scores, HADS depression scores, GP activity, emergency department visits, hospital admissions or exacerbations. The total cost to the health service of the intervention over the 6-month study period was £2039, giving an estimated ICER of £203,900. In selected patients with COPD, telemonitoring was effective in improving health-related quality of life and anxiety, but was not a cost-effective intervention. © The Author(s) 2015 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  11. Women's health and behavioral health issues in health care reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Jean Lau; Yee, Barbara W K; Banks, Martha E

    2014-01-01

    As health care reform promises to change the landscape of health care delivery, its potential impact on women's health looms large. Whereas health and mental health systems have historically been fragmented, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) mandates integrated health care as the strategy for reform. Current systems fragment women's health not only in their primary care, mental health, obstetrical, and gynecological needs, but also in their roles as the primary caregivers for parents, spouses, and children. Changes in reimbursement, and in restructuring financing and care coordination systems through accountable care organizations and medical homes, will potentially improve women's health care.

  12. Significance of Staphylococcus epidermidis in Health Care-Associated Infections, from Contaminant to Clinically Relevant Pathogen: This Is a Wake-Up Call!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widerström, Micael

    2016-07-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci, particularly Staphylococcus epidermidis, have been recognized as an important cause of health care-associated infections. Concurrently, S. epidermidis is a common contaminant in clinical cultures, which poses a diagnostic challenge. An article in this issue of Journal of Clinical Microbiology (I. Tolo, J. C. Thomas, R. S. B. Fischer, E. L. Brown, B. M. Gray, and D. A. Robinson, J Clin Microbiol 54:1711-1719, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JCM.03345-15) describes a rapid single nucleotide polymorphism-based assay for distinguishing between S. epidermidis isolates from hospital and nonhospital sources, which represents an important contribution to the characterization and understanding of S. epidermidis health care-associated infections. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Health care utilization and costs associated with adherence to clinical practice guidelines for early magnetic resonance imaging among workers with acute occupational low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Janessa M; Fulton-Kehoe, Deborah; Jarvik, Jeffrey G; Franklin, Gary M

    2014-04-01

    To estimate health care utilization and costs associated with adherence to clinical practice guidelines for the use of early magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; within the first 6 weeks of injury) for acute occupational low back pain (LBP). Washington State Disability Risk Identification Study Cohort (D-RISC), consisting of administrative claims and patient interview data from workers' compensation claimants (2002-2004). In this prospective, population-based cohort study, we compared health care utilization and costs among workers whose imaging was adherent to guidelines (no early MRI) to workers whose imaging was not adherent to guidelines (early MRI in the absence of red flags). We identified workers (age>18) with work-related LBP using administrative claims. We obtained demographic, injury, health, and employment information through telephone interviews to adjust for baseline differences between groups. We ascertained health care utilization and costs from administrative claims for 1 year following injury. Of 1,770 workers, 336 (19.0 percent) were classified as nonadherent to guidelines. Outpatient and physical/occupational therapy utilization was 52-54 percent higher for workers whose imaging was not adherent to guidelines compared to workers with guideline-adherent imaging; utilization of chiropractic care was significantly lower (18 percent). Nonadherence to guidelines for early MRI was associated with increased likelihood of lumbosacral injections or surgery and higher costs for out-patient, inpatient, and nonmedical services, and disability compensation. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  14. [Primary health care contributes to global health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aabenhus, Mette Morre; Schriver, Michael; Kallestrup, Per

    2012-05-28

    Global health interventions often focus on specific diseases, thus forming vertical programmes. Studies show that vertical programmes perform poorly, which underlines the need for a horizontal basis: universal community-based primary health care, which improves health equity and outcomes. The diagonal approach supports an integrated patient-centered health-care system. The ''15% by 2015''-initiative suggests that vertical programmes invest 15% of their budgets in strengthening integrated primary health care. Strategies depend on local context.

  15. Rural Health Clinics (RHCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Professional Shortage Area (HPSA). The J-I Visa Waiver allows international medical graduates who have pursued ... reimbursement payment rate per visit throughout the clinic's fiscal year, which is then reconciled through cost reporting ...

  16. Effect evaluation of a supervised versus non-supervised implementation of an oral health care guideline in nursing homes: a cluster randomised controlled clinical trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visschere, L. De; Schols, J.; Putten, G.J. van der; Baat, C. de; Vanobbergen, J.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare a supervised versus a non-supervised implementation of an oral health care guideline in Flanders (Belgium). BACKGROUND: The key factor in realising good oral health is daily oral hygiene care. In 2007, the Dutch guideline 'Oral health care in care homes for elderly people' was

  17. Preventing HIV Among U.S. Women of Color With Severe Mental Illness: Perceptions of Mental Health Care Providers Working in Urban Community Clinics

    OpenAIRE

    Agénor, Madina; Collins, Pamela Y.

    2013-01-01

    Given their knowledge of the behavioral issues related to psychiatric illness, mental health care providers are in a unique position to help prevent HIV among women with severe mental illness (SMI). We conducted in-depth interviews with providers at two New York City community clinics. We identified three major, interrelated themes pertaining to HIV prevention among women of color with SMI. Interventions that address the barriers that clinicians face in discussing sex, sexuality, and HIV with...

  18. Acute mental health care and South African mental health legislation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. Reliable data is necessary to facilitate the effective planning, management and restructuring of mental health care facilities. Access to accurate information on clinical conditions, treatment outcomes and expenditure is essential to ensure accountability, quality and cost-effective mental health care. This article is ...

  19. Acute mental health care and South African mental health legislation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This is the first of three reports on a follow-up review of mental health care at Helen Joseph Hospital (HJH). In this first part, qualitative and quantitative descriptions were made of the services and of demographic and clinical data on acute mental health care users managed at HJH, in a retrospective review of ...

  20. Characterization of knee osteoarthritis in Latin America. A comparative analysis of clinical and health care utilization in Argentina, Brazil, and Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos-Vargas, Rubén; Cardiel, Mario H; Loyola-Sánchez, Adalberto; De Abreu, Mirhelen Mendes; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A; Rossignol, Michel; Avouac, Bernard; Ferraz, Marcos Bosi; Halhol, Hafid

    2014-01-01

    The burden of knee osteoarthritis (OA) in Latin America is unknown. To determine the demographic, clinical, and therapeutic characteristics of patients with OA in Argentina, Brazil, and Mexico. This is an observational, cross-sectional study of patients with symptomatic knee OA referred from first care medical centers to Rheumatology departments. We included 1210 patients (Argentina 398, Brazil 402, Mexico 410; mean age 61.8 [12] years; 80.8% females). Knee OA pain lasted for 69 months; the duration and severity of the last episode were 190 days and (SD 5.2 [3.3]; 74% had functional limitations, but very few patients lost their job because of knee OA. Around 71% had taken medications, but 63% relied on their own pocket to afford knee OA cost. Most demographic and clinical variables differed across countries, particularly the level of pain, disability, treatment, and access to care. The variable country of origin influenced the level of pain, disability, and NSAIDs use in logistic regression models; age, pain, treatment, and health care access influenced at least 2 of the models. The burden of knee OA in Latin American depends on demographic, clinical, and therapeutic variables. The role of such variables differs across countries. The level of certain variables is significantly influenced by country of origin and health care system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  1. Attitude and practice of the health care professionals towards the clinical practice guidelines in King Khalid University Hospital in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahabi, Hayfaa A; Alzeidan, Rasmieh A; Fayed, Amel A; Esmaeil, Samia A; Al Aseri, Zohair A

    2011-08-01

    To explore the opinion and practice of the health care providers in King Khalid University Hospital (KKUH) towards clinical practice guidelines (CPGs). A cross-sectional self-reported anonymous survey was distributed to 2225 health care professionals working in KKUH clinical departments. The response rate was 56.5%. The respondents had a positive attitude towards CPGs; 90% thought that CPG unify patients' care and 96% agreed that CPGs improve the quality of services provided. The respondents' practice in using CPGs concurred with their attitude and opinion. A total of 86.3% agreed that CPGs changed the way they manage their patients and 71.8% agreed with the statement that they have already used CPGs in the management of the patients. Compared to nurses, physicians were significantly less likely to use CPGs in practice (P < 0.05); moreover, the practice of using guidelines differs significantly according to the years of experience, with 71% of respondents with experience of 15 years or more using CPGs in the management of their patients, compared to 60% among respondents with less years of experience (P < 0.05). The health care providers at KKUH have positive practice and attitude towards CPGs in general, which could positively influence the future introduction and implementation of evidence-based CPGs. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. COMMUNITY MEDICINE & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajiboro

    @hotmail.com, A.Ehigiegba@shell.com. KEYWORDS. Volunteer,. Obio Cottage. Hospital,. Participants,. Nigeria journal of. COMMUNITY MEDICINE. & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE. Journal of Community Medicine and Primary Health Care.

  3. Types of health care providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Types of health care providers URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001933.htm Types of health care providers To ...

  4. Understanding your health care costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000878.htm Understanding your health care costs To use the sharing features on this ... This is the payment you make for certain health care provider visits and prescriptions. It is a set ...

  5. Long-term success of oral health intervention among care-dependent institutionalized seniors: Findings from a controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwindling, Franz Sebastian; Krisam, Johannes; Hassel, Alexander J; Rammelsberg, Peter; Zenthöfer, Andreas

    2017-09-20

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the long-term effectiveness of oral health education of caregivers in nursing homes with care-dependent and cognitively impaired residents. Fourteen nursing homes with a total of 269 residents were allocated to a control group, with continued normal care, or to an intervention group. Allocation was performed at nursing home level. In the intervention group, caregivers were given oral health education, and ultrasonic cleaning devices were provided to clean removable prostheses. Oral health was assessed at baseline and after 6 and 12 months by use of the Plaque Control Record (PCR), Gingival Bleeding Index (GBI), Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Needs (CPITN) and Denture Hygiene Index (DHI). Mixed models for repeated measures were performed for each target variable, with possible confounding factors (intervention/control group, age, sex, residence location and care-dependence). In the control group, no changes of target variables were observed between baseline and the 6- and 12-month follow-ups. After 6 and 12 months, PCR and DHI were significantly improved in the intervention group. For PCR, the intergroup difference of improvements was -14.4 (95% CI: -21.8; -6.9) after 6 months. After 12 months, the difference was -16.2 (95% CI: -27.7; -4.7). For DHI, the intergroup difference compared to baseline was -15 (95% CI: -23.6; -6.5) after 6 months and -13.3 (95% CI: -24.9; -1.8) after 12 months. There was neither a statistically significant effect on GBI nor on CPITN. Care-dependency showed a substantial trend to smaller improvements in PCR (P = .074), while an inverse effect was apparent for DHI (P home residents over longer periods. Use of ultrasonic devices is a promising means of improving denture hygiene among the severely care-dependent. Such interventions can be easily and cheaply implemented in routine daily care. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Environmental Health: Health Care Reform's Missing Pieces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadope, Cece Modupe; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A series of articles that examine environmental health and discuss health care reform; connections between chlorine, chlorinated pesticides, and dioxins and reproductive disorders and cancers; the rise in asthma; connections between poverty and environmental health problems; and organizations for health care professionals who want to address…

  7. Achieving progress through clinical governance? A national study of health care managers' perceptions in the NHS in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, T; Walshe, K

    2004-10-01

    A national cross sectional study was undertaken to explore the perceptions concerning the importance of, and progress in, aspects of clinical governance among board level and directorate managers in English acute, ambulance, and mental health/learning disabilities (MH/LD) trusts. A stratified sample of acute, ambulance, and mental health/learning disabilities trusts in England (n = 100), from each of which up to 10 board level and 10 directorate level managers were randomly sampled. Fieldwork was undertaken between April and July 2002 using the Organisational Progress in Clinical Governance (OPCG) schedule to explore managers' perceptions of the importance of, and organisational achievement in, 54 clinical governance competency items in five aggregated domains: improving quality; managing risks; improving staff performance; corporate accountability; and leadership and collaboration. The difference between ratings of importance and achievement was termed a shortfall. Of 1916 individuals surveyed, 1177 (61.4%) responded. The competency items considered most important and recording highest perceived achievement related to corporate accountability structures and clinical risks. The highest shortfalls between perceived importance and perceived achievement were reported in joint working across local health communities, feedback of performance data, and user involvement. When aggregated into domains, greatest achievement was perceived in the assurance related areas of corporate accountability and risk management, with considerably less perceived achievement and consequently higher shortfalls in quality improvement and leadership and collaboration. Directorate level managers' perceptions of achievement were found to be significantly lower than those of their board level colleagues on all domains other than improving performance. No differences were found in perceptions of achievement between different types of trusts, or between trusts at different stages in the Commission

  8. A review of the empirical evidence of the value of structuring and coding of clinical information within electronic health records for direct patient care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipak Kalra

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background The case has historically been presented that structured and/or coded electronic health records (EHRs benefit direct patient care, but the evidence base for this is not well documented.Methods We searched for evidence of direct patient care value from the use of structured and/or coded information within EHRs. We interrogated nine international databases from 1990 to 2011. Value was defined using the Institute of Medicine’s six areas for improvement for healthcare systems: effectiveness, safety, patient-centredness, timeliness, efficiency and equitability. We included studies satisfying the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC group criteria.Results Of 5016 potentially eligible papers, 13 studies satisfied our criteria: 10 focused on effectiveness, with eight demonstrating potential for improved proxy and actual clinical outcomes if a structured and/or coded EHR was combined with alerting or advisory systems in a focused clinical domain. Three studies demonstrated improvement in safety outcomes. No studies were found reporting value in relation to patient-centredness, timeliness, efficiency or equitability.Conclusions We conclude that, to date, there has been patchy effort to investigate empirically the value from structuring and coding EHRs for direct patient care. Future investments in structuring and coding of EHRs should be informed by robust evidence as to the clinical scenarios in which patient care benefits may be realised.

  9. Impact of direct-to-consumer predictive genomic testing on risk perception and worry among patients receiving routine care in a preventive health clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Katherine M; Cowl, Clayton T; Tilburt, Jon C; Sinicrope, Pamela S; Robinson, Marguerite E; Frimannsdottir, Katrin R; Tiedje, Kristina; Koenig, Barbara A

    2011-10-01

    To assess the impact of direct-to-consumer (DTC) predictive genomic risk information on perceived risk and worry in the context of routine clinical care. Patients attending a preventive medicine clinic between June 1 and December 18, 2009, were randomly assigned to receive either genomic risk information from a DTC product plus usual care (n=74) or usual care alone (n=76). At intervals of 1 week and 1 year after their clinic visit, participants completed surveys containing validated measures of risk perception and levels of worry associated with the 12 conditions assessed by the DTC product. Of 345 patients approached, 150 (43%) agreed to participate, 64 (19%) refused, and 131 (38%) did not respond. Compared with those receiving usual care, participants who received genomic risk information initially rated their risk as higher for 4 conditions (abdominal aneurysm [P=.001], Graves disease [P=.04], obesity [P=.01], and osteoarthritis [P=.04]) and lower for one (prostate cancer [P=.02]). Although differences were not significant, they also reported higher levels of worry for 7 conditions and lower levels for 5 others. At 1 year, there were no significant differences between groups. Predictive genomic risk information modestly influences risk perception and worry. The extent and direction of this influence may depend on the condition being tested and its baseline prominence in preventive health care and may attenuate with time.

  10. Clinicians' perspectives on patient satisfaction in adult congenital heart disease clinics--a dimension of health care quality whose time has come.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenblum, Ronen; Gianola, Ann; Ionescu-Ittu, Raluca; Verstappen, Amy; Landzberg, Michael; Gurvitz, Michelle; Jenkins, Kathy; Bates, David W; Marelli, Ariane J

    2015-01-01

    Patient-centered care and patient satisfaction represent key dimensions of health care quality. This is relevant for the growing number of patients with life-long conditions. In the present study, our goal was to examine clinicians' attitudes and behavior with respect to patient satisfaction in adult congenital heart disease outpatient clinics. A 34-question survey was developed to assess adult congenital heart disease clinicians' awareness, attitudes, and behavior relative to patient satisfaction and administered in-person or online to clinicians from the largely U.S.-based Adult Congenital Heart Association's database of adult congenital heart disease health care providers. Overall, 267 questionnaires were filled out: 108 were collected in person (79% response rate) and 159 online (17.5% response rate). Responses were received from physicians (161); nurses (73); physician assistants (20); and others (13). Although 85% of clinicians believed it was important to inquire about patient satisfaction, only 28% reported routinely inquiring about this dimension of care. Only 34% claimed they had adequate training to cope with varying levels of patient satisfaction, 44% stated that their department utilized patient satisfaction surveys, and 37% received feedback from the hospital management in the preceding 12 months. In multivariate analyses, clinicians that received feedback from the hospital management and had adequate training were more likely to inquire about patient satisfaction. Although patient satisfaction is perceived as an important dimension of quality care by adult congenital heart disease clinicians, most of them reported insufficient institutional support to achieve this. Our findings suggest that clinicians would benefit from health care organizations engaging them in the delivery of this dimension of health care quality. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Developing a Health Care System for Children in Foster Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, Mary V; Beal, Sarah J

    2017-09-01

    In 2012, the Comprehensive Health Evaluations for Cincinnati's Kids (CHECK) Center was launched at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center to provide health care for over 1,000 children placed into foster care each year in the Cincinnati community. This consultation model clinical program was developed because children in foster care have been difficult to manage in the traditional health care setting due to unmet health needs, missing medical records, cumbersome state mandates, and transient and impoverished social settings. This case study describes the history and creation of the CHECK Center, demonstrating the development of a successful foster care health delivery system that is inclusive of all community partners, tailored for the needs and resources of the community, and able to adapt and respond to new information and changing systems.

  12. Family dental health care service

    OpenAIRE

    Riana Wardani

    2008-01-01

    The Family Dental Health Care Service is a new approach that includes efforts to serve oral and dental patients that focuses on maintenance, improvement and protection. This oral and dental health approach uses basic dentistry science and technology. The vision of the Family Dental Health Care Service is the family independences in the effort of dental health maintenance and to achieve the highest oral and dental health degree as possible through family dentist care that is efficient, effecti...

  13. Costs associated with workdays lost and utilization of health care resources because of asthma in daily clinical practice in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, P; Sanz de Burgoa, V

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is associated with high indirect costs due to lower work productivity and higher absenteeism and presenteeism. To study loss of productivity measured using the lost workday equivalent (LWDE) index and health care utilization in asthmatics depending on age, geographical location, time period, severity, and level of asthma control. In this cross-sectional, observational, epidemiological multicenter study, 120 allergists nationwide were asked to select asthmatic patients aged 18 to 65 years who were evenly distributed according to the 4 levels of asthma severity (Global Initiative on Asthma) during 3 different seasons. The participants collected sociodemographic data, spirometry values, Asthma Control Test (ACT) score, health care utilization data, perceived stress according to the Impact on Work Productivity Index (IMPALA, indice del Impacto de la Enfermedad en la Productividad Laboral), and score on the Sheehan disability scale. The LWDE index was used to measure the number of workdays lost and the number of workdays with asthma symptoms combined with the percentage for average performance at work. The study sample comprised 1098 patients (58.7% females; 48.5% aged 18-40 and 51.5% aged 41-65). According to the ACT score, disease was uncontrolled in 57.6% of patients, well controlled in 32.8%, and totally controlled in 9.6%. The mean cost due to workdays lost was Euro 285.81/patient/mo (95% CI, Euro 252.71-318.92). Indirect costs were significantly higher in older patients (41-65 years, Euro 405.08; 95% CI, 348.97-461.19), patients with more severe disease (Euro 698.95; 95% CI, 588.63-809.27), and patients with more poorly controlled asthma (Euro 466.86; 95% CI, Euro 414.39-519.33). The average cost of health care units per patient for each 3-month period was Euro1317.30 (95% CI, Euro 1151.34-Euro 1483.26). Indirect costs were significantly higher in older patients (Euro 2104.00 in patients aged 18-40 vs Euro 3301.55 in patients aged 41-65), in northern and

  14. Self-care as a health resource of elders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høy, Bente; Hall, E.O.C.; Wagner, L.

    2007-01-01

    into self-care as a significant health resource of elders with different health status. It suggests that an elder's self-care ability is determined by the interaction of various sub-resources and conditions and emphasizes the constantly evolving nature of self-care. The framework may be of use in clinical......AIM: To review the literature related to self-care and health promotion for elders and to develop an understanding of self-care as a health resource. BACKGROUND: Self-care may improve health and prevent illness and disabilities in elders. Although studies of self-care are numerous, the significance...... of the concept as a health resource for elders lacks clarity. Before 1989, research focused principally on medical self-care at the expense of health care, and self-care was seen more as supplementary to professional health care rather than as a health-promoting approach in health care. METHOD...

  15. International health care spending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schieber, G J; Puollier, J P

    1986-01-01

    Trends in health are reviewed for the member countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) covering the following: the basic difficulties inherent in international comparative studies; the absolute levels of health expenditures in 1984; the levels and rates of growth of the health share in the gross domestic product (GDP) and the public share of total health expenditures; the elasticities of real health expenditures to real GDP for the 1960-75, 1975-84, and 1960-84 time periods; growth in health expenditures for the largest 7 OECD countries in terms of growth in population, health prices, health care prices in excess of overall prices, and utilization/intensity of services per person. International comparisons are a problem due to differences in defining the boundaries of the health sector, the heterogeneity of data, and methodological problems arising from comparing different economic, demographic, cultural, and institutional structures. The most difficult problem in international comparisons of health expenditures is lack of appropriate measures of health outcome. Exhibit 1 contains per capita health expenditures denominated in US dollars based on GDP purchasing power parities for 21 OECD countries for 1984. Per capita health expenditures ranged from less than $500 in Greece, Portugal, and Spain to over $1400 in Sweden and the US, with an OECD average of $871. After adjusting for price level differences, there still appears to be a greater than 3-fold difference in the "volume" of services consumed across the OECD countries. To determine if per capita health expenditures are related to a country's wealth as measured by its per capita GDP, the relationship between per capita health expenditures and per capita GDP for the 21 countries were examined for 1984. The data points and the "best fitting" trend line indicate a statistically significant relationship in which each $100 difference in per capita GDP is associated with a $10

  16. Effects of a nurse-led transitional care program on clinical outcomes, health-related knowledge, physical and mental health status among Chinese patients with coronary artery disease: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pan; Hu, Yu-Ding; Xing, Feng-Mei; Li, Chang-Zai; Lan, Wang-Feng; Zhang, Xiao-Li

    2017-09-01

    Coronary artery disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among adults worldwide, including China. After a hospital stay, transitional care could help to ensure improved patient care and outcomes, and reduce Medicare costs. Nevertheless, the results of the existing transitional care are not always satisfactory and our knowledge of how to perform effective transitional care for patients with coronary artery disease is limited in mainland China. To examine the effectiveness of a nurse-led transitional care program on clinical outcomes, health-related knowledge, and physical and mental health status among Chinese patients with coronary artery disease. Randomized controlled trial. The Omaha system and Pender's health promoting model were employed in planning and implementing this nurse-led transitional care program. The sample was comprised of 199 Chinese patients with coronary artery disease. The experimental group (n=100) received nurse-led transitional care intervention in addition to routine care. The nurse-led transitional care intervention included a structured assessment and health education, followed by 7 months of individual teaching and coaching (home visits, telephone follow-up and group activity). The control group (n=99) received a comparable length routine care and follow-up contacts. Evaluations were conducted at baseline and completion of the interventions using the perceived knowledge scale for coronary heart disease, the medical outcomes study 36-item short-form health survey and clinical measures (blood pressure, blood glucose, lipids, body mass index). Data were collected between March and October 2014. Compared with the control group, participants in the experimental group showed significant better clinical outcomes (systolic blood pressure, t=5.762, P=0.000; diastolic blood pressure, t=4.250, P=0.000; fasting blood glucose, t=2.249, P=0.027; total cholesterol, t=4.362, P=0.000; triglyceride, t=3.147, P=0.002; low density lipoprotein

  17. From Systematic Reviews to Clinical Recommendations for Evidence-Based Health Care: Validation of Revised Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (R-AMSTAR) for Grading of Clinical Relevance

    OpenAIRE

    Kung, Jason; Chiappelli, Francesco; Cajulis, Olivia O; Avezova, Raisa; Kossan, George; Chew, Laura; Maida, Carl A

    2010-01-01

    Research synthesis seeks to gather, examine and evaluate systematically research reports that converge toward answering a carefully crafted research question, which states the problem patient population, the intervention under consideration, and the clinical outcome of interest. The product of the process of systematically reviewing the research literature pertinent to the research question thusly stated is the ?systematic review?. The objective and transparent approach of the systematic revi...

  18. National audit of continence care: adherence to National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidance in older versus younger adults with faecal incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harari, Danielle; Husk, Janet; Lowe, Derek; Wagg, Adrian

    2014-11-01

    previous UK National Audits of Continence Care showed low rates of assessment and treatment of faecal incontinence (FI) in older people. the 2009 audit assessed adherence to the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence guidelines on management of FI and compared care in older versus younger patients. fifteen older (65+) and 15 younger (18-65) patients with FI were to be audited in hospital (inpatient or outpatient), primary care (PC) and care home sites. data were submitted for n = 2,930 cases from 133 hospitals, n = 1,729 from 97 PC surgeries and n = 693 from 63 care homes. Bowel history was not documented in 41% older versus 24% younger patients in hospitals and 27 versus 19% in PC (both P older people, there was no documented focused examination in one-third in hospitals, one-half in PC and three-quarters in care homes. Overall, older people. Clinicians, including geriatricians, need to lead on improving care in older people including comprehensive assessment where needed. Improvement in some indicators in older people with successive audits suggests that ongoing national audit with linked information resources can be useful as both monitor and agent for change. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) for clinically distressed health care workers: Waitlist-controlled evaluation of an ACT workshop in a routine practice setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Cerith S; Frude, Neil; Flaxman, Paul E; Boyd, Jane

    2018-03-01

    To examine the effects of a 1-day acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) workshop on the mental health of clinically distressed health care employees, and to explore ACT's processes of change in a routine practice setting. A quasi-controlled design, with participants block allocated to an ACT intervention or waiting list control group based on self-referral date. Participants were 35 health care workers who had self-referred for the ACT workshop via a clinical support service for staff. Measures were completed by ACT and control group participants at pre-intervention and 3 months post-intervention. Participants allocated to the waitlist condition went on to receive the ACT intervention and were also assessed 3 months later. At 3 months post-intervention, participants in the ACT group reported a significantly lower level of psychological distress compared to the control group (d = 1.41). Across the 3-month evaluation period, clinically significant change was exhibited by 50% of ACT participants, compared to 0% in the control group. When the control group received the same ACT intervention, 69% went on to exhibit clinically significant change. The ACT intervention also resulted in significant improvements in psychological flexibility, defusion, and mindfulness skills, but did not significantly reduce the frequency of negative cognitions. Bootstrapped mediation analyses indicated that the reduction in distress in the ACT condition was primarily associated with an increase in mindfulness skills, especially observing and non-reactivity. These findings provide preliminary support for providing brief ACT interventions as part of routine clinical support services for distressed workers. A 1-day ACT workshop delivered in the context of a routine staff support service was effective for reducing psychological distress among health care workers. The brief nature of this group intervention means it may be particularly suitable for staff support and primary care mental

  20. Health care need

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasman, Andreas; Hope, Tony; Østerdal, Lars Peter

    2006-01-01

    The argument that scarce health care resources should be distributed so that patients in 'need' are given priority for treatment is rarely contested. In this paper, we argue that if need is to play a significant role in distributive decisions it is crucial that what is meant by need can be precis......, the three interpretations provide a starting-point for further debate of what the concept means in its specific application. We discuss combined interpretations, the meaning of grading needs, and compare needs-based priority setting to social welfare maximisation...

  1. The Teamwork Mini-Clinical Evaluation Exercise (T-MEX): a workplace-based assessment focusing on collaborative competencies in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olupeliyawa, Asela M; O'Sullivan, Anthony J; Hughes, Chris; Balasooriya, Chinthaka D

    2014-02-01

    Teamwork is an important and challenging area of learning during the transition from medical graduate to intern. This preliminary investigation examined the psychometric and logistic properties of the Teamwork Mini-Clinical Evaluation Exercise (T-MEX) for the workplace-based assessment of key competencies in working with health care teams. The authors designed the T-MEX for direct observation and assessment of six collaborative behaviors in seven clinical situations important for teamwork, feedback, and reflection. In 2010, they tested it on University of New South Wales senior medical students during their last six-week clinical term to investigate its overall utility, including validity and reliability. Assessors rated students in different situations on the extent to which they met expectations for interns for each collaborative behavior. Both assessors and students rated the tool's usefulness and feasibility. Assessment forms for 88 observed encounters were submitted by 25 students. The T-MEX was suited to a broad range of collaborative clinical practice situations, as evidenced by the encounter types and the behaviors assessed by health care team members. The internal structure of the behavior ratings indicated construct validity. A generalizability study found that eight encounters were adequate for high-stakes measurement purposes. The mean times for observation and feedback and the participants' perceptions suggested usefulness for feedback and feasibility in busy clinical settings. Findings suggest that the T-MEX has good utility for assessing trainee competence in working with health care teams. It fills a gap within the suite of existing tools for workplace-based assessment of professional attributes.

  2. Access and care issues in urban urgent care clinic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adams Jill C

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although primary care should be the cornerstone of medical practice, inappropriate use of urgent care for non-urgent patients is a growing problem that has significant economic and healthcare consequences. The characteristics of patients who choose the urgent care setting, as well as the reasoning behind their decisions, is not well established. The purpose of this study was to determine the motivation behind, and characteristics of, adult patients who choose to access health care in our urgent care clinic. The relevance of understanding the motivation driving this patient population is especially pertinent given recent trends towards universal healthcare and the unclear impact it may have on the demands of urgent care. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey of patients seeking care at an urgent care clinic (UCC within a large acute care safety-net urban hospital over a six-week period. Survey data included demographics, social and economic information, reasons that patients chose a UCC, previous primary care exposure, reasons for delaying care, and preventive care needs. Results A total of 1, 006 patients were randomly surveyed. Twenty-five percent of patients identified Spanish as their preferred language. Fifty-four percent of patients reported choosing the UCC due to not having to make an appointment, 51.2% because it was convenient, 43.9% because of same day test results, 42.7% because of ability to get same-day medications and 15.1% because co-payment was not mandatory. Lack of a regular physician was reported by 67.9% of patients and 57.2% lacked a regular source of care. Patients reported delaying access to care for a variety of reasons. Conclusion Despite a common belief that patients seek care in the urgent care setting primarily for economic reasons, this study suggests that patients choose the urgent care setting based largely on convenience and more timely care. This information is especially applicable to

  3. Access and care issues in urban urgent care clinic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, David R; Batal, Holly A; Majeres, Sharon; Adams, Jill C; Dale, Rita; Mehler, Philip S

    2009-12-04

    Although primary care should be the cornerstone of medical practice, inappropriate use of urgent care for non-urgent patients is a growing problem that has significant economic and healthcare consequences. The characteristics of patients who choose the urgent care setting, as well as the reasoning behind their decisions, is not well established. The purpose of this study was to determine the motivation behind, and characteristics of, adult patients who choose to access health care in our urgent care clinic. The relevance of understanding the motivation driving this patient population is especially pertinent given recent trends towards universal healthcare and the unclear impact it may have on the demands of urgent care. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of patients seeking care at an urgent care clinic (UCC) within a large acute care safety-net urban hospital over a six-week period. Survey data included demographics, social and economic information, reasons that patients chose a UCC, previous primary care exposure, reasons for delaying care, and preventive care needs. A total of 1, 006 patients were randomly surveyed. Twenty-five percent of patients identified Spanish as their preferred language. Fifty-four percent of patients reported choosing the UCC due to not having to make an appointment, 51.2% because it was convenient, 43.9% because of same day test results, 42.7% because of ability to get same-day medications and 15.1% because co-payment was not mandatory. Lack of a regular physician was reported by 67.9% of patients and 57.2% lacked a regular source of care. Patients reported delaying access to care for a variety of reasons. Despite a common belief that patients seek care in the urgent care setting primarily for economic reasons, this study suggests that patients choose the urgent care setting based largely on convenience and more timely care. This information is especially applicable to the potential increase in urgent care volume in a universal

  4. Clinical effectiveness of an ultra-brief intervention for common mental health syndromes in primary care: study protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collings, Sunny; Mathieson, Fiona; Dowell, Anthony; Stanley, James; Hatcher, Simon; Goodyear-Smith, Felicity; Lane, Brigitte; Munsterman, Amy

    2015-06-05

    Although mild to moderate mental health problems are common and often debilitating, treatment options in primary care settings in New Zealand are often severely limited for patients with these conditions. Previously, we developed an ultra-brief intervention (UBI) to address mild to moderate psychological concerns, designed to be delivered by primary care clinicians. Recent feasibility testing, including an adaptation for Māori individuals (the indigenous people of New Zealand), showed that the brief intervention was feasible and acceptable to both clinicians and their patients. This protocol describes a large pragmatic randomized controlled trial of our UBI in primary care settings across the greater Wellington region, compared with practice as usual. We are using a two-arm cluster randomized controlled trial, with primary care practices randomized to exclusively deliver either the UBI or practice as usual to all their recruited participants. The structured, guided self-help UBI is delivered in three brief general practitioner (GP) appointments over a five week period. Participants are invited into the study based on partner primary health organization access criteria (youth, people with low income, or people with Māori or Pacific Island heritage). Improvements in mental health from baseline to post-treatment will be compared between the intervention and control groups using a mixed-models application of analysis of covariance. Data analysis will be on an intention-to-treat basis, to increase the real-world relevance of UBI and to meet the study's objective of releasing UBI to primary care clinicians nationwide. The UBI is a first-line intervention tool for GPs that models the stepped care approach advocated in New Zealand, against a background of limited access to treatments for often-overlooked patient groups. It is proposed to be accessible to clinicians and patients alike, with the potential to be relevant to primary care clinicians across New Zealand

  5. FastStats: Home Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adult Day Services Centers Home Health Care Hospice Care Nursing Home Care Residential Care Communities Screenings Mammography Pap ... Centers Hospice Care National Study of Long-Term Care Providers Nursing Home Care Residential Care Communities Centers for Medicare ...

  6. Effect of a Primary Care Management Intervention on Mental Health-Related Quality of Life Among Survivors of Sepsis: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Konrad; Worrack, Susanne; Von Korff, Michael; Davydow, Dimitry; Brunkhorst, Frank; Ehlert, Ulrike; Pausch, Christine; Mehlhorn, Juliane; Schneider, Nico; Scherag, André; Freytag, Antje; Reinhart, Konrad; Wensing, Michel; Gensichen, Jochen

    2016-06-28

    Survivors of sepsis face long-term sequelae that diminish health-related quality of life and result in increased care needs in the primary care setting, such as medication, physiotherapy, or mental health care. To examine if a primary care-based intervention improves mental health-related quality of life. Randomized clinical trial conducted between February 2011 and December 2014, enrolling 291 patients 18 years or older who survived sepsis (including septic shock), recruited from 9 intensive care units (ICUs) across Germany. Participants were randomized to usual care (n = 143) or to a 12-month intervention (n = 148). Usual care was provided by their primary care physician (PCP) and included periodic contacts, referrals to specialists, and prescription of medication, other treatment, or both. The intervention additionally included PCP and patient training, case management provided by trained nurses, and clinical decision support for PCPs by consulting physicians. The primary outcome was change in mental health-related quality of life between ICU discharge and 6 months after ICU discharge using the Mental Component Summary (MCS) of the 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36 [range, 0-100; higher ratings indicate lower impairment; minimal clinically important difference, 5 score points]). The mean age of the 291 patients was 61.6 years (SD, 14.4); 66.2% (n = 192) were men, and 84.4% (n = 244) required mechanical ventilation during their ICU stay (median duration of ventilation, 12 days [range, 0-134]). At 6 and 12 months after ICU discharge, 75.3% (n = 219 [112 intervention, 107 control]) and 69.4% (n = 202 [107 intervention, 95 control]), respectively, completed follow-up. Overall mortality was 13.7% at 6 months (40 deaths [21 intervention, 19 control]) and 18.2% at 12 months (53 deaths [27 intervention, 26 control]). Among patients in the intervention group, 104 (70.3%) received the intervention at high levels of integrity. There was no

  7. Implementing electronic health care predictive analytics: considerations and challenges

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Amarasingham, Ruben; Patzer, Rachel E; Huesch, Marco; Nguyen, Nam Q; Xie, Bin

    2014-01-01

    .... Integrating electronic health care predictive analytics (e-HPA) into the clinical work flow, testing e-HPA in a patient population, and subsequently disseminating e-HPA across US health care systems on a broad scale require thoughtful planning...

  8. Task Force on Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-09-01

    The five leading issues identified, in order of importance, were 1. The need for treatment outcome and efficacy data. 2. The need for changes in clinical and academic preparation of entry-level practitioners. 3. The lack of inclusion or use of services for communication and related disorders in public and private health care programs. 4. The need for greater professional autonomy within the health care system. 5. The need to improve services to underserved populations with communication and related disorders. This report was forwarded to key National Office staff and appropriate ASHA boards, councils, and committees for the purposes of determining its feasibility and developing a national plan for action. The feasibility and action plan will detail completed, ongoing and future activities of the Association related to each issue, recommendation, and strategy. Periodic review of the actions taken and progress achieved will be monitored by the Executive Board, other appropriate boards and councils, and designated National Office staff. The plan represents a progressive view of needed change for the professions of speech-language pathology and audiology within the context of the broader health care delivery system.

  9. Telemedicine in diabetes foot care delivery: health care professionals' experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolltveit, Beate-Christin Hope; Gjengedal, Eva; Graue, Marit; Iversen, Marjolein M; Thorne, Sally; Kirkevold, Marit

    2016-04-18

    Introducing new technology in health care is inevitably a challenge. More knowledge is needed to better plan future telemedicine interventions. Our aim was therefore to explore health care professionals' experience in the initial phase of introducing telemedicine technology in caring for people with diabetic foot ulcers. Our methodological strategy was Interpretive Description. Data were collected between 2014 and 2015 using focus groups (n = 10). Participants from home-based care, primary care and outpatient hospital clinics were recruited from the intervention arm of an ongoing cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT) (Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01710774). Most were nurses (n = 29), but the sample also included one nurse assistant, podiatrists (n = 2) and physicians (n = 2). The participants reported experiencing meaningful changes to their practice arising from telemedicine, especially associated with increased wound assessment knowledge and skills and improved documentation quality. They also experienced more streamlined communication between primary health care and specialist health care. Despite obstacles associated with finding the documentation process time consuming, the participants' attitudes to telemedicine were overwhelmingly positive and their general enthusiasm for the innovation was high. Our findings indicate that using a telemedicine intervention enabled the participating health care professionals to approach their patients with diabetic foot ulcer with more knowledge, better wound assessment skills and heightened confidence. Furthermore, it streamlined the communication between health care levels and helped seeing the patients in a more holistic way.

  10. Mental Health Support Provided Throughout the Bariatric Surgery Clinical Pathway in French Specialized Care Centers for Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamore, Kristopher; Kaci, Sandra S; Czernichow, Sébastien; Bretault, Marion; Bouillot, Jean-Luc; Naudé, Anne-Jeanne; Gribe-Ouaknine, Sandra; Carette, Claire; Flahault, Cécile

    2017-03-01

    Pre-operative psychological assessment is recommended by international guidelines for bariatric surgery candidates. Thereby, service teams caring for bariatric patients should include at least one mental health provider (e.g., a psychologist or psychiatrist). The objective of this study was to evaluate the psychology and psychiatry resources and practices in the 37 specialized obesity centers (CSOs) created by the French Ministry of Health. CSO coordinators were contacted by e-mail to collect general information on the centers (e.g., number of bariatric operations). Secondly, psychologists and psychiatrists of each center completed an anonymous questionnaire assessing their professional practices and their organization of care pathways. The vast majority of CSO coordinators (81%, n = 26/32) answered our survey. These results show significant differences and shortages in terms of the psychology/psychiatry resources available. Most of the psychologists (n = 26/31) and psychiatrists (n = 10/10) stated that they systematically meet new patients only before surgery (56%) or both before and after the operation (30%); however, some psychologists and psychiatrists (14%) do not systematically meet all the patients (before and/or after surgery). Nevertheless, all the professionals provide psychology assessments, and about 75% of them offer a psychological follow-up, indicating a similarity regarding the practices of psychologists and psychiatrists. Our results highlight the place of psychological/psychiatric evaluations in French CSOs and emphasize the absence of mental health providers in several of these services. Post-operative psychological follow-up is not usually provided. It would be appropriate to create clear recommendations for post-operative psychological or psychiatric long-term follow-up.

  11. Optimising health and safety of people who inject drugs during transition from acute to outpatient care: narrative review with clinical checklist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakarar, Kinna; Weinstein, Zoe M; Walley, Alexander Y

    2016-06-01

    The opioid epidemic in the USA continues to worsen. Medical providers are faced with the challenge of addressing complications from opioid use disorders and associated injection drug use. Unsafe injection practices among people who inject drugs (PWID) can lead to several complications requiring acute care encounters in the emergency department and inpatient hospital. Our objective is to provide a narrative review to help medical providers recognise and address key health issues in PWID, who are being released from the emergency department and inpatient hospital. In the midst of rises in overdose deaths and infections such as hepatitis C, we highlight several health issues for PWID, including overdose and infection prevention. We provide a clinical checklist of actions to help guide providers in the care of these complex patients. The clinical checklist includes strategies also applicable to low-resource settings, which may lack addiction treatment options. Our review and clinical checklist highlight key aspects of optimising the health and safety of PWID. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  12. Integrating mental health into primary health care – Uganda's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    This has been a vital activity in the implementation of the programme to equip district health workers with update knowledge and skills to handle mental health care as planned. There has been massive training and re-training of district health workers. Equally urgent, was the need to review general nurses and clinical ...

  13. Development, implementation and evaluation of a clinical research engagement and leadership capacity building program in a large Australian health care service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misso, Marie L; Ilic, Dragan; Haines, Terry P; Hutchinson, Alison M; East, Christine E; Teede, Helena J

    2016-01-14

    Health professionals need to be integrated more effectively in clinical research to ensure that research addresses clinical needs and provides practical solutions at the coal face of care. In light of limited evidence on how best to achieve this, evaluation of strategies to introduce, adapt and sustain evidence-based practices across different populations and settings is required. This project aims to address this gap through the co-design, development, implementation, evaluation, refinement and ultimately scale-up of a clinical research engagement and leadership capacity building program in a clinical setting with little to no co-ordinated approach to clinical research engagement and education. The protocol is based on principles of research capacity building and on a six-step framework, which have previously led to successful implementation and long-term sustainability. A mixed methods study design will be used. Methods will include: (1) a review of the literature about strategies that engage health professionals in research through capacity building and/or education in research methods; (2) a review of existing local research education and support elements; (3) a needs assessment in the local clinical setting, including an online cross-sectional survey and semi-structured interviews; (4) co-design and development of an educational and support program; (5) implementation of the program in the clinical environment; and (6) pre- and post-implementation evaluation and ultimately program scale-up. The evaluation focuses on research activity and knowledge, attitudes and preferences about clinical research, evidence-based practice and leadership and post implementation, about their satisfaction with the program. The investigators will evaluate the feasibility and effect of the program according to capacity building measures and will revise where appropriate prior to scale-up. It is anticipated that this clinical research engagement and leadership capacity building

  14. COMMUNITY MEDICINE & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Client Satisfaction with Antenatal Care Services in Primary Health Care. Centres in Sabon Gari Local Government Area, Kaduna State Nigeria. journal of. COMMUNITY MEDICINE. & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE. 1. 1. 1. M.B Sufiyan , A.A Umar , A. Shugaba . 1Department of Community Medicine, Ahmadu Bello University, ...

  15. Reforming the health care system: implications for health care marketers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrochuk, M A; Javalgi, R G

    1996-01-01

    Health care reform has become the dominant domestic policy issue in the United States. President Clinton, and the Democratic leaders in the House and Senate have all proposed legislation to reform the system. Regardless of the plan which is ultimately enacted, health care delivery will be radically changed. Health care marketers, given their perspective, have a unique opportunity to ensure their own institutions' success. Organizational, managerial, and marketing strategies can be employed to deal with the changes which will occur. Marketers can utilize personal strategies to remain proactive and successful during an era of health care reform. As outlined in this article, responding to the health care reform changes requires strategic urgency and action. However, the strategies proposed are practical regardless of the version of health care reform legislation which is ultimately enacted.

  16. Attending Unintended Transformations of Health Care Infrastructure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wentzer, Helle; Bygholm, Ann

    2007-01-01

    of theories on human-computer interaction and IT-mediated communication, different empirical studies of IT implementation in health care are analyzed. The outcome is an analytical discernment between different relations of communication and levels of interaction with IT in health care infrastructure....... These relations and levels are synthesized into a framework for identifying tensions and potential problems in the mediation of health care with the IT system. These problems are also known as unexpected adverse consequences, UACs, from IT implementation into clinical health care practices. Results: This paper...... develops a conceptual framework for addressing transformations of communication and workflow in health care as a result of implementing IT. Conclusion and discussion: The purpose of the conceptual framework is to support the attention to and continuous screening for errors and unintended consequences...

  17. Cognitive systems engineering in health care

    CERN Document Server

    Bisantz, Ann M; Fairbanks, Rollin J

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive Engineering for Better Health Care Systems, Ann M. Bisantz, Rollin J. Fairbanks, and Catherine M. BurnsThe Role of Cognitive Engineering in Improving Clinical Decision Support, Anne Miller and Laura MilitelloTeam Cognitive Work Analysis as an Approach for Understanding Teamwork in Health Care, Catherine M. BurnsCognitive Engineering Design of an Emergency Department Information System, Theresa K. Guarrera, Nicolette M. McGeorge, Lindsey N. Clark, David T. LaVergne, Zachary A. Hettinger, Rollin J. Fairbanks, and Ann M. BisantzDisplays for Health Care Teams: A Conceptual Framework and Design Methodology, Avi ParushInformation Modeling for Cognitive Work in a Health Care System, Priyadarshini R. PennathurSupport for ICU Clinician Cognitive Work through CSE, Christopher Nemeth, Shilo Anders, Jeffrey Brown, Anna Grome, Beth Crandall, and Jeremy PamplinMatching Cognitive Aids and the "Real Work" of Health Care in Support of Surgical Microsystem Teamwork, Sarah Henrickson Parker and Shawna J. PerryEngageme...

  18. The VA Maryland Health Care System's telemental health program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Edward F

    2012-05-01

    The VA Maryland Health Care System introduced videoconferencing technology to provide psychiatry, evidenced-based psychotherapy, case management, and patient education at rural clinics where it was difficult to recruit providers. Telemental health services enable rural clinics to offer additional services, such as case management and patient education. Services have been expanded to urban outpatient clinics where a limited number of mental health clinic hours are available. This technology expands the availability of mental health providers and services, allowing patients to receive services from providers located at distant medical centers.

  19. Integrating Community Health Workers (CHWs) into Health Care Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Julianne; Razi, Sima; Emery, Kyle; Quattrone, Westleigh; Tardif-Douglin, Miriam

    2017-10-01

    Health care organizations increasingly employ community health workers (CHWs) to help address growing provider shortages, improve patient outcomes, and increase access to culturally sensitive care among traditionally inaccessible or disenfranchised patient populations. Scholarly interest in CHWs has grown in recent decades, but researchers tend to focus on how CHWs affect patient outcomes rather than whether and how CHWs fit into the existing health care workforce. This paper focuses on the factors that facilitate and impede the integration of the CHWs into health care organizations, and strategies that organizations and their staff develop to overcome barriers to CHW integration. We use qualitative evaluation data from 13 awardees that received Health Care Innovation Awards from the Centers of Medicare and Medicaid Innovation to enhance the quality of health care, improve health outcomes, and reduce the cost of care using programs involving CHWs. We find that organizational capacity, support for CHWs, clarity about health care roles, and clinical workflow drive CHW integration. We conclude with practical recommendations for health care organizations interested in employing CHWs.

  20. [Assessing the reliability of clinical malaria diagnosis in children consulting in three peripheral health care facilities, in Niakhar rural area, Senegal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munier, A; Diallo, A; Sokhna, C; Senghor, P; Ba, F; Chippaux, J P

    2009-05-01

    A demographic survey site has been implemented in Niakhar rural zone in Senegal since the 1960s and many epidemiological and demographic studies have been conducted in this context. In this Sahelo-Sudanese area, malaria transmission is mesoendemic and mainly seasonal. In health care facilities, malaria real burden is poorly known as malaria diagnosis only relies on patients' clinical signs. The aim of our study was to measure the reliability of malaria diagnosis in these health centres by performing a parasitological confirmation of presumptive malaria cases and by assessing the validity of diagnosis according to child's age. A cross-sectional study was conducted in August-December 2006 (rainy season) and in February-June 2007 (dry season) in three health care facilities of the area (2 public centres and one private dispensary). Children aged 1 to 14 years old and accompanied by an adult were included. Two thick blood smears were carried out for each patient. A total of 474 children were included; among them 208 (43.9%) had a positive blood smear. Among the 335 (70.7%) presumptive malaria cases, 182 (54.3%) were confirmed by thick smear. Sensitivity specificity positive and negative predictive values were respectively 87.5%, 42.6%, 55.3% and 80.7%. Clinical signs which were predictive of confirmed malaria were vomiting and body temperature > or =38 degrees C. Clinical diagnosis performances decreased significantly during the dry season and in children under the age of two. The proportion of true malaria cases (54.3%) confirms the results of previous studies described in literature and shows a consistency for the last twenty years. Malaria is the main diagnosis attributed to patients by health care agents, regardless of the child's age or the season, whereas thick smear results are predominantly negative among children aged less than 2 and during dry season. A better knowledge of malaria morbidity in these health care facilities is an asset for setting up further

  1. Indonesian infertility patients' health seeking behaviour and patterns of access to biomedical infertility care: an interviewer administered survey conducted in three clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Linda Rae; Wiweko, Budi; Hinting, Aucky; Adnyana, I B Putra; Pangestu, Mulyoto

    2012-09-28

    Indonesia has high levels of biological need for infertility treatment, great sociological and psychological demand for children, and yet existing infertility services are underutilized. Access to adequate comprehensive reproductive health services, including infertility care, is a basic reproductive right regardless of the economic circumstances in which individuals are born into. Thus, identifying and implementing strategies to improve access to assisted reproductive technology (ART) in Indonesia is imperative. The principle objectives of this article are to improve our understanding of infertility patients' patterns of health seeking behaviour and their patterns of access to infertility treatment in Indonesia, in order to highlight the possibilities for improving access. An interviewer-administered survey was conducted with 212 female infertility patients recruited through three Indonesian infertility clinics between July and September 2011. Participants were self-selected and data was subject to descriptive statistical analysis. Patients identified a number of barriers to access, including: low confidence in infertility treatment and high rates of switching between providers due to perceived treatment failure; the number and location of clinics; the lack of a well established referral system; the cost of treatment; and patients also experienced fear of receiving a diagnosis of sterility, of vaginal examinations and of embarrassment. Women's age of marriage and the timing of their initial presentation to gynaecologists were not found to be barriers to timely access to infertility care. The findings based on the responses of 212 female infertility patients indicated four key areas of opportunity for improving access to infertility care. Firstly, greater patient education about the nature and progression of infertility care was required among this group of women. Secondly, increased resources in terms of the number and distribution of infertility clinics would

  2. Indonesian infertility patients’ health seeking behaviour and patterns of access to biomedical infertility care: an interviewer administered survey conducted in three clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Indonesia has high levels of biological need for infertility treatment, great sociological and psychological demand for children, and yet existing infertility services are underutilized. Access to adequate comprehensive reproductive health services, including infertility care, is a basic reproductive right regardless of the economic circumstances in which individuals are born into. Thus, identifying and implementing strategies to improve access to assisted reproductive technology (ART) in Indonesia is imperative. The principle objectives of this article are to improve our understanding of infertility patients’ patterns of health seeking behaviour and their patterns of access to infertility treatment in Indonesia, in order to highlight the possibilities for improving access. Methods An interviewer-administered survey was conducted with 212 female infertility patients recruited through three Indonesian infertility clinics between July and September 2011. Participants were self-selected and data was subject to descriptive statistical analysis. Results Patients identified a number of barriers to access, including: low confidence in infertility treatment and high rates of switching between providers due to perceived treatment failure; the number and location of clinics; the lack of a well established referral system; the cost of treatment; and patients also experienced fear of receiving a diagnosis of sterility, of vaginal examinations and of embarrassment. Women’s age of marriage and the timing of their initial presentation to gynaecologists were not found to be barriers to timely access to infertility care. Conclusions The findings based on the responses of 212 female infertility patients indicated four key areas of opportunity for improving access to infertility care. Firstly, greater patient education about the nature and progression of infertility care was required among this group of women. Secondly, increased resources in terms of the number and

  3. Occupational Health for Health Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health care workers are exposed to many job hazards. These can include Infections Needle injuries Back injuries ... prevention practices. They can reduce your risk of health problems. Use protective equipment, follow infection control guidelines, ...

  4. Clinically Feasible Stratification of 3-Year Chronic Disease Risk in Primary Care: The Mental Health Integration Risk Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Heidi T; Reiss-Brennan, Brenda; Brunisholz, Kimberly D; Horne, Benjamin D

    Depression is a common illness that imposes a disproportionately large health burden. Depression is generally associated with a higher prevalence of chronic disease risk factors and may contribute to higher chronic disease risk. This study aimed to create and validate sex-specific Mental Health Integration Risk Scores (MHIRS) that predict 3-year chronic disease diagnosis. MHIRS was created to predict the first diagnosis of any of the 10 chronic diseases in patients completing a Patient Health Questionnaire-9 Depression Survey who were free at baseline from those 10 chronic disease diagnoses. MHIRS used sex-specific weightings of Patient Health Questionnaire 9 results, age, and components of the complete metabolic profile and complete blood count in randomly chosen derivation (70%) and validation (30%) groups. Among females (N = 10,162, age: 48 ± 16), c-statistics for the composite chronic disease end point were 0.746 (0.725, 0.767) for the derivation group and 0.717 (0.682, 0.753) for the validation group, whereas males (N = 4615, age: 48 ± 15) had 0.755 (0.727, 0.783) and 0.742 (0.702, 0.782). In the validation group, MHIRS strata of low-, moderate-, and high-risk categories had hazard ratios (HR) for any 3-year chronic disease diagnosis among females of HR = 3.42 for moderate vs low and HR = 9.75 for high vs low, whereas males had HR = 4.80 and HR = 10.68, respectively (all p chronic disease diagnosis. Designed to be calculated electronically by an electronic health record, MHIRS can be efficiently obtained by clinicians to identify patients at higher chronic disease risk who require further evaluation and more precise clinical management. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Student and preceptor perceptions of primary health care clinical placements during pre-service education: Qualitative results from a quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phafoli, Semakaleng H; Christensen-Majid, Alice; Skolnik, Laura; Reinhardt, Stephanie; Nyangu, Isabel; Whalen, Madeleine; Stender, Stacie C

    2017-10-19

    As a practice discipline, nursing education has a mandate to collaborate with all clinical settings, including primary health care (PHC), to prepare nursing students to function effectively in different settings upon deployment. Prior to 2011, nursing and midwifery students received minimal exposure to PHC settings in Lesotho. In 2010, the Maternal and Child Health Integrated Program began working with nurses' training institutions to support PHC clinical placements. Between April 2013 and June 2014, a multi-methods study was conducted to describe the effect of PHC placements on students and preceptors. The study employed qualitative methods, namely seven focus group discussions (FGDs), held with 69 students and preceptors. Data analysis followed the principles of grounded theory. Students, nurse educators and preceptors perceived PHC clinical placements as appropriate settings for acquisition of a variety of country relevant clinical experiences for nurses and midwives in Lesotho. Students expressed their likelihood to accept deployment at PHC settings post-graduation. Preceptors indicated that PHC clinical placements re-enforced the importance of continuing education for practicing clinicians. The placements supported an increase in competence and confidence of nursing and midwifery students, which will likely aid their transition into the workforce and perhaps increase the likelihood for the young professionals to accept deployment to these areas post-graduation. Given the disease burden in Lesotho and that majority of Basotho people access healthcare at the PHC level, every effort should be taken to ensure that nursing and midwifery students get adequate exposure to health care provision at these facilities. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Federalism and Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Alan Tarr

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available President Barack Obama proposed a major overhaul of the American healthsystem, and in 2010 the U.S. Congress enacted his proposal, the PatientProtection and Affordable Care Act. Opponents of the Act challenged itsconstitutionality in federal court, claiming that it exceeds the powers grantedto the federal government under the Commerce Clause and the NecessaryProper Clause of the federal Constitution. Some courts have upheldthe law, but others have agreed with the critics, in particular ruling thatthe provision requiring citizens to buy health insurance is unconstitutional.Eventually the U.S. Supreme Court will rule on the issue. This article tracesthe controversy, surveys the interpretation of pertinent constitutional provisionsin past cases, analyzes the constitutional arguments presented byproponents and opponents of the Act, and concludes that the Act is constitutional.

  7. Disparities in HIV clinic care across Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarus, Jeffery V.; Laut, Kamilla Grønborg; Safreed-Harmon, Kelly

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although advances in HIV medicine have yielded increasingly better treatment outcomes in recent years, HIV-positive people with access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) still face complex health challenges. The EuroSIDA Study Group surveyed its clinics to explore regional differences...... in clinic services. Methods: The EuroSIDA study is a prospective observational cohort study that began enrolling patients in 1994. In early 2014, we conducted a 59-item survey of the 98 then-active EuroSIDA clinics. The survey covered HIV clinical care and other aspects of patient care. The EuroSIDA East...... tuberculosis/HIV treatment integration in the East Europe group (27% versus 84% p

  8. Sex differences in the relative contribution of social and clinical factors to the Health Utilities Index Mark 2 measure of health-related quality of life in older home care clients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hogan David B

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The heterogeneity evident among home care clients highlights the need for greater understanding of the clinical and social determinants of multi-dimensional health-related quality of life (HRQL indices and of potential sex-differences in these determinants. We examined the relative contribution of social and clinical factors to HRQL among older home care clients and explored whether any of the observed associations varied by sex. Methods The Canadian-US sample included 514 clients. Self-reported HRQL was measured during in-home interviews (2002-04 using the Health Utilities Index Mark 2 (HUI2. Data on clients' sociodemographic, health and clinical characteristics were obtained with the Minimum Data Set for Home Care. The relative associations between clients' characteristics and HUI2 scores were examined using multivariable linear regression models. Results Women had a significantly lower mean HUI2 score than men (0.48, 95%CI 0.46-0.50 vs. 0.52, 0.49-0.55. Clients with distressed caregivers and poor self-rated health exhibited significantly lower HRQL scores after adjustment for a comprehensive list of clinical conditions. Several other factors remained statistically significant (arthritis, psychiatric illness, bladder incontinence, urinary tract infection or clinically important (reported loneliness, congestive heart failure, pressure ulcers correlates of lower HUI2 scores in adjusted analyses. These associations generally did not vary significantly by sex. Conclusion For females and males, HRQL scores were negatively associated with conditions predictive or indicative of disability and with markers of psychosocial stress. Despite sex differences in the prevalence of social and clinical factors likely to affect HRQL, few varied significantly by sex in their relative impact on HUI2 scores. Further exploration of differences in the relative importance of clinical and psychosocial well-being (e.g., loneliness to HRQL among

  9. Nutritional status of children after a food-supplementation program integrated with routine health care through mobile clinics in migrant communities in the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Kavita; Marein-Efron, Gabriela; Huang, Shirley; O'Hare, Geraldine; Finalle, Rodney; Shah, Samir S

    2010-09-01

    The objective of this study was to compare acute and chronic undernutrition rates before and after the introduction of a food-supplementation program as an adjunct to routine health care for children of migrant workers in the Dominican Republic. The cross-sectional study was conducted in five rural communities in the Dominican Republic. Children 18 years and younger were eligible if they received routine health care from local mobile clinics. Data were obtained before (2005) and after (2006) initiation of a food-supplementation program. chi(2) or Fisher exact tests were used for analysis. Among 175 children in 2005, 52% were female, and 59% were supplementation program. Rates of chronic undernutrition decreased from 33% to 18% after the initiation of the food-supplementation program (P = 0.003). Food supplementation in the context of routine health-care visits improved the nutritional status of children, and it warrants further exploration as a way to reduce childhood undernutrition in resource-scarce areas.

  10. Health and Disability: Partnerships in Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Jane; McDonald, Rachael

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite awareness of the health inequalities experienced by people with intellectual disability, their health status remains poor. Inequalities in health outcomes are manifest in higher morbidity and rates of premature death. Contributing factors include the barriers encountered in accessing and receiving high-quality health care.…

  11. Delegation and supervision of health care assistants’ work in the daily management of uncertainty and the unexpected in clinical practice: invisible learning among newly qualified nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Allan, Helen T.; Magnusson, Carin; Evans, Karen; Ball, Elaine; Westwood, Sue; Curtis, Kathy; Horton, Khim; Johnson, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The invisibility of nursing work has been discussed in the international literature but not in relation to learning clinical skills. Evans and Guile’s (2012) theory of recontextualisation is used to explore the ways in which invisible or unplanned and unrecognised learning takes place as newly qualified nurses learn to delegate to and supervise the work of the health care assistant. In the British context, delegation and supervision are thought of as skills which are learnt ‘on the job’. We s...

  12. Clinical Documentation and Data Transfer from Ebola and Marburg Virus Disease Wards in Outbreak Settings: Health Care Workers’ Experiences and Preferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silja Bühler

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Understanding human filovirus hemorrhagic fever (FHF clinical manifestations and evaluating treatment strategies require the collection of clinical data in outbreak settings, where clinical documentation has been limited. Currently, no consensus among filovirus outbreak-response organisations guides best practice for clinical documentation and data transfer. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with health care workers (HCWs involved in FHF outbreaks in sub-Saharan Africa, and with HCWs experienced in documenting and transferring data from high-risk areas (isolation wards or biosafety level 4 laboratories. Methods for data documentation and transfer were identified, described in detail and categorised by requirement for electricity and ranked by interviewee preference. Some methods involve removing paperwork and other objects from the filovirus disease ward without disinfection. We believe that if done properly, these methods are reasonably safe for certain settings. However, alternative methods avoiding the removal of objects, or involving the removal of paperwork or objects after non-damaging disinfection, are available. These methods are not only safer, they are also perceived as safer and likely more acceptable to health workers and members of the community. The use of standardised clinical forms is overdue. Experiments with by sunlight disinfection should continue, and non-damaging disinfection of impregnated paper, suitable tablet computers and underwater cameras should be evaluated under field conditions.

  13. Clinical Documentation and Data Transfer from Ebola and Marburg Virus Disease Wards in Outbreak Settings: Health Care Workers’ Experiences and Preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bühler, Silja; Roddy, Paul; Nolte, Ellen; Borchert, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Understanding human filovirus hemorrhagic fever (FHF) clinical manifestations and evaluating treatment strategies require the collection of clinical data in outbreak settings, where clinical documentation has been limited. Currently, no consensus among filovirus outbreak-response organisations guides best practice for clinical documentation and data transfer. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with health care workers (HCWs) involved in FHF outbreaks in sub-Saharan Africa, and with HCWs experienced in documenting and transferring data from high-risk areas (isolation wards or biosafety level 4 laboratories). Methods for data documentation and transfer were identified, described in detail and categorised by requirement for electricity and ranked by interviewee preference. Some methods involve removing paperwork and other objects from the filovirus disease ward without disinfection. We believe that if done properly, these methods are reasonably safe for certain settings. However, alternative methods avoiding the removal of objects, or involving the removal of paperwork or objects after non-damaging disinfection, are available. These methods are not only safer, they are also perceived as safer and likely more acceptable to health workers and members of the community. The use of standardised clinical forms is overdue. Experiments with by sunlight disinfection should continue, and non-damaging disinfection of impregnated paper, suitable tablet computers and underwater cameras should be evaluated under field conditions. PMID:24556792

  14. Clinical documentation and data transfer from Ebola and Marburg virus disease wards in outbreak settings: health care workers' experiences and preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bühler, Silja; Roddy, Paul; Nolte, Ellen; Borchert, Matthias

    2014-02-19

    Understanding human filovirus hemorrhagic fever (FHF) clinical manifestations and evaluating treatment strategies require the collection of clinical data in outbreak settings, where clinical documentation has been limited. Currently, no consensus among filovirus outbreak-response organisations guides best practice for clinical documentation and data transfer. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with health care workers (HCWs) involved in FHF outbreaks in sub-Saharan Africa, and with HCWs experienced in documenting and transferring data from high-risk areas (isolation wards or biosafety level 4 laboratories). Methods for data documentation and transfer were identified, described in detail and categorised by requirement for electricity and ranked by interviewee preference. Some methods involve removing paperwork and other objects from the filovirus disease ward without disinfection. We believe that if done properly, these methods are reasonably safe for certain settings. However, alternative methods avoiding the removal of objects, or involving the removal of paperwork or objects after non-damaging disinfection, are available. These methods are not only safer, they are also perceived as safer and likely more acceptable to health workers and members of the community. The use of standardised clinical forms is overdue. Experiments with by sunlight disinfection should continue, and non-damaging disinfection of impregnated paper, suitable tablet computers and underwater cameras should be evaluated under field conditions.

  15. COMMUNITY MEDICINE & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajiboro

    2013-09-02

    Port Harcourt. ... Journal of Community Medicine and Primary Health Care. 25 (2) 53-58. KEYWORDS. Healer shopping,. Discharge Against. Medical Advice,. Non- communicable diseases, epidemiological transition, Port.

  16. [Person centered clinical care: principles and strategies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzich, Juan Enrique; Perales, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    The development of person-centered clinical care is inscribed within an international programmatic movement towards a medicine focused on the totality of the person. This movement, with broad historical bases, has been maturing since 2008 through conferences among global health institutions, research projects and academic publications. This paper is aimed at elucidating the conceptual principles of person-centered medicine (PCM) and to delineate strategies for the practical application of such principles in clinical care services. The above objectives have been approached through literature reviews, international consultations, and reflections on the patterns and indications obtained. The principles identified for person-centered medicine are the following: Ethical commitment, holistic framework, cultural awareness and responsiveness, communication and relational focus, individualized clinical care, common ground among clinicians, patient and family for joint diagnostic understanding and shared decision making, person- and community-centered organization of integrated services, and person-centered medical education and research. Additionally, pertinent strategies have been delineated for the implementation of such principles in clinical care. The authors conclude that the presented principles and strategies are consistent with suggestions offered in the literature and may serve as bases for the design of indices and scales. Their continuous refinement is proposed through future international and local studies. to clarify the key concepts of the movement as well as strategies for their practical clinical application.

  17. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    adedamla

    financing are critical issues that continue to bother health policy makers. .... Ethical approval. Ethical approval was obtained from the. Health Research Ethics Committee of the Delta. State University Teaching Hospital, Oghara and informed written (and or verbal) ... Teachers/Religious Leaders. Indifferent. 85. 24.3%. 117.

  18. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    adedamla

    Background: Quarry industry has become a major means of livelihood in Ebonyi state, but insufficient data exists on their operations and use of control measures like dust mask, with no serious attempt at comprehensive health education. The study sought to assess the effect of health education on the perception and ...

  19. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    mania) and anxiety disorders (General anxiety, agoraphobia, social phobia, obsessive-compulsive disorder and post traumatic stress disorder). Conclusion: Findings suggest that there is need to consider mental and psychological care of clients with HIV/AIDS to minimise the prevalence of psychiatric disorder among HIV ...

  20. Rural health clinics infrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, K.

    1997-12-01

    The author discusses programs which were directed at the installation of photovoltaic power systems in rural health clinics. The objectives included: vaccine refrigeration; ice pack freezing; lighting; communications; medical appliances; sterilization; water purification; and income generation. The paper discusses two case histories, one in the Dominican Republic and one in Colombia. The author summarizes the results of the programs, both successes and failures, and offers an array of conclusions with regard to the implementation of future programs of this general nature.

  1. Space age health care delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    Space age health care delivery is being delivered to both NASA astronauts and employees with primary emphasis on preventive medicine. The program relies heavily on comprehensive health physical exams, health education, screening programs and physical fitness programs. Medical data from the program is stored in a computer bank so epidemiological significance can be established and better procedures can be obtained. Besides health care delivery to the NASA population, NASA is working with HEW on a telemedicine project STARPAHC, applying space technology to provide health care delivery to remotely located populations.

  2. Improved clinical and laboratory skills after team-based, malaria case management training of health care professionals in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namagembe Allen

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deployment of highly effective artemisinin-based combination therapy for treating uncomplicated malaria calls for better targeting of malaria treatment to improve case management and minimize drug pressure for selecting resistant parasites. The Integrated Management of Malaria curriculum was developed to train multi-disciplinary teams of clinical, laboratory and health information assistants. Methods Evaluation of training was conducted in nine health facilities that were Uganda Malaria Surveillance Programme (UMSP sites. From December 2006 to June 2007, 194 health professionals attended a six-day course. One-hundred and one of 118 (86% clinicians were observed during patient encounters by expert clinicians at baseline and during three follow-up visits approximately six weeks, 12 weeks and one year after the course. Experts used a standardized tool for children less than five years of age and similar tool for patients five or more years of age. Seventeen of 30 laboratory professionals (57% were assessed for preparation of malaria blood smears and ability to interpret smear results of 30 quality control slides. Results Percentage of patients at baseline and first follow-up, respectively, with proper history-taking was 21% and 43%, thorough physical examination 18% and 56%, correct diagnosis 51% and 98%, treatment in compliance with national policy 42% and 86%, and appropriate patient education 17% and 83%. In estimates that adjusted for individual effects and a matched sample, relative risks were 1.86 (95% CI: 1.20,2.88 for history-taking, 2.66 (95%CI: 1.60,4.41 for physical examination, 1.77 (95%CI: 1.41,2.23 for diagnosis, 1.96 (95%CI: 1.46,2.63 for treatment, and 4.47 (95%CI: 2.68,7.46 for patient education. Results were similar for subsequent follow-up and in sub-samples stratified by patient age. Quality of malaria blood smear preparation improved from 21.6% at baseline to 67.3% at first follow-up (p p p p Conclusion A

  3. Study protocol for a randomized, controlled, superiority trial comparing the clinical and cost- effectiveness of integrated online mental health assessment-referral-care in pregnancy to usual prenatal care on prenatal and postnatal mental health and infant health and development: the Integrated Maternal Psychosocial Assessment to Care Trial (IMPACT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingston, Dawn; Austin, Marie-Paule; Hegadoren, Kathy; McDonald, Sheila; Lasiuk, Gerri; McDonald, Sarah; Heaman, Maureen; Biringer, Anne; Sword, Wendy; Giallo, Rebecca; Patel, Tejal; Lane-Smith, Marie; van Zanten, Sander Veldhuyzen

    2014-03-06

    Stress, depression, and anxiety affect 15 to 25% of pregnant women. However, fewer than 20% of prenatal care providers assess and treat mental health problems and fewer than 20% of pregnant women seek mental healthcare. For those who seek treatment, the lack of health system integration and existing barriers frequently prevent treatment access. Without treatment, poor prenatal mental health can persist for years and impact future maternal, child, and family well-being. The purpose of this randomized controlled trial is to evaluate the effectiveness of an integrated process of online psychosocial assessment, referral, and cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for pregnant women compared to usual prenatal care (no formal screening or specialized care). The primary outcome is self-reported prenatal depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms at 6 to 8 weeks postrandomization. Secondary outcomes are postpartum depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms; self-efficacy; mastery; self-esteem; sleep; relationship quality; coping; resilience; Apgar score; gestational age; birth weight; maternal-infant attachment; infant behavior and development; parenting stress/competence; and intervention cost-effectiveness, efficiency, feasibility, and acceptability. Pregnant women are eligible if they: 1) are prenatal mental healthcare and the use of highly accessible computer-based psychosocial assessment and CBT on maternal, infant, and family-based outcomes. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01901796.

  4. Health Literacy and Access to Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Despite well-documented links between low health literacy, low rates of health insurance coverage, and poor health outcomes, there has been almost no research on the relationship between low health literacy and self-reported access to care. This study analyzed a large, nationally representative sample of community-dwelling adults ages 50 and older to estimate the relationship between low health literacy and self-reported difficulty obtaining care. We found that individuals with low health literacy were significantly more likely than individuals with adequate health literacy to delay or forego needed care or to report difficulty finding a provider, even after controlling for other factors including health insurance coverage, employment, race/ethnicity, poverty, and general cognitive function. They were also more likely to lack a usual source of care, although this result was only marginally significant after controlling for other factors. The results show that in addition to any obstacles that low health literacy creates within the context of the clinical encounter, low health literacy also reduces the probability that people get in the door of the health care system in a timely way. PMID:27043757

  5. Crossing the "digital divide:" implementing an electronic medical record system in a rural Kenyan health center to support clinical care and research.

    OpenAIRE

    Tierney, William M.; Rotich, Joseph K.; Smith, Faye E.; Bii, John; Einterz, Robert M.; Hannan, Terry J.

    2002-01-01

    To improve care, one must measure it. In the US, electronic medical record systems have been installed in many institutions to support health care management, quality improvement, and research. Developing countries lack such systems and thus have difficulties managing scarce resources and investigating means of improving health care delivery and outcomes. We describe the implementation and use of the first documented electronic medical record system in ambulatory care in sub-Saharan Africa. A...

  6. Anal Health Care Basics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jason; Mclemore, Elisabeth; Tejirian, Talar

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that countless patients suffer from anal problems, there tends to be a lack of understanding of anal health care. Unfortunately, this leads to incorrect diagnoses and treatments. When treating a patient with an anal complaint, the primary goals are to first diagnose the etiology of the symptoms correctly, then to provide an effective and appropriate treatment strategy.The first step in this process is to take an accurate history and physical examination. Specific questions include details about bowel habits, anal hygiene, and fiber supplementation. Specific components of the physical examination include an external anal examination, a digital rectal examination, and anoscopy if appropriate.Common diagnoses include pruritus ani, anal fissures, hemorrhoids, anal abscess or fistula, fecal incontinence, and anal skin tags. However, each problem presents differently and requires a different approach for management. It is of paramount importance that the correct diagnosis is reached. Common errors include an inaccurate diagnosis of hemorrhoids when other pathology is present and subsequent treatment with a steroid product, which is harmful to the anal area.Most of these problems can be avoided by improving bowel habits. Adequate fiber intake with 30 g to 40 g daily is important for many reasons, including improving the quality of stool and preventing colorectal and anal diseases.In this Special Report, we provide an overview of commonly encountered anal problems, their presentation, initial treatment options, and recommendations for referral to specialists.

  7. Family dental health care service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riana Wardani

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The Family Dental Health Care Service is a new approach that includes efforts to serve oral and dental patients that focuses on maintenance, improvement and protection. This oral and dental health approach uses basic dentistry science and technology. The vision of the Family Dental Health Care Service is the family independences in the effort of dental health maintenance and to achieve the highest oral and dental health degree as possible through family dentist care that is efficient, effective, fair, evenly distributed, safe and has a good quality. To support this effort, the Ministry of Health has issued Health Care Policy and Implementation Guideline as well as the licensing standard for family dentist practice.

  8. A systematic review of management strategies for children's mental health care in the emergency department: update on evidence and recommendations for clinical practice and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Amanda S; Hartling, Lisa; Soleimani, Amir; Kirkland, Scott; Dyson, Michele P; Cappelli, Mario

    2017-06-01

    Children with mental health crises require access to specialised resources and services which are not yet standard in general and paediatric EDs. In 2010, we published a systematic review that provided some evidence to support the use of specialised care models to reduce hospitalisation, return ED visits and length of ED stay. We perform a systematic review to update the evidence base and inform current policy statements. Twelve databases and the grey literature were searched up to January 2015. Seven studies were included in the review (four newly identified studies). These studies compared ED-based strategies designed to assess, treat and/or therapeutically support or manage a mental health presentation. The methodological quality of six studies was assessed using the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organization of Care Risk of Bias tool (one interrupted time series study) and a modified Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (three retrospective cohort and two before-after studies). The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system was applied to rate overall evidence quality (high, moderate, low or very low) for individual outcomes from these six studies. An additional study evaluated the psychometric properties of a clinical instrument and was assessed using criteria developed by the Society of Pediatric Psychology Assessment Task Force (well-established, approaching well-established or promising assessment). There is low to very low overall evidence quality that: (1) use of screening laboratory tests to medically clear mental health patients increases length of ED stay and costs, but does not increase the risk of clinical management or disposition change if not conducted; and (2) specialised models of ED care reduce lengths of ED stay, security man-hours and restraint orders. One mental health assessment tool of promising quality, the home, education, activities and peers, drugs and alcohol, suicidality, emotions and behaviour, discharge

  9. Review of Developments in Electronic, Clinical Data Collection, and Documentation Systems over the Last Decade - Are We Ready for Big Data in Routine Health Care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kerstin A; Combs, Stephanie E

    2016-01-01

    Recently, information availability has become more elaborate and widespread, and treatment decisions are based on a multitude of factors, including imaging, molecular or pathological markers, surgical results, and patient's preference. In this context, the term "Big Data" evolved also in health care. The "hype" is heavily discussed in literature. In interdisciplinary medical specialties, such as radiation oncology, not only heterogeneous and voluminous amount of data must be evaluated but also spread in different styles across various information systems. Exactly this problem is also referred to in many ongoing discussions about Big Data - the "three V's": volume, velocity, and variety. We reviewed 895 articles extracted from the NCBI databases about current developments in electronic clinical data management systems and their further analysis or postprocessing procedures. Few articles show first ideas and ways to immediately make use of collected data, particularly imaging data. Many developments can be noticed in the field of clinical trial or analysis documentation, mobile devices for documentation, and genomics research. Using Big Data to advance medical research is definitely on the rise. Health care is perhaps the most comprehensive, important, and economically viable field of application.

  10. Review of developments in electronic, clinical data collection and documentation systems over the last decade – Are we ready for Big Data in routine health care?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Anne Kessel

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, information availability has become more elaborate and wide spread, and treatment decisions are based on a multitude of factors including imaging, molecular or pathological markers, surgical results and patient’s preference. In this context the term Big Data evolved also in health care. The hype is heavily discussed in literature. In interdisciplinary medical specialties, such as radiation oncology, not only a heterogeneous and voluminous amount of data must be evaluated, it is also spread in different styles across various information systems. Exactly this problem is also referred to in many ongoing discussions about Big Data - the three V’s: volume, velocity, and variety. We reviewed 895 articles extracted from the NCBI databases about current developments in electronic clinical data management systems and their further analysis or post-processing procedures. Few articles show first ideas and ways to immediately make use of collected data, particularly imaging data. Many developments can be noticed in the field of clinical trial or analysis documentation, mobile devices for documentation and genomics research. Using Big Data to advance medical research is definitely on the rise. Health care is perhaps the most comprehensive, important and economically viable field of application.

  11. Foster Care and Child Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDavid, Lolita M

    2015-10-01

    Children in foster care need more from health providers than routine well-child care. The changes in legislation that were designed to prevent children from languishing in foster care also necessitate a plan that works with the child, the biological family, and the foster family in ensuring the best outcome for the child. This approach acknowledges that most foster children will return to the biological family. Recent research on the effect of adverse childhood experiences across all socioeconomic categories points to the need for specifically designed, focused, and coordinated health and mental health services for children in foster care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Health care for nautical tourist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolić, N

    1992-01-01

    Nautical tourism is one of the developing branches of tourism in Europe. It differs from other forms of tourism. Conditions under which nautical tourists live are similar to those of seamen employed on vessels in costal shipping. The health care for nautical tourists should be organized according to the principles of health care for crews of merchant ships engaged in constal shipping.

  13. COMMUNITY MEDICINE & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajiboro

    communicable diseases such as hypertension and transitions currently experienced in Sub-Saharan. 96. JOURNAL OF COMMUNITY MEDICINE AND PRIMARY HEALTH CARE VOL. 26, NO 1, MARCH 2014. KEYWORDS journal of. COMMUNITY MEDICINE. & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE. Journal of Community Medicine ...

  14. Prospects for Health Care Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastner, Theodore

    1992-01-01

    This editorial reviews areas of health care reform including managed health care, diagnosis-related groups, and the Resource-Based Relative Value Scale for physician services. Relevance of such reforms to people with developmental disabilities is considered. Much needed insurance reform is not thought to be likely, however. (DB)

  15. COMMUNITY MEDICINE & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the_monk

    PRIMARY HEALTH CARE. Journal of Community Medicine and Primary Health Care. 26 (1) 21-29. KEYWORDS. Household, expenditure,. Treatment, presumptive malaria,. Gimba ... A cross-sectional descriptive study conducted during community diagnosis posting of final year medical students of. Ahmadu Bello University ...

  16. Using the diffusion of innovations theory to assess socio-technical factors in planning the implementation of an electronic health record alert across multiple primary care clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Pin Lin

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: Understanding variation in organizational culture and infrastructure across primary care clinics is important in planning implementation of an intervention to reduce ADEs among patients with CKD.

  17. Health Professionals' Knowledge of Women's Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, Rebecca M.

    2000-01-01

    Survey responses from 71 health professionals, benchmarking data from 8 hospitals, continuing education program evaluations, and focus groups with nursing, allied health, and primary care providers indicated a need for professional continuing education on women's health issues. Primary topic needs were identified. The data formed the basis for…

  18. Academic Health Centers and Health Care Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Stephen H.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A discussion of the role of academic health centers in health care reform efforts looks at the following issues: balancing academic objectivity and social advocacy; managing sometimes divergent interests of centers, faculty, and society; and the challenge to develop infrastructure support for reform. Academic health centers' participation in…

  19. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    adedamla

    223 nursing mothers with babies over three months old on the immunization clinic days at Federal Medical Center,. Abeokuta. Structured questionnaire was used for data collection. Frequency, percentages and Chi square were utilized for analysis. Results: Most 154(69.1%) of the respondents had good knowledge about ...

  20. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Otolaryngology, Dentistry and Dental surgery, Internal Medicine, Pathology,. Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Surgery,. Psychiatry and Community Medicine. Study design and Data collection. This was a cross-sectional and multi-clinic survey involving the mothers of children attending the Paediatrics out patients, Dental.

  1. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the_monk

    treatment for sexually transmitted diseases reported to ... Patients attending the sexually transmitted disease clinic of the Lagos State University Teaching Hospital, .... Female. 10. 20. Educational status. No education. Primary school completed. 4. 8. Secondary school completed. 20. 40. Tertiary education completed. 26. 52.

  2. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the_monk

    2012-05-01

    May 1, 2012 ... Results: The findings reveal different modes money was made available for payment for health services. On the whole, about 98% of payment was through out-of pocket spending (user-charges) with most respondents using their own money. Although this financing method shown to be associated with ...

  3. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2Department of Community Health, University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Edo State. 1. 2. 2. Awunor N.S , Omuemu V.O , Adam V.Y. ABSTRACT. Introduction. A nation's disease control effort is often as good as the surveillance and notification system put in place, which would help to generate the much needed ...

  4. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    living on each square inch of the phone. This study determined the prevalence of micro-organisms on the mobile phones of health workers and their role as a source of hospital acquired infection. The study utilised a cross-sectional design. A total of one hundred and eighty swabs were collected from the mobile phones of ...

  5. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the_monk

    child deaths among under-fives were due to. Childhood immunization is an effective public. VPDs, this represents 17% of global total. 1 health initiative aimed at reducing the burden mortality in children under five years of age. of vaccine preventable diseases (VPDs) and. To achieve the Millennium Developmental.

  6. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-10-07

    Oct 7, 2011 ... These factors include poor environmental and personal hygiene, poverty, malnutrition, unsafe water supply and ... The environment farmers live in, their standard of living and nutrition are very important to their health. ..... Globalization of food system: JOURNAL OF COMMUNITY MEDICINE AND PRIMARY ...

  7. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    instruments were pretested self-administered questionnaire and observational checklist. The data generated were analyzed using .... The observational checklist (OBL) was used to. Kwara State was carried from April to ..... supervision of health workers by middle cadre Central Zonal Office). Report on Routine immunization ...

  8. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Further studies on this subject are recommended. Employees' Assessment of Leadership in a Tertiary. Hospital in South-South Nigeria. Adeleye O. A, Aduh U. Department of Community Health, .... National Institute of Standards and Technology, (where it is trying to go in the future)”; “my senior were originally designed for ...

  9. Teens, technology, and health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leanza, Francesco; Hauser, Diane

    2014-09-01

    Teens are avid users of new technologies and social media. Nearly 95% of US adolescents are online at least occasionally. Health care professionals and organizations that work with teens should identify online health information that is both accurate and teen friendly. Early studies indicate that some of the new health technology tools are acceptable to teens, particularly texting, computer-based psychosocial screening, and online interventions. Technology is being used to provide sexual health education, medication reminders for contraception, and information on locally available health care services. This article reviews early and emerging studies of technology use to promote teen health. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Latex allergy in health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Virtič

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The increasing use of natural rubber latex medical gloves in the last three decades has caused an increase in latex allergy. The majority of risk groups for allergy development include health care workers, workers in the rubber industry, atopic individuals and children with congenital malformations. Three types of pathological reactions can occur in people using latex medical gloves: irritant contact dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis and immediate hypersensitivity. The latex allergy is caused by constituent components of latex gloves and added powders; there are also numerous latex allergens involved in cross-reactivity between latex and fruits and vegetables, the so-called latex-fruit syndrome. The diagnosis is based on an accurate history of exposure, clinical presentation and confirmatory in vivo and in vitro tests. Prevention is the easiest, most effective and least expensive way to avoid latex allergy. Powder-free latex gloves with reduced levels of proteins and chemicals, and synthetic gloves for allergic workers must be provided in the work environment. There are already many health care institutions around the world where all latex products have been replaced by synthetic material products.

  11. Clinical update: communication issues and advance care planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Crystal Dea; Reynolds, Ashley M

    2013-11-01

    To provide a clinical update on practical strategies to enhance the quality of communication in the palliative and end-of-life medical care settings. Published articles, textbooks, reports, and clinical experience. The components of effective and compassionate care throughout the advanced illness trajectory require thoughtful and strategic communication with patients, families, and members of the health care team. Unfortunately, few health care professionals are formally trained in communication skills. Nurses who possess self-awareness and are skilled in effective communication practices are integral to the provision of high-quality palliative care for patients and families coping with advanced malignancies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Recognition of the health assistant as a delegated clinical role and their inclusion in models of care: a systematic review and meta-synthesis of qualitative evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munn, Zachary; Tufanaru, Catalin; Aromataris, Edoardo

    2013-03-01

    Assistants have been utilised worldwide in healthcare as a means to ensure the provision of adequate and efficient healthcare in the midst of increased pressures on health services for many years. This review aimed to synthesise available qualitative evidence regarding the appropriateness of strategies used to establish the health assistant role as a recognised delegated clinical role and to promote their inclusion in models of care. This review focused on how to make strategies appropriate for health assistants and professionals. Health assistants were defined as those who provide assistance and support to health professionals by whom they are directly or indirectly supervised in all healthcare and health education sectors. A systematic review with meta-synthesis of qualitative studies using meta-aggregation was conducted. Types of participants considered included assistants in healthcare, including nursing and allied health assistants. The phenomena of interest was the appropriateness of strategies used to establish the assistant role as a recognised delegated clinical role and/or to promote their inclusion in models of care. Qualitative research studies including, but not limited to, designs such as phenomenology, grounded theory, ethnography, action research and feminist research were considered for inclusion. Electronic searches of multiple databases including MEDLINE, AMED, CINAHL and EMBASE, limited to the English language were conducted during the period of 14 April to 13 May 2011. In addition, grey literature was also searched for, as well as a hand search of relevant journals. Assessment of methodological quality of papers prior to inclusion in the review was performed using a standardised critical appraisal instrument from the Joanna Briggs Institute Qualitative Assessment and Review Instrument (JBI QARI). Data were extracted using the standardised data extraction tool from JBI QARI. Data synthesis using the JBI QARI approach of meta-synthesis by meta

  13. Conceptualizing and prioritizing clinical trial outcomes from the perspectives of people with Parkinson's disease versus health care professionals: a concept mapping study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjödahl Hammarlund, Catharina; Nilsson, Maria H; Idvall, Markus; Rosas, Scott R; Hagell, Peter

    2014-08-01

    Focusing clinical investigations on outcomes that are meaningful from an end-user perspective is central in clinical research, particularly in chronic disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD). However, little is known about how end-users such as people with PD (PwPD) and health care professionals (HCPs) view and prioritize therapeutic outcomes. To compare the perspectives of PwPD and HCPs regarding prioritized areas for outcome measurement in clinical PD trials. Concept mapping was used to identify prioritized outcomes (statements) through focus groups (n = 27; 12 PwPD, 12 HCPs, three researchers), statement sorting and importance rating (n = 38; 19 PwPD, 19 HCPs), followed by quantitative (multidimensional scaling, cluster analysis, procrustes analysis) and qualitative analysis. Sorting of 99 statements by PwPD and HCPs yielded 2D maps (PwPD/HCPs stress values, 0.31/0.21) with eight clusters per group. The correlation between raw sorting data of PwPD and HCPs was 0.80, and there was a significant concordance (m 12 = 0.53; P experience ("illness"). This study illustrates the clinical importance of attention to the perspective of PwPD; taking this into account is likely to provide evidence from clinical investigations that are meaningful and interpretable for end-users.

  14. Academic health centers and health care reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, S H; Lurie, N; Fisher, E S; Haugen, D

    1993-09-01

    There is increasing support for the proposition that academic health centers have a duty to accept broad responsibility for the health of their communities. The Health of the Public program has proposed that centers become directly involved in the social-political process as advocates for reform of the health care system. Such engagement raises important issues about the roles and responsibilities of centers and their faculties. To address these issues, the authors draw upon the available literature and their experiences in recent health care reform efforts in Minnesota and Vermont in which academic health center faculty participated. The authors discuss (1) the problematic balance between academic objectivity and social advocacy that faculty must attempt when they engage in the health care reform process; (2) the management of the sometimes divergent interests of academic health centers, some of their faculty, and society (including giving faculty permission to engage in reform efforts and developing a tacit understanding that distinguishes faculty positions on reform issues from the center's position on such issues); and (3) the challenge for centers to develop infrastructure support for health reform activities. The authors maintain that academic health centers' participation in the process of health care reform helps them fulfill the trust of the public that they are obligated to and ultimately depend on.

  15. The Employer-Led Health Care Revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Patricia A; Mecklenburg, Robert S; Martin, Lindsay A

    2015-01-01

    To tame its soaring health care costs, intel tried many popular approaches: "consumer-driven health care" offerings such as high-deductible/low-premium plans, on-site clinics and employee wellness programs. But by 2009 intel realized that those programs alone would not enable the company to solve the problem, because they didn't affect its root cause: the steadily rising cost of the care employees and their families were receiving. Intel projected that its health care expenditures would hit a whopping $1 billion by 2012. So the company decided to try a novel approach. As a large purchaser of health services and with expertise in quality improvement and supplier management, intel was uniquely positioned to drive transformation in its local health care market. The company decided that it would manage the quality and cost of its health care suppliers with the same rigor it applied to its equipment suppliers by monitoring quality and cost. It spearheaded a collaborative effort in Portland, Oregon, that included two health systems, a plan administrator, and a major government employer. So far the Portland collaborative has reduced treatment costs for certain medical conditions by 24% to 49%, improved patient satisfaction, and eliminated over 10,000 hours worth of waste in the two health systems' business processes.

  16. Implementing health research through academic and clinical partnerships: a realistic evaluation of the Collaborations for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (CLAHRC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rycroft-Malone, Jo; Wilkinson, Joyce E; Burton, Christopher R; Andrews, Gavin; Ariss, Steven; Baker, Richard; Dopson, Sue; Graham, Ian; Harvey, Gill; Martin, Graham; McCormack, Brendan G; Staniszewska, Sophie; Thompson, Carl

    2011-07-19

    The English National Health Service has made a major investment in nine partnerships between higher education institutions and local health services called Collaborations for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (CLAHRC). They have been funded to increase capacity and capability to produce and implement research through sustained interactions between academics and health services. CLAHRCs provide a natural 'test bed' for exploring questions about research implementation within a partnership model of delivery. This protocol describes an externally funded evaluation that focuses on implementation mechanisms and processes within three CLAHRCs. It seeks to uncover what works, for whom, how, and in what circumstances. This study is a longitudinal three-phase, multi-method realistic evaluation, which deliberately aims to explore the boundaries around knowledge use in context. The evaluation funder wishes to see it conducted for the process of learning, not for judging performance. The study is underpinned by a conceptual framework that combines the Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services and Knowledge to Action frameworks to reflect the complexities of implementation. Three participating CLARHCS will provide in-depth comparative case studies of research implementation using multiple data collection methods including interviews, observation, documents, and publicly available data to test and refine hypotheses over four rounds of data collection. We will test the wider applicability of emerging findings with a wider community using an interpretative forum. The idea that collaboration between academics and services might lead to more applicable health research that is actually used in practice is theoretically and intuitively appealing; however the evidence for it is limited. Our evaluation is designed to capture the processes and impacts of collaborative approaches for implementing research, and therefore should contribute to the evidence

  17. Does Interpersonal Psychotherapy improve clinical care for adolescents with depression attending a rural child and adolescent mental health service? Study protocol for a cluster randomised feasibility trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villanueva Elmer V

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depression amongst adolescents is a costly societal problem. Little research documents the effectiveness of public mental health services in mapping this problem. Further, it is not clear whether usual care in such services can be improved via clinician training in a relevant evidence based intervention. One such intervention, found to be effective and easily learned amongst novice clinicians, is Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT. The study described in the current paper has two main objectives. First, it aims to investigate the impact on clinical care of implementing Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Adolescents for the treatment of adolescent depression within a rural mental health service compared with Treatment as Usual (TAU. The second objective is to record the process and challenges (i.e. feasibility, acceptability, sustainability associated with implementing and evaluating an evidence-based intervention within a community service. This paper outlines the study rationale and design for this community based research trial. Methods/design The study involves a cluster randomisation trial to be conducted within a Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service in rural Australia. All clinicians in the service will be invited to participate. Participating clinicians will be randomised via block design at each of four sites to (a training and delivery of IPT, or (b TAU. The primary measure of impact on care will be a clinically significant change in depressive symptomatology, with secondary outcomes involving treatment satisfaction and changes in other symptomatology. Participating adolescents with significant depressive symptomatology, aged 12 to 18 years, will complete assessment measures at Weeks 0, 12 and 24 of treatment. They will also complete a depression inventory once a month during that period. This study aims to recruit 60 adolescent participants and their parent/guardian/s. A power analysis is not indicated as an intra

  18. Rationale, design, and implementation protocol of an electronic health record integrated clinical prediction rule (iCPR randomized trial in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wisnivesky Juan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical prediction rules (CPRs represent well-validated but underutilized evidence-based medicine tools at the point-of-care. To date, an inability to integrate these rules into an electronic health record (EHR has been a major limitation and we are not aware of a study demonstrating the use of CPR's in an ambulatory EHR setting. The integrated clinical prediction rule (iCPR trial integrates two CPR's in an EHR and assesses both the usability and the effect on evidence-based practice in the primary care setting. Methods A multi-disciplinary design team was assembled to develop a prototype iCPR for validated streptococcal pharyngitis and bacterial pneumonia CPRs. The iCPR tool was built as an active Clinical Decision Support (CDS tool that can be triggered by user action during typical workflow. Using the EHR CDS toolkit, the iCPR risk score calculator was linked to tailored ordered sets, documentation, and patient instructions. The team subsequently conducted two levels of 'real world' usability testing with eight providers per group. Usability data were used to refine and create a production tool. Participating primary care providers (n = 149 were randomized and intervention providers were trained in the use of the new iCPR tool. Rates of iCPR tool triggering in the intervention and control (simulated groups are monitored and subsequent use of the various components of the iCPR tool among intervention encounters is also tracked. The primary outcome is the difference in antibiotic prescribing rates (strep and pneumonia iCPR's encounters and chest x-rays (pneumonia iCPR only between intervention and control providers. Discussion Using iterative usability testing and development paired with provider training, the iCPR CDS tool leverages user-centered design principles to overcome pervasive underutilization of EBM and support evidence-based practice at the point-of-care. The ongoing trial will determine if this collaborative

  19. Care of the Child with Special Health Care Needs: A Report on 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Care of the child with special health care needs is gradually becoming a significant public health issue. To identify what these special health care needs are in our environment, 2 children presenting with clinical features of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy were studied. This crippling neuromuscular disorder has no cure at ...

  20. Health record systems that meet clinical needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Negrini

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Increased attention has recently been focused on health record systems as a result of accreditation programs, a growing emphasis on patient safety, and the increase in lawsuits involving allegations of malpractice. Health-care professionals frequently express dissatisfaction with the health record systems and complain that the data included are neither informative nor useful for clinical decision making. This article reviews the main objectives of a hospital health record system, with emphasis on its roles in communication and exchange among clinicians, patient safety, and continuity of care, and asks whether current systems have responded to the recent changes in the Italian health-care system.Discussion If health records are to meet the expectations of all health professionals, the overall information need must be carefully analyzed, a common data set must be created, and essential specialist contributions must be defined. Working with health-care professionals, the hospital management should define how clinical information is to be displayed and organized, identify a functionally optimal layout, define the characteristics of ongoing patient assessment in terms of who will be responsible for these activities and how often they will be performed. Internet technology can facilitate data retrieval and meet the general requirements of a paper-based health record system, but it must also ensure focus on clinical information, business continuity, integrity, security, and privacy.Conclusions The current health records system needs to be thoroughly revised to increase its accessibility, streamline the work of health-care professionals who consult it, and render it more useful for clinical decision making—a challenging task that will require the active involvement of the many professional classes involved.

  1. The health care information directive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goel Vivek

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Developments in information technology promise to revolutionise the delivery of health care by providing access to data in a timely and efficient way. Information technology also raises several important concerns about the c