WorldWideScience

Sample records for headache disorders secondary

  1. Heat stress disorders and headache: a case of new daily persistent headache secondary to heat stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Di Lorenzo, C; Ambrosini, A; Coppola, G; Pierelli, F

    2009-01-01

    Headache is considered as a common symptom of heat stress disorders (HSD), but no forms of secondary headache from heat exposure are reported in the International Classification of Headache Disorders-2 Edition (ICHD-II). Heat-stroke (HS) is the HSD most severe condition, it may be divided into two forms: classic (due to a long period environmental heat exposure) and exertional (a severe condition caused by strenuous physical exercises in heat environmental conditions). Here we report the case...

  2. Secondary Headaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the medical history or examination to suggest secondary headache. Headache can be caused by general medical conditions such as severe hypertension, or by conditions that affect the brain and ...

  3. Causes of secondary headache (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temporomandibular joint, or TMJ, dysfunction, can be a cause of secondary headache. Secondary headaches result from underlying disorders which produce pain as a symptom. The TMJ may become painful and dysfunctional as a result ...

  4. Temporomandibular dysfunction and headache disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speciali, José G; Dach, Fabíola

    2015-02-01

    It has been well established that primary headaches (especially migraine, chronic migraine, and tension-type headache) and temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD) are comorbid diseases, with the presence of one of them in a patient increasing the prevalence of the others. The relationship between the 2 diseases may involve the sharing of common physiopathological aspects. Studies about the treatment of this disease association have shown that a simultaneous therapeutic approach to the 2 diseases is more effective than the separate treatment of each. As a consequence, specialists in orofacial pain are now required to know the criteria for the diagnosis of headaches, and headache physicians are required to know the semiologic aspects of orofacial pain. Nevertheless, a headache may be attributed to TMD, instead be an association of 2 problems - TMD and primary headaches - in these cases a secondary headache, described in item 11.7 of the International Classification of Headache Disorders, is still a controversial topic. Attempts to determine the existence of this secondary headache with a specific or suggestive phenotype have been frustrated. The conclusion that can be reached based on the few studies published thus far is that this headache has a preferential unilateral or bilateral temporal location and migraine-like or tension-type headache-like clinical characteristics. In the present review, we will consider the main aspects of the TMD-headache relationship, that is, comorbidity of primary headaches and TMD and clinical aspects of the headaches attributed to TMD from the viewpoint of the International Headache Society and of a group of specialists in orofacial pain. This paper aims to explore our understanding of the association between TMD and headaches in general and migraine in particular. © 2015 American Headache Society.

  5. Temporomandibular Disorders and Headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff-Radford, Steven B; Abbott, Jeremy J

    2016-08-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and primary headaches can be perpetual and debilitating musculoskeletal and neurological disorders. The presence of both can affect up to one-sixth of the population at any one time. Initially, TMDs were thought to be predominantly musculoskeletal disorders, and migraine was thought to be solely a cerebrovascular disorder. The further understanding of their pathophysiology has helped to clarify their clinical presentation. This article focuses on the role of the trigeminal system in associating TMD and migraine. By discussing recent descriptions of prevalence, diagnosis, and treatment of headache and TMD, we will further elucidate this relationship. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Temporomandibular disorders and migraine headache

    OpenAIRE

    Demarin, Vida; Bašić Kes, Vanja

    2010-01-01

    Migraine headache and temporomandibular disorders show significant overlap in the area or distribution of pain, the gender prevalence and age distribution. Temporomandibular disorders may cause headaches per se, worsen existent primary headaches, and add to the burden of headache disorders. The patients with combined migraine and tension-type headaches had a higher prevelance of temporomandibular disorders. Evidence supporting a close relationship include the increased masticatory...

  7. Temporomandibular disorders in headache patients

    OpenAIRE

    Mello, Christiane-Espinola-Bandeira; Oliveira, José-Luiz-Góes; Jesus, Alan-Chester-Feitosa; Maia, Mila-Leite-de Moraes; de Santana, Jonielly-Costa-Vasconcelos; Andrade, Loren-Suyane-Oliveira; Siqueira Quintans, Jullyana-de Souza; Quintans-Junior, Lucindo-José; Conti, Paulo-César-Rodrigues; Bonjardim, Leonardo-Rigoldi

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify the frequency of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and its seve-rity in individuals with headache. Study Design: 60 adults divided into three groups of 20 individuals: chronic daily headache (CDH), episodic headache (EH) and a control group without headache (WH). Headache diagnosis was performed according to the criteria of International Headache Society and the signs and symptoms of TMD were achieved by using a clinical exam and an anamnestic quest...

  8. Primary Headache Disorders- Part 2: Tension-type headache and medication overuse headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay, Gary W; Barkin, Robert L

    2017-12-01

    In Part 2 of Primary Headache disorders, we discuss the fourth Primary Headache Disorder, Tension-Type Headache (TTHA). We are again using the ICHD-III (Beta) definitions of such headaches, taking into consideration episodic and chronic TTHA, as well as the presence or absence of pericranial muscle tenderness. We discuss the pathophysiology and pharmacotherapeutic treatment of TTHA, and the aspects of the Myofascial Pain Syndrome that enhance and help the development of TTHA. We then discuss Medication Overuse Headache (MOH), itself a Secondary headache disorder, but one that is extremely important as it assists with the chronification of both migraine and TTHA. Finally we discuss how to manage and treat those patients with MOH. Chronic migraine, which is TTHA, Migraine as well as, in many patients, MOH, is discussed along with the treatment of this multifaceted disorder. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Laboratory tests of headache disorders - Dawn of a new era?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schytz, Henrik Winther; Olesen, Jes

    2016-01-01

    secondary headaches. Background In this narrative review we present and discuss published tests that might be useful in phenotyping and/or diagnosis of long-lasting headache disorders such as migraine, tension-type headache, trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias, trigeminal neuralgia and persisting secondary...... headaches. Aim The palpometer test, quantitative sensory testing, nociceptive blink reflex and autonomic tests may be valuable to phenotype and/or diagnose subforms of migraine, tension-type headache, cluster headache, trigeminal neuralgia and medication-overuse headache. Provocation tests with glyceryl...... if well-reputed tertiary headache centers commence developing and implementing laboratory tests in order to improve the classification and treatment of headache patients....

  10. Temporomandibular disorders and headaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff-Radford, Steven B; Bassiur, Jennifer P

    2014-05-01

    Headache and temporomandibular disorders should be treated together but separately. If there is marked limitation of opening, imaging of the joint may be necessary. The treatment should then include education regarding limiting jaw function, appliance therapy, instruction in jaw posture, and stretching exercises, as well as medications to reduce inflammation and relax the muscles. The use of physical therapies, such as spray and stretch and trigger point injections, is helpful if there is myofascial pain. Tricyclic antidepressants and the new-generation antiepileptic drugs are effective in muscle pain conditions. Arthrocentesis and/or arthroscopy may help to restore range of motion. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Temporomandibular disorders in headache patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Christiane-Espinola-Bandeira; Oliveira, José-Luiz-Góes; Jesus, Alan-Chester-Feitosa; Maia, Mila-Leite-de Moraes; de Santana, Jonielly-Costa-Vasconcelos; Andrade, Loren-Suyane-Oliveira; Siqueira Quintans, Jullyana-de Souza; Quintans-Junior, Lucindo-José; Conti, Paulo-César-Rodrigues

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify the frequency of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and its seve-rity in individuals with headache. Study Design: 60 adults divided into three groups of 20 individuals: chronic daily headache (CDH), episodic headache (EH) and a control group without headache (WH). Headache diagnosis was performed according to the criteria of International Headache Society and the signs and symptoms of TMD were achieved by using a clinical exam and an anamnestic questionnaire. The severity of TMD was defined by the temporomandibular index (TMI). Results: The TMD signs and symptoms were always more frequent in individuals with headache, especially report of pain in TMJ area (CDH, n=16; EH, n=12; WH, n=6), pain to palpation on masseter (CDH, n=19; EH, n=16; WH, n=11) which are significantly more frequent in episodic and chronic daily headache. The mean values of temporomandibular and articular index (CDH patients) and muscular index (CDH and EH patients) were statistically higher than in patients of the control group, notably the articular (CDH=0.38; EH=0.25;WH=0.19) and muscular (CDH=0.46; EH=0.51; WH=0.26) indices. Conclusions: These findings allow us to speculate that masticatory and TMJ pain are more common in headache subjects. Besides, it seems that the TMD is more severe in headache patients. Key words:Temporomandibular dysfunction, headache disorders. PMID:22926473

  12. Diagnostic criteria for headache attributed to temporomandibular disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffman, Eric; Ohrbach, Richard; List, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We assessed and compared the diagnostic accuracy of two sets of diagnostic criteria for headache secondary to temporomandibular disorders (TMD).......We assessed and compared the diagnostic accuracy of two sets of diagnostic criteria for headache secondary to temporomandibular disorders (TMD)....

  13. Evaluation for secondary causes of headache: the role of blood and urine testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loder, Elizabeth; Cardona, Luzma

    2011-02-01

    Most patients presenting for evaluation of headache meet diagnostic criteria for a benign, primary headache disorder based on history and physical examination findings alone. No further testing is needed in such cases. Additional diagnostic evaluation is needed in cases that do not meet criteria for a primary headache disorder or which are associated with unusual or worrisome features. This article will review secondary causes of headache listed in the International Classification of Headache Disorders-II in which blood and urine testing might aid in diagnosis. We offer recommendations for diagnostic evaluation when these disorders are suspected causes of headache. © 2011 American Headache Society.

  14. Diagnostic criteria for headache attributed to temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffman, Eric; Ohrbach, Richard; List, Thomas; Anderson, Gary; Jensen, Rigmor; John, Mike T; Nixdorf, Donald; Goulet, Jean-Paul; Kang, Wenjun; Truelove, Ed; Clavel, Al; Fricton, James; Look, John

    2012-07-01

    We assessed and compared the diagnostic accuracy of two sets of diagnostic criteria for headache secondary to temporomandibular disorders (TMD). In 373 headache subjects with TMD, a TMD headache reference standard was defined as: self-reported temple headache, consensus diagnosis of painful TMD and replication of the temple headache using TMD-based provocation tests. Revised diagnostic criteria for Headache attributed to TMD were selected using the RPART (recursive partitioning and regression trees) procedure, and refined in half of the data set. Using the remaining half of the data, the diagnostic accuracy of the revised criteria was compared to that of the International Headache Society's International Classification of Headache Diseases (ICHD)-II criteria A to C for Headache or facial pain attributed to temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder. Relative to the TMD headache reference standard, ICHD-II criteria showed sensitivity of 84% and specificity of 33%. The revised criteria for Headache attributed to TMD had sensitivity of 89% with improved specificity of 87% (p headache that is changed with jaw movement, function or parafunction and (2) provocation of that headache by temporalis muscle palpation or jaw movement. Having significantly better specificity than the ICHD-II criteria A to C, the revised criteria are recommended to diagnose headache secondary to TMD.

  15. Headache

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SEARCH Definition Treatment ... visits to the doctor. The International Classification of Headache Disorders, published by the International Headache Society, is used to classify more than 150 types ...

  16. Temporomandibular disorders, facial pain, and headaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Steven D

    2012-05-01

    Headaches and facial pain are common in the general population. In many cases, facial pain can be resultant from temporomandibular joint disorders. Studies have identified an association between headaches and temporomandibular joint disorders suggesting the possibility of shared pathophysiologic mechanisms of these 2 maladies. The aim of this paper is to elucidate potential commonalities of these disorders and to provide a brief overview of an examination protocol that may benefit the headache clinician in daily practice. © 2012 American Headache Society.

  17. Association between headache and temporomandibular disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouelhuda, Amira Mokhtar; Kim, Hyun-Seok; Kim, Sang-Yun; Kim, Young-Kyun

    2017-12-01

    Headaches are one of the most common conditions associated with temporomandibular disorder (TMD). In the present paper, we evaluated the relationship between headache and TMD, determined whether headache influences the symptoms of TMD, and reported two cases of TMD accompanied by headache. Our practical experience and a review of the literature suggested that headache increases the frequency and intensity of pain parameters, thus complicating dysfunctional diseases in both diagnostic and treatment phases. Therefore, early and multidisciplinary treatment of TMD is necessary to avoid the overlap of painful events that could result in pain chronicity.

  18. The Use of Cannabis for Headache Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochte, Bryson C.; Beletsky, Alexander; Samuel, Nebiyou K.; Grant, Igor

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Headache disorders are common, debilitating, and, in many cases, inadequately managed by existing treatments. Although clinical trials of cannabis for neuropathic pain have shown promising results, there has been limited research on its use, specifically for headache disorders. This review considers historical prescription practices, summarizes the existing reports on the use of cannabis for headache, and examines the preclinical literature exploring the role of exogenous and endogenous cannabinoids to alter headache pathophysiology. Currently, there is not enough evidence from well-designed clinical trials to support the use of cannabis for headache, but there are sufficient anecdotal and preliminary results, as well as plausible neurobiological mechanisms, to warrant properly designed clinical trials. Such trials are needed to determine short- and long-term efficacy for specific headache types, compatibility with existing treatments, optimal administration practices, as well as potential risks. PMID:28861505

  19. Temporomandibular disorders dysfunction in headache patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Christiane-Espinola-Bandeira; Oliveira, José-Luiz-Góes; Jesus, Alan-Chester-Feitosa; Maia, Mila-Leite-de Moraes; de Santana, Jonielly-Costa-Vasconcelos; Andrade, Loren-Suyane-Oliveira; Quintans, Jullyana-de Souza Siqueira; Quintans-Junior, Lucindo-José; Conti, Paulo-César-Rodrigues; Bonjardim, Leonardo-Rigoldi

    2012-11-01

    To identify the frequency of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and its severity in individuals with headache. 60 adults divided into three groups of 20 individuals: chronic daily headache (CDH), episodic headache (EH) and a control group without headache (WH). Headache diagnosis was performed according to the criteria of International Headache Society and the signs and symptoms of TMD were achieved by using a clinical exam and an anamnestic questionnaire. The severity of TMD was defined by the temporomandibular index (TMI). The TMD signs and symptoms were always more frequent in individuals with headache, especially report of pain in TMJ area (CDH, n=16; EH, n=12; WH, n=6), pain to palpation on masseter (CDH, n=19; EH, n=16; WH, n=11) which are significantly more frequent in episodic and chronic daily headache. The mean values of temporomandibular and articular index (CDH patients) and muscular index (CDH and EH patients) were statistically higher than in patients of the control group, notably the articular (CDH=0.38; EH=0.25;WH=0.19) and muscular (CDH=0.46; EH=0.51; WH=0.26) indices. These findings allow us to speculate that masticatory and TMJ pain are more common in headache subjects. Besides, it seems that the TMD is more severe in headache patients.

  20. Neurostimulation therapies for primary headache disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magis, Delphine; Jensen, Rigmor; Schoenen, Jean

    2012-01-01

    Most pharmacological treatments of primary headache disorders are partially effective and have cumbersome side effects. Therapies with better efficacy and tolerance are needed. Neurostimulation techniques may have this potential. This is an attempt to summarize the latest clinical trial results...

  1. Temporomandibular disorders and tension-type headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongini, Franco

    2007-12-01

    Pathologies currently defined as temporomandibular disorders may be different in nature. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders and craniofacial and cervical myogenous pain (MP) are distinct pathologies but may be superimposed and share some etiologic factors. Tension-type headache (TTH) may often be associated with craniofacial and cervical pain, and the same pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatment may be efficacious for both. Psychiatric comorbidity (depression and/or anxiety disorder) is less frequent in sheer TMJ disorders, compared with MP and TTH. A screening for the presence of an underlying psychiatric disorder should be part of the clinical evaluation in patients suffering from headache and facial pain.

  2. Neurobiology and sleep disorders in cluster headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barloese, Mads Christian Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Cluster headache is characterized by unilateral attacks of severe pain accompanied by cranial autonomic features. Apart from these there are also sleep-related complaints and strong chronobiological features. The interaction between sleep and headache is complex at any level and evidence suggests...... that it may be of critical importance in our understanding of primary headache disorders. In cluster headache several interactions between sleep and the severe pain attacks have already been proposed. Supported by endocrinological and radiological findings as well as the chronobiological features, predominant...... involvement of cardiac autonomic control. We conducted a questionnaire survey on 275 cluster headache patients and 145 controls as well an in-patient sleep study including 40 CH-patients and 25 healthy controls. The findings include: A distinct circannual connection between cluster occurrence and the amount...

  3. Unusual headaches in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamford, Cynthia C; Mays, MaryAnn; Tepper, Stewart J

    2011-08-01

    Prevalence of headache lowers with age, and headaches of elderly adults tend to be different than those of the younger population. Secondary headaches, such as headaches associated with vascular disease, head trauma, and neoplasm, are more common. Also, certain headache types tend to be geriatric disorders, such as primary cough headache, hypnic headache, typical aura without headache, exploding head syndrome, and giant cell arteritis. This review provides an overview of some of the major and unusual geriatric headaches, both primary and secondary.

  4. Temporomandibular disorders in adolescents with headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojka, Anna; Żarowski, Marcin; Steinborn, Barbara; Hedzelek, Wiesław; Wiśniewska-Spychała, Beata; Dorocka-Bobkowska, Barbara

    2018-02-01

    Headache is a common complaint in all age groups and is a frequent cause of medical consultations and hospitalization. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of bite and non-bite parafunctions as well as the signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) in adolescents presenting with primary headaches. Parents of adolescents presented with headaches to the Department of Developmental Neurology within a 12-month period were asked to complete a questionnaire developed by the authors of this study. Of the 1000 patients evaluated, 19 females and 21 males, aged 13 to 17 years, met the inclusion criterion - a confirmed clinical diagnosis of migraine or a tension headache according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd edition. The diagnostic algorithm of the study group consisted of a full medical history, an assessment of the occurrence of bite habits and a physical examination based on the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD). Bite and non-bite parafunctions were found in 36 of the study group patients. A significant difference (p = 0.0003) between the number of bite parafunctions and non-bite parafunctions was found in females but not in males. However, bite parafunctions were more frequent in boys compared to girls (p = 0.01). Our findings suggest that it may be useful for pediatricians and neurologists to include TMD dysfunctions as a part of a standard examination of adolescents presenting with persistent headaches.

  5. Neurobiology and sleep disorders in cluster headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barloese, Mads Christian Johannes

    2015-01-01

    of daylight, substantially poorer sleep quality in patients compared to controls which was present not only inside the clusters but also outside, affected REM-sleep in patients without a particular temporal connection to nocturnal attacks, equal prevalence of sleep apnea in both patient and control groups......Cluster headache is characterized by unilateral attacks of severe pain accompanied by cranial autonomic features. Apart from these there are also sleep-related complaints and strong chronobiological features. The interaction between sleep and headache is complex at any level and evidence suggests...... that it may be of critical importance in our understanding of primary headache disorders. In cluster headache several interactions between sleep and the severe pain attacks have already been proposed. Supported by endocrinological and radiological findings as well as the chronobiological features, predominant...

  6. A retrospective analysis of the headache associated with temporomandibular joint disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungari, C; Quarato, D; Gennaro, P; Riccardi, E; Agrillo, A; Mitro, V; Cascino, F; Reale, G; Rinna, C; Filiaci, F

    2012-11-01

    Headache is a common symptom, that can be extremely disabling, affecting 26 million of patients only in Italy. ICHD-II has reported two categories: "primary headaches" and "secondary headaches". Temporomandibular joint disorders can lead to a secondary headaches. We want to evaluate the prevalence and clinical features of headache among a series of patients having temporomandibular joint disorders and we illustrate the evolution of headache following medical treatament of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders. This is a retrospective study carried out on chart review of 426 consecutive patients with various degrees of temporomandibular disorders and treated with medical devices from 2007 to 2011. Headache was reported by 73 patients (17.14%). Headache was observed in 36 of 51 patients with lock and in 32 out of 130 patients with mandibular deflections (Table I). The remaining 5 patients with headache had articular noise. Headache is not a rare finding in a population with temporomandibular dysfunctions and is more often a tension-type rather than trigeminal headache.

  7. The International Classification of Headache Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, J.

    2008-01-01

    A set of related medical disorders that lack a proper classification system and diagnostic criteria is like a society without laws. The result is incoherence at best, chaos at worst. For this reason, the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD) is arguably the single most important....... In summary, the ICHD has attained widespread acceptance at the international level and has substantially facilitated both clinical research and clinical care in the field of headache medicine Udgivelsesdato: 2008/5...... universally accepted, and criticism of the classification has been minor relative to that directed at other disease classification systems. Over the 20 years following publication of the first edition of the ICHD, headache research has rapidly accelerated despite sparse allocation of resources to that effort...

  8. Gastrointestinal Headache; a Narrative Review

    OpenAIRE

    Majid T Noghani; Hossein Rezaeizadeh; Sayed Mohammad Baqer Fazljoo; Mahmoud Yousefifard; Mansoor Keshavarz

    2016-01-01

    There are studies reporting primary headaches to be associated with gastrointestinal disorders, and some report resolution of headache following the treatment of the associated gastrointestinal disorder. Headache disorders are classified by The International Headache Society as primary or secondary; however, among the secondary headaches, those attributed to gastrointestinal disorders are not appreciated. Therefore, we aimed to review the literature to provide evidence for headaches, which or...

  9. Characteristics of Elderly-Onset (≥65 years) Headache Diagnosed Using the International Classification of Headache Disorders, Third Edition Beta Version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Tae Jin; Kim, Yong Jae; Kim, Byung Kun; Kim, Byung Su; Kim, Jae Moon; Kim, Soo Kyoung; Moon, Heui Soo; Cha, Myoung Jin; Park, Kwang Yeol; Sohn, Jong Hee; Chu, Min Kyung; Cho, Soo Jin

    2016-10-01

    New-onset headache in elderly patients is generally suggestive of a high probability of secondary headache, and the subtypes of primary headache diagnoses are still unclear in the elderly. This study investigated the characteristics of headache with an older age at onset (≥65 years) and compared the characteristics between younger and older age groups. We prospectively collected demographic and clinical data of 1,627 patients who first visited 11 tertiary hospitals in Korea due to headache between August 2014 and February 2015. Headache subtype was categorized according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders, Third Edition Beta Version. In total, 152 patients (9.3%, 106 women and 46 men) experienced headache that began from 65 years of age [elderly-onset group (EOG)], while the remaining 1,475 patients who first experienced headache before the age of 65 years were classified as the younger-age-at-onset group (YOG). Among the primary headache types, tension-type headache (55.6% vs. 28.8%) and other primary headache disorders (OPH, 31.0% vs. 17.3%) were more common in the EOG than in the YOG, while migraine was less frequent (13.5% vs. 52.2%) (p=0.001) in the EOG. Among OPH, primary stabbing headache (87.2%) was more frequent in the EOG than in the YOG (p=0.032). The pain was significantly less severe (p=0.026) and the frequency of medication overuse headache was higher in EOG than in YOG (23.5% vs. 7.6%, p=0.040). Tension-type headache and OPH headaches, primarily stabbing headache, were more common in EOG patients than in YOG patients. The pain intensity, distribution of headache diagnoses, and frequency of medication overuse differed according to the age at headache onset.

  10. Headache Exacerbates Pain Characteristics in Temporomandibular Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Yuri Martins; Alves da Costa, Dayse Regina; de Lima Ferreira, Ana Paula; Porporatti, André Luís; Svensson, Peter; Rodrigues Conti, Paulo César; Bonjardim, Leonardo Rigoldi

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of headache in adults with masticatory myofascial pain (MMP) on the outcome variables clinical pain (ie, self-reported pain intensity and pressure pain sensitivity), sleep quality, and pain catastrophizing. A total of 97 patients with MMP were diagnosed with co-existing headache (MMPH group, n = 50) or without headache (MMP group, n = 47) according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD). The outcome parameters were the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI); the Catastrophizing Thoughts subscale of the Pain-Related Self-Statement Scale (PRSS-C); pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) of the masseter and anterior temporalis muscles; and self-reported facial pain intensity measured on a 0- to 10-cm visual analog scale (VAS). Student t test for independent samples (α = 1.2%) and factorial analysis of variance (ANOVA) (α = 5%) were used to analyze the data. The MMPH group showed significantly impaired sleep quality (mean ± standard deviation [SD] PSQI score 9.1 ± 3.5) compared with the MMP group (7.2 ± 3.4; P = .008). Subscale scores on the PRSS-C were significantly higher in the MMPH (2.1 ± 1.2) than in the MMP group (1.6 ± 1.4, uncorrected P = .048). Also, the PPTs (kgf/cm²) of the masseter and anterior temporalis muscles were significantly lower in the MMPH group (1.52 ± 0.53; 1.29 ± 0.43, respectively) than in the MMP group (2.09 ± 0.73; 1.70 ± 0.68, respectively; P headache patients had lower PPTs in the anterior temporalis muscle (P = .041) in comparison with non-headache patients. Co-existence of headache further exacerbates clinical characteristics in patients with painful TMD, which implies involvement of common mechanisms and pathways of vulnerability in these patients.

  11. Are headache and temporomandibular disorders related? A blinded study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballegaard, V; Thede-Schmidt-Hansen, P; Svensson, P; Jensen, R

    2008-08-01

    To investigate overlaps between headache and temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in a clinical headache population and to describe the prevalence of TMD in headache patients, 99 patients referred to a specialized headache centre were diagnosed according to Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (RDC/TMD) and classified in headache groups according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders, second edition for headache diagnoses in a blinded design. The prevalence of TMD in the headache population was 56.1%. Psychosocial dysfunction caused by TMD pain was observed in 40.4%. No significant differences in TMD prevalence were revealed between headache groups, although TMD prevalence tended to be higher in patients with combined migraine and tension-type headache. Moderate to severe depression was experienced by 54.5% of patients. Patients with coexistent TMD had a significantly higher prevalence of depression-most markedly in patients with combined migraine and tension-type headache. Our studies indicate that a high proportion of headache patients have significant disability because of ongoing chronic TMD pain. The trend to a higher prevalence of TMD in patients with combined migraine and tension-type headache suggests that this could be a risk factor for TMD development. A need for screening procedures and treatment strategies concerning depression in headache patients with coexistent TMD is underlined by the overrepresentation of depression in this group. Our findings emphasize the importance of examination of the masticatory system in headache sufferers and underline the necessity of a multidimensional approach in chronic headache patients.

  12. Modified Valsalva test differentiates primary from secondary cough headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Russell J M; Davies, Paul T G

    2013-03-28

    The current definition of cough headache includes provocation of the symptom by Valsalva manoeuvre, and it is generally believed that all cough headache results from a sudden increase in intracranial pressure. We sought to question that presumption and to determine whether the Valsalva test might distinguish primary from secondary cough headache. We examined 16 consecutive cough headache patients using a modified Valsalva test (exhalation into the connecting tube of a standard anaeroid sphygmomanometer to 60 mm Hg for 10 seconds). A positive response was recorded if the manoeuvre provoked headache. All patients subsequently underwent brain MRI. None of the patients had neurological signs. Eleven had positive modified Valsalva tests. Ten were found subsequently to have posterior fossa pathologies (secondary cough headache: 8 Chiari Type 1 malformations, 2 posterior fossa meningiomas). The cough headache was relieved following surgery in all cases. One patient with a positive Valsalva test had an apparently normal brain MRI but measurements of hindbrain and posterior fossa dimensions were consistent with 'posterior fossa crowdedness'. The remaining 5 patients had negative (4 patients) or equivocal (1 patient) Valsalva tests and normal MRI scans (primary cough headache). These findings suggest that secondary cough headache results from a transient increase in intracranial CSF pressure during exertion in the presence of obstruction to normal cerebrospinal fluid dynamics. The modified Valsalva test can also determine whether tonsillar herniation found on brain MRI is symptomatic. Primary cough headache appears to be caused by a different mechanism, possibly through congestion of the orbital venous plexus in the presence of jugular venous incompetence and a reduced threshold for trigeminal sensory activation.

  13. The headache of temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virdee, J

    2018-03-01

    This article endeavours to revise the key guidance and evidence on temporomandibular disorders (TMD), with a particular focus on myofascial pain. It highlights the important role that primary care dental practitioners play in providing holistic care during the patient's journey to manage this painful condition. I hope to give an insight into my own personal experiences to highlight the challenges patients can face in seeking appropriate support.

  14. Management of headache disorders in the Emergency Department setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pari, Elisa; Rinaldi, Fabrizio; Gipponi, Stefano; Venturelli, Elisabetta; Liberini, Paolo; Rao, Renata; Padovani, Alessandro

    2015-07-01

    Headache is a common presenting complaint in the Emergency Department. The aim of this study was to delineate the demographic profile of patients presenting a chief complaint of headache and to assess the application of diagnostic algorithms for the management of these patients. We examined patients admitted to the Spedali Civili Hospital ED between January 2005 and December 2009 who complained of headache not related to trauma and all patients hospitalized for headache in Neurological Clinic, from ED, between January 2008 and December 2009. 7495 patients were examined at ED for headaches. 72 % of patients were discharged, 22 % were admitted. From 2005 to 2009, there was a definite decrease in the rate of hospitalization due to headache (15 vs 9.9 % in Department of Neurology and 26 vs 18.9 % in all Departments). Considering the decrease year by year, this reduction was significant from 2007 to 2008, when the algorithms were adopted. The most common diagnosis in the ED was "Non-specific headache" (41 %), followed by "Primary headaches and complications of primary headaches" (20.8 %), "Secondary headaches not associated with risk of serious disease" (20.4 %) and "Secondary headache associated with risk of serious disease" (5 %). Over 2-year period (2008-2009) we found an increase in the diagnosis of "Primary headaches and complications of primary headaches" and "Secondary headaches associated with risk of serious disease" compared with a decrease of "nonspecific headache" and "secondary headaches not associated with risk of serious disease". The use of the diagnostic algorithms and collaborative network between the ED and the Headache Center can improve the management of patients with headache in ED.

  15. Temporomandibular Disorders and Headache: A Retrospective Analysis of 1198 Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Di Paolo, Carlo; D'Urso, Anna; Papi, Piero; Di Sabato, Francesco; Rosella, Daniele; Pompa, Giorgio; Polimeni, Antonella

    2017-01-01

    Aim. Headache is one of the most common diseases associated with Temporomandibular Disorders (TMDs). The aim of this study was to evaluate, retrospectively, if headache influences TMD’s symptoms. Material and Methods. A total sample of 1198 consecutive TMD patients was selected. After a neurological examination, a diagnosis of headache, according to the latest edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders, was performed in 625 subjects. Patients were divided into two group...

  16. Disability from posttraumatic headache is compounded by coexisting posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roper, Louise S; Nightingale, Peter; Su, Zhangjie; Mitchell, James L; Belli, Antonio; Sinclair, Alexandra J

    2017-01-01

    Posttraumatic headache (PTH) occurs in up to 82% of patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) occurs in 39% of those with PTH. This study evaluates whether PTSD affects PTH disability. Eighty-six patients with TBI were prospectively evaluated in a secondary care trauma center. Headache disability was assessed using the Headache Impact Test version 6 and signs indicative of PTSD using the PTSD Check List Civilian version. Increased PTSD-type symptoms were significantly associated with increased headache disability ( p headache disability (Spearman's correlation rho=0.361, p =0.001). Increased severity of PTSD-type symptoms is significantly associated with increased headache disability in patients with chronic PTH. Managing PTSD symptoms in patients with chronic PTH may facilitate headache management.

  17. Comprehensive Application of the International Classification of Headache Disorders Third Edition, Beta Version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byung-Kun; Cho, Soo-Jin; Kim, Byung-Su; Sohn, Jong-Hee; Kim, Soo-Kyoung; Cha, Myoung-Jin; Song, Tae-Jin; Kim, Jae-Moon; Park, Jeong Wook; Chu, Min Kyung; Park, Kwang-Yeol; Moon, Heui-Soo

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility and usefulness of the International Classification of Headache Disorders, third edition, beta version (ICHD-3β), and compare the differences with the International Classification of Headache Disorders, second edition (ICHD-2). Consecutive first-visit patients were recruited from 11 headache clinics in Korea. Headache classification was performed in accordance with ICHD-3β. The characteristics of headaches were analyzed and the feasibility and usefulness of this version was assessed by the proportion of unclassified headache disorders compared with ICHD-2. A total of 1,627 patients were enrolled (mean age, 47.4±14.7 yr; 62.8% female). Classification by ICHD-3β was achieved in 97.8% of headache patients, whereas 90.0% could be classified by ICHD-2. Primary headaches (n=1,429, 87.8%) were classified as follows: 697 migraines, 445 tension-type headaches, 22 cluster headaches, and 265 other primary headache disorders. Secondary headache or painful cranial neuropathies/other facial pains were diagnosed in 163 patients (10.0%). Only 2.2% were not classified by ICHD-3β. The main reasons for missing classifications were insufficient information (1.6%) or absence of suitable classification (0.6%). The diagnoses differed from those using ICHD-2 in 243 patients (14.9%). Among them, 165 patients were newly classified from unclassified with ICHD-2 because of the relaxation of the previous strict criteria or the introduction of a new diagnostic category. ICHD-3β would yield a higher classification rate than its previous version, ICHD-2. ICHD-3β is applicable in clinical practice for first-visit headache patients of a referral hospital.

  18. Influence of temple headache frequency on physical functioning and emotional functioning in subjects with temporomandibular disorder pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    List, Thomas; John, Mike T; Ohrbach, Richard; Schiffman, Eric L; Truelove, Edmond L; Anderson, Gary C

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the relationship of headache frequency with patient-reported physical functioning and emotional functioning in temporomandibular disorder (TMD) subjects with concurrent temple headache. The Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (RDC/TMD) Validation Project identified, as a subset of 614 TMD cases and 91 controls (n = 705), 309 subjects with concurrent TMD pain diagnoses (RDC/TMD) and temple headache. The temple headaches were subdivided into infrequent, frequent, and chronic headache according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders, second edition (ICHD-II). Study variables included self-report measures of physical functioning (Jaw Function Limitation Scale [JFLS], Graded Chronic Pain Scale [GCPS], Short Form-12 [SF-12]) and emotional functioning (depression and anxiety as measured by the Symptom Checklist-90R/SCL-90R). Differences among the three headache subgroups were characterized by increasing headache frequency. The relationship between ordered headache frequency and physical as well as emotional functioning was analyzed using linear regression and trend tests for proportions. Physical functioning, as assessed with the JFLS (P headache frequency. Emotional functioning, reflected in depression and anxiety, was also associated with increased frequency of headache (both P Headache frequency was substantially correlated with reduced physical functioning and emotional functioning in subjects with TMD and concurrent temple headaches. A secondary finding was that headache was precipitated by jaw activities more often in subjects with more frequent temple headaches.

  19. Temporomandibular disorders, headaches and chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrzewska, Joanna M

    2015-03-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are a major cause of non-dental orofacial pain with a suggested prevalence of 3% to 5% in the general population. TMDs present as unilateral or bilateral pain centered round the pre-auricular area and can be associated with clicking and limitation in jaw movements. It is important to ascertain if there are other comorbid factors such as headaches, widespread chronic pain and mood changes. A biopsychosocial approach is crucial with a careful explanation and self-care techniques encouraged.

  20. The Association Between Headaches and Temporomandibular Disorders is Confounded by Bruxism and Somatic Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, Hedwig A; Speksnijder, Caroline M; Engelbert, Raoul H H; Lobbezoo, Frank; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G; Visscher, Corine M

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this observational study was to establish the possible presence of confounders on the association between temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and headaches in a patient population from a TMD and Orofacial Pain Clinic. Several subtypes of headaches have been diagnosed: self-reported headache, (probable) migraine, (probable) tension-type headache, and secondary headache attributed to TMD. The presence of TMD was subdivided into 2 subtypes: painful TMD and function-related TMD. The associations between the subtypes of TMD and headaches were evaluated by single regression models. To study the influence of possible confounding factors on this association, the regression models were extended with age, sex, bruxism, stress, depression, and somatic symptoms. Of the included patients (n=203), 67.5% experienced headaches. In the subsample of patients with a painful TMD (n=58), the prevalence of self-reported headaches increased to 82.8%. The associations found between self-reported headache and (1) painful TMD and (2) function-related TMD were confounded by the presence of somatic symptoms. For probable migraine, both somatic symptoms and bruxism confounded the initial association found with painful TMD. The findings of this study imply that there is a central working mechanism overlapping TMD and headache. Health care providers should not regard these disorders separately, but rather look at the bigger picture to appreciate the complex nature of the diagnostic and therapeutic process.

  1. Unique Migraine Subtypes, Rare Headache Disorders, and Other Disturbances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goadsby, Peter J

    2015-08-01

    The medical aphorism that common things happen commonly makes unique (and less common) migraine subtypes especially appropriate to review for the general neurologist. This article also identifies some rare headache disorders and other disturbances, and offers strategies to manage them. This article discusses migraine with brainstem aura, which is troublesome clinically and has had a change in terminology in the International Classification of Headache Disorders, Third Edition, beta version (ICHD-3 beta), and hemiplegic migraine, which is also troublesome in practice. The rare headache disorder hypnic headache and the exploding head syndrome are also discussed. When hypnic headache is recognized, it is eminently treatable, while exploding head syndrome is a benign condition with no reported consequences. Unique migraine subtypes, rare headache disorders, and other disturbances present to neurologists. When recognized, they can often be managed very well, which offers significant benefits to patients and practice satisfaction to neurologists.

  2. Disseminated neurocysticercosis presenting as affective mood disorder with chronic tension type headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnarpan Chatterjee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurocysticercosis is a common parasitic infection in India presenting usually with seizues, headache, focal neurological deficits. Neurocysticercosis presenting as a psychiatric illness is rare. Disseminated cysticercosis with involvement of central nervous system and head and neck muscles is rare even in endemic areas. We present a case of disseminated cysticercosis, which presented with chronic tension type headache and affective mood disorder. Treatment with cysticidal drugs led to complete remission of psychiatric complaints. In endemic areas history suggestive of mood disorder should not be used as supportive evidence of a primary headache syndome like tension type headche without ruling out secondary causes. Making an early diagnosis can prevent morbidity.

  3. Classification of Headache Disorders: Extending to a Multiaxial System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Paul R

    2016-11-01

    This article argues for extending the International Classification of Headache Disorders to include information that goes beyond diagnosis. The obvious model is a multiaxial system as has been developed for other taxonomies. An axis for recording disability and impact on functioning, and an axis for recording the triggers of headache/migraine, are perhaps the strongest contenders for adding to the system, but there are other possibilities such as lifestyle factors relevant to headache. Extensions such as these would contribute to headache management, provide clear targets for change, and encourage adoption of a biopsychosocial perspective. © 2016 American Headache Society.

  4. Use of the International Classification of Headache Disorders, Second Edition, criteria in the diagnosis of primary headache in schoolchildren: epidemiology study from eastern Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alp, Recep; Alp, Selen Ilhan; Palanci, Yilmaz; Sur, Haydar; Boru, Ulku Turk; Ozge, Aynur; Yapici, Zuhal

    2010-07-01

    We aimed to determine the prevalence of primary headache among schoolchildren in the city of Agri, located in eastern Turkey, where geographical, climatic and socio-economic conditions differ greatly from those of other regions of Turkey. A cross-sectional school-based (ages ranging from 11 to 18) study was conducted from January to April 2006. Diagnosis was based on the second edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders. This population was evaluated by a two-stage clustered sampling procedure. In the first phase, 1385 children were asked whether they had had a headache within the past year. For the second-step interview, 540 children (38.9%) with a complaint of headache were selected. Five children who had complained of headaches in the first interview did not agree to participate in the second stage. Of the remaining 535, 473 were identified as having primary headache and 62 as having secondary headache. Overall, one-year prevalence of headache subtypes was 14.3% for migraine, 3.5% for probable migraine, 8.6% for pure tension-type headache, 4.6% for migraine plus tension-type headache, and 3.0% for probable migraine plus tension-type headache. The prevalence of migraine was higher in our study than in previous studies.

  5. Disorders presenting with headache as the sole symptom ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Disorders presenting with headache as the sole symptom. ... Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... probably do not require sophisticated neurological skills or investigations, failure to recognise an underlying disorder or an ...

  6. A RETROSPECTIVE OBSERVATIONAL STUDY OF PREVALENCE AND OCULAR MANIFESTATIONS IN VARIOUS OCULAR CAUSES FOR HEADACHE DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasan Shanmugam

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Headache or cephalgia is one of the commonest symptoms causing pain in head above eyes or the ears, behind the head in the occipital region or in the back of the upper neck causing pain as well as disability to an individual. WHO reports around 47% of adults worldwide will have experienced headache in the last year. Headache maybe primary or secondary. Tension headache is more common type of primary headache. Almost, 90% of adults have tension headache and it is more common in females than males. Migraine headache is third most prevalent disorder worldwide and ranked as seventh highest cause of disability. Migraine headaches are the second most common type of primary headaches, whereas cluster headache, a relatively uncommon type of primary headache affecting less than 1 in every 1000 adults. 1 Many people suffer from mixed headache disorder in which tension headache or secondary headache may trigger migraine. Headache on 15 or more days in every month affects 1.7-4% of the world adult population. Hospital-based studies of migraine shows India is home over 16% of world inhabitants suffering from migraine. MATERIALS AND METHODS In our study, total screening of 1200 cases was done with headache symptomatology reported to Eye OPD directly as well as referred from ENT, Medical, NeuroMedical, Surgical, Neurosurgical, Psychiatry, Orthopaedics and Trauma Ward. A detailed clinical examination and ophthalmological examination was done in 1200 cases. RESULTS Sexual prevalence in our study indicated female with increased prevalence of 46.67% compared to male of 36%. Among 30 cases of migrainous headache with or without aura, the sexual prevalence in our study has female-to-male ratio as 2:1 (female - 20 cases and male - 10 cases. No cluster headache disorder was reported in our study. Among the tension headache presented with ocular manifestations like association of the refractive error, redness, burning sensation, the female prevalence among

  7. Exercise Headaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... headaches may require emergency medical attention. Symptoms Primary exercise headaches These headaches: Are usually described as throbbing ... sides of the head in most cases Secondary exercise headaches These headaches may cause: The same symptoms ...

  8. Other primary headaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anish Bahra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The ′Other Primary Headaches′ include eight recognised benign headache disorders. Primary stabbing headache is a generally benign disorder which often co-exists with other primary headache disorders such as migraine and cluster headache. Primary cough headache is headache precipitated by valsalva; secondary cough has been reported particularly in association with posterior fossa pathology. Primary exertional headache can occur with sudden or gradual onset during, or immediately after, exercise. Similarly headache associated with sexual activity can occur with gradual evolution or sudden onset. Secondary headache is more likely with both exertional and sexual headache of sudden onset. Sudden onset headache, with maximum intensity reached within a minute, is termed thunderclap headache. A benign form of thunderclap headache exists. However, isolated primary and secondary thunderclap headache cannot be clinically differentiated. Therefore all headache of thunderclap onset should be investigated. The primary forms of the aforementioned paroxysmal headaches appear to be Indomethacin sensitive disorders. Hypnic headache is a rare disorder which is termed ′alarm clock headache′, exclusively waking patients from sleep. The disorder can be Indomethacin responsive, but can also respond to Lithium and caffeine. New daily persistent headache is a rare and often intractable headache which starts one day and persists daily thereafter for at least 3 months. The clinical syndrome more often has migrainous features or is otherwise has a chronic tension-type headache phenotype. Management is that of the clinical syndrome. Hemicrania continua straddles the disorders of migraine and the trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias and is not dealt with in this review.

  9. Headache

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... most common type of headache is a tension headache. Tension headaches are due to tight muscles in your shoulders, neck, scalp and jaw. They are often related to stress, depression or anxiety. You are more likely to ...

  10. Potential risk factors for psychiatric disorders in patients with headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimnuan, Chaichana; Asawavichienjinda, Thanin; Srikiatkhachorn, Anan

    2012-01-01

    Psychiatric comorbidities are common among patients with headache. These can compromise the quality of life of patients and may affect the result of treatment. No available systematic study concerning this problem has been conducted in Thailand. The study aimed to determine the prevalence and risk factors of psychiatric disorders in patients with headache in tertiary care facility. The study was conducted at the Headache Clinic, King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital in Bangkok, Thailand. One hundred and thirteen patients were enrolled. Diagnosis of headache was made based on International Classification of Headache Disorders II system. Mental disorders were assessed using Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders. Other possible risk factors were extracted using significant physical symptoms count and accumulated risk for mental disorder. Of the 113 samples analyzed, the prevalence of depression, anxiety, and somatoform disorder was found to be 29.2%, 9.7%, and 27.4%, respectively. No definite relationship between headache types and mental disorders was observed. High number of significant physical complaints and health concerns significantly increased the risk for depression (OR = 4.6, 95% CI = 1.6 to 13.5) while the level of possible risk for mental disorder was associated with an increased risk for somatoform disorder (OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.2 to 2.2). The study confirmed high prevalence of psychiatric comorbidities in patients with headache. The results of this study will raise the awareness of physicians to possible underlying mental disorders in patients with headache and facilitate appropriate treatment or psychiatric referral. © 2011 American Headache Society.

  11. Headaches and myofascial temporomandibular disorders: overlapping entities, separate managements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, P C R; Costa, Y M; Gonçalves, D A; Svensson, P

    2016-09-01

    There are relevant clinical overlaps between some of the painful temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and headache conditions that may hamper the diagnostic process and treatment. A non-systematic search for studies on the relationship between TMD and headaches was carried out in the following databases: PubMed, Cochrane Library and Embase. Important pain mechanisms contributing to the close association and complex relationship between TMD and headache disorders are as follows: processes of peripheral and central sensitisation which take place in similar anatomical areas, the possible impairment of the descending modulatory pain pathways and the processes of referred pain. In addition, the clinical examination does not always provide distinguishing information to differentiate between headaches and TMD. So, considering the pathophysiology and the clinical presentation of some types of headache and myofascial TMD, such overlap can be considered not only a matter of comorbid relationship, but rather a question of disorders where the distinction lines are sometimes hard to identify. These concerns are certainly reflected in the current classification systems of both TMD and headache where the clinical consequences of diagnosis such as headache attributed to or associated with TMD are uncertain. There are several similarities in terms of therapeutic strategies used to manage myofascial TMD and headaches. Considering all these possible levels of interaction, we reinforce the recommendation for multidisciplinary approaches, by a team of oro-facial pain specialists and a neurologist (headache specialist), to attain the most precise differential diagnosis and initiate the best and most efficient treatment. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Temporomandibular Disorders and Headache: A Retrospective Analysis of 1198 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Paolo, Carlo; D'Urso, Anna; Papi, Piero; Di Sabato, Francesco; Rosella, Daniele; Pompa, Giorgio; Polimeni, Antonella

    2017-01-01

    Aim . Headache is one of the most common diseases associated with Temporomandibular Disorders (TMDs). The aim of this study was to evaluate, retrospectively, if headache influences TMD's symptoms. Material and Methods . A total sample of 1198 consecutive TMD patients was selected. After a neurological examination, a diagnosis of headache, according to the latest edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders, was performed in 625 subjects. Patients were divided into two groups based on presence/absence of headache: Group with Headache (GwH) and Group without Headache (GwoH). Descriptive statistics and Chi-square index were performed. Results . Sociodemographic (gender, marital status, and occupation) and functional factors, occlusion (occlusal and skeletal classes, dental formula, and occlusal abnormalities), and familiar pain did not show a statistically significant correlation in either group. Intensity and frequency of neck pain, arthralgia of TMJ, and myalgia showed higher correlation values in GwH. Conclusion . This study is consistent with previous literature in showing a close relationship between headache and TMD. All data underlines that headache makes pain parameters more intense and frequent. Therefore, an early and multidisciplinary treatment of TMDs should be performed in order to avoid the overlay of painful events that could result in pain chronicity.

  13. Temporomandibular Disorders and Headache: A Retrospective Analysis of 1198 Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Di Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Headache is one of the most common diseases associated with Temporomandibular Disorders (TMDs. The aim of this study was to evaluate, retrospectively, if headache influences TMD’s symptoms. Material and Methods. A total sample of 1198 consecutive TMD patients was selected. After a neurological examination, a diagnosis of headache, according to the latest edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders, was performed in 625 subjects. Patients were divided into two groups based on presence/absence of headache: Group with Headache (GwH and Group without Headache (GwoH. Descriptive statistics and Chi-square index were performed. Results. Sociodemographic (gender, marital status, and occupation and functional factors, occlusion (occlusal and skeletal classes, dental formula, and occlusal abnormalities, and familiar pain did not show a statistically significant correlation in either group. Intensity and frequency of neck pain, arthralgia of TMJ, and myalgia showed higher correlation values in GwH. Conclusion. This study is consistent with previous literature in showing a close relationship between headache and TMD. All data underlines that headache makes pain parameters more intense and frequent. Therefore, an early and multidisciplinary treatment of TMDs should be performed in order to avoid the overlay of painful events that could result in pain chronicity.

  14. Temporomandibular Disorders and Headache: A Retrospective Analysis of 1198 Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Paolo, Carlo; D'Urso, Anna; Di Sabato, Francesco; Pompa, Giorgio

    2017-01-01

    Aim. Headache is one of the most common diseases associated with Temporomandibular Disorders (TMDs). The aim of this study was to evaluate, retrospectively, if headache influences TMD's symptoms. Material and Methods. A total sample of 1198 consecutive TMD patients was selected. After a neurological examination, a diagnosis of headache, according to the latest edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders, was performed in 625 subjects. Patients were divided into two groups based on presence/absence of headache: Group with Headache (GwH) and Group without Headache (GwoH). Descriptive statistics and Chi-square index were performed. Results. Sociodemographic (gender, marital status, and occupation) and functional factors, occlusion (occlusal and skeletal classes, dental formula, and occlusal abnormalities), and familiar pain did not show a statistically significant correlation in either group. Intensity and frequency of neck pain, arthralgia of TMJ, and myalgia showed higher correlation values in GwH. Conclusion. This study is consistent with previous literature in showing a close relationship between headache and TMD. All data underlines that headache makes pain parameters more intense and frequent. Therefore, an early and multidisciplinary treatment of TMDs should be performed in order to avoid the overlay of painful events that could result in pain chronicity. PMID:28420942

  15. Drug therapy in headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weatherall, Mark W

    2015-06-01

    All physicians will encounter patients with headaches. Primary headache disorders are common, and often disabling. This paper reviews the principles of drug therapy in headache in adults, focusing on the three commonest disorders presenting in both primary and secondary care: tension-type headache, migraine and cluster headache. The clinical evidence on the basis of which choices can be made between the currently available drug therapies for acute and preventive treatment of these disorders is presented, and information given on the options available for the emergency parenteral treatment of refractory migraine attacks and cluster headache. © Royal College of Physicians 2015. All rights reserved.

  16. Headache and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder: an epidemiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Daniela A G; Bigal, Marcelo E; Jales, Luciana C F; Camparis, Cinara M; Speciali, José G

    2010-02-01

    A population-based cross-sectional study was conducted to estimate the prevalence of migraine, episodic tension-type headaches (ETTH), and chronic daily headaches (CDH), as well as the presence of symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in the adult population. The potential comorbidity of headache syndromes and TMD has been established mostly based on clinic-based studies. A representative sample of 1230 inhabitants (51.5% women) was interviewed by a validated phone survey. TMD symptoms were assessed through 5 questions, as recommended by the American Academy of Orofacial Pain, in an attempt to classify possible TMD. Primary headaches were diagnosed based on the International Classification of Headache Disorders. When at least 1 TMD symptom was reported, any headache happened in 56.5% vs 31.9% (P headache as the reference, the prevalence of at least 1 TMD symptom was increased in ETTH (prevalence ratio = 1.48, 95% confidence interval = 1.20-1.79), migraine (2.10, 1.80-2.47) and CDH (2.41, 1.84-3.17). At least 2 TMD symptoms also happened more frequently in migraine (4.4, 3.0-6.3), CDH (3.4; 1.5-7.6), and ETTH (2.1; 1.3-3.2), relative to individuals with no headaches. Finally, 3 or more TMD symptoms were also more common in migraine (6.2; 3.8-10.2) than in no headaches. Differences were significant for ETTH (2.7 1.5-4.8), and were numerically but not significant for CDH (2.3; 0.66-8.04). Temporomandibular disorder symptoms are more common in migraine, ETTH, and CDH relative to individuals without headache. Magnitude of association is higher for migraine. Future studies should clarify the nature of the relationship.

  17. Headache attributed to intracranial pressure alterations: applicability of the International Classification of Headache Disorders ICHD-3 beta version versus ICHD-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curone, M; Peccarisi, C; Bussone, G

    2015-05-01

    %, criterion C; and 68 %, criterion D; while applying ICHD-3 beta version all patients, 100 % fitted criterion A, B, C, D. 73 % patients of Group A fitted all ICHD-2 criteria and 97.5 % all ICHD-3 beta version criteria for headache attributed to IIH. 68 % patients of Group B fitted all ICHD-2 criteria and 100 % all ICHD-3 beta version criteria for headache attributed to SIH. In Group C and Group D, although patients fitted some clinical criteria, the underlying disorder caused exclusion of both ICHD-2 and ICHD-3 beta version applicability for headache attributed to IIH and SIH; they were coded in criteria for the secondary headaches. In summary, ICHD-3 beta version seems to have better applicability but worse reliability in defining headache features in CSF alterations.

  18. Pediatric Aspects of Headache Classification in the International Classification of Headache Disorders-3 (ICHD-3 beta version).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAbee, Gary N; Morse, Anne Marie; Assadi, Mitra

    2016-01-01

    This analysis looks at the applicability of the International Classification of Headache Disorders-3 beta (ICHD-3 beta) to various headache syndromes of children and adolescents. Areas of similarities and differences between adult and pediatric headaches are addressed as they relate to the ICHD-3 beta.

  19. Proposals for new standardized general diagnostic criteria for the secondary headaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, J; Steiner, T; Bousser, M-G

    2009-01-01

    headache and chronic migraine. These changes made apparent a further need for broader revisions to the standard formulation of diagnostic criteria for the secondary headaches. Currently, the fourth criterion makes impossible the definitive diagnosis of a secondary headache until the underlying cause has...... propose maintaining a standard approach to the secondary headaches using a set of four criteria A, B, C and D, but we construct these so that the requirement for resolution or successful treatment is removed. The proposal for general diagnostic criteria for the secondary headaches will be entered...... classification are then foreseen for the next 10 years. Until the printing of ICHD-IIR, the printed ICHD-II criteria remain in place for all other purposes. We issue a plea to the headache community to use and study these proposed general criteria for the secondary headaches in order to provide more evidence...

  20. Headache and temporomandibular disorders: evidence for diagnostic and behavioural overlap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaros, A G; Urban, D; Locke, J

    2007-06-01

    To assess the diagnostic and behavioural overlap of headache patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD), individuals recruited from the general population with self-described headaches were compared with non-headache controls. The examination and diagnostic procedures in the Research Diagnostic Criteria (RDC) for TMD were applied to both sets of subjects by a blinded examiner. Following their examination, subjects used experience sampling methods to obtain data on pain, tooth contact, masticatory muscle tension, emotional states and stress. Results showed that a significantly higher proportion of the headache patients received an RDC/TMD diagnosis of myofascial pain than non-headache controls. Headache patients also reported significantly more frequent and intense tooth contact, more masticatory muscle tension, more stress and more pain in the face/head and other parts of the body than non-headache controls. These results are similar to those reported for TMD patients and they suggest that headache patients and TMD patients overlap considerably in diagnosis and oral parafunctional behaviours.

  1. Temporomandibular disorders, sleep bruxism, and primary headaches are mutually associated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Giovana; Franco, Ana Lúcia; Gonçalves, Daniela Aparecida; Speciali, José Geraldo; Bigal, Marcelo Eduardo; Camparis, Cinara Maria

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the association among temporomandibular disorders (TMD), sleep bruxism, and primary headaches, assessing the risk of occurrence of primary headaches in patients with or without painful TMD and sleep bruxism. The sample consisted of 301 individuals (253 women and 48 men) with ages varying from 18 to 76 years old (average age of 37.5 years). The Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders were used to classify TMD. Sleep bruxism was diagnosed by clinical criteria proposed by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, and primary headaches were diagnosed according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders-II. Data were analyzed by chi-square and odds ratio tests with a 95% confidence interval, and the significance level adopted was .05. An association was found among painful TMD, migraine, and tension-type headache (P headache (3.7; 1.59-8.75). With regard to sleep bruxism, the association was significant only for chronic migraine (3.8; 1.83-7.84). When the sample was stratified by the presence of sleep bruxism and painful TMD, only the presence of sleep bruxism did not increase the risk for any type of headache. The presence of painful TMD without sleep bruxism significantly increased the risk in particular for chronic migraine (30.1; 3.58-252.81), followed by episodic migraine (3.7; 1.46-9.16). The association between painful TMD and sleep bruxism significantly increased the risk for chronic migraine (87.1; 10.79-702.18), followed by episodic migraine (6.7; 2.79-15.98) and episodic tension-type headache (3.8; 1.38-10.69). The association of sleep bruxism and painful TMD greatly increased the risk for episodic migraine, episodic tension-type headache, and especially for chronic migraine.

  2. Headache attributed to temporomandibular disorders and masticatory myofascial pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Kazuhiko; Shinozaki, Takahiro; Okada-Ogawa, Akiko; Matsukawa, Yumiko; Dezawa, Ko; Nakaya, Yuka; Chen, Jui-Yen; Noma, Noboru; Oka, Shunichi; Iwata, Koichi; Imamura, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the temporal association between temporomandibular disorders (TMD)-related symptoms and headache during TMD treatment for patients who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for headache attributed to TMD (HATMD) specified in the Diagnostic criteria for TMD (DC/TMD) and International classification of headache disorders (ICHD)-3 beta. The study enrolled 34 patients with HATMD induced by masticatory myofascial pain but not by temporomandibular arthralgia. Facial pain intensity, the pressure pain threshold of pericranial muscles, and maximum unassisted opening of the jaw were assessed at an initial examination and before and after physical therapy. The intensity and frequency of headache episodes and tooth contact ratio were also recorded before and after the intervention. Headache intensity and frequency significantly decreased, and these reductions were temporally related to improvements in facial pain intensity, maximum unassisted opening, and pressure pain threshold during TMD treatment. Linear regression analysis showed significant correlations between facial pain intensity and headache intensity and between tooth contact ratio and pressure pain threshold. Among patients who fulfilled the DC/TMD and ICHD-3 beta diagnostic criteria for HATMD, headache improved during TMD treatment, and the improvement was temporally related to amelioration of TMD symptoms. These findings suggest that sensitization in the central and peripheral nervous systems is responsible for HATMD. (J Oral Sci 58, 195-204, 2016).

  3. Headaches as somatoform disorders in children and adolescents

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    Anna Kostorz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Somatoform disorders are often the main cause for seeking professional advice and performing a number of specialist checks. The aim of the study was to determine the frequency of somatoform disorders in the form of headaches in children and adolescents neurologically diagnosed and the risk factors thereof. Analysis of the biological and situational risk factors were established. Somatoform disorders were diagnosed in 27 out of 276 children with headaches. We concluded that in the differential diagnosis of headaches, somatoform headaches should not be omitted as every 10th patient in the developmental age diagnosed on the neurological ward because of headache shows signs of somatoform heada - ches. In diagnostically difficult cases it is recommended that analysis of biological and situational risk factors be performed with special attention paid to chronic disease of the patient and/or in his immediate family, the patient’s psychological disorders and dysfunctional or low social status families. The creation of separate criteria for somatoform disorders of the developmental age should be considered.

  4. [Headache: classification and diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbaat, P A T; Couturier, E G M

    2016-11-01

    There are many types of headache and, moreover, many people have different types of headache at the same time. Adequate treatment is possible only on the basis of the correct diagnosis. Technically and in terms of content the current diagnostics process for headache is based on the 'International Classification of Headache Disorders' (ICHD-3-beta) that was produced under the auspices of the International Headache Society. This classification is based on a distinction between primary and secondary headaches. The most common primary headache types are the tension type headache, migraine and the cluster headache. Application of uniform diagnostic concepts is essential to come to the most appropriate treatment of the various types of headache.

  5. Chronic daily headaches

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    Fayyaz Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic Daily Headache is a descriptive term that includes disorders with headaches on more days than not and affects 4% of the general population. The condition has a debilitating effect on individuals and society through direct cost to healthcare and indirectly to the economy in general. To successfully manage chronic daily headache syndromes it is important to exclude secondary causes with comprehensive history and relevant investigations; identify risk factors that predict its development and recognise its sub-types to appropriately manage the condition. Chronic migraine, chronic tension-type headache, new daily persistent headache and medication overuse headache accounts for the vast majority of chronic daily headaches. The scope of this article is to review the primary headache disorders. Secondary headaches are not discussed except medication overuse headache that often accompanies primary headache disorders. The article critically reviews the literature on the current understanding of daily headache disorders focusing in particular on recent developments in the treatment of frequent headaches.

  6. Headaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and does the pain occur during times of stress or after you have been sitting in one position for a long time?YesNoDo you have intense throbbing pain, often with nausea or vomiting, and see flashing lights or spots before the headache?YesNoDo your headaches occur after you read, watch ...

  7. Comprehensive Application of the International Classification of Headache Disorders Third Edition, Beta Version

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Byung-Kun; Cho, Soo-Jin; Kim, Byung-Su; Sohn, Jong-Hee; Kim, Soo-Kyoung; Cha, Myoung-Jin; Song, Tae-Jin; Kim, Jae-Moon; Park, Jeong Wook; Chu, Min Kyung; Park, Kwang-Yeol; Moon, Heui-Soo

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility and usefulness of the International Classification of Headache Disorders, third edition, beta version (ICHD-3?), and compare the differences with the International Classification of Headache Disorders, second edition (ICHD-2). Consecutive first-visit patients were recruited from 11 headache clinics in Korea. Headache classification was performed in accordance with ICHD-3?. The characteristics of headaches were analyzed and the feasibility ...

  8. Mandibular function, temporomandibular disorders, and headache in prematurely born children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsson, Liselotte; Ekberg, Ewacarin; Nilner, Maria; Bondemark, Lars

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate mandibular function, signs, and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and headache in prematurely born 8- to 10-year-old children, and to compare the findings with matched full-term born controls. Seventy-three preterm children were selected from the Medical Birth Register--one group comprising 36 extremely preterm children born before the 29th gestational week, the other group 37 very preterm children born during gestational weeks 29 to 32. The preterm children were compared with a control group of 41 full-term children matched for gender, age, nationality, and living area. The subjective symptoms of TMD and headache were registered using a questionnaire. Mandibular function, signs, and symptoms of TMD and headache were registered. TMD diagnoses were set per Research Diagnostic Criteria for temporomandibular disorders (RDC/TMD). No significant differences between groups or gender were found for TMD diagnoses according to RDC/TMD or for headache. The preterm children had smaller mandibular movement capacity than the full-term control group, but when adjusting for weight, height, and head circumference mostly all group differences disappeared. Prematurely born children of 8 to 10 years of age did not differ from full-term born children when considering diagnoses according to RDC/TMD, signs, and symptoms of TMD or headache.

  9. Top-100 cited articles on headache disorders: A bibliometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kang Min; Park, Bong Soo; Park, Sihyung; Yoon, Dae Young; Bae, Jong Seok

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and characterize the most-cited articles on headache disorders published in journals that have made key contributions in the field. We performed a search of journals and selected the top-100 cited articles by utilizing the Institute for Scientific Information database available under the banner of the Web of Science, which provides the most relevant bibliometric information on scientific articles published since 1950. The top-100 cited articles were published in 20 journals. The most frequently cited journal was Neurology (19 articles), and followed by Cephalagia (15 articles) and Headache (15 articles). Migraine was the most common topic subject (81 articles), and original articles predominated (91 articles). The topics of the classic articles had varied from decade to decade. The most common topic subject was epidemiology (37 articles), followed by pathophysiology (20 articles), treatment (18 articles), review (10 articles), neuroimaging (11 articles), genetics (3 articles), and diagnostic tools (2 articles). The present study has produced a detailed list of the most-cited articles on headache disorders, which is the first such study in this field. This list makes it possible to recognize the classic articles on headache disorders as well as research trends and academic achievements in this field. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. The relationship of temporomandibular disorders with headaches: a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özkan, Nilüfer Cakir; Ozkan, Fatih

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to retrospectively analyze the incidence of the concurrent existence of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and headaches. Forty patients (36 female, 4 male, mean age: 29.9±9.6 years) clinically diagnosed with TMD were screened. Patient records were analyzed regarding: range of mouth opening, temporomandibular joint (TMJ) noises, pain on palpation of the TMJ and masticatory muscles and neck and upper back muscles, and magnetic resonance imaging of the TMJ. According to patient records, a total of 40 (66.6%) patients were diagnosed with TMD among 60 patients with headache. Thirty-two (53%) patients had TMJ internal derangement (ID), 8 (13%) patients had only myofascial pain dysfunction (MPD) and 25 (41.6%) patients had concurrent TMJ ID/MPD. There were statistically significant relationships between the number of tender masseter muscles and MPD patients (p=0.04) and between the number of tender medial pterygoid muscles and patients with reducing disc displacement (RDD) (p=0.03). The TMJ and associated orofacial structures should be considered as possible triggering or perpetuating factors for headaches, especially tension-type. There might be a significant connection between TMD and headache. However, most medical and dental practitioners are unaware of this relationship. Therefore, a careful evaluation of the TMJ and associated orofacial structures is required for a correct interpretation of the craniofacial pain in headache patients, and these patients should be managed with a multidisciplinary approach.

  11. Prevalence and impact of primary headache disorders among students and working population in 18-25 years age group

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    Gowri Aishwarya S, Eswari N, Chandrasekar M, Chandra Prabha J

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Headache or cephalalgia is defined as pain in the head. Headache is an extremely common symptom that may have a profound impact on peoples’ functioning and quality of life. According to International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD, they are Primary and Secondary headaches. Primary Headaches are triggered by stress, alcohol, changes in sleep pattern, anxiety, poor posture, all of which are part and parcel our day-to-day life. The study was performed to investigate the prevalence of primary headache disorders and its severity of impact among students and working population in the age group 18-25. Methods: The study was conducted on 718 subjects of which 483 subjects were medical and engineering students from the age group 18-21 and 235 subjects were working people from the age group 22-25. Written consent was taken from each of them. Headache Impact Test-6 (version 1.1 and the HARDSHIP Questionnaire by Timothy Steiner et al. were the questionnaires used to diagnose the severity of impact and the type of headache respectively. The study was ethically approved by Ethical Clearance Board of MAHER University. People suffering from psychiatric illness were excluded from the study. Result: There was increased prevalence of migraine in the age group 18-21 and tension type headache in the age group 22-25.Over 50%of subjects from both the age groups had headaches that have substantial to severe impact on their lives. There was no significant gender variation in headache prevalence.

  12. Evaluation relationship between temporomandibular joint disorder and headache: A review literature

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    Farzaneh Aghahosseini

    2017-12-01

    Conclusion: Bruxism and temporomandibular disorders are the two main contributing factors in initiation and perpetuation of headache. Treatment of these two phenomena would be effective in the treatment of headache.

  13. Headache associated with hemodialysis

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    Nikić Petar M.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Hemodialysis (HD is one of the most accessible methods for the treatment of the growing number of patients suffering from terminal-stage renal insufficiency. Although headache is the most frequently encountered neurological symptom during HD, there are few studies reporting its prevalence and clinical features. OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to examine the frequency, demographic and clinical features of headache during HD, and to compare these parameters among patients with and without headache. METHOD The study involved 126 patients (48 female and 78 male with chronic renal failure on regular HD for at least six months, at the Dialysis Unit of Nephrology Department, Kruševac. All patients were inquired about their possible problems with headache using the standardized questionnaire designed according to the diagnostic criteria of the International Headache Classification of Headache Disorders, second edition, published in 2004 (ICHD-II. Subsequently, the patients were clinically evaluated and patients with headaches were further sub classified by a neurologist with special interest in headache disorders. Patients with headache were compared to the patients without headache regarding age, sex, duration of HD, causes of end-stage renal disease, arterial diastolic and systolic blood pressure, and serum values of the most important blood parameters such as sodium, potassium, urea and creatinine. In the group of patients with headache we analyzed the characteristics of specific headache type according to ICHD-II classification. We also analyzed the most important clinical features of hemodialysis headache (HDH. RESULTS In the group of 126 evaluated patients, 41 (32.5% patients had headaches. There were no statistically significant differences between the patients with headaches and those without headaches regarding sex, age, BMI, duration of HD, causes of end-stage renal disease, arterial blood pressure, red blood cell count

  14. Post-traumatic stress disorder in U.S. soldiers with post-traumatic headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Jacqueline F; Erickson, Jay C

    2013-01-01

    To determine the impact of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on headache characteristics and headache prognosis in U.S. soldiers with post-traumatic headache. PTSD and post-concussive headache are common conditions among U.S. Army personnel returning from deployment. The impact of comorbid PTSD on the characteristics and outcomes of post-traumatic headache has not been determined in U.S. Army soldiers. A retrospective cohort study was conducted among 270 consecutive U.S. Army soldiers diagnosed with post-traumatic headache at a single Army neurology clinic. All subjects were screened for PTSD at baseline using the PTSD symptom checklist. Headache frequency and characteristics were determined for post-traumatic headache subjects with and without PTSD at baseline. Headache measures were reassessed 3 months after the baseline visit, and were compared between groups with and without PTSD. Of 270 soldiers with post-traumatic headache, 105 (39%) met screening criteria for PTSD. There was no significant difference between subjects with PTSD and those without PTSD with regard to headache frequency (17.2 vs 15.7 headache days per month; P = .15) or chronic daily headache (58.1% vs 52.1%; P = .34). Comorbid PTSD was associated with higher headache-related disability as measured by the Migraine Disability Assessment Score. Three months after the baseline neurology clinic visit, the number of subjects with at least 50% reduction in headache frequency was similar among post-traumatic headache cases with and without PTSD (25.9% vs 26.8%). PTSD is prevalent among U.S. Army soldiers with post-traumatic headache. Comorbid PTSD is not associated with more frequent headaches or chronic daily headache in soldiers evaluated at a military neurology clinic for chronic post-traumatic headache. Comorbid PTSD does not adversely affect short-term headache outcomes, although prospective controlled trials are needed to better assess this relationship. © 2013 American Headache

  15. Gastrointestinal Headache; a Narrative Review

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    Majid T Noghani

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available There are studies reporting primary headaches to be associated with gastrointestinal disorders, and some report resolution of headache following the treatment of the associated gastrointestinal disorder. Headache disorders are classified by The International Headache Society as primary or secondary; however, among the secondary headaches, those attributed to gastrointestinal disorders are not appreciated. Therefore, we aimed to review the literature to provide evidence for headaches, which originate from the gastrointestinal system. Gastrointestinal disorders that are reported to be associated with primary headaches include dyspepsia, gastro esophageal reflux disease (GERD, constipation, functional abdominal pain, inflammatory bowel syndrome (IBS, inflammatory bowel disorders (IBD, celiac disease, and helicobacter pylori (H. Pylori infection. Some studies have demonstrated remission or improvement of headache following the treatment of the accompanying gastrointestinal disorders. Hypotheses explaining this association are considered to be central sensitization and parasympathetic referred pain, serotonin pathways, autonomic nervous system dysfunction, systemic vasculopathy, and food allergy. Traditional Persian physicians, namely Ebn-e-Sina (Avicenna and Râzi (Rhazes believed in a type of headache originating from disorders of the stomach and named it as an individual entity, the "Participatory Headache of Gastric Origin". We suggest providing a unique diagnostic entity for headaches coexisting with any gastrointestinal abnormality that are improved or cured along with the treatment of the gastrointestinal disorder.

  16. Posttraumatic stress disorder and intimate partner violence in a women's headache center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Megan R; Fried, Lise E; Pineles, Suzanne L; Shipherd, Jillian C; Bernstein, Carolyn A

    2012-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder has been linked to women's ill health, including headaches. Intimate partner violence, which may result in posttraumatic stress disorder, is often reported by women with headaches. Prior studies of intimate partner violence and headache have estimated lifetime but not 12-month prevalence. The researchers in this study examined the relationship between headache and posttraumatic stress disorder in a novel population, and estimated 12-month and lifetime prevalence rates of intimate partner violence. Patients were recruited from a women's headache center (n = 92) during 2006-07 and completed the Migraine Disability Assessment measure of headache severity. Posttraumatic stress disorder was measured using a modified Breslau scale. Twelve-month and lifetime physical intimate partner violence were measured with the Partner Violence Screen and the STaT ("slapped, threatened and throw") measure. Multivariable regression determined factors independently associated with headache severity. Among all participants, 28.3% screened positive for posttraumatic stress disorder; 9.8% and 36.9% of women endorsed recent and lifetime intimate partner violence. Posttraumatic stress disorder was strongly associated with headache severity (β = 34.12, p = 0.01). Patients reporting lifetime intimate partner violence exhibited a trend of nine additional days of disability due to headache over 90 days. Posttraumatic stress disorder and intimate partner violence occur among a sizable proportion of women referred for headache. The authors' findings reaffirm that clinicians treating women with headaches must be aware of the possibility of posttraumatic stress disorder and intimate partner violence in such patients.

  17. [Changes introduced into the recent International Classification of Headache Disorders: ICHD-III beta classification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belvis, Robert; Mas, Natàlia; Roig, Carles

    2015-01-16

    The International Headache Society (IHS) has published the third edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-III beta), the most commonly used guide to diagnosing headaches in the world. To review the recent additions to the guide, to explain the new entities that appear in it and to compare the conditions that have had their criteria further clarified against the criteria in the previous edition. We have recorded a large number of clarifications in the criteria in practically all the headaches and neuralgias in the classification, but the conditions that have undergone the most significant clarifications are chronic migraine, primary headache associated with sexual activity, short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks, new daily persistent headache, medication-overuse headache, syndrome of transient headache and neurological deficits with cerebrospinal fluid lymphocytosis. The most notable new entities that have been incorporated are external-compression headache, cold-stimulus headache, nummular headache, headache attributed to aeroplane travel and headache attributed to autonomic dysreflexia. Another point to be highlighted is the case of the new headaches (still not considered entities in their own right) included in the appendix, some of the most noteworthy being epicrania fugax, vestibular migraine and infantile colic. The IHS recommends no longer using the previous classification and changing over to the new classification (ICHD-III beta) in healthcare, teaching and research, in addition to making this new guide as widely known as possible.

  18. National Headache Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Headache Topic Sheets (Spanish) Headache FAQ NHF Webinars Education Modules MigrainePro™ Children’s Headache Disorders New Perspectives on Caffeine and Headache War Veterans Health Resource Initiative National Headache Foundation Brochures ...

  19. Primary headaches interfere with the efficacy of temporomandibular disorders management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porporatti, André Luís; Costa, Yuri Martins; Conti, Paulo César Rodrigues; Bonjardim, Leonardo Rigoldi; Calderon, Patrícia dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    This cross-sectional study aimed to evaluate the influence of Primary Headache (PH) on efficacy of a Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) conservative therapy and its association with the presence of self-reported parafunctional habits. Sample was composed of 400 medical records, divided into four groups: I) Muscular TMD (n = 64); II) Muscular TMD+PH (n = 48); III) Muscular TMD+Articular TMD (n = 173); IV) Muscular TMD+Articular TMD+PH (n = 115). All groups had undergone a TMD therapy for three months with a stabilization appliance and counseling for habits and behavioral changes, with no specific headache management. Current pain intensity and existence or not of self-reported bruxism were assessed. Repeated measures ANOVA and Chi-Square test followed by Odds were used for statistical analysis, with a significance level of 5%. results of this study showed that: (1) A conservative therapy with stabilization appliance and counseling for habits and behavioral changes was effective in the TMD pain relief; (2) Groups with an additional diagnosis of PH had worsened the pain improvement significantly; and (3) no association between the presence of self-reported bruxism and PH was found. this study could elucidate the important effect that headache may have on the TMD management.

  20. Primary headaches interfere with the efficacy of temporomandibular disorders management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luís PORPORATTI

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This cross-sectional study aimed to evaluate the influence of Primary Headache (PH on efficacy of a Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD conservative therapy and its association with the presence of self-reported parafunctional habits. SAMPLE AND METHODS: Sample was composed of 400 medical records, divided into four groups: I Muscular TMD (n=64; II Muscular TMD+PH (n=48; III Muscular TMD+Articular TMD (n=173; IV Muscular TMD+Articular TMD+PH (n=115. All groups had undergone a TMD therapy for three months with a stabilization appliance and counseling for habits and behavioral changes, with no specific headache management. Current pain intensity and existence or not of self-reported bruxism were assessed. Repeated measures ANOVA and Chi-Square test followed by Odds were used for statistical analysis, with a significance level of 5%. RESULTS: results of this study showed that: (1 A conservative therapy with stabilization appliance and counseling for habits and behavioral changes was effective in the TMD pain relief; (2 Groups with an additional diagnosis of PH had worsened the pain improvement significantly; and (3 no association between the presence of self-reported bruxism and PH was found. CONCLUSIONS: this study could elucidate the important effect that headache may have on the TMD management.

  1. Prevalence and impact of headache and migraine among secondary school students in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofovwe, Gabriel E; Ofili, Antoinette N

    2010-11-01

    A cross-sectional descriptive study to determine the overall, age and gender specific prevalence, trigger factors and impact of headache and migraine on quality of life of students attending secondary schools in Benin City, Nigeria. Six secondary schools were randomly selected from which students were randomly selected. A self-administered questionnaire was used to screen those with frequent headache, defined as at least 2 episodes of headache unrelated to fever or any underlying disease within the last 12 months or at least 1 episode in the last 6 months preceding the date questionnaire was administered. Another questionnaire based on the ICHD-2 criteria for diagnosis of migraine was then administered to those with frequent headaches. Data analysis was with SPSS 13.0 for Windows. One thousand six hundred and seventy-nine students aged 11-18 years were recruited. The overall prevalence of headache was 19.5%. The prevalence of migraine was 13.5%. Migraine was more common in girls than in boys at all ages. The most common trigger factors included emotional stress, sunlight or bright light, sleep deprivation, and hunger. Inability to participate in outdoor activities, household chores, and school absenteeism were the common impacts on the quality of life of among 76.8% of the migraineurs. Migraine is common and underdiagnosed among secondary school students in Benin City, Nigeria, and negatively impacts on the quality of life including school absenteeism. © 2010 American Headache Society.

  2. Headache in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Seby; Hajj-Ali, Rula A

    2014-03-01

    Autoimmune diseases are a group of heterogeneous inflammatory disorders characterized by systemic or localized inflammation, leading to ischemia and tissue destruction. These include disorders like systemic lupus erythematosus and related diseases, systemic vasculitides, and central nervous system (CNS) vasculitis (primary or secondary). Headache is a very common manifestation of CNS involvement of these diseases. Although headache characteristics can be unspecific and often non-diagnostic, it is important to recognize because headache can be the first manifestation of CNS involvement. Prompt recognition and treatment is necessary not only to treat the headache, but also to help prevent serious neurological sequelae that frequently accompany autoimmune diseases. In this review, we discuss headache associated with autoimmune diseases along with important mimics. © 2014 American Headache Society.

  3. Evaluation relationship between temporomandibular joint disorder and headache: A review literature

    OpenAIRE

    Farzaneh Aghahosseini; Nafiseh Sheykhbahaei

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims: Headache is among the most common complaints in patients suffering from temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD). Thus, it seems that evaluation of patients with headache in terms of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders is necessary. In people with TMD, parafunctional activities play an important etiologic role. Considering the high prevalence of bruxism and TMDs in patients with headache, assessment the accuracy and severity of this association can play a key role in d...

  4. The Role of Melatonin in the Treatment of Primary Headache Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfand, Amy A.; Goadsby, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To provide a summary of knowledge about the use of melatonin in the treatment of primary headache disorders. Background Melatonin is secreted by the pineal gland; its production is regulated by the hypothalamus and increases during periods of darkness. Methods We undertook a narrative review of the literature on the role of melatonin in the treatment of primary headache disorders. Results There are randomized placebo-controlled trials examining melatonin for preventive treatment of migraine and cluster headache. For cluster headache, melatonin 10 mg was superior to placebo. For migraine, a randomized placebo-controlled trial of melatonin 3 mg (immediate release) was positive, though an underpowered trial of melatonin 2 mg (sustained release) was negative. Uncontrolled studies, case series, and case reports cover melatonin’s role in treating tension-type headache, hypnic headache, hemicrania continua, SUNCT/SUNA and primary stabbing headache. Conclusions Melatonin may be effective in treating several primary headache disorders, particularly cluster headache and migraine. Future research should focus on elucidating the underlying mechanisms of benefit of melatonin in different headache disorders, as well as clarifying optimal dosing and formulation. PMID:27316772

  5. No Laughing Matter: Gelastic Migraine and Other Unusual Headache Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Paul G; Robertson, Carrie E

    2016-05-01

    Primary and secondary headache disorders have established diagnostic criteria in the International Classification of Headache Disorders IIIb, as well as classic findings, which although not part of the formal criteria are often suggestive of a particular diagnosis. At times, headache disorders can involve unusual symptoms that lack an identifiable secondary cause. This review will discuss some of these unusual symptoms, including headache associated auditory and olfactory symptoms, as well as two case reports involving gelastic migraine and migrainous thoracalgia.

  6. Role of Acupuncture in the Treatment or Prevention of Migraine, Tension-Type Headache, or Chronic Headache Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coeytaux, Remy R; Befus, Deanna

    2016-07-01

    To summarize the current evidence that evaluates the effectiveness of acupuncture for the treatment or prevention of migraine, tension-type headache, and chronic headache disorders. Findings from selected systematic reviews and meta-analyses are summarized. Recently published systematic reviews and meta-analyses demonstrate that acupuncture is associated with improved clinical outcomes compared to routine care only, medical management, and sham acupuncture 2 months after randomization. The evidence in support of acupuncture's comparative effectiveness at longer follow-up periods is mixed. Cost effectiveness analyses conducted in the United Kingdom and Germany suggest that acupuncture is a cost-effective treatment option in those countries. There are few or no cost-effectiveness studies of acupuncture in the United States. This brief review of the current, published evidence does not include a discussion of potential risks or adverse events associated with acupuncture. There is also the question of the extent to which placebo effects might contribute to acupuncture's clinical effectiveness. From a purely comparative effectiveness perspective, however, the evidence from clinical trials and meta-analyses makes a compelling case in support of a potentially important role for acupuncture as part of a treatment plan for patients with migraine, tension-type headache, and several different types of chronic headache disorders. © 2016 American Headache Society.

  7. Headache Disorders May Be a Risk Factor for the Development of New Onset Hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Andrew T; Pinney, Susan M; Xie, Changchun; Herrick, Robert L; Bai, Yun; Buckholz, Jeanette; Martin, Vincent T

    2017-01-01

    To determine whether headache disorders are a risk factor for the development of new onset hypothyroidism. Past studies have reported associations between headache disorders and hypothyroidism, but the directionality of the association is unknown. This was a longitudinal retrospective cohort study using data from the Fernald Medical Monitoring Program (FMMP). Residents received physical examinations and thyroid function testing every 3 years during the 20 year program. Residents were excluded from the cohort if there was evidence of past thyroid disease or abnormal thyroid function tests at the first office visit. A diagnosis of a headache disorder was established by self-report of "frequent headaches," use of any headache-specific medication, or a physician diagnosis of a headache disorder. The primary outcome measure was new onset hypothyroidism defined as the initiation of thyroid replacement therapy or TSH ≥ 10 without thyroid medication. A Cox survival analysis with time dependent variables were used for the model. Headache disorders, age, sex, body mass index, income, smoking, narcotic use, and hypothyroidism-producing medications were independent variables in the model. Data from 8412 residents enrolled in the FMMP were used in the current study. Headache disorders were present in about 26% of the residents and new onset hypothyroidism developed in ∼7%. The hazard ratio for the development of new onset hypothyroidism was 1.21 (95% CI = 1.001, 1.462) for those with headache disorders. Headache disorders may be associated with an increased risk for the development of new onset hypothyroidism. © 2016 American Headache Society.

  8. Headache children with temporomandibular disorders have several types of pain and other symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljeström, M-R; Le Bell, Y; Anttila, P; Aromaa, M; Jämsä, T; Metsähonkala, L; Helenius, H; Viander, S; Jäppilä, E; Alanen, P; Sillanpää, M

    2005-11-01

    The aim was to investigate the association between temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and overall muscle tenderness, depressive symptoms, sleep difficulties, headache frequency and related symptoms in children with primary headache in comparison with controls. Based on an unselected population sample of 1135 Finnish schoolchildren classified according to the type of headache at age 12, altogether 297 children aged 13-14 from different headache groups and healthy controls were randomly selected for an interview and clinical examinations. Children with migraine had more TMD signs than children with nonmigrainous headaches or healthy controls. High TMD total scores were associated with palpation tenderness in other parts of the body and with frequent headache attacks. We conclude that children with overall headache, migraine in particular, and high total TMD scores showed an increased overall tenderness to muscle palpation and multiply manifested hypersensitivity pain.

  9. The complex interrelations between two paroxysmal disorders: headache and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianchetti, Carlo; Avanzini, Giuliano; Dainese, Filippo; Guidetti, Vincenzo

    2017-06-01

    The interrelations between headache/migraine and epileptic seizures are an interesting topic, still lacking a systematization, which is the objective of the present revision. We organize the general setting on: (a) a distinction between pre-ictal, ictal, post-ictal and inter-ictal headaches, assuming "ictal" as epileptic seizure, and (b) the kind of headache, if it is of migraine type or not. Concerning pre-ictal migraine/headache, the necessity of its differentiation from an epileptic headache presenting as an aura of a seizure is stressed; this is connected with the indefiniteness of the term "migralepsy". The term "migraine aura-triggered seizure" should be used only in front of a proven triggering effect of migraine. Epileptic headache (called also "ictal epileptic headache") is a well-characterized entity, in which different types of head pain may occur and an ictal EEG is necessary for the diagnosis. It may present as an isolated event ("isolated epileptic headache"), requiring a differential diagnosis from other kinds of headache, or it may be uninterruptedly followed by other epileptic manifestations being in this case easily identifiable as an epileptic aura. Hemicrania epileptica is a very rare variant of epileptic headache, characterized by the ipsilaterality of head pain and EEG paroxysms. Ictal non-epileptic headache needs to be differentiated from epileptic headache. Post-ictal headaches are a frequent association of headache with seizures, particularly in patients suffering also from inter-ictal headache-migraine. The reported systematization of the topic led us to suggest a classification which is shown in Appendix.

  10. Pediatric Headache: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdon, Raquel; DiSabella, Marc T

    2017-03-01

    Headache represents the most common neurologic disorder in the general population including children and is increasingly being recognized as a major source of morbidity in youth related to missed school days and activities. In this article, we take a holistic approach to the child presenting with headache with a focus on the detailed headache history, physical and neurologic examinations, and diagnostic evaluation of these patients. Clinical presentations and classification schema of multiple primary and secondary headache types in children are discussed using the International Headache Criteria (IHCD-3) as a guide, and a summary provided of the various treatment modalities employed for pediatric headache including lifestyle modifications, behavioral techniques, and abortive and preventive medications. Copyright © 2017 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. "WHICH Headache to Investigate, WHEN, and HOW?"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravishankar, K

    2016-11-01

    Headache is a common problem in medical practice. The International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-3 beta) 1 divides all headaches into two broad categories. Most headaches seen in practice belong to the category of primary headaches, where there is no underlying structural cause identifiable. Less than 10% headaches in practice belong to the category of secondary headaches where there is an underlying condition, that can sometimes be ominous and life-threatening. Fear of missing a treatable serious secondary headache disorder is the most important reason why we need to investigate headache patients. There is no dilemma in investigating the patient when the clinical presentation is straightforward but when the headache presents differently or with 'red flags,' it can sometimes be quite challenging to order the right investigation and rapidly arrive at the right diagnosis. This article looks at some of the elusive headache scenarios and outlines an approach that addresses the issue of 'appropriate' investigation in the headache patient. With advancing technology and increasing expertise, the author feels it is time now to do away with the practice of ordering an exhaustive battery of tests in all headache patients. With experience, clinicians can learn to choose tests judiciously and order specific tests based on a working diagnosis. As the title suggests, knowing 'WHEN to order WHAT test in WHICH headache patient? ' forms the theme of this article. © 2016 American Headache Society.

  12. Diagnostic and Therapeutic Problems of Geriatric Headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaviyan Ghandehari

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available There is no difference in clinical characteristics of headache between old individuals and younger’s. However, differential diagnosis of migrainous aura and transient ischemic attacks may be difficult in old people who frequently have vascular risk factors. Old people have less headache than the young’s. Chronic tension headache is the most common primary type of headache in the elderly. Chronic paroxismal hemicrania and headache due to giant cell arterities are specified to the elderly, Secondary headaches; e.g headache due to cervical spondylosis and brain tumors is more common in the old people than young. Old people poorly tolerate headache drugs, i.e. Ergotamine, Triptans and Tricyclics. Trigeminal neuralgia is often seen in the elderly and is resistant to medical therapy in the old people. Headache could be the main manifestation of depression in old people. Headaches secondary to disorders of internal medicine; i.e. hypertension and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease have importance in the elderly. Subarachnoid hemorrhage is considered in every old person with sudden onset explosive headache especially in cases with decreased consciousness and neck stiffness. Old individuals use a collection of different drugs due to suffering various diseases and commonly have drug induced headaches. Neuroimaging should be performed in a geriatric patient with new onset sever headache without medical disorder or consumption of drug induced headache. Some of the old people suffer of multiple types of headache.

  13. Headache and psychological disorders in children and adolescents: a cross-generational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, Federica; Caputi, Marcella; Gallucci, Marcello; Termine, Cristiano; Chiappedi, Matteo; Balottin, Umberto

    2017-08-01

    Headache and psychopathology (especially anxiety and mood disorders) are comorbid across the life span. The present study is a clinical contribution in the direction of studying the familial recurrence of headache, and the interplay of headache and psychopathology in children. The clinical sample is composed by 130 headache patients (53 boys and 77 girls, age range 8-18), while the control group is composed by 87 healthy subjects from the general population (39 boys and 48 girls, age range 8-18). A structured interview according to International Classification for Headache Disorders-II criteria has been administered to the clinical group; the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) and the Self Administrated Psychiatric Scales for Children and Adolescents (SAFA) have been used in order to assess psychopathology in both groups. The recurrence of headache in family members is confirmed by the present study, albeit limited to paternal side, χ2 (4, N.=130)=10.47, P=0.033. Results also showed that scores obtained by the clinical sample in CBCL and SAFA are generally higher than scores obtained by the control group, but without differences between headache sub-types. Finally, internalizing symptoms (anxiety and depression) in children correlate with mothers' point of view, r≥0.23, Pheadache patients and their mothers. Headache runs in families, with high level of psychological disorders. Mothers are particularly attuned with the psychological needs of their headache children.

  14. Are headache and temporomandibular disorders related? A blinded study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballegaard, V.; Thede-Schmidt-Hansen, P.; Svensson, P.

    2008-01-01

    differences in TMD prevalence were revealed between headache groups, although TMD prevalence tended to be higher in patients with combined migraine and tension-type headache. Moderate to severe depression was experienced by 54.5% of patients. Patients with coexistent TMD had a significantly higher prevalence...... of depression-most markedly in patients with combined migraine and tension-type headache. Our studies indicate that a high proportion of headache patients have significant disability because of ongoing chronic TMD pain. The trend to a higher prevalence of TMD in patients with combined migraine and tension......-type headache suggests that this could be a risk factor for TMD development. A need for screening procedures and treatment strategies concerning depression in headache patients with coexistent TMD is underlined by the overrepresentation of depression in this group. Our findings emphasize the importance...

  15. The Association between Headaches and Temporomandibular Disorders is Confounded by Bruxism and Somatic Complaints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, Hedwig A.; Speksnijder, Caroline M.; Engelbert, Raoul; Lobbezoo, Frank; Nijhuis – van der Sanden, Maria W G; Visscher, Corine M.

    OBJECTIVES:: The objective of this observational study was to establish the possible presence of confounders on the association between temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and headaches in a patient population from a TMD and Orofacial Pain Clinic. METHODS:: Several subtypes of headaches were

  16. The Association Between Headaches and Temporomandibular Disorders is Confounded by Bruxism and Somatic Symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, H.A. van der; Speksnijder, C.M.; Engelbert, R.H.; Lobbezoo, F.; Nijhuis-Van der Sanden, M.W.G.; Visscher, C.M.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of this observational study was to establish the possible presence of confounders on the association between temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and headaches in a patient population from a TMD and Orofacial Pain Clinic. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Several subtypes of headaches

  17. Acute headache diagnosis in pregnant women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmakidis, Constantine; Dayal, Ashlesha K.; Lipton, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To characterize demographic and clinical features in pregnant women presenting with acute headache, and to identify clinical features associated with secondary headache. Methods: We conducted a 5-year, single-center, retrospective study of consecutive pregnant women presenting to acute care with headache receiving neurologic consultation. Results: The 140 women had a mean age of 29 ± 6.4 years and often presented in the third trimester (56.4%). Diagnoses were divided into primary (65.0%) and secondary (35.0%) disorders. The most common primary headache disorder was migraine (91.2%) and secondary headache disorders were hypertensive disorders (51.0%). The groups were similar in demographics, gestational ages, and most headache features. In univariate analysis, secondary headaches were associated with a lack of headache history (36.7% vs 13.2%, p = 0.0012), seizures (12.2% vs 0.0%, p = 0.0015), elevated blood pressure (55.1% vs 8.8%, p headache history (OR 4.9, 95% CI 1.7–14.5) had an increased association with secondary headache, while psychiatric comorbidity (OR 0.13, 95% CI 0.021–0.78) and phonophobia (OR 0.29, 95% CI 0.09–0.91) had a reduced association with secondary headache. Conclusions: Among pregnant women receiving inpatient neurologic consultation, more than one-third have secondary headache. Diagnostic vigilance should be heightened in the absence of a headache history and if seizures, hypertension, or fever are present. Attack features may not adequately distinguish primary vs secondary disorders, and low thresholds for neuroimaging and monitoring for preeclampsia are justified. PMID:26291282

  18. Short-term diagnostic stability of probable headache disorders based on the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 3rd edition beta version, in first-visit patients: a multicenter follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byung-Su; Moon, Heui-Soo; Sohn, Jong-Hee; Cha, Myong-Jin; Song, Tae-Jin; Kim, Jae-Moon; Park, Jeong Wook; Park, Kwang-Yeol; Cho, Soo-Jin; Kim, Soo-Kyoung

    2016-01-01

    A "Probable headache disorder" is diagnosed when a patient's headache fulfills all but one criterion of a headache disorder in the 3rd beta edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorder (ICHD-3β). We investigated diagnostic changes in probable headache disorders in first-visit patients after at least 3 months of follow-up. This was a longitudinal study using a prospective headache registry from nine headache clinics of referral hospitals. The diagnostic change of probable headache disorders at baseline was assessed at least 3 months after the initial visit using ICHD-3β. Of 216 patients with probable headache disorders at baseline, the initial probable diagnosis remained unchanged for 162 (75.0 %) patients, while it progressed to a definite diagnosis within the same headache subtype for 45 (20.8 %) by fulfilling the criteria during a median follow-up period of 6.5 months. Significant difference on the proportions of constant diagnosis was not found between headache subtypes (P headache (TTH), and 76.0 % for probable other primary headache disorders (OPHD). Among patients with headache recurrence, the proportion of constant diagnosis was higher for probable migraine than for probable TTH plus probable OPHD (59.2 vs. 23.1 %; P 3 and ≤ 6 months vs. > 6 and ≤ 10 months) in probable migraine, probable TTH, and probable OPHD, respectively. In this study, a probable headache diagnosis, based on ICHD-3β, remained in approximately three-quarters of the outpatients; however, diagnostic stability could differ by headache recurrence and subtype. Probable headache management might have to consider these differences.

  19. European Headache Federation consensus on technical investigation for primary headache disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitsikostas, D D; Ashina, M; Craven, A

    2016-01-01

    awakening the patient, or precipitated by physical activity or Valsalva manoeuvre, first onset of headache ≥50 years of age, neurological symptoms or signs, trauma, fever, seizures, history of malignancy, history of HIV or active infections, and prior history of stroke or intracranial bleeding. All national...

  20. Headache associated with temporomandibular disorders among young Brazilian adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Ana L; Fernandes, Giovana; Gonçalves, Daniela A G; Bonafé, Fernanda S S; Camparis, Cinara M

    2014-04-01

    To verify whether headaches (HAs) are associated with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in young Brazilian adolescents. From a population sample, 3117 public school children (12 to 14 y) were randomly invited to participate in this study. TMD was assessed according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) Axis I, in addition to questions #3, #4, and #14 of Axis II history questionnaire. HAs were investigated with question #18 of RDC/TMD Axis II. Chronic TMD pain was considered as pain that has persisted for 6 months or more, as proposed by the International Association for the Study of Pain. The statistical analysis consisted of χ tests, odds ratio (OR), and logistic regression models, adopting a significance level of 5%. The sample included 1307 individuals (a response rate of 41.93%), and 56.8% (n=742) were girls. Overall, 330 adolescents (25.2%) were diagnosed with painful TMD and 595 (45.5%) presented with HAs. Individuals presenting with HAs were more likely to present painful TMD (OR=4.94; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.73-6.54, P<0.001), especially combined muscle and joint painful TMD (OR=7.58; 95% CI, 4.77-12.05, P<0.001). HAs also increased the risk to a higher magnitude for chronic TMD pain (OR=6.12; 95% CI, 4.27-8.78, P<0.0001). All estimated ORs remained essentially unchanged after adjusting for sex. HAs were a potential risk factor for TMD in adolescents, and the risk was particularly higher for painful and chronic TMD. When HAs are present in young adolescents, a complete examination is strongly recommended with regard to the presence of painful TMD, and vice versa.

  1. Headache in Patients With Pituitary Lesions: A Longitudinal Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzoli, Paul; Iuliano, Sherry; Weizenbaum, Emma; Laws, Edward

    2016-03-01

    Headache is a presenting feature in 37% to 70% of patients with pituitary tumor. Other pituitary lesions may also present with headache, and together these lesions account for about 20% of all primary brain lesions. Although pituitary lesions have been associated with headache, the exact nature of the relationship remains undefined. It is not always clear whether the presenting headache is an unrelated primary headache, a lesion-induced aggravation of a preexisting primary headache, or a separate secondary headache related to the lesion. To characterize headache in patients referred to a multidisciplinary neuroendocrine clinic with suspected pituitary lesions and to assess changes in headache in those who underwent surgery. We used a self-administered survey of headache characteristics completed by patients upon presentation and after any pituitary surgical procedure. One hundred thirty-three participants completed the preoperative questionnaire (response rate of 99%). The overall prevalence of headache was 63%. Compared to patients without headache, the group with headache was more likely to be female (P = .001), younger (P = .001), and to have had a prior headache diagnosis (P headache localized to the anterior region of the head. Fifty-one patients with headache underwent transsphenoidal pituitary surgery. Headache was not associated with increased odds of having surgery (odds ratio, 0.90). At 3 months, 81% of surgically treated patients with headache who completed the postoperative questionnaire (21/26) reported improvement or resolution of headaches. No patient who completed the postoperative questionnaire (44/84) reported new or worsened headache. Frequent, disabling headaches are common in patients with pituitary lesions referred for neuroendocrine consultation, especially in younger females with a preexisting headache disorder. Surgery in this group was associated with headache improvement or resolution in the majority and was not found to cause or worsen

  2. Migraine headaches and mood/anxiety disorders in the ELSA Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulart, Alessandra C; Santos, Itamar S; Brunoni, André R; Nunes, Maria Angélica; Passos, Valéria M; Griep, Rosane H; Lotufo, Paulo A; Benseñor, Isabela M

    2014-09-01

    To describe the relationship between mood/anxiety disorders and migraine headaches emphasizing the frequency of episodes based in a cross-sectional analysis in the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health. It has been suggested that frequency of migraine headaches can be directly associated with the presence of psychiatric disorders. Migraine headaches (International Headache Society criteria) was classified as migraine and 10,531 without migraine headaches (reference). Our main result was an increase in the strength of association between migraine and MDD as frequency of migraine increased for all sample: odds ratio of 2.14 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.33-3.43) for migraine/month to 6.94 (95% CI 4.20-11.49) for daily headaches for all sample. Significant associations with migraine were also found for GAD, OCD, MADD, and CMD for total sample: MDD, GAD, OCD, MADD, and CMD for women, and MADD and CMD for men. Among men with daily migraine complaint, we found a significant association between migraine and OCD after correction for multiple comparisons (odds ratio 29.86 [95% CI 4.66-191.43]). Analyzing probable and definite migraine cases together, we replicated the findings in a lower magnitude. The increase in migraine frequency was associated with progressively higher frequencies of having mood/anxiety disorders in all samples suggesting for some psychiatric disorders a likely dose-response effect especially for women. © 2014 American Headache Society.

  3. Familial occurrence of signs of temporomandibular disorders in headache children and their mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljeström, Marjo-Riitta; Aromaa, Minna; Bell, Yrsa Le; Jämsä, Tapio; Helenius, Hans; Virtanen, Ruut; Anttila, Pirjo; Metsähonkala, Liisa; Rautava, Päivi; Alanen, Pentti; Sillanpää, Matti

    2007-06-01

    Earlier studies have provided evidence of genetic inheritance of headache, especially migraine, but no familial occurrence has been found regarding temporomandibular disorders (TMD). In adults, headache and TMD have been found to be associated with each other, but studies on children are few. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that there is no association between signs of TMD in 13-year-old headache children and their mothers. The study population was a nested case-control study of the population-based Finnish Family Competence Study originally consisting of over 1000 families. A structured questionnaire was sent to the families of 6-year-old children. A clinical examination was performed in 96 children with headache and 96 pairwise controls. At the age of 13 years, 75 of these same 96 children with headache and 79 of 96 headache-free controls participated in pediatric and stomatognathic examinations. Moreover, the mothers (n=154) filled in a structured headache questionnaire and participated in the stomatognathic examination. No association between mother's and child's TMD signs was found. There was a significant association between signs of TMD and both migraine and tension-type headache in children. In mothers, the association was significant only between migraine and TMD signs. Familial occurrence of signs of TMD cannot be found in headache children and their mothers.

  4. Temporomandibular disorders are differentially associated with headache diagnoses: a controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Daniela A G; Camparis, Cinara M; Speciali, José G; Franco, Ana L; Castanharo, Sabrina M; Bigal, Marcelo E

    2011-09-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are considered to be comorbid with headaches. Earlier population studies have suggested that TMD may also be a risk factor for migraine progression. If that is true, TMD should be associated with specific headache syndromes (eg, migraine and chronic migraine), but not with headaches overall. Accordingly, our aim was to explore the relationship between TMD subtypes and severity with primary headaches in a controlled clinical study. The sample consisted of 300 individuals. TMDs were assessed using the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD, and primary headache was classified according to International Classification for Headache Disorders-2. Univariate and multivariate models assessed headache diagnoses and frequency as a function of the parameters of TMD. Relative to those without TMD, individuals with myofascial TMD were significantly more likely to have chronic daily headaches (CDHs) [relative risk (RR)=7.8; 95% confidence interval (CI), 3.1-19.6], migraine (RR=4.4; 95% CI, 1.7-11.7), and episodic tension-type headache (RR=4.4; 95% CI, 1.5-12.6). Grade of TMD pain was associated with increased odds of CDH (Pheadache (Pheadache frequency. In multivariate analyses, TMD was associated with migraine and CDH (P=0.001). Painful TMD (P=0.0034) and grade of TMD pain (Pheadache frequency. TMD, TMD subtypes, and TMD severity are independently associated with specific headache syndromes and with headache frequency. This differential association suggests that the presence of central facilitation of nociceptive inputs may be of importance, as positive association was observed only when muscular TMD pain was involved.

  5. [Diagnosis and classification of headache and temporomandibular disorders, a new opportunity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koole, P; Koole, R

    2011-05-01

    Patients with orofacial pains are generally treated by physicians. A small number of patients are treated for pain in the temporomandibular joint, the masticatory and the neck muscles, by dentists and orofacial surgeons. Among half of the patients being treated in neurological headache clinics, the temporomandibular joint and the masticatory muscles are the source of the pain. In order to achieve better research and a classification, the International Headache Society, consisting largely of neurologists, developed a classification system. A comparable development occurred among oral health specialists. Employing these 2 methods with the same patients leads to different diagnoses and treatments. Both the International Classification of Headache Disorders II and the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders are being revised. This creates the opportunity to establish a single classification for these orofacial pains, preferably within the new International Classification of Headache Disorders.

  6. Stress and headache chronification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houle, Timothy; Nash, Justin M

    2008-01-01

    In this special section, the concept of stress has been linked to the chronification of headache and is considered to be one of several likely mechanisms for the progression of an otherwise episodic disorder to a chronic daily phenomenon. The present review discusses the concept of stress and describes the mechanisms through which stress could influence headache progression. The hypothesized mechanisms include stress serving as a unique trigger for individual attacks, as a nociceptive activator, and as a moderator of other mechanisms. Finally, the techniques used in the screening and management of stress are mentioned in the context of employing strategies for the primary, secondary, or tertiary prevention of headache progression.

  7. The Role of Headache in the Classification and Management of Hypertensive Disorders in Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperling, Jeffrey D; Dahlke, Joshua D; Huber, Warren J; Sibai, Baha M

    2015-08-01

    Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy remain among the leading causes of maternal morbidity and mortality. The onset of headaches in patients with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy has been considered as a premonitory symptom for eclampsia and other adverse maternal outcomes. Headaches are very common symptoms during pregnancy and the postpartum period with a reported incidence of 39%; however, headache is absent in 30-50% of women before the onset of eclampsia and is a poor predictor of eclampsia and adverse maternal outcomes. If included in the definition of cerebral or visual disturbances, headache may be considered a symptom of preeclampsia, a diagnostic feature of preeclampsia with severe features, a premonitory symptom of eclampsia, and an indication for delivery. Inclusion of this nonspecific symptom in the diagnosis and management of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy in the absence of an evidence basis may lead to unintended consequences including excessive testing, visits to outpatient offices or emergency departments, additional hospitalization, and iatrogenic preterm delivery without proven benefit. If a cerebral disturbance such as severe or persistent headache presents for the first time during pregnancy or postpartum, an evaluation should be performed that considers a broad differential diagnosis, including but not limited to hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, and the diagnostic evaluation is similar to that in nonpregnant adults. This commentary draws attention to the implications of considering the cerebral disturbance of headache as a symptom that portends adverse pregnancy outcome in the current recommendations for diagnosing and managing hypertensive disorders of pregnancy.

  8. Association of posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms with migraine and headache after a natural disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcaya, Mariana C; Lowe, Sarah R; Asad, Asad L; Subramanian, S V; Waters, Mary C; Rhodes, Jean

    2017-05-01

    Previous research shows that migraine and general headache symptoms increase after traumatic events. Questions remain about whether posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) produces migraine/headache symptoms, or if individuals afflicted by migraine/headache are especially likely to develop PTSD. We test whether PTSD symptoms following a natural disaster are associated with higher odds of reporting frequent headaches/migraines postdisaster. We decompose PTSD into intrusion, avoidance, and hyperarousal symptom clusters to examine which, if any, are uniquely related to headache/migraine postdisaster. We use prospectively collected pre- and postdisaster data to explore whether overall PTSD symptoms and symptom clusters are associated with migraine/headache in a sample of Hurricane Katrina survivors. We account for severity of hurricane exposure and control for baseline migraine and headache problems to reduce the probability that heightened PTSD susceptibility among those who already suffered from the conditions could explain observed associations. PTSD symptoms were associated with higher odds of experiencing frequent headaches or migraines with a standard deviation change in PTSD score corresponding to over twice the odds (95% confidence interval [1.64, 2.68]) of having trouble with frequent headaches or migraines in the post-Katrina period. Each additional point on the intrusion subscale (sample M [SD] = 1.6 [1.1]) was associated with 55% higher odds of reporting frequent headache/migraine (95% confidence interval [1.03, 2.33]), but we found no association with avoidance or hyperarousal symptoms. Clinicians and disaster planners should be aware that disaster survivors might be at heightened risk of migraine/headache episodes, and those experiencing intrusive reminders may be most affected. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Temporomandibular disorders and chronic daily headaches in the community and in specialty care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Junior, Ariovaldo Alberto; Krymchantowski, Abouch Valenty; Gomes, João Bosco Lima; Leite, Frederico Mota Gonçalves; Alves, Betânia Mara Franco; Lara, Rodrigo Pinto; Gómez, Rodrigo Santiago; Teixeira, Antônio Lúcio

    2013-09-01

    Chronic daily headaches (CDHs) are often associated with temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). However, large studies assessing the relationship were conducted in general, and not clinical, populations. Thus, clinical exams were not completed. Clinic-based studies with expert diagnosis are, in turn, often small and may not be representative. To contrast the demographic and clinical symptoms of CDH and TMD in participants within the general population relative to patients seen in a headache clinic. All inhabitants 10 years and older of a small city in Brazil were interviewed. Those with more than 15 days of headache per month were examined by a team consisting of a neurologist, a dentist, and a physical therapist. Headaches were classified as per the Second Edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders and TMD as per the Research Diagnostic Criteria. The procedure was repeated (by the same team) with CDH sufferers consecutively seen in a headache center. Of 1605 inhabitants interviewed, 57 (3.6%) had CDH, and 43 completed all physical assessments. For specialty care group, of 289 patients, 92 had CDH, and 85 completed all assessments. No significant differences were seen for gender and age, but education level was significantly higher among those recruited at specialty care. Muscular TMD happened in 30.2% of CDH patients from the community vs 55.3% in the headache center (difference of -25.1%, 95% confidence interval of difference=-40.8% to -9.4%). No TMD happened in 41.9% of those recruited from the population relative to 20% of those in the headache center (21.9%, 95% confidence interval=6.7-37.1%). Individuals with CDH recruited from the general population are significantly less likely to have CDH relative to those selected from the headache center. Issues of generalizability are of concern when conducting clinic-based studies on the topic. © 2013 American Headache Society.

  10. Sleep-related headache and its management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Niranjan N; Sahota, Pradeep

    2013-12-01

    apnea, which includes cluster headache, hypnic headache, and headache related to obstructive sleep apnea; and (2) headaches with high prevalence of insomnia, medication overuse, and psychiatric comorbidity including chronic migraine and chronic tension-type headache. The initial step in the management of sleep related headache is proper diagnosis with exclusion of secondary headaches. Screening for sleep disorders with the use of proper tests including polysomnography and referral to sleep clinic, when appropriate is very helpful. Control of individual episode in less than 2 hours should be the initial goal using measures to abort and prevent a relapse. Cluster headache responds very well to injectable Imitrex and oxygen. Verapamil, steroids and lithium are used for preventive treatment of cluster headache. Intractable cluster headache patients have responded to hypothalamic deep brain stimulation. Hypnic headache patients respond to nightly caffeine, indomethacin, and lithium. Paroxysmal hemicrania responds very well to indomethacin. Early morning headaches associated with obstructive sleep apnea respond to CPAP or BiPAP with complete resolution of headache within a month. Patient education and lifestyle modification play a significant role in overall success of the treatment. Chronic tension-type headache and chronic migraine have high prevalence of insomnia and comorbid psychiatric disorders, which require behavioral insomnia treatment and medication if needed along with psychiatric evaluation. Apart from the abortive treatment tailored to the headache types, - such as triptans and DHE 45 for migraine and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication for chronic tension-type headache, preventive treatment with different class of medications including antiepileptics (Topamax and Depakote), calcium channel blockers (verapamil), beta blockers (propranolol), antidepressants (amitriptyline), and Botox may be used depending upon the comorbid conditions.

  11. Topical review: sleep bruxism, headaches, and sleep-disordered breathing in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carra, Maria Clotilde; Bruni, Olivero; Huynh, Nelly

    2012-01-01

    Sleep bruxism, a well-known burden for dentists, is commonly observed in pediatric populations. Dentists are responsible for the detection and prevention of the detrimental consequences on the stomatognathic system that may occur in some patients with sleep bruxism. However, sleep bruxism is much more than tooth wear, since it is frequently associated with orofacial pain, headaches, and other more severe sleep disorders, such as sleep-disordered breathing. Although the mechanisms underlying the possible interactions among sleep bruxism, headaches, and sleep-disordered breathing need further research, these conditions are often concomitant. A literature search was performed to identify relevant publications related to the topic, which have been integrated in this topical review. The aim of this article was to provide a brief overview on sleep bruxism, headaches, and sleep-disordered breathing in pediatric patients and to promote a multispecialist approach (including dentists, sleep specialist physicians, and psychologists) in the diagnosis and management of these frequently associated disorders.

  12. Association between headache and temporomandibular joint disorders in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branco, Luciana P; Santis, Tatiana O; Alfaya, Thays A; Godoy, Camila H L; Fragoso, Yara D; Bussadori, Sandra K

    2013-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the relationship between temporomandibular joint disorder (TMJD) and headache in children and adolescents. A prospective cross-sectional cohort study was carried out involving 93 children and adolescents (6 to 14 years of age) at the outpatient service of a dental school. All participants underwent a clinical examination involving Axis 1 of the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders, along with a characterization of headache and an anthropometric evaluation. Statistical analysis involved the chi-squared test for quantitative variables and the Student's t-test, ANOVA and Tukey's test for quantitative data. An adjusted logistic regression model was used to determine significant associations among gender, age, TMJD and headache. Mild TMJD was identified in 35.8% of the sample and was not associated the presence of headache. Moderate TMJD was found in 25.8% of patients and severe TMJD was found in 11.8%; both forms of TMJD were associated with headache. A significant correlation was found between the intensity of TMJD and the risk of headache. The present findings demonstrate a positive correlation between TMJD and headache in children and adolescents, independently of gender and age.

  13. Primary headache disorders in the Republic of Georgia: prevalence and risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katsarava, Z; Dzagnidze, A; Kukava, M

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the 1-year prevalences of migraine and tension-type headache (TTH), and identify their principal risk factors, in the general population of the Republic of Georgia. METHODS: In a community-based door-to-door survey, 4 medical residents interviewed all biologically unrelated......, a remarkably high percentage of the population of Georgia have headache on >/=15 days/month. This study demonstrates the importance of socioeconomic factors in a developing country and unmasks the unmet needs of people with headache disorders....

  14. Occipital Headaches in Children: Are They a Red Flag?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genizi, Jacob; Khourieh-Matar, Amal; Assaf, Nurit; Chistyakov, Irena; Srugo, Isaac

    2017-10-01

    Occipital headache is considered a risk factor for serious secondary headache pathology. The purpose of our study was to assess the etiology of occipital headaches among children visiting the emergency department. Subjects were children aged 5 to 18 years who were referred to the emergency department due to headaches during the years 2013 to 2014. A total of 314 patients with headaches were seen at our emergency department. Thirty-nine patients had occipital headaches. Viral infections were the most prevalent final diagnosis (97; 31%), followed by migraine (37; 11.8%). None of our patients had a brain tumor. There was no difference in final diagnosis between the occipital and nonoccipital groups. The most common causes of occipital headaches are viral infections and primary headaches. Serious intracranial disorders presenting solely as occipital headaches and not accompanied by other neurologic signs are uncommon. Thus, occipital headaches should be evaluated in the same manner as other headache locations.

  15. Is There a Relation between Tension-Type Headache, Temporomandibular Disorders and Sleep?

    OpenAIRE

    Caspersen, N.; Hirsvang, J. R.; Kroell, L.; Jadidi, F.; Baad-Hansen, L.; Svensson, P.; Jensen, R.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Tension-Type Headache (TTH) is the most prevalent headache often associated with impaired function and quality of life. Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) and TTH frequently coexist; characterized by pericranial tenderness and impact on daily life. We aim to apply a standardized questionnaire for TMD to characterize and analyse an eventual relation between sleep and oral health in TTH in a controlled design. Material and Methods. 58 consecutive TTH patients and 58 healthy control...

  16. Radiological diagnosis and differential diagnosis of headache

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langner, S.; Kirsch, M.

    2015-01-01

    Headache is very common and affects almost everyone at some point. It is one of the most common disorders that leads patients to see their physician. All different forms have the nociception via trigeminal nerve fibers in common. Beside the clinical course headaches are classified as either primary or secondary, with the latter having an identifiable structural or biochemical cause. Imaging has a low diagnostic yield in primary headache but play an important role in the differential diagnosis of secondary forms. An overview of different forms of secondary headache is given, outlining diagnostic procedures and the morphologic imaging features of each syndrome.

  17. Prevalence and association of headaches, temporomandibular joint disorders, and occlusal interferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troeltzsch, M; Troeltzsch, M; Cronin, R J; Brodine, A H; Frankenberger, R; Messlinger, K

    2011-06-01

    Although an interaction of malocclusion, parafunction, and temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) can be inferred from the experience of daily practice, scientific evidence to corroborate this hypothesis does not exist. However, there are indications that TMD and headaches may be intertwined. The purpose of this study was to identify the presence or absence of an association of occlusal interferences, parafunction, TMD, or physiologic, muscular, or prosthodontic factors with the occurrence of headache. In a private practice population of 1031 subjects (436 men and 595 women, mean age 49.6 years) the demographic parameters, headache and general pain history, habits and general personal information were recorded. Clinical examination for dental, muscular, and temporomandibular joint pathology was accomplished. Data were statistically analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U, Kruskal-Wallis, and Chi-Square tests (α = .05). A multinomial logistic regression analysis was performed with respect to confounding variables. Headache affliction was found to affect women more frequently than men (1.7:1). Students and non academics were more prone to suffer from headache. Parafunction (P=.001), TMD (P=.001) and gross differences between centric occlusion and maximum intercuspation of more than a 3 mm visible track marked with 8 μm articulation foil (P=.001) significantly influenced the presence of headache. Headache intensity and frequency decreased with age. While tension-type headache was most frequently diagnosed, the parameters studied were not significantly associated with one certain headache diagnosis more frequently than others. Stomatognathic factors of TMD, parafunction, and gross differences between centric occlusion and maximum intercuspation of more than 3 mm are associated with headache. These findings should be interpreted with caution due to the cross-sectional nature of this study. Copyright © 2011 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry

  18. Traumatic stressors and post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms in headache patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leeuw, Reny; Schmidt, John E; Carlson, Charles R

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of significant traumatic stressors and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in a headache population. Several recent publications have emphasized the relationship between life stressors and/or daily hassles and recurrent headaches. However, little is known about the prevalence and impact of major traumatic stressors in patients with recurrent headaches. Eighty patients with either migraine or tension-type headache completed a PTSD checklist. Data were compared with those from patients with chronic masticatory muscle pain of similar intensity and duration. Almost 64% of the headache patients reported one or more major traumatic stressors. This percentage was not significantly different from that of the comparison group, and fell within the broad range reported for exposure to traumatic stressors in epidemiologic studies with nonpatient populations. One out of 6 patients in the total headache sample, and 1 out of 4 of those reporting a traumatic stressor, reported symptoms suggestive of current PTSD. The prevalence of current PTSD-like symptomatology reported by the headache patients was comparable to that of the comparison group of the present study, but higher than that reported for the general population in the available literature printed in English. Traumatic stressors most often reported were not related to direct physical trauma, but rather associated with loss or serious illness of a loved one. Exposure to traumatic events in patients with a primary diagnosis of recurrent headaches is similar to that reported for chronic masticatory muscle pain patients or nonpatient populations. However, symptoms consistent with a diagnosis of current PTSD appear to be more frequent in patients with recurrent headaches than reported in the scientific literature printed in English for nonpatient populations. Screening for PTSD symptomatology is recommended as part of the routine clinical evaluation of headache.

  19. Temporomandibular disorder is more prevalent among patients with primary headaches in a tertiary outpatient clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Felipe Tomaz-Morais

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD in patients with primary headaches attended in a tertiary neurology ambulatory.Method Authorized by the Ethics Committee, the present cross-sectional study was conducted with a random sample of patients screened for orofacial pain and primary headaches at a tertiary hospital in Northeast of Brazil.Results The sample consisted in 42 patients with primary headache, 59.5% male. The prevalence of > 6 TMD signs and symptoms was 54.8%. In those patients with migraine TMD was present in 71.4% and in tension-type headache in 38.1% (p = 0.030; OR = 4.1. TMD was related to the clinical status of headache associated or attributed to medication overuse (p = 0.001.Conclusion TMD has a high prevalence in patients with primary headaches (54.8%. Special attention must be given to patients with migraine and headache associated or attributed to medication overuse.

  20. Headaches. More than just sinusitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knauth, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Headaches are among the commonest somatic complaints seen in clinical practice. The International Headache Society differentiates about 190 types of headaches. This article focuses on the variety of secondary headaches with a radiologically identifiable cause. (orig.)

  1. Effect of brief daily exercise on headache among adults--secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars L; Mortensen, Ole S; Zebis, Mette K

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This paper investigates secondary outcomes (headache) in a randomized controlled trial with physical exercise among office workers with neck/shoulder pain. METHODS: A total of 198 office workers with frequent neck/shoulder pain were randomly allocated to either one of two intervention...... were unaffected. CONCLUSIONS: Two minutes of daily resistance training for ten weeks reduces headache frequency among office workers with neck/shoulder pain. The vast number of adult workers suffering from one or two days of weekly headaches and who could potentially comply with and benefit from brief...... exercise programs stresses the applicability of our findings....

  2. Are signs of temporomandibular disorders stable and predictable in adolescents with headache?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljeström, M-R; Le Bell, Y; Laimi, K; Anttila, P; Aromaa, M; Jämsä, T; Metsähonkala, L; Vahlberg, T; Viander, S; Alanen, P; Sillanpää, M

    2008-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to study changes in signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and factors predicting TMD signs in adolescents with and without headache. A population-based sample (n = 212) of 13-year-olds with and without headache was re-examined at the age of 16. The study included a questionnaire, face-to-face interview and somatic examination. In addition, a neurological examination, a muscle evaluation and a stomatognathic examination were performed. Significant changes were seen in TMD signs during the follow-up, but TMD signs at the end of the follow-up could not be predicted by baseline headache, sleeping difficulties, depression or muscle pain. TMD signs at the age of 16 were associated with female gender and muscle pain. We conclude that considerable changes in TMD signs occur in the follow-up of adolescents with and without headache. Headache-related TMD are not predictable in adolescents with and without headache.

  3. Unusual headache syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, Luiz P

    2013-01-01

    Some headache syndromes have few cases reported in the literature. Their clinical characteristics, pathogenesis, and treatment may have not been completely defined. They may not actually be uncommon but rather under-recognized and/or underreported. A literature review of unusual headache syndromes, searching PubMed and ISI Web of Knowledge, was performed. After deciding which disorders to study, relevant publications in scientific journals, including original articles, reviews, meeting abstracts, and letters or correspondences to the editors were searched. This paper reviewed the clinical characteristics, the pathogenesis, the diagnosis, and the treatment of five interesting and unusual headache syndromes: exploding head syndrome, red ear syndrome, neck-tongue syndrome, nummular headache, and cardiac cephalgia. Recognizing some unusual headaches, either primary or secondary, may be a challenge for many non-headache specialist physicians. It is important to study them because the correct diagnosis may result in specific treatments that may improve the quality of life of these patients, and this can even be life saving. © 2013 American Headache Society.

  4. Headache secondary to sleep-related bruxism: A case with polysomnographic findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sourav Das

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep-related bruxism may present with headache. However, in clinical practice it may be difficult to differentiate from other causes of headache, especially in subjects with substance abuse. We are presenting a case of sleep-related bruxism that presented with headache and sleep-related symptoms in the presence of substance abuse. Polysomnography was used to ascertain cause of headache. How the other possible causes of headache ruled out is also discussed in report. In short, Sleep-related bruxism can cause headache that is worse in the morning. It is associated with poor quality sleep.

  5. Obesity and headache: part I--a systematic review of the epidemiology of obesity and headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Nu Cindy; Scher, Ann I; Moghekar, Abhay; Bond, Dale S; Peterlin, B Lee

    2014-02-01

    Individually, both obesity and headache are conditions associated with a substantial personal and societal impact. Recent data support that obesity is comorbid with headache in general and migraine specifically, as well as with certain secondary headache conditions such as idiopathic intracranial hypertension. In the current manuscript, we first briefly review the epidemiology of obesity and common primary and secondary headache disorders individually. This is followed by a systematic review of the general population data evaluating the association between obesity and headache in general, and then obesity and migraine and tension-type headache disorders. Finally, we briefly discuss the data on the association between obesity and a common secondary headache disorder that is associated with obesity, idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Taken together, these data suggest that it is important for clinicians and patients to be aware of the headache/migraine-obesity association, given that it is potentially modifiable. Hypotheses for mechanisms of the obesity-migraine association and treatment considerations for overweight and obese headache sufferers are discussed in the companion manuscript, as part II of this topic. © 2014 American Headache Society.

  6. Headache and facial pain: differential diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Jonathan A; Fox, Roger W; Martin, Vincent T; Lockey, Richard F

    2013-01-01

    Headaches affect 90% of the population sometime during their life. Most are benign and fleeting, some are serious and life-threatening, and others require ongoing medical consultation and treatment. A careful history and physical is necessary to establish a differential diagnosis and to guide the choice of testing to make an accurate diagnosis. The most common types of headaches are discussed in this review. They are divided into primary and secondary headache disorders as classified by the International Headache Society. Primary headache disorders include migraine without and with aura, cluster and tension-type headaches. Secondary headaches are those that occur as a result of some other disorder and include brain tumors, rhinosinusitis, diseases of intracranial and extracranial vasculature, and temporomandibular joint disease. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Cluster Headache Clinical Phenotypes: Tobacco Nonexposed (Never Smoker and No Parental Secondary Smoke Exposure as a Child) versus Tobacco-Exposed: Results from the United States Cluster Headache Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozen, Todd D

    2018-05-01

    To present results from the United States Cluster Headache Survey comparing the clinical presentation of tobacco nonexposed and tobacco-exposed cluster headache patients. Cluster headache is uniquely tied to a personal history of tobacco usage/cigarette smoking and, if the individual cluster headache sufferer did not smoke, it has been shown that their parent(s) typically did and that individual had significant secondary smoke exposure as a child. The true nontobacco exposed (no personal or secondary exposure) cluster headache sufferer has never been fully studied. The United States Cluster Headache Survey consisted of 187 multiple choice questions related to cluster headache including: patient demographics, clinical headache characteristics, family history, triggers, smoking history (personal and secondary), and headache-related disability. The survey was placed on a website from October through December 2008. One thousand one hundred thirty-four individuals completed the survey. One hundred thirty-three subjects or 12% of the surveyed population had no personal smoking/tobacco use history and no secondary smoke exposure as an infant/child, thus a nontobacco exposed population. In the nonexposed population, there were 87 males and 46 females with a gender ratio of 1.9:1. Episodic cluster headache occurred in 80% of nonexposed subjects. One thousand and one survey responders or 88% were tobacco-exposed (729 males and 272 females) with a gender ratio of 2.7:1. Eighty-three percent had a personal smoking history, while only 17% just had parents who smoked with secondary smoke exposure. Eighty-five percent of smokers had double exposure with a personal smoking history and secondary exposure as a child. Nonexposed cluster headache subjects are significantly more likely to develop cluster headache at ages 40 years and younger, while the exposed sufferers are significantly more likely to develop cluster headache at 40 years of age and older. Nonexposed patients have a

  8. Self-reported aural symptoms, headache and temporomandibular disorders in Japanese young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhter, Rahena; Morita, Manabu; Ekuni, Disuke; Hassan, Nur Mohammad Monsur; Furuta, Michiko; Yamanaka, Reiko; Matsuka, Yoshizo; Wilson, David

    2013-02-06

    To investigate the associations of aural symptoms, headache and depression with the presence of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) symptoms in a young adult population in Japan. A personal interview survey was conducted on first-year university students (n = 1,930) regarding symptoms of TMD, aural problems, headache, shoulder pain and depression. Logistic regression was applied to assess the associations of these problems with the presence of TMD symptoms after controlling for age and gender. Among the 1,930 students, 543 students exhibited TMD symptoms and were classified into 7 groups: clicking only (Group I, n = 319), pain in the TMJ only (Group II, n = 21), difficulty in mouth opening only (Group III, n = 18), clicking and pain (Group IV, n = 29), clicking and difficulty in mouth opening (Group V, n = 48), difficulty in mouth opening and pain (Group VI, n = 11), and combination of three symptoms (Group VII, n = 97). The control group (n = 1,387) were subjects without any TMD symptoms. After adjusting for age and gender, a strong association was observed between TMD symptoms (Group II and IV) and tinnitus (OR = 12.1 and 13.2, respectively). TMD symptoms (Group I, II and III) were also associated with vertigo and headache. Otalgia and depression were significantly associated with the presence of clicking only. TMD symptoms were significantly correlated to aural symptoms and headache. A functional evaluation of the stomatognathic system should be considered in subjects with unexplained aural symptoms and headache.

  9. Temporomandibular disorder-type pain and migraine headache in women: a preliminary twin study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesh, Octavia; Noonan, Carolyn; Buchwald, Dedra S; Goldberg, Jack; Afari, Niloo

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether shared genetic influences are responsible for the association between pain from temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and migraine headache. Data were obtained from 1,236 monozygotic and 570 dizygotic female twin pairs from the University of Washington Twin Registry. TMD pain was assessed with a question about persistent or recurrent pain in the jaw, temple, in front of the ear, or in the ear. The presence of migraine headache was determined by self-report of doctor-diagnosed migraine. Univariate and bivariate structural equation models estimated the components of variance attributable to genetic and environmental influences. The best fitting univariate models indicated that additive genetic effects contributed 27% of the variance in TMD pain (95% confidence interval = 15% to 38%) and 49% of the variance in migraine headache (95% confidence interval = 40% to 57%). The best-fitting bivariate model revealed that 12% of the genetic component of TMD pain is shared with migraine headache. These preliminary findings suggest that the association between TMD pain and migraine headache in women may be partially due to a modest shared genetic risk for both conditions. Future studies can focus on replicating these findings with symptom- and diagnosis-based instruments.

  10. Headache care in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shengyuan; Zhang, Mingjie; Zhou, Jiying; Liu, Ruozhuo; Wan, Qi; Li, Yansheng

    2014-04-01

    Headache disorders are problematic worldwide. China is no different. A population-based door-to-door survey revealed that the 1-year prevalence of primary headache disorders in China was 23.8%, constituting a major societal burden. Many headache centers and clinics have been established in China, and headache disorders (and associated stress) are receiving an increased level of expert attention. This review summarizes the outcomes of the epidemiological survey and the progress of clinical and basic research in China, describes the present situation in terms of headache diagnosis and treatment, and discusses the future of headache care in China. © 2014 American Headache Society.

  11. New daily persistent headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Tyagi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available New daily persistent headache (NDPH is a chronic headache developing in a person who does not have a past history of headaches. The headache begins acutely and reaches its peak within 3 days. It is important to exclude secondary causes, particularly headaches due to alterations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF pressure and volume. A significant proportion of NDPH sufferers may have intractable headaches that are refractory to treatment. The condition is best viewed as a syndrome rather than a diagnosis. The headache can mimic chronic migraine and chronic tension-type headache, and it is also important to exclude secondary causes, particularly headaches due to alterations in CSF pressure and volume. A large proportion of NDPH sufferers have migrainous features to their headache and should be managed with treatments used for treating migraine. A small group of NDPH sufferers may have intractable headaches that are refractory to treatment.

  12. Prevalence and Features of a Probable Diagnosis in First-Visit Headache Patients Based on the Criteria of the Third Beta Edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders: A Prospective, Cross-Sectional Multicenter Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Kyoung; Moon, Heui-Soo; Cha, Myong-Jin; Kim, Byung-Su; Kim, Byung-Kun; Park, Jeong-Wook; Park, Kwang-Yeol; Sohn, Jong-Hee; Chu, Min-Kyung; Song, Tae-Jin; Kim, Jae-Moon; Cho, Soo-Jin

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to determine the characteristics and significance of a probable diagnostic entity for primary headache disorder (PHD). A diagnosis of probable primary headache disorder (PPHD) is given when a patient's headache fulfills all but one criteria of the third beta edition of the international classification of headache disorder (ICHD-3β). Despite the uncertainty regarding this diagnosis, the inclusion of a probable diagnosis entity in this manual may aid in the accurate classification of headache disorders and allow effective treatment strategies to be started at the patient's initial visit. This cross-sectional multicenter registry study assessed first-visit patients with complaints of headaches who presented at the outpatient clinics of 11 neurologists in Korea. The classification of a headache disorder was made according to the criteria of the ICHD-3β by each investigator based on the initial evaluation of the patient or by a consensus meeting for uncertain cases. The rates of a probable diagnosis among PPHD patients were assessed and the clinical characteristics of these patients were compared with those of patients with a diagnosis of definite primary headache disorder (DPHD). A total of 1429 patients were diagnosed with PHD, and 305 (21.3%) of these patients had PPHD. The proportions of PPHD differed among the subtypes of DPHD as follows: migraines (16.1%), tension-type headaches (TTH; 33%), trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia (TAC; 40.9%), and other PHD (14%, P headache intensity than patients with DPHD (5.8 ± 2.2 vs. 6.5 ± 2.1, respectively, P headache from onset (median: 1 vs. 4 months, respectively, P headaches. The incorporation of a probable diagnosis into the ICHD-3β may be useful for reducing the diagnoses of unspecified headaches. © 2016 American Headache Society.

  13. Prevalence, characteristics and management of headache experienced by people with schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder: a cross sectional cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connaughton, Joanne; Wand, Benedict

    2017-08-01

    Headache is the most common type of pain reported by people with schizophrenia. This study aimed to establish prevalence, characteristics and management of these headaches. One hundred participants with schizophrenia/schizoaffective disorder completed a reliable and valid headache questionnaire. Two clinicians independently classified each headache as migraine, tension-type, cervicogenic or other. The 12-month prevalence of headache (57%) was higher than the general population (46%) with no evidence of a relationship between psychiatric clinical characteristics and presence of headache. Prevalence of cervicogenic (5%) and migraine (18%) was comparable to the general population. Tension-type (16%) had a lower prevalence and 19% of participants experienced other headache. No one with migraine was prescribed migraine specific medication; no one with cervicogenic and tension-type received best-practice treatment. Headache is a common complaint in people with schizophrenia/schizoaffective disorder with most fitting recognised diagnostic criteria for which effective interventions are available. No one in this sample was receiving best-practice care for their headache.

  14. Obesity and Headache: Part I – A Systematic Review of the Epidemiology of Obesity and Headache

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Nu Cindy; Scher, Ann I.; Moghekar, Abhay; Bond, Dale S.; Peterlin, B. Lee

    2014-01-01

    Individually, both obesity and headache are conditions associated with a substantial personal and societal impact. Recent data support that obesity is comorbid with headache in general and migraine specifically, as well as with certain secondary headache conditions such as idiopathic intracranial hypertension. In the current manuscript, we first briefly review the epidemiology of obesity and common primary and secondary headache disorders individually. This is followed by a systematic review of the general population data evaluating the association between obesity and headache in general, and then obesity and migraine and tension-type headache disorders. Finally, we briefly discuss the data on the association between obesity and a common secondary headache disorder that is associated with obesity, idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Taken together, these data suggest that it is important for clinicians and patients to be aware of the headache/migraine-obesity association, given that it is potentially modifiable. Hypotheses for mechanisms of the obesity-migraine association and treatment considerations for overweight and obese headache sufferers are discussed in the companion manuscript, as part II of this topic. PMID:24512574

  15. Secondary chronic cluster headache treated by posterior hypothalamic deep brain stimulation: first reported case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Giuseppe; Rizzi, Michele; Cordella, Roberto; Caraceni, Augusto; Zecca, Ernesto; Bussone, Gennaro; Franzini, Angelo; Leone, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the posterior hypothalamus (pHyp) has been reported as an effective treatment for primary, drug-refractory and chronic cluster headache (CCH). We here describe the use of such a procedure for the treatment of secondary CCH due to a neoplasm affecting the soft tissues of the right hemiface. A 27-year-old man affected by infiltrating angiomyolipoma of the right hemiface who subsequently developed drug refractory homolateral CCH underwent DBS of the right pHyp region at the Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Neurologico Carlo Besta. After surgery, the patient presented a significant reduction in frequency of pain bouts. However, because of a subsequent infection, the entire system was removed. After re-implantation of the system, successful outcome was observed at 2 years follow-up. This brief report shows the feasibility of pHyp DBS in secondary drug-refractory CCH syndromes; future reports are needed in order to confirm our positive result.

  16. Prevalence of primary headache disorders diagnosed according to ICHD-3 beta in three different social groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebedeva, Elena R; Kobzeva, Natalia R; Gilev, Denis

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of our study was to estimate the one-year prevalence of primary headache disorders in three different social groups using the third edition beta of the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-3 beta). MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study population included a total...... of 3124 participants: 1042 students (719 females, 323 males, mean age 20.6, age range 17-40), 1075 workers (146 females, 929 males, mean age 40.4, age range 21-67) and 1007 blood donors (484 females, 523 males, mean age 34.1, age range 18-64). We used a semi-structured, validated face-to-face interview....... RESULTS: The age-adjusted one-year prevalence of migraine in females was significantly higher (p Age-adjusted prevalence of migraine among males did not differ among the three groups: 4.5% in students, 4.9% in workers and 4...

  17. [Management of children with headache in a Pediatric Emergency Department before and after the introduction of the Second International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-II)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioachin, Anna; Fiumana, Elisa; Tarocco, Anna; Verzola, Adriano; Forini, Elena; Guerra, Valentina; Salani, Manuela; Faggioli, Raffaella

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate how the management of children admitted with headache to a Pediatric Emergency Department, was modified by the introduction of the Second International Classification of Headache Disorders ( ICHD-II) published in 2004. The complexity and average costs of the services provided to patients in 2002 and 2011 were compared. The results revealed a decrease in the number of tests performed and in-hospital admissions. However, tests were more complex, and an increase in requests of specialist advice was observed. We hypothesized that this change may be related to the introduction of ICHD-II, which suggests a more rational approach to the child with headache and a better use of hospital resources.

  18. The role of emotional and behavioral disorders in the development of drug dependence in patients with medication-induced headache (review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Shagbazyan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Medication-induced headache (MIH is a variety of chronic daily headache (HA. MIH belongs to secondary (symptomatic HA, develops as a complication of pre-existing primary cephalgia, and is caused by the overuse of drugs to relieve HA. The role of drug dependence syndrome and behavioral and emotional disorders in the development of MIH, which may be associated with dysfunction of certain brain systems that control these functions, has been recently discussed. The paper reviews the literature dealing with studies of the role of behavioral and emotional disorders and orbitofrontal cortical dysfunction in the development of drug dependence syndrome in patients with MIH. The importance of analyzing these aspects of MIH is determined by the prospects for applying alternative approaches to managing these patients.

  19. Classification and clinical features of headache patients: an outpatient clinic study from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunfeng; Zhou, Jiying; Fan, Xiaoping; Li, Xuelian; Ran, Li; Tan, Ge; Chen, Lixue; Wang, Kuiyun; Liu, Bowen

    2011-10-01

    This study aimed to analyze and classify the clinical features of headache in neurological outpatients. A cross-sectional study was conducted consecutively from March to May 2010 for headache among general neurological outpatients attending the First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University. Personal interviews were carried out and a questionnaire was used to collect medical records. Diagnosis of headache was according to the International classification of headache disorders, 2nd edition (ICHD-II). Headache patients accounted for 19.5% of the general neurology clinic outpatients. A total of 843 (50.1%) patients were defined as having primary headache, 454 (27%) secondary headache, and 386 (23%) headache not otherwise specified (headache NOS). For primary headache, 401 (23.8%) had migraine, 399 (23.7%) tension-type headache (TTH), 8 (0.5%) cluster headache and 35 (2.1%) other headache types. Overall, migraine patients suffered (1) more severe headache intensity, (2) longer than 6 years of headache history and (3) more common analgesic medications use than TTH ones (p headaches than migraine patients, and typically headache frequency exceeded 15 days/month (p headache patients were defined as chronic daily headache. Almost 20% of outpatient visits to the general neurology department were of headache patients, predominantly primary headache of migraine and TTH. In outpatient headaches, more attention should be given to headache intensity and duration of headache history for migraine patients, while more attention to headache frequency should be given for the TTH ones.

  20. Self-reported aural symptoms, headache and temporomandibular disorders in Japanese young adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhter Rahena

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate the associations of aural symptoms, headache and depression with the presence of temporomandibular disorder (TMD symptoms in a young adult population in Japan. Methods A personal interview survey was conducted on first-year university students (n = 1,930 regarding symptoms of TMD, aural problems, headache, shoulder pain and depression. Logistic regression was applied to assess the associations of these problems with the presence of TMD symptoms after controlling for age and gender. Results Among the 1,930 students, 543 students exhibited TMD symptoms and were classified into 7 groups: clicking only (Group I, n = 319, pain in the TMJ only (Group II, n = 21, difficulty in mouth opening only (Group III, n = 18, clicking and pain (Group IV, n = 29, clicking and difficulty in mouth opening (Group V, n = 48, difficulty in mouth opening and pain (Group VI, n = 11, and combination of three symptoms (Group VII, n = 97. The control group (n = 1,387 were subjects without any TMD symptoms. After adjusting for age and gender, a strong association was observed between TMD symptoms (Group II and IV and tinnitus (OR = 12.1 and 13.2, respectively. TMD symptoms (Group I, II and III were also associated with vertigo and headache. Otalgia and depression were significantly associated with the presence of clicking only. Conclusions TMD symptoms were significantly correlated to aural symptoms and headache. A functional evaluation of the stomatognathic system should be considered in subjects with unexplained aural symptoms and headache.

  1. The Use and Method of Action of Intravenous Lidocaine and Its Metabolite in Headache Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, Thomas; Silberstein, Stephen D

    2018-03-14

    Lidocaine, an amide anesthetic, has been used in the treatment of a wide variety of pain disorders for over 75 years. In addition to pain control, lidocaine is an anti-arrhythmic agent and has anti-inflammatory properties. Lidocaine's unique properties, including nonlinear pharmacokinetics, have limited its modern-day use. The purpose of this review is to offer a better understanding of the properties of this unique treatment, which we hope will allow more practitioners to offer this to their patients. An analysis of the history, pharmacokinetics, and relevant uses of lidocaine in headache medicine based on a synthesis of the medical literature and clinical experience. Lidocaine is an amide anesthetic that inhibits voltage gated sodium channels, and lidocaine metabolism occurs exclusively in the liver. One lidocaine metabolite has its own unique properties and may be an active form of the drug. Open label and retrospective studies have investigated the use of lidocaine in many headache disorders, primarily via injection or infusion. Further research into the active metabolite of lidocaine may allow for its use as a novel nonopiate treatment of chronic pain. © 2018 American Headache Society.

  2. Clinical effectiveness of primary and secondary headache treatment by transcranial direct current stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry ePinchuk

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The clinical effectiveness of headache treatment by transcranial direct current stimulation with various locations of stimulating electrodes on the scalp was analyzed retrospectively. The results of the treatment were analyzed in 90 patients aged from 19 to 54 years (48 patients had migraine without aura, 32 – frequent episodic tension-type headaches, 10 – chronic tension-type headaches and in 44 adolescents aged 11 – 16 years with chronic posttraumatic headaches after a mild head injury. Clinical effectiveness of tDCS with 70 – 150 µA current for 30 – 45 minutes via 6.25 cm2 stimulating electrodes is comparable to that of modern pharmacological drugs, with no negative side effects. The obtained result has been maintained on average from 5 to 9 months. It has been demonstrated that effectiveness depends on localization of stimulating electrodes used for different types of headaches.

  3. Headache and endovascular procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Biase, Stefano; Longoni, Marco; Gigli, Gian Luigi; Agostoni, Elio

    2017-05-01

    The International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-3 beta) includes headache attributed to intracranial endovascular procedures (EVPs). The aim of this review is to describe the clinical and pathophysiological aspects of headache related to vascular lesions and EVPs. Current studies regarding this issue are contradictory, although generally favouring headache improvement after EVPs. Further large studies are needed to adequately assess the effect of EVPs on headache.

  4. Cluster headache

    Science.gov (United States)

    Histamine headache; Headache - histamine; Migrainous neuralgia; Headache - cluster; Horton's headache; Vascular headache - cluster ... Doctors do not know exactly what causes cluster headaches. They ... (chemical in the body released during an allergic response) or ...

  5. Overview of diagnosis and management of paediatric headache. Part I: diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozge, Aynur; Termine, Cristiano; Antonaci, Fabio; Natriashvili, Sophia; Guidetti, Vincenzo; Wöber-Bingöl, Ciçek

    2011-02-01

    Headache is the most common somatic complaint in children and adolescents. The evaluation should include detailed history of children and adolescents completed by detailed general and neurological examinations. Moreover, the possible role of psychological factors, life events and excessively stressful lifestyle in influencing recurrent headache need to be checked. The choice of laboratory tests rests on the differential diagnosis suggested by the history, the character and temporal pattern of the headache, and the physical and neurological examinations. Subjects who have any signs or symptoms of focal/progressive neurological disturbances should be investigated by neuroimaging techniques. The electroencephalogram and other neurophysiological examinations are of limited value in the routine evaluation of headaches. In a primary headache disorder, headache itself is the illness and headache is not attributed to any other disorder (e.g. migraine, tension-type headache, cluster headache and other trigeminal autonomic cephalgias). In secondary headache disorders, headache is the symptom of identifiable structural, metabolic or other abnormality. Red flags include the first or worst headache ever in the life, recent headache onset, increasing severity or frequency, occipital location, awakening from sleep because of headache, headache occurring exclusively in the morning associated with severe vomiting and headache associated with straining. Thus, the differential diagnosis between primary and secondary headaches rests mainly on clinical criteria. A thorough evaluation of headache in children and adolescents is necessary to make the correct diagnosis and initiate treatment, bearing in mind that children with headache are more likely to experience psychosocial adversity and to grow up with an excess of both headache and other physical and psychiatric symptoms and this creates an important healthcare problem for their future life.

  6. Case studies of uncommon headaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Randolph W

    2006-05-01

    The following interesting and uncommon headache disorders are presented through case studies: exploding head syndrome, hypnic headache, neck-tongue syndrome, "Alice in Wonderland" syndrome, nummular headache, red ear syndrome, burning mouth syndrome, spontaneous intracranial hypotension syndrome, and cardiac cephalalgia.

  7. Longitudinal Study of Headache Trajectories in the Year After Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Relation to Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Kathryn; Bell, Kathleen R; Ehde, Dawn M; Temkin, Nancy; Dikmen, Sureyya; Williams, Rhonda M; Dillworth, Tiara; Hoffman, Jeanne M

    2015-11-01

    To examine headache trajectories among persons with mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) in the year after injury and the relation of headache trajectory to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) at 1 year postinjury. Prospective, longitudinal study. Participants were recruited through a university medical center and participated in follow-up assessments by telephone. Prospectively enrolled individuals (N=212) within 1 week of MTBI who were hospitalized for observation or other system injuries. Participants were assessed at baseline and 3, 6, and 12 months postinjury. Not applicable. Participants rated average headache pain intensity using the 0 to 10 numerical rating scale at each assessment period. The PTSD Checklist-Civilian Version was completed at 12 months postinjury. Latent class growth analysis produced a 4-trajectory group model, with groups labeled resolved, worsening, improving, and chronic. Multivariate regression modeling revealed that younger age and premorbid headache correlated with membership in the worse trajectory groups (worsening and chronic; PHeadache is common in the year after MTBI, with younger people, persons who previously had headaches, and persons with PTSD more likely to report chronic or worsening headache. Further research is needed to examine whether PTSD symptoms exacerbate headaches or whether problematic headache symptoms exacerbate PTSD. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Principles of headaches evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Rosa Rolim de Andrade

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT However common tension-type headache is in epidemiologic population-based studies, migraine is the most common diagnosis in patients seeking treatment for headache in primary care. The appropriate evaluation of headache should be as follows: 1 To rule out the most serious underlying pathologies and to look for other secondary causes of headache, 2 To determine the type of primary headache using the patient's history as a primary diagnostic tool. Symptoms can always overlap, particularly between migraine and tension-type headache and between migraine and some secondary causes of headache (such as neurologic or systemic disease. A brief headache screen based only on anamnesis and physical examination data which direct to an underlying pathology is useful to primary care physicians in particular. An imaging study is not necessary in the vast majority of patients presenting with headache. Nevertheless, imaging (usually CT scan is warranted in the patients outlined above.

  9. Neurostimulation for neck pain and headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jennifer; Ball, Perry A; Fanciullo, Gilbert J

    2014-03-01

    Patients with medically refractory headache disorders are a rare and challenging-to-treat group. The introduction of peripheral neurostimulation (PNS) has offered a new avenue of treatment for patients who are appropriate surgical candidates. The utility of PNS for headache management is actively debated. Preliminary reports suggested that 60-80% of patients with chronic headache who have failed maximum medical therapy respond to PNS. However, complications rates for PNS are high. Recent publication of 2 large randomized clinical trials with conflicting results has underscored the need for further research and careful patient counseling. In this review, we summarize the current evidence for PNS in treatment of chronic migraine, trigeminal autonomic cephalagias and occipital neuralgia, and other secondary headache disorders. © 2014 American Headache Society.

  10. Migraine is the most prevalent primary headache in individuals with temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Ana L; Gonçalves, Daniela A G; Castanharo, Sabrina M; Speciali, José G; Bigal, Marcelo E; Camparis, Cinara M

    2010-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of primary headaches (HA) in adults with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) who were assessed in a specialty orofacial pain clinic, as well as in controls without TMD. The sample consisted of 158 individuals with TMD seen at a university-based specialty clinic, as well as 68 controls. The Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD were used to diagnose the TMD patients. HAs were assessed using a structured interview and classified according to the Second Edition of the International Classification for Headache Disorders. Data were analyzed by chi-square tests with a significance level of 5% and odds ratio (OR) tests with a 95% confidence interval (CI). HAs occurred in 45.6% of the control group (30.9% had migraine and 14.7% had tension-type headache [TTH]) and in 85.5% of individuals with TMD. Among individuals with TMD, migraine was the most prevalent primary HA (55.3%), followed by TTH (30.2%); 14.5% had no HA. In contrast to controls, the odds ratio (OR) for HA in those with TMD was 7.05 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.65-13.61; P = .000), for migraine, the OR was 2.76 (95% CI = 1.50-5.06; P = .001), and for TTH, the OR was 2.51 (95% CI = 1.18-5.35; P = .014). Myofascial pain/arthralgia was the most common TMD diagnosis (53.2%). The presence of HA or specific HAs was not associated with the time since the onset of TMD (P = .714). However, migraine frequency was positively associated with TMD pain severity (P = .000). TMD was associated with increased primary HA prevalence rates. Migraine was the most common primary HA diagnosis in individuals with TMD.

  11. New Daily Persistent Headache: Historical Review and an Interview with Dr. Walter Vanast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Matthew S; Vanast, Walter J; Allan Purdy, R

    2017-06-01

    New daily persistent headache (NDPH) is an idiopathic headache syndrome characterized by the abrupt onset of an unremitting, daily, continuous headache without an antecedent escalating headache pattern, and not attributable to other primary or secondary headache disorders. We review the history of NDPH in terms of its characterization and classification, and then interview Dr. Walter Vanast, the neurologist who initially described NDPH three decades ago, to gain his perspective now that there is more widespread recognition and interest in this syndrome. © 2017 American Headache Society.

  12. Is There a Relation between Tension-Type Headache, Temporomandibular Disorders and Sleep?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Caspersen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Tension-Type Headache (TTH is the most prevalent headache often associated with impaired function and quality of life. Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD and TTH frequently coexist; characterized by pericranial tenderness and impact on daily life. We aim to apply a standardized questionnaire for TMD to characterize and analyse an eventual relation between sleep and oral health in TTH in a controlled design. Material and Methods. 58 consecutive TTH patients and 58 healthy controls were included. The Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD questionnaire, Oral Health Impact profile (OHIP and questionnaires for sleep were applied. Results. TTH-patients had significantly higher pain scores (, decreased quality of life (, and higher total sleep scores ( compared to controls. Conclusion. For the first time we have identified a clear relation between TTH and TMD symptoms, depression, anxiety, poor sleep, and impairments of oral function in carefully classified patients. These findings indicate a close, but incomplete, overlap between TTH and TMD. Their underlying pathophysiological mechanisms need further research.

  13. Is There a Relation between Tension-Type Headache, Temporomandibular Disorders and Sleep?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspersen, N; Hirsvang, J R; Kroell, L; Jadidi, F; Baad-Hansen, L; Svensson, P; Jensen, R

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Tension-Type Headache (TTH) is the most prevalent headache often associated with impaired function and quality of life. Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) and TTH frequently coexist; characterized by pericranial tenderness and impact on daily life. We aim to apply a standardized questionnaire for TMD to characterize and analyse an eventual relation between sleep and oral health in TTH in a controlled design. Material and Methods. 58 consecutive TTH patients and 58 healthy controls were included. The Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) questionnaire, Oral Health Impact profile (OHIP) and questionnaires for sleep were applied. Results. TTH-patients had significantly higher pain scores (P < 0.001), decreased quality of life (P < 0.001), and higher total sleep scores (P < 0.001) compared to controls. Conclusion. For the first time we have identified a clear relation between TTH and TMD symptoms, depression, anxiety, poor sleep, and impairments of oral function in carefully classified patients. These findings indicate a close, but incomplete, overlap between TTH and TMD. Their underlying pathophysiological mechanisms need further research.

  14. Clinical Implications of Associations between Headache and Gastrointestinal Disorders: A Study Using the Hallym Smart Clinical Data Warehouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Hwa; Lee, Jae-June; Kwon, Youngsuk; Kim, Jong-Ho; Sohn, Jong-Hee

    2017-01-01

    The brain and gastrointestinal (GI) tract are strongly connected via neural, endocrine, and immune pathways. Previous studies suggest that headaches, especially migraines, may be associated with various GI disorders. However, upper GI endoscopy in migraineurs has shown a low prevalence of abnormal findings. Also, the majority of studies have not demonstrated an association between Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection and migraine, although a pathogenic role for HP infection in migraines has been suggested. Further knowledge concerning the relation between headaches and GI disorders is important as it may have therapeutic consequences. Thus, we sought to investigate possible associations between GI disorders and common primary headaches, such as migraines and tension-type headaches (TTH), using the Smart Clinical Data Warehouse (CDW) over a period of 10 years. We retrospectively investigated clinical data using a clinical data analytic solution called the Smart CDW from 2006 to 2016. In patients with migraines and TTH who visited a gastroenterology center, GI disorder diagnosis, upper GI endoscopy findings, and results of HP infection were collected and compared to clinical data from controls, who had health checkups without headache. The time interval between headache diagnosis and an examination at a gastroenterology center did not exceed 1 year. Patients were age- and sex-matched and eligible cases were included in the migraine ( n  = 168), the TTH ( n  = 168), and the control group ( n  = 336). Among the GI disorders diagnosed by gastroenterologists, gastroesophageal reflux disorder was more prevalent in the migraine group, whereas gastric ulcers were more common in the migraine and TTH groups compared with controls ( p  < 0.0001). With regard to endoscopic findings, there were high numbers of erosive gastritis and chronic superficial gastritis cases in the migraine and TTH groups, respectively, and the severity of gastritis was significantly

  15. Rare nocturnal headaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Anna S; Kaube, Holger

    2004-06-01

    This review describes rare headaches that can occur at night or during sleep, with a focus on cluster headaches, paroxysmal hemicrania, short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks with conjunctival injection and tearing, hypnic headache and exploding head syndrome. It is known that cluster headaches and hypnic headache are associated with rapid eye movement sleep, as illustrated by recent polysomnographic studies. Functional imaging studies have documented hypothalamic activation that is likely to be of relevance to circadian rhythms. These headache syndromes have been shown to respond to melatonin and lithium therapy, both of which have an indirect impact on the sleep-wake cycle. There is growing evidence that cluster headache and hypnic headache are chronobiological disorders.

  16. What clues are available for differential diagnosis of headaches in emergency settings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mert, Ertan; Ozge, Aynur; Taşdelen, Bahar; Yilmaz, Arda; Bilgin, Nursel G

    2008-04-01

    The correct diagnosis of headache disorders in an emergency room is important for developing early management strategies and determining optimal emergency room activities. This prospective clinical based study was performed in order to determine demographic and clinical clues for differential diagnosis of primary and secondary headache disorders and also to obtain a classification plot for the emergency room practitioners. This study included 174 patients older than 15 years of age presenting in the emergency room with a chief complaint of headache. Definite headache diagnoses were made according to ICHD-II criteria. Classification and regression tree was used as new method for the statistical analysis of the differential diagnostic process. Our 174 patients with headache were diagnosed as basically primary (72.9%) and secondary (27.1%) headaches. Univariate analysis with cross tabs showed three important results. First, unilateral pain location caused 1.431-fold increase in the primary headache risk (p = 0.006). Second, having any triggers caused 1.440-fold increase in the primary headache risk (p = 0.001). Third, having associated co-morbid medical disorders caused 4.643-fold increase in the secondary headache risk (p < 0.001). It was concluded that the presence of comorbidity, the patient's age, the existence of trigger and relaxing factors, the pain in other body parts that accompanies headache and the quality of pain in terms of location and duration were all important clues for physicians in making an accurate differentiation between primary and secondary headaches.

  17. Guidelines for the organization of headache education in Europe: the headache school II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rigmor; Mitsikostas, Dimos D; Valade, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    In order to promote education on headache disorders, European Headache Federation (EHF) in conjunction with National Headache Societies organizes educational courses meeting uniform standards according to previous published guidelines. Based on six headache summer schools' experience, an EHF...

  18. Effect of treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in patients with cervicogenic headache: a single-blind, randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Piekartz, Harry; Lüdtke, Kerstin

    2011-01-01

    The present study was comprised of 43 patients (16 men) with cervicogenic headaches for over three months, diagnosed according to the International Classification of Diagnostic Criteria of Headaches (ICDH-II). The patients were randomly assigned to receive either manual therapy for the cervical region (usual care group) or additional manual therapy techniques to the temporomandibular region to additionally influence temporomandibular disorders (TMD). All patients were assessed prior to treatment, after six sessions of treatment, and at a six-month follow-up. The outcome criteria were: intensity of headaches measured on a colored analog scale, the Neck Disability Index (Dutch version), the Conti Anamnestic Questionnaire, noise registration at the mandibular joint using a stethoscope, the Graded Chronic Pain Status (Dutch version), mandibular deviation, range of mouth opening, and pressure/pain threshold of the masticatory muscles. The results indicate in the studied sample of cervicogenic headache patients, 44.1% had TMD. The group that received additional temporomandibular manual therapy techniques showed significantly decreased headache intensities and increased neck function after the treatment period. These improvements persisted during the treatment-free period (follow-up) and were not observed in the usual care group. This trend was also reflected on the questionnaires and the clinical temporomandibular signs. Based on these observations, we strongly believe that treatment of the temporomandibular region has beneficial effects for patients with cervicogenic headaches, even in the long-term.

  19. The Clinical Features, Risk Factors, and Surgical Treatment of Cervicogenic Headache in Patients With Cervical Spine Disorders Requiring Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimohata, Keiko; Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Onodera, Osamu; Nishizawa, Masatoyo; Shimohata, Takayoshi

    2017-07-01

    To clarify the clinical features and risk factors of cervicogenic headache (CEH; as diagnosed according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders-Third Edition beta) in patients with cervical spine disorders requiring surgery. CEH is caused by cervical spine disorders. The pathogenic mechanism of CEH is hypothesized to involve a convergence of the upper cervical afferents from the C1, C2, and C3 spinal nerves and the trigeminal afferents in the trigeminocervical nucleus of the upper cervical cord. According to this hypothesis, functional convergence of the upper cervical and trigeminal sensory pathways allows the bidirectional (afferent and efferent) referral of pain to the occipital, frontal, temporal, and/or orbital regions. Previous prospective studies have reported an 86-88% prevalence of headache in patients with cervical myelopathy or radiculopathy requiring anterior cervical surgery; however, these studies did not diagnose headache according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders criteria. Therefore, a better understanding of the prevalence rate, clinical features, risk factors, and treatment responsiveness of CEH in patients with cervical spine disorders requiring surgery is necessary. We performed a single hospital-based prospective cross-sectional study and enrolled 70 consecutive patients with cervical spine disorders such as cervical spondylotic myelopathy, ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament, cervical spondylotic radiculopathy, and cervical spondylotic myeloradiculopathy who had been scheduled to undergo anterior cervical fusion or dorsal cervical laminoplasty between June 2014 and December 2015. Headache was diagnosed preoperatively according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders-Third Edition beta. The Japanese Orthopaedic Association Cervical Myelopathy Evaluation Questionnaire, Neck Disability Index, and a 0-100 mm visual analog scale (VAS) were used to evaluate clinical

  20. [Different headache forms of chapter 4 of the International Headache Classification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göbel, A; Heinze, A; Göbel, H

    2012-12-01

    Chapter 4 of the International Classification of Headaches contains a group of clinically very heterogeneous primary headache forms. Little is known about the pathogenesis of these headache types and therapy is usually based on isolated case reports and uncontrolled studies. The forms include primary stabbing headache, primary cough headache, primary exertional headache, primary headache associated with sexual activity, hypnic headache, primary thunderclap headache, hemicrania continua and the new daily persistent headache. Some of these headache forms may be of a symptomatic nature and require careful examination, imaging and further tests. Primary and secondary headache forms must be carefully distinguished.

  1. Temporo-mandibular disorders are an important comorbidity of migraine and may be clinically difficult to distinguish them from tension-type headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Ariovaldo Alberto da; Brandão, Karina Viana; Faleiros, Bruno Engler; Tavares, Rafael Mattos; Lara, Rodrigo Pinto; Januzzi, Eduardo; Carvalho, Anísio Bueno de; Carvalho, Eliane Maria Duarte de; Gomes, João Bosco Lima; Leite, Frederico Mota Gonçalves; Alves, Betania Mara Franco; Gómez, Rodrigo Santiago; Teixeira, Antônio Lúcio

    2014-02-01

    Clinical differentiation between the primary headaches and temporomandibular disorders (TMD) can be challenging. To investigate the relationship between TMD and primary headaches by conducting face to face assessments in patients from an orofacial pain clinic and a headache tertiary center. Sample consists of 289 individuals consecutively identified at a headache center and 78 individuals seen in an orofacial pain clinic because of symptoms suggestive of TMD. Migraine was diagnosed in 79.8% of headache sufferers, in headache tertiary center, and 25.6% of those in orofacial pain clinic (pheadache was present in 20.4% and 46.1%, while the TMD painful occurred in 48.1% and 70.5% respectively (pheadache, and this headache was more frequent in the dental center than at the medical center.

  2. Radiological diagnosis and differential diagnosis of headache; Radiologische Diagnostik und Differenzialdiagnostik bei Kopfschmerzen im Erwachsenenalter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langner, S.; Kirsch, M. [University Medicine Greifswald (Germany). Inst. for Diagnostic Radiology and Neuroradiology

    2015-10-15

    Headache is very common and affects almost everyone at some point. It is one of the most common disorders that leads patients to see their physician. All different forms have the nociception via trigeminal nerve fibers in common. Beside the clinical course headaches are classified as either primary or secondary, with the latter having an identifiable structural or biochemical cause. Imaging has a low diagnostic yield in primary headache but play an important role in the differential diagnosis of secondary forms. An overview of different forms of secondary headache is given, outlining diagnostic procedures and the morphologic imaging features of each syndrome.

  3. Headache among patients with HIV disease: prevalence, characteristics, and associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkland, Kale E; Kirkland, Karl; Many, W J; Smitherman, Todd A

    2012-03-01

    Headache is one of the most common medical complaints reported by individuals suffering from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), but limited and conflicting data exist regarding their prevalence, prototypical characteristics, and relationship to HIV disease variables in the current era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). The aims of the present cross-sectional study were to characterize headache symptoms among patients with HIV/AIDS and to assess relations between headache and HIV/AIDS disease variables. Two hundred HIV/AIDS patients (49% female; mean age = 43.22 ± 12.30 years; 74% African American) from an internal medicine clinic and an AIDS outreach clinic were administered a structured headache diagnostic interview to assess headache characteristics and features consistent with International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD)-II diagnostic semiologies. They also completed 2 measures of headache-related disability. Prescribed medications, most recent cluster of differentiation (CD4) cell count, date of HIV diagnosis, possible causes of secondary headache, and other relevant medical history were obtained via review of patient medical records. One hundred seven patients (53.5%) reported headache symptoms, the large majority of which were consistent with characteristics of primary headache disorders after excluding 4 cases attributable to secondary causes. Among those who met criteria for a primary headache disorder, 88 (85.44%) met criteria for migraine, most of which fulfilled ICHD-II appendix diagnostic criteria for chronic migraine. Fifteen patients (14.56%) met criteria for episodic or chronic tension-type headache. Severity of HIV (as indicated by CD4 cell counts), but not duration of HIV or number of prescribed antiretroviral medications, was strongly associated with headache severity, frequency, and disability and also distinguished migraine from TTH. Problematic headache is highly prevalent

  4. Characteristics of the first 1000 headaches in an outpatient headache clinic registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Ángel L; Rojo, Esther; Herrero, Sonia; Neri, María J; Bautista, Lourdes; Peñas, María L; Cortijo, Elisa; Mulero, Patricia; Fernández, Rosa

    2011-02-01

    To analyze the incidence and characteristics of the first 1000 headaches in an outpatient clinic. Headache is a common cause of medical consultation, both in primary care and in specialist neurology outpatient clinics. The International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd Edition (ICHD-II), enables headaches to be classified in a precise and reproducible manner. In January 2008, an outpatient headache clinic was set up in Hospital Clínico Universitario, a tertiary hospital in Valladolid, Spain. Headaches were classified prospectively in accordance with ICHD-II criteria. In each case we recorded age and sex, duration of headache, ancillary tests required, and previous symptomatic or prophylactic therapies. In January 2010, the registry included 1000 headaches in 682 patients. The women/men ratio was 2.46/1 and the mean age of the patients was 43.19 ± 17.1 years (range: 14-94 years). Patients were referred from primary care (53.4%), general neurology clinics (36.6%), and other specialist clinics (9%). The headaches were grouped (ICHD-II classification) as follows: group 1 (Migraine), 51.4%; group 2 (Tension-type headache), 16%; group 3 (Trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias), 2.6%; group 4 (Other primary headaches) and group 13 (Cranial neuralgias), 3.4%. The diagnostic criteria of chronic migraine were satisfied in 8.5% of migraines. Regarding secondary headaches, 1.1% of all cases were included in group 5 (Headaches attributed to trauma) and 8.3% in group 8 (Headaches attributed to a substance or its withdrawal). Only 3.4% of headaches were classified in group 14 (Unspecified or not elsewhere classified), and 5.2% were included in the groups listed in the ICHD-II research appendix. This registry outlines the characteristics of patients seen in an outpatient headache clinic in a tertiary hospital; our results are similar to those previously reported for this type of outpatient clinic. Migraine was the most common diagnosis. Most headaches can be classified using

  5. Surgical outcome in headache due to mucosal contact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Fumiyuki; Yabe, Haruna; Ogawa, Kaoru

    2010-01-01

    Headaches is classified as primary and secondary, with secondary originating in head and neck conditions, the most important etiology being acute sinusitis. Headache due to mucosal contact, rarely encountered by otorhinolaryngologists, is an important secondary headache, whose criteria are defined by the International Classification of Headache Disorders to include intermittent pain localized in the periorbital and medial canthal or temporozygomatic regions, evidence that pain is attributable to mucosal contact and the presence of mucosal contact in the absence of acute rhinosinusitis, obtained using clinical examinations, nasal endoscopy, and/or computed tomography (CT). After mucosal contact is surgically corrected pain usually disappears permanently within 7 days. We reviewed mucosal contact headaches in 63 subjects undergoing nasal or paranasal surgery from April 2007 to March 2008. Of those 7 were diagnosed with headaches due to contact points in nasal mucosa, ranging from canthal to the temporozygomatic. The most common contact, between the middle turbinate and nasal septum, was seen in 6 of the 7. Surgery eliminated symptoms in 4 and ameliorated them in 3 indicating effective headache management. Subjects with severe headaches or localized periorbital and medial canthal pain regions, mucosal contact involvement is ruled out when CT allows no lesions. When mucosal contact headache is suspected, however surgery should be considered as a last resort. (author)

  6. Headaches. More than just sinusitis; Kopfschmerzen. Mehr als nur Sinusitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knauth, Michael [Universitaetsklinikum Goettingen (Germany). Abt. Neuroradiologie

    2011-09-15

    Headaches are among the commonest somatic complaints seen in clinical practice. The International Headache Society differentiates about 190 types of headaches. This article focuses on the variety of secondary headaches with a radiologically identifiable cause. (orig.)

  7. Epidemiology and comorbidity of headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stovner, L.J.; Jensen, Rigmor Højland

    2008-01-01

    The burden associated with headache is a major public health problem, the true magnitude of which has not been fully acknowledged until now. Globally, the percentage of the adult population with an active headache disorder is 47% for headache in general, 10% for migraine, 38% for tension-type...... headache, and 3% for chronic headache that lasts for more than 15 days per month. The large costs of headache to society, which are mostly indirect through loss of work time, have been reported. On the individual level, headaches cause disability, suffering, and loss of quality of life that is on a par...

  8. Temporal change in headache and its contribution to the risk of developing first-onset temporomandibular disorder in the Orofacial Pain: Prospective Evaluation and Risk Assessment (OPPERA) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchivileva, Inna E; Ohrbach, Richard; Fillingim, Roger B; Greenspan, Joel D; Maixner, William; Slade, Gary D

    2017-01-01

    While cross-sectional studies have demonstrated an association between headache and temporomandibular disorder (TMD), whether headache can predict the onset of TMD is unknown. The aims of this study were to evaluate the contribution of headache to the risk of developing TMD and describe patterns of change in headache types over time. An initially TMD-free cohort of 2410 persons with low frequency of headache completed quarterly questionnaires assessing TMD and headache symptoms over a median 3.0-year follow-up period. First-onset TMD was confirmed by clinical examination in 199 participants. Baseline reports of migraine (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.67, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.06-2.62) or mixed headache types (HR = 4.11, 95% CI: 1.47-11.46), or headache frequency (HR = 2.13, 95% CI: 1.31-3.48) predicted increased risk of developing TMD. In addition, headache dynamics across the follow-up period before the TMD onset were evaluated in a nested case-control study where 248 incident TMD cases were matched to 191 TMD-free controls. Both headache prevalence and frequency increased across the observation period among those who developed TMD but not among controls. Patients with TMD were more likely to experience worsening in the headache type compared with that by controls, eg, prevalence of definite migraine among TMD cases increased 10-fold. Among all headache types experienced by patients with TMD before the TMD onset, migraine had the highest odds of progression relative to remission (odds ratio = 2.8, 95% CI: 1.6-4.8), whereas for controls this ratio was significant only for the tension-type headache (odds ratio = 2.1, 95% CI: 1.2-3.9). The important clinical implication of these findings is that adequate treatment of migraine may reduce the risk for developing TMD.

  9. Movement disorders secondary to craniocerebral trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Joachim K

    2015-01-01

    Over the past few decades it has been recognized that traumatic brain injury may result in various movement disorders. In survivors of severe head injury, post-traumatic movement disorders were reported in about 20%, and they persisted in about 10% of patients. The most frequent persisting movement disorder in this population is kinetic cerebellar outflow tremor in about 9%, followed by dystonia in about 4%. While tremor is associated most frequently with cerebellar or mesencephalic lesions, patients with dystonia frequently have basal ganglia or thalamic lesions. Moderate or mild traumatic brain injury only rarely causes persistent post-traumatic movement disorders. It appears that the frequency of post-traumatic movement disorders overall has been declining which most likely is secondary to improved treatment of brain injury. In patients with disabling post-traumatic movement disorders which are refractory to medical treatment, stereotactic neurosurgery can provide long-lasting benefit. While in the past the primary option for severe kinetic tremor was thalamotomy and for dystonia thalamotomy or pallidotomy, today deep brain stimulation has become the preferred treatment. Parkinsonism is a rare consequence of single head injury, but repeated head injury such as seen in boxing can result in chronic encephalopathy with parkinsonian features. While there is still controversy whether or not head injury is a risk factor for the development of Parkinson's disease, recent studies indicate that genetic susceptibility might be relevant. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Tension Headache

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tight band around your head. A tension headache (tension-type headache) is the most common type of headache, and ... Headache after a head injury, especially if the headache gets worse ... tension or stress. But research suggests muscle contraction isn't the ...

  11. The methodology of population surveys of headache prevalence, burden and cost: Principles and recommendations from the Global Campaign against Headache

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The global burden of headache is very large, but knowledge of it is far from complete and needs still to be gathered. Published population-based studies have used variable methodology, which has influenced findings and made comparisons difficult. Among the initiatives of the Global Campaign against Headache to improve and standardize methods in use for cross-sectional studies, the most important is the production of consensus-based methodological guidelines. This report describes the development of detailed principles and recommendations. For this purpose we brought together an expert consensus group to include experience and competence in headache epidemiology and/or epidemiology in general and drawn from all six WHO world regions. The recommendations presented are for anyone, of whatever background, with interests in designing, performing, understanding or assessing studies that measure or describe the burden of headache in populations. While aimed principally at researchers whose main interests are in the field of headache, they should also be useful, at least in parts, to those who are expert in public health or epidemiology and wish to extend their interest into the field of headache disorders. Most of all, these recommendations seek to encourage collaborations between specialists in headache disorders and epidemiologists. The focus is on migraine, tension-type headache and medication-overuse headache, but they are not intended to be exclusive to these. The burdens arising from secondary headaches are, in the majority of cases, more correctly attributed to the underlying disorders. Nevertheless, the principles outlined here are relevant for epidemiological studies on secondary headaches, provided that adequate definitions can be not only given but also applied in questionnaires or other survey instruments. PMID:24467862

  12. Are occlusal characteristics, headache, parafunctional habits and clicking sounds associated with the signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder in adolescents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauriti, Leandro; Motta, Lara Jansiski; Silva, Paula Fernanda da Costa; Leal de Godoy, Camila Haddad; Alfaya, Thays Almeida; Fernandes, Kristianne Porta Santos; Mesquita-Ferrari, Raquel Agnelli; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil

    2013-10-01

    [Purpose] To assess the association between the oclusal characteristics, headache, parafunctional habits and clicking sounds and signs/symptoms of TMD in adolescents. [Subjects] Adolescents between 14 and 18 years of age. [Methods] The participants were evaluated using the Helkimo Index and a clinical examination to track clicking sounds, parafunctional habits and other signs/symptoms of temporomandibular disorder (TMD). Subjects were classified according to the presence or absence of headache, type of occlusion, facial pattern and type of bite. In statistical analyse we used the chi-square test and Fisher's exact test, with a level of significance of 5%. [Results] The sample was made up of 81 adolescents with a mean age of 15.64 years; 51.9% were male. The prevalence of signals/symptoms of TMD was 74.1%, predominantly affecting females. Signals/symptoms of TMD were significantly associated with clicking sounds, headache and nail biting. No associations were found between signals/symptoms of TMD and angle classification, type of bite and facial pattern. [Conclusion] Headache is one of the most closely associated symptoms of TMD. Clicking sounds were found in the majority of cases. Therefore, the sum of two or more factors may be necessary for the onset and perpetuation of TMD.

  13. A Cross-Sectional Clinic-Based Study in Patients With Side-Locked Unilateral Headache and Facial Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Sanjay; Rathore, Chaturbhuj; Makwana, Prayag; Dave, Ankit

    2016-07-01

    To undertake the epidemiological evaluation of the patients presenting with side-locked headache and facial pain in a tertiary neurology outpatient clinic. Side-locked unilateral headache and facial pain include a large number of primary and secondary headaches and cranial neuropathies. A diagnostic approach for the patients presenting with strictly unilateral headaches is important as many of these headache disorders respond to a highly selective drug. Epidemiological data may guide us to formulate a proper approach for such patients. However, the literature is sparse on strictly unilateral headache and facial pain. We prospectively recruited 307 consecutive adult patients (>18 years) with side-locked headache and facial pain presenting to a neurology outpatient clinic between July 2014 and December 2015. All patients were subjected to MRI brain and other investigations to find out the different secondary causes. The diagnosis was carried out by at least two headache specialists together. All patients were classified according to the International Classification of Headache Disorder-third edition (ICHD-3β). The mean age at the time of examination was 42.4 ± 13.6 years (range 18-80 years). Forty-eight percent of patients were male. Strictly unilateral headaches accounted for 19.2% of the total headaches seen in the clinic. Headaches were classified as primary in 58%, secondary in 18%, and cranial neuropathies and other facial pain in 16% patients. Five percent of patients could not be classified. Three percent of patients were classified as per the Appendix section of ICHD-3β. The prevalence of secondary headaches and painful cranial neuropathies increased with age. A total of 36 different diagnoses were made. Only two diseases (migraine and cluster headache) had a prevalence of more than 10%. The prevalence of 13 diseases varied between 6 and 9%. The prevalence of other 14 groups was ≤1%. Migraine was the most common diagnosis (15%). Cervicogenic headache

  14. Temporo-mandibular disorders are an important comorbidity of migraine and may be clinically difficult to distinguish them from tension-type headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariovaldo Alberto da Silva Júnior

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Clinical differentiation between the primary headaches and temporomandibular disorders (TMD can be challenging. Objectives : To investigate the relationship between TMD and primary headaches by conducting face to face assessments in patients from an orofacial pain clinic and a headache tertiary center. Method : Sample consists of 289 individuals consecutively identified at a headache center and 78 individuals seen in an orofacial pain clinic because of symptoms suggestive of TMD. Results : Migraine was diagnosed in 79.8% of headache sufferers, in headache tertiary center, and 25.6% of those in orofacial pain clinic (p<0.001. Tension-type headache was present in 20.4% and 46.1%, while the TMD painful occurred in 48.1% and 70.5% respectively (p<0.001. Conclusion : TMD is an important comorbidity of migraine and difficult to distinguish clinically from tension-type headache, and this headache was more frequent in the dental center than at the medical center.

  15. [Headache: Otorhinolaryngological aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, O

    2016-01-01

    Headache is the main symptom in a wide variety of diseases of which ear, nose and throat (ENT) entities are only a small fraction but are not reflected in the number of patients. Comprehensive knowledge of the clinical signs of the most common primary headaches, e. g. migraine, is therefore essential for the ENT specialist because the few patients with secondary headache from ENT-related causes must be identified. Reasons for confusing primary headache with e. g. sinusitis are mostly symptoms mediated by the trigeminal nerve, such as nasal obstruction and rhinorrhea because branches of the trigeminal nerve also innervate the meninges. The ENT-specific origin of headaches is characterized by clinical findings of physical organ disease; therefore, from an ENT perspective imaging should be part of the diagnostic procedure as normal imaging findings are indicative of primary headache, which would not normally be treated by an ENT specialist.

  16. [Primary headache and depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesztelyi, Gyöngyi

    2004-11-28

    Primary headaches--mainly tension-type headache and migraine--affect a significant portion of the population. Depression is also highly prevalent. The co-existence of a primary headache and depression in the same patient therefore might be a coincidence due to the high prevalence of these conditions, but there might be a causal relationship between them, or headaches and depression might have a common background. This review of the literature summarizes the features of the relationship between primary headaches and depression. Depression is more prevalent in headache patients than in the headache-free population. Prospective epidemiological studies suggest a common genetic, biochemical or environmental background behind primary headaches and depression. This theory is supported by the role of the same neurotransmitter systems (mostly serotonin and dopamine) in headaches as well as in depression. Comorbid depression is associated with female gender, higher age, and higher frequency of headaches. Most depression inventories--questionnaires used to screen for the severity of depressive symptoms--contain transdiagnostic items, therefore their use in their original form is limited in organic diseases: due to the somatic items they might overestimate the severity of depression. When examining a headache patient special attention should be paid to the recognition of comorbid depression. The diagnosis of suspected mood disorder could be supported by using simple screening methods, such as the original or the abbreviated versions of standard depression inventories, but the final diagnosis of major depression needs psychiatric evaluation. Quality of life of the headache patient is affected not only by the characteristics of pain (frequency, duration, severity) but also by the disability caused by headache and the associating mood disorder. Recognizing coexisting mood disorder and disability helps to make the best treatment choice for the acute and preventive treatment of

  17. Tension type headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debashish Chowdhury

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tension type headaches are common in clinical practice. Earlier known by various names, the diagnosis has had psychological connotations. Recent evidence has helped clarify the neurobiological basis and the disorder is increasingly considered more in the preview of neurologists. The classification, clinical features, differential diagnosis and treatment of tension type headache are discussed in this paper.

  18. Sex Headaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sex headaches Overview Sex headaches are brought on by sexual activity — especially an orgasm. You may notice a dull ache in your head ... severe headache just before or during orgasm. Most sex headaches are nothing to worry about. But some ...

  19. Predictors of headache before, during, and after pregnancy: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Dana P; Smitherman, Todd A; Eisenach, James C; Penzien, Donald B; Houle, Timothy T

    2012-03-01

    The present study endeavored to identify predictors of headache during pregnancy, shortly after delivery, and at 8-week follow-up. Many women suffer from headaches during pregnancy and the post-partum period. However, little is known about factors that predict headache surrounding childbirth. Secondary analysis of longitudinal cohort study of 2434 parturients hospitalized for cesarean or vaginal delivery in 4 university hospitals in the United States and Europe. Data were gathered from interviews and review of medical records shortly after delivery; 972 of the women were contacted 8 weeks later to assess persistent headache. The primary outcome measures were experiencing headache during pregnancy, headache within 72 hours after delivery, and headache at 8 weeks after delivery. Of the parturients, 10% experienced headache during pregnancy, 3.7% within 72 hours after delivery, and 3.6% at 8 weeks postdelivery. Compared to those without a history of headache, a history of headache prior to pregnancy was the strongest predictor of headache during pregnancy (9.8% vs 23.5%; risk ratio 2.4; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.4 to 4.0). Experiencing headache during pregnancy (adjusted hazard ratio HR 3.8; 95% CI: 2.4 to 6.2) and receiving needle-based regional anesthesia for pain treatment (adjusted hazard ratio 2.2; 95% CI: 1.1 to 4.5) were independently associated with headache within 72 hours after delivery with event rates of 11.1% and 10.5%, respectively. Compared to those without such a history, headache before pregnancy was significantly associated with experiencing headache 8 weeks after delivery (4.0% vs 23.8%; risk ratio = 6.0; 95% CI: 2.0 to 8.0), but headache during pregnancy or shortly after delivery was not. Several other psychosocial predictors (eg, somatization, smoking before pregnancy) were statistically associated with at least 1 headache outcome. A history of headache prior to pregnancy is a strong predictor of headache during and after pregnancy, the

  20. Epidural blood patch for refractory low CSF pressure headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Søren Aalbæk; Fomsgaard, Jonna Storm; Jensen, Rigmor

    2011-01-01

    primary effect parameter was total headache burden defined as area under the curve (AUC: intensity × duration) and as secondary effect parameters we identified: intensity (VAS 0-10), frequency (days per month), duration in hours (total hours/month) and also medication days (days on medication...... of non-invasive/conservative measures and invasive measures with epidural blood patch providing the cornerstone of the invasive measures. In the present pilot study we therefore aimed to evaluate the treatment efficacy of epidural blood patch (EBP) in treatment-refractory low-pressure headache. Our......Once believed an exceedingly rare disorder, recent evidence suggests that low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure headache has to be considered an important cause of new daily persistent headaches, particularly among young and middle-aged individuals. Treatment of low CSF pressure headache consists...

  1. Epidural blood patch for refractory low CSF pressure headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Søren Aalbæk; Fomsgaard, Jonna Storm; Jensen, Rigmor

    2011-01-01

    of non-invasive/conservative measures and invasive measures with epidural blood patch providing the cornerstone of the invasive measures. In the present pilot study we therefore aimed to evaluate the treatment efficacy of epidural blood patch (EBP) in treatment-refractory low-pressure headache. Our......Once believed an exceedingly rare disorder, recent evidence suggests that low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure headache has to be considered an important cause of new daily persistent headaches, particularly among young and middle-aged individuals. Treatment of low CSF pressure headache consists...... primary effect parameter was total headache burden defined as area under the curve (AUC: intensity × duration) and as secondary effect parameters we identified: intensity (VAS 0-10), frequency (days per month), duration in hours (total hours/month) and also medication days (days on medication...

  2. Cluster Headache

    OpenAIRE

    Pearce, Iris

    1985-01-01

    Cluster headache is the most severe primary headache with recurrent pain attacks described as worse than giving birth. The aim of this paper was to make an overview of current knowledge on cluster headache with a focus on pathophysiology and treatment. This paper presents hypotheses of cluster headache pathophysiology, current treatment options and possible future therapy approaches. For years, the hypothalamus was regarded as the key structure in cluster headache, but is now thought to be pa...

  3. The classification of chronic daily headache in French children and adolescents: A comparison between the second edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders and Silberstein-Lipton criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Christophe Cuvellier

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Jean-Christophe Cuvellier1, Frédéric Couttenier2, Stéphane Auvin1, Louis Vallée11Department of Child Neurology, Pediatric Clinic, University Hospital, Lille, France; 2Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Pediatric Clinic, University Hospital, Lille, FranceAbstract: Few data are available on the applicability of both the criteria proposed by Silberstein and Lipton (S-L and the International Classification of Headache Disorders-II (ICHD-II in the classification of children and adolescents with chronic daily headache (CDH. The International Headache Society recently added revised criteria (ICHD-IIR for chronic migraine to its Appendix. We retrospectively reviewed all charts of 34 children and adolescents (<17 years with primary CDH presenting to the outpatient clinic of the Universitary Department of Neuropediatrics of Lille between February 2004 and February 2006 and tried to classify their CDH according to both S-L criteria and the recently published ICHD-IIR. Thirty-two children (94% and 33 children (97% could respectively be successfully classified into one subtype of CDH according to the S-L classification and the ICHD-IIR. Transformed migraine was the most common diagnosis (61.8%, followed by new daily-persistent headache (20.6% when the S-L criteria were used. Twenty-three children and adolescents (67.6% could be classified under one of the migraine categories according to the ICHD-IIR classification. We think that both S-L and ICHD-II classifications, when used with detailed headache histories and diaries, are adequate to classify chronic daily headache in children and adolescents.Keywords: chronic daily headache, classification, children, adolescents

  4. Headache and neuropsychic disorders in the puerperium: a case report with suspected deficiency of urea cycle enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonini, Maria Clara; Bignamini, V; Mattioli, M

    2011-05-01

    An enzymatic abnormality of the urea cycle is a metabolic disorder occasionally seen in adults, but particularly in the puerperium. The main risk is acute hyperammoniemic encephalopathy, leading to psychosis, coma and even death if not diagnosed promptly and treated appropriately. Headache is frequent in the puerperium normally manifesting between 3 and 6 days after delivery. We describe here a 39-year-old woman, who 3 days after delivery presented diffuse tension-type headache and depression, followed by behavioral disorders, psychomotor agitation, epileptic seizures, and finally coma 2 days later. Pregnancy and normal delivery: routine blood chemistry findings, CT scan, MR imaging, angio-MR of the brain, and lumbar puncture were normal. EEG when seizures started, it showed diffuse slowing, as in the case of metabolic encephalopathy. This led us to assay blood ammonia, which was high at >400 mmol. Liver function and abdominal US were normal; hence, we suspected a urea cycle enzymatic abnormality, and requested for genetic tests. These confirmed a congenital primary metabolic deficiency of arginine succinate synthetase, with high citrullinemia (type II, adult form). Dialysis was started promptly, with initially iv arginine, then orally, plus medical therapy for the hyperammoniemia and a low protein diet; plasma ammonia dropped swiftly to normal, and her state of consciousness gradually improved until all the clinical symptoms had resolved. Ammonia assay should always be considered in the first few days of the puerperium in women with headache and behavioral disorders, to exclude an inborn deficiency of the urea cycle, which may have gone unnoticed until then.

  5. Prevalence and burden of headache disorders in Lithuania and their public-health and policy implications: a population-based study within the Eurolight Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastenytė, Daiva; Mickevičienė, Dalia; Stovner, Lars Jacob; Thomas, Hallie; Andrée, Colette; Steiner, Timothy J

    2017-12-01

    The Eurolight project assessed the impact of headache disorders in ten EU countries, using the same structured questionnaire but varying sampling methods. In Lithuania, sample selection employed methods in line with consensus recommendations for population-based burden-of-headache studies. The survey was cross-sectional. We identified, from the Residents' Register Service, a sample of inhabitants of Kaunas city and surrounding Kaunas region reflecting age (in the range 18-65 years), gender and rural/urban distributions of Lithuania. Medical students called unannounced at their homes and conducted face-to-face interviews employing a structured questionnaire. Of 1137 people in the pre-identified sample, 573 (male 237 [41.4%], female 336 [58.6%]; mean age 40.9 ± 13.8 years) completed interviews (participation proportion: 50.4%). Gender-adjusted 1-year prevalences were: any headache 74.7%; migraine 18.8%; tension-type headache (TTH) 42.2%; all headache on ≥15 days/month 8.6%; probable medication-overuse headache (pMOH) 3.2%. Migraine (OR: 3.6) and pMOH (OR: 2.9) were associated with female gender. All headache types except TTH were associated with significantly diminished quality of life. Migraine caused a mean 4.5% loss in paid worktime per affected male and 3.5% per affected female. Lost per-person times due to TTH were much less, but to pMOH and other headache on ≥15 days/month much higher. Among the entire workforce, lost productivity to migraine was estimated at 0.7%, to TTH 0.3% and to pMOH or other headache on ≥15 days/month 0.5%. The total of 1.5% may translate directly into lost GDP. Alternative calculations based on headache yesterday (with little recall error) produced, for all headache, a corroborating 1.7%. Similar losses from household work would also drain the nation's economy. Our findings were comparable to those from earlier studies using similar methods in Russia and Georgia. The multiple burdens from headache in Lithuania indicate

  6. Secondary psychosis induced by metabolic disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier eBonnot

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic disorders are not well recognized by psychiatrists as a possible source of secondary psychoses. Inborn errors of metabolism (IEMs are not frequent. Although, their prompt diagnosis may lead to suitable treatments. IEMs are well known to paediatricians, in particular for their most serious forms, having an early expression most of the time. Recent years discoveries have unveiled later expression forms, and sometimes, very discreet first physical signs. There is a growing body of evidence that supports the hypothesis that IEMs can manifest as atypical psychiatric symptoms, even in the absence of clear neurological symptoms. In the present review, we propose a detailed overview at schizophrenia-like and autism-like symptoms that can lead practitioners to bear in mind an IEM. Other psychiatric manifestations are also found, as behavioral., cognitive, learning and mood disorders. However, they are less frequent. Ensuring an accurate IEM diagnosis, in front of these psychiatric symptoms should be a priority, in order to grant suitable and valuable treatment for these pathologies.

  7. Atypical Presentation of Zoster Mimicking Headache and Temporomandibular Disorder: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Mohammad Reza; Chamani, Goli

    2016-01-01

    Herpes zoster in the prodromal stage may be mistaken for other diseases characterized by pain in the area of prodrome, such as dental pain. We report on a case of trigeminal herpes zoster, which presented as sudden onset headache and acute temporomandibular pain in the prodromal phase.

  8. Headache: an important factor associated with muscle soreness/pain at the two-year follow-up point among patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-I; Liu, Chia-Yih; Yang, Ching-Hui; Wang, Shuu-Jiun

    2016-01-01

    No study has compared the associations of headache, anxiety, and depression at baseline with muscle soreness or pain (MS/P) at baseline and at the two-year follow-up point among outpatients with major depressive disorder (MDD). This study aimed to investigate the above issue. This study enrolled 155 outpatients with MDD at baseline, and 131 attended a two-year follow-up appointment. At baseline, migraine was diagnosed based on the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2(nd) edition. MDD and anxiety disorders were diagnosed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR. The visual analog scale was used to evaluate the intensities of headache and MS/P in the neck, shoulder, back, upper limbs, and lower limbs. Depression and anxiety were evaluated using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Multiple linear regressions were used to compare the associations of these factors with MS/P. Compared with anxiety disorders, migraine was more strongly associated with MS/P in all areas at baseline and in the upper and lower limbs at follow-up. Headache intensity at baseline was the factor most strongly associated with MS/P in all areas at baseline and follow-up after controlling for depression and anxiety. Headache intensity at baseline predicted MS/P at baseline and follow-up. Migraine and headache intensity are important factors related to MS/P at baseline and follow-up among patients with MDD. Integrating depression and headache treatment might be indicated to improve MS/P.

  9. Cluster Headache

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a role. Unlike migraine and tension headache, cluster headache generally isn't associated with triggers, such as foods, hormonal changes or stress. Once a cluster period begins, however, drinking alcohol ...

  10. Management of children and young people with headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehouse, William P; Agrawal, Shakti

    2017-04-01

    Headache is very common in children and young people. The correct advice and treatment requires consideration of a wide differential diagnosis between primary and secondary headaches, and also of the different types of primary headache. The International Classification of Headache Disorders gives useful descriptions and diagnostic criteria that are especially useful for primary headaches. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) Clinical Guideline 150 provides evidence-based recommendations on treatments for adults and young people from age 12 years. However, the same principles can be applied to younger children when a specific diagnosis can be made. Key recommendations from the NICE Quality Standards include, establishing a precise diagnosis if possible, avoiding, diagnosing and treating medication overuse headache, and combining a triptan with a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug or paracetamol as the first-line acute/rescue treatment for migraine with or without aura. Although rare in children and young people, it is important to diagnose new daily persistent headache, as it responds poorly or not at all to medication; and paroxysmal hemicrania as it responds very well to indomethacin but not to other commonly used analgesics. When faced with difficulties in reaching a precise diagnosis or in finding effective therapies, further advice should be sought from a children's headache clinic or specialist. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  11. Idiopathic Oesophageal Dysmotility Disorder: Stridor Secondary to Megaesophagus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. G. Natesh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an interesting case of an elderly lady who presented with stridor caused by megaesophagus secondary to an acquired idiopathic dysmotility disorder. We discuss the aetiology and management of megaesophagus secondary to this condition and how it differs from megaesophagus secondary to achalasia.

  12. The classification of chronic daily headache in French children and adolescents: A comparison between the second edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders and Silberstein-Lipton criteria

    OpenAIRE

    Jean-Christophe Cuvellier; Frédéric Couttenier; Stéphane Auvin; Louis Vallée

    2008-01-01

    Jean-Christophe Cuvellier1, Frédéric Couttenier2, Stéphane Auvin1, Louis Vallée11Department of Child Neurology, Pediatric Clinic, University Hospital, Lille, France; 2Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Pediatric Clinic, University Hospital, Lille, FranceAbstract: Few data are available on the applicability of both the criteria proposed by Silberstein and Lipton (S-L) and the International Classification of Headache Disorders-II ...

  13. Headache And Hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shukla Rakesh

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many reasons to suggest a link between headache and hormones. Migraine is three times common in women as compared to men after puberty, cyclic as well as non-cyclic fluctuations in sex hormone levels during the entire reproductive life span of a women are associated with changes in frequency or severity of migraine attack, abnormalities in the hypothalamus and pineal gland have been observed in cluster headache, oestrogens are useful in the treatment of menstrual migraine and the use of melatonin has been reported in various types of primary headaches. Headache associated with various endocrinological disorders may help us in a better understanding of the nociceptive mechanisms involved in headache disorders. Prospective studies using headache diaries to record the attacks of headache and menstrual cycle have clarified some of the myths associated with menstrual migraine. Although no change in the absolute levels of sex hormones have been reported, oestrogen withdrawal is the most likely trigger of the attacks. Prostaglandins, melatonin, opioid and serotonergic mechanisms may also have a role in the pathogenesis of menstrual migraine. Guidelines have been published by the IHS recently regarding the use of oral contraceptives by women with migraine and the risk of ischaemic strokes in migraineurs on hormone replacement therapy. The present review includes menstrual migraine, pregnancy and migraine, oral contraceptives and migraine, menopause and migraine as well as the hormonal changes in chronic migraine.

  14. Common primary headaches in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuradha Mitra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Headache is a very common problem in pregnancy. Evaluation of a complaint of headache requires categorizing it as primary or secondary. Migrainous headaches are known to be influenced by fluctuation of estrogen levels with high levels improving it and low levels deteriorating the symptoms. Tension-type Headaches (TTHs are the most common and usually less severe types of headache with female to male ratio 3:1. Women known to have primary headache before conception who present with a headache that is different from their usual headache, or women not known to have primary headache before conception who present with new-onset of headache during pregnancy need neurologic assessments for potential secondary cause for their headache. In addition to proper history and physical examination, both non-contrast computed tomography (CT and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI are considered safe to be performed in pregnant women when indicated. Treatment of abortive and prophylactic therapy should include non-pharmacologic tools, judicious use of drugs which are safe for mother and fetus.

  15. Mechanism of brain tumor headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Lynne P

    2014-04-01

    Headaches occur commonly in all patients, including those who have brain tumors. Using the search terms "headache and brain tumors," "intracranial neoplasms and headache," "facial pain and brain tumors," "brain neoplasms/pathology," and "headache/etiology," we reviewed the literature from the past 78 years on the proposed mechanisms of brain tumor headache, beginning with the work of Penfield. Most of what we know about the mechanisms of brain tumor associated headache come from neurosurgical observations from intra-operative dural and blood vessel stimulation as well as intra-operative observations and anecdotal information about resolution of headache symptoms with various tumor-directed therapies. There is an increasing overlap between the primary and secondary headaches and they may actually share a similar biological mechanism. While there can be some criticism that the experimental work with dural and arterial stimulation produced head pain and not actual headache, when considered with the clinical observations about headache type, coupled with improvement after treatment of the primary tumor, we believe that traction on these structures, coupled with increased intracranial pressure, is clearly part of the genesis of brain tumor headache and may also involve peripheral sensitization with neurogenic inflammation as well as a component of central sensitization through trigeminovascular afferents on the meninges and cranial vessels. © 2014 American Headache Society.

  16. Psychiatric comorbidity of chronic daily headache: focus on traumatic experiences in childhood, post-traumatic stress disorder and suicidality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juang, Kai Dih; Yang, Chin-Yi

    2014-04-01

    The fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistic Manual (DSM-5) reclassified some mental disorders recently. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is in a new section termed "trauma- and stressor-related disorder". Community-based studies have shown that PTSD is associated with a notably high suicidal risk. In addition to previous findings of comorbidity between chronic daily headache (CDH) and both depressive disorders and anxiety disorders, recent data suggest that frequency of childhood maltreatment, PTSD, and suicidality are also increased in CDH. CDH patients with migraine aura are especially at risk of suicidal ideation. Research suggests that migraine attack, aura, frequency, and chronicity may all be related to serotonergic dysfunction. Vulnerability to PTSD and suicidality are also linked to brain serotonin function, including polymorphisms in the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR). In the present review, we focus on recent advances in knowledge of traumatic experiences in childhood, PTSD, and suicidality in relation to migraine and CDH. We hypothesize that vulnerability to PTSD is associated with migraine attack, migraine aura, and CDH. We further postulate that these associations may explain some of the elevated suicidal risks among patients with migraine, migraine aura, and/or CDH. Field studies are required to support these hypotheses.

  17. [Headache Treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diener, Hans Christoph; Holle-Lee, Dagny; Nägel, Steffen; Gaul, Charly

    2017-03-01

    A precondition for the successful treatment of headaches is the correct headache diagnosis. Triptans are effective for attack treatment of migraine and cluster headache. However, there are not effective for the treatment of tension-type headache. For the prevention of frequent episodic migraine betablockers, flunarizine, topiramate and amitriptyline are recommended. For the prevention of chronic migraine evidence is only available for onabotulinumtoxinA and topiramate. For prophylactic treatment of tension-type headaches tricyclic antidepressants are used. In cluster headache verapamil (in combination with steroids) is the most frequently used prophylactic agent. This article focusses on the current acute and prophylactic treatment of common headache syndromes. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. New-Onset Headache in Patients With Autoimmune Encephalitis Is Associated With anti-NMDA-Receptor Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schankin, Christoph J; Kästele, Fabian; Gerdes, Lisa Ann; Winkler, Tobias; Csanadi, Endy; Högen, Tobias; Pellkofer, Hannah; Paulus, Walter; Kümpfel, Tania; Straube, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    We tested the hypotheses (i) that autoimmune encephalitis is associated with new-onset headache, and (ii) that the occurrence of headache is associated with the presence of anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-receptor antibodies. Autoimmune encephalitis presents with cognitive dysfunction as well as neuro-psychiatric symptoms. Its pathophysiology might involve antibody-mediated dysfunction of the glutamatergic system as indicated by the presence of anti-NMDA-receptor antibodies in some patients. In this cross-sectional study, patients with autoimmune encephalitis were assessed with a standardized interview for previous headache and headache associated with autoimmune encephalitis. Headache was classified according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders, second edition. Clinical and paraclinical findings were correlated with the occurrence of headache. Of 40 patients with autoimmune encephalitis, 19 did not have a history of headache. Of those, nine suffered from encephalitis-associated headache. Seven of these nine had anti-NMDA-receptor antibodies in contrast to only two among the remaining 10 patients without new-onset headache (P = .023, odds ratio: 14, 95% confidence interval: 1.5; 127). In most patients headache occurred in attacks on more than 15 days/month, was severe, and of short duration (less than 4 hours). International Headache Society criteria for migraine were met in three patients. New-onset headache is a relevant symptom in patients with autoimmune encephalitis who have no history of previous headache, especially in the subgroup with anti-NMDA-receptor antibodies. This indicates a thorough investigation for secondary headaches including anti-NMDA-R antibodies for patients with new-onset headache and neuropsychiatric findings. Glutamatergic dysfunction might be important for the generation of head pain but may only occasionally be sufficient to trigger migraine-like attacks in nonmigraineurs. © 2016 American Headache Society.

  19. Considerations in the treatment of tension-type headache in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrobel Goldberg, Stephanie; Silberstein, Stephen; Grosberg, Brian M

    2014-11-01

    Tension-type headache (TTH) is the most prevalent headache type in all age groups worldwide, including patients with advanced age. Because of its high prevalence and possible association with medical and psychiatric co-morbidities, TTH has a major socioeconomic impact. The lifetime prevalence of TTH ranges between 30 and 78 %, and the 1-year prevalence in individuals over the age of 55 years is 35.8 % (27.8 % in men, 42.4 % in women). Since the prevalence of secondary headache disorders increases in the elderly, the initial evaluation of this group of patients with a new-onset headache or a change in a pre-existing headache pattern should be directed towards their exclusion. This article reviews the diagnostic and treatment dilemmas encountered in elderly patients with tension-type headaches, highlighting both pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions.

  20. Botulinum Toxin Type A as a Therapeutic Agent against Headache and Related Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siro Luvisetto

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A is a toxin produced by the naturally-occurring Clostridium botulinum that causes botulism. The potential of BoNT/A as a useful medical intervention was discovered by scientists developing a vaccine to protect against botulism. They found that, when injected into a muscle, BoNT/A causes a flaccid paralysis. Following this discovery, BoNT/A has been used for many years in the treatment of conditions of pathological muscle hyperactivity, like dystonias and spasticities. In parallel, the toxin has become a “glamour” drug due to its power to ward off facial wrinkles, particularly frontal, due to the activity of the mimic muscles. After the discovery that the drug also appeared to have a preventive effect on headache, scientists spent many efforts to study the potentially-therapeutic action of BoNT/A against pain. BoNT/A is effective at reducing pain in a number of disease states, including cervical dystonia, neuropathic pain, lower back pain, spasticity, myofascial pain and bladder pain. In 2010, regulatory approval for the treatment of chronic migraine with BoNT/A was given, notwithstanding the fact that the mechanism of action is still not completely elucidated. In the present review, we summarize experimental evidence that may help to clarify the mechanisms of action of BoNT/A in relation to the alleviation of headache pain, with particular emphasis on preclinical studies, both in animals and humans. Moreover, we summarize the latest clinical trials that show evidence on headache conditions that may obtain benefits from therapy with BoNT/A.

  1. Botulinum Toxin Type A as a Therapeutic Agent against Headache and Related Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luvisetto, Siro; Gazerani, Parisa; Cianchetti, Carlo; Pavone, Flaminia

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) is a toxin produced by the naturally-occurring Clostridium botulinum that causes botulism. The potential of BoNT/A as a useful medical intervention was discovered by scientists developing a vaccine to protect against botulism. They found that, when injected into a muscle, BoNT/A causes a flaccid paralysis. Following this discovery, BoNT/A has been used for many years in the treatment of conditions of pathological muscle hyperactivity, like dystonias and spasticities. In parallel, the toxin has become a “glamour” drug due to its power to ward off facial wrinkles, particularly frontal, due to the activity of the mimic muscles. After the discovery that the drug also appeared to have a preventive effect on headache, scientists spent many efforts to study the potentially-therapeutic action of BoNT/A against pain. BoNT/A is effective at reducing pain in a number of disease states, including cervical dystonia, neuropathic pain, lower back pain, spasticity, myofascial pain and bladder pain. In 2010, regulatory approval for the treatment of chronic migraine with BoNT/A was given, notwithstanding the fact that the mechanism of action is still not completely elucidated. In the present review, we summarize experimental evidence that may help to clarify the mechanisms of action of BoNT/A in relation to the alleviation of headache pain, with particular emphasis on preclinical studies, both in animals and humans. Moreover, we summarize the latest clinical trials that show evidence on headache conditions that may obtain benefits from therapy with BoNT/A. PMID:26404377

  2. Association Between Chronic Tension-Type Headache Coexistent with Chronic Temporomandibular Disorder Pain and Limitations in Physical and Emotional Functioning: A Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emshoff, Rüdiger; Bertram, Felix; Schnabl, Dagmar; Emshoff, Iris

    2017-01-01

    To assess the association between chronic tension-type headache coexistent with chronic temporomandibular disorder (TMD) pain and severe limitations in physical and emotional functioning. Sample size estimation was used to determine that this case-control study should include 126 subjects. Subjects suffering from chronic TMD who were aged between 18 and 68 were recruited in routine clinical practice. Of the 126 included subjects, 63 had TMD pain associated with chronic tension-type headache (cases) and 63 had TMD pain without a history of tension-type headache (controls). Clinical diagnosis of TMD was made according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (RDC/TMD) Axis I criteria, and clinical diagnosis of headache was made according to the International Classification of Headache (ICHD-II). RDC/TMD Axis II criteria were applied to record the scores from the Graded Chronic Pain Scale (GCPS) and the Symptoms Checklist-90-Revised Depression (SCL-DEP) and Somatization (SCL-SOM) scales. A logistic regression analysis was used to assess the relationship between TMD pain with chronic tension-type headache and high levels of depression and somatization severity as scored on the SCLDEP and SCL-SOM scales, respectively, and high pain-related disability (GCPS grade III or IV). Data were adjusted to take into account age, gender, time since TMD pain onset, chronic TMD pain intensity, and characteristic pain intensity. The presence of chronic tension-type headache was significantly associated with severe SCL-DEP (odds ratio [OR] = 7.2; P headache coexistent with chronic TMD pain and key aspects of physical and emotional functioning reflected in severe depression, severe somatization, and high pain-related disability.

  3. Headache in children's drawings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojaczyńska-Stanek, Katarzyna; Koprowski, Robert; Wróbel, Zygmunt; Gola, Małgorzata

    2008-02-01

    Headache is a common health problem in childhood. Children's drawings are helpful in the diagnosis of headache type. Children, especially younger ones, communicate better through pictures than verbally. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the usefulness of drawings of the child's headache in the diagnostic process carried out by a pediatrician and a pediatric neurologist. At the beginning of a visit in a neurological clinic, or on the first day of hospitalization, the child was asked, "Please draw your headache," or "How do you feel your headache?" without any additional explanations or suggestions. Clinical diagnosis of headache type was made on the basis of the standard diagnostic evaluation. For the purpose of this study, children's headaches were categorized as migraine, tension-type headache, or "the others." One hundred twenty-four drawings of children with headaches were analyzed by 8 pediatricians and 8 pediatric neurologists. The analysts were unaware of the clinical history, age, sex, and diagnosis of the patients. The clinical diagnosis was considered the "gold standard" to which the headache drawing diagnosis was compared. There were 68 girls 5-18 years of age and 56 boys 7-18 years of age. Of the 124 children, 40 were clinically diagnosed with migraine (32.2%), 47 with tension-type headache (37.9%), and 37 (29.8%) as the others. Children with migraine most frequently draw sharp elements. Children with tension-type headache mainly drew compression elements and pressing elements. In the group of "the other" headaches, 21 children were diagnosed with somatoform disorders. The most frequent element in this group's drawings was a whirl in the head. Colors used most frequently were black and red, which signify severe pain. There was no difference in sensitivity of diagnoses between neurologists and pediatricians. Because the evaluation of drawings by children with headaches done both by pediatricians and pediatric neurologists was correct for

  4. Psychological factors in childhood headaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Kathleen; Dunn, David; Scott, Eric

    2010-06-01

    Recurrent headaches in children are most often migraines and are based in a genetic predisposition with a low headache threshold. As with any pain experience, there is a large emotional component associated with an attack of migraines that grows in amplitude as the headaches become more frequent and resistant to medicine, sleep, or other agents that used to work. Childhood headaches are especially complicated for 3 reasons: (1) the parents' fear (communicated to the child that serious medical pathology underlies the head pain), (2) the lack of evidence-based pharmacologic treatment, and (3) the belief that these headaches are largely psychological. This article addresses the mystery surrounding childhood headaches by delving into the influence of school, friends, and family; the impact of divorce; the coping skills required for a child to manage a migrainous nervous system; the potential secondary gain from headaches; psychiatric comorbidities and how to treat them; and the role of psychological intervention. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Cognitive behavior therapy for comorbid migraine and/or tension-type headache and major depressive disorder: An exploratory randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Paul R; Aiello, Rachele; Gilson, Kathryn; Meadows, Graham; Milgrom, Jeannette; Reece, John

    2015-10-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated comorbidity between migraine and tension-type headache on the one hand, and depression on the other. Presence of depression is a negative prognostic indicator for behavioral treatment of headaches. Despite the recognised comorbidity, there is a limited research literature evaluating interventions designed for comorbid headaches and depression. Sixty six participants (49 female, 17 male) suffering from migraine and/or tension-type headache and major depressive disorder were randomly allocated to a Routine Primary Care control group or a Cognitive Behavior Therapy group that also received routine primary care. The treatment program involved 12 weekly 50-min sessions administered by clinical psychologists. Participants in the treatment group improved significantly more than participants in the control group from pre-to post-treatment on measures of headaches, depression, anxiety, and quality of life. Improvements achieved with treatment were maintained at four month follow-up. Comorbid anxiety disorders were not a predictor of response to treatment, and the only significant predictor was gender (men improved more than women). The new integrated treatment program appears promising and worthy of further investigation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Vestibular migraine in multicenter neurology clinics according to the appendix criteria in the third beta edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Soo-Jin; Kim, Byung-Kun; Kim, Byung-Su; Kim, Jae-Moon; Kim, Soo-Kyoung; Moon, Heui-Soo; Song, Tae-Jin; Cha, Myoung-Jin; Park, Kwang-Yeol; Sohn, Jong-Hee

    2016-04-01

    Vestibular migraine (VM), the common term for recurrent vestibular symptoms with migraine features, has been recognized in the appendix criteria of the third beta edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-3β). We applied the criteria for VM in a prospective, multicenter headache registry study. Nine neurologists enrolled consecutive patients visiting outpatient clinics for headache. The presenting headache disorder and additional VM diagnoses were classified according to the ICHD-3β. The rates of patients diagnosed with VM and probable VM using consensus criteria were assessed. A total of 1414 patients were enrolled. Of 631 migraineurs, 65 were classified with VM (10.3%) and 16 with probable VM (2.5%). Accompanying migraine subtypes in VM were migraine without aura (66.2%), chronic migraine (29.2%), and migraine with aura (4.6%). Probable migraine (75%) was common in those with probable VM. The most common vestibular symptom was head motion-induced dizziness with nausea in VM and spontaneous vertigo in probable VM. The clinical characteristics of VM did not differ from those of migraine without VM. We diagnosed VM in 10.3% of first-visit migraineurs in neurology clinics using the ICHD-3β. Applying the diagnosis of probable VM can increase the identification of VM. © International Headache Society 2015.

  7. Nummular headache and pituitary lesion: A case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Chui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nummular headache (NH is a newly categorized headache disorder characterized by a consistent clinicographics in each attack. Currently, it is considered as a primary headache disorder due to epicranial neuralgia but the pathomechanism is still unknown. We report a woman, whose recurrent NH subsided after trans-sphenoidal surgery for her pituitary oncocytoma. The recovery of NH in this patient encourages the central mechanism for NH occurrence. After a review of literature concerning, NH and intracranial secondaries we propose that central NH is a referral pain from pain-sensitive structures, such as meninges, superimposing by pre-existing lower pain threshold or pain modulation.

  8. Prevalence of Headache in Patients With Mitochondrial Disease: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraya, Torsten; Deschauer, Marcus; Joshi, Pushpa Raj; Zierz, Stephan; Gaul, Charly

    2018-01-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are a heterogeneous group of diseases with different phenotypes and genotypes. Headache and, particularly migraine, seems to occur often in patients with MELAS and in patients with CPEO phenotypes. The International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-3 beta) has classified headache as a secondary entity only in MELAS patients. Other headache phenotypes in mitochondrial diseases are not considered in ICHD-3beta. In this study, we analyzed headache phenomenology in a large group of patients with mitochondrial disorders. A cross-sectional questionnaire-based study on 85 patients with mitochondrial disease with different genotypes and phenotypes was conducted between 2010 and 2011. A structured headache questionnaire according to ICHD-2 was used followed by a telephone interview by a headache expert. Prevalence and characteristics of headache could be analyzed in 42 patients. Headache diagnosis was correlated with genotypes and phenotypes. In addition, the mtDNA haplotype H was analyzed. Headache was reported in 29/42 (70%; 95% CI, from 55.1 to 83.0%) of the patients. Tension-type headache (TTH) showed the highest prevalence in 16/42 (38%; 95% CI, from 23.4 to 52.8%) patients, followed by migraine and probable migraine in 12/42 (29%; 95% CI, from 14.9 to 42.2%) patients. Nine of the 42 (21%; 95% CI, from 9 to 33.8%) patients reported two different headache types. Patients with the mtDNA mutation m.3243A > G (n = 8) and MELAS (n = 7) showed the highest prevalence of headaches (88% and 85%, respectively). In patients with the CPEO phenotype (n = 32), headache occurred in 14/18 (78%; 95% CI, from 58.6 to 97%) of patients with single deletions, and in 7/13 (54%; 95% CI, from 26.7 to 80.9%) patients with multiple mtDNA deletions. There were no association between the mtDNA haplotype Hand the headache-diagnosis. The prevalence of headache was higher in patients with mitochondrial diseases than reported in the general population

  9. Short-lasting headache syndromes and treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozen, Todd D

    2004-08-01

    A number of primary headache syndromes are marked by their short duration of pain. Many of these syndromes have their own unique treatment, so they must be recognized by practicing physicians. In this article, a number of the short-lasting headache disorders are reviewed, including chronic paroxysmal hemicrania, SUNCT syndrome, hypnic headache, exploding head syndrome, primary stabbing headache, and cough headache.

  10. The Role of Negative Affect on Headache-Related Disability Following Traumatic Physical Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacella, Maria L; Hruska, Bryce; George, Richard L; Delahanty, Douglas L

    2018-03-01

    Acute postinjury negative affect (NA) may contribute to headache pain following physical injury. Early psychiatric-headache comorbidity conveys increased vulnerability to chronic headache-related disability and impairment. Yet, it is unknown whether NA is involved in the transition to chronic headache related-disability after injury. This prospective observational study examined the role of acute postinjury NA on subacute and chronic headache-related disability above and beyond nonpsychiatric factors. Eighty adult survivors of single-incident traumatic physical injury were assessed for negative affect (NA): a composite of depression and anxiety symptoms, and symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSS) during the acute 2-week postinjury phase. NA was examined as the primary predictor of subacute (6-week) and chronic (3-month) headache-related disability; secondary analyses examined whether the individual NA components differentially impacted the outcomes. Hierarchical linear regression confirmed NA as a unique predictor of subacute (Cohen's f  2  = 0.130; P = .005) and chronic headache related-disability (Cohen's f  2  = 0.160; P = .004) beyond demographic and injury-related factors (sex, prior headaches, and closed head injury). Upon further analysis, PTSS uniquely predicted greater subacute (Cohen's f  2  = 0.105; P = .012) and chronic headache-related disability (Cohen's f  2  = 0.103; P = .022) above and beyond demographic and injury-related factors, depression, and anxiety. Avoidance was a robust predictor of subacute headache impairment (explaining 15% of the variance) and hyperarousal was a robust predictor of chronic headache impairment (10% of the variance). Although NA consistently predicted headache-related disability, PTSS alone was a unique predictor above and beyond nonpsychiatric factors, depression, and anxiety. These results are suggestive that early treatment of acute postinjury PTSS may correlate with

  11. SUNCT Headache (Short-Lasting, Unilateral, Neuralgiform with Conjunctival Injection and Tearing)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You are here Home » Disorders » All Disorders SUNCT Headache Information Page SUNCT Headache Information Page What research is being done? The NINDS conducts a wide range of research on headache disorders. This research aims to discover ways to ...

  12. Tension headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, D K

    1978-05-01

    Headache is an extremely common symptom, and many headaches undoubtedly have a relationship to stressful situations. The clear definition, however, of a "tension headache" complex and its differentiation from migraine in some patients is difficult. The problems are in the identification of a specific headache pattern induced by stress or "tension" and the relationship of the symptom to involuntary contraction of neck and scalp muscles. Treatment consists of analgesics and occasionally mild tranquilizers. Psychotherapy consists of reassurance and often other supportive measures, including modification of life styles. Various feedback techniques have been reported of value, but their superiority to suggestion and hypnosis is still problematic.

  13. Effect of adrenomedullin on the cerebral circulation: relevance to primary headache disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, K A; Birk, S; Kitamura, K

    2009-01-01

    Adrenomedullin (ADM) is closely related to calcitonin gene-related peptide, which has a known causative role in migraine. Animal studies have strongly suggested that ADM has a vasodilatory effect within the cerebral circulation. For these reasons, ADM is also likely to be involved in migraine....... However, the hypothetical migraine-inducing property and effect on human cerebral circulation of ADM have not previously been investigated. Human ADM (0.08 microg kg(-1) min(-1)) or placebo (saline 0.9%) was administered as a 20-min intravenous infusion to 12 patients suffering from migraine without aura...... in a crossover double-blind study. The occurrence of headache and associated symptoms were registered regularly 24 h post infusion. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured by (133)Xenon single-photon emission computed tomography, mean blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (V(MCA)) by transcranial...

  14. [Management of chronic daily headache in children and adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuvellier, J-C

    2009-01-01

    Chronic daily headache (CDH) affects 2 to 4% of adolescent females and 0,8 to 2% of adolescent males. CDH is diagnosed when headaches occur more than 4 hours a day, for greater than or equal to 15 headache days per month, over a period of 3 consecutive months, without an underlying pathology. It is manifested by severe intermittent headaches, that are migraine-like, as well as a chronic baseline headache. Silberstein and Lipton divided patients into four diagnostic categories: transformed migraine, chronic tension-type headache, new daily-persistent headache, and hemicrania continua. The second edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders did not comprise any CDH category as such, but provided criteria for all four types of CDH: chronic migraine, chronic tension-type headache, new daily-persistent headache, and hemicrania continua. Evaluation of CDH needs to include a complete history and physical examination to identify any possibility of the headache representing secondary headaches. Children and adolescents with CDH frequently have sleep disturbance, pain at other sites, dizziness, medication-overuse headache and a psychiatric comorbidity (anxiety and mood disorders). CDH frequently results in school absence. CDH management plan is dictated by CDH subtype, the presence or absence of medication overuse, functional disability and presence of attacks of full-migraine superimposed. Reassuring, explaining, and educating the patient and family, starting prophylactic therapy and limiting aborting medications are the mainstay of treatment. It includes pharmacologic (acute and prophylactic therapy) and nonpharmacologic measures (biobehavioral management, biofeedback-assisted relaxation therapy, and psychologic or psychiatric intervention). Part of the teaching process must incorporate life-style changes, such as regulation of sleep and eating habits, regular exercise, avoidance of identified triggering factors and stress management. Emphasis must be

  15. Thunderclap headache

    OpenAIRE

    Dodick, D

    2002-01-01

    The aim is to review the background underlying the debate related to the alternative nomenclatures for and the most appropriate diagnostic evaluation of patients with thunderclap headache. The clinical profile and differential diagnosis of thunderclap headache is described, and a nosological framework and diagnostic approach to this group of patients is proposed.

  16. Diagnosis and management of headache attributed to airplane travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainardi, Federico; Maggioni, Ferdinando; Lisotto, Carlo; Zanchin, Giorgio

    2013-03-01

    The headache attributed to airplane travel, also named "airplane headache", is characterized by the sudden onset of a severe head pain exclusively in relation to airplane flights, mainly during the landing phase. Secondary causes, such as upper respiratory tract infections or acute sinusitis, must be ruled out. Although its cause is not thoroughly understood, sinus barotrauma should be reasonably involved in the pathophysiological mechanisms. Furthermore, in the current International Classification of Headache Disorders, rapid descent from high altitude is not considered as a possible cause of headache, although the onset of such pain in airplane travellers or aviators has been well known since the beginning of the aviation era. On the basis of a survey we conducted with the courteous cooperation of people who had experienced this type of headache, we proposed diagnostic criteria to be added to the forthcoming revision of the International Classification of Headache Disorders. Their formal validation would favour further studies aimed at improving knowledge of the pathophysiological mechanisms involved and at implementing preventative measures.

  17. Acute headache and persistent headache attributed to cervical artery dissection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schytz, Henrik W; Ashina, Messoud; Magyari, Melinda

    2014-01-01

    for Headache or facial or neck pain attributed to cervical carotid or vertebral artery dissection or Headache attributed to intracranial arterial dissection. Six months after dissection five of 19 patients still reported persistent headache attributed to dissection. The study demonstrates that the ICHD......The criteria for headache attributed to cervical artery dissection have been changed in the new third edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-III beta). We have retrospectively investigated 19 patients diagnosed from 2001 to 2006 with cervical artery dissection......-III beta criteria for cervical artery dissection are useful for classifying patients at the first encounter. We show for the first time that persistent headache attributed to arterial dissection is frequent....

  18. Nummular headache update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Juan A; Montojo, Teresa; Alvarez, Mónica

    2012-04-01

    Nummular headache is characterized by head pain exclusively felt in a rounded or elliptical area, typically 1 to 6 cm in diameter. The pain remains confined to the same symptomatic area, which does not change in shape or size with time. The symptomatic area may be localized in any part of the head but mostly in the parietal region. Rarely, the disorder may be multifocal, each symptomatic area keeping all the characteristics of nummular headache. The pain is generally mild or moderate, commonly described as oppressive or stabbing, and lasting minutes, hours, or days, with a remitting or unremitting pattern. Superimposed on the baseline pain, there may be spontaneous or triggered exacerbations. During and between symptomatic periods, the affected area may show variable combinations of hypoesthesia, dysesthesia, paresthesia, tenderness, and trophic changes. Nummular headache emerges as a primary disorder with a clear-cut clinical picture developed in a unique topography.

  19. Application of ICHD-II Criteria in a Headache Clinic of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhao; Di, Hai; Dai, Wei; Liang, Jingyao; Pan, Meiyan; Zhang, Mingjie; Zhou, Zhibin; Li, Zheng; Liu, Ruozhuo; Yu, Shengyuan

    2012-01-01

    Background China has the huge map and the largest population in the world. Previous studies on the prevalence and classification of headaches were conducted based on the general population, however, similar studies among the Chinese outpatient population are scarce. This study aimed to analyze the characteristics of 1843 headache patients enrolled in a North China headache clinic of the General Hospital for Chinese People's Liberation Army from October 2011 to May 2012, with the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd Edition (ICHD-II). Methods and Results Personal interviews were carried out and a detailed questionnaire was used to collect medical records including age, sex and headache characteristics. Patients came from 28 regions of China with the median age of 40.9 (9–80) years and the female/male ratio of 1.67/1. The primary headaches (78.4%) were classified as the following: migraine (39.1%), tension-type headache (32.5%), trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (5.3%) and other primary headache (1.5%). Among the rest patients, 12.9% were secondary headaches, 5.9% were cranial neuralgias and 2.5% were unspecified or not elsewhere classified. Fourteen point nine percent (275/1843) were given an additional diagnosis of chronic daily headache, including medication-overuse headache (MOH, 49.5%), chronic tension-type headache (CTTH, 32.7%) and chronic migraine (CM, 13.5%). The visual analogue scale (VAS) score of TTH with MOH was significantly higher than that of CTTH (6.8±2.0 vs 5.6±2.0, Pheadache clinic outpatients in a tertiary hospital of North China that migraine is the most common diagnosis. Furthermore, most headaches in this patient population can be classified using ICHD-II criteria. PMID:23239993

  20. International Classification of Headache Disorders 3rd edition beta-based field testing of vestibular migraine in China: Demographic, clinical characteristics, audiometric findings and diagnosis statues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yixin; Kong, Qingtao; Chen, Jinjin; Li, Lunxi; Wang, Dayan; Zhou, Jiying

    2016-03-01

    This study explored the clinical characteristics of vestibular migraine in Chinese subjects and performed a field test of the criteria of the International Classification of Headache Disorders 3rd edition beta version. Consecutive patients with vestibular migraine were surveyed and registered in a headache clinic during the study period. The diagnosis of vestibular migraine was made according to International Classification of Headache Disorders 3rd edition beta version. Assessments included standardized neuro-otology bedside examination, pure-tone audiogram, bithermal caloric testing, neurological imaging, cervical X-ray or magnetic resonance imaging, Doppler ultrasound of cerebral arteries and laboratory tests. A total of 67 patients (62 female/five male, 47.8 ± 10.3 years old) were enrolled in this study. The mean ages of migraine and vertigo onset were 32.2 ± 11.5 and 37.9 ± 10.1 years, respectively. The most common migraine subtype was migraine without aura (79%), followed by migraine with aura (12%) and chronic migraine (9%). The duration of vertigo attacks varied from seconds to days and 25% of patients had attacks that lasted less than 5 minutes. Among the patients with short-lasting attacks, 75% of these patients had ≥5 attacks per day within 72 hours. Auditory symptoms were reported in 36% of the patients. Migraine prophylactic treatments were effective in 77% of the patients. Our study showed that the clinical features of vestibular migraine in China were similar to those of Western studies. The definition of vertigo episodes and migraine subtypes of vestibular migraine in International Classification of Headache Disorders 3rd edition beta version might be modified further. More than five vertigo attacks per day within 72 hours might be helpful as far as identifying vestibular migraine patients with short-lasting attacks. © International Headache Society 2015.

  1. Tinnitus Patients with Comorbid Headaches: The Influence of Headache Type and Laterality on Tinnitus Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berthold Langguth

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundBoth clinical experience and clinical studies suggest a relationship between tinnitus and headache. Here, we aimed to investigate the influence of comorbid headache type and headache laterality on tinnitus characteristics.MethodThe Tinnitus Research Initiative database was screened for patients of the Tinnitus Center of the University Regensburg who reported comorbid headaches. These patients were contacted to complete additional validated questionnaires. Based on these data, patients were categorized according to headache type and headache laterality, and their clinical characteristics were compared with tinnitus patients, who did not report comorbid headaches.ResultsData from 193 patients with tinnitus and comorbid headaches were compared with those from 765 tinnitus patients without comorbid headaches. Tinnitus patients with comorbid headache have higher scores in tinnitus questionnaires, a lower quality of life and more frequently comorbidities such as painful sensation to loud sounds, vertigo, pain (neck, temporomandibular, and general, and depressive symptoms when compared with tinnitus patients without headaches. Both headache laterality and headache type interact with the degree of comorbidity with higher impairment in patients with left-sided and bilateral headaches as well as in patients with migraine or cluster headache.ConclusionThe observed increased impairment in tinnitus patients with comorbid headache can be explained as an additive effect of both disorders on health-related quality of life. The more frequent occurrence of further comorbidities suggests a generally increased amplification of sensory signals in a subset of tinnitus patients with comorbid headaches.

  2. [Arterial hypertension secondary to endocrine disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minder, Anna; Zulewski, Henryk

    2015-06-01

    Endocrine hypertension offers a potentially curative therapy if the underlying cause is identified and treated accordingly. In contrast to the high prevalence of arterial hypertension especially in the elderly, the classical endocrine causes remain a rare entity. Among patients with arterial hypertension the prevalence of Cushing's syndrome or pheochromocytoma is less than 1%. Primary hyperaldosteronism is more frequent with a reported prevalence of up to 9%. In order to avoid unnecessary, costly and potentially harmful evaluations and therapies due to the limited sensitivity and specificity of the critical endocrine tests it is mandatory to limit the exploration for endocrine causes to preselected patients with high pretest probability for an endocrine disorder. Younger age at manifestation of arterial hypertension or drug resistant hypertension together with other clinical signs of an endocrine disorder should raise the suspicion and prompt the appropriate evaluation.

  3. Headache associated with cough : a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cordenier, Ann; De Hertogh, Willem; De Keyser, Jacques; Versijpt, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Headache only triggered by coughing is a rather uncommon condition. The aim of the present review is to present an overview of the diagnosis, clinical characteristics, pathophysiology and treatment of both primary and symptomatic cough headache and discuss other relevant headache disorders affected

  4. Patterns of headache in panic disorder: a survey of members of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    2004-02-17

    . Panic Disorder Support Group. A history of migraine at baseline increased fourfold the risk for major depression, and the risk of panic by a factor of 12. In another study, males were 7 times more likely to have migraines if they.

  5. Cluster headache

    OpenAIRE

    Leroux, Elizabeth; Ducros, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Cluster headache (CH) is a primary headache disease characterized by recurrent short-lasting attacks (15 to 180 minutes) of excruciating unilateral periorbital pain accompanied by ipsilateral autonomic signs (lacrimation, nasal congestion, ptosis, miosis, lid edema, redness of the eye). It affects young adults, predominantly males. Prevalence is estimated at 0.5–1.0/1,000. CH has a circannual and circadian periodicity, attacks being clustered (hence the name) in bouts that can occur ...

  6. Headache and Dizziness: How to Differentiate Vestibular Migraine from Other Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Joshua M; Escasena, Carlos A

    2015-07-01

    Headache and dizziness are two of the most common symptoms prompting medical evaluation and may be seen in many primary and secondary headache and dizziness syndromes. Many of these disease processes share common characteristics making determination of the diagnosis extremely challenging. As more is understood about the concurrence of these symptoms, new diagnostic considerations have emerged, and the beta version of the latest edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders describes a new entity termed vestibular migraine that may affect many patients presenting with headache and dizziness. This article examines the epidemiology of headache and dizziness, describes the presenting features of patients with conditions which often express these two symptoms, discusses recommendations for evaluation and testing for these patients, and serves to aid in the differentiation between vestibular migraine and other potential diagnoses.

  7. Evaluation of Pain Syndromes, Headache, and Temporomandibular Joint Disorders in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horswell, Bruce B; Sheikh, Jason

    2018-02-01

    After a thorough review of the history and presentation of a child's facial pain, a targeted head and neck examination is critical to the appropriate diagnosis of facial pain and temporomandibular joint disorders. It is critical to distinguish between the structural (trauma, degenerative disease, and tumor) and nonstructural (neurogenic, myogenic, and psychological) causes of pain, which will allow for incorporation of appropriate strategies of medical, psychological, dental, and surgical therapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Secondary Abnormalities of Neurotransmitters in Infants with Neurological Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Cazorla, A.; Serrano, M.; Perez-Duenas, B.; Gonzalez, V.; Ormazabal, A.; Pineda, M.; Fernandez-Alvarez, E.; Campistol, J. M. D.; Artuch, R. M. D.

    2007-01-01

    Neurotransmitters are essential in young children for differentiation and neuronal growth of the developing nervous system. We aimed to identify possible factors related to secondary neurotransmitter abnormalities in pediatric patients with neurological disorders. We analyzed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and biogenic amine metabolites in 56 infants…

  9. Nummular headache: diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Juan A; Pareja, Julia

    2003-05-01

    Nummular headache (coin-shaped cephalgia) has an unusual distinct feature: it is characterized by mild-to-moderate pressure-like pain exclusively felt in a rounded or elliptical area typically 2-6 cm in diameter. Although any region of the head may be affected, the parietal area is the common localization of nummular headache. The pain remains confined to the same symptomatic area which does not change in shape or size with time. The pain is continuous but lancinating exacerbations lasting for several seconds or gradually increasing from 10 mins to 2 h may superimpose the baseline pain. The temporal pattern is either chronic or remitting. Pseudoremissions may be observed when the pain reaches a very low grade or only discomfort (not pain) in the affected area is reported. At times, discomfort may prevail. Either during symptomatic periods or interictally, the affected area may show a variable combination of hypoethesia, dysesthesia, paresthesia or tenderness. Physical and supplementary examinations are normal. Nummular headache emerges as a primary clear-cut clinical picture. The particular topography and signs of sensory dysfunction make it reasonable to vent the idea that nummular headache is an extracranial headache, probably stemming from epicranial tissues such as terminal branches of sensitive nerves. Nummular headache may seem to be the paradigm of epicranias (group of headaches and pericranial neuralgias stemming from epicranial tissues). Nummular headache must be distinguished from head pain secondary to local processes and from tender points of more extensive headaches. Although nummular headache may frequently coexist with other primary headaches, it has an independent course. Treatment is seldom necessary and in most cases simple reassurance is sufficient.

  10. Headache Attributed to Craniocervical Dystonia - A Little Known Headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, Marcos Eugenio Ramalho; Rocha-Filho, Pedro Augusto Sampaio

    2017-02-01

    Craniocervical dystonia is a focal or segmental dystonia in its distribution, classically known as spasmodic torticollis when in its pure cervical presentation. Although craniocervical dystonia has been recognized as a possible cause of headache since the publication of the second version of International Classification of Headache Disorders, there are few studies about this entity. This was a narrative review. Craniocervical dystonia was associated with muscle pain in 67-89% of the cases. Headaches of any kind affected approximately 60% of patients with craniocervical dystonia, and were located mainly in the occipital and cervical regions. Headache attributed to craniocervical dystonia specifically was rarely found, and it was described in only one patient out of 80 in one study. Treatment with botulinum neurotoxin is considered to be the first-line treatment for focal dystonias, including craniocervical dystonia, and besides reducing clinical severity, impairment, and pain scores among the patients with craniocervical dystonia, there were also descriptions of improvements in headaches attributed to craniocervical dystonia and other headaches associated with this dystonia. Headache attributed to craniocervical dystonia has been poorly studied. There is a need for more studies to evaluate its characteristics and treatment. © 2016 American Headache Society.

  11. Headache in children with Chiari I malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toldo, Irene; Tangari, Marta; Mardari, Rodica; Perissinotto, Egle; Sartori, Stefano; Gatta, Michela; Calderone, Milena; Battistella, Pier Antonio

    2014-05-01

    Headache is the most common symptom of Chiari 1 malformation, a condition characterized by the herniation of cerebellar tonsils through the foramen magnum. However, the headache pattern of cases with Chiari 1 malformations is not well defined in the literature, especially in children. The aim of this retrospective chart review was to evaluate the frequency and the characteristics of headache in children with Chiari 1 malformation at initial evaluation and during follow up. Forty-five cases with tonsillar ectopia were selected among 9947 cases under 18 years of age who underwent neuroimaging between 2002 and 2010. A semistructured clinical interview (mean follow-up: 5.2 years) was conducted. Headache was classified according to the second edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders. Possible associations between clinical picture, in particular headache pattern, but also other signs and symptoms attributable to Chiari 1 malformation, and the extent of tonsillar ectopia were found for 3 different groups: those with borderline (headache, and 9/33 (27%) of those patients (5 with mild and 4 with severe tonsillar ectopia) reported headache attributed to Chiari 1 malformation. In our studied pediatric population, the most common symptom for cases diagnosed with Chiari 1 malformation was headache, and headache attributed to Chiari 1 malformation was the most common headache pattern in patients with Chiari 1 malformation. The presence of headache attributed to Chiari 1 malformation along with 3 other signs or symptoms of Chiari 1 malformation were highly predictive of severe tonsillar ectopia. © 2014 American Headache Society.

  12. Headaches - danger signs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migraine headache - danger signs; Tension headache - danger signs; Cluster headache - danger signs; Vascular headache - danger signs ... and other head pain. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  13. Headaches of otolaryngological interest: current status while awaiting revision of classification. Practical considerations and expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farri, A; Enrico, A; Farri, F

    2012-04-01

    In 1988, diagnostic criteria for headaches were drawn up by the International Headache Society (IHS) and is divided into headaches, cranial neuralgias and facial pain. The 2(nd) edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD) was produced in 2004, and still provides a dynamic and useful instrument for clinical practice. We have examined the current IHC, which comprises 14 groups. The first four cover primary headaches, with "benign paroxysmal vertigo of childhood" being the forms of migraine of interest to otolaryngologists; groups 5 to 12 classify "secondary headaches"; group 11 is formed of "headache or facial pain attributed to disorder of cranium, neck, eyes, ears, nose, sinuses, teeth, mouth or other facial or cranial structures"; group 13, consisting of "cranial neuralgias and central causes of facial pain" is also of relevance to otolaryngology. Neither the current classification system nor the original one has a satisfactory collocation for migraineassociated vertigo. Another critical point of the classification concerns cranio-facial pain syndromes such as Sluder's neuralgia, previously included in the 1988 classification among cluster headaches, and now included in the section on "cranial neuralgias and central causes of facial pain", even though Sluder's neuralgia has not been adequately validated. As we have highlighted in our studies, there are considerable similarities between Sluder's syndrome and cluster headaches. The main features distinguishing the two are the trend to cluster over time, found only in cluster headaches, and the distribution of pain, with greater nasal manifestations in the case of Sluder's syndrome. We believe that it is better and clearer, particularly on the basis of our clinical experience and published studies, to include this nosological entity, which is clearly distinct from an otolaryngological point of view, as a variant of cluster headache. We agree with experts in the field of headaches, such as

  14. Can palpation-induced muscle pain pattern contribute to the differential diagnosis among temporomandibular disorders, primary headaches phenotypes and possible bruxism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porporatti, André-Luís; Calderon, Patrícia-dos-Santos; Conti, Paulo-César-Rodrigues; Bonjardim, Leonardo-Rigoldi

    2016-01-01

    Background The evaluation of possible differences in the distribution or characteristics of palpation-induced pain in the masticatory muscles could be valuable in terms of diagnostic assessment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of different combinations of anterior temporalis (AT) and masseter palpation-induced pain in the diagnostic of temporomandibular disorder (TMD), primary headaches and bruxism. Material and Methods A total of 1200 dental records of orofacial pain adult patients were analyzed. The outcomes were dichotomously classified (presence/absence) as following: a) AT and/or masseter palpation-induced pain; b) myogenous TMD; c) temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthralgia (arthrogenous TMD); d) migraine; e) tension-type headache (TTH); f) self-reported bruxism. Binomial logistic regression model (α = 5%) was applied to the data considering the palpation-induced muscle pain as the dependent variable. Results Mean age (SD) were 35.7 years (13.4) for 635 included dental records (83% females). Myogenous and arthrogenous TMD, migraine, TTH and bruxism were mainly associated with, respectively, masseter palpation-induced pain (ppain (ppain (ppain (p=0.009 - OR=1.62, 95%CI 1.12-2.33) and bilateral masseter palpation-induced pain (p=0.01 - OR=1.74, 95%CI 1.13-2.69). Conclusions Palpation-induced pain in the masticatory muscles may play a role in the differential diagnosis among painful TMD, primary headaches and bruxism. Key words:Diagnosis, temporomandibular joint disorders, migraine, tension-type headache, bruxism. PMID:26615507

  15. Tension headache

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are chronic, they can interfere with life and work. When to Contact a Medical Professional Call 911 if: You are experiencing "the worst headache of your life" You have speech, vision, or movement problems or loss of balance, especially if you have not had these symptoms ...

  16. Headache and pregnancy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negro, A; Delaruelle, Z; Ivanova, T A; Khan, S; Ornello, R; Raffaelli, B; Terrin, A; Reuter, U; Mitsikostas, D D

    2017-10-19

    This systematic review summarizes the existing data on headache and pregnancy with a scope on clinical headache phenotypes, treatment of headaches in pregnancy and effects of headache medications on the child during pregnancy and breastfeeding, headache related complications, and diagnostics of headache in pregnancy. Headache during pregnancy can be both primary and secondary, and in the last case can be a symptom of a life-threatening condition. The most common secondary headaches are stroke, cerebral venous thrombosis, subarachnoid hemorrhage, pituitary tumor, choriocarcinoma, eclampsia, preeclampsia, idiopathic intracranial hypertension, and reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome. Migraine is a risk factor for pregnancy complications, particularly vascular events. Data regarding other primary headache conditions are still scarce. Early diagnostics of the disease manifested by headache is important for mother and fetus life. It is especially important to identify "red flag symptoms" suggesting that headache is a symptom of a serious disease. In order to exclude a secondary headache additional studies can be necessary: electroencephalography, ultrasound of the vessels of the head and neck, brain MRI and MR angiography with contrast ophthalmoscopy and lumbar puncture. During pregnancy and breastfeeding the preferred therapeutic strategy for the treatment of primary headaches should always be a non-pharmacological one. Treatment should not be postponed as an undermanaged headache can lead to stress, sleep deprivation, depression and poor nutritional intake that in turn can have negative consequences for both mother and baby. Therefore, if non-pharmacological interventions seem inadequate, a well-considered choice should be made concerning the use of medication, taking into account all the benefits and possible risks.

  17. Pathophysiology of Headaches with a Prominent Vascular Component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan A Pareja

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular changes, whether preliminary or secondary, seem to accompany most headaches. The literature concerning pathophysiological mechanisms in headaches where vascular phenomena are a major, integral part, ie, migraine and cluster headache syndrome, is reviewed and the most common forms of headache associated with cerebrovascular disease are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the vascular phenomena and on the abundant hypotheses and theories regarding headache mechanisms. This review also presents alternative explanatory models, and compares the available anatomical, physiological and biochemical results.

  18. Specific music therapy techniques in the treatment of primary headache disorders in adolescents: a randomized attention-placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Julian; Oelkers-Ax, Rieke; Kaess, Michael; Parzer, Peter; Lenzen, Christoph; Hillecke, Thomas Karl; Resch, Franz

    2013-10-01

    Migraine and tension-type headache have a high prevalence in children and adolescents. In addition to common pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions, music therapy has been shown to be efficient in the prophylaxis of pediatric migraine. This study aimed to assess the efficacy of specific music therapy techniques in the treatment of adolescents with primary headache (tension-type headache and migraine). A prospective, randomized, attention-placebo-controlled parallel group trial was conducted. Following an 8-week baseline, patients were randomized to either music therapy (n = 40) or a rhythm pedagogic program (n = 38) designed as an "attention placebo" over 6 sessions within 8 weeks. Reduction of both headache frequency and intensity after treatment (8-week postline) as well as 6 months after treatment were taken as the efficacy variables. Treatments were delivered in equal dose and frequency by the same group of therapists. Data analysis of subjects completing the protocol showed that neither treatment was superior to the other at any point of measurement (posttreatment and follow-up). Intention-to-treat analysis revealed no impact of drop-out on these results. Both groups showed a moderate mean reduction of headache frequency posttreatment of about 20%, but only small numbers of responders (50% frequency reduction). Follow-up data showed no significant deteriorations or improvements. This article presents a randomized placebo-controlled trial on music therapy in the treatment of adolescents with frequent primary headache. Music therapy is not superior to an attention placebo within this study. These results draw attention to the need of providing adequate controls within therapeutic trials in the treatment of pain. Copyright © 2013 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Prevalence of signs and symptoms indicative of temporomandibular disorders and headaches in 35-, 50-, 65- and 75-year-olds living in Västerbotten, Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yekkalam, Negin; Wänman, Anders

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze and compare prevalence of signs and frequently occurring symptoms indicative of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and headaches in 35-, 50-, 65- and 75-year-old men and women in Västerbotten County, Sweden. From a total target population of 11 324 subjects living in Västerbotten County in the year 2002, 300 individuals in each age group were randomly selected. Of these, 998 (82% response rate) answered and returned a postal questionnaire and 779 (65% response rate) individuals accepted a clinical examination. The prevalence of frequent TMD symptoms peaked among 50-year-old women and then declined. Women at this age reported significantly higher prevalence compared to men for all TMD symptoms except temporomandibular joint locking. In the 65- and 75-year-olds, the prevalence was practically equal between men and women as well as between these ages. Frequent headaches showed the highest prevalence among 35- and 50-year-old women, with a statistically significant difference between men and women of 50 years of age (p temporomandibular joint sounds (p headaches showed a similar pattern, with higher prevalence among the 35- and 50-year-old, as compared to the 65- and 75-year-old, participants. The pattern may be related to biological, psychosocial or generation-related factors.

  20. Manual therapy for tension-type headache related to quality of work life and work presenteeism: Secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monzani, Lucas; Espí-López, Gemma Victoria; Zurriaga, Rosario; Andersen, Lars L

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this research is to evaluate the efficacy of manual therapy for tension-type headache (TTH) in restoring workers quality of work life, and how work presenteeism affects this relation. This study is a secondary analysis of a factorial, randomized clinical trial on manual therapy interventions. Altogether, 80 patients (85% women) with TTH and without current symptoms of any other concomitant disease participated. An experienced therapist delivered the treatment: myofascial inhibitory technique (IT), articulatory technique (AT), combined technique (IT and AT), and control group (no treatment). In general, all treatments as compared to our control group had a large effect (f≥.69) in the improvement of participants' quality of work life. Work presenteeism interacted with TTH treatment type's efficacy on participant's quality of work life. The inhibitory technique lead to higher reports of quality of work life than other treatment options only for participants with very low frequency of work presenteeism. In turn, TTH articulatory treatment techniques resulted in higher reports of quality of work life for a high to very high work presenteeism frequency. Articulatory manipulation technique is the more efficient treatment to improve quality of work life when the frequency of work presenteeism is high. Implications for future research and practice are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The quality of diagnosis and management of migraine and tension-type headache in three social groups in Russia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebedeva, Elena R; Kobzeva, Natalia R; Gilev, Denis V

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Three successive editions of the International Classification of Headache Disorders and multiple guideline papers on headache care have described evidence based diagnosis and treatment of headache disorders. It remains unknown, however, to which extent this has improved the diagnosis ...

  2. Factors Associated With Medication-Overuse Headache in Patients Seeking Treatment for Primary Headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Kelly R; Roland, Malcolm M; Smitherman, Todd A

    2018-03-09

    Although risk factors for medication-overuse headache have been identified within the general population, most studies have neglected clinical samples. The present study examined the relative and combined associations of these factors with medication-overuse headache in a sample of US adults seeking treatment for primary headache disorders. Treatment-seeking headache patients provided data on demographics, headache variables, psychiatric variables, use of headache medications, and use of other prescription medications and substances. A classification tree selection strategy was utilized within this cross-sectional study to differentiate between those with and without medication-overuse headache, and a final multivariable model assessed their combined utility. Forty-three of 164 participants (26.2%) met diagnostic criteria for medication-overuse headache. Relative to non-medication-overuse headache participants, participants with medication-overuse headache reported greater headache-related disability (odds ratio = 1.09, 95% confidence interval = 1.01-1.18), escape and avoidance responses indicative of fear of pain (odds ratio = 1.07, 95% confidence interval = 1.00-1.15), and use of combination medications for headache (odds ratio = 3.10, 95% confidence interval = 1.51-6.36). The final multivariable model differentiated well between the 2 groups (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve = .78; 95% confidence interval = .71-.86). Items that assess headache-related disability, use of combination medications, and fear of pain help identify patients who are currently overusing acute headache medications and may serve as indicators of treatment progress. Future studies should apply similar analytic approaches longitudinally to identify headache sufferers at risk for medication-overuse headache prior to headache progression. © 2018 American Headache Society.

  3. Challenges in developing drugs for primary headaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schytz, Henrik Winther; Hargreaves, Richard; Ashina, Messoud

    2017-01-01

    This review considers the history of drug development in primary headaches and discusses challenges to the discovery of innovative headache therapeutics. Advances in headache genetics have yet to translate to new classes of therapeutics and there are currently no clear predictive human biomarkers...... for any of the primary headaches that can guide preventative drug discovery and development. Primary headache disorder subtypes despite common phenotypic presentation are undoubtedly heterogeneous in their pathophysiology as judged by the variability of response to headache medicines. Sub......, despite having promising effects in basic pain models, have not delivered efficacy in the clinic. Future efforts may triage novel physiological mediators using human experimental models of headache pain to support drug discovery strategies that target active pathways pharmacologically....

  4. Headache associated with sexual activity: From the benign to the life threatening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Aiwansoba Imarhiagbe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neurologic syndromes like headache may on occasion complicate sexual activity. Though largely benign, the headache may seldom be a symptom of an underlying sinister and life threatening neurologic disorder such as aneurysmal subarachnoid heamorrhage. Method: Relevant published materials on the subject of headache associated with sexual intercourse and their cross references from Pubmed Medline, Cochrane Library, International Headache society, EMBASE and other relevant bibliographic repositories were ferreted since 1980 till date. Result: HAS is mainly a diagnosis of exclusion. The secondary or malignant form has a course that is dictated by its underlying cause. HAS in the primary or benign form is amenable to treatment with drugs including indomethacin, propranolol and calcium channel blockers (nimodipine, verapamil and diltiazem with excellent prognosis. Conclusion: Early evaluation for underlying cause of HAS and institution of appropriate treatment is recommended.

  5. [Individual medical relevance of headaches. Comorbidities and quality of life].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haag, G

    2014-08-01

    In a multitude of cases, very frequent primary headaches lead to a clear deterioration in quality of life. Particularly in patients with chronic migraine, chronic tension headache, and cluster headache, quality of life is limited. This contradicts the preconception still encountered today that headaches are not a serious illness. Comorbidities with somatic and above all mental disorders are also very frequently observed in headache patients. In the foreground are the cardiovascular diseases of arterial hypertension, stroke, and coronary heart disease, as well as the mental disorders of depression, anxiety disorders, posttraumatic stress disorders, and sleep disorders. When such comorbidities are present, the quality of life of the sufferers is significantly reduced. Therefore, headache disorders should be taken seriously and sufferers should be provided with a consistent therapy. In cases of severe types of headache and in the presence of comorbidities, it is imperative that therapy is also prophylactic and multimodal in nature.

  6. Circadian variations in the clinical presentation of headaches among migraineurs: A study using a smartphone headache diary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong-Wook; Cho, Soo-Jin; Park, Sang-Gue; Chu, Min Kyung

    2018-04-01

    Migraines occur within certain time frames. Nevertheless, information regarding circadian variation in the clinical presentation of migraine is limited. We investigated circadian variations in the clinical presentation of migraine using a smartphone headache diary (SHD). We enrolled adult participants with the diagnosis of migraine according to the third beta edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders. Participants were asked to log in to the SHD every day for 90 days to record the occurrence of headaches. We compared the occurrence and clinical presentation of headaches during four 6-hour quadrants per day (00:00-05:59, 06:00-11:59, 12:00-17:59, and 18:00-23:59). Migraine-type headache was defined as a headache attack that fulfilled all criteria of migraine, except for the criterion regarding typical headache duration. Eighty-two participants kept a dairy for at least 50% of the study period and recorded 1491 headache attacks. Among the 1491 headache attacks, 474 (31.8%) were classified as migraine-type headaches and 1017 (68.2%) were classified as non-migraine-type headaches. All headaches, migraine-type headaches and non-migraine-type headaches occurred most frequently between 06:00 and 11:59, and least frequently between 18:00 and 23:59, and between 00:00 and 05:59. Migrainous headache characteristics, such as unilateral pain, pulsating quality, severe headache intensity, aggravation by movement, nausea, photophobia, and phonophobia presented most frequently between 06:00 and 11:59, and least frequently between 18:00 and 23:59, and 00:00 and 05:59 among 1491 all headache attacks. Headache clinical presentation as well as headache occurrence exhibited circadian periodicity among migraineurs. SHD: smartphone headache diary; ICHD-3 beta: the third edition beta version of the International Classification of Headache Disorders.

  7. Primary Molecular Disorders and Secondary Biological Adaptations in Bartter Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschênes, Georges; Fila, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Bartter syndrome is a hereditary disorder that has been characterized by the association of hypokalemia, alkalosis, and the hypertrophy of the juxtaglomerular complex with secondary hyperaldosteronism and normal blood pressure. By contrast, the genetic causes of Bartter syndrome primarily affect molecular structures directly involved in the sodium reabsorption at the level of the Henle loop. The ensuing urinary sodium wasting and chronic sodium depletion are responsible for the contraction of the extracellular volume, the activation of the renin-aldosterone axis, the secretion of prostaglandins, and the biological adaptations of downstream tubular segments, meaning the distal convoluted tubule and the collecting duct. These secondary biological adaptations lead to hypokalemia and alkalosis, illustrating a close integration of the solutes regulation in the tubular structures. PMID:21941653

  8. Primary Molecular Disorders and Secondary Biological Adaptations in Bartter Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges Deschênes

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bartter syndrome is a hereditary disorder that has been characterized by the association of hypokalemia, alkalosis, and the hypertrophy of the juxtaglomerular complex with secondary hyperaldosteronism and normal blood pressure. By contrast, the genetic causes of Bartter syndrome primarily affect molecular structures directly involved in the sodium reabsorption at the level of the Henle loop. The ensuing urinary sodium wasting and chronic sodium depletion are responsible for the contraction of the extracellular volume, the activation of the renin-aldosterone axis, the secretion of prostaglandins, and the biological adaptations of downstream tubular segments, meaning the distal convoluted tubule and the collecting duct. These secondary biological adaptations lead to hypokalemia and alkalosis, illustrating a close integration of the solutes regulation in the tubular structures.

  9. Epidural blood patch for refractory low CSF pressure headache: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Søren Aalbæk; Fomsgaard, Jonna Storm; Jensen, Rigmor

    2011-08-01

    Once believed an exceedingly rare disorder, recent evidence suggests that low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure headache has to be considered an important cause of new daily persistent headaches, particularly among young and middle-aged individuals. Treatment of low CSF pressure headache consists of non-invasive/conservative measures and invasive measures with epidural blood patch providing the cornerstone of the invasive measures. In the present pilot study we therefore aimed to evaluate the treatment efficacy of epidural blood patch (EBP) in treatment-refractory low-pressure headache. Our primary effect parameter was total headache burden defined as area under the curve (AUC: intensity × duration) and as secondary effect parameters we identified: intensity (VAS 0-10), frequency (days per month), duration in hours (total hours/month) and also medication days (days on medication/month). In our primary effect parameter we found a significant reduction in AUC with more than 25% and this is considered to be clinically relevant. We found also a significant and relevant reduction at -22% in intensity. A trend towards reduction in duration was seen. We found no statistically significant reduction in frequency. An increase in days with use of medication was found. Increased awareness of low CSF pressure headache is emphasized and a controlled larger randomized study is needed to confirm the results. However the present results, allows us to conclude that EBP in treatment-refractory low CSF pressure headache can be considered as a treatment option.

  10. Low Tyramine Headache Diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find A Provider Contact Membership Donate 25 Oct Low-Tyramine Diet for Migraine Posted at 17:16h ... and Diamond Headache Clinic Headache Diet Tags: headache , low tyramine diet , MAOI , tyramine No Comments Post A ...

  11. Application of ICHD-II criteria in a headache clinic of China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Dong

    Full Text Available China has the huge map and the largest population in the world. Previous studies on the prevalence and classification of headaches were conducted based on the general population, however, similar studies among the Chinese outpatient population are scarce. This study aimed to analyze the characteristics of 1843 headache patients enrolled in a North China headache clinic of the General Hospital for Chinese People's Liberation Army from October 2011 to May 2012, with the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd Edition (ICHD-II.Personal interviews were carried out and a detailed questionnaire was used to collect medical records including age, sex and headache characteristics. Patients came from 28 regions of China with the median age of 40.9 (9-80 years and the female/male ratio of 1.67/1. The primary headaches (78.4% were classified as the following: migraine (39.1%, tension-type headache (32.5%, trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (5.3% and other primary headache (1.5%. Among the rest patients, 12.9% were secondary headaches, 5.9% were cranial neuralgias and 2.5% were unspecified or not elsewhere classified. Fourteen point nine percent (275/1843 were given an additional diagnosis of chronic daily headache, including medication-overuse headache (MOH, 49.5%, chronic tension-type headache (CTTH, 32.7% and chronic migraine (CM, 13.5%. The visual analogue scale (VAS score of TTH with MOH was significantly higher than that of CTTH (6.8±2.0 vs 5.6±2.0, P<0.001. The similar result was also observed in VAS score between migraine with MOH and CM (8.0±1.5 vs 7.0±1.5, P = 0.004. The peak age at onset of TTH for male and female were both in the 3(rd decade of life. However, the age distribution at onset of migraine shows an obvious sex difference, i.e. the 2(nd decade for females and the 1(st decade for males.This study revealed the characteristics of the headache clinic outpatients in a tertiary hospital of North China that migraine is

  12. Harry Potter and the curse of headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheftell, Fred; Steiner, Timothy J; Thomas, Hallie

    2007-06-01

    Headache disorders are common in children and adolescents. Even young male Wizards are disabled by them. In this article we review Harry Potter's headaches as described in the biographical series by JK Rowling. Moreover, we attempt to classify them. Regrettably we are not privy to the Wizard system of classifying headache disorders and are therefore limited to the Muggle method, the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd edition (ICHD-II). Harry's headaches are recurrent. Although conforming to a basic stereotype, and constant in location, throughout the 6 years of his adolescence so far described they have shown a tendency to progression. Later descriptions include a range of accompanying symptoms. Despite some quite unusual features, they meet all but one of the ICHD-II criteria for migraine, so allowing the diagnosis of 1.6 Probable migraine.

  13. Cluster headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ducros Anne

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cluster headache (CH is a primary headache disease characterized by recurrent short-lasting attacks (15 to 180 minutes of excruciating unilateral periorbital pain accompanied by ipsilateral autonomic signs (lacrimation, nasal congestion, ptosis, miosis, lid edema, redness of the eye. It affects young adults, predominantly males. Prevalence is estimated at 0.5–1.0/1,000. CH has a circannual and circadian periodicity, attacks being clustered (hence the name in bouts that can occur during specific months of the year. Alcohol is the only dietary trigger of CH, strong odors (mainly solvents and cigarette smoke and napping may also trigger CH attacks. During bouts, attacks may happen at precise hours, especially during the night. During the attacks, patients tend to be restless. CH may be episodic or chronic, depending on the presence of remission periods. CH is associated with trigeminovascular activation and neuroendocrine and vegetative disturbances, however, the precise cautive mechanisms remain unknown. Involvement of the hypothalamus (a structure regulating endocrine function and sleep-wake rhythms has been confirmed, explaining, at least in part, the cyclic aspects of CH. The disease is familial in about 10% of cases. Genetic factors play a role in CH susceptibility, and a causative role has been suggested for the hypocretin receptor gene. Diagnosis is clinical. Differential diagnoses include other primary headache diseases such as migraine, paroxysmal hemicrania and SUNCT syndrome. At present, there is no curative treatment. There are efficient treatments to shorten the painful attacks (acute treatments and to reduce the number of daily attacks (prophylactic treatments. Acute treatment is based on subcutaneous administration of sumatriptan and high-flow oxygen. Verapamil, lithium, methysergide, prednisone, greater occipital nerve blocks and topiramate may be used for prophylaxis. In refractory cases, deep-brain stimulation of the

  14. [A rarely known headache: Airplane travel headache].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azman, Filiz; Erkılınç, Büşra; Çabalar, Murat; Çağırıcı, Sultan; Yayla, Vildan

    2017-01-01

    Recently, headache associated with airplane travel has gained importance with case reports and took its place in the classification of headache in 2013. This rare condition has different spesific characteristic from the primary headaches and its pathophysiology is not clear yet. In this case report, a 27-years-old female patient was diagnosed with the headache associated with airplane travel by history, examination and imaging findings. The possible pathophysiology and treatment were discussed.

  15. Can palpation-induced muscle pain pattern contribute to the differential diagnosis among temporomandibular disorders, primary headaches phenotypes and possible bruxism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Yuri-Martins; Porporatti, André-Luís; Calderon, Patrícia-dos-Santos; Conti, Paulo-César-Rodrigues; Bonjardim, Leonardo-Rigoldi

    2016-01-01

    The evaluation of possible differences in the distribution or characteristics of palpation-induced pain in the masticatory muscles could be valuable in terms of diagnostic assessment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of different combinations of anterior temporalis (AT) and masseter palpation-induced pain in the diagnostic of temporomandibular disorder (TMD), primary headaches and bruxism. A total of 1200 dental records of orofacial pain adult patients were analyzed. The outcomes were dichotomously classified (presence/absence) as following: a) AT and/or masseter palpation-induced pain; b) myogenous TMD; c) temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthralgia (arthrogenous TMD); d) migraine; e) tension-type headache (TTH); f) self-reported bruxism. Binomial logistic regression model (α = 5%) was applied to the data considering the palpation-induced muscle pain as the dependent variable. Mean age (SD) were 35.7 years (13.4) for 635 included dental records (83% females). Myogenous and arthrogenous TMD, migraine, TTH and bruxism were mainly associated with, respectively, masseter palpation-induced pain (pbruxism.

  16. Masticatory sensory-motor changes after an experimental chewing test influenced by pain catastrophizing and neck-pain-related disability in patients with headache attributed to temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Touche, Roy; Paris-Alemany, Alba; Gil-Martínez, Alfonso; Pardo-Montero, Joaquín; Angulo-Díaz-Parreño, Santiago; Fernández-Carnero, Josué

    2015-03-05

    Recent research has shown a relationship of craniomandibular disability with neck-pain-related disability has been shown. However, there is still insufficient information demonstrating the influence of neck pain and disability in the sensory-motor activity in patients with headache attributed to temporomandibular disorders (TMD). The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of neck-pain-related disability on masticatory sensory-motor variables. An experimental case-control study investigated 83 patients with headache attributed to TMD and 39 healthy controls. Patients were grouped according to their scores on the neck disability index (NDI) (mild and moderate neck disability). Initial assessment included the pain catastrophizing scale and the Headache Impact Test-6. The protocol consisted of baseline measurements of pressure pain thresholds (PPT) and pain-free maximum mouth opening (MMO). Individuals were asked to perform the provocation chewing test, and measurements were taken immediately after and 24 hours later. During the test, patients were assessed for subjective feelings of fatigue (VAFS) and pain intensity. VAFS was higher at 6 minutes (mean 51.7; 95% CI: 50.15-53.26) and 24 hours after (21.08; 95% CI: 18.6-23.5) for the group showing moderate neck disability compared with the mild neck disability group (6 minutes, 44.16; 95% CI 42.65-45.67/ 24 hours after, 14.3; 95% CI: 11.9-16.7) and the control group. The analysis shows a decrease in the pain-free MMO only in the group of moderate disability 24 hours after the test. PPTs of the trigeminal region decreased immediately in all groups, whereas at 24 hours, a decrease was observed in only the groups of patients. PPTs of the cervical region decreased in only the group with moderate neck disability 24 hours after the test. The strongest negative correlation was found between pain-free MMO immediately after the test and NDI in both the mild (r = -0.49) and moderate (r = -0.54) neck disability

  17. Medical Undergraduate Survey on Headache Education in Singapore: Knowledge, Perceptions, and Assessment of Unmet Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Jonathan Jia Yuan; Chan, Yee Cheun

    2017-06-01

    .8%) respondent was able to correctly classify all listed primary and secondary headache disorders correctly. Only 37.0% were able to identify all 4 indications (headaches that were new, worsening, and unresponsive to treatment or associated with neurological symptoms) that warranted neuroimaging in a patient with a pre-existing diagnosis of migraine. The antidepressants were the most frequently reported incorrect option for the abortive treatment of migraine (16.5%). Nearly one-fifth (18.9%) were unable to name a single abortive treatment correctly, while a significant proportion (39.4%) could not identify a single correct prophylactic migraine treatment. A large proportion (62.2%) opined that their exposure to 'headache diagnosis and management' was inadequate, with a minority (3.1%) being 'very comfortable' in the diagnosing migraine. A significant proportion felt uncomfortable in treating special population groups diagnosed with migraine - pregnant (79.5%), elderly (48.0%), those with cardiac conditions (51.2%). The current medical undergraduate curriculum on headache disorders in Singapore may harbor significant unmet needs. A review of the syllabus to increase headache education may be one method to address this gap. Further studies in this area are required. © 2017 American Headache Society.

  18. Rounding behavior in the reporting of headache frequency complicates headache chronification research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houle, Timothy T; Turner, Dana P; Houle, Thomas A; Smitherman, Todd A; Martin, Vincent; Penzien, Donald B; Lipton, Richard B

    2013-06-01

    To characterize the extent of measurement error arising from rounding in headache frequency reporting (days per month) in a population sample of headache sufferers. When reporting numerical health information, individuals tend to round their estimates. The tendency to round to the nearest 5 days when reporting headache frequency can distort distributions and engender unreliability in frequency estimates in both clinical and research contexts. This secondary analysis of the 2005 American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention study survey characterized the population distribution of 30-day headache frequency among community headache sufferers and determined the extent of numerical rounding ("heaping") in self-reported data. Headache frequency distributions (days per month) were examined using a simplified version of Wang and Heitjan's approach to heaping to estimate the probability that headache sufferers round to a multiple of 5 when providing frequency reports. Multiple imputation was used to estimate a theoretical "true" headache frequency. Of the 24,000 surveys, headache frequency data were available for 15,976 respondents diagnosed with migraine (68.6%), probable migraine (8.3%), or episodic tension-type headache (10.0%); the remainder had other headache types. The mean number of headaches days/month was 3.7 (standard deviation = 5.6). Examination of the distribution of headache frequency reports revealed a disproportionate number of responses centered on multiples of 5 days. The odds that headache frequency was rounded to 5 increased by 24% with each 1-day increase in headache frequency (odds ratio: 1.24, 95% confidence interval: 1.23 to 1.25), indicating that heaping occurs most commonly at higher headache frequencies. Women were more likely to round than men, and rounding decreased with increasing age and increased with symptoms of depression. Because of the coarsening induced by rounding, caution should be used when distinguishing between episodic and chronic

  19. Airplane headache: a further case report of a young man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domitrz, Izabela

    2010-12-01

    Headache with normal examinations and imaging, occurring during an airplane flight has been rarely reported. We present a young patient with a new type of headache that appeared during flights: take-off and landing of a plane and was not associated with other conditions. This airplane headache is rather rare in population and the pathophysiology of this type is not clear. Secondary causes must be ruled out before the diagnosis of a primary headache is made.

  20. Headaches in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... his or her head to indicate severe pain. Tension-type headache Tension-type headaches can cause: A pressing tightness ... headaches. Be alert for things that may cause stress in your child's life, such as difficulty ... Keep a headache diary. A diary can help you determine what ...

  1. A STUDY ON PREVALENCE OF ANXIETY DISORDERS AMONG HIGHER SECONDARY SCHOOL STUDENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Srinivasa; Chaithanya C; Ravindra

    2015-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are very common in secondary school children with little epidemiological data from countries like India. The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of anxiety disorders in higher secondary school students using Screen for Ch ild Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED) questionnaire. Methodology: The study was conducted in July 2014 and 100 students belonging to class 11 and class 12 of a higher secondary school at Tiptur were includ...

  2. Tension-type Headache With Medication Overuse: Pathophysiology and Clinical Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Monteith, Teshamae S.; Oshinsky, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    Tension-type headache (TTH) is the most prevalent primary headache disorder. An important factor in the long-term prognosis of TTH is the overuse of acute medications used to treat headache. There are many reasons why patients with TTH overuse acute medications, including biobehavioral influences, dependency, and a lack of patient education. Chronic daily headache occurs in 4.1% of the general population, and chronic tension-type headache and medication overuse headache (MOH) occur in approxi...

  3. Headache in sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Tad

    2014-09-01

    Sports- and exercise-related headaches are not unusual. Despite their frequent occurrence in this context, there are little epidemiologic data concerning sports-related headache. The recent attention of concussive injuries and associated post-traumatic headache has renewed interest in the study of those headaches occurring after head trauma; however, any primary headache type can also occur in the setting of contact and/or collision sports. The nonspecific nature of headaches provides unique challenges to clinicians encountering this complaint. It is, therefore, imperative that physicians treating athletes are able to distinguish the various headache types and presentations often seen in this population.

  4. Headache In Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasa R

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Headaches are common in children. The presentation of headache in children is varied and hence the characterization of headache is more challenging. This situation is worsened further by inadequacies in the history and the effect of maturational factors. Relevant epidemiological and limitations in the applicability of International Headache Society criteria in childhood headache and the rationale for newer criteria are discussed. Migraine and tension-type headache are the common primary headache seen in children. Although there is a paucity of clinical trials the management of childhood migraine, the important role of correct pharmacological approach has been delineated. The pivotal role of non-pharmacological treatment is emphasized.

  5. [Predictors of remission from major depressive disorder in secondary care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvo, Lilian; Saldivia, Sandra; Parra, Carlos; Cifuentes, Manuel; Bustos, Claudio; Acevedo, Paola; Díaz, Marcela; Ormazabal, Mitza; Guerra, Ivonne; Navarrete, Nicol; Bravo, Verónica; Castro, Andrea

    2017-12-01

    Background The knowledge of predictive factors in depression should help to deal with the disease. Aim To assess potential predictors of remission of major depressive disorders (MDD) in secondary care and to propose a predictive model. Material and Methods A 12 month follow-up study was conducted in a sample of 112 outpatients at three psychiatric care centers of Chile, with baseline and quarterly assessments. Demographic, psychosocial, clinical and treatment factors as potential predictors, were assessed. A clinical interview with the checklist of DSM-IV diagnostic criteria, the Hamilton Depression Scale and the List of Threatening Experiences and Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support were applied. Results The number of stressful events, perceived social support, baseline depression scores, melancholic features, time prior to beginning treatment at the secondary level and psychotherapeutic sessions were included in the model as predictors of remission. Sex, age, number of previous depressive episodes, psychiatric comorbidity and medical comorbidity were not significantly related with remission. Conclusions This model allows to predict depression score at six months with 70% of accuracy and the score at 12 months with 72% of accuracy.

  6. Clinical aspects of headache in HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Huma U; Cho, Tracey A

    2014-05-01

    Headaches are commonly seen in those patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and are the most common form of pain reported among HIV patients. There have been relatively few studies attempting to determine the rates and phenotypes of the headaches that occur in patients with HIV. Patients with HIV are susceptible to a much broader array of secondary headache causes, sometimes with atypical manifestations due to a dampened inflammatory response. The investigation of a headache in the HIV patient should be thorough and focused on making sure that secondary and HIV-specific causes are either ruled out or treated if present. An effective treatment plan should incorporate the use of appropriate pharmacological agents along with the integration of non-pharmacological therapies, such as relaxation and lifestyle regulation. When treating for headaches in patients with HIV, it is important to keep in mind comorbidities and other medications, especially combination antiretroviral therapy. For those with complicated headache histories, referral to a specialized headache center may be appropriate. © 2014 American Headache Society.

  7. [PRIMARY HEADACHE IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS--DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matar, Amal Khourieh; Kerem, Nogah C; Srugo, Isaac; Genizi, Jacob

    2015-12-01

    Primary headaches are one of the most common disorders of childhood, with migraine and tension type headaches (TTHs) being the most frequent ones. In spite of their prevalence, there is paucity of knowledge regarding the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms that cause headaches and regarding the unique aspects of headaches in children and adolescents. To review the literature and summarize the knowledge regarding clinical features, diagnosis and management of primary headache in children and adolescents, mainly migraine and TTH. Most of our current knowledge regarding primary headaches in children and adolescents is driven from extrapolations from studies that were conducted with adult patients. Therefore, it needs to be validated for the different age groups. Migraines may be diagnosed effectively based on the 2nd edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-II), however, TTH is diagnosed mainly by the absence of features found in other headache types. Treatment strategies for primary headaches vary according to patient's age, family structure, culture and beliefs, headache diagnosis, and based on the disability the headache imposes on the patient's daily living. It was shown that a multidisciplinary approach, that includes continuing counseling, education, and reassurance, in combination with pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment, is an effective strategy for children and adolescents suffering from primary headaches. Further studies are needed to enrich our knowledge about the pathophysiological mechanisms that cause headaches in children and adolescents and to develop efficient strategies to alleviate their burden.

  8. Experimental headache in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Helle Klingenberg

    1995-01-01

    The need for valid human experimental models of headache is obvious. Several compounds have been proposed as headache-inducing agents, but only the nitroglycerin (NTG) model has been validated. In healthy subjects, intravenous infusions of the nitric oxide (NO) donor NTG induce a dose......-dependent headache and dilatation of the temporal, radial and middle cerebral artery. NTG-induced headache, although less intense, resembles migraine in pain characteristics, but the accompanying symptoms are rarely present. Cephalic large arteries are dilated during migraine headache as well as during NTG headache....... N-acetylcysteine enhances the formation of NO and potentiates NTG-induced headache, whereas mepyramine, a H1-antagonist capable of blocking histamine-induced headache, has no effect. Thus, the headache is dependent on NO or other steps in the NO cascade. The model is useful for pharmacological...

  9. Traumatic-event headaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haas David C

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic headaches from head trauma and whiplash injury are well-known and common, but chronic headaches from other sorts of physical traumas are not recognized. Methods Specific information was obtained from the medical records of 15 consecutive patients with chronic headaches related to physically injurious traumatic events that did not include either head trauma or whiplash injury. The events and the physical injuries produced by them were noted. The headaches' development, characteristics, duration, frequency, and accompaniments were recorded, as were the patients' use of pain-alleviative drugs. From this latter information, the headaches were classified by the diagnostic criteria of the International Headache Society as though they were naturally-occurring headaches. The presence of other post-traumatic symptoms and litigation were also recorded. Results The intervals between the events and the onset of the headaches resembled those between head traumas or whiplash injuries and their subsequent headaches. The headaches themselves were, as a group, similar to those after head trauma and whiplash injury. Thirteen of the patients had chronic tension-type headache, two had migraine. The sustained bodily injuries were trivial or unidentifiable in nine patients. Fabrication of symptoms for financial remuneration was not evident in these patients of whom seven were not even seeking payments of any kind. Conclusions This study suggests that these hitherto unrecognized post-traumatic headaches constitute a class of headaches characterized by a relation to traumatic events affecting the body but not including head or whiplash traumas. The bodily injuries per se can be discounted as the cause of the headaches. So can fabrication of symptoms for financial remuneration. Altered mental states, not systematically evaluated here, were a possible cause of the headaches. The overall resemblance of these headaches to the headaches after

  10. Hijab (headscarf) headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Huma N; Solomon, Glen D

    2015-03-01

    Hijab (headscarf) headache is well known among wearers and is a common topic of discussion. It has never previously been reported in the medical literature. Five women described bilateral headache either prompted by or worsened by donning the hijab, or headscarf. The headache always resolved soon after removal of the headscarf. Hijab headache may also be alleviated by minimal modifications in style while allowing women to maintain their moral conviction. It likely represents an extracranial etiology of headache, and recognition may prevent unnecessary evaluation and suffering in hijab wearers. © 2015 American Headache Society.

  11. Management of cluster headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer C; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of cluster headache is 0.1% and cluster headache is often not diagnosed or misdiagnosed as migraine or sinusitis. In cluster headache there is often a considerable diagnostic delay - an average of 7 years in a population-based survey. Cluster headache is characterized by very severe...... or severe orbital or periorbital pain with a duration of 15-180 minutes. The cluster headache attacks are accompanied by characteristic associated unilateral symptoms such as tearing, nasal congestion and/or rhinorrhoea, eyelid oedema, miosis and/or ptosis. In addition, there is a sense of restlessness...... and agitation. Patients may have up to eight attacks per day. Episodic cluster headache (ECH) occurs in clusters of weeks to months duration, whereas chronic cluster headache (CCH) attacks occur for more than 1 year without remissions. Management of cluster headache is divided into acute attack treatment...

  12. Primary headaches in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar Pan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Headache is a widespread clinical problem; the prevalence is high in all age groups, from which children and teenagers are not spared. It has been reported that, as many as 75% of school-age children may experience headache infrequently, among them 10% have recurrent headaches. [1],[2] The vast majority of headaches are primary and classified as migraine, tension-type headache (TTH, cluster headache, and other trigeminal autonomic cephalgias. The type of primary headaches could usually be diagnosed by a thorough and careful history taking, and physical examination. Once the diagnosis of migraine is established and appropriate reassurance provided, a balanced and individually tailored treatment plan can be instituted. The goal of treatment includes abortive or acute pain treatment, preventive long-term treatment, and biobehavioral therapy. Knowledge of precise impact of primary headaches on child′s quality of life helps to design a proper comprehensive treatment plan.

  13. Team players against headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaul, Charly; Visscher, Corine M; Bhola, Rhia

    2011-01-01

    Multidisciplinary approaches are gaining acceptance in headache treatment. However, there is a lack of scientific data about the efficacy of various strategies and their combinations offered by physiotherapists, physicians, psychologists and headache nurses. Therefore, an international platform...... for medication overuse headache. The significant value of physiotherapy, education in headache schools, and implementation of strategies of cognitive behavioural therapy was highlighted and the way paved for future studies and international collaboration....

  14. Team players against headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaul, Charly; Visscher, Corine M; Bhola, Rhia

    2011-01-01

    Multidisciplinary approaches are gaining acceptance in headache treatment. However, there is a lack of scientific data about the efficacy of various strategies and their combinations offered by physiotherapists, physicians, psychologists and headache nurses. Therefore, an international platform f...... for medication overuse headache. The significant value of physiotherapy, education in headache schools, and implementation of strategies of cognitive behavioural therapy was highlighted and the way paved for future studies and international collaboration....

  15. A Survey of Headache Medicine Physicians on the Likeability of Headaches and Their Personal Headache History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Randolph W; Ghosh, Kamalika

    2016-03-01

    Two prior studies have shown an increased prevalence of migraine among physicians who are headache medicine specialists (HMS). There have been no studies of the prevalence of other headache disorders among HMS. A prior survey showed that neurologists like to treat some headaches more than others but there has not been a similar survey of HMS. The aim of the survey was to learn more about the prevalence of headaches among HMS and which headache disorders they like to treat. An email survey was sent to 749 physician members of the American Headache Society who were asked to respond to the following statement using a 5-point Likert scale (from 1, strongly disagree to 5, strongly agree): "I like to treat patients with the following types of headaches or syndromes." They were asked, "Have you personally suffered from any of the following at any time during your life: episodic migraine (EM), chronic migraine (CM), refractory migraine (RM), episodic cluster (EC), chronic cluster (CC), new daily persistent headache (NDPH), and postconcussion syndrome (PCS)." The response rate was 15.8% (n = 118) with a mean age of 51.4 years, 64.4% males, and 85.6% neurologists. HMS reported likeability for treating disorders in rank order as follows: EM (mean = 4.69, SD = 0.61); CM (mean = 4.20, SD = 0.94); RM (mean = 3.62, SD = 1.17); EC (mean = 4.37, SD = 0.80); CC (mean = 3.68, SD = 1.10); NDPH (mean = 3.52, SD = 1.21); and PCS (mean = 3.66, SD = 1.18). The lifetime prevalence of disorders was as follows: EM, 69.5% (85.7% in females and 60.5% in males); CM, 13.6% (19% in females and 10.5% in males); RM, .9% (2.4% females and 0% males); EC, 1.7% (0% females and 2.6% males); CC, 0%; NDPH, 0%, and PCS, 4.2% (7.1% females and 2.6% males). HMS with a personal history of EM (mean = 4.73, SD = 0.51) showed a significant preference (t130  = 7.30, P headaches (mean = 3.90, SD = 0.77). HMS preferred to treat some

  16. Headache in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soee, Ann Britt L; Skov, Liselotte; Skovgaard, Lene Theil

    2013-01-01

    . Results: Fifty per cent of the children had an improvement in headache frequency above 50% at six months. By the use of repeated measurement analysis, we found a significant decrease in headache frequency in all of the six headache groups, whereas the increase in quality of life (PedsQL™ 4.0...

  17. Headache and botulinum toxin

    OpenAIRE

    Porta, M.; Camerlingo, M.

    2005-01-01

    The authors discuss clinical and international experience about botulinum toxins (BTX types A and B) in headache treatment. Data from literature suggest good results for the treatment of tensiontype headache, migraine and chronic tension–type headache. In the present paper mechanisms of action and injection sites will also be discussed.

  18. Alice in Wonderland Syndrome, Burning Mouth Syndrome, Cold Stimulus Headache, and HaNDL: Narrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valença, Marcelo M; de Oliveira, Daniella A; Martins, Hugo André de L

    2015-10-01

    Unusual headache syndromes are not as infrequent in clinical practice as was generally believed. About three fourths of the classified headache disorders found in the ICHD-II can be considered rare. The aim of this narrative review was to perform a literature review of the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic criteria, and treatment of the following unusual headache disorders: Alice in Wonderland syndrome, burning mouth syndrome, cold stimulus headache, and the syndrome of transient headache and neurologic deficits with cerebrospinal fluid lymphocytosis. A literature review was performed using PubMed for each of the abovementioned headache disorders. The unusual headache syndromes as a distinct group of disorders are not as infrequent in clinical practice as was generally believed. Some of them, albeit considered as unusual, may occur with relative frequency, such as cold stimulus headache and burning mouth syndrome. © 2015 American Headache Society.

  19. Post-traumatic headache: is it for real? Crossfire debates on headache: pro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermann, Mark; Keidel, Matthias; Diener, Hans-Christoph

    2010-04-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury is very common in Western societies, affecting approximately 1.8 million individuals in the USA. Even though between 30% and 90% of patients develop post-traumatic headache, post-traumatic headache remains a very controversial disorder. Particularly when it comes to chronic post-traumatic headache following mild closed head injury and headache attributed to whiplash injury. Some experts are disputing its existence as a genuine disorder. Indistinct disease classification, unresolved pathophysiological mechanism, and the role of accident-related legal issues further fuel this controversy. The complex combination of pain and neuropsychological symptoms needs further research in understanding the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms associated with the acute headache following trauma but more so the mechanisms associated with the development of chronic pain in some patients. Investigators should refrain from oversimplifying these complex mechanisms as hysteric exaggeration of everyday complains and from implying greed as motivation for this potentially very disabling disease.

  20. Guidelines for the organization of headache education in Europe: the headache school II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rigmor; Mitsikostas, Dimos D; Valade, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    of a similar scientific standard has been developed. To be certified for CME credits, patronage, and financial support from EHF, it is highly recommended to adhere to the suggested teaching strategies. We hereby aim to promote and professionalize the education in headache disorders and endorse the educational......In order to promote education on headache disorders, European Headache Federation (EHF) in conjunction with National Headache Societies organizes educational courses meeting uniform standards according to previous published guidelines. Based on six headache summer schools' experience, an EHF......, a day-to-day program, and a multiple-choice test battery have now been outlined. It is recommended to include practical sessions with patient interviews and hands-on demonstrations of non-pharmacological treatment strategies. For countries that want a 'low cost' education program, a Video School program...

  1. Influence of headache frequency on clinical signs and symptoms of TMD in subjects with temple headache and TMD pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Gary C; John, Mike T; Ohrbach, Richard; Nixdorf, Donald R; Schiffman, Eric L; Truelove, Edmond S; List, Thomas

    2011-04-01

    The relationship of the frequency of temple headache to signs and symptoms of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders (TMD) was investigated in a subset of a larger convenience sample of community TMD cases. The study sample included 86 painful TMD, nonheadache subjects; 309 painful TMD subjects with varied frequency of temple headaches; and 149 subjects without painful TMD or headache for descriptive comparison. Painful TMD included Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders diagnoses of myofascial pain, TMJ arthralgia, and TMJ osteoarthritis. Mild to moderate-intensity temple headaches were classified by frequency using criteria based on the International Classification of Headache Disorder, 2nd edition, classification of tension-type headache. Outcomes included TMD signs and symptoms (pain duration, pain intensity, number of painful masticatory sites on palpation, mandibular range of motion), pressure pain thresholds, and temple headache resulting from masticatory provocation tests. Trend analyses across the painful TMD groups showed a substantial trend for aggravation of all of the TMD signs and symptoms associated with increased frequency of the temple headaches. In addition, increased headache frequency showed significant trends associated with reduced PPTs and reported temple headache with masticatory provocation tests. In conclusion, these findings suggest that these headaches may be TMD related, as well as suggesting a possible role for peripheral and central sensitization in TMD patients. Copyright © 2010 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Posttraumatic Headache: Basic Mechanisms and Therapeutic Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamins, Joshua; Charles, Andrew

    2018-06-01

    Frequent or continuous headache, often refractory to medical therapy, is a common occurrence after head trauma. In addition to being the most common acute symptom after traumatic brain injury (TBI), headache is also one of the most persistent and disabling symptoms. Different studies indicate that 18-58% of those suffering a TBI will have significant headache at 1 year following the trauma. In addition to being disabling on its own, posttraumatic headache (PTH) is a predictor of overall outcome after concussion. Despite its remarkable prevalence and associated social and economic costs, many fundamental and important questions about PTH remain unanswered. The purpose of this review is to identify key questions regarding the clinical characteristics of posttraumatic headache, its basic mechanisms, and its optimal management. We discuss phenotypic features of PTH, pathophysiological mechanisms of TBI including potential overlaps with those of migraine and other primary headache disorders, and potential novel targets for treatment. We suggest different strategies to finding answers to the questions regarding PTH in order to advance the understanding of the disorder and develop more effective therapies. © 2018 American Headache Society.

  3. Very Early-onset Schizophrenia with Secondary Onset Tic Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telgote, Shilpa A; Pendharkar, Shreyas Shrikant; Kelkar, Amol D; Bhojane, Sachin

    2017-01-01

    Very early-onset schizophrenia (defined as an onset of psychosis before 13 years of age) is a rare and severe form of the disorder which is clinically and neurobiologically continuous with the adult-onset disorder. It is rarely reported tic disorder.

  4. Risk factors for secondary substance use disorders in people with childhood and adolescent-onset bipolar disorder: opportunities for prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenneson, Aileen; Funderburk, Jennifer S; Maisto, Stephen A

    2013-07-01

    Compared to other mental illnesses, bipolar disorder is associated with a disproportionately high rate of substance use disorders (SUDs), and the co-occurrence is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Early diagnosis of primary bipolar disorder may provide opportunities for SUD prevention, but little is known about the risk factors for secondary SUD among individuals with bipolar disorder. The purposes of this study were to describe the population of people with childhood and adolescent-onset primary bipolar disorder, and to identify risk factors for secondary SUD in this population. Using data collected from the National Comorbidity Survey Replication study, we identified 158 individuals with childhood-onset (adolescent-onset (13-18 years) primary bipolar disorder (I, II or subthreshold). Survival analysis was used to identify risk factors for SUD. Compared to adolescent-onset, people with childhood-onset bipolar disorder had increased likelihoods of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (adjusted odds ratio=2.81) and suicide attempt (aOR=3.61). Males were more likely than females to develop SUD, and did so at a faster rate. Hazard ratios of risk factors for SUD were: lifetime oppositional defiant disorder (2.048), any lifetime anxiety disorder (3.077), adolescent-onset bipolar disorder (1.653), and suicide attempt (15.424). SUD was not predicted by bipolar disorder type, family history of bipolar disorder, hospitalization for a mood episode, ADHD or conduct disorder. As clinicians struggle to help individuals with bipolar disorder, this study provides information that might be useful in identifying individuals at higher risk for SUD. Future research can examine whether targeting these risk factors may help prevent secondary SUD. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Causality and headache triggers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Dana P.; Smitherman, Todd A.; Martin, Vincent T.; Penzien, Donald B.; Houle, Timothy T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to explore the conditions necessary to assign causal status to headache triggers. Background The term “headache trigger” is commonly used to label any stimulus that is assumed to cause headaches. However, the assumptions required for determining if a given stimulus in fact has a causal-type relationship in eliciting headaches have not been explicated. Methods A synthesis and application of Rubin’s Causal Model is applied to the context of headache causes. From this application the conditions necessary to infer that one event (trigger) causes another (headache) are outlined using basic assumptions and examples from relevant literature. Results Although many conditions must be satisfied for a causal attribution, three basic assumptions are identified for determining causality in headache triggers: 1) constancy of the sufferer; 2) constancy of the trigger effect; and 3) constancy of the trigger presentation. A valid evaluation of a potential trigger’s effect can only be undertaken once these three basic assumptions are satisfied during formal or informal studies of headache triggers. Conclusions Evaluating these assumptions is extremely difficult or infeasible in clinical practice, and satisfying them during natural experimentation is unlikely. Researchers, practitioners, and headache sufferers are encouraged to avoid natural experimentation to determine the causal effects of headache triggers. Instead, formal experimental designs or retrospective diary studies using advanced statistical modeling techniques provide the best approaches to satisfy the required assumptions and inform causal statements about headache triggers. PMID:23534872

  6. Headache diaries and calendars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torelli, Paola; Jensen, Rigmor

    2010-01-01

    Headache is one of the most common types of pain and, in the absence of biological markers, headache diagnosis depends only on information obtained from clinical interviews and physical and neurological examinations. Headache diaries make it possible to record prospectively the characteristics...... of every attack and the use of headache calendars is indicated for evaluating the time pattern of headache, identifying aggravating factors, and evaluating the efficacy of preventive treatment. This may reduce the recall bias and increase accuracy in the description. The use of diagnostic headache diaries...... practice for diagnosis and follow-up of treatments; and (2) describe the tools that have been developed for research and their main applications in the headache field. In addition, we include information on diaries available online and proposals for future areas of research....

  7. Hemodialysis-related headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sav, Murat Yusuf; Sav, Tansu; Senocak, Elif; Sav, Nadide Melike

    2014-10-01

    Headache is one of the most frequently encountered neurological symptoms during hemodialysis. According to International Classification of Headache criteria dialysis-related headache was defined as the headache occurring during hemodialysis with no specific characteristic. It resolves spontaneously within 72 hours after the hemodialysis session ends. There are few studies in the literature investigating the clinical features of dialysis headache. The pathophysiology of hemodialysis-related headache is not known, but various triggering factors have been identified, including changes in blood pressure, serum sodium and magnesium levels during hemodialysis sessions, caffeine deprivation and stress. The aim of this article is to evaluate and analyze features of headache in patients undergoing hemodialysis. © 2014 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  8. The Nord-Trøndelag Health Study shows increased prevalence of primary recurrent headaches among adolescents over a four-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsena, Brit A; Dyb, Grete; Hagen, Knut; Stovner, Lars J; Holmen, Turid L; Zwart, John-Anker

    2017-12-29

    Objective Earlier epidemiological studies have shown that headaches are frequent among adolescents, especially girls. In particular, recurrent primary headache disorders such as migraine and tension-type headaches are common complaints in this age group. Headaches are increasingly being recognized as a significant health problem in adolescents and can lead to significant disabilities by affecting their lives, their school performance and their social lives. The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of primary headaches among adolescents aged 16-20 years in Norway in two periods. Very few replicate studies have re-evaluated the prevalence of primary headaches in this age range and it is uncertain whether the prevalence is increasing. Methods Two cross-sectional, population-based studies were conducted in Norway from 1995 to 1997 (Young-HUNT 1) and from 1999 to 2001 (Young-HUNT 2). In Young-HUNT 1, 2594 adolescents in 2nd and 3rd grade in upper secondary school (aged 16-20 years) completed a comprehensive questionnaire including one question regarding headache during the last 12 months. In addition, 1730 of the students were interviewed about their headache complaints. In Young-HUNT 2, 2373 adolescents aged 16-20 years completed the same questionnaire and 1655 were interviewed in the same way as the earlier survey. The interviews were performed by trained nurses, and respondents were asked if they had experienced recurrent headache during the last year. If so, the headache was classified as migraine (MI), tensiontype headache (TTH) or non-classifiable headache (NCH). Headache frequency during the past year was recorded according to the following categories: Less than 1 day per month (less than monthly), 1-3 days per month (monthly), 1-5 days per week (weekly), or more than 5 days per week (daily). Results The participation rate was 88% in Young-HUNT 1 and 81% in Young-HUNT 2. The overall prevalence of having had headaches during the last 12 months did not

  9. The NTI-tss device for the therapy of bruxism, temporomandibular disorders, and headache – Where do we stand? A qualitative systematic review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapelmann, Henrike; Türp, Jens C

    2008-01-01

    Background The NTI-tss device is an anterior bite stop, which, according to the manufacturer, is indicated for the prevention and treatment of bruxism, temporomandibular disorders (TMDs), tension-type headaches, and migraine. The aim of this systematic review was to appraise the currently available evidence regarding the efficacy and safety of the NTI-tss splint. Methods We performed a systematic search in nine electronic databases and in NTI-tss-associated websites (last update: December 31, 2007). The reference lists of all relevant articles were perused. Five levels of scientific quality were distinguished. Reporting quality of articles about randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was evaluated using the Jadad score. To identify adverse events, we searched in the identified publications and in the MAUDE database. Results Nine of 68 relevant publications reported about the results of five different RCTs. Two RCTs concentrated on electromyographic (EMG) investigations in patients with TMDs and concomitant bruxism (Baad-Hansen et al 2007, Jadad score: 4) or with bruxism alone (Kavaklı 2006, Jadad score: 2); in both studies, compared to an occlusal stabilization splint the NTI-tss device showed significant reduction of EMG activity. Two RCTs focused exclusively on TMD patients; in one trial (Magnusson et al 2004, Jadad score: 3), a stabilization appliance led to greater improvement than an NTI-tss device, while in the other study (Jokstad et al 2005, Jadad score: 5) no difference was found. In one RCT (Shankland 2002, Jadad score: 1), patients with tension-type headache or migraine responded more favorably to the NTI-tss splint than to a bleaching tray. NTI-tss-induced complications related predominantly to single teeth or to the occlusion. Conclusion Evidence from RCTs suggests that the NTI-tss device may be successfully used for the management of bruxism and TMDs. However, to avoid potential unwanted effects, it should be chosen only if certain a patient will be

  10. The NTI-tss device for the therapy of bruxism, temporomandibular disorders, and headache – Where do we stand? A qualitative systematic review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Türp Jens C

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The NTI-tss device is an anterior bite stop, which, according to the manufacturer, is indicated for the prevention and treatment of bruxism, temporomandibular disorders (TMDs, tension-type headaches, and migraine. The aim of this systematic review was to appraise the currently available evidence regarding the efficacy and safety of the NTI-tss splint. Methods We performed a systematic search in nine electronic databases and in NTI-tss-associated websites (last update: December 31, 2007. The reference lists of all relevant articles were perused. Five levels of scientific quality were distinguished. Reporting quality of articles about randomized controlled trials (RCTs was evaluated using the Jadad score. To identify adverse events, we searched in the identified publications and in the MAUDE database. Results Nine of 68 relevant publications reported about the results of five different RCTs. Two RCTs concentrated on electromyographic (EMG investigations in patients with TMDs and concomitant bruxism (Baad-Hansen et al 2007, Jadad score: 4 or with bruxism alone (Kavaklı 2006, Jadad score: 2; in both studies, compared to an occlusal stabilization splint the NTI-tss device showed significant reduction of EMG activity. Two RCTs focused exclusively on TMD patients; in one trial (Magnusson et al 2004, Jadad score: 3, a stabilization appliance led to greater improvement than an NTI-tss device, while in the other study (Jokstad et al 2005, Jadad score: 5 no difference was found. In one RCT (Shankland 2002, Jadad score: 1, patients with tension-type headache or migraine responded more favorably to the NTI-tss splint than to a bleaching tray. NTI-tss-induced complications related predominantly to single teeth or to the occlusion. Conclusion Evidence from RCTs suggests that the NTI-tss device may be successfully used for the management of bruxism and TMDs. However, to avoid potential unwanted effects, it should be chosen only if certain a

  11. The NTI-tss device for the therapy of bruxism, temporomandibular disorders, and headache - where do we stand? A qualitative systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapelmann, Henrike; Türp, Jens C

    2008-07-29

    The NTI-tss device is an anterior bite stop, which, according to the manufacturer, is indicated for the prevention and treatment of bruxism, temporomandibular disorders (TMDs), tension-type headaches, and migraine. The aim of this systematic review was to appraise the currently available evidence regarding the efficacy and safety of the NTI-tss splint. We performed a systematic search in nine electronic databases and in NTI-tss-associated websites (last update: December 31, 2007). The reference lists of all relevant articles were perused. Five levels of scientific quality were distinguished. Reporting quality of articles about randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was evaluated using the Jadad score. To identify adverse events, we searched in the identified publications and in the MAUDE database. Nine of 68 relevant publications reported about the results of five different RCTs. Two RCTs concentrated on electromyographic (EMG) investigations in patients with TMDs and concomitant bruxism (Baad-Hansen et al 2007, Jadad score: 4) or with bruxism alone (Kavakli 2006, Jadad score: 2); in both studies, compared to an occlusal stabilization splint the NTI-tss device showed significant reduction of EMG activity. Two RCTs focused exclusively on TMD patients; in one trial (Magnusson et al 2004, Jadad score: 3), a stabilization appliance led to greater improvement than an NTI-tss device, while in the other study (Jokstad et al 2005, Jadad score: 5) no difference was found. In one RCT (Shankland 2002, Jadad score: 1), patients with tension-type headache or migraine responded more favorably to the NTI-tss splint than to a bleaching tray. NTI-tss-induced complications related predominantly to single teeth or to the occlusion. Evidence from RCTs suggests that the NTI-tss device may be successfully used for the management of bruxism and TMDs. However, to avoid potential unwanted effects, it should be chosen only if certain a patient will be compliant with follow-up appointments. The

  12. Epidemiology, etiology and study of clinical findings of headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghaffarpoor M

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available In a cross-sectional epidemiological study of headache disorders in neurology clinic of Fatemieh hospital of Semnan (August 22-November 20.1996, information on types of headaches, quality, severity, location, duration, frequency, precipitating factors, age of onset, influence of menstruation and pregnancy, positive familial history, use of oral contraceptive pills and other epidemiological factors including socioeconomic and age/sex composition was collected. The presence of any types of headaches was ascertained by a clinical interview and examination using the operational diagnostic criteria of the International Headaches Society. The prevalence of migraine and tension type headache was also analysed in relation to variables of life style (physical activity and sleep pattern and associated signs and symptoms (nausea, vomiting, photophobia and phonophobia. In this study migraine and tension headache were also compared in variable aspects with each other. 1 Headache was more prevalent in women than men (F/M=3/1. 2 The most common types of headache included: tension type headache (41.4%, migraine (31.2% and unclassified headaches (17.2%. 3 Migraine and T.T.H were more prevalent in early adult life and middle ages. 4 In both migraine and tension type headache the time profiles (duration, frequency, age of onset, quality and location were like that noted in textbook and previous studies. 5 In both migraine and tension type headache the most conspicuous precipitating factor was stress and mental tension and frequent headaches were accompanied with psychiatric problems (e.g depression and or anxiety. 6 Nausea, vomiting, phonophobia and photophobia were the most common associated symptoms in both of them. 7 Positive familial history and aggravation of headache in perimenstual period were more commonly seen in patients with migraine than tension type headache. In conclusion using the operational diagnostic criteria of International Headache Society in

  13. Chronic daily headache: personality study by means of computerized MMPI-2

    OpenAIRE

    De Fidio, Dario; Sciruicchio, Vittorio; Pastore, Beatrice; Prudenzano, Maria Pia; Di Pietro, Elisa; Tramontano, Alfonso; Lorizio, Angelo; Granella, Franco; Bussone, Gennaro; Grazzi, Licia; Sarchielli, Paola

    2000-01-01

    Unresolved questions in headache research are the roles of drug abuse and psychopathology in headache disorder, especially in chronic daily headache. We investigated the utility of the revised version of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI-2) for assessing psychopathology in chronic daily headache patients. Chronic headache sufferers gave characteristic responses on Hy (hypochondria), D (depression) and Hs (hysteria) scales which are known as the ?neurotic triad?. Although o...

  14. Comprehensive Headache Experience in Collegiate Student-Athletes: An Initial Report From the NCAA Headache Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Tad; Sufrinko, Alicia; Cowan, Robert; Scott Black, W; Watson, Dave; Edwards, Bill; Livingston, Scott; Webster, Keith; Akers, David; Lively, Mathew; Kontos, Anthony P

    2017-06-01

    The prevalence of primary headache disorders in the general population provides a unique challenge in the evaluation of headache occurring in the context of sport. Despite a wealth of studies exploring the epidemiology of headache in the layperson, little is known about the prevalence and nature of headaches in collegiate student-athletes. These scenarios are challenging in the return to play context, as it is often unclear whether an athlete has an exacerbation of a primary headache disorder, new onset headache unrelated to trauma, or has suffered a concussive injury. To establish the prevalence and nature of headaches in collegiate student-athletes. Retrospective cross-sectional survey. This cross-sectional survey evaluated the characteristics and prevalence of headache in 834 student-athletes from four NCAA Division-I institutions. Because headache occurrence may vary by sport (collision, contact, non-contact), by sex, and medical history, our sample included male and female athletes in a variety of sports, with differing degrees of contact exposure. The 20 question survey collected data on personal and family history of headache, as well as concussion history. A total of 23.7% (n = 198) of participants reported having a personal history of migraine, 25.2% (n = 210) history of sinus headache, and 12.3% (n = 103) history of tension type headache. Among athletes with a prior history of concussion, 46.3% (n = 25) of females reported a history of migraine, while only 32.2% of males reported history of migraine (χ 2  = 3.421, P = .064). The etiology of increased prevalence of migraine in our study is unclear. Whether this is due to increased awareness of headache disorders, a consequence of contact exposure, or a predisposition for migraine development in this age group remains unclear. Further studies are indicated. © 2017 American Headache Society.

  15. May headache triggered by odors be regarded as a differentiating factor between migraine and other primary headaches?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Néto, Raimundo Pereira; Rodrigues, Ânderson Batista; Cavalcante, Dandara Coelho; Ferreira, Pedro Henrique Piauilino Benvindo; Nasi, Ema Pereira; Sousa, Kamila Maria de Holanda; Peres, Mário Fernando Pietro; Valença, Marcelo Moraes

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this article is to characterize olfactory stimulation as a trigger of headaches attacks and differentiation between migraine and other primary headaches. Participants and methods The study was prospective and experimental, with comparison of groups. A total of 158 volunteers (73 men and 85 women) were diagnosed with primary headaches, according to the criteria of the International Classification of Headache Disorders, Third Edition (beta version) (ICHD-3β). The study was conducted by two examiners; one of them was assigned to diagnose the presence and type of primary headache, while the other was responsible for exposing the volunteers to odor and recording the effects of this exposure. Results Of the 158 volunteers with headache, there were 72 (45.6%) cases of migraine and 86 (54.4%) with other primary headaches. In both groups, there were differences in headache characteristics (χ 2  = 4.132; p = 0.046). Headache attacks (25/72; 34.7%) and nausea (5/72; 6.9%) were triggered by odor only in patients with migraine, corresponding to 19.0% (30/158) of the sample, but in none with other primary headaches (χ 2  = 43.78; p Headache occurred more often associated with nausea ( p = 0.146) and bilateral location ( p = 0.002) in migraineurs who had headache triggered by odor. Headache was triggered after 118 ± 24.6 min and nausea after 72.8 ± 84.7 min of exposure to odor. Conclusions The odor triggered headache attacks or nausea only in migraineurs. Therefore, headache triggered by odors may be considered a factor of differentiation between migraine and other primary headaches and this trigger seems very specific of migraine.

  16. Development of social anxiety disorder secondary to attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (the developmental hypothesis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyuncu, Ahmet; Alkın, Tunç; Tükel, Raşit

    2018-04-01

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) may develop secondary to childhood attention deficit/hyperactivity (ADHD) in a subgroup of the patients with SAD. Patients pass through a number of identifiable stages of developmental pathways to SAD as they grow up. Patients with ADHD have maladaptive behaviours in social settings due to the symptoms of ADHD. These behaviours are criticized by their parents and social circle; they receive insults, humiliation and bullying. After each aversive incident, the individual feels shame and guilt. A vicious cycle emerges. The patients then develop social fears and a cognitive inhibition that occurs in social situations. The inhibition increases gradually as the fear persists and the individual becomes withdrawn. Patients start to monitor themselves and to focus on others' feedback. Finally, performative social situations become extremely stimulating for them and may trigger anxiety/panic attacks. If this hypothesis is proven, treatment of 'patients with SAD secondary to ADHD' should focus on the primary disease. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  17. Management of chronic daily headache in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Kenneth J; Gladstein, Jack

    2008-01-01

    Chronic daily headache (CDH) occurs in 1-2% of children and adolescents. It can evolve from either episodic tension-type headache or episodic migraine, or can appear with no previous headache history. As with other primary headache disorders, treatment is based on the level of disability. There are children and adolescents who cope well, but there are others who are markedly disabled by their chronic headaches. As in adults, children and adolescents with CDH are at risk for medication overuse. CDH is a diagnosis of exclusion, based on a thorough history, normal physical examination, and negative neuroimaging findings. Along with the chronic headaches, children with this condition may have co-morbid sleep problems, autonomic dysfunction, anxiety, and/or depression. Principles of treatment include identifying migrainous components, stopping medication overuse, stressing normalcy, using rational pharmacotherapy, and addressing co-morbid conditions. Successful outcomes often involve identifying an appropriate headache preventative, reintegration into school, and family participation in resetting realistic expectations.

  18. Very early-onset schizophrenia with secondary onset tic disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Shilpa A Telgote; Shreyas Shrikant Pendharkar; Amol D Kelkar; Sachin Bhojane

    2017-01-01

    Very early-onset schizophrenia (defined as an onset of psychosis before 13 years of age) is a rare and severe form of the disorder which is clinically and neurobiologically continuous with the adult-onset disorder. It is rarely reported

  19. Orofacial pain and headaches associated with exfoliation glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noma, Noboru; Iwasa, Mayumi; Young, Andrew; Ikeda, Mariko; Hsu, Yung-Chu; Yamamoto, Maasa; Inoue, Kenji; Imamura, Yoshiki

    2017-12-01

    Exfoliation syndrome is the most common identifiable cause of open-angle glaucoma. The authors report a case of exfoliation glaucoma in a patient who had orofacial pain. A 77-year-old woman was treated at the orofacial pain clinic for left-sided facial pain and headaches of 7 months' duration. Her cataracts and open-angle glaucoma had been diagnosed approximately 3 years earlier. Her main symptoms were orofacial pain, eye redness, inflammation of the eyelids, and eyelid edema. Magnetic resonance imaging showed no evidence of intracranial or extracranial pathology. Hemicrania continua was considered as a possible diagnosis. Indomethacin was prescribed but did not affect her headaches. She then went to an ophthalmologist to rule out secondary headaches. Intraocular pressure was 13 millimeters of mercury in the right eye and 67 mm Hg in the left eye. The ophthalmologist made a diagnosis of exfoliation glaucoma, and the patient underwent surgical treatment for the glaucoma and cataracts. After surgery, she was free of symptoms, and intraocular pressure was 15 mm Hg in the left eye. During differential diagnosis, dentists need to consider intraoral and systemic conditions that can mimic odontogenic or orofacial pain disorders in the patient's medical history and that have a higher incidence associated with the patient's age. Copyright © 2017 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Mixed acid-base disorder secondary to topiramate use in traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Golla

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a man with traumatic brain injury. He was started on to prophylactic topiramate which led to a mixed acid-base disorder. He had severe metabolic acidosis secondary to renal tubular acidification defect and respiratory alkalosis secondary to hyperventilation. Withdrawal of the offending drug led to the prompt resolution of the acid-base disturbance.

  1. Childhood headache attributed to airplane travel: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Kirsty; Rafiq, Nadia; Prabhakar, Prab; Ahmed, Mas

    2015-05-01

    Headache attributed to airplane flights is a rare form of headache disorder. This case study describes an 11-year-old girl with recurrent, severe, frontal headaches occurring during airplane travel. The episodes were associated with dizziness and facial pallor but no additional symptoms and showed spontaneous resolution on landing. Blood tests and imaging revealed no abnormalities. The present case fulfils the criteria for airplane headache recently included in the revised edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-III Beta). Only a few cases of airplane headache have been reported in children. To our knowledge, this is the fourth case. We review the current literature on this rare syndrome and discuss various proposed pathophysiological mechanisms. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Headache Associated With Sexual Activity: A Current Overview Accompanied By Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Akyol

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available According to the last classification of the International Headache Society (IHS, primary headache associated with sexual activity (PHASA begins as dull bilateral pain with sexual stimulation and suddenly condenses with orgasm in the absence of any intracranial disorder. The differential diagnosis includes various pathologies such as reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome, arterial dissection, glaucoma, subarachnoid hemorrhage due to aneurysmal rupture, and pheochromocytoma. PHASA is not subdivided into preorgasmic or orgasmic subforms, but it was accepted as a single entity with variable presentation in this last classification [International Classification of Headache Disorders, 3rd edition, beta version (ICHD-III ]. It is mandatory to exclude possible secondary pathology, even in cases with typical clinical presentation (middle age, male, normal neurological examination. We found an underlying secondary pathology in only one of the three cases (internal carotid artery aneurysm. We considered it appropriate to present three cases to increase the awareness of clinicians in terms of secondary pathology. All three patients received indomethacin for preemptive therapy (50mg, intake 30-60 minute prior to sexual activity with good results.

  3. Noninvasive neuromodulation in migraine and cluster headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starling, Amaal

    2018-06-01

    The purpose of this narrative review is to provide an overview of the currently available noninvasive neuromodulation devices for the treatment of migraine and cluster headache. Over the last decade, several noninvasive devices have undergone development and clinical trials to evaluate efficacy and safety. Based on this body of work, single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation, transcutaneous supraorbital neurostimulation, and noninvasive vagal nerve stimulation devices have been cleared by the United States Food and Drug Administration and are available for clinical use for the treatment of primary headache disorders. Overall, these novel noninvasive devices appear to be safe, well tolerated, and have demonstrated promising results in clinical trials in both migraine and cluster headache. This narrative review will provide a summary and update of the proposed mechanisms of action, evidence, safety, and future directions of various currently available modalities of noninvasive neuromodulation for the treatment of migraine and cluster headache.

  4. Headache research and medical practice in Brazil: an historical overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valença, Marcelo Moraes; da Silva, Amanda Araújo; Bordini, Carlos Alberto

    2015-02-01

    Since the creation of the Brazilian Headache Society in 1978, substantial developments have taken place in both research and clinical practice in the field of headache medicine in Brazil. The Society now has almost 300 members throughout the country, actively working to improve the health of the general population and, in particular, diagnose and treat headache disorders. In addition, in a few large cities, such as São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Recife, Ribeirão Preto, Curitiba, and Porto Alegre, headache specialists have come together to promote research projects and increase knowledge in the field through MSc, PhD, and postdoctoral programs. Furthermore, scientific journals have emerged and books have been published to record and disseminate Brazilian scientific production in headache medicine. In this narrative review, we will briefly describe some important aspects of headache medicine in Brazil from prehistoric times to the present day, discuss the origin of headache medicine as a specialty in Brazil, the principal publications dealing with headache disorders, the use of plants and other unconventional forms of treatment used by faith healers, the main training centers, and the research produced to date by Brazilians. In conclusion, in recent years enormous progress has been made in headache medicine in Brazil stimulating us to review and expand our role in an increasingly international scenario. © 2015 American Headache Society.

  5. Headache is associated with lower alcohol consumption among medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Domingues,Renan Barros; Domingues,Simone Aires

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between headache and alcohol consumption among medical students. 480 medical students were submitted to a questionnaire about headaches and drinking alcohol. Headache was assessed by ID-Migraine and functional disability was evaluated with MIDAS. The evaluation of alcohol consumption was assessed with Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT). There was significantly lower proportion of students with drinking problem among stude...

  6. Choosing wisely in headache medicine: the American Headache Society's list of five things physicians and patients should question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loder, Elizabeth; Weizenbaum, Emma; Frishberg, Benjamin; Silberstein, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to draw attention to tests and procedures associated with low-value care in headache medicine, the American Headache Society (AHS) joined the Choosing Wisely initiative of the American Board of Internal Medicine Foundation. The AHS president appointed an ad hoc "Choosing Wisely" task force of the AHS. The committee surveyed AHS members to develop a candidate list of items for the AHS "Top 5" list of low-value care in headache medicine. Through a process of literature review and consensus, the final list of five items was chosen. Draft recommendations went through several rounds of revision and a process of outside review. The AHS Board of Directors approved the final list of "Five Things." The five recommendations approved by the AHS Board of Directors are: (1) don't perform neuroimaging studies in patients with stable headaches that meet criteria for migraine; (2) don't perform computed tomography imaging for headache when magnetic resonance imaging is available, except in emergency settings; (3) don't recommend surgical deactivation of migraine trigger points outside of a clinical trial; (4) don't prescribe opioid- or butalbital-containing medications as a first-line treatment for recurrent headache disorders; and (5) don't recommend prolonged or frequent use of over-the-counter pain medications for headache. We recommend that headache medicine specialists and other physicians who evaluate and treat headache disorders should use this list when discussing care with patients. © 2013 American Headache Society.

  7. Ictal headache and visual sensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piccioli, M.; Parisi, P.; Tisei, P.; Villa, M. P.; Buttinelli, C.; Kasteleijn-Nolst Trenite, D. G. A.

    Migrainous headache is reported by patients with photosensitive epilepsy, whereas their relatives complain more often about headache than the relatives of patients with other types of epilepsy. We therefore investigated whether headache itself could be an epileptic symptom related to

  8. Neurostimulation in cluster headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jeppe L; Barloese, Mads; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Neurostimulation has emerged as a viable treatment for intractable chronic cluster headache. Several therapeutic strategies are being investigated including stimulation of the hypothalamus, occipital nerves and sphenopalatine ganglion. The aim of this review is to provide...... effective strategy must be preferred as first-line therapy for intractable chronic cluster headache....

  9. Disorders Of Sexual Preference Among Secondary School Teachers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In Nigeria, there is a dearth of data on Disorders of Sexual Preference (DSP), which is due to the unwillingness by most people to volunteer information on such issues. In spite of this, anecdotal evidence suggests strongly that DSP exist in Nigeria. Aims and objectives: This study was aimed at determining the ...

  10. HeadacheCoach: Towards headache prevention by sensing and making sense of personal lifestyle data

    OpenAIRE

    Terzimehić, Nađa; Leipold, Nadja; Fritzen, Alexandra; Böhm, Markus; Krcmar, Helmut

    2018-01-01

    Estimates are that almost half of the world’s population has an active primary headache disorder, i.e. with no illness as an underlying cause. These can start manifesting in early adulthood and can last until the rest of the sufferer’s life. Most specialists concur that sudden changes in daily lifestyle, such are sleep rhythm, nutrition behavior or stress experience, can be valid triggers for headache sufferers. Health care professionals recommend leading a diary to self-mon...

  11. Headache yesterday in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Surveys enquiring about burden of headache over a prior period of time (eg, 3 months) are subject to recall bias. To eliminate this as far as possible, we focused on presence and impact of headache on the preceding day (“headache yesterday”). Methods Adults (18-65 years) were surveyed from the general populations of Germany, Italy, Lithuania, Luxembourg and the Netherlands, from a work-force population in Spain and from mostly non-headache patient populations of Austria, France and UK. A study of non-responders in some countries allowed detection of potential participation bias where initial participation rates were low. Results Participation rates varied between 11% and 59% (mean 27%). Non-responder studies suggested that, because of participation bias, headache prevalence might be overestimated in initial responders by up to 2% (absolute). Across all countries, 1,422 of 8,271 participants (15-17%, depending on correction for participation bias) had headache yesterday lasting on average for 6 hours. It was bad or very bad in 56% of cases and caused absence from work or school in 6%. Among those who worked despite headache, 20% reported productivity reduced by >50%. Social activities were lost by 24%. Women (21%) were more likely than men (12%) to have headache yesterday, but impact was similar in the two genders. Conclusions With recall biases avoided, our findings indicate that headache costs at least 0.7% of working capacity in Europe. This calculation takes into account that most of those who missed work could make up for this later, which, however, means that leisure and social activities are even more influenced by headache. PMID:24884765

  12. PECULIARITIES OF HEADACHES IN CHILDREN WITH RHEUMATIC ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.V. Podkletnova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Headache is the more often seen complaint in patient with rheumatoid arthritis (RA at the visit to the neurologist. The objective of this study is analysis of headaches in children with different types of RA. 166 patients with different types of rheumatoid arthritis were examined, 65 (39,1% children had complaints to the headaches. All patients with complaints to the headaches underwent complex examination — taking neurological history, neurological examination, and radiography of cervical part of spinal column in 2 projections, Doppler sonography of cervical vessels, eye grounds examination. Analysis of symptoms of headaches makes possible dividing it to the main types in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: craniocervicalgia, vascular headaches, and secondary headaches on the ground of RA exacerbation, intoxication, and steroid arterial hypertension, and stress headaches. It was shown, that headaches can be a result of both disease and its antirheumatic treatment.Key words: children, headaches, juvenile arthritis.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2009;8(3:27-34

  13. Should non acute and recurrent headaches have neuroimaging ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method: Seventy-four cases that were referred to the specialist neurology clinic with complaints of chronic and recurrent headaches without focal neurological defi cit that had CT scan were reviewed consecutively using the short form of the International Classification of Headache Disorders second edition (ICHD 2) criteria ...

  14. The Frequent Unusual Headache Syndromes: A Proposed Classification Based on Lifetime Prevalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valença, Marcelo M; de Oliveira, Daniella A

    2016-01-01

    There is no agreement on a single cutoff point or prevalence for regarding a given disease as rare. The concept of what is a rare headache disorder is even less clear and the spectrum from a very frequent, frequent, occasional to rare headache syndrome is yet to be established. An attempt has been made to estimate the lifetime prevalence of each of the headache subtypes classified in the ICHD-II. Using the ICHD-II, 199 different headache subtypes were identified. The following classification was made according to the estimated lifetime prevalence of each headache disorder: very frequent (prevalence >10%); frequent (between 1 and 10%); occasional (between 0.07 and 1%); and unusual or rare (headache disorders, 7/199 (4%) as very frequent, 9/199 (5%) as frequent, and 29/199 (15%) as occasional forms of headache disorder. The unusual headache syndromes do not appear to be as infrequent in clinical practice as has been generally believed. About three-fourths of the classified headache disorders found in the ICHD-II can be considered as rare. This narrative review article may be regarded as an introduction to the concept of unusual headaches and a proposed classification of all headaches (at least those listed in the ICHD-II). © 2015 American Headache Society.

  15. Headache following intracranial neuroendovascular procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Eric P; Moskowitz, Shaye I; Tepper, Stewart J; Gupta, Rishi; Novak, Eric; Hussain, Muhammad Shazam; Stillman, Mark J

    2012-05-01

    Predicting who will develop post-procedure headache (PPH) following intracranial endovascular procedures (IEPs) would be clinically useful and potentially could assist in reducing the excessive diagnostic testing so often obtained in these patients. Although limited safety data exist, the use of triptans or dihydroergotamine (DHE) often raise concern when used with pre/post-coiled aneurysms. We sought to determine risk factors for PPH following IEP, to evaluate the utility of diagnostic testing in patients with post-coil acute headache (HA), and to record whether triptans and DHE have been used safely in this clinical setting. We conducted a retrospective chart review of adult patients undergoing IEPs. Bivariate analyses were conducted to compare patients who did and did not develop PPH. We reviewed records pertaining to 372 patients, of whom 263 underwent intracranial coil embolizations, 21 acrylic glue embolizations, and 88 stent placements. PPH occurred in 72% of coil patients, 33% of glue patients, and 14% of stent patients. Significant risk factors for post-coil HA were female gender, any pre-coil HA history, smoking, and anxiety/depression. A pre-stent history of HA exceeding 1 year's duration, and smoking were risk factors for post-stent HA. A pre-glue history of HA exceeding 1 year was the only risk factor for post-glue HA. In the small subgroup available for study, treatment with triptans or DHE was not associated with adverse events in pre/post-coiled aneurysms. Diagnostic testing was low yield. Occurrence of PPH was common after IEPs and especially so with coiling and in women, smokers, and those with anxiety/depression, and was often of longer duration than allowed by current International Classification of Headache Disorders-II criteria. The yield of diagnostic testing was low, and in a small subgroup treatment with triptans or DHE did not cause adverse events in pre/post-coiled aneurysms. Prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  16. Regional cerebral blood flow in childhood headache

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roach, E.S.; Stump, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured in 16 cranial regions in 23 children and adolescents with frequent headaches using the non-invasive Xenon-133 inhalation technique. Blood flow response to 5% carbon dioxide (CO2) was also determined in 21 patients, while response to 50% oxygen was measured in the two patients with hemoglobinopathy. Included were 10 patients with a clinical diagnosis of migraine, 4 with musculoskeletal headaches, and 3 with features of both types. Also studied were 2 patients with primary thrombocythemia, 2 patients with hemoglobinopathy and headaches, 1 patient with polycythemia, and 1 with headaches following trauma. With two exceptions, rCBF determinations were done during an asymptomatic period. Baseline rCBF values tended to be higher in these young patients than in young adults done in our laboratory. Localized reduction in the expected blood flow surge after CO2 inhalation, most often noted posteriorly, was seen in 8 of the 13 vascular headaches, but in none of the musculoskeletal headache group. Both patients with primary thrombocythemia had normal baseline flow values and altered responsiveness to CO2 similar to that seen in migraineurs; thus, the frequently reported headache and transient neurologic signs with primary thrombocythemia are probably not due to microvascular obstruction as previously suggested. These data support the concept of pediatric migraine as a disorder of vasomotor function and also add to our knowledge of normal rCBF values in younger patients. Demonstration of altered vasomotor reactivity to CO2 could prove helpful in children whose headache is atypical

  17. Two reports of flight-related headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatani, Kazuhiko

    2013-07-01

    Airplane headache is flight-related and appears during airplane landing and/or takeoff without accompanying symptoms. Intracranial and paranasal imaging studies reveal no abnormalities. The etiology is still uncertain, although sinus barotrauma has been proposed as a possible mechanism. 1) A 26-yr-old woman presented with recurring headache during each air travel since she was 22 yr old. Severe bursting pain suddenly manifested in the bilateral orbits and temples during airplane descent, with no accompanying additional symptoms. She had no unusual medical history. X-ray computed tomography (CT) scans showed no abnormalities except thickening of the nasal mucosa. Effective pain relief was obtained with over-the-counter nasal decongestant spray. 2) A 49-yr-old man presented with a 3-yr history of flight-related headache that appeared at airplane touchdown, when he had mental stress, or when he was suffering from a lack of sleep. Pain was of a severe jabbing quality, localized over the forehead with no additional accompanying symptoms. He had a past history of episodic tension-type headache. Intracranial and paranasal CT scan revealed no abnormalities. Headache ceased spontaneously within 40 min of the end of the flight and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug premedication did not prevent the headache. Sinus barotrauma was thought to be a plausible explanation for the headache in Case 1. In Case 2, an anxiety disorder could be considered as an underlying etiology. The etiology of so-called airplane headache is probably protean and this should be taken into account when assessing cases of in-flight cephalalgia.

  18. [Prevalence and indirect costs of headache in a Brazilian Company].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, M; Rodrigues, A de J; De Oliveira, G V; De Souza, K F; Doi, L M; Rocha, M B; Saporta, M A; Orleans, R B; Kotecki, R; Estrela, V V; De Medeiros, V A; Borges, W I

    1998-12-01

    Employees from a Brazilian oil company research centre (n = 993) were interviewed on the occurrence of headache during a 30 days period. Headache prevalence was 49.8%, with a mean frequency of 4.3 +/- 7.0 attacks per month, lasting 12.2 +/- 21.4 hours each. According to the International Headache Society diagnostic criteria, migraine (5.5%), episodic tension-type headache (26.4%), chronic tension-type headache (1.7%) and headaches not fulfilling the criteria for such disorders (16.2%) were observed. Women suffered comparatively more headache and specifically migraine than men. The pain interfered with work productivity in 10% of the subjects, corresponding to 538.75 hours off. According to an indirect costs estimation for each headache, the company may loose up to US$125.98 per employee annually. Since among headaches migraine has the highest indirect cost, migraine prevention and treatment is particularly important at the working environment. Migraine frequency may be prevented to a large extent, resulting on positive effects in both the quality of life and productivity. The cost-benefit ratio clearly favours therapeutic and preventive programs against chronic headaches.

  19. Rethinking headache chronification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Dana P; Smitherman, Todd A; Penzien, Donald B; Lipton, Richard B; Houle, Timothy T

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this series is to examine several threats to the interpretation of headache chronification studies that arise from methodological issues. The study of headache chronification has extensively used longitudinal designs with 2 or more measurement occasions. Unfortunately, application of these designs, when combined with the common practice of extreme score selection as well as the extant challenges in measuring headache frequency rates (eg, unreliability, regression to the mean), induces substantive threats to accurate interpretation of findings. Partitioning the amount of observed variance in rates of chronification and remission attributable to regression artifacts is a critical yet previously overlooked step to learning more about headache as a potentially progressive disease. In this series on rethinking headache chronification, we provide an overview of methodological issues in this area (this paper), highlight the influence of rounding error on estimates of headache frequency (second paper), examine the influence of random error and regression artifacts on estimates of chronification and remission (third paper), and consider future directions for this line of research (fourth paper). © 2013 American Headache Society.

  20. Update of Inpatient Treatment for Refractory Chronic Daily Headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Tzu-Hsien; Wang, Shuu-Jiun

    2016-01-01

    Chronic daily headache (CDH) is a group of headache disorders, in which headaches occur daily or near-daily (>15 days per month) and last for more than 3 months. Important CDH subtypes include chronic migraine, chronic tension-type headache, hemicrania continua, and new daily persistent headache. Other headaches with shorter durations (headache and various psychiatric disorders, such as depression and anxiety. Indications of inpatient treatment for CDH patients include poor responses to outpatient management, need for detoxification for overuse of specific medications (particularly opioids and barbiturates), and severe psychiatric comorbidities. Inpatient treatment usually involves stopping acute pain, preventing future attacks, and detoxifying medication overuse if present. Multidisciplinary integrated care that includes medical staff from different disciplines (e.g., psychiatry, clinical psychology, and physical therapy) has been recommended. The outcomes of inpatient treatment are satisfactory in terms of decreasing headache intensity or frequency, withdrawal from medication overuse, reducing disability, and improving life quality, although long-term relapse is not uncommon. In conclusion, inpatient treatment may be useful for select patients with refractory CDH and should be incorporated in a holistic headache care program.

  1. Refractory chronic cluster headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitsikostas, Dimos D; Edvinsson, Lars; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2014-01-01

    Chronic cluster headache (CCH) often resists to prophylactic pharmaceutical treatments resulting in patients' life damage. In this rare but pragmatic situation escalation to invasive management is needed but framing criteria are lacking. We aimed to reach a consensus for refractory CCH definition...... for clinical and research use. The preparation of the final consensus followed three stages. Internal between authors, a larger between all European Headache Federation members and finally an international one among all investigators that have published clinical studies on cluster headache the last five years...

  2. Karyotype in secondary hematologic disorders after treatment for Hodgkin's disease. A study of 19 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iurlo, A.; Mecucci, C.; Van Orshoven, A.; Michaux, J.L.; Boogaerts, M.; Van den Berghe, H.

    1988-01-01

    In 19 cases of secondary hematologic disorders in patients previously treated for Hodgkin's disease, chromosome aberrations were analyzed in relation to the type of previous chemo- and/or radiotherapy, age of the patients, histopathologic features of the Hodgkin's disease at diagnosis, time interval between the treatment and the occurrence of the secondary disorder, and survival. The karyotype was of significant prognostic value when three cytogenetic groups were considered: patients with normal karyotypes; patients with aberrations of chromosome 7 as the sole anomaly; and patients with complex rearrangements and translocations. The last group showed the lowest rate of survival. Bone marrow transplantation was successful in two patients with a normal karyotype

  3. The transition from primary to secondary school in mainstream education for children with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandy, William; Murin, Marianna; Baykaner, Ozlem; Staunton, Sara; Hellriegel, Josselyn; Anderson, Seonaid; Skuse, David

    2016-01-01

    The transition from primary to secondary education (hereafter 'school transition') is a major ecological shift that poses considerable social, emotional, academic and organisational challenges. It is commonly assumed that this school transition is especially difficult for children with autism spectrum disorder, but that idea is mainly based on anecdotal evidence and requires systematic investigation. We describe change and continuity for children with autism spectrum disorder (N = 28, mean age = 11.29 years, mean full-scale IQ = 87.86) transitioning in mainstream education from primary to secondary school. Levels of psychopathology, adaptive functioning and peer victimisation were measured by parent, self and teacher report in the last year of primary school, and again after one term of secondary school. At follow-up, all participants were still in their secondary school, and there was no evidence for a marked escalation of difficulties during the transition. Instead, we observed high levels of psychopathology and maladaption at baseline which persisted across the transition and were in some cases under-recognised. By parent report, levels of bullying fell from primary to secondary school. Future research should investigate factors, such as school characteristics, that influence the move to secondary education in autism spectrum disorder, to inform the development of interventions to promote successful school transition. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Diagnosis, pathophysiology, and management of cluster headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Jan; May, Arne

    2018-01-01

    Cluster headache is a trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia characterised by extremely painful, strictly unilateral, short-lasting headache attacks accompanied by ipsilateral autonomic symptoms or the sense of restlessness and agitation, or both. The severity of the disorder has major effects on the patient's quality of life and, in some cases, might lead to suicidal ideation. Cluster headache is now thought to involve a synchronised abnormal activity in the hypothalamus, the trigeminovascular system, and the autonomic nervous system. The hypothalamus appears to play a fundamental role in the generation of a permissive state that allows the initiation of an episode, whereas the attacks are likely to require the involvement of the peripheral nervous system. Triptans are the most effective drugs to treat an acute cluster headache attack. Monoclonal antibodies against calcitonin gene-related peptide, a crucial neurotransmitter of the trigeminal system, are under investigation for the preventive treatment of cluster headache. These studies will increase our understanding of the disorder and perhaps reveal other therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. BIOFEEDBACK TRAINING AND TENSION-TYPE HEADACHE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šecić, Ana; Cvjeticanin, Timon; Kes, Vanja Bašić

    2016-03-01

    Biofeedback is a training method, which connects physiological and psychological processes in a person for the purposes of improving his/her physical, emotional, mental and spiritual health. In biofeedback treatment, an active role of the patient is stressed for him/her to be able to actively control the physiological and emotional processes. The aim of biofeedback is to improve the conscious control of the individual's involuntary physiological activity. Research has shown that biofeedback, either applied alone or in combination with other behavioral therapies (techniques), is an effective treatment for various medical and psychological disorders, from headache and hypertension to temporomandibular and attention deficit disorders. More than 90% of adults experience headache once a year, which makes headache one of the most common symptoms and diagnoses in medicine. Tension-type headaches occur in at least 40% of the population and their impact on the health insurance costs and diminished productivity is significant. Studies have shown that clinical biofeedback training is effective in treating headaches. Moreover, the authors stress the need for additional research and further development of methodology for this kind of research.

  6. Radionuclide imaging in primary and secondary disorders of the myocardium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Follansbee, W.P.

    1987-01-01

    The list of all potential causes of myocardial disease or injury is an extensive one: a condensed version is presented. Conceptually these processes can be categorized into those which are, or appear to be, primary to the myocardium and those which secondarily involve it. Nuclear imaging procedures, particularly those used to assess ventricular function, are in a general sense potentially applicable to the clinical evaluation of any of these entities. In certain of these conditions, however, nuclear cardiac procedures have a demonstrated or potential additional and more specific role for the diagnosis and quantification of the entity. A number of these, including coronary artery disease, valvular heart disease, cor pulmonale, and myocardial trauma, are the topics of other chapters and, therefore, are not dealt with further here. The remainder of the myocardial disorders in which nuclear imaging procedures have a recognized or potential specific role are the focus of this discussion

  7. The comparison of sleep disturbances between the subjects with headache and healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Bostani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Headache is one of the most common complaints of the patients referring to the treatment centers. Also, some studies have reported the correlation of sleep disturbances with migraine and tension headaches. This study was aimed to analyze the association of sleep disturbances with migraine and tension headaches. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 1005 students of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences were selected by stratified random sampling during the academic year 2013-2014. Having attracted the participation and cooperation of the participants, sleep disorder and symptoms of headache (migraine and tension tests were administered. Results: The overall prevalence of headache, migraine headache and tension headache in students of medical science were 73.8 %, 16.7 % and 30.9 %, respectively. 20.3% of medical students had sleep disorder. Difficulty in sleep onset, daytime fatigue, apnea and sadness and anxiety were associated with headache. Total sleep disorder was directly associated with migraine headache (P<0.05.Conclusion: There was a correlation between sleep disorders and headache, especially migraine headache. Considering the importance of sleep in the incidence of headaches, sleep hygiene education and changes in the quality and patterns of sleep are essential for students, which can greatly affect their individual and social life.

  8. Headaches: In Depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 4):199–208. Kemper KJ, Breuner CC. Complementary, holistic, and integrative medicine: headaches . Pediatrics in Review . 2010; ... based evaluation of complementary health approaches for pain management in the United States. Mayo Clinic Proceedings . September ...

  9. [The Classification of Headache: Important Aspects of Patient's History and Clinical Diagnostic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamm, Katharina; Ruscheweyh, Ruth; Eren, Ozan; Straube, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    Headache disorders are the most occuring symptoms in human population. Basis for a successful therapy of headaches is a definite diagnosis, which needs in turn valid criteria for the graduation of headaches. Corresponding to the classification of the International Headache Society (IHS) especially relevant questions about patient's history and clinical examination lead to a diagnosis. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Does monosodium glutamate really cause headache? : a systematic review of human studies

    OpenAIRE

    Obayashi, Yoko; Nagamura, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    Although monosodium glutamate (MSG) is classified as a causative substance of headache in the International Classification of Headache Disorders 3rd edition (ICHD-III beta), there is no literature in which causal relationship between MSG and headache was comprehensively reviewed. We performed systematic review of human studies which include the incidence of headache after an oral administration of MSG. An analysis was made by separating the human studies with MSG administration with or withou...

  11. Supporting Students with Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD) at Secondary School: A Parent and Student Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Adele

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a small-scale research project undertaken in July 2007, which focused on a group of students with a diagnosis of autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) currently attending a mainstream secondary school. Three focus groups were held with students in Years 9 and 11 and with their parents in order to explore current practice on…

  12. Behaviour Disorders Related to Drug Abuse among Secondary School Students in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    King'endo, Madrine

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find out the behavior disorders displayed by secondary school students as a result of substance abuse. This would assist to train teachers on specialized intervention methods so that they can have knowledge on how to curb drug menace in learning institutions. The students were interrogated about substance abuse…

  13. The Transition from Primary to Secondary School in Mainstream Education for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandy, William; Murin, Marianna; Baykaner, Ozlem; Staunton, Sara; Hellriegel, Josselyn; Anderson, Seonaid; Skuse, David

    2016-01-01

    The transition from primary to secondary education (hereafter "school transition") is a major ecological shift that poses considerable social, emotional, academic and organisational challenges. It is commonly assumed that this school transition is especially difficult for children with autism spectrum disorder, but that idea is mainly…

  14. Glassy transition in a disordered model for the RNA secondary structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagnani, A.; Parisi, G.; Ricci-Tersenghi, F.

    2000-04-01

    We numerically study a disordered model for the RNA secondary structure and we find that it undergoes a phase transition, with a breaking of the replica symmetry in the low temperature region (like in spin glasses). Our results are based on the exact evaluation of the partition function. (author)

  15. Validity of 'post-traumatic stress disorder with secondary psychotic features': a review of the evidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braakman, M. H.; Kortmann, F. A. M.; van den Brink, W.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the evidence from empirical studies regarding the validity of 'post-traumatic stress disorder with secondary psychotic features' (PTSD-SP) as a separate diagnostic entity. METHOD: The authors performed a review tracing publications between 1980 and January 2008. RESULTS:

  16. Cluster Headache: Epidemiology, Pathophysiology, Clinical Features, and Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Diana Yi-Ting; Yuan Ong, Jonathan Jia; Goadsby, Peter James

    2018-04-01

    Cluster headache is a primary headache disorder affecting up to 0.1% of the population. Patients suffer from cluster headache attacks lasting from 15 to 180 min up to 8 times a day. The attacks are characterized by the severe unilateral pain mainly in the first division of the trigeminal nerve, with associated prominent unilateral cranial autonomic symptoms and a sense of agitation and restlessness during the attacks. The male-to-female ratio is approximately 2.5:1. Experimental, clinical, and neuroimaging studies have advanced our understanding of the pathogenesis of cluster headache. The pathophysiology involves activation of the trigeminovascular complex and the trigeminal-autonomic reflex and accounts for the unilateral severe headache, the prominent ipsilateral cranial autonomic symptoms. In addition, the circadian and circannual rhythmicity unique to this condition is postulated to involve the hypothalamus and suprachiasmatic nucleus. Although the clinical features are distinct, it may be misdiagnosed, with patients often presenting to the otolaryngologist or dentist with symptoms. The prognosis of cluster headache remains difficult to predict. Patients with episodic cluster headache can shift to chronic cluster headache and vice versa. Longitudinally, cluster headache tends to remit with age with less frequent bouts and more prolonged periods of remission in between bouts.

  17. Naratriptan in the Prophylactic Treatment of Cluster Headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yasuo; Mitsufuji, Takashi; Asano, Yoshio; Shimazu, Tomokazu; Kato, Yuji; Tanahashi, Norio; Maruki, Yuichi; Sakai, Fumihiko; Yamamoto, Toshimasa; Araki, Nobuo

    2017-10-01

    Objective Naratriptan has been reported to reduce the frequency of cluster headache. The purpose of this study was to determine whether naratriptan is effective as a prophylactic treatment for cluster headache in Japan. Methods We retrospectively reviewed all 43 patients with cluster headache who received preventive treatment with naratriptan from April 2009 to April 2015. The International Classification of Headache Disorders, 3rd Edition (beta version) (ICHD-3 beta) was used to diagnose cluster headache. This study was conducted at 3 centers (Department of Neurology, Saitama Medical University; Saitama Neuropsychiatric Institute; Saitama Medical University International Medical Center). Patients were recruited from these specialized headache outpatient centers. Naratriptan was taken before the patient went to bed. Results The study population included 30 men (69.8%) and 13 women (30.2%). Twenty-two cases received other preventive treatments (51.2%), while 21 cases only received naratriptan (48.8%). Among the 43 cases, 37 patients (86.0%) achieved an improvement of cluster headache on naratriptan. Conclusion Naratriptan has been suggested as a preventive medicine for cluster headache because of the longer the biological half-life in comparison to other triptans. The internal use of naratriptan 2 hours before attacks appears to achieve a good response in patients with cluster headache.

  18. New daily-persistent headache versus tension-type headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Matthew S; Crystal, Sara C

    2010-12-01

    New daily-persistent headache (NDPH) and chronic tension-type headache (CTTH) are two forms of primary chronic daily headache of long duration that often are similar in their headache manifestations. NDPH distinguishes itself from CTTH and the other forms of chronic daily headache by its continuous head pain from onset. However, despite formalized criteria that specify NDPH must resemble the acute onset of a headache identical to that of CTTH, NDPH commonly has migraine features. Here, we review the available literature on NDPH and compare its clinical features, epidemiology, prognosis, inciting factors, and treatment to CTTH.

  19. Deep brain stimulation for cluster headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grover, Patrick J; Pereira, Erlick A C; Green, Alexander L

    2009-01-01

    Cluster headache is a severely debilitating disorder that can remain unrelieved by current pharmacotherapy. Alongside ablative neurosurgical procedures, neuromodulatory treatments of deep brain stimulation (DBS) and occipital nerve simulation have emerged in the last few years as effective...... treatments for medically refractory cluster headaches. Pioneers in the field have sought to publish guidelines for neurosurgical treatment; however, only small case series with limited long-term follow-up have been published. Controversy remains over which surgical treatments are best and in which...... circumstances to intervene. Here we review current data on neurosurgical interventions for chronic cluster headache focusing upon DBS and occipital nerve stimulation, and discuss the indications for and putative mechanisms of DBS including translational insights from functional neuroimaging, diffusion weighted...

  20. Sleep and chronobiology in cluster headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barloese, M; Lund, N.; Petersen, A

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Cluster headache (CH) is the headache disorder with the strongest chronobiological traits. The severe attacks of pain occur with diurnal and annual rhythmicity but the precise rhythm and involvement of potential zeitgebers is unknown. Patients complain of poor sleep quality yet...... this has never been studied. We investigated triggers, rhythms, sleep quality and chronotypes in CH. METHODS: Patients and controls completed questionnaires and structured interviews composed of new and previously validated parts including the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and Morningness......-Eveningness Questionnaire (MEQ). Patients were characterized by a CH index, a unified measure of headache burden. RESULTS: A total of 275 CH patients and 145 matched controls were included. The most common trigger was sleep (80%) and a relationship between clusters and daylight was identified. Of the patients, 82...

  1. Tension‑Type Headache - Psychiatric Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Campos Mendes

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The tension‑type headaches (Ctt are the most frequent headaches in the general population and those with higher socio‑economic impact, given the high degree of disability they cause. Objective: The authors propose to conduct a review of the available literature on the subject, from a psychiatric perspective. Discussion: Several studies have identified a higher prevalence of psychiatric disorders, personality traits and ineffective coping mechanisms in patients with Ctt, so it is essential to understand this relationship and the impact of these psychopathological factors on this kind of headaches. Conclusion: Their clinical and therapeutic approach is hampered by these and other factors and multiple strategies of pharmacological and psycho‑behavioral treatment have been used on them, however, scientific evidence is still scarce.

  2. Endovascular thrombectomy and post-procedural headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Sabrina; Amin, Faisal Mohammad; Holtmannspötter, Markus

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We investigated the prevalence of post-procedural headache in patients who have undergone thrombectomy for ischemic stroke, and correlated history of migraine with risk of peri-procedural complications. A total of 314 patients underwent thrombectomy at the Danish National Hospital from...... January 2012 to December 2014. Eligible subjects were phone-interviewed using a purpose-developed semi-structured questionnaire according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders 3, beta version criteria. FINDINGS: Among 96 eligible subjects, there was a significant decrease in migraine...... (p = 0.022) within the first 3 months after EVT compared to 1 year before treatment, which was further evident at interview time (on average 1.6 years after EVT, p = 0.013). A minority of patients experienced headaches for the first time within 3 months of their EVT (migraine 2, TTH 9), which...

  3. The importance of secondary trauma exposure for post-disaster mental disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, R C; McLaughlin, K A; Koenen, K C; Petukhova, M; Hill, E D

    2012-03-01

    Interventions to treat mental disorders after natural disasters are important both for humanitarian reasons and also for successful post-disaster physical reconstruction that depends on the psychological functioning of the affected population. A major difficulty in developing such interventions, however, is that large between-disaster variation exists in the prevalence of post-disaster mental disorders, making it difficult to estimate need for services in designing interventions without carrying out a post-disaster mental health needs assessment survey. One of the daunting methodological challenges in implementing such surveys is that secondary stressors unique to the disaster often need to be discovered to understand the magnitude, type, and population segments most affected by post-disaster mental disorders. This problem is examined in the current commentary by analyzing data from the WHO World Mental Health (WMH) Surveys. We analyze the extent to which people exposed to natural disasters throughout the world also experienced secondary stressors and the extent to which the mental disorders associated with disasters were more proximally due to these secondary stressors than to the disasters themselves. RESULTS. Lifetime exposure to natural disasters was found to be high across countries (4.4-7.5%). 10.7-11.4% of those exposed to natural disasters reported the occurrence of other related stressors (e.g. death of a loved one and destruction of property). A monotonic relationship was found between the number of additional stressors and the subsequent onset of mental disorders CONCLUSIONS. These results document the importance of secondary stressors in accounting for the effects of natural disasters on mental disorders. Implications for intervention planning are discussed.

  4. Headache attributed to airplane travel ('airplane headache'): clinical profile based on a large case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainardi, F; Lisotto, C; Maggioni, F; Zanchin, G

    2012-06-01

    The 'headache attributed to airplane travel', also named 'airplane headache' (AH), is a recently described headache disorder that appears exclusively in relation to airplane flights, in particular during the landing phase. Based on the stereotypical nature of the attacks in all reported cases, we proposed provisional diagnostic criteria for AH in a previously published paper. Up to now 37 cases have been described in the literature. After our paper was disseminated via the Internet, we received several email messages from subjects around the world who had experienced such a peculiar headache. Their cooperation, by completing a structured questionnaire and allowing the direct observation of three subjects, enabled us to carry out a study on a total of 75 patients suffering from AH. Our survey confirmed the stereotypical nature of the attacks, in particular with regard to the short duration of the pain (lasting less than 30 minutes in up to 95% of the cases), the clear relationship with the landing phase, the unilateral pain, the male preponderance, and the absence of accompanying signs and/or symptoms. It is conceivable to consider barotrauma as one of the main mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of AH. The observation that the pain appears inconstantly in the majority of cases, without any evident disorder affecting the paranasal sinuses, could be consistent with a multimodal pathogenesis underlying this condition, possibly resulting in the interaction between anatomic, environmental and temporary concurrent factors. This is by far the largest AH case series ever reported in the literature. The diagnostic criteria that we previously proposed proved to be valid when applied to a large number of patients suffering from this condition. We support its recognition as a new form of headache, to be included in the forthcoming update of the International Headache Society Classification, within '10. Headache attributed to disorder of homoeostasis'. Its formal

  5. Gender influences headache characteristics with increasing age in migraine patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolay, Hayrunnisa; Ozge, Aynur; Saginc, Petek; Orekici, Gulhan; Uludüz, Derya; Yalın, Osman; Siva, Aksel; Bıçakçi, Şebnem; Karakurum, Başak; Öztürk, Musa

    2015-08-01

    Migraine headache is one of the most common primary headache disorders and is three times more prevalent in women than in men, especially during the reproductive ages. The neurobiological basis of the female dominance has been partly established. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of gender on the headache manifestations in migraine patients. The study group consisted of 2082 adult patients from five different hospitals' tertiary care-based headache clinics. The relationship between headache characteristics and gender was evaluated in migraine with aura (MwA) and migraine without aura (MwoA). The duration, severity, frequency of headache and associated symptoms were evaluated in both genders and age-dependent variations and analyzed in two subgroups. Women with migraine were prone to significantly longer duration and intensity of headache attacks. Nausea, phonophobia and photophobia were more prevalent in women. Median headache duration was also longer in women than in men in MwA (p = 0.013) and MwoA (p < 0.001). Median headache intensity was higher in women than in men in MwA (p = 0.010) and MwoA (p = 0.009). The frequency of nausea was significantly higher in women than in men in MwA (p = 0.049). Throbbing headache quality and associated features (nausea, photophobia, and phonophobia) were significantly more frequent in women than in men in MwoA. The gender impact varied across age groups and significant changes were seen in female migraineurs after age 30. No age-dependent variation was observed in male migraineurs. Gender has an influence on the characteristics of the headache as well as on the associated symptoms in migraine patients, and this impact varies across the age groups, particularly in women. © International Headache Society 2014.

  6. Overlap between Headache, Depression, and Anxiety in General Neurological Clinics: A Cross-sectional Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cui-Bai Wei; Jian-Ping Jia; Fen Wang; Ai-Hong Zhou; Xiu-Mei Zuo; Chang-Biao Chu

    2016-01-01

    Background:Many studies have reported that depression and anxiety have bidirectional relationship with headache.However,few researches investigated the roles of depression or anxiety in patients with headache.We surveyed the prevalence of depression and anxiety as a complication or cause of headache among outpatients with a chief complaint of headache at neurology clinics in general hospitals.Additional risk factors for depression and anxiety were also analyzed.Methods:A cross-sectional study was conducted at 11 general neurological clinics.All consecutive patients with a chief complaint of headache were enrolled.Diagnoses of depression and anxiety were made using the Chinese version of the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview,and those for headache were made according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders,2nd Edition.The headache impact test and an 11-point verbal rating scale were applied to assess headache severity and intensity.Logistic regression was used to analyze risk factors of patients with headache for depression or anxiety.Results:A total of 749 outpatients with headache were included.Among them,148 (19.7%) were diagnosed with depression and 103 (13.7%) with anxiety.Further analysis showed that 114 (15.2%) patients complaining headache due to somatic symptoms of psychiatric disorders and 82 (10.9%) had a depression or anxiety comorbidity with headache.Most patients with depression or anxiety manifested mild to moderate headaches.Poor sleep and severe headache-related disabilities were predictors for either depression or anxiety.Conclusion:Clinicians must identify the etiology of headache and recognize the effects of depression or anxiety on headache to develop specific treatments.

  7. Incidence of migraine and tension-type headache in three different populations at risk within the German DMKG headache study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khil, Laura; Pfaffenrath, Volker; Straube, Andreas; Evers, Stefan; Berger, Klaus

    2012-03-01

    Unlike the prevalence, the incidence of headache disorders has attracted only little attention in epidemiological research. Different definitions of the 'population at risk' among the few published migraine and tension-type headache incidence studies limit their comparability and warrant further research. Therefore, we analysed data from the German Migraine and Headache Society (DMKG). Incidences were assessed in the general population in Germany via standardized headache questions using the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd Edition (ICHD-2). The population was drawn from a 5-year age-group- stratified and gender-stratified random sample from the population register. Of the 1312 baseline participants examined between 2003 and 2004, 1122 (85.5%) participated in the follow-up in 2006 and were the basis for three different populations at risk. We found that the three populations differed in size, age, gender and incidence estimate. The total sample incidence of migraine ranged between 0% and 3.3% and of tension-type headache between 5.3% and 9.2% depending on the definition of 'at risk'. We concluded that one significant problem in headache incidence estimation is the definition of 'at risk', limiting comparability. Thus, this study supports the need for a common definition for prospective headache incidence estimations.

  8. The mass media exposure and disordered eating behaviours in Spanish secondary students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calado, María; Lameiras, María; Sepulveda, Ana R; Rodríguez, Yolanda; Carrera, María V

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between disordered eating behaviours/attitudes and mass media exposure in a cross-sectional national survey of 1165 Spanish secondary students (age between 14 and 16 years). A battery of questionnaires were used to investigate mass media influence, body dissatisfaction, physical appearance, sociocultural attitudes and self-esteem. Likewise, the EAT-26 questionnaire was used to assess disordered eating behaviours/attitudes, identifying that 6.6% (n = 32) of the male and 13.6% (n = 68) of the female students reached a cut-off point of 20 or above. The main finding was that female and male adolescents with disordered eating showed an increased exposure to TV and magazine sections related to body image, specifically regarding music video channels, in comparison with those without eating disordered, gender-matched counterparts. However, findings indicate that media exposure was different to some degree between males and females with disordered eating behaviour. Males with disordered eating behaviours and attitudes were associated with higher TV and magazine exposure to health sections and also greater body dissatisfaction, internalisation of the thin-ideal and social and appearance comparison. In females, disordered eating was associated with higher TV and magazine exposure to dieting, fashion and sport sections, greater body dissatisfaction, internalisation and awareness of the thin-ideal and lower self-esteem. Understanding the mechanism involved in the media exposure's influence on adolescents is critical in preventing disordered eating.

  9. The Yekaterinburg headache initiative

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebedeva, Elena R; Olesen, Jes; Osipova, Vera V

    2013-01-01

    for a demonstrational interventional project in Russia, undertaken within the Global Campaign against Headache. The initiative proposes three actions: 1) raise awareness of need for improvement; 2) design and implement a three-tier model (from primary care to a single highly specialized centre with academic affiliation......) for efficient and equitable delivery of headache-related health care; 3) develop a range of educational initiatives aimed at primary-care physicians, non-specialist neurologists, pharmacists and the general public to support the second action. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: We set these proposals in a context...... of a health-care needs assessment, and as a model for all Russia. We present and discuss early progress of the initiative, justify the investment of resources required for implementation and call for the political support that full implementation requires. The more that the Yekaterinburg headache initiative...

  10. An examination of Gestalt contact styles, anger and anxiety levels of headache and non headache groups (Turkish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çiğdem Kudiaki

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Object: In migraine and tension type headaches, which constitute the largest part of primary headache disorders, the importance of psychological factors and psychotherapy applications are reported consistently. In the gestalt therapy approach, studies on physical disorders and body have a special precaution and it is assumed that the physical disorders that are highly related to psychological factors such as headache may be related to Gestalt contact patterns. This study was conducted to investigate Gestalt contact patterns, anger and anxiety levels, and to identify variables that predict contact patterns in the groups with and without headache. Methods: In the first group, migrain and tension type headache, there were 161 (141 female/20 male participants and in the group without headache there were 126 participants (94 female/32 male. There were 287 participants in total. Data was collected through Personal Information Form, Gestalt Contact Styles Scale – Revised Form, Multidimensional Anger Scale and Beck Anxiety Inventory. Results: The comparisons of groups in terms contact styles, anger and anxiety yields that the individuals in headache group engage in retroflection, deflection and desensitization contact styles more than individuals who do not have headaches and they have higher anger and anxiety levels. Similarly, the results of the regression analysis show that the negative attitudes towards oneself, others and the world are an important predictor of retroflection and deflection contacts styles. Also, the attitude of desensitization seems to play a role in decreasing anxious reactions and decreasing quiet responses. Discussion: The results indicate that unhealthy contact styles, anger and anxiety experiences have negative effects on headache. Thus, Gestalt therapy based psychotherapy techniques can me recommended to be an important foundation for treatment of headaches.

  11. Incidence of eating disorders in Danish psychiatric secondary healthcare 1970-2008

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelmark, Carina; Jensen, Signe Ow; Plessen, Kerstin J

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Is an increased focus on eating disorders during the past few decades reflected by increasing occurrence in the psychiatric health service system. METHOD: All first-time diagnoses of eating disorders identified in the Danish Central Psychiatric Research Register 1970-2008 constitute...... the present research database. Age-standardized rates per 100,000 inhabitants were calculated and autoregressive models were fitted for males and females separately as well as for in- and outpatients. RESULTS: The incidence of eating disorders diagnosed in Danish psychiatric secondary healthcare has increased...... considerably during a nearly 40-year period of observation both within the general category of eating disorders and also specifically for anorexia nervosa. The steepest increase is seen within females aged 15-19 years, where the highest incidences are also found. Anorexia nervosa constitutes the vast majority...

  12. Psychological Risk Factors in Headache

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Robert A.; Houle, Timothy T.; Rhudy, Jamie L.; Norton, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    Headache is a chronic disease that occurs with varying frequency and results in varying levels of disability. To date, the majority of research and clinical focus has been on the role of biological factors in headache and headache-related disability. However, reliance on a purely biomedical model of headache does not account for all aspects of headache and associated disability. Using a biopsychosocial framework, the current manuscript expands the view of what factors influence headache by considering the role psychological (i.e., cognitive and affective) factors have in the development, course, and consequences of headache. The manuscript initially reviews evidence showing that neural circuits responsible for cognitive–affective phenomena are highly interconnected with the circuitry responsible for headache pain. The manuscript then reviews the influence cognitions (locus of control and self-efficacy) and negative affect (depression, anxiety, and anger) have on the development of headache attacks, perception of headache pain, adherence to prescribed treatment, headache treatment outcome, and headache-related disability. The manuscript concludes with a discussion of the clinical implications of considering psychological factors when treating headache. PMID:17371358

  13. Secondary psychotic features in refugees diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Mette Kathrine; Sonne, Charlotte Kærgaard; Carlsson, Jessica

    2017-01-01

    at Competence Centre for Transcultural Psychiatry (CTP) were examined, and all the PTSD patients were divided into two groups; one group with secondary psychotic features (PTSD-SP group) and one without (PTSD group). A categorisation and description of the secondary psychotic features was undertaken. RESULTS......-SP prevalence in a clinical refugee population with PTSD. The study points to the difficulties distinguishing psychotic features from flashbacks and the authors call for attention to psychotic features in PTSD patients in order to improve documentation and understanding of the disorder....

  14. Myelography and headache

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, B.

    1985-01-01

    The side effects associated with the use of Metrizamide, Iopamidol and Iotrol in two double blind studies on lumbar myelography were determined. The cause of headache is explained on the one hand as the result of the distribution of the contrast substance in the CSF space (early headache) and on the other hand due to the CSF leak through the puncture lesion. Peculiar hints are given for a safe examination technique. Iotrol seems to be the safest contrast substance for intrathecal use, however it should be used in the smallest possible amount to reduce even further contrast-related effects in myelography. (Author)

  15. Tension-type headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Lars; Jensen, Rigmor; Bendtsen, Lars

    2009-01-01

    The substantial societal and individual burdens associated with tension-type headache (TTH) constitute a previously overlooked major public health issue. TTH is prevalent, affecting up to 78% of the general population, and 3% suffer from chronic TTH. Pericranial myofascial nociception probably...... is important for the pathophysiology of episodic TTH, whereas sensitization of central nociceptive pathways seems responsible for the conversion of episodic to chronic TTH. Headache-related disability usually can be reduced by identification of trigger factors combined with nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic...... treatments, but effective treatment modalities are lacking. Benefits can be gained by development of specific and effective treatment strategies....

  16. Headache and pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Negro, A; Delaruelle, Z; Ivanova, T A

    2017-01-01

    , brain MRI and MR angiography with contrast ophthalmoscopy and lumbar puncture. During pregnancy and breastfeeding the preferred therapeutic strategy for the treatment of primary headaches should always be a non-pharmacological one. Treatment should not be postponed as an undermanaged headache can lead...... to stress, sleep deprivation, depression and poor nutritional intake that in turn can have negative consequences for both mother and baby. Therefore, if non-pharmacological interventions seem inadequate, a well-considered choice should be made concerning the use of medication, taking into account all...

  17. Protein secondary structure appears to be robust under in silico evolution while protein disorder appears not to be.

    KAUST Repository

    Schaefer, Christian

    2010-01-16

    MOTIVATION: The mutation of amino acids often impacts protein function and structure. Mutations without negative effect sustain evolutionary pressure. We study a particular aspect of structural robustness with respect to mutations: regular protein secondary structure and natively unstructured (intrinsically disordered) regions. Is the formation of regular secondary structure an intrinsic feature of amino acid sequences, or is it a feature that is lost upon mutation and is maintained by evolution against the odds? Similarly, is disorder an intrinsic sequence feature or is it difficult to maintain? To tackle these questions, we in silico mutated native protein sequences into random sequence-like ensembles and monitored the change in predicted secondary structure and disorder. RESULTS: We established that by our coarse-grained measures for change, predictions and observations were similar, suggesting that our results were not biased by prediction mistakes. Changes in secondary structure and disorder predictions were linearly proportional to the change in sequence. Surprisingly, neither the content nor the length distribution for the predicted secondary structure changed substantially. Regions with long disorder behaved differently in that significantly fewer such regions were predicted after a few mutation steps. Our findings suggest that the formation of regular secondary structure is an intrinsic feature of random amino acid sequences, while the formation of long-disordered regions is not an intrinsic feature of proteins with disordered regions. Put differently, helices and strands appear to be maintained easily by evolution, whereas maintaining disordered regions appears difficult. Neutral mutations with respect to disorder are therefore very unlikely.

  18. Protein secondary structure appears to be robust under in silico evolution while protein disorder appears not to be.

    KAUST Repository

    Schaefer, Christian; Schlessinger, Avner; Rost, Burkhard

    2010-01-01

    MOTIVATION: The mutation of amino acids often impacts protein function and structure. Mutations without negative effect sustain evolutionary pressure. We study a particular aspect of structural robustness with respect to mutations: regular protein secondary structure and natively unstructured (intrinsically disordered) regions. Is the formation of regular secondary structure an intrinsic feature of amino acid sequences, or is it a feature that is lost upon mutation and is maintained by evolution against the odds? Similarly, is disorder an intrinsic sequence feature or is it difficult to maintain? To tackle these questions, we in silico mutated native protein sequences into random sequence-like ensembles and monitored the change in predicted secondary structure and disorder. RESULTS: We established that by our coarse-grained measures for change, predictions and observations were similar, suggesting that our results were not biased by prediction mistakes. Changes in secondary structure and disorder predictions were linearly proportional to the change in sequence. Surprisingly, neither the content nor the length distribution for the predicted secondary structure changed substantially. Regions with long disorder behaved differently in that significantly fewer such regions were predicted after a few mutation steps. Our findings suggest that the formation of regular secondary structure is an intrinsic feature of random amino acid sequences, while the formation of long-disordered regions is not an intrinsic feature of proteins with disordered regions. Put differently, helices and strands appear to be maintained easily by evolution, whereas maintaining disordered regions appears difficult. Neutral mutations with respect to disorder are therefore very unlikely.

  19. Clinical aspects of perimenstrual headaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Frederick R

    2009-02-01

    Menstrual migraine (MM) is either pure, if attacks are limited solely during the perimenstrual window (PMW), or menstrually related (MRM), if two of three PMWs are associated with attacks with additional migraine events outside the PMW. Acute migraine specific therapy is equally effective in MM and non-MM. Although the International Classification of Headache Disorders-II classifies MM without aura, data suggest this needs revision. The studies on extended-cycle oral contraceptives suggest benefits for headache-prone individuals. Triptan mini-prophylaxis outcomes are positive, but a conclusion of "minimal net benefit compared to placebo" is not entirely unwarranted. In a 2008 evidence-based review, grade B recommendations exist for sumatriptan (50 and 100 mg), mefenamic acid (500 mg), and riza-triptan (10 mg) for the acute treatment of MRM. For the preventive mini-prophylactic treatment of MRM, grade B recommendations are provided for transcutaneous estrogen (1.5 mg), frovatriptan (2.5 mg twice daily), and naratriptan (1 mg twice daily).

  20. [Migraine type childhood headache aggravated by sexual abuse: case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaleağasi, Hakan; Ozge, Aynur; Toros, Fevziye; Kar, Hakan

    2009-04-01

    Although the vast majority of chronic headache is idiopathic in origin, child abuse can be a very rare cause of paroxysmal headaches in children. The aim of this report was to present a case of migraine headache aggravated after sexual abuse, which did not respond to treatment. An 11-year-old girl admitted to the outpatient department of the Neurology Clinic with headache complaint for the past two years. Neurological examination, neuroimaging and laboratory tests were normal. According to the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD)-II criteria, the headache was diagnosed as migraine without aura and treatment as prophylaxis was planned. Her headache did not respond to treatment, so she was consulted with the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and diagnosed as major depressive disorder. During one of the psychological interviews, she confessed that she had been sexually abused by her mother's boyfriend for two years. After this confession and punishment of the abuser, her headache improved dramatically. The prevalence of physical, sexual, and emotional abuse during childhood has been estimated between 13% and 27%, and these children may suffer chronic pain, headache or depression. Sexual abuse has been strongly associated with the migraine-depression phenotype when abuse first occurred before the age of 12 years. Despite the high prevalence of abuse, many physicians do not routinely ask about abuse history. In conclusion, child abuse must be kept in mind in intractable childhood headache. A multidisciplinary approach with the Departments of Forensic Sciences and Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and detailed psychiatric evaluation should be useful in these cases.

  1. Acute medication overuse in headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abouch Valenty Krymchantovscki

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Primary headache patients frequently overuse analgesics. Acute medication overuse plays an important role in the transformation of episodic into chronic headaches. The sudden discontinuation of analgesic and migraine prevention introduction are the main issues in the management of chronic daily headache patients. Educational strategies for those who do not overuse acute medications and an agressive approach to those overusing are fundamental for the efficacy of the primary frequent headache treatment.

  2. Review of botulinum toxin type A for the prophylactic treatment of chronic daily headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Evers

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Stefan EversDepartment of Neurology, University of Münster, Münster, GermanyAbstract: Botulinum toxin A is increasingly used in the treatment of idiopathic and symptomatic headache disorders. However, only few controlled trials are available and many trials can hardly be compared to each other because of different endpoints and different trial designs. In particular chronic daily headache, which is defined as an idiopathic headache occurring on more than 15 days per month for at least 3 months and a daily duration of at least 4 hours, is considered as a headache disorder with possible efficacy of botulinum toxin A. For the prophylactic treatment of chronic tension-type headache and chronic migraine, no sufficient positive evidence for a successful treatment can be obtained from randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled trials to date. For the treatment of chronic daily headache including medication overuse headache, there is some positive evidence for efficacy in a subgroup of patients. To date, the majority of double-blind and placebo-controlled studies do not suggest that botulinum toxin A is efficacious in the treatment of chronic idiopathic headache disorders. However, it is possible that some subgroups of patients with chronic daily headache will benefit from a long-term treatment with botulinum toxin A.Keywords: botulinum toxin A, chronic daily headache, chronic tension-type headache, chronic migraine

  3. Medication overuse headache and chronic migraine in a specialized headache centre: field-testing proposed new appendix criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeeberg, P; Olesen, Jes; Jensen, R

    2009-01-01

    The classification subcommittee of the International Headache Society (IHS) has recently suggested revised criteria for medication overuse headache (MOH) and chronic migraine (CM). We field tested these revised criteria by applying them to the headache population at the Danish Headache Centre...... suggest that the IHS has succeeded in choosing new criteria for CM which are neither too strict, nor too loose. For MOH, a shift to the appendix criteria will increase the number of MOH patients, but take into account the possibility of permanent changes in pain perception due to medication overuse...... and the possibility of a renewed effect of prophylactic drugs due to medication withdrawal. We therefore recommend the implementation of the appendix criteria for both MOH and CM into the main body of the International Classification of Headache Disorders....

  4. Headaches with ocular localization and involvement Cefaleas de localización y compromiso oculares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Lucía Muñoz Cardona

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The most frequent primary headaches, including migraine variants, and intrinsic optic nerve disorders that produce headache, are reviewed. The latter are often accompanied by autonomic nervous system alterations which lead to vasomotor changes, frequently present in neuralgic processes known as headaches with disautonomic involvement. Epidemiological, semiological, clinical, and therapeutical aspects of different cranial, facial and ocular diseases that produce headache are included. Some physiopathological elements that may help to analyze painful craniofacial processes are discussed. Secondary headaches and common facial neuralgias, on the other hand, are also considered because they may confuse the differential diagnosis. Se revisan las cefaleas primarias más frecuentes que comprometen las estructuras oculares y vecinas al globo ocular, las variantes de la migraña y las alteraciones propias del nervio óptico que alteran la función visual y que se acompañan no solamente de síntomas dolorosos sino también de trastornos vasomotores debidos a alteraciones del sistema nervioso autónomo que suelen ser comunes en algunos procesos neurálgicos llamados ahora cefaleas con compromiso disautonómico. En este artículo se comentan los elementos epidemiológicos de las diferentes enfermedades craneales, faciales y oculares que cursan con cefalea; las diferencias clínicas entre las mismas y su presentación semiológica, al igual que algunos elementos terapéuticos. Se discuten además algunos elementos fisiopatológicos de gran utilidad en el análisis de los procesos dolorosos craneofaciales y el perfil temporal de los mismos; también se comentan algunas cefaleas secundarias que comparten con las primarias elementos que se prestan a confusión en la clínica. Finalmente, se hace un análisis de las neuralgias faciales comunes.

  5. Headache of cervical origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burguet, J.L.; Wackenheim, A.

    1984-01-01

    The authors recall cervical etiologies of headache. They distinguish on the one hand the cervico-occipital region with minor and major malformations and acquired lesions, and on the other hand the middle and inferior cervical segment. They also recall the original structuralist analysis of the cervical spine and give the example of the ''cervical triplet''. (orig.) [de

  6. Primary stabbing headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Juan A; Sjaastad, Ottar

    2010-01-01

    Primary stabbing headache is characterized by transient, cephalic ultrashort stabs of pain. It is a frequent complaint with a prevalence of 35.2%, a female preponderance, and a mean age of onset of 28 years (Vågå study). Attacks are generally characterized by moderate to severe, jabbing or stabbing pain, lasting from a fraction of a second to 3s. Attack frequency is generally low, with one or a few attacks per day. The paroxysms generally occur spontaneously, during daytime. Most patients exhibit a sporadic pattern, with an erratic, unpredictable alternation between symptomatic and non-symptomatic periods. Paroxysms are almost invariably unilateral. Temporal and fronto-ocular areas are most frequently affected. Attacks tend to move from one area to another, in either the same or the opposite hemicranium. Jabs may be accompanied by a shock-like feeling and even by head movement - "jolts" -or vocalization. On rare occasions, conjunctival hemorrhage and monocular vision loss have been described as associated features. Primary stabbing headache may concur, synchronously or independently, with other primary headaches. In contrast to what is the case in adults, in childhood it is not usually associated with other headaches. Treatment is rarely necessary. Indomethacin, 75-150 mg daily, may seem to be of some avail. Celecoxib, nifedipine, melatonin, and gabapentin have been reported to be effective in isolated cases and small series of patients. The drug studies need corroboration. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Headaches and Sinus Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the following: 1. No nausea or vomiting (anorexia may occur) 2. No more than 1 of ... DIAGNOSIS IN PATIENTS PRESENTING WITH “SINUS HEADACHE” . Multiple studies, including large ... 10:202-209 In cases of non-sinus related headaches, the appropriate specialist ...

  8. Headache of cervical origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burguet, J L; Wackenheim, A

    1984-08-01

    The authors recall cervical etiologies of headache. They distinguish on the one hand the cervico-occipital region with minor and major malformations and acquired lesions, and on the other hand the middle and inferior cervical segment. They also recall the original structuralist analysis of the cervical spine and give the example of the ''cervical triplet''.

  9. Migraine headaches in a nutshell

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    According to the International Headache Society, a migraine is a headache that lasts for 4–72 hours and presents with at least two of the following symptoms: unilateral localisation, moderate to severe pain intensity, aggravation by movement, and a pulsating feeling. The headache is also usually accompanied by nausea ...

  10. Occipital headaches and neuroimaging in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bear, Joshua J; Gelfand, Amy A; Goadsby, Peter J; Bass, Nancy

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the common thinking, as reinforced by the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 3rd edition (beta), that occipital headaches in children are rare and suggestive of serious intracranial pathology. We performed a retrospective chart review cohort study of all patients ≤18 years of age referred to a university child neurology clinic for headache in 2009. Patients were stratified by headache location: solely occipital, occipital plus other area(s) of head pain, or no occipital involvement. Children with abnormal neurologic examinations were excluded. We assessed location as a predictor of whether neuroimaging was ordered and whether intracranial pathology was found. Analyses were performed with cohort study tools in Stata/SE 13.0 (StataCorp, College Station, TX). A total of 308 patients were included. Median age was 12 years (32 months-18 years), and 57% were female. Headaches were solely occipital in 7% and occipital-plus in 14%. Patients with occipital head pain were more likely to undergo neuroimaging than those without occipital involvement (solely occipital: 95%, relative risk [RR] 10.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4-77.3; occipital-plus: 88%, RR 3.7, 95% CI 1.5-9.2; no occipital pain: 63%, referent). Occipital pain alone or with other locations was not significantly associated with radiographic evidence of clinically significant intracranial pathology. Children with occipital headache are more likely to undergo neuroimaging. In the absence of concerning features on the history and in the setting of a normal neurologic examination, neuroimaging can be deferred in most pediatric patients when occipital pain is present. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  11. Habituation and sensitization in primary headaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The phenomena of habituation and sensitization are considered most useful for studying the neuronal substrates of information processing in the CNS. Both were studied in primary headaches, that are functional disorders of the brain characterized by an abnormal responsivity to any kind of incoming innocuous or painful stimuli and it’s cycling pattern over time (interictal, pre-ictal, ictal). The present review summarizes available data on stimulus responsivity in primary headaches obtained with clinical neurophysiology. In migraine, the majority of electrophysiological studies between attacks have shown that, for a number of different sensory modalities, the brain is characterised by a lack of habituation of evoked responses to repeated stimuli. This abnormal processing of the incoming information reaches its maximum a few days before the beginning of an attack, and normalizes during the attack, at a time when sensitization may also manifest itself. An abnormal rhythmic activity between thalamus and cortex, namely thalamocortical dysrhythmia, may be the pathophysiological mechanism subtending abnormal information processing in migraine. In tension-type headache (TTH), only few signs of deficient habituation were observed only in subgroups of patients. By contrast, using grand-average responses indirect evidence for sensitization has been found in chronic TTH with increased nociceptive specific reflexes and evoked potentials. Generalized increased sensitivity to pain (lower thresholds and increased pain rating) and a dysfunction in supraspinal descending pain control systems may contribute to the development and/or maintenance of central sensitization in chronic TTH. Cluster headache patients are chrarcterized during the bout and on the headache side by a pronounced lack of habituation of the brainstem blink reflex and a general sensitization of pain processing. A better insight into the nature of these ictal/interictal electrophysiological dysfunctions in primary

  12. The efficacy of oral habit modification on headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agha-Hosseini, Farzaneh; Sheykhbahaei, Nafiseh; Mirzaii-Dizgah, Iraj; Fatehi, Farzad

    2017-12-01

    Headache is the most common complaint of patients suffering from temporomandibular joint disorders (TMDs). Thus, temporomandibular joint (TMJ) examinations maybe necessary in patients with headache. Considering the high prevalence of bruxism and TMDs in patients with headache the effects of conservative TMD treatment on headache should be assessed. Patients were questioned about headaches in the past three months. Those responding affirmatively to this question were examined for TMD and bruxism. After the examinations, 219 patients remained in the study and received self-management instructions. Patients were requested to modify oral habits except when eating or sleeping. The degree of pain (visual analogue scale), headache disability index (HDI), frequency of headaches (FH) per month and TMD intensity were evaluated. The median levels of pain, HDI, FH, and TMD intensity were 8, 44, 8, and 7, respectively, before modifying oral habits and decreased to 4, 24, 2, and 3, respectively, after intervention. These decreases were statistically significant. Having patients maintain free space between the teeth and relax muscles can be an efficient method to treat headache and TMD, especially when repeated frequently.

  13. Clinical characteristics of hemolytic uremic syndrome secondary to cobalamin C disorder in Chinese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi-Liang; Song, Wen-Qi; Peng, Xiao-Xia; Liu, Xiao-Rong; He, Le-Jian; Fu, Li-Bing

    2015-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the clinical characteristics of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) secondary to cobalamin C disorder (cbl-C disorder). We reviewed retrospectively the medical records of 3 children with HUS secondary to cbl-C disorder who had been treated between April 1, 2009 and October 31, 2013. The 3 patients with HUS secondary to cbl-C disorder presented with progressive hemolytic anemia, acute renal failure, thrombocytopenia, poor feeding, and failure to thrive. Two of the 3 patients once had high blood pressure. The mutations of c.609G>A (p.W203X), c.217C>T (p.R73X) and c.365A>T (p.H122L) in the methylmalonic aciduria (cobalamin deficiency) cbl-C type, with homocystinuria gene were detected in the 3 patients. In these patients the levels of lactate dehydrogenase and homocysteine in serum were elevated and the level of methylmalonic acid (MMA) in urine was also elevated. After treatment with hydroxocobalamin, 2 patients were discharged with no obvious abnormal growth and neurological development and 1 patient died of multiple organ failure. The results of this study demonstrated that cbl-C disorder should be investigated in any child presenting with HUS. The high concentrations of homocysteine and MMA could be used for timely recognization of the disease. Once the high levels of plasma homocystein and/or plasma or urine MMA are detected, the treatment with parenteral hydroxocobalamin should be prescribed immediately. The early diagnosis and treatment would contribute to the good prognosis of the disease.

  14. Team players against headache: multidisciplinary treatment of primary headaches and medication overuse headache

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaul, C.; Visscher, C.M.; Bhola, R.; Sorbi, M.J.; Galli, F.; Rasmussen, A.V.; Jensen, R.

    2011-01-01

    Multidisciplinary approaches are gaining acceptance in headache treatment. However, there is a lack of scientific data about the efficacy of various strategies and their combinations offered by physiotherapists, physicians, psychologists and headache nurses. Therefore, an international platform for

  15. Headache - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Migraine - what to ask your doctor; Tension-type headache - what to ask your doctor; Cluster headache - what to ask your doctor ... How can I tell if the headache I am having is dangerous? What are ... headache ? A migraine headache ? A cluster headache ? What medical ...

  16. Risk factors for headache in the UK military: cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rona, Roberto J; Jones, Margaret; Goodwin, Laura; Hull, Lisa; Wessely, Simon

    2013-05-01

    To assess the importance of service demographic, mental disorders, and deployment factors on headache severity and prevalence, and to assess the impact of headache on functional impairment. There is no information on prevalence and risk factors of headache in the UK military. Recent US reports suggest that deployment, especially a combat role, is associated with headache. Such an association may have serious consequences on personnel during deployment. A survey was carried out between 2004 and 2006 (phase 1) and again between 2007 and 2009 (phase 2) of randomly selected UK military personnel to study the health consequences of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. This study is based on those who participated in phase 2 and includes cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses. Headache severity in the last month and functional impairment at phase 2 were the main outcomes. Forty-six percent complained of headache in phase 2, half of whom endorsed moderate or severe headache. Severe headache was strongly associated with probable post-traumatic stress disorder (multinomial odds ratio [MOR] 9.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] 6.4-14.2), psychological distress (MOR 6.15, 95% CI 4.8-7.9), multiple physical symptoms (MOR 18.2, 95% CI 13.4-24.6) and self-reported mild traumatic brain injury (MOR 3.5, 95% CI 1.4-8.6) after adjustment for service demographic factors. Mild headache was also associated with these variables but at a lower level. Moderate and severe headache were associated with functional impairment, but the association was partially explained by mental disorders. Mental ill health was also associated with reporting moderate and severe headache at both phase 1 and phase 2. Deployment and a combat role were not associated with headache. Moderate and severe headache are common in the military and have an impact on functional impairment. They are more strongly associated with mental disorders than with mild traumatic brain injury. © 2013 American Headache Society.

  17. Superficial artery aneurysms underlying nummular headache--2 cases and proposed diagnostic work-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Ruiz, Pedro; Cuadrado, María-Luz; Aledo-Serrano, Angel; Alonso-Oviés, Almudena; Porta-Etessam, Jesús; Ganado, Tomás

    2014-01-01

    Nummular headache, considered a primary headache in the 3rd edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders, has nonetheless been attributed in several occasions to underlying epicranial anomalies. Vascular imaging of the head in 2 patients with nummular headache revealed fusiform aneurysms of the scalp vessel in close relation to the painful area. One of the patients underwent surgical resection of the aneurysm with excellent response. A response to triptans was noted in both. In selected patients with nummular headache, vascular imaging of the scalp may reveal anomalies amenable to surgical treatment or triptan administration, sometimes resulting in disappearance of the pain. © 2014 American Headache Society.

  18. Migraine headache in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sina, Farzad; Razmeh, Saeed; Habibzadeh, Neda; Zavari, Arefeh; Nabovvati, Mona

    2017-08-29

    Migraine is a neurological disorder that afflicts many people in the world and can cause severe disability during the attacks. The pathophysiology of migraine is complex and not fully understood. It seems that migraine is common in idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). However, the association between migraine headache and IIH is still unclear. The present study was conducted to assess the prevalence of migraine headache and associated factors in IIH patients. In this cross-sectional study, a total of 68 patients diagnosed with IIH underwent a medical history interview and a neurological examination. The diagnosis of migraine was based on the four diagnostic criteria of the International Classification of Headache Disorders 3rd edition. Forty-five patients (63.2%) met the diagnostic criteria of migraine headache. There was no significant difference between patients with and without migraine headache in respect of their age, gender, body mass. This study revealed high prevalence of migraine headache in IIH patients; appropriate treatment can reduce their headache and prevent unnecessary treatments for IIH.

  19. The association of headache frequency with pain interference and the burden of disease is mediated by depression and sleep quality, but not anxiety, in chronic tension type headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios-Ceña, María; Fernández-Muñoz, Juan J; Castaldo, Matteo; Wang, Kelun; Guerrero-Peral, Ángel; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César

    2017-12-01

    A better understanding of potential relationship between mood disorders, sleep quality, pain, and headache frequency may assist clinicians in determining optimal therapeutic programs. The aim of the current study was to analyze the effects of sleep quality, anxiety, depression on potential relationships between headache intensity, burden of headache, and headache frequency in chronic tension type headache (CTTH). One hundred and ninety-three individuals with CTTH participated. Headache features were collected with a 4-weeks headache diary. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale was used for assessing anxiety and depression. Headache Disability Inventory evaluated the burden of headache. Pain interference was determined with the bodily pain domain (SF-36 questionnaire). Sleep quality was assessed with Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Path analyses with maximum likelihood estimations were conducted to determine the direct and indirect effects of depression, anxiety, and sleep quality on the frequency of headaches. Two paths were observed: the first with depression and the second with sleep quality as mediators. Direct effects were noted from sleep quality, emotional burden of disease and pain interference on depression, and from depression to headache frequency. The first path showed indirect effects of depression from emotional burden and from sleep quality to headache frequency (first model R 2  = 0.12). Direct effects from the second path were from depression and pain interference on sleep quality and from sleep quality on headache frequency. Sleep quality indirectly mediated the effects of depression, emotional burden and pain interference on headache frequency (second model R 2  = 0.18). Depression and sleep quality, but not anxiety, mediated the relationship between headache frequency and the emotional burden of disease and pain interference in CTTH.

  20. The Sphenopalatine Ganglion: Anatomy, Pathophysiology, and Therapeutic Targeting in Headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Matthew S; Robertson, Carrie E; Kaplan, Eugene; Ailani, Jessica; Charleston, Larry; Kuruvilla, Deena; Blumenfeld, Andrew; Berliner, Randall; Rosen, Noah L; Duarte, Robert; Vidwan, Jaskiran; Halker, Rashmi B; Gill, Nicole; Ashkenazi, Avi

    2016-02-01

    The sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) has attracted the interest of practitioners treating head and face pain for over a century because of its anatomical connections and role in the trigemino-autonomic reflex. In this review, we discuss the anatomy of the SPG, as well as what is known about its role in the pathophysiology of headache disorders, including cluster headache and migraine. We then address various therapies that target the SPG, including intranasal medication delivery, new SPG blocking catheter devices, neurostimulation, chemical neurolysis, and ablation procedures. © 2015 American Headache Society.

  1. Joint hypermobility and headache: the glue that binds the two together--part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Vincent T; Neilson, Derek

    2014-09-01

    Past studies have reported that connective tissue disorders (CTDs) are more common in patients with specific types of headache disorders. The objectives of this study are (1) to review and critique the clinical studies reporting an association between joint hypermobility, CTDs and headache and (2) to postulate mechanisms though which CTDs might predispose to headache disorders. PubMed was searched for relevant articles with search terms that included joint hypermobility, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Marfan syndrome, and specific headache disorders. A narrative review was performed of these articles as well as those identified from the bibliography of these articles. Case reports and case control studies confirm an association between CTDs and migraine, coat-hanger headaches, carotid arterial dissections, intracranial hypotension, Arnold Chiari malformations-type 1, cervical spine disorders, and temporomandibular joint disorders. Observational cross-sectional studies suggest that the prevalence of CTDs is increased in patients with specific types of headache disorders. It is unknown if the CTDs directly cause these headaches disorders or are associated with them through other mechanisms. © 2014 American Headache Society.

  2. Resolution of chronic migraine headaches with intrathecal ziconotide: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narain S

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Sachin Narain,1 Lama Al-Khoury,2 Eric Chang3–6 1Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care, 2Department of Neurology, 3Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 4Department of Neurosurgery, 5Department of Orthopedics, 6Reeve-Irvine Research Center for Spinal Cord Injury, University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA, USA Background: Migraine headaches are a common and functionally debilitating disorder affecting approximately 17% of women and 5.6% of men. Compared to episodic migraine patients, chronic migraineurs are more likely to be occupationally disabled, miss family activities, have comorbid anxiety and/or chronic pain disorders, and utilize significantly more health care dollars. Ziconotide is a calcium channel blocker used for the treatment of chronic severe pain without issues of tolerance or dependency found with opioid therapy. Case: A 59-year-old female had an intrathecal baclofen pump placed for spasticity secondary to multiple sclerosis. Her symptoms also included lower extremity neuropathic pain and severe migraine headaches with 22 migraine headache days per month. Prior treatments included nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, triptans, anticonvulsants, antihypertensives, and Botox injections which reduced her symptoms to four migraine days per month at best. While her spasticity had markedly improved with intrathecal baclofen, ziconotide was added to help her neuropathic pain complaints. Following initiation of low-dose ziconotide (1 µg/day, the patient noted both lower extremity pain improvement and complete resolution of migraine headaches resulting in zero migraine days per month. She has now been migraine free for 8 months. Conclusion: Upon review of the available literature, there are no published cases of migraine improvement with intrathecal ziconotide. This represents the first case describing resolution of migraine symptoms with low-dose ziconotide. Keywords: ziconotide, migraine, symptoms, chronic

  3. Endovascular thrombectomy and post-procedural headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sabrina; Amin, Faisal Mohammad; Holtmannspötter, Markus; Hansen, Klaus; Florescu, Anna Maria; Fakhril-Din, Zainab; Petersen, Julie Falkenberg; Ghanizada, Hashmat; Ayata, Cenk; Gaist, David; Ashina, Messoud

    2017-12-01

    We investigated the prevalence of post-procedural headache in patients who have undergone thrombectomy for ischemic stroke, and correlated history of migraine with risk of peri-procedural complications. A total of 314 patients underwent thrombectomy at the Danish National Hospital from January 2012 to December 2014. Eligible subjects were phone-interviewed using a purpose-developed semi-structured questionnaire according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders 3, beta version criteria. Among 96 eligible subjects, there was a significant decrease in migraine (p = 0.022) within the first 3 months after EVT compared to 1 year before treatment, which was further evident at interview time (on average 1.6 years after EVT, p = 0.013). A minority of patients experienced headaches for the first time within 3 months of their EVT (migraine 2, TTH 9), which persisted at interview time for subjects with migraine. Out of 12 subjects with peri-procedural complications, 2 had a history of migraine with aura. Thrombectomy leads to a significant decrease in previously known migraine, and new onset of headache in a small subset of patients. A history of migraine does not appear to predispose to peri-procedural complications.

  4. Pediatric Inpatient Headache Therapy: What is Available.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabbouche, Marielle

    2015-01-01

    Status migrainosus is defined by the international classification of headache disorders (ICHD) criteria as a debilitating migraine lasting more then 72 hours. The epidemiology of status migrainosus is still unknown in adult and children, and frequently underdiagnosed. Children and adolescents often end up in the emergency room with an intractable headache that failed outpatient therapy. Six to seven percent of these children do not respond to acute infusion therapy and require hospitalization. It is imperative that more aggressive therapy is considered when patients are affected by a severe intractable headache to prevent further disability and returning the child to baseline activity. Multiple therapies are available for adults and children. Studies for acute therapy in the emergency room are available in adults and pediatric groups. Small studies are available for inpatient therapy in children and, along with available therapies for children and adolescents, are described in this review. A review of the literature shows growing evidence regarding the use of dihydroergotamine intravenously once patients are hospitalized. Effectiveness and safety have been proven in the last decades in adults and small studies in the pediatric populations. © 2015 American Headache Society.

  5. Primary headaches in restless legs syndrome patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Earlier studies conducted among migraineurs have shown an association between migraine and restless legs syndrome (RLS. We chose RLS patients and looked for migraine to exclude sample bias. Materials and Methods: 99 consecutive subjects of idiopathic RLS were recruited from the sleep clinic during four months period. Physician diagnosis of headache and depressive disorder was made with the help of ICHD-2 and DSM-IV-TR criteria, respectively. Sleep history was gathered. Severity of RLS and insomnia was measured using IRLS (Hindi version and insomnia severity index Hindi version, respectively. Chi-square test, one way ANOVA and t-test were applied to find out the significance. Results: Primary headache was seen in 51.5% cases of RLS. Migraine was reported by 44.4% subjects and other types of ′primary headaches′ were reported by 7.1% subjects. Subjects were divided into- RLS; RLS with migraine and RLS with other headache. Females outnumbered in migraine subgroup (χ2 =16.46, P<0.001. Prevalence of depression (χ2 =3.12, P=0.21 and family history of RLS (χ2 =2.65, P=0.26 were not different among groups. Severity of RLS (P=0.22 or insomnia (P=0.43 were also similar. Conclusion: Migraine is frequently found in RLS patients in clinic based samples. Females with RLS are prone to develop migraine. Depression and severity of RLS or insomnia do not affect development of headache.

  6. Evaluation of the signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders in children with headaches Avaliação dos sinais e sintomas de disfunções temporomandibulares em crianças com cefaléias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Mara de Paiva Bertoli

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the presence of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD in children with headaches in a neuropediatric ambulatory. METHOD: Fifty patients between 4 and 18 years of age were examined: 31 had headaches (24 migraine, 4 tension type and 3 unspecific headache and 19 formed the control group. The data collection was comprised of a structured questionnaire answered by the children's parents, and a subjective evaluation about the children’s emotional state. A specific questionnaire for TMD was applied, followed by a clinical dental examination of the children. As signs of TMD, mouth opening limitation, mandibular trajectory deviation in opening mouth, and joint noise were considered. As symptoms, pain on palpation of masseter and temporal muscles and on the poromandibular joint. RESULTS: A significant increase in signs and symptoms of TMD was found in patients with headaches when compared to the control group. There was also a significant difference in signs and symptoms of TMD according to age (increased with age and emotional state (tense> calm. CONCLUSION: There is a higher frequency of TMD in pediatric patients with headaches; thus, it is important to look for TMD signs and symptoms in this population.OBJETIVO: Avaliar a presença de sinais e sintomas de disfunção temporomandibular (DTM em crianças com cefaléias em um ambulatório de neuropediatria. MÉTODO: Foram examinados 50 pacientes com idade entre 4 e 18 anos, 31 com cefaléias (24 com enxaqueca, 4 com cefaléia tensional e 3 com cefaléia inespecífica e 19 do grupo controle. Os dados compreenderam um questionário estruturado respondido pelos pais e uma avaliação subjetiva sobre o estado emocional das crianças. Foi aplicado um questionário específico para DTM e realizado um exame clínico dental. Foram considerados como sinais de DTM: limitação da abertura bucal, desvio da trajetória ao abrir a boca e ru

  7. Predictors of Headache Before, During, and After Pregnancy: A Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Dana P.; Smitherman, Todd A.; Eisenach, James C.; Penzien, Donald B.; Houle, Timothy T.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The present study endeavored to identify predictors of headache during pregnancy, shortly after delivery, and at 8-week follow-up. Background Many women suffer from headaches during pregnancy and the postpartum period. However, little is known about factors that predict headache surrounding childbirth. Methods Secondary analysis of longitudinal cohort study of 2434 parturients hospitalized for cesarean or vaginal delivery in four university hospitals in the United States and Europe. Data were gathered from interviews and review of medical records shortly after delivery; 972 of the women were contacted 8 weeks later to assess persistent headache. The primary outcome measures were experiencing headache during pregnancy, headache within 72 hours after delivery, and headache at 8 weeks after delivery. Results Of the parturients, 10% experienced headache during pregnancy, 3.7% within 72 hours after delivery, and 3.6% at 8 weeks post delivery. Compared to those without a history of headache, a history of headache prior to pregnancy was the strongest predictor of headache during pregnancy (9.8% versus 23.5%; RR 2.4; 95% CI: 1.4 to 4.0). Experiencing headache during pregnancy (adjusted HR 3.8; 95% CI: 2.4 to 6.2) and receiving needle-based regional anesthesia for pain treatment (adjusted HR 2.2; 95% CI: 1.1 to 4.5) were independently associated with headache within 72 hours after delivery with event rates of 11.1% and 10.5%, respectively. Compared to those without such a history, headache before pregnancy was significantly associated with experiencing headache 8 weeks after delivery (4.0% versus 23.8%; RR = 6.0; 95% CI: 2.0 to 8.0), but headache during pregnancy or shortly after delivery was not. Several other psychosocial predictors (e.g., somatization, smoking before pregnancy) were statistically associated with at least one headache outcome. Conclusions A history of headache prior to pregnancy is a strong predictor of headache during and after pregnancy, the

  8. Experiences and perceptions of people with headache: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elliott Alison M

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few qualitative studies of headache have been conducted and as a result we have little in-depth understanding of the experiences and perceptions of people with headache. The aim of this paper was to explore the perceptions and experiences of individuals with headache and their experiences of associated healthcare and treatment. Methods A qualitative study of individuals with headache, sampled from a population-based study of chronic pain was conducted in the North-East of Scotland, UK. Seventeen semi-structured interviews were conducted with adults aged 65 or less. Interviews were analysed using the Framework approach utilising thematic analysis. Results Almost every participant reported that they were unable to function fully as a result of the nature and unpredictability of their headaches and this had caused disruption to their work, family life and social activities. Many also reported a negative impact on mood including feeling depressed, aggressive or embarrassed. Most participants had formed their own ideas about different aspects of their headache and several had searched for, or were seeking, increased understanding of their headache from a variety of sources. Many participants reported that their headaches caused them constant worry and anguish, and they were concerned that there was a serious underlying cause. A variety of methods were being used to manage headaches including conventional medication, complementary therapies and self-developed management techniques. Problems associated with all of these management strategies emerged. Conclusion Headache has wide-ranging adverse effects on individuals and is often accompanied by considerable worry. The development of new interventions or educational strategies aimed at reducing the burden of the disorder and associated anxiety are needed.

  9. Chronorisk in cluster headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barloese, Mads; Haddock, Bryan; Lund, Nunu T

    2018-01-01

    and a spectral analysis identifying oscillations in risk. Results The Gaussian model fit for the chronorisk distribution for all patients reporting diurnal rhythmicity (n = 286) had a goodness of fit R2 value of 0.97 and identified three times of increased risk peaking at 21:41, 02:02 and 06:23 hours....... In subgroups, three to five modes of increased risk were found and goodness of fit values ranged from 0.85-0.99. Spectral analysis revealed multiple distinct oscillation frequencies in chronorisk in subgroups including a dominant circadian oscillation in episodic patients and an ultradian in chronic....... Conclusions Chronorisk in cluster headache can be characterised as a sum of individual, timed events of increased risk, each having a Gaussian distribution. In episodic cluster headache, attacks follow a circadian rhythmicity whereas, in the chronic variant, ultradian oscillations are dominant reflecting...

  10. Self-reported efficacy of complementary and alternative medicine: the Akershus study of chronic headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristoffersen, Espen Saxhaug; Aaseth, Kjersti; Grande, Ragnhild Berling; Lundqvist, Christofer; Russell, Michael Bjørn

    2013-04-18

    Chronic headache is associated with disability and high utilisation of health care including complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). We investigated self-reported efficacy of CAM in people with chronic headache from the general population. Respondents with possible self-reported chronic headache were interviewed by physicians experienced in headache diagnostics. CAM queried included acupuncture, chiropractic, homeopathy, naprapathy, physiotherapy, psychological treatment, and psychomotor physiotherapy. Sixty-two % and 73% of those with primary and secondary chronic headache had used CAM.Self-reported efficacy of CAM ranged from 0-43% without significant differences between gender, headache diagnoses, co-occurrence of migraine, medication use or physician contact. CAM is widely used, despite self-reported efficacy of different CAM modalities is modest in the management of chronic headache.

  11. Understanding psychological stress, its biological processes, and impact on primary headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Justin M; Thebarge, Ronald W

    2006-10-01

    Psychological stress is generally acknowledged to be a central contributor to primary headache. Stress results from any challenge or threat, either real or perceived, to normal functioning. The stress response is the body's activation of physiological systems, namely the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, to protect and restore functioning. Chronic activation of the stress response can lead to wear and tear that eventually can predispose an individual to disease. There are multiple ways that stress and headache are closely related. Stress can (a) be a predisposing factor that contributes to headache disorder onset, (b) accelerate the progression of the headache disorder into a chronic condition, and (c) precipitate and exacerbate individual headache episodes. How stress impacts headache is not often understood. However, stress is assumed to affect primary headache by directly impacting pain production and modulation processes at both the peripheral and central levels. Stress can also independently worsen headache-related disability and quality of life. Finally, the headache experience itself can serve as a stressor that compromises an individual's health and well-being. With the prominent role that stress plays in headache, there are implications for the evaluation of stress and the use of stress reduction strategies at the various stages of headache disorder onset and progression. Future directions can help to develop a better empirical understanding of the pattern of the stress and headache connections and the mechanisms that explain the connections. Further research can also examine the interactive effects of stress and other factors that impact headache disorder onset, course, and adjustment.

  12. Inclusive Education for Pupils with Autistic Spectrum Disorders in Secondary Mainstream Schools: Teacher Attitudes, Experience and Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, Neil; Symes, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to examine the experience, attitudes and knowledge of school staff in relation to inclusive education for pupils with autistic spectrum disorders (ASDs) in mainstream secondary schools. Fifty-three participants from 11 secondary schools in the north-west of England completed a survey that covered socio-demographic…

  13. Brief Report: Self-Reported Academic, Social, and Mental Health Experiences of Post-Secondary Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Scott L. J.; Hart, Logan; Brown, Jane Thierfeld; Volkmar, Fred R.

    2018-01-01

    Increasing numbers of individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are enrolling in post-secondary academic institutions. However, research indicates that post-secondary students with ASD are struggling more than their typically developing peers, with high rates of loneliness, anxiety, depression, and an increased incidence of dropping-out…

  14. Aspirin is first-line treatment for migraine and episodic tension-type headache regardless of headache intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampl, Christian; Voelker, Michael; Steiner, Timothy J

    2012-01-01

    (1) To establish whether pre-treatment headache intensity in migraine or episodic tension-type headache (ETTH) predicts success or failure of treatment with aspirin; and (2) to reflect, accordingly, on the place of aspirin in the management of these disorders. Stepped care in migraine management uses symptomatic treatments as first-line, reserving triptans for those in whom this proves ineffective. Stratified care chooses between symptomatic therapy and triptans as first-line on an individual basis according to perceived illness severity. We questioned the 2 assumptions underpinning stratified care in migraine that greater illness severity: (1) reflects greater need; and (2) is a risk factor for failure of symptomatic treatment but not of triptans. With regard to the first assumption, we developed a rhetorical argument that need for treatment is underpinned by expectation of benefit, not by illness severity. To address the second, we reviewed individual patient data from 6 clinical trials of aspirin 1000 mg in migraine (N = 2079; 1165 moderate headache, 914 severe) and one of aspirin 500 and 1000 mg in ETTH (N = 325; 180 moderate, 145 severe), relating outcome to pre-treatment headache intensity. In migraine, for headache relief at 2 hours, a small (4.7%) and non-significant risk difference (RD) in therapeutic gain favored moderate pain; for pain freedom at 2 hours, therapeutic gains were almost identical (RD: -0.2%). In ETTH, for headache relief at 2 hours, RDs for both aspirin 500 mg (-4.2%) and aspirin 1000 mg (-9.7%) favored severe pain, although neither significantly; for pain freedom at 2 hours, RDs (-14.2 and -3.6) again favored severe pain. In neither migraine nor ETTH does pre-treatment headache intensity predict success or failure of aspirin. This is not an arguable basis for stratified care in migraine. In both disorders, aspirin is first-line treatment regardless of headache intensity. © 2011 American Headache Society.

  15. Primary headache diagnosis among chronic daily headache patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krymchantowski Abouch Valenty

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic daily headache (CDH refers to a group of non-paroxysmal daily or near-daily headaches with peculiar characteristics that are highly prevalent in populations of neurological clinics and not uncommon among non-patient populations. Most of the patients with CDH had, as primary diagnosis, episodic migraine, which, with the time, presented a progressive frequency, pattern modification and loss of specific migraine characteristics. Other CDH patients had chronic tension-type headache, new daily persistent headache and hemicrania continua, which evolved thru the time to the daily or near-daily presentation. The objective of this study was to determine the primary headache diagnosis among a population of chronic daily headache patients attending a tertiary center for headache treatment. During a 5-year period 651 consecutive chronic daily headache patients attending a private subspecialty center were studied prospectively. The criteria adopted were those proposed by Silberstein et al (1994, revised 1996. Five hundred seventy four patients (88.1% had episodic migraine as primary headache before turning into daily presentation, 52 (8% had chronic tension-type headache, 14 (2.2% had hemicrania continua and 11 patients (1.7% had new daily persistent headache. CDH is quite frequent in patients from clinic-based studies suggesting a high degree of disability. Emphasis on education of patients suffering from frequent primary headaches with regard to measures that are able to decrease suffering and disability as well as better medical education directed to more efficient ways to handle these patients are necessary to improve outcome of such a prevalent condition.

  16. Guidelines for controlled trials of drugs in tension-type headache: second edition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, L; Bigal, M E; Cerbo, R

    2010-01-01

    and chronic tension-type headache have been published, providing new information on trial methodology for this disorder. Furthermore, the classification of the headaches, including tension-type headache, has been revised. These developments support the need for also revising the guidelines for drug treatments......The Clinical Trials Subcommittee of the International Headache Society published its first edition of the guidelines on controlled trials of drugs in tension-type headache in 1995. These aimed 'to improve the quality of controlled clinical trials in tension-type headache', because 'good quality...... controlled trials are the only way to convincingly demonstrate the efficacy of a drug, and form the basis for international agreement on drug therapy'. The Committee published similar guidelines for clinical trials in migraine and cluster headache. Since 1995 several studies on the treatment of episodic...

  17. Easing the transition to secondary education for children with autism spectrum disorder: An evaluation of the Systemic Transition in Education Programme for Autism Spectrum Disorder (STEP-ASD)

    OpenAIRE

    Mandy, William; Murin, Marianna; Baykaner, Ozlem; Staunton, Sara; Cobb, Robert; Hellriegel, Josselyn; Anderson, Seonaid; Skuse, David

    2015-01-01

    In mainstream education, the transition from primary to secondary school ('school transition') is difficult for children with autism spectrum disorder, being marked by high levels of emotional and behavioural difficulties. The Systemic Transition in Education Programme for Autism Spectrum Disorder (STEP-ASD) is a new, manualised school transition intervention. We investigated its feasibility and efficacy for children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (N = 37; mean age = 11.47 years; mea...

  18. New-onset headache in an elderly man with uremia that improved only after correction of hyperphosphatemia ("uremic headache": a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chopra Vanilla

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction New-onset headaches in the elderly are usually secondary and rarely primary. We present the case of an elderly man with recent-onset headache due to uremic hyperphosphatemia and hypocalcemia. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of its kind in the literature. Case presentation We present the case of a 70-year-old Indian man with chronic kidney disease whose new-onset headache improved only when his hyperphosphatemia and hypocalcemia were corrected. He had diffuse, dense calcification of tentorium cerebelli and falx due to hyperphosphatemia. Conclusions This case report reinforces the importance of identifying the cause of a new-onset headache, particularly in the elderly, and treating it before blaming a tension headache or primary headache as the cause.

  19. Management of patients with headache and cervicalgia in outpatient practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Chechet

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of patients with headache (cephalgia concurrent with neck pain (cervicalgia remains an urgent problem of modern medicine. Concurrent cervicalgia in cephalgia substantially lowers quality of life in these patients and is encountered in more than half the patients. Cervicalgia is considered as a risk factor of migraine and tension headache attacks. Cervicogenic headache is assigned to one of the most common forms of secondary cephalgias. It is shown that patients with daily headache have functional insufficiency of the antinociceptive system that plays an important role in the maintenance and chronization of neck pain. The diagnosis of different cephalgic syndromes and the identification of causes of cervicalgia commonly raise problems in a physician; the rate of misdiagnoses and hence inadequate treatment has been high so far. The detection of various comorbid conditions, including cervicalgia, in a patient with cephalgia makes it possible to use effective treatment and to achieve good results.

  20. Secondary prevention of work-related upper extremity disorders: recommendations from the Annapolis conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerstein, Michael; Harrington, Cherise B

    2006-09-01

    Efforts to improve the secondary prevention of work-related upper extremity (WRUE) symptoms continue to present a challenge. As with many occupational musculoskeletal pain disorders no single, direct cause-effect relationship exists among specific exposures, pathologic processes, and symptoms. The field has yet to create truly effective and efficient interventions for these problems that are based on current epidemiological and clinical knowledge. A working conference was held in Annapolis, Maryland on September 23rd and 24th, 2005 with leaders in research and application related to upper extremity disorders to address this challenge. The intent of the meeting was to review "state of the art" evidence in epidemiology and intervention research in order to develop suggestions regarding next steps in intervention research and application. On day 2 a number of stakeholders were present to discuss what they perceived as the missing pieces in both epidemiological research and applied intervention research in order to generate more effective workplace interventions. The papers in this series of the Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation indicate that scientifically sound progress has been made over the past decade in identifying ergonomic, workplace psychosocial, and individual factors in both the etiology and exacerbation of these symptoms/disorders. However, there is a gap between this knowledge and the development and practical implementation of comprehensive interventions for these problems. The conference also highlighted the paucity of economic analyses of the impact of these disorders as well as the economic study of the impact of intervention. Approaches for such evaluations were presented and are included in this special section of the journal. This series of papers and the summary of the invited group's discussions provided in this paper clearly emphasize the need for innovative ways to think about these problems and specific research topics that can help

  1. Orgasmic headache treated with nimodipine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jea Whan; Ha, Yeon Soo; Park, Seung Chol; Seo, Ill Young; Lee, Hak Seung

    2013-07-01

    Orgasmic headache (OH) is a sudden and severe headache that occurs at the time of or shortly after an orgasm. AIM.: We present the case of typical primary headache associated with sexual activity, especially during an orgasmic period. A 34-year-old man complained of sudden and severe headache during sexual activity, or orgasmic period, for 2 months. The headache developed abruptly with an orgasm and then decreased shortly over a period of 4 ≈ 8 hours. Magnetic resonance angiography revealed severe spasm of the M1 segment of both the middle cerebral arteries. He was treated with oral nimodipine (30 mg every 8 hours), which alleviated the headache and prevented its recurrence. We postulated a pathophysiological relationship between OH and migraine, especially with respect to vasoconstriction, and believe that in such cases, nimodipine may be an effective therapy. © 2013 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  2. Delayed diagnosis in pediatric headache: an outpatient Italian survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Bruno; Dalla Libera, Dacia; De Feo, Donatella; Pavan, Giulia; Annovazzi, Pietro Osvaldo; Comi, Giancarlo

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this prospective study is to assess the time lapse between the onset of recurring headache and the correct diagnosis in a cohort of pediatric patients attending an Italian children's headache center for the first time. One hundred and one patients and parents, referred to the Pediatric Headache Centre of San Raffaele Hospital in Milan, Italy, underwent a semi-structured interview to ascertain features of headache since onset (clinical and family history, presence of childhood periodic syndromes, previously undergone instrumental exams and specialists' examinations before the correct diagnosis, past and current treatment). All patients were evaluated by expert neurologists and their headache was classified according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders II (2004). The median time delay from the onset of the first episode of recurrent headache to definite diagnosis was 20 months (interquartile range 12 to 36 months). A correlation with younger age and a more delayed headache diagnosis was found (r Spearman = 0.25; P = .039). An association between diagnostic delay and positive family history (median 24 months [12 to 48] vs 12 [6 to 24]; P = .014) or female gender (median 18 months [12 to 42] vs. 12 [5 to 30]; P trend = .070) was also evident. Notably, 76 out of 101 patients referred to our Center received an appropriate diagnosis according to International Classification of Headache Disorders II at the time of our visit only. Of note, up to 21% of this group were previously misdiagnosed (for epilepsy 43%, sinusitis 38%, or other diseases 19%), a fact that contributed to a longer time of clinical assessment (median 39 months) before reaching a correct diagnosis. The other group of 80 patients (79%) did not receive a specific diagnosis and treatment, and were not studied until their symptom became chronic and disabling. Pediatric headache is still under-diagnosed and not adequately considered as a health problem in the

  3. Headache in Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension: Findings From the Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Deborah I; Quiros, Peter A; Subramanian, Prem S; Mejico, Luis J; Gao, Shan; McDermott, Michael; Wall, Michael

    2017-09-01

    To characterize the phenotype, headache-related disability, medical co-morbidities, use of symptomatic headache medications, and headache response to study interventions in the Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial (IIHTT). Patients with untreated IIH and mild vision loss enrolled in the IIHTT and randomized to acetazolamide (ACZ) and weight loss or placebo (PLB) and weight loss had prospective assessment of headache disability using the Headache Impact Test-6 (HIT-6) questionnaire. Subjects with headache at the baseline visit were assigned a headache phenotype using the International Classification for Headache Disorders version 3 beta (ICHD-3b). Medication overuse was determined using the participants' reported medication use for the preceding month and ICHD-3b thresholds for diagnosing medication overuse headache. We investigated relationships between headache disability and various other clinical characteristics at baseline and at 6 months. Headache was present in 139 (84%) of the 165 enrollees at baseline. The most common headache phenotypes were migraine (52%), tension-type headache (22%), probable migraine (16%), and probable tension-type headache (4%). Fifty-one (37%) participants overused symptomatic medications at baseline, most frequently simple analgesics. A similar amount of improvement in the adjusted mean (± standard error) HIT-6 score occurred in the ACZ (-9.56 ± 1.05) and PLB groups (-9.11 ± 1.14) at 6 months (group difference -0.45, 95% CI -3.50 to 2.60, P = .77). Headache disability did not correlate with any of the studies, variables of interest, which included: the lumbar puncture opening pressure at baseline or at 6 months, body mass index, the amount of weight lost, papilledema grade, perimetric mean deviation, or the use of hormonal contraception. Headache disability was significantly associated with patient-reported quality of life in the physical, mental, and visual domains. Headache was common, of varied

  4. The evolution of headache from childhood to adulthood: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonaci, Fabio; Voiticovschi-Iosob, Cristina; Di Stefano, Anna Luisia; Galli, Federica; Ozge, Aynur; Balottin, Umberto

    2014-03-18

    Headache is one of the most common disorders in childhood, with an estimated 75% of children reporting significant headache by the age of 15 years. Pediatric migraine is the most frequent recurrent headache disorder, occurring in up to 28% of older teenagers. Headaches rank third among the illness-related causes of school absenteeism and result in substantial psychosocial impairment among pediatric patients. The aim of this study was to clarify the evolution of the clinical features of primary headache in the transition from childhood to adulthood through a review of relevant data available in the PubMed and Google Scholar databases for the period 1988 to July 2013.The search strategy identified 15 published articles which were considered eligible for inclusion in the analysis (i.e., relevant to the investigation of pediatric headache outcome). All were carried out after the publication of the first version of the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-I). The availability of data on the evolution of primary headaches over a period of time is important from both a clinical and a public health perspective. The identification of prognostic factors of the evolution of headache (remission or evolution into another headache form) over time should be an objective of future headache research for the development of prevention strategies. Given that headache is a major factor contributing to school absenteeism and poorer quality of life not only in childhood but also in adolescence, understanding the natural history and the management of the different headache forms is vital for our future.

  5. The evolution of headache from childhood to adulthood: a review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Headache is one of the most common disorders in childhood, with an estimated 75% of children reporting significant headache by the age of 15 years. Pediatric migraine is the most frequent recurrent headache disorder, occurring in up to 28% of older teenagers. Headaches rank third among the illness-related causes of school absenteeism and result in substantial psychosocial impairment among pediatric patients. The aim of this study was to clarify the evolution of the clinical features of primary headache in the transition from childhood to adulthood through a review of relevant data available in the PubMed and Google Scholar databases for the period 1988 to July 2013. The search strategy identified 15 published articles which were considered eligible for inclusion in the analysis (i.e. relevant to the investigation of pediatric headache outcome). All were carried out after the publication of the first version of the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-I). The availability of data on the evolution of primary headaches over a period of time is important from both a clinical and a public health perspective. The identification of prognostic factors of the evolution of headache (remission or evolution into another headache form) over time should be an objective of future headache research for the development of prevention strategies. Given that headache is a major factor contributing to school absenteeism and poorer quality of life not only in childhood but also in adolescence, understanding the natural history and the management of the different headache forms is vital for our future. PMID:24641507

  6. [Tricyclic antidepressant therapy in headache].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magyar, Máté; Csépány, Éva; Gyüre, Tamás; Bozsik, György; Bereczki, Dániel; Ertsey, Csaba

    2015-12-01

    The two most important representatives of the primary headaches are migraine and tension-type headache. More than 10% of the population suffer from migraine and even a greater part, approximately 30-40% from tension-type headache. These two headache types have a great effect both on the individual and on the society. There are two types of therapeutic approaches to headaches: the abortive and the prophylactic therapy. Prophylactic treatment is used for frequent and/or difficult-to-treat headache attacks. Although both migraine and tension-type headache are often associated with depression, for their treatment - in contrast to the widespread medical opinion - not all antidepressants were found to be effective. Amitriptyline, which is a tricyclic antidepressant, is used as a prophylactic therapy for headache since 1968. Its efficacy has been demonstrated in several double-blind, placebo-controlled studies. Although the newer types of antidepressant, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and selective serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, have a more favorable side-effect profile than tricyclic antidepressants, their headache prophylactic effect has not been proven yet.

  7. Prediction of tension-type headache risk in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Stepanchenko

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Tension-type headache is the actual problem of adolescent neurology, which is associated with the prevalence of the disease, the tendency of the disease to the chronic course and a negative impact on performance in education, work capacity and quality of patients’ life. The aim. To develop a method for prediction of tension-type headache occurrence in adolescents. Materials and methods. 2342 adolescent boys and girls at the age of 13-17 years in schools of Kharkiv were examined. We used questionnaire to identify the headache. A group of adolescents with tension-type headache - 1430 people (61.1% was selected. The control group included 246 healthy adolescents. Possible risk factors for tension-type headache formation were divided into 4 groups: genetic, biomedical, psychosocial and social. Mathematical prediction of tension-type headache risk in adolescents was performed using the method of intensive indicators normalization of E.N. Shigan, which was based on probabilistic Bayesian’s method. The result was presented in the form of prognostic coefficients. Results. The most informative risk factors for tension-type headache development were the diseases, from which the teenager suffered after 1 year (sleep disorders, gastrointestinal diseases, autonomic disorders in the family history, traumatic brain injury, physical inactivity, poor adaptation of the patient in the kindergarten and school, stresses. Diagnostic scale has been developed to predict the risk of tension-type headache. It includes 23 prognostic factors with their gradation and meaning of integrated risk indicator, depending on individual factor strength influence. The risk of tension-type headache development ranged from 25,27 to 81,43 values of prognostic coefficient (low probability (25,27-43,99, the average probability (43,99-62,71 and high probability (62,71- 81,43. Conclusion. The study of tension-type headache risk factors, which were obtained by using an assessed and

  8. Tension Type Headache: Evaluation of Chronic Type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer Karadaş

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Tension type headache(TTH which is a primary headache has episodic and chronic forms. Episodic TTH (ETTH can also be frequent-type and non-frequent-type. According to population-based studies, annual prevalence rates are 38.3% for ETTH and 2.2% for chronic TTH (CTTH. Patients can shift between the sub-groups of TTH. In particular, patients with ETTH are at risk of developing CTTH. Peripheral and central nociceptive mechanism are thought to be responsible in occurrence of TTH. Psychiatric disorders are frequently associated with TTH. Although basic and combined analgesics are used in acute treatment and antidepresants are used in prophylaxis, new treatment modalities are needed.

  9. Blunted autonomic response in cluster headache patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barloese, Mads; Brinth, Louise; Mehlsen, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cluster headache (CH) is a disabling headache disorder with chronobiological features. The posterior hypothalamus is involved in CH pathophysiology and is a hub for autonomic control. We studied autonomic response to the head-up tilt table test (HUT) including heart rate variability...... (HRV) in CH patients and compared results to healthy controls. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Twenty-seven episodic and chronic CH patients and an equal number of age-, sex- and BMI-matched controls were included. We analyzed responses to HUT in the time and frequency domain and by non-linear analysis. RESULTS......: CH patients have normal cardiovascular responses compared to controls but increased blood pressure. In the frequency analysis CH patients had a smaller change in the normalized low- (LF) (2.89 vs. 13.38, p 

  10. Pain, emotion, headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussone, Gennaro; Grazzi, Licia; Panerai, Alberto E

    2012-10-01

    Pain has been considered as part of a defensive strategy whose specific role is to signal an immediate active danger to the organism. This definition fits well for acute pain. It does not work well, however, for chronic pain that is maintained even in absence of an ongoing, active threat. Currently, acute and chronic pain are considered to be separate conditions. What follows is a review of the different theories about pain and its history. Different hypotheses regarding pain mechanisms are illustrated. New data emerging from scientific research on chronic pain (migraine in particular) involving innovative imaging techniques are reported and discussed. © 2012 American Headache Society.

  11. Chronic daily headache in U.S. soldiers after concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theeler, Brett J; Flynn, Frederick G; Erickson, Jay C

    2012-05-01

    To determine the prevalence and characteristics of, and factors associated with, chronic daily headache (CDH) in U.S. soldiers after a deployment-related concussion. A cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study was conducted with a cohort of 978 U.S. soldiers who screened positive for a deployment-related concussion upon returning from Iraq or Afghanistan. All soldiers underwent a clinical evaluation at the Madigan Traumatic Brain Injury Program that included a history, physical examination, 13-item self-administered headache questionnaire, and a battery of cognitive and psychological assessments. Soldiers with CDH, defined as headaches occurring on 15 or more days per month for the previous 3 months, were compared to soldiers with episodic headaches occurring less than 15 days per month. One hundred ninety-six of 978 soldiers (20%) with a history of deployment-related concussion met criteria for CDH and 761 (78%) had episodic headache. Soldiers with CDH had a median of 27 headache days per month, and 46/196 (23%) reported headaches occurring every day. One hundred seven out of 196 (55%) soldiers with CDH had onset of headaches within 1 week of head trauma and thereby met the time criterion for posttraumatic headache (PTHA) compared to 253/761 (33%) soldiers with episodic headache. Ninety-seven out of 196 (49%) soldiers with CDH used abortive medications to treat headache on 15 or more days per month for the previous 3 months. One hundred thirty out of 196 (66%) soldiers with CDH had headaches meeting criteria for migraine compared to 49% of soldiers with episodic headache. The number of concussions, blast exposures, and concussions with loss of consciousness was not significantly different between soldiers with and without CDH. Cognitive performance was also similar for soldiers with and without CDH. Soldiers with CDH had significantly higher average scores on the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) checklist compared to soldiers with episodic headaches. Forty

  12. New insights into secondary prevention in post-traumatic stress disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohar, Joseph; Juven-Wetzler, Alzbeta; Sonnino, Rachel; Cwikel-Hamzany, Shlomit; Balaban, Evgenya; Cohen, Hagit

    2011-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is unique amongst psychiatric disorders in two ways. Firstly, there is usually a very clear point of onset- the traumatic event The second unique feature of PTSD is that it is characterized by a failure of the normal response to resolve. Given these two characteristics, PTSD appears a good candidate for secondary prevention, ie, interventions immediately after the trauma. Evidence available starting from current concepts and contemporary research of potential secondary prevention interventions are presented. Common practices in the aftermath of trauma such as debriefing and benzodiazepines need to be carefully considered, taking into account their potential harm to the spontaneous recovery process, and the trajectory of PTSD, and not only judging them according to their immediate (comforting) effects. A discussion of the balance required between aiding recovery but not interfering with the potent natural resolution of symptoms (that is expected in most cases), along with potential avenues of future research, are presented. Results of a small pilot study with a single intervention of hydrocortisone immediately after trauma appear to be promising, and clearly indicate the need for further studies. PMID:22033784

  13. Botulinum toxin A is effective to treat tension-type headache caused by hemifacial spasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuma, Atsushi; Nagata, Eiichiro; Yasuda, Takashi; Kouchi, Maiko; Nakayama, Taira; Honma, Kazunari; Tokuoka, Kentaro; Kitagawa, Yasuhisa; Nogawa, Shigeru; Takizawa, Shunya

    2017-10-01

    We examined the relationship between hemifacial spasm (HFS; a form of cranio-cervical dystonia) and chronic primary headache, including tension-type headache (TTH). We also examined whether botulinum toxin A (BoNT/A) therapy for HFS ameliorates concomitant TTH. Fifty-one HFS patients receiving BoNT/A therapy were recruited. Patients' characteristics (including age, gender, chronic headache history, exercise habits, stiff neck, cervical spondylolysis history), stress factors, worsening/new onset of headache associated with HFS, and dose of BoNT/A were examined. We diagnosed headache types according to The International Classification of Headache Disorders, 3rd edition, beta. Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) and Headache Impact Test-6 (HIT-6) scores for headache severity were compared between the 6-week baseline before BoNT/A therapy and 6-week follow-up after BoNT/A therapy. Of 51 patients with HFS, 17 (33.3%) reported worsening or new onset of headache (especially TTH) associated with HFS (Group-S), and 34 were not aware of headache (Group-N). Twelve patients (70.6%) in group-S reported improvement of headache after BoNT/A therapy. NRS (from 7 [5-9] to 0 [0-5], pheadache (odds ratio 28.53: 2.96-275.10, pheadache, especially TTH, is associated with HFS. BoNT/A therapy for HFS may also be indirectly effective for treatment of TTH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Epidural blood patch for refractory low CSF pressure headache: a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Madsen, Søren Aalbæk; Fomsgaard, Jonna Storm; Jensen, Rigmor

    2011-01-01

    Once believed an exceedingly rare disorder, recent evidence suggests that low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure headache has to be considered an important cause of new daily persistent headaches, particularly among young and middle-aged individuals. Treatment of low CSF pressure headache consists of non-invasive/conservative measures and invasive measures with epidural blood patch providing the cornerstone of the invasive measures. In the present pilot study we therefore aimed to evaluate th...

  15. Headaches and Migraines: Understanding Headaches, From Mild to Migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... address them. Regular exercise helps me with the stress trigger. Also, I avoid chocolate. "The point is," Eckhart declares, "medical research has really made a difference for me." Fast Fasts The most common type of headache is a tension headache. These usually are due ...

  16. Headache characteristics of uncomplicated intracranial vertebral artery dissection and validation of ICHD-3 beta diagnostic criteria for headache attributed to intracranial artery dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Gyum; Choi, Jeong-Yoon; Kim, Sung Un; Jung, Jin-Man; Kwon, Do-Young; Park, Moon Ho; Oh, Kyungmi

    2015-05-01

    Headache may be a warning sign of subsequent stroke in patients with vertebral artery dissection (VAD). Even though the headache characteristics of VAD have been described predominantly in patients with extracranial VAD and neurological complications, headache semiology is not well known in patients with uncomplicated intracranial vertebral artery dissection (ICVAD). In the present study, we attempt to identify the headache semiology that characterizes ICVAD and validate the revised version of the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-3 beta) criteria for headache attributed to intracranial artery dissection. Six patients with neurologically uncomplicated ICVAD presented at a participating medical center, and eight similar patients were reviewed in the literature. Combining these data, we analyzed headache characteristics of patients with uncomplicated ICVAD according to their pain onset and duration, nature, intensity, location, aggravating and relieving factors, associated symptoms, response to medication, and prognosis. Headache in uncomplicated ICVAD usually has an acute mode of onset (11/14) and persistent (10/14) temporal feature. Pain that has a throbbing quality (nine of 14) and severe intensity (13/14) on the ipsilesional (10/14) and occipitonuchal area (12/14) is a headache prototype in ICVAD. Additionally, headache was intensified by head flexion and rotation (three of six), and relieved by head extension and supine positioning (five of six). Headache of all patients in the present study fulfilled the ICHD-3 beta criteria. Headache semiology of uncomplicated ICVAD is mostly homogenous in the present study. These characteristics may be helpful in the diagnosis of uncomplicated ICVAD. © International Headache Society 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  17. A Recurrent Headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe Dylewski

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Case Presentation A 43-year-old man presented to the emergency room in September 2004 with a two-day history of increasing headache, myalgias and low-grade fever. No family members had been ill recently and he denied having nausea or diarrhea. On examination, he was nontoxic, with a temperature of 37.5¡ãC, pulse of 90 beats/min and blood pressure of 146/84 mmHg. Skin rashes were not present, and the neck was supple. The patient claimed that he seldom had headaches but that he had been hospitalized in England 15 years ago for viral meningitis. He remembered receiving antibiotics at the time despite being told it was a viral meningitis. The patient underwent a computed tomography scan of the brain, which was normal, followed by a lumbar puncture. The opening pressure was not recorded, but there were 23x106/L polymorphonuclear cells and 308x106/L lymphocytes in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. The CSF protein was elevated at 1.26 g/L (N¡Ü0.45, with a CSF glucose of 2.9 mmol/L compared with a serum value of 5.3 mmol/L. The peripheral white blood cell count was 10.5x109/L, with 8.0x109/L neutrophils.

  18. PTSD, combat injury, and headache in Veterans Returning from Iraq/Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afari, Niloofar; Harder, Laura H; Madra, Naju J; Heppner, Pia S; Moeller-Bertram, Tobias; King, Clay; Baker, Dewleen G

    2009-10-01

    To examine the relationship between posttraumatic stress disorder, combat injury, and headache in Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom veterans at the VA San Diego Healthcare System. Previous investigations suggest that a relationship between posttraumatic stress disorder and primary headache disorders exists and could be complicated by the contribution of physical injury, especially one that results in loss of consciousness. These associations have not been systematically examined in Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom veterans. In this observational cross-sectional study, a battery of self-report, standardized questionnaires was completed by 308 newly registered veterans between March and October 2006. The Davidson Trauma Scale was used to determine the degree of posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms and combat-related physical injury was assessed by self-report. The presence of headache was based on a symptom checklist measure and self-reported doctor diagnoses. Logistic regression analysis was performed to predict presence of headache and determine odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals associated with demographic, military, in-theatre, and mental health characteristics. About 40% of the veterans met the criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder; 40% self-reported current headache, 10% reported a physician diagnosis of migraine, 12% a physician diagnosis of tension-type headache, and 6% reported both types of headache. Results from the logistic regression model indicated that combat-related physical injury (odds ratio: 2.25; 95% confidence interval: 1.17-4.33) and posttraumatic stress disorder (odds ratio: 4.13; 95% confidence interval: 2.44-6.99) were independent predictors of self-reported headache. Additional analyses found that veterans with both tension and migraine headache had higher rates of posttraumatic stress disorder (chi-square [d.f. = 3] = 15.89; P = .001) whereas veterans with migraine headache alone had

  19. Tension type headaches: a review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Location of the pain:There is often a typical location for tension- type headaches, as ... Cranial nerve abnormalities, including papilloedema. • Signs of ... peripheral and central mechanisms underlie tension-type ... Physiotherapy has been shown to be an effective management option for .... Acupuncture in primary headache.

  20. Headache in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanly, John G; Urowitz, Murray B; O'Keeffe, Aidan G

    2013-01-01

    To examine the frequency and characteristics of headaches and their association with global disease activity and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).......To examine the frequency and characteristics of headaches and their association with global disease activity and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)....

  1. Hypoxic mechanisms in primary headaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Britze, Josefine; Arngrim, Nanna; Schytz, Henrik Winther

    2017-01-01

    and cluster headache. Methods This narrative review investigates the current level of knowledge on the relation of hypoxia in migraine and cluster headache based on epidemiological and experimental studies. Findings Epidemiological studies suggest that living in high-altitude areas increases the risk...

  2. Implementation of effective, self-sustaining headache services in the Republic of Georgia: Evaluation of their impact on headache-related disability and quality of life of people with headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgadze, Gvantsa; Mania, Maka; Kukava, Maka; Dzagnidze, Ana; Mirvelashvili, Ekaterine; Steiner, Timothy J; Katsarava, Zaza

    2018-04-01

    Background Headache disorders are widespread and disabling. They are common in Georgia, especially headache on ≥15 days/month (HA ≥ 15), but there are no headache services. Objective We established headache services meeting local needs, investigating feasibility, consumer uptake and satisfaction, and cost, with an exit strategy bequeathing effective, self-sustaining services that could be rolled out nationwide. Methods We created headache centres in Tbilisi and Gori offering free expert care for three visits over three months, and affordable medication thereafter. The primary outcome measure was the percentage of patients using the service beyond the free period - a measure of both satisfaction and sustainability. Results Of 1,445 patients (age 43.7 ± 12.4 years; 10.5% male), 49.8% had episodic migraine, 22.5% episodic tension-type headache, 25.7% HA ≥ 15 (24.5% overusing medication) and 2.0% trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias. Only 454 (31.4%) and 51 (3.5%) returned for second and third visits; in these, headache improved and treatment costs decreased. As information about the service spread, five other headache clinics opened in Tbilisi and Kutaisi (western Georgia). Pharmaceutical companies reduced prices (sumatriptan 100 mg from US$7 to US$1). Conclusion The study failed to achieve its primary outcome, but sustainable headache services operating to international standards were successfully implemented nonetheless, with demand increasing.

  3. Epileptic seizures and headache/migraine: a review of types of association and terminology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianchetti, Carlo; Pruna, Dario; Ledda, Mariagiuseppina

    2013-11-01

    There are different possible temporal associations between epileptic seizures and headache attacks which have given rise to unclear or controversial terminologies. The classification of the International League Against Epilepsy does not refer to this type of disorder, while the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-2) defines three kinds of association: (1) migraine-triggered seizure ("migralepsy"), (2) hemicrania epileptica, and (3) post-ictal headache. We performed an extensive review of the literature, not including "post-ictal" and "inter-ictal" headaches. On the basis of well-documented reports, the following clinical entities may be identified: (A) "epileptic headache (EH)" or "ictal epileptic headache (IEH)": in this condition headache (with or without migrainous features) is an epileptic manifestation per se, with onset, and cessation if isolated, coinciding with the scalp or deep EEG pattern of an epileptic seizure. EH maybe followed by other epileptic manifestations (motor/sensory/autonomic); this condition should be differentiated from "pure" or "isolated" EH, in which headache/migraine is the sole epileptic manifestation (requiring differential diagnosis from other headache forms). "Hemicrania epileptica" (if confirmed) is a very rare variant of EH, characterized by ipsilateral location of headache and ictal EEG paroxysms. (B) "Pre-ictal migraine" and "pre-ictal headache": when a headache attack is followed during, or shortly after, by a typical epileptic seizure. The migraine attack may be with or without aura, and its seizure-triggering role ("migraine-triggered seizure") is still a subject of debate. A differentiation from occipital epilepsy is mandatory. The term "migralepsy" has not been used uniformly, and may therefore led to misinterpretation. On the basis of this review we suggest definitions and a terminology which may become the basis of a forthcoming classification of headaches associated with epileptic seizures. Copyright

  4. Can headache impair intellectual abilities in children? An observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esposito M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Maria Esposito,1 Antonio Pascotto,1 Beatrice Gallai,3 Lucia Parisi,2 Michele Roccella,2 Rosa Marotta,4 Serena Marianna Lavano,4 Antonella Gritti,5 Giovanni Mazzotta,6 Marco Carotenuto11Center for Childhood Headache, Clinic of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, Second University of Naples, Naples, 2Child Neuropsychiatry, Department of Psychology, University of Palermo, Palermo, 3Unit of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, University of Perugia, Perugia, 4Department of Psychiatry, “Magna Graecia” University of Catanzaro, Catanzaro, 5Suor Orsola Benincasa University, Napoli, 6Unit of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, Azienda Sanitaria Locale 4, Terni, ItalyBackground: The purpose of this study was to assess the cognitive functioning of children affected by headache, pinpointing the differences in intelligence style between subjects affected by migraine without aura and subjects with tension-type headache.Methods: The study population consisted of 147 children (mean age 10.82 ± 2.17 years with headache, recruited from the Headache Center for Developmental Age, Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry Clinic, Second University of Naples. Cognitive profiling was performed using Weschler Intelligence Scale for Children Third Edition throughout the sample. According to the International Classification of Headache Disorders II criteria for pediatric age, subjects were divided into a migraine without aura group (n = 75; 43 boys, 32 girls and a tension-type headache group (n = 72; 49 boys, 23 girls. The results were compared with the findings obtained from a sample of 137 healthy control subjects recruited from schools in the Campania region, matched for age and gender.Results: No difference in full intelligence quotient was found between the groups, but the children with tension-type headache had a lower verbal intelligence quotient and a higher performance intelligence quotient than the healthy controls and children with migraine. Factor

  5. Migraine and tension type headache in adolescents at grammar school in Germany - burden of disease and health care utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, Lucia; Straube, Andreas; Landgraf, Mirjam N; Filippopulos, Filipp; Heinen, Florian; von Kries, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    Tension-type headache and migraine are among the most prevalent chronic disorders in children/adolescents. Data on health care utilization for headache in this age group, however, are sparse. In 1399 grammar school students (aged 12-19 years) with headache in the last six months in Germany a) the burden of disease for headache (mean intensity, mean frequency in the last three months and PedMIDAS means), b) medical care utilization defined by proportion of students consulting a physician in the last 12 months and/or taking analgetic drugs in the last three months by headache types (migraine and tension-type headache) and by burden of disease were assessed. Primary headache substantially impaired daily living activities in adolescents which was mainly related to migraine. Medical care utilization and drug use, however, was low (consulting a physician: 12.0 %, 95 %-CI = [10.3-13.8]; taking analgetic drugs: 29.9 %, 95 %-CI = [27.5-32.4]) - even among students with severe headache (physician consultation: headache and 40 % of those with migraine had neither seen a physician nor used analgetic drugs because of their headache in the preceding 12 months. Adolescents with headache might too rarely seek professional help for treatment of headache. Health promotion in adolescents should increase awareness for evidence-based treatment options for headache.

  6. Adolescents' medicine use for headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holstein, Bjørn E; Andersen, Anette; Fotiou, Anastasios

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study reports secular trends in medicine use for headache among adolescents in 20 countries from 1986 to 2010. METHODS: The international Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) survey includes self-reported data about medicine use for headaches among nationally...... representative samples of 11-, 13- and 15-year-olds. We included 20 countries with data from at least three data collection waves, with a total of 380 129 participants. RESULTS: The prevalence of medicine use for headaches varied from 16.5% among Hungarian boys in 1994 to 62.9% among girls in Wales in 1998....... The prevalence was higher among girls than boys in every country and data collection year. The prevalence of medicine use for headaches increased in 12 of 20 countries, most notably in the Czech Republic, Poland, Russia, Sweden and Wales. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of medicine use for headaches among adolescents...

  7. Chinese Herbal Therapy for Chronic Tension-Type Headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YanQing Tong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the effects of Chinese herbal therapy on chronic tension-type headache. Method. 132 patients with chronic tension-type headache were enrolled in the study. All patients filled in headache questionnaire at baseline phase and 4, 8, and 12 weeks after baseline. As an alternative therapeutic method, the patients were orally administrated Chinese herbal concoction for ten days. Therapeutic effects were evaluated during 12 weeks of followup. Result. In the primary outcome analysis, mean headache scores were significantly lower in the group. Scores fell by 25%–40% during 12 weeks of followup. Patients fared significantly well for most secondary outcome measures. From baseline to 4–12 weeks of followup, the number of days with headache decreased by 6.8–9.5 days. Duration of each attack also significantly (P < 0.05 shortened from 5.3 hours at 4 weeks to 4.9 hours after 8 weeks of followup. Days with medication per four weeks at followup were lower than those at the baseline. The differences were significant (P < 0.05, 0.01 for all end points. Days with medication fell by 56.6% at 12 weeks. Conclusion. The study has provided evidence that Chinese herbal therapy can be clinically useful for the treatment of chronic tension-type headache.

  8. Thunderclap headache: Diagnostic considerations and neuroimaging features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortimer, A.M.; Bradley, M.D.; Stoodley, N.G.; Renowden, S.A.

    2013-01-01

    Thunderclap headache (TCH) is an acute and severe headache that has maximum intensity at onset; TCH can be primary or secondary. Primary TCH is diagnosed when no underlying cause is discovered; however, imaging is crucial in distinguishing secondary causes, which are wide-ranging. The radiologist should be aware of the list of potential diagnoses. Subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) is the most common cause of secondary TCH. Aneurysmal SAH accounts for the majority of cases, although other causes should also be considered and these include perimesencephalic haemorrhage, arteriovenous malformations, and dural arteriovenous fistula as well as reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome. Conditions that may present with TCH, with or without SAH include cervical artery dissection and cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Ischaemic stroke, pituitary apoplexy, and posterior reversible leucoencephalopathy are other potential causes, whereas non-vascular causes include colloid cysts of the third ventricle and spontaneous intracranial hypotension. Imaging features are reviewed with reference to clues gleaned from initial imaging using computed tomography, as well as characteristics that should be sought using magnetic resonance imaging or angiographic imaging

  9. Understanding of headache patterns modification in an emergency department during the economic crisis of Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougea, Anastasia; Spantideas, Nicolaos; Anagnostou, Evangelos; Massou, Efthalia; Xirou, Sophia; Thomaidis, Thomas; Evdokimidis, Ioannis; Kararizou, Evangelia

    2016-08-01

    Very few neurological research is published regarding health effects of global economic crisis. Our aim was to assess the impact of economic recession on frequency and severity of headaches. We also tested if depression, anxiety and experiences associated with crisis, such as unemployment, were reflected in headaches. This is a retrospective observational study in the Emergency setting of tertiary Clinic from 1 January 2008 until 31 December 2009 and from 1 January 2010 until 31 December 2011. Demographic data were collected of 1094 consecutive adult patients with headache. Multinomial logistic regression performed to examine if hospital anxiety depression (HAD), HAD anxiety, experience of serious life events, year of survey had influence on type of headache. The total number of headache cases increased significantly from 2008 to 2011 (p headaches remained unchanged over time (p > 0.05), while migraines decreased. Secondary and not otherwise specified (NOS) increased significantly (p headache, followed by migraines (in 2008, 2011) and NOS (2010). Chi square test showed significant correlation between type of headache and year, as well medication type and year (p headache [odds ratio (OR) 0.13; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.03, 0.7]. This is the first study showing that the prolonged economic crisis affected headache frequency accompanied by a higher use of analgesics.

  10. Response of Treatment in Patients with Primary Headaches and Hypertension: A Prospective Observational Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Cüneyt Hocagil

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the priority in the treatment of patients with primary headaches accompanied by high blood pressure. In our study, we investigated whether there was a relationship between the decline in headache after treatment and the change in the average arterial pressure. Materials and Methods: This prospective observational study was performed with 101 patients who were admitted to the hospital emergency department with primary headache accompanied by high blood pressure. After treatment, the decrease in the severity of headaches, mean arterial pressure, and percentage value for the drop of mean arterial pressure were calculated for all patients. Results: In the study, 25 (24.8% patients’ headache decreased 3 levels, 43 (42.6% patients’ headache decreased 2 levels, and 23 (22.8% patients’ headache decreased one level. The mean arterial pressure value at admission was 118.58±12.65 mmHg, and after treatment at the 30th minute decreased to 98.41±13.43 mmHg. Although there was a statistically significant (p0.05 drop in the mean arterial pressure value of the patients with one level decrease in headache severity after treatment. Conclusion: This study showed that when a primary headache, which is often associated with high blood pressure, was treated instead of treating high blood pressure as a secondary cause of headache, blood pressure decreased spontaneously

  11. Pain stress and headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panerai, Alberto E

    2012-05-01

    The association between pain and stress is an old one, but still it is not really clear who comes first. Pain induces stress, and stress induces pain. Pain is part of our homeostatic system and in this way is an emotion, i.e., it tells us that something is out-of-order (control), and emotion drives our behavior and one behavior is stress response. Stress comes from ourselves: the imagination we have or would like to have of us, from the image others give of us, from the goals we assume it is necessary to reach for our well-being or the goals others want us to fulfill. Stress comes from our social condition and the condition we would like, stress comes from dangerous situations we cannot control. Headache easily fits in the picture.

  12. Development and psychometric validation of the headache screening questionnaire – Dutch Version

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, Hedwig A.; Visscher, Corine M.; Engelbert, Raoul H.H.; Mulleners, Wim M.; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W. G.; Speksnijder, Caroline M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Headache is a common disorder which may lead to substantial socio-economic loss. Treatment options include self-management strategies, medication and physiotherapy. Physiotherapists need to be able to screen for the presence of migraine and tension-type headache (TTH), so they can adjust

  13. Impaired Mood in Headache Clinic Patients : Associations With the Perceived Hindrance and Attainability of Personal Goals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciere, Yvette; Visser, Annemieke; Lebbink, John; Sanderman, Robbert; Fleer, Joke

    BackgroundHeadache disorders are often accompanied by impaired mood, especially in the headache clinic population. There is a large body of literature demonstrating that an illness or disability may affect the way in which patients perceive their personal goals and that the perception that the

  14. Impaired Mood in Headache Clinic Patients: Associations With the Perceived Hindrance and Attainability of Personal Goals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciere, Yvette; Visser, Annemieke; Lebbink, John; Sanderman, Robbert; Fleer, Joke

    2016-01-01

    Background Headache disorders are often accompanied by impaired mood, especially in the headache clinic population. There is a large body of literature demonstrating that an illness or disability may affect the way in which patients perceive their personal goals and that the perception that the

  15. Evidence for efficacy of acute treatment of episodic tension-type headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, R Andrew; Derry, Sheena; Wiffen, Philip J

    2014-01-01

    The International Headache Society (IHS) provides guidance on the conduct of trials for acute treatment of episodic tension-type headache (TTH), a common disorder with considerable disability. Electronic and other searches identified randomised, double-blind trials of oral drugs treating episodic...

  16. Are Migraine and Tension-Type Headache Genetically Related? An Investigation of Twin Family Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligthart, Lannie; Huijgen, Annemarie; Willemsen, Gonneke; De Geus, Eco J.C.; Boomsma, Dorret I.

    Migraine and tension-type headache (TTH) are often viewed as distinct entities and defined as such in the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd edition (ICHD-II) criteria, although there is also empirical evidence to suggest they may be etiologically similar. This study aims to

  17. Mesenteric venous thrombosis secondary to an unsuspected JAK2 V617F-positive myeloproliferative disorder.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: Mesenteric venous thrombosis (MVT) is a rare but potentially fatal cause of mesenteric ischaemia. It presents insidiously and often diagnosis is made at emergency surgery. In half of the cases MVT develops without a causative factor, while in cases in which a pro-thrombotic state is found to exist MVT may be the first clinically detected consequence of that state. The myeloproliferative disorders (MPD) are known to contribute to the development of pro-thrombotic states. Recently, the JAK2 V617F mutation has been associated with the MPDs. CONCLUSION: We describe a case of MVT occurring secondary to an unsuspected MPD, in which the patient was subsequently found to carry this mutation. We highlight the necessity to screen for this mutation in cases of intra-abdominal thromboses so that appropriate systemic anticoagulation may be instituted, and the patient may be followed so as to detect the development of an overt MPD.

  18. Epicrania fugax: 19 cases of an emerging headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuadrado, María Luz; Ordás, Carlos M; Sánchez-Lizcano, María; Casas-Limón, Javier; Matías-Guiu, Jordi A; García-García, María Eugenia; Fernández-Matarrubia, Marta; Barahona-Hernando, Raúl; Porta-Etessam, Jesús

    2013-05-01

    Epicrania fugax (EF) is a primary headache of recent description. We aimed to report 19 new cases of EF, and thus contribute to the characterization of this emerging headache. EF is characterized by painful paroxysms starting in a particular area of the head, and rapidly radiating forwards or backwards through the territories of different nerves. The pain is felt in quick motion along a lineal or zigzag trajectory. To date, 47 cases have been published, 34 with forward EF and 13 with backward EF. We performed a descriptive study of all EF cases attending our Headache Unit from April 2010 to December 2012. Demographic and clinical data were recorded with a structured questionnaire. Overall, there were 12 women and 7 men. Mean age at onset was 51.7 ± 16.2. Fourteen patients had forward EF, while 5 patients had backward EF. Painful paroxysms lasted 1-4 seconds. Pain intensity was usually moderate or severe, and pain quality was mostly electric. Four patients had ocular autonomic accompaniments. Pain frequency was extremely variable, and 7 patients identified some triggers. Between attacks, 13 patients had some pain or tenderness in the stemming area. Thirteen patients required therapy for their pain. Neuromodulators, indomethacin, anesthetic blockades, and steroid injections were used in different cases, with partial or complete response. EF appears as a distinct headache syndrome and could be eventually included in future editions of the International Classification of Headache Disorders. © 2013 American Headache Society.

  19. [Venous angiomas and headache in children. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Mauricio; Huete, Isidro; Hernández, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Venous angiomas (VA) are benign entities; however infrequent symptomatic cases may occur. Case report and literature review. A 6 year old girl was referred with a history of bi-frontal, non-pulsatile, headache with no nausea or vomiting. Headache intensity was 4-6/10. The episodes were frequent, 3-4 times per week. Triggers include academic work. Computed tomography showed a small VA in left caudate nucleus, which was confirmed by a brain MRI, with no evidence of inflammatory or ischaemic changes, or another vascular malformation. Psychological and psycho-pedagogic techniques were used, combined with relaxation and cognitive-behavioural techniques to reduce the intensity and frequency. There was a good outcome, and the headache decreased to 10 episodes per year. The patient was monitored for 12 years until graduation from high school. The VA remained without complications. In the study of a headache, a VA usually is an incidental finding. The International Classification of Headache Disorders III provides specific criteria of frequent episodic tension-type headache, and allows us begin specific therapy for it. Monitoring of non-symptomatic VA cases should be clinical. The surgical management of these entities is exceptional. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Nonmedical Use of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Medication Among Secondary School Students in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, Ellen S; de Haan, Lydia; Bouvy, Marcel L; Heerdink, Eibert R

    2015-10-01

    No studies in Europe have assessed the extent of nonmedical attention-deficit/hyperactivitiy disorder (ADHD) medication use among adolescents, while also, in Europe, prescribing of these medicines has increased. Our objective was to study the prevalence and motives for nonmedical ADHD medication use among secondary school students in the Netherlands. Adolescent students 10-19 years of age from six secondary schools were invited to complete an online survey on use of ADHD medication, tobacco, alcohol, and drugs. Nonmedical ADHD medication use was defined as self-reported use without a prescription during the previous 12 months. Survey data were available for 777 students (15% response rate). The overall proportion of students self-reporting nonmedical ADHD medication use was 1.2% (n = 9), which represented almost 20% of the adolescents who reported ADHD medication use (n = 49). Most adolescents reported self-medication or enhancing study performance as motives for ADHD medication use. The proportion of the study sample reporting nonmedical ADHD medication use in our study is lower compared with that in previous research conducted in the United States and Canada; however, on a population-based level, there might be a considerable proportion of recreational users.

  1. Headache Characteristics and Clinical Features of Elderly Migraine Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rijk, Pablo; Resseguier, Noémie; Donnet, Anne

    2018-04-01

    To investigate the headache characteristics and clinical features of elderly migraine patients at a tertiary headache center. We retrospectively reviewed 239 records of migraine patients, over the age of 64 at the first visit, who had migraine as defined by the International Classification of Headache Disorders 3rd edition (beta version) from 2006 to 2015 based on the Marseille registry at Timone Hospital. 13.8% (33/239) patients had migraine with aura only, 13.0% (31/239) had both diagnoses. Of the patients who presented with migraine with aura, 13.4% (32/239) presented with aura without headache. Unilateral pain location was reported by 58.6% (140/239) of patients and the throbbing type of pain was present in 50.2% (120/239) of our study group. Photo- and phonophobia were observed in 77.4% (185/239) and 79.5% (190/239) of patients. Seventy-nine out of 239 (30.1%) patients were found to have probable medication overuse. Within this group, 31.65% (25/79) overused triptan and 70.9% (56/79) overused combination analgesics. We found higher frequencies of migraine for patients whose age at onset of migraine was younger than 18 years, and low frequency migraine was reported more frequently in the later onset group (P = .0357). We assess the headache characteristics of elderly migraine patients who were seen at our tertiary headache center and report the high frequency of probable medication overuse headache in this study group. Finally, we suggest that age of onset is an important factor in the clinical profile of these patients. © 2017 American Headache Society.

  2. Association between primary headaches and depression in young adults in southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asdrubal Falavigna

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To verify the association between depression and headache in young adults, as well as to identify the features of headache associated with depression and the influence of this mood disorder on headache-related disability. METHODS: A cross-sectional study with self-administered questionnaires about headache and depression was conducted at the Universidade de Caxias do Sul. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and Migraine Disability Assessment (MIDAS were used to evaluate depressive symptoms and headache-related disability, respectively. Depression was considered if BDI > 15. RESULTS: A thousand and thirteen young adults were included in the study. A clear relationship was observed between headache and depression among the participants. Multivariate analyses demonstrated that nausea or vomiting related to headache and higher headacherelated disability scores were independent factors associated with depression. Migraine was more associated with depression than the other types of headache. CONCLUSION: The results demonstrate an association between headache and depression. Depressive symptoms are more likely to be found in young adults with more disabling headaches.

  3. Non-invasive methods for measuring vascular changes in neurovascular headaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schytz, Henrik W; Amin, Faisal M; Selb, Juliette

    2018-01-01

    Vascular changes during spontaneous headache attacks have been studied over the last 30 years. The interest in cerebral vessels in headache research was initially due to the hypothesis of cerebral vessels as the pain source. Here, we review the knowledge gained by measuring the cerebral vasculature...... studies of migraine and other headache disorders do not provide solid evidence for cerebral blood flow velocity changes during spontaneous attacks of migraine headache. SPECT studies have clearly shown cortical vascular changes following migraine aura and the differences between migraine with aura...... compared to migraine without aura. PET studies have shown focal activation in brain structures related to headache, but whether the changes are specific to different primary headaches have yet to be demonstrated. MR angiography has shown precise changes in large cerebral vessels during spontaneous migraine...

  4. Classification of perimenstrual headache: clinical relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGregor, E Anne

    2012-10-01

    Although more than 50% of women with migraine report an association between migraine and menstruation, menstruation has generally considered to be no more than one of a variety of different migraine triggers. In 2004, the second edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders introduced specific diagnostic criteria for menstrual migraine. Results from research undertaken subsequently lend support to the clinical impression that menstrual migraine should be seen as a distinct clinical entity. This paper reviews the recent research and provides specific recommendations for consideration in future editions of the classification.

  5. Implementing practice guidelines for anxiety disorders in secondary mental health care: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Dijk Maarten K

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent years have seen the large-scale development of clinical practice guidelines for mental disorders in several countries. In the Netherlands, more than ten multidisciplinary guidelines for mental health care have been developed since 2003. The first dealt with the treatment of anxiety disorders. An important question was whether it is feasible to implement these guidelines because implementing practice guidelines is often difficult. Although several implementation interventions have proven effective, there seems to be no ready-made strategy that works in all circumstances. Case description The Dutch multidisciplinary guidelines for anxiety disorders were implemented in a community mental health care centre, located in the east of the Netherlands. The centre provides secondary outpatient care. The unit within the centre that specializes in the treatment of anxiety disorders has 16 team members with diverse professional backgrounds. Important steps in the process of implementing the guidelines were analysing the care provided before start of the implementation to determine the goals for improvement, and analysing the context and target group for implementation. Based on these analyses, a tailor-made multifaceted implementation strategy was developed that combined the reorganization of the care process, the development of instruction materials, the organization of educational meetings and the use of continuous quality circles to improve adherence to guidelines. Discussion and evaluation Significant improvements in adherence rates were made in the aspect of care that was targeted for change. An increase was found in the number of patients being provided with recommended forms of psychotherapeutic treatment, ranging from 43% to 54% (p  Conclusion The case study presented here shows that the implementation of practice guidelines for anxiety disorders in mental health care is feasible. Based on the results of our study, the

  6. The relationship between migraine headache and asthma features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirican, Nigar; Demirci, Seden; Cakir, Munire

    2017-06-01

    Migraine and asthma are comorbid chronic disorders with episodic attacks thought to involve inflammatory and neurological mechanisms. The objective of the present study is to investigate the relationship of asthma features between the asthma patients with migraine and those without migraine headache. A cross-sectional study was conducted from October 2015 to June 2016. Physician-diagnosed asthma patients aged 18 years and above were included. Demographic data, pulmonary function test and treatment of asthma were recorded. Asthma control was assessed using the asthma control test (ACT) and asthma control questionnaire (ACQ). The diagnosis of migraine was made by the neurologist with face-to face examinations based on the International Classification of Headache Disorders, third edition beta (ICHD-III-beta) criteria. Data about the age at onset, frequency of headache attacks, duration of headache attack, the presence of aura, and severity of headache were recorded. The severity of headache was evaluated using visual analogue scale (VAS). Overall 121 asthma patients were included in this study. Migraine was found to be present in 32 (26.4%) of patients. No statistically significant difference was found between asthma group and asthma with migraine groups in terms of pulmonary function test parameters. The mean ACT score in asthma with migraine patients group was significantly lower than the asthma groups. Morever, in the group asthma with migraine, a negative significant correlations were found between ACT scores with VAS scores. This study demonstrates that migraine headache may be associated with poor asthma control. On the other hand, it should not be forgotten that ACT is a subjective test and can be affected from by many clinical parameters.

  7. Incidence of ′headache attributed to temporomandibular disease′ in patients with clicking sound in the region temporomandibular joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caner Sahin

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion TMJ 2014 consortium network showed that headache attributed to TMD may be in associated with cephalalgia. The rate of headache is higher in patients with TMJ disorders. TMJ disorders should also be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of cephalalgia considering the quality of life of patients.

  8. Pain perception studies in tension-type headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezov, David; Ashina, Sait; Jensen, Rigmor; Bendtsen, Lars

    2011-02-01

    Tension-type headache (TTH) is a disorder with high prevalence and significant impact on society. Understanding of pathophysiology of TTH is paramount for development of effective treatments and prevention of chronification of TTH. Our aim was to review the findings from pain perception studies of pathophysiology of TTH as well as to review the research of pathophysiology of TTH. Pain perception studies such as measurement of muscle tenderness, pain detection thresholds, pain tolerance thresholds, pain response to suprathreshold stimulation, temporal summation and diffuse noxious inhibitory control (DNIC) have played a central role in elucidating the pathophysiology of TTH. It has been demonstrated that continuous nociceptive input from peripheral myofascial structures may induce central sensitization and thereby chronification of the headache. Measurements of pain tolerance thresholds and suprathreshold stimulation have shown presence of generalized hyperalgesia in chronic tension-type headache (CTTH) patients, while DNIC function has been shown to be reduced in CTTH. One imaging study showed loss of gray matter structures involved in pain processing in CTTH patients. Future studies should aim to integrate pain perception and imaging to confirm this finding. Pharmacological studies have shown that drugs like tricyclic anti-depressant amitriptyline and nitric oxide synthase inhibitors can reverse central sensitization and the chronicity of headache. Finally, low frequency electrical stimulation has been shown to rapidly reverse central sensitization and may be a new modality in treatment of CTTH and other chronic pain disorders. © 2010 American Headache Society.

  9. The impact of dyspepsia on symptom severity and quality of life in adults with headache.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Ling Sharon Tai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dyspepsia and headache frequently co-exist, but the clinical implication of this association is uncertain. We planned to examine the prevalence and impact of dyspepsia in adults with headache. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted in a secondary care setting. Clinical, psychological and health-related quality of life (HRQOL data were compared between subjects with headache and controls (non-headache subjects. The impact of dyspepsia was analysed further in subjects with headache alone. RESULTS: 280 subjects (93 cases with headache and 187 matched controls were recruited. The following baseline characteristics of subjects were as follows: mean age 45.0 ± 17.3 years, 57.0% females and ethnic distribution-Malaysian = 45 (48.4%, Chinese n = 24 (25.8% and Indians n = 24 (25.8%. Headache sub-types among cases with headache were as follows: tension-type headache (TTH n = 53 (57.0% and migraine n = 40 (43.0%. Dyspepsia was more prevalent in cases with headache compared to controls (25.8% vs 12.8%, p = 0.011, and headache was independently associated with dyspepsia (OR 2.75, 95% CI 1.39-5.43. Among cases with headache, there was a trend towards a higher prevalence of dyspepsia in those with migraine (27.5% compared to TTH (24.5%. Subjects with headache and dyspepsia, compared to those with headache alone, had a greater severity of headache symptoms (63.67 ± 22.85 mm vs 51.20 ± 24.0 mm VAS, p = 0.029. Overall HRQOL scores were lower in headache subjects with dyspepsia (EQ-5D summary score 0.82 ± 0.18 vs 0.90 ± 0.16, p = 0.037 and EQ-5D VAS 62.08 ± 17.50 mm vs 72.62 ± 18.85 mm, p = 0.018, compared to those without dyspepsia. CONCLUSION: Dyspepsia is associated with more severe headache symptoms and results in a lower HRQOL in patients with headache.

  10. Prescription headache medication in OEF/OIF veterans: results from the Women Veterans Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seng, Elizabeth K; Driscoll, Mary A; Brandt, Cynthia A; Bathulapalli, Harini; Goulet, Joseph; Silliker, Norman; Kerns, Robert D; Haskell, Sally G

    2013-09-01

    To examine differences in male and female veterans of Operations Enduring Freedom/Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) period of service in taking prescription headache medication, and associations between taking prescription headache medication and mental health status, psychiatric symptoms, and rates of traumatic events. Headaches are common among active service members and are associated with impairment in quality of life. Little is known about headaches in OEF/OIF veterans. Veterans participating in the Women Veterans Cohort Study responded to a cross-sectional survey to assess taking prescription headache medication, mental health status (Post Deployment Health Assessment), psychiatric symptoms (portions of the Brief Patient Health Questionnaire and the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist), and traumatic events (the Traumatic Life Events Questionnaire and queries regarding military trauma). Gender differences among taking prescription headache medication, health status, psychiatric symptoms, and traumatic events were examined. Regression analyses were used to examine the influence of gender on the associations between taking prescription headache medication and health status, psychiatric symptoms, and traumatic events. 139/551 (25.2%) participants reported taking prescription headache medication in the past year. A higher proportion of women veterans (29.1%) reported taking prescription medication for headache in the last year compared with men (19.7%). Taking prescription headache medication was associated with poorer perceived mental health status, higher anxiety and posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms, and higher rates of traumatic events. The association between prescription headache medication use and perceived mental health status, and with the association between prescription headache medication use and posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms, was stronger for men than for women. Among OEF/OIF veterans, the prevalence of clinically relevant headache is high

  11. Reduced CSF hypocretin-1 levels are associated with cluster headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barloese, Mads; Jennum, Poul; Lund, Nunu

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cluster headache (CH) is a debilitating disorder characterized by unilateral, severe pain attacks with accompanying autonomic symptoms, often waking the patient from sleep. As it exhibits strong chronobiological traits and genetic studies have suggested a link with the hypocretin (HCR...

  12. Migraine headaches in a nutshell | Schellack | South African Family ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article aims to provide a concise, high-level overview of the classification, management and treatment of migraine. Migraine is a common, debilitating neurological disorder that is characterised by the presence of severe headaches, which may last anything from a few hours to a few days (4–72 hours). Thus, the ...

  13. [Effect of autogenic training with cognitive and symbol therapy on the treatment of patients with primary headache].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zsombók, Terézia; Juhász, Gabriella; Gonda, Xénia; Vitrai, József; Bagdy, György

    2005-01-01

    Only a minor part of headaches are associated with an organic abnormality in the nervous system. In case of migraine and tension headache, the main provoking factor is psychological stress. Furthermore, these syndromes often occur together with depression and anxiety disorders, and when these comorbid conditions are present headache attacks tend to be more frequent, longer and stronger, causing an increase in the consumption of antimigraine agents, and at the same time increase the consumption of antidepressant and anxiolytic agents. Further to drugs, modified versions of Schultz-type autogenic training is also frequently used for anxiolysis. The aim of our research was to study the effect of the cognitive and symbol therapy enhanced autogenic training on headache and related drug consumption in three different types of primary headaches. Twenty five female patients with migraine, tension-type headache or mixed headache participated in an eight-month follow-up study. Headache frequency, analgesic, antimigraine and anxiolytic consumption were measured by means of a headache diary. During the first four months (observation phase) patients became familiar with using the diary, and in the second four months they participated in autogenic training. The data of the second, third and fourth months were considered as baseline data. Our method decreased headache frequency and drug consumption in all three headache groups. This means that the cognitive and symbol therapy enhanced autogenic training is an effective alternative for medications in the treatment of primary headaches.

  14. Critical Evaluation of Headache Classifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özge, Aynur

    2013-08-01

    Transforming a subjective sense like headache into an objective state and establishing a common language for this complaint which can be both a symptom and a disease all by itself have kept the investigators busy for years. Each recommendation proposed has brought along a set of patients who do not meet the criteria. While almost the most ideal and most comprehensive classification studies continued at this point, this time criticisims about withdrawing from daily practice came to the fore. In this article, the classification adventure of scientists who work in the area of headache will be summarized. More specifically, 2 classifications made by the International Headache Society (IHS) and the point reached in relation with the 3rd classification which is still being worked on will be discussed together with headache subtypes. It has been presented with the wish and belief that it will contribute to the readers and young investigators who are interested in this subject.

  15. Sleep in cluster headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barloese, M C J; Jennum, P J; Lund, N T

    2015-01-01

    with rapid eye movement (REM) sleep have been suggested. Sleep in a large, well-characterized population of CH patients was investigated. METHODS: Polysomnography (PSG) was performed on two nights in 40 CH patients during active bout and one night in 25 age, sex and body mass index matched controls...... in hospital. Macrostructure and other features of sleep were analyzed and related to phenotype. Clinical headache characterization was obtained by semi-structured interview. RESULTS: Ninety-nine nights of PSG were analyzed. Findings included a reduced percentage of REM sleep (17.3% vs. 23.0%, P = 0.......0037), longer REM latency (2.0 vs. 1.2 h, P = 0.0012) and fewer arousals (7.34 vs. 14.1, P = 0.003) in CH patients. There was no difference in prevalence of sleep apnea between patients (38%) and matched controls (32%, P = 0.64) although the apnea index in patients was numerically higher (mean apnea...

  16. Risk of placental abruption in relation to migraines and headaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananth Cande V

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Migraine, a common chronic-intermittent disorder of idiopathic origin characterized by severe debilitating headaches and autonomic nervous system dysfunction, and placental abruption, the premature separation of the placenta, share many common pathophysiological characteristics. Moreover, endothelial dysfunction, platelet activation, hypercoagulation, and inflammation are common to both disorders. We assessed risk of placental abruption in relation to maternal history of migraine before and during pregnancy in Peruvian women. Methods Cases were 375 women with pregnancies complicated by placental abruption, and controls were 368 women without an abruption. During in-person interviews conducted following delivery, women were asked if they had physician-diagnosed migraine, and they were asked questions that allowed headaches and migraine to be classified according to criteria established by the International Headache Society. Logistic regression procedures were used to calculate odds ratios (aOR and 95% confidence intervals (CI adjusted for confounders. Results Overall, a lifetime history of any headaches or migraine was associated with an increased odds of placental abruption (aOR = 1.60; 95% CI 1.16-2.20. A lifetime history of migraine was associated with a 2.14-fold increased odds of placental abruption (aOR = 2.14; 95% CI 1.22-3.75. The odds of placental abruption was 2.11 (95% CI 1.00-4.45 for migraineurs without aura; and 1.59 (95% 0.70-3.62 for migraineurs with aura. A lifetime history of tension-type headache was also increased with placental abruption (aOR = 1.61; 95% CI 1.01-2.57. Conclusions This study adds placental abruption to a growing list of pregnancy complications associated with maternal headache/migraine disorders. Nevertheless, prospective cohort studies are needed to more rigorously evaluate the extent to which migraines and/or its treatments are associated with the occurrence of placental abruption.

  17. Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial of Internet-Delivered Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment for Pediatric Headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Emily F; Beals-Erickson, Sarah E; Noel, Melanie; Claar, Robyn; Palermo, Tonya M

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and preliminary effectiveness of an Internet-delivered cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) intervention for adolescents with chronic headache. Headache is among the most common pain complaints of childhood. Cognitive-behavioral interventions are efficacious for improving pain among youth with headache. However, many youth do not receive psychological treatment for headache due to poor access, which has led to consideration of alternative delivery modalities such as the Internet. We used a parallel arm randomized controlled trial design to evaluate the feasibility and preliminary effectiveness of an Internet-delivered family-based CBT intervention, Web-based management of adolescent pain. Adolescents were eligible for the trial if they were a new patient being evaluated in a specialized headache clinic, between 11 and 17 years of age, and had recurrent headache for 3 months or more as diagnosed by a pediatric neurologist. Eighty-three youths were enrolled in the trial. An online random number generator was used to randomly assign participants to receive Internet CBT adjunctive to specialized headache treatment (n = 44) or specialized headache treatment alone (n = 39). The primary treatment outcome was headache days. Youth and parents in the Internet CBT group demonstrated high levels of engagement with the web program and reported satisfaction with the intervention. Multilevel modelling (MLM) was used to conduct hypothesis testing for continuous outcomes. For our primary treatment outcome of headache days, adolescents reported a statistically significant reduction in headache days from baseline to post-treatment and baseline to 3-month follow-up in both treatment conditions (main effect for time F(2, 136) = 19.70, P headache treatment group at post-treatment or follow-up (group × time interaction F(2, 134) = 0.94, P = .395). For our secondary treatment outcomes, findings from MLM showed that adolescents in both

  18. Association Between Severity of Temporomandibular Disorders and the Frequency of Headache Attacks in Women With Migraine: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florencio, Lidiane Lima; de Oliveira, Anamaria Siriani; Carvalho, Gabriela Ferreira; Dach, Fabiola; Bigal, Marcelo Eduardo; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Bevilaqua-Grossi, Débora

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the magnitude of association of the severity of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) in women with episodic and chronic migraine. Thirty-one women with episodic migraine (mean age: 33 years), 21 with chronic migraine (mean age: 35 years) and 32 healthy controls (mean age: 31 years) were included. The Fonseca Anamnestic Index was applied to assess severity of TMDs. TMD severity was considered as follows: no TMD (0-19 points), mild TMD (20-49 points), moderate TMD (50-69 points), and severe TMD (70-100 points). To compare the proportion of TMD severity among groups, a χ 2 test was performed. Prevalence ratio (PR) was calculated to determine the association of TMD severity and both migraine groups using the control group as the reference. Women with chronic and episodic migraine were more likely to exhibit TMD signs and symptoms of any severity than healthy controls (χ 2 = 30.26; P < .001). TMD prevalence was 54% for healthy controls, 78% for episodic migraine, and 100% for chronic migraine. Women with chronic migraine exhibited greater risk of more severe manifestations of TMD than healthy controls (PR: 3.31; P = .008). This association was not identified for episodic migraine (PR: 2.18; P = .101). The presence of TMD signs and symptoms was associated with migraine independently of the frequency; however, the magnitude of the association of more severe TMD was significantly greater in chronic, but not episodic, migraine. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Hemin and bile pigments are the secondary structure regulators of intrinsically disordered antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zsila, Ferenc; Juhász, Tünde; Bősze, Szilvia; Horváti, Kata; Beke-Somfai, Tamás

    2018-02-01

    The interaction of protoporphyrin compounds of human origin with the major bee venom component melittin (26 a.a., Z +6) and its hybrid derivative (CM15, 15 a.a., Z +6) were studied by a combination of various spectroscopic methods. Throughout a two-state, concentration-dependent process, hemin and its metabolites (biliverdin, bilirubin, bilirubin ditaurate) increase the parallel β-sheet content of the natively unfolded melittin, suggesting the oligomerization of the peptide chains. In contrast, α-helix promoting effect was observed with the also disordered but more cationic CM15. According to fluorescence quenching experiments, the sole Trp residue of melittin is the key player during the binding, in the vicinity of which the first pigment molecule is accommodated presumably making indole-porphyrin π-π stacking interaction. As circular dichroism titration data suggest, cooperative association of additional ligands subsequently occurs, resulting in multimeric complexes with an apparent dissociation constant ranged from 20 to 65 μM. Spectroscopic measurements conducted with the bilirubin catabolite urobilin and stercobilin refer to the requirement of intact dipyrrinone moieties for inducing secondary structure transformations. The binding topography of porphyrin rings on a model parallel β-sheet motif was evaluated by absorption spectroscopy and computational modeling showing a slipped-cofacial binding mode responsible for the red shift and hypochromism of the Soret band. Our results may aid to recognize porphyrin-responsive binding motifs of biologically relevant, intrinsically disordered peptides and proteins, where transient conformations play a vital role in their functions. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Pre-Service and In-Service Secondary School Teachers' Knowledge about Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Attitudes toward Students with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Limeng; Gao, Xuesong

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on a mixed-method inquiry into pre-service and in-service secondary school teachers' knowledge about Attention-deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and attitudes toward students with this disorder in Hong Kong. The inquiry revealed no differences between pre-service and in-service secondary school teachers concerning their…

  1. New Investigator and Trainee Task Force Survey on the Recruitment and Retention of Headache Specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minen, Mia T; Monteith, Tesha; Strauss, Lauren D; Starling, Amaal

    2015-09-01

    We sought to survey the New Investigators and Trainees Section (NITS) members of the American Headache Society (AHS) to better understand their exposure to headache medicine during training and to determine their perceptions and attitudes about the field and the future of headache medicine. Despite the high prevalence of headache disorders in the general population, only about 2% of neurology residents pursue headache medicine fellowships. Furthermore, there is a paucity of United Council of Neurologic Subspecialties headache specialists in the country to meet the population demands. Thus, there needs to be a focus on how to recruit and retain more headache specialists. A survey was distributed via SurveyMonkey to the NITS listserv. It remained online for 60 days, during which reminder emails were sent to members of the listserv. In addition, the survey was available on laptops at NITS-related events at an annual AHS meeting. Descriptive analyses were then conducted using SurveyMonkey and Excel. Of the 93 members of NITS, 64 of the 96 (68.8%) clicked to initiate the survey and 52.7% successfully completed it. Attendings made up the majority of respondents (62.5%), followed by fellows (10.9%), and residents (7.8%). Key highlights of the survey included the following: just under 10% reported no exposure to a headache center during any time in their training (medical school, residency, or fellowship); less than 2% had exposure to a headache center during medical school; less than half of participants reported exposure to a headache center in residency (45.3%) and during fellowship (43.4%). Having a mentor in the field, liking the patient population, and working in a headache center, 64.7%, 52.9%, and 41.2%, respectively, were the top ways in which participants became interested in headache. The journal Headache (56.9%), attendings (56.3%), and the AHS/American Academy of Neurology guidelines for migraine management (52.0%) are the resources cited as being used all

  2. Comparative cost analysis of generalized anxiety disorder and major depressive disorder patients in secondary care from a national hospital registry in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujanpää, Tero; Ylisaukko-Oja, Tero; Jokelainen, Jari; Linna, Miika; Timonen, Markku

    2014-07-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) has shown to cause high costs to society. Earlier research indicates that generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) also causes high costs, but only limited data is available in varying settings. To analyse the secondary care costs of GAD compared with those of MDD. Retrospective database analysis from Finnish Hospital Discharge Registers (FHDR). All GAD and MDD patients diagnosed between 1 January 2007 and 31 December 2007 in FHDR were recorded and individual-level secondary care costs during a 48-month follow-up period were measured. The total mean cost of GAD with history of MDD or some other anxiety disorder was significantly higher than that of MDD with history of GAD or some other anxiety disorder during the 48-month follow-up period. The costs of pure GAD were comparable with those of pure MDD, but after adjusting for age and sex, the costs of pure MDD were higher than those of pure GAD. The economic burden of individual GAD patients is comparable with that of MDD patients in secondary care.

  3. Tension-Type Headache - The Normal and Most Prevalent Headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Rigmor Højland

    2018-02-01

    Tension-type headache (TTH) is the most prevalent form of primary headache in the general population but paradoxically the least studied headache. In this article, the epidemiology and diagnostic challenges of TTH are presented and discussed. The typical features and differential diagnosis of TTH are highlighted and the situations more likely to raise doubts are discussed. A structured approach to the patient and a better comprehension of the very frequent coexistence of migraine and medication overuse headache in the clinical population are emphasized. According to the IHS classification, several diagnoses should be applied but still some clinicians prefer to apply a single combined diagnosis in the severely affected patients, namely chronic migraine. Such uneven practice may complicate the diagnostic comparability and the entire management of TTH. The present treatment strategies for TTH are summarized and hopefully an increased awareness of TTH can translate into better quality of care and a more specific diagnosis and treatment for the numerous TTH sufferers. © 2017 American Headache Society.

  4. Headaches caused by decreased intracranial pressure: diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokri, Bahram

    2003-06-01

    More patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension are now being diagnosed, and it is realized that most cases result from spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks. A broader clinical and imaging spectrum of the disorder is recognized. This paper reviews new insights into the variability of clinical manifestations, imaging features, etiological factors, anatomy of leaks, and implications of these in patient management. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension should not be equated with post-lumbar puncture headaches. In a substantial minority of patients, headaches are not orthostatic and may mimic other types of headache. Additional diverse neurological manifestations may dominate the clinical picture and patients may occasionally have no headache at all. Reports on unusual presentations of the disorder continue to appear in the literature. Furthermore, additional imaging features of cerebrospinal fluid leaks are recognized. High-flow and slow-flow leaks may present diagnostic challenges, and require modification of diagnostic studies aimed at locating the site of the leak. Stigmata of connective tissue abnormality, especially abnormalities of fibrillin and elastin, are seen in a notable minority of patients, pointing to weakness of the dural sac as one of the etiological factors. After treatment of spontaneous intracranial hypotension, surgically or by epidural blood patch, a rebound and self-limiting intracranial hypertension may sometimes develop. In the past decade, interest in spontaneous intracranial hypotension has been rekindled, with a substantial growth of knowledge on various aspects of the disorder. We are in the learning phase, and new information will probably appear in the future, with notable diagnostic and therapeutic implications.

  5. Examination of the diagnostic validity of 'headache attributed to whiplash injury': a controlled, prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, H; Stovner, L J; Obelieniene, D; Surkiene, D; Mickeviciene, D; Bovim, G; Sand, T

    2006-11-01

    Acute and chronic headache attributed to whiplash injury are new diagnostic entities in the International Classification of Headache Disorders, second edition. A main objective of the present study was to assess the validity of these nosologic entities by studying the headache pattern in an inception cohort of 210 rear-end car collision victims and in 210 matched controls. Consecutive drivers involved in rear-end collisions were identified from the daily records of the Traffic Police Department of Kaunas, Lithuania. A standard self-report questionnaire was sent to the drivers between 2 and 7 days after the collision, and their passengers were recruited as well. Headache and neck pain were evaluated within 7 days of the collision, at 2 months and 1 year after the collision. A control group of non-traumatized subjects received questionnaires at the time of the selection and 1 year later. Of the 75 collision victims who developed headache within the first 7 days of the collision, 37 had a clinical picture in accordance with the criteria for acute whiplash headache (i.e., concomitant neck pain) and 38 did not. For acute headache after collision, concomitant neck pain was of no relevance to the headache type or its course. In both these subgroups, migraine and tension-type headache could be diagnosed in similar proportions and the prognosis after 2 months and 1 year was also similar. Preexisting headache was a strong prognostic factor in both groups for both acute and chronic pain. Compared with the non-traumatized control group, the 1-year incidence of new or worsened headache, or of headache improvement, was the same. A likely interpretation of the data is that acute headaches after rear-end car collisions mainly represent episodes of a primary headache precipitated by the stress of the situation. We conclude that the nosologic validity of both acute and chronic whiplash headache is poor as the headaches, in accordance with the criteria lack distinguishing clinical

  6. Post-craniotomy headache: a clinical view with a focus on the persistent form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha-Filho, Pedro Augusto Sampaio

    2015-05-01

    Post-craniotomy headache is a frequent complication of neurosurgical procedures and is often a challenge for neurosurgeons, neurologists, and headache specialists. This was a narrative review. Surgical trauma, adherence of the musculature to the dura mater, peripheral nerve injury, development of neurinomas in the surgical scar, and central sensitization may be involved in the genesis of such headaches. Performing smaller craniotomies, replacement of the bone (craniotomy), performing cranioplasty, and infiltration of the surgical site with local anesthesia at the end of the surgical procedure are strategies used to prevent such headaches. Among the most frequent characteristics of post-craniotomy headaches are that they start on the first days after the operation, are located on the same side as and at the site of the surgical scar, and improve with the passage of time. Depression, anxiety, and temporomandibular disorders are frequently associated with these headaches. Abortive treatment such as opioids, ordinary analgesics, non-hormonal anti-inflammatory drugs, and triptans can be administered. There have been reports of improvements using sodium divalproex, verapamil, and local anesthetics. Post-craniotomy headaches can have significant repercussions on patients' quality of life. There is a need for clinical trials evaluating therapeutic options for treatment of this type of headache. © 2015 American Headache Society.

  7. Benign vascular sexual headache and exertional headache: interrelationships and long term prognosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Silbert, P L; Edis, R H; Stewart-Wynne, E G; Gubbay, S S

    1991-01-01

    There is a definite relationship between the vascular type of benign sexual headache and benign exertional headache. Forty five patients with benign vascular sexual headache were reviewed. Twenty seven (60%) experienced benign vascular sexual headache alone and eighteen (40%) had experienced both benign vascular sexual headache and benign exertional headache on at least one occasion. The mean age was 34.3 years with a male:female ratio of 5.4:1. Thirty patients with a history of benign vascul...

  8. Headache in the parturient: Pathophysiology and management of post-dural puncture headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gita Nath

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Headache in the postpartum period is common and multifactorial in origin. Apart from primary causes such as tension headaches and migraine, secondary headaches such as post-dural puncture headache (PDPH are increasingly common because of increasing use of regional anaesthesia and analgesia during childbirth. Preventive measures for PDPH include the use of smaller gauge pencil-point needles for spinal blocks; epidural needles of 18 G or less; using saline rather than air for epidural space identification and the use of ultrasound guidance, especially for difficult cases such as morbid obesity and spinal deformities. In case of accidental dural puncture (ADP, the choice is between inserting the catheter in an adjacent space or intrathecal catheterization. Current evidence seems to be in favour of inserting the epidural catheter into the subarachnoid space and using the intrathecal catheter for analgesia/anaesthesia after prominently labelling it as intrathecal, to prevent misuse. It should be removed after at least 24 hours and a 10 ml bolus of saline injected before removal of catheter may be helpful. Either way, having written protocols for the management of accidental dural puncture helps to reduce the incidence of PDPH. PDPH can be disabling in severity and can mar the whole experience of childbirth. In addition, severe untreated PDPH can cause complications such as nerve palsies, subdural hematoma and cerebral venous thrombosis. Conservative methods of treatment should be tried first such as adequate hydration, paracetamol, caffeine, sumatriptan or ACTH/hydrocortisone. Epidural blood patching is the most effective treatment for PDPH. It is more effective if done 24-48 hours after dural puncture. It is an invasive procedure with its own complications as well as a failure rate of up to 30%, so that a second or even third patch may be necessary. Both these facts should be intimated to the patient beforehand. Meticulous follow-up and evaluation

  9. Headache after traumatic brain injury: a national survey of clinical practices and treatment approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Allen W; Watanabe, Thomas K; Hoffman, Jeanne M; Bell, Kathleen R; Lucas, Sylvia; Dikmen, Sureyya

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with headache after traumatic brain injury (TBI) receive care in a wide variety of clinical locations by physicians trained in multiple specialties. To understand current practice patterns and perceptions of treatment issues among clinicians managing headache after TBI. National survey of current clinical practice using a 20-item questionnaire developed by the authors. Survey respondents were members of the Central Nervous System Council list survey of the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (N = 1782) and the American Headache Society membership (N = 1260). The survey was sent electronically to potential participants and was followed by 2 biweekly reminders. The survey queried the physicians' clinical setting; their use of headache classification systems, headache diaries, checklists, and diagnostic procedures; the pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatments prescribed; and headache chronicity and associated symptoms and disorders among their patients with TBI. Completed surveys were received from 193 respondents. The use of standardized classification systems and checklists was commonly reported. Respondents used nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic treatment approaches with similar frequency and modest perceived success rates. A high frequency of headache-associated new sleep and mood disorders was reported. When response differences occurred between practice settings, they reflected a focus on headache diagnosis, classification, and pharmacologic treatment among neurology and specialty headache clinics, whereas a nonpharmacologic approach to management among TBI specialty and general rehabilitation clinicians was more commonly reported. Management strategies for treating headache after TBI vary widely among general and specialty clinical practices. This suggests that additional research is needed that would lead to an increase in the use of established headache classification and the development of standardized management

  10. Peripheral Nerve Blocks for the Treatment of Headache in Older Adults: A Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hascalovici, Jacob R; Robbins, Matthew S

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study is to provide demographical and clinical descriptions of patients age 65 years old and older who were treated with peripheral nerve blocks (PNBs) at our institution and evaluate the safety and efficacy of this treatment. Headache disorders are common, disabling chronic neurological diseases that often persist with advancing age. Geriatric headache management poses unique therapeutic challenges because of considerations of comorbidity, drug interactions, and adverse effects. Peripheral nerve blocks are commonly used for acute and short-term prophylactic treatment for headache disorders and may be a safer alternative to standard pharmacotherapy in this demographic. We performed a single center, retrospective chart review of patients at least 65 years of age who received peripheral nerve blocks for headache management over a 6 year period. Sixty-four patients were mostly female (78%) with an average age of 71 years (range 65-94). Representative headache diagnoses were chronic migraine 50%, episodic migraine 12.5%, trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia 9.4%, and occipital neuralgia 7.8%. Average number of headache days/month was 23. Common comorbidities were hypertension 48%, hyperlipidemia 42%, arthritis 27%, depression 47%, and anxiety 33%. Eighty-nine percent were prescribed at least 1 medication fulfilling the Beers criteria. The average number of peripheral nerve blocks per patient was 4. Peripheral nerve blocks were felt to be effective in 73% for all headaches, 81% for chronic migraine, 75% for episodic migraine, 67% for chronic tension type headache, 67% for new daily persistent headache, and 60% for occipital neuralgia. There were no adverse events related to PNBs reported. PNBs might be a safe and effective alternative headache management strategy for older adults. Medical and psychiatric comorbidities, medication overuse, and Beers list medication rates were extraordinarily high, giving credence to the use of peripherally administered

  11. Headache impact of chronic and episodic migraine: results from the American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buse, Dawn; Manack, Aubrey; Serrano, Daniel; Reed, Michael; Varon, Sepideh; Turkel, Catherine; Lipton, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The Headache Impact Test-6 (HIT-6) has been demonstrated to be a reliable and valid measure that assesses the impact of headaches on the lives of persons with migraine. Originally used in studies of episodic migraine (EM), HIT-6 is finding increasing applications in chronic migraine (CM) research. (1) To examine the headache-impact on persons with migraine (EM and CM) using HIT-6 in a large population sample; (2) to identify predictors of headache-impact in this sample; (3) to assess the magnitude of effect for significant predictors of headache-impact in this sample. The American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention study is a longitudinal, population-based study that collected data from persons with severe headache from 2004 to 2009 through annual, mailed surveys. Respondents to the 2009 survey who met International Classification of Headache Disorders 2 criteria for migraine reported at least 1 headache in the preceding year, and completed the HIT-6 questionnaire were included in the present analysis. Persons with migraine were categorized as EM (average headache days per month) or CM (average ≥15 headache days per month). Predictors of headache-impact examined include: sociodemographics; headache days per month; a composite migraine symptom severity score (MSS); an average pain severity rating during the most recent long-duration headache; depression; and anxiety. HIT-6 scores were analyzed both as continuous sum scores and using the standard, validated categories: no impact; some impact; substantial impact; and severe impact. Group contrasts were based on descriptive statistics along with linear regression models. Multiple imputation techniques were used to manage missing data. There were 7169 eligible respondents (CM = 373, EM = 6554). HIT-6 scores were normally distributed. After converting sum HIT-6 scores to the standard categories, those with CM were significantly more likely to experience "severe" headache impact (72.9% vs 42.3%) and had higher odds of

  12. Characteristics of Headache After an Intracranial Endovascular Procedure: A Prospective Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linjing; Wu, Xiancong; Di, Hai; Feng, Tao; Wang, Yunxia; Wang, Jun; Cao, Xiangyu; Li, Baomin; Liu, Ruozhuo; Yu, Shengyuan

    2017-03-01

    Two editions of the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD) diagnostic criteria for "Headache attributed to an intracranial endovascular procedure" have been published, in 2004 and 2013. 1,2 Despite studies that have suggested that the former is not very practical, the ICHD-3 beta did not contain major changes. Moreover, so far no consensus exists regarding characteristics of headache after intracranial endovascular procedure. Thus, there is a need for sound suggestions to improve the ICHD-3 beta diagnostic criteria. Using a prospective design, we identified consecutive patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs) with neuroendovascular treatment from January 2014 to December 2014. In total, 73 patients were enrolled, and 58 patients ultimately completed the 6-month follow-up. After the procedure, five of the 29 patients (17.2%) with pre-existing headache experienced marked worsening after the procedure, while seven of the 29 patients without prior headache developed new-onset headache post-procedurally. The headaches started within 24 hours, with a mean duration of 24-72 hours. The headaches were moderate to severe. The eligibility of these events to be considered headaches caused by neuroendovascular procedures according to the ICHD-3 beta diagnostic criteria for designation was far from ideal. Most cases of markedly worsening headaches and new-onset headaches started within 24 hours and persisted longer than that specified in the ICHD-3 beta diagnostic criteria. Moreover, considering that some items are not very practical, the ICHD-3 beta diagnostic criteria should be revised in the light of recent literature reports. © 2016 American Headache Society.

  13. Cluster headache as a first manifestation of multiple sclerosis: case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijajlović MD

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Milija D Mijajlović,* Vuk M Aleksić,* Nadežda M Čovičković Šternić Department for Cerebrovascular Disorders and Headaches, Neurology Clinic, Clinical Center of Serbia, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Cluster headache (CH is estimated to be the most common primary trigeminal autonomic headache, although it is a rare disabling medical condition. Dominant symptoms of CH include severe unilateral orbital, supraorbital, and/or temporal pain, lasting from 15 to 180 minutes if untreated, associated with at least one of various autonomic symptoms during the headache, such as conjunctival injection, lacrimation, nasal congestion and rhinorrhea, facial sweating, miosis, ptosis, and eyelid edema. Headache is not frequently a symptom of multiple sclerosis (MS. The most commonly reported primary headaches are migraine without aura and a tension-type headache. Several described cases involved complicated migraine, ophthalmoplegic migraine-like headache, and finally cluster-like headache. We present a case of a 45-year-old male patient who had typical CH attacks as the initial and only clinical manifestation of MS, which was diagnosed after cerebrospinal fluid (CSF isoelectric focusing and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI investigation. He presented as a typical cluster-like headache patient since in the background of the CH symptoms and signs, were MS demyelinating lesions. In a patient with CH symptoms one should always think about the possibility of cluster-like-headache, which presents the CH patient with different underlying diseases, so we proposed a protocol to evaluate such patients and exclude diseases that could be in the background of CH symptoms. Keywords: demyelinating disease, headache, trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia, diagnosis

  14. Headache during airplane travel ("airplane headache"): first case in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kararizou, Evangelia; Anagnostou, Evangelos; Paraskevas, George P; Vassilopoulou, Sofia D; Naoumis, Dimitrios; Kararizos, Grigoris; Spengos, Konstantinos

    2011-08-01

    Headache related to airplane flights is rare. We describe a 37-year-old female patient with multiple intense, jabbing headache episodes over the last 3 years that occur exclusively during airplane flights. The pain manifests during take-off and landing, and is located always in the left retro-orbital and frontotemporal area. It is occasionally accompanied by dizziness, but no additional symptoms occur. Pain intensity diminishes and disappears after 15-20 min. Apart from occasional dizziness, no other symptoms occur. The patient has a history of tension-type headache and polycystic ovaries. Blood tests and imaging revealed no abnormalities. Here, we present the first case in Greece. We review the current literature on this rare syndrome and discuss on possible pathophysiology and the investigation of possible co-factors such as anxiety and depression.

  15. Grey zones in the diagnosis of adult migraine without aura based on the International Classification of Headache Disorders-III beta: exploring the covariates of possible migraine without aura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozge, Aynur; Aydinlar, Elif; Tasdelen, Bahar

    2015-01-01

    Exploring clinical characteristics and migraine covariates may be useful in the diagnosis of migraine without aura. To evaluate the diagnostic value of the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD)-III beta-based diagnosis of migraine without aura; to explore the covariates of possible migraine without aura using an analysis of grey zones in this area; and, finally, to make suggestions for the final version of the ICHD-III. A total of 1365 patients (mean [± SD] age 38.5±10.4 years, 82.8% female) diagnosed with migraine without aura according to the criteria of the ICHD-III beta were included in the present tertiary care-based retrospective study. Patients meeting all of the criteria of the ICHD-III beta were classified as having full migraine without aura, while those who did not meet one, two or ≥3 of the diagnostic criteria were classified as zones I, II and III, respectively. The diagnostic value of the clinical characteristics and covariates of migraine were determined. Full migraine without aura was evident in 25.7% of the migraineurs. A higher likelihood of zone I classification was shown for an attack lasting 4 h to 72 h (OR 1.560; P=0.002), with pulsating quality (OR 4.096; P<0.001), concomitant nausea⁄vomiting (OR 2.300; P<0.001) and photophobia⁄phonophobia (OR 4.865; P<0.001). The first-rank determinants for full migraine without aura were sleep irregularities (OR 1.596; P=0.005) and periodic vomiting (OR 1.464; P=0.026). However, even if not mentioned in ICHD-III beta, the authors determined that motion sickness, abdominal pain or infantile colic attacks in childhood, associated dizziness and osmophobia have important diagnostic value. In cases that do not fulfill all of the diagnostic criteria although they are largely consistent with the characteristics of migraine in clinical terms, the authors believe that a history of infantile colic; periodic vomiting (but not periodic vomiting syndrome); recurrent abdominal pain; the

  16. Patients with tension-type headaches feel stigmatized

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Prakash

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The author, a sufferer of tension-type headache (TTH, believes that the word "tension" in "tension-type headache" carries a social stigma and that patients do not accept a diagnosis of TTH readily. TTH is the most common primary headache disorder. The disability of TTH as a burden of society is greater than that of migraine. Absenteeism because of TTH is higher than that due to migraine. However, patients with TTH do not go for consultation. Even the prevalence of new daily persistent headache (NDPH is 12 times higher at the headache clinic than that of chronic TTH (CTTH. These points hint that TTH patients probably do not want to visit the clinic. The author believes that it could be because of the stigma attached to "tension." Herein, the author has noted the first responses given by 50 consecutive patients with TTH when they were told that they had been suffering from TTH. The first answer of 64% of patients with TTH was "I do not have any tension/stress ." This denial is similar to the denial declared by patients with depression. Depression and tension are similar in the sense that both are considered as a signs of personal weakness. Such a preconception in the society creates a stigma, and patients deny the diagnosis, conceal symptoms, and become reluctant to seek help and treatment.

  17. Psychological functioning in headache sufferers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrasik, F; Blanchard, E B; Arena, J G; Teders, S J; Teevan, R C; Rodichok, L D

    1982-05-01

    The present study examined the psychological test responses of 99 headache sufferers and 30 matched nonheadache controls. Headache subjects were of four types: migraine (n = 26), muscle contraction (n = 39), combined migraine-muscle contract ion (n = 22), and cluster (n = 12). Measures consisted of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory, a modified hostility scale derived from the MMPI, Back Depression Inventory, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Autonomic Perception Questionnaire, Rathus Assertiveness Schedule, Social Readjustment Rating Scale, Psychosomatic Symptom Checklist, Schalling-Sifneos Scale, Need for Achievement, and Hostile Press. Significant differences were found on five clinical scales of the MMPI--1, 2, 3, 6, and 7. Of the non-MMPI scales, only the Psychosomatic Symptom Checklist and Trait Anxiety Inventory were significant. Control subjects revealed no significant findings on any tests. The headache groups fell along a continuum, beginning with cluster subjects, who showed only minimal distress, continuing through migraine and combined migraine-muscle contraction, and ending with muscle contraction subjects, who revealed the greatest degree of psychological disturbance. However, none of the headache groups could be characterized by marked elevations on any of the psychological tests, which contrasts with past research findings. It is suggested that the present results may be more representative of the "typical" headache sufferer.

  18. Headache in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: effects of chronic hypoxaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozge, Aynur; Ozge, Cengiz; Kaleagasi, Hakan; Yalin, Osman Ozgür; Unal, Ozgür; Ozgür, Eylem S

    2006-02-01

    The frequency and characteristics of headache in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are not clear and there are only a few studies that have assessed the relationship between chronic hypoxaemia and headache. We performed this study in order to evaluate the frequency and characteristics of headache in COPD patients. A total of 119 patients, with a mean age of 63.4 +/- 8.2 years, diagnosed with moderate or severe stable COPD were included in the study. Overall 31.9% of the patients complained of headache and 45.4% were reported to have sleep disorders. There were significant effects of family history of COPD, having other systemic disorders or sleep disorders (snoring, bruxism, restless leg syndrome, etc.) and laboratory data of chronic hypoxaemia and airway obstruction on headache co-morbidity. In conclusion, possibly being a specific subtype of elderly headache, headache in patients with moderate or severe COPD is a common problem and future studies are needed to obtain more knowledge about its pathophysiological and clinical basis.

  19. Headache triggers in the US military.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theeler, Brett J; Kenney, Kimbra; Prokhorenko, Olga A; Fideli, Ulgen S; Campbell, William; Erickson, Jay C

    2010-05-01

    Headaches can be triggered by a variety of factors. Military service members have a high prevalence of headache but the factors triggering headaches in military troops have not been identified. The objective of this study is to determine headache triggers in soldiers and military beneficiaries seeking specialty care for headaches. A total of 172 consecutive US Army soldiers and military dependents (civilians) evaluated at the headache clinics of 2 US Army Medical Centers completed a standardized questionnaire about their headache triggers. A total of 150 (87%) patients were active-duty military members and 22 (13%) patients were civilians. In total, 77% of subjects had migraine; 89% of patients reported at least one headache trigger with a mean of 8.3 triggers per patient. A wide variety of headache triggers was seen with the most common categories being environmental factors (74%), stress (67%), consumption-related factors (60%), and fatigue-related factors (57%). The types of headache triggers identified in active-duty service members were similar to those seen in civilians. Stress-related triggers were significantly more common in soldiers. There were no significant differences in trigger types between soldiers with and without a history of head trauma. Headaches in military service members are triggered mostly by the same factors as in civilians with stress being the most common trigger. Knowledge of headache triggers may be useful for developing strategies that reduce headache occurrence in the military.

  20. JABAWS 2.2 distributed web services for Bioinformatics: protein disorder, conservation and RNA secondary structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troshin, Peter V; Procter, James B; Sherstnev, Alexander; Barton, Daniel L; Madeira, Fábio; Barton, Geoffrey J

    2018-06-01

    JABAWS 2.2 is a computational framework that simplifies the deployment of web services for Bioinformatics. In addition to the five multiple sequence alignment (MSA) algorithms in JABAWS 1.0, JABAWS 2.2 includes three additional MSA programs (Clustal Omega, MSAprobs, GLprobs), four protein disorder prediction methods (DisEMBL, IUPred, Ronn, GlobPlot), 18 measures of protein conservation as implemented in AACon, and RNA secondary structure prediction by the RNAalifold program. JABAWS 2.2 can be deployed on a variety of in-house or hosted systems. JABAWS 2.2 web services may be accessed from the Jalview multiple sequence analysis workbench (Version 2.8 and later), as well as directly via the JABAWS command line interface (CLI) client. JABAWS 2.2 can be deployed on a local virtual server as a Virtual Appliance (VA) or simply as a Web Application Archive (WAR) for private use. Improvements in JABAWS 2.2 also include simplified installation and a range of utility tools for usage statistics collection, and web services querying and monitoring. The JABAWS CLI client has been updated to support all the new services and allow integration of JABAWS 2.2 services into conventional scripts. A public JABAWS 2 server has been in production since December 2011 and served over 800 000 analyses for users worldwide. JABAWS 2.2 is made freely available under the Apache 2 license and can be obtained from: http://www.compbio.dundee.ac.uk/jabaws. g.j.barton@dundee.ac.uk.

  1. Oxygen treatment of cluster headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Anja S; Barloese, Mads C J; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Our aim was to review the existing literature to document oxygen's therapeutic effect on cluster headache. METHOD: A PubMed search resulted in 28 hits, and from these and their references we found in total 11 relevant studies. We included six studies that investigated the efficacy......, but not a prophylactic effect. Despite the fact that only a few high-quality RCT studies are available, oxygen treatment is close to an ideal treatment because it is effective and safe. However, sufferers of cluster headache do not always have access to oxygen because of logistic and financial concerns....

  2. Tension-Type Headache - The Normal and Most Prevalent Headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rigmor Højland

    2018-01-01

    diagnosis of TTH are highlighted and the situations more likely to raise doubts are discussed. POTENTIAL SOLUTION: A structured approach to the patient and a better comprehension of the very frequent coexistence of migraine and medication overuse headache in the clinical population are emphasized. According...

  3. Headaches and Migraines: Headache Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are thought to involve abnormal functioning of the brain's blood vessels. Migraines cause severe pain on one or both ... migraines. Toxic: The second most common type of vascular headache, toxic ... They are brought on by stressful events and involve the tightening or tensing of facial ...

  4. Carbon monoxide inhalation induces headache in a human headache model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arngrim, Nanna; Schytz, Henrik Winther; Britze, Josefine

    2018-01-01

    , double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover design, 12 healthy volunteers were allocated to inhalation of CO (carboxyhemoglobin 22%) or placebo on two separate days. Headache was scored on a verbal rating scale from 0-10. We recorded mean blood velocity in the middle cerebral artery (VMCA) by transcranial...

  5. Defining refractory migraine: results of the RHSIS Survey of American Headache Society members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, Elliott A; Peterlin, B Lee; Lake, Alvin E; Lipton, Richard B; Hanlon, Alexandra; Siegel, Sherry; Levin, Morris; Goadsby, Peter J; Markley, Herbert G

    2009-04-01

    To gauge consensus regarding a proposed definition for refractory migraine proposed by Refractory Headache Special Interest Section, and where its use would be most appropriate. Headache experts have long recognized that a subgroup of headache sufferers remains refractory to treatment. Although different groups have proposed criteria to define refractory migraine, the definition remains controversial. The Refractory Headache Special Interest Section of the American Headache Society developed a definition through a consensus process, assisted by a literature review and initial membership survey. A 12-item questionnaire was distributed at the American Headache Society meeting in 2007 during a platform session and at the Refractory Headache Special Interest Section symposium. The same questionnaire was subsequently sent to all American Headache Society members via e-mail. A total of 151 responses from AHS members form the basis of this report. The survey instrument was designed using Survey Monkey. Frequencies and percentages of the survey were used to describe survey responses. American Headache Society members agreed that a definition for refractory migraine is needed (91%) that it should be added to the International Classification of Headache Disorders-2 (86%), and that refractory forms of non-migraine headache disorders should be defined (87%). Responders believed a refractory migraine definition would be of greatest value in selecting patients for clinical drug trials. The current refractory migraine definition requires a diagnosis of migraine, interference with function or quality of life despite modification of lifestyle factors, and adequate trials of acute and preventive medicines with established efficacy. The proposed criteria for the refractory migraine definition require failing 2 preventive medications to meet the threshold for failure. Although 42% of respondents agreed with the working definition of refractory migraine, 43% favored increasing the

  6. [A role of treatment of autonomic syndrome in patients with tension-type headache].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duma, S N

    2015-01-01

    The study aims to evaluate the effect of correction of psycho-vegetative violations anxiolitikami on the frequency and intensity of headache. the study included 50 women (average age - 37,4 years) with confirmed diagnosis: frequent episodic headache and chronic headache no factor abuses. Patients of the main group received ibuprofen to 200-400 mg/day for headaches in combination with tizanidine (2-4 mg/day) and anvifen 750 mg a day for 8 weeks. Patients in the comparison group received ibuprofen and tizanidine in the same mode, but did not take anvifen. Evaluated the severity of headaches by visual analogue scale, the level of anxiety on the Hamilton depression rating scale, vegetative disorders on questionnaire ( Wayne), the quality of sleep before treatment and 60 days. In addition, 60 day therapy was conducted subjective assessment of the General state on a scale GGI. The conclusion about expediency of inclusion of, anvifen in the complex treatment of the condition.

  7. MIGRAINE AND TENSION-TYPE HEADACHE IN CHILDREN: THE APPROACH TO EFFECTIVE TREATMENT. PART 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Sergeev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric neurologists often have to prescribe drugs off-label in children, according to individual approach to every patient and weighing possible benefits and risk of side-effects. Multidisciplinary approach to migraine and tension-type headache treatment in children, including correction of comorbid psychiatric and somatic disorders, is a critical point in decrease of frequency and severity of headaches and normalization of everyday children’s activity. In the second part of the article the authors discuss the problems of symptomatic (episodic drugs taking in order to arrest a headache attack and preventive (regular prolonged drug taking directed on decrease of frequency and severity of headaches medical treatment of migraine and tension-type headaches in pediatric practice.

  8. [Botulinum toxin type A in headache treatment : Established and experimental indications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaul, C; Holle-Lee, D; Straube, A

    2016-08-01

    In recent years botulinum toxin type A has been used increasingly more in the treatment of specific headache disorders. Especially regarding chronic migraine with and without combined medication overuse, convincing randomized studies have proven the efficacy of this treatment option and have led to approval for this indication. Regarding other headache entities, such as episodic migraine, tension-type headache, trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia (TAC), neuralgic, neuropathic and myofascial pain, currently available scientific data on the efficacy of botulinum toxin type A are scarce and often ambiguous. The exact underlying mechanisms of the influence of botulinum toxin type A on the pathophysiology of headache are not completely clear but an influence on the release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) seems to play a crucial role. This article summarizes the most important studies as well as experiences of treatment with botulinum toxin type A regarding different headache entities.

  9. Supraorbital electrical stimulation in management of chronic type tension headache: A randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Nashwa S

    2018-02-01

    Headache disorders are considered one of the ten most disabling conditions, for both males and females, according to the World Health Organization. Chronic type tension headache (CTTH) has a prevalence of 2-3% within the general population. The purpose of this research was to investigate the effect of stimulating noninvasively the trigeminal nerve in the supraorbital area (SOES) for treatment of CTTH. In an 8-week period of intervention, 45 patients were divided equally into three groups. Both group A "study" and group B received conventional physical therapy program three times a week. Group A received additional SOES for 20 minutes daily. Group C was on prescribed medications only. Assessments occurred pre and post intervention using Headache Impact Test (HIT), headache frequency, and visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain. In between groups, comparison showed statistically significant differences between all groups (p headache frequencies than group C. SOES had positive therapeutic results for treatment of CTTH.

  10. Pain therapy in practice. What can PET tell us about idiopathic headache?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, A.

    1998-01-01

    The concept of vascular headache as a pathophysiological unity implies that the source of pain is a vascular lesion. However, diagnostic PET scanning of patients suffering from primary headache has brought revolutionary new insights in this field, shedding light on the mechanisms inducing this pain. The new knowledge in general confirms the key aspects of the concept, namely that the pathogenesis of migranous headache can be attributed to an imbalance of the brain stem neurons which control the antinozizeption and the extra- and intracranial blood flow. The pathogenesis of cluster-type headache is assumed to be induced by a disorder of the central nervous system in the pace-maker cells or circadian regions of the hypothalamic grey matter. A possible dilatation of the large vessels near the base is not due to a specific type of headache but rather is an unspecific reaction to trigeminal activation. (orig./CB) [de

  11. The methodology of population surveys of headache prevalence, burden and cost

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stovner, Lars Jacob; Al Jumah, Mohammed; Birbeck, Gretchen L

    2014-01-01

    The global burden of headache is very large, but knowledge of it is far from complete and needs still to be gathered. Published population-based studies have used variable methodology, which has influenced findings and made comparisons difficult. Among the initiatives of the Global Campaign against...... to include experience and competence in headache epidemiology and/or epidemiology in general and drawn from all six WHO world regions. The recommendations presented are for anyone, of whatever background, with interests in designing, performing, understanding or assessing studies that measure or describe...... the burden of headache in populations. While aimed principally at researchers whose main interests are in the field of headache, they should also be useful, at least in parts, to those who are expert in public health or epidemiology and wish to extend their interest into the field of headache di