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Sample records for head-neck segment dynamic

  1. Gender differences in head-neck segment dynamic stabilization during head acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, Ryan T; Sitler, Michael R; Swanik, C Buz; Swanik, Kathleen A; Higgins, Michael; Torg, Joseph

    2005-02-01

    Recent epidemiological research has revealed that gender differences exist in concussion incidence but no study has investigated why females may be at greater risk of concussion. Our purpose was to determine whether gender differences existed in head-neck segment kinematic and neuromuscular control variables responses to an external force application with and without neck muscle preactivation. Forty (20 females and 20 males) physically active volunteers participated in the study. The independent variables were gender, force application (known vs unknown), and force direction (forced flexion vs forced extension). The dependent variables were kinematic and EMG variables, head-neck segment stiffness, and head-neck segment flexor and extensor isometric strength. Statistical analyses consisted of multiple multivariate and univariate analyses of variance, follow-up univariate analyses of variance, and t-tests (P Gender differences existed in head-neck segment dynamic stabilization during head angular acceleration. Females exhibited significantly greater head-neck segment peak angular acceleration (50%) and displacement (39%) than males despite initiating muscle activity significantly earlier (SCM only) and using a greater percentage of their maximum head-neck segment muscle activity (79% peak activity and 117% muscle activity area). The head-neck segment angular acceleration differences may be because females exhibited significantly less isometric strength (49%), neck girth (30%), and head mass (43%), resulting in lower levels of head-neck segment stiffness (29%). For our subject demographic, the results revealed gender differences in head-neck segment dynamic stabilization during head acceleration in response to an external force application. Females exhibited significantly greater head-neck segment peak angular acceleration and displacement than males despite initiating muscle activity earlier (SCM only) and using a greater percentage of their maximum head-neck segment

  2. Atlas-based automatic segmentation of head and neck organs at risk and nodal target volumes: a clinical validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daisne, Jean-François; Blumhofer, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Intensity modulated radiotherapy for head and neck cancer necessitates accurate definition of organs at risk (OAR) and clinical target volumes (CTV). This crucial step is time consuming and prone to inter- and intra-observer variations. Automatic segmentation by atlas deformable registration may help to reduce time and variations. We aim to test a new commercial atlas algorithm for automatic segmentation of OAR and CTV in both ideal and clinical conditions. The updated Brainlab automatic head and neck atlas segmentation was tested on 20 patients: 10 cN0-stages (ideal population) and 10 unselected N-stages (clinical population). Following manual delineation of OAR and CTV, automatic segmentation of the same set of structures was performed and afterwards manually corrected. Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC), Average Surface Distance (ASD) and Maximal Surface Distance (MSD) were calculated for “manual to automatic” and “manual to corrected” volumes comparisons. In both groups, automatic segmentation saved about 40% of the corresponding manual segmentation time. This effect was more pronounced for OAR than for CTV. The edition of the automatically obtained contours significantly improved DSC, ASD and MSD. Large distortions of normal anatomy or lack of iodine contrast were the limiting factors. The updated Brainlab atlas-based automatic segmentation tool for head and neck Cancer patients is timesaving but still necessitates review and corrections by an expert

  3. Atlas-based automatic segmentation of head and neck organs at risk and nodal target volumes: a clinical validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daisne, Jean-François; Blumhofer, Andreas

    2013-06-26

    Intensity modulated radiotherapy for head and neck cancer necessitates accurate definition of organs at risk (OAR) and clinical target volumes (CTV). This crucial step is time consuming and prone to inter- and intra-observer variations. Automatic segmentation by atlas deformable registration may help to reduce time and variations. We aim to test a new commercial atlas algorithm for automatic segmentation of OAR and CTV in both ideal and clinical conditions. The updated Brainlab automatic head and neck atlas segmentation was tested on 20 patients: 10 cN0-stages (ideal population) and 10 unselected N-stages (clinical population). Following manual delineation of OAR and CTV, automatic segmentation of the same set of structures was performed and afterwards manually corrected. Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC), Average Surface Distance (ASD) and Maximal Surface Distance (MSD) were calculated for "manual to automatic" and "manual to corrected" volumes comparisons. In both groups, automatic segmentation saved about 40% of the corresponding manual segmentation time. This effect was more pronounced for OAR than for CTV. The edition of the automatically obtained contours significantly improved DSC, ASD and MSD. Large distortions of normal anatomy or lack of iodine contrast were the limiting factors. The updated Brainlab atlas-based automatic segmentation tool for head and neck Cancer patients is timesaving but still necessitates review and corrections by an expert.

  4. SU-E-J-224: Multimodality Segmentation of Head and Neck Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aristophanous, M; Yang, J; Beadle, B

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Develop an algorithm that is able to automatically segment tumor volume in Head and Neck cancer by integrating information from CT, PET and MR imaging simultaneously. Methods: Twenty three patients that were recruited under an adaptive radiotherapy protocol had MR, CT and PET/CT scans within 2 months prior to start of radiotherapy. The patients had unresectable disease and were treated either with chemoradiotherapy or radiation therapy alone. Using the Velocity software, the PET/CT and MR (T1 weighted+contrast) scans were registered to the planning CT using deformable and rigid registration respectively. The PET and MR images were then resampled according to the registration to match the planning CT. The resampled images, together with the planning CT, were fed into a multi-channel segmentation algorithm, which is based on Gaussian mixture models and solved with the expectation-maximization algorithm and Markov random fields. A rectangular region of interest (ROI) was manually placed to identify the tumor area and facilitate the segmentation process. The auto-segmented tumor contours were compared with the gross tumor volume (GTV) manually defined by the physician. The volume difference and Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) between the manual and autosegmented GTV contours were calculated as the quantitative evaluation metrics. Results: The multimodality segmentation algorithm was applied to all 23 patients. The volumes of the auto-segmented GTV ranged from 18.4cc to 32.8cc. The average (range) volume difference between the manual and auto-segmented GTV was −42% (−32.8%–63.8%). The average DSC value was 0.62, ranging from 0.39 to 0.78. Conclusion: An algorithm for the automated definition of tumor volume using multiple imaging modalities simultaneously was successfully developed and implemented for Head and Neck cancer. This development along with more accurate registration algorithms can aid physicians in the efforts to interpret the multitude of

  5. SU-E-J-224: Multimodality Segmentation of Head and Neck Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aristophanous, M; Yang, J; Beadle, B [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Develop an algorithm that is able to automatically segment tumor volume in Head and Neck cancer by integrating information from CT, PET and MR imaging simultaneously. Methods: Twenty three patients that were recruited under an adaptive radiotherapy protocol had MR, CT and PET/CT scans within 2 months prior to start of radiotherapy. The patients had unresectable disease and were treated either with chemoradiotherapy or radiation therapy alone. Using the Velocity software, the PET/CT and MR (T1 weighted+contrast) scans were registered to the planning CT using deformable and rigid registration respectively. The PET and MR images were then resampled according to the registration to match the planning CT. The resampled images, together with the planning CT, were fed into a multi-channel segmentation algorithm, which is based on Gaussian mixture models and solved with the expectation-maximization algorithm and Markov random fields. A rectangular region of interest (ROI) was manually placed to identify the tumor area and facilitate the segmentation process. The auto-segmented tumor contours were compared with the gross tumor volume (GTV) manually defined by the physician. The volume difference and Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) between the manual and autosegmented GTV contours were calculated as the quantitative evaluation metrics. Results: The multimodality segmentation algorithm was applied to all 23 patients. The volumes of the auto-segmented GTV ranged from 18.4cc to 32.8cc. The average (range) volume difference between the manual and auto-segmented GTV was −42% (−32.8%–63.8%). The average DSC value was 0.62, ranging from 0.39 to 0.78. Conclusion: An algorithm for the automated definition of tumor volume using multiple imaging modalities simultaneously was successfully developed and implemented for Head and Neck cancer. This development along with more accurate registration algorithms can aid physicians in the efforts to interpret the multitude of

  6. Interleaved 3D-CNNs for joint segmentation of small-volume structures in head and neck CT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xuhua; Xiang, Lei; Nie, Dong; Shao, Yeqin; Zhang, Huan; Shen, Dinggang; Wang, Qian

    2018-02-26

    Accurate 3D image segmentation is a crucial step in radiation therapy planning of head and neck tumors. These segmentation results are currently obtained by manual outlining of tissues, which is a tedious and time-consuming procedure. Automatic segmentation provides an alternative solution, which, however, is often difficult for small tissues (i.e., chiasm and optic nerves in head and neck CT images) because of their small volumes and highly diverse appearance/shape information. In this work, we propose to interleave multiple 3D Convolutional Neural Networks (3D-CNNs) to attain automatic segmentation of small tissues in head and neck CT images. A 3D-CNN was designed to segment each structure of interest. To make full use of the image appearance information, multiscale patches are extracted to describe the center voxel under consideration and then input to the CNN architecture. Next, as neighboring tissues are often highly related in the physiological and anatomical perspectives, we interleave the CNNs designated for the individual tissues. In this way, the tentative segmentation result of a specific tissue can contribute to refine the segmentations of other neighboring tissues. Finally, as more CNNs are interleaved and cascaded, a complex network of CNNs can be derived, such that all tissues can be jointly segmented and iteratively refined. Our method was validated on a set of 48 CT images, obtained from the Medical Image Computing and Computer Assisted Intervention (MICCAI) Challenge 2015. The Dice coefficient (DC) and the 95% Hausdorff Distance (95HD) are computed to measure the accuracy of the segmentation results. The proposed method achieves higher segmentation accuracy (with the average DC: 0.58 ± 0.17 for optic chiasm, and 0.71 ± 0.08 for optic nerve; 95HD: 2.81 ± 1.56 mm for optic chiasm, and 2.23 ± 0.90 mm for optic nerve) than the MICCAI challenge winner (with the average DC: 0.38 for optic chiasm, and 0.68 for optic nerve; 95HD: 3.48 for

  7. Semiautomated segmentation of head and neck cancers in 18F-FDG PET scans: A just-enough-interaction approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beichel, Reinhard R; Van Tol, Markus; Ulrich, Ethan J; Bauer, Christian; Chang, Tangel; Plichta, Kristin A; Smith, Brian J; Sunderland, John J; Graham, Michael M; Sonka, Milan; Buatti, John M

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop, validate, and compare a highly computer-aided method for the segmentation of hot lesions in head and neck 18F-FDG PET scans. A semiautomated segmentation method was developed, which transforms the segmentation problem into a graph-based optimization problem. For this purpose, a graph structure around a user-provided approximate lesion centerpoint is constructed and a suitable cost function is derived based on local image statistics. To handle frequently occurring situations that are ambiguous (e.g., lesions adjacent to each other versus lesion with inhomogeneous uptake), several segmentation modes are introduced that adapt the behavior of the base algorithm accordingly. In addition, the authors present approaches for the efficient interactive local and global refinement of initial segmentations that are based on the "just-enough-interaction" principle. For method validation, 60 PET/CT scans from 59 different subjects with 230 head and neck lesions were utilized. All patients had squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. A detailed comparison with the current clinically relevant standard manual segmentation approach was performed based on 2760 segmentations produced by three experts. Segmentation accuracy measured by the Dice coefficient of the proposed semiautomated and standard manual segmentation approach was 0.766 and 0.764, respectively. This difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.2145). However, the intra- and interoperator standard deviations were significantly lower for the semiautomated method. In addition, the proposed method was found to be significantly faster and resulted in significantly higher intra- and interoperator segmentation agreement when compared to the manual segmentation approach. Lack of consistency in tumor definition is a critical barrier for radiation treatment targeting as well as for response assessment in clinical trials and in clinical oncology decision-making. The properties

  8. Semiautomated segmentation of head and neck cancers in 18F-FDG PET scans: A just-enough-interaction approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beichel, Reinhard R., E-mail: reinhard-beichel@uiowa.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Iowa Institute for Biomedical Imaging, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Department of Internal Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Van Tol, Markus; Ulrich, Ethan J.; Bauer, Christian [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Iowa Institute for Biomedical Imaging, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Chang, Tangel; Plichta, Kristin A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Smith, Brian J. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Sunderland, John J.; Graham, Michael M. [Department of Radiology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Sonka, Milan [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Iowa Institute for Biomedical Imaging, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Buatti, John M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Iowa Institute for Biomedical Imaging, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to develop, validate, and compare a highly computer-aided method for the segmentation of hot lesions in head and neck 18F-FDG PET scans. Methods: A semiautomated segmentation method was developed, which transforms the segmentation problem into a graph-based optimization problem. For this purpose, a graph structure around a user-provided approximate lesion centerpoint is constructed and a suitable cost function is derived based on local image statistics. To handle frequently occurring situations that are ambiguous (e.g., lesions adjacent to each other versus lesion with inhomogeneous uptake), several segmentation modes are introduced that adapt the behavior of the base algorithm accordingly. In addition, the authors present approaches for the efficient interactive local and global refinement of initial segmentations that are based on the “just-enough-interaction” principle. For method validation, 60 PET/CT scans from 59 different subjects with 230 head and neck lesions were utilized. All patients had squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. A detailed comparison with the current clinically relevant standard manual segmentation approach was performed based on 2760 segmentations produced by three experts. Results: Segmentation accuracy measured by the Dice coefficient of the proposed semiautomated and standard manual segmentation approach was 0.766 and 0.764, respectively. This difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.2145). However, the intra- and interoperator standard deviations were significantly lower for the semiautomated method. In addition, the proposed method was found to be significantly faster and resulted in significantly higher intra- and interoperator segmentation agreement when compared to the manual segmentation approach. Conclusions: Lack of consistency in tumor definition is a critical barrier for radiation treatment targeting as well as for response assessment in clinical trials and in

  9. TU-AB-303-07: Evaluation of Automatic Segmentation of Critical Structures for Head-And-Neck and Thoracic Radiotherapy Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, J; Balter, P; Court, L

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance of commercially available automatic segmentation tools built into treatment planning systems (TPS) in terms of their segmentation accuracy and flexibility in customization. Methods: Twelve head-and-neck cancer patients and twelve thoracic cancer patients were retrospectively selected to benchmark the model-based segmentation (MBS) and atlas-based segmentation (ABS) in RayStation TPS and the Smart Probabilistic Image Contouring Engine (SPICE) in Pinnacle TPS. Multi-atlas contouring service (MACS) that was developed in-house as a plug-in of Pinnacle TPS was evaluated as well. Manual contours used in clinic were reviewed and modified for consistency and served as ground truth for the evaluation. Head-and-neck evaluation included six regions of interest (ROIs): left and right parotid glands, brainstem, spinal cord, mandible, and submandibular glands. Thoracic evaluation includes seven ROIs: left and right lungs, spinal cord, heart, esophagus, and left and right brachial plexus. Auto-segmented contours were compared with the manual contours using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and the mean surface distance (MSD). Results: In head- and-neck evaluation, only mandible has a high accuracy in all segmentations (DSC>85%); SPICE achieved DSC>70% for parotid glands; MACS achieved this for both parotid glands and submandibular glands; and RayStation ABS achieved this for spinal cord. In thoracic evaluation, SPICE achieved the best in lung and heart segmentation, while MACS achieved the best for all other structures. The less distinguishable structures on CT images, such as brainstem, spinal cord, parotid glands, submandibular glands, esophagus, and brachial plexus, showed great variability in different segmentation tools (mostly DSC<70% and MSD>3mm). The template for RayStation ABS can be easily customized by users, while RayStation MBS and SPICE rely on the vendors to provide the templates/models. Conclusion: Great variability was

  10. TU-AB-303-07: Evaluation of Automatic Segmentation of Critical Structures for Head-And-Neck and Thoracic Radiotherapy Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, J; Balter, P; Court, L [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance of commercially available automatic segmentation tools built into treatment planning systems (TPS) in terms of their segmentation accuracy and flexibility in customization. Methods: Twelve head-and-neck cancer patients and twelve thoracic cancer patients were retrospectively selected to benchmark the model-based segmentation (MBS) and atlas-based segmentation (ABS) in RayStation TPS and the Smart Probabilistic Image Contouring Engine (SPICE) in Pinnacle TPS. Multi-atlas contouring service (MACS) that was developed in-house as a plug-in of Pinnacle TPS was evaluated as well. Manual contours used in clinic were reviewed and modified for consistency and served as ground truth for the evaluation. Head-and-neck evaluation included six regions of interest (ROIs): left and right parotid glands, brainstem, spinal cord, mandible, and submandibular glands. Thoracic evaluation includes seven ROIs: left and right lungs, spinal cord, heart, esophagus, and left and right brachial plexus. Auto-segmented contours were compared with the manual contours using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and the mean surface distance (MSD). Results: In head- and-neck evaluation, only mandible has a high accuracy in all segmentations (DSC>85%); SPICE achieved DSC>70% for parotid glands; MACS achieved this for both parotid glands and submandibular glands; and RayStation ABS achieved this for spinal cord. In thoracic evaluation, SPICE achieved the best in lung and heart segmentation, while MACS achieved the best for all other structures. The less distinguishable structures on CT images, such as brainstem, spinal cord, parotid glands, submandibular glands, esophagus, and brachial plexus, showed great variability in different segmentation tools (mostly DSC<70% and MSD>3mm). The template for RayStation ABS can be easily customized by users, while RayStation MBS and SPICE rely on the vendors to provide the templates/models. Conclusion: Great variability was

  11. 3D Dynamic Modeling of the Head-Neck Complex for Fast Eye and Head Orientation Movements Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A. Sierra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 3D dynamic computer model for the movement of the head-neck complex is presented. It incorporates anatomically correct information about the diverse elements forming the system. The skeleton is considered as a set of interconnected rigid 3D bodies following the Newton-Euler laws of movement. The muscles are modeled using Enderle's linear model, which shows equivalent dynamic characteristics to Loeb's virtual muscle model. The soft tissues, namely, the ligaments, intervertebral disks, and facet joints, are modeled considering their physiological roles and dynamics. In contrast with other head and neck models developed for safety research, the model is aimed to study the neural control of the complex during fast eye and head movements, such as saccades and gaze shifts. In particular, the time-optimal hypothesis and the feedback control ones are discussed.

  12. Pathology-based validation of FDG PET segmentation tools for volume assessment of lymph node metastases from head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schinagl, Dominic A.X. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology (874), P.O. Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Span, Paul N.; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Hoogen, Frank J.A. van den [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Merkx, Matthias A.W. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Slootweg, Piet J. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Pathology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Oyen, Wim J.G. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2013-12-15

    FDG PET is increasingly incorporated into radiation treatment planning of head and neck cancer. However, there are only limited data on the accuracy of radiotherapy target volume delineation by FDG PET. The purpose of this study was to validate FDG PET segmentation tools for volume assessment of lymph node metastases from head and neck cancer against the pathological method as the standard. Twelve patients with head and neck cancer and 28 metastatic lymph nodes eligible for therapeutic neck dissection underwent preoperative FDG PET/CT. The metastatic lymph nodes were delineated on CT (Node{sub CT}) and ten PET segmentation tools were used to assess FDG PET-based nodal volumes: interpreting FDG PET visually (PET{sub VIS}), applying an isocontour at a standardized uptake value (SUV) of 2.5 (PET{sub SUV}), two segmentation tools with a fixed threshold of 40 % and 50 %, and two adaptive threshold based methods. The latter four tools were applied with the primary tumour as reference and also with the lymph node itself as reference. Nodal volumes were compared with the true volume as determined by pathological examination. Both Node{sub CT} and PET{sub VIS} showed good correlations with the pathological volume. PET segmentation tools using the metastatic node as reference all performed well but not better than PET{sub VIS}. The tools using the primary tumour as reference correlated poorly with pathology. PET{sub SUV} was unsatisfactory in 35 % of the patients due to merging of the contours of adjacent nodes. FDG PET accurately estimates metastatic lymph node volume, but beyond the detection of lymph node metastases (staging), it has no added value over CT alone for the delineation of routine radiotherapy target volumes. If FDG PET is used in radiotherapy planning, treatment adaptation or response assessment, we recommend an automated segmentation method for purposes of reproducibility and interinstitutional comparison. (orig.)

  13. A multimodality segmentation framework for automatic target delineation in head and neck radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jinzhong; Aristophanous, Michalis, E-mail: MAristophanous@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Beadle, Beth M.; Garden, Adam S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Schwartz, David L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: To develop an automatic segmentation algorithm integrating imaging information from computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to delineate target volume in head and neck cancer radiotherapy. Methods: Eleven patients with unresectable disease at the tonsil or base of tongue who underwent MRI, CT, and PET/CT within two months before the start of radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy were recruited for the study. For each patient, PET/CT and T1-weighted contrast MRI scans were first registered to the planning CT using deformable and rigid registration, respectively, to resample the PET and magnetic resonance (MR) images to the planning CT space. A binary mask was manually defined to identify the tumor area. The resampled PET and MR images, the planning CT image, and the binary mask were fed into the automatic segmentation algorithm for target delineation. The algorithm was based on a multichannel Gaussian mixture model and solved using an expectation–maximization algorithm with Markov random fields. To evaluate the algorithm, we compared the multichannel autosegmentation with an autosegmentation method using only PET images. The physician-defined gross tumor volume (GTV) was used as the “ground truth” for quantitative evaluation. Results: The median multichannel segmented GTV of the primary tumor was 15.7 cm{sup 3} (range, 6.6–44.3 cm{sup 3}), while the PET segmented GTV was 10.2 cm{sup 3} (range, 2.8–45.1 cm{sup 3}). The median physician-defined GTV was 22.1 cm{sup 3} (range, 4.2–38.4 cm{sup 3}). The median difference between the multichannel segmented and physician-defined GTVs was −10.7%, not showing a statistically significant difference (p-value = 0.43). However, the median difference between the PET segmented and physician-defined GTVs was −19.2%, showing a statistically significant difference (p-value =0.0037). The median Dice similarity coefficient between the multichannel segmented

  14. A multimodality segmentation framework for automatic target delineation in head and neck radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jinzhong; Beadle, Beth M; Garden, Adam S; Schwartz, David L; Aristophanous, Michalis

    2015-09-01

    To develop an automatic segmentation algorithm integrating imaging information from computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to delineate target volume in head and neck cancer radiotherapy. Eleven patients with unresectable disease at the tonsil or base of tongue who underwent MRI, CT, and PET/CT within two months before the start of radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy were recruited for the study. For each patient, PET/CT and T1-weighted contrast MRI scans were first registered to the planning CT using deformable and rigid registration, respectively, to resample the PET and magnetic resonance (MR) images to the planning CT space. A binary mask was manually defined to identify the tumor area. The resampled PET and MR images, the planning CT image, and the binary mask were fed into the automatic segmentation algorithm for target delineation. The algorithm was based on a multichannel Gaussian mixture model and solved using an expectation-maximization algorithm with Markov random fields. To evaluate the algorithm, we compared the multichannel autosegmentation with an autosegmentation method using only PET images. The physician-defined gross tumor volume (GTV) was used as the "ground truth" for quantitative evaluation. The median multichannel segmented GTV of the primary tumor was 15.7 cm(3) (range, 6.6-44.3 cm(3)), while the PET segmented GTV was 10.2 cm(3) (range, 2.8-45.1 cm(3)). The median physician-defined GTV was 22.1 cm(3) (range, 4.2-38.4 cm(3)). The median difference between the multichannel segmented and physician-defined GTVs was -10.7%, not showing a statistically significant difference (p-value = 0.43). However, the median difference between the PET segmented and physician-defined GTVs was -19.2%, showing a statistically significant difference (p-value =0.0037). The median Dice similarity coefficient between the multichannel segmented and physician-defined GTVs was 0.75 (range, 0.55-0.84), and the

  15. A multimodality segmentation framework for automatic target delineation in head and neck radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jinzhong; Aristophanous, Michalis; Beadle, Beth M.; Garden, Adam S.; Schwartz, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an automatic segmentation algorithm integrating imaging information from computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to delineate target volume in head and neck cancer radiotherapy. Methods: Eleven patients with unresectable disease at the tonsil or base of tongue who underwent MRI, CT, and PET/CT within two months before the start of radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy were recruited for the study. For each patient, PET/CT and T1-weighted contrast MRI scans were first registered to the planning CT using deformable and rigid registration, respectively, to resample the PET and magnetic resonance (MR) images to the planning CT space. A binary mask was manually defined to identify the tumor area. The resampled PET and MR images, the planning CT image, and the binary mask were fed into the automatic segmentation algorithm for target delineation. The algorithm was based on a multichannel Gaussian mixture model and solved using an expectation–maximization algorithm with Markov random fields. To evaluate the algorithm, we compared the multichannel autosegmentation with an autosegmentation method using only PET images. The physician-defined gross tumor volume (GTV) was used as the “ground truth” for quantitative evaluation. Results: The median multichannel segmented GTV of the primary tumor was 15.7 cm"3 (range, 6.6–44.3 cm"3), while the PET segmented GTV was 10.2 cm"3 (range, 2.8–45.1 cm"3). The median physician-defined GTV was 22.1 cm"3 (range, 4.2–38.4 cm"3). The median difference between the multichannel segmented and physician-defined GTVs was −10.7%, not showing a statistically significant difference (p-value = 0.43). However, the median difference between the PET segmented and physician-defined GTVs was −19.2%, showing a statistically significant difference (p-value =0.0037). The median Dice similarity coefficient between the multichannel segmented and physician-defined GTVs was

  16. To study the role of dynamic magnetic resonance imaging in assessing the femoral head vascularity in intracapsular femoral neck fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaushik, Abhishek, E-mail: abhiortho27@gmail.co [Department of Orthopedics, 513, Thermal Colony, Sector-22, Faridabad 121005, Haryana (India); Sankaran, Balu; Varghese, Mathew [Department of Orthopedics, St Stephen' s Hospital, Tis hazari, Delhi, New Delhi 110054 (India)

    2010-09-15

    Intracapsular femoral neck fractures remain unsolved fractures even after improvement in techniques of diagnosis and internal fixation. Individuals who sustain displaced femoral neck fractures are at high risk of developing avascular necrosis and non-union. Although several methods for predicting the viability of femoral head have been reported, they are not effective or widely used because of unreliability, potential complications and technical difficulties. Dynamic MRI was introduced in the recent past as a simple, non-invasive technique to predict the femoral head viability after the femoral neck fractures. In this study role of dynamic MRI was studied in 30 patients with 31 intracapsular femoral neck fractures. Fractures were divided in to three types according to dynamic curve patterns on MRI evaluation and were followed up for 6 months to 2 years to observe the final outcome. Sensitivity, Specificity and the Accuracy of dynamic MRI in predicting vascularity after femoral neck fracture are 87%, 88% and 87%, respectively. Type A or Type B curve pattern is a positive factor to successful osteosynthesis with p value <0.0001 (Chi-square test). This is a statistically significant value. From this finding it can be suggested that the reliability of dynamic curves A and B in predicting maintained vascularity of femoral head is high. This investigation can be used to predict the vascularity of femoral head after intracapsular femoral neck fractures. There was a good correlation between the outcomes of fractures and dynamic MRI curves done within 48 h of injury. This signifies the role of dynamic MRI in predicting the vascularity of femoral head as early as 48 h. A treatment algorithm can be suggested on the basis of dynamic MRI curves. The fractures with Type C dynamic curve should be considered as fractures with poor vascularity of femoral head and measures to enhance the vascularity of femoral head along with rigid internal fixation should be undertaken to promote

  17. To study the role of dynamic magnetic resonance imaging in assessing the femoral head vascularity in intracapsular femoral neck fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaushik, Abhishek; Sankaran, Balu; Varghese, Mathew

    2010-01-01

    Intracapsular femoral neck fractures remain unsolved fractures even after improvement in techniques of diagnosis and internal fixation. Individuals who sustain displaced femoral neck fractures are at high risk of developing avascular necrosis and non-union. Although several methods for predicting the viability of femoral head have been reported, they are not effective or widely used because of unreliability, potential complications and technical difficulties. Dynamic MRI was introduced in the recent past as a simple, non-invasive technique to predict the femoral head viability after the femoral neck fractures. In this study role of dynamic MRI was studied in 30 patients with 31 intracapsular femoral neck fractures. Fractures were divided in to three types according to dynamic curve patterns on MRI evaluation and were followed up for 6 months to 2 years to observe the final outcome. Sensitivity, Specificity and the Accuracy of dynamic MRI in predicting vascularity after femoral neck fracture are 87%, 88% and 87%, respectively. Type A or Type B curve pattern is a positive factor to successful osteosynthesis with p value <0.0001 (Chi-square test). This is a statistically significant value. From this finding it can be suggested that the reliability of dynamic curves A and B in predicting maintained vascularity of femoral head is high. This investigation can be used to predict the vascularity of femoral head after intracapsular femoral neck fractures. There was a good correlation between the outcomes of fractures and dynamic MRI curves done within 48 h of injury. This signifies the role of dynamic MRI in predicting the vascularity of femoral head as early as 48 h. A treatment algorithm can be suggested on the basis of dynamic MRI curves. The fractures with Type C dynamic curve should be considered as fractures with poor vascularity of femoral head and measures to enhance the vascularity of femoral head along with rigid internal fixation should be undertaken to promote

  18. Head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogl, S.E.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 10 chapters. Some of the titles are: Combined Surgical Resection and Irradiation for Head and Neck Cancers; Analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Head and Neck Database: Identification of Prognostic Factors and the Re-evaluation of American Joint Committee Stages; Combined Modality Approach to Head and Neck Cancer; Induction Combination Chemotherapy of Regionally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer; and Outcome after Complete Remission to Induction Chemotherapy in Head and Neck Cancer

  19. Revisiting the dose-effect correlations in irradiated head and neck cancer using automatic segmentation tools of the dental structures, mandible and maxilla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thariat, J.; Ramus, L.; Odin, G.; Vincent, S.; Orlanducci, M.H.; Dassonville, O.; Darcourt, V.; Lacout, A.; Marcy, P.Y.; Cagnol, G.; Malandain, G.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. - Manual delineation of dental structures is too time-consuming to be feasible in routine practice. Information on dose risk levels is crucial for dentists following irradiation of the head and neck to avoid post-extraction osteoradionecrosis based on empirical dose-effects data established on bidimensional radiation therapy plans. Material and methods. - We present an automatic atlas-based segmentation framework of the dental structures, called Dentalmaps, constructed from a patient image-segmentation database. Results. - This framework is accurate (within 2 Gy accuracy) and relevant for the routine use. It has the potential to guide dental care in the context of new irradiation techniques. Conclusion. - This tool provides a user-friendly interface for dentists and radiation oncologists in the context of irradiated head and neck cancer patients. It will likely improve the knowledge of dose-effect correlations for dental complications and osteoradionecrosis. (authors)

  20. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ... Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ...

  1. TH-CD-206-05: Machine-Learning Based Segmentation of Organs at Risks for Head and Neck Radiotherapy Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibragimov, B; Pernus, F; Strojan, P; Xing, L

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate and efficient delineation of tumor target and organs-at-risks is essential for the success of radiotherapy. In reality, despite of decades of intense research efforts, auto-segmentation has not yet become clinical practice. In this study, we present, for the first time, a deep learning-based classification algorithm for autonomous segmentation in head and neck (HaN) treatment planning. Methods: Fifteen HN datasets of CT, MR and PET images with manual annotation of organs-at-risk (OARs) including spinal cord, brainstem, optic nerves, chiasm, eyes, mandible, tongue, parotid glands were collected and saved in a library of plans. We also have ten super-resolution MR images of the tongue area, where the genioglossus and inferior longitudinalis tongue muscles are defined as organs of interest. We applied the concepts of random forest- and deep learning-based object classification for automated image annotation with the aim of using machine learning to facilitate head and neck radiotherapy planning process. In this new paradigm of segmentation, random forests were used for landmark-assisted segmentation of super-resolution MR images. Alternatively to auto-segmentation with random forest-based landmark detection, deep convolutional neural networks were developed for voxel-wise segmentation of OARs in single and multi-modal images. The network consisted of three pairs of convolution and pooing layer, one RuLU layer and a softmax layer. Results: We present a comprehensive study on using machine learning concepts for auto-segmentation of OARs and tongue muscles for the HaN radiotherapy planning. An accuracy of 81.8% in terms of Dice coefficient was achieved for segmentation of genioglossus and inferior longitudinalis tongue muscles. Preliminary results of OARs regimentation also indicate that deep-learning afforded an unprecedented opportunities to improve the accuracy and robustness of radiotherapy planning. Conclusion: A novel machine learning framework

  2. TH-CD-206-05: Machine-Learning Based Segmentation of Organs at Risks for Head and Neck Radiotherapy Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibragimov, B [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Pernus, F [University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Strojan, P; Xing, L [Institute of Oncology, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Accurate and efficient delineation of tumor target and organs-at-risks is essential for the success of radiotherapy. In reality, despite of decades of intense research efforts, auto-segmentation has not yet become clinical practice. In this study, we present, for the first time, a deep learning-based classification algorithm for autonomous segmentation in head and neck (HaN) treatment planning. Methods: Fifteen HN datasets of CT, MR and PET images with manual annotation of organs-at-risk (OARs) including spinal cord, brainstem, optic nerves, chiasm, eyes, mandible, tongue, parotid glands were collected and saved in a library of plans. We also have ten super-resolution MR images of the tongue area, where the genioglossus and inferior longitudinalis tongue muscles are defined as organs of interest. We applied the concepts of random forest- and deep learning-based object classification for automated image annotation with the aim of using machine learning to facilitate head and neck radiotherapy planning process. In this new paradigm of segmentation, random forests were used for landmark-assisted segmentation of super-resolution MR images. Alternatively to auto-segmentation with random forest-based landmark detection, deep convolutional neural networks were developed for voxel-wise segmentation of OARs in single and multi-modal images. The network consisted of three pairs of convolution and pooing layer, one RuLU layer and a softmax layer. Results: We present a comprehensive study on using machine learning concepts for auto-segmentation of OARs and tongue muscles for the HaN radiotherapy planning. An accuracy of 81.8% in terms of Dice coefficient was achieved for segmentation of genioglossus and inferior longitudinalis tongue muscles. Preliminary results of OARs regimentation also indicate that deep-learning afforded an unprecedented opportunities to improve the accuracy and robustness of radiotherapy planning. Conclusion: A novel machine learning framework

  3. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... find out more. Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ... find out more. Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ...

  4. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... find out more. Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ... find out more. Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ...

  5. Evaluation of an automatic segmentation algorithm for definition of head and neck organs at risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, David; Boylan, Chris; Liptrot, Tom; Aitkenhead, Adam; Lee, Lip; Yap, Beng; Sykes, Andrew; Rowbottom, Carl; Slevin, Nicholas

    2014-08-03

    The accurate definition of organs at risk (OARs) is required to fully exploit the benefits of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head and neck cancer. However, manual delineation is time-consuming and there is considerable inter-observer variability. This is pertinent as function-sparing and adaptive IMRT have increased the number and frequency of delineation of OARs. We evaluated accuracy and potential time-saving of Smart Probabilistic Image Contouring Engine (SPICE) automatic segmentation to define OARs for salivary-, swallowing- and cochlea-sparing IMRT. Five clinicians recorded the time to delineate five organs at risk (parotid glands, submandibular glands, larynx, pharyngeal constrictor muscles and cochleae) for each of 10 CT scans. SPICE was then used to define these structures. The acceptability of SPICE contours was initially determined by visual inspection and the total time to modify them recorded per scan. The Simultaneous Truth and Performance Level Estimation (STAPLE) algorithm created a reference standard from all clinician contours. Clinician, SPICE and modified contours were compared against STAPLE by the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and mean/maximum distance to agreement (DTA). For all investigated structures, SPICE contours were less accurate than manual contours. However, for parotid/submandibular glands they were acceptable (median DSC: 0.79/0.80; mean, maximum DTA: 1.5 mm, 14.8 mm/0.6 mm, 5.7 mm). Modified SPICE contours were also less accurate than manual contours. The utilisation of SPICE did not result in time-saving/improve efficiency. Improvements in accuracy of automatic segmentation for head and neck OARs would be worthwhile and are required before its routine clinical implementation.

  6. Validation of clinical acceptability of an atlas-based segmentation algorithm for the delineation of organs at risk in head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoang Duc, Albert K., E-mail: albert.hoangduc.ucl@gmail.com; McClelland, Jamie; Modat, Marc; Cardoso, M. Jorge; Mendelson, Alex F. [Center for Medical Image Computing, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Eminowicz, Gemma; Mendes, Ruheena; Wong, Swee-Ling; D’Souza, Derek [Radiotherapy Department, University College London Hospitals, 235 Euston Road, London NW1 2BU (United Kingdom); Veiga, Catarina [Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Kadir, Timor [Mirada Medical UK, Oxford Center for Innovation, New Road, Oxford OX1 1BY (United Kingdom); Ourselin, Sebastien [Centre for Medical Image Computing, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess whether clinically acceptable segmentations of organs at risk (OARs) in head and neck cancer can be obtained automatically and efficiently using the novel “similarity and truth estimation for propagated segmentations” (STEPS) compared to the traditional “simultaneous truth and performance level estimation” (STAPLE) algorithm. Methods: First, 6 OARs were contoured by 2 radiation oncologists in a dataset of 100 patients with head and neck cancer on planning computed tomography images. Each image in the dataset was then automatically segmented with STAPLE and STEPS using those manual contours. Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) was then used to compare the accuracy of these automatic methods. Second, in a blind experiment, three separate and distinct trained physicians graded manual and automatic segmentations into one of the following three grades: clinically acceptable as determined by universal delineation guidelines (grade A), reasonably acceptable for clinical practice upon manual editing (grade B), and not acceptable (grade C). Finally, STEPS segmentations graded B were selected and one of the physicians manually edited them to grade A. Editing time was recorded. Results: Significant improvements in DSC can be seen when using the STEPS algorithm on large structures such as the brainstem, spinal canal, and left/right parotid compared to the STAPLE algorithm (all p < 0.001). In addition, across all three trained physicians, manual and STEPS segmentation grades were not significantly different for the brainstem, spinal canal, parotid (right/left), and optic chiasm (all p > 0.100). In contrast, STEPS segmentation grades were lower for the eyes (p < 0.001). Across all OARs and all physicians, STEPS produced segmentations graded as well as manual contouring at a rate of 83%, giving a lower bound on this rate of 80% with 95% confidence. Reduction in manual interaction time was on average 61% and 93% when automatic

  7. Automated Segmentation of the Parotid Gland Based on Atlas Registration and Machine Learning: A Longitudinal MRI Study in Head-and-Neck Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaofeng [Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Wu, Ning; Cheng, Guanghui [Radiation Oncology, Jilin University, Chuangchun, Jilin (China); Zhou, Zhengyang [Department of Radiology, Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital, The Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, Nanjing (China); Yu, David S.; Beitler, Jonathan J.; Curran, Walter J. [Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Liu, Tian, E-mail: tliu34@emory.edu [Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To develop an automated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) parotid segmentation method to monitor radiation-induced parotid gland changes in patients after head and neck radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: The proposed method combines the atlas registration method, which captures the global variation of anatomy, with a machine learning technology, which captures the local statistical features, to automatically segment the parotid glands from the MRIs. The segmentation method consists of 3 major steps. First, an atlas (pre-RT MRI and manually contoured parotid gland mask) is built for each patient. A hybrid deformable image registration is used to map the pre-RT MRI to the post-RT MRI, and the transformation is applied to the pre-RT parotid volume. Second, the kernel support vector machine (SVM) is trained with the subject-specific atlas pair consisting of multiple features (intensity, gradient, and others) from the aligned pre-RT MRI and the transformed parotid volume. Third, the well-trained kernel SVM is used to differentiate the parotid from surrounding tissues in the post-RT MRIs by statistically matching multiple texture features. A longitudinal study of 15 patients undergoing head and neck RT was conducted: baseline MRI was acquired prior to RT, and the post-RT MRIs were acquired at 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up examinations. The resulting segmentations were compared with the physicians' manual contours. Results: Successful parotid segmentation was achieved for all 15 patients (42 post-RT MRIs). The average percentage of volume differences between the automated segmentations and those of the physicians' manual contours were 7.98% for the left parotid and 8.12% for the right parotid. The average volume overlap was 91.1% ± 1.6% for the left parotid and 90.5% ± 2.4% for the right parotid. The parotid gland volume reduction at follow-up was 25% at 3 months, 27% at 6 months, and 16% at 12 months. Conclusions: We have validated

  8. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed with ... and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed with ...

  9. Spatial Segmentation of MALDI FT-ICR MSI Data: A Powerful Tool to Explore the Head and Neck Tumor in Situ Lipodome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krásný, Lukáš; Hoffmann, F.; Ernst, G.; Trede, D.; Alexandrov, T.; Havlíček, Vladimír; Gruntinas-Lichius, O.; Eggeling, F.; Cerecelius, Anna C.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 1 (2015), s. 36-43 ISSN 1044-0305 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ECOST-STSM-BM1104-200513-028870; GA MŠk(CZ) LD13038 Grant - others:European Union 7th Framework Programme(CZ) 305259 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : spatial segmentation * head tumor * neck tumor * cancer Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.031, year: 2015

  10. WE-E-213CD-02: Gaussian Weighted Multi-Atlas Based Segmentation for Head and Neck Radiotherapy Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peroni, M; Sharp, G C; Golland, P; Baroni, G

    2012-06-01

    To develop a multi-atlas segmentation strategy for IMRT head and neck therapy planning. The method was tested on thirty-one head and neck simulation CTs, without demographic or pathology pre-clustering. We compare Fixed Number (FN) and Thresholding (TH) selection (based on normalized mutual information ranking) of the atlases to be included for current patient segmentation. Next step is a pairwise demons Deformable Registration (DR) onto current patient CT. DR was extended to automatically compensate for patient different field of view. Propagated labels are combined according to a Gaussian Weighted (GW) fusion rule, adapted to poor soft tissues contrast. Agreement with manual segmentation was quantified in terms of Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC). Selection methods, number of atlases used, as well as GW, average and majority voting fusion were discriminated by means of Friedman Test (a=5%). Experimental tuning of the algorithm parameters was performed on five patients, deriving an optimal configuration for each structure. DSC reduction was not significant when ten or more atlases are selected, whereas DSC for single most similar atlas selection is 10% lower in median. DSC of FN selection rule were significantly higher for most structures. Tubular structures may benefit from computing average contour rather than looking at the singular voxel contribution, whereas the best performing strategy for all other structures was GW. When half database is selected, final median DSC were 0.86, 0.80, 0.51, 0.81, 0.69 and 0.79 for mandible, spine, optical nerves, eyes, parotids and brainstem respectively. We developed an efficient algorithm for multiatlas based segmentation of planning CT volumes, based on DR and GW. FN selection of database atlases is foreseen to increase computational efficiency. The absence of clinical pre-clustering and specific imaging protocol on database subjects makes the results closer to real clinical application. "Progetto Roberto Rocca" funded by

  11. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-18

    Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck; Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Cancer; Head and Neck Sarcoma; Paraganglioma of Head and Neck; Chordoma of Head and Neck; Chondrosarcoma of Head and Neck; Angiofibroma of Head and Neck

  12. Head and Neck Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Head and neck cancer overview What are my ... and neck cancer. For updated information on new cancer treatments that are available, you should discuss these issues ...

  13. Merkel cell carcinoma of the head and neck: poorer prognosis than non-head and neck sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morand, G B; Madana, J; Da Silva, S D; Hier, M P; Mlynarek, A M; Black, M J

    2016-04-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare, aggressive neurocutaneous malignancy. This study investigated whether patients with Merkel cell carcinoma in the head and neck had poorer outcomes than patients with Merkel cell carcinoma located elsewhere. A retrospective study was performed of patients with Merkel cell carcinoma treated at the Jewish General Hospital in Montréal, Canada, from 1993 to 2013. Associations between clinicopathological characteristics and disease-free and disease-specific survival rates were examined according to the Kaplan-Meier method. Twenty-seven patients were identified. Although basic clinicopathological characteristics and treatments were similar between head and neck and non-head and neck Merkel cell carcinoma groups, disease-free and disease-specific survival rates were significantly lower in the head and neck Merkel cell carcinoma group (log-rank test; p = 0.043 and p = 0.001, respectively). Mortality was mainly due to distant metastasis. Patients with head and neck Merkel cell carcinoma had poorer survival rates than patients with non-head and neck Merkel cell carcinoma in our study. The tendency to obtain close margins, a less predictable metastatic pattern, and/or intrinsic tumour factors related to the head and neck may explain this discrepancy.

  14. Dosimetric Evaluation of Automatic Segmentation for Adaptive IMRT for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Stuart Y.; Hwang, Andrew; Weinberg, Vivian; Yom, Sue S.; Quivey, Jeanne M.; Xia Ping

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Adaptive planning to accommodate anatomic changes during treatment requires repeat segmentation. This study uses dosimetric endpoints to assess automatically deformed contours. Methods and Materials: Sixteen patients with head-and-neck cancer had adaptive plans because of anatomic change during radiotherapy. Contours from the initial planning computed tomography (CT) were deformed to the mid-treatment CT using an intensity-based free-form registration algorithm then compared with the manually drawn contours for the same CT using the Dice similarity coefficient and an overlap index. The automatic contours were used to create new adaptive plans. The original and automatic adaptive plans were compared based on dosimetric outcomes of the manual contours and on plan conformality. Results: Volumes from the manual and automatic segmentation were similar; only the gross tumor volume (GTV) was significantly different. Automatic plans achieved lower mean coverage for the GTV: V95: 98.6 ± 1.9% vs. 89.9 ± 10.1% (p = 0.004) and clinical target volume: V95: 98.4 ± 0.8% vs. 89.8 ± 6.2% (p 3 of the spinal cord 39.9 ± 3.7 Gy vs. 42.8 ± 5.4 Gy (p = 0.034), but no difference for the remaining structures. Conclusions: Automatic segmentation is not robust enough to substitute for physician-drawn volumes, particularly for the GTV. However, it generates normal structure contours of sufficient accuracy when assessed by dosimetric end points.

  15. Dynamic intensity-modulated non-coplanar arc radiotherapy (INCA) for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krayenbuehl, Jerome; Davis, J. Bernard; Ciernik, I. Frank

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: To define the potential advantages of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) applied using a non-coplanar dynamic arc technique for the treatment of head and neck cancer. Materials and methods: External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) was planned in ten patients with head and neck cancer using coplanar IMRT and non-coplanar arc techniques, termed intensity modulated non-coplanar arc EBRT (INCA). Planning target volumes (PTV1) of first order covered the gross tumor volume and surrounding clinical target volume treated with 68-70 Gy, whereas PTV2 covered the elective lymph nodes with 54-55 Gy using a simultaneous internal boost. Treatment plan comparison between IMRT and INCA was carried out using dose-volume histogram and 'equivalent uniform dose' (EUD). Results: INCA resulted in better dose coverage and homogeneity of the PTV1, PTV2, and reduced dose delivered to most of the organs at risk (OAR). For the parotid glands, a reduction of the mean dose of 2.9 (±2.0) Gy was observed (p 0.002), the mean dose to the larynx was reduced by 6.9 (±2.9) Gy (p 0.003), the oral mucosa by 2.4 (±1.1) Gy (p < 0.001), and the maximal dose to the spinal cord by 3.2 (±1.7) Gy (p = 0.004). The mean dose to the brain was increased by 3.0 (±1.4) Gy (p = 0.002) and the mean lung dose increased by 0.2 (±0.4) Gy (p = 0.87). The EUD suggested better avoidance of the OAR, except for the lung, and better coverage and dose uniformity were achieved with INCA compared to IMRT. Conclusion: Dose delivery accuracy with IMRT using a non-coplanar dynamic arc beam geometry potentially improves treatment of head and neck cancer

  16. Patterns of local-regional recurrence following parotid-sparing conformal and segmental intensity-modulated radiotherapy for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, Laura A.; Anzai, Yoshimi; Marsh, Lon; Martel, Mary K.; Paulino, Augusto; Ship, Jonathan A.; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the patterns of local-regional recurrence in patients with head and neck cancer treated with parotid-sparing conformal and segmental intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Fifty-eight patients with head and neck cancer were treated with bilateral neck radiation (RT) using conformal or segmental IMRT techniques, while sparing a substantial portion of one parotid gland. The targets for CT-based RT planning included the gross tumor volume (GTV) (primary tumor and lymph node metastases) and the clinical target volume (CTV) (postoperative tumor bed, expansions of the GTVs and lymph node groups at risk of subclinical disease). Lymph node targets at risk of subclinical disease included the bilateral jugulodigastric and lower jugular lymph nodes, bilateral retropharyngeal lymph nodes at risk, and high jugular nodes at the base of skull in the side of the neck at highest risk (containing clinical neck metastases and/or ipsilateral to the primary tumor). The CTVs were expanded by 5 mm to yield planning target volumes (PTVs). Planning goals included coverage of all PTVs (with a minimum of 95% of the prescribed dose) and sparing of a substantial portion of the parotid gland in the side of the neck at less risk. The median RT doses to the gross tumor, the operative bed, and the subclinical disease PTVs were 70.4 Gy, 61.2 Gy, and 50.4 Gy respectively. All recurrences were defined on CT scans obtained at the time of recurrence, transferred to the pretreatment CT dataset used for RT planning, and analyzed using dose-volume histograms. The recurrences were classified as 1) 'in-field', in which 95% or more of the recurrence volume (V recur ) was within the 95% isodose; 2) 'marginal', in which 20% to 95% of V recur was within the 95% isodose; or 3) 'outside', in which less than 20% of V recur was within the 95% isodose. Results: With a median follow-up of 27 months (range 6 to 60 months), 10 regional recurrences, 5 local recurrences

  17. Patterns of local-regional recurrence following parotid-sparing conformal and segmental intensity-modulated radiotherapy for head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, L A; Anzai, Y; Marsh, L; Martel, M K; Paulino, A; Ship, J A; Eisbruch, A

    2000-03-15

    To analyze the patterns of local-regional recurrence in patients with head and neck cancer treated with parotid-sparing conformal and segmental intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Fifty-eight patients with head and neck cancer were treated with bilateral neck radiation (RT) using conformal or segmental IMRT techniques, while sparing a substantial portion of one parotid gland. The targets for CT-based RT planning included the gross tumor volume (GTV) (primary tumor and lymph node metastases) and the clinical target volume (CTV) (postoperative tumor bed, expansions of the GTVs and lymph node groups at risk of subclinical disease). Lymph node targets at risk of subclinical disease included the bilateral jugulodigastric and lower jugular lymph nodes, bilateral retropharyngeal lymph nodes at risk, and high jugular nodes at the base of skull in the side of the neck at highest risk (containing clinical neck metastases and/or ipsilateral to the primary tumor). The CTVs were expanded by 5 mm to yield planning target volumes (PTVs). Planning goals included coverage of all PTVs (with a minimum of 95% of the prescribed dose) and sparing of a substantial portion of the parotid gland in the side of the neck at less risk. The median RT doses to the gross tumor, the operative bed, and the subclinical disease PTVs were 70.4 Gy, 61.2 Gy, and 50.4 Gy respectively. All recurrences were defined on CT scans obtained at the time of recurrence, transferred to the pretreatment CT dataset used for RT planning, and analyzed using dose-volume histograms. The recurrences were classified as 1) "in-field," in which 95% or more of the recurrence volume (V(recur)) was within the 95% isodose; 2) "marginal," in which 20% to 95% of V(recur) was within the 95% isodose; or 3) "outside," in which less than 20% of V(recur) was within the 95% isodose. With a median follow-up of 27 months (range 6 to 60 months), 10 regional recurrences, 5 local recurrences (including one noninvasive recurrence) and 1

  18. Semiautomatic methods for segmentation of the proliferative tumour volume on sequential FLT PET/CT images in head and neck carcinomas and their relation to clinical outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arens, Anne I.J.; Grootjans, Willem; Oyen, Wim J.G.; Visser, Eric P. [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, P.O. Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Troost, Esther G.C. [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Centre, MAASTRO clinic, GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Hoeben, Bianca A.W.; Bussink, Johan; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M. [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Lee, John A.; Gregoire, Vincent [St-Luc University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); Hatt, Mathieu; Visvikis, Dimitris [Laboratoire de Traitement de l' Information Medicale (LaTIM), INSERM UMR1101, Brest (France)

    2014-05-15

    Radiotherapy of head and neck cancer induces changes in tumour cell proliferation during treatment, which can be depicted by the PET tracer {sup 18}F-fluorothymidine (FLT). In this study, three advanced semiautomatic PET segmentation methods for delineation of the proliferative tumour volume (PV) before and during (chemo)radiotherapy were compared and related to clinical outcome. The study group comprised 46 patients with 48 squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck, treated with accelerated (chemo)radiotherapy, who underwent FLT PET/CT prior to treatment and in the 2nd and 4th week of therapy. Primary gross tumour volumes were visually delineated on CT images (GTV{sub CT}). PVs were visually determined on all PET scans (PV{sub VIS}). The following semiautomatic segmentation methods were applied to sequential PET scans: background-subtracted relative-threshold level (PV{sub RTL}), a gradient-based method using the watershed transform algorithm and hierarchical clustering analysis (PV{sub W} and {sub C}), and a fuzzy locally adaptive Bayesian algorithm (PV{sub FLAB}). Pretreatment PV{sub VIS} correlated best with PV{sub FLAB} and GTV{sub CT}. Correlations with PV{sub RTL} and PV{sub W} and {sub C} were weaker although statistically significant. During treatment, the PV{sub VIS}, PV{sub W} and {sub C} and PV{sub FLAB} significant decreased over time with the steepest decline over time for PV{sub FLAB}. Among these advanced segmentation methods, PV{sub FLAB} was the most robust in segmenting volumes in the third scan (67 % of tumours as compared to 40 % for PV{sub W} and {sub C} and 27 % for PV{sub RTL}). A decrease in PV{sub FLAB} above the median between the pretreatment scan and the scan obtained in the 4th week was associated with better disease-free survival (4 years 90 % versus 53 %). In patients with head and neck cancer, FLAB proved to be the best performing method for segmentation of the PV on repeat FLT PET/CT scans during (chemo)radiotherapy. This may

  19. A quality and efficiency analysis of the IMFASTTM segmentation algorithm in head and neck 'step and shoot' IMRT treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potter, Larry D.; Chang, Sha X.; Cullip, Timothy J.; Siochi, Alfredo C.

    2002-01-01

    The performance of segmentation algorithms used in IMFAST for 'step and shoot' IMRT treatment delivery is evaluated for three head and neck clinical treatments of different optimization objectives. The segmentation uses the intensity maps generated by the in-house TPS PLANUNC using the index-dose minimization algorithm. The dose optimization objectives include PTV dose uniformity and dose volume histogram-specified critical structure sparing. The optimized continuous intensity maps were truncated into five and ten intensity levels and exported to IMFAST for MLC segments optimization. The MLC segments were imported back to PLUNC for dose optimization quality calculation. The five basic segmentation algorithms included in IMFAST were evaluated alone and in combination with either tongue and groove/match line correction or fluence correction or both. Two criteria were used in the evaluation: treatment efficiency represented by the total number of MLC segments and optimization quality represented by a clinically relevant optimization quality factor. We found that the treatment efficiency depends first on the number of intensity levels used in the intensity map and second the segmentation technique used. The standard optimal segmentation with fluence correction is a consistent good performer for all treatment plans studied. All segmentation techniques evaluated produced treatments with similar dose optimization quality values, especially when ten-level intensity maps are used

  20. Comparison of five segmentation tools for 18F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose-positron emission tomography-based target volume definition in head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinagl, Dominic A X; Vogel, Wouter V; Hoffmann, Aswin L; van Dalen, Jorn A; Oyen, Wim J; Kaanders, Johannes H A M

    2007-11-15

    Target-volume delineation for radiation treatment to the head and neck area traditionally is based on physical examination, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging. Additional molecular imaging with (18)F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) may improve definition of the gross tumor volume (GTV). In this study, five methods for tumor delineation on FDG-PET are compared with CT-based delineation. Seventy-eight patients with Stages II-IV squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck area underwent coregistered CT and FDG-PET. The primary tumor was delineated on CT, and five PET-based GTVs were obtained: visual interpretation, applying an isocontour of a standardized uptake value of 2.5, using a fixed threshold of 40% and 50% of the maximum signal intensity, and applying an adaptive threshold based on the signal-to-background ratio. Absolute GTV volumes were compared, and overlap analyses were performed. The GTV method of applying an isocontour of a standardized uptake value of 2.5 failed to provide successful delineation in 45% of cases. For the other PET delineation methods, volume and shape of the GTV were influenced heavily by the choice of segmentation tool. On average, all threshold-based PET-GTVs were smaller than on CT. Nevertheless, PET frequently detected significant tumor extension outside the GTV delineated on CT (15-34% of PET volume). The choice of segmentation tool for target-volume definition of head and neck cancer based on FDG-PET images is not trivial because it influences both volume and shape of the resulting GTV. With adequate delineation, PET may add significantly to CT- and physical examination-based GTV definition.

  1. Comparison of Five Segmentation Tools for 18F-Fluoro-Deoxy-Glucose-Positron Emission Tomography-Based Target Volume Definition in Head and Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schinagl, Dominic A.X.; Vogel, Wouter V.; Hoffmann, Aswin L.; Dalen, Jorn A. van; Oyen, Wim J.; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Target-volume delineation for radiation treatment to the head and neck area traditionally is based on physical examination, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging. Additional molecular imaging with 18 F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) may improve definition of the gross tumor volume (GTV). In this study, five methods for tumor delineation on FDG-PET are compared with CT-based delineation. Methods and Materials: Seventy-eight patients with Stages II-IV squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck area underwent coregistered CT and FDG-PET. The primary tumor was delineated on CT, and five PET-based GTVs were obtained: visual interpretation, applying an isocontour of a standardized uptake value of 2.5, using a fixed threshold of 40% and 50% of the maximum signal intensity, and applying an adaptive threshold based on the signal-to-background ratio. Absolute GTV volumes were compared, and overlap analyses were performed. Results: The GTV method of applying an isocontour of a standardized uptake value of 2.5 failed to provide successful delineation in 45% of cases. For the other PET delineation methods, volume and shape of the GTV were influenced heavily by the choice of segmentation tool. On average, all threshold-based PET-GTVs were smaller than on CT. Nevertheless, PET frequently detected significant tumor extension outside the GTV delineated on CT (15-34% of PET volume). Conclusions: The choice of segmentation tool for target-volume definition of head and neck cancer based on FDG-PET images is not trivial because it influences both volume and shape of the resulting GTV. With adequate delineation, PET may add significantly to CT- and physical examination-based GTV definition

  2. SU-E-T-605: Performance Evaluation of MLC Leaf-Sequencing Algorithms in Head-And-Neck IMRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing, J; Lin, H [Hefei University of Technology, Hefei, Anhui (China); Chow, J [Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the efficiency of three multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf-sequencing algorithms proposed by Galvin et al, Chen et al and Siochi et al using external beam treatment plans for head-and-neck intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods: IMRT plans for head-and-neck were created using the CORVUS treatment planning system. The plans were optimized and the fluence maps for all photon beams determined. Three different MLC leaf-sequencing algorithms based on Galvin et al, Chen et al and Siochi et al were used to calculate the final photon segmental fields and their monitor units in delivery. For comparison purpose, the maximum intensity of fluence map was kept constant in different plans. The number of beam segments and total number of monitor units were calculated for the three algorithms. Results: From results of number of beam segments and total number of monitor units, we found that algorithm of Galvin et al had the largest number of monitor unit which was about 70% larger than the other two algorithms. Moreover, both algorithms of Galvin et al and Siochi et al have relatively lower number of beam segment compared to Chen et al. Although values of number of beam segment and total number of monitor unit calculated by different algorithms varied with the head-and-neck plans, it can be seen that algorithms of Galvin et al and Siochi et al performed well with a lower number of beam segment, though algorithm of Galvin et al had a larger total number of monitor units than Siochi et al. Conclusion: Although performance of the leaf-sequencing algorithm varied with different IMRT plans having different fluence maps, an evaluation is possible based on the calculated number of beam segment and monitor unit. In this study, algorithm by Siochi et al was found to be more efficient in the head-and-neck IMRT. The Project Sponsored by the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (J2014HGXJ0094) and the Scientific Research Foundation for the

  3. SU-E-T-605: Performance Evaluation of MLC Leaf-Sequencing Algorithms in Head-And-Neck IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing, J; Lin, H; Chow, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the efficiency of three multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf-sequencing algorithms proposed by Galvin et al, Chen et al and Siochi et al using external beam treatment plans for head-and-neck intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods: IMRT plans for head-and-neck were created using the CORVUS treatment planning system. The plans were optimized and the fluence maps for all photon beams determined. Three different MLC leaf-sequencing algorithms based on Galvin et al, Chen et al and Siochi et al were used to calculate the final photon segmental fields and their monitor units in delivery. For comparison purpose, the maximum intensity of fluence map was kept constant in different plans. The number of beam segments and total number of monitor units were calculated for the three algorithms. Results: From results of number of beam segments and total number of monitor units, we found that algorithm of Galvin et al had the largest number of monitor unit which was about 70% larger than the other two algorithms. Moreover, both algorithms of Galvin et al and Siochi et al have relatively lower number of beam segment compared to Chen et al. Although values of number of beam segment and total number of monitor unit calculated by different algorithms varied with the head-and-neck plans, it can be seen that algorithms of Galvin et al and Siochi et al performed well with a lower number of beam segment, though algorithm of Galvin et al had a larger total number of monitor units than Siochi et al. Conclusion: Although performance of the leaf-sequencing algorithm varied with different IMRT plans having different fluence maps, an evaluation is possible based on the calculated number of beam segment and monitor unit. In this study, algorithm by Siochi et al was found to be more efficient in the head-and-neck IMRT. The Project Sponsored by the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (J2014HGXJ0094) and the Scientific Research Foundation for the

  4. Head and neck cancer in South Asia: Macroeconomic consequences and the role of the head and neck surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkire, Blake C; Bergmark, Regan W; Chambers, Kyle; Lin, Derrick T; Deschler, Daniel G; Cheney, Mack L; Meara, John G

    2016-08-01

    Head and neck cancer constitutes a substantial portion of the burden of disease in South Asia, and there is an undersupply of surgical capacity in this region. The purpose of this study was to estimate the economic welfare losses due to head and neck cancer in India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh in 2010. We used publicly available estimates of head and neck cancer morbidity and mortality along with a concept termed the value of a statistical life to estimate economic welfare losses in the aforementioned countries in 2010. Economic losses because of head and neck cancer in India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh totaled $16.9 billion (2010 US dollars [USD]), equivalent to 0.26% of the region's economic output. Bangladesh, the poorest country, experienced the greatest proportional losses. The economic consequences of head and neck cancer in South Asia are significant, and building surgical capacity is essential to begin to address this burden. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38:1242-1247, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Dynamic head-neck stabilization and modulation with perturbation bandwidth investigated using a multisegment neuromuscular model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Happee, R. (Riender); de Bruijn, E. (Edo); Forbes, P.A. (Patrick A.); F.C.T. van der Helm (Frans C.)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThe human head-neck system requires continuous stabilization in the presence of gravity and trunk motion. We investigated contributions of the vestibulocollic reflex (VCR), the cervicocollic reflex (CCR), and neck muscle co-contraction to head-in-space and head-on-trunk stabilization,

  6. Dynamic head-neck stabilization and modulation with perturbation bandwidth investigated using a multisegment neuromuscular model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Happee, R.; de Bruijn, E.; Forbes, P.A.; van der Helm, F.C.T.

    2017-01-01

    The human head-neck system requires continuous stabilization in the presence of gravity and trunk motion. We investigated contributions of the vestibulocollic reflex (VCR), the cervicocollic reflex (CCR), and neck muscle co-contraction to head-in-space and head-on-trunk stabilization, and

  7. Automatic Delineation of On-Line Head-And-Neck Computed Tomography Images: Toward On-Line Adaptive Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Tiezhi; Chi Yuwei; Meldolesi, Elisa; Yan Di

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and validate a fully automatic region-of-interest (ROI) delineation method for on-line adaptive radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: On-line adaptive radiotherapy requires a robust and automatic image segmentation method to delineate ROIs in on-line volumetric images. We have implemented an atlas-based image segmentation method to automatically delineate ROIs of head-and-neck helical computed tomography images. A total of 32 daily computed tomography images from 7 head-and-neck patients were delineated using this automatic image segmentation method. Manually drawn contours on the daily images were used as references in the evaluation of automatically delineated ROIs. Two methods were used in quantitative validation: (1) the dice similarity coefficient index, which indicates the overlapping ratio between the manually and automatically delineated ROIs; and (2) the distance transformation, which yields the distances between the manually and automatically delineated ROI surfaces. Results: Automatic segmentation showed agreement with manual contouring. For most ROIs, the dice similarity coefficient indexes were approximately 0.8. Similarly, the distance transformation evaluation results showed that the distances between the manually and automatically delineated ROI surfaces were mostly within 3 mm. The distances between two surfaces had a mean of 1 mm and standard deviation of <2 mm in most ROIs. Conclusion: With atlas-based image segmentation, it is feasible to automatically delineate ROIs on the head-and-neck helical computed tomography images in on-line adaptive treatments

  8. Public knowledge of head and neck cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, T E

    2010-04-01

    Studies show 60% of patients with newly diagnosed Head & Neck Squamous Cell Cancer in Ireland, present with advanced disease. A poor level of knowledge and awareness among the public of Head & Neck Cancer, is an important consideration in the often delayed presentation for medical attention in many of these cases. Our study surveyed 200 members of the public to assess their knowledge and awareness of Head & Neck Cancer. One hundred and forty (70%) of respondents had never encountered the term "Head & Neck Cancer". One hundred and forty six (73%) failed to identify excessive alcohol consumption as a risk factor. Less than 100 (50%) would have concern about persisting hoarseness or a prolonged oral ulcer. An urgent need exists to raise awareness of Head & Neck Cancer among the public in Ireland.

  9. Head and Neck Cancer—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head and neck cancers include hypopharyngeal, laryngeal, lip and oral cavity, metastatic squamous neck, nasopharyngeal, oropharyngeal, paranasal sinus, and salivary gland cancers. Find evidence-based information on head and neck cancer treatment, causes and prevention, research, screening, and statistics.

  10. CT-based patient modeling for head and neck hyperthermia treatment planning: manual versus automatic normal-tissue-segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhaart, René F; Fortunati, Valerio; Verduijn, Gerda M; van Walsum, Theo; Veenland, Jifke F; Paulides, Margarethus M

    2014-04-01

    Clinical trials have shown that hyperthermia, as adjuvant to radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy, improves treatment of patients with locally advanced or recurrent head and neck (H&N) carcinoma. Hyperthermia treatment planning (HTP) guided H&N hyperthermia is being investigated, which requires patient specific 3D patient models derived from Computed Tomography (CT)-images. To decide whether a recently developed automatic-segmentation algorithm can be introduced in the clinic, we compared the impact of manual- and automatic normal-tissue-segmentation variations on HTP quality. CT images of seven patients were segmented automatically and manually by four observers, to study inter-observer and intra-observer geometrical variation. To determine the impact of this variation on HTP quality, HTP was performed using the automatic and manual segmentation of each observer, for each patient. This impact was compared to other sources of patient model uncertainties, i.e. varying gridsizes and dielectric tissue properties. Despite geometrical variations, manual and automatic generated 3D patient models resulted in an equal, i.e. 1%, variation in HTP quality. This variation was minor with respect to the total of other sources of patient model uncertainties, i.e. 11.7%. Automatically generated 3D patient models can be introduced in the clinic for H&N HTP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. CT-based patient modeling for head and neck hyperthermia treatment planning: Manual versus automatic normal-tissue-segmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verhaart, René F.; Fortunati, Valerio; Verduijn, Gerda M.; Walsum, Theo van; Veenland, Jifke F.; Paulides, Margarethus M.

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: Clinical trials have shown that hyperthermia, as adjuvant to radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy, improves treatment of patients with locally advanced or recurrent head and neck (H and N) carcinoma. Hyperthermia treatment planning (HTP) guided H and N hyperthermia is being investigated, which requires patient specific 3D patient models derived from Computed Tomography (CT)-images. To decide whether a recently developed automatic-segmentation algorithm can be introduced in the clinic, we compared the impact of manual- and automatic normal-tissue-segmentation variations on HTP quality. Material and methods: CT images of seven patients were segmented automatically and manually by four observers, to study inter-observer and intra-observer geometrical variation. To determine the impact of this variation on HTP quality, HTP was performed using the automatic and manual segmentation of each observer, for each patient. This impact was compared to other sources of patient model uncertainties, i.e. varying gridsizes and dielectric tissue properties. Results: Despite geometrical variations, manual and automatic generated 3D patient models resulted in an equal, i.e. 1%, variation in HTP quality. This variation was minor with respect to the total of other sources of patient model uncertainties, i.e. 11.7%. Conclusions: Automatically generated 3D patient models can be introduced in the clinic for H and N HTP

  12. Automated volume analysis of head and neck lesions on CT scans using 3D level set segmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Street, Ethan; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Sahiner, Berkman; Gujar, Sachin; Ibrahim, Mohannad; Mukherji, Suresh K.; Chan, Heang-Ping

    2007-01-01

    The authors have developed a semiautomatic system for segmentation of a diverse set of lesions in head and neck CT scans. The system takes as input an approximate bounding box, and uses a multistage level set to perform the final segmentation. A data set consisting of 69 lesions marked on 33 scans from 23 patients was used to evaluate the performance of the system. The contours from automatic segmentation were compared to both 2D and 3D gold standard contours manually drawn by three experienced radiologists. Three performance metric measures were used for the comparison. In addition, a radiologist provided quality ratings on a 1 to 10 scale for all of the automatic segmentations. For this pilot study, the authors observed that the differences between the automatic and gold standard contours were larger than the interobserver differences. However, the system performed comparably to the radiologists, achieving an average area intersection ratio of 85.4% compared to an average of 91.2% between two radiologists. The average absolute area error was 21.1% compared to 10.8%, and the average 2D distance was 1.38 mm compared to 0.84 mm between the radiologists. In addition, the quality rating data showed that, despite the very lax assumptions made on the lesion characteristics in designing the system, the automatic contours approximated many of the lesions very well

  13. Head and Neck Cancer—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head and neck cancers include cancers in the larynx (voice box), throat, lips, mouth, nose, and salivary glands. Start here to find information on head and neck cancer treatment in adults and children, causes and prevention, screening, research, and statistics.

  14. Monte Carlo-based QA for IMRT of head and neck cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, F.; Sham, J.; Ma, C.-M.; Li, J.-S.

    2007-06-01

    It is well-known that the presence of large air cavity in a dense medium (or patient) introduces significant electronic disequilibrium when irradiated with megavoltage X-ray field. This condition may worsen by the possible use of tiny beamlets in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Commercial treatment planning systems (TPSs), in particular those based on the pencil-beam method, do not provide accurate dose computation for the lungs and other cavity-laden body sites such as the head and neck. In this paper we present the use of Monte Carlo (MC) technique for dose re-calculation of IMRT of head and neck cancers. In our clinic, a turn-key software system is set up for MC calculation and comparison with TPS-calculated treatment plans as part of the quality assurance (QA) programme for IMRT delivery. A set of 10 off-the-self PCs is employed as the MC calculation engine with treatment plan parameters imported from the TPS via a graphical user interface (GUI) which also provides a platform for launching remote MC simulation and subsequent dose comparison with the TPS. The TPS-segmented intensity maps are used as input for the simulation hence skipping the time-consuming simulation of the multi-leaf collimator (MLC). The primary objective of this approach is to assess the accuracy of the TPS calculations in the presence of air cavities in the head and neck whereas the accuracy of leaf segmentation is verified by fluence measurement using a fluoroscopic camera-based imaging device. This measurement can also validate the correct transfer of intensity maps to the record and verify system. Comparisons between TPS and MC calculations of 6 MV IMRT for typical head and neck treatments review regional consistency in dose distribution except at and around the sinuses where our pencil-beam-based TPS sometimes over-predicts the dose by up to 10%, depending on the size of the cavities. In addition, dose re-buildup of up to 4% is observed at the posterior nasopharyngeal

  15. Morbidity of the neck after head and neck cancer therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wilgen, C.P.; Dijkstra, P.U.; van der Laan, B.F.; Plukker, J.T.; Roodenburg, J.L.

    Background. Studies on morbidity of the neck after head and neck cancer therapy are scarcely described. Methods. Patients who underwent surgery, including neck dissection, with and without radiation therapy at least 1 year before the study were asked to participate. We assessed neck pain, loss of

  16. Can FDG-PET assist in radiotherapy target volume definition of metastatic lymph nodes in head-and-neck cancer?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schinagl, D.A.X.; Hoffmann, A.L.; Vogel, W.V.; Dalen, J.A. van; Verstappen, S.M.M.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The role of FDG-PET in radiotherapy target volume definition of the neck was evaluated by comparing eight methods of FDG-PET segmentation to the current CT-based practice of lymph node assessment in head-and-neck cancer patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seventy-eight

  17. A customized head and neck support system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentel, Gunilla C.; Marks, Lawrence B.; Sherouse, George W.; Spencer, David P.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To describe a customized head and neck immobilization system for patients receiving radiotherapy including a head support that conforms to the posterior contour of the head and neck. Methods: The system includes a customized headrest to support the posterior head and neck. This is fixed to a thermoplastic face mask that molds to the anterior head/face contours. The shape of these customized head and neck supports were compared to 'standard' supports. Results: This system is comfortable for the patients and appears to be effective in reproducing the setup of the treatment. Conclusions: The variability in the size and shape of the customized posterior supports exceeded that of 'standard' headrests. It is our clinical impression that the customized supports improve reproducibility and are now a standard part of our immobilization system. The quantitative analysis of the customized headrests and some commonly used 'standard' headrests suggests that the customized supports are better able to address variabilities in patient shape

  18. The clinical utility of reduced-distortion readout-segmented echo-planar imaging in the head and neck region: initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyasu, Sho; Iima, Mami; Umeoka, Shigeaki; Morisawa, Nobuko; Togashi, Kaori [Kyoto University, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Sakyo-Ku, Kyoto (Japan); Porter, David A. [Siemens AG, MED MR PLM AW Neurology, Allee am Roethelheimpark 2, Erlangen (Germany); Ito, Juichi [Kyoto University, Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Sakyo-Ku, Kyoto (Japan); Le Bihan, Denis [Kyoto University, Human Brain Research Center, Graduate School of Medicine, Sakyo-Ku, Kyoto (Japan); Neurospin, CEA-Saclay Center, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2014-12-15

    To evaluate whether readout-segmented echo-planar imaging (RS-EPI) diffusion weighted image (DWI) can diminish image distortion in the head and neck area, compared with single-shot (SS)-EPI DWI. We conducted phantom and patient studies using 3 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a 16-channel coil. For the phantom study, we evaluated distortion and signal homogeneity in gel phantoms. For the patient study, 29 consecutive patients with clinically suspicious parotid lesions were prospectively enrolled. RS-EPI and SS-EPI DWI were evaluated by two independent readers for identification of organ/lesion and distortion, using semiquantitative scales and quantitative scores. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values and contrast-noise ratios of parotid tumours (if present; n = 15) were also compared. The phantom experiments showed that RS-EPI provided less distorted and more homogeneous ADC maps than SS-EPI. In the patient study, RS-EPI was found to provide significantly less distortion in almost all organs/lesions (p < 0.05), according to both semiquantitative scales and quantitative scores. There was no significant difference in ADC values and contrast-noise ratios between the two DWI techniques. The distortion in DWI was significantly reduced with RS-EPI in both phantom and patient studies. The RS-EPI technique provided more homogenous images than SS-EPI, and can potentially offer higher image quality in the head and neck area. (orig.)

  19. Pocket Proteins Suppress Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Myeong-Kyun; Pitot, Henry C.; Lambert, Paul F.

    2012-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) is a common cancer in humans long known to be caused by tobacco and alcohol use, but now an increasing percentage of HNSCC is recognized to be caused by the same human papillomaviruses (HPVs) that cause cervical and other anogenital cancers. HPV-positive HNSCCs differ remarkably from HPV-negative HNSCCs in their clinical response and molecular properties. From studies in mice, we know that E7 is the dominant HPV oncoprotein in head and neck cancer. E7 is best known for its ability to inactivate pRb, the product of the retinoblastoma tumor susceptibility gene. However loss of pRb function does not fully account for E7’s potency in causing head and neck cancer. In this study, we characterized the cancer susceptibility of mice deficient in the expression of pRb and either of two related “pocket” proteins, p107 and p130, that are also inactivated by E7. pRb/p107 deficient mice developed head and neck cancer as frequently as do HPV16 E7 transgenic mice. The head and neck epithelia of the pRb/p107 deficient mice also displayed the same acute phenotypes and biomarker readouts as observed in the epithelia of E7 transgenic mice. Mice deficient for pRb and p130 in their head and neck epithelia showed intermediate acute and tumor phenotypes. We conclude that pRb and p107 act together to efficiently suppress head and neck cancer, and are therefore highly relevant targets of HPV16 E7 in its contribution to HPV-positive HNSCC. PMID:22237625

  20. Neck muscle endurance and head posture: A comparison between adolescents with and without neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Ana Carolina; Silva, Anabela G

    2016-04-01

    The main aims of this study were to compare the neck flexor and extensor endurance and forward head posture between adolescents with and without neck pain. The secondary aims were to explore potential associations between muscles endurance, head posture and neck pain characteristics and to assess intra-rater reliability of the measurements used. Adolescents with neck pain (n = 35) and age-matched asymptomatic adolescents (n = 35) had their forward head posture, neck flexor endurance and neck extensor endurance measured using clinical tests. Intra-rater reliability was also assessed. Forward head posture and neck flexor and extensor endurance tests showed moderate to almost perfect intra-rater reliability (ICC between 0.58 and 0.88). Adolescents with neck pain showed significantly less forward head posture (neck pain = 46.62 ± 4.92; asymptomatic = 44.18°± 3.64°, p > 0.05) and less neck flexor (neck pain = 24.50 ± 23.03s; asymptomatic = 35.89 ± 21.53s, p > 0.05) and extensor endurance (neck pain = 12.6.64 ± 77.94s; asymptomatic = 168.66 ± 74.77s, p > 0.05) than asymptomatic adolescents. Results suggest that changes in posture and neck muscle endurance are a feature of adolescents with neck pain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. TCGA head Neck

    Science.gov (United States)

    Investigators with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network have discovered genomic differences – with potentially important clinical implications – in head and neck cancers caused by infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV).

  2. SU-C-BRA-04: Automated Segmentation of Head-And-Neck CT Images for Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Via Multi-Atlas Machine Learning (MAML)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, X; Gao, H; Sharp, G

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate image segmentation is a crucial step during image guided radiation therapy. This work proposes multi-atlas machine learning (MAML) algorithm for automated segmentation of head-and-neck CT images. Methods: As the first step, the algorithm utilizes normalized mutual information as similarity metric, affine registration combined with multiresolution B-Spline registration, and then fuses together using the label fusion strategy via Plastimatch. As the second step, the following feature selection strategy is proposed to extract five feature components from reference or atlas images: intensity (I), distance map (D), box (B), center of gravity (C) and stable point (S). The box feature B is novel. It describes a relative position from each point to minimum inscribed rectangle of ROI. The center-of-gravity feature C is the 3D Euclidean distance from a sample point to the ROI center of gravity, and then S is the distance of the sample point to the landmarks. Then, we adopt random forest (RF) in Scikit-learn, a Python module integrating a wide range of state-of-the-art machine learning algorithms as classifier. Different feature and atlas strategies are used for different ROIs for improved performance, such as multi-atlas strategy with reference box for brainstem, and single-atlas strategy with reference landmark for optic chiasm. Results: The algorithm was validated on a set of 33 CT images with manual contours using a leave-one-out cross-validation strategy. Dice similarity coefficients between manual contours and automated contours were calculated: the proposed MAML method had an improvement from 0.79 to 0.83 for brainstem and 0.11 to 0.52 for optic chiasm with respect to multi-atlas segmentation method (MA). Conclusion: A MAML method has been proposed for automated segmentation of head-and-neck CT images with improved performance. It provides the comparable result in brainstem and the improved result in optic chiasm compared with MA. Xuhua Ren and Hao

  3. SU-C-BRA-04: Automated Segmentation of Head-And-Neck CT Images for Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Via Multi-Atlas Machine Learning (MAML)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, X; Gao, H [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, Shanghai (China); Sharp, G [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Accurate image segmentation is a crucial step during image guided radiation therapy. This work proposes multi-atlas machine learning (MAML) algorithm for automated segmentation of head-and-neck CT images. Methods: As the first step, the algorithm utilizes normalized mutual information as similarity metric, affine registration combined with multiresolution B-Spline registration, and then fuses together using the label fusion strategy via Plastimatch. As the second step, the following feature selection strategy is proposed to extract five feature components from reference or atlas images: intensity (I), distance map (D), box (B), center of gravity (C) and stable point (S). The box feature B is novel. It describes a relative position from each point to minimum inscribed rectangle of ROI. The center-of-gravity feature C is the 3D Euclidean distance from a sample point to the ROI center of gravity, and then S is the distance of the sample point to the landmarks. Then, we adopt random forest (RF) in Scikit-learn, a Python module integrating a wide range of state-of-the-art machine learning algorithms as classifier. Different feature and atlas strategies are used for different ROIs for improved performance, such as multi-atlas strategy with reference box for brainstem, and single-atlas strategy with reference landmark for optic chiasm. Results: The algorithm was validated on a set of 33 CT images with manual contours using a leave-one-out cross-validation strategy. Dice similarity coefficients between manual contours and automated contours were calculated: the proposed MAML method had an improvement from 0.79 to 0.83 for brainstem and 0.11 to 0.52 for optic chiasm with respect to multi-atlas segmentation method (MA). Conclusion: A MAML method has been proposed for automated segmentation of head-and-neck CT images with improved performance. It provides the comparable result in brainstem and the improved result in optic chiasm compared with MA. Xuhua Ren and Hao

  4. Unusual head and neck injury in elevator: autopsy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, B; Türkmen, N; Dokgöz, H

    2012-10-01

    Industrial injuries related to auto-load-carrying vehicles were not frequently reported in the literature. Presented case was, 31-year-old male furniture worker. Deceased was found in awkward position in furniture workshop. Victim was observed on his knees in front of the elevator, head and neck lodged within openings of the elevator, and head and neck structures compressed-guillotined by the lower platform of the elevator were detected. We presented rare case of head and neck compression by elevator. Key words: head - neck - accidents - elevator - autopsy.

  5. Combining registration and active shape models for the automatic segmentation of the lymph node regions in head and neck CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Antong; Deeley, Matthew A.; Niermann, Kenneth J.; Moretti, Luigi; Dawant, Benoit M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is the state of the art technique for head and neck cancer treatment. It requires precise delineation of the target to be treated and structures to be spared, which is currently done manually. The process is a time-consuming task of which the delineation of lymph node regions is often the longest step. Atlas-based delineation has been proposed as an alternative, but, in the authors' experience, this approach is not accurate enough for routine clinical use. Here, the authors improve atlas-based segmentation results obtained for level II-IV lymph node regions using an active shape model (ASM) approach. Methods: An average image volume was first created from a set of head and neck patient images with minimally enlarged nodes. The average image volume was then registered using affine, global, and local nonrigid transformations to the other volumes to establish a correspondence between surface points in the atlas and surface points in each of the other volumes. Once the correspondence was established, the ASMs were created for each node level. The models were then used to first constrain the results obtained with an atlas-based approach and then to iteratively refine the solution. Results: The method was evaluated through a leave-one-out experiment. The ASM- and atlas-based segmentations were compared to manual delineations via the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) for volume overlap and the Euclidean distance between manual and automatic 3D surfaces. The mean DSC value obtained with the ASM-based approach is 10.7% higher than with the atlas-based approach; the mean and median surface errors were decreased by 13.6% and 12.0%, respectively. Conclusions: The ASM approach is effective in reducing segmentation errors in areas of low CT contrast where purely atlas-based methods are challenged. Statistical analysis shows that the improvements brought by this approach are significant.

  6. Topographic Pattern Distribution of Head And Neck Squamous Cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FINEPRINT

    value of 71% of SCC in Turkey. Nevertheless a similar report documented a relatively lower value especially in. Yemen where head and neck SCC constituted only 8% of all head and neck cancers. Reports from Yemen revealed that oral cavity SCC was the most common topographic site of all head and. 3 neck cancers.

  7. Kinematics of a Head-Neck Model Simulating Whiplash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colicchia, Giuseppe; Zollman, Dean; Wiesner, Hartmut; Sen, Ahmet Ilhan

    2008-01-01

    A whiplash event is a relative motion between the head and torso that occurs in rear-end automobile collisions. In particular, the large inertia of the head results in a horizontal translation relative to the thorax. This paper describes a simulation of the motion of the head and neck during a rear-end (whiplash) collision. A head-neck model that…

  8. MR of head and neck hemangiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilaniuk, L.T.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Gusnard, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper defines the MR characteristics of head and neck hemangiomas and to evaluate the role of MR in their diagnosis and management. Eighteen pediatric and young adult patients with head and neck hemangiomas (six neck, six face, three eyelid, two scalp, and one parotid) underwent high-field-strength 1.5-T MR imaging. Conventional spin-echo sequences with T1 and T2 weighting were performed. In addition, one-third of patients underwent MR angiography and gadolinium enhancement. The hemangiomas were isointense to muscle on T1-weighted images and hyperintense on proton-density and T2-weighted images

  9. Pharyngeal diameter in various head and neck positions during exercise in sport horses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background In equine athletes, dynamic stenotic disorders of the upper airways are often the cause for abnormal respiratory noises and/or poor performance. There are hypotheses, that head and neck flexion may influence the morphology and function of the upper airway and thus could even induce or deteriorate disorders of the upper respiratory tract. Especially the pharynx, without osseous or cartilaginous support is prone to changes in pressure and airflow during exercise. The objective of this study was to develop a method for measuring the pharyngeal diameter in horses during exercise, in order to analyse whether a change of head-neck position may have an impact on the pharyngeal diameter. Results Under the assumption that the width of the epiglottis remains constant in healthy horses, the newly developed method for calculating the pharyngeal diameter in horses during exercise is unsusceptible against changes of the viewing-angle and distance between the endoscope and the structures, which are to be assessed. The quotient of the width of the epiglottis and the perpendicular from a fixed point on the dorsal pharynx to the epiglottis could be used to determine the pharyngeal diameter. The percentage change of this quotient (pharynx-epiglottis-ratio; PE-ratio) in the unrestrained head-neck position against the reference position was significantly larger than that of any other combination of the head-neck positions investigated. A relation between the percentage change in PE-ratio and the degree of head and neck flexion could not be confirmed. Conclusions It could be shown, that the pharyngeal diameter is reduced through the contact position implemented by the rider in comparison to the unrestrained head and neck position. An alteration of the pharyngeal diameter depending on the degree of head and neck flexion (represented by ground and withers angle) could not be confirmed. PMID:24886465

  10. Schwannomas of the head and neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasios Kanatas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Schwannomas are benign encapsulated nerve sheath tumors composed of Schwann cells. Malignant change in head and neck schwannomas is rare, with the incidence varying between 8 and 13.9%. In this review, we discuss the presentation and the management of head and neck schwannomas. The issues and difficulties based on our own experience as well as the experience of published reports from the literature are presented.

  11. Genetics Home Reference: head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and neck squamous cell carcinoma Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... Consumer Version: Overview of Mouth, Nose, and Throat Cancers Orphanet: Squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck University of Michigan ...

  12. Automatic tissue segmentation of head and neck MR images for hyperthermia treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortunati, Valerio; Niessen, Wiro J; Veenland, Jifke F; Van Walsum, Theo; Verhaart, René F; Paulides, Margarethus M

    2015-01-01

    A hyperthermia treatment requires accurate, patient-specific treatment planning. This planning is based on 3D anatomical models which are generally derived from computed tomography. Because of its superior soft tissue contrast, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) information can be introduced to improve the quality of these 3D patient models and therefore the treatment planning itself. Thus, we present here an automatic atlas-based segmentation algorithm for MR images of the head and neck.Our method combines multiatlas local weighting fusion with intensity modelling. The accuracy of the method was evaluated using a leave-one-out cross validation experiment over a set of 11 patients for which manual delineation were available.The accuracy of the proposed method was high both in terms of the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and the 95th percentile Hausdorff surface distance (HSD) with median DSC higher than 0.8 for all tissues except sclera. For all tissues, except the spine tissues, the accuracy was approaching the interobserver agreement/variability both in terms of DSC and HSD. The positive effect of adding the intensity modelling to the multiatlas fusion decreased when a more accurate atlas fusion method was used.Using the proposed approach we improved the performance of the approach previously presented for H and N hyperthermia treatment planning, making the method suitable for clinical application. (paper)

  13. Automatic tissue segmentation of head and neck MR images for hyperthermia treatment planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortunati, Valerio; Verhaart, René F.; Niessen, Wiro J.; Veenland, Jifke F.; Paulides, Margarethus M.; van Walsum, Theo

    2015-08-01

    A hyperthermia treatment requires accurate, patient-specific treatment planning. This planning is based on 3D anatomical models which are generally derived from computed tomography. Because of its superior soft tissue contrast, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) information can be introduced to improve the quality of these 3D patient models and therefore the treatment planning itself. Thus, we present here an automatic atlas-based segmentation algorithm for MR images of the head and neck. Our method combines multiatlas local weighting fusion with intensity modelling. The accuracy of the method was evaluated using a leave-one-out cross validation experiment over a set of 11 patients for which manual delineation were available. The accuracy of the proposed method was high both in terms of the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and the 95th percentile Hausdorff surface distance (HSD) with median DSC higher than 0.8 for all tissues except sclera. For all tissues, except the spine tissues, the accuracy was approaching the interobserver agreement/variability both in terms of DSC and HSD. The positive effect of adding the intensity modelling to the multiatlas fusion decreased when a more accurate atlas fusion method was used. Using the proposed approach we improved the performance of the approach previously presented for H&N hyperthermia treatment planning, making the method suitable for clinical application.

  14. Early-onset dropped head syndrome after radiotherapy for head and neck cancer: dose constraints for neck extensor muscles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inaba, Koji; Nakamura, Satoshi; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Kashihara, Tairo; Kobayashi, Kazuma; Harada, Ken; Kitaguchi, Mayuka; Sekii, Shuhei; Takahashi, Kana; Murakami, Naoya; Ito, Yoshinori; Igaki, Hiroshi; Uno, Takashi; Itami, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Dropped head syndrome (DHS) is a famous but unusual late complication of multimodality treatment for head and neck carcinoma. We reported this early-onset complication and analyzed the dose to the neck extensor muscles. We examined the records of three patients with DHS after radiotherapy. The doses to the neck extensor muscles were compared between three patients with DHS and nine patients without DHS. The mean dose to the neck extensor muscles of the three patients with DHS were 58.5 Gy, 42.3 Gy and 60.9 Gy, while the dose was <50 Gy in all nine patients in the control group. The onset of this syndrome was 5 months, 6 months and 15 months. The early-onset DHS may have something to do with dose to the neck extensor muscles. The proposed dose to the neck extensor muscles might be <46 Gy (or at least <50 Gy)

  15. Pattern of head and neck cancers among patients attending ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lack of baseline data in Tanzania concerning head and ... that there is a synergistic effect of alcohol consumption and tobacco use in causing head and neck cancers ... risk factors, while radiation around the head and neck is associated with ...

  16. Effect of different head-neck-jaw postures on cervicocephalic kinesthetic sense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, H; Alghadir, A H; Iqbal, Z A

    2017-12-01

    To investigate the effect of different induced head-neck-jaw postures on head-neck relocation error among healthy subjects. 30 healthy adult male subjects participated in this study. Cervicocephalic kinesthetic sense was measured while standing, habitual sitting, habitual sitting with clenched jaw and habitual sitting with forward head posture during right rotation, left rotation, flexion and extension using kinesthetic sensibility test. Head-neck relocation error was least while standing, followed by habitual sitting, habitual sitting with forward head posture and habitual sitting with jaw clenched. However, there was no significant difference in error between different tested postures during all the movements. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to see the effect of different induced head-neck-jaw postures on head-neck position sense among healthy subjects. Assuming a posture for a short duration of time doesn't affect head-neck relocation error in normal healthy subjects.

  17. Brachytherapy in the treatment of head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Seong Yul

    1999-01-01

    Brachytherapy has been proved to be an effective method for the purpose of increasing radiation dose to the tumor and reducing the dose to the surrounding normal tissue. In head and neck cancer, the rationale of brachytherapy is as follows; Firstly, early small lesion is radiocurative and the major cause of failure is local recurrence. Secondly, it can diminish evidently the dose to the normal tissue especially masseteric muscle and salivary gland. Thirdly, the anatomy of head and neck is suitable to various technique of brachytherapy. On background of accumulated experience of LDR iridium brachytherapy of head and neck cancer for the last 15 years, the author reviewed the history of radioisotope therapy, the characteristics of radionuclides, and some important things in the method, clinical technique and treatment planning. The author analyzed the clinical result of 185 cases of head and neck cancer treated in the Korea Cancer Center Hospital. Finally the future prospect of brachytherapy of head and neck cancer is discussed

  18. Evaluation of atlas based auto-segmentation for head and neck target volume delineation in adaptive/replan IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speight, R; Lindsay, R; Harding, R; Sykes, J; Karakaya, E; Prestwich, R; Sen, M

    2014-01-01

    IMRT for head and neck patients requires clinicians to delineate clinical target volumes (CTV) on a planning-CT (>2hrs/patient). When patients require a replan-CT, CTVs must be re-delineated. This work assesses the performance of atlas-based autosegmentation (ABAS), which uses deformable image registration between planning and replan-CTs to auto-segment CTVs on the replan-CT, based on the planning contours. Fifteen patients with planning-CT and replan-CTs were selected. One clinician delineated CTVs on the planning-CTs and up to three clinicians delineated CTVs on the replan-CTs. Replan-CT volumes were auto-segmented using ABAS using the manual CTVs from the planning-CT as an atlas. ABAS CTVs were edited manually to make them clinically acceptable. Clinicians were timed to estimate savings using ABAS. CTVs were compared using dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and mean distance to agreement (MDA). Mean inter-observer variability (DSC>0.79 and MDA<2.1mm) was found to be greater than intra-observer variability (DSC>0.91 and MDA<1.5mm). Comparing ABAS to manual CTVs gave DSC=0.86 and MDA=2.07mm. Once edited, ABAS volumes agreed more closely with the manual CTVs (DSC=0.87 and MDA=1.87mm). The mean clinician time required to produce CTVs reduced from 169min to 57min when using ABAS. ABAS segments volumes with accuracy close to inter-observer variability however the volumes require some editing before clinical use. Using ABAS reduces contouring time by a factor of three.

  19. Postoperative radiation for advanced head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ang, K. Kian; Garden, Adam S.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To discuss both general and specific indications for radiation following surgery for patients with cancers of the head and neck. Patients with advanced cancers of the head and neck are often not suitable candidates for treatment with definitive radiation, and are treated with surgery. Frequently these patients fail by recurring in either the primary sites or in the necks. Adjuvant radiation is therefore often a critical component in the management of these patients. While radiation can be done either prior to or after surgery, most centers prefer the postoperative setting. This refresher course will review general concepts of postoperative irradiation for the patient with head and neck cancer and apply these concepts to specific situations. The course will begin with a broad review of the indications for postoperative irradiation as not all patients undergoing surgery for cancers of the head and neck require additional treatment. We will also review the concept of using postoperative radiation to allow for more conservative surgery with preservation of function. The second portion of the course will focus on general techniques of postoperative irradiation. We will review concepts of patient setup and treatment portal design and describe how specific techniques are practiced at MDACC. Controversial topics, including field matching, total dose and fractionation, and the timing of postoperative radiation will be discussed. The final section of the course will review the results of postoperative irradiation as applied to the head and neck in general as well as to specific subsites. In addition to results for the common scenarios of squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity, pharynx and larynx, we will review results of postoperative irradiation for skin cancers of the head and neck, paranasal sinuses, and salivary glands

  20. Advances in otolaryngology-Head and neck surgery. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, E.N.; Bluestone, C.D.

    1987-01-01

    This book consists of 14 sections. The section titles are: The impact of AIDS on otolaryngology--head and neck surgery; The management of sleep apneas and snoring; Antimicrobial agents for infections in the ear, nose, and throat--head and neck; Nasal allergy: Medical and surgical treatment; Uses of computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in temporal bone imaging; Surgical management of otitis media with effusion; middle ear reconstruction: Current status; Cochlear implants: an overview; Diagnosis and management of acute facial paralysis; The use of the laser in head and neck surgery; The management and prevention of subglottic stenosis in infants and children; Management of the mass in the thyroid; Suction-assisted lipectomy of the head and neck area; and Ambulatory surgery

  1. Advances in otolaryngology-Head and neck surgery. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, E.N. (Univ. of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (US)); Bluestone, C.D. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (US))

    1987-01-01

    This book consists of 14 sections. The section titles are: The impact of AIDS on otolaryngology--head and neck surgery; The management of sleep apneas and snoring; Antimicrobial agents for infections in the ear, nose, and throat--head and neck; Nasal allergy: Medical and surgical treatment; Uses of computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in temporal bone imaging; Surgical management of otitis media with effusion; middle ear reconstruction: Current status; Cochlear implants: an overview; Diagnosis and management of acute facial paralysis; The use of the laser in head and neck surgery; The management and prevention of subglottic stenosis in infants and children; Management of the mass in the thyroid; Suction-assisted lipectomy of the head and neck area; and Ambulatory surgery.

  2. Dynamic Parameter Identification of Subject-Specific Body Segment Parameters Using Robotics Formalism: Case Study Head Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Rodríguez, Miguel; Valera, Angel; Page, Alvaro; Besa, Antonio; Mata, Vicente

    2016-05-01

    Accurate knowledge of body segment inertia parameters (BSIP) improves the assessment of dynamic analysis based on biomechanical models, which is of paramount importance in fields such as sport activities or impact crash test. Early approaches for BSIP identification rely on the experiments conducted on cadavers or through imaging techniques conducted on living subjects. Recent approaches for BSIP identification rely on inverse dynamic modeling. However, most of the approaches are focused on the entire body, and verification of BSIP for dynamic analysis for distal segment or chain of segments, which has proven to be of significant importance in impact test studies, is rarely established. Previous studies have suggested that BSIP should be obtained by using subject-specific identification techniques. To this end, our paper develops a novel approach for estimating subject-specific BSIP based on static and dynamics identification models (SIM, DIM). We test the validity of SIM and DIM by comparing the results using parameters obtained from a regression model proposed by De Leva (1996, "Adjustments to Zatsiorsky-Seluyanov's Segment Inertia Parameters," J. Biomech., 29(9), pp. 1223-1230). Both SIM and DIM are developed considering robotics formalism. First, the static model allows the mass and center of gravity (COG) to be estimated. Second, the results from the static model are included in the dynamics equation allowing us to estimate the moment of inertia (MOI). As a case study, we applied the approach to evaluate the dynamics modeling of the head complex. Findings provide some insight into the validity not only of the proposed method but also of the application proposed by De Leva (1996, "Adjustments to Zatsiorsky-Seluyanov's Segment Inertia Parameters," J. Biomech., 29(9), pp. 1223-1230) for dynamic modeling of body segments.

  3. 50 Facts about Oral, Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You 50 Facts about Oral, Head and Neck Cancer 50 Facts about Oral, Head and Neck Cancer Patient Health ... cancer has increased in all races and both sexes. Thyroid cancers account for ... who work in environments with dust, glues, formaldehyde, mustard gas, ...

  4. Digital subtraction angiography in head and neck radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmody, R F; Seeger, J F; Smith, R L; Horsley, W W; Miller, R W

    1984-07-01

    Intravenous digital subtraction angiography (IVDSA) was used to evaluate 44 patients with suspected otolaryngologic abnormalities. Sixteen had IVDSA for pulsatile tinnitus or suspected glomus tumor of the petrous bone. Nine patients were evaluated because of pulsatile neck masses, and 12 others had suspected tumors of the neck, face, and paranasal sinuses. Seven had IVDSA following head and neck trauma. The technique of examination is described. The current indications of IVDSA in head and neck radiology are discussed. It is concluded that IVDSA is a suitable substitute for conventional angiography for many otolaryngologic conditions and, because of its safety, can be used more liberally.

  5. Hyperparathyroidism following head and neck irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, S.D.; Frame, B.; Miller, M.J.; Kleerskoper, M.; Block, M.A.; Parfitt, A.M.

    1980-01-01

    A history of head and neck irradiation in childhood or adolescence was found in 22 of 130 patients with primary hyperparathyroidism compared with only 12 of 400 control patients. Among 200 patients with a known history of childhood irradiation, biochemical or surgical evidence of hyperparathyroidism was found in ten, a prevalence of 5%. This is at least 30 times the prevalence of hyperparathyroidism in the general population. The data indicate that head and neck irradiation should be regarded as an important risk factor in the subsequent development of hyperparathyroidism

  6. Hyperparathyroidism following head and neck irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, S.D.; Frame, B.; Miller, M.J.; Kleerskoper, M.; Block, M.A.; Parfitt, A.M.

    1980-02-01

    A history of head and neck irradiation in childhood or adolescence was found in 22 of 130 patients with primary hyperparathyroidism compared with only 12 of 400 control patients. Among 200 patients with a known history of childhood irradiation, biochemical or surgical evidence of hyperparathyroidism was found in ten, a prevalence of 5%. This is at least 30 times the prevalence of hyperparathyroidism in the general population. The data indicate that head and neck irradiation should be regarded as an important risk factor in the subsequent development of hyperparathyroidism.

  7. Management of common head and neck masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Thomas F; Muratore, Christopher S

    2007-02-01

    Head and neck masses are a common clinical concern in infants, children, and adolescents. The differential diagnosis for a head or neck mass includes congenital, inflammatory, and neoplastic lesions. An orderly and thorough examination of the head and neck with an appropriate directed workup will facilitate the diagnosis. The most common entities occur repeatedly within the various age groups and can be differentiated with a clear understanding of embryology and anatomy of the region, and an understanding of the natural history of a specific lesion. Congenital lesions most commonly found in the pediatric population include the thyroglossal duct cyst and the branchial cleft and arch anomalies. The inflammatory masses are secondary to local or systemic infections. The most common etiology for cervical adenopathy in children is reactive lymphadenopathy following a viral or bacterial illness. Persistent adenopathy raises more concerns, especially enlarged lymph nodes within the posterior triangle or supraclavicular space, nodes that are painless, firm, and not mobile, or a single dominant node that persists for more than 6 weeks should all heighten concern for malignancy. In this review, we discuss the current principles of surgical management of the most common head and neck masses that present to pediatricians and pediatric surgeons.

  8. The Danish Head and Neck Cancer database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Jens; Jovanovic, Aleksandar; Godballe, Christian

    2016-01-01

    of continuous clinical trials and subsequent implementation in national guidelines. The database has furthermore been used to describe the effect of reduced waiting time, changed epidemiology, and influence of comorbidity and socioeconomic parameters. CONCLUSION: Half a century of registration of head and neck......AIM OF THE DATABASE: The Danish Head and Neck Cancer database is a nationwide clinical quality database that contains prospective data collected since the early 1960s. The overall aim of this study was to describe the outcome of the national strategy for multidisciplinary treatment of head and neck......) of cancer in the nasal sinuses, salivary glands, or thyroid gland (corresponding to the International Classification of Diseases, tenth revision, classifications C.01-C.11, C.30-C.32, C.73, and C.80). MAIN VARIABLES: The main variables used in the study were symptoms and the duration of the symptoms...

  9. Role of Met Axis in Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yiru, E-mail: xuyiru@umich.edu; Fisher, Gary J., E-mail: xuyiru@umich.edu [Department of Dermatology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2013-11-26

    Head and neck cancer is the sixth most common type of cancer worldwide. Despite advances in aggressive multidisciplinary treatments, the 5-year survival rate for this dreadful disease is only 50%, mostly due to high rate of recurrence and early involvement of regional lymph nodes and subsequent metastasis. Understanding the molecular mechanisms responsible for invasion and metastasis is one of the most pressing goals in the field of head and neck cancer. Met, also known as hepatocyte growth factor receptor (HGFR), is a member of the receptor protein tyrosine kinase (RPTK) family. There is compelling evidence that Met axis is dysregulated and plays important roles in tumorigenesis, progression, metastasis, angiogenesis, and drug resistance in head and neck cancer. We describe in this review current understanding of Met axis in head and neck cancer biology and development of therapeutic inhibitors targeting Met axis.

  10. Multidisciplinary management of head and neck cancer: First expert consensus using Delphi methodology from the Spanish Society for Head and Neck Cancer (part 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mañós, M; Giralt, J; Rueda, A; Cabrera, J; Martinez-Trufero, J; Marruecos, J; Lopez-Pousa, A; Rodrigo, J P; Castelo, B; Martínez-Galán, J; Arias, F; Chaves, M; Herranz, J J; Arrazubi, V; Baste, N; Castro, A; Mesía, R

    2017-07-01

    Head and neck cancer is one of the most frequent malignances worldwide. Despite the site-specific multimodality therapy, up to half of the patients will develop recurrence. Treatment selection based on a multidisciplinary tumor board represents the cornerstone of head and neck cancer, as it is essential for achieving the best results, not only in terms of outcome, but also in terms of organ-function preservation and quality of life. Evidence-based international and national clinical practice guidelines for head and neck cancer not always provide answers in terms of decision-making that specialists must deal with in their daily practice. This is the first Expert Consensus on the Multidisciplinary Approach for Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSCC) elaborated by the Spanish Society for Head and Neck Cancer and based on a Delphi methodology. It offers several specific recommendations based on the available evidence and the expertise of our specialists to facilitate decision-making of all health-care specialists involved. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Digital subtraction angiography in head and neck radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmody, R.F.; Seeger, J.F.; Smith, R.L.; Horsley, W.W.; Miller, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    Intravenous digital subtraction angiography (IVDSA) was used to evaluate 44 patients with suspected otolaryngologic abnormalities. Sixteen had IVDSA for pulsatile tinnitus or suspected glomus tumor of the petrous bone. Nine patients were evaluated because of pulsatile neck masses, and 12 others had suspected tumors of the neck, face, and paranasal sinuses. Seven had IVDSA following head and neck trauma. The technique of examination is described. The current indications of IVDSA in head and neck radiology are discussed. It is concluded that IVDSA is a suitable substitute for conventional angiography for many otolaryngologic conditions and, because of its safety, can be used more liberally. (orig.)

  12. The role of radiology in head and neck tumours in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Kieran

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Head and neck malignancy is rare in children. However, distinguishing malignant tumours from the more common and numerous benign causes of neck masses in childhood is crucial as many malignant conditions have an excellent prognosis with appropriate oncological management. Ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging all have crucial roles in the diagnosis of head and neck malignancy in children and there is an emerging role for positron emission tomography, particularly in the management and follow-up of lymphoma. We describe the imaging appearances of the common malignant tumours arising in the extracranial head and neck in children, focusing on lymphoma, rhabdomyosarcoma and nasopharyngeal carcinoma. The clinical presentation and radiological appearances of benign tumours in the head and neck in children may overlap with those seen in malignant disease. We describe the imaging appearances of juvenile angiofibroma, vascular abnormalities involving the extracranial head and neck and cervical teratomas. Advances in both imaging techniques and cancer staging systems, many of the latter aimed at avoiding over-treatment and treatment-related complications, will lead to an increasingly central role for imaging in childhood head and neck cancer. PMID:20199940

  13. The potential for tumor suppressor gene therapy in head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkeland, Andrew C; Ludwig, Megan L; Spector, Matthew E; Brenner, J Chad

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma remains a highly morbid and fatal disease. Importantly, genomic sequencing of head and neck cancers has identified frequent mutations in tumor suppressor genes. While targeted therapeutics increasingly are being investigated in head and neck cancer, the majority of these agents are against overactive/overexpressed oncogenes. Therapy to restore lost tumor suppressor gene function remains a key and under-addressed niche in trials for head and neck cancer. Recent advances in gene editing have captured the interest of both the scientific community and the public. As our technology for gene editing and gene expression modulation improves, addressing lost tumor suppressor gene function in head and neck cancers is becoming a reality. This review will summarize new techniques, challenges to implementation, future directions, and ethical ramifications of gene therapy in head and neck cancer.

  14. Oncologic safety of cervical nerve preservation in neck dissection for head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Keigo; Asato, Ryo; Tsuji, Jun; Miyazaki, Masakazu; Kada, Shinpei; Tsujimura, Takashi; Kataoka, Michiko

    2017-09-01

    Although the functional merits of preserving cervical nerves in neck dissection for head and neck cancer have been reported, the oncologic safety has not yet been determined. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety of cervical nerve preservation. A retrospective chart review was performed on patients with head and neck cancer who had been treated by neck dissection between 2009 and 2014 at Kyoto Medical Center. Management of cervical nerves and clinical results were analyzed. A total of 335 sides of neck dissection had been performed in 222 patients. Cervical nerves were preserved in 175 neck sides and resected in 160 sides. The 5-year overall survival (OS) rate calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method was 71%. The 5-year neck control rate was 95% in cervical nerve preserved sides and 89% in cervical nerve resected sides. Preserving cervical nerves in neck dissection is oncologically safe in selected cases. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Automatic Segmentation and Online virtualCT in Head-and-Neck Adaptive Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peroni, Marta, E-mail: marta.peroni@mail.polimi.it [Department of Bioengineering, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Ciardo, Delia [Advanced Radiotherapy Center, European Institute of Oncology, Milano (Italy); Spadea, Maria Francesca [Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, Universita degli Studi Magna Graecia, Catanzaro (Italy); Riboldi, Marco [Department of Bioengineering, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Bioengineering Unit, Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica, Pavia (Italy); Comi, Stefania; Alterio, Daniela [Advanced Radiotherapy Center, European Institute of Oncology, Milano (Italy); Baroni, Guido [Department of Bioengineering, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Bioengineering Unit, Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica, Pavia (Italy); Orecchia, Roberto [Advanced Radiotherapy Center, European Institute of Oncology, Milano (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milano (Italy); Medical Department, Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica, Pavia (Italy)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to develop and validate an efficient and automatic strategy to generate online virtual computed tomography (CT) scans for adaptive radiation therapy (ART) in head-and-neck (HN) cancer treatment. Method: We retrospectively analyzed 20 patients, treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), for an HN malignancy. Different anatomical structures were considered: mandible, parotid glands, and nodal gross tumor volume (nGTV). We generated 28 virtualCT scans by means of nonrigid registration of simulation computed tomography (CTsim) and cone beam CT images (CBCTs), acquired for patient setup. We validated our approach by considering the real replanning CT (CTrepl) as ground truth. We computed the Dice coefficient (DSC), center of mass (COM) distance, and root mean square error (RMSE) between correspondent points located on the automatically segmented structures on CBCT and virtualCT. Results: Residual deformation between CTrepl and CBCT was below one voxel. Median DSC was around 0.8 for mandible and parotid glands, but only 0.55 for nGTV, because of the fairly homogeneous surrounding soft tissues and of its small volume. Median COM distance and RMSE were comparable with image resolution. No significant correlation between RMSE and initial or final deformation was found. Conclusion: The analysis provides evidence that deformable image registration may contribute significantly in reducing the need of full CT-based replanning in HN radiation therapy by supporting swift and objective decision-making in clinical practice. Further work is needed to strengthen algorithm potential in nGTV localization.

  16. Automatic segmentation and online virtualCT in head-and-neck adaptive radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peroni, Marta; Ciardo, Delia; Spadea, Maria Francesca; Riboldi, Marco; Comi, Stefania; Alterio, Daniela; Baroni, Guido; Orecchia, Roberto

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop and validate an efficient and automatic strategy to generate online virtual computed tomography (CT) scans for adaptive radiation therapy (ART) in head-and-neck (HN) cancer treatment. We retrospectively analyzed 20 patients, treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), for an HN malignancy. Different anatomical structures were considered: mandible, parotid glands, and nodal gross tumor volume (nGTV). We generated 28 virtualCT scans by means of nonrigid registration of simulation computed tomography (CTsim) and cone beam CT images (CBCTs), acquired for patient setup. We validated our approach by considering the real replanning CT (CTrepl) as ground truth. We computed the Dice coefficient (DSC), center of mass (COM) distance, and root mean square error (RMSE) between correspondent points located on the automatically segmented structures on CBCT and virtualCT. Residual deformation between CTrepl and CBCT was below one voxel. Median DSC was around 0.8 for mandible and parotid glands, but only 0.55 for nGTV, because of the fairly homogeneous surrounding soft tissues and of its small volume. Median COM distance and RMSE were comparable with image resolution. No significant correlation between RMSE and initial or final deformation was found. The analysis provides evidence that deformable image registration may contribute significantly in reducing the need of full CT-based replanning in HN radiation therapy by supporting swift and objective decision-making in clinical practice. Further work is needed to strengthen algorithm potential in nGTV localization. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Neck control after definitive radiochemotherapy without planned neck dissection in node-positive head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Na Young; Lee, Keun-Wook; Ahn, Soon-Hyun; Kim, Jae-Sung; Ah Kim, In

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate neck control outcomes after definitive radiochemotherapy without planned neck dissection in node-positive head and neck cancer. We retrospectively reviewed medical records of fifty patients with node-positive head and neck cancer who received definitive radiochemotherapy. Twelve patients subsequently underwent neck dissection for suspicious recurrent or persistent disease. A median dose of 70 Gy (range 60-70.6) was delivered to involved nodes. Response evaluation was performed at a median of 5 weeks after completion of radiotherapy. Neck failure was observed in 11 patients and the 3-year regional control (RC) rate was 77.1%. Neck dissection was performed in 10 of the 11 patients; seven of these cases were successfully salvaged, and the ultimate rate of neck control was 92%. The remaining two patients who received neck dissection had negative pathologic results. On univariate analysis, initial nodal size > 2 cm, a less-than-complete response at the primary site, post-radiotherapy nodal size > 1.5 cm, and post-radiotherapy nodal necrosis were associated with RC. On multivariate analysis, less-than-complete primary site response and post-radiotherapy nodal necrosis were identified as independent prognostic factors for RC. The neck failure rate after definitive radiochemotherapy without planned neck dissection was 22%. Two-thirds of these were successfully salvaged with neck dissection and the ultimate neck control rate was 92%. Our results suggest that planned neck dissection might not be necessary in patients with complete response of primary site, no evidence of residual lesion > 1.5 cm, or no necrotic lymph nodes at the 1-2 months follow-up evaluation after radiotherapy

  18. The current status of oncolytic viral therapy for head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew O. Old

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Cancer affects the head and neck region frequently and leads to significant morbidity and mortality. Oncolytic viral therapy has the potential to make a big impact in cancers that affect the head and neck. We intend to review the current state of oncolytic viruses in the treatment of cancers that affect the head and neck region. Method: Data sources are from National clinical trials database, literature, and current research. Results: There are many past and active trials for oncolytic viruses that show promise for treating cancers of the head and neck. The first oncolytic virus was approved by the FDA October 2015 (T-VEC, Amgen for the treatment of melanoma. Active translational research continues for this and many other oncolytic viruses. Conclusion: The evolving field of oncolytic viruses is impacting the treatment of head and neck cancer and further trials and agents are moving forward in the coming years. Keywords: Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, Oncolytic viruses, Clinical trials, Novel therapeutics

  19. Head and neck position sense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Bridget; McNair, Peter; Taylor, Denise

    2008-01-01

    Traumatic minor cervical strains are common place in high-impact sports (e.g. tackling) and premature degenerative changes have been documented in sports people exposed to recurrent impact trauma (e.g. scrummaging in rugby) or repetitive forces (e.g. Formula 1 racing drivers, jockeys). While proprioceptive exercises have been an integral part of rehabilitation of injuries in the lower limb, they have not featured as prominently in the treatment of cervical injuries. However, head and neck position sense (HNPS) testing and re-training may have relevance in the management of minor sports-related neck injuries, and play a role in reducing the incidence of ongoing pain and problems with function. For efficacious programmes to be developed and tested, fundamental principles associated with proprioception in the cervical spine should be considered. Hence, this article highlights the importance of anatomical structures in the cervical spine responsible for position sense, and how their interaction with the CNS affects our ability to plan and execute effective purposeful movements. This article includes a review of studies examining position sense in subjects with and without pathology and describes the effects of rehabilitation programmes that have sought to improve position sense. In respect to the receptors providing proprioceptive information for the CNS, the high densities and complex arrays of spindles found in cervical muscles suggest that these receptors play a key role. There is some evidence suggesting that ensemble encoding of discharge patterns from muscle spindles is relayed to the CNS and that a pattern recognition system is used to establish joint position and movement. Sensory information from neck proprioceptive receptors is processed in tandem with information from the vestibular system. There are extensive anatomical connections between neck proprioceptive inputs and vestibular inputs. If positional information from the vestibular system is inaccurate or

  20. Imaging of the head and neck. 2. rev. and enl. ed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mafee, M.F.; Valvassori, G.E. [University of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States); Becker, M. [Geneva University Hospital (Switzerland)

    2004-07-01

    Remarkable advances in medical diagnostic imaging have been made during the past three decades. The development of new imaging techniques and continuous improvements in the display of digital images have opened new horizons in the study of head and neck anatomy and pathology. The American Society of Head and Neck Radiology (ASHNR) and its European and Asiatic counterparts evolved because of the emerging awareness of the roles that head and neck radiologists play in the diagnosis and management of head and neck, base of the skull, neuro-ophthalmologic and neuro-otologic diseases. This edition continues the tradition of excellence set by the first edition of Valvassori's Head and Neck Imaging (which was also the first textbook in head and neck radiology), and provides a comprehensive review of the most pertinent and up-to-date knowledge in the field of head and neck imaging. The content of this edition has been organized into 12 chapters according to anatomic regions. It now includes new material on the temporomandibular joint, the lacrimal drainage system, dental scanning, fibro-osseous and cartilaginous lesions of the head and neck, MRI sialography, MR interventional technique, and thyroid and parathyroid glands. All chapters have been expanded to address new developments in the field and to stress the importance of imaging anatomy, pathologic correlation, and pertinent clinical data. For each anatomic region, the embryology and anatomy are introduced, followed by congenital and developmental disorders, inflammatory processes, benign and malignant neoplastic diseases, trauma, and postoperative changes. The detailed reference lists in each chapter include key references and are as recent as possible. Care has been taken to include exquisitely reproduced illustrations that provide the maximum of pertinent information. It is our hope that this textbook will be useful to students and physicians in the fields of radiology, otolaryngology, neurootology, rhinology

  1. Imaging of the head and neck. 2. rev. and enl. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mafee, M.F.; Valvassori, G.E.; Becker, M.

    2004-01-01

    Remarkable advances in medical diagnostic imaging have been made during the past three decades. The development of new imaging techniques and continuous improvements in the display of digital images have opened new horizons in the study of head and neck anatomy and pathology. The American Society of Head and Neck Radiology (ASHNR) and its European and Asiatic counterparts evolved because of the emerging awareness of the roles that head and neck radiologists play in the diagnosis and management of head and neck, base of the skull, neuro-ophthalmologic and neuro-otologic diseases. This edition continues the tradition of excellence set by the first edition of Valvassori's Head and Neck Imaging (which was also the first textbook in head and neck radiology), and provides a comprehensive review of the most pertinent and up-to-date knowledge in the field of head and neck imaging. The content of this edition has been organized into 12 chapters according to anatomic regions. It now includes new material on the temporomandibular joint, the lacrimal drainage system, dental scanning, fibro-osseous and cartilaginous lesions of the head and neck, MRI sialography, MR interventional technique, and thyroid and parathyroid glands. All chapters have been expanded to address new developments in the field and to stress the importance of imaging anatomy, pathologic correlation, and pertinent clinical data. For each anatomic region, the embryology and anatomy are introduced, followed by congenital and developmental disorders, inflammatory processes, benign and malignant neoplastic diseases, trauma, and postoperative changes. The detailed reference lists in each chapter include key references and are as recent as possible. Care has been taken to include exquisitely reproduced illustrations that provide the maximum of pertinent information. It is our hope that this textbook will be useful to students and physicians in the fields of radiology, otolaryngology, neurootology, rhinology, head

  2. A feasibility study of NIR fluorescent image-guided surgery in head and neck cancer based on the assessment of optimum surgical time as revealed through dynamic imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yokoyama J

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Junkichi Yokoyama,* Mitsuhisa Fujimaki,* Shinichi Ohba, Takashi Anzai, Ryota Yoshii, Shin Ito, Masataka Kojima, Katsuhisa IkedaDepartment of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan *These authors contributed equally to this study Background: In order to minimize surgical stress and preserve organs, endoscopic or robotic surgery is often performed when conducting head and neck surgery. However, it is impossible to physically touch tumors or to observe diffusely invaded deep organs through the procedure of endoscopic or robotic surgery. In order to visualize and safely resect tumors even in these cases, we propose using an indocyanine green (ICG fluorescence method for navigation surgery in head and neck cancer. Objective: To determine the optimum surgical time for tumor resection after the administration of ICG based on the investigation of dynamic ICG fluorescence imaging. Methods: Nine patients underwent dynamic ICG fluorescence imaging for 360 minutes, assessing tumor visibility at 10, 30, 60, 120, 180, and 360 minutes. All cases were scored according to near-infrared (NIR fluorescence imaging visibility scored from 0 to 5. Results: Dynamic NIR fluorescence imaging under the HyperEye Medical System indicated that the greatest contrast in fluorescent images between tumor and normal tissue could be observed from 30 minutes to 1 hour after the administration of ICG. The optimum surgical time was determined to be between 30 minutes to 2 hours after ICG injection. These findings are particularly useful for detection and safe resection of tumors invading the parapharyngeal space. Conclusion: ICG fluorescence imaging is effective for the detection of head and neck cancer. Preliminary findings suggest that the optimum timing for surgery is from 30 minutes to 2 hours after the ICG injection. Keywords: indocyanine green (ICG, navigation surgery, robotic surgery, endoscopic surgery, minimally invasive

  3. The variation of the strength of neck extensor muscles and semispinalis capitis muscle size with head and neck position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezasoltani, A; Nasiri, R; Faizei, A M; Zaafari, G; Mirshahvelayati, A S; Bakhshidarabad, L

    2013-04-01

    Semispinalis capitis muscle (SECM) is a massive and long cervico-thoracic muscle which functions as a main head and neck extensor muscle. The aim of this study was to detect the effect of head and neck positions on the strength of neck extensor muscles and size of SECM in healthy subjects. Thirty healthy women students voluntarily participated in this study. An ultrasonography apparatus (Hitachi EUB 525) and a system of tension-meter were used to scan the right SECM at the level of third cervical spine and to measure the strength of neck extensor muscles at three head and neck positions. Neck extensor muscles were stronger in neutral than flexion or than extension positions while the size of SECM was larger in extension than neutral or than flexion position. The force generation capacity of the main neck extensor muscle was lower at two head and neck flexion and extension positions than neutral position. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Oral Surgeries Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Injury / Trauma Surgery Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Oral, Head and Neck Pathology TMJ and Facial Pain Wisdom Teeth Management Procedures Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are ...

  5. Dosimetric Comparison of Split Field and Fixed Jaw Techniques for Large IMRT Target Volumes in the Head and Neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, Shiv P.; Das, Indra J.; Kumar, Arvind; Johnstone, Peter A.S.

    2011-01-01

    Some treatment planning systems (TPSs), when used for large-field (>14 cm) intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), create split fields that produce excessive multiple-leaf collimator segments, match-line dose inhomogeneity, and higher treatment times than nonsplit fields. A new method using a fixed-jaw technique (FJT) forces the jaw to stay at a fixed position during optimization and is proposed to reduce problems associated with split fields. Dosimetric comparisons between split-field technique (SFT) and FJT used for IMRT treatment is presented. Five patients with head and neck malignancies and regional target volumes were studied and compared with both techniques. Treatment planning was performed on an Eclipse TPS using beam data generated for Varian 2100C linear accelerator. A standard beam arrangement consisting of nine coplanar fields, equally spaced, was used in both techniques. Institutional dose-volume constraints used in head and neck cancer were kept the same for both techniques. The dosimetric coverage for the target volumes between SFT and FJT for head and neck IMRT plan is identical within ±1% up to 90% dose. Similarly, the organs at risk (OARs) have dose-volume coverage nearly identical for all patients. When the total monitor unit (MU) and segments were analyzed, SFT produces statistically significant higher segments (17.3 ± 6.3%) and higher MU (13.7 ± 4.4%) than the FJT. There is no match line in FJT and hence dose uniformity in the target volume is superior to the SFT. Dosimetrically, SFT and FJT are similar for dose-volume coverage; however, the FJT method provides better logistics, lower MU, shorter treatment time, and better dose uniformity. The number of segments and MU also has been correlated with the whole body radiation dose with long-term complications. Thus, FJT should be the preferred option over SFT for large target volumes.

  6. Knowledge and screening of head and neck cancer among American Indians in South Dakota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwojak, Sunshine; Deschler, Daniel; Sargent, Michele; Emerick, Kevin; Guadagnolo, B Ashleigh; Petereit, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    We established the level of awareness of risk factors and early symptoms of head and neck cancer among American Indians in South Dakota and determined whether head and neck cancer screening detected clinical findings in this population. We used the European About Face survey. We added questions about human papillomavirus, a risk factor for head and neck cancer, and demographics. Surveys were administered at 2 public events in 2011. Participants could partake in a head and neck cancer screening at the time of survey administration. Of the 205 American Indians who completed the survey, 114 participated in the screening. Mean head and neck cancer knowledge scores were 26 out of 44. Level of education was the only factor that predicted higher head and neck cancer knowledge (b = 0.90; P = .01). Nine (8%) people had positive head and neck cancer screening examination results. All abnormal clinical findings were in current or past smokers (P = .06). There are gaps in American Indian knowledge of head and neck cancer risk factors and symptoms. Community-based head and neck cancer screening in this population is feasible and may be a way to identify early abnormal clinical findings in smokers.

  7. American Head and Neck Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... research and insights. Comments This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged. This iframe ... and Announcements Copyright ©2016 · American Head and Neck Society · Privacy and Return Policy Managed by BSC Management, ...

  8. Genetic alterations in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagai M.A.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The genetic alterations observed in head and neck cancer are mainly due to oncogene activation (gain of function mutations and tumor suppressor gene inactivation (loss of function mutations, leading to deregulation of cell proliferation and death. These genetic alterations include gene amplification and overexpression of oncogenes such as myc, erbB-2, EGFR and cyclinD1 and mutations, deletions and hypermethylation leading to p16 and TP53 tumor suppressor gene inactivation. In addition, loss of heterozygosity in several chromosomal regions is frequently observed, suggesting that other tumor suppressor genes not yet identified could be involved in the tumorigenic process of head and neck cancers. The exact temporal sequence of the genetic alterations during head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC development and progression has not yet been defined and their diagnostic or prognostic significance is controversial. Advances in the understanding of the molecular basis of head and neck cancer should help in the identification of new markers that could be used for the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of the disease.

  9. Development of an Inflatable Head/Neck Restraint System for Ejection Seats

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-02-28

    crewman’s head . It has been observed that low pressures, about 2 psi (1.38 nt/cm2 ) to 4 psi (2.76 nt/cm2 ), create some "spring back" or trampoline ...neck ring Neck injury Head rotation 210 ABSTRACT (Continue on rev’erse side If necessary end identify by block number) 4A ringý-shaped inflatable head ...injuries due to violent forward head rotation at the time of ejection thrust and parachute opening shock. Inflation of the neck ring will,’ be conducted by a

  10. What are Head Cavities? - A History of Studies on Vertebrate Head Segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuratani, Shigeru; Adachi, Noritaka

    2016-06-01

    Motivated by the discovery of segmental epithelial coeloms, or "head cavities," in elasmobranch embryos toward the end of the 19th century, the debate over the presence of mesodermal segments in the vertebrate head became a central problem in comparative embryology. The classical segmental view assumed only one type of metamerism in the vertebrate head, in which each metamere was thought to contain one head somite and one pharyngeal arch, innervated by a set of cranial nerves serially homologous to dorsal and ventral roots of spinal nerves. The non-segmental view, on the other hand, rejected the somite-like properties of head cavities. A series of small mesodermal cysts in early Torpedo embryos, which were thought to represent true somite homologs, provided a third possible view on the nature of the vertebrate head. Recent molecular developmental data have shed new light on the vertebrate head problem, explaining that head mesoderm evolved, not by the modification of rostral somites of an amphioxus-like ancestor, but through the polarization of unspecified paraxial mesoderm into head mesoderm anteriorly and trunk somites posteriorly.

  11. Fatal gunshots to the head and neck regions in Benin City, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OBJECTIVE: To ascertain the magnitude of fatal gunshot injuries to the head and neck in Benin City. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This is a prospective study of fatal gun shots to the head and neck region with respect to age, sex, intent for the gunshots, type of gun, area of the head and neck affected and who did the ...

  12. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... cancer of the head, neck and mouth. The Oral Cancer Foundation estimates that close to 42,000 Americans ... diagnosed with oral or pharyngeal cancer this year. Oral cancer’s mortality is particularly high, not because it is ...

  13. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Oral, Head and Neck Pathology TMJ and Facial Pain Wisdom Teeth Management Procedures Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are ... more. TMJ and Facial Pain TMJ and Facial ... Teeth Management Wisdom Teeth Management An impacted wisdom tooth can ...

  14. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... teeth or become infected. It can also invite bacteria that lead to gum disease. Click here to find out ... and surgically treating cancer of the head, neck and mouth. The Oral Cancer Foundation estimates that close to ...

  15. Head and Neck Cancers in Developing Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Joshi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck cancers are the most common cancers in developing countries, especially in Southeast Asia. Head and neck cancers are more common in males compared to females. This is mainly attributed to tobacco, areca nut, alcohol, etc. Oral cancers are most common amongst all head and neck squamous cell cancers (HNSCC. HNSCC in the developing world differ from those in the Western world in terms of age, site of disease, etiology, and molecular biology. Poverty, illiteracy, advanced stage at presentation, lack of access to health care, and poor treatment infrastructure pose a major challenge in management of these cancers. The annual GDP (gross domestic product spent on health care is very low in developing countries compared to the developed countries. Cancer treatment leads to a significant financial burden on the cancer patients and their families. Several health programs have been implemented to curb this rising burden of disease. The main aims of these health programs are to increase awareness among people regarding tobacco and to improve access to health care facilities, early diagnosis, treatment, and palliative care.

  16. Overexpression of EMMPRIN isoform 2 is associated with head and neck cancer metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiquan Huang

    Full Text Available Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN, a plasma membrane protein of the immunoglobulin (Ig superfamily, has been reported to promote cancer cell invasion and metastasis in several human malignancies. However, the roles of the different EMMPRIN isoforms and their associated mechanisms in head and neck cancer progression remain unknown. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we found that EMMPRIN isoform 2 (EMMPRIN-2 was the only isoform that was overexpressed in both head and neck cancer tissues and cell lines and that it was associated with head and neck cancer metastasis. To determine the effects of EMMPRIN-2 on head and neck cancer progression, we transfected head and neck cancer cells with an EMMPRIN-2 expression vector and EMMPRIN-2 siRNA to exogenously modulate EMMPRIN-2 expression and examined the functional importance of EMMPRIN-2 in head and neck cancer invasion and metastasis. We found that EMMPRIN-2 promoted head and neck cancer cell invasion, migration, and adhesion in vitro and increased lung metastasis in vivo. Mechanistic studies revealed that EMMPRIN-2 overexpression promoted the secretion of extracellular signaling molecules, including matrix metalloproteinases-2(MMP-2, urokinase-type plasminogen activator(uPA and Cathepsin B, in head and neck cancer cells. While MMP-2 and uPA have been demonstrated to be important mediators of EMMPRIN signaling, the role of Cathepsin B in EMMPRIN-mediated molecular cascades and tumorigenesis has not been established. We found that EMMPRIN-2 overexpression and Cathepsin B down-regulation significantly inhibited the invasion, migration and adhesion of Tca8133 cells, suggesting that Cathepsin B is required for EMMPRIN-2 enhanced cell migration and invasion in head and neck cancer. The results of our study demonstrate the important role of EMMPRIN-2 in head and neck cancer progression for the first time and reveal that increased extracellular secretion of Cathepsin B may be a novel

  17. Overexpression of EMMPRIN isoform 2 is associated with head and neck cancer metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhiquan; Tan, Ning; Guo, Weijie; Wang, Lili; Li, Haigang; Zhang, Tianyu; Liu, Xiaojia; Xu, Qin; Li, Jinsong; Guo, Zhongmin

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN), a plasma membrane protein of the immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily, has been reported to promote cancer cell invasion and metastasis in several human malignancies. However, the roles of the different EMMPRIN isoforms and their associated mechanisms in head and neck cancer progression remain unknown. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we found that EMMPRIN isoform 2 (EMMPRIN-2) was the only isoform that was overexpressed in both head and neck cancer tissues and cell lines and that it was associated with head and neck cancer metastasis. To determine the effects of EMMPRIN-2 on head and neck cancer progression, we transfected head and neck cancer cells with an EMMPRIN-2 expression vector and EMMPRIN-2 siRNA to exogenously modulate EMMPRIN-2 expression and examined the functional importance of EMMPRIN-2 in head and neck cancer invasion and metastasis. We found that EMMPRIN-2 promoted head and neck cancer cell invasion, migration, and adhesion in vitro and increased lung metastasis in vivo. Mechanistic studies revealed that EMMPRIN-2 overexpression promoted the secretion of extracellular signaling molecules, including matrix metalloproteinases-2(MMP-2), urokinase-type plasminogen activator(uPA) and Cathepsin B, in head and neck cancer cells. While MMP-2 and uPA have been demonstrated to be important mediators of EMMPRIN signaling, the role of Cathepsin B in EMMPRIN-mediated molecular cascades and tumorigenesis has not been established. We found that EMMPRIN-2 overexpression and Cathepsin B down-regulation significantly inhibited the invasion, migration and adhesion of Tca8133 cells, suggesting that Cathepsin B is required for EMMPRIN-2 enhanced cell migration and invasion in head and neck cancer. The results of our study demonstrate the important role of EMMPRIN-2 in head and neck cancer progression for the first time and reveal that increased extracellular secretion of Cathepsin B may be a novel mechanism

  18. Economic impact of a head and neck oncologic surgeon: the case mix index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalisi, Scharukh; Sanan, Akshay; Mcdonough, Katie; Hussein, Khalil; Platt, Michael; Truong, Minh Tam; Couch, Marion; Burkey, Brian B

    2014-10-01

    Head and neck oncologic surgery is a time-consuming specialty that requires extensive resources and manpower. Case mix index (CMI) is used in evaluating the complexity and economic impact of surgeons. Head and neck oncologic surgeons generate significant revenue for hospitals, yet compensation is relatively low. Retrospective review of a tertiary hospital's case mix data for 605 otolaryngology admissions from 2009 to 2011 was performed. CMI comparison for head and neck oncologic surgeons versus general otolaryngology was performed. In an otolaryngology department of 9 surgeons; there was a significant difference (p 1) favoring head and neck oncologic surgeons. Head and neck oncologic surgeons increase the CMI for hospitals and ultimately influence the hospital's reimbursement. There is a need for increased collaboration between hospitals and departments in fostering and furthering their head and neck surgical oncology programs by taking CMI into consideration. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Nutrition management for head and neck cancer patients improves clinical outcome and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Richter, Urs; Betz, C; Hartmann, S; Brands, R C

    2017-12-01

    Up to 80% of patients with head and neck cancers are malnourished because of their lifestyle and the risk factors associated with this disease. Unfortunately, nutrition management systems are not implemented in most head and neck cancer clinics. Even worse, many head and neck surgeons as well as hospital management authorities disregard the importance of nutrition management in head and neck cancer patients. In addition, the often extensive resection and reconstruction required for tumors in the upper aerodigestive tract pose special challenges for swallowing and sufficient food intake, placing special demands on nutrition management. This article presents the basics of perioperative metabolism and nutrition management of head and neck cancer patients and makes recommendations for clinical practice. Implementing a nutrition management system in head and neck cancer clinics will improve the clinical outcome and the survival of the patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Lhermitte's Sign Developing after IMRT for Head and Neck Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong C. Lim

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Lhermitte's sign (LS is a benign form of myelopathy with neck flexion producing an unpleasant electric-shock sensation radiating down the extremities. Although rare, it can occur after head and neck radiotherapy. Results. We report a case of Lhermitte's developing after curative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT for a patient with locoregionally advanced oropharyngeal cancer. IMRT delivers a conformal dose of radiation in head and neck cancer resulting in a gradient of radiation dose throughout the spinal cord. Using IMRT, more dose is delivered to the anterior spinal cord than the posterior cord. Conclusions. Lhermitte's sign can develop after IMRT for head and neck cancer. We propose an anterior spinal cord structure, the spinothalamic tract to be the target of IMRT-caused LS.

  1. Physics of radiation therapy of head and neck tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almond, P.R.

    1987-01-01

    Radiotherapy treatment of head and neck cancers probably requires more individual planning than for any other cancer site because of the large number of variables that exist. The fact that tumors may be superficial or relatively deep-seated, the complex shape of the head and neck region, the presence of significant inhomogeneities such as bone and air spaces, and the need to spare critical structures such as the eyes or central nervous system all add to the need for careful considerations of the physical parameters involved in radiotherapy. In addition, the high mobility of the head allows it to assume a wide variety of positions so that techniques have had to be developed for careful simulation, repositioning, and immobilization during treatment. In the head and neck region shaping of the beam becomes important, and therefore, blocked fields, compensators, or wedges are often used. Although the specific radiotherapy techniques for each site of head and neck cancer are described in the various chapters of this book, a general description of the various types of radiation beams, radioactive sources, beam modifiers, treatment planning techniques, and treatment implementation is given in this chapter. The discussion is divided into three main categories: (1) external beam, (2) brachytherapy, and (3) simulation and immobilization

  2. Post-operative radiation therapy for advanced head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ang, Kian K.; Garden, Adam S.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To discuss both general and specific indications for radiation following surgery for patients with cancers of the head and neck. Patients with advanced cancers of the head and neck are often not suitable candidates for treatment with definitive radiation, and are treated with surgery. Frequently these patients fail by recurring in either the primary sites or in the necks. Adjuvant radiation is therefore often a critical component in the management of these patients. While radiation can be done either prior to or after surgery, most centers prefer the postoperative setting. This refresher course will review general concepts of postoperative irradiation for the patient with head and neck cancer and apply these concepts to specific situations. The course will begin with a broad review of the indications for postoperative irradiation as not all patients undergoing surgery for cancers of the head and neck require additional treatment. We will also review the concept of using postoperative radiation to allow for more conservative surgery with preservation of function. The second portion of the course will focus on general techniques of postoperative irradiation. We will review concepts of patient setup and treatment portal design and describe how specific techniques are practiced at MDACC. Controversial topics, including field matching, total dose and fractionation, and the timing of postoperative radiation will be discussed. The final section of the course will review the results of postoperative irradiation as applied to the head and neck in general as well as to specific subsites. In addition to results for the common scenarios of squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity, pharynx and larynx, we will review results of postoperative irradiation for skin cancers of the head and neck, paranasal sinuses, and salivary glands

  3. Preoperative embolization of hypervascular head and neck tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, A. K.; Purkayastha, S.; Bodhey, N. K.; Kapilamoorthy, T. R.; Kesavadas, C.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The embolization of vascular tumours of the head and neck has become an important adjunct to the surgical treatment of these tumours. A vascular tumour in the head and neck region in a surgically treatable patient may be a candidate for embolization. Palliative embolization may be the sole treatment for high risk patients. Reducing intraoperative bleeding may shorten surgery time thus decreasing morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study is to assess the efficacy of embolization as an adjunct to surgery or as a curative measure in the management of hypervascular head and neck tumours. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 46 consecutive patients 27 men and 16 women; mean age, 37.8 years) with 48 hypervascular head and neck tumours that had undergone preoperative transarterial, direct puncture or combined mode of embolization. Diagnosis of tumours was made on the basis of findings of imaging studies. The 46 patients underwent embolization either through transarterial route, by direct puncture technique or both direct puncture and arterial route. The devascularization reached 90-95% with the use of NBCA. The amount of devascularization reached by transarterial particle embolization is a little lesser. One patient (carotid body tumour) developed mild unilateral seventh, ninth and 10th cranial nerve palsy after transarterial embolization, transient hemiparesis was seen in another patient (nasopharyngeal angiofibroma). Both patients improved completely with steroids and had no deficit on follow up. One patient developed delayed glue migration into the middle cerebral artery territory 6 h after the procedure with no reported increase in size of the lesion in the following 5 years. Preoperative embolization of hypervascular tumour of head and neck region appears to be safe and improves the chance of complete removal during surgery with minimal blood loss

  4. Head-neck-radiology; Kopf-Hals-Radiologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohnen, Mathias (ed.) [Staedtische Kliniken Neuss Lukaskrankenhaus GmbH (Germany). Institut fuer klinische Radiologie

    2012-11-01

    The book on head-neck-radiology covers the following issues: (1) Methodic fundamentals: conventional radiography, angiography, sonography, computerized tomography, digital volume tomography, NMR imaging, nuclear medicine. (2) Base of the skull. (3) Petrous bone. (4) Pharynx. (5) Paranasal sinuses. (6) Eye socket. (7) Temporomandibular joint. (8) Salivary gland. (9) Oral cavity. (19) Parynx. (11) Neck soft tissue and lymph nodes. (12) Thyroid and parathyroid. (13) Teeth and jaw. (14) Interventions.

  5. Clinical usefulness of a newly-developed head and neck surface coil for MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Morio; Kogure, Takashi; Hayashi, Sanshin

    1995-01-01

    To obtain correct diagnosis at early stages of cervical lymph node swelling, especially cases with suspected epipharyngeal carcinoma, and cerebral arterial sclerotic diseases, high-quality MR images visualizing the entire head and neck structures and vessels are of crucial importance. When obtaining images of head and neck regions using a head coil, signal intensity (SI) and signal to noise ratio (SNR) of regions below the hypopharynx are weakened. Moreover, when obtaining images of head and neck regions using an anterior neck coil, SI and SNR of upper regions of epipharynx are also weakened. In an attempt to solve these problems, we developed a new head and neck surface coil for MR imaging. With this new coil we were able to obtain better images (153 cases) from regions below the hypopharynx to the upper regions of the epipharynx in the same time as images obtained using the head coil and anterior neck coil. 2D TOF MR angiographic images (11 cases) obtained by the head and neck surface coil are superior to 2D TOF angiographic images obtained by the anterior neck coil. MR images obtained with this improved method are valuable in the evaluation and management of head and neck region disease. (author)

  6. [Quality assurance in head and neck medical oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digue, Laurence; Pedeboscq, Stéphane

    2014-05-01

    In medical oncology, how can we be sure that the right drug is being administered to the right patient at the right time? The implementation of quality assurance criteria is important in medical oncology, in order to ensure that the patient receives the best treatment safely. There is very little literature about quality assurance in medical oncology, as opposed to radiotherapy or cancer surgery. Quality assurance must cover the entire patient care process, from the diagnosis, to the therapeutic decision and drug distribution, including its selection, its preparation and its delivery to the patient (administration and dosage), and finally the potential side effects and their management. The dose-intensity respect is crucial, and its reduction can negatively affect overall survival rates, as shown in breast and testis cancers for example. In head and neck medical oncology, it is essential to respect the few well-standardized recommendations and the dose-intensity, in a population with numerous comorbidities. We will first review quality assurance criteria for the general medical oncology organization and then focus on head and neck medical oncology. We will then describe administration specificities of head and neck treatments (chemoradiation, radiation plus cetuximab, postoperative chemoradiation, induction and palliative chemotherapy) as well as their follow-up. Lastly, we will offer some recommendations to improve quality assurance in head and neck medical oncology.

  7. Is mask-based stereotactic head-and-neck fixation as precise as stereotactic head fixation for precision radiotherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georg, Dietmar; Bogner, Joachim; Dieckmann, Karin; Poetter, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to compare setup accuracy and reproducibility of a stereotactic head and a head-and-neck fixation system, both based on thermoplastic material. Methods and Material: Ten patients were immobilized with a head and a head-and-neck fixation system (both BrainLAB, Germany). Both mask systems were modified with a custom-made mouthpiece and a strip of thermoplastic material attached to the lower part of the mask. During the first treatment session, after positioning patients using room lasers, two orthogonal portal images were taken as reference. Later on, at least five sets of orthogonal portal images were acquired for each patient. The isocentric setup accuracy was determined by comparing field edges and anatomic landmarks and the repositioning accuracy in the mask was obtained by comparing individual anatomic landmarks with respect to the metal balls, fixed on the masks. Systematic and random deviations and resulting three-dimensional (3D) vectors were calculated. Additionally, margins were derived from the systematic and random component of the isocentric setup accuracy. Finally, inter- and intraobserver variations were analyzed. Results: The systematic variation of the isocentric setup accuracy was very similar for the two mask systems, but the random variations were slightly larger for the head-and-neck system, resulting in a 0.4-mm larger 3D vector. The repositioning variations for the head mask were smaller compared with the head-and-neck mask, resulting in smaller 3D vectors for the random (∼0.4 mm) and systematic variations (∼0.6 mm). For both mask systems, a 2-mm margin can be used in lateral and anteroposterior direction, whereas in craniocaudal direction, this margin should be extended to 2.5 mm for the head mask and to 3 mm for the head-and-neck mask. The average absolute differences between two observers were within 0.5 mm, maximum deviations around 1 mm. Conclusion: Thermoplastic mask-based stereotactic head-and-neck

  8. A historical review of head and neck cancer in celebrities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folz, B J; Ferlito, A; Weir, N; Pratt, L W; Rinaldo, A; Werner, J A

    2007-06-01

    The illnesses of celebrity patients always receive more attention from the general public than those of ordinary patients. With regard to cancer, this fact has helped to spread information about the four major malignancies: breast cancer, prostatic cancer, lung cancer and colorectal cancer. Head and neck cancer, on the other hand, is still not well recognised by the lay public, although the risk factors are similar to those of lung cancer. It was the objective of this analysis to identify cases of celebrity patients, the description of which could help to increase awareness of head and neck cancer, its symptoms and risk factors. The Internet and medical literature databases were searched for celebrity patients who had suffered from head and neck cancer. The search revealed numerous famous head and neck cancer patients. However, only seven cases were documented well in the medical literature. Among the identified persons were one emperor, two United States presidents, a legendary composer, a world-renowned medical doctor, an outstanding athlete and an extraordinary entertainer. In spite of their exclusive position in society, these patients did not have a better prognosis compared with ordinary patients of their time. Only two of the group experienced long term survival and only one was cured. None of these influential figures used their influence to fund research or to promote knowledge about their respective diseases. The identified cases could help increase public awareness of head and neck cancer. Similar to activities in other oncologic fields, current celebrity head and neck cancer patients should be encouraged to discuss their diseases openly, which could have a positive effect on public health.

  9. Effect of head restraint backset on head-neck kinematics in whiplash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stemper, Brian D; Yoganandan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank A

    2006-03-01

    Although head restraints were introduced in the 1960s as a countermeasure for whiplash, their limited effectiveness has been attributed to incorrect positioning. The effect of backset on cervical segmental angulations, which were previously correlated with spinal injury, has not been delineated. Therefore, the practical restraint position to minimize injury remains unclear. A parametric study of increasing head restraint backset between 0 and 140mm was conducted using a comprehensively validated computational model. Head retraction values increased with increasing backset, reaching a maximum value of 53.5mm for backsets greater than 60mm. Segmental angulation magnitudes, greatest at levels C5-C6 and C6-C7, reached maximum values during the retraction phase and increased with increasing backset. Results were compared to a previously published head restraint rating system, wherein lower cervical extension magnitudes from this study exceeded mean physiologic limits for restraint positions rated good, acceptable, marginal, and poor. As head restraint contact was the limiting factor in head retraction and segmental angulations, the present study indicates that minimizing whiplash injury may be accomplished by limiting head restraint backset to less than 60mm either passively or actively after impact.

  10. Radiomic Machine Learning Classifiers for Prognostic Biomarkers of Head & Neck Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chintan eParmar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Radiomics extracts and mines large number of medical imaging features in a non-invasive and cost-effective way. The underlying assumption of radiomics is that these imaging features quantify phenotypic characteristics of entire tumor. In order to enhance applicability of radiomics in clinical oncology, highly accurate and reliable machine learning approaches are required. In this radiomic study, thirteen feature selection methods and eleven machine learning classification methods were evaluated in terms of their performance and stability for predicting overall survival in head and neck cancer patients. Methods: Two independent head and neck cancer cohorts were investigated. Training cohort HN1 consisted 101 HNSCC patients. Cohort HN2 (n=95 was used for validation. A total of 440 radiomic features were extracted from the segmented tumor regions in CT images. Feature selection and classification methods were compared using an unbiased evaluation framework. Results: We observed that the three feature selection methods MRMR (AUC = 0.69, Stability = 0.66, MIFS (AUC = 0.66, Stability = 0.69, and CIFE (AUC = 0.68, Stability = 0.7 had high prognostic performance and stability. The three classifiers BY (AUC = 0.67, RSD = 11.28, RF (AUC = 0.61, RSD = 7.36, and NN (AUC = 0.62, RSD = 10.52 also showed high prognostic performance and stability. Analysis investigating performance variability indicated that the choice of classification method is the major factor driving the performance variation (29.02% of total variance. Conclusions: Our study identified prognostic and reliable machine learning methods for the prediction of overall survival of head and neck cancer patients. Identification of optimal machine-learning methods for radiomics based prognostic analyses could broaden the scope of radiomics in precision oncology and cancer care.

  11. Estimation of eye absorbed doses in head & neck radiotherapy practices using thermoluminescent detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gh Bagheri

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available  Determination of eye absorbed dose during head & neck radiotherapy is essential to estimate the risk of cataract. Dose measurements were made in 20 head & neck cancer patients undergoing 60Co radiotherapy using LiF(MCP thermoluminescent dosimeters. Head & neck cancer radiotherapy was delivered by fields using SAD & SSD techniques. For each patient, 3 TLD chips were placed on each eye. Head & neck dose was about 700-6000 cGy in 8-28 equal fractions. The range of eye dose is estimated to be (3.49-639.1 mGy with a mean of maximum dose (98.114 mGy, which is about 3 % of head & neck dose. Maximum eye dose was observed for distsnces of about 3 cm from edge of the field to eye.

  12. Human Papillomavirus Induced Transformation in Cervical and Head and Neck Cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Allie K. [Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (United States); Wise-Draper, Trisha M. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of Cincinnati Medical Center, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (United States); Wells, Susanne I., E-mail: Susanne.Wells@cchmc.org [Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most widely publicized and researched pathogenic DNA viruses. For decades, HPV research has focused on transforming viral activities in cervical cancer. During the past 15 years, however, HPV has also emerged as a major etiological agent in cancers of the head and neck, in particular squamous cell carcinoma. Even with significant strides achieved towards the screening and treatment of cervical cancer, and preventive vaccines, cervical cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-associated deaths for women in developing countries. Furthermore, routine screens are not available for those at risk of head and neck cancer. The current expectation is that HPV vaccination will prevent not only cervical, but also head and neck cancers. In order to determine if previous cervical cancer models for HPV infection and transformation are directly applicable to head and neck cancer, clinical and molecular disease aspects must be carefully compared. In this review, we briefly discuss the cervical and head and neck cancer literature to highlight clinical and genomic commonalities. Differences in prognosis, staging and treatment, as well as comparisons of mutational profiles, viral integration patterns, and alterations in gene expression will be addressed.

  13. Human Papillomavirus Induced Transformation in Cervical and Head and Neck Cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, Allie K.; Wise-Draper, Trisha M.; Wells, Susanne I.

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most widely publicized and researched pathogenic DNA viruses. For decades, HPV research has focused on transforming viral activities in cervical cancer. During the past 15 years, however, HPV has also emerged as a major etiological agent in cancers of the head and neck, in particular squamous cell carcinoma. Even with significant strides achieved towards the screening and treatment of cervical cancer, and preventive vaccines, cervical cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-associated deaths for women in developing countries. Furthermore, routine screens are not available for those at risk of head and neck cancer. The current expectation is that HPV vaccination will prevent not only cervical, but also head and neck cancers. In order to determine if previous cervical cancer models for HPV infection and transformation are directly applicable to head and neck cancer, clinical and molecular disease aspects must be carefully compared. In this review, we briefly discuss the cervical and head and neck cancer literature to highlight clinical and genomic commonalities. Differences in prognosis, staging and treatment, as well as comparisons of mutational profiles, viral integration patterns, and alterations in gene expression will be addressed

  14. Oncogenic impact of human papilloma virus in head and neck cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Heffernan, C B

    2012-02-01

    There is considerable debate within the literature about the significance of human papilloma virus in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, and its potential influence on the prevention, diagnosis, grading, treatment and prognosis of these cancers. Cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption have traditionally been cited as the main risk factors for head and neck cancers. However, human papilloma virus, normally associated with cervical and other genital carcinomas, has emerged as a possible key aetiological factor in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, especially oropharyngeal cancers. These cancers pose a significant financial burden on health resources and are increasing in incidence. The recent introduction of vaccines targeted against human papilloma virus types 16 and 18, to prevent cervical cancer, has highlighted the need for ongoing research into the importance of human papilloma virus in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

  15. The dynamics of monolithic suspensions for advanced detectors: A 3-segment model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piergiovanni, F; Campagna, E; Cesarini, E; Martelli, F; Vetrano, F; Vicere, A [Universita di Urbino, Via S.Chiara 27, 61029 Urbino (Italy); Lorenzini, M; Cagnoli, G; Losurdo, G, E-mail: piergiovanni@fi.infn.i [INFN, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez. di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

    2010-05-01

    In order to reduce the suspension thermal noise, the second generation GW interferometric detectors will employ monolithic suspensions in fused silica to hold the mirrors. The fibres are produced by melting and pulling apart a fused silica rod, obtaining a long thin wire with two thicker heads. The dynamics of such a fibre is in principle different from that of a cylindrical, regular fibre, because most of the deformation energy is stored in the neck region where the diameter is variable. This is an advantage, since adjusting the neck tapering, a thermoelastic noise cancellation effect can be obtained. Therefore, a careful study of the suspensions behavior is necessary to estimate the overall noise and to optimize the control strategy. To simplify the control design, a simple three segment model for the silica fibres has been developed, fully equivalent to the beam equation at low frequencies. The model, analytically proved for a regular cylindrical fibre, can be extended to a fibre with tapered necks, provided that the equivalent bending length is suitably measured. We developed a tool to measure the position of the bending point for each fibre, thus allowing to experimentally check the validity of the model. A numerical code has been written to solve the beam equation for wires with varying diameter. This code confirms the validity of the three segment model. Moreover, it is possible to extend the solution to higher frequencies thus computing the transfer function and the energy distribution of the suspension system and estimating the thermal noise contribution.

  16. [Rare tumors of the head and neck; on behalf of the REFCOR, the French Network of rare head and neck tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baujat, Bertrand; Thariat, Juliette; Baglin, Anne Catherine; Costes, Valérie; Testelin, Sylvie; Reyt, Emile; Janot, François

    2014-05-01

    Malignant tumors of the upper aerodigestive tract may be rare by their histology (sarcoma, variants of conventional squamous cell carcinomas) and/or location (sinuses, salivary glands, ear, of various histologies themselves). They represent less than 10% of head and neck neoplasms. The confirmation of their diagnosis often requires a medical expertise and sometimes biomolecular techniques complementary to classical histology and immunohistochemistry. Due to their location, their treatment often requires a specific surgical technique. Radiation therapy is indicated based on histoclinical characteristics common to other head and neck neoplasms but also incorporate grade. Further, the technique must often be adapted to take into account the proximity of organs at risk. For most histologies, chemotherapy is relatively inefficient but current molecular advances may allow to consider pharmaceutical developments in the coming years. The REFCOR, the French Network of head and neck cancers aims to organize and promote the optimal management of these rare and heterogeneous diseases, to promote research and clinical trials.

  17. Delays in diagnosis, referral and management of head and neck ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Delays in diagnosis, referral and management of head and neck cancer presenting at Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi. ... Vol 83, No 4 (2006) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... Background: The most important prognostic factor in head and neck cancer is the stage of the disease at presentation.

  18. SU-E-J-220: Evaluation of Atlas-Based Auto-Segmentation (ABAS) in Head-And-Neck Adaptive Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Q; Yan, D

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Evaluate the accuracy of atlas-based auto segmentation of organs at risk (OARs) on both helical CT (HCT) and cone beam CT (CBCT) images in head and neck (HN) cancer adaptive radiotherapy (ART). Methods: Six HN patients treated in the ART process were included in this study. For each patient, three images were selected: pretreatment planning CT (PreTx-HCT), in treatment CT for replanning (InTx-HCT) and a CBCT acquired in the same day of the InTx-HCT. Three clinical procedures of auto segmentation and deformable registration performed in the ART process were evaluated: a) auto segmentation on PreTx-HCT using multi-subject atlases, b) intra-patient propagation of OARs from PreTx-HCT to InTx-HCT using deformable HCT-to-HCT image registration, and c) intra-patient propagation of OARs from PreTx-HCT to CBCT using deformable CBCT-to-HCT image registration. Seven OARs (brainstem, cord, L/R parotid, L/R submandibular gland and mandible) were manually contoured on PreTx-HCT and InTx-HCT for comparison. In addition, manual contours on InTx-CT were copied on the same day CBCT, and a local region rigid body registration was performed accordingly for each individual OAR. For procedures a) and b), auto contours were compared to manual contours, and for c) auto contours were compared to those rigidly transferred contours on CBCT. Dice similarity coefficients (DSC) and mean surface distances of agreement (MSDA) were calculated for evaluation. Results: For procedure a), the mean DSC/MSDA of most OARs are >80%/±2mm. For intra-patient HCT-to-HCT propagation, the Resultimproved to >85%/±1.5mm. Compared to HCT-to-HCT, the mean DSC for HCT-to-CBCT propagation drops ∼2–3% and MSDA increases ∼0.2mm. This Resultindicates that the inferior imaging quality of CBCT seems only degrade auto propagation performance slightly. Conclusion: Auto segmentation and deformable propagation can generate OAR structures on HCT and CBCT images with clinically acceptable accuracy. Therefore

  19. Primary malignant head and neck tumours in Ghana: a survey of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    McRoy

    Results: 2,041 of 4,546 reports were malignant. 1342 were ... Conclusion: We observed a rising incidence of head and neck .... head and neck cancer rose from 44 cases in ... Carcinosarcoma. 1. Clear cell tumour. 0. 1. Cutaneous lymphoma. 1.

  20. Head & Neck Oncology: purpose, scope and goals-charting the future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Upile, Tahwinder; Jerjes, Waseem; Sterenborg, Henricus J. C. M.; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Sandison, Ann; Witjes, Max J. H.; Biel, Merrill A.; Bigio, Irving; Wong, Brian J. F.; Gillenwater, Ann; MacRobert, Alexander J.; Robinson, Dominic J.; Betz, Christian S.; Stepp, Herbert; Bolotine, Lina; McKenzie, Gordon; Mosse, Charles Alexander; Barr, Hugh; Chen, Zhongping; Berg, Kristian; D'Cruz, Anil K.; Stone, Nicholas; Kendall, Catherine; Fisher, Sheila; Leunig, Andreas; Olivo, Malini; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Soo, Khee Chee; Bagnato, Vanderlei; Choo-Smith, Lin-Ping; Svanberg, Katarina; Tan, I. Bing; Wilson, Brian C.; Wolfsen, Herbert; Yodh, Arjun G.; Hopper, Colin

    2009-01-01

    For many years now there has been a growing frustration with the statistics of head and neck cancer. Despite the many advances in diagnosis and therapy, there has been little change in the prognosis for most cancers of the head and neck in the last 50 years, so what is the point of yet another

  1. Head and neck cancer: Radiotherapeutic precepts in the management of the neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Million, R.R.; Cassisi, N.J.; Parsons, J.T.; Mendenhall, W.M.

    1986-01-01

    The authors provide a series of statements regarding the use of radiotherapy and surgery for metastatic squamous cancer to the neck. Some of these precepts are established facts requiring no additional documentation - for example, the combination of radiation and neck dissection for effective treatment of N2B neck disease or for subclinical disease, depending on extracapsular spread. Other precepts of the authors are not as generally accepted by head and neck surgeons, such as the mandatory staging of neck dissections following curative radiation therapy or the routine use of computerized tomography (CT) to confirm pathologic adenopathy. Most of the authors' precepts are supported by a combination of their personal clinical experience and hard data from the University of Florida, Gainesville

  2. Clinical Applications of FDG PET and PET/CT in Head and Neck Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Al-Ibraheem

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available 18F-FDG PET plays an increasing role in diagnosis and management planning of head and neck cancer. Hybrid PET/CT has promoted the field of molecular imaging in head and neck cancer. This modality is particular relevant in the head and neck region, given the complex anatomy and variable physiologic FDG uptake patterns. The vast majority of 18F-FDG PET and PET/CT applications in head and neck cancer related to head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Clinical applications of 18F-FDG PET and PET/CT in head and neck cancer include diagnosis of distant metastases, identification of synchronous 2nd primaries, detection of carcinoma of unknown primary and detection of residual or recurrent disease. Emerging applications are precise delineation of the tumor volume for radiation treatment planning, monitoring treatment, and providing prognostic information. The clinical role of 18F-FDG PET/CT in N0 disease is limited which is in line with findings of other imaging modalities. MRI is usually used for T staging with an intense discussion concerning the preferable imaging modality for regional lymph node staging as PET/CT, MRI, and multi-slice spiral CT are all improving rapidly. Is this review, we summarize recent literature on 18F-FDG PET and PET/CT imaging of head and neck cancer.

  3. Dosimetry audit for a multi-centre IMRT head and neck trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, Catharine H.; Hansen, Vibeke Nordmark; Chantler, Hannah; Edwards, Craig; James, Hayley V.; Webster, Gareth; Miles, Elizabeth A.; Guerrero Urbano, M. Teresa; Bhide, Shree A.; Bidmead, A. Margaret; Nutting, Christoper M.

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: PARSPORT was a multi-centre randomised trial in the UK which compared Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) and conventional radiotherapy (CRT) for patients with head and neck cancer. The dosimetry audit goals were to verify the plan delivery in participating centres, ascertain what tolerances were suitable for head and neck IMRT trials and develop an IMRT credentialing program. Materials and methods: Centres enrolling patients underwent rigorous quality assurance before joining the trial. Following this each centre was visited for a dosimetry audit, which consisted of treatment planning system tests, fluence verification films, combined field films and dose point measurements. Results: Mean dose point measurements were made at six centres. For the primary planning target volume (PTV) the differences with the planned values for the IMRT and CRT arms were -0.6% (1.8% to -2.4%) and 0.7% (2.0% to -0.9%), respectively. Ninety-four percent of the IMRT fluence films for individual fields passed gamma criterion of 3%/3 mm and 75% of the films for combined fields passed gamma criterion 4%/3 mm (no significant difference between dynamic delivery and step and shoot delivery). Conclusions: This audit suggests that a 3% tolerance could be applied for PTV point doses. For dose distributions tolerances of 3%/3 mm on individual fields and 4%/3 mm for combined fields are proposed for multi-centre head and neck IMRT trials.

  4. Therapeutic applications of botulinum neurotoxins in head and neck disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Alshadwi

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Botulinum neurotoxin therapy provides viable alternatives to traditional treatment modalities for some conditions affecting the head and neck region that have neurological components. This therapy can overcome some of the morbidities associated with conventional therapy. More research is needed to determine the ideal doses of botulinum neurotoxin to treat different diseases affecting the head and neck regions.

  5. Treatment of Childhood Head and Neck Cancer - Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Find diagnosis, staging, and treatment information for these head and neck cancers: hypopharynx, larynx, lip and oral cavity, neck cancer with occult primary, nasopharynx, oropharynx, paranasal sinus and nasal cavity, and salivary gland cancer.

  6. PET-CT–Guided Surveillance of Head and Neck Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck who underwent PET-CT–guided surveillance had fewer operations but similar overall survival rates to those of patients who underwent planned neck dissection.

  7. Paragangliomas of the head and neck region: A single center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumudachalam Pindicura

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Paragangliomas of the head and neck are uncommon lesions. The most common site in the head and neck region was the jugulotympanic region. Most cases of jugulotympanic paraganglioma presented in the fifth decade and later. Laryngeal paraganglioma presented clinically earlier in the second decade. Jugulotympanic and laryngeal paraganglioma showed dominance of tumor vasculature histologically. There was a rare case of laryngeal paraganglioma with lateral neck extension in this study.

  8. Intravoxel Incoherent Motion MR Imaging in the Head and Neck: Correlation with Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MR Imaging and Diffusion-Weighted Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao Quan; Choi, Young Jun; Sung, Yu Sub; Yoon, Ra Gyoung; Jang, Seung Won; Park, Ji Eun; Heo, Young Jin; Baek, Jung Hwan; Lee, Jeong Hyun

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the correlation between perfusion- and diffusion-related parameters from intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) and those from dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging (DCE-MRI) and diffusion-weighted imaging in tumors and normal muscles of the head and neck. We retrospectively enrolled 20 consecutive patients with head and neck tumors with MR imaging performed using a 3T MR scanner. Tissue diffusivity (D), pseudo-diffusion coefficient (D(*)), and perfusion fraction (f) were derived from bi-exponential fitting of IVIM data obtained with 14 different b-values in three orthogonal directions. We investigated the correlation between D, f, and D(*) and model-free parameters from the DCE-MRI (wash-in, Tmax, Emax, initial AUC60, whole AUC) and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value in the tumor and normal masseter muscle using a whole volume-of-interest approach. Pearson's correlation test was used for statistical analysis. No correlation was found between f or D(*) and any of the parameters from the DCE-MRI in all patients or in patients with squamous cell carcinoma (p > 0.05). The ADC was significantly correlated with D values in the tumors (p correlation with f values in the tumors (p = 0.017, r = 0.528) and muscles (p = 0.003, r = 0.630), but no correlation with D(*) (p > 0.05, respectively). Intravoxel incoherent motion shows no significant correlation with model-free perfusion parameters derived from the DCE-MRI but is feasible for the analysis of diffusivity in both tumors and normal muscles of the head and neck.

  9. Updates in Head and Neck Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Largo, Rene D; Garvey, Patrick B

    2018-02-01

    After reading this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Have a basic understanding of virtual planning, rapid prototype modeling, three-dimensional printing, and computer-assisted design and manufacture. 2. Understand the principles of combining virtual planning and vascular mapping. 3. Understand principles of flap choice and design in preoperative planning of free osteocutaneous flaps in mandible and midface reconstruction. 4. Discuss advantages and disadvantages of computer-assisted design and manufacture in reconstruction of advanced oncologic mandible and midface defects. Virtual planning and rapid prototype modeling are increasingly used in head and neck reconstruction with the aim of achieving superior surgical outcomes in functionally and aesthetically critical areas of the head and neck compared with conventional reconstruction. The reconstructive surgeon must be able to understand this rapidly-advancing technology, along with its advantages and disadvantages. There is no limit to the degree to which patient-specific data may be integrated into the virtual planning process. For example, vascular mapping can be incorporated into virtual planning of mandible or midface reconstruction. Representative mandible and midface cases are presented to illustrate the process of virtual planning. Although virtual planning has become helpful in head and neck reconstruction, its routine use may be limited by logistic challenges, increased acquisition costs, and limited flexibility for intraoperative modifications. Nevertheless, the authors believe that the superior functional and aesthetic results realized with virtual planning outweigh the limitations.

  10. Navigation in head and neck oncological surgery: an emerging concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangloff, P; Mastronicola, R; Cortese, S; Phulpin, B; Sergeant, C; Guillemin, F; Eluecque, H; Perrot, C; Dolivet, G

    2011-01-01

    Navigation surgery, initially applied in rhinology, neurosurgery and orthopaedic cases, has been developed over the last twenty years. Surgery based on computed tomography data has become increasingly important in the head and neck region. The technique for hardware fusion between RMI and computed tomography is also becoming more useful. We use such device since 2006 in head and neck carcinologic situation. Navigation allows control of the resection in order to avoid and protect the precise anatomical structures (vessels and nerves). It also guides biopsy and radiofrequency. Therefore, quality of life is much more increased and morbidity is decreased for these patients who undergo major and mutilating head and neck surgery. Here we report the results of 33 navigation procedures performed for 31 patients in our institution.

  11. Fractionation schedules for cancers of the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harari, Paul M.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: This refresher course reviews current research activity and treatment results in the field of radiation therapy fractionation. The presentation emphasizes worldwide studies of altered fractionation, highlighting head and neck cancer as the primary teaching model. Basic radiobiological principles guiding the development of altered fractionation regimens, and advancing the understanding of fractionation effects on normal and tumor tissue are reviewed. A 'standard' prescription of 2 Gy x 35 fractions = 70 Gy may not provide the optimal balance between primary tumor control and late normal tissue effects for all patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. The last decade has witnessed the treatment of thousands of head and neck cancer patients with curative radiotherapy using altered fractination schedules designed to improve overall treatment results. Although the number of different fractionation regimens currently being investigated continues to increase, the common guiding principles behind their design are relatively simple. Common fractionation terminology (i.e., accelerated hyperfractionation) will be reviewed, as well as a brief summary of radiobiological concepts pertaining to tumor potential doubling time, tumor proliferation kinetics, overall treatment time and fraction size-dependence of acute and late tissue effects. Several well known head and neck fractionation schedules from around the world (Manchester Christie Hospital-United Kingdom, Princess Margaret Hospital-Canada, Massachusetts General Hospital-USA, MD Anderson Hospital-USA, University of Florida-USA, Mount Vernon Hospital CHART-United Kingdom, RTOG and EORTC trials-USA and Europe) will be summarized with regard to design-rationale, treatment technique and results. The design of several current cooperative group trials investigating altered head and neck fractionation will be presented, as well as concepts prompting the pilot evaluation of several brand new

  12. Prospective observer and software-based assessment of magnetic resonance imaging quality in head and neck cancer: Should standard positioning and immobilization be required for radiation therapy applications?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yao; Mohamed, Abdallah S R; Yang, Jinzhong; Colen, Rivka R; Frank, Steven J; Wang, Jihong; Wassal, Eslam Y; Wang, Wenjie; Kantor, Michael E; Balter, Peter A; Rosenthal, David I; Lai, Stephen Y; Hazle, John D; Fuller, Clifton D

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of a head and neck magnetic resonance simulation and immobilization protocol on reducing motion-induced artifacts and improving positional variance for radiation therapy applications. Two groups (group 1, 17 patients; group 2, 14 patients) of patients with head and neck cancer were included under a prospective, institutional review board-approved protocol and signed informed consent. A 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner was used for anatomic and dynamic contrast-enhanced acquisitions with standard diagnostic MRI setup for group 1 and radiation therapy immobilization devices for group 2 patients. The impact of magnetic resonance simulation/immobilization was evaluated qualitatively by 2 observers in terms of motion artifacts and positional reproducibility and quantitatively using 3-dimensional deformable registration to track intrascan maximum motion displacement of voxels inside 7 manually segmented regions of interest. The image quality of group 2 (29 examinations) was significantly better than that of group 1 (50 examinations) as rated by both observers in terms of motion minimization and imaging reproducibility (P quality of head and neck MRI in terms of motion-related artifacts and positional reproducibility was greatly improved by use of radiation therapy immobilization devices. Consequently, immobilization with external and intraoral fixation in MRI examinations is required for radiation therapy application. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TMJ DISORDER AND HEAD AND NECK POSTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sesi R. Puspita Dewi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular joint disorders may be caused by variety of factors; one of which is the posture of head and neck. However, this remains controversial and a subject of debate by experts. The objective of this study was to know whether there was a relation between temporomandibular disorders and the head and neck posture seen radiographically. Subjects were 40 dental students from University of Indonesia who met the inclusion criteria, selected through questionnaire, and subjective examination based on Helkimo’s dysfunction index. Then, lateral cephalometric radiographs were done to all subjects. In the radiogram, a horizontal line was made from the nasion point to the sella tursica, and a vertical line was drawn along the prominent bone of C1 – C5. The angle between the two lines was measured, and used to represent the head and neck posture. The design of the study was cross sectional. Based on statistical analysis, there was no significant relationship between the anamnestic dysfunction index as well as the clinical dysfunction index that represented the temporomandibular joint disorders and the posture of the head and neck seen radiographically.

  14. Multiple squamous cell carcinomas within the head and neck region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Katsuro; Hanazawa, Hideyuki; Sato, Yuichiro; Takahashi, Sugata

    2004-01-01

    Clinical features of multiple squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cases within the head and neck that were treated in our department during the recent 10 years are discussed. Multiple SCCs arose in 6.6% of the cases with primary SCC; 67% of the cases had two carcinomas, and 33% had more than three carcinomas. The most common site of the multiple SCCs was the oral cavity (54%). The most frequent interval between treatment of previous carcinoma and diagnosis of subsequent carcinoma was simultaneous, but more than 5 years' interval was observed in 36% of the patients. The most common initial treatment of the carcinoma was irradiation, but the ratio of surgery increased for subsequent carcinomas. Prognosis of the patients with more than three carcinomas was not worse than that of patients with two carcinomas. Therefore, early diagnosis of the subsequent carcinomas based on careful long-term observation in the head and neck is necessary for follow-up of the patients with SCC of the head and neck. Treatment strategies considering the treatment of subsequent carcinomas are needed for the patients with primary head and neck SCC. (author)

  15. [Assessment of psychological status of inpatients with head and neck cancer before surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L; Wang, B Q; Gao, T H; Tian, J

    2018-01-07

    Objective: To investigate the prevalence and psychosocial characteristics in inpatients with head and neck cancer before surgery. Method: From September 2015 to December 2016, 237 consecutive inpatients with head and neck cancer who had been scheduled for surgery were prospectively enrolled in Department of Head and Neck Surgery of Shanxi Provincial Tumor Hospital. Mental health symptoms were systematically investigated using three psychological instruments: symptom checklist-90 (SCL-90), Zung self-rating anxiety scale (SAS) and Zung self-rating depression scale (SDS). SPSS 17.0 software was used to analyze the data. And he results of SCL-90, SAS and SDS were compared with the Chinese norm. For all statistical analyses, a P value psychological status in inpatients with head and neck cancer before surgery. Identifying these patients using proper screening instrument is of great important clinical implications for the early detection, management, and reduction of the distress associated with head and neck cancer.

  16. Hypothyroidism after Radiotherapy of Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Eun; Eun; Kim, Jae Chul; Park, In Kyu; Yea, Ji Woon

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to retrospectively evaluate the incidence of hypothyroidism in locally advanced head and neck cancer patients who received radiotherapy (RT) either with or without neck dissection. From January 2000 to December 2005, 115 patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer and who received definitive RT or postoperative RT including standard anterior low-neck field were recruited to be part of this study. Nineteen patients had undergone ipsilateral neck dissection, whereas, 18 patients underwent bilateral neck dissection, and 78 patients were received RT alone. Patients' ages ranged from 28 to 85 years (median, 59 years) and there were a total of 73 male and 42 female patients. The primary tumor sites were the oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, larynx, and other sites in 18, 40, 28, 22 and 7 patients, respectively. Radiation dose to the thyroid gland ranged from 44 Gy to 66 Gy with a median dose of 50 Gy. Follow-up time ranged from 2 to 91 months, with a median of 29 months. The 1- and 3- year incidence of hypothyroidism was 28.7% (33 patients) and 33.0% (38 patients), respectively. The median time to detection of hypothyroidism was 8.5 months (range, 0 to 36 months). A univariate analysis revealed that neck node dissection was a risk factor for hypothyroidism (p=0.037). However, no factor was statistically significant from the results of a multivariate analysis. Patients treated for advanced head and neck cancer with radiotherapy with or without neck dissection will develop hypothyroidism. It is important to check the thyroid function periodically in these patients especially with the risk factor of neck node dissection.

  17. Hypothyroidism after Radiotherapy of Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Eun; Eun; Kim, Jae Chul; Park, In Kyu [Kyungpook National Yonsei University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Yea, Ji Woon [Dongguk University Gyeongju Hospital, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    The aim of the present study was to retrospectively evaluate the incidence of hypothyroidism in locally advanced head and neck cancer patients who received radiotherapy (RT) either with or without neck dissection. From January 2000 to December 2005, 115 patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer and who received definitive RT or postoperative RT including standard anterior low-neck field were recruited to be part of this study. Nineteen patients had undergone ipsilateral neck dissection, whereas, 18 patients underwent bilateral neck dissection, and 78 patients were received RT alone. Patients' ages ranged from 28 to 85 years (median, 59 years) and there were a total of 73 male and 42 female patients. The primary tumor sites were the oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, larynx, and other sites in 18, 40, 28, 22 and 7 patients, respectively. Radiation dose to the thyroid gland ranged from 44 Gy to 66 Gy with a median dose of 50 Gy. Follow-up time ranged from 2 to 91 months, with a median of 29 months. The 1- and 3- year incidence of hypothyroidism was 28.7% (33 patients) and 33.0% (38 patients), respectively. The median time to detection of hypothyroidism was 8.5 months (range, 0 to 36 months). A univariate analysis revealed that neck node dissection was a risk factor for hypothyroidism (p=0.037). However, no factor was statistically significant from the results of a multivariate analysis. Patients treated for advanced head and neck cancer with radiotherapy with or without neck dissection will develop hypothyroidism. It is important to check the thyroid function periodically in these patients especially with the risk factor of neck node dissection.

  18. A value framework in head and neck cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Jonas A; Seiwert, Tanguy Y

    2014-01-01

    The care of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma has greatly evolved over the past 30 years. From single modality to a multidisciplinary care, there has also been a concurrent increase in treatment intensity, resulting, at many times, in more zealous regimens that patients must endure. In this article, we apply Porter's value model as a framework to balance survival, toxicities, cost, and trade-offs from a patient's perspective in head and neck cancer. This model defines value as the health outcome per dollar achieved. Domains and outcomes that are important to patients, including not only survival or short-term quality of life, but also functional outcomes, recovery, sustainability of recovery, and the lasting consequences of therapy are included in this framework. Other outcomes that are seldom measured in head and neck cancer, such as work disability and financial toxicities, are also included and further discussed. Within this value model and based on evidence, we further discuss de-escalation of care, intensity-modulated radiation therapy, newer surgical methods, and enhancements in the process of care as potential approaches to add value for patients. Finally, we argue that knowing the patient's preferences is essential in the value discussion, as the attribute that will ultimately provide the most value to the individual patient with head and neck cancer.

  19. Digital subtraction angiography in evaluation of vascular supply of head and neck paragangliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juszkat, R.; Szyfter, P.; Zarzecka, A.

    2008-01-01

    Paragangliomas (PGs) of the head and neck are relatively rare and represent 0.6% of all head and neck tumors and 0.03% of all tumors. There are four groups of head and neck PGs: carotid body tumors, vagal PGs, jugular PGs, and tympanic PGs. The resection of head and neck PGs carries an inherent risk of injury to cranial nerves and vascular structures which may lead to excessive bleeding. To plan the surgical strategy for PGs, detailed information about the vascular supply of the tumor is required. Between January 1998 and April 2007, 41 tumors of the head and neck were identified in 37 patients (20 females, 17 males, mean age: 38.4 years). Single tumors were observed in 33 patients, two head and neck PGs were identified in 3 patients, and 1 patient presented 3 PGs, one of which was located laterally to the aortic arch. There were 21 PGs located at the carotid bifurcation, 10 in the jugular foramen, 6 in the tympanic cavity, and 4 along the course of the vagus nerve. In all the cases of PGs located in the head and neck, the vascular supply came from branches of the external carotid artery. Vascular supply from the internal carotid and the vertebral arteries was not seen in any of the patients. The most common vascular supply in the cases of carotid body tumors and jugular PGs was the pharyngeal ascending artery. In the cases of vagal PGs it was the pharyngeal ascending artery and the posterior auricular artery and in the case of tympanic PGs the posterior auricular artery. DSA is an important tool in the diagnosis of head and neck PGs. The evaluation of its vascularization is essential in planning further treatment, both endovascular and surgical. (author)

  20. Primary malignant head and neck tumours in Ghana: a survey of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To determine the incidence of primary head and neck cancers seen at Korle Bu Teaching hospital, Ghana. Methods: A retrospective study of histopathological records of diagnosed head and neck cancers from 1989-2008. Results: 2,041 of 4,546 reports were malignant. 1342 were primary cancers. These were studied ...

  1. Outcome after re-irradiation of head and neck cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platteaux, Nele; Dirix, Piet; Vanstraelen, Bianca; Nuyts, Sandra [University Hospitals Leuven, Campus Gasthuisberg (Belgium). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively report the outcome of head and neck cancer patients following re-irradiation. Patients and Methods: A total of 51 patients with recurrent or second primary head and neck cancer received re-irradiation at Leuven University Hospital. Survival and locoregional control were calculated. Doses to organs at risk were retrieved from dose-volume histograms. Radiation-related toxicities were reported. Results: The 2-year actuarial overall survival rate was 30%. On univariate analysis, surgery before re-irradiation and high radiation dose were associated with superior survival. Grade 3 acute and grade 3 or more late toxicity occurred in respectively 29.4% and 35.3% of the patients. Conclusion: Re-irradiation in head and neck cancer patients is feasible with acceptable late toxicity, although the survival remains poor. (orig.)

  2. Cetuximab And The Head And Neck Squamous Cell Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concu, Riccardo; Cordeiro, Maria Natalia Dias Soeiro

    2018-01-12

    The head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) is the most common type of head and neck cancer (more than 90%), and all over the world more than a half million people have been developing this cancer in the last years. This type of cancer is usually marked by a poor prognosis with a really significant morbidity and mortality. Cetuximab received early favor as an exciting and promising new therapy with relatively mild side effect, and due to this received authorization in the 2004 from the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and in the 2006 from the Food and Drug Association (FDA) for the treatment of patients with squamous cell cancer of the head and neck in combination with radiation therapy for locally advanced disease. In this work we will review the application and the efficacy of the Cetuximab in the treatment of the HNSCC. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. The Reliability of Pectorals Major Myocutaneous Flap in Head and Neck Reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Marakby, H.H.

    2006-01-01

    Background: The pectorals major myocutaneous pedicle flap (PMMPF) has been considered to be the workhorse of pedicled flaps in head and neck reconstruction. Several series of PMMPF procedures in head and neck reconstruction have been reported in the literature. Even with the worldwide use of free flaps, the flap is still considered the mainstay head and neck reconstructive procedures in many centers. However, the flap is usually associated with a high incidence of complications in addition 10 its large bulk compared with the free fasciocutaneous flaps. Also the final functional and the aesthetic results are not comparable to free flaps head and neck reconstruction. Aim of the Study: The aim of the study is to evaluate the reliability of such flap in selected cases of head and neck reconstruction. The indications, technique, complications and the functional as well as the aesthetic results of the flap utilization were evaluated. Patients and Methods: Between May 2002 and May 2005 a 26 consecutive head and neck reconstruction procedures using the PMMPF were carried out on 25 patients at the Department of Surgery, National Cancer Institute, Cairo University. The indications for the flap use were defects due to resection of stage II-IV cancer in the head and neck region. The site, stage of the disease and the presence or absence of distant metastasis were assessed. Also preoperative assessment included the fitness of patients for such an extensive procedure. The total operative time, the need for blood transfusion, the postoperative complications, were all documented. The length of hospital stay, the follow-up of patients as well as the incidence of local recurrence underneath the flap were all evaluated. Results: Pectorals major myocutaneous pedicled flap reconstructions were used to reconstruct defects in the following sites: oral cavity (LO patients); oropharynx/hypopharynx, (5 patients); and neck or face (10 patients). Of the 26 PMMPF reconstructions. 22 flaps were

  4. Anticancer activity of drug conjugates in head and neck cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Debatosh; Rahman, Mohammad Aminur; Chen, Zhuo Georgia; Shin, Dong M

    2016-06-01

    Sexually transmitted oral cancer/head and neck cancer is increasing rapidly. Human papilloma virus (HPV) is playing a role in the pathogenesis of a subset of squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck (SCCHN). Paclitaxel is a widely used anticancer drug for breast, ovarian, testicular, cervical, non-small cell lung, head and neck cancer. However, it is water insoluble and orally inactive. We report the synthesis of water soluble nanosize conjugates of paclitaxel, branched PEG, and EGFR-targeting peptide by employing native chemical ligation. We performed a native chemical ligation between the N-hydroxy succinimide (NHS) ester of paclitaxel succinate and cysteine at pH 6.5 to give the cysteine-conjugated paclitaxel derivative. The thiol functionality of cysteine was activated and subsequently conjugated to multiarm thiol-PEG to obtain the paclitaxel branched PEG conjugate. Finally, we conjugated an EGFR-targeting peptide to obtain conjugates of paclitaxel, branched PEG, and EGFR-targeting peptide. These conjugates show anticancer activity against squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck cells (SCCHN, Tu212).

  5. Metabolic microscopy of head and neck cancer organoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Amy T.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2016-03-01

    Studies for head and neck cancer have primarily relied on cell lines or in vivo animal studies. However, a technique that combines the benefits of high-throughput in vitro studies with a complex, physiologically relevant microenvironment would be advantageous for understanding drug effects. Organoids provide a unique platform that fulfills these goals. Organoids are generated from excised and digested tumor tissue and are grown in culture. Fluorescence microscopy provides high-resolution images on a similar spatial scale as organoids. In particular, autofluorescence imaging of the metabolic cofactors NAD(P)H and FAD can provide insight into response to anti-cancer treatment. The optical redox ratio reflects relative amounts of NAD(P)H and FAD, and the fluorescence lifetime reflects enzyme activity of NAD(P)H and FAD. This study optimizes and characterizes the generation and culture of organoids grown from head and neck cancer tissue. Additionally, organoids were treated for 24 hours with a standard chemotherapy, and metabolic response in the organoids was measured using optical metabolic imaging. Ultimately, combining head and neck cancer organoids with optical metabolic imaging could be applied to test drug sensitivity for drug development studies as well as treatment planning for cancer patients.

  6. Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) Induced Head & Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Comprehensive Retrospect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishat, Roquaiya; Ramachandra, Sujatha; Kumar, Harish; Bandyopadhyay, Alokenath

    2015-01-01

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma accounts for the sixth most common malignancy occurring worldwide with tobacco and alcohol being the two well established risk factors. In the recent years, substantial evidence has been obtained that Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) associated head and neck cancers are on the rise. This article provides an insight into the structure of HPV genome, molecular pathogenesis, detection methods and clinical implications of HPV positive Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma. PMID:26266234

  7. Bilateral avascular necrosis of the femoral head following asynchronous postictal femoral neck fractures: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatadass, K; Avinash, M; Rajasekaran, S

    2018-05-01

    Bilateral avascular necrosis (AVN) following postictal bilateral fracture neck of the femur is a rare occurrence. Here, we report a case of bilateral AVN of the femoral head following an asynchronous bilateral postictal fracture neck of the femur. A 16-year-old autistic boy presented with left hip pain following an episode of seizures and radiographs showed Delbet type II fracture neck of the left femur. This was treated by closed reduction and cancellous screw fixation and skeletal traction for 6 weeks. At 3 months, follow-up radiograph showed union of the fracture, but he had developed segmental AVN with collapse of the head. At 8 months, the patient presented with pain in the right hip following another episode of seizures and radiograph of the pelvis showed a fresh Delbet type II fracture neck of the right femur with established AVN of the left femoral head. He underwent closed reduction and cancellous screw fixation of the right hip and implant exit of the left hip. At the 6-month follow-up after this surgery, his radiograph of the pelvis showed AVN with collapse and extrusion of the femoral head on the right side as well. Literature review shows an increased risk of fracture neck of the femur among epileptics. The incidence of AVN is maximum in Delbet type I, followed by Delbet type II and type III in that order. Although there are no clear guidelines on the management of post-traumatic AVN of the femoral head, the majority have reported that most of them will eventually develop arthritis and will require total hip replacement at a later date. Upon extensive literature search, no case report of bilateral fracture neck of the femur with bilateral AVN was found and hence this case was reported.

  8. Whole-body magnetic resonance angiography for presurgical planning of free-flap head and neck reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, Manuel; Nkenke, Emeka; Kikuchi, Keiichi; Schwab, Siegfried A.; Janka, Rolf; Uder, Michael; Lell, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Aim of the study was to evaluate if a whole-body magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) protocol meets the requirements to evaluate the donor and host site target vessels for planning of microvascular head and neck reconstructions. Patients and methods: In 20 patients, scheduled for reconstruction of the mandible with fibular free flaps, contrast-enhanced whole-body MRA was performed prior to surgery. 32-Channel 1.5-T MR angiograms were acquired using a 2-step contrast (gadobutrol) injection scheme to visualize the arterial vasculature from head to feet. Maximum intensity projection and multiplanar reconstruction technique was employed to visualize MRA data. For image evaluation the arterial tree was divided into 51 segments. The presence of artefacts impairing diagnostic quality was noted. Evaluable segments were assessed regarding the presence of stenoses >50% diameter reduction, occlusions or aneurysms. Results: No adverse reactions or complications occurred. Of 1020 vessel segments 1003 (98.3%) were evaluable. 36 stenoses >50%, 50 occlusions and one aneurysm were observed. In 21 of 40 lower limbs relevant atherosclerotic changes were depicted. Conclusion: Whole-body MRA proved to be a suitable three-dimensional, noninvasive, nonionising modality for preoperative evaluation of the entire arterial vasculature.

  9. Dentalmaps: Automatic Dental Delineation for Radiotherapy Planning in Head-and-Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thariat, Juliette; Ramus, Liliane; Maingon, Philippe; Odin, Guillaume; Gregoire, Vincent; Darcourt, Vincent; Guevara, Nicolas; Orlanducci, Marie-Helene; Marcie, Serge; Poissonnet, Gilles; Marcy, Pierre-Yves

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To propose an automatic atlas-based segmentation framework of the dental structures, called Dentalmaps, and to assess its accuracy and relevance to guide dental care in the context of intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A multi-atlas–based segmentation, less sensitive to artifacts than previously published head-and-neck segmentation methods, was used. The manual segmentations of a 21-patient database were first deformed onto the query using nonlinear registrations with the training images and then fused to estimate the consensus segmentation of the query. Results: The framework was evaluated with a leave-one-out protocol. The maximum doses estimated using manual contours were considered as ground truth and compared with the maximum doses estimated using automatic contours. The dose estimation error was within 2-Gy accuracy in 75% of cases (with a median of 0.9 Gy), whereas it was within 2-Gy accuracy in 30% of cases only with the visual estimation method without any contour, which is the routine practice procedure. Conclusions: Dose estimates using this framework were more accurate than visual estimates without dental contour. Dentalmaps represents a useful documentation and communication tool between radiation oncologists and dentists in routine practice. Prospective multicenter assessment is underway on patients extrinsic to the database.

  10. Cetuximab & Nivolumab in Patients With Recurrent/Metastatic Head & Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-10

    Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus; Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Cancer; Head and Neck Carcinoma

  11. Unusual Cancers of the Head and Neck

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more information). Unusual Cancers of the Head and Neck Nasopharyngeal Cancer See the PDQ summary on Childhood ... of PDQ documents can be used freely as text. It cannot be identified as an NCI PDQ ...

  12. Manual of head and neck imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raghavan, Prashant; Mukherjee, Sugoto; Jameson, Mark J.; Wintermark, Max

    2014-01-01

    Easy-to-read short chapters. Tables, checklists, and algorithms to assist in arriving at a quick diagnosis. Clinical pearls that will enable the radiologist to issue a relevant report. One-stop resource when preparing for radiology and otolaryngology exams. Line diagrams to illustrate key concepts. This book is designed as an easily readable manual that will be of great practical value for radiology and otolaryngology residents during their clinical rotations. Key facts on head and neck imaging are presented in short chapters written in an easily readable style. Line drawings are used to illustrate key concepts, and tables, checklists, and algorithms will enable the readers to arrive at a quick diagnosis. In addition, emphasis is placed on clinical pearls that will assist them in preparing suitable reports. The Manual of Head and Neck Imaging is sized to allow residents to read it completely within a matter of days, and it will also serve as an ideal quick reference guide as different clinical situations arise.

  13. Evaluation of the dynamic and kinematic performance of the THOR dummy : neck performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoofman, M.; van Ratingen, M.R.; Wismans, J.S.H.M.; Cesari, D.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the frontal head-neck performance of the THOR neck with respect to the human frontal head-neck performance and the Hybrid-III frontal head-neck performance. For this purpose, tests were carried out with an isolated THOR and Hybrid-III head-neck system on a

  14. Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer in Adults - Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Find diagnosis, staging, and treatment information for these head and neck cancers: hypopharynx, larynx, lip and oral cavity, neck cancer with occult primary, nasopharynx, oropharynx, paranasal sinus and nasal cavity, and salivary gland cancer.

  15. Parsing the roles of neck-linker docking and tethered head diffusion in the stepping dynamics of kinesin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhechun; Goldtzvik, Yonathan; Thirumalai, D

    2017-11-14

    Kinesin walks processively on microtubules (MTs) in an asymmetric hand-over-hand manner consuming one ATP molecule per 16-nm step. The individual contributions due to docking of the approximately 13-residue neck linker to the leading head (deemed to be the power stroke) and diffusion of the trailing head (TH) that contributes in propelling the motor by 16 nm have not been quantified. We use molecular simulations by creating a coarse-grained model of the MT-kinesin complex, which reproduces the measured stall force as well as the force required to dislodge the motor head from the MT, to show that nearly three-quarters of the step occurs by bidirectional stochastic motion of the TH. However, docking of the neck linker to the leading head constrains the extent of diffusion and minimizes the probability that kinesin takes side steps, implying that both the events are necessary in the motility of kinesin and for the maintenance of processivity. Surprisingly, we find that during a single step, the TH stochastically hops multiple times between the geometrically accessible neighboring sites on the MT before forming a stable interaction with the target binding site with correct orientation between the motor head and the [Formula: see text] tubulin dimer.

  16. Clinicopathological characteristics of head and neck Merkel cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopf, Andreas; Bas, Murat; Hofauer, Benedikt; Mansour, Naglaa; Stark, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    There are still controversies about the therapeutic strategies and subsequent outcome in head and neck Merkel cell carcinoma. Clinicopathological data of 23 Merkel cell carcinomas, 93 cutaneous head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs), 126 malignant melanomas, and 91 primary parotid gland carcinomas were comprehensively analyzed. Merkel cell carcinomas were cytokeratin 20 (CK20)/neuron-specific enolase (NSE)/chromogranin A (CgA)/synaptophysin (Syn)/thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1)/MIB1 immunostained. All Merkel cell carcinomas underwent wide local excision. Parotidectomy/neck dissection was performed in 40%/33% cutaneous Merkel cell carcinoma and 100%/100% in parotid gland Merkel cell carcinoma. Five-year recurrence-free interval (RFI)/overall survival (OS) was significantly higher in malignant melanoma (81/80%) than in cutaneous Merkel cell carcinoma/HNSCC. Interestingly, 5-year RFI/OS was significantly higher in Merkel cell carcinoma (61%/79%) than in HNSCC (33%/65%; p Merkel cell carcinoma and parotid gland carcinomas, nor in the immunohistochemical profile. Five-year RFI/OS was significantly better in cutaneous Merkel cell carcinoma when compared with TNM classification matched HNSCC. Five-year RFI/OS was comparable in parotid gland Merkel cell carcinoma and other primary parotid gland malignancies. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 39: 92-97, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Use of complementary and alternative medicine in head and neck cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, C M; Ng, A; Loh, K S

    2010-05-01

    To determine the prevalence and profile of patients who use complementary and alternative medicine, within a cohort of head and neck cancer patients. Cross-sectional survey. Ninety-three consecutive head and neck cancer patients being followed up at the department of otolaryngology head and neck surgery were surveyed using an interviewer-administered questionnaire. The prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine use was 67.8 per cent. Patients who used complementary and alternative medicine were more likely to be female, better educated and younger, compared with non-users. A total of 82.5 per cent (52/63) perceived complementary and alternative medicine to be effective, even though they were aware of the lack of research and endorsement by their physician regarding such medicine. The use of complementary and alternative medicine by head and neck cancer patients is common, regardless of efficacy or cost. Clinicians should routinely ask patients about their use of complementary and alternative medicine, to facilitate communication and enable appropriate use of such medicine.

  18. PET with a dual-head coincidence gamma camera in head and neck cancer: A comparison with computed tomography and dedicated PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimny, M.

    2001-01-01

    Positron emission tomography with 18 F-fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG PET) is a promising imaging tool for detecting and staging of primary or recurrent head and neck cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate a dual-head gamma camera modified for coincidence detection (KGK-PET) in comparison to computed tomography (CT) and dedicated PET (dPET). 50 patients with known or suspected primary or recurrent head and neck cancer were enrolled. 32 patients underwent KGK-PET and dPET using a one-day protocol. The sensitivity for the detection of primary/ recurrent head and neck cancer for KGK-PET and CT was 80% and 54%, respectively, specificity was 73% and 82%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity for the detection of lymph node metastases based on neck sides with KGK-PET was 71% (CT: 65%) and 88% (CT: 89%) respectively. In comparison to dPET, KGK-PET revealed concordant results in 32/32 patients with respect to primary tumor/recurrent disease and in 55/60 evaluated neck sides. All involved neck sides that were missed by KGK-PET were also negative with dPET. These results indicate that in patients with head and neck cancer KGK-PET reveals information, that are similar to dPET and complementary to CT. (orig.) [de

  19. Association Between Preoperative Nutritional Status and Postoperative Outcome in Head and Neck Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, John S L; Seto, Alfred; Li, George K H

    2017-04-01

    Head and neck cancer patients treated with surgery often experience significant postoperative morbidities. Administering preoperative nutritional intervention may improve surgical outcomes, but there is currently a paucity of data reviewing the association between preoperative nutritional status and postoperative outcome. It is therefore of importance to investigate this association among head and neck cancer patients. To assess the association between preoperative nutritional status and postoperative outcome in head and neck cancer patients treated with surgery, a retrospective study of 70 head and neck cancer patients who were surgically treated between 2013 and 2014 in a tertiary referral head and neck surgery center in Hong Kong was conducted. Clinical data regarding preoperative nutritional status and postoperative outcome were retrieved from a computer record system. Logistic and linear regressions were used to analyze the appropriate parameters. A higher preoperative albumin level was associated with lower rates of postoperative complications and better wound healing (P cancer patients, preoperative intervention strategies that boost albumin levels could be considered for improving surgical outcome.

  20. An analysis of stabilisation for head and neck image guided IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middleton, Mark; Nguyen, Huong; Plank, Ashley; Jones, Mark; Shannon, Debbie; Sisson, Toni

    2014-01-01

    Aims: Daily IGRT using kV imaging has allowed an enhanced field of view for head and neck IMRT patients. This has allowed the treating radiation therapists to note set-up error beyond traditional spatial or translational and include angular error. This study compares two stabilisation methods for head and neck IGRT and compares spatial and angular error between them. Methods and materials: 9 patients were assessed using a CIVCO S-board and generic Silverman head rest and another 9 patients were assessed using a CIVCO S-board with a CIVCO S-type vac-fix bag. Daily IGRT was undertaken and pre-intervention set-up error collected. This was inclusive of error in the lateral, longitudinal and vertical plans and angular discrepancy between cervical spine 1 and cervical spine 7. Results: The vac-fix solution provided a significant reduction in the systematic yaw position (anterior–posterior) (p = 0.04). It also reduced the mean resultant systematic angular error significantly (p = 0.01). The lateral systematic spatial error was decreased significantly by the vac-fix (p = 0.03) whilst the longitudinal and vertical systematic errors were not. The differences in random error between the two stabilisation solutions were not significant. Conclusion: kV IGRT has allowed treating radiation therapists to note angular error in the head and neck region. This can be difficult to deal with using only IGRT. Stabilisation solutions in the head and neck region must be able to manage both spatial and angular set-up error. The vac-fix solution has improved the management of angular error for head and neck IMRT patients

  1. [Head and neck paragangliomas. Embryological origin and anatomical characteristics: topographic distribution and vascularization pattern].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carretero González, José; Blanco Pérez, Pedro; Vázquez Osorio, María Teresa; Benito González, Fernando; Sañudo Tejedo, José Ramón

    2009-02-01

    Paragangliomas are tumors that arise in the extraadrenal paraganglia and result from migration of neural crest cells during embryonic development. Based on their anatomical distribution, innervation and microscopic structure, these tumors can be classified into interrelated families: branchiomeric paraganglia (related to the branchial clefts and arches), intravagal, aortic-sympathetic and visceral-autonomic. Head and neck paragangliomas belong mainly to the first two of these families. The present article is divided into two parts. The first part reviews the embryological origin of these tumors. Special emphasis is placed on the process of neurulation or neural tube formation, neurosegmentation (with a summary of the mechanisms involved in the initial segmentation of the neural tube and of the hindbrain and spinal medulla), and the development of the sensory placodes and secondary inductions in the cranial region. Subsequently, the neural crest is analyzed, with special attention paid to the cranial neural crest. The embryonogenesis of paragangliomas is also described. The second part describes the topographical distribution of head and neck paragangliomas according to their localization: jugulotympanic, orbit, intercarotid, subclavian and laryngeal. The embryonogenesis and most important anatomical characteristics are described for each type.

  2. Drugs Approved for Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for head and neck cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging in the head and neck tumor diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimoto, Yasuyuki; Igarashi, Masahito; Miyata, Mamoru; Sonoda, Tetsushi; Miyoshi, Shunji; Hiraide, Fumihisa; Morita, Mamoru; Tanaka, Osamu

    1987-06-01

    MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) is a new diagnostic technique that is being applied to study disease processes that involve the upper aero-digestive tract and cranial nerves of interest to otolaryngologist. Seventy four patients with head and neck tumor were enrolled to study the diagnostic efficacy of MRI in comparison with X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT). Five cases of head and neck tumors were presented. Characteristic findings of MRI were discussed. T2 weighted images are very useful in the diagnosis of head and neck tumors. Tumors in the areas surrounded by bone tissue were clearly imaged without such artifacts as recognized in X-ray CT. Information from mutiplane imaging, especially from coronal and sagittal sections, made it easier to determine the type and extent of the lesion. High signal linear parts which are in the periphery of the tumor offer important information that no adhesion is present.

  4. A review of scientific papers about head and neck cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paoli, Severo de; Fonseca, Adenilson de Souza da; Paoli, Flavia de; Geller, Mauro [Centro Universitario Serra dos Orgaos, Teresopolis, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: severodepaoli@gmail.com; Presta, Giuseppe Antonio [Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UNIRIO), RJ (Brazil); Santos-Filho, Sebastiao David; Bernardo-Filho, Mario [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes. Dept. de Biofisica e Biometria

    2008-12-15

    Head and neck cancer is one of the 10 most frequent cancers worldwide, with an estimated 500000 new cases diagnosed annually. Treatment of head and neck cancers require a multidisciplinary approach due their complexity and the functional and esthetic alterations that cancer can cause. The interest of the scientific community in a specific subject can be evaluated by analyzing of the number and the quality of published papers on the topic. The information obtained from PubMed (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez) has been used as a tool in various publications to aid the evaluation of the scientific interest in specific research areas The aim of this work is to evaluate, using PubMed, the scientific interest in studies of head and neck cancer treatments such as radiotherapy, chemotherapy and surgery. The searches were performed on PubMed for publications from the period of 1949 to 2008 using the search terms 'head and neck cancer' and 'surgery' or 'radiotherapy' or 'chemotherapy'. The number of publications per year was determined in each search. The percentage of publications was also calculated for each subject in each year. An interest factor in a subject (IFS) was also determined. The number of publications was higher for surgery than chemotherapy or radiotherapy. The calculated 1964 IFS for surgery was 14.79, 12.74 for radiotherapy, and 19.58 for chemotherapy. The 1995 IFS for surgery was 1.99, 2.09 for radiotherapy, and 2.08 for chemotherapy. The relation obtained for 1995 was maintained in the subsequent years. There are more publications related to surgical treatment for head and neck cancer when compared with radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Moreover, in the recent years there has an increased interest in treatments utilizing chemotherapy, or this associated to radiotherapy. (author)

  5. A review of scientific papers about head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paoli, Severo de; Fonseca, Adenilson de Souza da; Paoli, Flavia de; Geller, Mauro; Presta, Giuseppe Antonio; Santos-Filho, Sebastiao David; Bernardo-Filho, Mario

    2008-01-01

    Head and neck cancer is one of the 10 most frequent cancers worldwide, with an estimated 500000 new cases diagnosed annually. Treatment of head and neck cancers require a multidisciplinary approach due their complexity and the functional and esthetic alterations that cancer can cause. The interest of the scientific community in a specific subject can be evaluated by analyzing of the number and the quality of published papers on the topic. The information obtained from PubMed (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez) has been used as a tool in various publications to aid the evaluation of the scientific interest in specific research areas The aim of this work is to evaluate, using PubMed, the scientific interest in studies of head and neck cancer treatments such as radiotherapy, chemotherapy and surgery. The searches were performed on PubMed for publications from the period of 1949 to 2008 using the search terms 'head and neck cancer' and 'surgery' or 'radiotherapy' or 'chemotherapy'. The number of publications per year was determined in each search. The percentage of publications was also calculated for each subject in each year. An interest factor in a subject (IFS) was also determined. The number of publications was higher for surgery than chemotherapy or radiotherapy. The calculated 1964 IFS for surgery was 14.79, 12.74 for radiotherapy, and 19.58 for chemotherapy. The 1995 IFS for surgery was 1.99, 2.09 for radiotherapy, and 2.08 for chemotherapy. The relation obtained for 1995 was maintained in the subsequent years. There are more publications related to surgical treatment for head and neck cancer when compared with radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Moreover, in the recent years there has an increased interest in treatments utilizing chemotherapy, or this associated to radiotherapy. (author)

  6. Molecular imaging of head and neck cancers. Perspectives of PET/MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stumpp, P.; Kahn, T.; Purz, S.; Sabri, O.

    2016-01-01

    The 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography ( 18 F-FDG-PET/CT) procedure is a cornerstone in the diagnostics of head and neck cancers. Several years ago PET-magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) also became available as an alternative hybrid multimodal imaging method. Does PET/MRI have advantages over PET/CT in the diagnostics of head and neck cancers ?The diagnostic accuracy of the standard imaging methods CT, MRI and PET/CT is depicted according to currently available meta-analyses and studies concerning the use of PET/MRI for these indications are summarized. In all studies published up to now PET/MRI did not show superiority regarding the diagnostic accuracy in head and neck cancers; however, there is some evidence that in the future PET/MRI can contribute to tumor characterization and possibly be used to predict tumor response to therapy with the use of multiparametric imaging. Currently, 18 F-FDG-PET/CT is not outperformed by PET/MRI in the diagnostics of head and neck cancers. The additive value of PET/MRI due to the use of multiparametric imaging needs to be investigated in future research. (orig.) [de

  7. Case Report: Down-staging locally advanced head and neck cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    big meta-analysis of chemotherapy in head and neck cancer. (MACH-NC) involving over ... and neck cancer of squamous cell histology, HIV infected who was down-staged ... of the submitted specimen confirmed ulcerated oral mucosa with an ...

  8. Dynamic MRI of tumours in head and neck with a contrast-enhanced FLASH-2D sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeurer, J.; Rausch, M.; Richter, W.S.; Boeck, J.C.; Steinkamp, H.J.; Vogl, T.J.; Felix, R.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of a dynamic contrast enhanced FLASH-2D sequence for differential diagnosis of tumours in head and neck in 93 patients. Initially, the localization of the lesion and the selection of four representative slices for the dynamic study were obtained by a T2-weighted spin-echo sequence (TR 2000-3000 ms; TE 25/90 ms). After IV bolus injection of the contrast agent 10 images were acquired during a period of 3 min by a FLASH-2D sequence (TR 60 ms; TE 6 ms; flip angle 40 ; matrix 256 x 256; one acquisition). The percentage signal intensity (SI) increase (r) and the slope (S) of the curve were calculated on the basis of the SI time curve of the pathological lesion and of muscle. Inflammatory processes could be differentiated from malignant or benign tumours by means of a higher contrast enhancement. The time of the maximum SI was not specific for the different lesions. In comparison with muscle the maximum SI change was achieved earlier in a pathological process. (orig.)

  9. Shoulder and neck morbidity in quality of life after surgery for head and neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wilgen, C.P.; Dijkstra, P.U.; van der Laan, B.F.; Plukker, J.T.; Roodenburg, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    Background. Quality of life has become a major issue in determining the outcome of treatment in head and neck surgery with curative intent. The aim of our study was to determine which factors in the postoperative care, especially shoulder and neck morbidity, are related to quality of life and how

  10. Standardization of Head and Neck Contouring Using the Acanthiomeatal Line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, Snehal; Teh, Bin S.; Hinojosa, Jose; Bell, Bent C.; Paulino, Arnold C.; Butler, E. Brian

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the perceived and actual chin position(s) used for radiotherapy of head-and-neck cancers in a variety of clinical settings. Dosimetrists were asked to describe the external landmarks used to set the chin position. The lateral treatment planning radiographic figures in Ang's textbook, Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancers: Indications and Techniques, were analyzed for chin position by drawing a horizontal line from the tip of the chin to the cervical spine. The physicians at 7 departments were asked to rate the chin positions used in their departments for head-and-neck simulations. Choices included: (1) mildly flexed, (2) neutral, (3) mildly extended, and (4) hyperextended. In addition, each center was asked to select 2 representative cases to show routine chin position. The dosimetrists fixed the chin in neutral position by placing a virtual plane defined by 3 points (the base of the nasal septum [acanthus] and the external auditory canals) perpendicular to the table top. The type of head holder was irrelevant. Eighty-two percent (31/38) of the figures in Ang's text showed positioning in the neutral position (tip of the chin intersected the cervical spine between C2-3/C3-4). Most (71.4%) of the radiotherapists thought their patients were treated in the hyperextended neck position but, in fact, 85.7% (12/14) of the simulations showed a neural neck position. Reproducible chin positioning can be obtained by using the acanthiomeatal line. Consistent use of this technique will create a uniformly positioned set of axial co-images that have consistent appearance of avoidance and lymphatic areas. This will simplify contouring on axial computed tomography (CT) images of the neck. Standardizing the chin position is an important step to developing a standardized atlas and developing an information tool for automated contouring.

  11. Relationship between ABO blood groups and head and neck cancer among Greek patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakava, Kassiani; Karelas, Ioannis; Koutrafouris, Ioannis; Damianidis, Savvas; Stampouloglou, Paulos; Papadakis, Georgios; Xenos, Antonios; Krania, Foteini; Sarof, Paulos; Tasopoulos, Georgios; Petridis, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    We examined the association of ABO blood groups with the different types of head and neck cancers. 195 diagnosed cases and 801 controls were selected from a Greek tertiary cancer center. Information regarding type of head and neck cancer and ABO blood group was collected and registered. The O blood group was found to be most prevalent followed by A, B and AB among the controls, whereas blood group A followed by O, B and AB was most prevalent among cancer patients. The difference among the distribution between the cases and controls was statistically significant in blood group A (pblood group A had 1.52-fold higher risk of developing head and neck cancer compared to people of other blood groups. Blood group A was found to be a potential risk factor for the development of head and neck cancers.

  12. Clinicopathological correlates of pediatric head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sengupta Subhabrata

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : The spectrum of head and neck tumors in children continues to be the cause of diverse, diagnostically challenging issues. Aims : To demonstrate and compare the unique clinicopathological features in our study population and their correlations with the final histopathological diagnosis. Methods : Fifty-three children with head and neck cancer were examined thoroughly at the Otorhinolaryngology department in a tertiary care teaching hospital followed by histopathological studies. Results : Lymphomas were the most common malignant lesions seen followed by rhabdomyosarcomas, nasopharyngeal carcinomas, and others like thyroid carcinomas and eosinophilic granulomas. In the neck, the commonest cause of primary malignant disease was lymphoma; however, the most frequent lesion was reactive lymphadenitis. In the sinonasal region, the commonest malignancy was rhabdomyosarcoma, which often had extension to the orbit and the face. Recurrent epistaxis was found universally in the malignant cases of this region. In the facial region, disfiguring swelling with proptosis was mainly caused by rhabdomyosarcoma. The only case of tonsillar malignancy was due to non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The duration of disease was less than 1 year. Conclusion : The most common manifestation of the malignant lesions in the pediatric age group was with a history of an enlarging, painless neck swelling. Still, an insignificant lump in the neck or recurrent bleeding from nose may be the manifestation of an underlying cancer.

  13. Clinically practical intensity modulation for complex head and neck lesions using multiple, static MLC fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verhey, L.J.; Xia, P.; Akazawa, P.

    1997-01-01

    times were estimated on the basis of our own experience and that of other investigators. Results: Comparable DVH's for target volumes were obtained for 3DCRT and for each of the IMRT methods investigated. Typical dose heterogeneities within the target volume were 15 - 20%. In each case, doses were normalized so that at least 95% of the target volume received the prescribed dose. For both cases, the Peacock MIMiC delivered the least dose to the critical normal tissues. The MSMLC plans used 4 or 5 axial beam directions which were carefully selected to avoid or minimize overlap between normal tissues and the target volume and thereby reduce the need for intensity modulation to the point where 3 intensity levels were adequate to produce excellent conformal plans. The normal tissue DVH's for these MSMLC plans were as good as or better than DMLC with 9 evenly spaced fields and 10 intensity levels. The MLC shapes for each beam were obtained by applying an algorithm designed to minimize the number of segments per field consistent with the mechanical constraints of the MLC. In general, 7 or 8 MLC patterns were required per beam to produce 3-level intensity patterns. For the more complex of the 2 cases studied, a total of 4 fields and 29 MLC segments was required. The time required to deliver all fields for a single treatment for either MSMLC or DMLC is expected to be less than 15 minutes. Conclusions: IMRT dose distributions for complex tumors of the head and neck are significantly better than the best that can be obtained with 3DCRT methods with partial transmission blocks. MSMLC plans can produce dose distributions which are as good as or better than those obtained by more complex dynamic IMRT methods. By judicious selection of beam directions, the number of fields and the number of intensity levels and MLC segments per field can be small enough to make MSMLC clinically practical. The simplicity and ease of verification of the 'stop and shoot' MSMLC method of IMRT beam

  14. Intravoxel incoehrent motion MR imaging in the head and neck: Correlation with dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Xiao Quan; Choi, Young Jun; Sung, Yu Sub; Jang, Seung Won; Park, Ji Eun; Heo, Young Jin; Beak, Jung Hwan; Lee, Jeong Hyun [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Ra Gyoung [Dept. of Radiology, Catholic Kwandong University International St. Mary' s Hospital, Catholic Kwandong University College of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    To investigate the correlation between perfusion- and diffusion-related parameters from intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) and those from dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging (DCE-MRI) and diffusion-weighted imaging in tumors and normal muscles of the head and neck. We retrospectively enrolled 20 consecutive patients with head and neck tumors with MR imaging performed using a 3T MR scanner. Tissue diffusivity (D), pseudo-diffusion coefficient (D{sup *}), and perfusion fraction (f) were derived from bi-exponential fitting of IVIM data obtained with 14 different b-values in three orthogonal directions. We investigated the correlation between D, f, and D{sup *} and model-free parameters from the DCE-MRI (wash-in, T{sub max}, E{sub max}, initial AUC{sub 60}, whole AUC) and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value in the tumor and normal masseter muscle using a whole volume-of-interest approach. Pearson's correlation test was used for statistical analysis. No correlation was found between f or D{sup *} and any of the parameters from the DCE-MRI in all patients or in patients with squamous cell carcinoma (p > 0.05). The ADC was significantly correlated with D values in the tumors (p < 0.001, r = 0.980) and muscles (p = 0.013, r = 0.542), despite its significantly higher value than D. The difference between ADC and D showed significant correlation with f values in the tumors (p = 0.017, r = 0.528) and muscles (p = 0.003, r = 0.630), but no correlation with D{sup *} (p > 0.05, respectively). Intravoxel incoherent motion shows no significant correlation with model-free perfusion parameters derived from the DCE-MRI but is feasible for the analysis of diffusivity in both tumors and normal muscles of the head and neck.

  15. Intravoxel Incoherent Motion MR Imaging in the Head and Neck: Correlation with Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MR Imaging and Diffusion-Weighted Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Xiao Quan [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029 (China); Choi, Young Jun; Sung, Yu Sub [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Ra Gyoung [Department of Radiology, Catholic Kwandong University International St. Mary' s Hospital, Catholic Kwandong University College of Medicine, Incheon 22711 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Seung Won; Park, Ji Eun [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of); Heo, Young Jin [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiology, Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan 47392 (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Jung Hwan; Lee, Jeong Hyun [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the correlation between perfusion- and diffusion-related parameters from intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) and those from dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging (DCE-MRI) and diffusion-weighted imaging in tumors and normal muscles of the head and neck. We retrospectively enrolled 20 consecutive patients with head and neck tumors with MR imaging performed using a 3T MR scanner. Tissue diffusivity (D), pseudo-diffusion coefficient (D{sup *}), and perfusion fraction (f) were derived from bi-exponential fitting of IVIM data obtained with 14 different b-values in three orthogonal directions. We investigated the correlation between D, f, and D{sup *} and model-free parameters from the DCE-MRI (wash-in, T{sub max}, E{sub max}, initial AUC{sub 60}, whole AUC) and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value in the tumor and normal masseter muscle using a whole volume-of-interest approach. Pearson's correlation test was used for statistical analysis. No correlation was found between f or D{sup *} and any of the parameters from the DCE-MRI in all patients or in patients with squamous cell carcinoma (p > 0.05). The ADC was significantly correlated with D values in the tumors (p < 0.001, r = 0.980) and muscles (p = 0.013, r = 0.542), despite its significantly higher value than D. The difference between ADC and D showed significant correlation with f values in the tumors (p = 0.017, r = 0.528) and muscles (p = 0.003, r = 0.630), but no correlation with D{sup *} (p > 0.05, respectively). Intravoxel incoherent motion shows no significant correlation with model-free perfusion parameters derived from the DCE-MRI but is feasible for the analysis of diffusivity in both tumors and normal muscles of the head and neck.

  16. Intravoxel incoehrent motion MR imaging in the head and neck: Correlation with dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Xiao Quan; Choi, Young Jun; Sung, Yu Sub; Jang, Seung Won; Park, Ji Eun; Heo, Young Jin; Beak, Jung Hwan; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Yoon, Ra Gyoung

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the correlation between perfusion- and diffusion-related parameters from intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) and those from dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging (DCE-MRI) and diffusion-weighted imaging in tumors and normal muscles of the head and neck. We retrospectively enrolled 20 consecutive patients with head and neck tumors with MR imaging performed using a 3T MR scanner. Tissue diffusivity (D), pseudo-diffusion coefficient (D * ), and perfusion fraction (f) were derived from bi-exponential fitting of IVIM data obtained with 14 different b-values in three orthogonal directions. We investigated the correlation between D, f, and D * and model-free parameters from the DCE-MRI (wash-in, T max , E max , initial AUC 60 , whole AUC) and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value in the tumor and normal masseter muscle using a whole volume-of-interest approach. Pearson's correlation test was used for statistical analysis. No correlation was found between f or D * and any of the parameters from the DCE-MRI in all patients or in patients with squamous cell carcinoma (p > 0.05). The ADC was significantly correlated with D values in the tumors (p < 0.001, r = 0.980) and muscles (p = 0.013, r = 0.542), despite its significantly higher value than D. The difference between ADC and D showed significant correlation with f values in the tumors (p = 0.017, r = 0.528) and muscles (p = 0.003, r = 0.630), but no correlation with D * (p > 0.05, respectively). Intravoxel incoherent motion shows no significant correlation with model-free perfusion parameters derived from the DCE-MRI but is feasible for the analysis of diffusivity in both tumors and normal muscles of the head and neck

  17. Pictorial essay: Vascular interventions in extra cranial head and neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suyash S Kulkarni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Medicine is an ever changing field and interventional radiology (IR procedures are becoming increasingly popular because of high efficacy and its minimally invasive nature of the procedure. Management of disease processes in the extra cranial head and neck (ECHN has always been a challenge due to the complex anatomy of the region. Cross sectional imaging of the ECHN has grown and evolved tremendously and occupies a pivotal and integral position in the clinical management of variety of head and neck pathologies. Advances in angiographic technologies including flat panel detector systems, biplane, and 3-dimensional rotational angiography have consolidated and expanded the role of IR in the management of various ECHN pathologies. The ECHN is at cross roads between the origins of great vessels and the cerebral vasculature. Thorough knowledge of functional and technical aspects of neuroangiography is essential before embarking on head and neck vascular interventions. The vessels of the head and neck can be involved by infectious and inflammatory conditions, get irradiated during radiotherapy and injured due to trauma or iatrogenic cause. The ECHN is also a common site for various hypervascular neoplasms and vascular malformations, which can be treated with endovascular and percutaneous embolization. This pictorial essay provides a review of variety of ECHN pathologies which were managed by various IR procedures using different approaches.

  18. Imaging of head and neck venous malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flis, Christine M.; Connor, Stephen E.

    2005-01-01

    Venous malformations (VMs) are non proliferative lesions that consist of dysplastic venous channels. The aim of imaging is to characterise the lesion and define its anatomic extent. We will describe the plain film, ultrasound (US) (including colour and duplex Doppler), computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), conventional angiographic and direct phlebographic appearances of venous malformations. They will be illustrated at a number of head and neck locations, including orbit, oral cavity, superficial and deep facial space, supraglottic and intramuscular. An understanding of the classification of such vascular anomalies is required to define the correct therapeutic procedure to employ. Image-guided sclerotherapy alone or in combination with surgery is now the first line treatment option in many cases of head and neck venous malformations, so the radiologist is now an integral part of the multidisciplinary management team. (orig.)

  19. Selective pathologies of the head and neck in children: a developmental perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozolek, John A

    2009-09-01

    The range of pathology seen in the head and neck region is truly amazing and to a large extent probably mirrors the complex signaling pathways and careful orchestration of events that occurs between the primordial germ layers during the development of this region. As is true in general for the entire discipline of pediatric pathology, the head and neck pathology within this age group is as diverse and different as its adult counterpart. Cases that come across the pediatric head and neck surgical pathology bench are more heavily weighted toward developmental and congenital lesions such as branchial cleft anomalies, thyroglossal duct cysts, ectopias, heterotopias, choristomas, and primitive tumors. Many congenital "benign" lesions can cause significant morbidity and even mortality if they compress the airway or other vital structures. Exciting investigations into the molecular embryology of craniofacial development have begun to shed light on the pathogenesis of craniofacial developmental lesions and syndromes. Much more investigation is needed, however, to intertwine aberrations in the molecular ontogeny and development of the head and neck regions to the represented pathology. This review will integrate traditional morphologic embryology with some of the recent advances in the molecular pathways of head and neck development followed by a discussion of a variety of developmental lesions finishing with tumors presumed to be derived from pluripotent/progenitor cells and tumors that show anomalous or aborted development.

  20. Head pain referral during examination of the neck in migraine and tension-type headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Dean H; Drummond, Peter D

    2012-09-01

    To investigate if and to what extent typical head pain can be reproduced in tension-type headache (TTH), migraine without aura sufferers, and controls when sustained pressure was applied to the lateral posterior arch of C1 and the articular pillar of C2, stressing the atlantooccipital and C2-3 segments respectively. Occipital and neck symptoms often accompany primary headache, suggesting involvement of cervical afferents in central pain processing mechanisms in these disorders. Referral of head pain from upper cervical structures is made possible by convergence of cervical and trigeminal nociceptive afferent information in the trigemino-cervical nucleus. Upper cervical segmental and C2-3 zygapophysial joint dysfunction is recognized as a potential source of noxious afferent information and is present in primary headache sufferers. Furthermore, referral of head pain has been demonstrated from symptomatic upper cervical segments and the C2-3 zygapophysial joints, suggesting that head pain referral may be a characteristic of cervical afferent involvement in headache. Thirty-four headache sufferers and 14 controls were examined interictally. Headache patients were diagnosed according the criteria of the International Headache Society and comprised 20 migraine without aura (females n = 18; males n = 2; average age 35.3 years) and 14 TTH sufferers (females n = 11; males n = 3; average age 30.7 years). Two techniques were used specifically to stress the atlantooccipital segments (Technique 1 - C1) and C2-3 zygapophysial joints (Technique 2 - C2). Two techniques were also applied to the arm--the common extensor origin and the mid belly of the biceps brachii. Participants reported reproduction of head pain with "yes" or "no" and rated the intensity of head pain and local pressure of application on a scale of 0 -10, where 0 = no pain and 10 = intolerable pain. None of the subjects reported head pain during application of techniques on the arm. Head pain referral during the

  1. Tackler’s head position relative to the ball carrier is highly correlated with head and neck injuries in rugby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Yoshinori; Shiota, Yuki; Ota, Chihiro; Yoneda, Takeshi; Tahara, Shigeyuki; Maki, Nobukazu; Matsuura, Takahiro; Sekiguchi, Masahiro; Itoigawa, Yoshiaki; Tateishi, Tomohiko; Kaneko, Kazuo

    2018-01-01

    Objectives To characterise the tackler’s head position during one-on-one tackling in rugby and to determine the incidence of head, neck and shoulder injuries through analysis of game videos, injury records and a questionnaire completed by the tacklers themselves. Methods We randomly selected 28 game videos featuring two university teams in competitions held in 2015 and 2016. Tackles were categorised according to tackler’s head position. The ‘pre-contact phase’ was defined; its duration and the number of steps taken by the ball carrier prior to a tackle were evaluated. Results In total, 3970 tackles, including 317 (8.0%) with the tackler’s head incorrectly positioned (ie, in front of the ball carrier) were examined. Thirty-two head, neck or shoulder injuries occurred for an injury incidence of 0.8% (32/3970). The incidence of injury in tackles with incorrect head positioning was 69.4/1000 tackles; the injury incidence with correct head positioning (ie, behind or to one side of the ball carrier) was 2.7/1000 tackles. Concussions, neck injuries, ‘stingers’ and nasal fractures occurred significantly more often during tackles with incorrect head positioning than during tackles with correct head positioning. Significantly fewer steps were taken before tackles with incorrect head positioning that resulted in injury than before tackles that did not result in injury. Conclusion Tackling with incorrect head position relative to the ball carrier resulted in a significantly higher incidence of concussions, neck injuries, stingers and nasal fractures than tackling with correct head position. Tackles with shorter duration and distance before contact resulted in more injuries. PMID:29162618

  2. Early detection by sup(99m)Tc-Sn-pyrophosphate scintigraphy of femoral head necrosis following medial femoral neck fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greiff, J.; Lanng, S.; Hoeilund-Carlsen, P.F.; Karle, A.K.; Uhrenholdt, A.

    1980-01-01

    A selected series of 24 patients with displaced medial femoral neck fracture, treated with closed reduction and osteosynthesis with cancellous bone screws (ASIF), were investigated. During an observation period of 6 to 26 months, serial hip joint scintigraphies were performed and compared with serial X-ray examinations. At the first scintigraphic examination performed on average 5-6 weeks after the fracture, two separate investigators found a decreased amount of activity or no activity in the femoral head of 10 and 8 patients, respectively. At the second scintigraphic examination performed on average 11.1 weeks after the fracture both investigators found no activity or a decreased amount of activity in 8 patients. This figure declined to 7 during the following period, because one patient with decreased activity was recorded as having normal activity 15 months after the fracture. These 7 patients all developed radiological signs of femoral head collapse on average 16.3 months after the fracture (range 5-26 months), whereas their scintigrams displayed decreased or absent tracer uptake on average 1.2 months after the fracture (P<0.01). None of the patients with initially normal or increased uptake later showed decreased or absent uptake during the study and none developed radiological collapse. It may be concluded that absent or decreased uptake of sup(99m)Tc-Sn-pyrophosphate in the femoral head following medial femoral neck fracture indicates femoral head necrosis and a high risk of late segmental collapse, whereas normal or increased uptake implying preserved blood supply means that late segmental collapse will probably never develop. (author)

  3. Predictors of Pain among Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuman, Andrew G.; Terrell, Jeffrey E.; Light, Emily; Wolf, Gregory T.; Bradford, Carol R.; Chepeha, Douglas; Jiang, Yunyun; McLean, Scott; Ghanem, Tamer A.; Duffy, Sonia A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Pain is a strong contributor to cancer patients’ quality of life. The objective of this study was to determine predictors of pain 1 year after the diagnosis of head and neck cancer. Design Prospective, multi-site cohort study. Setting Three academically-affiliated medical centers. Patients Previously untreated patients with carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract (n=374). Main Outcome Measures Participants were surveyed pre-treatment and 1 year thereafter. Multivariate analyses were conducted to determine predictors of the SF-36 bodily pain score 1 year after diagnosis. Results The mean SF-36 bodily pain score at 1 year was 65, compared to 61 at diagnosis (p=.004), compared to 75 among population norms (lower scores indicate worse pain). Variables independently associated with pain included pre-treatment pain score (p<0.001), less education (p=0.02), neck dissection (p=0.001), feeding tube (p=0.05), xerostomia (p<0.001), depressive symptoms (p<0.001), taking more pain medication (p<0.001), less physical activity (p=.02), and poor sleep quality (p=0.006). Current smoking and problem drinking were marginally significant (p=0.07 and 0.08, respectively). Conclusions Aggressive pain management may be indicated for head and neck cancer patients who undergo neck dissections, complain of xerostomia, require feeding tubes, and have medical comorbidities. Treatment of modifiable risk factors such as depression, poor sleep quality, tobacco and alcohol abuse may also reduce pain and improve quality of life among head and neck cancer patients. PMID:23165353

  4. Lymphoma no Hodgkin extra nodal in head and neck: value of CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos Aguilar, A.; Romance Garcia, A.; Fuentes Lupianez, J.J.; Sanchez Lafuente, J.; Rodriguez Sanpedro, F.

    1994-01-01

    The head and neck regions is one of the most common sites of extra nodal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). We studied 7 cases of NHL of head and neck using CT enhanced with intravenous contrast medium, analyzing the important role it plays in diagnosis, treatment planning and evaluation of the recurrence of these tumors. (Author)

  5. Cost-effectiveness of simultaneous versus sequential surgery in head and neck reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kevin K; Enepekides, Danny J; Higgins, Kevin M

    2011-02-01

    To determine whether simultaneous (ablation and reconstruction overlaps by two teams) head and neck reconstruction is cost effective compared to sequentially (ablation followed by reconstruction) performed surgery. Case-controlled study. Tertiary care hospital. Oncology patients undergoing free flap reconstruction of the head and neck. A match paired comparison study was performed with a retrospective chart review examining the total time of surgery for sequential and simultaneous surgery. Nine patients were selected for both the sequential and simultaneous groups. Sequential head and neck reconstruction patients were pair matched with patients who had undergone similar oncologic ablative or reconstructive procedures performed in a simultaneous fashion. A detailed cost analysis using the microcosting method was then undertaken looking at the direct costs of the surgeons, anesthesiologist, operating room, and nursing. On average, simultaneous surgery required 3 hours 15 minutes less operating time, leading to a cost savings of approximately $1200/case when compared to sequential surgery. This represents approximately a 15% reduction in the cost of the entire operation. Simultaneous head and neck reconstruction is more cost effective when compared to sequential surgery.

  6. [The related factors of head and neck mocosal melanoma with lymph node metastasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, G F; Guo, W; Chen, X H; Huang, Z G

    2017-12-05

    Objective: To investigate the related factors of mucosal melanoma of head and neck with lymph node metastasis for early diagnosis and further treatments. Method: A retrospective analysis of 117 cases of head and neck mucosal malignant melanoma patients which received surgical treatment was performed. Eleven cases of patients with pathologically confirmed lymph node metastasis and 33 cases without lymph node metastasis (1∶3) were randomly selected to analyze. The related factors of lymph node metastasis of head and neck mucosal melanoma patients including age, gender, whether the existence of recurrence, bone invasion, lesion location were analyzed. The single factor and logistic regression analysis were performed, P difference was statistically significant. Result: The lymph node metastasis rate of head and neck mucosal melanoma was 9.40%(11/117), the single factor analysis showed that there were 3 factors to be associated with lymph node metastasis, which was recurrence ( P =0.0000), bone invasion ( P =0.001), primary position ( P =0.007). Recurrence ( P =0.021) was a risk factor for lymph node metastasis according to the Logistic regression analysis, and the impact of bone invasion ( P =0.487) and primary location ( P =0.367) remained to be further explored. Conclusion: The patients of head and neck mucosal melanoma with the presence of recurrent usually accompanied by a further progression of the disease, such as lymph node metastasis, so for recurrent patients should pay special attention to the situation of lymph node and choose the reasonable treatment. Copyright© by the Editorial Department of Journal of Clinical Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery.

  7. Evaluation of the dynamic and kinematic performance of the THOR dummy: neck performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoofman, M.; Ratingen, M.R. van; Wismans, J.S.H.M.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the frontal head-neck performance of the THOR neck with respect to the human frontal head-neck performance and the Hybrid-III frontal head-neck performance. For this purpose, tests were carried out with an isolated THOR and Hybrid-III-neck system on a HyGe

  8. Quantitative Ultrasonic Nakagami Imaging of Neck Fibrosis After Head and Neck Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaofeng [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Yoshida, Emi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Cassidy, Richard J.; Beitler, Jonathan J.; Yu, David S.; Curran, Walter J. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Liu, Tian, E-mail: tliu34@emory.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of ultrasound Nakagami imaging to quantitatively assess radiation-induced neck fibrosis, a common sequela of radiation therapy (RT) to the head and neck. Methods and Materials: In a pilot study, 40 study participants were enrolled and classified into 3 subgroups: (1) a control group of 12 healthy volunteers; (2) an asymptomatic group of 11 patients who had received intensity modulated RT for head and neck cancer and had experienced no neck fibrosis; and (3) a symptomatic group of 17 post-RT patients with neck fibrosis. Each study participant underwent 1 ultrasound study in which scans were performed in the longitudinal orientation of the bilateral neck. Three Nakagami parameters were calculated to quantify radiation-induced tissue injury: Nakagami probability distribution function, shape, and scaling parameters. Physician-based assessments of the neck fibrosis were performed according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late morbidity scoring scheme, and patient-based fibrosis assessments were rated based on symptoms such as pain and stiffness. Results: Major discrepancies existed between physician-based and patient-based assessments of radiation-induced fibrosis. Significant differences in all Nakagami parameters were observed between the control group and 2 post-RT groups. Moreover, significant differences in Nakagami shape and scaling parameters were observed among asymptomatic and symptomatic groups. Compared with the control group, the average Nakagami shape parameter value increased by 32.1% (P<.001), and the average Nakagami scaling parameter increased by 55.7% (P<.001) for the asymptomatic group, whereas the Nakagami shape parameter increased by 74.1% (P<.001) and the Nakagami scaling parameter increased by 83.5% (P<.001) for the symptomatic group. Conclusions: Ultrasonic Nakagami imaging is a potential quantitative tool to characterize radiation-induced asymptomatic and symptomatic neck fibrosis.

  9. Quantitative Ultrasonic Nakagami Imaging of Neck Fibrosis After Head and Neck Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Yoshida, Emi; Cassidy, Richard J.; Beitler, Jonathan J.; Yu, David S.; Curran, Walter J.; Liu, Tian

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of ultrasound Nakagami imaging to quantitatively assess radiation-induced neck fibrosis, a common sequela of radiation therapy (RT) to the head and neck. Methods and Materials: In a pilot study, 40 study participants were enrolled and classified into 3 subgroups: (1) a control group of 12 healthy volunteers; (2) an asymptomatic group of 11 patients who had received intensity modulated RT for head and neck cancer and had experienced no neck fibrosis; and (3) a symptomatic group of 17 post-RT patients with neck fibrosis. Each study participant underwent 1 ultrasound study in which scans were performed in the longitudinal orientation of the bilateral neck. Three Nakagami parameters were calculated to quantify radiation-induced tissue injury: Nakagami probability distribution function, shape, and scaling parameters. Physician-based assessments of the neck fibrosis were performed according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late morbidity scoring scheme, and patient-based fibrosis assessments were rated based on symptoms such as pain and stiffness. Results: Major discrepancies existed between physician-based and patient-based assessments of radiation-induced fibrosis. Significant differences in all Nakagami parameters were observed between the control group and 2 post-RT groups. Moreover, significant differences in Nakagami shape and scaling parameters were observed among asymptomatic and symptomatic groups. Compared with the control group, the average Nakagami shape parameter value increased by 32.1% (P<.001), and the average Nakagami scaling parameter increased by 55.7% (P<.001) for the asymptomatic group, whereas the Nakagami shape parameter increased by 74.1% (P<.001) and the Nakagami scaling parameter increased by 83.5% (P<.001) for the symptomatic group. Conclusions: Ultrasonic Nakagami imaging is a potential quantitative tool to characterize radiation-induced asymptomatic and symptomatic neck fibrosis

  10. Head And Neck Rhabdomyosacroma In Childhood: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Rhabdomyosarcoma may be histologically indistinguishable from other undifferentiated childhood tumours occurring in the head and neck region on routine heamatoxylin and eosin staining. Aim: aimed at assessing the usefulness of employing immunohistochemistry, as an adjunct to routine H&E staining, ...

  11. Clinical problems of multiple primary cancers including head and neck cancers. From the viewpoint of radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, Masamichi; Myojin, Miyako; Nishiyama, Noriaki; Taguchi, Hiroshi; Takagi, Masaru; Tanaka, Katsuhiko

    2003-01-01

    A total of 2144 head and neck cancers were treated by radiotherapy at the National Sapporo Hospital between 1974 and 2001. Of these, 313 (14.6%) were found to have other primary cancers besides head and neck cancer, in which double cancers were 79% and triple or more cancers were 21%. Frequency according to primary site of the first head and neck cancer was oral cavity: 107/603 (17.7%), epipharynx cancer: 7/117 (6.0%), oropharyngeal cancer: 63/257 (24.5%), hypopharyngeal cancer: 65/200 (32.5%), laryngeal cancer: 114/558 (20.4%), and nose/paranasal sinus: 4.9% respectively. Esophageal cancer, head and neck cancer, lung cancer and gastric cancer were very frequent as other primary sites combined with the head and neck. The first onset region was the head and neck in 233 out of 313 cases with multiple primary cancers. The five-year survival rate from the onset of head and neck cancers is 52%, 10-year: 30%, and 5-year cause-specific survival rate 82%, and 10-year: 78%, respectively. The treatment possibilities in multiple primary cancers tend to be limited because the treatment areas are sometimes overlapped. New approaches to the treatment of multiple primary cancers should be considered in the future. (author)

  12. The head problem. The organizational significance of segmentation in head development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horder, Tim J; Presley, Robert; Slípka, Jaroslav

    2010-01-01

    This review argues for the segmental basis of chordate head organization which, like somite-based segmental organization in the trunk, takes its origin from early mesodermal development. The review builds on, and brings up to date, Goodrich's well-known scheme of head organization. It surveys recent data in support of this scheme and shows how evidence and arguments supposedly in conflict with it can be accommodated. Many of the arguments revolve around matters of methodology; the limitations of older LM, SEM (on which the concept of "somitomeres" is based) and recent molecular evidence (which has sometimes been seen as allocating the central role in head organization to the CNS and the neural crest) are highlighted and shown to explain a number of claims contrary to Goodrich's. We provide (in Part 2) a new, comparative survey of the best available evidence most directly relevant to the Goodrich Bauplan, with a special emphasis on stem chordates. The postotic region has commonly been seen as segmentally organized: the critical issues concern the preotic region. There are many reasons why Goodrich's three preotic segments may become specialized during evolution and why the underlying initial segmental organization may be overridden in later stages during embryonic development; we refer to a number of these. We conclude that the preotic segmental Bauplan is remarkably conserved and most explicitly demonstrated among stem forms, but we also suggest that the concept of the prechordal plate requires careful reexamination. Central to our overall analysis is the importance of the epigenetic nature of embryogenesis; its implications are made clear. Finally we speculate on evolutionary implications for the origin of the head and its specialized features. The review is intended to serve as a resource giving access to references to a wealth of now neglected, older data on anamniote embryology.

  13. Biomechanics of Head, Neck, and Chest Injury Prevention for Soldiers: Phase 2 and 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-10-2-0165 TITLE: “ Biomechanics of Head, Neck, and Chest Injury Prevention for Soldiers: Phase 2 & 3”.” PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...27Sep2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-10-2-0165 “ Biomechanics of Head, Neck, and Chest Injury Prevention for Soldiers: Phase 2...Virginia Tech – Wake Forest University, Center for Injury Biomechanics and the U.S. Army entitled “ Biomechanics of Head, Neck, and Chest Injury

  14. Coherent Raman Scattering Microscopy for Evaluation of Head and Neck Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoesli, Rebecca C; Orringer, Daniel A; McHugh, Jonathan B; Spector, Matthew E

    2017-09-01

    Objective We aim to describe a novel, label-free, real-time imaging technique, coherent Raman scattering (CRS) microscopy, for histopathological evaluation of head and neck cancer. We evaluated the ability of CRS microscopy to delineate between tumor and nonneoplastic tissue in tissue samples from patients with head and neck cancer. Study Design Prospective case series. Setting Tertiary care medical center. Subjects and Methods Patients eligible were surgical candidates with biopsy-proven, previously untreated head and neck carcinoma and were consented preoperatively for participation in this study. Tissue was collected from 50 patients, and after confirmation of tumor and normal specimens by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E), there were 42 tumor samples and 42 normal adjacent controls. Results There were 42 confirmed carcinoma specimens on H&E, and CRS microscopy identified 37 as carcinoma. Of the 42 normal specimens, CRS microscopy identified 40 as normal. This resulted in a sensitivity of 88.1% and specificity of 95.2% in distinguishing between neoplastic and nonneoplastic images. Conclusion CRS microscopy is a unique label-free imaging technique that can provide rapid, high-resolution images and can accurately determine the presence of head and neck carcinoma. This holds potential for implementation into standard practice, allowing frozen margin evaluation even at institutions without a histopathology laboratory.

  15. Current and future state of chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuwa, Nobukazu

    2002-01-01

    Radiation therapy was the conventional treatment for locally advanced, nonresectable head and neck cancer. However, therapeutic results were poor with this treatment modality, and chemoradiotherapy has been used in an effort to improve therapeutic results. Improved local-regional control and disease-free or overall survival have been shown in several randomized trials using a concurrent or alternative approach. Induction chemotherapy (neoadjuvant chemotherapy), however, has not been shown to improve local-regional control or survival. Induction chemotherapy followed by definitive radiotherapy may be useful in the selection of patients who are likely to benefit from non-surgical organ preservation treatment schemes. Further clinical trials are needed to clarify the most suitable combination of chemotherapy and radiation. Intraarterial chemotherapy combined with radiation therapy for head and neck cancer has been attempted for many years. However, the indications, clinical significance, and selection of suitable anti-cancer drugs remain unclarified. The modern superselective intraarterial approach should be re-evaluated. Many head and neck cancers have been found to overexpress the receptor to epidermal growth factor (EGFR). Antibodies such as IMC-C225 that specifically target EGF receptors with radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy may prove to be valuable contributors to the treatment of advanced head and neck cancer. (author)

  16. Head and neck injuries from the Boston Marathon bombing at four hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ajay K; Buch, Karen; Sung, Edward; Abujudeh, Hani; Sakai, Osamu; Aaron, Sodickson; Lev, Michael

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the imaging findings of head and neck injuries in patients from the Boston Marathon bombing. A total of 115 patients from the Boston Marathon bombing presenting to four hospitals who underwent imaging to evaluate for head and neck injuries were included in the study. Twelve patients with positive findings on radiography or cross-sectional imaging were included in the final analysis. The radiographic, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features of these patients were evaluated for the presence of shrapnel and morphological abnormality. Head and neck injuries were seen in 12 out of 115 patients presenting to the four hospitals. There were secondary blast injuries to the head and neck in eight patients, indicated by the presence of shrapnel on imaging. In the four patients without shrapnel, there were two with subgaleal hematomas, one with facial contusion and one with mastoid injury. There were two patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage, one with brain contusion, one with cerebral laceration, and one with globe rupture. There was frontal bone, nasal bone, and orbital wall fracture in one patient each. Imaging identified 26 shrapnel fragments, 21 of which were ball bearings. Injuries to the head and neck region identified on imaging from the Boston Marathon bombing were not common. The injuries seen were predominantly secondary blast injuries from shrapnel, and did not result in calvarial penetration of the shrapnel fragments.

  17. Pulmonary complication associated with head and neck cancer surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manzoor, T.; Ahmed, Z.; Sheikh, N.A.; Khan, M.M.

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the frequency of short-term pulmonary complications in the patients undergoing various head and neck cancer surgeries in our setup and to assess possible risk factors responsible for these complications. Seventy patients of age group 20 to 80 years, regardless of gender, treated surgically for head and neck cancers were enrolled. Main outcome measures included development of pulmonary complications following 15 days of oncological surgery. The complications studied were pneumothorax, bronchopneumonia, atelectasis, pulmonary embolism and cardiopulmonary arrest. A total of 24.28% patients suffered from postoperative pulmonary complications; 17.14% developed bronchopneumonia, 5.71% pulmonary embolism, and 1.42% went into cardiopulmonary arrest, none developed pneumothorax or pulmonary atelectasis. A significant correlation of postoperative bronchopneumonia was seen with heavy smoking and assisted ventilation. Pulmonary embolism was associated with extended assisted ventilation and prolonged surgery. Cardiopulmonary arrest was associated with comorbidity and assisted ventilation after surgery. The frequency of bronchopneumonia supersedes all of the postoperative pulmonary complications in head and neck oncological surgery. Patients at risk of developing postoperative complications are heavy smokers, diabetics, those undergoing prolonged surgery, tracheostomy, and extended assisted ventilation. (author)

  18. Environmental tobacco smoking, mutagen sensitivity, and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z F; Morgenstern, H; Spitz, M R; Tashkin, D P; Yu, G P; Hsu, T C; Schantz, S P

    2000-10-01

    Although active tobacco smoking has been considered a major risk factor for head and neck cancer, few studies have evaluated environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) and its interaction with mutagen sensitivity on the risk of head and neck cancer. We investigated the relationship between ETS and head and neck cancer in a case-control study of 173 previously untreated cases with pathologically confirmed diagnoses of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck and 176 cancer-free controls at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center between 1992 and 1994. A structured questionnaire was used to collect ETS exposure and other covariates including a history of active tobacco smoking and alcohol use. ETS measures include a history of ETS exposure at home and at workplace. The associations between passive smoking and head and neck cancer were analyzed by Mantel-Haenszel methods and logistic regression models. Additive and multiplicative models were used to evaluate effect modifications between ETS and mutagen sensitivity. The crude odds ratio (OR) for ETS exposure was 2.8 [95% confidence intervals (CI), 1.3-6.0]. Controlling for age, sex, race, education, alcohol consumption, pack-years of cigarette smoking, and marijuana use, the risk of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck was increased with ETS (adjusted OR, 2.4; 95% CI, 0.9-6.8). Dose-response relationships were observed for the degree of ETS exposure; the adjusted ORs were 2.1 (95% CI, 0.7-6.1) for those with moderate exposure and 3.6 (95% CI, 1.1-11.5) for individuals with heavy exposure (P for trend = 0.025), in comparison with those who never had ETS exposures. These associations and the dose-response relationships were still present when the analysis was restricted to nonactive smoking cases and controls (crude OR, 2.2; 95% CI, 0.6-8.4). Crude odds ratios were 1.8 for those with moderate ETS exposure and 4.3 for individuals with heavy ETS exposure among nonsmoking cases and controls (P for trend = 0.008). More

  19. Neck Kinematics and Electromyography While Wearing Head Supported Mass During Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanks, Matthew M; Sefton, JoEllen M; Oliver, Gretchen D

    2018-01-01

    Advanced combat helmets (ACH) coupled with night-vision goggles (NVG) are required for tactical athletes during training and service. Head and neck injuries due to head supported mass (HSM) are a common occurrence in military personnel. The current study aimed to investigate the effects of HSM on neck muscle fatigue that may lead to chronic stress and injury of the head and neck. Subjects wore an ACH and were affixed with electromagnetic sensors to obtain kinematic data, as well as EMG electrodes to obtain muscle activations of bilateral sternocleidomastoid, upper trapezius, and paraspinal muscles while running on a treadmill. Subjects performed a 2-min warmup at a walking pace, a 5-min warmup jog, running at a pace equal to 90% maximum heart rate until absolute fatigue, and lastly a 2-min cooldown at a walking pace. Kinematic and EMG data were collected over each 2-min interval. Days later, the same subjects wore the same ACH in addition to the NVG and performed the same protocol as the first session. This study showed significant differences in muscle activation of the right upper trapezius [F(1,31) = 10.100] and both sternocleidomastoid [F(1,31) = 12.280] muscles from pre-fatigue to absolute fatigue. There were no significant differences noted in the kinematic variables. This study suggests that HSM can fatigue bilateral neck flexors and rotators, as well as fatigue the neck extensors and rotators on the contralateral side of the mounted NVG.Hanks MM, Sefton JM, Oliver GD. Neck kinematics and electromyography while wearing head supported mass during running. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2018; 89(1):9-13.

  20. Improved normal tissue sparing in head and neck radiotherapy using biological cost function based-IMRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, N; Lawford, C; Khoo, V; Rolfo, M; Joon, D L; Wada, M

    2011-12-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has reduced the impact of acute and late toxicities associated with head and neck radiotherapy. Treatment planning system (TPS) advances in biological cost function based optimization (BBO) and improved segmentation techniques have increased organ at risk (OAR) sparing compared to conventional dose-based optimization (DBO). A planning study was undertaken to compare OAR avoidance in DBO and BBO treatment planning. Simultaneous integrated boost treatment plans were produced for 10 head and neck patients using both planning systems. Plans were compared for tar get coverage and OAR avoidance. Comparisons were made using the BBO TPS Monte Carlo dose engine to eliminate differences due to inherent algorithms. Target coverage (V95%) was maintained for both solutions. BBO produced lower OAR doses, with statistically significant improvement to left (12.3%, p = 0.005) and right parotid mean dose (16.9%, p = 0.004), larynx V50_Gy (71.0%, p = 0.005), spinal cord (21.9%, p < 0.001) and brain stem dose maximums (31.5%, p = 0.002). This study observed improved OAR avoidance with BBO planning. Further investigations will be undertaken to review any clinical benefit of this improved planned dosimetry.

  1. Volumetric visualization of head and neck CT data for treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jean S.; Jani, Ashesh B.; Pelizzari, Charles A.; Haraf, Daniel J.; Vokes, Everett E.; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Chen, George T.Y.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the utility of volume rendering, an alternative visualization technique to surface rendering, in the practice of CT based radiotherapy planning for the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Rendo-avs, a volume visualization tool developed at the University of Chicago, was used to volume render head and neck CT scans from two cases. Rendo-avs is a volume rendering tool operating within the graphical user interface environment of AVS (Application Visualization System). Users adjust the opacity of various tissues by defining the opacity transfer function (OTF), a function which preclassifies voxels by opacity prior to rendering. By defining the opacity map (OTF), the user selectively enhances and suppresses structures of various intensity. Additional graphics tools are available within the AVS network, allowing for the manipulation of perspective, field of view, data orientation. Users may draw directly on volume rendered images, create a partial surface, and thereby correlate objects in the 3D scene to points on original axial slices. Information in volume rendered images is mapped into the original CT slices via a Z buffer, which contains the depth information (Z coordinate) for each pixel in the rendered view. Locally developed software was used to project conventionally designed GTV contours onto volume rendered images. Results: The lymph nodes, salivary glands, vessels, and airway are visualized in detail without prior manual segmentation. Volume rendering can be used to explore the finer anatomic structures that appear on consecutive axial slices as 'points'. Rendo-avs allowed for acceptable interactivity, with a processing time of approximately 5 seconds per 256 x 256 pixel output image. Conclusions: Volume rendering is a useful alternative to surface rendering, offering high-quality visualization, 3D anatomic delineation, and time savings to the user, due to the elimination of manual segmentation as a preprocessing step. Volume rendered

  2. Morbidity after neck dissection in head and neck cancer patients : a study describing shoulder and neck complaints, and quality of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilgen, Cornelis Paul van

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis we are aiming at more insight in morbidity after head and neck cancer treatment (resection of the primary tumour, neck dissection and pre-or post-operative radiation therapy). We will study shoulder complaints and the role of the spinal accessory nerve, pain and the underlying pain

  3. The burden of chronic pain after major head and neck tumor therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Sulieman Terkawi

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Our study highlighted the high burden of chronic pain after therapy for major head and neck tumors. We identified demographic and clinical factors that are associated with the presence of chronic pain. Further studies are required to better understand the risk factors to implement strategies to prevent, alleviate, and treat chronic pain associated with major head and neck tumor therapies.

  4. MRI Sequences in Head & Neck Radiology - State of the Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmann, Gerlig; Henninger, Benjamin; Kremser, Christian; Jaschke, Werner

    2017-05-01

    Background  Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an essential imaging modality for the evaluation of head & neck pathologies. However, the diagnostic power of MRI is strongly related to the appropriate selection and interpretation of imaging protocols and sequences. The aim of this article is to review state-of-the-art sequences for the clinical routine in head & neck MRI and to describe the evidence for which medical question these sequences and techniques are useful. Method  Literature review of state-of-the-art sequences in head & neck MRI. Results and Conclusion  Basic sequences (T1w, T2w, T1wC+) and fat suppression techniques (TIRM/STIR, Dixon, Spectral Fat sat) are important tools in the diagnostic workup of inflammation, congenital lesions and tumors including staging. Additional sequences (SSFP (CISS, FIESTA), SPACE, VISTA, 3D-FLAIR) are used for pathologies of the cranial nerves, labyrinth and evaluation of endolymphatic hydrops in Menière's disease. Vessel and perfusion sequences (3D-TOF, TWIST/TRICKS angiography, DCE) are used in vascular contact syndromes, vascular malformations and analysis of microvascular parameters of tissue perfusion. Diffusion-weighted imaging (EPI-DWI, non-EPI-DWI, RESOLVE) is helpful in cholesteatoma imaging, estimation of malignancy, and evaluation of treatment response and posttreatment recurrence in head & neck cancer. Understanding of MRI sequences and close collaboration with referring physicians improves the diagnostic confidence of MRI in the daily routine and drives further research in this fascinating image modality. Key Points:   · Understanding of MRI sequences is essential for the correct and reliable interpretation of MRI findings.. · MRI protocols have to be carefully selected based on relevant clinical information.. · Close collaboration with referring physicians improves the output obtained from the diagnostic possibilities of MRI.. Citation Format · Widmann G, Henninger B, Kremser C et

  5. Marijuana use and increased risk of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z F; Morgenstern, H; Spitz, M R; Tashkin, D P; Yu, G P; Marshall, J R; Hsu, T C; Schantz, S P

    1999-12-01

    Marijuana is the most commonly used illegal drug in the United States. In some subcultures, it is widely perceived to be harmless. Although the carcinogenic properties of marijuana smoke are similar to those of tobacco, no epidemiological studies of the relationship between marijuana use and head and neck cancer have been published. The relationship between marijuana use and head and neck cancer was investigated by a case-control study of 173 previously untreated cases with pathologically confirmed diagnoses of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck and 176 cancer-free controls at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center between 1992 and 1994. Epidemiological data were collected by using a structured questionnaire, which included history of tobacco smoking, alcohol use, and marijuana use. The associations between marijuana use and head and neck cancer were analyzed by Mantel-Haenszel methods and logistic regression models. Controlling for age, sex, race, education, alcohol consumption, pack-years of cigarette smoking, and passive smoking, the risk of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck was increased with marijuana use [odds ratio (OR) comparing ever with never users, 2.6; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.1-6.6]. Dose-response relationships were observed for frequency of marijuana use/day (P for trend marijuana use (P for trend marijuana use were observed with cigarette smoking, mutagen sensitivity, and to a lesser extent, alcohol use. Our results suggest that marijuana use may increase the risk of head and neck cancer with a strong dose-response pattern. Our analysis indicated that marijuana use may interact with mutagen sensitivity and other risk factors to increase the risk of head and neck cancer. The results need to be interpreted with some caution in drawing causal inferences because of certain methodological limitations, especially with regard to interactions.

  6. Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer in Adults - Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Find information about prognosis, staging, and treatment for adult head and neck cancer sites: hypopharynx, larynx, lip and oral cavity, neck cancer with occult primary, nasopharynx, oropharynx, paranasal sinus and nasal cavity, and salivary gland cancer.

  7. Systematic evaluation of three different commercial software solutions for automatic segmentation for adaptive therapy in head-and-neck, prostate and pleural cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Macchia, Mariangela; Fellin, Francesco; Amichetti, Maurizio; Cianchetti, Marco; Gianolini, Stefano; Paola, Vitali; Lomax, Antony J; Widesott, Lamberto

    2012-01-01

    To validate, in the context of adaptive radiotherapy, three commercial software solutions for atlas-based segmentation. Fifteen patients, five for each group, with cancer of the Head&Neck, pleura, and prostate were enrolled in the study. In addition to the treatment planning CT (pCT) images, one replanning CT (rCT) image set was acquired for each patient during the RT course. Three experienced physicians outlined on the pCT and rCT all the volumes of interest (VOIs). We used three software solutions (VelocityAI 2.6.2 (V), MIM 5.1.1 (M) by MIMVista and ABAS 2.0 (A) by CMS-Elekta) to generate the automatic contouring on the repeated CT. All the VOIs obtained with automatic contouring (AC) were successively corrected manually. We recorded the time needed for: 1) ex novo ROIs definition on rCT; 2) generation of AC by the three software solutions; 3) manual correction of AC. To compare the quality of the volumes obtained automatically by the software and manually corrected with those drawn from scratch on rCT, we used the following indexes: overlap coefficient (DICE), sensitivity, inclusiveness index, difference in volume, and displacement differences on three axes (x, y, z) from the isocenter. The time saved by the three software solutions for all the sites, compared to the manual contouring from scratch, is statistically significant and similar for all the three software solutions. The time saved for each site are as follows: about an hour for Head&Neck, about 40 minutes for prostate, and about 20 minutes for mesothelioma. The best DICE similarity coefficient index was obtained with the manual correction for: A (contours for prostate), A and M (contours for H&N), and M (contours for mesothelioma). From a clinical point of view, the automated contouring workflow was shown to be significantly shorter than the manual contouring process, even though manual correction of the VOIs is always needed

  8. Systematic evaluation of three different commercial software solutions for automatic segmentation for adaptive therapy in head-and-neck, prostate and pleural cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Macchia, Mariangela; Fellin, Francesco; Amichetti, Maurizio; Cianchetti, Marco; Gianolini, Stefano; Paola, Vitali; Lomax, Antony J; Widesott, Lamberto

    2012-09-18

    To validate, in the context of adaptive radiotherapy, three commercial software solutions for atlas-based segmentation. Fifteen patients, five for each group, with cancer of the Head&Neck, pleura, and prostate were enrolled in the study. In addition to the treatment planning CT (pCT) images, one replanning CT (rCT) image set was acquired for each patient during the RT course. Three experienced physicians outlined on the pCT and rCT all the volumes of interest (VOIs). We used three software solutions (VelocityAI 2.6.2 (V), MIM 5.1.1 (M) by MIMVista and ABAS 2.0 (A) by CMS-Elekta) to generate the automatic contouring on the repeated CT. All the VOIs obtained with automatic contouring (AC) were successively corrected manually. We recorded the time needed for: 1) ex novo ROIs definition on rCT; 2) generation of AC by the three software solutions; 3) manual correction of AC.To compare the quality of the volumes obtained automatically by the software and manually corrected with those drawn from scratch on rCT, we used the following indexes: overlap coefficient (DICE), sensitivity, inclusiveness index, difference in volume, and displacement differences on three axes (x, y, z) from the isocenter. The time saved by the three software solutions for all the sites, compared to the manual contouring from scratch, is statistically significant and similar for all the three software solutions. The time saved for each site are as follows: about an hour for Head&Neck, about 40 minutes for prostate, and about 20 minutes for mesothelioma. The best DICE similarity coefficient index was obtained with the manual correction for: A (contours for prostate), A and M (contours for H&N), and M (contours for mesothelioma). From a clinical point of view, the automated contouring workflow was shown to be significantly shorter than the manual contouring process, even though manual correction of the VOIs is always needed.

  9. Systematic evaluation of three different commercial software solutions for automatic segmentation for adaptive therapy in head-and-neck, prostate and pleural cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    La Macchia Mariangela

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To validate, in the context of adaptive radiotherapy, three commercial software solutions for atlas-based segmentation. Methods and materials Fifteen patients, five for each group, with cancer of the Head&Neck, pleura, and prostate were enrolled in the study. In addition to the treatment planning CT (pCT images, one replanning CT (rCT image set was acquired for each patient during the RT course. Three experienced physicians outlined on the pCT and rCT all the volumes of interest (VOIs. We used three software solutions (VelocityAI 2.6.2 (V, MIM 5.1.1 (M by MIMVista and ABAS 2.0 (A by CMS-Elekta to generate the automatic contouring on the repeated CT. All the VOIs obtained with automatic contouring (AC were successively corrected manually. We recorded the time needed for: 1 ex novo ROIs definition on rCT; 2 generation of AC by the three software solutions; 3 manual correction of AC. To compare the quality of the volumes obtained automatically by the software and manually corrected with those drawn from scratch on rCT, we used the following indexes: overlap coefficient (DICE, sensitivity, inclusiveness index, difference in volume, and displacement differences on three axes (x, y, z from the isocenter. Results The time saved by the three software solutions for all the sites, compared to the manual contouring from scratch, is statistically significant and similar for all the three software solutions. The time saved for each site are as follows: about an hour for Head&Neck, about 40 minutes for prostate, and about 20 minutes for mesothelioma. The best DICE similarity coefficient index was obtained with the manual correction for: A (contours for prostate, A and M (contours for H&N, and M (contours for mesothelioma. Conclusions From a clinical point of view, the automated contouring workflow was shown to be significantly shorter than the manual contouring process, even though manual correction of the VOIs is always needed.

  10. Head and neck trauma in Iraq and Afghanistan: different war, different surgery, lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Joseph

    2013-10-01

    The objectives are to compare and contrast the head and neck trauma experience in Iraq and Afghanistan and to identify trauma lessons learned that are applicable to civilian practice. A retrospective review of one head and neck surgeon's operative experience in Iraq and Afghanistan was performed using operative logs and medical records. The surgeon's daily operative log book with patient demographic data and operative reports was reviewed. Also, patient medical records were examined to identify the preoperative and postoperative course of care. The head and neck trauma experiences in Iraq and Afghanistan were very different, with a higher percentage of emergent cases performed in Iraq. In Iraq, only 10% of patients were pretreated at a facility with surgical capabilities. In Afghanistan, 93% of patients were pretreated at such facilities. Emergent neck exploration for penetrating neck trauma and emergent airway surgery were more common in Iraq, which most likely accounted for the increased perioperative mortality also seen in Iraq (5.3% in Iraq vs. 1.3% in Afghanistan). Valuable lessons regarding soft tissue trauma repair, midface fracture repair, and mandible fracture repair were learned. The head and neck trauma experiences in Iraq and Afghanistan were very different, and the future training for mass casualty trauma events should reflect these differences. Furthermore, valuable head and neck trauma lessons learned in both war zones are applicable to the civilian practice of trauma. Level 4. Copyright © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  11. Automatic planning of head and neck treatment plans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hazell, Irene; Bzdusek, Karl; Kumar, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    radiation dose planning (dosimetrist) and potentially improve the overall plan quality. This study evaluates the performance of the Auto-Planning module that has recently become clinically available in the Pinnacle3 radiation therapy treatment planning system. Twenty-six clinically delivered head and neck...... as the previously delivered clinical plans. For all patients, the Auto-Planning tool produced clinically acceptable head and neck treatment plans without any manual intervention, except for the initial target and OAR delineations. The main benefit of the method is the likely improvement in the overall treatment......Treatment planning is time-consuming and the outcome depends on the person performing the optimization. A system that automates treatment planning could potentially reduce the manual time required for optimization and could also pro-vide a method to reduce the variation between persons performing...

  12. [Volume changes to the neck lymph node metastases in head-neck tumors. The evaluation of radiotherapeutic treatment success].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liszka, G; Thalacker, U; Somogyi, A; Németh, G

    1997-08-01

    This work is engaged with the volume change of neck lymph node metastasis of malignant tumors in the head-neck region during radiotherapy. In 54 patients with head and neck tumors, the volume of neck lymph nodes before and after radiation was measured. The volumetry was done with CT planimetry. The total dose was 66 Gy (2 Gy/d) telecobalt from 2 lateral opponated fields. The time of volume change could be defined with measuring of the half-time and the doubling-time by the help of Schwartz formula. After 10 Gy the volume diminution was about 20% and half-time 24 to 26 days. Afterwards the time of volume diminution picked up speed and finally achieved 60 to 72%. Meanwhile the half-time decreased to the half value. The result was independent of the site of primary tumor, the patient's sex and age. In our opinion the effectivity of radiotherapy can best be judged with defining of the volume change of lymph nodes of the neck.

  13. Oral sequelae of head and neck radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissink, A; Jansma, J; Spijkervet, FKL; Burlage, FR; Coppes, RP

    In addition to anti-tumor effects, ionizing radiation causes damage in normal tissues located in the radiation portals. Oral complications of radiotherapy in the head and neck region are the result of the deleterious effects of radiation on, e. g., salivary glands, oral mucosa, bone, dentition,

  14. Automatic skull segmentation from MR images for realistic volume conductor models of the head: Assessment of the state-of-the-art

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Duemose; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard; Puonti, Oula

    2018-01-01

    Anatomically realistic volume conductor models of the human head are important for accurate forward modeling of the electric field during transcranial brain stimulation (TBS), electro- (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG). In particular, the skull compartment exerts a strong influence on the fi......Anatomically realistic volume conductor models of the human head are important for accurate forward modeling of the electric field during transcranial brain stimulation (TBS), electro- (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG). In particular, the skull compartment exerts a strong influence...... local defects. In contrast to FSL BET2, the SPM12-based segmentation with extended spatial tissue priors and the BrainSuite-based segmentation provide coarse reconstructions of the vertebrae, enabling the construction of volume conductor models that include the neck. We exemplarily demonstrate...

  15. Benign aggressive lesions of femoral head and neck: Is salvage possible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogesh Panchwagh

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Benign aggressive bone lesions of the femoral head and neck are mostly seen in young adults and warrant treatment for pain, impending fracture or established fracture, and disease clearance. It becomes challenging to treat them effectively while attempting salvage of the femoral head and yet achieving long term disease control with minimum complications. We describe our technique and experience in dealing with these lesions which can achieve the above-mentioned goals and can be easily replicated. Materials and Methods: We analyzed 15 cases of surgically treated, biopsy-proven benign, locally aggressive lesions affecting the femoral head and neck in skeletally mature individuals. All cases were treated with extended curettage through anterolateral modified Smith–Petersen approach along with tricortical iliac crest bone graft (combined with fibular graft in some cases reconstruction with or without suitable internal fixation. Results: All, except one, patients were available for follow up. The age ranged from 18 to 43 years and the follow up ranged between 24 and 124 months (average 78 months. These included aneurysmal bone cysts (9, giant cell tumors (4, and fibrous dysplasia (2. The indication was pain (8, with impending (2 or established pathological neck femur fracture (5. In all cases, there was satisfactory healing of lesion and timely rehabilitation. Nonunion, avascular necrosis or local recurrences were not seen. The MSTS functional score was good or excellent in all (range 26–29, average 28. Conclusion: Benign aggressive lesions affecting femoral head and neck in young and middle-aged adults pose a treatment challenge. A sturdy, lasting reconstruct with acceptable functional outcome and minimal recurrence rate can be achieved by salvaging the femoral head and neck using curettage and reconstruction, obviating the need for replacement at such an early age.

  16. Head and Neck Cancers in North-East Iran: A 25 year Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Emadzadeh

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Cancers are among the worst noncommunicable diseases around the world. Head and neck cancers are ranked as the fifth most common cancers worldwide. As there are different distributions of risk factors around the world, the incidence of these cancers varies from one place to another. Materials and Methods: We conducted a descriptive analytic cross-sectional study, based on census-based records from the private oncology clinic in Mashhad, Iran. Data from 1,075 patients with head and neck cancers were analyzed from 1986 to 2010. We categorized the duration of study into five periods: 1986–1990, 1991–1995, 1996–2000, 2001–2005, and 2006–2010. Head and neck cancers refers to cancers originating from seven sites in the head and neck including the nasal cavity, oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, salivary glands, paranasal sinuses, and thyroid. Results: Data of 1,075 patients were analyzed. 66.2% were male. Mean ± standard deviation (SD age at the time of diagnosis was 55.37±15.55 years. The most frequent type of head and neck cancer was larynx cancer (36%, followed by pharynx (28.5%, oral (17.5%, thyroid (6.8%, sinus (6.4%, salivary gland (4.10%, and nasal cancer (0.70%. although larynx cancer was the most frequent cancer over the whole study duration, there was a significant (P=0.04 difference in the relative frequency of these cancers across the five time periods. There was a significant difference in mean age between cancer categories (P

  17. Oral complications in the head and neck radiation patient. Introduction and scope of the problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, Lena

    2002-01-01

    Head and neck cancer arises in the upper aerodigestive tract, most commonly in the oral cavity, pharynx, and larynx. The anatomy and physiology of this region are uniquely complex, and the function and appearance are critical to patients' self-image and quality of life. Head and neck cancer is re...... care for these patients. New developments in radiotherapy techniques are expected to lead to even higher cure rates and fewer side effects in patients with head and neck cancer....... survival but has also increased treatment side effects. A dedicated multidisciplinary team of oncologist, head and neck surgeon, dentist, nurse, dietician, physical therapist, social worker and in some instances plastic surgeon, prosthodontist, and psychologist is needed to provide the optimal supportive...

  18. Recurrence and survival after neck dissections in cutaneous head and neck melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter Stemann; Chakera, Annette Hougaard; Thamsborg, Andreas Key Milan

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: An important prognostic factor in head and neck melanoma is the status of the regional lymph nodes since the presence of metastatic disease in the nodes greatly aggravates the prognosis. There is no consensus on the surgical treatment algorithm for this group. Our aim was to study i...

  19. Target definition in prostate, head, and neck

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rasch, Coen; Steenbakkers, Roel; van Herk, Marcel

    2005-01-01

    Target definition is a major source of errors in both prostate and head and neck external-beam radiation treatment. Delineation errors remain constant during the course of radiation and therefore have a large impact on the dose to the tumor. Major sources of delineation variation are visibility of

  20. Magnetic resonance angiography for the head and neck region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aschenbach, R.; Esser, D.

    2004-01-01

    Magnetic resonance angiography is a noninvasive method in vascular imaging using noncontrast- enhanced and contrast-enhanced techniques. The contrast media used in contrast- enhanced magnetic resonance angiography are different from the X-ray contrast media and do not affect the thyroid gland or renal function. In detecting hypervascularized lesions in the head and neck, contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography is the method of choice, which provides an acceptable quality in comparison to digital subtraction angiography. Future developments in magnetic resonance imaging techniques will cause a wider use of magnetic resonance angiography, especially in head and neck imaging. Digital subtraction angiography should therefore only be used in problem cases and for preoperative embolization [de

  1. Targeted therapies and radiation for the treatment of head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Gwi Eon

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide an update on novel radiation treatments for head and neck cancer. Despite the remarkable advances in chemotherapy and radiotherapy techniques, the management of advanced head and neck cancer remains challenging. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is an appealing target for novel therapies in head and neck cancer because not only EGFR activation stimulates many important signaling pathways associated with cancer development and progression, and importantly, resistance to radiation. Furthermore, EGFR overexpression is known to be portended for a worse outcome in patients with advanced head and neck cancer. Two categories of compounds designed to abrogate EGFR signaling, such as monoclonal antibodies (Cetuximab) and tyrosine kinase inhibitors (ZD1839 and OSI-774) have been assessed and have been most extensively studied in preclinical models and clinical trials. Additional TKIs in clinical trials include a reversible agent, Cl-1033, which blocks activation of all erbB receptors. Encouraging preclinical data for head and neck cancers resulted in rapid translation into the clinic. Results from initial clinical trials show rather surprisingly that only minority of patients benefited from EGFR inhibition as monotherapy or in combination with chemotherapy. In this review, we begin with a brief summary of erbB-mediated signal transduction. Subsequently, we present data on prognostic-predictive value of erbB receptor expression in HNC followed by preclinical and clinical data on the role of EGFR antagonists alone or in combination with radiation in the treatment of HNC. Finally, we discuss the emerging thoughts on resistance to EGFR blockade and efforts in the development of multiple-targeted therapy for combination with chemotherapy or radiation. Current challenges for investigators are to determine (1) who will benefit from targeted agents and which agents are most appropriate to combine with radiation and/or chemotherapy, (2

  2. Liposomal treatment of xerostomia, odor, and taste abnormalities in patients with head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiser, Clemens; Hofauer, Benedikt; Scherer, Elias; Schukraft, Johannes; Knopf, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Smell and taste disorders, sicca symptoms, can be detected in patients with head and neck cancer. The purpose of this study was to assess the utility of local liposomal application in the treatment of patients with head and neck cancers. Ninety-eight patients with head and neck cancer were included in this study. The groups were defined as: group 1 = only surgery; group 2 = surgery + adjuvant radiochemotherapy; and group 3 = primarily radiochemotherapy. All patients had finished cancer treatment and received liposomal sprays for the nose and mouth for 2 months (LipoNasal, LipoSaliva; Optima Pharmaceutical GmbH, Germany) and suffered from taste and smell disorders. We performed tests with "Sniffin' Sticks," "Taste Strips," and a xerostomia questionnaire before and after treatment. After application of liposomes, patients demonstrated a statistically significant increase in smell and taste, and reduced xerostomia. Our results demonstrate that using nonpharmaceutical liposomal sprays improve smell, taste, and symptoms of xerostomia in patients with head and neck cancer. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: E1232-E1237, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Value of PET/CT in the approach to head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curioni, Otavio Alberto; Amar, Ali; Viana, Debora [Hospital Heliopolis, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Service of Head and Neck Surgery and Otorhynolaryngology; Souza, Ricardo Pires de [Hospital Heliopolis, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Service of Radiology; Rapoport, Abrao [Hospital Heliopolis, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Dedivitis, Rogerio Aparecido [Universidade de Sao Paulo (HC-FMUSP), SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Group of Larynx and Hypopharynx; Cernea, Claudio Roberto; Brandao, Lenine Garcia [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FMUSP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Dept. of Head and Neck Surgery

    2012-11-15

    Objective: To evaluate the role of PET/CT in the approach to patients with head and neck cancer. Materials and Methods: Retrospective study of medical records and PET/CT images of 63 patients with head and neck cancer. Results: Alterations were observed in 76% of the cases. Out of these cases, 7 (11%) were considered as false-positive, with SUV < 5.0. PET/CT demonstrated negative results in 15 cases (24%). Among the 14 cases where the method was utilized for staging, 3 (22%) had their stages changed. Conclusion: PET/CT has shown to be of potential value in the routine evaluation of patients with head and neck cancer, but further studies of a higher number of cases are required to define a protocol for utilization of the method. (author)

  4. Sequential response patterns to chemotherapy and radiotherapy in head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, W.K.; O'Donoghue, G.M.; Sheetz, S.

    1985-01-01

    Surgery and/or radiotherapy have been the standard therapies for locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck region. Despite major improvement in these therapeutic techniques, the control rate in cases of advanced cancer remains poor. More recently, induction chemotherapy as initial treatment has been used in previously untreated squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. For the last 6 years at the Boston Veterans Administration (V.A.) Medical Center, initial induction chemotherapy followed by surgery and/or radiotherapy has been employed in the treatment of advanced head and neck cancer. The use of chemotherapy and radiotherapy has allowed the authors to monitor and correlate sequential response patterns produced by each modality of treatment. The authors have observed that responders to chemotherapy can be predicted to have further response to subsequent radiotherapy

  5. The management of vacuum neck drains in head and neck surgery and the comparison of two different practice protocols for drain removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasbekar, A V; Davies, F; Upile, N; Ho, M W; Roland, N J

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The management of vacuum neck drains in head and neck surgery is varied. We aimed to improve early drain removal and therefore patient discharge in a safe and effective manner. Methods The postoperative management of head and neck surgical patients with vacuum neck drains was reviewed retrospectively. A new policy was then implemented to measure drainage three times daily (midnight, 6am, midday). The decision for drain removal was based on the most recent drainage period (at Measuring drainage volumes three times daily allows for more accurate assessment of wound drainage, and this can lead to earlier removal of neck drains and safe discharge.

  6. Hypothyroidism after radiotherapy for head and neck cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozawa, Hiroyuki; Saito, Hideyuki; Inagaki, Kouji; Mizutari, Kunio

    2004-01-01

    We report two cases of hypothyroidism with clinical symptoms that occurred after radiotherapy for cancer of the head and neck. The first patient underwent total laryngectomy without thyroidectomy for laryngeal cancer and partial gastrectomy for gastric cancer. Radiation of the neck was carried out postoperatively. Two years later, he developed chest pain and pericardial effusion was detected, leading to a diagnosis of myxedema due to hypothyroidism. The second patient received radiotherapy alone for laryngeal carcinoma. Two months later, a low serum sodium concentration and anemia were detected, both of which proved difficult to correct. The cause of these changes was found subsequently to be hypothyroidism. From the experience of these 2 cases, we measured thyroid function in 37 patients who had received neck radiation for head and neck cancers at our hospital over the past 10 years. In 13 of the 37 patients (35%), hypothyroidism was observed. The prevalence of hypothyroidism was higher in the 13 patients treated with both radiation and surgery, with 6 (46%) showing this condition, compared with 7 of the 24 patients (29%) who received radiation alone. The risk factor responsible for hypothyroidism was not evident from statistical analysis of these cases. We consider that thyroid function should be evaluated periodically in patients who have received neck radiotherapy, as it is often difficult to diagnose hypothyroidism from clinical symptoms. (author)

  7. [Application of virtual reality in surgical treatment of complex head and neck carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y Q; Li, C; Shui, C Y; Cai, Y C; Sun, R H; Zeng, D F; Wang, W; Li, Q L; Huang, L; Tu, J; Jiang, J

    2018-01-07

    Objective: To investigate the application of virtual reality technology in the preoperative evaluation of complex head and neck carcinoma and he value of virtual reality technology in surgical treatment of head and neck carcinoma. Methods: The image data of eight patients with complex head and neck carcinoma treated from December 2016 to May 2017 was acquired. The data were put into virtual reality system to built the three-dimensional anatomical model of carcinoma and to created the surgical scene. The process of surgery was stimulated by recognizing the relationship between tumor and surrounding important structures. Finally all patients were treated with surgery. And two typical cases were reported. Results: With the help of virtual reality, surgeons could adequately assess the condition of carcinoma and the security of operation and ensured the safety of operations. Conclusions: Virtual reality can provide the surgeons with the sensory experience in virtual surgery scenes and achieve the man-computer cooperation and stereoscopic assessment, which will ensure the safety of surgery. Virtual reality has a huge impact on guiding the traditional surgical procedure of head and neck carcinoma.

  8. Brachytherapy for head and neck cancer. Treatment results and future prospect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibuya, Hitoshi; Yoshimura, Ro-ichi; Miura, Masahiko; Ayukawa, Fumio; Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    Following the increasing desire of many patients to keep the form and function of speech and swallowing, interstitial brachytherapy has become the main treatment for head and neck cancer. In addition, aged and physically handicapped patients who are refused general anesthesia have come to be referred to our clinic to receive less invasive and curative treatment. In the field of brachytherapy for head and neck cancers, less complicated and more superior treatment results have been achieved following the introduction of spacers, computer dosimetry and so on. As a result of these efforts, treatment results have come to fulfill the desire of patients and their families. During the past 43 years from 1962 to 2005, we have treated over 2, 100 patients of head and neck cancer including 850 with stage I·II oral tongue carcinoma by brachytherapy and acquired a lot of important and precious data including the treatment results, multiple primary cancers as well as radiation-induced cancers. (author)

  9. Nurse-led psychosocial interventions in follow-up care for head and neck cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Goeij, IC

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Head and neck cancer and its treatment frequently results in long-term physical problems, such as dry mouth, difficulty eating, impaired speech and/or altered shoulder function. In part because of these persisting problems, head and neck cancer patients are prone to deteriorated

  10. Radiotherapy in head and neck: a standard treatment?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santini Blasco, A; Torres Lopez, M; Apardian Manougian, R

    1998-01-01

    The present work is an exhaustive revision of the literature regarding the employment of combined treatments of radiochemotherapy in the head and neck neoplasms. The sanitary importance of this group of illnesses starts to become remarkable not only due to their frequency but for the high percentage of patients that present themselves for consultation with an advanced illness where the results of the classic treatments of surgery and radiotherapy are discouraging. These results are poor for the survival as well as in the quality of this. It analyzes the role of the different pharmaceuticals used in patients as well as the fundamentally different associations with radiotherapy: neoadjuvant, adjuvant and concomitant. These results allow to affirm that this treatment form is elected for those patients with advanced tumors of head and neck with a general state that allows to tolerate a bigger toxicity [es

  11. Sex Differences in Anthropometrics and Heading Kinematics Among Division I Soccer Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretzin, Abigail C; Mansell, Jamie L; Tierney, Ryan T; McDevitt, Jane K

    Soccer players head the ball repetitively throughout their careers; this is also a potential mechanism for a concussion. Although not all soccer headers result in a concussion, these subconcussive impacts may impart acceleration, deceleration, and rotational forces on the brain, leaving structural and functional deficits. Stronger neck musculature may reduce head-neck segment kinematics. The relationship between anthropometrics and soccer heading kinematics will not differ between sexes. The relationship between anthropometrics and soccer heading kinematics will not differ between ball speeds. Pilot, cross-sectional design. Level 3. Division I soccer athletes (5 male, 8 female) were assessed for head-neck anthropometric and neck strength measurements in 6 directions (ie, flexion, extension, right and left lateral flexions and rotations). Participants headed the ball 10 times (25 or 40 mph) while wearing an accelerometer secured to their head. Kinematic measurements (ie, linear acceleration and rotational velocity) were recorded at 2 ball speeds. Sex differences were observed in neck girth ( t = 5.09, P soccer heading kinematics for sex and ball speeds. Neck girth and neck strength are factors that may limit head impact kinematics.

  12. Autopsy findings in carotid arterial rupture following radiotherapy of head and neck advanced carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satake, Bunsuke; Matsuura, Shizumu; Sakaino, Kouji; Maehara, Yasunobu

    1989-01-01

    The influence of radiotherapy in advanced head and neck cancer was investigated by autopsy of head and neck patients who had had carotid artery rupture. Twenty-five cases of head and neck cancer revealed carotid artery rupture among the 255 head and neck cases autopsied from 1972 to 1985. The rate of carotid artery rupture in hypopharyngeal cancer was 8/32 (25%); in oral cancer 8/55 (14.5%), and in other cancers 9/165 (5.4%). In localization of ruptured arteries there were 9 cases of common carotid artery, 14 cases of external carotid artery, one case of internal carotid artery, and one unknown. These cases were irradiated using more than 70 Gy. The following reasons for carotid artery rupture were suspected: 1. There was a tumor with deep ulceration and necrosis near the vessel. 2. The wall of the artery had radiation angitis. 3. The artery wall was necrotic because of invasion by the tumor. 4. Thrombosis developed with ensuant rupture of the artery. Radiotherapy for advanced cancer of the head and neck is necessary to control pain and as palliative treatment, but to avoid rupture of the carotid artery, pain clinic techniques and chemotherapy as palliative treatment for this kinds of terminal condition should also be considered. (author)

  13. Neck dissection following chemo radiation for node positive head and neck carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thariat, J.; Thariat, J.; Marcy, P.Y.; Bozec, A.; Peyrade, F.; Hofman, P.; Hamoir, M.; Janot, F.; De Mones, E.; Marcy, P.Y.; Carrier, P.; Bozec, I.; Guevara, J.; Santini, J.; Albert, S.; Vedrine, P.O.; Graff, P.; Peyrade, F.; Hofman, P.; Bourhis, J.; Lapeyre, M.

    2009-01-01

    The optimal timing and extent of neck dissection in the context of chemo radiation for head and neck cancer remains controversial. For some institutions, it is uncertain whether neck dissection should still be performed up front especially for cystic nodes. For others, neck dissection can be performed after chemo radiation and can be omitted for N1 disease as long as a complete response to chemo radiation is obtained. The question is debated for N2 and N3 disease even after a complete response as the correlation between radiological and clinical assessment and pathology may not be reliable. Response rates are greater than or equal to 60% and isolated neck failures are less than or equal to 10% with current chemo radiation protocols. Some therefore consider that systematic up front or planned neck dissection would lead to greater than or equal to 50% unnecessary neck dissections for N2-N3 disease. Positron-emission tomography (PET) scanning to assess treatment response and have shown a very high negative predictive value of greater than or equal to 95% when using a standard uptake value of 3 for patients with a negative PET at four months after the completion of therapy. These data may support the practice of observing PET-negative necks. More evidence-based data are awaited to assess the need for neck dissection on PET. Selective neck dissection based on radiological assessment and preoperative findings and not exclusively on initial nodal stage may help to limit morbidity and to improve the quality of life without increasing the risk of neck failure. Adjuvant regional radiation boosts might be discussed on an individual basis for aggressive residual nodal disease with extra-capsular spread and uncertain margins but evidence is missing. Medical treatments aiming at reducing the metastatic risk especially for N3 disease are to be evaluated

  14. Community Awareness - A Key to the Early Detection of Head and Neck Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Manickam

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Mortality and morbidity associated with head and neck cancers have decreased to a great extent in many developed countries of the world due to early diagnosis and treatment with advances in surgical techniques and better availability of radiotherapist and oncologists. But the situation in developing countries like India is quite different. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES This study was conducted amongst the patients attending the Otolaryngology department of a teaching hospital in Kolkata to find the incidence of various types and sites of head and neck cancer, to assess time delay from the date of onset of symptom to the final disease confirmation in relation to patients’ demographic profile, to assess time delay in histopathological diagnosis after reaching a tertiary care setup and also to correlate tobacco consumption and alcohol intake as risk factors for head and neck cancer and to note the reasons for late presentation, as described by the patient. MATERIALS AND METHODS The descriptive study was conducted at a tertiary level teaching hospital, in the Department of Otorhinolaryngology for a period from August 2013 to August 2015 with a study population of 133.  OBSERVATIONS  An average time lag from the onset of symptom to final diagnosis as malignancy was found to be 6 months to one year in nearly 72% of cases. Most of the patients were uneducated males of more than 50 years of age, hailing from rural areas. Cancer larynx was found to be the commonest of all head and neck cancers (31.6%. More than 65% of the patients were addicted to tobacco chewing or smoking or consumption of alcohol.  DISCUSSION  Poverty, lack of education, poor communication, lack of health care infrastructure in rural areas, community awareness about various risk factors, lack of effective health policy to achieve early diagnosis of head neck cancer were common factors related to delay in diagnosis.  CONCLUSION  Tobacco use and alcohol intake are the

  15. Outcomes of Vacuum-Assisted Therapy in the Treatment of Head and Neck Wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satteson, Ellen S; Crantford, John Clayton; Wood, Jeyhan; David, Lisa R

    2015-10-01

    Head and neck wounds can present a reconstructive challenge for the plastic surgeon. Whether from skin cancer, trauma, or burns, there are many different treatment modalities used to dress and manage complex head and neck wounds. Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy has been used on wounds of nearly every aspect of the body but not routinely in the head and neck area. This study was conducted to demonstrate our results using the VAC in the treatment of complex head and neck wounds. This is an IRB-approved, retrospective review of 69 patients with 73 head and neck wounds that were managed using the VAC between 1999 and 2008. The wound mechanism, location, and size, length of VAC therapy, patient comorbidities, use of radiation, complications, and ultimate outcome were assessed. In this patient population, the VAC was utilized because the standard reconstructive ladder was not a good option or had previously failed. Sixty-nine patients with complex head and neck wounds were treated with the wound VAC. The mean age of the patients was 66 years, with a range of 5-96 years. Males outnumbered females in this study nearly 2:1. Eighty-six percent of patients had wounds secondary to cancer, 8% secondary to trauma, 3% secondary to infection, and 3% secondary to burns. The VAC was used as a dressing over skin grafts in 50%, over Integra in 21%, and over open debrided wounds in 29%. Wounds healed without complication in 44% of the skin grafts, 67% of Integra-covered wounds, and 71% of debrided wounds. Minor complications included failure of complete graft take, failure of granulation tissue formation in open debrided wounds, infection, and hematoma formation under skin grafts. Major complications included positive cancer margins requiring reexcision and death secondary to pulmonary embolism, sepsis, and metastatic cancer. Most complications resolved with dressing changes, repeat grafting, or the administration of antibiotics. Our results demonstrate that the wound VAC

  16. Can FDG-PET assist in radiotherapy target volume definition of metastatic lymph nodes in head-and-neck cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schinagl, Dominic A.X.; Hoffmann, Aswin L.; Vogel, Wouter V.; Dalen, Jorn A. van; Verstappen, Suzan M.M.; Oyen, Wim J.G.; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: The role of FDG-PET in radiotherapy target volume definition of the neck was evaluated by comparing eight methods of FDG-PET segmentation to the current CT-based practice of lymph node assessment in head-and-neck cancer patients. Materials and methods: Seventy-eight head-and-neck cancer patients underwent coregistered CT- and FDG-PET scans. Lymph nodes were classified as 'enlarged' if the shortest axial diameter on CT was ≥10 mm, and as 'marginally enlarged' if it was 7-10 mm. Subsequently, lymph nodes were assessed on FDG-PET applying eight segmentation methods: visual interpretation (PET VIS ), applying fixed thresholds at a standardized uptake value (SUV) of 2.5 and at 40% and 50% of the maximum signal intensity of the primary tumor (PET SUV , PET 40% , PET 50% ) and applying a variable threshold based on the signal-to-background ratio (PET SBR ). Finally, PET 40%N , PET 50%N and PET SBRN were acquired using the signal of the lymph node as the threshold reference. Results: Of 108 nodes classified as 'enlarged' on CT, 75% were also identified by PET VIS , 59% by PET 40% , 43% by PET 50% and 43% by PET SBR . Of 100 nodes classified as 'marginally enlarged', only a minority were visualized by FDG-PET. The respective numbers were 26%, 10%, 7% and 8% for PET VIS , PET 40% , PET 50% and PET SBR . PET 40%N , PET 50%N and PET SBRN , respectively, identified 66%, 82% and 96% of the PET VIS -positive nodes. Conclusions: Many lymph nodes that are enlarged and considered metastatic by standard CT-based criteria appear to be negative on FDG-PET scan. Alternately, a small proportion of marginally enlarged nodes are positive on FDG-PET scan. However, the results are largely dependent on the PET segmentation tool used, and until proper validation FDG-PET is not recommended for target volume definition of metastatic lymph nodes in routine practice.

  17. Dose-response relationship for elective neck irradiation of head and neck cancer - facts and controversies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suwinski, R.; Maciejewski, B.; Withers, H.R.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assign dose-response relationship for subclinical neck metastases of squamous cell head and neck cancer based on extensive survey of 24 data sets collected from the literature. Neck relapse rates (NRR) without and after elective (ENI) or preoperative irradiation were estimated for each site and stage of primary tumor and the reduction in neck relapse rate was calculated. An average NRR without ENI was 22% (12-35% ) and only 2.5% (0-1 0%) after the ENI with total dose of 46- 50 Gy which gives high reduction rate in the risk of neck recurrences being on the average 89% and 42% (0-46%) after preoperative irradiation using 22-30 Gy. Dose response curve for elective and preoperative irradiation have shown that 50 Gy in 2 Gy fraction reduces the incidence of neck relapses in the NO patients by more than 90% and only by less than 50% after total doses lower than 30 Gy. No correlation between the risk of neck metastases without ENI and the reduction in neck relapses after ENI was found. (authors)

  18. Complementary medicine use in patients with head and neck cancer in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Amin, Mohamed

    2010-08-01

    The objectives of the study were: first, to determine the prevalence of traditional medicine (TM) and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use in head and neck cancer patients in Ireland; second, to educate ourselves on the plethora of CAM\\/TM options available to patients outside the dominion of conventional medicine. The study design consisted of a cross-sectional survey carried out in three head and neck cancer centres. Self-administered questionnaires were distributed to 110 head and neck cancer patients attending the three cancer centres and data were collected for statistical analysis. A total of 106 patients completed the questionnaire; 21.7% of the participants used CAM\\/TM since their diagnosis with head and neck cancer. CAM\\/TM usage was higher in female (34.3%) than in male patients (16.2%). CAM\\/TM use was more common in the 41-50-year age group, in patients with higher educational levels and those holding strong religious beliefs, and also in married than single patients. The most common types of CAM\\/TM used were spiritual and laying on of hands. The most common reasons reported for using CAM\\/TM were to counteract the ill effects of treatment and increase the body\\'s ability to fight cancer. Sources of information on CAM\\/TM were friends (65%), family (48%) and media (21%). This survey reveals a high prevalence of CAM\\/TM use in head and neck cancer patients, hence emphasising the need for otolaryngologists to educate themselves on the various therapies available to be able to provide informative advice. There is an urgent need for evidence-based investigation of various CAM\\/TM therapies currently offered to patients.

  19. COMPARISON OF THE PERIPHERAL DOSES FROM DIFFERENT IMRT TECHNIQUES FOR PEDIATRIC HEAD AND NECK RADIATION THERAPY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Masahiko; Saigo, Yasumasa; Higuchi, Kenta; Fujimura, Takuya; Koriyama, Chihaya; Yoshiura, Takashi; Akiba, Suminori

    2017-11-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) can deliver high and homogeneous doses to the target area while limiting doses to organs at risk. We used a pediatric phantom to simulate the treatment of a head and neck tumor in a child. The peripheral doses were examined for three different IMRT techniques [dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC), segmental multileaf collimator (SMLC) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT)]. Peripheral doses were evaluated taking thyroid, breast, ovary and testis as the points of interest. Doses were determined using a radio-photoluminescence glass dosemeter, and the COMPASS system was used for three-dimensional dose evaluation. VMAT achieved the lowest peripheral doses because it had the highest monitor unit efficiency. However, doses in the vicinity of the irradiated field, i.e. the thyroid, could be relatively high, depending on the VMAT collimator angle. DMLC and SMLC had a large area of relatively high peripheral doses in the breast region. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. MR angiography in the diagnosis of tumors in the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogl, T.J.; Balzer, J.O.; Juergens, M.; Lissner, J.; Grevers, G.

    1992-01-01

    40 normal individuals and 153 patients with lesions in the head and neck were examined by conventional imaging methods and by means of MR angiography (1.5 Tesla Magnetome). The problems to be solved concerned the ralationship between tumors and vessels and vascular anomalies and abnormalities at the skull base (56 cases), the facial skeleton (62 cases) and the neck (35 cases). Digital subtraction angiography was performed in 54 patients and the findings corelated with MR angiography. Optimal results were obtained by using a FISP 3D sequence; in this way arterial structures could be rendered reproducibly down to a diameter of 2 mm. The venous system in the head and neck was best shown by a FLASH 2D sequence. Correlation with arterial DSA showed high accuracy of MR angiography (91%) concerning displacement of vessels, the topography and the recognition of vascular occlusions. Our results indicate that MR angiography is a rapid and reliable procedure for evaluating the arterial and venous changes due to tumors in the head and neck region. (orig.) [de

  1. Direction-Specific Impairments in Cervical Range of Motion in Women with Chronic Neck Pain: Influence of Head Posture and Gravitationally Induced Torque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolfsson, Thomas; Björklund, Martin; Svedmark, Åsa; Srinivasan, Divya; Djupsjöbacka, Mats

    2017-01-01

    Cervical range of motion (ROM) is commonly assessed in clinical practice and research. In a previous study we decomposed active cervical sagittal ROM into contributions from lower and upper levels of the cervical spine and found level- and direction-specific impairments in women with chronic non-specific neck pain. The present study aimed to validate these results and investigate if the specific impairments can be explained by the neutral posture (defining zero flexion/extension) or a movement strategy to avoid large gravitationally induced torques on the cervical spine. Kinematics of the head and thorax was assessed in sitting during maximal sagittal cervical flexion/extension (high torque condition) and maximal protraction (low torque condition) in 120 women with chronic non-specific neck pain and 40 controls. We derived the lower and upper cervical angles, and the head centre of mass (HCM), from a 3-segment kinematic model. Neutral head posture was assessed using a standardized procedure. Previous findings of level- and direction-specific impairments in neck pain were confirmed. Neutral head posture was equal between groups and did not explain the direction-specific impairments. The relative magnitude of group difference in HCM migration did not differ between high and low torques conditions, lending no support for our hypothesis that impairments in sagittal ROM are due to torque avoidance behaviour. The direction- and level-specific impairments in cervical sagittal ROM can be generalised to the population of women with non-specific neck pain. Further research is necessary to clarify if torque avoidance behaviour can explain the impairments.

  2. Direction-Specific Impairments in Cervical Range of Motion in Women with Chronic Neck Pain: Influence of Head Posture and Gravitationally Induced Torque.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Rudolfsson

    Full Text Available Cervical range of motion (ROM is commonly assessed in clinical practice and research. In a previous study we decomposed active cervical sagittal ROM into contributions from lower and upper levels of the cervical spine and found level- and direction-specific impairments in women with chronic non-specific neck pain. The present study aimed to validate these results and investigate if the specific impairments can be explained by the neutral posture (defining zero flexion/extension or a movement strategy to avoid large gravitationally induced torques on the cervical spine.Kinematics of the head and thorax was assessed in sitting during maximal sagittal cervical flexion/extension (high torque condition and maximal protraction (low torque condition in 120 women with chronic non-specific neck pain and 40 controls. We derived the lower and upper cervical angles, and the head centre of mass (HCM, from a 3-segment kinematic model. Neutral head posture was assessed using a standardized procedure.Previous findings of level- and direction-specific impairments in neck pain were confirmed. Neutral head posture was equal between groups and did not explain the direction-specific impairments. The relative magnitude of group difference in HCM migration did not differ between high and low torques conditions, lending no support for our hypothesis that impairments in sagittal ROM are due to torque avoidance behaviour.The direction- and level-specific impairments in cervical sagittal ROM can be generalised to the population of women with non-specific neck pain. Further research is necessary to clarify if torque avoidance behaviour can explain the impairments.

  3. In a bad place: Carers of patients with head and neck cancer experiences of travelling for cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balfe, Myles; Keohane, Kieran; O' Brien, Katie; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael; Maguire, Rebecca; Hanly, Paul; O' Sullivan, Eleanor; Sharp, Linda

    2017-10-01

    To explore the effect that treatment-related commuting has on carers of patients with head and neck cancer. Semi-structured interviews, thematically analysed, with 31 carers. Treatment-related commuting had a considerable impact on carers of patients with head and neck cancer, both in practical terms (economic costs, disruption) and also in psychological terms. Many carers of patients with head and neck cancer described becoming distressed by their commute. Some carers from large urban cities appeared to have hidden commuting burdens. Some carers respond to commuting stress by 'zoning out' or becoming 'like zombies'. Treatment-related travel for head and neck cancer can have significant practical and psychological impacts. Health professionals should be aware of the impacts that commuting can have on head and neck caregivers. Health services may be able to take practical steps, such as providing subsidized parking, to address head and neck carergivers' difficulties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Treatment results of the neck by concurrent chemoradiotherapy for advanced head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokumaru, Yutaka; Fujii, Masato; Habu, Noboru; Yajima, Yoko; Yorozu, Atsunori

    2009-01-01

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) is one of the recent emerging modalities for advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC). However some of the patients treated by CCRT have residual or recurrent cervical lymph nodes. In these cases, neck dissection is considered to be useful in the point of locolegional control and disease free survival. This study aims to analyze neck control rate by CCRT and usefulness of the neck dissection after CCRT for HNSCC. The medical records of 69 consecutive patients (stage III: 4%, stage IV: 96%) treated with CCRT for SCCHN (hypopharynx: 40, oropharynx: 25, larynx: 4) from 2003 through 2007 were reviewed. Clinical complete response (CR) rates of N1, N2a, N2b, N2c and N3 were 75%, 100%, 71%, 74% and 43% respectively. Among the patients with complete neck response, only 2 patients (5%) had an isolated neck recurrence. Eleven patients underwent surgical neck procedures including 7 planned neck dissections and 4 salvage neck dissections. All the 11 patients with neck dissections had good regional control except 1 case. There were a few minor complications such as wound infection and laryngeal edema. Patients who have a complete clinical regional response to CCRT have a low probability of an isolated recurrence in the neck. Planned and salvage neck dissections can be safely performed and considered to be useful in the point of regional control after intensive CCRT. (author)

  5. Epidemiology and Molecular Biology of Head and Neck Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jou, Adriana; Hess, Jochen

    2017-01-01

    Head and neck cancer is a common and aggressive malignancy with a high morbidity and mortality profile. Although the large majority of cases resemble head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), the current classification based on anatomic site and tumor stage fails to capture the high level of biologic heterogeneity, and appropriate clinical management remains a major challenge. Hence, a better understanding of the molecular biology of HNSCC is urgently needed to support biomarker development and personalized care for patients. This review focuses on recent findings based on integrative genomics analysis and multi-scale modeling approaches and how they are beginning to provide more sophisticated clues as to the biological and clinical diversity of HNSCC. © 2017 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  6. Corrosion at the head-neck interface of current designs of modular femoral components: essential questions and answers relating to corrosion in modular head-neck junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, K; Panagiotidou, A P; Khan, M; Blunn, G; Haddad, F S

    2016-05-01

    There is increasing global awareness of adverse reactions to metal debris and elevated serum metal ion concentrations following the use of second generation metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasties. The high incidence of these complications can be largely attributed to corrosion at the head-neck interface. Severe corrosion of the taper is identified most commonly in association with larger diameter femoral heads. However, there is emerging evidence of varying levels of corrosion observed in retrieved components with smaller diameter femoral heads. This same mechanism of galvanic and mechanically-assisted crevice corrosion has been observed in metal-on-polyethylene and ceramic components, suggesting an inherent biomechanical problem with current designs of the head-neck interface. We provide a review of the fundamental questions and answers clinicians and researchers must understand regarding corrosion of the taper, and its relevance to current orthopaedic practice. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B:579-84. ©2016 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  7. Head and neck: normal variations and benign findings in FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Højgaard, Liselotte; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Loft, Annika

    2014-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography with FDG of the head and neck region is mainly used for the diagnosis of head and neck cancer, for staging, treatment evaluation, relapse, and planning of surgery and radio therapy. This article is a practical guide of imaging techniques, including a detailed protocol for FDG PET in head and neck imaging, physiologic findings, and pitfalls in selected case stories. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Panendoscopy as a screening procedure for simultaneous primary tumors in head and neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dhooge, IJ; DeVos, M; Albers, FWJ; VanCauwenberge, PB

    Head and neck cancer is often associated with second primary neoplasms. These cancers most commonly involve other regions of the head and neck, esophagus, and lung. The majority of cases are also squamous cell carcinomas. In view of this rather frequent occurrence of multiple primary cancers and how

  9. MRI sequences in head and neck radiology. State of the art

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widmann, Gerlig; Henninger, Benjamin; Kremser, Christian; Jaschke, Werner [Medical Univ. of Innsbruck (Austria). Dept. of Radiology

    2017-05-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an essential imaging modality for the evaluation of head and neck pathologies. However, the diagnostic power of MRI is strongly related to the appropriate selection and interpretation of imaging protocols and sequences. The aim of this article is to review state-of-the-art sequences for the clinical routine in head and neck MRI and to describe the evidence for which medical question these sequences and techniques are useful. Literature review of state-of-the-art sequences in head and neck MRI. Basic sequences (T1w, T2w, T1wC+) and fat suppression techniques (TIRM/STIR, Dixon, Spectral Fat sat) are important tools in the diagnostic workup of inflammation, congenital lesions and tumors including staging. Additional sequences (SSFP (CISS, FIESTA), SPACE, VISTA, 3D-FLAIR) are used for pathologies of the cranial nerves, labyrinth and evaluation of endolymphatic hydrops in Meniere's disease. Vessel and perfusion sequences (3D-TOF, TWIST/TRICKS angiography, DCE) are used in vascular contact syndromes, vascular malformations and analysis of microvascular parameters of tissue perfusion. Diffusion-weighted imaging (EPI-DWI, non-EPI-DWI, RESOLVE) is helpful in cholesteatoma imaging, estimation of malignancy, and evaluation of treatment response and posttreatment recurrence in head and neck cancer. Understanding of MRI sequences and close collaboration with referring physicians improves the diagnostic confidence of MRI in the daily routine and drives further research in this fascinating image modality.

  10. MRI sequences in head and neck radiology. State of the art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widmann, Gerlig; Henninger, Benjamin; Kremser, Christian; Jaschke, Werner

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an essential imaging modality for the evaluation of head and neck pathologies. However, the diagnostic power of MRI is strongly related to the appropriate selection and interpretation of imaging protocols and sequences. The aim of this article is to review state-of-the-art sequences for the clinical routine in head and neck MRI and to describe the evidence for which medical question these sequences and techniques are useful. Literature review of state-of-the-art sequences in head and neck MRI. Basic sequences (T1w, T2w, T1wC+) and fat suppression techniques (TIRM/STIR, Dixon, Spectral Fat sat) are important tools in the diagnostic workup of inflammation, congenital lesions and tumors including staging. Additional sequences (SSFP (CISS, FIESTA), SPACE, VISTA, 3D-FLAIR) are used for pathologies of the cranial nerves, labyrinth and evaluation of endolymphatic hydrops in Meniere's disease. Vessel and perfusion sequences (3D-TOF, TWIST/TRICKS angiography, DCE) are used in vascular contact syndromes, vascular malformations and analysis of microvascular parameters of tissue perfusion. Diffusion-weighted imaging (EPI-DWI, non-EPI-DWI, RESOLVE) is helpful in cholesteatoma imaging, estimation of malignancy, and evaluation of treatment response and posttreatment recurrence in head and neck cancer. Understanding of MRI sequences and close collaboration with referring physicians improves the diagnostic confidence of MRI in the daily routine and drives further research in this fascinating image modality.

  11. Local Control After Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Rhabdomyosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, Amarinthia E.; Okcu, M. Fatih; Chintagumpala, Murali; Teh, Bin S.; Paulino, Arnold C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the patterns of failure in patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head-and-neck rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS). Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2005, 19 patients with a diagnosis of head-and-neck RMS received IMRT at The Methodist Hospital. There were 11 male and 8 female patients, with a median age of 6 years at time of irradiation. Tumor location was parameningeal in 7, orbital in 6, and other head-and-neck RMS in 6. Chemotherapy was given to all patients, with vincristine, actinomycin D, and cyclophosphamide being the most common regimen (n = 18). The median prescribed dose was 5040 cGy. The clinical target volume included the gross tumor volume with a 1.5-cm margin. The median duration of follow-up for surviving patients was 56 months. Results: The 4-year overall survival and local control rates were 76% and 92.9%, respectively. One patient developed a local failure in the high-dose region of the radiation field; there were no marginal failures. Distant metastasis was seen in 4 patients. Overall survival was 42.9% for parameningeal sites and 100% for other sites (p < 0.01). Late toxicities were seen in 7 patients. Two secondary malignancies occurred in 1 child with embryonal RMS of the face and a p53 mutation. Conclusions: Local control was excellent in patients receiving IMRT for head-and-neck RMS. Patterns of local failure reveal no marginal failures in this group of patients

  12. Nuclear medicine in diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the head and neck. I. Salivary and parathyroid gland disease and one identification and staging of head and neck tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blahd, W.H.; Rose, J.G.

    1981-01-01

    The advent of both improved imaging systems and new radioactive agents has increased the effectiveness of nuclear medicine in diagnosing and treating diseases of the head and neck. In this first in a series of two articles, the role of nuclear medicine is discussed in the evaluation of diseases of the salivary and parathyroid glands, and in the identification and staging of head and neck tumors. Radionuclide studies of the salivary glands are useful in the identification of tumors and the evaluation of gland function. Such studies are a valuable adjunct in the diagnosis of Sjoegren's syndrome and of acute and chronic inflammatory disease. Radionuclide imaging also has been helpful in the detection of adenomata and hyperplasia of the parathyroid glands and often complements ultrasonography localization procedures. The advent of gallium-67 imaging has improved the staging of head and neck tumors

  13. Initial treatment results using cyberknife for head and neck tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Himei, Kengo; Katsui, Kuniaki; Yoshida, Atsushi; Takemoto, Mitsuhiro; Kobayashi, Mitsuru; Kuroda, Masahiro; Hiraki, Yoshio

    2002-01-01

    The CyberKnife, a medical device for stereotactic radiotherapy, is composed of a combination of a robot manipulator and LINAC. For the treatment of head and neck tumors, this system has been applied. Between June 2000 and January 2001, 18 patients with head and neck tumor were treated with this system because of tumor recurrence, difficulty in surgery or additional increase after external radiotherapy. The median age was 64 years. Primary lesions were skull base (4), nasopharynx (3), paranasal sinus (3), nasal cavity (2), lacrimal gland (1), oropharynx (1), oral floor (1), and buccul mucosa (1), metastatic lymph nodes were found in three. The prescribed dose was 12-38 Gy as for marginal dose. The response rate (CR+PR) was 44.4% and local control rate (CR+PR+NC) was 77.8%. The adverse effects were assessed by the NCI-CTC Version 2.0 and observed grade 3 in two cases. Our early experience indicates that this system could to be feasible for the treatment of locally advanced or recurrent head and neck tumor, and for the reduction of adverse effect and maintenance of useful QOL of patients. (author)

  14. Cancer of the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leignel, D.; Toledano, A.; Calais, G.; Gardner, M.; Valinta, D.; Halimi, P.; Alberini, J.L.; Plantet, M.M.; Banal, A.; Hans, S.; Floiras, J.L.; Labib, A.; Djemaa, A.; Naoun, L.; Bali, M.; Melais, K.; George, L.; Cazalet, M.; Gross, E.; Padovani, L.; Cowen, D.; Pignon, T.; Bannour, N.; Guedouar, R.; Bouaouina, N.; Mege, A.; Lapeyre, M.; Graff, P.; Marchesi, V.; Aletti, P.; Marchal, C.; Peiffert, D.; Serre, A.; Ailleres, N.; Lemanski, C.; Hay, M.H.; Llacer Moscardo, C.; Allaw, A.; Azria, D.; Dubois, J.B.; Fenoglietto, P.; Maalej, M.; Nasr, C.; Chaari, N.; Hentati, D.; Kochbati, L.; Besbes, M.; Benjelloun, H.; Benchakroun, N.; Houjami, M.; Jouhadi, H.; Tawfiq, N.; Acharki, A.; Sahraoui, S.; Benider, A.; Racadot, S.; Mercier, M.; Dessard-Diana, B.; Bensadoun, R.J.; Martin, M.; Malaurie, E.; Favrel, V.; Housset, M.; Journel, C.; Calais, G.; Huet, J.; Pillet, G.; Hennequin, C.; Haddad, E.; Diana, C.; Blaska-Jaulerry, B.; Henry-Amar, M.; Gehanno, P.; Baillet, F.; Mazeron, J.J.; Chaouache, C.K.; Tebra Mrad, T.M.S.; Bannour, B.N.S.; Bouaouina, B.N.; Favrel, V.; Khodri, M.; Chapet, O.; Nguyen, D.; Ardiet, J.; Romestaing, P.; Thillays, F.; Bardet, E.; Rolland, F.; Maingan, P.; Campion, L.; Mahe, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    Thirteen articles are presented in relation with head and neck cancer. Chemoradiotherapy, medical examinations using nuclear techniques such PET scanning, fractionated radiotherapy after a chemotherapy, analysis of dose volume for patients treated by irradiation with a combined chemotherapy, dosimetry, conformal radiotherapy with intensity modulation, dosimetry in brachytherapy, association of radiotherapy and chemotherapy in the treatment of nose pharynx carcinomas, recurrence, are the different subjects treated in this part. (N.C.)

  15. Supportive care for head and neck cancer patients receiving radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenda, Sadamoto

    2015-01-01

    Recently (chemo-)radiotherapy has been widely used in head and neck cancer with definite evidence. As long survivor has increased, social problems associated with late toxicity have become more. Late toxicities induced by radiotherapy for head and neck lesion are often severe. Xerostomia is one of the severe late toxicities conventionally and dysphagia after chemoradiotherapy is a new topic. Some industrial development (ex. Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy: IMRT) play a great role in toxicity management. Multidisciplinary approach (cooperation between not only physicians but also nurses and dentists) is necessary to control toxicities. The research of supportive care will be needed same as definitive treatment in the future. (author)

  16. Cetuximab in locally advanced head-and-neck cancer: defining the population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, C.

    2010-01-01

    Encouraging data for targeted therapy in head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma are opening new options for treatment. Phase III trials of cetuximab, an antibody directed against the epidermal growth factor receptor (egfr) have demonstrated benefit in the locally advanced and metastatic settings. Recognizing the importance of emerging therapies, Cancer Care Ontario published guideline recommendations for egfr-targeted therapy in stage iii and iv head-and-neck cancer. The present paper takes a further look at the population for whom an offer of cetuximab therapy may be appropriate. PMID:20697514

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of head and neck vascular anomalies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Magnetic resonance imaging of head and neck vascular anomalies: pearls and pitfalls. Shaimaa Abdelsattar Mohammad, Amr Abdelhamid Abou Zeid, Ahmed M. Fawzi, Mohamed M. Dahab, Iman A. Ragab, Osama El-Naggar ...

  18. Radionuclide and thermographic diagnosis of head and neck tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogdasarov, Yu.B.; Lenskaya, O.P.; Polyakov, B.I.; Belkina, B.M. (Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Moscow. Onkologicheskij Nauchnyj Tsentr)

    1983-10-01

    Radionuclide and thermographic studies using /sup 67/Ga-citrate and /sup 111/In-bleomycin were performed in 129 patients with laryngeal cancer, chemodectoma of the neck, retinoblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma of the orbital and facial soft tissues and cancer of the tongue. Elevated amounts of the radiopharmaceuticals were found in patients with tumors. In thermographic studies higher temperature activity corresponding to the tumor was noted. Radio-nuclide thermographic studies extend diagnostic opportunities for head and neck tumors.

  19. Radionuclide and thermographic diagnosis of head and neck tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogdasarov, Yu.B.; Lenskaya, O.P.; Polyakov, B.I.; Belkina, B.M.

    1983-01-01

    Radionuclide and thermographic studies using 67 Ga-citrate and 111 In-bleomycin were performed in 129 patients with laryngeal cancer, chemodectoma of the neck, retinoblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma of the orbital and facial soft tissues and cancer of the tongue. Elevated amounts of the radiopharmaceuticals were found in patients with tumors. In thermographic studies higher temperature activity corresponding to the tumor was noted. Radio-nuclide thermographic studies extend diagnostic opportunities for head and neck tumors

  20. Palliative radiotherapy in locally advanced head and neck cancer-A prospective trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghoshal Sushmita

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate the role of palliative radiotherapy for symptom control in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 25 patients with stage 3 and stage 4 head and neck cancer were treated with a short course of palliative radiotherapy (30 Gray (Gy in 10 fractions over 2 weeks. Baseline symptoms were assessed using a 11 point numerical scale for pain, dysphagia, cough, insomnia and dyspnoea. The primary end point was relief of symptoms in the fourth week after radiotherapy. Percentage symptom relief was quantified by the patient using a rupee scale. RESULTS: All 22 patients with pain and 90% of patients with dysphagia, dyspnoea and disturbed sleep had greater than 50% relief in symptoms after radiotherapy. Cough was relieved in sixty percent of cases. CONCLUSION: A short course of radiation can be an effective method of symptom palliation in head and neck cancers.

  1. Motorcycle helmet type and the risk of head injury and neck injury during motorcycle collisions in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhardt, Taryn; Rice, Thomas; Troszak, Lara; Zhu, Motao

    2016-01-01

    The use of novelty motorcycle helmets is often prompted by beliefs that wearing a standard helmet can contribute to neck injury during traffic collisions. The goal of this analysis was to examine the association between helmet type and neck injury risk and the association between helmet type and head injury. Data were collected during the investigation of motorcycle collisions of any injury severity by the California Highway Patrol (CHP) and 83 local law enforcement agencies in California between June 2012 and July 2013. We estimated head injury and neck injury risk ratios from data on 7051 collision-involved motorcyclists using log-binomial regression. Helmet type was strongly associated with head injury occurrence but was not associated with the occurrence of neck injury. Rider age, rider alcohol use, and motorcycle speed were strong, positive predictors of both head and neck injury. Interventions to improve motorcycle helmet choice and to counteract misplaced concerns surrounding neck injury risk are likely to lead to reductions in head injury, brain injury, and death. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Merkel cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takes, R. P.; Balm, A. J.; Loftus, B. M.; Baris, G.; Hilgers, F. J.; Gregor, R. T.

    1994-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare cutaneous tumour that typically arises in the head and neck area of elderly patients. The tumour often follows an aggressive course with frequent local recurrences and (regional) metastases, especially when localized above the clavicles. Five patients with a Merkel

  3. The association of temporomandibular disorder pain with history of head and neck injury in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Dena J; Mueller, Beth A; Critchlow, Cathy W; LeResche, Linda

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the risk of self-reported temporomandibular disorder (TMD) pain among adolescents in relation to previous head and/or neck injury. 3,101 enrollees (11 to 17 years of age) of a nonprofit integrated health-care system were interviewed by telephone. Two hundred four cases with self-reported TMD pain and 194 controls without self-reported TMD pain frequency-matched to the cases by age and gender completed standardized in-person interviews and physical examinations in which reports of previous head/neck injuries were recorded. Odds ratio (OR) estimates and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of the relative risks of TMD pain associated with prior head and/or neck injuries were calculated using logistic regression. A greater proportion of subjects reporting TMD pain (36%) than controls (25%) had a history of head and/or neck injuries (OR = 1.8, 95% CI, 1.1-2.8). In a separate analysis, the presence of TMD based upon the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) was assessed in relation to prior head and/or neck injury. Cases reporting TMD pain and meeting the RDC/TMD criteria for myofascial pain and/or arthralgia or arthritis were 2.0 (CI, 1.0-3.8) times more likely to have had a prior head injury than were controls with neither self-reported nor RDC/TMD pain diagnoses. The results suggest a modest association of prior head injuries with both self-reported and clinically diagnosed TMD pain in adolescents.

  4. Neck extensor muscle weakness (Dropped head syndrome) following radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatia, S.; Miller, R.C.; Lachance, D.L.

    2006-01-01

    Background. Dropped head syndrome is an unusual condition in which the head cannot be held upright in its normal anatomic position secondary to pronounced, isolated, neck extensor muscle weakness. Case report. A case of dropped head syndrome in a female with a history of radiotherapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma and a clinical history consistent with multiple sclerosis is presented, and potential etiologies are discussed. Conclusions. Muscular atrophy and lower motor neuron injury secondary to isolated anterior horn cell injury from radiotherapy emerge as the most likely etiology. (author)

  5. EVIDENCE OF EPSTEIN-BARR VIRUS ASSOCIATION WITH HEAD AND NECK CANCERS: A REVIEW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Soorebettu R; Wilson, David F

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is ubiquitous: over 90% of the adult population is infected with this virus. EBV is capable of infecting both B lymphocytes and epithelial cells throughout the body including the head and neck region. Transmission occurs mainly by exchange of saliva. The infection is asymptomatic or mild in children but, in adolescents and young adults, it causes infectious mononucleosis, a self-limiting disease characterized by lethargy, sore throat, fever and lymphadenopathy. Once established, the virus often remains latent and people become lifelong carriers without experiencing disease. However, in some people, the latent virus is capable of causing malignant tumours, such as nasopharyngeal carcinoma and various B- and T-cell lymphomas, at sites including the head, neck and oropharyngeal region. As lymphoma is the second-most common malignant disease of the head, neck and oral region after squamous cell carcinoma, oral health care workers including dentists and specialists have a responsibility to carry out a thorough clinical examination of this anatomical region with a view to identifying and diagnosing lesions that may represent lymphomas. Early detection allows early treatment resulting in better prognosis. The focus of this review is on the morphology, transmission and carcinogenic properties of EBV and clinical and diagnostic aspects of a range of EBV-associated malignancies occurring in the head, neck and oral region. As carcinogenic agents, viruses contribute to a significant proportion of the global cancer burden: approximately 15% of all human cancers, worldwide, are attributable to viruses.1,2 Serologic and epidemiologic studies are providing mounting evidence of an etiologic association between viruses and head and neck malignancies.3 To update oral and maxillofacial surgeons and oral medicine specialists and raise awareness of this association, we recently reviewed the evidence of the etiologic role of human papillomavirus in oral disease.4

  6. Dysphagia after sequential chemoradiation therapy for advanced head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goguen, Laura A; Posner, Marshall R; Norris, Charles M; Tishler, Roy B; Wirth, Lori J; Annino, Donald J; Gagne, Adele; Sullivan, Christopher A; Sammartino, Daniel E; Haddad, Robert I

    2006-06-01

    Assess impact of sequential chemoradiation therapy (SCRT) for advanced head and neck cancer (HNCA) on swallowing, nutrition, and quality of life. Prospective cohort study of 59 patients undergoing SCRT for advanced head and neck cancer. Follow-up median was 47.5 months. Regional Cancer Center. Median time to gastrostomy tube removal was 21 weeks. Eighteen of 23 patients who underwent modified barium swallow demonstrated aspiration; none developed pneumonia. Six of 7 with pharyngoesophageal stricture underwent successful dilatation. Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Head and Neck Scale questionnaires at median 6 months after treatment revealed "somewhat" satisfaction with swallowing. At the time of analysis, 97% have the gastronomy tube removed and take soft/regular diet. Early after treatment dysphagia adversely affected weight, modified barium swallow results, and quality of life. Diligent swallow therapy, and dilation as needed, allowed nearly all patients to have their gastronomy tubes removed and return to a soft/regular diet. Dysphagia is significant after SCRT but generally slowly recovers 6 to 12 months after SCRT. C-4.

  7. Comparison of five segmentation tools for 18F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose-positron emission tomography-based target volume definition in head and neck cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schinagl, D.A.X.; Vogel, W.V.; Hoffmann, A.L.; Dalen, J.A. van; Oyen, W.J.G.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: Target-volume delineation for radiation treatment to the head and neck area traditionally is based on physical examination, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging. Additional molecular imaging with (18)F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) may

  8. Training programme impact on thermoplastic immobilization for head and neck radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Outhwaite, Julie-Anne; McDowall, W. Robert; Marquart, Louise; Rattray, Gregory; Fielding, Andrew; Hargrave, Catriona

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether uniform guidelines and training in the stabilization and formation of thermoplastic shells can improve the reproducibility of set-up for Head and Neck cancer patients. Methods and materials: Image based measurements of the planning and treatment positions for 35 head and neck cancer patients undergoing radical radiotherapy were analysed to provide a baseline of the reproducibility of thermoplastic immobilization. Radiation therapists (RT) were surveyed to establish a perception of their confidence in thermoplastic procedures. An evidence based staff training programme was created and implemented. Set-up reproduction and staff perception were reviewed to measure the impact of the training programme. Results: The mean (SD) 3D vectors of anatomical displacement, measured on the patient images, improved from 4.64 (2.03) for the baseline group compared to 3.02 (1.65) following training (p < 0.01). The proportion of 3D displacements of patient data exceeding 5 mm 3D vector was decreased from 37.1% to 5.7% (p < 0.001) and the 3 mm vector from 85.7% to 42.9% (p < 0.001). The post-training survey scores demonstrated improved confidence in reproducibility of set-up for head and neck patients. Conclusion: The Thermoplastic Shells Training Program has been found to improve the treatment reproducibility for head and neck radiation therapy patients. Uniform guidelines have increased RT confidence in thermoplastic procedures.

  9. Vascular lesions of head and neck: A literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazia Masoom Syed

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular lesions are among the most common congenital and neonatal abnormalities. These anomalies can occur throughout the whole body, with 60%, however, being located in the head and neck region probably due to its intricate vascular anatomy of region. There is a significant confusion in the literature because of the use of confusing descriptive terminology for the same vascular entity and eponyms. Correct naming of lesion, appropriate classification, and clinical appearance of vascular lesions have a direct impact on understanding of etiologies of these complex lesions, diagnosis, and in treating patients. Thus, the aim of this article is to provide comprehensive knowledge about classifications and to have an insight of various important vascular lesions affecting head and neck region based on its pathogenesis, clinical presentation, and management.

  10. Oral complications of radiotherapy in the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jham, Bruno Correi; Freire, Addah Regina da Silva

    2006-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a treatment modality largely used for head and neck malignancies. However, high doses of radiation in large areas, including the oral cavity, maxilla, mandible and salivary glands may result in several undesired reactions. Mucositis, candidosis, disgeusia, radiation caries, osteoradionecrosis, soft tissue necrosis and xerostomia are some of radiotherapy's complications.Aim: The aim of this study is to briefly review the side effects that may be seen in the oral cavity during or after radiotherapy treatment in the head and neck region.Basic Method Used: Review of relevant literature.Study Design: Literature review.Results: Radiotherapy is still associated with several side effects, significantly affecting patients quality of life.Conclusions: A multidisciplinary treatment, including physicians, dentists, speech therapists, nutritionists, and psychologists, is the best alternative to minimize, or even prevent such reactions. (author)

  11. Pre- and postirradiation care of the mouth in head and neck cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, M.A.; Lownie, J.F.

    1982-01-01

    Radiotherapy plays an important role in the treatment of head and neck cancer. The effects of radiotherapy on the oral hard and soft tissues may range from a mild mucositis to severe caries and osteoradionecrosis. It is the responsibility of the dentist to treat and prevent the severe sequelae which may arise. This paper outlines the effects of radiotherapy on the oral structures and discusses the dental treatment of the patient during radiotherapy. Emphasis is placed on the prevention of complications. The head and neck cancer patient must be thoroughly examined by the dentist and treatment planning may then be divided into pre-irradiaton treatment, treatment during irradiation and post-irradiation treatment. The dentist thus forms an essential member of the team treating patients with head and neck cancer [af

  12. Pre- and postirradiation care of the mouth in head and neck cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, M A; Lownie, J F [University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa). Dept. of Surgery

    1982-08-01

    Radiotherapy plays an important role in the treatment of head and neck cancer. The effects of radiotherapy on the oral hard and soft tissues may range from a mild mucositis to severe caries and osteoradionecrosis. It is the responsibility of the dentist to treat and prevent the severe sequelae which may arise. This paper outlines the effects of radiotherapy on the oral structures and discusses the dental treatment of the patient during radiotherapy. Emphasis is placed on the prevention of complications. The head and neck cancer patient must be thoroughly examined by the dentist and treatment planning may then be divided into pre-irradiaton treatment, treatment during irradiation and post-irradiation treatment. The dentist thus forms an essential member of the team treating patients with head and neck cancer.

  13. The study of correlation between forward head posture and neck pain in Iranian office workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejati, Parisa; Lotfian, Sara; Moezy, Azar; Nejati, Mina

    2015-01-01

    Factors such as prolonged sitting at work or improper posture of head during work may have a great role in neck pain occurrence among office employees, particularly among those who work with computers. Although some studies claim a significant difference in head posture between patients and pain-free participants, in literature the forward head posture (FHP) has not always been associated with neck pain. Since head, cervical and thoracic postures and their relation with neck pain has not been studied in Iranian office employees, the purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between some work-related and individual factors, such as poor posture, with neck pain in the office employees. It was a cross-sectional correlation study carried out to explore the relationship between neck pain and sagittal postures of cervical and thoracic spine among office employees in forward looking position and also in a working position. Forty-six subjects without neck pain and 55 with neck pain were examined using a photographic method. Thoracic and cervical postures were measured using the high thoracic (HT) and craniovertebral (CV) angles, respectively. High thoracic and CV angles were positively correlated with the presence of neck pain only in working position (p 0.05). Our findings have revealed that office employees had a defective posture while working and that the improper posture was more severe in the office employees who suffered from the neck pain. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  14. CK8 correlates with malignancy in leukoplakia and carcinomas of the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gires, Olivier; Mack, Brigitte; Rauch, Jens; Matthias, Christoph

    2006-01-01

    Screening of head and neck carcinoma patients with the proteomics-based AMIDA technology yielded a set of tumour-associated antigens, including the intermediate filament protein cytokeratin 8 (CK8). The expression pattern and specificity of CK8 was compared with those of the established markers pan-cytokeratins and CK13, and with that of the proliferation marker Ki67. Expression of CK8 correlated positively with malignancies of the head and neck areas. CK8 was not expressed in healthy epithelium, except for some rare cases of cells of the basal layer and laryngeal tissue. In contrast, the vast majority of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas and metastases strongly expressed CK8. Interestingly, CK8 de novo expression correlated with dysplastic areas of oral leukoplakic lesions, while hyperplastic leukoplakia remained CK8-negative but strongly panCK and CK13 positive. Thus, CK8 is an attractive marker molecule for a differentiated diagnosis of leukoplakia and head and neck carcinomas, which possesses notedly improved specificity as compared with panCK and CK13

  15. Management of somatic pain induced by treatment of head and neck cancer: Postoperative pain. Guidelines of the French Oto-Rhino-Laryngology--Head and Neck Surgery Society (SFORL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espitalier, F; Testelin, S; Blanchard, D; Binczak, M; Bollet, M; Calmels, P; Couturaud, C; Dreyer, C; Navez, M; Perrichon, C; Morinière, S; Albert, S

    2014-09-01

    To present the guidelines of the French Oto-Rhino-Laryngology--Head and Neck Surgery Society (SFORL) concerning the management of somatic pain induced by the treatment of head and neck cancer, and in particular the management of early and late post-surgical pain. A multidisciplinary work group conducted a review of the scientific literature on the study topic. An editorial group subsequently read the resulting guidelines before validation. It is recommended to prevent onset of pain caused by malpositioning on the operating table, as well as pain related to postoperative care. During surgery, it is recommended to spare nerve and muscle structures as far as possible to limit painful sequelae. Management of early postoperative pain upon tumor resection and flap harvesting sites requires patient-controlled analgesia by morphine pump. Physical therapy is recommended after flap harvesting to minimize painful sequelae. Preventive and curative measures should be undertaken for appropriate management of post-surgical pain in the treatment of head and neck cancers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. The role of computed tomography in the radiotherapy of head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hokama, Yukio; Miura, Kentaro; Katsuyama, Naofumi; Nakano, Masao; Noda, Yutaka; Yamashiro, Masahiro

    1983-01-01

    The clinical usefullness of computed tomography (CT) was evaluated in 20 patients with carcinoma of the head and neck before, during and after radiotherapy. The role of CT in the radiotherapy of head and neck cancer was studied. In case of carcinoma of nasopharynx and maxillary antrum, bone destruction and tumor configuration in soft tissue were well delineated and usefull for clinical staging and radiotherapy planning. Neck lymph node involvement was also well detected, especially by using contrast enhancement. CT revealed also the structure of metastatic lesion to neck lymph node, for example central necrosis. Many authors have reported the usefullness of CT for radiotherapy planning. But we would emphasize the contribution in the observation of tumor regression by radiotherapy, and follow-up after the therapy. (author)

  17. Advances in Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gregoire, Vincent; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Nuyts, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Over the last few decades, significant improvements have been made in the radiotherapy (RT) treatment of head and neck malignancies. The progressive introduction of intensity-modulated RT and the use of multimodality imaging for target volume and organs at risk delineation, together with the use of

  18. Human Papilloma Virus Associated Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    OpenAIRE

    Ajila, Vidya; Shetty, Harish; Babu, Subhas; Shetty, Veena; Hegde, Shruthi

    2015-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the commonest causes for mortality and morbidity with squamous cell carcinoma being the sixth most frequent malignant tumour worldwide. In addition to tobacco and alcohol, human papilloma virus (HPV) is associated with a proportion of head and neck cancers. As in cervical cancers, HPV types 16 and 18 are the cause of malignant transformation. HPV-positive cancers of head and neck have unique characteristics such as occurrence in a younger age group, distinct clinical and...

  19. Assessment of pain during head and neck irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissman, D.E.; Janjan, N.; Byhardt, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    Radiation therapy for patients with head and neck malignancies frequently results in painful mucositis, which is usually poorly controlled with standard analgesics or topical anesthetics. To better understand the temporal development of radiation-induced pain and the effects of this pain on activities of daily living, 14 patients undergoing radiation therapy for a newly diagnosed head and neck malignancy completed daily pain diaries during the course of irradiation. All patients developed painful mucositis, usually beginning during the second or third week of radiation. Despite the use of analgesics/anesthetics, pain was rated as moderate or severe on 37% of treatment days and was noted to be constant or present throughout most of the day on 58% of treatment days. Eating and sleep disturbances related to pain occurred on 55% and 34% of treatment days, respectively. Eight patients had greater than a 2-kg weight loss. Radiation induces a predictable pattern of pain and comorbidity, which may be amenable to earlier and more aggressive analgesic treatment

  20. [Managment of head and neck cancers during pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiciński, Krzysztof; Skorek, Andrzej; Stankiewicz, Czesław

    2011-01-01

    The coincidence of malignant disease during pregnancy is uncommon. The incidence of cancer in pregnancy has increased, due to the tendency to postpone childbirth to an older age. Cancer complicates approximately 0.1% of all pregnancies. Managing head and neck cancers during pregnancy requires additional pregnancy-related understanding of the aetiological effect of pregnancy on cancer, knowledge of the direct and indirect effects of cancer on pregnancy, and the effect of diagnostic and treatment modalities on pregnancy. The timing of treatment is an important determinant on foetal wellbeing. A multidisciplinary approach should be adopted to enable parents and clinicians to make the best clinical decision. Clinicians must be cognizant with the ethical dilemmas of treatment. In head and neck cancers, pregnancy has no effect on maternal prognosis when compared to non-pregnant patients matched by age, cancer stage and treatment. Copyright © 2011 Polish Otolaryngology Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner (Poland). All rights reserved.

  1. End-stage head and neck cancer coping mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Popescu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Coping mechanisms are patients’ means of adapting to stressful situations and involve psychological and physical changes in behavior. Patients adapt to head and neck cancer in a variety of ways. Head and neck cancers are extremely debilitating, especially in advanced stages of the disease or in end-of-life situations. While an oncology team needs to address the needs of all oncology patients, the advanced terminal patients require special attention. Most of these patients do not cope well with their situation and have a tendency to cease social interactions. Pain is the most frequentlyexperienced medical disability in patients having an end-stage illness experience, and thus an important medical endeavor is to afford dignity to the dying patient facingan incurable disease. In such cases, the medical community should never refuse therapy or to assist a dying patient.In some instances, the patient and family may derive benefit from their religious beliefs.

  2. Simple overlay device for determining radial head and neck height

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Jun-Gyu; Southgate, Richard D.; Fitzsimmons, James S.; O' Driscoll, Shawn W. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2010-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that a simple overlay device can be used on radiographs to measure radial head and neck height. Thirty anteroposterior elbow radiographs from 30 patients with a clinical diagnosis of lateral epicondylitis were examined to measure radial head and neck height. Three methods using different points along the bicipital tuberosity as a landmark were used. Method 1 used the proximal end of the bicipital tuberosity, method 2 used the most prominent point of the bicipital tuberosity, and method 3 used a simple overlay device (SOD) template that was aligned with anatomic reference points. All measurements were performed three times by three observers to determine interobserver and intraobserver reliability. Intraclass correlation coefficients revealed higher interobserver and intraobserver correlations for the SOD template method than for the other two methods. The 95% limits of agreement between observers were markedly better (-1.8 mm to +1.0 mm) for the SOD template method than for the proximal point method (-3.8 mm to +3.4 mm) or the prominent point method (-5.9 mm to +4.9 mm). We found that the SOD template method was reliable for assessing radial head and neck height. It had less variability than other methods, its 95% limit of agreement being less than 2 mm. This method could be helpful for assessing whether or not the insertion of a radial head prosthesis has resulted in over-lengthening of the radius. (orig.)

  3. Simple overlay device for determining radial head and neck height

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Jun-Gyu; Southgate, Richard D.; Fitzsimmons, James S.; O'Driscoll, Shawn W.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that a simple overlay device can be used on radiographs to measure radial head and neck height. Thirty anteroposterior elbow radiographs from 30 patients with a clinical diagnosis of lateral epicondylitis were examined to measure radial head and neck height. Three methods using different points along the bicipital tuberosity as a landmark were used. Method 1 used the proximal end of the bicipital tuberosity, method 2 used the most prominent point of the bicipital tuberosity, and method 3 used a simple overlay device (SOD) template that was aligned with anatomic reference points. All measurements were performed three times by three observers to determine interobserver and intraobserver reliability. Intraclass correlation coefficients revealed higher interobserver and intraobserver correlations for the SOD template method than for the other two methods. The 95% limits of agreement between observers were markedly better (-1.8 mm to +1.0 mm) for the SOD template method than for the proximal point method (-3.8 mm to +3.4 mm) or the prominent point method (-5.9 mm to +4.9 mm). We found that the SOD template method was reliable for assessing radial head and neck height. It had less variability than other methods, its 95% limit of agreement being less than 2 mm. This method could be helpful for assessing whether or not the insertion of a radial head prosthesis has resulted in over-lengthening of the radius. (orig.)

  4. Pulmonary squamous cell carcinoma following head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: Metastasis or second primary?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, Tom W.; Nederlof, Petra M.; van den Brekel, Michiel W. M.; van't Veer, Laura J.; de Jong, Daphne; Hart, August A. M.; van Zandwijk, Nico; Klomp, Houke; Balm, Alfons J. M.; van Velthuysen, Marie-Louise F.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To distinguish a metastasis from a second primary tumor in patients with a history of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and subsequent pulmonary squamous cell carcinoma. Experimental Design: For 44 patients with a primary squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck followed by a

  5. Treatment of Pediatric Head and Neck Cancer - Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Find information about prognosis, staging, and treatment for the following head and neck cancer sites in children: esthesioneuroblastoma, larynx and papillomatosis, nasopharynx, oral cavity, and salivary gland.

  6. Perception of Shame in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMains, Kevin Christopher; Peel, Jennifer; Weitzel, Erik K; Der-Torossian, Hirak; Couch, Marion

    2015-11-01

    This survey was developed to assess the prevalence and effects of the perception of shame in otolaryngology-head and neck surgery residency training in the United States. Survey. US otolaryngology training programs. Faculty and trainees in US otolaryngology training programs. A 14-item survey to assess the prevalence of the experience of shame and the attitudes toward use of shame in otolaryngology residency training was sent to all otolaryngology-head and neck surgery program directors for distribution among their respective faculty and resident cohorts. A total of 267 responses were received (women, 24.7%; men, 75.3%): 42.7% of respondents were trainees; 7.0% of trainees thought that shame was a necessary/effective tool, compared with 11.4% of faculty; 50% of respondents felt that they had been personally shamed during residency; and 69.9% of respondents had witnessed another trainee being shamed during residency training. Trainees were most commonly shamed in the operating room (78.4%). Otolaryngology faculty members did the shaming 95.1% of the time. Although shaming prompted internal reflection/self-improvement in 57.4% of trainees, it also caused loss of self-confidence in 52.5%. Trainees who had been shamed were more likely to view shame as an appropriate educational tool (P Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  7. Modified use of a dynamic bite opener--treatment and prevention of trismus in a child with head and neck cancer: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, P U; Kropmans, T J; Tamminga, R Y

    1992-10-01

    Trismus may be a complication arising during or after treatment of patients with head and neck cancer. Treatment of trismus is difficult, making prevention very important. To prevent and treat trismus in a patient with a nasopharyngeal tumor, the Contract-Relax-Antagonist-Contract (CRAC) technique was applied, with the aid of a custom-made dynamic bite opener (DBO). The CRAC technique in combination with the DBO, as a therapy/prevention program for trismus, is not referred to in the literature. The combination of CRAC and DBO appeared to be a gentle and effective method well tolerated by the patient.

  8. Auto-Segmentation of Head and Neck Cancer using Textural features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hollensen, Christian; Jørgensen, Peter Stanley; Højgaard, Liselotte

    - and intra observer variability. Several automatic segmentation methods have been developed using positron emission tomography (PET) and/or computerised tomography (CT). The aim of the present study is to develop a model for 3-dimensional auto-segmentation, the level set method, to contour gross tumour...

  9. Parotid metastasis--an independent prognostic factor for head and neck cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ch'ng, S; Maitra, A; Lea, R; Brasch, H; Tan, S T

    2006-01-01

    Metastatic parotid cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the most common parotid gland malignancy in New Zealand and Australia. The current AJCC TNM staging system does not account for the extent of nodal metastasis. A staging system that separates parotid (P stage) from neck disease (N stage) has been proposed recently. To review the outcome of patients with metastatic head and neck cutaneous SCC treated at our multidisciplinary Head and Neck Service using the proposed staging system. Consecutive patients were culled from our Head and Neck/Skull Base Database, 1990-2004. These patients were restaged according to the proposed staging system: P stage: P0 = no disease in the parotid (i.e., neck disease only); P1 = metastatic node P2=metastatic node > 3 cm and 6 cm, or disease involving the facial nerve or skull base. N stage: N0=no disease in the neck (i.e., parotid disease only); N1 = single ipsilateral metastatic node 3 cm, or contralateral neck involvement. Loco-regional recurrence and disease-specific survival were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method and comparison of graphs made with the log-rank test. Multivariate analysis using the Cox regression model was carried out to assess the impact of various parameters. Sixty-seven patients with metastatic head and neck cutaneous SCC were identified. Thirty-seven patients had parotid metastasis (of whom 13 also had neck disease) while 21 had neck metastasis alone. Nine patients had dermal or soft tissue metastasis. These nine patients were excluded from this series, and data analysis was carried out on the remaining 58 (46 men, 12 women, mean age 71 years) patients. Sixty-seven percent of the patients underwent post-operative adjuvant radiotherapy. The five-year disease-specific survival rate was 54%. Among 56 patients followed up to disease recurrence or for a minimum period of 18 months, the loco-regional recurrence rate was 52%. The presence of parotid disease was an independent prognostic factor on

  10. Dental problems of the patients with head and neck cancer after radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizutani, Kimishige; Koseki, Yonoshin [Osaka Dental Univ. (Japan); Inoue, Toshihiko [and others

    1996-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to demonstrate dental problems such as changes of saliva flow rates (ml/min), taste sensation and DMF-teeth (D: decay, M: missing, F: filling) after radiation therapy for the patients with head and neck cancer. Between January 1990 and April 1995, a total of 56 patients with head and neck cancer after radiation therapy was reviewed to demonstrate dental problems at the Department of Oral Radiology, Osaka Dental University Hospital. The results were as follows. In the case of 7 inpatients with head and neck cancer (nasopharynx: 3, mouth floor: 2, tongue: 2), non-stimulating saliva flow rates for 5 minutes was nearly equal to 0 ml at the level of 60 Gy/6 weeks to 80 Gy/8 weeks. In the scoring system of the taste sensation after radiation therapy for 23 patients with oral cancer (tongue: 18, mouth floor: 5), distribution of the patients with 3 points (3 points stand for patients feel good as well as pretreatment) was 91% for sweetness, 78% for sharpness, 96% for bitterness and 96% for acidity, respectively. Concerning DMF-teeth after radiation therapy for 26 patients with head and neck cancer (nasopharynx: 10, oropharynx: 8, tongue: 8), changes of DMF-Teeth of the group of nasopharynx and oropharynx was more higher than that of the group of tongue comparing to report on the survey of dental diseases in Japan, 1993 as control. We emphasize that these data are more effective to improve their oral environments and to up their recognition for oral cavity in the patients with head and neck cancer pre or post-irradiation. (author).

  11. Dental problems of the patients with head and neck cancer after radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizutani, Kimishige; Koseki, Yonoshin; Inoue, Toshihiko

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to demonstrate dental problems such as changes of saliva flow rates (ml/min), taste sensation and DMF-teeth (D: decay, M: missing, F: filling) after radiation therapy for the patients with head and neck cancer. Between January 1990 and April 1995, a total of 56 patients with head and neck cancer after radiation therapy was reviewed to demonstrate dental problems at the Department of Oral Radiology, Osaka Dental University Hospital. The results were as follows. In the case of 7 inpatients with head and neck cancer (nasopharynx: 3, mouth floor: 2, tongue: 2), non-stimulating saliva flow rates for 5 minutes was nearly equal to 0 ml at the level of 60 Gy/6 weeks to 80 Gy/8 weeks. In the scoring system of the taste sensation after radiation therapy for 23 patients with oral cancer (tongue: 18, mouth floor: 5), distribution of the patients with 3 points (3 points stand for patients feel good as well as pretreatment) was 91% for sweetness, 78% for sharpness, 96% for bitterness and 96% for acidity, respectively. Concerning DMF-teeth after radiation therapy for 26 patients with head and neck cancer (nasopharynx: 10, oropharynx: 8, tongue: 8), changes of DMF-Teeth of the group of nasopharynx and oropharynx was more higher than that of the group of tongue comparing to report on the survey of dental diseases in Japan, 1993 as control. We emphasize that these data are more effective to improve their oral environments and to up their recognition for oral cavity in the patients with head and neck cancer pre or post-irradiation. (author)

  12. Assessment of nutritional status and quality of life in patients treated for head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevost, V; Joubert, C; Heutte, N; Babin, E

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify tools for the assessment of nutritional status in head and neck cancer patients, to evaluate the impact of malnutrition on therapeutic management and quality of life and to propose a simple screening approach adapted to routine clinical practice. The authors conducted a review of the literature to identify tools for the assessment of nutritional status in head and neck cancer patients published in French and English. Articles were obtained from the PubMed database and from the references of these articles and selected journals, using the keywords: "nutritional assessment", and "head and neck" and "cancer". Anthropometric indices, laboratory parameters, dietary intake assessment, clinical scores and nutritional risk scores used in patients with head and neck cancers are presented. The relevance of these tools in clinical practice and in research is discussed, together with the links between nutritional status and quality of life. This article is designed to help teams involved in the management of patients with head and neck cancer to choose the most appropriate tools for assessment of nutritional status according to their resources and their objectives. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. A five-colour colour-coded mapping method for DCE-MRI analysis of head and neck tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, J.; Chow, S.K.K.; Yeung, D.K.W.; King, A.D.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To devise a method to convert the time–intensity curves (TICs) of head and neck dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data into a pixel-by-pixel colour-coded map for identifying normal tissues and tumours. Materials and methods: Twenty-three patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) underwent DCE-MRI. TIC patterns of primary tumours, metastatic nodes, and normal tissues were assessed and a program was devised to convert the patterns into a classified colour-coded map. The enhancement patterns of tumours and normal tissue structures were evaluated and categorized into nine grades (0–8) based on the predominance of coloured pixels on maps. Results: Five identified TIC patterns were converted into a colour-coded map consisting of red (maximum enhancement), brown (continuous slow rise-up), yellow (rapid wash-in and wash-out), green (rapid wash-in and plateau), and blue (rapid wash-in and rise-up). The colour-coded map distinguished all 21 primary tumours and 15 metastatic nodes from normal structures. Primary tumours and metastatic nodes were colour coded as predominantly yellow (grades 1–2) in 17/21 and 6/15, green (grades 3–5) in 3/21 and 5/15, and blue (grades 6–7) in 1/21 and 4/15, respectively. Vessels were coded red in 46/46 (grade 0) and muscles were coded brown in 23/23 (grade 8). Salivary glands, thyroid glands, and palatine tonsils were coded into predominantly yellow (grade 1) in 46/46 and 10/10 and 18/22, respectively. Conclusion: DCE-MRI derived five-colour-coded mapping provides an objective easy-to-interpret method to assess the dynamic enhancement pattern of head and neck cancers.

  14. Objective classification of different head and neck positions and their influence on the radiographic pharyngeal diameter in sport horses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Various head and neck positions in sport horses are significant as they can interfere with upper airway flow mechanics during exercise. Until now, research has focused on subjectively described head and neck positions. The objective of this study was to develop an objective, reproducible method for quantifying head and neck positions accurately. Results Determining the angle between the ridge of the nose and the horizontal plane (ground angle) together with the angle between the ridge of nose and the line connecting the neck and the withers (withers angle) has provided values that allow precise identification of three preselected head and neck positions for performing sport horses. The pharyngeal diameter, determined on lateral radiographs of 35 horses, differed significantly between the established flexed position and the remaining two head and neck positions (extended and neutral). There was a significant correlation between the pharyngeal diameter and the ground angle (Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient −0.769, p horses. The ground angle and the withers angle show significant correlation with the measured pharyngeal diameter in resting horses. Hence, these angles provide an appropriate method for assessing the degree of head and neck flexion. Further research is required to examine the influence of increasing head and neck flexion and the related pharyngeal diameter on upper airway function in exercising horses. PMID:24886564

  15. Human papilloma virus infection in head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribius, Silke; Hoffmann, Markus

    2013-03-01

    The causal link between cervical cancer and human papilloma virus (HPV) is well known. It is now becoming clear that some types of squamous-cell carcinoma of the head and neck, particularly oropharyngeal carcinoma (OPC), are also linked to HPV infection. The development of vaccines against certain HPV genotypes has changed the management strategy for HPV-associated diseases of the uterine cervix. An analogous approach is now being considered for the prevention of HPV-associated diseases of the head and neck. We review pertinent articles retrieved by a selective search of the literature for phase II and III trials providing evidence about a possible effect of HPV status on the survival rates of patients with OPC. Seven trials fulfilled our search criteria: four phase III trials with retrospective HPV analysis and three phase II trials with retrospective and prospective HPV analysis. Patients with HPV-positive OPC survive significantly longer than those with HPV-negative OPC. Tobacco smoking has been identified as a negative prognostic factor in patients with either HPV-negative or HPV-positive disease. The established treatment strategy for OPC in patients with and without the traditional risk factors (tobacco and alcohol consumption) is now being reconsidered in the light of what we have learned about the role of HPV infection. Ongoing and projected clinical trials with risk-factor stratification may soon lead to changes in treatment. Further study is needed to answer the question whether HPV infection in the head and neck region is carcinogenic.

  16. Head segmentation in vertebrates

    OpenAIRE

    Kuratani, Shigeru; Schilling, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Classic theories of vertebrate head segmentation clearly exemplify the idealistic nature of comparative embryology prior to the 20th century. Comparative embryology aimed at recognizing the basic, primary structure that is shared by all vertebrates, either as an archetype or an ancestral developmental pattern. Modern evolutionary developmental (Evo-Devo) studies are also based on comparison, and therefore have a tendency to reduce complex embryonic anatomy into overly simplified patterns. Her...

  17. Genome Study Yields Clues to Head and Neck Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers have surveyed the genetic changes in nearly 300 head and neck cancers, revealing some previously unknown alterations that may play a role in the disease, including in patients whose cancer is associated with the human papillomavirus (HPV).

  18. Improving Therapeutic Ratio in Head and Neck Cancer with Adjuvant and Cisplatin-Based Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana G. Marcu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Advanced head and neck cancers are difficult to manage despite the large treatment arsenal currently available. The multidisciplinary effort to increase disease-free survival and diminish normal tissue toxicity was rewarded with better locoregional control and sometimes fewer side effects. Nevertheless, locoregional recurrence is still one of the main reasons for treatment failure. Today, the standard of care in head and neck cancer management is represented by altered fractionation radiotherapy combined with platinum-based chemotherapy. Targeted therapies as well as chronotherapy were trialled with more or less success. The aim of the current work is to review the available techniques, which could contribute towards a higher therapeutic ratio in the treatment of advanced head and neck cancer patients.

  19. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography protocol considerations for head and neck cancer imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escott, Edward J

    2008-08-01

    Positron emission tomographic-computed tomographic (PET-CT) imaging of patients with primary head and neck cancers has become an established approach for staging and restaging, as well as radiation therapy planning. The inherent co-registration of PET and CT images made possible by the integrated PET-CT scanner is particularly valuable in head and neck cancer imaging due to the complex and closely situated anatomy in this part of the body, the varied sources of physiologic and benign 2-deoxy-2-[F-18]fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) tracer uptake that occurs in the neck, and the varied and complex posttreatment appearance of the neck. Careful optimization of both the CT and the PET portion of the examination is essential to insure the most accurate and clinically valuable interpretation of these examinations.

  20. Regional Myocutaneous Flaps for Head and Neck Reconstruction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Regional myocutaneous pedicle flaps (RMF) are known to be relevant in the reconstruction of major head and neck oncologic defects with pectoralis major myocutaneous pedicle flap (PMMC) being the best-known RMF. For over three decades, since first described by Ariyan in 1979, PMMC has continually been used in the ...

  1. A systematic review of acelluar dermal matrices in head and neck reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shridharani, Sachin M; Tufaro, Anthony P

    2012-11-01

    The use of acellular dermal matrices has been well described in the scientific literature since the early 1990 s and has been utilized for multiple applications in the head and neck for both aesthetic and reconstructive efforts. After systematically searching the PubMed database and following further refinement (based on the authors' inclusion and exclusion criteria), the authors identified 30 studies that provided information about patients who had undergone head and neck reconstruction with the use of acellular dermal matrix. Studies had to report quantifiable objective results in patients who were older than 1 year and younger than 90 years. The authors excluded single case reports, studies with fewer than 10 patients, and studies not published in English. The optimal material used as an implant for reconstruction possesses the following properties: facilitation of vascular ingrowth, decreased propensity to incite inflammation, biologic inertness, resistance to infection, and ease of handling. Acellular dermal matrix possesses many of these properties and is utilized in reconstructing nasal soft tissue and skeletal support, tympanic membrane, periorbital soft tissue, extraoral and intraoral defects, oropharyngeal defects, dura mater, and soft-tissue deficits from parotidectomy. Furthermore, it is used to assist in preventing Frey syndrome following parotidectomy and surgical treatment of facial paralysis. Use of acellular dermal matrix for head and neck reconstruction has expanded exponentially and is validated in many studies. Further prospective randomized control trials are warranted to further investigate the efficacy of acellular dermal matrix in head and neck reconstruction.

  2. Hypothyroidism following surgery and radiation therapy for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, I. K.; Kim, J. C.

    1997-01-01

    Radiation therapy in combination with surgery has an important role in the therapy of the head and neck cancer. We conducted a prospective study for patients with head and neck cancer treated with surgery and radiation to evaluate the effect of therapies on the thyroid gland, and to identify the factors that might influence the development of hypothyroidism. From September 1986 through December 1994, 71 patients with head and cancer treated with surgery and radiation were included in this prospective study. Patients' age ranged from 32 to 73 years with a median age of 58 years. There were 12 women and 59 men. Total laryngectomy with neck dissection was carried out in 45 patients and neck dissection alone in 26 patients. All patients were serially monitored for thyroid function before and after radiation therapy. Radiation dose to the thyroid gland ranged from 40.6Gy to 60Gy with a median dose of 50Gy. The follow-up duration was 3 to 80 months. The overall incidence of hypothyroidism was 56.3% (40/71); 7 out of 71 patients (9.9%) developed clinical hypothyroidism and 33 patients (46.4%) developed subclinical hypothyroidism. No thyroid nodules, thyroid cancers, or hyperthyroidism was detected. The risk factor that significantly influenced the incidence of hypothyroidism was a combination of surgery (total laryngectomy with neck dissection) and radiation therapy (P=0.0000). Four of 26 patients (15.4%) with neck dissection alone developed hypothyroidism while 36 of 45 patients (80%) with laryngectomy and neck dissection developed hypothyroidism. The hypothyroidism following surgery and radiation therapy was a relatively common complication. The factor that significantly influenced the incidence of hypothyroidism was combination of surgery and radiation therapy. Evaluation of thyroid function before and after radiation therapy with periodic thyroid function tests is recommended for an early detection of hypothyroidism and thyroid hormone replacement therapy is

  3. Hypothyroidism following surgery and radiation therapy for head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, I. K.; Kim, J. C. [Kyungpook National Univ., Taegu (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine

    1997-09-01

    Radiation therapy in combination with surgery has an important role in the therapy of the head and neck cancer. We conducted a prospective study for patients with head and neck cancer treated with surgery and radiation to evaluate the effect of therapies on the thyroid gland, and to identify the factors that might influence the development of hypothyroidism. From September 1986 through December 1994, 71 patients with head and cancer treated with surgery and radiation were included in this prospective study. Patients` age ranged from 32 to 73 years with a median age of 58 years. There were 12 women and 59 men. Total laryngectomy with neck dissection was carried out in 45 patients and neck dissection alone in 26 patients. All patients were serially monitored for thyroid function before and after radiation therapy. Radiation dose to the thyroid gland ranged from 40.6Gy to 60Gy with a median dose of 50Gy. The follow-up duration was 3 to 80 months. The overall incidence of hypothyroidism was 56.3% (40/71); 7 out of 71 patients (9.9%) developed clinical hypothyroidism and 33 patients (46.4%) developed subclinical hypothyroidism. No thyroid nodules, thyroid cancers, or hyperthyroidism was detected. The risk factor that significantly influenced the incidence of hypothyroidism was a combination of surgery (total laryngectomy with neck dissection) and radiation therapy (P=0.0000). Four of 26 patients (15.4%) with neck dissection alone developed hypothyroidism while 36 of 45 patients (80%) with laryngectomy and neck dissection developed hypothyroidism. The hypothyroidism following surgery and radiation therapy was a relatively common complication. The factor that significantly influenced the incidence of hypothyroidism was combination of surgery and radiation therapy. Evaluation of thyroid function before and after radiation therapy with periodic thyroid function tests is recommended for an early detection of hypothyroidism and thyroid hormone replacement therapy is

  4. Epidemiological Evaluation of Head and Neck Sarcomas in Iran (the Study of 105 Cases Over 13 Years).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alishahi, Batoul; Kargahi, Neda; Homayouni, Solmaz

    2015-08-01

    Head and neck sarcomas are exceedingly rare and they include 4% - 10% of all sarcomas and less than 1% of all neoplasm of head and neck. The aim of this study is to evaluate the epidemiological characteristics of head and neck sarcomas of patients in Isfahan, Iran. In this retrospective study, from the 16000 patients whose files were evaluated, the total number of 105 head and neck sarcomas were collected. They were evaluated with due attention to age, gender of the patients and the most common location of the lesion. From the total number of 105 (0.6%) patients with sarcomas, 56 were men (53.33%) and 49 women (46.66%). The most common head and neck sarcomas among this population were Osteosarcoma (32 cases, 30.47%), Chondrosarcoma (14 cases, 13.33%), and Ewing sarcoma (11 cases, 10.47%).The most common soft tissue sarcoma was Rabdomiosarcoma. Mandible was the most common location for these lesions. In this study, the hard tissue sarcomas were more prevalent than soft tissue ones. Hence, special attention should be paid to the patients when being diagnosed.

  5. Effect of cell-phone radiofrequency on angiogenesis and cell invasion in human head and neck cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alahmad, Yaman M; Aljaber, Mohammed; Saleh, Alaaeldin I; Yalcin, Huseyin C; Aboulkassim, Tahar; Yasmeen, Amber; Batist, Gerald; Moustafa, Ala-Eddin Al

    2018-05-13

    Today, the cell phone is the most widespread technology globally. However, the outcome of cell-phone radiofrequency on head and neck cancer progression has not yet been explored. The chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) and human head and neck cancer cell lines, FaDu and SCC25, were used to explore the outcome of cell-phone radiofrequency on angiogenesis, cell invasion, and colony formation of head and neck cancer cells, respectively. Western blot analysis was used to investigate the impact of the cell phone on the regulation of E-cadherin and Erk1/Erk2 genes. Our data revealed that cell-phone radiofrequency promotes angiogenesis of the CAM. In addition, the cell phone enhances cell invasion and colony formation of human head and neck cancer cells; this is accompanied by a downregulation of E-cadherin expression. More significantly, we found that the cell phone can activate Erk1/Erk2 in our experimental models. Our investigation reveals that cell-phone radiofrequency could enhance head and neck cancer by stimulating angiogenesis and cell invasion via Erk1/Erk2 activation. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Staging of primary head and neck tumors and detection of recurrences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, S.; Baum, R.P.; Knecht, R.; Hoer, G.

    2001-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinomas represent the vast majority of all malignant tumors of the head and neck region. Lymph node involvement is the most important prognostic factor affecting survival of patients with head and neck cancer. The effectiveness of surgical treatment depends on the complete excision of all tumor tissue and an accurate preoperative diagnosis. Tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) staging is therefore mandatory. In comparison to positron emission tomography with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG PET), morphological imaging modalities (CT, MRI) have been applied for the localization of primary head and neck tumors because of their better anatomical resolution. Metabolic tumor imaging using FDG PET is superior to morphological imaging by CT and MRI in the detection of small cervical lymph node metastases (Class 1a indication). Increased FDG uptake has also been observed in benign inflammatory lesions after radiation therapy, therefore detection of local recurrence with FDG PET can be problematic. To ensure a high diagnostic accuracy it is been suggested to perform FDG PET not earlier than 3 months after radiation therapy (Class 1a indication for the diagnosis of local recurrence). (orig.) [de

  7. Reconstructive techniques in transoral robotic surgery for head and neck cancer: a North American survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konofaos, Petros; Hammond, Sarah; Ver Halen, Jon P; Samant, Sandeep

    2013-02-01

    Although the use of transoral robotic surgery for tumor extirpation is expanding, little is known about national trends in the reconstruction of resultant defects. An 18-question electronic survey was created by an expert panel of surgeons from the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at the University of Tennessee. Eligible participants were identified by the American Head and Neck Society Web site and from the Intuitive Surgical, Inc., Web site after review of surgeons trained in transoral robotic surgery techniques. Twenty-three of 27 preselected head and neck surgeons (85.18 percent) completed the survey. All respondents use transoral robotic surgery for head and neck tumor extirpation. The majority of the respondents [n = 17 (77.3 percent)] did not use any means of reconstruction. With respect to methods of reconstruction following transoral robotic surgery defects, the majority [n = 4 (80.0 percent)] used a free flap, a pedicled local flap [n = 3 (60.0 percent)], or a distant flap [n = 3 (60.0 percent)]. The radial forearm flap was the most commonly used free flap by all respondents. In general, the majority of survey respondents allow defects to heal secondarily or close primarily. Based on this survey, consensus indications for pedicled or free tissue transfer following transoral robotic surgery defects were primary head and neck tumors (stage T3 and T4a), pharyngeal defects with exposure of vital structures, and prior irradiation or chemoradiation to the operative site and neck.

  8. Second cancers following radiotherapy for early stage head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibuya, Hitoshi; Yoshimura, Ryo-ichi; Oota, Sayako; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Miura, Masahiko

    2005-01-01

    Different site specificity of second primary cancer following treatment for early stage squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck was found in the analysis of post-treatment long-term follow up cases. The highest risk of second primary cancer was observed in the oro-hypo-pharynx cancer groups, and the lowest risks were observed in the epi-pharynx cancer and maxillary sinus cancer groups. Squamous cell carcinoma in the irradiated head and neck region with long latency periods could be included in the radiation induced cancer from comparison with post-irradiation cases for malignant lymphoma, benign diseases as well as breast cancers. (author)

  9. Effect of Pretreatment Anemia on Treatment Outcome of Concurrent Radiochemotherapy in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortin, Andre; Wang Changshu; Vigneault, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of anemia on outcome of treatment with radiochemotherapy in patients with head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: The data of 196 patients with Stage II-IV head-and-neck cancer treated with concomitant cisplatin-based radiochemotherapy were retrospectively reviewed. Anemia was defined according to World Health Organization criteria as hemoglobin 140 g/L. Conclusions: Anemia was strongly associated with local control and survival in this cohort of patients with head-and-neck cancer receiving radiochemotherapy

  10. Management of somatic pain induced by head-and-neck cancer treatment: definition and assessment. Guidelines of the French Oto-Rhino-Laryngology- Head and Neck Surgery Society (SFORL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binczak, M; Navez, M; Perrichon, C; Blanchard, D; Bollet, M; Calmels, P; Couturaud, C; Dreyer, C; Espitalier, F; Testelin, S; Albert, S; Morinière, S

    2014-09-01

    The authors present the guidelines of the French Oto-Rhino-Laryngology- Head and Neck Surgery Society (Société Française d'Oto-rhino-Laryngologie et de Chirurgie de la Face et du Cou [SFORL]) for the management of somatic pain induced by head-and-neck cancer treatment, and in particular the instruments needed for the definition and initial assessment of the various types of pain. A multidisciplinary work group was entrusted with a review of the scientific literature on the above topic. Guidelines were drawn up, based on the articles retrieved and the group members' individual experience. They were then read over by an editorial group independent of the work group. The final version was established in a coordination meeting. The guidelines were graded as A, B, C or expert opinion, by decreasing level of evidence. The priority is to eliminate tumoral recurrence when pain reappears or changes following head-and-neck cancer treatment. Neuropathic pain screening instruments and pain assessment scales should be used to assess pain intensity and treatment efficacy. Functional rehabilitation sessions should be prescribed to reduce musculoskeletal pain and prevent ankylosis and postural disorder. Psychotherapy and mind-body therapy, when available, should be provided in case of chronic pain. In case of recalcitrant complex pain, referral should be made to a multidisciplinary pain structure. The management of somatic pain induced by head-and-neck cancer treatment above all requires identifying and assessing the intensity of the various types of pain involved, their functional impact and their emotional component. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Incidence and risk factors of refeeding syndrome in head and neck cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Stine Ostenfeldt; Kristensen, Marianne Boll; Wessel, Irene

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the incidence rates of refeeding phenomena (defined as a decline in p-phosphate) and refeeding syndrome (RFS; defined as development of clinical symptoms in addition to a decline in p-phosphate) in head and neck cancer patients, and to identify risk factors. Fifty......-four head and neck cancer patients referred for surgery were included. Forty-six potential risk factors were registered at the baseline, and p-phosphate was measured at Days 2, 4, and 7. Eleven patients (20%) developed RFS, and twenty-eight (52%) developed refeeding phenomena. At baseline, these patients...... presented a higher prevalence of head and neck pain, eating difficulties, higher p-phosphate levels, lower p-transferrin levels, and, in men, lower b-hemoglobin levels. Patients who developed symptoms had a decline in p-phosphate ≥0.22 mmol/l. At baseline, these patients had higher p-phosphate levels...

  12. Viable tumor in salvage neck dissections in head and neck cancer : Relation with initial treatment, change of lymph node size and human papillomavirus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bovenkamp, Karlijn; Dorgelo, Bart; Noordhuis, Maartje G; van der Laan, Bernard F A M; van der Vegt, Bert; Bijl, Hendrik P; Roodenburg, Jan L; van Dijk, Boukje A C; Oosting, Sjoukje F; Schuuring, Ed M D; Langendijk, Johannes A; Halmos, Gyorgy B; Plaat, Boudewijn E C

    Objectives: To identify predictive factors for the presence of viable tumor and outcome in head and neck cancer patients who undergo therapeutic salvage neck dissections. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of 76 salvage neck dissections after radiotherapy alone (n = 22), radiotherapy in

  13. Factors affecting the aluminium content of human femoral head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zioła-Frankowska, Anetta; Dąbrowski, Mikołaj; Kubaszewski, Łukasz; Rogala, Piotr; Frankowski, Marcin

    2015-11-01

    Tissues for the study were obtained intraoperatively during hip replacement procedures from 96 patients. In all the cases, the indication for this treatment was primary or secondary degenerative changes in the hip joint. The subject of the study was the head and neck of the femur, resected in situ. Aluminium concentrations measured in femoral head and neck samples from patients aged between 25 and 91 were varied. Statistical methods were applied to determine the variations in relation to the parameters from the background survey. Significant differences in the aluminium content of femoral head samples were observed between patients under and over 60 years of age. Based on the results, it was confirmed that the aluminium accumulates in bones over a lifetime. The study showed that the content of aluminium in the head and neck of the femur depends on the factors such as: type of medicines taken, contact with chemicals at work, differences in body anatomy and sex. The study on the levels of aluminium in bones and the factors affecting its concentration is a valuable source of information for further research on the role of aluminium in bone diseases. Based on the investigations, it was found that the GF-AAS technique is the best analytical tool for routine analysis of aluminium in complex matrix samples. The use of femoral heads in the investigations was approved by the Bioethics Committee of the University of Medical Sciences in Poznań (Poland). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Nonparameningeal head and neck rhabdomyosarcoma in children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orbach, Daniel; Mosseri, Veronique; Gallego, Soledad

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This article reports risk factors and long-term outcome in localized nonparameningeal head and neck rhabdomyosarcomas in children and adolescents from a combined dataset from 3 consecutive international trials. METHODS: Data from 140 children (9.3% of total) prospectively enrolled in ...

  15. Neck injury tolerance under inertial loads in side impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Andrew S; Kallieris, Dimitrios; Frechede, Bertrand

    2007-03-01

    Neck injury remains a major issue in road safety. Current side impact dummies and side impact crashworthiness assessments do not assess the risk of neck injury. These assessments are limited by biofidelity and knowledge regarding neck injury criteria and tolerance levels in side impacts. Side impact tests with PMHS were performed at the Heidelberg University in the 1980s and 1990s to improve primarily the understanding of trunk dynamics, injury mechanisms and criteria. In order to contribute to the definition of human tolerances at neck level, this study presents an analysis of the head/neck biomechanical parameters that were measured in these tests and their relationship to neck injury severity. Data from 15 impact tests were analysed. Head accelerations, and neck forces and moments were calculated from 9-accelerometer array head data, X-rays and anthropometric data. Statistically significant relationships were observed between resultant head acceleration and neck force and neck injury severity. The average resultant head acceleration for AIS 2 neck injuries was 112 g, while resultant neck force was 4925 N and moment 241 Nm. The data compared well to other test data on cadavers and volunteers. It is hoped that the paper will assist in the understanding of neck injuries and the development of tolerance criteria.

  16. The radiotherapy effect on the quality of life of patients with head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Namie Okino; Dias, Adriana Marques; Zago, Marcia Maria Fontao

    2006-01-01

    In cases of head and neck cancer, surgical advances in combination with radiotherapy (RT) have brought an increase in patients' probability of cure. RT is widely used and aims to destroy cancer cells in order to reduce or eliminate a malignant tumor. However, RT also causes major changes in patients' quality of life during and after treatment. The current study aims to evaluate the side effects of RT in patients with head and neck cancer and its influence on quality of life. The study population included head and neck cancer patients submitted to RT at the University of Sao Paulo Hospital in Ribeirao Preto, Brazil. Data were collected with the FACT H and N instrument and McMaster University's Questionnaire for head and neck RT and submitted to quantitative statistical analysis using SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences). The main side effects of RT that affected physical quality of life were related to salivation and nutritional problems, while the predominant emotional problems were depression and anxiety. (author)

  17. Head and neck cancer in South Asia: macroeconomic consequences and the role of surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkire, Blake C; Bergmark, Regan W; Chambers, Kyle; Cheney, Mack L; Meara, John G

    2015-04-27

    Head and neck cancer, for which the diagnosis and treatment are often surgical, comprises a substantial proportion of the burden of disease in South Asia. Further, estimates of surgical volume suggest this region faces a critical shortage of surgical capacity. We aimed to estimate the total economic welfare losses due to the morbidity and mortality of head and neck cancer in India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh for 1 year (2010). We used publicly available estimates from the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation regarding the morbidity and mortality of head and neck cancer in India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh, along with an economic concept termed the value of a statistical life, to estimate total economic welfare losses due to head and neck cancer in the aforementioned countries in the year 2010. The counterfactual scenario is absence of disease. Sensitivity analyses were done with regard to how the value of a statistical life changes with income. In 2010, the most conservative estimate of economic welfare losses due to head and neck cancer in the three studied countries is US$16·9 billion (2010 USD, PPP), equivalent to 0·26% of their combined gross domestic product (GDP). The welfare losses experienced by the population younger than 70 years of age accounted for US$15·2 billion (90% of the total losses). When adjusted for the size of their respective economies, Bangladesh, the poorest of the three countries, incurred the greatest loss (US$930 million), equivalent to 0·29% of its GDP. India and Pakistan experienced welfare losses of US$14·1 billion and US$1·9 billion, respectively. These figures are equivalent to 0·26% of the GDP for both countries. Oropharyngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer made up the largest share of the total burden at 39% (US$6·6 billion), followed closely by oral cavity cancer at 34% (US$5·7 billion). The burden of non-communicable diseases, to which cancer contributes greatly, is growing at a rapid pace in South Asia. Head and neck

  18. Characterization of HPV and host genome interactions in primary head and neck cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfenov, Michael; Pedamallu, Chandra Sekhar; Gehlenborg, Nils; Freeman, Samuel S.; Danilova, Ludmila; Bristow, Christopher A.; Lee, Semin; Hadjipanayis, Angela G.; Ivanova, Elena V.; Wilkerson, Matthew D.; Protopopov, Alexei; Yang, Lixing; Seth, Sahil; Song, Xingzhi; Tang, Jiabin; Ren, Xiaojia; Zhang, Jianhua; Pantazi, Angeliki; Santoso, Netty; Xu, Andrew W.; Mahadeshwar, Harshad; Wheeler, David A.; Haddad, Robert I.; Jung, Joonil; Ojesina, Akinyemi I.; Issaeva, Natalia; Yarbrough, Wendell G.; Hayes, D. Neil; Grandis, Jennifer R.; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Meyerson, Matthew; Park, Peter J.; Chin, Lynda; Seidman, J. G.; Hammerman, Peter S.; Kucherlapati, Raju; Ally, Adrian; Balasundaram, Miruna; Birol, Inanc; Bowlby, Reanne; Butterfield, Yaron S.N.; Carlsen, Rebecca; Cheng, Dean; Chu, Andy; Dhalla, Noreen; Guin, Ranabir; Holt, Robert A.; Jones, Steven J.M.; Lee, Darlene; Li, Haiyan I.; Marra, Marco A.; Mayo, Michael; Moore, Richard A.; Mungall, Andrew J.; Robertson, A. Gordon; Schein, Jacqueline E.; Sipahimalani, Payal; Tam, Angela; Thiessen, Nina; Wong, Tina; Protopopov, Alexei; Santoso, Netty; Lee, Semin; Parfenov, Michael; Zhang, Jianhua; Mahadeshwar, Harshad S.; Tang, Jiabin; Ren, Xiaojia; Seth, Sahil; Haseley, Psalm; Zeng, Dong; Yang, Lixing; Xu, Andrew W.; Song, Xingzhi; Pantazi, Angeliki; Bristow, Christopher; Hadjipanayis, Angela; Seidman, Jonathan; Chin, Lynda; Park, Peter J.; Kucherlapati, Raju; Akbani, Rehan; Casasent, Tod; Liu, Wenbin; Lu, Yiling; Mills, Gordon; Motter, Thomas; Weinstein, John; Diao, Lixia; Wang, Jing; Fan, You Hong; Liu, Jinze; Wang, Kai; Auman, J. Todd; Balu, Saianand; Bodenheimer, Tom; Buda, Elizabeth; Hayes, D. Neil; Hoadley, Katherine A.; Hoyle, Alan P.; Jefferys, Stuart R.; Jones, Corbin D.; Kimes, Patrick K.; Marron, J.S.; Meng, Shaowu; Mieczkowski, Piotr A.; Mose, Lisle E.; Parker, Joel S.; Perou, Charles M.; Prins, Jan F.; Roach, Jeffrey; Shi, Yan; Simons, Janae V.; Singh, Darshan; Soloway, Mathew G.; Tan, Donghui; Veluvolu, Umadevi; Walter, Vonn; Waring, Scot; Wilkerson, Matthew D.; Wu, Junyuan; Zhao, Ni; Cherniack, Andrew D.; Hammerman, Peter S.; Tward, Aaron D.; Pedamallu, Chandra Sekhar; Saksena, Gordon; Jung, Joonil; Ojesina, Akinyemi I.; Carter, Scott L.; Zack, Travis I.; Schumacher, Steven E.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Freeman, Samuel S.; Meyerson, Matthew; Cho, Juok; Chin, Lynda; Getz, Gad; Noble, Michael S.; DiCara, Daniel; Zhang, Hailei; Heiman, David I.; Gehlenborg, Nils; Voet, Doug; Lin, Pei; Frazer, Scott; Stojanov, Petar; Liu, Yingchun; Zou, Lihua; Kim, Jaegil; Lawrence, Michael S.; Sougnez, Carrie; Lichtenstein, Lee; Cibulskis, Kristian; Lander, Eric; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Muzny, Donna; Doddapaneni, HarshaVardhan; Kovar, Christie; Reid, Jeff; Morton, Donna; Han, Yi; Hale, Walker; Chao, Hsu; Chang, Kyle; Drummond, Jennifer A.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Kakkar, Nipun; Wheeler, David; Xi, Liu; Ciriello, Giovanni; Ladanyi, Marc; Lee, William; Ramirez, Ricardo; Sander, Chris; Shen, Ronglai; Sinha, Rileen; Weinhold, Nils; Taylor, Barry S.; Aksoy, B. Arman; Dresdner, Gideon; Gao, Jianjiong; Gross, Benjamin; Jacobsen, Anders; Reva, Boris; Schultz, Nikolaus; Sumer, S. Onur; Sun, Yichao; Chan, Timothy; Morris, Luc; Stuart, Joshua; Benz, Stephen; Ng, Sam; Benz, Christopher; Yau, Christina; Baylin, Stephen B.; Cope, Leslie; Danilova, Ludmila; Herman, James G.; Bootwalla, Moiz; Maglinte, Dennis T.; Laird, Peter W.; Triche, Timothy; Weisenberger, Daniel J.; Van Den Berg, David J.; Agrawal, Nishant; Bishop, Justin; Boutros, Paul C.; Bruce, Jeff P; Byers, Lauren Averett; Califano, Joseph; Carey, Thomas E.; Chen, Zhong; Cheng, Hui; Chiosea, Simion I.; Cohen, Ezra; Diergaarde, Brenda; Egloff, Ann Marie; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Ferris, Robert L.; Frederick, Mitchell J.; Grandis, Jennifer R.; Guo, Yan; Haddad, Robert I.; Hammerman, Peter S.; Harris, Thomas; Hayes, D. Neil; Hui, Angela BY; Lee, J. Jack; Lippman, Scott M.; Liu, Fei-Fei; McHugh, Jonathan B.; Myers, Jeff; Ng, Patrick Kwok Shing; Perez-Ordonez, Bayardo; Pickering, Curtis R.; Prystowsky, Michael; Romkes, Marjorie; Saleh, Anthony D.; Sartor, Maureen A.; Seethala, Raja; Seiwert, Tanguy Y.; Si, Han; Tward, Aaron D.; Van Waes, Carter; Waggott, Daryl M.; Wiznerowicz, Maciej; Yarbrough, Wendell; Zhang, Jiexin; Zuo, Zhixiang; Burnett, Ken; Crain, Daniel; Gardner, Johanna; Lau, Kevin; Mallery, David; Morris, Scott; Paulauskis, Joseph; Penny, Robert; Shelton, Candance; Shelton, Troy; Sherman, Mark; Yena, Peggy; Black, Aaron D.; Bowen, Jay; Frick, Jessica; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Harper, Hollie A.; Lichtenberg, Tara M.; Ramirez, Nilsa C.; Wise, Lisa; Zmuda, Erik; Baboud, Julien; Jensen, Mark A.; Kahn, Ari B.; Pihl, Todd D.; Pot, David A.; Srinivasan, Deepak; Walton, Jessica S.; Wan, Yunhu; Burton, Robert; Davidsen, Tanja; Demchok, John A.; Eley, Greg; Ferguson, Martin L.; Shaw, Kenna R. Mills; Ozenberger, Bradley A.; Sheth, Margi; Sofia, Heidi J.; Tarnuzzer, Roy; Wang, Zhining; Yang, Liming; Zenklusen, Jean Claude; Saller, Charles; Tarvin, Katherine; Chen, Chu; Bollag, Roni; Weinberger, Paul; Golusiński, Wojciech; Golusiński, Paweł; Ibbs, Matthiew; Korski, Konstanty; Mackiewicz, Andrzej; Suchorska, Wiktoria; Szybiak, Bartosz; Wiznerowicz, Maciej; Burnett, Ken; Curley, Erin; Gardner, Johanna; Mallery, David; Penny, Robert; Shelton, Troy; Yena, Peggy; Beard, Christina; Mitchell, Colleen; Sandusky, George; Agrawal, Nishant; Ahn, Julie; Bishop, Justin; Califano, Joseph; Khan, Zubair; Bruce, Jeff P; Hui, Angela BY; Irish, Jonathan; Liu, Fei-Fei; Perez-Ordonez, Bayardo; Waldron, John; Boutros, Paul C.; Waggott, Daryl M.; Myers, Jeff; Lippman, Scott M.; Egea, Sophie; Gomez-Fernandez, Carmen; Herbert, Lynn; Bradford, Carol R.; Carey, Thomas E.; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Haddad, Andrea S.; Jones, Tamara R.; Komarck, Christine M.; Malakh, Mayya; McHugh, Jonathan B.; Moyer, Jeffrey S.; Nguyen, Ariane; Peterson, Lisa A.; Prince, Mark E.; Rozek, Laura S.; Sartor, Maureen A.; Taylor, Evan G.; Walline, Heather M.; Wolf, Gregory T.; Boice, Lori; Chera, Bhishamjit S.; Funkhouser, William K.; Gulley, Margaret L.; Hackman, Trevor G.; Hayes, D. Neil; Hayward, Michele C.; Huang, Mei; Rathmell, W. Kimryn; Salazar, Ashley H.; Shockley, William W.; Shores, Carol G.; Thorne, Leigh; Weissler, Mark C.; Wrenn, Sylvia; Zanation, Adam M.; Chiosea, Simion I.; Diergaarde, Brenda; Egloff, Ann Marie; Ferris, Robert L.; Romkes, Marjorie; Seethala, Raja; Brown, Brandee T.; Guo, Yan; Pham, Michelle; Yarbrough, Wendell G.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have established that a subset of head and neck tumors contains human papillomavirus (HPV) sequences and that HPV-driven head and neck cancers display distinct biological and clinical features. HPV is known to drive cancer by the actions of the E6 and E7 oncoproteins, but the molecular architecture of HPV infection and its interaction with the host genome in head and neck cancers have not been comprehensively described. We profiled a cohort of 279 head and neck cancers with next generation RNA and DNA sequencing and show that 35 (12.5%) tumors displayed evidence of high-risk HPV types 16, 33, or 35. Twenty-five cases had integration of the viral genome into one or more locations in the human genome with statistical enrichment for genic regions. Integrations had a marked impact on the human genome and were associated with alterations in DNA copy number, mRNA transcript abundance and splicing, and both inter- and intrachromosomal rearrangements. Many of these events involved genes with documented roles in cancer. Cancers with integrated vs. nonintegrated HPV displayed different patterns of DNA methylation and both human and viral gene expressions. Together, these data provide insight into the mechanisms by which HPV interacts with the human genome beyond expression of viral oncoproteins and suggest that specific integration events are an integral component of viral oncogenesis. PMID:25313082

  19. Radiosensitization of head and neck cancer cells by the phytochemical agent sulforaphane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotowski, Ulana; Heiduschka, Gregor; Brunner, Markus; Fahim, Tammer; Thurnher, Dietmar; Czembirek, Cornelia; Eder-Czembirek, Christina; Schmidt, Rainer

    2011-01-01

    Sulforaphane is a naturally occurring compound found in broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables. Recently it gained attention because of its antiproliferative properties in many cancer cell lines. The aim of this study was to investigate whether sulforaphane could act as a radiosensitizer in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines. Four head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines (i.e., (HNSCC) SCC9, SCC25, CAL27, and FADU) were treated with sulforaphane and subsequently irradiated. Then proliferation and clonogenic assays were performed. Apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry. Possible regulation of Akt and Mcl-1 was investigated by western blotting. Sulforaphane and radiation in combination leads to stronger inhibition of cell proliferation and of clonogenic survival than each treatment method alone. Western blot analysis of Akt and Mcl-1 showed no changed expression. Sulforaphane is a promising agent in the treatment of head and neck cancer due to its antiproliferative and radio-sensitizing properties. A combination of sulforaphane and radiation decreases clonogenic survival. Apoptosis is not regulated through Akt or the Mcl-1 protein. (orig.)

  20. Radiosensitization of head and neck cancer cells by the phytochemical agent sulforaphane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotowski, Ulana; Heiduschka, Gregor; Brunner, Markus; Fahim, Tammer; Thurnher, Dietmar [Medical University of Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery; Czembirek, Cornelia; Eder-Czembirek, Christina [Medical University of Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Cranio-, Maxillofacial and Oral Surgery; Schmidt, Rainer [Medical University of Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Radiotherapy and -biology

    2011-09-15

    Sulforaphane is a naturally occurring compound found in broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables. Recently it gained attention because of its antiproliferative properties in many cancer cell lines. The aim of this study was to investigate whether sulforaphane could act as a radiosensitizer in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines. Four head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines (i.e., (HNSCC) SCC9, SCC25, CAL27, and FADU) were treated with sulforaphane and subsequently irradiated. Then proliferation and clonogenic assays were performed. Apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry. Possible regulation of Akt and Mcl-1 was investigated by western blotting. Sulforaphane and radiation in combination leads to stronger inhibition of cell proliferation and of clonogenic survival than each treatment method alone. Western blot analysis of Akt and Mcl-1 showed no changed expression. Sulforaphane is a promising agent in the treatment of head and neck cancer due to its antiproliferative and radio-sensitizing properties. A combination of sulforaphane and radiation decreases clonogenic survival. Apoptosis is not regulated through Akt or the Mcl-1 protein. (orig.)

  1. A patient positioning system in head and neck irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bormann, U.; Strauch, B.; Schmitt, G.

    1986-01-01

    A holding system is presented which allows a good, easy, and reproducable positioning of the patient in percutanous head and neck radiotherapy. The patients are lying comfortably on a neck support and are fixed in such a way that they are not able to turn in a lateral or longitudinal direction. The distance chin-jugulum can be easily determined by an integrated measuring tape. Due to the use of UV ink and UV lamps, the field marking of the patient's skin cannot be seen in the spectrum of visible light. (orig.) [de

  2. PET/CT imaging in head and neck tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roedel, R.; Palmedo, H.; Reichmann, K.; Reinhardt, M.J.; Biersack, H.J.; Straehler-Pohl, H.J.; Jaeger, U.

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of combined PET/CT examinations for detection of malignant tumors and their metastases in head and neck oncology. 51 patients received whole body scans on a dual modality PET/CT system. CT was performed without i.v. contrast. The results were compared concerning the diagnostic impact of native CT scan on FDG-PET images and the additional value of fused imaging. From 153 lesions were 97 classified as malignant on CT and 136 on FDG/PET images, as suspicious for malignancy in 33 on CT and 7 on FDG-PET and as benign in 23 on CT and 10 on FDG-PET. With combined PET/CT all primary and recurrent tumors could be found, the detection rate in patients with unknown primary tumors was 45%. Compared to PET or CT alone the sensitivity, specifity and accuracy could be significantly improved by means of combined PET/CT. Fused PET/CT imaging with [F18]-FDG and native CT-scanning enables accurate diagnosis in 93% of lesions and 90% of patients with head and neck oncology. (orig.) [de

  3. Robot-Assisted Free Flap in Head and Neck Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Gyeol Song

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundRobots have allowed head and neck surgeons to extirpate oropharyngeal tumors safely without the need for lip-split incision or mandibulotomy. Using robots in oropharyngeal reconstruction is new but essential for oropharyngeal defects that result from robotic tumor excision. We report our experience with robotic free-flap reconstruction of head and neck defects to exemplify the necessity for robotic reconstruction.MethodsWe investigated head and neck cancer patients who underwent ablation surgery and free-flap reconstruction by robot. Between July 1, 2011 and March 31, 2012, 5 cases were performed and patient demographics, location of tumor, pathologic stage, reconstruction methods, flap size, recipient vessel, necessary pedicle length, and operation time were investigated.ResultsAmong five free-flap reconstructions, four were radial forearm free flaps and one was an anterolateral thigh free-flap. Four flaps used the superior thyroid artery and one flap used a facial artery as the recipient vessel. The average pedicle length was 8.8 cm. Flap insetting and microanastomosis were achieved using a specially manufactured robotic instrument. The total operation time was 1,041.0 minutes (range, 814 to 1,132 minutes, and complications including flap necrosis, hematoma, and wound dehiscence did not occur.ConclusionsThis study demonstrates the clinically applicable use of robots in oropharyngeal reconstruction, especially using a free flap. A robot can assist the operator in insetting the flap at a deep portion of the oropharynx without the need to perform a traditional mandibulotomy. Robot-assisted reconstruction may substitute for existing surgical methods and is accepted as the most up-to-date method.

  4. CT and MRI matching for radiotherapy planning in head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasch, C; Keus, R; Touw, A; Lebesque, J; Van Herk, M [Nederlands Kanker Inst. ` Antoni van Leeuwenhoekhuis` , Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1995-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of matched CT and MRI information on target delineation in radiotherapy planning for head and neck tumors. MRI images of eight patients with head and neck cancer in supine position, not necessarily obtained in radiotherapy treatment position were matched to the CT scans made in radiotherapy position using automatic three-dimensional chamfer-matching of bony structures. Four independent observers delineated the Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) in CT scans and axial and sagittal MR scans. The GTV`s were compared, overlapping volumes and non-overlapping volumes between the different datasets and observers were determined. In all patients a good match of CT and MRI information was accomplished in the head region. The combined information provided a better visualisation of the GTV, oedema and normal tissues compared with CT or MRI alone. Determination of overlapping and non-overlapping volumes proved to be a valuable tool to measure uncertainties in the determination of the GTV. CT-MRI matching in patients with head and neck tumors is feasible and makes a more accurate irradiation with higher tumor doses and less normal tissue complications possible. Remaining uncertainties in the determination of the GTV can be quantified using the combined information of MRI and CT.

  5. Accuracy of self-reported tobacco assessments in a head and neck cancer treatment population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, Graham W.; Arnold, Susanne M.; Valentino, Joseph P.; Gal, Thomas J.; Hyland, Andrew J.; Singh, Anurag K.; Rangnekar, Vivek M.; Cummings, K. Michael; Marshall, James R.; Kudrimoti, Mahesh R.

    2012-01-01

    Prospective analysis was performed of self-reported and biochemically confirmed tobacco use in 50 head and neck cancer patients during treatment. With 93.5% compliance to complete weekly self-report and biochemical confirmatory tests, 29.4% of smokers required biochemical assessment for identification. Accuracy increased by 14.9% with weekly vs. baseline self-reported assessments. Data confirm that head and neck cancer patients misrepresent true tobacco use during treatment.

  6. Maximum-intensity-projection CT angiography for evaluating head and neck tumors. Usefulness of helical CT and auto bone masking method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Osamu; Nakashima, Noriko; Ogawa, Chiaki; Shen, Yun; Takata, Yasunori; Azemoto, Shougo.

    1994-01-01

    Angiographic images of 10 adult patients with head and neck tumors were obtained by helical computed tomography (CT) using maximum intensity projection (MIP). In all cases, the vasculature of the head and neck region was directly demonstrated. In the head and neck, bone masking is a more important problem than in other regions. We developed an effective automatic bone masking method (ABM) using 2D/3D connectivity. Helical CT angiography with MIP and ABM provided accurate anatomic depiction, and was considered to be helpful in preoperative evaluation of head and neck tumors. (author)

  7. Functional morphology of the primate head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalley, Thierra K; Grider-Potter, Neysa

    2015-04-01

    The vertebral column plays a key role in maintaining posture, locomotion, and transmitting loads between body components. Cervical vertebrae act as a bridge between the torso and head and play a crucial role in the maintenance of head position and the visual field. Despite its importance in positional behaviors, the functional morphology of the cervical region remains poorly understood, particularly in comparison to the thoracic and lumbar sections of the spinal column. This study tests whether morphological variation in the primate cervical vertebrae correlates with differences in postural behavior. Phylogenetic generalized least-squares analyses were performed on a taxonomically broad sample of 26 extant primate taxa to test the link between vertebral morphology and posture. Kinematic data on primate head and neck postures were used instead of behavioral categories in an effort to provide a more direct analysis of our functional hypothesis. Results provide evidence for a function-form link between cervical vertebral shape and postural behaviors. Specifically, taxa with more pronograde heads and necks and less kyphotic orbits exhibit cervical vertebrae with longer spinous processes, indicating increased mechanical advantage for deep nuchal musculature, and craniocaudally longer vertebral bodies and more coronally oriented zygapophyseal articular facets, suggesting an emphasis on curve formation and maintenance within the cervical lordosis, coupled with a greater resistance to translation and ventral displacement. These results not only document support for functional relationships in cervical vertebrae features across a wide range of primate taxa, but highlight the utility of quantitative behavioral data in functional investigations. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Radioisotope scintigraphy after arterial catheterization in head-and neck tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serson, D.; Andrade Sobrinho, J. de; Oliveira Nunes, J.E. de; Rapoport, A.

    1983-01-01

    A new method with radioisotopes is presented to determine the first arterial regional supply, for localized intra-arterial treatment with antiblastic drugs. Cases of head and neck where the method was used presented [pt

  9. Head and neck reconstruction with pedicled flaps in the free flap era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahieu, R; Colletti, G; Bonomo, P; Parrinello, G; Iavarone, A; Dolivet, G; Livi, L; Deganello, A

    2016-12-01

    Nowadays, the transposition of microvascular free flaps is the most popular method for management of head and neck defects. However, not all patients are suitable candidates for free flap reconstruction. In addition, not every defect requires a free flap transfer to achieve good functional results. The aim of this study was to assess whether pedicled flap reconstruction of head and neck defects is inferior to microvascular free flap reconstruction in terms of complications, functionality and prognosis. The records of consecutive patients who underwent free flap or pedicled flap reconstruction after head and neck cancer ablation from 2006 to 2015, from a single surgeon, in the AOUC Hospital, Florence Italy were analysed. A total of 93 patients, the majority with oral cancer (n = 59), were included, of which 64 were pedicled flap reconstructions (69%). The results showed no significant differences in terms of functional outcome, flap necrosis and complications in each type of reconstruction. Multivariate regression analysis of flap necrosis and functional impairments showed no associated factors. Multivariate regression analysis of complicated flap healing showed that only comorbidities remained an explaining factor (p = 0.019). Survival analysis and proportional hazard regression analysis regarding cancer relapse or distant metastasis, showed no significant differences in prognosis of patients concerning both types of reconstruction. In this retrospective, non-randomised study cohort, pedicled flaps were not significantly inferior to free flaps for reconstruction of head and neck defects, considering functionality, complications and prognosis. © Copyright by Società Italiana di Otorinolaringologia e Chirurgia Cervico-Facciale, Rome, Italy.

  10. Primary childhood head and neck neoplasms: An 8-year ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Although infectious diseases remain the leading cause of death among children in our environment, neoplastic diseases have emerged as important cause of childhood morbidity and mortality. Method: A retrospective review of neoplastic lesions of the head and neck region histologically diagnosed at ...

  11. Femoroacetabular impingement: bone marrow oedema associated with fibrocystic change of the femoral head and neck junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, S.L.J. [Department of Radiology, RNOH Stanmore, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom) and Department of Radiology, Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Birmingham (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: jamesslj@email.com; Connell, D.A. [Department of Radiology, RNOH Stanmore, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom); O' Donnell, P. [Department of Radiology, RNOH Stanmore, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Saifuddin, A. [Department of Radiology, RNOH Stanmore, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2007-05-15

    Aim: To describe the association of bone marrow oedema adjacent to areas of fibrocystic change at the femoral head and neck junction in patients with femoroacetabular impingement. Materials and methods: The clinical and imaging findings in six patients with bone marrow oedema adjacent to an area of fibrocystic change at the femoral head and neck junction are presented. There were five males and one female (age range 19-42 years, mean age 34.5 years). Three patients were referred with a clinical suspicion of femoroacetabular impingement, two with suspected osteoid osteoma and one with a clinical diagnosis of sciatica. The volume of bone marrow oedema (grade 1: 0-25%, grade 2: 26-50%, grade 3: 51-75% and grade 4: 76-100% of the femoral neck width), presence of labral and articular cartilage abnormality, joint effusion, and femoral head and neck morphology were recorded. Results: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) identified fibrocystic change in the anterolateral aspect of the femoral head and neck junction in all cases (mean size 9 mm, range 5-14 mm, three multilocular and three unilocular cysts). The volume of oedema was variable (one grade 1, two grade 2, one grade 3 and two grade 4). All patients had abnormality of the anterosuperior labrum with five patients demonstrating chondral loss. An abnormal femoral head and neck junction was identified in five patients. Conclusion: The radiological finding of fibrocystic change at the anterosuperior femoral neck with or without bone marrow oedema should prompt the search for femoroacetabular impingement. Bone marrow oedema may rarely be identified adjacent to these areas of cystic change and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of bone marrow oedema in the femoral neck.

  12. Femoroacetabular impingement: bone marrow oedema associated with fibrocystic change of the femoral head and neck junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, S.L.J.; Connell, D.A.; O'Donnell, P.; Saifuddin, A.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To describe the association of bone marrow oedema adjacent to areas of fibrocystic change at the femoral head and neck junction in patients with femoroacetabular impingement. Materials and methods: The clinical and imaging findings in six patients with bone marrow oedema adjacent to an area of fibrocystic change at the femoral head and neck junction are presented. There were five males and one female (age range 19-42 years, mean age 34.5 years). Three patients were referred with a clinical suspicion of femoroacetabular impingement, two with suspected osteoid osteoma and one with a clinical diagnosis of sciatica. The volume of bone marrow oedema (grade 1: 0-25%, grade 2: 26-50%, grade 3: 51-75% and grade 4: 76-100% of the femoral neck width), presence of labral and articular cartilage abnormality, joint effusion, and femoral head and neck morphology were recorded. Results: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) identified fibrocystic change in the anterolateral aspect of the femoral head and neck junction in all cases (mean size 9 mm, range 5-14 mm, three multilocular and three unilocular cysts). The volume of oedema was variable (one grade 1, two grade 2, one grade 3 and two grade 4). All patients had abnormality of the anterosuperior labrum with five patients demonstrating chondral loss. An abnormal femoral head and neck junction was identified in five patients. Conclusion: The radiological finding of fibrocystic change at the anterosuperior femoral neck with or without bone marrow oedema should prompt the search for femoroacetabular impingement. Bone marrow oedema may rarely be identified adjacent to these areas of cystic change and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of bone marrow oedema in the femoral neck

  13. Modern principles of reconstructive surgery for advanced head and neck tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulbakin, D. E.; Choinzonov, E. L.; Mukhamedov, M. R.; Garbukov, E. U.; Shtin, V. I.; Havkin, N. M.; Vasilev, R. V.

    2017-09-01

    Background: Surgery remains the mainstay of treatment for head and neck cancer. Reconstruction after cancer surgery can help to restore both the appearance and function of the affected areas. Materials and methods: From 2008 to 2016, a total of 120 reconstructive surgeries were performed at the Department of Head and Neck Tumors of Tomsk Cancer Research Institute. The majority of patients had locally advanced cancer (T3 stage in 49 patients and T4 stage in 41 patients). The localizations of the defects requiring reconstruction were as follows: oral cavity—26 cases; tongue—24 cases; skin (including defects of lower lip)—12 cases; maxilla—14 cases; larynx and hypopharynx—12 cases; lips—6 cases, cheek—11 cases, and mandibulla—5 cases. Various free flaps (83%) and pedicle flaps (17%) were used for the reconstruction of the large defects following extirpation of head and neck malignant tumors. In 15 cases (13%), the implants from titanium and titanium nickelide (TiNi) were used to restore the supporting and skeletal functions of the reconstructed region. We used 3D model of the patient's skull for a more precise planning of the reconstruction of maxillofacial bone defects. Results: Good functional results were achieved in most cases. Full flap necrosis was observed in 12 cases (10%). Fibular flap necroses were noted in 8 cases (7%). Conclusions: Single-stage reconstructions of the lost structures after tumor resection significantly improve survival of head and neck cancer patients without causing significant functional and aesthetic damage, as well as contribute to quick rehabilitation of these patients and improvement of their social status. To reduce postoperative complications after reconstructive surgery, it is necessary to carefully select the appropriate reconstructive implant materials.

  14. Optimization of MR imaging for extracranial head and neck lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalley, R.W.; Maravilla, K.R.; Cohen, W.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have used a 1.5T MR imager to study 28 pathologically proven extracranial head and neck lesions. Multiple pulse sequences were performed pre-and/or post-gadolinium, including T1-weighted, short TI inversion-recovery (STIR), spin-density, and T2-weighted sequences. T1-weighted images provided excellent anatomic detail but relatively poor muscle/lesion contrast. Gadolinium often improved lesion visibility; however, discrimination from surrounding fat was impaired. Postcontrast T2-weighted images seemed to provide better lesion conspicuity than did pre-gadolinium images. STIR imaging provided the highest lesion conspicuity in fatty areas. No single sequence was optimal for all head and neck imaging. The authors analyze the advantages and limitations of each sequence and formulate rational imaging protocols based on the primary region of interest

  15. Effects of breathing a hyperoxic hypercapnic gas mixture on blood oxygenation and vascularity of head-and-neck tumors as measured by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rijpkema, Mark; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.; Joosten, Frank; Kogel, Albert J. van der; Heerschap, Arend

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: For head-and-neck tumors, breathing a hyperoxic hypercapnic gas mixture and administration of nicotinamide has been shown to result in a significantly improved tumor response to accelerated radiotherapy (ARCON, Accelerated Radiotherapy with CarbOgen and Nicotinamide). This may be caused by improved tumor oxygenation, possibly mediated by vascular effects. In this study, both blood oxygenation and vascular effects of breathing a hyperoxic hypercapnic gas mixture (98% O 2 +2% CO 2 ) were assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with head-and-neck tumors. Methods and Materials: Tumor vascularity and oxygenation were investigated by dynamic gadolinium contrast-enhanced MRI and blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) MRI, respectively. Eleven patients with primary head-and-neck tumors were each measured twice; with and without breathing the hyperoxic hypercapnic gas mixture. Results: BOLD MR imaging revealed a significant increase of the MRI time constant of transverse magnetization decay (T 2 *) in the tumor during hypercapnic hyperoxygenation, which correlates to a decrease of the deoxyhemoglobin concentration. No changes in overall tumor vascularity were observed, as measured by the gadolinium contrast uptake rate in the tumor. Conclusion: Breathing a hyperoxic hypercapnic gas mixture improves tumor blood oxygenation in patients with head-and-neck tumors, which may contribute to the success of the ARCON therapy

  16. [Oral and maxillofacial surgery: mandatory link in the chain of head and neck oncology patient care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merkx, M.A.W.; Roodenburg, J.L.; Visscher, J.G. de

    2007-01-01

    The incidence of head and neck tumors in The Netherlands is rising, mainly due to increasing numbers of oral and pharyngeal carcinomas. Notwithstanding good opportunities for early detection by inspection and palpation, there appears to be a tendency to detect cancer of the head and neck in its

  17. Impact of MLC leaf position errors on simple and complex IMRT plans for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mu, G; Ludlum, E; Xia, P

    2008-01-01

    The dosimetric impact of random and systematic multi-leaf collimator (MLC) leaf position errors is relatively unknown for head and neck intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) patients. In this report we studied 17 head and neck IMRT patients, including 12 treated with simple plans ( 100 segments). Random errors (-2 to +2 mm) and systematic errors (±0.5 mm and ±1 mm) in MLC leaf positions were introduced into the clinical plans and the resultant dose distributions were analyzed based on defined endpoint doses. The dosimetric effect was insignificant for random MLC leaf position errors up to 2 mm for both simple and complex plans. However, for systematic MLC leaf position errors, we found significant dosimetric differences between the simple and complex IMRT plans. For 1 mm systematic error, the average changes in D 95% were 4% in simple plans versus 8% in complex plans. The average changes in D 0.1cc of the spinal cord and brain stem were 4% in simple plans versus 12% in complex plans. The average changes in parotid glands were 9% in simple plans versus 13% for the complex plans. Overall, simple IMRT plans are less sensitive to leaf position errors than complex IMRT plans

  18. Outcomes of the treatment of head and neck sarcomas in a tertiary referral center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew eLindford

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck sarcomas are a rare and heterogeneous group of tumors that pose management challenges. We report our experience with these tumors. Forty consecutive patients treated for 44 head and neck sarcomas between 1997 and 2014 were culled from our prospectively maintained head and neck database. Five patients were excluded. The adult cohort consisted 29 (83% patients of a mean age of 57.7 years, with 33 sarcomas. The most common diagnoses were undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma (27% and chondroblastic osteosarcoma (21%. Clear surgical margins were achieved in 24/33 (73% lesions. Twenty-two patients received radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy. Fourteen patients developed local (n=6, regional (n=1 and distant (n=7 recurrence. The overall 5-year survival was 66% with a mean survival interval of 66.5 months. Recurrent sarcoma, close (<1mm or involved surgical margins and advanced age were associated with statistically significantly reduced survival. The pediatric cohort consisted 6 (17% patients, with a mean age of nine years. Five patients had primary embryonal rhabdomyosarcomas and one had chondroblastic osteosarcoma. Clear surgical margins were achieved in 5 (83% patients. All patients received adjuvant radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy. Mean survival interval was 102 months. Three patients developed local (n=1 or distant (n=2 recurrence. Twenty-three free and 8 pedicled flaps were performed in 25 patients. 11/39 (28% lesions in 11 patients developed a complication. In conclusion, head and neck sarcomas are best managed by a multidisciplinary team at a tertiary head and neck referral centre and resection with clear margins is vital for disease control.

  19. Initial conformation of kinesin's neck linker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng Yi-Zhao; Yan Shi-Wei; Ji Qing; Liu Shu-Xia

    2014-01-01

    How ATP binding initiates the docking process of kinesin's neck linker is a key question in understanding kinesin mechanisms. By exploiting a molecular dynamics method, we investigate the initial conformation of kinesin's neck linker in its docking process. We find that, in the initial conformation, the neck linker has interactions with β0 and forms a ‘cover-neck bundle’ structure with β0. From this initial structure, the formation of extra turns and the docking of the cover-neck bundle structure can be achieved. The motor head provides a forward force on the initial cover-neck bundle structure through ATP-induced rotation. This force, together with the hydrophobic interaction of ILE327 with the hydrophobic pocket on the motor head, drives the formation of the extra turn and initiates the neck linker docking process. Based on these findings, a pathway from ATP binding-induced motor head rotation to neck linker docking is proposed. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  20. ''Dropped-head'' syndrome due to isolated myositis of neck extensor muscles: MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaeta, Michele; Mazziotti, Silvio; Blandino, Alfredo; Toscano, Antonio; Rodolico, Carmelo; Mazzeo, Anna

    2006-01-01

    MRI findings of a patient with dropped-head syndrome due to focal myositis of the neck extensor muscles are presented. MRI showed oedematous changes and marked enhancement of the neck extensor muscles. After therapy MRI demonstrated disappearance of the abnormal findings. (orig.)

  1. Incidence and severity of head and neck injuries in victims of road traffic crashes: In an economically developed country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bener, Abdulbari; Rahman, Yassir S Abdul; Mitra, Biswadev

    2009-01-01

    Head and neck injuries following the road traffic crashes (RTCs) are the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in most developed and developing countries and may also result in temporary or permanent disability. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence pattern of head and neck injuries, investigate its trend and identify the severity of injuries involved with road traffic crashes (RTCs) during the period 2001-2006. This is a retrospective descriptive hospital based study. The patients with head and neck injuries were seen and treated in the Accident and Emergency Department of the Hamad General Hospital and other Trauma Centers of the Hamad Medical Corporation following the road traffic crashes during the period 2001-2006. This study is a retrospective analysis of 6709 patients attended and treated at the Accident and Emergency and Trauma centers for head and neck injuries over a 6 year period. Head and neck injuries were determined according to the ICD 10 criteria. Of these, 3013 drivers, 2502 passengers, 704 pedestrians and 490 two wheel riders (motor bike and cyclists). Details of all the road traffic crash patients were compiled in the database of the Emergency Medical Services (EMS), and the data of patients with head and neck injuries were extracted from this database. A total of 6709 patients with head and neck injuries was reported during the study period. Majority of the victims were non-Qataris (68.7%), men (85.9%) and in the age group 20-44 years (68.5%). There were statistical significant differences in relation to age, nationality, gender, and accident during week ends for head and neck injuries (pQatar from road traffic crashes. The incidence of head and neck injuries is still very high in Qatar, but the severity of injury was mild in most of the victims. The findings of the study highlighted the need for taking urgent steps for safety of people especially drivers and passengers.

  2. Photodynamic therapy in head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil H Nelke

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a special type of treatment involving the use of a photosensitizer or a photosensitizing agent along with a special type of light, which, combined together, induces production of a form of oxygen that is used to kill surrounding cells in different areas of the human body. Specification of the head and neck region requires different approaches due to the surrounding of vital structures. PDT can also be used to treat cells invaded with infections such as fungi, bacteria and viruses. The light beam placed in tumor sites activates locally applied drugs and kills the cancer cells. Many studies are taking place in order to invent better photosensitizers, working on a larger scale and to treat deeply placed and larger tumors. It seems that PDT could be used as an alternative surgical treatment in some tumor types; however, all clinicians should be aware that the surgical approach is still the treatment of choice. PDT is a very accurate and effective therapy, especially in early stages of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC, and can greatly affect surgical outcomes in cancerous patients. We present a detailed review about photosensitizers, their use, and therapeutic advantages and disadvantages.

  3. 18F-deoxyglucose-PET in the detection of recurrence in head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yingrui; Li Weixiong; Gu Meixin; Xie Songxi

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate 18 F-deoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in the detection of suspicious recurrence in head and neck cancers, as compared with CT/MRI imaging. Methods: Thirty-seven patients with clinically suspicious recurrences in head and neck cancers underwent FDG-PET, with 34 checked with CT/MRI imaging. The final diagnosis of recurrence were proved by pathology or clinical following-up. Results: FDG-PET detected recurrence successfully in 32 of 37 (86.5%) patients with 3 false positives and 2 false negatives. The FDG-PET sensitivity, specificity and accuracy in defining local recurrence were 91.7%, 76.9%, 86.5%, respectively; and those of CT/MRI were 68.2%, 75.0%, 61.8%, respectively. Conclusion: In comparison with CT/MRI, FDG-PET possesses a high accuracy in detecting recurrence in head and neck cancers

  4. The role of EGFR-targeting strategies in the treatment of head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dequanter D

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Didier Dequanter, Mohammad Shahla, Pascal Paulus, Philippe H LothaireDepartment of Surgery, CHU Charleroi (Hopital Andre Vésale, Montigny le Tilleul, BelgiumAbstract: With its targeted mechanism of action and synergistic activity with current treatment modalities, cetuximab is a potentially valuable treatment option for patients with recurrent and/or metastatic squamous cell cancer of the head and neck who have progressed on cisplatin-based chemotherapy. The use of cetuximab in combination with radiotherapy as definitive treatment for locoregionally advanced squamous cell cancer of the head and neck is generally restricted to patients unfit to receive cisplatin-based chemoradiation, which is still considered the standard of care. The effect of this epidermal growth factor receptor antagonist occurs without any change in the pattern and the severity of toxicity usually associated with head and neck radiation.Keywords: cetuximab, SCCHN, radiotherapy

  5. National evaluation of multidisciplinary quality metrics for head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, John D; Speedy, Sedona E; Ferris, Robert L; Rademaker, Alfred W; Patel, Urjeet A; Samant, Sandeep

    2017-11-15

    The National Quality Forum has endorsed quality-improvement measures for multiple cancer types that are being developed into actionable tools to improve cancer care. No nationally endorsed quality metrics currently exist for head and neck cancer. The authors identified patients with surgically treated, invasive, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in the National Cancer Data Base from 2004 to 2014 and compared the rate of adherence to 5 different quality metrics and whether compliance with these quality metrics impacted overall survival. The metrics examined included negative surgical margins, neck dissection lymph node (LN) yield ≥ 18, appropriate adjuvant radiation, appropriate adjuvant chemoradiation, adjuvant therapy within 6 weeks, as well as overall quality. In total, 76,853 eligible patients were identified. There was substantial variability in patient-level adherence, which was 80% for negative surgical margins, 73.1% for neck dissection LN yield, 69% for adjuvant radiation, 42.6% for adjuvant chemoradiation, and 44.5% for adjuvant therapy within 6 weeks. Risk-adjusted Cox proportional-hazard models indicated that all metrics were associated with a reduced risk of death: negative margins (hazard ratio [HR] 0.73; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.71-0.76), LN yield ≥ 18 (HR, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.89-0.96), adjuvant radiation (HR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.64-0.70), adjuvant chemoradiation (HR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.79-0.88), and adjuvant therapy ≤6 weeks (HR, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.89-0.96). Patients who received high-quality care had a 19% reduced adjusted hazard of mortality (HR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.79-0.83). Five head and neck cancer quality metrics were identified that have substantial variability in adherence and meaningfully impact overall survival. These metrics are appropriate candidates for national adoption. Cancer 2017;123:4372-81. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  6. The role of oral hygiene in head and neck cancer: results from International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology (INHANCE) consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, D; Sartori, S; Brennan, P; Curado, M P; Wünsch-Filho, V; Divaris, K; Olshan, A F; Zevallos, J P; Winn, D M; Franceschi, S; Castellsagué, X; Lissowska, J; Rudnai, P; Matsuo, K; Morgenstern, H; Chen, C; Vaughan, T L; Hofmann, J N; D'Souza, G; Haddad, R I; Wu, H; Lee, Y-C; Hashibe, M; Vecchia, C La; Boffetta, P

    2016-08-01

    Poor oral hygiene has been proposed to contribute to head and neck cancer (HNC) risk, although causality and independency of some indicators are uncertain. This study investigates the relationship of five oral hygiene indicators with incident HNCs. In a pooled analysis of 8925 HNC cases and 12 527 controls from 13 studies participating in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology Consortium, comparable data on good oral hygiene indicators were harmonized. These included: no denture wear, no gum disease (or bleeding), oral hygiene indicator and cumulative score on HNC risk, adjusting for tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption. Inverse associations with any HNC, in the hypothesized direction, were observed for cancer sites, especially for tooth brushing and dentist visits. The population attributable fraction for ≤ 2 out of 5 good oral hygiene indicators was 8.9% (95% CI 3.3%, 14%) for oral cavity cancer. Good oral hygiene, as characterized by few missing teeth, annual dentist visits, and daily tooth brushing, may modestly reduce the risk of HNC. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Treatment of late sequelae after radiotherapy for head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strojan, Primož; Hutcheson, Katherine A; Eisbruch, Avraham; Beitler, Jonathan J; Langendijk, Johannes A; Lee, Anne W M; Corry, June; Mendenhall, William M; Smee, Robert; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Ferlito, Alfio

    2017-09-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) is used to treat approximately 80% of patients with cancer of the head and neck. Despite enormous advances in RT planning and delivery, a significant number of patients will experience radiation-associated toxicities, especially those treated with concurrent systemic agents. Many effective management options are available for acute RT-associated toxicities, but treatment options are much more limited and of variable benefit among patients who develop late sequelae after RT. The adverse impact of developing late tissue damage in irradiated patients may range from bothersome symptoms that negatively affect their quality of life to severe life-threatening complications. In the region of the head and neck, among the most problematic late effects are impaired function of the salivary glands and swallowing apparatus. Other tissues and structures in the region may be at risk, depending mainly on the location of the irradiated tumor relative to the mandible and hearing apparatus. Here, we review the available evidence on the use of different therapeutic strategies to alleviate common late sequelae of RT in head and neck cancer patients, with a focus on the critical assessment of the treatment options for xerostomia, dysphagia, mandibular osteoradionecrosis, trismus, and hearing loss. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Role of Free Tissue Transfer in Merkel Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Londino, A. V.; Miles, B. A.

    2012-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is an uncommon neuroendocrine malignancy with a propensity for the head and neck. It typically presents a symptomatically in elderly Caucasians and is characterized by early local and regional spread. There is currently limited data on the appropriate algorithm for treatment of MCC. However, multimodal therapy with wide surgical excision with or without radiation therapy has become standard of care. The location of the primary tumor and intensive adjuvant therapy is often required, provides a challenge to the reconstructive head and neck surgeon. Occasionally, free tissue transfer reconstructive techniques are employed in the reconstruction of MCC defects. This paper will discuss the role of free tissue transfer as a reconstructive option after surgery for advanced head and neck MCC

  9. Lymphangioma of the head and neck: Four case reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Bong Hae; Nah, Kyung Soo [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Yeon Hwa [Dept. of Dental Hygiene, Yeojoo Institute of Technology, Yeojoo (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-03-15

    Lymphangiomas are uncommon benign congenital tumors. Most occur in the head and neck and most lesions present by the age of 2 years. We present our experience with four patients who have lymphangiomas of the head and neck with tongue involvement. First case is a 7-year-old male who has the cystic lymphangioma of left submandibular area. Second a 22-year-old female has a lesion involving the border of right tongue. Third case is the lymphangioma which occur in the right upper lip of a 6-year old male. The last patient is a 28-year old male who fell down and whose right face was swollen up. He had undergone an operation and treated with steroid before. The characteristic appearances of imaging methods were described and all lesions best depicted on T2-weighted images. Our experience indicates that MRI is useful in the diagnosis and treatment planning of lymphangioma.

  10. Superselective intraarterial infusion therapy for head and neck carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatani, Hiroaki; Sawada, Shoichi; Takeda, Taizo

    2004-01-01

    We report the results of superselective intraarterial cisplatin (CDDP) infusion therapy combined with irradiation for 23 patients, mainly advanced head and neck carcinoma. All patients received intraarterial CDDP infusions with intravenous sodium thiosulfate (STS) neutralization. CDDP infusion was performed by the Seldinger's technique in 16 patients and by the implanted intraarterial reservoir system in 7 patients. STS was also infused by the reservoir system implanted at the forearm in most patients. An overall response was observed in 21 of the 23 (91.3%) patients. Complete and partial responses were achieved in 16 (69.6%) and 5 (21.7%) patients, respectively. There were no patients with worse than grade III complications. We concluded that superselective intraarterial infusion therapy with a high dose of CDDP and STS was very effective for the management of advanced head and neck carcinomas and we recommend the implantable reservoir system for both CDDP and STS administration as an easy and low-invasive method. (author)

  11. Lymphangioma of the head and neck: Four case reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Bong Hae; Nah, Kyung Soo; Jeong, Yeon Hwa

    2000-01-01

    Lymphangiomas are uncommon benign congenital tumors. Most occur in the head and neck and most lesions present by the age of 2 years. We present our experience with four patients who have lymphangiomas of the head and neck with tongue involvement. First case is a 7-year-old male who has the cystic lymphangioma of left submandibular area. Second a 22-year-old female has a lesion involving the border of right tongue. Third case is the lymphangioma which occur in the right upper lip of a 6-year old male. The last patient is a 28-year old male who fell down and whose right face was swollen up. He had undergone an operation and treated with steroid before. The characteristic appearances of imaging methods were described and all lesions best depicted on T2-weighted images. Our experience indicates that MRI is useful in the diagnosis and treatment planning of lymphangioma.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging guided reirradiation of recurrent and second primary head and neck cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Allen M.; Cao, Minsong; Hsu, Sophia; Lamb, James; Mikaeilian, Argin; Yang, Yingli; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Low, Daniel A.; Steinberg, Michael L.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To report a single-institutional experience using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided radiation therapy for the reirradiation of recurrent and second cancers of the head and neck. Methods and materials: Between October 2014 and August 2016, 13 consecutive patients with recurrent or new primary cancers of the head and neck that occurred in a previously irradiated field were prospectively enrolled in an institutional registry trial to investigate the feasibility and efficacy of ...

  13. Squamous cell carcinoma presenting with trigeminal anesthesia: An uncommon presentation of head & neck cancer with unknown primary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ameer T; Dagher, Walid I; O'Leary, Miriam A; Wein, Richard O

    The differential diagnosis of facial anesthesia is vast. This may be secondary to trauma, neoplasm, both intracranial and extracranial, infection, and neurologic disease. When evaluating a patient with isolated facial anesthesia, the head and neck surgeon often thinks of adenoid cystic carcinoma, which has a propensity for perineural invasion and spread. When one thinks of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma with or without unknown primary, the typical presentation involves dysphagia, odynophagia, weight loss, hoarseness, or more commonly, a neck mass. Squamous cell carcinoma presenting as facial anesthesia and perineural spread, with no primary site is quite rare. Case presentations and review of the literature. Trigeminal anesthesia is an uncommon presentation of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma with unknown primary. We present two interesting cases of invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the trigeminal nerve, with no primary site identified. We will also review the literature of head and neck malignancies with perineural spread and the management techniques for the two different cases presented. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. SU-E-T-593: Clinical Evaluation of Direct Aperture Optimization in Head/Neck and Prostate IMRT Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosini, M [King Saud University Hospitals, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); GALAL, M [Hermitage Medical Clinic, Dublin (Ireland); Emam, I [Ain Shams University, Cairo (France); Kamal, G; Algohary, M [Al Azhar University, Cairo (Egypt)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the planning and dosimetric advantages of direct aperture optimization (DAO) over beam-let optimization in IMRT treatment of head and neck (H/N) and prostate cancers. Methods: Five Head and Neck as well as five prostate patients were planned using the beamlet optimizer in Elekta-Xio ver 4.6 IMRT treatment planning system. Based on our experience in beamlet IMRT optimization, PTVs in H/N plans were prescribed to 70 Gy delivered by 7 fields. While prostate PTVs were prescribed to 76 Gy with 9 fields. In all plans, fields were set to be equally spaced. All cases were re-planed using Direct Aperture optimizer in Prowess Panther ver 5.01 IMRT planning system at same configurations and dose constraints. Plans were evaluated according to ICRU criteria, number of segments, number of monitor units and planning time. Results: For H/N plans, the near maximum dose (D2) and the dose that covers 95% D95 of PTV has improved by 4% in DAO. For organs at risk (OAR), DAO reduced the volume covered by 30% (V30) in spinal cord, right parotid, and left parotid by 60%, 54%, and 53% respectively. This considerable dosimetric quality improvement achieved using 25% less planning time and lower number of segments and monitor units by 46% and 51% respectively. In DAO prostate plans, Both D2 and D95 for the PTV were improved by only 2%. The V30 of the right femur, left femur and bladder were improved by 35%, 15% and 3% respectively. On the contrary, the rectum V30 got even worse by 9%. However, number of monitor units, and number of segments decreased by 20% and 25% respectively. Moreover the planning time reduced significantly too. Conclusion: DAO introduces considerable advantages over the beamlet optimization in regards to organs at risk sparing. However, no significant improvement occurred in most studied PTVs.

  15. [Planned neck dissection in the treatment of locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, L; Lou, J L; Wang, K J; Fang, M Y; Fu, Z F

    2018-02-07

    Objective: To investigate the value of planned neck dissection combined with induction chemotherapy and concurrent chemoradiotherapy in regional control and the outcome of locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Methods: A prospective randomized controlled study totally enrolled sixty-four patients of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas(include oropharynx, hypopharynx, and larynx) in stages Ⅳa-Ⅳb with lymph node metastase was were N2-N3. All patients firstly received 2-3 cycles of induction chemotherapy(ICT), then divided into two groups randomly, according to the efficacy of ICT. Group A(the study group) received planned neck dissection(PND) and concurrent chemoradiotherapy(CCRT). Group B(the control group) received concurrent chemoradiotherapy(CCRT). The differences in clinicopathologic features, local recurrence(LR), regional recurrence(RR), disease-free survival(DFS), and overall survival(OS) between the two groups were estimated. SPSS 19.0 software was used to analyze the data. Results: Group A enrolled twenty-one patients, and group B enrolled forty-three patients.The follow-up of all patients were 4-55 months, median follow-up time was 22 months. In study group, two-year OS and DFS were 80.9% and 68.3%, respectively. In control group, two-year OS and DFS were 90.7% and 67.1%, respectively. There was no significant difference in gender( P =0.215), age( P =0.828), primary tumor site( P =0.927), LR( P =0.126), DFS( P =0.710), and OS( P =0.402) between the two groups, while the RR(χ(2)=5.640, P squamous cell carcinoma.

  16. Head and neck computed tomography virtual endoscopy: evaluation of a new imaging technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallivan, R P; Nguyen, T H; Armstrong, W B

    1999-10-01

    To evaluate a new radiographic imaging technique: computed tomography virtual endoscopy (CTVE) for head and neck tumors. Twenty-one patients presenting with head and neck masses who underwent axial computed tomography (CT) scan with contrast were evaluated by CTVE. Comparisons were made with video-recorded images and operative records to evaluate the potential utility of this new imaging technique. Twenty-one patients with aerodigestive head and neck tumors were evaluated by CTVE. One patient had a nasal cylindrical cell papilloma; the remainder, squamous cell carcinomas distributed throughout the upper aerodigestive tract. Patients underwent complete head and neck examination, flexible laryngoscopy, axial CT with contrast, CTVE, and in most cases, operative endoscopy. Available clinical and radiographic evaluations were compared and correlated to CTVE findings. CTVE accurately demonstrated abnormalities caused by intraluminal tumor, but where there was apposition of normal tissue against tumor, inaccurate depictions of surface contour occurred. Contour resolution was limited, and mucosal irregularity could not be defined. There was very good overall correlation between virtual images, flexible laryngoscopic findings, rigid endoscopy, and operative evaluation in cases where oncological resections were performed. CTVE appears to be most accurate in evaluation of subglottic and nasopharyngeal anatomy in our series of patients. CTVE is a new radiographic technique that provides surface-contour details. The technique is undergoing rapid technical evolution, and although the image quality is limited in situations where there is apposition of tissue folds, there are a number of potential applications for this new imaging technique.

  17. The Danish Head and Neck Cancer fast-track program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roennegaard, Anders B.; Rosenberg, Tine; Bjørndal, Kristine

    2018-01-01

    -track clinical pathway solutions. Objectives: The objectives of this study were 1) to present the setup of the head and neck cancer (HNC) fast-track program at Odense University Hospital (OUH) as an example of the Danish model and 2) to present patient characteristics, diagnostic outcome, cancer detection rate...

  18. Effects of neck and circumoesophageal connective lesions on posture and locomotion in the cockroach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgel, Angela L; Ritzmann, Roy E

    2005-06-01

    Few studies in arthropods have documented to what extent local control centers in the thorax can support locomotion in absence of inputs from head ganglia. Posture, walking, and leg motor activity was examined in cockroaches with lesions of neck or circumoesophageal connectives. Early in recovery, cockroaches with neck lesions had hyper-extended postures and did not walk. After recovery, posture was less hyper-extended and animals initiated slow leg movements for multiple cycles. Neck lesioned individuals showed an increase in walking after injection of either octopamine or pilocarpine. The phase of leg movement between segments was reduced in neck lesioned cockroaches from that seen in intact animals, while phases in the same segment remained constant. Neither octopamine nor pilocarpine initiated changes in coordination between segments in neck lesioned individuals. Animals with lesions of the circumoesophageal connectives had postures similar to intact individuals but walked in a tripod gait for extended periods of time. Changes in activity of slow tibial extensor and coxal depressor motor neurons and concomitant changes in leg joint angles were present after the lesions. This suggests that thoracic circuits are sufficient to produce leg movements but coordinated walking with normal motor patterns requires descending input from head ganglia.

  19. Gastroesophageal reflux disease and odds of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Evan L; Zevallos, Jose P; Olshan, Andrew F

    2016-05-01

    Exposure to excess gastric acid resulting from gastroesophageal reflux disease, also known as acid reflux or heartburn, might contribute to initiation of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, particularly laryngeal cancer. Prior epidemiologic studies have reported inconsistent results. We sought to clarify this relationship using an observational study with a larger available sample size and better-characterized exposure information than most prior studies. A population-based case-control study of head and neck cancer in North Carolina with 1,340 newly diagnosed cases and 1,378 controls matched on age, race, and sex. We used unconditional logistic regression to examine associations between self-reported heartburn and development of overall head and neck cancer as well as development of cancer at specific tumor sites. Subgroup analysis by smoking and alcoholic drinking status was used to make comparisons with a previous study that used a similar study design. Overall, an increased odds of head and neck cancer was not associated with either self-reported history of heartburn symptoms (odds ratio = 0.85; 95% confidence interval 0.68, 1.06) or self-reported medical diagnosis of GERD (OR = 0.89; 95% CI 0.71, 1.11). These patterns held for specific tumor sites. For laryngopharyngeal cancer, we did not detect any associations regardless of joint smoking and alcoholic drinking status. Gastroesophageal reflux does not appear to play a role in development of head and neck cancer. 3b. Laryngoscope, 126:1091-1096, 2016. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  20. PET/MRI in head and neck cancer: initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platzek, Ivan; Laniado, Michael [Dresden University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Dresden (Germany); Beuthien-Baumann, Bettina [Dresden University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Dresden (Germany); Schneider, Matthias [Dresden University Hospital, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Dresden (Germany); Gudziol, Volker [Dresden University Hospital, Department of Otolaryngology, Dresden (Germany); Langner, Jens; Schramm, Georg; Hoff, Joerg van den [Institute of Bioinorganic and Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Kotzerke, Joerg [Dresden University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Dresden (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of PET/MRI (positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging) with FDG ({sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose) for initial staging of head and neck cancer. The study group comprised 20 patients (16 men, 4 women) aged between 52 and 81 years (median 64 years) with histologically proven squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck region. The patients underwent a PET scan on a conventional scanner and a subsequent PET/MRI examination on a whole-body hybrid system. FDG was administered intravenously prior to the conventional PET scan (267-395 MBq FDG, 348 MBq on average). The maximum standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}) of the tumour and of both cerebellar hemispheres were determined for both PET datasets. The numbers of lymph nodes with increased FDG uptake were compared between the two PET datasets. No MRI-induced artefacts where observed in the PET images. The tumour was detected by PET/MRI in 17 of the 20 patients, by PET in 16 and by MRI in 14. The PET/MRI examination yielded significantly higher SUV{sub max} than the conventional PET scanner for both the tumour (p < 0.0001) and the cerebellum (p = 0.0009). The number of lymph nodes with increased FDG uptake detected using the PET dataset from the PET/MRI system was significantly higher the number detected by the stand-alone PET system (64 vs. 39, p = 0.001). The current study demonstrated that PET/MRI of the whole head and neck region is feasible with a whole-body PET/MRI system without impairment of PET or MR image quality. (orig.)

  1. Role of infectious agents in the carcinogenesis of brain and head and neck cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alibek Kenneth

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This review concentrates on tumours that are anatomically localised in head and neck regions. Brain cancers and head and neck cancers together account for more than 873,000 cases annually worldwide, with an increasing incidence each year. With poor survival rates at late stages, brain and head and neck cancers represent serious conditions. Carcinogenesis is a multi-step process and the role of infectious agents in this progression has not been fully identified. A major problem with such research is that the role of many infectious agents may be underestimated due to the lack of or inconsistency in experimental data obtained globally. In the case of brain cancer, no infection has been accepted as directly oncogenic, although a number of viruses and parasites are associated with the malignancy. Our analysis of the literature showed the presence of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV in distinct types of brain tumour, namely glioblastoma multiforme (GBM and medulloblastoma. In particular, there are reports of viral protein in up to 100% of GBM specimens. Several epidemiological studies reported associations of brain cancer and toxoplasmosis seropositivity. In head and neck cancers, there is a distinct correlation between Epstein-Barr virus (EBV and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC. Considering that almost every undifferentiated NPC is EBV-positive, virus titer levels can be measured to screen high-risk populations. In addition there is an apparent association between human papilloma virus (HPV and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC; specifically, 26% of HNSCCs are positive for HPV. HPV type 16 was the most common type detected in HNSCCs (90% and its dominance is even greater than that reported in cervical carcinoma. Although there are many studies showing an association of infectious agents with cancer, with various levels of involvement and either a direct or indirect causative effect, there is a scarcity of articles covering the role of

  2. Moving Toward Bioadjuvant Approaches to Head and Neck Cancer Prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saba, Nabil F.; Hammond, Anthea; Shin, Dong M.; Khuri, Fadlo R.

    2007-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma affects >45,000 Americans annually. Patients who are successfully treated for their primary tumor are at high risk of developing a second primary tumor, making effective preventive strategies highly desirable for this disease. Although a landmark study in 1990 suggested some benefit of high-dose retinoids in head and neck cancer prevention, subsequent trials using more tolerable doses have shown limited clinical success. Newer preventive strategies have included bioadjuvant therapy combining retinoids with interferon and α-tocopherol, combinations of molecularly targeted agents, and oncolytic viruses. Furthermore, considerable evidence has supported a cancer protective role for several nutrients, including green tea and curcumin analogs. Natural compounds such as these with favorable long-term safety profiles might be particularly suited to the cancer prevention setting, in which patients will usually tolerate only moderate risk and toxicity

  3. Palliative radiotherapy in head and neck cancers: Evidence based review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talapatra Kaustav

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck (SCCHN is one of the commonest cancers seen in India, constituting up to 25% of their overall cancer burden. Advanced SCCHN is a bad disease with a poor prognosis and patients usually die of uncontrolled loco-regional disease. Curative intent management of loco-regionally advanced SCCHN has become more evidence-based with active clinical research in the form of large prospective randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses. However, little has been written about palliative radiotherapy (PRT in head and neck cancers. It is widely recognized that PRT provides effective palliation and improved quality-of-life in advanced incurable malignancies. It is in this context that this study proposes to review the existing literature on palliative radiotherapy in advanced incurable SCCHN to help formulate consensus guidelines and recommendations.

  4. Postoperative radiotherapy after laser surgery with or without chemotherapy in head and neck evolved cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryll, L.; Pradier, O.; Nitsche, M.; Christiansen, H.; Hess, C.

    2007-01-01

    We compared concurrent combination chemoradiotherapy and adjuvant radiotherapy after laser surgery in patients with stage 3/4 non metastatic squamous cell head and neck cancer. Combination chemotherapy and concurrent irradiation after laser surgery was not superior to surgery and postoperative radiotherapy for resectable advanced squamous cell head and neck cancer. However, the collective is small, and the follow-up to short to conclude. (authors)

  5. The role of dentistry other than oral care in patients undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidenobu Matsuzaki

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The usefulness of dental approaches, such as oral management, has gained recognition among patients treated for head and neck cancer. In particular, oral management plays a very important role before, during, and after treatment in patients undergoing radiotherapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of both. However, specialized dentistry knowledge and techniques that are useful for patients undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck cancer have yet to be reported. Therefore, in this review article, our aim is to introduce dental approaches in radiotherapy for patients with head and neck cancer that have been developed and are currently being used at our institute.

  6. Electromagnetic Head-And-Neck Hyperthermia Applicator: Experimental Phantom Verification and FDTD Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulides, Margarethus M.; Bakker, Jurriaan F.; Rhoon, Gerard C. van

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To experimentally verify the feasibility of focused heating in the neck region by an array of two rings of six electromagnetic antennas. We also measured the dynamic specific absorption rate (SAR) steering possibilities of this setup and compared these SAR patterns to simulations. Methods and Materials: Using a specially constructed laboratory prototype head-and-neck applicator, including a neck-mimicking cylindrical muscle phantom, we performed SAR measurements by electric field, Schottky-diode sheet measurements and, using the power-pulse technique, by fiberoptic thermometry and infrared thermography. Using phase steering, we also steered the SAR distribution in radial and axial directions. All measured distributions were compared with the predictions by a finite-difference time-domain-based electromagnetic simulator. Results: A central 50% iso-SAR focus of 35 ± 3 mm in diameter and about 100 ± 15 mm in length was obtained for all investigated settings. Furthermore, this SAR focus could be steered toward the desired location in the radial and axial directions with an accuracy of ∼5 mm. The SAR distributions as measured by all three experimental methods were well predicted by the simulations. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that focused heating in the neck is feasible and that this focus can be effectively steered in the radial and axial directions. For quality assurance measurements, we believe that the Schottky-diode sheet provides the best compromise among effort, speed, and accuracy, although a more specific and improved design is warranted

  7. A study of the positioning errors of head and neck in the process of intensity modulation radiated therapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Chengguang; Lin Liuwen; Liu Bingti; Liu Xiaomao; Li Guowen

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the positioning errors of head and neck during intensity-modulated radiation therapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods: Nineteen patients with middle-advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (T 2-4 N 1-3 M 0 ), treated by intensity-modulated radiation therapy, underwent repeated CT during their 6-week treatment course. All the patients were immobilized by head-neck-shoulder thermoplastic mask. We evaluated their anatomic landmark coordinated in a total of 66 repeated CT data sets and respective x, y, z shifts relative to their position in the planning CT. Results: The positioning error of the neck was 2.44 mm ± 2.24 mm, 2.05 mm ± 1.42 mm, 1.83 mm ± 1.53 mm in x, y, z respectively. And that of the head was 1.05 mm ± 0.87 mm, 1.23 mm ± 1.05 mm, 1.17 mm ± 1.55 mm respectively. The positioning error between neck and head have respectively statistical difference (t=-6.58, -5.28, -3.42, P=0.000, 0.000, 0.001). The system error of the neck was 2.33, 1.67 and 1.56 higher than that of the head, respectively in left-right, vertical and head-foot directions; and the random error of neck was 2.57, 1.34 and 0.99 higher than that of head respectively. Conclusions: In the process of the intensity-modulated radiation therapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma, with the immobilization by head-neck-shoulder thermoplastic mask, the positioning error of neck is higher than that of head. (authors)

  8. High response rates following paclitaxel/5-FU and simultaneous radiotherapy in advanced head and neck carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, M.; Westerhausen, M.; Makoski, H.B.; Sesterhenn, K.; Schroeder, R.

    1997-01-01

    The main stay of treatment for head and neck cancer patients with advanced disease has been chemotherapy with Cisplatin/5-FU and simultaneous applied radiotherapy. With this multimodality treatment including radical surgery after two cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and 40 Gy radiotherapy we reported 60% complete remission after 5 years for patients with stage III/IV of head and neck cancer. Paclitaxel, a new plant product, has demonstrated significant antineoplastic activity in head and neck tumors (ECOG-Study: 40% RR). Therefore we performed a trial with Taxol/5-FU and simultaneous radiation in a neoadjuvant and postoperative adjuvant setting of stage III/IV squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck with pre-existent contraindication against Cisplatin. Patients and Methods: 30 patients with a primarily inoperable stage III/IV of SCC of the head and neck were enrolled to receive day 1 and 29 Taxol 175 mg/m 2 as a 3-hour-infusion, followed by 120-hour-cvi of 1000 mg/m 2 /d 5-FU. Locally irradiation was given ad 40 Gy (2 Gy/d/day 1-26). Radical surgery followed about day 56. Postoperatively patients received again 2 cycles of Taxol/5-FU and simultaneous irradiation with 30 Gy. Results: So far 30 patients were treated and all patients reached a CR after complete treatment, ongoing for 23/30 patients for 6 till 34 months: 4 patients developed a second neoplasia, and 3 patients gloved a local relapse. The principal toxicity was moderate (neutropenia, peripheral neuropathy, arthralgia/myalgia) and sensible with supportive care (e.g. PEG). Conclusions: The results suggest that the treatment of SCC of the head and neck with Taxol/5-FU and simultaneous radiation and radical surgery is a highly effective schedule and comparable with the treatment with Cisplatin/5-FU. (orig.) [de

  9. Supportive use of megestrol acetate (Megace) with head/neck and lung cancer patients receiving radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McQuellon, Richard P.; Moose, Dawn B.; Russell, Gregory B.; Case, L. Douglas; Greven, Katherine; Stevens, Michael; Shaw, Edward G.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to measure the effect of megestrol acetate (MA) on weight loss and quality of life (QOL) in patients with cancer of the lung or head and neck undergoing curative radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: This was a Phase III, placebo-controlled, double-blind randomized study. Patients received either 800 mg/day of MA (20 milliliters po qAM) or placebo over a 12-week period. Patients received radiation of the head and neck or thorax using a dose of at least 50 Gy, either alone or with chemotherapy. Weight was assessed weekly, whereas QOL was assessed at baseline and at 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Results: Patient characteristics on the MA arm (16 lung, 12 head/neck; mean age: 60 years) were similar to those on the placebo arm (17 lung, 11 head/neck; mean age: 65.8 years). Patients in the MA group had a mean weight loss over 12 weeks of 2.7 pounds, whereas the placebo group had a mean weight loss of 10.6 pounds. There was a significant time by treatment interaction (p=0.001), with the difference in weight between treatment groups being most pronounced after 6 weeks. Although overall QOL was similar in both arms of the study, several QOL subscale items did differ significantly. Compared to the placebo-treated patients, head-and-neck cancer patients in the MA arm reported the ability to eat as much as they liked (p=0.02 at 12 weeks), and lung cancer patients in the MA arm reported significantly better appetite at 4 weeks (p=0.03) and 8 weeks (p=0.001). Conclusion: MA used prophylactically is useful as an appetite stimulant; it can help patients maintain weight over the course of curative radiotherapy of the head and neck or lung and can improve specific aspects of QOL

  10. MRI with DWI for the Detection of Posttreatment Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Why Morphologic MRI Criteria Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ailianou, A; Mundada, P; De Perrot, T; Pusztaszieri, M; Poletti, P-A; Becker, M

    2018-04-01

    Although diffusion-weighted imaging combined with morphologic MRI (DWIMRI) is used to detect posttreatment recurrent and second primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, the diagnostic criteria used so far have not been clarified. We hypothesized that precise MRI criteria based on signal intensity patterns on T2 and contrast-enhanced T1 complement DWI and therefore improve the diagnostic performance of DWIMRI. We analyzed 1.5T MRI examinations of 100 consecutive patients treated with radiation therapy with or without additional surgery for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. MRI examinations included morphologic sequences and DWI ( b =0 and b =1000 s/mm 2 ). Histology and follow-up served as the standard of reference. Two experienced readers, blinded to clinical/histologic/follow-up data, evaluated images according to clearly defined criteria for the diagnosis of recurrent head and neck squamous cell carcinoma/second primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma occurring after treatment, post-radiation therapy inflammatory edema, and late fibrosis. DWI analysis included qualitative (visual) and quantitative evaluation with an ADC threshold. Recurrent head and neck squamous cell carcinoma/second primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma occurring after treatment was present in 36 patients, whereas 64 patients had post-radiation therapy lesions only. The Cohen κ for differentiating tumor from post-radiation therapy lesions with MRI and qualitative DWIMRI was 0.822 and 0.881, respectively. Mean ADCmean in recurrent head and neck squamous cell carcinoma/second primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma occurring after treatment (1.097 ± 0.295 × 10 -3 mm 2 /s) was significantly lower ( P .05). Although ADCs were similar in tumors and late fibrosis, morphologic MRI criteria facilitated distinction between the 2 conditions. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and positive and negative likelihood ratios (95% CI) of

  11. Recent results of cetuximab use in the treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Perri

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Francesco Perri1, Francesco Longo2, Franco Ionna2, Francesco Caponigro11Head and Neck Medical Oncology Unit, 2Head and Neck Surgery Unit, National Tumor Institute of Naples, Naples, ItalyAbstract: Cetuximab is a chimeric monoclonal antibody that targets the epidermal growth factor receptor. The role of cetuximab is paramount in several subsets of head and neck cancer. In particular, the EXTREME study has indicated cetuximab as the only drug to improve survival when associated with cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil in patients with recurrent/metastatic disease. Furthermore, cetuximab, both alone and in combination with cisplatin, is active in patients with recurrent/metastatic disease who have failed prior platinum-based chemotherapy. Cetuximab, given in association with radiation therapy, is a treatment of choice in first-line therapy of patients with locally advanced inoperable disease. In the same setting, the role of induction chemotherapy has gained considerable interest over the last few years and a number of efforts are being pursued to optimally integrate induction chemotherapy with radiation therapy plus cetuximab. The combination of cetuximab and other targeted therapies is among the most promising new perspectives for patients with head and neck cancer.Keywords: cetuximab, head and neck cancer, locally advanced, recurrent/metastatic

  12. Accumulation of [sup 99m]Tc-glutathione in head and neck tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ercan, M.T. (Depts. of Nuclear Medicine and Otorhinolaryngology, Faculty of Medicine, Hacettepe Univ., Ankara (Turkey)); Aras, T. (Depts. of Nuclear Medicine and Otorhinolaryngology, Faculty of Medicine, Hacettepe Univ., Ankara (Turkey)); Aktas, A. (Depts. of Nuclear Medicine and Otorhinolaryngology, Faculty of Medicine, Hacettepe Univ., Ankara (Turkey)); Kaya, S. (Depts. of Nuclear Medicine and Otorhinolaryngology, Faculty of Medicine, Hacettepe Univ., Ankara (Turkey)); Bekdik, C.F. (Depts. of Nuclear Medicine and Otorhinolaryngology, Faculty of Medicine, Hacettepe Univ., Ankara (Turkey))

    1994-10-01

    Glutathione labelled with [sup 99m]Tc was used to study blood clearance and normal distribution in 3 healthy volunteers and in 10 patients with biopsy-proven tumors in the head and neck region. Static scintigrams were obtained at 1, 3, 6, and 24 h. ROIs over tumors and normal soft tissues were compared to obtain T/N ratios. In normal subjects blood clearance reached a plateau at 6 h; no radioactivity accumulation in the head and neck region was observed. Only the cardiac blood pool, the liver, the kidneys and the urinary bladder were evident. Excretion was via the kidneys. Malignant tumors and metastases were well visualized in 7 patients (true-positive), starting at 1 h. The mean T/N ratio was 2.69 [+-] 0.77. The best images were obtained at 3-6 h. 1 false-positive (granulamatous reaction), 1 false-negative (malignant epithelial tumor in the radix of tongue) and 1 true-negative (angiofibroma) results were obtained. [sup 99m]Tc-GSH is a potential radiopharmaceutical for the scintigraphic visualization of head and neck tumors. Further clinical studies are warranted to show its sensitivity and accuracy. (orig.)

  13. Reduction of xerostomia in head and neck cancer patients. A critical review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanley, O.; Leech, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Radical radiotherapy given with or without concurrent chemotherapy is the main treatment modality in non-surgical patients for the management of squamous cell carcinoma in the head and neck. Xerostomia, which results from reduced salivary production is a debilitating side-effect of radiation therapy to these patients. Xerostomia may greatly impact on quality of life for head and neck cancer patients for up to 24 months post-radiation therapy. Such effects include difficulties in fundamental daily activities such as speech, mastication and swallowing. It is believed that modulated techniques provide better sparing to surrounding salivary glands. The aim of this critical review of the literature is to investigate what advantage intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can provide over 3 dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) in reducing xerostomia in this subset of patients. Search methodology: An extensive literature search was undertaken to compare the incidence of grade 2 or worse xerostomia in HNSCC patients treated with IMRT or 3DCRT (±chemotherapy). Results: Studies reported a lower incidence of grade 2 or worse xerostomia with IMRT over patients treated with 3DCRT. The highest incidence of xerostomia was reported at 6 months following the completion of radiotherapy treatment. The incidence of xerostomia in patients declined with time, in both patients treated with IMRT and those of the 3DCRT cohort. The incidence of xerostomia was greater in the acute setting than in the late. Conclusion: An IMRT technique can consistently reduce grade 2 or worse xerostomia in head and neck cancer patients over conformal techniques. This will not compromise dose homogeneity or dose coverage. IMRT should remain the standard of care for head and neck patients. - Highlights: • IMRT technique can consistently reduce grade 2 or worse xerostomia in head and neck cancer patients over 3DCRT. • IMRT does not compromise the treatment's dose homogeneity or

  14. Non-invasive head fixation for external irradiation of tumors of the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bale, R.J.; Sweeney, R.; Nevinny, M.; Auer, T.; Bluhm, A.; Lukas, P.; Vogele, M.; Thumfart, W.F.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To fully utilize the technical capabilities of radiation diagnostics and planning, a precise and reproducible method of head fixation is a prerequisite. Method: We have adapted the Vogele-Bale-Hohner (VBH) head holder (Wellhoefer Dosimetrie, Schwarzenbruck, Germany), originally designed for frameless stereotactic operations, to the requirements of external beam radiotherapy. A precise and reproducible head fixation is attained by an individualized vacuum upper-dental cast which is connected over 2 hydraulic arms to an adjustable head- and rigid base-plate. Radiation field and patient alignment lasers are marked on a relocatable clear PVC localization box. Results: The possibility of craniocaudal adjustment of the head plate on the base plate allows the system to adapt to the actucal position of the patient on the raditherapy couch granting tensionless repositioning. The VBH head holder has proven itself to be a precise yet practicable method of head fixation. Duration of mouthpiece production and daily repositioning is comparable to that of the thermoplastic mask. Conclusion: The new head holder is in routine use at our hospital and quite suitable for external beam radiation of patients with tumors of the head and neck. (orig.) [de

  15. Quadriplegia secondary to cervical spondylotic myelopathy-a rare complication of head and neck surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Fan; Kang, Chung-Jan; Lee, Sai-Cheung; Tsao, Chung-Kan

    2013-02-01

    Free tissue reconstruction after ablation of head and neck malignancy often requires extensive cervical manipulation, which may exacerbate preexisting cervical spondylosis and result in progression to cervical myelopathy. We present a rare case of postoperative quadriplegia caused by cervical spondylotic myelopathy after head and neck reconstruction. A 63-year-old man without a history of cervical spondylosis underwent resection of a gingivo-buccal squamous cell carcinoma with immediate reconstruction with free fibula osteocutaneous flap. On postoperative day 4, the patient was found to have quadriplegia. MRI demonstrated severe cervical myelopathy. Decompressive laminectomy was performed. The patient underwent an extensive rehabilitation program but only realized moderate improvement. Cervical spondylotic myelopathy is a rare but disastrous complication of head and neck surgery. We hypothesize that it is potentially avoidable with heightened awareness of this disease entity, preoperative identification of patients at risk, and prophylactic interventions Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Profiling Invasiveness in Head and Neck Cancer: Recent Contributions of Genomic and Transcriptomic Approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nisa, Lluís; Aebersold, Daniel Matthias; Giger, Roland; Caversaccio, Marco Domenico; Borner, Urs; Medová, Michaela; Zimmer, Yitzhak

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput molecular profiling approaches have emerged as precious research tools in the field of head and neck translational oncology. Such approaches have identified and/or confirmed the role of several genes or pathways in the acquisition/maintenance of an invasive phenotype and the execution of cellular programs related to cell invasion. Recently published new-generation sequencing studies in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) have unveiled prominent roles in carcinogenesis and cell invasion of mutations involving NOTCH1 and PI3K-patwhay components. Gene-expression profiling studies combined with systems biology approaches have allowed identifying and gaining further mechanistic understanding into pathways commonly enriched in invasive HNSCC. These pathways include antigen-presenting and leucocyte adhesion molecules, as well as genes involved in cell-extracellular matrix interactions. Here we review the major insights into invasiveness in head and neck cancer provided by high-throughput molecular profiling approaches

  17. Incidental head and neck findings on 18F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, S P; Kinshuck, A J; Williams, C; Dwivedi, R; Wieshmann, H; Jones, T M

    2015-09-01

    The overlapping risk factors for lung and head and neck cancer present a definite risk of synchronous malignant pathology. This is the first study to specifically review incidental positron emission tomography computed tomography findings in the head and neck region in lung carcinoma patients. A retrospective review was performed of all lung cancer patients who underwent positron emission tomography computed tomography imaging over a five-year period (January 2008 - December 2012), identified from the Liverpool thoracic multidisciplinary team database. Six hundred and nine patients underwent positron emission tomography computed tomography imaging over this period. In 76 (12.5 per cent) scans, incidental regions of avid 18F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose uptake were reported in the head and neck region. In the 28 patients who were fully investigated, there were 4 incidental findings of malignancy. In lung cancer patients undergoing investigative positron emission tomography computed tomography scanning, a significant number will also present with areas of clinically significant 18F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose uptake in the head and neck region. Of these, at least 5 per cent may have an undiagnosed malignancy.

  18. A six year prospective study of the incidence and causes of head and neck injuries in international football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, C W; Junge, A; Dvorak, J

    2005-08-01

    To identify those risk factors that have the greatest impact on the incidence of head and neck injuries in international football. A case-control study of players sustaining head and neck injuries during 20 FIFA tournaments (men and women) from 1998 to 2004. Video recordings of incidents were used to identify a range of parameters associated with the incidents. Team physicians provided medical reports describing the nature of each injury. chi2 tests (pvideo sequences. The commonest injuries were contusions (53%), lacerations (20%), and concussions (11%). The incidence of all head and neck injuries was 12.5/1000 player hours (men 12.8, women 11.5) and 3.7 for lost-time injuries (men 3.5, women 4.1). The commonest causes of injury involved aerial challenges (55%) and the use of the upper extremity (33%) or head (30%). The unfair use of the upper extremity was significantly more likely to cause an injury than any other player action. Only one injury (a neck muscle strain) occurred as a result of heading the ball throughout the 20 tournaments equivalent to 0.05 injuries/1000 player hours. Players' actions most likely to cause a head or neck injury were the use of the upper extremity or the head but in the majority of cases these challenges were deemed to be fair and within the laws of the game.

  19. Psychosocial aspects of head and neck cancer--a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruyn, J F; de Jong, P C; Bosman, L J; van Poppel, J W; van Den Borne, H W; Ryckman, R M; de Meij, K

    1986-12-01

    This study is a systematic analysis of the literature on psychosocial aspects in head and neck cancer patients. Patients with head and neck cancer experience a variety of physical as well as psychosocial problems. Physical problems include swallowing or chewing, speech and physical appearance. Psychosocial problems include anxiety, depression, loss of self-esteem and uncertainty about the future. Because of these problems, isolation from friends typically occurs, re-employment is difficult, and there are social and sexual tensions within families. Information and support by professionals, partners and/or fellow patients are related to positive rehabilitation outcomes such as the acquisition of speech, increases in constructive social functioning and decreases in depression.

  20. An overview of head and neck treatment at the KNH radiotherapy, Nairobi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mucheusi, L.

    2006-01-01

    It is known from several studies that precise radical radiotherapy leads to better local control thus increasing overall survival of patients suffering from Head and Neck malignancies if diagnosed early enough. The wide gap in the techniques and equipment used between the developed and the developing world are a source of concern especially in Sub Saharan africa which hardly boasts of even a single linear accelerator. in this presentation, common Head and Neck condition treatment is examined as it is done at the Kenyatta National Hospital. The treatment techniques used the planning process/innovations improvisations-adopted by radiographers at the institution to achieve the prescribed treatment

  1. Initial results of CyberKnife treatment for recurrent previously irradiated head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Himei, Kengo; Katsui, Kuniaki; Yoshida, Atsushi

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of CyberKnife for recurrent previously irradiated head and neck cancer. Thirty-one patients with recurrent previously irradiated head and neck cancer were treated with a CyberKnife from July 1999 to March 2002 at Okayama Kyokuto Hospital were retrospectively studied. The accumulated dose was 28-80 Gy (median 60 Gy). The interval between CyberKnife treatment and previous radiotherapy was 0.4-429.5 months (median 16.3 months). Primary lesions were nasopharynx: 7, maxillary sinus: 6, tongue: 5, ethmoid sinus: 3, and others: 1. The pathology was squamous cell carcinoma: 25, adenoid cystic carcinoma: 4, and others: 2. Symptoms were pain: 8, and nasal bleeding: 2. The prescribed dose was 15.0-40.3 Gy (median 32.3 Gy) as for the marginal dose. The response rate (complete response (CR)+partial response (PR)) and local control rate (CR+PR+no change (NC)) was 74% and 94% respectively. Pain disappeared for 4 cases, relief was obtained for 4 cases and no change for 2 cases and nasal bleeding disappeared for 2 cases for an improvement of symptoms. An adverse effects were observed as mucositis in 5 cases and neck swelling in one case. Prognosis of recurrent previously irradiated head and neck cancer was estimated as poor. Our early experience shows that CyberKnife is expected to be feasible treatment for recurrent previously irradiated head and neck cancer, and for the reduction adverse effects and maintenance of useful quality of life (QOL) for patients. (author)

  2. Electrophysiologic analysis of injury to cranial nerve XI during neck dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanisnik, Bostjan; Zargi, Miha; Rodi, Zoran

    2016-04-01

    Despite preservation of the accessory nerve, a considerable number of patients report partial nerve damage after modified radical neck dissection (MRND) and selective neck dissection. Accessory nerve branches for the trapezius muscle were stimulated during neck dissection, and the M wave amplitude was measured during distinct surgical phases. The accessory nerve was mapped in 20 patients. The M wave recordings indicated that major nerve damage occurred during dissection at levels IIa and IIb in the most proximal segment of the nerve. The M waves evoked from this nerve segment decreased significantly during surgery (analysis of variance; p = .001). The most significant intraoperative injury to the accessory nerve during neck dissection occurs at anatomic nerve levels IIa and IIb. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: E372-E376, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Skin Cancer of the Head and Neck

    OpenAIRE

    Ouyang, Yun-Hsuan

    2010-01-01

    The majority of skin cancers of the head and neck are nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSC). Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma are the most frequent types of NMSC. Malignant melanoma is an aggressive neoplasm of skin, and the ideal adjuvant therapy has not yet been found, although various options for treatment of skin cancer are available to the patient and physician, allowing high cure rate and excellent functional and cosmetic outcomes. Sunscreen protection and early evaluation of ...

  4. Emerging Trends in the Epidemiological Pattern of Head and Neck ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Emerging Trends in the Epidemiological Pattern of Head and Neck Cancers in Lagos, ... The oral cavity was the most affected anatomic site (21.2%, 230/1083) in the ... and squamous cell carcinoma accounted for 58% (421/726) of carcinomas ...

  5. Transoral robotic surgery in head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hans, S; Delas, B; Gorphe, P; Ménard, M; Brasnu, D

    2012-02-01

    Robots have invaded industry and, more recently, the field of medicine. Following the development of various prototypes, Intuitive Surgical® has developed the Da Vinci surgical robot. This robot, designed for abdominal surgery, has been widely used in urology since 2000. The many advantages of this transoral robotic surgery (TORS) are described in this article. Its disadvantages are essentially its high cost and the absence of tactile feedback. The first feasibility studies in head and neck cancer, conducted in animals, dummies and cadavers, were performed in 2005, followed by the first publications in patients in 2006. The first series including more than 20 patients treated by TORS demonstrated the feasibility for the following sites: oropharynx, supraglottic larynx and hypopharynx. However, these studies did not validate the oncological results of the TORS technique. TORS decreases the number of tracheotomies, and allows more rapid swallowing rehabilitation and a shorter length of hospital stay. Technical improvements are expected. Smaller, more ergonomic, new generation robots, therefore more adapted to the head and neck, will probably be available in the future. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Suppression of cellular immunity by head and neck irradiation. Precipitating factors and reparative mechanisms in an experimental model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, W.C.; Hasslinger, B.J.; Suter, C.M.; Blanchard, C.L.; Goldstein, A.L.; Chretien, P.B.

    1986-01-01

    A model was developed in C 3 H mice to investigate the immunosuppressive effects of head and neck irradiation and to explore mechanisms for repair of the defects. Mice receiving 1200 rad (12 Gy) of head and neck irradiation showed significant depression of delayed-type hypersensitivity, peripheral blood lymphocyte counts, spleen cell counts, and spleen cell production of interleukin-2. Treatment with optimal dosages of thymosin alpha 1 (T alpha-1) produced significant increases in all of these values, in some instances to levels higher than in the nonirradiated controls. In identical experiments with mice irradiated to a portal limited to the pelvic region, T alpha-1 induced only partial remission of the abnormalities. The dose response of T alpha-1 with head and neck irradiation showed a relatively limited dose range for immune restoration, a finding that warrants similar determinations in clinical trials with immunomodulating agents. The results suggest a potential clinical usefulness of T alpha-1 and also interleukin-2 in restoring cellular immunity after irradiation for head and neck cancers. The model appears to be useful for investigating immunomodulating agents before they are clinically evaluated as adjuvants with head and neck irradiation regimens

  7. Postoperative drainage in head and neck surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Ida; Morar, Pradeep; Belloso, Antonio

    2010-11-01

    A major factor affecting patients' length of hospitalisation following head and neck surgery remains the use of surgical drains. The optimal time to remove these drains has not been well defined. A routine practice is to measure the drainage every 24 h and remove the drain when daily drainage falls below 25 ml. This study aims to determine whether drainage measurement at shorter intervals decreases the time to drain removal and hence the length of in-patient stays. A 6-month prospective observational study was performed. The inclusion criteria were patients who underwent head and neck surgery without neck dissection and had a closed suction drain inserted. Drainage rates were measured at 8-hourly intervals. Drains were removed when drainage-rate was ≤ 1 ml/h over an 8-h period. A total of 43 patients were evaluated. The highest drainage rate occurred in the first 8 postoperative hours and decreased significantly in the subsequent hours. The median drainage rates at 8, 16, 24, 32 and 40 postoperative hours were 3.375, 1, 0, 0 and 0 ml/h, respectively. Applying our new removal criteria of ≤ 1 ml/h drainage rate, the drains were removed in 22 (51%) patients at the 16th postoperative hour; 37 (86%) were removed by 24 h after operation. In comparison, only nine (20.9%) patients could potentially be discharged the day after surgery if previous criteria of ≤ 25 ml/24-h were used to decide on drain removal. Our 8-hourly drainage-rate monitoring has facilitated safe earlier discharge of an additional 28 (65%) patients on the day after surgery. This has led to improvement in patient care, better optimisation of hospital resources and resulted in positive economic implications to the department.

  8. Evaluation of atlas-based autosegmentation with ABAS software for head-and-neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiuchun; Hu Cairong; Chen Chuanben; Cai Yongjun

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the autocontouring accuracy using the atlas-based autosegmentation of CT images for head-and-neck cancer. Methods: Ten head and neck patients with contours were selected. Two groups of autocontouring atlas were tested, the first group was for patients with own atlas, for the second group we tested the autocontouring of eight patients with other two patients atlas. Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and overlap index (OI) were introduced to evaluate the autocontours, and the discrepancy between the two groups was evaluated through paired t-test. Results: Both the DSC and OI of all the organs in the first group were >0.80, the result of mandible was the highest (>0.91), the DSC of the gross tumor volume (GTV) was the lowest (0.81), the OI of the GTV was 0.82, and the DSC and OI of the clinical target volume (node) were 0.82 and 0, 79, respectively. Only the risk organ was delineated in the second group, and spinal cord and brain stem were combined to analyze. All the DSC was about 0.70, and the DSC and OI of mandible were higher than the others, which was due to its bone anatomy. The accuracy in the second group was significantly lower than that of the first group (t =3.24 - 8.26, P =0.014 -0.000), except the right parotid (t=2.08, P=0.075). Conclusions: Automatic segmentation generates contours of sufficient accuracy for adaptive planning intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to accommodate anatomic changes during treatment. For convention planning IMRT normal structure auto-contouring,it need to select more standard atlas in order to acquire a satisfied autocontours. (authors)

  9. Robot-Assisted Free Flap in Head and Neck Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Gyeol Song

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background  Robots have allowed head and neck surgeons to extirpate oropharyngealtumors safely without the need for lip-split incision or mandibulotomy. Using robots inoropharyngealreconstruction is newbut essentialfor oropharyngeal defectsthatresultfromrobotic tumor excision. We report our experience with robotic free-flap reconstruction ofhead and neck defectsto exemplify the necessity forrobotic reconstruction.Methods  We investigated head and neck cancer patients who underwent ablation surgeryand free-flap reconstruction by robot. Between July 1, 2011 andMarch 31, 2012, 5 caseswereperformed and patient demographics, location of tumor, pathologic stage, reconstructionmethods, flap size, recipient vessel, necessary pedicle length, and operation time wereinvestigated.Results  Among five free-flap reconstructions, four were radial forearm free flaps and onewas an anterolateral thigh free-flap. Four flaps used the superior thyroid artery and oneflap used a facial artery as the recipient vessel. The average pedicle length was 8.8 cm. Flapinsetting and microanastomosis were achieved using a specially manufactured roboticinstrument. The total operation timewas 1,041.0 minutes(range, 814 to 1,132 minutes, andcomplicationsincluding flap necrosis, hematoma, andwound dehiscence did not occur.Conclusions  Thisstudy demonstratesthe clinically applicable use ofrobotsin oropharyngealreconstruction, especially using a free flap. A robot can assist the operator in insettingthe flap at a deep portion of the oropharynx without the need to perform a traditionalmandibulotomy. Robot-assisted reconstruction may substitute for existing surgical methodsand is accepted asthemost up-to-datemethod.

  10. The retrograde transverse cervical artery as a recipient vessel for free tissue transfer in complex head and neck reconstruction with a vessel-depleted neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciudad, Pedro; Agko, Mouchammed; Manrique, Oscar J; Date, Shivprasad; Kiranantawat, Kidakorn; Chang, Wei Ling; Nicoli, Fabio; Lo Torto, Federico; Maruccia, Michele; Orfaniotis, Georgios; Chen, Hung-Chi

    2017-11-01

    Reconstruction in a vessel-depleted neck is challenging. The success rates can be markedly decreased because of unavailability of suitable recipient vessels. In order to obtain a reliable flow, recipient vessels away from the zone of fibrosis, radiation, or infection need to be explored. The aim of this report is to present our experience and clinical outcomes using the retrograde flow coming from the distal transverse cervical artery (TCA) as a source for arterial inflow for complex head and neck reconstruction in patients with a vessel-depleted neck. Between July 2010 and June 2016, nine patients with a vessel-depleted neck underwent secondary head and neck reconstruction using the retrograde TCA as recipient vessel for microanastomosis. The mean age was 49.6 years (range, 36 to 68 years). All patients had previous bilateral neck dissections and all, except one, had also received radiotherapy. Indications included neck contracture release (n = 3), oral (n = 1), mandibular (n = 3) and pharyngoesophageal (n = 2) reconstruction necessitating free anterolateral thigh (n = 3) and medial sural artery (n = 1) perforator flaps, fibula (n = 3) and ileocolon (n = 2) flaps respectively. There was 100% flap survival rate with no re-exploration or any partial flap loss. One case of intra-operative arterial vasospasm at the anastomotic suture line was managed intra-operatively with vein graft interposition. There were no other complications or donor site morbidity during the follow-up period. In a vessel-depleted neck, the reverse flow of the TCA may be a reliable option for complex secondary head and neck reconstruction in selected patients. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Chemotherapy for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfister, David G.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The role of chemotherapy in the management of squamous cell carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract is undergoing rapid evolution. Historically, the use of chemotherapy was limited to patients with incurable disease who had exhausted all surgical and radiation therapy options. The results of recent randomized trials, however, suggest an increasing role for chemotherapy as part of primary management in patients with unresectable disease; advanced larynx or hypopharynx cancer with the intent of larynx preservation, or advanced nasopharynx cancer. This refresher course will provide a comprehensive overview of the current indications for chemotherapy in the management of these malignancies, and will highlight areas of controversy and future directions of investigation. More specifically, the following areas will be emphasized. 1. The identification of drugs commonly used in the management of head and neck cancer, their customary dosing and side effects. 2. The impact of induction and/or adjuvant chemotherapy combined with surgery and radiation therapy as defined by randomized trials, including a discussion of the Head and Neck Contracts program and the Intergroup adjuvant trial. 3. The development of larynx/function preservation treatment programs, including a review of the Veterans Administration and EORTC larynx preservation studies. 4. The evolving role of chemotherapy as part of innovative combined modality programs, especially in patients with unresectable disease. The rationale and utility of sequential versus concomitant/alternating chemotherapy-radiation strategies, and relevant randomized clinical trials comparing the different strategies will be discussed. 5. The appropriate application of chemotherapy in the palliative setting, including a discussion of the relative merits of single-agent versus combination chemotherapy

  12. Chemotherapy for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfister, David G.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The role of chemotherapy in the management of squamous cell carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract is undergoing rapid evolution. Historically, the use of chemotherapy was limited to patients with incurable disease who had exhausted all surgical and radiation therapy options. The results of recent randomized trials, however, suggest an increasing role for chemotherapy as part of primary management in patients seeking to avoid potentially morbid surgical procedures or with unresectable disease. This refresher course will provide a comprehensive overview of the current indications for chemotherapy in the management of these malignancies, and will highlight areas of controversy and future directions of investigation. More specifically, the following areas will be emphasized. 1. The identification of drugs commonly used in the management of head and neck cancer, their customary dosing and side effects. 2. The impact of induction and/or adjuvant chemotherapy combined with surgery and radiation therapy as defined by randomized trials, including a discussion of the Head and Neck Contracts program and the Intergroup adjuvant trial. 3. The development of larynx/function preservation treatment programs, including a review of the Memorial Hospital experience with larynx preservation and the Veterans Administration larynx preservation study. 4. The evolving role of chemotherapy as part of innovative combined modality programs, especially in patients with unresectable disease. The rationale and utility of sequential versus concomitant/alternating chemotherapy-radiation strategies, and relevant randomized clinical trials comparing the different strategies will be discussed. 5. The appropriate application of chemotherapy in the palliative setting, including a discussion of the relative merits of single-agent versus combination chemotherapy

  13. Ultrasonographic changes in malignant neck nodes during radiotherapy in head and neck squamous carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, P.D.; Laskar, S.G.; Shrivastava, S.K.; Dinshaw, K.A.; Gupta, T.; Agarwal, J.P.; Arya, S.

    2005-01-01

    Limited information is available about the sonomorphological changes in metastatic neck nodes during radiotherapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pattern of sonomorphological changes in metastatic neck nodes with radiotherapy. The study population consisted of 16 consecutive patients planned for radical radiotherapy to the head and neck. All patients were subjected to four ultrasound examinations: before therapy, at 46 Gy, at the conclusion of radiation and at first follow up. A total of 59 ultrasound examinations were performed on 16 patients. The difference between the mean number of nodes detected per patient before (10.6) and after (7.8) radiation was significant (P = 0.05). Sixteen nodes were categorized as malignant at first sonography, half of which reverted back to normal by the end of radiation. Changes in the sonomorphology of malignant cervical lymph nodes occur with radiotherapy with more that half demonstrating reversion to normal pattern. Future studies correlating this with histopathology should be considered Copyright (2005) Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd

  14. Pictorial essay: Vascular interventions in extra cranial head and neck

    OpenAIRE

    Suyash S Kulkarni; Nitin S Shetty; Tejas P Dharia; Ashwin M Polnaya

    2012-01-01

    Medicine is an ever changing field and interventional radiology (IR) procedures are becoming increasingly popular because of high efficacy and its minimally invasive nature of the procedure. Management of disease processes in the extra cranial head and neck (ECHN) has always been a challenge due to the complex anatomy of the region. Cross sectional imaging of the ECHN has grown and evolved tremendously and occupies a pivotal and integral position in the clinical management of variety of head ...

  15. Head and neck cancer due to heavy metal exposure via tobacco smoking and professional exposure: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khlifi, Rim; Hamza-Chaffai, Amel

    2010-01-01

    Chronic exposures to heavy metals via tobacco smoking and professional exposure may increase the risk of head and neck cancer, although the epidemiologic evidence is limited by problems of low study power and inadequate adjustment for tobacco and professional exposure use. Numerous scientific reviews have examined the association of various heavy metals exposure with respiratory cancer as well as other cancer types, but few have been published on head and neck cancer. The purpose of this paper, therefore, is to review the head and neck tract cancer-related data on exposure to heavy metals via smoking and working exposure and to study the major mechanisms underlying some toxic metals carcinogenesis.

  16. The application of super-selective external carotid artery embolization in head and neck diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xin Yongtong; Wei Dingtai; Lin Shifeng; Ye Jian'an; Chen Youying

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the application of super-selective external carotid artery embolization in head and neck diseases. Methods: DSA and super-selective external carotid artery embolization were carried out in 41 cases of head and neck diseases including 12 cases of epistaxis, 7 nasopharyngeal fibroangioma, 1 traumatic arterial bleeding, 14 vascular malformation, and 7 malignancies. Results: No recurrence of nose bleeding after embolization of epistaxis was seen within 6-12 month follow up. The operative bleeding was reduced significantly by preoperative embolization in nasopharyngeal fibroangioma. No recurrence of bleeding was reduced significantly by preoperative embolization in nasopharyngeal fibroangioma. No recurrence of bleeding was achieved after embolization of traumatic artery. Among the case of vascular malformation, 3 were proven to be significantly efficient, 6 efficient, and 5 inefficient in the 6-12 month follow up. Among the 7 malignant cases, 3 survived more than 2 years. Conclusion: Super-selective external carotid artery embolization is safe and effective in the treatment of head and neck diseases. (authors)

  17. Profiling Invasiveness in Head and Neck Cancer: Recent Contributions of Genomic and Transcriptomic Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lluís Nisa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available High-throughput molecular profiling approaches have emerged as precious research tools in the field of head and neck translational oncology. Such approaches have identified and/or confirmed the role of several genes or pathways in the acquisition/maintenance of an invasive phenotype and the execution of cellular programs related to cell invasion. Recently published new-generation sequencing studies in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC have unveiled prominent roles in carcinogenesis and cell invasion of mutations involving NOTCH1 and PI3K-patwhay components. Gene-expression profiling studies combined with systems biology approaches have allowed identifying and gaining further mechanistic understanding into pathways commonly enriched in invasive HNSCC. These pathways include antigen-presenting and leucocyte adhesion molecules, as well as genes involved in cell-extracellular matrix interactions. Here we review the major insights into invasiveness in head and neck cancer provided by high-throughput molecular profiling approaches.

  18. Intercomparison of two dynamic treatment techniques, ring scan and spot scan, for head and neck tumors with the Piotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takai, M.; Blattmann, H.; Pedroni, E.

    1988-01-01

    An evaluation of the ring scan and the spot scan was made for the pion irradiation of head and neck tumors with the Piotron. For the geometry of the Piotron, with its 60 radially converging beams, two scanning techniques have been developed, ring scan and spot scan. They have different characteristics concerning achievable dose distributions and sensitivity to tissue inhomogenities. The optimized 3-dimensional dose distributions for the treatment with ring scan and spot scan techniques were calculated for two examples of the target volume. The comparison of the dose distributions has shown that the ring scan is better in sparing normal tissues than the spot scan for a simple shape target volume but not for an irregular shape target volume with the present status of the technique. The irradiation time needed for the ring scan is longer, for the present examples three times, than for the spot scan. From the practical view point the spot scan is preferable to the ring scan for the treatment of head and neck tumors with the Piotron

  19. Accessible or Inaccessible? Diagnostic Efficacy of CT-Guided Core Biopsies of Head and Neck Masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, Jane D., E-mail: janecunningham0708@gmail.com; McCusker, Mark W.; Power, Sarah; PearlyTi, Joanna; Thornton, John; Brennan, Paul; Lee, Michael J.; O’Hare, Alan; Looby, Seamus [Beaumont Hospital, Department of Radiology (Ireland)

    2015-04-15

    PurposeTissue sampling of lesions in the head and neck is challenging due to complex regional anatomy and sometimes necessitates open surgical biopsy. However, many patients are poor surgical candidates due to comorbidity. Thus, we evaluated the use of CT guidance for establishing histopathological diagnosis of head and neck masses.MethodsAll consecutive patients (n = 22) who underwent CT-guided core biopsy of head or neck masses between April 2009 and August 2012 were retrospectively reviewed using the departmental CT interventional procedures database. The indication for each biopsy performed was to establish or exclude a diagnosis of neoplasia in patients with suspicious head or neck lesions found on clinical examination or imaging studies. Patients received conscious sedation and 18 G, semiautomated core needle biopsies were performed by experienced neuroradiologists using 16-slice multidetector row CT imaging guidance (Somatom Definition Siemens Medical Solutions, Germany). Histopathology results of each biopsy were analysed.ResultsSixteen of 22 biopsies that were performed (73 %) yielded a pathological diagnosis. Anatomic locations biopsied included: masticator (n = 7), parapharyngeal (n = 3), parotid (n = 3), carotid (n = 3), perivertebral (n = 3), pharyngeal (n = 2), and retropharyngeal (n = 1) spaces. Six biopsies (27 %) were nondiagnostic due to inadequate tissue sampling, particularly small biopsy sample size and failure to biopsy the true sampling site due to extensive necrosis. No major complications were encountered.ConclusionsThe use of CT guidance to perform core biopsies of head and neck masses is an effective means of establishing histopathological diagnosis and reduces the need for diagnostic open surgical biopsy and general anaesthesia.

  20. Relationships among head posture, pain intensity, disability and deep cervical flexor muscle performance in subjects with postural neck pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun V. Subbarayalu, PhD

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Information Technology (IT professionals working with computers gradually develop forward head posture and, as a result, these professionals are susceptible to several neck disorders. This study intended to reveal the relationships between pain intensity, disability, head posture and deep cervical flexor (DCF muscle performance in patients with postural neck pain. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on 84 IT professionals who were diagnosed with postural neck pain. The participants were recruited with a random sampling approach. A Visual Analogue Scale (VAS, the Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire (NPQ, the Modified Head Posture Spinal Curvature Instrument (MHPSCI, and the Stabilizer Pressure Biofeedback Unit were used to measure neck pain intensity, neck disability, head posture, and DCF muscle performance, respectively. Results: The Pearson correlation coefficient revealed a significantly strong positive relationship between the VAS and the NPQ (r = 0.734. The cranio-vertebral (CV angle was found to have a significantly negative correlation with the VAS (r = −0.536 and a weak negative correlation with the NPQ (r = −0.389. Conclusion: This study concluded that a smaller CV angle corresponded to greater neck pain intensity and disability. Furthermore, there is no significant relationship between CV angle and DCF muscle performance, indicating that head posture re-education through postural correction exercises would not completely correct the motor control deficits in DCF muscles. In addition, a suitable exercise regimen that exclusively targets the deep cervical flexor muscle to improve its endurance is warranted. Keywords: Craniovertebral angle, Disability deep cervical flexors muscle performance, Head posture, Postural neck pain

  1. Delineation of the neck node levels for head and neck tumors: A 2013 update. DAHANCA, EORTC, HKNPCSG, NCIC CTG, NCRI, RTOG, TROG consensus guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grégoire, Vincent; Ang, Kian; Budach, Wilfried

    2014-01-01

    In 2003, a panel of experts published a set of consensus guidelines for the delineation of the neck node levels in node negative patients (Radiother Oncol, 69: 227-36, 2003). In 2006, these guidelines were extended to include the characteristics of the node positive and the post-operative neck...... (Radiother Oncol, 79: 15-20, 2006). These guidelines did not fully address all nodal regions and some of the anatomic descriptions were ambiguous, thereby limiting consistent use of the recommendations. In this framework, a task force comprising opinion leaders in the field of head and neck radiation...... of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, and in alignment with the TNM atlas for lymph nodes in the neck, 10 node groups (some being divided into several levels) were defined with a concise description of their main anatomic boundaries, the normal structures juxtaposed to these nodes, and the main tumor sites...

  2. Dysphagia severity following chemoradiation and postoperative radiation for head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Nam P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, VA North Texas Health Care System, Radiation Oncology Service (140), 4500 S, Lancaster Road, Dallas, TX 72516 (United States)]. E-mail: NamPhong.Nguyen@med.va.gov; Moltz, Candace C. [Audiology and Speech Pathology Service (126), VA North Texas Health Care System, Dallas, TX 75216 (United States); Frank, Cheryl [Audiology and Speech Pathology Service (126), VA North Texas Health Care System, Dallas, TX 75216 (United States); Karlsson, Ulf [Department of Radiation Oncology, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27858 (United States); Nguyen, Phuc D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, VA North Texas Health Care System, Radiation Oncology Service (140), 4500 S, Lancaster Road, Dallas, TX 72516 (United States); Vos, Paul [Department of Biostatistics, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27858 (United States); Smith, Herbert J. [Radiology Service, VA North Texas Health Care System, Dallas, TX 75216 (United States); Dutta, Suresh [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States); Nguyen, Ly M. [Public Health School, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Lemanski, Claire [Department of Radiation Oncology, Val D' Aurelle, Montpellier (France); Chan, Wayne [Radiation Oncology Service, VAMC, Jackson, MS 39216 (United States); Sallah, Sabah [Division of Hematology/Oncology Research, Novo Nordisk, Athens (Greece)

    2006-09-15

    Objective: The purpose of the study is to evaluate dysphagia severity following chemoradiation and postoperative radiation for head and neck cancer, and particularly the aspiration risk because of its potential life-threatening consequence. Materials and methods: We reviewed retrospectively the modified barium swallow (MBS) results in 110 patients who complained of dysphagia following chemoradiation (57) and postoperative radiation (53) of their head and neck cancer. Patients were selected if they were cancer free at the time of the swallowing study. Dysphagia severity was graded on a scale of 1-7. Patients were grouped according to the dysphagia severity: mild (grades 2-3), moderate (grades 4-5), and severe (grades 6-7). Results: Mean and median dysphagia grades were 4.84/5 and 4.12/4 for chemoradiation and postoperative radiation respectively. The mean difference between the two groups is statistically significant (p = 0.02). Mild dysphagia occurred in 13 patients (22%) of the chemoradiation group and 17 (32%) of the postoperative group. Corresponding number for the moderate group was 25 (43%) and 25 (48%), respectively. Severe dysphagia was significant in the chemoradiation group (34%) compared to the postoperative group (19%). However, the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.29). There was a higher proportion of patients with large tumor (T3-T4) in the chemoradiation group who developed severe dysphagia. Conclusion: Dysphagia remained a significant morbidity of chemoradiation and postoperative radiation for head and neck cancer. Dysphagia may be more severe in the chemoradiation group because of the higher proportion of patients with large tumor, the high radiation dose, and a high number of oropharyngeal tumors. Aspiration occurred in both groups. Diagnostic studies such as MBS should be part of future head and neck cancer prospective studies to assess the prevalence of aspiration, as it may be silent.

  3. Concomitant intraarterial chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancer evaluated by FDG-PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitagawa, Yoshimasa; Yonekura, Yoshiharu; Sano, Kazuo; Maruta, Yoshihiro; Ogasawara, Toshiyuki; Ogawa, Toru; Yoshida, Masanori [Fukui Medical Univ., Matsuoka (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of combined intraarterial chemotherapy (THP-ADM, 5-FU, and carboplatin) and radiotherapy on head and neck squamous cell carcinomas using positron emission tomography with {sup 18}F labeled fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET). Twenty-three patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were included in the study. All patients completed the treatment regimen, and underwent 2 FDG-PET prior to and 4 weeks after chemoradiotherapy. The pre- and posttreatment PET images were compared with clinical and histopathological evaluations of the treatment effect. For the quantitative evaluation of regional radioactivity, standardized uptake values (SUVs) were used. The overall clinical response rate to the chemoradiotherapy was 100% (CR rate: 78.3%). Prior to treatment, FDG-PET detected neoplasms in all 23 patients. The neoplastic lesions showed high SUVs (mean: 9.15 mg/ml) prior to treatment, which significantly decreased after therapy (3.60 mg/ml, p<0.01, paired student t-test). Lesions with higher pretreatment SUVs (greater than 7 mg/ml) showed residual viable tumor cells after treatment in 4 out of 15 patients, whereas those with lower SUVs (less than 7 mg/ml 8 patients) were successfully treated. Four out of 9 tumors with posttreatment SUVs greater than 4 mg/ml had viable tumor cells, whereas all (14/14) tumors with post-SUVs less than 4 mg/ml showed no viable cells. With concomitant chemoradiotherapy monitored by FDG-PET, 8 patients avoided operation altogether, and the remaining 15 patients underwent a reduced form of surgery. Twenty patients survived (20/23, 87%) without recurrence. Concomitant chemoradiotherapy is effective for head and neck carcinoma. Pretreatment FDG-PET is useful for predicting the response to treatment. Posttreatment FDG-PET can evaluate residual viable cells. Thus FDG-PET is a valuable tool in the treatment of head and neck tumors. (author)

  4. Comparison between Japanese and French interstitial brachytherapy for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nose, Takayuki; Koizumi, Masahiko; Nishiyama, Kinji; Inoue, Toshihiko

    2001-01-01

    Interstitial brachytherapy is the optimal radiotherapy modality for head and neck cancer because the highest dose conformity can be achieved, and implanted tubes can move synchronously with the tumor movement. Compared with radical surgery, interstitial brachytherapy can achieve equivalent local control with less morbidity and less functional deficit. In Japan, because of technical limitations, interstitial brachytherapy has been confined to treatment of small tongue cancers. To improve our head and neck cancer treatment, technical limitations should be eliminated and a wider indication for interstitial brachytherapy should be achieved. In France, interstitial brachytherapy has been technically more developed and widely indicated than in Japan. We analyzed the differences between Japanese (Osaka) and French (Lyon and Nancy) techniques, to improve our interstitial brachytherapy. Implant devices and techniques: French applicators (Longcip 1) are more flexible and more suitable for loop techniques of the soft palate, the base of the tongue, and the vallecula, than applicators available in Japan. Various implant techniques are established especially for the oropharynx in France. Mandibular protection: Lead blocks used in France can more effectively shield the mandible than our silicone spacers. We showed the dosimetric results in an experimental treatment setting. Dose specification: The five-mm dose specification method used in Japan can work only for easy cases, such as small oral tongue cancers and mouth floor cancers. For complicated implants, such as for the oropharynx, the CTV-based dose specification method used in France is essential for sufficient irradiation. Indications: The indication for head and neck interstitial brachytherapy in Japan is limited mostly to small oral tongue cancers. The indication in France is wider, including the oral cavity, the oropharynx, and postoperative cases. We can refine our head and neck cancer treatment if we combine French

  5. Dysphagia severity following chemoradiation and postoperative radiation for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Nam P.; Moltz, Candace C.; Frank, Cheryl; Karlsson, Ulf; Nguyen, Phuc D.; Vos, Paul; Smith, Herbert J.; Dutta, Suresh; Nguyen, Ly M.; Lemanski, Claire; Chan, Wayne; Sallah, Sabah

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study is to evaluate dysphagia severity following chemoradiation and postoperative radiation for head and neck cancer, and particularly the aspiration risk because of its potential life-threatening consequence. Materials and methods: We reviewed retrospectively the modified barium swallow (MBS) results in 110 patients who complained of dysphagia following chemoradiation (57) and postoperative radiation (53) of their head and neck cancer. Patients were selected if they were cancer free at the time of the swallowing study. Dysphagia severity was graded on a scale of 1-7. Patients were grouped according to the dysphagia severity: mild (grades 2-3), moderate (grades 4-5), and severe (grades 6-7). Results: Mean and median dysphagia grades were 4.84/5 and 4.12/4 for chemoradiation and postoperative radiation respectively. The mean difference between the two groups is statistically significant (p = 0.02). Mild dysphagia occurred in 13 patients (22%) of the chemoradiation group and 17 (32%) of the postoperative group. Corresponding number for the moderate group was 25 (43%) and 25 (48%), respectively. Severe dysphagia was significant in the chemoradiation group (34%) compared to the postoperative group (19%). However, the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.29). There was a higher proportion of patients with large tumor (T3-T4) in the chemoradiation group who developed severe dysphagia. Conclusion: Dysphagia remained a significant morbidity of chemoradiation and postoperative radiation for head and neck cancer. Dysphagia may be more severe in the chemoradiation group because of the higher proportion of patients with large tumor, the high radiation dose, and a high number of oropharyngeal tumors. Aspiration occurred in both groups. Diagnostic studies such as MBS should be part of future head and neck cancer prospective studies to assess the prevalence of aspiration, as it may be silent

  6. Nonsurgical treatment of aggressive fibromatosis in the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, C.B. Jr.; Shagets, F.W.; Mansfield, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    Aggressive fibromatosis is a poorly defined, locally aggressive, yet histologically benign fibroblastic proliferative lesion that may occur in the head and neck. The lesion is highly cellular and locally infiltrative and has a propensity to invade and erode bone, compromising vital structures within the head and neck. However, it is not a true malignancy because it does not have malignant cytologic characteristics nor does it metastasize. We present two cases of aggressive fibromatosis occurring in young adult men. The first case involved a rapidly enlarging mass of the anterior maxilla that involved the upper lip, nasal alae, nasal septum, inferior turbinates, and hard palate. The patient underwent incisional biopsy to confirm the diagnosis. Because of difficulty in determining the actual margins of this extensive lesion and the significant morbidity that would have resulted from surgical resection, we elected to treat this patient with chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The second case was an extensive lesion involving the right temporal bone, pterygomaxillary space, and infratemporal, temporal, and middle cranial fossae. Incisional biopsy confirmed the diagnosis. Because of the lack of functional and cosmetic deficits and the unavoidable morbidity of a surgical resection, this patient was treated with radiation therapy. Although wide field resection is the most satisfactory form of treatment, in situations in which this modality would result in unacceptable morbidity or if surgical margins are positive, then radiation therapy and chemotherapy should be considered. Support for these therapeutic modalities is found in larger series of cases outside the head and neck

  7. Alternative Agents to Prevent Fogging in Head and Neck Endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patorn Piromchai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background The essential factor for diagnosis and treatment of diseases in head and neck endoscopy is the visibility of the image. An anti-fogging agent can reduce this problem by minimizing surface tension to prevent the condensation of water in the form of small droplets on a surface. There is no report on the use of hibiscrub ® or baby shampoo to reduce fogging in the literature. The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy between commercial anti-fogging agent, hibiscrub ® and baby shampoo to reduce fogging for the use in head and neck endoscopy. Methods The study was conducted at the Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University in August 2010. Commercial anti-fogging agent, baby shampoo and hibiscrub ® were applied on rigid endoscope lens before putting them into a mist generator. The images were taken at baseline, 15 seconds, 30 seconds and 1 minute. The images' identifiers were removed before they were sent to two evaluators. A visual analogue scale (VAS was used to rate the image quality from 0 to 10. Results The difference in mean VAS score between anti-fogging agent, baby shampoo and hibiscrub ® versus no agent were 5.46, 4.45 and 2.1 respectively. The commercial anti-fogging agent and baby shampoo had most protective benefit and performed significantly better than no agent ( P < 0.05. Conclusions Baby shampoo is an effective agent to prevent fogging during head and neck endoscopy and compares favourably with commercial anti-fogging agent.

  8. Exercise program design considerations for head and neck cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midgley, Adrian W; Lowe, Derek; Levy, Andrew R; Mepani, Vishal; Rogers, Simon N

    2018-01-01

    The present study aimed to establish exercise preferences, barriers, and perceived benefits among head and neck cancer survivors, as well as their level of interest in participating in an exercise program. Patients treated for primary squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck between 2010 and 2014 were identified from the hospital database and sent a postal questionnaire pack to establish exercise preferences, barriers, perceived benefits, current physical activity levels, and quality of life. A postal reminder was sent to non-responders 4 weeks later. The survey comprised 1021 eligible patients of which 437 (43%) responded [74% male, median (interquartile range) age, 66 (60-73) years]. Of the respondents, 30% said 'Yes' they would be interested in participating in an exercise program and 34% said 'Maybe'. The most common exercise preferences were a frequency of three times per week, moderate-intensity, and 15-29 min per bout. The most popular exercise types were walking (68%), flexibility exercises (35%), water activites/swimming (33%), cycling (31%), and weight machines (19%). Home (55%), outdoors (46%) and health club/gym (33%) were the most common preferred choices for where to regularly exercise. Percieved exercise benefits relating to improved physical attributes were commonly cited, whereas potential social and work-related benefits were less well-acknowledged. The most commonly cited exercise barriers were dry mouth or throat (40%), fatigue (37%), shortness of breath (30%), muscle weakness (28%) difficulty swallowing (25%), and shoulder weakness and pain (24%). The present findings inform the design of exercise programs for head and neck cancer survivors.

  9. ESTRO ACROP guidelines for positioning, immobilisation and position verification of head and neck patients for radiation therapists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Leech

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Over the last decade, the management of locally advanced head and neck cancers (HNCs has seen a substantial increase in the use of chemoradiation. These guidelines have been developed to assist Radiation TherapisTs (RTTs in positioning, immobilisation and position verification for head and neck cancer patients. Materials and methods: A critical review of the literature was undertaken by the writing committee.Based on the literature review, a survey was developed to ascertain the current positioning, immobilisation and position verification methods for head and neck radiation therapy across Europe. The survey was translated into Italian, German, Greek, Portuguese, Russian, Croatian, French and Spanish.Guidelines were subsequently developed by the writing committee. Results: Results from the survey indicated that a wide variety of treatment practices and treatment verification protocols are in operation for head and neck cancer patients across Europe currently.The guidelines developed are based on the experience and expertise of the writing committee, remaining cognisant of the variations in imaging and immobilisation techniques used currently in Europe. Conclusions: These guidelines have been developed to provide RTTs with guidance on positioning, immobilisation and position verification of HNC patients. The guidelines will also provide RTTs with the means to critically reflect on their own daily clinical practice with this patient group. Keywords: Head and neck, Immobilisation, Positioning, Verification

  10. Primary malignant head and neck tumours in Ghana: a survey of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    McRoy

    12] epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection (for nasopharyngeal cancer),[13] and others which include immune suppression, sunlight ... incidence of primary head and neck malignant tumours to contribute to the knowledge and understanding on this.

  11. Is Planned Neck Dissection Necessary for Head and Neck Cancer After Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Min; Hoffman, Henry T.; Chang, Kristi; Funk, Gerry F.; Smith, Russell B.; Tan Huaming; Clamon, Gerald H.; Dornfeld, Ken; Buatti, John M.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to determine regional control of local regional advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), along with the role and selection criteria for neck dissection after IMRT. Methods and Materials: A total of 90 patients with stage N2A or greater HNSCC were treated with definitive IMRT from December 1999 to July 2005. Three clinical target volumes were defined and were treated to 70 to 74 Gy, 60 Gy, and 54 Gy, respectively. Neck dissection was performed for selected patients after IMRT. Selection criteria evolved during this period with emphasis on post-IMRT [ 18 F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in recent years. Results: Median follow-up for all patients was 29 months (range, 0.2-74 months). All living patients were followed at least 9 months after completing treatment. Thirteen patients underwent neck dissection after IMRT because of residual lymphadenopathy. Of these, 6 contained residual viable tumor. Three patients with persistent adenopathy did not undergo neck dissection: 2 refused and 1 had lung metastasis. Among the remaining 74 patients who were observed without neck dissection, there was only 1 case of regional failure. Among all 90 patients in this study, the 3-year local and regional control was 96.3% and 95.4%, respectively. Conclusions: Appropriately delivered IMRT has excellent dose coverage for cervical lymph nodes. A high radiation dose can be safely delivered to the abnormal lymph nodes. There is a high complete response rate. Routine planned neck dissection for patients with N2A and higher stage after IMRT is not necessary. Post-IMRT [ 18 F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography is a useful tool in selecting patients appropriate for neck dissection

  12. Kinetic analysis of dynamic 18F-fluoromisonidazole PET correlates with radiation treatment outcome in head-and-neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulsen Frank

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypoxia compromises local control in patients with head-and-neck cancer (HNC. In order to determine the value of [18F]-fluoromisonidazole (Fmiso with regard to tumor hypoxia, a patient study with dynamic Fmiso PET was performed. For a better understanding of tracer uptake and distribution, a kinetic model was developed to analyze dynamic Fmiso PET data. Methods For 15 HNC patients, dynamic Fmiso PET examinations were performed prior to radiotherapy (RT treatment. The data was analyzed using a two compartment model, which allows the determination of characteristic hypoxia and perfusion values. For different parameters, such as patient age, tumor size and standardized uptake value, the correlation to treatment outcome was tested using the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney U-test. Statistical tests were also performed for hypoxia and perfusion parameters determined by the kinetic model and for two different metrics based on these parameters. Results The kinetic Fmiso analysis extracts local hypoxia and perfusion characteristics of a tumor tissue. These parameters are independent quantities. In this study, different types of characteristic hypoxia-perfusion patterns in tumors could be identified. The clinical verification of the results, obtained on the basis of the kinetic analysis, showed a high correlation of hypoxia-perfusion patterns and RT treatment outcome (p = 0.001 for this initial patient group. Conclusion The presented study established, that Fmiso PET scans may benefit from dynamic acquisition and analysis by a kinetic model. The pattern of distribution of perfusion and hypoxia in the tissue is correlated to local control in HNC.

  13. Impact of HPV infection on the development of head and neck cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betiol, J.; Villa, L.L.; Sichero, L.

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV)-related head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is considered to be a distinct clinical entity with better prognosis than the classical tobacco- and alcohol-associated tumors. The increasing incidence of this neoplasia during the last decades highlights the need to better understand the role of HPV in the development of these cancers. Although the proportion of HNSCC attributed to HPV varies considerably according to anatomical site, overall approximately 25% of all HNSCC are HPV-DNA positive, and HPV-16 is by far the most prevalent type. In this review we discuss the existing evidence for a causal association between HPV infection and HNSCC at diverse anatomical head and neck subsites. PMID:23532264

  14. 10th International Symposium on Head And Neck Skin Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Brekel, Michiel W. M.; Balm, Alfons J. M.; Lohuis, Peter J. F. M.; van der Veen, J. P. Wietse

    2011-01-01

    Since 1993, ten multidisciplinary symposia were organized at The Netherlands Cancer Institute on the diagnosis and treatment of malignancies of the head and neck. The symposia are meant to provide up-to-date teaching for physicians by world-renowned speakers. The previous symposia dealt with

  15. The Prevalence of Xerostomia Occurrence after Doing Radiation Therapy in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barunawaty Yunus

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Xerostomia is one side effect of radiation therapy that most commonly affects head and neck. This situation is a symptom and not a disease which is generally associated with reduced saliva. For patients this situation is not pleasant and for dentist, this symptom is considered as a challenging case. This research intended to know the prevalence of xerostomia after radiation therapy in cancer patients with head and neck area. The subjects of this study were patients with head and neck area cancer who underwent radiotherapy treatment at Hasanuddin University teaching hospital, subjects were then taken saliva before and after given a total dose of 20 Gy and a total dose of 40 Gy. The analysis of the data processed by the computer program and the Wilcoxon test significance level is accepted when p<0.05. The mean bulk saliva before radiotherapy was higher than average rainfall saliva after radiotherapy total dose of 20 Gy and 40 Gy. Radiotherapy of the head and neck area total dose of 20 Gy and 40 Gy may affect rainfall saliva so that patients feel the symptoms of xerostomia.

  16. The role of physical activity and nutritional intake on nutritional status in patients with head and neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sealy, Martine

    Malnutrition is a frequent problem in patients with head and neck cancer. Prevention or timely treatment of malnutrition is of great importance because deteriorated nutritional status can have a negative effect on clinical outcome in head and neck cancer patients. Malnutrition is a multidimensional

  17. Current Evidence regarding Prophylactic Antibiotics in Head and Neck and Maxillofacial Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic prophylaxis is commonly used to decrease the rate of infections in head and neck surgery. The aim of this paper is to present the available evidence regarding the application of antibiotic prophylaxis in surgical procedures of the head and neck region in healthy patients. A systemic literature review based on Medline and Embase databases was performed. All reviews and meta-analyses based on RCTs in English from 2000 to 2013 were included. Eight out of 532 studies fulfilled all requirements. Within those, only seven different operative procedures were analyzed. Evidence exists for the beneficial use of prophylactic antibiotics for tympanostomy, orthognathic surgery, and operative tooth extractions. Unfortunately, little high-level evidence exists regarding the use of prophylactic antibiotics in head and neck surgery. In numerous cases, no clear benefit of antibiotic prophylaxis has been shown, particularly considering their potential adverse side effects. Antibiotics are often given unnecessarily and are administered too late and for too long. Furthermore, little research has been performed on the large number of routine cases in the above-mentioned areas of specialization within the last few years, although questions arising with respect to the treatment of high-risk patients or of specific infections are discussed on a broad base. PMID:25110703

  18. Chemoradiotherapy in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: focus on targeted therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozec, A.; Thariat, J.; Bensadoun, R.J.; Milano, G.

    2008-01-01

    Radiotherapy is an essential treatment for many patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Its association with molecular targeted therapies represents a real progress. Among the recent advances in the molecular targeted therapy of cancer, the applications centred on E.G.F.R. are currently the most promising and the most advanced at clinical level. Considering the set of therapeutic tools targeting E.G.F.R., there are at present two well-identified emerging categories of drugs with monoclonal antibodies, on the one hand, and tyrosine kinase inhibitors, on the other. In many preclinical studies, the combination of anti-E.G.F.R. drugs with irradiation has led to additive or supra-additive cytotoxic effects. Furthermore, anti-angiogenic agents have shown promising results in association with anti-E.G.F.R. drugs and radiotherapy. This research effort has recently produced encouraging clinical results in advanced head and neck cancer with combination of cetuximab (an anti-E.G.F.R. monoclonal antibody) with irradiation with a significant impact on patient survival. Active and efficient clinical research is currently ongoing to determine the place of molecular targeted therapies in the treatment of head and neck cancer, particularly in association with radiotherapy. (authors)

  19. Evaluation of epigenetic inactivation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misawa, Yuki; Misawa, Kiyoshi; Kawasaki, Hideya; Imai, Atsushi; Mochizuki, Daiki; Ishikawa, Ryuji; Endo, Shiori; Mima, Masato; Kanazawa, Takeharu; Iwashita, Toshihide; Mineta, Hiroyuki

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the methylation status of the genes encoding the vascular endothelial growth factor receptors and to evaluate the usefulness of VEGFR methylation as a prognostic indicator in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. VEGFR messenger RNA expression and promoter methylation were examined in a panel of cell lines via quantitative reverse transcription and methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Promoter methylation was compared with clinical characteristics in 128 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma samples. The normalized methylation values for the VEGFR1, VEGFR2 and VEGFR3 promoters tended to be higher in the tumour cell lines than in normal tonsil samples, whereas amounts of VEGFR1, VEGFR2 and VEGFR3 messenger RNA were significantly higher. Methylation of the VEGFR1 promoter (p = 0.003; 66/128 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma samples, 52%) and VEGFR3 promoter (p = 0.043; 53/128 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma samples, 41%) significantly correlated with recurrence, whereas methylation of the VEGFR2 promoter significantly correlated with lymph node metastasis (p = 0.046; 47/128 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma samples, 37%). Concurrent methylation of the VEGFR1 and VEGFR3 promoters significantly correlated with reduced disease-free survival (log-rank test, p = 0.009). In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, methylation of the VEGFR1, VEGFR3 and both the VEGFR1 and VEGFR3 promoters independently predicted recurrence (odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals: 3.19, 1.51-6.75 (p = 0.002); 2.24, 1.06-4.76 (p = 0.035); and 2.56, 1.09-6.05 (p = 0.032), respectively). Methylation of the VEGFR promoters predicts poor prognosis in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients.

  20. Measuring quality of life in patients with head and neck cancer: Update of the EORTC QLQ-H&N Module, Phase III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singer, Susanne; Araújo, Cláudia; Arraras, Juan Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to pilot test an updated version of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Head and Neck Module (EORTC QLQ-H&N60). METHODS: Patients with head and neck cancer were asked to complete a list of 60 head...... and neck cancer-specific items comprising the updated EORTC head and neck module and the core questionnaire EORTC QLQ-C30. Debriefing interviews were conducted to identify any irrelevant items and confusing or upsetting wording. RESULTS: Interviews were performed with 330 patients from 17 countries......, representing different head and neck cancer sites and treatments. Forty-one of the 60 items were retained according to the predefined EORTC criteria for module development, for another 2 items the wording was refined, and 17 items were removed. CONCLUSION: The preliminary EORTC QLQ-H&N43 can now be used...

  1. Periodontal disease, atherosclerosis, adverse pregnancy outcomes, and head-and-neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han, Y.W.; Houcken, W.; Loos, B.G.; Schenkein, H.A.; Tezal, M.

    2014-01-01

    Interrelationships between periodontal infection and systemic conditions such as cardiovascular disease, adverse pregnancy outcomes, and head-and-neck cancer have become increasingly appreciated in recent years. Periodontitis is associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and, experimentally, with

  2. Critical weight loss in head and neck cancer - prevalence and risk factors at diagnosis : an explorative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager-Wittenaar, H.; Dijkstra, P.U.; Vissink, A.; van der Laan, B.F.A.M.; van Oort, R.P.; Roodenburg, J.L.N.

    Goals of work Critical weight loss (>= 5% in 1 month or >= 10% in 6 months) is a common phenomenon in head and neck cancer patients. It is unknown which complaints are most strongly related to critical weight loss in head and neck cancer patients at the time of diagnosis. The aim of this explorative

  3. The role of human papilloma virus and p16 in occult primary of the head and neck: a comprehensive review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotopoulos, George; Pavlidis, Nicholas

    2015-02-01

    Cancer of unknown primary of the head and neck is a challenging entity for the oncologist. The role of human papilloma virus/p16 in carcinogenesis and in prognosis is well established in certain HNSCC especially in that of the oropharynx. In the case of occult primary of the head and neck the role of HPV/p16 positivity is not well defined regarding prognosis and localization of the primary. An independent review of PubMed and ScienceDirect database was performed up to May 2014 using combinations of terms such as "occult primary of the head and neck", "CUP of the head and neck" "metastatic cervical squamous cell carcinoma of unknown primary", "HPV" and "HPV and head and neck cancer". Literature review shows a strong association between HPV/p16 positivity and primary location in the oropharynx in patients with CUP of the head and neck as well as a better clinical outcome. HPV positivity and p16 overexpression could be used as surrogate markers in the search of the primary site of patients with CUP of the head and neck therefore maybe guiding treatment decisions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Preradiation dental decisions in patients with head and neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruins, H.H. (Hubert Herman)

    2001-01-01

    This thesis presents a series of studies that investigated preradiation dental decision making in patients with head and neck cancer. In Chapter 1, it is ascertained that in view of the risk for oral sequelae resulting from high-dose radiotherapy, special attention to preradiation dental planning

  5. Morbidity And Quality Of Life Among Head And Neck Cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the relative frequency of acute radiation morbidity and their perceived effect on quality of life among head and neck cancer patients treated with radical radiotherapy. Design: A cross-sectional study. Setting: Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi. Subjects: Thirty eight patients comprising 28 males and ...

  6. The role of physical activity and nutritional intake on nutritional status in patients with head and neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martine Sealy

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition is a frequent problem in patients with head and neck cancer. Prevention or timely treatment of malnutrition is of great importance because deteriorated nutritional status can have a negative effect on clinical outcome in head and neck cancer patients. Malnutrition can be viewed as a

  7. Head and neck cancer in HIV patients and their parents: a Danish cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsig, Frederik N; Gerstoft, Jan; Kronborg, Gitte

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism for the increased risk of head and neck cancer (HNC) observed in HIV patients is controversial. We hypothesized that family-related risk factors increase the risk of HNC why we estimated the risk of this type of cancer in both HIV patients and their parents.......The mechanism for the increased risk of head and neck cancer (HNC) observed in HIV patients is controversial. We hypothesized that family-related risk factors increase the risk of HNC why we estimated the risk of this type of cancer in both HIV patients and their parents....

  8. Use of MRI in interventions in head and neck surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, T.; Schneider, J.P.; Schmidt, F.; Kahn, T.; Bootz, F.; Weber, A.; Weidenbach, H.; Heinke, W.; Koehler-Brock, A.

    2001-01-01

    Presentation of new concepts and applications of MR-guided head and neck surgery are presented. Examples of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures such as evaluation of transseptal tumor biopsies, placement of afterloading catheters for brachytherapy, and microscopic surgery of paranasal sinuses in the open MRI are discussed. Material and Methods: 24 MRI-guided ENT-procedures (14 transsphenoidal biopsies, one transnasal biopsy, 6 placements of brachytherapy catheters, and 3 operations of the paranasal sinuses) were performed in an open 0.5 T MR system. Results: localisation and/or extension of all lesions as well as the placement of biopsy needles or catheters were determined with great precision during the interventions. Conclusions: surgical risk and postoperative morbidity are significantly reduced in MR-guided surgery of the petroclival region and the region of head and neck compared to other, conventional methods. Thus, interventional MRI-guidance optimizes minimal invasive surgery and catheter placement in difficult anatomical regions like the petroclival region. (orig.) [de

  9. Taste dysfunction in irradiated patients with head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Wen-Kai; Yamamoto, Tomoya; Komiyama, Sohtaro

    2002-01-01

    Taste disorders caused by radiation therapy for head and neck cancer are common. This prospective study of 40 patients with head and neck cancer assessed changes in taste sensations during radiation therapy. The relationship between the time course and the degree of taste disorder was studied. The taste recognition threshold and supra-threshold taste intensity performance for the four basic tastes were measured using the whole-mouth taste method before, during, and after radiation therapy. Bitter taste was affected most. An increase in threshold for sweet taste depended upon whether the tip of tongue was included within the radiation field. The slope of the taste intensity performance did not change during or after radiotherapy. The pattern of salivary dysfunction was different from that of taste dysfunction. The main cause of taste disorders during radiation support the hypothesis that taste dysfunction is due to damage to the taste buds in the radiation field. (author)

  10. Taste dysfunction in irradiated patients with head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Wen-Kai; Yamamoto, Tomoya; Komiyama, Sohtaro [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine; Inokuchi, Akira [Saga Medical School (Japan)

    2002-04-01

    Taste disorders caused by radiation therapy for head and neck cancer are common. This prospective study of 40 patients with head and neck cancer assessed changes in taste sensations during radiation therapy. The relationship between the time course and the degree of taste disorder was studied. The taste recognition threshold and supra-threshold taste intensity performance for the four basic tastes were measured using the whole-mouth taste method before, during, and after radiation therapy. Bitter taste was affected most. An increase in threshold for sweet taste depended upon whether the tip of tongue was included within the radiation field. The slope of the taste intensity performance did not change during or after radiotherapy. The pattern of salivary dysfunction was different from that of taste dysfunction. The main cause of taste disorders during radiation support the hypothesis that taste dysfunction is due to damage to the taste buds in the radiation field. (author)

  11. Impact of conventional radiotherapy on health-related quality of life and critical functions of the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, Nadine P.; Cohen, Stacy B. M.A.; Kammer, Rachael E.; Sullivan, Paula A.; Brewer, Kathryn A.; Hong, Theodore S.; Chappell, Richard J.; Harari, Paul M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Head-and-neck radiotherapy is associated with significant morbidities. Our purpose was to document impact of morbidities by use of multiple objective measures and health-related quality of life (HR-QOL). Methods and Materials: Ten head-and-neck cancer patients were evaluated before receiving conventional head-and-neck radiotherapy and at 1 month and 6 months after treatment. We evaluated weight, saliva production, diet, swallow function, auditory function, and HR-QOL. Results: After radiotherapy, weight was reduced in 89% of subjects. Salivary function was significantly reduced and did not resolve by 6 months. Diet impairment and abnormalities in swallowing function persisted at 6 months. Perception of physical functioning was reduced after treatment, and swallowing, coughing, and dry-mouth symptoms increased. Very few changes were observed in auditory function. Conclusions: Conventional head-and-neck radiotherapy is associated with substantial functional deficits and diminished HR-QOL. Deficits reported here can serve as a baseline for comparison with results derived from new radiotherapy-treatment techniques

  12. Human papilloma virus: a new risk factor in a subset of head and neck cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisht, Manisha; Bist, Sampan Singh

    2011-01-01

    Head and neck cancer is the sixth most common malignancy worldwide. Tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption are two well known behavioral risk factors associated with head and neck cancer. Recently, evidence is mounting that infection with human papilloma virus, most commonly human papilloma virus-16 is responsible for a subset of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma especially tumors of tonsillar origin. The molecular pathway used by human papilloma virus to trigger malignant transformation of tissue is different from that of other well known risk factors, i.e. smoking and alcohol, associated with squamous cell carcinoma. Apparently, these subsets of patients with human papilloma virus positive tumor are more likely to have a better prognosis than human papilloma virus negative tumor. Considering this fact, the human papilloma virus infection should be determined in all oropharyngeal cancers since it can have a major impact on the decision making process of the treatment.

  13. Neuroendocrine tumours of the head and neck: anatomical, functional and molecular imaging and contemporary management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subedi, Navaraj; Prestwich, Robin; Chowdhury, Fahmid; Patel, Chirag

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) of the head and neck are rare neoplasms and can be of epithelial or non-epithelial differentiation. Although the natural history of NETs is variable, it is crucial to establish an early diagnosis of these tumours as they can be potentially curable. Conventional anatomical imaging and functional imaging using radionuclide scintigraphy and positron emission tomography/computed tomography can be complementary for the diagnosis, staging and monitoring of treatment response. This article describes and illustrates the imaging features of head and neck NETs, discusses the potential future role of novel positron-emitting tracers that are emerging into clinical practice and reviews contemporary management of these tumours. Familiarity with the choice of imaging techniques and the variety of imaging patterns and treatment options should help guide radiologists in the management of this rare but important subgroup of head and neck neoplasms. PMID:24240099

  14. Relative Risk of Various Head and Neck Cancers among Different Blood Groups: An Analytical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kote, Sunder; Patthi, Basavaraj; Singla, Ashish; Singh, Shilpi; Kundu, Hansa; Jain, Swati

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cancer is a unique disease characterized by abnormal growth of cells which have the ability to invade the adjacent tissues and sometimes even distant organs. The limited and contrasting evidence regarding the association of ABO blood groups with the different types of head and neck cancers in the Indian population warrants the need for the present study. Aim and Objective: To assess the relative risk of various Head & Neck cancers among different blood groups. Materials and Method: Three hundred sixty two diagnosed cases of different type of head and neck cancers and 400 controls were selected from four hospitals of New Delhi, India. The information regarding the type of head and neck cancer was obtained from the case sheets of the patients regarding their socio demographic profile, dietary history using a structured performa. The information regarding type of cancer (cases only), ABO blood group was collected. Statistical Tests: The data was analysed using the SPSS 19 version. Chi square test and odd ratios were calculated. The level of significance was fixed at 5%. Results: The O blood group was found to be most prevalent followed by B, A and AB among the cases as well as the controls. Oral cancer patients showed maximum number in blood group O followed by B, A and AB. Significant pattern of distribution was seen among the patients of esophageal cancer, laryngeal cancer and salivary gland cancer as well (p= 0.003, p=0.000 p=0.112 respectively. Conclusion: The present study reveals that there is an inherited element in the susceptibility or protection against different types of head and neck cancers. Blood group A was found to be a potential risk factor for the development of oral cancers, esophageal cancers and salivary gland cancers while blood group B was found to be a potential risk factor for laryngeal cancers. PMID:24959511

  15. Relative Risk of Various Head and Neck Cancers among Different Blood Groups: An Analytical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Khushboo; Kote, Sunder; Patthi, Basavaraj; Singla, Ashish; Singh, Shilpi; Kundu, Hansa; Jain, Swati

    2014-04-01

    Cancer is a unique disease characterized by abnormal growth of cells which have the ability to invade the adjacent tissues and sometimes even distant organs. The limited and contrasting evidence regarding the association of ABO blood groups with the different types of head and neck cancers in the Indian population warrants the need for the present study. To assess the relative risk of various Head & Neck cancers among different blood groups. Three hundred sixty two diagnosed cases of different type of head and neck cancers and 400 controls were selected from four hospitals of New Delhi, India. The information regarding the type of head and neck cancer was obtained from the case sheets of the patients regarding their socio demographic profile, dietary history using a structured performa. The information regarding type of cancer (cases only), ABO blood group was collected. Statistical Tests: The data was analysed using the SPSS 19 version. Chi square test and odd ratios were calculated. The level of significance was fixed at 5%. The O blood group was found to be most prevalent followed by B, A and AB among the cases as well as the controls. Oral cancer patients showed maximum number in blood group O followed by B, A and AB. Significant pattern of distribution was seen among the patients of esophageal cancer, laryngeal cancer and salivary gland cancer as well (p= 0.003, p=0.000 p=0.112 respectively. The present study reveals that there is an inherited element in the susceptibility or protection against different types of head and neck cancers. Blood group A was found to be a potential risk factor for the development of oral cancers, esophageal cancers and salivary gland cancers while blood group B was found to be a potential risk factor for laryngeal cancers.

  16. The role of FDG PET in management of neck metastasis from head-and-neck cancer after definitive radiation treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Min; Smith, Russell B.; Graham, Michael M.; Hoffman, Henry T.; Tan Huaming; Funk, Gerry F.; Graham, Scott M.; Chang, Kristi; Dornfeld, Kenneth J.; Menda, Yusuf; Buatti, John M.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The role of neck dissection after definitive radiation for head-and-neck cancer is controversial. We select patients for neck dissection based on postradiation therapy (post-RT), computed tomography (CT), and [ 18 F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET). We summarize the clinical outcomes of patients treated with this policy to further elucidate the role of FDG PET in decision making for neck dissection after primary radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between December 1999 and February 2004, 53 eligible patients were identified. These patients had stage N2A or higher head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma and had complete response of the primary tumor after definitive radiation with or without chemotherapy. PET or computed tomography (CT) scans were performed within 6 months after treatment. Neck dissection was performed in patients with residual lymphadenopathy (identified by clinical examination or CT) and a positive PET scan. Those without residual lymph nodes and a negative PET were observed without neck dissection. For patients with residual lymphadenopathy, but a negative PET scan, neck dissection was performed at the discretion of the attending surgeon and decision of the patient. There was a total of 70 heminecks available for analysis (17 patients had bilateral neck disease). Results: There were 21 heminecks with residual lymphadenopathy identified on CT imaging or clinical examination and negative PET. Of these, 4 had neck dissection and were pathologically negative. The remaining 17 were observed without neck dissection. There was a total of 42 heminecks without residual lymph nodes on post-RT CT imaging or clinical examination with a negative PET. They were also observed without neck dissection. Seven heminecks had a positive PET scan and residual lymphadenopathy. Six of them had neck dissection and 1 had fine-needle aspiration of a residual node; 3 contained residual viable cancer and 4 were pathologically negative. At

  17. Prognostic value of FDG PET/CT in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dequanter D

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available D Dequanter,1,2 M Shahla,2 C Aubert,2 Y Deniz,2 P Lothaire2 1Department of Oncology, Laboratory of Experimental Radiotherapy, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium; 2Head and Neck Department, Hôpital André Vésale, CHU de Charleroi, Montigny le Tilleul, Belgium Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT to identify the presence of cervical lymph nodes metastases and extracapsular spread with histologic correlations in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.Methods: The medical records of 54 patients who underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma before surgery were reviewed. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis was performed to differentiate patients with cervical lymph node metastasis from those without lymph node metastasis. The same statistical analysis was done to differentiate cervical lymph nodes with extracapsular spread from those without extracapsular spread.Results: Metastatic disease was diagnosed histologically in 49% (26 of 54 of the patients. Extracapsular spread was present in ten of the 54 patients (19%. When ROC curve analysis and maximum standardized uptake (SUVmax values were used to detect cervical lymph node metastasis, the area under the ROC curve was 0.96 and the optimal cutoff value for SUVmax was 4.05 based on ROC curve analysis. The sensitivity and specificity of SUVmax for the detection of cervical lymph node metastasis using this cutoff point were 92% and 88%, respectively. When ROC curve analysis and SUVmax values were used in order to detect extracapsular spread, the area under the ROC curve was 0.86, and the optimal cutoff value for SUVmax was 4.15 based on ROC curve analysis. Using this cutoff value, the sensitivity and specificity of SUVmax for the detection of extracapsular spread were 83% and 88%, respectively.Conclusion: In our study, a median 18F-FDG PET/CT SUVmax cutoff

  18. Head and neck cancer burden and preventive measures in Central and South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdomo, Sandra; Martin Roa, Guillermo; Brennan, Paul; Forman, David; Sierra, Mónica S

    2016-09-01

    Central and South America comprise one of the areas characterized by high incidence rates for head and neck cancer. We describe the geographical and temporal trends in incidence and mortality of head and neck cancers in the Central and South American region in order to identify opportunities for intervention on the major identified risk factors: tobacco control, alcohol use and viral infections. We obtained regional- and national-level incidence data from 48 population-based cancer registries in 13 countries and cancer deaths from the WHO mortality database for 18 countries. Age-standardized incidence (ASR) and mortality (ASMR) rates per 100,000 person-years were estimated. Brazil had the highest incidence rates for oral and pharyngeal cancer in the region for both sexes, followed by Cuba, Uruguay and Argentina. Cuba had the highest incidence and mortality rates of laryngeal cancer in the region for males and females. Overall, males had rates about four times higher than those in females. Most countries in the region have implemented WHO recommendations for both tobacco and alcohol public policy control. Head and neck squamous-cell cancer (HNSCC) incidence and mortality rates in the Central and South America region vary considerably across countries, with Brazil, Cuba, French Guyana, Uruguay and Argentina experiencing the highest rates in the region. Males carry most of the HNSCC burden. Improvement and implementation of comprehensive tobacco and alcohol control policies as well as the monitoring of these factors are fundamental to prevention of head and neck cancers in the region. Copyright © 2015 International Agency for Research on Cancer. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Can Predictive Modeling Identify Head and Neck Oncology Patients at Risk for Readmission?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Amy M; Casper, Keith A; Peter, Kay St; Wilson, Keith M; Mark, Jonathan R; Collar, Ryan M

    2018-05-01

    Objective Unplanned readmission within 30 days is a contributor to health care costs in the United States. The use of predictive modeling during hospitalization to identify patients at risk for readmission offers a novel approach to quality improvement and cost reduction. Study Design Two-phase study including retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data followed by prospective longitudinal study. Setting Tertiary academic medical center. Subjects and Methods Prospectively collected data for patients undergoing surgical treatment for head and neck cancer from January 2013 to January 2015 were used to build predictive models for readmission within 30 days of discharge using logistic regression, classification and regression tree (CART) analysis, and random forests. One model (logistic regression) was then placed prospectively into the discharge workflow from March 2016 to May 2016 to determine the model's ability to predict which patients would be readmitted within 30 days. Results In total, 174 admissions had descriptive data. Thirty-two were excluded due to incomplete data. Logistic regression, CART, and random forest predictive models were constructed using the remaining 142 admissions. When applied to 106 consecutive prospective head and neck oncology patients at the time of discharge, the logistic regression model predicted readmissions with a specificity of 94%, a sensitivity of 47%, a negative predictive value of 90%, and a positive predictive value of 62% (odds ratio, 14.9; 95% confidence interval, 4.02-55.45). Conclusion Prospectively collected head and neck cancer databases can be used to develop predictive models that can accurately predict which patients will be readmitted. This offers valuable support for quality improvement initiatives and readmission-related cost reduction in head and neck cancer care.

  20. Usefulness of fat suppression MR imagings for head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitagawa, Yoshimasa; Ishii, Yasuo; Morihiro, Hironori; Ogasawara, Toshiyuki

    1996-01-01

    Large amounts of fat and complex anatomy make the head and neck region one of the more challenging areas for MR imagings. The high signal intensity of fat on T1 weighted images (T1W1) has limited the utility of Gd-DTPA in imaging of head and neck lesions. The contrast enhanced lesions may have T1W1 signal intensity similar to fat, which results in diagnostic difficulty. A fat suppression technique used in conjunction with Gd-DTPA ensures that enhancing lesions will not be obscured by high signal from the surrounding fat or by chemical shift artifact. We evaluated the role or chemical shift imagings for fat suppression in the depiction of 15 patients with head and neck cancers. Gd-DTPA-enhanced fat suppression T1W1 were compared with conventional pre and postcontrast T1- and T2W1 using a four-point grading system (Grade 0-3) in detecting and defining the extent of primary lesions and lymphnodes. Gd-DTPA-enhanced fat suppression T1W1 (average score 2.93) which had a score of 3 in 14 patients, were superior to conventional T1W1 (0.73), postcontrast T1W1 (1.80) and T2W1 (1.67). Gd-DTPA enhanced fat suppression T1W1 were particularly beneficial in the detection of central necrosis or extracapsular invasion of neck lymphnodes as well as in defining the extent of tumor invasion to fat-containing areas such as bone marrow or cheek. Our data suggested that fat suppression technique was extremely useful to delineate the primary tumors and regional lymphnodes without increasing scan time or image postprocessing. (author)

  1. Prophylactic treatment of mycotic mucositis in radiotherapy of patients with head and neck cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koc, M.; Aktas, E. [Ataturk Univ., Erzurum (Turkey). Medical School

    2003-02-01

    Patients undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck cancer are at increased risk of developing oral candidiasis. The objective of this study was to investigate the clinical Candida mucositis and interruptions in radiotherapy in patients suffering from head and neck cancer, receiving fluconazole in comparison with a control group without specific prophylaxis. Eighty consecutive patients were randomized in a prospective double-blind trial of prophylactic oral fluconazole or treatment with the same drug when mycotic infections appeared. Adult head and neck cancer patients who were undergoing treatment with radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy, radiotherapeutic coverage of the entire oropharynx and oral cavity at least 3 cm anterior to the retromolar trigone and receiving a total dose of more than 6000 cGy and Karnofsk