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Sample records for head pinhole spect

  1. Dynamic molecular imaging of cardiac innervation using a dual head pinhole SPECT system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Jicun; Boutchko, Rostyslav; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Reutter, BryanW.; Huesman, Ronald H.; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2008-01-01

    Typically 123I-MIBG is used for the study of innervation and function of the sympathetic nervous system in heart failure. The protocol involves two studies: first a planar or SPECT scan is performed to measure initial uptake of the tracer, followed some 3-4 hours later by another study measuring the wash-out of the tracer from the heart. A fast wash-out is indicative of a compromised heart. In this work, a dual head pinhole SPECT system was used for imaging the distribution and kinetics of 123I-MIBG in the myocardium of spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHR) and normotensive Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats. The system geometry was calibrated based on a nonlinear point projection fitting method using a three-point source phantom. The angle variation effect of the parameters was modeled with a sinusoidal function. A dynamic acquisition was performed by injecting 123I-MIBG into rats immediately after starting the data acquisition. The detectors rotated continuously performing a 360o data acquisition every 90 seconds. We applied the factor analysis (FA)method and region of interest (ROI) sampling method to obtain time activity curves (TACs)in the blood pool and myocardium and then applied two-compartment modeling to estimate the kinetic parameters. Since the initial injection bolus is too fast for obtaining a consistent tomographic data set in the first few minutes of the study, we applied the FA method directly to projections during the first rotation. Then the time active curves for blood and myocardial tissue were obtained from ROI sampling. The method was applied to determine if there were differences in the kinetics between SHR and WKY rats and requires less time by replacing the delayed scan at 3-4 hours after injection with a dynamic acquisition over 90 to 120 minutes. The results of a faster washout and a smaller distribution volume of 123I-MIBG near the end of life in the SHR model of hypertrophic cardiomyopthy may be indicative of a failing heart in late stages of heart

  2. Improved quantification in single-pinhole and multiple-pinhole SPECT using micro-CT information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanhove, Christian; Bossuyt, Axel; Defrise, Michel; Lahoutte, Tony

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of accurate quantification in pinhole SPECT using micro-CT information. Pinhole SPECT scans were performed using a clinical dual-head gamma camera. Each pinhole SPECT scan was followed by a micro-CT acquisition. Functional and anatomical images were coregistered using six point sources visible with both modalities. Pinhole SPECT images were reconstructed iteratively. Attenuation correction was based on micro-CT information. Scatter correction was based on dual and triple-energy window methods. Phantom and animal experiments were performed. A phantom containing nine vials was filled with different concentrations of 99m Tc. Three vials were also filled with CT contrast agent to increase attenuation. Activity concentrations measured on the pinhole SPECT images were compared with activity concentrations measured by the dose calibrator. In addition, 11 mice were injected with 99m Tc-labelled Nanobodies. After acquiring functional and anatomical images, the animals were killed and the liver activity was measured using a gamma-counter. Activity concentrations measured on the reconstructed images were compared with activity concentrations measured with the gamma counter. The phantom experiments demonstrated an average error of -27.3 ± 15.9% between the activity concentrations measured on the uncorrected pinhole SPECT images and in the dose calibrator. This error decreased significantly to -0.1 ± 7.3% when corrections were applied for nonuniform attenuation and scatter. The animal experiment revealed an average error of -18.4 ± 11.9% between the activity concentrations measured on the uncorrected pinhole SPECT images and measured with the gamma counter. This error decreased to -7.9 ± 10.4% when attenuation and scatter correction was applied. Attenuation correction obtained from micro-CT data in combination with scatter correction allows accurate quantification in pinhole SPECT. (orig.)

  3. Implementation and Evaluation of Pinhole SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacArtain Anne Marie

    2002-08-01

    The aim of this work was to implement Pinhole SPECT into a working Nuclear Medicine department. It has been reported that pinhole SPECT has been successfully performed to visualise pathology in ankle bones using gamma camera and the images were constructed using a standard filtered back-projection algorithm (Bahk YW, 1998). The objective of this study was to produce and evaluate this technique with the equipment available in the nuclear medicine department. The system performance was assessed using both the low-energy high resolution and the pinhole collimators. Phantoms constructed using capillary tubes, filled with technetium 99m (pertechnetate) were imaged in different arrays to identify possible limitations in the reconstruction software. A thyroid phantom with hot and cold inserts was also imaged. Data was acquired in ''tep-and-shoot'' mode as the camera was rotated 180 degrees or 360 degrees around the phantom. Images were reconstructed using standard parallel back-projection algorithm and a weighted backprojection algorithm (Nowak). An attempt was made to process images of the phantom in Matlab using the Iradon function modified by application of a cone-beam type algorithm (Feldkamp L, 1984). Visual comparison of static images between the pinhole and the LEHR collimators showed the expected improved spatial resolution of the pinhole images. Pinhole SPECT images should be reconstructed using the appropriate cone beam algorithm. However, it was established that reconstructing pinhole SPECT images using a standard parallel backprojection algorithm yielded results which were deemed to be clinically useful. The Nowak algorithm results were a distinct improvement on those achieved with the parallel backprojection algorithm. Likewise the results from the cone beam algorithm were better than the former but not as good as those obtained from the Nowak algorithm. This was due to the fact that the cone beam algorithm did not include a weighting factor. Implementation

  4. Design of a Multi-Pinhole Collimator for I-123 DaTscan Imaging on Dual-Headed SPECT Systems in Combination with a Fan-Beam Collimator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Michael A; Mukherjee, Joyeeta M; Könik, Arda; Zubal, I George; Dey, Joyoni; Licho, Robert

    2016-02-01

    For the 2011 FDA approved Parkinson's Disease (PD) SPECT imaging agent I-123 labeled DaTscan, the volume of interest (VOI) is the interior portion of the brain. However imaging of the occipital lobe is also required with PD for calculation of the striatal binding ratio (SBR), a parameter of significance in early diagnosis, differentiation of PD from other disorders with similar clinical presentations, and monitoring progression. Thus we propose the usage of a combination of a multi-pinhole (MPH) collimator on one head of the SPECT system and a fan-beam on the other. The MPH would be designed to provide high resolution and sensitivity for imaging of the interior portion of the brain. The fan-beam collimator would provide lower resolution but complete sampling of the brain addressing data sufficiency and allowing a volume-of-interest to be defined over the occipital lobe for calculation of SBR's. Herein we focus on the design of the MPH component of the combined system. Combined reconstruction will be addressed in a subsequent publication. An analysis of 46 clinical DaTscan studies was performed to provide information to define the VOI, and design of a MPH collimator to image this VOI. The system spatial resolution for the MPH was set to 4.7 mm, which is comparable to that of clinical PET systems, and significantly smaller than that of fan-beam collimators employed in SPECT. With this set, we compared system sensitivities for three aperture array designs, and selected the 3 × 3 array due to it being the highest of the three. The combined sensitivity of the apertures for it was similar to that of an ultra-high resolution fan-beam (LEUHRF) collimator, but smaller than that of a high-resolution fan-beam collimator (LEHRF). On the basis of these results we propose the further exploration of this design through simulations, and the development of combined MPH and fan-beam reconstruction.

  5. An investigation of inconsistent projections and artefacts in multi-pinhole SPECT with axially aligned pinholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kench, P L; Meikle, S R; Lin, J; Gregoire, M C

    2011-01-01

    Multiple pinholes are advantageous for maximizing the use of the available field of view (FOV) of compact small animal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) detectors. However, when the pinholes are aligned axially to optimize imaging of extended objects, such as rodents, multiplexing of the pinhole projections can give rise to inconsistent data which leads to 'ghost point' artefacts in the reconstructed volume. A novel four pinhole collimator with a baffle was designed and implemented to eliminate these inconsistent projections. Simulation and physical phantom studies were performed to investigate artefacts from axially aligned pinholes and the efficacy of the baffle in removing inconsistent data and, thus, reducing reconstruction artefacts. SPECT was performed using a Defrise phantom to investigate the impact of collimator design on FOV utilization and axial blurring effects. Multiple pinhole SPECT acquired with a baffle had fewer artefacts and improved quantitative accuracy when compared to SPECT acquired without a baffle. The use of four pinholes positioned in a square maximized the available FOV, increased acquisition sensitivity and reduced axial blurring effects. These findings support the use of a baffle to eliminate inconsistent projection data arising from axially aligned pinholes and improve small animal SPECT reconstructions.

  6. Absolute quantitative total-body small-animal SPECT with focusing pinholes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, C.; Van der Have, F.; Vastenhouw, B.; Dierckx, R.A.J.O.; Paans, A.M.J.; Beekman, F.J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In pinhole SPECT, attenuation of the photon flux on trajectories between source and pinholes affects quantitative accuracy of reconstructed images. Previously we introduced iterative methods that compensate for image degrading effects of detector and pinhole blurring, pinhole sensitivity

  7. Multi-pinhole collimator design for small-object imaging with SiliSPECT: a high-resolution SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shokouhi, S; Peterson, T E; Metzler, S D; Wilson, D W

    2009-01-01

    We have designed a multi-pinhole collimator for a dual-headed, stationary SPECT system that incorporates high-resolution silicon double-sided strip detectors. The compact camera design of our system enables imaging at source-collimator distances between 20 and 30 mm. Our analytical calculations show that using knife-edge pinholes with small-opening angles or cylindrically shaped pinholes in a focused, multi-pinhole configuration in combination with this camera geometry can generate narrow sensitivity profiles across the field of view that can be useful for imaging small objects at high sensitivity and resolution. The current prototype system uses two collimators each containing 127 cylindrically shaped pinholes that are focused toward a target volume. Our goal is imaging objects such as a mouse brain, which could find potential applications in molecular imaging.

  8. Optimizing multi-pinhole SPECT geometries using an analytical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rentmeester, M C M; Have, F van der; Beekman, F J

    2007-01-01

    State-of-the-art multi-pinhole SPECT devices allow for sub-mm resolution imaging of radio-molecule distributions in small laboratory animals. The optimization of multi-pinhole and detector geometries using simulations based on ray-tracing or Monte Carlo algorithms is time-consuming, particularly because many system parameters need to be varied. As an efficient alternative we develop a continuous analytical model of a pinhole SPECT system with a stationary detector set-up, which we apply to focused imaging of a mouse. The model assumes that the multi-pinhole collimator and the detector both have the shape of a spherical layer, and uses analytical expressions for effective pinhole diameters, sensitivity and spatial resolution. For fixed fields-of-view, a pinhole-diameter adapting feedback loop allows for the comparison of the system resolution of different systems at equal system sensitivity, and vice versa. The model predicts that (i) for optimal resolution or sensitivity the collimator layer with pinholes should be placed as closely as possible around the animal given a fixed detector layer, (ii) with high-resolution detectors a resolution improvement up to 31% can be achieved compared to optimized systems, (iii) high-resolution detectors can be placed close to the collimator without significant resolution losses, (iv) interestingly, systems with a physical pinhole diameter of 0 mm can have an excellent resolution when high-resolution detectors are used

  9. A new reconstruction strategy for image improvement in pinhole SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeniya, Tsutomu; Watabe, Hiroshi; Kim, Kyeong Min; Teramoto, Noboru; Hayashi, Takuya; Iida, Hidehiro; Aoi, Toshiyuki; Sohlberg, Antti; Kudo, Hiroyuki

    2004-01-01

    Pinhole single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is able to provide information on the biodistribution of several radioligands in small laboratory animals, but has limitations associated with non-uniform spatial resolution or axial blurring. We have hypothesised that this blurring is due to incompleteness of the projection data acquired by a single circular pinhole orbit, and have evaluated a new strategy for accurate image reconstruction with better spatial resolution uniformity. A pinhole SPECT system using two circular orbits and a dedicated three-dimensional ordered subsets expectation maximisation (3D-OSEM) reconstruction method were developed. In this system, not the camera but the object rotates, and the two orbits are at 90 and 45 relative to the object's axis. This system satisfies Tuy's condition, and is thus able to provide complete data for 3D pinhole SPECT reconstruction within the whole field of view (FOV). To evaluate this system, a series of experiments was carried out using a multiple-disk phantom filled with 99m Tc solution. The feasibility of the proposed method for small animal imaging was tested with a mouse bone study using 99m Tc-hydroxymethylene diphosphonate. Feldkamp's filtered back-projection (FBP) method and the 3D-OSEM method were applied to these data sets, and the visual and statistical properties were examined. Axial blurring, which was still visible at the edge of the FOV even after applying the conventional 3D-OSEM instead of FBP for single-orbit data, was not visible after application of 3D-OSEM using two-orbit data. 3D-OSEM using two-orbit data dramatically reduced the resolution non-uniformity and statistical noise, and also demonstrated considerably better image quality in the mouse scan. This system may be of use in quantitative assessment of bio-physiological functions in small animals. (orig.)

  10. Pinhole SPECT: high resolution imaging of brain tumours in small laboratory animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franceschim, M.; Bokulic, T.; Kusic, Z.; Strand, S.E.; Erlandsson, K.

    1994-01-01

    The performance properties of pinhole SPECT and the application of this technology to evaluate radionuclide uptake in brain in small laboratory animals were investigated. System sensitivity and spatial resolution measurements of a rotating scintillation camera system were made for a low energy pinhole collimator equipped with 2.0 mm aperture pinhole insert. Projection data were acquired at 4 degree increments over 360 degrees in the step and shoot mode using a 4.5 cm radius of rotation. Pinhole planar and SPECT imaging were obtained to evaluate regional uptake of Tl-201, Tc-99m-MIBI, Tc-99m-HMPAO and Tc-99m-DTPA in tumor and control regions of the brain in a primary brain tumor model in Fisher 344 rats. Pinhole SPECT images were reconstructed using a modified cone- beam algorithm developed from a two dimensional fan-beam filtered backprojection algorithm. The reconstructed transaxial resolution of 2.8 FWHM and system sensitivity of 0.086 c/s/kBq with the 2.0 mm pinhole collimator aperture were measured. Tumor to non-tumor uptake ratios at 19-28 days post tumor cell inoculation varied by a factor > 20:1 on SPECT images. Pinhole SPECT provides an important new approach for performing high resolution imaging: the resolution properties of pinhole SPECT are superior to those which have been achieved with conventional SPECT or PET imaging technologies. (author)

  11. Multi-pinhole SPECT calibration. Influence of data noise and systematic orbit deviations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Lin; Vunckx, Kathleen; Nuyts, Johan [Katholieke Univ. Leuven (Belgium). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    2011-07-01

    Previously it has been proved that the geometry of a multi-pinhole SPECT system with circular orbit can be uniquely determined from a measurement of two point sources, without the knowledge of the distance between them. In this paper, we report that this conclusion only holds if the motion of the camera is perfectly circular. In reality, the detector heads systematically slightly deviate from the circular orbit, which may introduce nonnegligible bias in the calibrated parameters. An analytical linear model was extended to estimate the influence of both data noise and systematic deviations on the accuracy of the calibration and the image quality of the reconstruction. It turns out that applying the knowledge of the distances greatly reduces the reconstruction error, especially in the presence of systematic deviations. In addition, we propose that instead of using the information about the distances between the point sources, it is more straightforward to use the knowledge about the distances between the pinhole apertures during multi-pinhole calibration. The two distance fixing approaches yield similar calibration accuracy, but fixing the inter-pinhole distances is more preferable since it facilitates simultaneous animal-calibration data acquisition. Our theoretical results are supported by reconstruction images of a Jaszczak-type phantom. (orig.)

  12. High-resolution tomography of positron emitters with clustered pinhole SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goorden, Marlies C; Beekman, Freek J [Section of Radiation Detection and Medical Imaging, Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands)], E-mail: m.c.goorden@tudelft.nl

    2010-03-07

    State-of-the-art small-animal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) enables sub-half-mm resolution imaging of radio-labelled molecules. Due to severe photon penetration through pinhole edges, current multi-pinhole SPECT is not suitable for high-resolution imaging of photons with high energies, such as the annihilation photons emitted by positron emitting tracers (511 keV). To deal with this edge penetration, we introduce here clustered multi-pinhole SPECT (CMP): each pinhole in a cluster has a narrow opening angle to reduce photon penetration. Using simulations, CMP is compared with (i) a collimator with traditional pinholes that is currently used for sub-half-mm imaging of SPECT isotopes (U-SPECT-II), and (ii), like (i) but with collimator thickness adapted to image high-energy photons (traditional multi-pinhole SPECT, TMP). At 511 keV, U-SPECT-II is able to resolve the 0.9 mm rods of an iteratively reconstructed Jaszczak-like capillary hot rod phantom, and while TMP only leads to small improvements, CMP can resolve rods as small as 0.7 mm. Using a digital tumour phantom, we show that CMP resolves many details not assessable with standard USPECT-II and TMP collimators. Furthermore, CMP makes it possible to visualize uptake of positron emitting tracers in sub-compartments of a digital mouse striatal brain phantom. This may open up unique possibilities for analysing processes such as those underlying the function of neurotransmitter systems. Additional potential of CMP may include (i) the imaging of other high-energy single-photon emitters (e.g. I-131) and (ii) localized imaging of positron emitting tracers simultaneously with single photon emitters, with an even better resolution than coincidence PET.

  13. Absolute quantitative total-body small-animal SPECT with focusing pinholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Chao; Have, Frans van der; Vastenhouw, Brendan; Beekman, Freek J.; Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O.; Paans, Anne M.J.

    2010-01-01

    In pinhole SPECT, attenuation of the photon flux on trajectories between source and pinholes affects quantitative accuracy of reconstructed images. Previously we introduced iterative methods that compensate for image degrading effects of detector and pinhole blurring, pinhole sensitivity and scatter for multi-pinhole SPECT. The aim of this paper is (1) to investigate the accuracy of the Chang algorithm in rodents and (2) to present a practical Chang-based method using body outline contours obtained with optical cameras. Here we develop and experimentally validate a practical method for attenuation correction based on a Chang first-order method. This approach has the advantage that it is employed after, and therefore independently from, iterative reconstruction. Therefore, no new system matrix has to be calculated for each specific animal. Experiments with phantoms and animals were performed with a high-resolution focusing multi-pinhole SPECT system (U-SPECT-II, MILabs, The Netherlands). This SPECT system provides three additional optical camera images of the animal for each SPECT scan from which the animal contour can be estimated. Phantom experiments demonstrated that an average quantification error of -18.7% was reduced to -1.7% when both window-based scatter correction and Chang correction based on the body outline from optical images were applied. Without scatter and attenuation correction, quantification errors in a sacrificed rat containing sources with known activity ranged from -23.6 to -9.3%. These errors were reduced to values between -6.3 and +4.3% (with an average magnitude of 2.1%) after applying scatter and Chang attenuation correction. We conclude that the modified Chang correction based on body contour combined with window-based scatter correction is a practical method for obtaining small-animal SPECT images with high quantitative accuracy. (orig.)

  14. An analytical simulation technique for cone-beam CT and pinhole SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xuezhu; Qi Yujin

    2011-01-01

    This study was aimed at developing an efficient simulation technique with an ordinary PC. The work involved derivation of mathematical operators, analytic phantom generations, and effective analytical projectors developing for cone-beam CT and pinhole SPECT imaging. The computer simulations based on the analytical projectors were developed by ray-tracing method for cone-beam CT and voxel-driven method for pinhole SPECT of degrading blurring. The 3D Shepp-Logan, Jaszczak and Defrise phantoms were used for simulation evaluations and image reconstructions. The reconstructed phantom images were of good accuracy with the phantoms. The results showed that the analytical simulation technique is an efficient tool for studying cone-beam CT and pinhole SPECT imaging. (authors)

  15. Modeling and characterization of a SPECT system with pinhole collimation for the imaging of small animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auer, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    My thesis work focuses on the development of several quantitative reconstruction methods dedicated to small animal Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT). The latter is based on modeling the acquisition process of the 4-heads pinhole SPECT system available at Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien (IPHC) and fully integrated to the AMISSA platform using Monte Carlo simulations. The system matrix approach, combined with the OS-EM iterative reconstruction algorithm, enabled to characterize the system performances and to compare it to the state of the art. Sensitivity of about 0,027% in the center of the field of view associated to a tomographic spatial resolution of 0, 875 ± 0, 025 mm were obtained. The major drawbacks of Monte Carlo methods led us to develop an efficient and simplified modeling of the physical effects occurring in the subject. My approach based on a system matrix decomposition, associated to a scatter pre-calculated database method, demonstrated an acceptable time for a daily imaging subject follow-up (∼ 1 h), leading to a personalized imaging reconstruction (article accepted). The inherent approximations of the scatter pre-calculated approach (first order scattering modeling and segmented emission) have a moderate impact on the recovery coefficients results, nevertheless a correction of about 10% was achieved. (author) [fr

  16. Modeling of Pixelated Detector in SPECT Pinhole Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Bing; Zeng, Gengsheng L

    2014-04-10

    A challenge for the pixelated detector is that the detector response of a gamma-ray photon varies with the incident angle and the incident location within a crystal. The normalization map obtained by measuring the flood of a point-source at a large distance can lead to artifacts in reconstructed images. In this work, we investigated a method of generating normalization maps by ray-tracing through the pixelated detector based on the imaging geometry and the photo-peak energy for the specific isotope. The normalization is defined for each pinhole as the normalized detector response for a point-source placed at the focal point of the pinhole. Ray-tracing is used to generate the ideal flood image for a point-source. Each crystal pitch area on the back of the detector is divided into 60 × 60 sub-pixels. Lines are obtained by connecting between a point-source and the centers of sub-pixels inside each crystal pitch area. For each line ray-tracing starts from the entrance point at the detector face and ends at the center of a sub-pixel on the back of the detector. Only the attenuation by NaI(Tl) crystals along each ray is assumed to contribute directly to the flood image. The attenuation by the silica (SiO 2 ) reflector is also included in the ray-tracing. To calculate the normalization for a pinhole, we need to calculate the ideal flood for a point-source at 360 mm distance (where the point-source was placed for the regular flood measurement) and the ideal flood image for the point-source at the pinhole focal point, together with the flood measurement at 360 mm distance. The normalizations are incorporated in the iterative OSEM reconstruction as a component of the projection matrix. Applications to single-pinhole and multi-pinhole imaging showed that this method greatly reduced the reconstruction artifacts.

  17. Maximum likelihood reconstruction for pinhole SPECT with a displaced center-of-rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.; Jaszczak, R.J.; Coleman, R.E.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, the authors describe the implementation of a maximum likelihood (ML), algorithm using expectation maximization (EM) for pin-hole SPECT with a displaced center-of-rotation. A ray-tracing technique is used in implementing the ML-EM algorithm. The proposed ML-EM algorithm is able to correct the center of rotation displacement which can be characterized by two orthogonal components. The algorithm is tested using experimentally acquired data, and the results demonstrate that the pinhole ML-EM algorithm is able to correct artifacts associated with the center-of-rotation displacement

  18. GATE simulation of a new design of pinhole SPECT system for small animal brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozsahin, D. Uzun; Bläckberg, L.; Fakhri, G. El; Sabet, H.

    2017-01-01

    Small animal SPECT imaging has gained an increased interest over the past decade since it is an excellent tool for developing new drugs and tracers. Therefore, there is a huge effort on the development of cost-effective SPECT detectors with high capabilities. The aim of this study is to simulate the performance characteristics of new designs for a cost effective, stationary SPECT system dedicated to small animal imaging with a focus on mice brain. The conceptual design of this SPECT system platform, Stationary Small Animal SSA-SPECT, is to use many pixelated CsI:TI detector modules with 0.4 mm × 0.4 mm pixels in order to achieve excellent intrinsic detector resolution where each module is backed by a single pinhole collimator with 0.3 mm hole diameter. In this work, we present the simulation results of four variations of the SSA-SPECT platform where the number of detector modules and FOV size is varied while keeping the detector size and collimator hole size constant. Using the NEMA NU-4 protocol, we performed spatial resolution, sensitivity, image quality simulations followed by a Derenzo-like phantom evaluation. The results suggest that all four SSA-SPECT systems can provide better than 0.063% system sensitivity and < 1.5 mm FWHM spatial resolution without resolution recovery or other correction techniques. Specifically, SSA-SPECT-1 showed a system sensitivity of 0.09% in combination with 1.1 mm FWHM spatial resolution.

  19. Evaluation of penetration and scattering components in conventional pinhole SPECT: phantom studies using Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deloar, Hossain M; Watabe, Hiroshi; Aoi, Toshiyuki; Iida, Hidehiro

    2003-01-01

    In quantitative pinhole SPECT, photon penetration through the collimator edges (penetration), and photon scattering by the object (object scatter) and collimator (collimator scatter) have not been investigated rigorously. Monte Carlo simulation was used to evaluate these three physical processes for different tungsten knife-edge pinhole collimators using uniform, hotspot and donut phantoms filled with 201 Tl, 99m Tc, 123 I and 131 I solutions. For the hotspot phantom, the penetration levels with respect to total counts for a 1 mm pinhole aperture were 78%, 28% and 23% for 131 I, 123 I and 99m Tc, respectively. For a 2 mm aperture, these values were 65% for 131 I, 16% for 123 I and 12% for 99m Tc. For all pinholes, 201 Tl penetration was less than 4%. The evaluated scatter (from object and collimator) with a hotspot phantom for the 1 mm pinhole was 24%, 16%, 18% and 13% for 201 Tl, 99m Tc, 123 I and 131 I, respectively. Summation of the object and collimator scatter for the uniform phantom was approximately 20% higher than that for the hotspot phantom. Significant counts due to penetration and object and collimator scatter in the reconstructed image were observed inside the core of the donut phantom. The collimator scatter can be neglected for all isotopes used in this study except for 131 I. Object scatter correction for all radionuclides used in this study is necessary and correction for the penetration contribution is necessary for all radionuclides but 201 Tl

  20. Accelerated 3D-OSEM image reconstruction using a Beowulf PC cluster for pinhole SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeniya, Tsutomu; Watabe, Hiroshi; Sohlberg, Antti; Iida, Hidehiro

    2007-01-01

    A conventional pinhole single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with a single circular orbit has limitations associated with non-uniform spatial resolution or axial blurring. Recently, we demonstrated that three-dimensional (3D) images with uniform spatial resolution and no blurring can be obtained by complete data acquired using two-circular orbit, combined with the 3D ordered subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) reconstruction method. However, a long computation time is required to obtain the reconstruction image, because of the fact that 3D-OSEM is an iterative method and two-orbit acquisition doubles the size of the projection data. To reduce the long reconstruction time, we parallelized the two-orbit pinhole 3D-OSEM reconstruction process by using a Beowulf personal computer (PC) cluster. The Beowulf PC cluster consists of seven PCs connected to Gbit Ethernet switches. Message passing interface protocol was utilized for parallelizing the reconstruction process. The projection data in a subset are distributed to each PC. The partial image forward-and back-projected in each PC is transferred to all PCs. The current image estimate on each PC is updated after summing the partial images. The performance of parallelization on the PC cluster was evaluated using two independent projection data sets acquired by a pinhole SPECT system with two different circular orbits. Parallelization using the PC cluster improved the reconstruction time with increasing number of PCs. The reconstruction time of 54 min by the single PC was decreased to 10 min when six or seven PCs were used. The speed-up factor was 5.4. The reconstruction image by the PC cluster was virtually identical with that by the single PC. Parallelization of 3D-OSEM reconstruction for pinhole SPECT using the PC cluster can significantly reduce the computation time, whereas its implementation is simple and inexpensive. (author)

  1. Wireless Synchronization of a Multi-Pinhole Small Animal SPECT Collimation Device With a Clinical Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiFilippo, Frank P.; Patel, Sagar

    2009-06-01

    A multi-pinhole collimation device for small animal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) uses the gamma camera detectors of a standard clinical SPECT scanner. The collimator and animal bed move independently of the detectors, and therefore their motions must be synchronized. One approach is manual triggering of the SPECT acquisition simultaneously with a programmed motion sequence for the device. However, some data blurring and loss of image quality result, and true electronic synchronization is preferred. An off-the-shelf digital gyroscope with integrated Bluetooth interface provides a wireless solution to device synchronization. The sensor attaches to the SPECT gantry and reports its rotational speed to a notebook computer controlling the device. Software processes the rotation data in real-time, averaging the signal and issuing triggers while compensating for baseline drift. Motion commands are sent to the collimation device with minimal delay, within approximately 0.5 second of the start of SPECT gantry rotation. Test scans of a point source demonstrate an increase in true counts and a reduction in background counts compared to manual synchronization. The wireless rotation sensor provides robust synchronization of the collimation device with the clinical SPECT scanner and enhances image quality.

  2. Optimization of pinhole single photon emission computed tomography (pinhole SPECT) reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Israel-Jost, V.

    2006-11-01

    In SPECT small animal imaging, it is highly recommended to accurately model the response of the detector in order to improve the low spatial resolution. The volume to reconstruct is thus obtained both by back-projecting and de-convolving the projections. We chose iterative methods, which permit one to solve the inverse problem independently from the model's complexity. We describe in this work a Gaussian model of point spread function (PSF) whose position, width and maximum are computed according to physical and geometrical parameters. Then we use the rotation symmetry to replace the computation of P projection operators, each one corresponding to one position of the detector around the object, by the computation of only one of them. This is achieved by choosing an appropriate polar discretization, for which we control the angular density of voxels to avoid over-sampling the center of the field of view. Finally, we propose a new family of algorithms, the so-called frequency adapted algorithms, which enable to optimize the reconstruction of a given band in the frequency domain on both the speed of convergence and the quality of the image. (author)

  3. Optimization of a pinhole collimator in a SPECT scintillating fiber detector system: a Monte Carlo analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hademenos, G.J.

    1994-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were used to optimize the dimensions of a lead pinhole collimator in a photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system consisting of a line of equally spaced Tc-99m point sources and a plastic scintillating fiber detector. The optimization was performed by evaluating the spatial resolution and scanner sensitivity for each source distribution location and collimator parameter variation. An optimal spatial resolution of 0.43 cm FWHM was observed for a source distribution positioned 2.0 cm from the collimated scintillating fiber detection system with a pinhole radius of 1.0 mm and a collimator thickness of 3.0 cm for a 10,000 emission photon simulation. The optimal sensitivity occurred for a source distance of 2.0 cm, a radius of 3.0 mm and a thickness of 3.0 cm. (author)

  4. Reconstruction of multiple-pinhole micro-SPECT data using origin ensembles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Morgan C; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Metzler, Scott D; Moore, Stephen C

    2016-10-01

    The authors are currently developing a dual-resolution multiple-pinhole microSPECT imaging system based on three large NaI(Tl) gamma cameras. Two multiple-pinhole tungsten collimator tubes will be used sequentially for whole-body "scout" imaging of a mouse, followed by high-resolution (hi-res) imaging of an organ of interest, such as the heart or brain. Ideally, the whole-body image will be reconstructed in real time such that data need only be acquired until the area of interest can be visualized well-enough to determine positioning for the hi-res scan. The authors investigated the utility of the origin ensemble (OE) algorithm for online and offline reconstructions of the scout data. This algorithm operates directly in image space, and can provide estimates of image uncertainty, along with reconstructed images. Techniques for accelerating the OE reconstruction were also introduced and evaluated. System matrices were calculated for our 39-pinhole scout collimator design. SPECT projections were simulated for a range of count levels using the MOBY digital mouse phantom. Simulated data were used for a comparison of OE and maximum-likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) reconstructions. The OE algorithm convergence was evaluated by calculating the total-image entropy and by measuring the counts in a volume-of-interest (VOI) containing the heart. Total-image entropy was also calculated for simulated MOBY data reconstructed using OE with various levels of parallelization. For VOI measurements in the heart, liver, bladder, and soft-tissue, MLEM and OE reconstructed images agreed within 6%. Image entropy converged after ∼2000 iterations of OE, while the counts in the heart converged earlier at ∼200 iterations of OE. An accelerated version of OE completed 1000 iterations in <9 min for a 6.8M count data set, with some loss of image entropy performance, whereas the same dataset required ∼79 min to complete 1000 iterations of conventional OE. A combination of the two

  5. A clinical gamma camera-based pinhole collimated system for high resolution small animal SPECT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mejia, J.; Galvis-Alonso, O.Y., E-mail: mejia_famerp@yahoo.com.b [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Biologia Molecular; Castro, A.A. de; Simoes, M.V. [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Clinica Medica; Leite, J.P. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FMRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Dept. de Neurociencias e Ciencias do Comportamento; Braga, J. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Div. de Astrofisica

    2010-11-15

    The main objective of the present study was to upgrade a clinical gamma camera to obtain high resolution tomographic images of small animal organs. The system is based on a clinical gamma camera to which we have adapted a special-purpose pinhole collimator and a device for positioning and rotating the target based on a computer-controlled step motor. We developed a software tool to reconstruct the target's three-dimensional distribution of emission from a set of planar projections, based on the maximum likelihood algorithm. We present details on the hardware and software implementation. We imaged phantoms and heart and kidneys of rats. When using pinhole collimators, the spatial resolution and sensitivity of the imaging system depend on parameters such as the detector-to-collimator and detector-to-target distances and pinhole diameter. In this study, we reached an object voxel size of 0.6 mm and spatial resolution better than 2.4 and 1.7 mm full width at half maximum when 1.5- and 1.0-mm diameter pinholes were used, respectively. Appropriate sensitivity to study the target of interest was attained in both cases. Additionally, we show that as few as 12 projections are sufficient to attain good quality reconstructions, a result that implies a significant reduction of acquisition time and opens the possibility for radiotracer dynamic studies. In conclusion, a high resolution single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system was developed using a commercial clinical gamma camera, allowing the acquisition of detailed volumetric images of small animal organs. This type of system has important implications for research areas such as Cardiology, Neurology or Oncology. (author)

  6. Design and evaluation of two multi-pinhole collimators for brain SPECT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ling; Tsui, Benjamin M W; Mok, Greta S P

    2017-10-01

    SPECT is a powerful tool for diagnosing or staging brain diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) but is limited by its inferior resolution and sensitivity. At the same time, pinhole SPECT provides superior resolution and detection efficiency trade-off as compared to the conventional parallel-hole collimator for imaging small field-of-view (FOV), which fits for the case of brain imaging. In this study, we propose to develop and evaluate two multi-pinhole (MPH) collimator designs to improve the imaging of cerebral blood flow and striatum. We set the target resolutions to be 12 and 8 mm, respectively, and the FOV at 200 mm which is large enough to cover the whole brain. The constraints for system optimization include maximum and minimum detector-to-center-of-FOV (CFOV) distances of 344 and 294 mm, respectively, and minimal radius-of-rotation (ROR) of 135 mm to accommodate patients' shoulder. According to the targeted FOV, resolutions, and constraints, we determined the pinhole number, ROR, focal length, aperture acceptance angle, and aperture diameter which maximized the system sensitivity. We then assessed the imaging performance of the proposed MPH and standard low-energy high-resolution (LEHR) collimators using analytical simulations of a digital NCAT brain phantom with 99m Tc-HMPAO/ 99m Tc-TRODAT-1 distributions; Monte Carlo simulations of a hot-rod phantom; and a Defrise phantom using GATE v6.1. Projections were generated over 360° and reconstructed using the 3D MPH/LEHR OS-EM methods with up to 720 updates. The normalized mean square error (NMSE) was calculated over the cerebral and striatal regions extracted from the reconstructed images for 99m Tc-HMPAO and 99m Tc-TRODAT-1 simulations, respectively, and average normalized standard deviation (NSD) based on 20 noise realizations was assessed on selected uniform 3D regions as the noise index. Visual assessment and image profiles were applied to the results of Monte Carlo

  7. Analytical, experimental, and Monte Carlo system response matrix for pinhole SPECT reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguiar, Pablo; Pino, Francisco; Silva-Rodríguez, Jesús; Pavía, Javier; Ros, Doménec; Ruibal, Álvaro

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the performance of two approaches to the system response matrix (SRM) calculation in pinhole single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) reconstruction. Methods: Evaluation was performed using experimental data from a low magnification pinhole SPECT system that consisted of a rotating flat detector with a monolithic scintillator crystal. The SRM was computed following two approaches, which were based on Monte Carlo simulations (MC-SRM) and analytical techniques in combination with an experimental characterization (AE-SRM). The spatial response of the system, obtained by using the two approaches, was compared with experimental data. The effect of the MC-SRM and AE-SRM approaches on the reconstructed image was assessed in terms of image contrast, signal-to-noise ratio, image quality, and spatial resolution. To this end, acquisitions were carried out using a hot cylinder phantom (consisting of five fillable rods with diameters of 5, 4, 3, 2, and 1 mm and a uniform cylindrical chamber) and a custom-made Derenzo phantom, with center-to-center distances between adjacent rods of 1.5, 2.0, and 3.0 mm. Results: Good agreement was found for the spatial response of the system between measured data and results derived from MC-SRM and AE-SRM. Only minor differences for point sources at distances smaller than the radius of rotation and large incidence angles were found. Assessment of the effect on the reconstructed image showed a similar contrast for both approaches, with values higher than 0.9 for rod diameters greater than 1 mm and higher than 0.8 for rod diameter of 1 mm. The comparison in terms of image quality showed that all rods in the different sections of a custom-made Derenzo phantom could be distinguished. The spatial resolution (FWHM) was 0.7 mm at iteration 100 using both approaches. The SNR was lower for reconstructed images using MC-SRM than for those reconstructed using AE-SRM, indicating that AE-SRM deals better with the

  8. Imaging of intestinal lymphocyte homing by means of pinhole SPECT in a TNBS colitis mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennink, Roelof J.; Montfrans, Catherine van; Jonge, Wouter J. de; Bruin, Kora de; Deventer, Sander J. van; Velde, Anje A. te

    2004-01-01

    Background and aims: The increasing knowledge of the molecular basis of leukocyte trafficking results in the development of novel anti-inflammatory strategies for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). For optimal evaluation of therapy efficacy, information about inflammatory activity in bowel segments or lymphocyte recirculation and kinetics in the follow-up of experimental treatment for IBD is needed. The aim of this study was to evaluate a non-invasive scintigraphic technique, able to assess lymphocyte trafficking in a trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) induced mouse colitis model of IBD. Methods: TNBS sensitized and non-sensitized murine total splenocytes were labeled in vitro with 111 In-oxine and injected into either control or TNBS colitis BALB/c mice. Biodistribution and specific radioactive uptake, representing transferred cells, were determined by serial dedicated animal planar scintigraphy and pinhole SPECT of the abdomen 4, 24 and 48h post injection of labeled cells. In addition, the severity of inflammation was. Results: Migration of 111 In labeled splenocytes to the colon increased in time and was maximal at 48h after administration. The highest specific radioactive uptake ratio in the colon after 48h was observed in mice with TNBS colitis that received TNBS sensitized lymphocytes. Histological scoring confirmed the presence of colitis in the TNBS treated groups. Conclusion: Homing of TNBS-sensitized lymphocytes can be assessed in vivo by means of dedicated animal pinhole SPECT. Generally, this technique enables serial measurement of specific cell trafficking with potential of in vivo evaluation of novel anti-inflammatory strategies in inflammatory bowel disease

  9. Analytical, experimental, and Monte Carlo system response matrix for pinhole SPECT reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguiar, Pablo, E-mail: pablo.aguiar.fernandez@sergas.es [Fundación Ramón Domínguez, Medicina Nuclear, CHUS, Spain and Grupo de Imaxe Molecular, IDIS, Santiago de Compostela 15706 (Spain); Pino, Francisco [Unitat de Biofísica, Facultat de Medicina, Universitat de Barcelona, Spain and Servei de Física Médica i Protecció Radiológica, Institut Catalá d' Oncologia, Barcelona 08036 (Spain); Silva-Rodríguez, Jesús [Fundación Ramón Domínguez, Medicina Nuclear, CHUS, Santiago de Compostela 15706 (Spain); Pavía, Javier [Servei de Medicina Nuclear, Hospital Clínic, Barcelona (Spain); Institut d' Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pí i Sunyer (IDIBAPS) (Spain); CIBER en Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN), Barcelona 08036 (Spain); Ros, Doménec [Unitat de Biofísica, Facultat de Medicina, Casanova 143 (Spain); Institut d' Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pí i Sunyer (IDIBAPS) (Spain); CIBER en Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN), Barcelona 08036 (Spain); Ruibal, Álvaro [Servicio Medicina Nuclear, CHUS (Spain); Grupo de Imaxe Molecular, Facultade de Medicina (USC), IDIS, Santiago de Compostela 15706 (Spain); Fundación Tejerina, Madrid (Spain); and others

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the performance of two approaches to the system response matrix (SRM) calculation in pinhole single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) reconstruction. Methods: Evaluation was performed using experimental data from a low magnification pinhole SPECT system that consisted of a rotating flat detector with a monolithic scintillator crystal. The SRM was computed following two approaches, which were based on Monte Carlo simulations (MC-SRM) and analytical techniques in combination with an experimental characterization (AE-SRM). The spatial response of the system, obtained by using the two approaches, was compared with experimental data. The effect of the MC-SRM and AE-SRM approaches on the reconstructed image was assessed in terms of image contrast, signal-to-noise ratio, image quality, and spatial resolution. To this end, acquisitions were carried out using a hot cylinder phantom (consisting of five fillable rods with diameters of 5, 4, 3, 2, and 1 mm and a uniform cylindrical chamber) and a custom-made Derenzo phantom, with center-to-center distances between adjacent rods of 1.5, 2.0, and 3.0 mm. Results: Good agreement was found for the spatial response of the system between measured data and results derived from MC-SRM and AE-SRM. Only minor differences for point sources at distances smaller than the radius of rotation and large incidence angles were found. Assessment of the effect on the reconstructed image showed a similar contrast for both approaches, with values higher than 0.9 for rod diameters greater than 1 mm and higher than 0.8 for rod diameter of 1 mm. The comparison in terms of image quality showed that all rods in the different sections of a custom-made Derenzo phantom could be distinguished. The spatial resolution (FWHM) was 0.7 mm at iteration 100 using both approaches. The SNR was lower for reconstructed images using MC-SRM than for those reconstructed using AE-SRM, indicating that AE-SRM deals better with the

  10. The performance of a hybrid analytical-Monte Carlo system response matrix in pinhole SPECT reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Bitar, Z; Pino, F; Candela, C; Ros, D; Pavía, J; Rannou, F R; Ruibal, A; Aguiar, P

    2014-01-01

    It is well-known that in pinhole SPECT (single-photon-emission computed tomography), iterative reconstruction methods including accurate estimations of the system response matrix can lead to submillimeter spatial resolution. There are two different methods for obtaining the system response matrix: those that model the system analytically using an approach including an experimental characterization of the detector response, and those that make use of Monte Carlo simulations. Methods based on analytical approaches are faster and handle the statistical noise better than those based on Monte Carlo simulations, but they require tedious experimental measurements of the detector response. One suggested approach for avoiding an experimental characterization, circumventing the problem of statistical noise introduced by Monte Carlo simulations, is to perform an analytical computation of the system response matrix combined with a Monte Carlo characterization of the detector response. Our findings showed that this approach can achieve high spatial resolution similar to that obtained when the system response matrix computation includes an experimental characterization. Furthermore, we have shown that using simulated detector responses has the advantage of yielding a precise estimate of the shift between the point of entry of the photon beam into the detector and the point of interaction inside the detector. Considering this, it was possible to slightly improve the spatial resolution in the edge of the field of view. (paper)

  11. Brain SPECT in severs traumatic head injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaulieu, F.; Eder, V.; Pottier, J.M.; Baulieu, J.L.; Fournier, P.; Legros, B.; Chiaroni, P.; Dalonneau, M.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this work was to compare the results of the early brain scintigraphy in traumatic brain injury to the long term neuropsychological behavior. Twenty four patients had an ECD-Tc99m SPECT, within one month after the trauma; scintigraphic abnormalities were evaluated according to a semi-quantitative analysis. The neuropsychological clinical investigation was interpreted by a synthetic approach to evaluate abnormalities related to residual motor deficit, frontal behavior, memory and language disorders. Fourteen patients (58%) had sequela symptoms. SPECT revealed 80 abnormalities and CT scan only 31. Statistical analysis of uptake values showed significantly lower uptake in left basal ganglia and brain stem in patients with sequela memory disorders. We conclude that the brain perfusion scintigraphy is able to detect more lesions than CT and that it could really help to predict the neuropsychological behavior after severe head injury. Traumatology could become in the future a widely accepted indication of perfusion SPECT. (authors)

  12. An accurate and efficient system model of iterative image reconstruction in high-resolution pinhole SPECT for small animal research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, P-C; Hsu, C-H [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Hsiao, I-T [Department Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China); Lin, K M [Medical Engineering Research Division, National Health Research Institutes, Zhunan Town, Miaoli County, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: cghsu@mx.nthu.edu.tw

    2009-06-15

    Accurate modeling of the photon acquisition process in pinhole SPECT is essential for optimizing resolution. In this work, the authors develop an accurate system model in which pinhole finite aperture and depth-dependent geometric sensitivity are explicitly included. To achieve high-resolution pinhole SPECT, the voxel size is usually set in the range of sub-millimeter so that the total number of image voxels increase accordingly. It is inevitably that a system matrix that models a variety of favorable physical factors will become extremely sophisticated. An efficient implementation for such an accurate system model is proposed in this research. We first use the geometric symmetries to reduce redundant entries in the matrix. Due to the sparseness of the matrix, only non-zero terms are stored. A novel center-to-radius recording rule is also developed to effectively describe the relation between a voxel and its related detectors at every projection angle. The proposed system matrix is also suitable for multi-threaded computing. Finally, the accuracy and effectiveness of the proposed system model is evaluated in a workstation equipped with two Quad-Core Intel X eon processors.

  13. Resolution improvement and noise reduction in human pinhole SPECT using a multi-ray approach and the SHINE method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seret, A.; Vanhove, C.; Defrise, M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This work aimed at quantifying the gains in spatial resolution and noise that could be achieved when using resolution modelling based on a multi-ray approach and additionally the Statistical and Heuristic Noise Extraction (SHINE) method in human pinhole single photon emission tomography (PH-SPECT). Methods: PH-SPECT of two line phantoms and one homogeneous cylinder were recorded using parameters suited for studies of the human neck area. They were reconstructed using pinhole dedicated ordered subsets expectation maximisation algorithm including a resolution recovery technique based on 7 or 21 rays. Optionally, the SPECT data were SHINE pre-processed. Transverse and axial full widths at half-maximum (FWHM) were obtained from the line phantoms. The noise was quantified using the coefficient of variation (COV) derived from the uniform phantom. Two human PH-SPECT studies of the thyroid (a hot nodule and a very low uptake) were processed with the same algorithms. Results: Depending on the number of iterations, FWHM decreased by 30 to 50% when using the multi-ray approach in the reconstruction process. The SHINE method did not affect the resolution but decreased the COV by at least 20% and by 45% when combined with the multi-ray method. The two human studies illustrated the gain in spatial resolution and the decrease in noise afforded both by the multi-ray reconstruction and the SHINE method. Conclusion: Iterative reconstruction with resolution modelling allows to obtain high resolution human PH-SPECT studies with reduced noise content. The SHINE method affords an additional noise reduction without compromising the resolution. (orig.)

  14. Imaging of striatal dopamine transporters in rat brain with single pinhole SPECT and co-aligned MRI is highly reproducible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booij, Jan; Bruin, Kora de; Win, Maartje M.L. de; Lavini, Cristina Mphil; Heeten, Gerard J. den; Habraken, Jan

    2003-01-01

    A recently developed pinhole high-resolution SPECT system was used to measure striatal to non-specific binding ratios in rats (n = 9), after injection of the dopamine transporter ligand 123 I-FP-CIT, and to assess its test/retest reproducibility. For co-alignment purposes, the rat brain was imaged on a 1.5 Tesla clinical MRI scanner using a specially developed surface coil. The SPECT images showed clear striatal uptake. On the MR images, cerebral and extra-cerebral structures could be easily delineated. The mean striatal to non-specific [ 123 I]FP-CIT binding ratios of the test/retest studies were 1.7 ± 0.2 and 1.6 ± 0.2, respectively. The test/retest variability was approximately 9%. We conclude that the assessment of striatal [ 123 I]FP-CIT binding ratios in rats is highly reproducible

  15. Early and delayed pinhole MIBI SPECT in detecting hyperfunctioning parathyroid glands: a comparison with peroperative γ probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gültekin, Salih Sinan; Kir, Metin; Tuğ, Tuğbay; Demirer, Seher; Genç, Yasemin

    2011-10-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the early and delayed pinhole MIBI single photon emission computed tomography (pSPECT) images in detecting hyperfunctioning parathyroid glands, to make a comparison with peroperative γ probe (GP) findings. Planar, early, and delayed pSPECT scans and skin in-vivo and ex-vivo GP counts were obtained in 22 patients with hyperparathyroidism. All data were analyzed statistically on the basis of localization of the lesions, using the histopathological findings as the gold standard. Histopathological examinations revealed 18 of 44 adenomas, 18 of 44 hyperplasic glands, two of 44 lymph nodules, five of 44 thyroid nodules, and one of 44 normal parathyroid glands. Sensitivity and specificity were found to be 36 and 100% for planar, 69 and 75% for early pSPECT, 86 and 88% for delayed pSPECT scans, and similarly, 78 and 75% on skin, 92 and 75% in-vivo and 83 and 100% ex-vivo GP counts, respectively. For distinction ability of GP counts between three groups of lesions, there was a statistically significant difference among the three groups for ex-vivo GP counts but not between groups of adenomas and hyperplasic lesions for in-vivo GP counts. Early and delayed pSPECT scans play a complementary role on the planar scans. Delayed pSPECT scans and in-vivo GP counts are equally valuable to localize both single and multiple hyperfunctioning parathyroid glands. Ex-vivo GP counts seem to be better for making a distinction among types of lesions.

  16. Experimental task-based optimization of a four-camera variable-pinhole small-animal SPECT system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesterman, Jacob Y.; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Wilson, Donald W.

    2005-04-01

    We have previously utilized lumpy object models and simulated imaging systems in conjunction with the ideal observer to compute figures of merit for hardware optimization. In this paper, we describe the development of methods and phantoms necessary to validate or experimentally carry out these optimizations. Our study was conducted on a four-camera small-animal SPECT system that employs interchangeable pinhole plates to operate under a variety of pinhole configurations and magnifications (representing optimizable system parameters). We developed a small-animal phantom capable of producing random backgrounds for each image sequence. The task chosen for the study was the detection of a 2mm diameter sphere within the phantom-generated random background. A total of 138 projection images were used, half of which included the signal. As our observer, we employed the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) with Laguerre-Gauss channels. The signal-to-noise (SNR) of this observer was used to compare different system configurations. Results indicate agreement between experimental and simulated data with higher detectability rates found for multiple-camera, multiple-pinhole, and high-magnification systems, although it was found that mixtures of magnifications often outperform systems employing a single magnification. This work will serve as a basis for future studies pertaining to system hardware optimization.

  17. Effect of streptozotocin-induced diabetes on left ventricular function in adult rats: an in vivo Pinhole Gated SPECT study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weytjens Caroline

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have suggested that diabetes mellitus (DM may cause left ventricular (LV dysfunction directly resulting in increased susceptibility to heart failure. Using pinhole collimators and advances in data processing, gated SPECT was recently adapted to image the rat heart. The present study was aimed to assess this new imaging technique for quantifying LV function and remodeling from the Streptozotocin (STZ rat model compared to controls. Methods Twenty one rats were randomly assigned to control or diabetic group. Six months after the induction of diabetes by STZ, Pinhole 99 m Tc-sestamibi gated SPECT was performed for determining rat LV volumes and function. Post-mortem histopathologic analysis was performed to evaluate the determinant of LV remodeling in this model. Results After six months, the normalized to body weight LV End-systolic volume was significantly different in diabetic rats compared to controls (0.46 ± 0.02 vs 0.33 ± 0.03 μL/g; p = 0.01. The normalized LV End-diastolic volume was also different in both groups (1.51 ± 0.03 vs 0.88 ± 0.05 μL/g; p = 0.001 and the normalized stroke volume was significantly higher in STZ-rats (1.05 ± 0.02 vs 0.54 ± 0.06 μL/g; p = 0.001. The muscular fibers were thinner at histology in the diabetic rats (0.44 ± 0.07 vs 0.32 ± 0.06 AU; p = 0.01. Conclusion Pinhole 99 m Tc-sestamibi gated SPECT can successfully be applied for the evaluation of cardiac function and remodeling in STZ-induced diabetic rats. In this model, LV volumes were significantly changed compared to a control population, leading to a LV dysfunction. These findings were consistent with the histopathological abnormalities. Finally, these data further suggest the presence of diabetes cardiomyopathy.

  18. Improved image quality in pinhole SPECT by accurate modeling of the point spread function in low magnification systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pino, Francisco; Roé, Nuria; Aguiar, Pablo; Falcon, Carles; Ros, Domènec; Pavía, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has become an important noninvasive imaging technique in small-animal research. Due to the high resolution required in small-animal SPECT systems, the spatially variant system response needs to be included in the reconstruction algorithm. Accurate modeling of the system response should result in a major improvement in the quality of reconstructed images. The aim of this study was to quantitatively assess the impact that an accurate modeling of spatially variant collimator/detector response has on image-quality parameters, using a low magnification SPECT system equipped with a pinhole collimator and a small gamma camera. Methods: Three methods were used to model the point spread function (PSF). For the first, only the geometrical pinhole aperture was included in the PSF. For the second, the septal penetration through the pinhole collimator was added. In the third method, the measured intrinsic detector response was incorporated. Tomographic spatial resolution was evaluated and contrast, recovery coefficients, contrast-to-noise ratio, and noise were quantified using a custom-built NEMA NU 4–2008 image-quality phantom. Results: A high correlation was found between the experimental data corresponding to intrinsic detector response and the fitted values obtained by means of an asymmetric Gaussian distribution. For all PSF models, resolution improved as the distance from the point source to the center of the field of view increased and when the acquisition radius diminished. An improvement of resolution was observed after a minimum of five iterations when the PSF modeling included more corrections. Contrast, recovery coefficients, and contrast-to-noise ratio were better for the same level of noise in the image when more accurate models were included. Ring-type artifacts were observed when the number of iterations exceeded 12. Conclusions: Accurate modeling of the PSF improves resolution, contrast, and recovery

  19. Improved image quality in pinhole SPECT by accurate modeling of the point spread function in low magnification systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pino, Francisco [Unitat de Biofísica, Facultat de Medicina, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona 08036, Spain and Servei de Física Mèdica i Protecció Radiològica, Institut Català d’Oncologia, L’Hospitalet de Llobregat 08907 (Spain); Roé, Nuria [Unitat de Biofísica, Facultat de Medicina, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona 08036 (Spain); Aguiar, Pablo, E-mail: pablo.aguiar.fernandez@sergas.es [Fundación Ramón Domínguez, Complexo Hospitalario Universitario de Santiago de Compostela 15706, Spain and Grupo de Imagen Molecular, Instituto de Investigacións Sanitarias de Santiago de Compostela (IDIS), Galicia 15782 (Spain); Falcon, Carles; Ros, Domènec [Institut d’Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Barcelona 08036, Spain and CIBER en Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN), Barcelona 08036 (Spain); Pavía, Javier [Institut d’Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Barcelona 080836 (Spain); CIBER en Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN), Barcelona 08036 (Spain); and Servei de Medicina Nuclear, Hospital Clínic, Barcelona 08036 (Spain)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has become an important noninvasive imaging technique in small-animal research. Due to the high resolution required in small-animal SPECT systems, the spatially variant system response needs to be included in the reconstruction algorithm. Accurate modeling of the system response should result in a major improvement in the quality of reconstructed images. The aim of this study was to quantitatively assess the impact that an accurate modeling of spatially variant collimator/detector response has on image-quality parameters, using a low magnification SPECT system equipped with a pinhole collimator and a small gamma camera. Methods: Three methods were used to model the point spread function (PSF). For the first, only the geometrical pinhole aperture was included in the PSF. For the second, the septal penetration through the pinhole collimator was added. In the third method, the measured intrinsic detector response was incorporated. Tomographic spatial resolution was evaluated and contrast, recovery coefficients, contrast-to-noise ratio, and noise were quantified using a custom-built NEMA NU 4–2008 image-quality phantom. Results: A high correlation was found between the experimental data corresponding to intrinsic detector response and the fitted values obtained by means of an asymmetric Gaussian distribution. For all PSF models, resolution improved as the distance from the point source to the center of the field of view increased and when the acquisition radius diminished. An improvement of resolution was observed after a minimum of five iterations when the PSF modeling included more corrections. Contrast, recovery coefficients, and contrast-to-noise ratio were better for the same level of noise in the image when more accurate models were included. Ring-type artifacts were observed when the number of iterations exceeded 12. Conclusions: Accurate modeling of the PSF improves resolution, contrast, and recovery

  20. Varenicline increases in vivo striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor binding: an ultra-high-resolution pinhole [123I]IBZM SPECT study in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crunelle, Cleo L.; Wit, Tim C. de; Bruin, Kora de; Ramakers, Ruud M.; Have, Frans van der; Beekman, Freek J.; Brink, Wim van den; Booij, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Ex vivo storage phosphor imaging rat studies reported increased brain dopamine D 2/3 receptor (DRD 2/3 ) availability following treatment with varenicline, a nicotinergic drug. However, ex vivo studies can only be performed using cross-sectional designs. Small-animal imaging offers the opportunity to perform serial assessments. We evaluated whether high-resolution pinhole single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging in rats was able to reproduce previous ex vivo findings. Methods: Rats were imaged for baseline striatal DRD 2/3 availability using ultra-high-resolution pinhole SPECT (U-SPECT-II) and [ 123 I]IBZM as a radiotracer, and randomized to varenicline (n=7; 2 mg/kg) or saline (n=7). Following 2 weeks of treatment, a second scan was acquired. Results: Significantly increased striatal DRD 2/3 availability was found following varenicline treatment compared to saline (time⁎treatment effect): posttreatment difference in binding potential between groups corrected for initial baseline differences was 2.039 (P=.022), indicating a large effect size (d=1.48). Conclusions: Ultra-high-resolution pinhole SPECT can be used to assess varenicline-induced changes in DRD 2/3 availability in small laboratory animals over time. Future small-animal studies should include imaging techniques to enable repeated within-subjects measurements and reduce the amount of animals.

  1. Simultaneous thallium-201/technetium-99m pyrophosphate tomography in patients with acute myocardial infarction: comparison of rotational SPECT and seven pinhole tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, T.; Schuemichen, C.; Beck, A.; Moser, E.; Zeiher, A.

    1992-01-01

    Simultaneous Tl-201/Tc-99m pyrophosphate (PPi) tomography was compared to Tc-99m PPi tomography and rotational SPECT (SPECT) was compared to seven pinhole tomography (9-PHT), respectively, in 19 patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The results were correlated to electrocardiographic and angiographic findings. With Tl-201/Tc-99, PPi, all infarctions were detected and site of infarction was determined, independent of the tomographic technique used. There was no significant difference between the two acquisition techniques 7-PHT and SPECT concerning spatial extent of Tc-99m PPi accumulation and the uptake ratio. However, using only Tc-99m PPi without Tl-201 as anatomical marker, SPECT detected 15/19 infarctions. In 7 of these 15 cases infarction site was correctly determined. 7-PHT detected 11/19 and site was correctly determined in 9/11 infarctions. Myocardial infarctions which failed diagnosis using Tc-99m PPi alone showed significantly smaller spatial extent of Tc-99m PPi accumulation and necrosis to blood pool ratio was lower as assessed by Tl201/Tc-99m PPi tomography. In conclusions, tomography using simultaneous Tl-201/Tc-99m PPi imaging is a reliable technique for diagnosis and localization of AMI. For this reason, results obtained with SPECT and 7-PHT are comparable. Independent of the tomographic technique used, combined imaging is superior to Tc-99m PPi alone without Tl-201 as additional anatomical marker (orig./MG) [de

  2. Rapid construction of pinhole SPECT system matrices by distance-weighted Gaussian interpolation method combined with geometric parameter estimations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ming-Wei; Chen, Yi-Chun

    2014-01-01

    In pinhole SPECT applied to small-animal studies, it is essential to have an accurate imaging system matrix, called H matrix, for high-spatial-resolution image reconstructions. Generally, an H matrix can be obtained by various methods, such as measurements, simulations or some combinations of both methods. In this study, a distance-weighted Gaussian interpolation method combined with geometric parameter estimations (DW-GIMGPE) is proposed. It utilizes a simplified grid-scan experiment on selected voxels and parameterizes the measured point response functions (PRFs) into 2D Gaussians. The PRFs of missing voxels are interpolated by the relations between the Gaussian coefficients and the geometric parameters of the imaging system with distance-weighting factors. The weighting factors are related to the projected centroids of voxels on the detector plane. A full H matrix is constructed by combining the measured and interpolated PRFs of all voxels. The PRFs estimated by DW-GIMGPE showed similar profiles as the measured PRFs. OSEM reconstructed images of a hot-rod phantom and normal rat myocardium demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed method. The detectability of a SKE/BKE task on a synthetic spherical test object verified that the constructed H matrix provided comparable detectability to that of the H matrix acquired by a full 3D grid-scan experiment. The reduction in the acquisition time of a full 1.0-mm grid H matrix was about 15.2 and 62.2 times with the simplified grid pattern on 2.0-mm and 4.0-mm grid, respectively. A finer-grid H matrix down to 0.5-mm spacing interpolated by the proposed method would shorten the acquisition time by 8 times, additionally. -- Highlights: • A rapid interpolation method of system matrices (H) is proposed, named DW-GIMGPE. • Reduce H acquisition time by 15.2× with simplified grid scan and 2× interpolation. • Reconstructions of a hot-rod phantom with measured and DW-GIMGPE H were similar. • The imaging study of normal

  3. Optimization of pinhole single photon emission computed tomography (pinhole SPECT) reconstruction; Optimisation de la reconstruction en tomographie d'emission monophotonique avec colimateur stenope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Israel-Jost, V

    2006-11-15

    In SPECT small animal imaging, it is highly recommended to accurately model the response of the detector in order to improve the low spatial resolution. The volume to reconstruct is thus obtained both by back-projecting and de-convolving the projections. We chose iterative methods, which permit one to solve the inverse problem independently from the model's complexity. We describe in this work a Gaussian model of point spread function (PSF) whose position, width and maximum are computed according to physical and geometrical parameters. Then we use the rotation symmetry to replace the computation of P projection operators, each one corresponding to one position of the detector around the object, by the computation of only one of them. This is achieved by choosing an appropriate polar discretization, for which we control the angular density of voxels to avoid over-sampling the center of the field of view. Finally, we propose a new family of algorithms, the so-called frequency adapted algorithms, which enable to optimize the reconstruction of a given band in the frequency domain on both the speed of convergence and the quality of the image. (author)

  4. Geometric calibration method for multiple head cone beam SPECT systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizo, Ph.; Grangeat, P.; Guillemaud, R.; Sauze, R.

    1993-01-01

    A method is presented for performing geometric calibration on Single Photon Emission Tomography (SPECT) cone beam systems with multiple cone beam collimators, each having its own orientation parameters. This calibration method relies on the fact that, in tomography, for each head, the relative position of the rotation axis and of the collimator does not change during the acquisition. In order to ensure the method stability, the parameters to be estimated in intrinsic parameters and extrinsic parameters are separated. The intrinsic parameters describe the acquisition geometry and the extrinsic parameters position of the detection system with respect to the rotation axis. (authors) 3 refs

  5. Longitudinal in vivo evaluation of bone regeneration by combined measurement of multi-pinhole SPECT and micro-CT for tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lienemann, Philipp S.; Metzger, Stéphanie; Kiveliö, Anna-Sofia; Blanc, Alain; Papageorgiou, Panagiota; Astolfo, Alberto; Pinzer, Bernd R.; Cinelli, Paolo; Weber, Franz E.; Schibli, Roger; Béhé, Martin; Ehrbar, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Over the last decades, great strides were made in the development of novel implants for the treatment of bone defects. The increasing versatility and complexity of these implant designs request for concurrent advances in means to assess in vivo the course of induced bone formation in preclinical models. Since its discovery, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) has excelled as powerful high-resolution technique for non-invasive assessment of newly formed bone tissue. However, micro-CT fails to provide spatiotemporal information on biological processes ongoing during bone regeneration. Conversely, due to the versatile applicability and cost-effectiveness, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) would be an ideal technique for assessing such biological processes with high sensitivity and for nuclear imaging comparably high resolution (designed poly(ethylene glycol)-based hydrogels that release bone morphogenetic protein to guide the healing of critical sized calvarial bone defects. By combined in vivo longitudinal multi-pinhole SPECT and micro-CT evaluations we determine the spatiotemporal course of bone formation and remodeling within this synthetic hydrogel implant. End point evaluations by high resolution micro-CT and histological evaluation confirm the value of this approach to follow and optimize bone-inducing biomaterials.

  6. In vivo assessment of 111In labelled lymphocyte gut homing in a TNBS colitis mouse model determined by dedicated animal pinhole SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennink, R.J.; Bruin, C.M. de; Montfrans, C. van; Jonge, W.J. de; Deventer, S.J. van; Velde, A.A. te

    2002-01-01

    Aims: The increasing knowledge of the molecular basis of leukocyte trafficking results in the development of novel anti-inflammatory strategies for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). For optimal evaluation of therapy efficacy, information about inflammatory activity in bowel segments or lymphocyte recirculation and kinetics in the follow-up of experimental treatment for IBD is needed. The aim of this study was to evaluate a non-invasive scintigraphic technique, able to assess lymphocyte trafficking in a trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) induced mouse colitis model of IBD. Materials and Methods: TNBS sensitised and non-sensitised murine total splenocytes, isolated from donor TNBS colitis or placebo treated BALB/c mice, were labelled in vitro with 111 In-oxine and injected intravenously into recipient BALB/c mice with TNBS-induced colitis or healthy BALB/c mice instilled with saline. Biodistribution and specific radioactive uptake, representing transferred cells, was determined by serial dedicated animal planar scintigraphy and pinhole SPECT of the abdomen 4, 24 and 48h post injection of labelled cells. Moreover, the severity of inflammation in recipient mice was determined by histological scoring. Results: Lymphocyte migration to the inflamed colon of recipient mice increased in time and was maximal at 48h after administration of the 111 In-oxine labelled donor splenocytes. The highest specific radioactive uptake ratio in the colon after 48h was observed in recipient mice with TNBS colitis that received TNBS sensitised lymphocytes (saline vs. TNBS colitis resp. 0.22 ± 0.035 and 0.51 ± 0.033 mean ± SEM p<0.01). Histological scoring confirmed colitis in the TNBS colitis recipient groups and excluded colitis in the saline instilled recipient groups. TNBS colitis recipient mice that received sensitised lymphocytes had a more severe colitis upon histological evaluation as compared with TNBS colitis recipient mice receiving non-sensitised cells (mean histological

  7. In vivo detection of small tumour lesions by multi-pinhole SPECT applying a (99m)Tc-labelled nanobody targeting the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüwel, Thomas; Nevoltris, Damien; Bode, Julia; Dullin, Christian; Baty, Daniel; Chames, Patrick; Alves, Frauke

    2016-02-25

    The detection of tumours in an early phase of tumour development in combination with the knowledge of expression of tumour markers such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is an important prerequisite for clinical decisions. In this study we applied the anti-EGFR nanobody (99m)Tc-D10 for visualizing small tumour lesions with volumes below 100 mm(3) by targeting EGFR in orthotopic human mammary MDA-MB-468 and MDA-MB-231 and subcutaneous human epidermoid A431 carcinoma mouse models. Use of nanobody (99m)Tc-D10 of a size as small as 15.5 kDa enables detection of tumours by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging already 45 min post intravenous administration with high tumour uptake (>3% ID/g) in small MDA-MB-468 and A431 tumours, with tumour volumes of 52.5 mm(3) ± 21.2 and 26.6 mm(3) ± 16.7, respectively. Fast blood clearance with a serum half-life of 4.9 min resulted in high in vivo contrast and ex vivo tumour to blood and tissue ratios. In contrast, no accumulation of (99m)Tc-D10 in MDA-MB-231 tumours characterized by a very low expression of EGFR was observed. Here we present specific and high contrast in vivo visualization of small human tumours overexpressing EGFR by preclinical multi-pinhole SPECT shortly after administration of anti-EGFR nanobody (99m)Tc-D10.

  8. In vivo detection of small tumour lesions by multi-pinhole SPECT applying a 99mTc-labelled nanobody targeting the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüwel, Thomas; Nevoltris, Damien; Bode, Julia; Dullin, Christian; Baty, Daniel; Chames, Patrick; Alves, Frauke

    2016-01-01

    The detection of tumours in an early phase of tumour development in combination with the knowledge of expression of tumour markers such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is an important prerequisite for clinical decisions. In this study we applied the anti-EGFR nanobody 99mTc-D10 for visualizing small tumour lesions with volumes below 100 mm3 by targeting EGFR in orthotopic human mammary MDA-MB-468 and MDA-MB-231 and subcutaneous human epidermoid A431 carcinoma mouse models. Use of nanobody 99mTc-D10 of a size as small as 15.5 kDa enables detection of tumours by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging already 45 min post intravenous administration with high tumour uptake (>3% ID/g) in small MDA-MB-468 and A431 tumours, with tumour volumes of 52.5 mm3 ± 21.2 and 26.6 mm3 ± 16.7, respectively. Fast blood clearance with a serum half-life of 4.9 min resulted in high in vivo contrast and ex vivo tumour to blood and tissue ratios. In contrast, no accumulation of 99mTc-D10 in MDA-MB-231 tumours characterized by a very low expression of EGFR was observed. Here we present specific and high contrast in vivo visualization of small human tumours overexpressing EGFR by preclinical multi-pinhole SPECT shortly after administration of anti-EGFR nanobody 99mTc-D10. PMID:26912069

  9. The usefulness of postoperative pinhole bone scintigraphy in the assessment of prognosis after multiple drilling or vascularized bone graft in patients with avascular necrosis of femoral head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Young An; Kim, Sung Hoon; Cheon, Kyung Ah; Park, Young Ha; Jeong, Soo Kyo [College of Medicine, The Catholic Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song Moon Kab [Eulji Medical Center, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-08-01

    It is important to evaluate the healing process of avascular necrosis (AVN) involving femoral head after treatment. The purpose of this study was to assess the usefulness of pinhole bone scintigraphy in the AVN of femoral head after surgery. We analyzed the changing pattern of pinhole bone scintigram in 21 femoral heads of 16 patients (14 lesions/11 male, 7 lesions/5 female, mean age : 39.4 yrs) before and after multiple drilling or vascularized bone grafting for AVN of the femoral head. In all patients, pre-operative scintigrams were obtained at 1 to 3 months before treatment and the first post-operative scintigrams were obtained at 1 to 3 months after treatment. All patients were followed for 2 to 4 years after operation. The findings of the pinhole scintigrams were divided into three patterns: 1) curvilinear, 2) scattered spotty and 3) underdetermined. The 10 of 11 lesions with curvilinear pattern had good postoperative clinical and radiological follow-up findings. However, all 6 lesions with scattered spotty pattern showed poor postoperative findings, which necessitated total hip joint replacement. Of the 4 lesions with undetermined pattern, 2 required total hip joint replacement. There was significant difference in postoperative prognosis between the curvilinear and scattered spotty patterns (p<0.05). We conclude that the pattern of pinhole bone scintigram obtained within 1 to 3 months after multiple drilling or vascularized bone graft operation is a useful prognostic indicator in the AVN of femoral head.

  10. The usefulness of postoperative pinhole bone scintigraphy in the assessment of prognosis after multiple drilling or vascularized bone graft in patients with avascular necrosis of femoral head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Young An; Kim, Sung Hoon; Cheon, Kyung Ah; Park, Young Ha; Jeong, Soo Kyo; Song Moon Kab

    1999-01-01

    It is important to evaluate the healing process of avascular necrosis (AVN) involving femoral head after treatment. The purpose of this study was to assess the usefulness of pinhole bone scintigraphy in the AVN of femoral head after surgery. We analyzed the changing pattern of pinhole bone scintigram in 21 femoral heads of 16 patients (14 lesions/11 male, 7 lesions/5 female, mean age : 39.4 yrs) before and after multiple drilling or vascularized bone grafting for AVN of the femoral head. In all patients, pre-operative scintigrams were obtained at 1 to 3 months before treatment and the first post-operative scintigrams were obtained at 1 to 3 months after treatment. All patients were followed for 2 to 4 years after operation. The findings of the pinhole scintigrams were divided into three patterns: 1) curvilinear, 2) scattered spotty and 3) underdetermined. The 10 of 11 lesions with curvilinear pattern had good postoperative clinical and radiological follow-up findings. However, all 6 lesions with scattered spotty pattern showed poor postoperative findings, which necessitated total hip joint replacement. Of the 4 lesions with undetermined pattern, 2 required total hip joint replacement. There was significant difference in postoperative prognosis between the curvilinear and scattered spotty patterns (p<0.05). We conclude that the pattern of pinhole bone scintigram obtained within 1 to 3 months after multiple drilling or vascularized bone graft operation is a useful prognostic indicator in the AVN of femoral head

  11. High-resolution brain SPECT imaging by combination of parallel and tilted detector heads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Atsuro; Takeuchi, Wataru; Ishitsu, Takafumi; Morimoto, Yuichi; Kobashi, Keiji; Ueno, Yuichiro

    2015-10-01

    To improve the spatial resolution of brain single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), we propose a new brain SPECT system in which the detector heads are tilted towards the rotation axis so that they are closer to the brain. In addition, parallel detector heads are used to obtain the complete projection data set. We evaluated this parallel and tilted detector head system (PT-SPECT) in simulations. In the simulation study, the tilt angle of the detector heads relative to the axis was 45°. The distance from the collimator surface of the parallel detector heads to the axis was 130 mm. The distance from the collimator surface of the tilted detector heads to the origin on the axis was 110 mm. A CdTe semiconductor panel with a 1.4 mm detector pitch and a parallel-hole collimator were employed in both types of detector head. A line source phantom, cold-rod brain-shaped phantom, and cerebral blood flow phantom were evaluated. The projection data were generated by forward-projection of the phantom images using physics models, and Poisson noise at clinical levels was applied to the projection data. The ordered-subsets expectation maximization algorithm with physics models was used. We also evaluated conventional SPECT using four parallel detector heads for the sake of comparison. The evaluation of the line source phantom showed that the transaxial FWHM in the central slice for conventional SPECT ranged from 6.1 to 8.5 mm, while that for PT-SPECT ranged from 5.3 to 6.9 mm. The cold-rod brain-shaped phantom image showed that conventional SPECT could visualize up to 8-mm-diameter rods. By contrast, PT-SPECT could visualize up to 6-mm-diameter rods in upper slices of a cerebrum. The cerebral blood flow phantom image showed that the PT-SPECT system provided higher resolution at the thalamus and caudate nucleus as well as at the longitudinal fissure of the cerebrum compared with conventional SPECT. PT-SPECT provides improved image resolution at not only upper but also at

  12. Effect of pinhole shape on projection resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, L C; Metzler, S D; Moore, S C

    2016-01-01

    We are designing a dual-resolution pre-clinical SPECT system based on square-pinhole apertures for use in applications with a small field-of-view (FOV), such as cardiac imaging of mice. Square pinholes allow for increased sensitivity due to more efficient projection tiling on the detector compared to circular pinholes. Aperture fabrication techniques cannot produce a perfect square, giving the square pinholes some amount of roundedness at the corners. This work investigates how this roundedness affects the physical properties of projection images in terms of spatial resolution. Different pinhole full-acceptance angles and roundedness values were simulated. To facilitate a fair comparison, properties of the non-square pinholes were manipulated to yield pinholes with approximately the same sensitivity (to within 0.1%) and FOV (to within 0.5%) as those of the square pinholes, subsequently referred to as matched apertures. The aperture size (flat-to-flat edge length) of each non-square aperture was increased until its sensitivity was approximately equal to that of the square pinhole. Next, the full acceptance angle was increased until the FOV of each non-square aperture was approximately equivalent to that of the square pinhole. Sensitivity was calculated to include both the geometric and penetrative sensitivity of a point source, as well as the packing faction of the multi-pinhole collimator. Using the sensitivity-matched and FOV-matched apertures, spatial resolution was estimated. For the 0.3 mm, 0.5 mm, and 1 mm edge-length square apertures studied, the full-width at half-maximum widened as pinhole shape changed from square to circle, while full-width tenth-maximum showed little change. These results indicate that a perfect square pinhole shape is more desirable than a rounded-square pinhole with regard to spatial resolution when sensitivity and FOV-matched pinholes are compared. (paper)

  13. Nontraumatic femoral head necrosis. Classification of bone scintigraphic findings and diagnostic value of SPECT following planar imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minoshima, Satoshi; Uchida, Yoshitaka; Anzai, Yoshimi; Uno, Kimiichi; Arimizu, Noboru [Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1994-09-01

    This study was conducted to determine bone scintigraphic findings in nontraumatic femoral head avascular necrosis and diagnostic value of SPECT imaging following a conventional planar imaging. Forty-three femoral heads in twenty-six cases with idiopathic femoral head necrosis (n=2), systemic lupus erythematosus (n=22), aplastic anemia (n=1), and renal transplantation (n=1) were studied. The diagnosis for femoral head necrosis was based on magnetic resonance imaging as well as other diagnostic studies in all cases. Scintigraphic findings of planar and SPECT images were classified into six categories: normal (N); cold or decrease (C); partial increase with cold or decrease (PH+C); ring-like increase with a cold center (RH+C); partial increase (PH); diffuse and/or irregular increase (DH). Avascular necrosis was confirmed in twenty-four femoral heads, in which planar and SPECT images showed scintigraphic findings of N (n=3, 2), C (n=1, 3), PH+C (n=2, 8), RH+C (n=2, 3), PH (n=9, 2), and DH (n=7, 6), respectively. Femoral heads without avascular necrosis demonstrated planar and SPECT findings of N (n=16, 12), C (n=0, 6), and DH (n=3, 1), respectively. When considering C, PH+C, and RH+C as diagnostic findings for avascular necrosis, sensitivities of planar and SPECT images were 21% and 58%, and specificities were 100% and 68%, respectively. In nineteen femoral heads with normal planar findings (N), SPECT correctly identified avascular necrosis in two femoral heads and misidentified six normal femoral heads as avascular necrosis. In nineteen femoral heads with nondiagnostic abnormalities (PH, DH), SPECT correctly identified avascular necrosis in seven femoral heads and showed no false positive. Diagnostic planar findings in five femoral heads were concordant with SPECT diagnosis. These results indicate that SPECT imaging is most valuable when planar images show nondiagnostic abnormalities based on the proposed classification of scintigraphic findings. (author).

  14. Nontraumatic femoral head necrosis. Classification of bone scintigraphic findings and diagnostic value of SPECT following planar imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minoshima, Satoshi; Uchida, Yoshitaka; Anzai, Yoshimi; Uno, Kimiichi; Arimizu, Noboru

    1994-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine bone scintigraphic findings in nontraumatic femoral head avascular necrosis and diagnostic value of SPECT imaging following a conventional planar imaging. Forty-three femoral heads in twenty-six cases with idiopathic femoral head necrosis (n=2), systemic lupus erythematosus (n=22), aplastic anemia (n=1), and renal transplantation (n=1) were studied. The diagnosis for femoral head necrosis was based on magnetic resonance imaging as well as other diagnostic studies in all cases. Scintigraphic findings of planar and SPECT images were classified into six categories: normal (N); cold or decrease (C); partial increase with cold or decrease (PH+C); ring-like increase with a cold center (RH+C); partial increase (PH); diffuse and/or irregular increase (DH). Avascular necrosis was confirmed in twenty-four femoral heads, in which planar and SPECT images showed scintigraphic findings of N (n=3, 2), C (n=1, 3), PH+C (n=2, 8), RH+C (n=2, 3), PH (n=9, 2), and DH (n=7, 6), respectively. Femoral heads without avascular necrosis demonstrated planar and SPECT findings of N (n=16, 12), C (n=0, 6), and DH (n=3, 1), respectively. When considering C, PH+C, and RH+C as diagnostic findings for avascular necrosis, sensitivities of planar and SPECT images were 21% and 58%, and specificities were 100% and 68%, respectively. In nineteen femoral heads with normal planar findings (N), SPECT correctly identified avascular necrosis in two femoral heads and misidentified six normal femoral heads as avascular necrosis. In nineteen femoral heads with nondiagnostic abnormalities (PH, DH), SPECT correctly identified avascular necrosis in seven femoral heads and showed no false positive. Diagnostic planar findings in five femoral heads were concordant with SPECT diagnosis. These results indicate that SPECT imaging is most valuable when planar images show nondiagnostic abnormalities based on the proposed classification of scintigraphic findings. (author)

  15. A practical head tracking system for motion correction in neurological SPECT and PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulton, R.R.; Eberl, S.; Meikle, S.; Hutton, B.F.; Braun, M.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Patient motion during data acquisition can degrade the quality of SPECT and PET images. Techniques for motion correction in neurological studies in both modalities based on continuous monitoring of head position have been proposed. However difficulties in developing suitable head tracking systems have so far impeded clinical implementations. We have developed a head tracking system based on the mechanical ADL-1 tracker (Shooting Star Technology, Rosedale, Canada) on a Trionix triple-head SPECT camera A software driver running on a SUN Sparc host computer communicates with the tracker over a serial line providing up to 300 updates per second with angular and positional resolutions of 0.05 degrees and 0.2 mm respectively. The SUN Sparc workstation which acquires the SPECT study also communicates with the tracker, eliminating synchronisation problems. For motion correction, the motion parameters provided by the tracker within its own coordinate system must be converted to the camera's coordinate system. The conversion requires knowledge of the rotational relationships between the two coordinate systems and the displacement of their origins, both of which are determined from a calibration procedure. The tracker has been tested under clinical SPECT imaging conditions with a 3D Hoffman brain phantom. Multiple SPECT acquisitions were performed. After each acquisition the phantom was moved to a new position and orientation. Motion parameters reported by the tracker for each applied movement were compared with those obtained by applying an automated image registration program to the sequential reconstructed studies. Maximum differences were < 0.5 degrees and < 2mm, within the expected errors of the registration procedure. We conclude that this tracking system will be suitable for clinical evaluation of motion correction in SPECT and PET

  16. Comparison of {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO SPECT and MRI after Acute and Subacute Closed-Head Injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Won Jong; Lee, Sang Hoon; Sohn, Hyung Sun; Lee, Han Jin; Park, Jeong Mi; Chung, Soo Kyo; Kim, Choon Yul; Bahk, Yong Whee; Shin, Kyung Sub [Catholic University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO SPECT with MRI after acute and subacute closed head injury. There were thirty two focal lesions in all cases of these, Fifteen lesions(47%) were seen on both MRI and SPECT. Fourteen lesions(44%) were seen only on MRI. Three lesions(9%) were seen only on SPECT. Of the 14 lesions seen only on MRl, one was epidural hematoma, two were subdural hematoma, three were subdural hygroma, one was intracerebral hematoma, four were contusion, and three were diffuse axonal injuries. SPECT detected 52% of the focal lesions found on MRI. For the detection of lesions, MRl was superior to SPECT in fourteen cases, while SPECT was superior to MRI in three cases. In conclusion, there was a tendency that detection rate of the traumatic lesions was higher on MRI, but the SPECT could delineate more wide extent of lesion.

  17. A Comparative Study of SPECT, q-EEG and CT in Patients with Mild, Acute Head Trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Suk Ho; Kim, Jin Seok; Moon, Hee Seung

    1993-01-01

    Functional cerebral impairments have been verified objectively by brain SPECT and q-EEG (quantitative electroencephalography). Microcerebral circulatory defects without anatomical changes cannot be detected by the brain CT or MRI. Brain SPECT using 99m Tc-HMPAO (Hexamethyl propyleneamine oxime) as a key radioisotope may be accepted as the useful method for identifying functional cerebral impairments. We studied 25 patients with mild head trauma to define whether the SPECT was helpful in detecting cerebral impairment. The SPECT was positive in 23 patients out of 25, q-EEG positive in 16 patients and brain CT was positive in 3 cases. SPECT and q-EEG were more sensitive than CT. SPECT would be more useful method than brain CT to investigate cerebral function after head injury

  18. Scatter and crosstalk corrections for 99mTc/123I dual-radionuclide imaging using a CZT SPECT system with pinhole collimators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Peng; Hutton, Brian F.; Holstensson, Maria; Ljungberg, Michael; Hendrik Pretorius, P.; Prasad, Rameshwar; Liu, Chi; Ma, Tianyu; Liu, Yaqiang; Wang, Shi; Thorn, Stephanie L.; Stacy, Mitchel R.; Sinusas, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The energy spectrum for a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector has a low energy tail due to incomplete charge collection and intercrystal scattering. Due to these solid-state detector effects, scatter would be overestimated if the conventional triple-energy window (TEW) method is used for scatter and crosstalk corrections in CZT-based imaging systems. The objective of this work is to develop a scatter and crosstalk correction method for 99m Tc/ 123 I dual-radionuclide imaging for a CZT-based dedicated cardiac SPECT system with pinhole collimators (GE Discovery NM 530c/570c). Methods: A tailing model was developed to account for the low energy tail effects of the CZT detector. The parameters of the model were obtained using 99m Tc and 123 I point source measurements. A scatter model was defined to characterize the relationship between down-scatter and self-scatter projections. The parameters for this model were obtained from Monte Carlo simulation using SIMIND. The tailing and scatter models were further incorporated into a projection count model, and the primary and self-scatter projections of each radionuclide were determined with a maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) iterative estimation approach. The extracted scatter and crosstalk projections were then incorporated into MLEM image reconstruction as an additive term in forward projection to obtain scatter- and crosstalk-corrected images. The proposed method was validated using Monte Carlo simulation, line source experiment, anthropomorphic torso phantom studies, and patient studies. The performance of the proposed method was also compared to that obtained with the conventional TEW method. Results: Monte Carlo simulations and line source experiment demonstrated that the TEW method overestimated scatter while their proposed method provided more accurate scatter estimation by considering the low energy tail effect. In the phantom study, improved defect contrasts were observed with both

  19. Scatter and crosstalk corrections for {sup 99m}Tc/{sup 123}I dual-radionuclide imaging using a CZT SPECT system with pinhole collimators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Peng [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 and Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Hutton, Brian F. [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom and Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, New South Wales 2522 (Australia); Holstensson, Maria [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm 14186 (Sweden); Ljungberg, Michael [Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Lund University, Lund 222 41 (Sweden); Hendrik Pretorius, P. [Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 (United States); Prasad, Rameshwar; Liu, Chi, E-mail: chi.liu@yale.edu [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Ma, Tianyu; Liu, Yaqiang; Wang, Shi [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Thorn, Stephanie L.; Stacy, Mitchel R.; Sinusas, Albert J. [Department of Internal Medicine, Yale Translational Research Imaging Center, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: The energy spectrum for a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector has a low energy tail due to incomplete charge collection and intercrystal scattering. Due to these solid-state detector effects, scatter would be overestimated if the conventional triple-energy window (TEW) method is used for scatter and crosstalk corrections in CZT-based imaging systems. The objective of this work is to develop a scatter and crosstalk correction method for {sup 99m}Tc/{sup 123}I dual-radionuclide imaging for a CZT-based dedicated cardiac SPECT system with pinhole collimators (GE Discovery NM 530c/570c). Methods: A tailing model was developed to account for the low energy tail effects of the CZT detector. The parameters of the model were obtained using {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 123}I point source measurements. A scatter model was defined to characterize the relationship between down-scatter and self-scatter projections. The parameters for this model were obtained from Monte Carlo simulation using SIMIND. The tailing and scatter models were further incorporated into a projection count model, and the primary and self-scatter projections of each radionuclide were determined with a maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) iterative estimation approach. The extracted scatter and crosstalk projections were then incorporated into MLEM image reconstruction as an additive term in forward projection to obtain scatter- and crosstalk-corrected images. The proposed method was validated using Monte Carlo simulation, line source experiment, anthropomorphic torso phantom studies, and patient studies. The performance of the proposed method was also compared to that obtained with the conventional TEW method. Results: Monte Carlo simulations and line source experiment demonstrated that the TEW method overestimated scatter while their proposed method provided more accurate scatter estimation by considering the low energy tail effect. In the phantom study, improved defect contrasts were

  20. Correction of head motion artifacts in SPECT with fully 3-D OS-EM reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulton, R.R.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: A method which relies on continuous monitoring of head position has been developed to correct for head motion in SPECT studies of the brain. Head position and orientation are monitored during data acquisition by an inexpensive head tracking system (ADL-1, Shooting Star Technology, Rosedale, British Colombia). Motion correction involves changing the projection geometry to compensate for motion (using data from the head tracker), and reconstructing with a fully 3-D OS-EM algorithm. The reconstruction algorithm can accommodate any number of movements and any projection geometry. A single iteration of 3-D OS-EM using all available projections provides a satisfactory 3-D reconstruction, essentially free of motion artifacts. The method has been validated in studies of the 3-D Hoffman brain phantom. Multiple 36- degree acquisitions, each with the phantom in a different position, were performed on a Trionix triple head camera. Movements were simulated by combining projections from the different acquisitions. Accuracy was assessed by comparison with a motion-free reconstruction, visually and by calculating mean squared error (MSE). Motion correction reduced distortion perceptibly and, depending on the motions applied, improved MSE by up to an order of magnitude. Three-dimensional reconstruction of the 128 x 128 x 128 data set took 2- minutes on a SUN Ultra 1 workstation. This motion correction technique can be retro-fitted to existing SPECT systems and could be incorporated in future SPECT camera designs. It appears to be applicable in PET as well as SPECT, to be able to correct for any head movements, and to have the potential to improve the accuracy of tomographic brain studies under clinical imaging conditions

  1. Preliminary study on the head-injury by using SPECT with 99mTc-HMPAO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan Yihui; Liu Yongchang; Lin Xiangtong

    1994-01-01

    After the acute period of head trauma some cases of patients may have some symptoms, such as headache, poor memory, vertigo, et al. In this study, among 42 patients most of whom had normal CT or MRI abnormal findings of brain perfusion imaging were seen in 33 patients (78.6%). Multiple perfusion defects were observed in some patients (13/42). These indicate that the head-injury syndrome is closely related to brain blood perfusion. authors' conclusion is that the brain SPECT is able to find out the etiology of head injury syndrome

  2. Clinical Utility of '99mTc-HMPAO Brain SPECT Findings in Chronic Head Injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Jin ll; Chung, Tae Sub; Suh, Jung Ho; Kim, Dong Ik; Lee, Jong Doo; Park, Chang Yoon; Kim, Young Soo

    1992-01-01

    Minima deterioration of cerebral perfusion or microanatomical changes were undetectable on conventional Brain CT or MRI. So evaluation of focal functional changes of the brain parenchyme is essential in chronic head injury patients, who did not show focal anatomical changes on these radiological studies. However, the patients who had longstanding neurologic sequelae following head injury, there had been no available imaging modalities for evaluating these patients precisely. Therefore we tried to detect the focal functional changes on the brain parenchyme using 99m Tc-HMPAO Brain SPECT on the patients of chronic head injuries. Twenty three patients who had suffered from headache, memory dysfunction, personality change and insomnia lasting more than six months following head injury were included in our cases, which showed no anatomical abnormalities on Brain CT or MRI. At first they underwent psychological test whether the symptoms were organic or not. Also we were able to evaluate the cerebral perfusion changes with 99m Tc-HMPAO Brain SPECT in 22 patients among the 23, which five patients were focal and 17 patients were nonfocally diffuse perfusion changes. Thus we can predict the perfusion changes such as local vascular deterioration or functional defects using 99m Tc-HMPAO Brain SPECT in the patients who had suffered from post-traumatic sequelae, which changes were undetectable on Brain CT or MRI.

  3. A Silicon SPECT System for Molecular Imaging of the Mouse Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokouhi, Sepideh; Fritz, Mark A; McDonald, Benjamin S; Durko, Heather L; Furenlid, Lars R; Wilson, Donald W; Peterson, Todd E

    2007-01-01

    We previously demonstrated the feasibility of using silicon double-sided strip detectors (DSSDs) for SPECT imaging of the activity distribution of iodine-125 using a 300-micrometer thick detector. Based on this experience, we now have developed fully customized silicon DSSDs and associated readout electronics with the intent of developing a multi-pinhole SPECT system. Each DSSD has a 60.4 mm × 60.4 mm active area and is 1 mm thick. The strip pitch is 59 micrometers, and the readout of the 1024 strips on each side gives rise to a detector with over one million pixels. Combining four high-resolution DSSDs into a SPECT system offers an unprecedented space-bandwidth product for the imaging of single-photon emitters. The system consists of two camera heads with two silicon detectors stacked one behind the other in each head. The collimator has a focused pinhole system with cylindrical-shaped pinholes that are laser-drilled in a 250 μm tungsten plate. The unique ability to collect projection data at two magnifications simultaneously allows for multiplexed data at high resolution to be combined with lower magnification data with little or no multiplexing. With the current multi-pinhole collimator design, our SPECT system will be capable of offering high spatial resolution, sensitivity and angular sampling for small field-of-view applications, such as molecular imaging of the mouse brain.

  4. Early detection of femoral head avascular necrosis by bone SPECT compared to MRI in renal allograft recipients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Do Young; Yang, Seoung Oh; Lee, Hee Kyung; Han, Duck Jong; Shin, Myung Jin [Asan Mecical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    The prevalence of avascular necrosis (AVN) of femoral head in patients who receive immunosuppresive agents after renal transplantation is reported to be 4-29%. Among patients who develop AVN after renal transplantation, 80% become symptomatic within 2 years after transplantation. As the number of renal transplantation has been increased recently, early detection of femoral head AVN is very important because early surgical core decompression of femoral head can prevent collapse of the head. MRI is known to be very sensitive to diagnose femoral head AVN. However in three cases we report here, bone SPECT showed early changes of femoral head AVN, whereas MRI showed no specific abnormality. Case 1. A 53-year-old female received an allograft kidney transplantation in 1994. Preoperative bone scan was normal. She complained of both hip pain on Mar. 18 1997. Bone SPECT showed cold defect in both femoral heads but MRI showed no abnormality. After 3 months, bone SPECT and MRI showed AVN of both femoral heads. She underwent bilateral total hip replacement arthroplasty. AVN of femoral heads was confirmed by microscopic examination. Case 2. A 38-year-old female received an allograft kidney transplantation in Feb. 27 1997. Preoperative bone scan was normal. She ran a fever and creatinine was elevated from 1.2 to 2.8 mg/dL. She took high dose methylprednisolone therapy for acute reanl rejection. After two days, she complained pain in both hip joints and knee joints. Bone SPECT showed cold defects in both femoral heads but MRI showed no abnormality. A follow-up bone SPECT and MRI 20 days later revealed AVN of both femoral heads. Case 3. A 50-year-old male received an allograft kidney transplantation on Jul. 12 1995. Preoperative bone scan was normal. He complained of right hip pain on Jul, 26 1995. His bone SPECT showed cold defects in both femoral heads while MRI showed only minimal hip joint effusion. He also complained of left hip pain on Oct. 2 1995. He was admitted on Mar 17

  5. Early detection of femoral head avascular necrosis by bone SPECT compared to MRI in renal allograft recipients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Do Young; Yang, Seoung Oh; Lee, Hee Kyung; Han, Duck Jong; Shin, Myung Jin

    1997-01-01

    The prevalence of avascular necrosis (AVN) of femoral head in patients who receive immunosuppresive agents after renal transplantation is reported to be 4-29%. Among patients who develop AVN after renal transplantation, 80% become symptomatic within 2 years after transplantation. As the number of renal transplantation has been increased recently, early detection of femoral head AVN is very important because early surgical core decompression of femoral head can prevent collapse of the head. MRI is known to be very sensitive to diagnose femoral head AVN. However in three cases we report here, bone SPECT showed early changes of femoral head AVN, whereas MRI showed no specific abnormality. Case 1. A 53-year-old female received an allograft kidney transplantation in 1994. Preoperative bone scan was normal. She complained of both hip pain on Mar. 18 1997. Bone SPECT showed cold defect in both femoral heads but MRI showed no abnormality. After 3 months, bone SPECT and MRI showed AVN of both femoral heads. She underwent bilateral total hip replacement arthroplasty. AVN of femoral heads was confirmed by microscopic examination. Case 2. A 38-year-old female received an allograft kidney transplantation in Feb. 27 1997. Preoperative bone scan was normal. She ran a fever and creatinine was elevated from 1.2 to 2.8 mg/dL. She took high dose methylprednisolone therapy for acute reanl rejection. After two days, she complained pain in both hip joints and knee joints. Bone SPECT showed cold defects in both femoral heads but MRI showed no abnormality. A follow-up bone SPECT and MRI 20 days later revealed AVN of both femoral heads. Case 3. A 50-year-old male received an allograft kidney transplantation on Jul. 12 1995. Preoperative bone scan was normal. He complained of right hip pain on Jul, 26 1995. His bone SPECT showed cold defects in both femoral heads while MRI showed only minimal hip joint effusion. He also complained of left hip pain on Oct. 2 1995. He was admitted on Mar 17

  6. Dual head HIPDM SPECT imaging in the differential diagnosis of dementia with MR and CT correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wellman, H.N.; Gilmor, R.; Hendrie, H.; Mock, B.; Kapuscinski, A.; Appledorn, C.R.; Krepshaw, J.

    1985-01-01

    Dual head SPECT brain imaging was performed in 25 patients with a clinical diagnosis of dementia approximately one-half hour after a 5mCi dose of high purity (p,5n) I-123 HIPDM (N,N,N'-Trimethyl-N'-(2-hydroxy-3-methyl-5-iodobenzyl)- 1,3-propane diamine). Tomographic reconstruction used a 30th order, moderate cutoff (0.2) Butterworth filter found previously to optimize low noise and conspicuity. Most patients had CT and MR imaging and some patients were studied more than once. In approximately one-half of patients referred with a diagnosis of dementia of the Alzheimer's type, SPECT results were consistent with multiple infarct dementia (MID). MR studies in most of these patients with MID demonstrated multiple white matter defects correlating with multiple gray matter defects seen with SPECT and consistent with angiogenic disease of the Binswanger's type. While CT demonstrated cortical abnormalities in some patients, the findings were often nonspecific with enlarged ventricles and widened sulci

  7. A survey of head movement during clinical brain SPECT using an optical tracking system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandos, G.; Barnden, L.; Lineage, H.; Smith, T.; Unger, S.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The aim of this study was to survey patient motion during clinical brain SPECT using a commercial motion detection system called Polaris. Polaris is an optical tracker that remotely tracks head position and orientation via a small target attached to the patient. Its accuracy for position measurement is 1mm or 1 degree (deg), 33% moved > 2mm or 2deg and 10% moved > 4mm or 4deg. 65% of subjects moved 3 or more times. Motion in the D and P groups was equally likely to be small (<3mm or <3deg) or large and equally likely to occur early or late during acquisition. Motion in the N, F and C groups was less likely to be large and for N and F more likely to occur late in the acquisition suggesting fatigue was the main cause. The most common large movements were anterior-posterior translations and axial (Z) rotations. Significant head movement is common in brain SPECT, particularly in dementia and psychiatric subjects, and accurate motion correction is desirable to maintain image quality. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  8. Clinical Utility of '9{sup 9m}Tc-HMPAO Brain SPECT Findings in Chronic Head Injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Jin ll; Chung, Tae Sub; Suh, Jung Ho; Kim, Dong Ik; Lee, Jong Doo; Park, Chang Yoon; Kim, Young Soo [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-03-15

    Minima deterioration of cerebral perfusion or microanatomical changes were undetectable on conventional Brain CT or MRI. So evaluation of focal functional changes of the brain parenchyme is essential in chronic head injury patients, who did not show focal anatomical changes on these radiological studies. However, the patients who had longstanding neurologic sequelae following head injury, there had been no available imaging modalities for evaluating these patients precisely. Therefore we tried to detect the focal functional changes on the brain parenchyme using {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO Brain SPECT on the patients of chronic head injuries. Twenty three patients who had suffered from headache, memory dysfunction, personality change and insomnia lasting more than six months following head injury were included in our cases, which showed no anatomical abnormalities on Brain CT or MRI. At first they underwent psychological test whether the symptoms were organic or not. Also we were able to evaluate the cerebral perfusion changes with {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO Brain SPECT in 22 patients among the 23, which five patients were focal and 17 patients were nonfocally diffuse perfusion changes. Thus we can predict the perfusion changes such as local vascular deterioration or functional defects using {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO Brain SPECT in the patients who had suffered from post-traumatic sequelae, which changes were undetectable on Brain CT or MRI.

  9. High-resolution single photon planar and spect imaging of brain and neck employing a system of two co-registered opposed gamma imaging heads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Stanislaw [Yorktown, VA; Proffitt, James [Newport News, VA

    2011-12-06

    A compact, mobile, dedicated SPECT brain imager that can be easily moved to the patient to provide in-situ imaging, especially when the patient cannot be moved to the Nuclear Medicine imaging center. As a result of the widespread availability of single photon labeled biomarkers, the SPECT brain imager can be used in many locations, including remote locations away from medical centers. The SPECT imager improves the detection of gamma emission from the patient's head and neck area with a large field of view. Two identical lightweight gamma imaging detector heads are mounted to a rotating gantry and precisely mechanically co-registered to each other at 180 degrees. A unique imaging algorithm combines the co-registered images from the detector heads and provides several SPECT tomographic reconstructions of the imaged object thereby improving the diagnostic quality especially in the case of imaging requiring higher spatial resolution and sensitivity at the same time.

  10. Risk stratification for avascular necrosis of the femoral head after internal fixation of femoral neck fractures by post-operative SPECT/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Sang Won; Oh, Min Young; Yoon, Seok Ho; Kim, Jin Soo; Chang, Jae Suk; Ryu, Jin Sook [Asan Medical CenterUniversity of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji Wan [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Haeundae Paik Hospital, Inje University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head is a major complication after internal fixation of a femoral neck fracture and determines the functional prognosis. We investigated postoperative bone single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) for assessing the risk of femoral head AVN. We retrospectively reviewed 53 consecutive patients who underwent bone SPECT/CT within 2 weeks of internal fixation of a femoral neck fracture and follow-up serial hip radiographs over at least 12 months. Nine patients developed femoral head AVN. In 15 patients who showed normal uptake on immediate postoperative SPECT/CT, no AVN occurred, whereas 9 of 38 patients who showed cold defects of the femoral head later developed AVN. The negative predictive value of immediate postoperative SPECT/CT for AVN was 100 %, whereas the positive predictive value was 24 %. Among 38 patients with cold defects, 1 developed AVN 3 months postoperatively. A follow-up bone SPECT/CT was performed in the other 37 patients at 2–10 months postoperatively. The follow-up bone SPECT/CT revealed completely normalized femoral head uptake in 27, partially normalized uptake in 8, and persistent cold defects in 2 patients. AVN developed in 3.7 % (1/27), 62.5 % (5/8), and 100 % (2/2) of each group, respectively. According to the time point of imaging, radiotracer uptake patterns of the femoral head on postoperative bone SPECT/CT indicate the risk of AVN after internal fixation of femoral neck fractures differently. Postoperative bone SPECT/CT may help orthopedic surgeons determine the appropriate follow-up of these patients.

  11. Risk stratification for avascular necrosis of the femoral head after internal fixation of femoral neck fractures by post-operative SPECT/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Sang Won; Oh, Min Young; Yoon, Seok Ho; Kim, Jin Soo; Chang, Jae Suk; Ryu, Jin Sook; Kim, Ji Wan

    2017-01-01

    Avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head is a major complication after internal fixation of a femoral neck fracture and determines the functional prognosis. We investigated postoperative bone single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) for assessing the risk of femoral head AVN. We retrospectively reviewed 53 consecutive patients who underwent bone SPECT/CT within 2 weeks of internal fixation of a femoral neck fracture and follow-up serial hip radiographs over at least 12 months. Nine patients developed femoral head AVN. In 15 patients who showed normal uptake on immediate postoperative SPECT/CT, no AVN occurred, whereas 9 of 38 patients who showed cold defects of the femoral head later developed AVN. The negative predictive value of immediate postoperative SPECT/CT for AVN was 100 %, whereas the positive predictive value was 24 %. Among 38 patients with cold defects, 1 developed AVN 3 months postoperatively. A follow-up bone SPECT/CT was performed in the other 37 patients at 2–10 months postoperatively. The follow-up bone SPECT/CT revealed completely normalized femoral head uptake in 27, partially normalized uptake in 8, and persistent cold defects in 2 patients. AVN developed in 3.7 % (1/27), 62.5 % (5/8), and 100 % (2/2) of each group, respectively. According to the time point of imaging, radiotracer uptake patterns of the femoral head on postoperative bone SPECT/CT indicate the risk of AVN after internal fixation of femoral neck fractures differently. Postoperative bone SPECT/CT may help orthopedic surgeons determine the appropriate follow-up of these patients

  12. The influence of gravity on regional lung blood flow in humans: SPECT in the upright and head-down posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ax, M; Sanchez-Crespo, A; Lindahl, S G E; Mure, M; Petersson, J

    2017-06-01

    Previous studies in humans have shown that gravity has little influence on the distribution of lung blood flow while changing posture from supine to prone. This study aimed to evaluate the maximal influence of posture by comparison of regional lung blood flow in the upright and head-down posture in 8 healthy volunteers, using a tilt table. Regional lung blood flow was marked by intravenous injection of macroaggregates of human albumin labeled with 99m Tc or 113m In, in the upright and head-down posture, respectively, during tidal breathing. Both radiotracers remain fixed in the lung after administration. The distribution of radioactivity was mapped using quantitative single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) corrected for attenuation and scatter. All images were obtained supine during tidal breathing. A shift from upright to the head-down posture caused a clear redistribution of blood flow from basal to apical regions. We conclude that posture plays a role for the distribution of lung blood flow in upright humans, and that the influence of posture, and thereby gravity, is much greater in the upright and head-down posture than in horizontal postures. However, the results of the study demonstrate that lung structure is the main determinant of regional blood flow and gravity is a secondary contributor to the distribution of lung blood flow in the upright and head-down positions. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Using a dual-isotope quantitative SPECT method, we demonstrated that although a shift in posture redistributes blood flow in the direction of gravity, the results are also consistent with lung structure being a greater determinant of regional blood flow than gravity. To our knowledge, this is the first study to use modern imaging methods to quantify the shift in regional lung blood flow in humans at a change between the upright and head-down postures. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Cranial MR imaging and cerebral 99mTc HM-PAO-SPECT in patients with subacute or chronic severe closed head injury and normal CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prayer, L.; Wimberger, D.; Oder, W.; Kramer, J.; Schindler, E.; Podreka, I.; Imhof, H.

    1993-01-01

    Eighteen patients in the subacute or chronic state following severe closed head injury with normal cranial CT scans were examined by MR and 99m Tc HM-PAO SPECT. Correlations were sought between these 2 imaging modalities and the clinical outcome, as defined by the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOX) score. Both MR and SPECT revealed cerebral damage in all patients examined but structural and functional alterations did not coincide topographically in 64.9% of lesions. Nevertheless, complementary injury patterns suggesting poor recovery were found; cortical contusions and diffuse axonal injury (MR) in conjunction with cortical and thalamic hypoperfusion (SPECT) were noticed in 8 out of 12 patients with unfavorable outcome (GOS = III and IV). The synthesis of MR and SPECT information clearly enhanced the ability both to accurately assess posttraumatic brain damage and to improve patients' outcome prediction. (au) (18 refs.)

  14. Cranial MR imaging and cerebral 99mTc HM-PAO-SPECT in patients with subacute or chronic severe closed head injury and normal CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prayer, L.; Wimberger, D.; Oder, W.; Kramer, J.; Schindler, E.; Podreka, I.; Imhof, H.

    1993-01-01

    Eighteen patients in the subacute or chronic state following severe closed head injury with normal cranial CT scans were examined by MR and 99m Tc HM-PAO SPECT. Correlations were sought between these 2 imaging modalities and the clinical outcome, as defined by the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score. Both MR and SPECT revealed cerebral damage in all patients examined but structural and functional alterations did not coincide topographically in 64.9% of lesions. Nevertheless, complementary injury patterns suggesting poor recovery were found; cortical contusions and diffuse axonal injury (MR) in conjunction with cortical and thalamic hypoperfusion (SPECT) were noticed in 8 out of 12 patients with unfavorable outcome (GOS=III and IV). The synthesis of MR and SPECT information clearly enhanced the ability both to accurately assess posttraumatic brain damage and to improve patients' outcome prediction. (orig.)

  15. Cranial MR imaging and cerebral [sup 99m]Tc HM-PAO-SPECT in patients with subacute or chronic severe closed head injury and normal CT examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prayer, L.; Wimberger, D.; Oder, W.; Kramer, J.; Schindler, E.; Podreka, I.; Imhof, H.

    1993-11-01

    Eighteen patients in the subacute or chronic state following severe closed head injury with normal cranial CT scans were examined by MR and [sup 99m]Tc HM-PAO SPECT. Correlations were sought between these 2 imaging modalities and the clinical outcome, as defined by the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOX) score. Both MR and SPECT revealed cerebral damage in all patients examined but structural and functional alterations did not coincide topographically in 64.9% of lesions. Nevertheless, complementary injury patterns suggesting poor recovery were found; cortical contusions and diffuse axonal injury (MR) in conjunction with cortical and thalamic hypoperfusion (SPECT) were noticed in 8 out of 12 patients with unfavorable outcome (GOS = III and IV). The synthesis of MR and SPECT information clearly enhanced the ability both to accurately assess posttraumatic brain damage and to improve patients' outcome prediction. (au) (18 refs.).

  16. An investigation of head movement with a view to minimising motion artefact during SPECT and PET imaging of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, H.; Clarke, G.H.; Guy, R.; McKay, W.J.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Motion artefact has long been recognised as a major cause of image degradation. Single Photon Emission Computerised Tomography (SPECT) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) of the brain are playing an important role in the diagnosis and management of several neurological disorders. If these imaging modalities are to contribute fully to medical imaging it is essential that the improved spatial resolution of these systems is not compromised by patient movement. Thirty volunteer subjects have been examined using a simple video technique and the video images were used to classify and measure head movements which may occur during brain imaging. All subjects demonstrated angular movement within the transverse plane or rotation of the head. Angular movement within the sagittal plane or flexion/extension of the neck occurred in 69% of subjects and 72% of subjects exhibited translational movement of the sagittal plane. There was no movement of the coronal plane; nor was there any translational movement of the sagittal plane. These results suggest that when positioning the patient's head for brain imaging a system of head restraint which minimises rotation of the head should be used if image quality is to be maintained

  17. 99MTC-HL91 spect image versus 18F-FDG PET for detection of head and neck carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, L.S.; Liu, R.S.; Chou, K.L.; Yang, B.H.; Liao, S.Q.; Yeh, S.H.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Tumor hypoxia is a major complication of oncologic cell switch for chemotherapy(C/T) and / or radiotherapy(R/T). Such lesions detected by selective modem conventional examination remains difficult. 99mTc-HL91 is a potential agent for imaging hypoxic tissue in vivo. This study aimed to assess efficacy of 99mTc- HL91 in imaging of head and neck cancer and compared the result with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose(FDG)PET. Methods: Sixteen pts with head and neck cancers (7 hypopharyngeal cancers, 4 laryngeal cancers, 5 tongue base cancers) were enrolled in this study. Primary tumors and suspicious local,regional metastases were diagnosed by clinical examination, CT/MRI , and biopsy. After intravenous injection of 740 MBq of 99mTc-HL91, whole body planar scan and regional SPECT at 2hr postinjection were performed. Tumor lesion -to- normal background(T/N) ratios with 3x3 pixels of background ROI were also measured. The reference range of T/N ratio greater 3.0 defined +, close to 2.4 defined +/- and less than 1.5 defined as -. The FDG images with dedicated PET system was performed at 4hr after completion of 99mTc-HL91 study. The visualized tumors uptake with ratio of standardized uptake value (SUV) greater than 2.5 defined as +.. less than 2.5 defined -. Results: In 7 hypopharyngeal cancers, there are 2FDG+/HL91+, 3FDG+/HL91-, 2FDG+/HL91+/-, In 4 laryngeal cancers, there are 3FDG+/HL91-, 1FDG+/HL91 +/-. In 5 tongue base cancers, there are 5FDG+/HL91-.(Table 1). The T/N ratios of all head and neck cancers in primary tumor and regional lymph nodes were ranged from l.3/1.5 and 1.1/1.2 respectively. The frequency of FDG + in hypopharyngeal cancers is 1.0,in laryngeal cancers is 1.0 and in tongue base cancers is 1.0. The frequency of HL91+/+/- in hypopharyngeal cancers is 0..58,in laryngeal cancers is 0.25.and in tongue base cancers is 0. The overall detection rate of head and neck cancer by FDG+ in this study is 100% and overall detection rate of local-regional hypoxia, by

  18. Depth-of-Interaction Compensation Using a Focused-Cut Scintillator for a Pinhole Gamma Camera

    OpenAIRE

    Alhassen, Fares; Kudrolli, Haris; Singh, Bipin; Kim, Sangtaek; Seo, Youngho; Gould, Robert G.; Nagarkar, Vivek V.

    2011-01-01

    Preclinical SPECT offers a powerful means to understand the molecular pathways of drug interactions in animal models by discovering and testing new pharmaceuticals and therapies for potential clinical applications. A combination of high spatial resolution and sensitivity are required in order to map radiotracer uptake within small animals. Pinhole collimators have been investigated, as they offer high resolution by means of image magnification. One of the limitations of pinhole geometries is ...

  19. High-resolution SPECT for small-animal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi Yujin

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a brief overview of the development of high-resolution SPECT for small-animal imaging. A pinhole collimator has been used for high-resolution animal SPECT to provide better spatial resolution and detection efficiency in comparison with a parallel-hole collimator. The theory of imaging characteristics of the pinhole collimator is presented and the designs of the pinhole aperture are discussed. The detector technologies used for the development of small-animal SPECT and the recent advances are presented. The evolving trend of small-animal SPECT is toward a multi-pinhole and a multi-detector system to obtain a high resolution and also a high detection efficiency. (authors)

  20. Activity quantification of phantom using dual-head SPECT with two-view planar image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Leiming; Chen Tao; Sun Xiaoguang; Huang Gang

    2005-01-01

    The absorbed radiation dose from internally deposited radionuclide is a major factor in assessing risk and therapeutic utility in nuclear medicine diagnosis or treatment. The quantification of absolute activity in vivo is necessary procedure of estimating the absorbed dose of organ or tissue. To understand accuracy in the determination of organ activity, the experiments on 99 Tc m activity quantification were made for a body phantom using dual-heat SPECT with the two-view counting technique. Accuracy in the activity quantification is credible and is not affected by depth of source organ in vivo. When diameter of the radiation source is ≤2 cm, the most accurate activity quantification result can be obtained on the basis of establishing the system calibration factor and transmission factor. The use of Buijs's method is preferable, especially at very low source-to-background activity concentration rations. (authors)

  1. Comparison between a dual-head and a brain-dedicated SPECT system in the measurement of the loss of dopamine transporters with [123I]FP-CIT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varrone, Andrea; Sansone, Valeria; Pappata, Sabina; Salvatore, Marco; Pellecchia, Maria T.; Salvatore, Elena; de Michele, Giuseppe; Filla, Alessandro; Barone, Paolo; Amboni, Marianna

    2008-01-01

    Dual-head SPECT systems are used by many clinical departments for [ 123 I]FP-CIT SPECT imaging, while triple-head or brain-dedicated systems with better imaging performance are more commonly used by research institutions. There are limited data comparing the capability of the two types of system to measure dopamine transporter (DAT) loss in vivo. The aim of this study was to compare the ability of a dual-head and a brain-dedicated SPECT system to estimate the degree of DAT loss in different movement disorders with variable nigrostriatal impairment, with [ 123 I]FP-CIT. Four patients with essential tremor, 24 with Parkinson's disease (PD), six with spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 and six controls were studied with [ 123 I]FP-CIT. SPECT scans were performed on a dual-head (E.CAM - Siemens) and subsequently on a brain-dedicated system (Ceraspect - DSI). Striatal DAT outcome measures on the E.CAM and the Ceraspect were strongly correlated and the putamen-to-caudate ratios were almost identical. Although the measured values were lower by 52 ± 25% in caudate and by 51 ± 31% in putamen on the E.CAM (p < 0.0001), the average striatal DAT decrease in each patient group compared with controls was similar for both systems. In PD patients, similar correlations (p < 0.05) were found between motor UPDRS or Hoehn and Yahr stage and striatal DAT density. Despite underestimation of striatal DAT outcome measures, the E.CAM showed similar capability as the Ceraspect in measuring the degree of nigrostriatal dopaminergic deficit and assessing the correlation between DAT outcome measures and clinical variables of PD severity and stage. (orig.)

  2. Geometric calibration method for multiple-head cone-beam SPECT system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizo, P.; Grangeat, P.; Guillemaud, R.

    1994-01-01

    A method is presented for estimating the geometrical parameters of cone beam systems with multiple heads, each head having its own orientation. In tomography, for each head, the relative position of the rotation axis and f the collimator do not change during the data acquisition. The authors thus can separate the parameters into intrinsic parameters and extrinsic parameters. The intrinsic parameters describe the detection system geometry and the extrinsic parameters the position of the detection system with respect to the rotation axis. Intrinsic parameters must be estimated each time the acquisition geometry is modified. Extrinsic parameters are estimated by minimizing the distances between the measured position of a point source projection and the computed position obtained using the estimated extrinsic parameters. The main advantage of this method is that the extrinsic parameters are only weakly correlated when the intrinsic parameters are known. Thus the authors can use any simple least square error minimization method to perform the estimation of the extrinsic parameters. Giving a fixed value to the distance between the point source and the rotation axis in the estimation process, ensures the coherence of the extrinsic parameters between each head. They show that with this calibration method, the full width at half maximum measured with point sources is very close to the theoretical one, and remains almost unchanged when more than one head is used. Simulation results and reconstructions on a Jaszczak phantom are presented that show the capabilities of this method

  3. Graphic design of pinhole cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, H. B.; Chu, W. P.

    1979-01-01

    The paper describes a graphic technique for the analysis and optimization of pinhole size and focal length. The technique is based on the use of the transfer function of optical elements described by Scott (1959) to construct the transfer function of a circular pinhole camera. This transfer function is the response of a component or system to a pattern of lines having a sinusoidally varying radiance at varying spatial frequencies. Some specific examples of graphic design are presented.

  4. Virtual pinhole confocal microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, J.S.; Rector, D.M.; Ranken, D.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Biophysics Group; Peterson, B. [SciLearn Inc. (United States); Kesteron, J. [VayTech Inc. (United States)

    1999-06-01

    Scanned confocal microscopes enhance imaging capabilities, providing improved contrast and image resolution in 3-D, but existing systems have significant technical shortcomings and are expensive. Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed a novel approach--virtual pinhole confocal microscopy--that uses state of the art illumination, detection, and data processing technologies to produce an imager with a number of advantages: reduced cost, faster imaging, improved efficiency and sensitivity, improved reliability and much greater flexibility. Work at Los Alamos demonstrated proof of principle; prototype hardware and software have been used to demonstrate technical feasibility of several implementation strategies. The system uses high performance illumination, patterned in time and space. The authors have built functional confocal imagers using video display technologies (LCD or DLP) and novel scanner based on a micro-lens array. They have developed a prototype system for high performance data acquisition and processing, designed to support realtime confocal imaging. They have developed algorithms to reconstruct confocal images from a time series of spatially sub-sampled images; software development remains an area of active development. These advances allow the collection of high quality confocal images (in fluorescence, reflectance and transmission modes) with equipment that can inexpensively retrofit to existing microscopes. Planned future extensions to these technologies will significantly enhance capabilities for microscopic imaging in a variety of applications, including confocal endoscopy, and confocal spectral imaging.

  5. A small-animal imaging system capable of multipinhole circular/helical SPECT and parallel-hole SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Jianguo; Bradley, Eric L.; Majewski, Stan; Popov, Vladimir; Saha, Margaret S.; Smith, Mark F.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Welsh, Robert E.

    2008-01-01

    We have designed and built a small-animal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging system equipped with parallel-hole and multipinhole collimators and capable of circular or helical SPECT. Copper-beryllium parallel-hole collimators suitable for imaging the ∼35 keV photons from the decay of 125 I have been built and installed to achieve useful spatial resolution over a range of object-detector distances and to reduce imaging time on our dual-detector array. To address the resolution limitations in the parallel-hole SPECT and the sensitivity and limited field of view of single-pinhole SPECT, we have incorporated multipinhole circular and helical SPECT in addition to expanding the parallel-hole SPECT capabilities. The pinhole SPECT system is based on a 110 mm diameter circular detector equipped with a pixellated NaI(Tl) scintillator array (1x1x5 mm 3 /pixel). The helical trajectory is accomplished by two stepping motors controlling the rotation of the detector-support gantry and displacement of the animal bed along the axis of rotation of the gantry. Results obtained in SPECT studies of various phantoms show an enlarged field of view, very good resolution and improved sensitivity using multipinhole circular or helical SPECT. Collimators with one, three and five, 1-mm-diameter pinholes have been implemented and compared in these tests. Our objective is to develop a system on which one may readily select a suitable mode of either parallel-hole SPECT or pinhole circular or helical SPECT for a variety of small animal imaging applications

  6. Limited angle tomographic breast imaging: A comparison of parallel beam and pinhole collimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wessell, D.E.; Kadrmas, D.J.; Frey, E.C.

    1996-01-01

    Results from clinical trials have suggested no improvement in lesion detection with parallel hole SPECT scintimammography (SM) with Tc-99m over parallel hole planar SM. In this initial investigation, we have elucidated some of the unique requirements of SPECT SM. With these requirements in mind, we have begun to develop practical data acquisition and reconstruction strategies that can reduce image artifacts and improve image quality. In this paper we investigate limited angle orbits for both parallel hole and pinhole SPECT SM. Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) is used to analyze the artifacts associated with the limited angle orbits. Maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) reconstructions are then used to examine the effects of attenuation compensation on the quality of the reconstructed image. All simulations are performed using the 3D-MCAT breast phantom. The results of these simulation studies demonstrate that limited angle SPECT SM is feasible, that attenuation correction is needed for accurate reconstructions, and that pinhole SPECT SM may have an advantage over parallel hole SPECT SM in terms of improved image quality and reduced image artifacts

  7. A novel technetium-99m labeled monoclonal antibody (174H.64) for staging head and neck cancer by immuno-SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, R.P.; Adams, S.; Kiefer, J.; Niesen, A.; Knecht, R.; Howaldt, H.P.; Hertel, A.; Adamietz, I.A.; Sykes, T.; Boniface, G.R.; Noujaim, A.A.; Hoer, G.

    1993-01-01

    A novel murine monoclonal antibody (MAb 174H.64) was labeled with 99m Tc by a direct method. MAb 174H.64 detects a cytokeratin-associated antigen which is expressed by over 90% of all squamous cell carinomas. Panendoscopy, sonography and computerized tomography scan were performed in all cases as well as magnetic resonance imaging (in selected patients). Pre-operative immunoscintigraphy was performed in 21 patients with histologically proven primary carcinomas (18 with remaining primary tumors and 3 with lymph node recurrences). Scintigraphic images were obtained 4-6 h after injection of 1.1 GBq of the 99m Tc-labeled antibody (2 mg). Late images were acquired 18 to 24 h after injection. Single-Photon-Emission-Computed Tomography (SPECT) of the head and thorax was performed in all patients. The primary tumors were immunoscintigraphically visualized in all 18 patients with remaining primary tumor. Fifteen of 18 loco-regional lymph node metastases were visualized by immunoscintigraphy (the smallest lesions had a diameter of <1 cm), in one patient lymph node metastases were detected by immunoscan only. Two metastatically involved lymph nodes were identified by histology only (micrometastases). Distant metastases were present in 3 patients, of which two were identified by immunoscintigraphy. Immuno-SPECT according to this method was a sensitive and specific imaging modality for preoperative staging of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck and detected lymph node metastases with higher accuracy than conventional clinical and imaging modalities. (orig.)

  8. SPECT imaging with resolution recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronnikov, A. V.

    2011-01-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a method of choice for imaging spatial distributions of radioisotopes. Many applications of this method are found in nuclear industry, medicine, and biomedical research. We study mathematical modeling of a micro-SPECT system by using a point-spread function (PSF) and implement an OSEM-based iterative algorithm for image reconstruction with resolution recovery. Unlike other known implementations of the OSEM algorithm, we apply en efficient computation scheme based on a useful approximation of the PSF, which ensures relatively fast computations. The proposed approach can be applied with the data acquired with any type of collimators, including parallel-beam fan-beam, cone-beam and pinhole collimators. Experimental results obtained with a micro SPECT system demonstrate high efficiency of resolution recovery. (authors)

  9. Detection of pulmonary embolism with combined ventilation-perfusion SPECT and low-dose CT: head-to-head comparison with multidetector CT angiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutte, Henrik; Mortensen, Jann; Jensen, Claus Verner

    2009-01-01

    The diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE) is usually established by a combination of clinical assessment, D-dimer testing, and imaging with either pulmonary ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) scintigraphy or pulmonary multidetector CT (MDCT) angiography. Both V/Q SPECT and MDCT angiography seem to have...... high diagnostic accuracy. However, only limited data directly comparing these 2 modalities are available. Hybrid gamma-camera/MDCT systems have been introduced and allow simultaneous 3-dimensional lung V/Q SPECT and MDCT angiography, suitable for diagnosing PE. The aim of our study was to compare...

  10. From Pinholes to Black Holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenimore, Edward E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-10-06

    Pinhole photography has made major contributions to astrophysics through the use of “coded apertures”. Coded apertures were instrumental in locating gamma-ray bursts and proving that they originate in faraway galaxies, some from the birth of black holes from the first stars that formed just after the big bang.

  11. Effect of cerebral blood flow on consciousness and outcome after head injury. Assessment by jugular bulb venous metabolism and IMP-SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imaizumi, Shigeki; Onuma, Takehide; Motohashi, Osamu; Kameyama, Motonobu; Ishii, Kiyoshi [Sendai City Hospital (Japan)

    2002-10-01

    This study was performed to elucidate the therapeutical value of arteriojugularvenous oxygen difference (AVDO{sub 2}) in the ultra-emergent period after head injury. Rational therapeutic strategy after severe head injury needs information concerning the dynamical change of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and metabolism. We monitored the cerebral venous metabolism within 6 hours after head injury until the day IMP-SPECT was performed. Whole brain cerebral blood flow detected by IMP-SPECT and AVDO{sub 2} at the same day was compared, which restored to the period within 6 hours after head injury. From this procedure, we could outline cerebral blood flow conditions by only AVDO{sub 2} without IMP-SPECT in the ultra-emergent period. Eighty-six patients with head injury who were carried to our emergency center in the period of recent 2 years aged ranging from 15 to 94 years were the subjects. They all performed jugular bulb cannulation within 6 hours after the accident (Martin's phase I: day 0) to know saturation of jugular vein (SjO{sub 2}), AVDO{sub 2} and AVL. They were monitored until the day IMP-SPECT was performed (Martin's phase II; day 1-3 or phase III; day 4-15). The correlation between CBF and AVDO{sub 2}. The effect of CBF and cerebral venous metabolism on consciousness and outcome was also analyzed. CBF and AVDO{sub 2} in phase II and III were reversely correlated (p<0.0001). Normal CBF corresponded with 5.0 vol% in AVDO{sub 2}. AVDO{sub 2} in all cases changed 6.2 vol% at phase I, 4.5 vol% at phase II and 5.1 vol% at phase III. Glasgow comascale (GCS) on admission under 8 (n=47) and over 9 (n=39) significantly differed in AVDO{sub 2} and CBF in the period of II and III. The patients with favorable consciousness showed low AVDO{sub 2} and hyperemia afterwards. Dead cases in phase I (n=19) showed high AVDO{sub 2} and low SjO{sub 2}. The patients with severe disability (SD) (n=13) showed high AVDO{sub 2} and low CBF and the patients with good recovery (GR

  12. Dobutamine stress tetrofosmin SPECT. Evaluation of short rest-stress protocol and head to head comparison with MIBI in detection of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turgut, B.; Unlu, M.; Cengel, A.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility and diagnostic accuracy of same day short rest-dobutamine stress Tetrofosmin (TF) SPECT imaging protocol and to compare TF SPECT results with methoxyisobutyl isonitrile (MIBI) SPECT in the same subjects who were unable to perform treadmill exercise or were unsuitable for pharmacological vasodilator stress. The study group consisted of 19 patients (2 female and 17 male, with a mean age of 53.8±7.9 yrs) in whom coronary artery disease (CAD) had been proven or excluded at coronary angiography (CA). MIBI SPECT imaging was performed first. TF SPECT images were obtained one week after MIBI imaging. Immediately after the rest SPECT imaging in both of the MIBI and TF studies, patients underwent dobutamine stress tests. Rest-stress radiotracer doses and dobutamine doses were the same for both TF and MIBI studies. While 60 min waiting periods were applied for MIBI study, only 30 min waiting periods were applied for TF study after the rest and stress injections. Images were evaluated by visual and quantitative analysis. Dobutamine stress parameters were similar for both studies. Although in TF study, the time between radiopharmaceutical injection and imaging was shorter than in MIBI study, there was no significant difference between heart-to-liver (H/Li) and heart-to-lung (H/Lu) ratios. According to CA results, diagnostic accuracy was similar for TF and MIBI. While sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for TF study were calculated as 82%, 84% and 82%, respectively, the corresponding values for MIBI were 82%, 88% and 84%, respectively. This clinical study has shown comparable diagnostic performance for the detection of CAD between MIBI and TF. Good correlation was found between segmental analysis for both studies. MIBI and TF showed similar perfusion defects and good segmental correlation during dobutamine stress with the same quality images. Both radiopharmaceuticals may be acceptable with this imaging protocol

  13. SPECT assay of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies. Final performance report, March 1992--November 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaszczak, R.J.

    1995-12-01

    Research is described in the following areas: development and evaluation quantitatively of reconstruction algorithms with improved compensations for attenuation, scatter, and geometric collimator response; evaluation of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) quantification of iodine 123 and astatine 211; and the development and evaluation of SPECT pinhole imaging for low and medium energy photons

  14. SPECT assay of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies. Final performance report, March 1992--November 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaszczak, R.J.

    1995-12-01

    Research is described in the following areas: development and evaluation quantitatively of reconstruction algorithms with improved compensations for attenuation, scatter, and geometric collimator response; evaluation of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) quantification of iodine 123 and astatine 211; and the development and evaluation of SPECT pinhole imaging for low and medium energy photons.

  15. Surface and volume three-dimensional displays of Tc-99m HMPAO brain SPECT images in stroke patients with three-head gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shih, W.J.; Slevin, J.T.; Schleenbaker, R.E.; Mills, B.J.; Magoun, S.L.; Ryo, U.Y.

    1991-01-01

    This paper evaluates volume and surface 3D displays in Tc-99m HMPAO brain SPECT imaging in stroke patients. Using a triple-head gamma camera interfaced with a 64-bit supercomputer, 20 patients with stroke were studied. Each patient was imaged 30-60 minutes after an intravenous injection of 20 mCi of Tc-99m HMPAO. SPECT images as well as planar images were routinely obtained; volume and surface 3D display then proceeded, with the process requiring 5-10 minutes. Volume and surface 3D displays show the brain from all angles; thus the location and extension of lesion(s) in the brain are much easier to appreciate. While a cerebral lesion(s) was more clearly delineated by surface 3D imaging, crossed cerebellar diaschisis in seven patients was clearly exhibited with volume 3D but not with surface 3D imaging. Volume and surface 3D displays enhance continuity of structures and understanding of spatial relationships

  16. Head-to-Head Visual Comparison between Brain Perfusion SPECT and Arterial Spin-Labeling MRI with Different Postlabeling Delays in Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneta, T; Katsuse, O; Hirano, T; Ogawa, M; Yoshida, K; Odawara, T; Hirayasu, Y; Inoue, T

    2017-08-01

    Arterial spin-labeling MR imaging has been recently developed as a noninvasive technique with magnetically labeled arterial blood water as an endogenous contrast medium for the evaluation of CBF. Our aim was to compare arterial spin-labeling MR imaging and SPECT in the visual assessment of CBF in patients with Alzheimer disease. In 33 patients with Alzheimer disease or mild cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer disease, CBF images were obtained by using both arterial spin-labeling-MR imaging with a postlabeling delay of 1.5 seconds and 2.5 seconds (PLD 1.5 and PLD 2.5 , respectively) and brain perfusion SPECT. Twenty-two brain regions were visually assessed, and the diagnostic confidence of Alzheimer disease was recorded. Among all arterial spin-labeling images, 84.9% of PLD 1.5 and 9% of PLD 2.5 images showed the typical pattern of advanced Alzheimer disease (ie, decreased CBF in the bilateral parietal, temporal, and frontal lobes). PLD 1.5 , PLD 2.5 , and SPECT imaging resulted in obviously different visual assessments. PLD 1.5 showed a broad decrease in CBF, which could have been due to an early perfusion. In contrast, PLD 2.5 did not appear to be influenced by an early perfusion but showed fewer pathologic findings than SPECT. The distinctions observed by us should be carefully considered in the visual assessments of Alzheimer disease. Further studies are required to define the patterns of change in arterial spin-labeling-MR imaging associated with Alzheimer disease. © 2017 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  17. Combined SPECT/CT improves detection of initial bone invasion and determination of resection margins in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck compared to conventional imaging modalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolk, A. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Munich (Germany); Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Mund-Kiefer und Gesichtschirurgie, Muenchen (Germany); Schuster, T. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Institute of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, Munich (Germany); Chlebowski, A.; Kesting, M.; Bissinger, O.; Weitz, J. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Munich (Germany); Lange, P. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Munich (Germany); Scheidhauer, K.; Schwaiger, M.; Dinges, J. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany)

    2014-07-15

    Knowledge of the presence and extent of bone infiltration is crucial for planning the resection of potential bone-infiltrating squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (HNSCC). Routinely, plain-film radiography, multislice computed tomography (MSCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are used for preoperative staging, but they show relatively high rates of false-positive and false-negative findings. Scintigraphy with {sup 99m}Tc-bisphosphonate has the ability to show increased metabolic bone activity. If combined with anatomical imaging (e.g. (SPECT)/CT), it facilitates the precise localization of malignant bone lesions. The aim of this study was to analyse the indications and advantages of SPECT/CT compared with standard imaging modalities and histology with regard to specificity and sensitivity A longitudinally evaluated group of 30 patients with biopsy-proven HNSCC adjacent to the mandible underwent {sup 99m}Tc-bisphosphonate SPECT/CT, MRI, MSCT and conventional radiography before partial or rim resection of the mandible was performed. Bone infiltration was first evaluated with plain films, MSCT and MRI. In a second reading, SPECT/CT data were taken into account. The results (region and certainty of bone invasion) were evaluated among the different imaging modalities and finally compared with histological specimens from surgical resection as the standard of reference. For a better evaluation of the hybrid property of SPECT/CT, a retrospectively evaluated group of 20 additional patients with tumour locations similar to those of the longitudinally examined SPECT/CT group underwent SPECT, MSCT and MRI. To assess the influence of dental foci on the specificity of the imaging modalities, all patients were separated into two subgroups depending on the presence or absence of teeth in the area of potential tumour-bone contact. Histologically proven bone infiltration was found in 17 patients (57 %) when analysed by conventional imaging modalities. SPECT/CT data

  18. Combined SPECT/CT improves detection of initial bone invasion and determination of resection margins in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck compared to conventional imaging modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolk, A.; Schuster, T.; Chlebowski, A.; Kesting, M.; Bissinger, O.; Weitz, J.; Lange, P.; Scheidhauer, K.; Schwaiger, M.; Dinges, J.

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the presence and extent of bone infiltration is crucial for planning the resection of potential bone-infiltrating squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (HNSCC). Routinely, plain-film radiography, multislice computed tomography (MSCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are used for preoperative staging, but they show relatively high rates of false-positive and false-negative findings. Scintigraphy with 99m Tc-bisphosphonate has the ability to show increased metabolic bone activity. If combined with anatomical imaging (e.g. (SPECT)/CT), it facilitates the precise localization of malignant bone lesions. The aim of this study was to analyse the indications and advantages of SPECT/CT compared with standard imaging modalities and histology with regard to specificity and sensitivity A longitudinally evaluated group of 30 patients with biopsy-proven HNSCC adjacent to the mandible underwent 99m Tc-bisphosphonate SPECT/CT, MRI, MSCT and conventional radiography before partial or rim resection of the mandible was performed. Bone infiltration was first evaluated with plain films, MSCT and MRI. In a second reading, SPECT/CT data were taken into account. The results (region and certainty of bone invasion) were evaluated among the different imaging modalities and finally compared with histological specimens from surgical resection as the standard of reference. For a better evaluation of the hybrid property of SPECT/CT, a retrospectively evaluated group of 20 additional patients with tumour locations similar to those of the longitudinally examined SPECT/CT group underwent SPECT, MSCT and MRI. To assess the influence of dental foci on the specificity of the imaging modalities, all patients were separated into two subgroups depending on the presence or absence of teeth in the area of potential tumour-bone contact. Histologically proven bone infiltration was found in 17 patients (57 %) when analysed by conventional imaging modalities. SPECT/CT data revealed

  19. Femoral head avascular necrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrysikopoulos, H.; Sartoris, D.J.; Resnick, D.L.; Ashburn, W.; Pretorius, T.

    1988-01-01

    MR imaging has been shown to be more sensitive and specific than planar scintigraphy for avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head. However, experience with single photon emission CT (SPECT) is limited. The authors retrospectively compared 1.5-T MR imaging with SPECT in 14 patients with suspected femoral head AVN. Agreement between MR imaging and SPECT was present in 24 femurs, 14 normal and ten with AVN. MR imaging showed changes of AVN in the remaining four femoral heads. Of these, one was normal and the other three inconclusive for AVN by SPECT. The authors conclude that MR imaging is superior to SPECT for the evaluation of AVN of the hip

  20. Stereo Pinhole Camera: Assembly and experimental activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilmário Barbosa Santos

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the assembling of a stereo pinhole camera for capturing stereo-pairs of images and proposes experimental activities with it. A pinhole camera can be as sophisticated as you want, or so simple that it could be handcrafted with practically recyclable materials. This paper describes the practical use of the pinhole camera throughout history and currently. Aspects of optics and geometry involved in the building of the stereo pinhole camera are presented with illustrations. Furthermore, experiments are proposed by using the images obtained by the camera for 3D visualization through a pair of anaglyph glasses, and the estimation of relative depth by triangulation is discussed.

  1. Brain spect imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, R.G.L.; Hill, T.C.; Holman, B.L.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses how the rapid development of single-photon radiopharmaceuticals has given new life to tomographic brain imaging in nuclear medicine. Further developments in radiopharmaceuticals and refinements in neuro-SPECT (single-photon emission computed tomography) instrumentation should help to reinstate brain scintigraphy as an important part of neurologic diagnosis. SPECT of the brain evolved from experimentation using prototype instrumentation during the early 1960s. Although tomographic studies provided superior diagnostic accuracy when compared to planar techniques, the arrival of X-ray CT of the head resulted in the rapid demise of technetium brain imaging

  2. Brain SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feistel, H.

    1991-01-01

    Brain SPECT investigations have gained broad acceptance since the introduction of the lipophilic tracer Tc-99m-HMPAO. Depending on equipment and objectives in different departments, the examinations can be divided into three groups: 1. Under normal conditions and standardised patient preparation the 'rest' SPECT can be performed in every department with a tomographic camera. In cerebrovascular disease there is a demand for determination of either the perfusion reserve in reversible ischemia or prognostic values in completed stroke. In cases of dementia, SPECT may yield useful results according to differential diagnosis. Central cerebral system involvement in immunologic disease may be estimated with higher sensitivity than in conventional brain imaging procedures. In psychiatric diseases there is only a relative indication for brain SPECT, since results during recent years have been contradictory and may be derived only in interventional manner. In brain tumor diagnostics SPECT with Tl-201 possibly permits grading. In inflammatory disease, especially in viral encephalitis, SPECT may be used to obtain early diagnosis. Normal pressure hydrocephalus can be distinguished from other forms of dementia and, consequently, the necessity for shunting surgery can be recognised. 2. In departments equipped for emergency cases an 'acute' SPECT can be performed in illnesses with rapid changing symptoms such as different forms of migraine, transient global amnesia, epileptic seizures (so-called 'ictal SPECT') or urgent forms like trauma. 3. In cooperation with several departments brain SPECT can be practised as an interventional procedure in clinical and in scientific studies. (orig./MG) [de

  3. Variability in DMSA reporting following urinary tract infection in children: pinhole, planar, and pinhole with planar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossleigh, M.A.; Christian, C.L.; Craig, J.C.; Howman-Giles, R.B.; Grunewald, S.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the provision of DMSA images obtained by pinhole collimation reduces inter-observer variability of reporting compared with planar DMSA images alone. Methods: One hundred consecutive DMSA images were independently interpreted three times (pinhole alone, planar alone, pinhole and planar) by four participating nuclear medicine specialists from different departments and in random order. The presence or absence of renal parenchymal abnormality was classified using the modified four level grading system of Goldraich with mean values for the 6 comparisons reported. Results: The proportion of DMSA images interpreted as abnormal was 31% for planar, 34% for pinhole and 33% for planar with pinhole. Agreement was 89% for planar alone, 89% for pinhole alone and 90% for planar with pinhole, with kappa values 0.74, 0.75 and 0.80 respectively for the normal-abnormal scan classification of individual children. These results did not vary appreciably whether interpretation of patients, kidneys or kidney zones was compared. Reasons for disagreement in reporting included different interpretations of 'abnormalities' as normal anatomical variations (splenic impression, fetal lobulation, duplex collecting systems, column of Bertin) or true parenchymal abnormalities, different adjustments in thresholds for reporting abnormality when images were technically suboptimal, different weighting given to pinhole and planar images when both were provided, and error. Conclusion: Four experienced nuclear medicine physicians showed substantial agreement in the interpretation of planar alone, pinhole alone and planar with pinhole DMSA images, but the provision of both sets of images, planar and pinhole, did not reduce variability. (authors)

  4. Performance characterization of the Inveon preclinical small-animal PET/SPECT/CT system for multimodality imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magota, Keiichi; Kubo, Naoki; Kuge, Yuji; Nishijima, Ken-ichi; Zhao, Songji; Tamaki, Nagara

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the performance of the Inveon small-animal PET/SPECT/CT system and compared the imaging capabilities of the SPECT and PET components. For SPECT, the energy resolution, tomographic spatial resolution and system sensitivity were evaluated with a 99m Tc solution using a single pinhole collimator. For PET, the spatial resolution, absolute sensitivity, scatter fraction and peak noise equivalent count were evaluated. Phantoms and a normal rat were scanned to compare the imaging capabilities of SPECT and PET. The SPECT spatial resolution was 0.84 mm full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) at a radius of rotation of 25 mm using a 0.5-mm pinhole aperture collimator, while the PET spatial resolution was 1.63 mm FWHM at the centre. The SPECT system sensitivity at a radius of rotation of 25 mm was 35.3 cps/MBq (4 x 10 -3 %) using the 0.5-mm pinhole aperture, while the PET absolute sensitivity was 3.2% for 350-650 keV and 3.432 ns. Accordingly, the volume sensitivity of PET was three orders of magnitude higher than that of SPECT. This integrated PET/SPECT/CT system showed high performance with excellent spatial resolution for SPECT and sensitivity for PET. Based on the tracer availability and system performance, SPECT and PET have complementary roles in multimodality small-animal imaging. (orig.)

  5. SPECT data acquisition and image reconstruction in a stationary small animal SPECT/MRI system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jingyan; Chen, Si; Yu, Jianhua; Meier, Dirk; Wagenaar, Douglas J.; Patt, Bradley E.; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2010-04-01

    The goal of the study was to investigate data acquisition strategies and image reconstruction methods for a stationary SPECT insert that can operate inside an MRI scanner with a 12 cm bore diameter for simultaneous SPECT/MRI imaging of small animals. The SPECT insert consists of 3 octagonal rings of 8 MR-compatible CZT detectors per ring surrounding a multi-pinhole (MPH) collimator sleeve. Each pinhole is constructed to project the field-of-view (FOV) to one CZT detector. All 24 pinholes are focused to a cylindrical FOV of 25 mm in diameter and 34 mm in length. The data acquisition strategies we evaluated were optional collimator rotations to improve tomographic sampling; and the image reconstruction methods were iterative ML-EM with and without compensation for the geometric response function (GRF) of the MPH collimator. For this purpose, we developed an analytic simulator that calculates the system matrix with the GRF models of the MPH collimator. The simulator was used to generate projection data of a digital rod phantom with pinhole aperture sizes of 1 mm and 2 mm and with different collimator rotation patterns. Iterative ML-EM reconstruction with and without GRF compensation were used to reconstruct the projection data from the central ring of 8 detectors only, and from all 24 detectors. Our results indicated that without GRF compensation and at the default design of 24 projection views, the reconstructed images had significant artifacts. Accurate GRF compensation substantially improved the reconstructed image resolution and reduced image artifacts. With accurate GRF compensation, useful reconstructed images can be obtained using 24 projection views only. This last finding potentially enables dynamic SPECT (and/or MRI) studies in small animals, one of many possible application areas of the SPECT/MRI system. Further research efforts are warranted including experimentally measuring the system matrix for improved geometrical accuracy, incorporating the co

  6. Depth-of-Interaction Compensation Using a Focused-Cut Scintillator for a Pinhole Gamma Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhassen, Fares; Kudrolli, Haris; Singh, Bipin; Kim, Sangtaek; Seo, Youngho; Gould, Robert G.; Nagarkar, Vivek V.

    2011-06-01

    Preclinical SPECT offers a powerful means to understand the molecular pathways of drug interactions in animal models by discovering and testing new pharmaceuticals and therapies for potential clinical applications. A combination of high spatial resolution and sensitivity are required in order to map radiotracer uptake within small animals. Pinhole collimators have been investigated, as they offer high resolution by means of image magnification. One of the limitations of pinhole geometries is that increased magnification causes some rays to travel through the detection scintillator at steep angles, introducing parallax errors due to variable depth-of-interaction in scintillator material, especially towards the edges of the detector field of view. These parallax errors ultimately limit the resolution of pinhole preclinical SPECT systems, especially for higher energy isotopes that can easily penetrate through millimeters of scintillator material. A pixellated, focused-cut (FC) scintillator, with its pixels laser-cut so that they are collinear with incoming rays, can potentially compensate for these parallax errors and thus improve the system resolution. We performed the first experimental evaluation of a newly developed focused-cut scintillator. We scanned a Tc-99 m source across the field of view of pinhole gamma camera with a continuous scintillator, a conventional “straight-cut” (SC) pixellated scintillator, and a focused-cut scintillator, each coupled to an electron-multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) detector by a fiber-optic taper, and compared the measured full-width half-maximum (FWHM) values. We show that the FWHMs of the focused-cut scintillator projections are comparable to the FWHMs of the thinner SC scintillator, indicating the effectiveness of the focused-cut scintillator in compensating parallax errors.

  7. Depth-of-Interaction Compensation Using a Focused-Cut Scintillator for a Pinhole Gamma Camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhassen, Fares; Kudrolli, Haris; Singh, Bipin; Kim, Sangtaek; Seo, Youngho; Gould, Robert G; Nagarkar, Vivek V

    2011-06-01

    Preclinical SPECT offers a powerful means to understand the molecular pathways of drug interactions in animal models by discovering and testing new pharmaceuticals and therapies for potential clinical applications. A combination of high spatial resolution and sensitivity are required in order to map radiotracer uptake within small animals. Pinhole collimators have been investigated, as they offer high resolution by means of image magnification. One of the limitations of pinhole geometries is that increased magnification causes some rays to travel through the detection scintillator at steep angles, introducing parallax errors due to variable depth-of-interaction in scintillator material, especially towards the edges of the detector field of view. These parallax errors ultimately limit the resolution of pinhole preclinical SPECT systems, especially for higher energy isotopes that can easily penetrate through millimeters of scintillator material. A pixellated, focused-cut (FC) scintillator, with its pixels laser-cut so that they are collinear with incoming rays, can potentially compensate for these parallax errors and thus improve the system resolution. We performed the first experimental evaluation of a newly developed focused-cut scintillator. We scanned a Tc-99m source across the field of view of pinhole gamma camera with a continuous scintillator, a conventional "straight-cut" (SC) pixellated scintillator, and a focused-cut scintillator, each coupled to an electron-multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) detector by a fiber-optic taper, and compared the measured full-width half-maximum (FWHM) values. We show that the FWHMs of the focused-cut scintillator projections are comparable to the FWHMs of the thinner SC scintillator, indicating the effectiveness of the focused-cut scintillator in compensating parallax errors.

  8. Onboard functional and molecular imaging: A design investigation for robotic multipinhole SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowsher, James; Giles, William; Yin, Fang-Fang; Yan, Susu; Roper, Justin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Onboard imaging—currently performed primarily by x-ray transmission modalities—is essential in modern radiation therapy. As radiation therapy moves toward personalized medicine, molecular imaging, which views individual gene expression, may also be important onboard. Nuclear medicine methods, such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), are premier modalities for molecular imaging. The purpose of this study is to investigate a robotic multipinhole approach to onboard SPECT. Methods: Computer-aided design (CAD) studies were performed to assess the feasibility of maneuvering a robotic SPECT system about a patient in position for radiation therapy. In order to obtain fast, high-quality SPECT images, a 49-pinhole SPECT camera was designed which provides high sensitivity to photons emitted from an imaging region of interest. This multipinhole system was investigated by computer-simulation studies. Seventeen hot spots 10 and 7 mm in diameter were placed in the breast region of a supine female phantom. Hot spot activity concentration was six times that of background. For the 49-pinhole camera and a reference, more conventional, broad field-of-view (FOV) SPECT system, projection data were computer simulated for 4-min scans and SPECT images were reconstructed. Hot-spot localization was evaluated using a nonprewhitening forced-choice numerical observer. Results: The CAD simulation studies found that robots could maneuver SPECT cameras about patients in position for radiation therapy. In the imaging studies, most hot spots were apparent in the 49-pinhole images. Average localization errors for 10-mm- and 7-mm-diameter hot spots were 0.4 and 1.7 mm, respectively, for the 49-pinhole system, and 3.1 and 5.7 mm, respectively, for the reference broad-FOV system. Conclusions: A robot could maneuver a multipinhole SPECT system about a patient in position for radiation therapy. The system could provide onboard functional and molecular imaging with 4-min

  9. Onboard functional and molecular imaging: A design investigation for robotic multipinhole SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowsher, James, E-mail: james.bowsher@duke.edu; Giles, William; Yin, Fang-Fang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Yan, Susu [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Roper, Justin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Onboard imaging—currently performed primarily by x-ray transmission modalities—is essential in modern radiation therapy. As radiation therapy moves toward personalized medicine, molecular imaging, which views individual gene expression, may also be important onboard. Nuclear medicine methods, such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), are premier modalities for molecular imaging. The purpose of this study is to investigate a robotic multipinhole approach to onboard SPECT. Methods: Computer-aided design (CAD) studies were performed to assess the feasibility of maneuvering a robotic SPECT system about a patient in position for radiation therapy. In order to obtain fast, high-quality SPECT images, a 49-pinhole SPECT camera was designed which provides high sensitivity to photons emitted from an imaging region of interest. This multipinhole system was investigated by computer-simulation studies. Seventeen hot spots 10 and 7 mm in diameter were placed in the breast region of a supine female phantom. Hot spot activity concentration was six times that of background. For the 49-pinhole camera and a reference, more conventional, broad field-of-view (FOV) SPECT system, projection data were computer simulated for 4-min scans and SPECT images were reconstructed. Hot-spot localization was evaluated using a nonprewhitening forced-choice numerical observer. Results: The CAD simulation studies found that robots could maneuver SPECT cameras about patients in position for radiation therapy. In the imaging studies, most hot spots were apparent in the 49-pinhole images. Average localization errors for 10-mm- and 7-mm-diameter hot spots were 0.4 and 1.7 mm, respectively, for the 49-pinhole system, and 3.1 and 5.7 mm, respectively, for the reference broad-FOV system. Conclusions: A robot could maneuver a multipinhole SPECT system about a patient in position for radiation therapy. The system could provide onboard functional and molecular imaging with 4-min

  10. Gyral high density on CT scan after head injury; [sup 123]I-IMP SPECT and MRI findings in three children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Takumi; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi (Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine); Sakamoto, Tetsuya; Aruga, Tohru

    1994-02-01

    The authors treated three children who had 'gyral high density' on plain CT scans after head injury with acute subdural hematoma. [sup 123]I-IMP SPECT (IMP) and MRI in the chronic stage were performed. All were males, about one year of age, with acute subdural hematoma. CT scan 48 hours after injury showed diffuse low density in the ipsilateral parenchyma with minimum midline shift, and IMP showed decreased activity in the same area. Plain CT scan 1 to 3 weeks after injury showed remarkably high density along the gyri in part of the same area. This area was markedly enhanced on CT with contrast medium and showed decreased blood flow on IMP. This high density area disappeared within 2 months after injury and the area concerned showed brain atrophy. In the chronic stage (after 6 months), only the high density area along the gyri seen in the CT scan showed MRI evidence of ishemia, but there was no definite evidence of hemorrhage. All three children had hemiplegia at the time of discharge. The gyral high density suggests ischemic brain, but the pathophysiological process might be different from that of so-called hemorrhagic infarction. Presumably, it is due to incomplete autoregulation, the incomplete blood-brain barrier and the sensitivity to stimulation of cerebral blood vessels in the brains of infants. The intensity and range of the gyral high density are considered to be important in estimating the future amount of atrophic change in the insulted brain and the resulting sequelae. (author).

  11. Numerical simulation for neutron pinhole imaging in ICF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Faxin; Yang Jianlun; Wen Shuhuai

    2005-01-01

    Pinhole imaging of the neutron production in laser-driven inertial confinement fusion experiments can provide important information about performance of various capsule designs. In order to get good results in experiments, it is needed to judge performance of various pinhole designs qualitatively or quantitatively before experiment. Calculation of imaging can be simply separated into pinhole imaging and image spectral analysis. In this paper, pinhole imaging is discussed, codes for neutron pinhole imaging and image showing is programed. The codes can be used to provide theoretical foundation for pinhole designing and simulating data for image analysing. (authors)

  12. Mnemonic activation by SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migneco, O.; Darcourt, J.; Benoit, M; Malandain, G.; Thirion, J.P.; Robert, Ph.; Vidal, R.; Desvignes, Ph.; Benoliel, J.; Ayache, N.; Bussiere, F.

    1997-01-01

    Data of literature show that SPECT is able to detect cerebral activations induced by sensory-motor stimuli. The facts are not clearly established in what concerns the cognitive activations the amplitude of which is lower. We have studied an activation paradigm such as the Grober and Bruschke test which implies the long term explicit memory. It comprises a visual presentation of words followed by their indexed recall. By using a two-day protocol, 2 SPECTs were achieved in 4 healthy right-handed voluntaries as follows: one of activation (A) and one of control (B). The fifth subject benefited by a SPECT B and of an MRI. The injection for the examination A has been done during the indexed recall stage and for the examination B at the moment when the patient repeated several times the same 3 words. The SPECT data were collected 1 hour after the injection of 370 MBq of ECD making use of a 3-head camera equipped with UHR fan collimators and ending by a LMH on the reconstructed images of 8 mm. The MRI has been achieved by means of a Signa 1.5 Tesla magnet. The SPECT A and B of the subjects 1 to 4 were matched elastically to that of the subject 5 and that of the subject 5 was rigidly matched on its MRI. In this way the individual activation cards of the 4 subjects could be averaged and superimposed on the MRI of the 5. subject. One observes an internal temporal activation (maximal activation of left tonsil, +25% and right uncus, +23%) and a right cingulum activation (maximal activation, +25%), in agreement with the neuro-physiological data. The elastic matching makes possible the inter-subject averaging, what increases the signal-to-noise ratio of activation. The inter-modality rigid matching facilitates the anatomical localisation of the activation site. With these adapted tools, the cognitive activation is thus possible by SPECT and opens perspectives for early diagnosis of neurological troubles, namely of Alzheimer's disease

  13. PET and SPECT in neurology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O. [Groningen University Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Ghent Univ. (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine; Vries, Erik F.J. de; Waarde, Aren van [Groningen University Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Otte, Andreas (ed.) [Univ. of Applied Sciences Offenburg (Germany). Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology

    2014-07-01

    PET and SPECT in Neurology highlights the combined expertise of renowned authors whose dedication to the investigation of neurological disorders through nuclear medicine technology has achieved international recognition. Classical neurodegenerative disorders are discussed as well as cerebrovascular disorders, brain tumors, epilepsy, head trauma, coma, sleeping disorders, and inflammatory and infectious diseases of the CNS. The latest results in nuclear brain imaging are detailed. Most chapters are written jointly by a clinical neurologist and a nuclear medicine specialist to ensure a multidisciplinary approach. This state-of-the-art compendium will be valuable to anybody in the field of neuroscience, from the neurologist and the radiologist/nuclear medicine specialist to the interested general practitioner and geriatrician. It is the second volume of a trilogy on PET and SPECT imaging in the neurosciences, the other volumes covering PET and SPECT in psychiatry and in neurobiological systems.

  14. PET and SPECT in neurology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O.; Ghent Univ.; Vries, Erik F.J. de; Waarde, Aren van; Otte, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    PET and SPECT in Neurology highlights the combined expertise of renowned authors whose dedication to the investigation of neurological disorders through nuclear medicine technology has achieved international recognition. Classical neurodegenerative disorders are discussed as well as cerebrovascular disorders, brain tumors, epilepsy, head trauma, coma, sleeping disorders, and inflammatory and infectious diseases of the CNS. The latest results in nuclear brain imaging are detailed. Most chapters are written jointly by a clinical neurologist and a nuclear medicine specialist to ensure a multidisciplinary approach. This state-of-the-art compendium will be valuable to anybody in the field of neuroscience, from the neurologist and the radiologist/nuclear medicine specialist to the interested general practitioner and geriatrician. It is the second volume of a trilogy on PET and SPECT imaging in the neurosciences, the other volumes covering PET and SPECT in psychiatry and in neurobiological systems.

  15. A hardware investigation of robotic SPECT for functional and molecular imaging onboard radiation therapy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Susu; Tough, MengHeng; Bowsher, James; Yin, Fang-Fang; Cheng, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To construct a robotic SPECT system and to demonstrate its capability to image a thorax phantom on a radiation therapy flat-top couch, as a step toward onboard functional and molecular imaging in radiation therapy. Methods: A robotic SPECT imaging system was constructed utilizing a gamma camera detector (Digirad 2020tc) and a robot (KUKA KR150 L110 robot). An imaging study was performed with a phantom (PET CT Phantom TM ), which includes five spheres of 10, 13, 17, 22, and 28 mm diameters. The phantom was placed on a flat-top couch. SPECT projections were acquired either with a parallel-hole collimator or a single-pinhole collimator, both without background in the phantom and with background at 1/10th the sphere activity concentration. The imaging trajectories of parallel-hole and pinhole collimated detectors spanned 180° and 228°, respectively. The pinhole detector viewed an off-centered spherical common volume which encompassed the 28 and 22 mm spheres. The common volume for parallel-hole system was centered at the phantom which encompassed all five spheres in the phantom. The maneuverability of the robotic system was tested by navigating the detector to trace the phantom and flat-top table while avoiding collision and maintaining the closest possible proximity to the common volume. The robot base and tool coordinates were used for image reconstruction. Results: The robotic SPECT system was able to maneuver parallel-hole and pinhole collimated SPECT detectors in close proximity to the phantom, minimizing impact of the flat-top couch on detector radius of rotation. Without background, all five spheres were visible in the reconstructed parallel-hole image, while four spheres, all except the smallest one, were visible in the reconstructed pinhole image. With background, three spheres of 17, 22, and 28 mm diameters were readily observed with the parallel-hole imaging, and the targeted spheres (22 and 28 mm diameters) were readily observed in the pinhole

  16. Optimizing renal DMSA-scintigraphy with 7-pinhole collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botsch, H.; Pottmeyer, A.; Savaser, A.; Lochner, B.; Felix, R.

    1982-01-01

    Multiple pinhole emission tomographic imaging techniques are currently being applied to imaging of organs of a limited size. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of this technique in kidney imaging with Tcsup(99m)-DMSA. A 7-pinhole collimator having 4.5 mm. pinhole apertures was used in conjunction with a widefield camera. Left and right kidney were imaged separately. Twelve small renal cysts with a diameter of 1 to 3.5 cm. verified by US or CAT were investigated by 7-pinhole and planar scintigraphy. Eight of 12 renal cysts were identified by 7-pinhole scintigraphy whereas only one cyst was seen by planar scintigraphy. The borderline of cysts detection was 1.5 cm. in 7-pinhole tomography. Basing on these comparative studies and experiences on many patient investigations it seems reasonable to perform renal scintigraphy with 7-pinhole tomography in a routine manner. (orig.)

  17. Pinhole single-photon emission tomography reconstruction based on median root prior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohlberg, Antti; Kuikka, Jyrki T.; Ruotsalainen, Ulla

    2003-01-01

    The maximum likelihood expectation maximisation (ML-EM) algorithm can be used to reduce reconstruction artefacts produced by filtered backprojection (FBP) methods in pinhole single-photon emission tomography (SPET). However, ML-EM suffers from noise propagation along iterations, which leads to quantitatively unpleasant reconstruction results. To avoid this increase in noise, the median root prior (MRP) algorithm for pinhole SPET was implemented. Projection data of a line source and Picker's thyroid phantom were collected using a single-head gamma camera with a pinhole collimator. MRP was added to existing pinhole ML-EM reconstruction algorithm and the phantom studies were reconstructed using MRP, ML-EM and FBP for comparison. Coefficients of variation, contrasts and full-widths at half-maximum were calculated and showed a clear reduction in noise without significant loss of resolution or decrease in contrast when MRP was applied. MRP also produced visually pleasing images even with high iteration numbers, free of the checkerboard-type noise patterns which are typical of ML-EM images. (orig.)

  18. Investigation of imaging properties for submillimeter rectangular pinholes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Dan, E-mail: dxia@uchicago.edu [The Department of Radiology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Moore, Stephen C., E-mail: scmoore@bwh.harvard.edu, E-mail: miaepark@bwh.harvard.edu, E-mail: mcervo@bwh.harvard.edu; Park, Mi-Ae, E-mail: scmoore@bwh.harvard.edu, E-mail: miaepark@bwh.harvard.edu, E-mail: mcervo@bwh.harvard.edu; Cervo, Morgan, E-mail: scmoore@bwh.harvard.edu, E-mail: miaepark@bwh.harvard.edu, E-mail: mcervo@bwh.harvard.edu [Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Metzler, Scott D., E-mail: metzler@upenn.edu [The Department of Radiology, The University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: Recently, a multipinhole collimator with inserts that have both rectangular apertures and rectangular fields of view (FOVs) has been proposed for SPECT imaging since it can tile the projection onto the detector efficiently and the FOVs in transverse and axial directions become separable. The purpose of this study is to investigate the image properties of rectangular-aperture pinholes with submillimeter apertures sizes. Methods: In this work, the authors have conducted sensitivity and FOV experiments for 18 replicates of a prototype insert fabricated in platinum/iridium (Pt/Ir) alloy with submillimeter square-apertures. A sin{sup q}θ fit to the experimental sensitivity has been performed for these inserts. For the FOV measurement, the authors have proposed a new formula to calculate the projection intensity of a flood image on the detector, taking into account the penumbra effect. By fitting this formula to the measured projection data, the authors obtained the acceptance angles. Results: The mean (standard deviation) of fitted sensitivity exponents q and effective edge lengths w{sub e} were, respectively, 10.8 (1.8) and 0.38 mm (0.02 mm), which were close to the values, 7.84 and 0.396 mm, obtained from Monte Carlo calculations using the parameters of the designed inserts. For the FOV measurement, the mean (standard deviation) of the transverse and axial acceptances were 35.0° (1.2°) and 30.5° (1.6°), which are in good agreement with the designed values (34.3° and 29.9°). Conclusions: These results showed that the physical properties of the fabricated inserts with submillimeter aperture size matched our design well.

  19. Serotonin transporters in dopamine transporter imaging: a head-to-head comparison of dopamine transporter SPECT radioligands 123I-FP-CIT and 123I-PE2I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ziebell, Morten; Holm-Hansen, Signe; Thomsen, Gerda

    2010-01-01

    Current SPECT radioligands available for in vivo imaging of the dopamine transporter (DAT) also show affinity for monoamine transporters other than DAT, especially the serotonin transporter (SERT). The effect of this lack of selectivity for in vivo imaging is unknown. In this study, we compared...

  20. Wholebody and pinhole bone scan manifestations of reiter's syndorme: distribution pattern and specific and early signs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. H.; Chung, S. K.; Park, Y. H.; Lee, S. Y.; Sohn, H. S.; Han, B. H.; Bahk, Y. W. [College of Medicine, Catholic Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-07-01

    We wish to describe the characteristics panoramic wholebody bone distribution, and specific and preradiographic pinhole bone scan signs of Reiter's syndrome(RS) featured by pauciarthritis and enthesopathies in and about weight-bearing joints of the lower extremities and axial bones. We analyzed 55 sets of wholebody and pinhole bone scintigraphs of 55 patients with RS. The population was 44 men and 11 women with age ranging from 15 to 52 yr (mean=29.3). The scintigraphy was performed 2-2.5 hr pi of Tc-99m-HDP using a single-head gamma camera with a LEHR collimator and a 4-mm pinhole collimator for the wholebody and pinhole scintigraphy, respectively. We found 223 lesions with increased tracer uptake in total. Wholebody scans showed asymmetric pauciarticular distribution in weight bearing joints and periarticular entheses in the lower extremities in 63.2% (calcaneus=24.2%, ankle=8.1%, tibia=8.1% and others). The sternum, sacroiliac joint and spine were involved in 8.5%, 5.8% and 4.5%, respectively. Pinhole scan portrayed many specific signs including the 'tear-drop' sign of paravertebral ossification. 'whiskers' sign of femoral osteophytes and 'knuckle bone' sign of sausage digit. Twenty-four lesions (10.8%) showed preradiogrpahic signs in symptomatic ehthesopathies mostly in the calcaneus and proximal tibia. Nine cases with calcaneal enthesopathies and four cases with proximal tibial enthesopathy without radiographic bone change showed intense tracer uptake. Wholebody and pinhole magnification scans were useful in studying RS. The asymmetric pauciarticular distribution in the weight-bearing bones with enthesopathies was characteristic. Pinhole scan portrayed many specific signs and was sensitive permitting accurate preradiographic diagnosis in many cases.

  1. Whole-body and pinhole bone scintigraphic manifestations of Reiter`s syndrome: distribution patterns and early and characteristic signs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung-Hoon; Chung, Soo-Kyo; Park, Young-Ha; Lee, Sung-Yong; Sohn, Hyung-Sun [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Catholic University Hospitals, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bahk, Yong-Whee [Department of Radiology, Samsung Cheil Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-02-01

    The characteristic whole-body and pinhole scintigraphic manifestations of osteo-enthesopathy and arthropathy in Reiter`s syndrome (RS) are described, with an emphasis on early diagnosis. We analysed 59 sets of whole-body and pinhole bone scintigrams of 59 patients with RS. The population comprised 47 men and 12 women with an age range from 15 to 53 years (mean=29.4). Bone scintigraphy was carried out 2-2.5 h after intravenous injection of technetium-99m hydroxydiphosphonate using a single-head gamma camera (Siemens Orbiter Model 6601) with a low-energy high-resolution and a 4-mm pinhole collimator for whole-body and pinhole scintigraphy, respectively. In total 262 lesions of osteo-enthesopathy and arthritis were detected on 59 whole-body scintigrams, an incidence of 4.4 lesions per patient. As anticipated, the lesional distribution was asymmetrical: 68% were in the lower limb skeleton and 32% in the axial and upper limb skeleton. Pinhole bone scintigraphy, applied selectively to one region of interest in each case, enabled us to accurately diagnose arthritis and osteo-enthesopathy. It was noteworthy that osteo-enthesopathy, alone or in combination with arthritis, occurred in 78.9%, and had a strong predilection for the foot bones, especially the calcaneus (25.6%). Pinhole scintigraphy detected enthesopathy in the absence of radiographic alteration in 14.1% of cases and portrayed characteristic signs of RS in 6.9%. Whole-body bone scintigraphy augmented with pinhole scintigraphy was found to be useful in order to panoramically display the systemic involvement pattern, to assess the characteristic bone and articular alterations and to detect early signs of RS. (orig.) With 10 figs., 3 tabs., 19 refs.

  2. Contralateral thalamic hypoperfusion on brain perfusion SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seok Mo; Bae, Sang Kyun; Yoo, Kyung Moo; Yum, Ha Yong

    2000-01-01

    Brain perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is useful for the localization of cerebrovascular lesion and sometimes reveals more definite lesion than radiologic imaging modality such as CT or MRI does. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic usefulness of brain perfusion SPECT in patients with hemisensory impairment. Thirteen consecutive patients (M:F= 8:5, mean age = 48) who has hemisensory impairment were included. Brain perfusion SPECT was performed after intravenous injection of 1110 MBq of Tc-99m ECD. The images were obtained using a dual-head gamma camera with ultra-high resolution collimator. Semiquantitative analysis was performed after placing multiple ROIs on cerebral cortex, basal ganglia, thalamus and cerebellum. There were 10 patients with left hemisensory impairment and 3 patients with right-sided symptom. Only 2 patients revealed abnormal signal change in the thalamus on MRI. But brain perfusion SPECT showed decreased perfusion in the thalamus in 9 patients. Six patients among 10 patients with left hemisensory impairment revealed decreased perfusion in the contralateral thalamus on brain SPECT. The other 4 patients revealed no abnormality. Two patients among 3 patients with right hemisensory impairment also showed decreased perfusion in the contralateral thalamus on brain SPECT. One patients with right hemisensory impairment showed ipsilateral perfusion decrease. Two patients who had follow-up brain perfusion SEPCT after treatment revealed normalization of perfusion in the thalamus. Brain perfusion SPECT might be a useful tool in diagnosing patients with hemisensory impairment

  3. The clinical use of brain SPECT imaging in neuropsychiatry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amen, Daniel G; Wu, Joseph C; Carmichael, Blake

    2003-01-01

    This article reviews the literature on brain SPECT imaging in brain trauma, dementia, and temporal lobe epilepsy. Brain SPECT allows clinicians the ability to view cerebral areas of healthy, low, and excessive perfusion. This information can be correlated with what is known about the function or dysfunction of each area. SPECT has a number of advantages over other imaging techniques, including wider availability, lower cost, and high quality resolution with multi-headed cameras. There are a number of issues that compromise the effective use of SPECT, including low quality of some imaging cameras, and variability of image rendering and readings (Au)

  4. Validity of in vivo [123I]beta-CIT SPECT in detecting MDMA-induced neurotoxicity in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Win, Maartje M. L.; de Jeu, Rogier A. M.; de Bruin, Kora; Habraken, Jan B. A.; Reneman, Liesbeth; Booij, Jan; den Heeten, Gerard J.

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the ability of a high-resolution pinhole single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system, with [(123)I]beta-CIT as a radiotracer, to detect 3,4-methelenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, 'Ecstasy')-induced loss of serotonin transporters (SERTs) in the living rat brain. In

  5. Closure phenomena in pinholes irradiated by Nd laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auerbach, J.M.; Holmes, N.C.; Hunt, J.T.; Linford, G.J.

    1979-07-15

    An experimental investigation has been made on plasma closure in pinholes irradiated by Nd glass laser pulses; 300--500-..mu..m diam pinholes of various materials and thicknesses have been irradiated by 20--100-J 300-psec FWHM pulses on the Janus laser system. Calorimetry measurements have yielded data on pinhole energy transmission and intensity loading on the periphery of the pinhole. Ultrafast streak photography measurements indicate effective closure velocities of 2--5 x 10/sup 7/ cm/sec. Scattered light measurements have shown the transmission loss through a typical spatial filter configuration to be primarily refractive in nature.

  6. Estimate of energy density on CYCLOPS spatial filter pinhole structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guch, S. Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The inclusion of a spatial filter between the B and C stages in CYCLOPS to reduce the effects of small-scale beam self-focusing is discussed. An estimate is made of the energy density to which the pinhole will be subjected, and the survivability of various pinhole materials and designs is discussed

  7. Proton pinhole imaging on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zylstra, A. B., E-mail: zylstra@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Park, H.-S.; Ross, J. S.; Higginson, D. P.; Huntington, C.; Pollock, B.; Remington, B.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Ryutov, D.; Turnbull, D.; Wilks, S. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Fiuza, F. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Séguin, F. H. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Pinhole imaging of large (mm scale) carbon-deuterium (CD) plasmas by proton self-emission has been used for the first time to study the microphysics of shock formation, which is of astrophysical relevance. The 3 MeV deuterium-deuterium (DD) fusion proton self-emission from these plasmas is imaged using a novel pinhole imaging system, with up to five different 1 mm diameter pinholes positioned 25 cm from target-chamber center. CR39 is used as the detector medium, positioned at 100 cm distance from the pinhole for a magnification of 4 ×. A Wiener deconvolution algorithm is numerically demonstrated and used to interpret the images. When the spatial morphology is known, this algorithm accurately reproduces the size of features larger than about half the pinhole diameter. For these astrophysical plasma experiments on the National Ignition Facility, this provides a strong constraint on simulation modeling of the experiment.

  8. Preliminary Experience with Small Animal SPECT Imaging on Clinical Gamma Cameras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Aguiar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional lack of techniques suitable for in vivo imaging has induced a great interest in molecular imaging for preclinical research. Nevertheless, its use spreads slowly due to the difficulties in justifying the high cost of the current dedicated preclinical scanners. An alternative for lowering the costs is to repurpose old clinical gamma cameras to be used for preclinical imaging. In this paper we assess the performance of a portable device, that is, working coupled to a single-head clinical gamma camera, and we present our preliminary experience in several small animal applications. Our findings, based on phantom experiments and animal studies, provided an image quality, in terms of contrast-noise trade-off, comparable to dedicated preclinical pinhole-based scanners. We feel that our portable device offers an opportunity for recycling the widespread availability of clinical gamma cameras in nuclear medicine departments to be used in small animal SPECT imaging and we hope that it can contribute to spreading the use of preclinical imaging within institutions on tight budgets.

  9. Cervical SPECT Camera for Parathyroid Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2012-08-31

    Primary hyperparathyroidism characterized by one or more enlarged parathyroid glands has become one of the most common endocrine diseases in the world affecting about 1 per 1000 in the United States. Standard treatment is highly invasive exploratory neck surgery called Parathyroidectomy. The surgery has a notable mortality rate because of the close proximity to vital structures. The move to minimally invasive parathyroidectomy is hampered by the lack of high resolution pre-surgical imaging techniques that can accurately localize the parathyroid with respect to surrounding structures. We propose to develop a dedicated ultra-high resolution (~ 1 mm) and high sensitivity (10x conventional camera) cervical scintigraphic imaging device. It will be based on a multiple pinhole-camera SPECT system comprising a novel solid state CZT detector that offers the required performance. The overall system will be configured to fit around the neck and comfortably image a patient.

  10. A Silicon SPECT System for Molecular Imaging of the Mouse Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Shokouhi, Sepideh; Fritz, Mark A.; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Durko, Heather L.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Wilson, Donald W.; Peterson, Todd E.

    2007-01-01

    We previously demonstrated the feasibility of using silicon double-sided strip detectors (DSSDs) for SPECT imaging of the activity distribution of iodine-125 using a 300-micrometer thick detector. Based on this experience, we now have developed fully customized silicon DSSDs and associated readout electronics with the intent of developing a multi-pinhole SPECT system. Each DSSD has a 60.4 mm × 60.4 mm active area and is 1 mm thick. The strip pitch is 59 micrometers, and the readout of the 102...

  11. Brain SPECT in psychiatry: Delusion or reality?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavel, D.G.; Davis, G.; Epstein, P.; Kohn, R.; Antonino, F.; Devore-Best, S.; Craita, I.; Liu, P.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: The need for functional information is becoming increasingly evident for proper therapeutic approaches to the treatment and follow up of psychiatric diseases. While data on this subject already exists, there is a general lack of consensus about the use of brain SPECT in this domain and also a considerable negative prejudice due to a number of factors including poor quality imaging and unrealistic expectations. Based on a large group of brain SPECT-s performed over the past 3 years we attempted to sort and refine the indications for SPECT in psychiatry. Materials and Methods: High resolution brain SPECT was performed with triple head gamma camera, super-high resolution fan beam collimator and Tc-HMPAO. A comprehensive semiquantitative color, 3D surface as well as multi-thresholded volume display was routinely used and supplemented by automatic realignment in case of longitudinal follow-up. Results: 470 brain SPECT-s done on 432 patients were all referred by psychiatrists or neuro-psychiatrists for a wide spectrum of psychiatric diseases and ranged in age from 7 to 88 years. The most common primary reasons for referral were : attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD); anxiety; obsessive-compulsive disease, depression (refractory, chronic, bipolar ), impulse control problems; oppositional defiance, post traumatic brain injury; seizures, learning difficulties, pervasive development disorders, memory loss and differential of dementia. Among common denominators were long duration of the disease, unresponsiveness to treatment, worsening of clinical status, and presence of multiple conditions at the same time. The multiparametric display used enabled a comprehensive evaluation of the brain volume which included the hemispheric surfaces; the basal ganglia (striatum) and the thalamus, several components of the limbic and paralimbic systems: anterior and posterior cingulate and their respective subdivisions, insula-s and their subdivisions, apical and mesial

  12. Quantitatively accurate activity measurements with a dedicated cardiac SPECT camera: Physical phantom experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pourmoghaddas, Amir, E-mail: apour@ottawaheart.ca; Wells, R. Glenn [Physics Department, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6, Canada and Cardiology, The University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Ottawa, Ontario K1Y4W7 (Canada)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: Recently, there has been increased interest in dedicated cardiac single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scanners with pinhole collimation and improved detector technology due to their improved count sensitivity and resolution over traditional parallel-hole cameras. With traditional cameras, energy-based approaches are often used in the clinic for scatter compensation because they are fast and easily implemented. Some of the cardiac cameras use cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) detectors which can complicate the use of energy-based scatter correction (SC) due to the low-energy tail—an increased number of unscattered photons detected with reduced energy. Modified energy-based scatter correction methods can be implemented, but their level of accuracy is unclear. In this study, the authors validated by physical phantom experiments the quantitative accuracy and reproducibility of easily implemented correction techniques applied to {sup 99m}Tc myocardial imaging with a CZT-detector-based gamma camera with multiple heads, each with a single-pinhole collimator. Methods: Activity in the cardiac compartment of an Anthropomorphic Torso phantom (Data Spectrum Corporation) was measured through 15 {sup 99m}Tc-SPECT acquisitions. The ratio of activity concentrations in organ compartments resembled a clinical {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi scan and was kept consistent across all experiments (1.2:1 heart to liver and 1.5:1 heart to lung). Two background activity levels were considered: no activity (cold) and an activity concentration 1/10th of the heart (hot). A plastic “lesion” was placed inside of the septal wall of the myocardial insert to simulate the presence of a region without tracer uptake and contrast in this lesion was calculated for all images. The true net activity in each compartment was measured with a dose calibrator (CRC-25R, Capintec, Inc.). A 10 min SPECT image was acquired using a dedicated cardiac camera with CZT detectors (Discovery NM530c, GE

  13. Brain SPECT. SPECT in der Gehirndiagnostik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feistel, H. (Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Nuklearmedizinische Klinik mit Poliklinik)

    1991-12-01

    Brain SPECT investigations have gained broad acceptance since the introduction of the lipophilic tracer Tc-99m-HMPAO. Depending on equipment and objectives in different departments, the examinations can be divided into three groups: 1. Under normal conditions and standardised patient preparation the 'rest' SPECT can be performed in every department with a tomographic camera. In cerebrovascular disease there is a demand for determination of either the perfusion reserve in reversible ischemia or prognostic values in completed stroke. In cases of dementia, SPECT may yield useful results according to differential diagnosis. Central cerebral system involvement in immunologic disease may be estimated with higher sensitivity than in conventional brain imaging procedures. In psychiatric diseases there is only a relative indication for brain SPECT, since results during recent years have been contradictory and may be derived only in interventional manner. In brain tumor diagnostics SPECT with Tl-201 possibly permits grading. In inflammatory disease, especially in viral encephalitis, SPECT may be used to obtain early diagnosis. Normal pressure hydrocephalus can be distinguished from other forms of dementia and, consequently, the necessity for shunting surgery can be recognised. 2. In departments equipped for emergency cases an 'acute' SPECT can be performed in illnesses with rapid changing symptoms such as different forms of migraine, transient global amnesia, epileptic seizures (so-called 'ictal SPECT') or urgent forms like trauma. 3. In cooperation with several departments brain SPECT can be practised as an interventional procedure in clinical and in scientific studies. (orig./MG).

  14. SPECT in psychiatry. SPECT in der Psychiatrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barocka, A. (Psychiatrische Klinik und Poliklinik, Erlangen (Germany)); Feistel, H. (Nuklearmedizinische Klinik, Erlangen (Germany)); Ebert, D. (Psychiatrische Klinik und Poliklinik, Erlangen (Germany)); Lungershausen, E. (Psychiatrische Klinik und Poliklinik, Erlangen (Germany))

    1993-08-13

    This review presents Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) as a powerful tool for clinical use and research in psychiatry. Its focus is on regional cerebral blood flow, measured with technetium labelled HMPAO. In addition, first results with brain receptor imaging, concerning dopamin-D[sub 2] and benzodiazepine receptors, are covered. Due to major improvements in image quality, and impressive number of results has been accumulated in the past three years. The authors caution against using SPECT results as markers for disease entities. A finding like 'hypofrontality' is considered typical of a variety of mental disorders. Clearly both, more experience with SPECT and contributions from psychopathology, are needed. (orig.)

  15. Imaging of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Expression in Head and Neck Cancer with SPECT/CT and 111In-Labeled Cetuximab-F(ab')2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, L.K. van; Hoeben, B.A.W.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Franssen, G.M.; Boerman, O.C.; Bussink, J.

    2013-01-01

    Combined treatment of advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) with radiotherapy and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor cetuximab improves clinical outcome in comparison to radiotherapy alone but is effective only in a few cases. To select those patients most likely

  16. Nano-displacement measurement based on virtual pinhole confocal method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Long; Kuang, Cuifang; Xue, Yi; Liu, Xu

    2013-01-01

    A virtual pinhole confocal system based on charge-coupled device (CCD) detection and image processing techniques is built to measure axial displacement with 10 nm resolution, preeminent flexibility and excellent robustness when facing spot drifting. Axial displacement of the sample surface is determined by capturing the confocal laser spot using a CCD detector and quantifying the energy collected by programmable virtual pinholes. Experiments indicate an applicable measuring range of 1000 nm (Gaussian fitting r = 0.9902) with a highly linear range of 500 nm (linear fitting r = 0.9993). A concentric subtraction algorithm is introduced to further enhance resolution. Factors affecting measuring precision, sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio are discussed using theoretical deductions and diffraction simulations. The virtual pinhole technique has promising applications in surface profiling and confocal imaging applications which require easily-customizable pinhole configurations. (paper)

  17. Research On The Measure Method Of Oblique Pinhole Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Yu-Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many special advantages in measuring the diameter of blind and deep holes with a capacitive probe, there are still some challenges for the measurement of a oblique pinhole parameters because the measuring device is inconvenient to stretch into the oblique pinhole exactly. A five-dimensional measurement system was adopted in the paper which included a capacitive sensor probe and a three-coordinate measuring machine to accomplish the measurement for oblique pinholes. With the help of the three-dimensional coordinates measured from the pinhole axis, we put forward a comprehensive method of combining the projection method and the least squares method together for fitting spatial straight line to obtain the optimal equation of the spacial axis. Finally, a reliable and entire measurement system was set up.

  18. Diffraction phase microscopy realized with an automatic digital pinhole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Cheng; Zhou, Renjie; Kuang, Cuifang; Zhao, Guangyuan; Zhang, Zhimin; Liu, Xu

    2017-12-01

    We report a novel approach to diffraction phase microscopy (DPM) with automatic pinhole alignment. The pinhole, which serves as a spatial low-pass filter to generate a uniform reference beam, is made out of a liquid crystal display (LCD) device that allows for electrical control. We have made DPM more accessible to users, while maintaining high phase measurement sensitivity and accuracy, through exploring low cost optical components and replacing the tedious pinhole alignment process with an automatic pinhole optical alignment procedure. Due to its flexibility in modifying the size and shape, this LCD device serves as a universal filter, requiring no future replacement. Moreover, a graphic user interface for real-time phase imaging has been also developed by using a USB CMOS camera. Experimental results of height maps of beads sample and live red blood cells (RBCs) dynamics are also presented, making this system ready for broad adaption to biological imaging and material metrology.

  19. Brain SPECT in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guyot, M.; Baulieu, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    Brain SPECT in child involves specific trends regarding the patient cooperation, irradiation, resolution and especially interpretation because of the rapid scintigraphic modifications related to the brain maturation. In a general nuclear medicine department, child brain SPECT represents about 2 % of the activity. The choice indications are the perfusion children: thallium and MIBI in brain tumours, pharmacological and neuropsychological interventions. In the future, brain dedicated detectors and new radiopharmaceuticals will promote the development of brain SPECT in children. (author)

  20. Performance evaluation of D-SPECT: a novel SPECT system for nuclear cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlandsson, Kjell; Kacperski, Krzysztof; van Gramberg, Dean; Hutton, Brian F.

    2009-05-01

    D-SPECT (Spectrum Dynamics, Israel) is a novel SPECT system for cardiac perfusion studies. Based on CZT detectors, region-centric scanning, high-sensitivity collimators and resolution recovery, it offers potential advantages over conventional systems. A series of measurements were made on a β-version D-SPECT system in order to evaluate its performance in terms of energy resolution, scatter fraction, sensitivity, count rate capability and resolution. Corresponding measurements were also done on a conventional SPECT system (CS) for comparison. The energy resolution of the D-SPECT system at 140 keV was 5.5% (CS: 9.25%), the scatter fraction 30% (CS: 34%), the planar sensitivity 398 s-1 MBq-1 per head (99mTc, 10 cm) (CS: 72 s-1 MBq-1), and the tomographic sensitivity in the heart region was in the range 647-1107 s-1 MBq-1 (CS: 141 s-1 MBq-1). The count rate increased linearly with increasing activity up to 1.44 M s-1. The intrinsic resolution was equal to the pixel size, 2.46 mm (CS: 3.8 mm). The average reconstructed resolution using the standard clinical filter was 12.5 mm (CS: 13.7 mm). The D-SPECT has superior sensitivity to that of a conventional system with similar spatial resolution. It also has excellent energy resolution and count rate characteristics, which should prove useful in dynamic and dual radionuclide studies.

  1. Morphobiochemical diagnosis of acute trabecular microfractures using gamma correction Tc-99m HDP pinhole bone scan with histopathological verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahk, Yong-Whee; Hwang, Seok-Ha; Lee, U-Young; Chung, Yong-An; Jung, Joo-Young; Jeong, Hyeonseok S

    2017-11-01

    We prospectively performed gamma correction pinhole bone scan (GCPBS) and histopathologic verification study to make simultaneous morphobiochemical diagnosis of trabecular microfractures (TMF) occurred in the femoral head as a part of femoral neck fracture.Materials consisted of surgical specimens of the femoral head in 6 consecutive patients. The specimens were imaged using Tc-99m hydroxymethylene diphosphonate (HDP) pinhole scan and processed by the gamma correction. After cleansing with 10% formalin solution, injured specimen surface was observed using a surgical microscope to record TMF. Morphological findings shown in the photograph, naive pinhole bone scan, GCPBS, and hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) stain of the specimen were reciprocally correlated for histological verification and the usefulness of suppression and enhancement of Tc-99m HDP uptake was biochemically investigated in TMF and edema and hemorrhage using gamma correction.On the one hand, GCPBS was able to depict the calcifying calluses in TMF with enhanced Tc-99m HDP uptake. They were pinpointed, speckled, round, ovoid, rod-like, geographic, and crushed in shape. The smallest callus measured was 0.23 mm in this series. On the other hand, GCPBS biochemically was able to discern the calluses with enhanced high Tc-99m HDP uptake from the normal and edema dipped and hemorrhage irritated trabeculae with washed out uptake.Morphobiochemically, GCPBS can clearly depict microfractures in the femoral head produced by femoral neck fracture. It discerns the microcalluses with enhanced Tc-99m HDP uptake from the intact and edema dipped and hemorrhage irritated trabeculae with suppressed washed out Tc-99m HDP uptake. Both conventional pinhole bone scan and gamma correction are useful imaging means to specifically diagnose the microcalluses naturally formed in TMF.

  2. Left ventricular function in response to dipyridamole stress: head-to-head comparison between {sup 82}Rubidium PET and {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi SPECT ECG-gated myocardial perfusion imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giorgi, Maria Clementina; Meneghetti, Jose Claudio; Soares, Jose; Izaki, Marisa; Falcao, Andrea; Imada, Rodrigo; Chalela, William; Oliveira, Marco Antonio de; Nomura, Cesar [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Service - Heart Institute of the University of Sao Paulo Medical School, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Verberne, Hein J. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Academic Medical Center, P.O. Box 22700, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2017-05-15

    Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi (sestamibi) SPECT and rubidium-82 ({sup 82}Rb) PET both allow for combined assessment of perfusion and left ventricular (LV) function. We sought to compare parameters of LV function obtained with both methods using a single dipyridamole stress dose. A group of 221 consecutive patients (65.2 ± 10.4 years, 52.9% male) underwent consecutive sestamibi and {sup 82}Rb MPI after a single dipyridamole stress dose. Sestamibi and {sup 82}Rb summed rest (SRS), stress (SSS) and difference (SDS) scores, and LV end-diastolic (EDV) and end-systolic (ESV) volumes and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were compared. Bland-Altman analysis showed that with increasing ESV and EDV the difference between the two perfusion tracers increased both at rest and post-stress. The mean difference in EDV and ESV between the two perfusion tracers at rest could both be independently explained by the {sup 82}Rb SDS and the sestamibi SRS. The combined models explained approximately 30% of the variation in these volumes between the two perfusion tracers (R{sup 2} = 0.261, p = 0.005; R{sup 2} = 0.296, p < 0.001, for EDV and ESV respectively). However, the mean difference in LVEF between sestamibi and {sup 82}Rb showed no significant trend post-stress (R{sup 2} = 0.001, p = 0.70) and only a modest linear increase with increasing LVEF values at rest (R{sup 2} = 0.032, p = 0.009). Differences in left ventricular volumes between sestamibi and {sup 82}Rb MPI increase with increasing volumes. However, these differences did only marginally affect LVEF between sestamibi and {sup 82}Rb. In clinical practice these results should be taken into account when comparing functional derived parameters between sestamibi and {sup 82}Rb MPI. (orig.)

  3. Fast and accurate focusing analysis of large photon sieve using pinhole ring diffraction model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Lingjie; Wu, Yanxiong; Zhang, Jizhen; Qu, Hemeng

    2015-06-10

    In this paper, we developed a pinhole ring diffraction model for the focusing analysis of a large photon sieve. Instead of analyzing individual pinholes, we discuss the focusing of all of the pinholes in a single ring. An explicit equation for the diffracted field of individual pinhole ring has been proposed. We investigated the validity range of this generalized model and analytically describe the sufficient conditions for the validity of this pinhole ring diffraction model. A practical example and investigation reveals the high accuracy of the pinhole ring diffraction model. This simulation method could be used for fast and accurate focusing analysis of a large photon sieve.

  4. SPECT imaging of D{sub 2} dopamine receptors and endogenous dopamine release in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jongen, Cynthia [University Medical Center Utrecht, Image Sciences Institute, Q0S.459, P.O. Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Bruin, Kora de; Booij, Jan [University of Amsterdam, Academic Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Beekman, Freek [University Medical Center Utrecht, Image Sciences Institute, Q0S.459, P.O. Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Neuroscience and Pharmacology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Technical University Delft, Department R3, Section Radiation, Detection and Matter, Delft (Netherlands)

    2008-09-15

    The dopamine D{sub 2} receptor (D2R) is important in the mediation of addiction. [{sup 123}I]iodobenzamide (IBZM), a SPECT ligand for the D2R, has been used for in vivo studies of D2R availability in humans, monkeys, and rats. Although mouse models are important in the study of addiction, [{sup 123}I]IBZM has not been used in mice SPECT studies. This study evaluates the use of [{sup 123}I]IBZM for measuring D2R availability in mice. Pharmacokinetics of [{sup 123}I]IBZM in mice were studied with pinhole SPECT imaging after intravenous (i.v.) injection of [{sup 123}I]IBZM (20, 40, and 70 MBq). In addition, the ability to measure the release of endogenous dopamine after amphetamine administration with [{sup 123}I]IBZM SPECT was investigated. Thirdly, i.v. administration, the standard route of administration, and intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of [{sup 123}I]IBZM were compared. Specific binding of [{sup 123}I]IBZM within the mouse striatum could be clearly visualized with SPECT. Peak specific striatal binding ratios were reached around 90 min post-injection. After amphetamine administration, the specific binding ratios of [{sup 123}I]IBZM decreased significantly (-27.2%; n=6; p=0.046). Intravenous administration of [{sup 123}I]IBZM led to significantly higher specific binding than i.p. administration of the same dose. However, we found that i.v. administration of a dose of 70 MBq [{sup 123}I]IBZM might result in acute ethanol intoxication because ethanol is used as a preparative aid for the routine production of [{sup 123}I]IBZM. Imaging of D2R availability and endogenous dopamine release in mice is feasible using [{sup 123}I]IBZM single pinhole SPECT. Using commercially produced [{sup 123}I]IBZM, a dose of 40 MBq injected i.v. can be recommended. (orig.)

  5. SPECT imaging of D2 dopamine receptors and endogenous dopamine release in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jongen, Cynthia; Bruin, Kora de; Booij, Jan; Beekman, Freek

    2008-01-01

    The dopamine D 2 receptor (D2R) is important in the mediation of addiction. [ 123 I]iodobenzamide (IBZM), a SPECT ligand for the D2R, has been used for in vivo studies of D2R availability in humans, monkeys, and rats. Although mouse models are important in the study of addiction, [ 123 I]IBZM has not been used in mice SPECT studies. This study evaluates the use of [ 123 I]IBZM for measuring D2R availability in mice. Pharmacokinetics of [ 123 I]IBZM in mice were studied with pinhole SPECT imaging after intravenous (i.v.) injection of [ 123 I]IBZM (20, 40, and 70 MBq). In addition, the ability to measure the release of endogenous dopamine after amphetamine administration with [ 123 I]IBZM SPECT was investigated. Thirdly, i.v. administration, the standard route of administration, and intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of [ 123 I]IBZM were compared. Specific binding of [ 123 I]IBZM within the mouse striatum could be clearly visualized with SPECT. Peak specific striatal binding ratios were reached around 90 min post-injection. After amphetamine administration, the specific binding ratios of [ 123 I]IBZM decreased significantly (-27.2%; n=6; p=0.046). Intravenous administration of [ 123 I]IBZM led to significantly higher specific binding than i.p. administration of the same dose. However, we found that i.v. administration of a dose of 70 MBq [ 123 I]IBZM might result in acute ethanol intoxication because ethanol is used as a preparative aid for the routine production of [ 123 I]IBZM. Imaging of D2R availability and endogenous dopamine release in mice is feasible using [ 123 I]IBZM single pinhole SPECT. Using commercially produced [ 123 I]IBZM, a dose of 40 MBq injected i.v. can be recommended. (orig.)

  6. Assessment of early radiation effects on the liver. Comparison of SPECT and MR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masui, T.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the early effects of radiation on the liver using single photon emission CT (SPECT) with 99m Tc-phytate combined with a pinhole collimator and MR imaging with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) and to compare 2 modalities regarding the assessment of the reticuloendothelial cell function. Material and Methods: The right sides of the livers of 12 anesthetized rats were irradiated with X-rays (4000 Cgy). On the 3rd and 4th days postirradiation, SPECT and MR imaging pre- and postcontrast were performed. Results: On SPECT, the irradiated areas appeared as areas with reduced 99m Tc-phytate uptake in 9 rats. In the remaining 3 rats, irradiated lesions were not evident on SPECT. On the early postcontrast MR images, differential negative enhancement of the irradiated and nonirradiated areas in the same 9 rats as on SPECT was apparent. However, on the later postcontrast images of 3 of these rats, the irradiated areas, which were brighter than the nonirradiated areas, were visually less clear than those on the earlier postcontrast images. In the remaining 3 rats, no radiation damag was evident on MR images. Conclusion: SPECT with 99m Tc-phytate and early postcontrast MR imaging with SPIO can show early radiation damage of the liver. The serial assessment of the postcontrast MR images provides functional information on the Kupffer cells. (orig.)

  7. SPECT in psychiatry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barocka, A.; Feistel, H.; Ebert, D.; Lungershausen, E.

    1993-01-01

    This review presents Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) as a powerful tool for clinical use and research in psychiatry. Its focus is on regional cerebral blood flow, measured with technetium labelled HMPAO. In addition, first results with brain receptor imaging, concerning dopamin-D 2 and benzodiazepine receptors, are covered. Due to major improvements in image quality, and impressive number of results has been accumulated in the past three years. The authors caution against using SPECT results as markers for disease entities. A finding like 'hypofrontality' is considered typical of a variety of mental disorders. Clearly both, more experience with SPECT and contributions from psychopathology, are needed. (orig.) [de

  8. Pinhole bone scan mapping of metabolic profiles in osteoarthritis of the knee: a radiographic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. H.; Kim, H. H.; Chung, Y. A.; Chung, S. K.; Bahk, Y. W. [College of Medicine, The Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-07-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is mixture of damage to a joint and reaction induced therefrom. Heterogeneity, slow change and no proper means of assessing pathology make it a difficult disease to study. Diagnosis can be made by radiography when OA is established. But subtle metabolic change without radiographic alteration can only be detected by bone scan. Present study was performed to assess metabolic profiles of OA of the knee with various radiographic and preradiographic changes using pinhole bone scan (PBS). PBS and radiography were taken at the same time or a few days apart. We used single-head gamma camera and a 4-mm pinhole collimator. Patients were 9 men and 19 women (30-74 yr with mean being 55). PBS was correlated with radiography in each case. Increased tracer uptake was seen in 111 lesions in 28 knees. Intensity was arbitrarily graded into Grade 0-2. The results were divided into group with radiographic change (n=85; Table) and group without (n=26). Generally, tracer uptake was much intense in the sclerotic and cystic form. In radiographically normal group pathological uptake occurred mostly in subchondral bone (n=17) and some in the femoral condyle (n=9) denoting that subchondral bone is the most vulnerable. PBS is sensitive indicator of metabolic alternations in various disease processes of OA in both radiographically normal and abnormal cases.

  9. Brain lesion analysis using three-dimensional SPECT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Iekado; Onagi, Atsuo; Kuroki, Takao

    1995-01-01

    A three-headed gamma camera (PRISM 3000) is capable to scan the protocol of early dynamic SPECT and to analyze two radioisotopes at the same time. We have framed three-dimensional brain SPECT images for several brain diseases by using the Application Visualization System (AVS). We carried out volume measurements in brain tumors and/or AVMs by applying this methodology. Thallium-201 and/or 123I-IMP were used for brain SPECT imaging. The dynamic scan protocol was changed in accordance with the given disease. The protocol for brain tumors was derived from a preliminary comparative study with thallium-201 and 123I-IMP that had suggested a disparity in the detection of brain tumors and the differentiation between tumor tissue and normal brain. The three-dimension SPECT image represented the brain tumor or AVM in a striking fashion, and the changes with respect to tumor or AVM after radiosurgery or embolization were understood readily. (author)

  10. Final Progress Report: SPECT Assay of Radiolabeled Monoclonal Antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaszczak, Ronald J.

    2004-01-01

    During the past project period, we proposed to collaborate closely with DOE's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab or JLab) to design a compact, ultra-high-resolution, high-sensitivity gamma camera for quantifying brain-tumor distributions of I-131. We also proposed to continue our on-going research in developing and evaluating pinhole collimation for quantitative ultra-high-resolution imaging of I-131-labeled MAbs. We have made excellent progress in accomplishing much of the research related to pinhole collimation. Many of the most significant results have been presented in peer-reviewed journal articles and conference proceedings. We have also made good progress in collaborating with JLab's Detector Group in developing a compact, ultra-high-resolution, gamma camera. A prototype I-131 imager was delivered to Duke on May 28, 2003. Our research results are summarized in the following sections. A. JLAB-DUKE DEDICATED BRAIN-TUMOR IMAGING SYSTEM A.1. Determination of Optimal Collimator Design During the current project period a prototype I-131 dedicated brain imager has been designed and built. Computer simulations and analysis of alternate designs were performed at Duke to determine an optimal collimator design. Collimator response was characterized by spatial resolution and sensitivity. Both geometric (non-penetrative) and penetrative sensitivities were considered in selecting an optimal collimator design. Based on these simulation results, two collimator designs were selected and built by external vendors. Initial imaging results were obtained using these collimators. B. INITIAL DEVELOPMENT OF SPECT RECONSTRUCTION SOFTWARE FOR JLAB-DUKE CAMERA B.1. Modeling Thick Septa and Collimator Holes: Geometrical-Phantom Study A geometrical phantom was designed to illuminate spatial resolution effects. The phantom includes a uniformly attenuating medium that consists of all voxels within an elliptical cylinder that is centered on the axis of rotation

  11. An Evaluation of Pinhole Castration as an Alternative Technique for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We evaluated pinhole castration as an alternative technique for dog population control in resource poor rural communities of Gulu, Northern Uganda. Through a campaign dubbed 'Big Fix Gulu', households in selected communities were mobilized using radio announcements, posters and school visits, to present dogs for ...

  12. COPPER PITTING CORROSION AND PINHOLE LEAKS: A CASE STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Localized corrosion, or "pitting", of copper drinking water pipe continues is a problem for many water utilities and their customers. Extreme attack leads to pinhole leaks that can potentially lead to water damage, mold growth, and costly repairs for the homeowners, as well as th...

  13. Brain pertechnetate SPECT in perinatal asphyxia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sfakianakis, G.; Curless, R.; Goldberg, R.; Clarke, L.; Saw, C.; Sfakianakis, E.; Bloom, F.; Bauer, C.; Serafini, A.

    1984-01-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography of the brain was performed in 6 patients with perinatal asphyxis aged 8-26 days. A single-head (LFOV) commercial SPECT system (Picker) was used and data were acquired 2-3 hr after an IV injection of 1-2 mCi Tc-99m-pertechnetate (360/sup 0/ rotation, 60 views, 64 x 64 matrix, 50K cts/view). Reconstruction in three planes was performed using MDS software (Hanning medium resolution filter, with or without attenuation correction using Sorenson's technique). For each clinical study, a ring type phantom source was used to identify the level of reconstruction noise in the tomographic planes. Abnormalities were found in all patients studied, 3 central (moderate intensity), 2 peripheral (1 severe, 1 moderate) and 1 diffuse (mild intensity). Despite use of oral perchlorate (50 mg) in one patient the choroid plexus was visible. Since attenuation correction tended to amplify noise, the clinical studies were interpreted both with and without this correction. All 3 patients with central lesions were found abnormal on early (1-4 mo) neurologic follow-up examination, whereas the others were normal. No correlation was found between SPECT and 24 hr blood levels of CPK, ammonia, base excess, or the Apgar scores. Ct scans were reported abnormal (3 diffuse, 1 peripheral, 1 central and 1 questionable). Planar scintigrams obtained immediately after SPECT were normal (2), questionable (2) and abnormal (2). Follow-up SPECT brain scintigrams in two of the patients showed partial resolution. SPECT of the brain appears promising in perinatal asphyxia but long-term correlation with patient development is necessary.

  14. Anything wrong with brain SPECT? Not really

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavel, D.G.; Davis, G.; Craita, I.; Liu, P.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Despite increased evidence about the usefulness of Brain SPECT in Neuro-Psychiatry, it continues to represent only a low percentage of Nuclear Medicine procedures. The prevalent perception is that it is an inadequate diagnostic tool, and/or is not changing patient management. There are objective reasons for this, as the lack of awareness by Psychiatrists about the value of SPECT, but most important is the frequently poor quality of images provided. This can be due to inadequate gamma cameras but is mostly due to poor quality software. Materials and Methods: High resolution brain SPECT via triple head gamma camera, super-high resolution fan beam collimator and Tc-HMPAO. A combination of commercial software and local optimization was used for the final displays as well as for realignment of sequential brain SPECT studies. Results: We found out that 6 basic software improvements are needed to generate a final display where features can be clearly distinguished and which can be also easily assimilated by the referring physician. 1) Color scales: simple and efficient tools needed to generate user friendly and semiquantitative color shades as needed. Unfortunately various color scales may be needed depending on printer and paper used. 2): 3 D displays allowing, multiple standardized thresholdings, any number of groupings, differential coloring (with functional meaning) and adequate labeling. Should be completely or at least mostly automatic. 3) Automatic realignment of sequential studies: such programs exist in various forms (free WWW versions, proprietary Beta versions, etc.) but are still not supplied by the gamma camera vendors for general use. Should provide SPECT -SPECT and SPECT MRI options. 4) Localization of structures and slices a) Triangulation of structures and b) Identification of section location. 5) Graphics improvement for generating any number of optimized summary displays to accompany reports. 6) Availability of voxel based quantification software

  15. Brain SPECT in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tranquart, F.; Saliba, E.; Prunier, C.; Baulieu, F.; Besnard, J.C.; Guilloteau, D.; Baulieu, J.L.

    2001-01-01

    The modalities and the indications of perfusion and neurotransmission SPECT in childhood are presented. The perfusion as well as neurotransmission tracers have not yet authorization for use in children; they have to be used by prescription of magistral preparation or in research protocols. The radioprotection rules have to be strictly respected. The most frequent indication of perfusion SPECT is pharmacologically resistant epilepsy; the ictal SPECT before surgery allows the localization of the epileptogenic focus. Other indications are relevant in the prognosis of neonatal anoxia and encephalitis. In psychiatric disorders, especially in autism, the interest is the physiopathological approach of the brain dysfunctions. The neurotransmission SPECT is emerging as a consequence of the development of new radiotracer, as the dopaminergic system ligands. The decrease of the dopamine D2 receptors in the striatum can be imaged and quantified in the neonate. The lesions of dopamine system seem to be a consequence of the neonatal hypoxia-ischemia and it is predictive of motor sequelae. Brain SPECT should become a routine examination in child neurologic and psychiatric disorders. (authors)

  16. Simulation study of the second-generation MR-compatible SPECT system based on the inverted compound-eye gamma camera design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Xiaochun; Meng, Ling-Jian

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we present simulation studies for the second-generation MRI compatible SPECT system, MRC-SPECT-II, based on an inverted compound eye (ICE) gamma camera concept. The MRC-SPECT-II system consists of a total of 1536 independent micro-pinhole-camera-elements (MCEs) distributed in a ring with an inner diameter of 6 cm. This system provides a FOV of 1 cm diameter and a peak geometrical efficiency of approximately 1.3% (the typical levels of 0.1%-0.01% found in modern pre-clinical SPECT instrumentations), while maintaining a sub-500 μm spatial resolution. Compared to the first-generation MRC-SPECT system (MRC-SPECT-I) (Cai 2014 Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A 734 147-51) developed in our lab, the MRC-SPECT-II system offers a similar resolution with dramatically improved sensitivity and greatly reduced physical dimension. The latter should allow the system to be placed inside most clinical and pre-clinical MRI scanners for high-performance simultaneous MRI and SPECT imaging.

  17. SPECT in psychiatry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasper, S.; Gruenwald, F.; Walter, H.; Klemm, E.; Podreka, I.; Biersack, H.J.

    1994-01-01

    In the last fifteen years different attempts have been undertaken to understand the biological basis of major psychiatric disorders. One important tool to determine patterns of brain dysfunction is single emission computed tomography (SPECT). Whereas SPECT investigations are already a valuable diagnostic instrument for the diagnosis of dementia of the Alzheimer Type (DAT) there have not been consistent findings that can be referred to as specific for any other particular psychiatric diagnostic entity. Nevertheless, SPECT studies have been able to demonstrate evidence of brain dysfunction in patients with schizophrenia, depression, anxiety disorders, and substance abuse in which other methods showed no clear abnormality of brain function. Our manuscript reviews the data which are currently available in the literature and stresses the need for further studies, especially for prediction and monitoring psychiatric treatment modalities. (orig.) [de

  18. Applications of cerebral SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McArthur, C., E-mail: claire.mcarthur@nhs.net [Department of Neuroradiology, Institute of Neurological Sciences, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Jampana, R.; Patterson, J.; Hadley, D. [Department of Neuroradiology, Institute of Neurological Sciences, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-15

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) can provide three-dimensional functional images of the brain following the injection of one of a series of radiopharmaceuticals that crosses the blood-brain barrier and distributes according to cerebral perfusion, neurotransmitter, or cell density. Applications include differentiating between the dementias, evaluating cerebrovascular disease, preoperative localization of epileptogenic foci, diagnosing movement disorders, and evaluation of intracerebral tumours, while also proving a useful research tool. Unlike positronemission tomography (PET), SPECT imaging is widely available and can be performed in any department that has access to a rotating gamma camera. The purpose of this review is to demonstrate the utility of cerebral SPECT and increase awareness of its role in the investigation of neurological and psychiatric disorders.

  19. Linear micromechanical stepping drive for pinhole array positioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endrödy, Csaba; Mehner, Hannes; Hoffmann, Martin; Grewe, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    A compact linear micromechanical stepping drive for positioning a 7 × 5.5 mm 2 optical pinhole array is presented. The system features a step size of 13.2 µm and a full displacement range of 200 µm. The electrostatic inch-worm stepping mechanism shows a compact design capable of positioning a payload 50% of its own weight. The stepping drive movement, step sizes and position accuracy are characterized. The actuated pinhole array is integrated in a confocal chromatic hyperspectral imaging system, where coverage of the object plane, and therefore the useful picture data, can be multiplied by 14 in contrast to a non-actuated array. (paper)

  20. Oxidative Attack of Carbon/Carbon Substrates through Coating Pinholes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Leonhardt, Todd; Curry, Donald; Rapp, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    A critical issue with oxidation protected carbon/carbon composites used for spacecraft thermal protection is the formation of coating pinholes. In laboratory experiments, artificial pinholes were drilled through SiC-coatings on a carbon/carbon material and the material was oxidized at 600, 1000, and 1400 C at reduced pressures of air. The attack of the carbon/carbon was quantified by both weight loss and a novel cross-sectioning technique. A two-zone, one dimensional diffusion control model was adapted to analyze this problem. Agreement of the model with experiment was reasonable at 1000 and 1400 C; however results at lower temperatures show clear deviations from the theory suggesting that surface reaction control plays a role.

  1. Brain SPECT using dipyridamole for evaluation of vascular reserve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Su Zy; Park, Chan Hee; Yoon, Soo Hwan; Pai, Moon Sun; Yoon, Suk Nam; Cho, Kyung Kee

    1997-01-01

    Baseline and stress brain SPECT studies using CO 2 inhalation, acetazolamide (Diamox R ) and adenosine administrations have been used in the evaluation of cerebral vascular reserve. Recently dipyridamole (Persantine R ) which is one of the pharmacologic myocardial perfusion SPECT agents as a potent vasodilator is suggested as another cerebral vasodilator. IV Diamox R is not available in Korea. Therefore, the purpose of our study was to evaluate dipyridamole in stress brain SPECT in patients with Moya Moya disease. Eight patients with angiographically proven Moya Moya disease were studied. Their ages ranged from 7 to 62 year old. There were 4 males and 4 females. Each patient had a baseline and persantine brain SPECT studies with 1 to 3 days' interval. Dipyridamole was given intravenously at a dose of 0.56 mg/kg over 4 minutes while watching vital signs such as blood pressure, heart rate, and electrocardiogram. Three minutes after the completion of the infusion, 99mTc-ECD (0.2 mCi/Ib body weight) was injected. Brain SPECT was performed 30 minutes later using a tripple head gamma camera equipped with LEHR collimators. A total of 128 projections with an acquisition time of 30 second per projection was obtained and reconstructed by filtered back projections without attenuation correction. The difference between the baseline and persantine studies was analysed by visual and semiquantitavely. During the infusion of persantine, heart rate, blood pressure and side effects such as headache, chest discomfort were similar to the persantine myocardial SPECT studies. Five of eight patients showed a significant decrease in rCBF on persantine brain SPECT in comparison to the baseline study. The remaining three revealed no significant change in rCBF. Our study suggests that the dipyridamole stress brain SPECT is feasible and useful in assessing cerebral blood flow reserve. However we need to evaluate more number of patients in the future

  2. Usefulness of brain SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raynaud, C.; Rancurel, G.; Kieffer, E.; Ricard, S.; Askienazy, S.; Moretti, J.L.; Bourdoiseau, M.; Rapin, J.; Soussaline, F.

    1983-01-01

    Brain SPECT was not effectively exploited until I-123 isopropyl amphetamine (IAMP), indicator able to penetrate the blood brain barrier, became available. Although the experience of research teams working with IAMP is quite restricted due to the high cost of the indicator, some applications now appear to be worth the cost and in some cases provide data which cannot be obtained with routine techniques, especially in cerebrovascular patients, in epilepsy and some cases of tumor. Brain SPECT appears as an atraumatic test which is useful to establish a functional evaluation of the cerebral parenchyma, and which is a complement to arteriography, X-ray scan and regional cerebral blood flow measurement

  3. Use of Gamma Correction Pinhole Bone Scans in Trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahk, Youg Whee; Chung, Youg An; Park, Jung Mee

    2012-01-01

    99 mTc hydroxydiphosphonate (HDP) bone scanning is a classic metabolic nuclear imaging method and the most frequently performed examination. Clinically, it has long been cherished as an indispensable diagnostic screening tool and for monitoring of patients with bone, joint, and soft tissue diseases. The HDP bone scan, the pinhole scan in particular, is known for its ability to detect increased, decreased, or defective tracer uptake along with magnified anatomy. Unfortunately, however, the findings of such uptake changes are not specific in many traumatic bone disorders, especially when lesions are minute and complex. This study discusses the recently introduced gamma correction pinhole bone scan (GCPBS), emphasizing its usefulness in the diagnosis of traumatic bone diseases including occult fractures; and fish vertebra. Indeed, GCPBS can remarkably enhance the diagnostic feasibility of HDP pinhole bone scans by refining the topography, pathologic anatomy, and altered chemical profile of the traumatic diseases in question. The fine and precise depiction of anatomic and metabolic changes in these diseases has been shown to be unique to GCPBS, and they are not appreciated on conventional radiographs, multiple detector CT, or ultrasonographs. It is true that MR imaging can portray proton change, but understandably, it is a manifestation that is common to any bone disease

  4. DMSA SPECT imaging using oblique reconstruction in a paediatric population - benefits and technical considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsons, G.; Ford, M.; Crisp, J.; Bernard, E.; Howman-Giles, R.

    1997-01-01

    Full text: DMSA renal scans are frequently requested for the diagnosis and follow-up of acute pyelonephritis and cortical scarring. This study was designed to:- 1. evaluate oblique reconstruction of DMSA SPECT over standard plane reconstruction and planar imaging; and 2. report on the technical aspects important in obtaining high quality DMSA SPECT, particularly in neonates. Over seven months, 210/231 (91 %) of DMSA scans were performed with SPECT on children from age nine days to 16 years, the median age being 2.5 years. 65 patients (31 %) were under one year and 39 (18%) were under six months. Planar and SPECT imaging with standard plane reconstruction and oblique reorientation was performed on the Siemens triple-headed gamma camera. High quality SPECT images were obtained on the smallest babies using a paediatric palette, and were of comparable quality to those of older children. At the time of reporting, the nuclear medicine physician assessed the diagnostic value of the three types of date presented: (1) planar images; (2) standard plane SPECT reconstruction; and (3) oblique SPECT reconstruction. Cortical defects were identified separately for upper, middle and lower poles. Three physicians concluded that high quality SPECT is superior to planar images when assessing the renal cortex. In addition, oblique reorientation is superior to standard reconstruction, particularly at the upper and lower poles. SPECT is now performed routinely on patients of all ages, and the oblique sagittal and coronal reorientation is now used in place of the standard reconstruction

  5. High resolution SPECT imaging for visualization of intratumoral heterogeneity using a SPECT/CT scanner dedicated for small animal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umeda, Izumi O.; Tani, Kotaro; Tsuda, Keisuke

    2012-01-01

    Tumor interiors are never homogeneous and in vivo visualization of intratumoral heterogeneity would be an innovation that contributes to improved cancer therapy. But, conventional nuclear medicine tests have failed to visualize heterogeneity in vivo because of limited spatial resolution. Recently developed single photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) scanners dedicated for small animal imaging are of interest due to their excellent spatial resolution of 111 In and simulations of actual small animal imaging. The optimal conditions obtained were validated by in vivo imaging of sarcoma 180-bearing mice. Larger number of counts must be obtained within limited acquisition time to visualize tumor heterogeneity in vivo in animal imaging, compared to cases that simply detect tumors. At an acquisition time of 30 min, better image quality was obtained with pinhole apertures diameter of 1.4 mm than of 1.0 mm. The obtained best spatial resolution was 1.3 mm, it was acceptable for our purpose, though a little worse than the best possible performance of the scanner (1.0 mm). Additionally, the reconstruction parameters, such as noise suppression, voxel size, and iteration/subset number, needed to be optimized under the limited conditions and were different from those found under the ideal condition. The minimal radioactivity concentration for visualization of heterogeneous tumor interiors was estimated to be as high as 0.2-0.5 MBq/mL. Liposomes containing 111 In met this requirement and were administered to tumor-bearing mice. SPECT imaging successfully showed heterogeneous 111 In distribution within the tumors in vivo with good spatial resolution. A threshold of 0.2 MBq/g for clear visualization of tumor heterogeneity was validated. Autoradiograms obtained ex vivo of excised tumors confirmed that the in vivo SPECT images accurately depicted the heterogeneous intratumoral accumulation of liposomes. Intratumoral heterogeneity was successfully visualized under the optimized

  6. Patient position alters attenuation effects in multipinhole cardiac SPECT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmins, Rachel; Ruddy, Terrence D; Wells, R Glenn

    2015-03-01

    Dedicated cardiac cameras offer improved sensitivity over conventional SPECT cameras. Sensitivity gains are obtained by large numbers of detectors and novel collimator arrangements such as an array of multiple pinholes that focus on the heart. Pinholes lead to variable amounts of attenuation as a source is moved within the camera field of view. This study evaluated the effects of this variable attenuation on myocardial SPECT images. Computer simulations were performed for a set of nine point sources distributed in the left ventricular wall (LV). Sources were placed at the location of the heart in both an anthropomorphic and a water-cylinder computer phantom. Sources were translated in x, y, and z by up to 5 cm from the center. Projections were simulated with and without attenuation and the changes in attenuation were compared. A LV with an inferior wall defect was also simulated in both phantoms over the same range of positions. Real camera data were acquired on a Discovery NM530c camera (GE Healthcare, Haifa, Israel) for five min in list-mode using an anthropomorphic phantom (DataSpectrum, Durham, NC) with 100 MBq of Tc-99m in the LV. Images were taken over the same range of positions as the simulations and were compared based on the summed perfusion score (SPS), defect width, and apparent defect uptake for each position. Point sources in the water phantom showed absolute changes in attenuation of ≤8% over the range of positions and relative changes of ≤5% compared to the apex. In the anthropomorphic computer simulations, absolute change increased to 20%. The changes in relative attenuation caused a change in SPS of position-dependent changes were removed with attenuation correction. Translation of a source relative to a multipinhole camera caused only small changes in homogeneous phantoms with SPS changing position-dependent changes in attenuation.

  7. Analytical singular-value decomposition of three-dimensional, proximity-based SPECT systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrett, Harrison H. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States). College of Optical Sciences; Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States). Center for Gamma-Ray Imaging; Holen, Roel van [Ghent Univ. (Belgium). Medical Image and Signal Processing (MEDISIP); Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States). Center for Gamma-Ray Imaging

    2011-07-01

    An operator formalism is introduced for the description of SPECT imaging systems that use solid-angle effects rather than pinholes or collimators, as in recent work by Mitchell and Cherry. The object is treated as a 3D function, without discretization, and the data are 2D functions on the detectors. An analytic singular-value decomposition of the resulting integral operator is performed and used to compute the measurement and null components of the objects. The results of the theory are confirmed with a Landweber algorithm that does not require a system matrix. (orig.)

  8. Performance evaluation of a compact PET/SPECT/CT tri-modality system for small animal imaging applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Qingyang; Wang, Shi; Ma, Tianyu; Wu, Jing; Liu, Hui; Xu, Tianpeng; Xia, Yan; Fan, Peng; Lyu, Zhenlei; Liu, Yaqiang

    2015-01-01

    PET, SPECT and CT imaging techniques are widely used in preclinical small animal imaging applications. In this paper, we present a compact small animal PET/SPECT/CT tri-modality system. A dual-functional, shared detector design is implemented which enables PET and SPECT imaging with a same LYSO ring detector. A multi-pinhole collimator is mounted on the system and inserted into the detector ring in SPECT imaging mode. A cone-beam CT consisting of a micro focus X-ray tube and a CMOS detector is implemented. The detailed design and the performance evaluations are reported in this paper. In PET imaging mode, the measured NEMA based spatial resolution is 2.12 mm (FWHM), and the sensitivity at the central field of view (CFOV) is 3.2%. The FOV size is 50 mm (∅)×100 mm (L). The SPECT has a spatial resolution of 1.32 mm (FWHM) and an average sensitivity of 0.031% at the center axial, and a 30 mm (∅)×90 mm (L) FOV. The CT spatial resolution is 8.32 lp/mm @10%MTF, and the contrast discrimination function value is 2.06% with 1.5 mm size cubic box object. In conclusion, a compact, tri-modality PET/SPECT/CT system was successfully built with low cost and high performance

  9. Investigation of the hard x-ray background in backlit pinhole imagers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fein, J. R., E-mail: jrfein@umich.edu; Holloway, J. P. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2143 (United States); Peebles, J. L. [Center for Energy Research, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Keiter, P. A.; Klein, S. R.; Kuranz, C. C.; Manuel, M. J.-E.; Drake, R. P. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2143 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Hard x-rays from laser-produced hot electrons (>10 keV) in backlit pinhole imagers can give rise to a background signal that decreases signal dynamic range in radiographs. Consequently, significant uncertainties are introduced to the measured optical depth of imaged plasmas. Past experiments have demonstrated that hard x-rays are produced when hot electrons interact with the high-Z pinhole substrate used to collimate the softer He-α x-ray source. Results are presented from recent experiments performed on the OMEGA-60 laser to further study the production of hard x-rays in the pinhole substrate and how these x-rays contribute to the background signal in radiographs. Radiographic image plates measured hard x-rays from pinhole imagers with Mo, Sn, and Ta pinhole substrates. The variation in background signal between pinhole substrates provides evidence that much of this background comes from x-rays produced in the pinhole substrate itself. A Monte Carlo electron transport code was used to model x-ray production from hot electrons interacting in the pinhole substrate, as well as to model measurements of x-rays from the irradiated side of the targets, recorded by a bremsstrahlung x-ray spectrometer. Inconsistencies in inferred hot electron distributions between the different pinhole substrate materials demonstrate that additional sources of hot electrons beyond those modeled may produce hard x-rays in the pinhole substrate.

  10. {sup 67}Ga-SPECT/CT with a hybrid system in the clinical management of lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palumbo, Barbara; Sivolella, Silvio; Palumbo, Renato [University of Perugia, Nuclear Medicine Section, Department of Radiological Sciences, Perugia (Italy); Palumbo, Isabella; Liberati, Anna Marina [University of Perugia, Internal Medicine and Oncology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Perugia (Italy)

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the added value of co-registered fusion imaging using a hybrid system in patients with lymphoma. Twenty-four lymphoma patients underwent {sup 67}Ga-SPECT/CT using a hybrid tomograph consisting of a dual-head, variable-angle gamma camera and a low-dose X-ray tube. Results were compared with those of SPECT alone. Forty-five lesions were identified by SPECT alone, while 49 were detected by SPECT/CT. Forty out of the 45 lesions observed on SPECT were confirmed as lymphoma, but five were due to other causes (thoracic aorta blood pool activity, sialoadenitis in the submandibular gland, bowel activity, rib fracture and bone marrow activation due to radiotherapy). SPECT/CT identified nine more neoplastic lesions compared with SPECT alone: four areas of radiopharmaceutical accumulation were observed in para-aortic lymph nodes, three in the spleen, one in the liver and one in para-iliac lymph nodes. In five cases, SPECT/CT provided additional anatomical information over SPECT alone. In four patients, four large areas of {sup 67}Ga uptake (one mediastinal, two supraclavicular and one para-aortic) were better characterised; in one subject uptake was localised in the seventh thoracic vertebra only by SPECT/CT. Hybrid imaging provided additional data in 13 patients (54.2%), thus inducing oncologists to reconsider the therapeutic approach in eight subjects (33.2%): unnecessary treatment was avoided in four (16.6%) while therapy was altered in another four (16.6%). SPECT/CT hybrid system is able to provide information not obtained by SPECT alone. It allows the anatomical localisation of lymphoma and physiological radiopharmaceutical uptake, facilitates the diagnosis of tumours located in the abdomen (subdiaphragmatic lesions) and provides information that may cause a change in therapeutic strategy. (orig.)

  11. Assessment of grass root effects on soil piping in sandy soils using the pinhole test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernatek-Jakiel, Anita; Vannoppen, Wouter; Poesen, Jean

    2017-10-01

    Soil piping is an important land degradation process that occurs in a wide range of environments. Despite an increasing number of studies on this type of subsurface erosion, the impact of vegetation on piping erosion is still unclear. It can be hypothesized that vegetation, and in particular plant roots, may reduce piping susceptibility of soils because roots of vegetation also control concentrated flow erosion rates or shallow mass movements. Therefore, this paper aims to assess the impact of grass roots on piping erosion susceptibility of a sandy soil. The pinhole test was used as it provides quantitative data on pipeflow discharge, sediment concentration and sediment discharge. Tests were conducted at different hydraulic heads (i.e., 50 mm, 180 mm, 380 mm and 1020 mm). Results showed that the hydraulic head was positively correlated with pipeflow discharge, sediment concentration and sediment discharge, while the presence of grass roots (expressed as root density) was negatively correlated with these pipeflow characteristics. Smaller sediment concentrations and sediment discharges were observed in root-permeated samples compared to root-free samples. When root density exceeds 0.5 kg m- 3, piping erosion rates decreased by 50% compared to root-free soil samples. Moreover, if grass roots are present, the positive correlation between hydraulic head and both sediment discharge and sediment concentration is less pronounced, demonstrating that grass roots become more effective in reducing piping erosion rates at larger hydraulic heads. Overall, this study demonstrates that grass roots are quite efficient in reducing piping erosion rates in sandy soils, even at high hydraulic head (> 1 m). As such, grass roots may therefore be used to efficiently control piping erosion rates in topsoils.

  12. 1-123 iodoamphetamine SPECT findings in paranoid schizophrenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, T.R.; Walker, B.S.; Matthieson, S.; Miller, C.D.; Raese, J.

    1989-01-01

    To find out if frontal metabolic and cerebral blood flow differ between normal subjects and patients with paranoid schizophrenia (PAR), the authors have examined regional synaptic amine metabolism. Using [I- 123]iodoamphetamine (IMP), the authors compared 85 subjects (61 PAR patients and 24 normal subjects) with single-head single-photon emission CT (SPECT). Virtually automatic analysis assigned relative tracer uptake to the frontal, anterior temporoparietal (TP), and posterior TP regions. Consistent with the visual inspection of two clinicians familiar with SPECT IMP images, this objective method yielded T-tests that showed higher relative frontal lobe ratios in normal subjects than in PAR patients (P =.03)

  13. Radiopharmaceuticals for brain - SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moretti, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    Perfusion tracers for brain SPECT imaging suitable for regional cerebral blood flow measurement and regional cerebral blood volume determination, with respect to their ability to pass the blood-brain-barrier, are described. Problems related t the use of specific radiotracers to map receptors distribution in the brain are also discussed in this lecture. 9 figs, 6 tabs

  14. Single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganatra, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    Tomography in nuclear medicine did not originate after the introduction of X-ray computerized tomography (CT). Even in the days of rectilinear scanner, tomography was attempted with multiple detector heads rotating around the patient, but the counts at each plane were never very high to obtain a satisfactory image. A high resolution focusing collimator can look at different depths but taking several slices in one projection was a time consuming process. Rectilinear scanners lose lot of counts in the collimator to look at one point, at on time, in one plane. It is true that attempts to do tomography with gamma camera really got a boost after the success of CT. By that time, algorithms for doing reconstruction of images also were highly refined and for advanced. Clinical application of SPECT has become widespread now, because of the development of suitable radiopharmaceuticals and improvement in instrumentation. The SPECT provides a direct measure of regional organ function and is performed with nuclides such as 123 I and 99 Tc m that emit a mono-image photon during their decay. SPECT is far less expensive than positron emission tomography

  15. Single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganatra, R D

    1993-12-31

    Tomography in nuclear medicine did not originate after the introduction of X-ray computerized tomography (CT). Even in the days of rectilinear scanner, tomography was attempted with multiple detector heads rotating around the patient, but the counts at each plane were never very high to obtain a satisfactory image. A high resolution focusing collimator can look at different depths but taking several slices in one projection was a time consuming process. Rectilinear scanners lose lot of counts in the collimator to look at one point, at on time, in one plane. It is true that attempts to do tomography with gamma camera really got a boost after the success of CT. By that time, algorithms for doing reconstruction of images also were highly refined and for advanced. Clinical application of SPECT has become widespread now, because of the development of suitable radiopharmaceuticals and improvement in instrumentation. The SPECT provides a direct measure of regional organ function and is performed with nuclides such as {sup 123}I and {sup 99}Tc{sup m} that emit a mono-image photon during their decay. SPECT is far less expensive than positron emission tomography

  16. Characterization of a high-purity germanium detector for small-animal SPECT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Lindsay C; Campbell, Desmond L; Hull, Ethan L; Peterson, Todd E

    2011-09-21

    We present an initial evaluation of a mechanically cooled, high-purity germanium double-sided strip detector as a potential gamma camera for small-animal SPECT. It is 90 mm in diameter and 10 mm thick with two sets of 16 orthogonal strips that have a 4.5 mm width with a 5 mm pitch. We found an energy resolution of 0.96% at 140 keV, an intrinsic efficiency of 43.3% at 122 keV and a FWHM spatial resolution of approximately 1.5 mm. We demonstrated depth-of-interaction estimation capability through comparison of pinhole acquisitions with a point source on and off axes. Finally, a flood-corrected flood image exhibited a strip-level uniformity of less than 1%. This high-purity germanium offers many desirable properties for small-animal SPECT.

  17. Brain perfusion SPECT in dementia syndromes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libus, P.; Stupalova, J.; Kuzelka, I.; Konrad, J.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Brain perfusion SPECT is used in differential diagnostics of dementia syndromes. First of all the aim is to distinguish vascular dementia from degenerative dementia and to differentiate dementia from delirium, psychiatric syndromes, depression and secondary dementia, which is important in relation to therapy. The purpose of our study was to detect significance of BP SPECT and include it into the diagnostic process in dementia syndromes. Materials and methods: 51 women and 63 men aged 55 - 88 were evaluated in the study. The patients correspond to the general criteria of dementia diagnosis. They were sent to the examination by neurological, internal and psychiatric departments and out-patient departments. All patients were examined by 99mTc ECD SPECT using a double head camera PRISM 200 VP with LEHR collimator. The scintigraphic data were evaluated by the visual and semiquantitative analysis. Results: It was established that most patients in our group had vascular dementia, while Alzheimer's disease was second. In other groups we found out dementia at strategic infarct location, e.g. in gyrus angularis in the dominant hemisphere, frontal temporal lobe dementia and alcoholic dementia. Twenty-four patients had a normal diagnosis. Fifteen of them had a somatic reason of the delirious state and were re-classified into pseudodementia. Nine patients were not diagnostically included and the examination will repeated in four months time. Conclusion: We have found out a good applicability of brain perfusion SPECT in dementia syndromes diagnosis in our work. The best diagnosticable and most specific were the findings in multi-infarct dementia, Alzheimer's disease and frontal temporal lobe dementia. When vascular dementia is concerned we can even distinguish dementia at strategic infarction location, e.g. in thalamus, basal frontal telencefalon, in gyrus angularis of the dominant hemisphere, etc

  18. First validation of myocardial flow reserve assessed by dynamic 99mTc-sestamibi CZT-SPECT camera: head to head comparison with 15O-water PET and fractional flow reserve in patients with suspected coronary artery disease. The WATERDAY study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, Denis; Roule, Vincent; Nganoa, Catherine; Roth, Nathaniel; Baavour, Raphael; Parienti, Jean-Jacques; Beygui, Farzin; Manrique, Alain

    2018-07-01

    We assessed the feasibility of myocardial blood flow (MBF) and flow reserve (MFR) estimation using dynamic SPECT with a novel CZT camera in patients with stable CAD, in comparison with 15 O-water PET and fractional flow reserve (FFR). Thirty patients were prospectively included and underwent FFR measurements in the main coronary arteries (LAD, LCx, RCA). A stenosis ≥50% was considered obstructive and a FFR abnormal if ≤0.8. All patients underwent a dynamic rest/stress 99m Tc-sestamibi CZT-SPECT and 15 O-water PET for MBF and MFR calculation. Net retention kinetic modeling was applied to SPECT data to estimate global uptake values, and MBF was derived using Leppo correction. Ischemia by PET and CZT-SPECT was considered present if MFR was lower than 2 and 2.1, respectively. CZT-SPECT yielded higher stress and rest MBF compared to PET for global and LAD and LCx territories, but not in RCA territory. MFR was similar in global and each vessel territory for both modalities. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive and negative predictive value of CZT-SPECT were, respectively, 83.3, 95.8, 93.3, 100 and 85.7% for the detection of ischemia and 58.3, 84.6, 81.1, 36.8 and 93% for the detection of hemodynamically significant stenosis (FFR ≤ 0.8). Dynamic 99m Tc-sestamibi CZT-SPECT was technically feasible and provided similar MFR compared to 15 O-water PET and high diagnostic value for detecting impaired MFR and abnormal FFR in patients with stable CAD.

  19. Establishment study of the in vivo imaging analysis with small animal imaging modalities (micro-PET and micro-SPECT/CT) for bio-drug development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Beomsu; Park, Sanghyeon; Park, Jeonghoon; Jo, Sungkee; Jung, Uhee; Kim, Seolwha; Lee, Yunjong; Choi, Daeseong

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we established the image acquisition and analysis procedures of micro-PET, SPECT/CT using the experimental animal (mouse) for the development of imaging assessment method for the bio-drug. We examined the micro-SPECT/CT, PET imaging study using the Siemens Inveon micro-multimodality system (SPECT/CT) and micro-PET with 99m Tc-MDP, DMSA, and 18 F-FDG. SPECT imaging studies using 3 types of pinhole collimators. 5-MWB collimator was used for SPECT image study. To study whole-body distribution, 99m Tc-MDP SPECT image study was performed. We obtained the fine distribution image. And the CT images was obtained to provide the anatomical information. And then these two types images are fused. To study specific organ uptake, we examined 99 mTc-DMSA SPECT/CT imaging study. We also performed the PET image study using U87MG tumor bearing mice and 18 F-FDG. The overnight fasting, warming and anesthesia with 2% isoflurane pretreatment enhance the tumor image through reducing the background uptake including brown fat, harderian gland and skeletal muscles. Also we got the governmental approval for use of x-ray generator for CT and radioisotopes as sealed and open source. We prepared the draft of process procedure for the experimental animal imaging facility. These research results can be utilized as a basic image study protocols and data for the image assessment of drugs including biological drug

  20. SPM analysis of cerebrovascular reserve capacity after stimulation with acetazolamide measured by Tc-99m ECD SPECT in normal brain MRI patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, M. H.; Yoon, S. N.; Yoon, J. K.; Cho, C. W. [College of Medicine, Univ. of Ajou, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate normal response of acetazolamide in normal individuals, whose brain MRI is normal, using SPM99. In total, 10 Tc- 99m ECD brain SPECT were evaluated retrospectively. The half of the patients were male. Their mean age was 47.1 years old with a range of 33-61 years. They all visited our neurology department to evaluate stroke symptom. Their brain MRI was normal. Rest/acetazolamide brain SPECT was perfomed using Tc-99m ECD and the sequential injection and subtraction method. SPECT was acquired using fanbeam collimators and triple-head gamma camera (MultiSPECT III, Siemens medical systems, Inc. Hoffman Estates, III, USA). Chang's attenuation correction was applied their brain SPECT revealed normal rCBF pattern in visual analysis by two nuclear physician and they were diagnosed clinically normal. Using SPM method, we compared rest brain SPECT images with those of acetazolamide brain SPECT and measured the extent of the area with significant perfusion change (P<0.05) in predefined 34 cerebral regions. Acetazolamide brain SPECT showed no significant decreased region in comparison to rest brain SPECT. Only small portion of left mid temporal gyrus revealed increased rCBF on acetazolamide brain SPECT in comparison to rest brain SPECT. It apperas that there is no significant change in rCBF between rest and acetazolamide brain SPECT using Tc-99m ECD. The small number of this study is limitation of our study.

  1. High-Damage-Threshold Pinhole for Glass Fusion Laser Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumit, N.A.; Letzring, S.A.; Johnson, R.P.

    1998-01-01

    We are investigating methods to fabricate high-damage-threshold spatial-filter pinholes that might not be susceptible to plasma closure for relatively high energies and long pulses. These are based on the observation that grazing-incidence reflection from glass can withstand in excess of 5 kJ/cm 2 (normal to the beam) without plasma formation. The high damage threshold results from both the cos q spreading of the energy across the surface and the reflection of a large fraction of the energy from the surface, thereby greatly reducing the field strength within the medium

  2. Metabolic imaging using SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taki, Junichi; Matsunari, Ichiro

    2007-01-01

    In normal condition, the heart obtains more than two-thirds of its energy from the oxidative metabolism of long chain fatty acids, although a wide variety of substrates such as glucose, lactate, ketone bodies and amino acids are also utilised. In ischaemic myocardium, on the other hand, oxidative metabolism of free fatty acid is suppressed and anaerobic glucose metabolism plays a major role in residual oxidative metabolism. Therefore, metabolic imaging can be an important technique for the assessment of various cardiac diseases and conditions. In SPECT, several iodinated fatty acid traces have been introduced and studied. Of these, 123 I-labelled 15-(p-iodophenyl)3-R, S-methylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) has been the most commonly used tracer in clinical studies, especially in some of the European countries and Japan. In this review article, several fatty acid tracers for SPECT are characterised, and the mechanism of uptake and clinical utility of BMIPP are discussed in detail. (orig.)

  3. Myocardial Infarction Area Quantification using High-Resolution SPECT Images in Rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Luciano Fonseca Lemos de [Divisão de Cardiologia, Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Mejia, Jorge [Faculdade de Medicina de São José do Rio Preto, São José do Rio Preto, SP (Brazil); Carvalho, Eduardo Elias Vieira de; Lataro, Renata Maria; Frassetto, Sarita Nasbine [Divisão de Cardiologia, Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Fazan, Rubens Jr.; Salgado, Hélio Cesar [Departamento de Fisiologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Galvis-Alonso, Orfa Yineth [Faculdade de Medicina de São José do Rio Preto, São José do Rio Preto, SP (Brazil); Simões, Marcus Vinícius, E-mail: msimoes@fmrp.usp.br [Divisão de Cardiologia, Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-15

    Imaging techniques enable in vivo sequential assessment of the morphology and function of animal organs in experimental models. We developed a device for high-resolution single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging based on an adapted pinhole collimator. To determine the accuracy of this system for quantification of myocardial infarct area in rats. Thirteen male Wistar rats (250 g) underwent experimental myocardial infarction by occlusion of the left coronary artery. After 4 weeks, SPECT images were acquired 1.5 hours after intravenous injection of 555 MBq of 99mTc-Sestamibi. The tomographic reconstruction was performed by using specially developed software based on the Maximum Likelihood algorithm. The analysis of the data included the correlation between the area of perfusion defects detected by scintigraphy and extent of myocardial fibrosis assessed by histology. The images showed a high target organ/background ratio with adequate visualization of the left ventricular walls and cavity. All animals presenting infarction areas were correctly identified by the perfusion images. There was no difference of the infarct area as measured by SPECT (21.1 ± 21.2%) and by histology (21.7 ± 22.0%; p=0.45). There was a strong correlation between individual values of the area of infarction measured by these two methods. The developed system presented adequate spatial resolution and high accuracy for the detection and quantification of myocardial infarction areas, consisting in a low cost and versatile option for high-resolution SPECT imaging of small rodents.

  4. Implementation of angular response function modeling in SPECT simulations with GATE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Descourt, P; Visvikis, D; Carlier, T; Bardies, M; Du, Y; Song, X; Frey, E C; Tsui, B M W; Buvat, I

    2010-01-01

    Among Monte Carlo simulation codes in medical imaging, the GATE simulation platform is widely used today given its flexibility and accuracy, despite long run times, which in SPECT simulations are mostly spent in tracking photons through the collimators. In this work, a tabulated model of the collimator/detector response was implemented within the GATE framework to significantly reduce the simulation times in SPECT. This implementation uses the angular response function (ARF) model. The performance of the implemented ARF approach has been compared to standard SPECT GATE simulations in terms of the ARF tables' accuracy, overall SPECT system performance and run times. Considering the simulation of the Siemens Symbia T SPECT system using high-energy collimators, differences of less than 1% were measured between the ARF-based and the standard GATE-based simulations, while considering the same noise level in the projections, acceleration factors of up to 180 were obtained when simulating a planar 364 keV source seen with the same SPECT system. The ARF-based and the standard GATE simulation results also agreed very well when considering a four-head SPECT simulation of a realistic Jaszczak phantom filled with iodine-131, with a resulting acceleration factor of 100. In conclusion, the implementation of an ARF-based model of collimator/detector response for SPECT simulations within GATE significantly reduces the simulation run times without compromising accuracy. (note)

  5. Implementation of angular response function modeling in SPECT simulations with GATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Descourt, P; Visvikis, D [INSERM, U650, LaTIM, IFR SclnBioS, Universite de Brest, CHU Brest, Brest, F-29200 (France); Carlier, T; Bardies, M [CRCNA INSERM U892, Nantes (France); Du, Y; Song, X; Frey, E C; Tsui, B M W [Department of Radiology, J Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Buvat, I, E-mail: dimitris@univ-brest.f [IMNC-UMR 8165 CNRS Universites Paris 7 et Paris 11, Orsay (France)

    2010-05-07

    Among Monte Carlo simulation codes in medical imaging, the GATE simulation platform is widely used today given its flexibility and accuracy, despite long run times, which in SPECT simulations are mostly spent in tracking photons through the collimators. In this work, a tabulated model of the collimator/detector response was implemented within the GATE framework to significantly reduce the simulation times in SPECT. This implementation uses the angular response function (ARF) model. The performance of the implemented ARF approach has been compared to standard SPECT GATE simulations in terms of the ARF tables' accuracy, overall SPECT system performance and run times. Considering the simulation of the Siemens Symbia T SPECT system using high-energy collimators, differences of less than 1% were measured between the ARF-based and the standard GATE-based simulations, while considering the same noise level in the projections, acceleration factors of up to 180 were obtained when simulating a planar 364 keV source seen with the same SPECT system. The ARF-based and the standard GATE simulation results also agreed very well when considering a four-head SPECT simulation of a realistic Jaszczak phantom filled with iodine-131, with a resulting acceleration factor of 100. In conclusion, the implementation of an ARF-based model of collimator/detector response for SPECT simulations within GATE significantly reduces the simulation run times without compromising accuracy. (note)

  6. Feasibility of Stereo-Infrared Tracking to Monitor Patient Motion During Cardiac SPECT Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Beach, Richard D.; Pretorius, P. Hendrik; Boening, Guido; Bruyant, Philippe P.; Feng, Bing; Fulton, Roger R.; Gennert, Michael A.; Nadella, Suman; King, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    Patient motion during cardiac SPECT imaging can cause diagnostic imaging artifacts. We investigated the feasibility of monitoring patient motion using the Polaris motion-tracking system. This system uses passive infrared reflection from small spheres to provide real-time position data with vendor stated 0.35 mm accuracy and 0.2 mm repeatability. In our configuration, the Polaris system views through the SPECT gantry toward the patient's head. List-mode event data was temporally synchronized w...

  7. Image reconstruction methods for the PBX-M pinhole camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, A.; Powell, E.T.; Fonck, R.J.

    1990-03-01

    This paper describes two methods which have been used to reconstruct the soft x-ray emission profile of the PBX-M tokamak from the projected images recorded by the PBX-M pinhole camera. Both methods must accurately represent the shape of the reconstructed profile while also providing a degree of immunity to noise in the data. The first method is a simple least squares fit to the data. This has the advantage of being fast and small, and thus easily implemented on the PDP-11 computer used to control the video digitizer for the pinhole camera. The second method involves the application of a maximum entropy algorithm to an overdetermined system. This has the advantage of allowing the use of a default profile. This profile contains additional knowledge about the plasma shape which can be obtained from equilibrium fits to the external magnetic measurements. Additionally the reconstruction is guaranteed positive, and the fit to the data can be relaxed by specifying both the amount and distribution of noise in the image. The algorithm described has the advantage of being considerably faster, for an overdetermined system, than the usual Lagrange multiplier approach to finding the maximum entropy solution. 13 refs., 24 figs

  8. The origins of SPECT and SPECT/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutton, Brian F. [University College London, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); University of Wollongong, Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, Wollongong, NSW (Australia)

    2014-05-15

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has a long history of development since its initial demonstration by Kuhl and Edwards in 1963. Although clinical utility has been dominated by the rotating gamma camera, there have been many technological innovations with the recent popularity of organ-specific dedicated SPECT systems. The combination of SPECT and CT evolved from early transmission techniques used for attenuation correction with the initial commercial systems predating the release of PET/CT. The development and acceptance of SPECT/CT has been relatively slow with continuing debate as to what cost/performance ratio is justified. Increasingly, fully diagnostic CT is combined with SPECT so as to facilitate optimal clinical utility. (orig.)

  9. Slit-Slat Collimator Equipped Gamma Camera for Whole-Mouse SPECT-CT Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Liji; Peter, Jörg

    2012-06-01

    A slit-slat collimator is developed for a gamma camera intended for small-animal imaging (mice). The tungsten housing of a roof-shaped collimator forms a slit opening, and the slats are made of lead foils separated by sparse polyurethane material. Alignment of the collimator with the camera's pixelated crystal is performed by adjusting a micrometer screw while monitoring a Co-57 point source for maximum signal intensity. For SPECT, the collimator forms a cylindrical field-of-view enabling whole mouse imaging with transaxial magnification and constant on-axis sensitivity over the entire axial direction. As the gamma camera is part of a multimodal imaging system incorporating also x-ray CT, five parameters corresponding to the geometric displacements of the collimator as well as to the mechanical co-alignment between the gamma camera and the CT subsystem are estimated by means of bimodal calibration sources. To illustrate the performance of the slit-slat collimator and to compare its performance to a single pinhole collimator, a Derenzo phantom study is performed. Transaxial resolution along the entire long axis is comparable to a pinhole collimator of same pinhole diameter. Axial resolution of the slit-slat collimator is comparable to that of a parallel beam collimator. Additionally, data from an in-vivo mouse study are presented.

  10. Feasibility study on X-ray source with pinhole imaging method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Rui; Li Junli

    2007-01-01

    In order to verify the feasibility of study on X-ray source with pinhole imaging method, and optimize the design of X-ray pinhole imaging system, an X-ray pinhole imaging equipment was set up. The change of image due to the change of the position and intensity of X-ray source was estimated with mathematical method and validated with experiment. The results show that the change of the spot position and gray of the spot is linearly related with the change of the position and intensity of X-ray source, so it is feasible to study X-ray source with pinhole imaging method in this application. The results provide some references for the design of X-ray pinhole imaging system. (authors)

  11. Emulation and design of terahertz reflection-mode confocal scanning microscopy based on virtual pinhole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong-fa; Li, Qi

    2014-12-01

    In the practical application of terahertz reflection-mode confocal scanning microscopy, the size of detector pinhole is an important factor that determines the performance of spatial resolution characteristic of the microscopic system. However, the use of physical pinhole brings some inconvenience to the experiment and the adjustment error has a great influence on the experiment result. Through reasonably selecting the parameter of matrix detector virtual pinhole (VPH), it can efficiently approximate the physical pinhole. By using this approach, the difficulty of experimental calibration is reduced significantly. In this article, an imaging scheme of terahertz reflection-mode confocal scanning microscopy that is based on the matrix detector VPH is put forward. The influence of detector pinhole size on the axial resolution of confocal scanning microscopy is emulated and analyzed. Then, the parameter of VPH is emulated when the best axial imaging performance is reached.

  12. TH-C-17A-06: A Hardware Implementation and Evaluation of Robotic SPECT: Toward Molecular Imaging Onboard Radiation Therapy Machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, S; Touch, M; Bowsher, J; Yin, F; Cheng, L

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To construct a robotic SPECT system and demonstrate its capability to image a thorax phantom on a radiation therapy flat-top couch. The system has potential for on-board functional and molecular imaging in radiation therapy. Methods: A robotic SPECT imaging system was developed utilizing a Digirad 2020tc detector and a KUKA KR150-L110 robot. An imaging study was performed with the PET CT Phantom, which includes 5 spheres: 10, 13, 17, 22 and 28 mm in diameter. Sphere-tobackground concentration ratio was 6:1 of Tc99m. The phantom was placed on a flat-top couch. SPECT projections were acquired with a parallel-hole collimator and a single pinhole collimator. The robotic system navigated the detector tracing the flat-top table to maintain the closest possible proximity to the phantom. For image reconstruction, detector trajectories were described by six parameters: radius-of-rotation, x and z detector shifts, and detector rotation θ, tilt ϕ and twist γ. These six parameters were obtained from the robotic system by calibrating the robot base and tool coordinates. Results: The robotic SPECT system was able to maneuver parallel-hole and pinhole collimated SPECT detectors in close proximity to the phantom, minimizing impact of the flat-top couch on detector-to-COR (center-ofrotation) distance. In acquisitions with background at 1/6th sphere activity concentration, photopeak contamination was heavy, yet the 17, 22, and 28 mm diameter spheres were readily observed with the parallel hole imaging, and the single, targeted sphere (28 mm diameter) was readily observed in the pinhole region-of-interest (ROI) imaging. Conclusion: Onboard SPECT could be achieved by a robot maneuvering a SPECT detector about patients in position for radiation therapy on a flat-top couch. The robot inherent coordinate frame could be an effective means to estimate detector pose for use in SPECT image reconstruction. PHS/NIH/NCI grant R21-CA156390-01A1

  13. SPECT for smokers brain perfusion evaluation; SPECT para avaliacao da perfusao cerebral em fumantes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maliska, C.M.; Martins, E.F.; Barros, D.S.; Lopes, M.M.S.; Lourenco, C.; Goncalves, S.; Goncalves, M.B.; Miranda, M.M.B.G.; Neto, L.M.; Penque, E.; Antonucci, J.B. [Instituto Nacional do Cancer, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2002-07-01

    Cigarette smoking increases brain stroke risk, however,five to fifteen years after ceasing this habit, brain perfusion recovers normal pattern. We propose to compare brain perfusion patterns performing brain SPECT scans of smokers and non-smokers. Thirteen volunteers age range 20-30 years old) composed of six non-smokers and seven smokers were studied by brain scans (SPECT).We used ECD- {sup 99m} Tc radiolabelled as recommended by the manufacturer. All patients received 740 MBq of the radiopharmaceutical through intravenous injection, with their eyes opened and their ears unplugged, in a quiet room. We used a one head SPECT camera ( General Electric/ StarCam 4000 and Siemens/ E.Cam) with low-energy ultrahigh resolution collimator. Imaging begin 40 minutes after tracer injection. For reconstruction we used a Butterworth filter.The preliminary results showed brain perfusion deficit areas on five of the smokers while all non- smokers had normal brain perfusion scans. We believe that smoking increases the possibility of brain perfusion deficits. (author)

  14. Multimodality imaging: transfer and fusion of SPECT and MRI data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knesaurek, K.

    1994-01-01

    Image fusion is a technique which offers the best of both worlds. It unites the two basic types of medical images: functional body images(PET or SPECT scans), which provide physiological information, and structural images (CT or MRI), which provide an anatomic map of the body. Control-point based registration technique was developed and used. Tc-99m point sources were used as external markers in SPECT studies while, for MRI and CT imaging only anatomic landmarks were used as a control points. The MRI images were acquired on GE Signa 1.2 system and CT data on a GE 9800 scanner. SPECT studies were performed 1h after intravenous injection of the 740 MBq of the Tc-99m-HMPAO on the triple-headed TRIONIX gamma camera. B-spline and bilinear interpolation were used for the rotation, scaling and translation of the images. In the process of creation of a single composite image, in order to retain information from the individual images, MRI (or CT) image was scaled to one color range and a SPECT image to another. In some situations the MRI image was kept black-and-white while the SPECT image was pasted on top of it in 'opaque' mode. Most errors which propagate through the matching process are due to sample size, imperfection of the acquisition system, noise and interpolations used. Accuracy of the registration was investigated by SPECT-CT study performed on a phantom study. The results has shown that accuracy of the matching process is better, or at worse, equal to 2 mm. (author)

  15. Possible application of nonredundant pinhole arrays to fuel pin imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berzins, G.J.; Han, K.S.

    1975-11-01

    LMFBR Safety Test Facility imaging experiments rely on emission of radiation by the fuel pins and thus appear to strongly complement radiographic techniques in that they are most employable during peak excursion--a time of least favorable radiographic signal--to--noise ratio. Radiography, on the other hand, can provide information long before or after the excursion--times of below threshold signal for direct imaging techniques. An underlying premise of any imaging experiment is that, in addition to sufficient brightness, sufficient contrast exists in the scene. A further restriction is imposed by intervening materials, such as the wall of a containment vessel, that not only absorb but also scatter the radiation. These questions are approached by examining the properties of potential recording instrumentation, of pinhole apertures, and of the necessary radiation sources

  16. Fresnel's phase observation by means of the pinhole Young's experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina, F.F.; Matteucci, G.

    2000-04-01

    Using the conventional Young's experiment with two pinholes, we observe the shift effect of the Fresnel's phase on the interference patterns, by measuring its intensity on the optical axis. It allows us to propose a criterion for distinguishing between Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction. Indeed, in the Fraunhofer domain the Young's patterns will be centered on the optical axis. As a consequence, only constructive interference will occur at this point. But in the Fresnel domain, the Young's patterns will be laterally shifted in such a way that constructive and destructive interference will occur alternatively on the optical axis, and the intensity of the diffraction pattern at this point will oscillate. Extended diffracting apertures can be analyzed as ensembles of Young's pairs of wavelet sources. From this point of view, the intensity distribution they produce on the detector plane results from the superposition of all their interference patterns. (author)

  17. Optimization of a collimator size for the pin-hole camera of X-rays, and proposal of a method to correct degradations of efficiencies in neighboring parts of the image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Hiroaki; Nishihara, Sadamitsu; Taniuchi, Shou; Kamiya, Naotaka

    2012-01-01

    A visual image of the scattered X-ray distributions gives us useful information for beginners to study radiation physics. A pin-hole camera for X-rays can be made by use of simple materials as well as a two-dimensional X-ray detector (imaging plate: IP). In contrast with a pin-hole camera for the visible radiations, a pin-hole camera for X-rays uses a collimator, having a sufficient thickness to reduce X-rays. This design causes the following problem: in the case in which the X-rays are incident to the collimator from the diagonal direction, the some X-rays are absorbed by the wall of the collimator. Namely, the images in the surrounding part of the IP are underrepresented. The aim of this study is to suggest a correction method of the underrepresentation. We used a pin-hole camera (320 mm(long)×270 mm(wide)×300 mm(depth)) by means of the clinically applied IP (10×12 inch). In order to determine proper conditions for a size of collimators (pin-hole), experiments using medical X-ray equipments were carried out. The efficiencies and resolutions were experimentally determined for the collimator sizes of 2 to 8 mm φ . Then, images of scattered X-ray distributions were measured by the irradiation of a head phantom, and considerations were taken for a practical use of the pin-hole camera. Moreover, an exponential absorption of X-rays in the phantom was visualized by our camera in order to indicate a potential of quantitative analysis based on the image of scattered X-ray distributions. (author)

  18. Pinhole imaging in Legg--Perthes disease: further observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danigelis, J.A.

    1976-01-01

    Fifty-nine patients with Legg--Perthes disease and 12 others were studied using /sup 99m/Tc-polyphosphate and the pinhole collimator imaging technique. Radiographs of both hips were correlated with images in each patient. In the Legg--Perthes patients, a radionuclide uptake deficiency of variable size was observed in the proximal femoral epiphysis (EOC), which we believe is related to varying degrees of impaired blood supply. During later disease stages, adjacent zones of increased radio-nuclide activity or revascularization were observed that would replace the uptake defect eventually. Unless radiographic evidence of new bone formation was observed in the EOC, it was impossible to predict either the presence or extent of revascularization until bone imaging was done. Those patients with revascularization activity in the EOC exhibited a relatively short time interval (average, 3.2 months) before evidence of new bone formation radiographically. Others with increased radionuclide concentration limited to the growth plate and/or metaphysis averaged a much longer 7.8 months. In two patients there was a reversal of the initially increased activity in the growth plate, suggesting another vascular insult. There were no false-negative bone-image findings in the 12 cases that clinically and/or radiologically simulated Legg-Perthes disease. Our image studies correlate well with published histopathologic investigations, indicating to us that assessment of extent of pathologic involvement and of the disease course is facilitated by this technique. Subsequently, this could influence treatment selection and provide a more objective baseline from which to judge treatment results. Continued experience suggests pinhole bone imaging has useful clinical application in Legg--Perthes disease and other childhood hip disorders

  19. Pinhole imaging in Legg-Perthes disease: further observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danigelis, J A

    1976-01-01

    Fifty-nine patients with Legg-Perthes disease and 12 others were studied using 99mTc-polyphosphate and the pinhole collimator imaging technique. Radiographs of both hips were correlated with images in each patient. In the Legg-Perthes patients, a radionuclide uptake deficiency of variable size was observed in the proximal femoral epiphysis (EOC), which we believe is related to varying degrees of impaired blood supply. During later disease stages, adjacent zones of increased radionuclide activity of revascularization were observed that would replace the uptake defect eventually. Unless radiographic evidence of new bone formation was observed in the EOC, it was impossible to predict either the presence or extent of revascularization until bone imaging was done. Those patients with revascularization activity in the EOC exhibited a relatively short time interval (average, 3.2 months) before evidence of new bone formation radiographically. Others with increased radionuclide concentration limited to the growth plate and/or metaphysis averaged a much longer 7.8 months. In two patients there was a reversal of the initially increased activity in the growth plate, suggesting another vascular insult. There were no false-negative bone-image findings in the 12 cases that clinically and/or radiologically simulated Legg-Perthes disease. Our image studies correlate well with published histopathologic investigations, indicating to us that assessment of extent of pathologic involvement and of the disease course is facilitated by this technique. Subsequently, this could influence treatment selection and provide a more objective baseline from which to judge treatment results. Continued experience suggests pinhole bone imaging has useful clinical application in Legg-Perthes disease and other childhood hip disorders.

  20. Neuropsychiatry: PET and SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintana F, Juan Carlos

    2002-01-01

    Functional brain imaging with PET and SPECT have a definitive and well established role in the investigation of a variety of conditions such as dementia, epilepsy and drug addiction. With these methods it is possible to detect early rCBF (regional Cerebral Blood Flow) changes seen in dementia (even before clinical symptoms) and differentiate Alzheimer's disease from other dementias by means of the rCBF pattern change. 18-F-FDG PET imaging is a useful tool in partial epilepsy because both rCBF and brain metabolism are compromised at the epileptogenic focus. During the seizure, rCBF dramatically increases locally. Using SPECT it is possible to locate such foci with 97% accuracy. In drug addiction, particularly with cocaine, functional imaging has proven to be very sensitive to detect brain flow and metabolism derangement early in the course of this condition. These findings are important in many ways: prognostic value, they are used as a powerful reinforcement tool and to monitor functional recovery with rehabilitation. There are many other conditions in which functional brain imaging is of importance such as acute stroke treatment assessment, trauma rehabilitation and in psychiatric and abnormal movement diseases specially with the development of receptor imaging (au)

  1. Attenuation correction for SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoba, Minoru

    1986-01-01

    Attenuation correction is required for the reconstruction of a quantitative SPECT image. A new method for detecting body contours, which are important for the correction of tissue attenuation, is presented. The effect of body contours, detected by the newly developed method, on the reconstructed images was evaluated using various techniques for attenuation correction. The count rates in the specified region of interest in the phantom image by the Radial Post Correction (RPC) method, the Weighted Back Projection (WBP) method, Chang's method were strongly affected by the accuracy of the contours, as compared to those by Sorenson's method. To evaluate the effect of non-uniform attenuators on the cardiac SPECT, computer simulation experiments were performed using two types of models, the uniform attenuator model (UAM) and the non-uniform attenuator model (NUAM). The RPC method showed the lowest relative percent error (%ERROR) in UAM (11 %). However, 20 to 30 percent increase in %ERROR was observed for NUAM reconstructed with the RPC, WBP, and Chang's methods. Introducing an average attenuation coefficient (0.12/cm for Tc-99m and 0.14/cm for Tl-201) in the RPC method decreased %ERROR to the levels for UAM. Finally, a comparison between images, which were obtained by 180 deg and 360 deg scans and reconstructed from the RPC method, showed that the degree of the distortion of the contour of the simulated ventricles in the 180 deg scan was 15 % higher than that in the 360 deg scan. (Namekawa, K.)

  2. Evaluating performance of a pixel array semiconductor SPECT system for small animal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Naoki; Zhao, Songji; Fujiki, Yutaka

    2005-01-01

    Small animal imaging has recently been focused on basic nuclear medicine. We have designed and built a small animal SPECT imaging system using a semiconductor camera and a newly designed collimator. We assess the performance of this system for small object imaging. We employed an MGC 1500 (Acrorad Co.) camera including a CdTe semiconductor. The pixel size was 1.4 mm/pixel. We designed and produced a parallel-hole collimator with 20-mm hole length. Our SPECT system consisted of a semiconductor camera with the subject holder set on an electric rotating stage controlled by a computer. We compared this system with a conventional small animal SPECT system comprising a SPECT-2000H scanner with four Anger type cameras and pinhole collimators. The count rate linearity for estimation of the scatter was evaluated for a pie-chart phantom containing different concentrations of 99m Tc. We measured the full width half maximum (FWHM) of the 99m Tc SPECT line source along with scatter. The system volume sensitivity was examined using a flood source phantom which was 35 mm long with a 32-mm inside diameter. Additionally, an in vivo myocardial perfusion SPECT study was performed with a rat. With regards to energy resolution, the semiconductor camera (5.6%) was superior to the conventional Anger type camera (9.8%). In the count rate linearity evaluation, the regression lines of the SPECT values were y=0.019x+0.031 (r 2 =0.999) for our system and y=0.018x+0.060 (r 2 =0.997) for the conventional system. Thus, the scatter count using the semiconductor camera was less than that using the conventional camera. FWHMs of our system and the conventional system were 2.9±0.1 and 2.0±0.1 mm, respectively. Moreover, the system volume sensitivity of our system [0.51 kcps/(MBq/ml)/cm] was superior to that of the conventional system [0.44 kcps/(MBq/ml)/cm]. Our system provided clear images of the rat myocardium, sufficient for practical use in small animal imaging. Our SPECT system, utilizing a

  3. Nuclear myocardial perfusion imaging using thallium-201 with a novel multifocal collimator SPECT/CT: IQ-SPECT versus conventional protocols in normal subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Shinro; Nakajima, Kenichi; Onoguchi, Masahisa; Wakabayash, Hiroshi; Okuda, Koichi; Kinuya, Seigo

    2015-06-01

    A novel multifocal collimator, IQ-SPECT (Siemens) consists of SMARTZOOM, cardio-centric and 3D iterative SPECT reconstruction and makes it possible to perform MPI scans in a short time. The aims are to delineate the normal uptake in thallium-201 ((201)Tl) SPECT in each acquisition method and to compare the distribution between new and conventional protocol, especially in patients with normal imaging. Forty patients (eight women, mean age of 75 years) who underwent myocardial perfusion imaging were included in the study. All patients underwent one-day protocol perfusion scan after an adenosine-stress test and at rest after administering (201)Tl and showed normal results. Acquisition was performed on a Symbia T6 equipped with a conventional dual-headed gamma camera system (Siemens ECAM) and with a multifocal SMARTZOOM collimator. Imaging was performed with a conventional system followed by IQ-SPECT/computed tomography (CT). Reconstruction was performed with or without X-ray CT-derived attenuation correction (AC). Two nuclear physicians blinded to clinical information interpreted all myocardial perfusion images. A semi-quantitative myocardial perfusion was analyzed by a 17-segment model with a 5-point visual scoring. The uptake of each segment was measured and left ventricular functions were analyzed by QPS software. IQ-SPECT provided good or excellent image quality. The quality of IQ-SPECT images without AC was similar to those of conventional LEHR study. Mid-inferior defect score (0.3 ± 0.5) in the conventional LEHR study was increased significantly in IQ-SPECT with AC (0 ± 0). IQ-SPECT with AC improved the mid-inferior decreased perfusion shown in conventional images. The apical tracer count in IQ-SPECT with AC was decreased compared to that in LEHR (0.1 ± 0.3 vs. 0.5 ± 0.7, p IQ-SPECT was significantly higher than that from the LEHR collimator (p = 0.0009). The images of IQ-SPECT acquired in a short time are equivalent to that of conventional LEHR

  4. Serial SPECT in children with partial epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoya, Machiko; Ushiku, Hideo

    1995-01-01

    We performed serial single-photon emission CT (SPECT) with N-isopropyl-p-( 123 I)-Iodoamphetamine to measure the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in 15 children with partial epilepsy. SPECT showed focal changes in 14 cases. Ten cases had abnormalities in the initial SPECT and another four cases in the second test. The cases with normal rCBF in initial SPECT had been tested in an early phase after the onset, and then decreased rCBF were observed in the second SPECT. The cases with both abnormal rCBF in the initial SPECT and improved rCBF in the second SPECT showed good prognosis in clinico-electrophysiological evolutions. In cases with abnormal changes of rCBF in the second SPECT, clinical prognosis was found to be not so good. These findings suggest that serial SPECT may be used to follow the course of epilepsy. (author)

  5. Noise suppressed partial volume correction for cardiac SPECT/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Chung; Liu, Chi, E-mail: chi.liu@yale.edu [Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Liu, Hui [Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 and Key Laboratory of Particle and Radiation Imaging (Tsinghua University), Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Grobshtein, Yariv [GE Healthcare, Haifa 3910101 (Israel); Stacy, Mitchel R. [Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Sinusas, Albert J. [Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 and Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Purpose: Partial volume correction (PVC) methods typically improve quantification at the expense of increased image noise and reduced reproducibility. In this study, the authors developed a novel voxel-based PVC method that incorporates anatomical knowledge to improve quantification while suppressing noise for cardiac SPECT/CT imaging. Methods: In the proposed method, the SPECT images were first reconstructed using anatomical-based maximum a posteriori (AMAP) with Bowsher’s prior to penalize noise while preserving boundaries. A sequential voxel-by-voxel PVC approach (Yang’s method) was then applied on the AMAP reconstruction using a template response. This template response was obtained by forward projecting a template derived from a contrast-enhanced CT image, and then reconstructed using AMAP to model the partial volume effects (PVEs) introduced by both the system resolution and the smoothing applied during reconstruction. To evaluate the proposed noise suppressed PVC (NS-PVC), the authors first simulated two types of cardiac SPECT studies: a {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin myocardial perfusion scan and a {sup 99m}Tc-labeled red blood cell (RBC) scan on a dedicated cardiac multiple pinhole SPECT/CT at both high and low count levels. The authors then applied the proposed method on a canine equilibrium blood pool study following injection with {sup 99m}Tc-RBCs at different count levels by rebinning the list-mode data into shorter acquisitions. The proposed method was compared to MLEM reconstruction without PVC, two conventional PVC methods, including Yang’s method and multitarget correction (MTC) applied on the MLEM reconstruction, and AMAP reconstruction without PVC. Results: The results showed that the Yang’s method improved quantification, however, yielded increased noise and reduced reproducibility in the regions with higher activity. MTC corrected for PVE on high count data with amplified noise, although yielded the worst performance among all the methods

  6. Imaging of fast-neutron sources using solid-state track-recorder pinhole radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruddy, F.H.; Gold, R.; Roberts, J.H.; Kaiser, B.J.; Preston, C.C.

    1983-08-01

    Pinhole imaging methods are being developed and tested for potential future use in imaging the intense neutron source of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility. Previously reported, extensive calibration measurements of the proton, neutron, and alpha particle response characteristics of CR-39 polymer solid state track recorders (SSTRs) are being used to interpret the results of imaging experiments using both charged particle and neutron pinhole collimators. High resolution, neutron pinhole images of a 252 Cf source have been obtained in the form of neutron induced proton recoil tracks in CR-39 polymer SSTR. These imaging experiments are described as well as their potential future applications to FMIT

  7. Thyroid mass estimation in Grave's disease by SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pant, G.S.; Sharma, S.K.; Kumar, R.; Pandey, A.K.; Gupta, A.K.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: One of the important parts of treatment of Grave's disease with I-131 is the delivery of accurate dose to the target volume. Three important parameters that need to be accurately measured for dosimetry are; the 24 hr thyroid uptake (%), the thyroid mass and effective half life of I-131 in the gland. In this presentation we describe the estimation thyroid mass by SPECT. We have standardised a method to estimated thyroid volume by SPECT using thyroid phantoms of different sizes and then used them for routine thyroid mass estimation in patients with Graves' disease. Materials and Methods: Due to variation in thyroid weight in patients with Grave's disease, we standardised the scintigraphic (SPECT) technique using thyroid phantoms of different volumes such as 5 ml, 9.5 ml, 10.5 ml, 35 ml, 80 ml, 101ml and 110 ml. Each phantom was filled with 99 mTc solution with different activity concentration (100 μCi, 300 μCi, 600 μCi and 1.0 μCi) and SPECT images were acquired on a VARICAM dual head camera in 128x128 matrix. The acquired data was processed using a standardised Metz filter but without attenuation or scatter correction. Coronal slices were used with suitable threshold for edge detection. An irregular ROI was plotted around each lobe and isthmus of the thyroid gland and the enclosed slice area was measured. The area measured from all the frames was added and multiplied by the slice thickness to get the volume of the thyroid gland. The estimated volume of each phantom was compared and correlated with its actual volume. The thyroid mass in 40 patients was estimated by SPECT and compared with that estimated by ultrasonography.Results and Conclusion: The results of thyroid mass estimation with SPECT in phantom study suggested a 30% threshold for all phantom volumes. However, 35% threshold was used in patients' images for estimating thyroid volume. The estimated volumes by scintigraphy were compared with that estimated by ultrasonography. A correlation coefficient

  8. Modeling erosion of unsaturated compacted bentonite by groundwater flow; pinhole erosion test case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurila, T.; Sane, P.; Olin, M.; Koskinen, K.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Erosion of compacted clay material by water flow is a critical factor affecting the performance of radioactive waste confinement. Our emphasis in this work is the buffer of KBS-3V concept, proposed to be compacted MX-80 bentonite. Unsaturated erosion occurs during the saturation phase of the EBS, and the main quantity of interest is the total buffer mass carried away by a groundwater flow that induces erosion by forming piping channels near the buffer/rock interface. The purpose of this work is to provide modeling tools to support erosion experiments. Role of modeling is first to interpret experimental observations in terms of processes, and to estimate robustness of experimental results. Secondly, we seek to scale up results from the laboratory scale, particularly to time scales longer than those experimentally accessible. We have performed modeling and data analysis pertaining to tests of unsaturated clay erosion. Pinhole experiments were used to study this erosion case. The main differences to well-understood pinhole erosion tests are that the material is strongly swelling and that the water flow is not determined by the pressure head but by the total flux. Groundwater flow in the buffer is determined by the flux because pressure losses occur overwhelmingly in the surrounding rock, not in the piping channel. We formulate a simple model that links an effective solid diffusivity -based swelling model to erosion by flow on the solid/liquid interface. The swelling model is similar in concept to that developed at KTH, but simpler. Erosion in the model is caused by laminar flow in the pinhole, and happens in a narrow region at the solid/liquid interface where velocity and solid volume fraction overlap. The erosion model can be mapped to erosion by wall shear, and can thus be considered as extension of that classic erosion model. The main quantity defining the behavior of clay erosion in the model is the ratio of

  9. The usefulness of CBF brain SPECT in forensic medicine: the civil law codes cases. A description of four cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piskunowicz, M.; Lass, P.; Bandurski, T.; Krzyzanowski, M.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this report was to assess the usefulness of cerebral blood flow (CBF) scanning utilising the SPECT technique in forensic medicine cases in the area of civil law cases. CBF SPECT scanning was performed in four patients utilising 99m Tc-ECD and a triple-head gammacamera. In the analysis both the asymmetry index and cerebellar normalisation were applied. Reference values were obtained by studying 30 healthy volunteers. In those cases CBF SPECT scanning played an important role in forensic argument. It influenced the sentence and the amount of financial compensation. CBF SPECT scanning may provide valuable information in forensic medicine argument in civil law cases, but only when taken together with psychometric tests and other neuroimaging methods (CT, MRI). The value of CBF SPECT scanning alone may be limited in judicial proceedings. (author)

  10. Regional cerebral blood flow in SPECT pattern in Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenart-Jankowska, D.; Junik, R.; Sowinski, J.; Gembicki, M.; Wender, M.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of our work was to compare the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in SPECT examination in Parkinson's disease with (17 cases) and without (7 cases) dementia and in various clinical stages of the disease. The patients underwent SPECT examination 5-40 min after intravenous application of HMPAO (Ceretec, Amersham) with 740 Mbq (20 mCi) pertechnate 99m Tc. SPECT was performed with a Siemens Diacam single-head rotating gamma camera coupled to a high resolution collimator and Icon computer system provided by the manufacturer. The results were defined in relative values of ROI in relation to cerebellum. Patients with Parkinson's disease showed hypoperfusion in cerebral lobes and in deep cerebral structures including the basal ganglia. Regional perfusion deficit in SPECT was seen with and without associated dementia and already in early stage of the disease. Parkinson's disease is provoked by the lesions of dopaminergic neurons of the central nervous system leading to domination of extrapyramidal symptoms. There are many indications that also the neurotransmitters associated with cognitive functions as acetylcholine demonstrate some abnormalities. However, only in some cases of Parkinson's disease dementia is the dominating symptom. Our results of regional cerebral blood flow testify that in Parkinson's disease the dysfunction of the central nervous system is more diffuse than has previously been suggested. (author)

  11. The role of SPECT in the evaluation of skeletal trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, I P.C. [Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick (Australia)

    1993-02-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has, in the last decade, established a critical role in routine diagnosis. Skeletal scintigraphy exemplifies the impact in improving detection of lesions by delineation of their site and size. The advantage of minimizing the superimposed radioactivity from overlying and underlying structures is typified by the readiness with which avascular necrosis of the femoral head can be identified by removal of the surrounding hyperaemia which masks the classical photopaenia. However, the ability to achieve an accurate image at a plane at a prescribed depth is most characteristically shown by the study of a vertebra, a bone of irregular contour and subject to a variety of pathological disorders at different sites within it. The various focal abnormalities resulting from these can be localized exactly, readily distinguishing, for example, those in the body from those in the natural arch. In particular, the alterations resulting from trauma, such as pars interarticularis stress fracture, are readily seen. Consequently SPECT has an indispensable role in the investigation and management of low back pain. However, the ability of SPECT to delineate abnormal accumulation has provided a new approach to the evaluation of knee pain, especially when acute such as that resulting from athletic injury, since the identification of the presence or absence of focal abnormalities can be critical to patient management. The frequency of these various disorders in which SPECT is so useful explains why the procedure has become such a routine high-volume examination in so many departments. (author).

  12. Patient position alters attenuation effects in multipinhole cardiac SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timmins, Rachel; Ruddy, Terrence D.; Wells, R. Glenn

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Dedicated cardiac cameras offer improved sensitivity over conventional SPECT cameras. Sensitivity gains are obtained by large numbers of detectors and novel collimator arrangements such as an array of multiple pinholes that focus on the heart. Pinholes lead to variable amounts of attenuation as a source is moved within the camera field of view. This study evaluated the effects of this variable attenuation on myocardial SPECT images. Methods: Computer simulations were performed for a set of nine point sources distributed in the left ventricular wall (LV). Sources were placed at the location of the heart in both an anthropomorphic and a water-cylinder computer phantom. Sources were translated in x, y, and z by up to 5 cm from the center. Projections were simulated with and without attenuation and the changes in attenuation were compared. A LV with an inferior wall defect was also simulated in both phantoms over the same range of positions. Real camera data were acquired on a Discovery NM530c camera (GE Healthcare, Haifa, Israel) for five min in list-mode using an anthropomorphic phantom (DataSpectrum, Durham, NC) with 100 MBq of Tc-99m in the LV. Images were taken over the same range of positions as the simulations and were compared based on the summed perfusion score (SPS), defect width, and apparent defect uptake for each position. Results: Point sources in the water phantom showed absolute changes in attenuation of ≤8% over the range of positions and relative changes of ≤5% compared to the apex. In the anthropomorphic computer simulations, absolute change increased to 20%. The changes in relative attenuation caused a change in SPS of <1.5 for the water phantom but up to 4.2 in the anthropomorphic phantom. Changes were larger for axial than for transverse translations. These results were supported by SPS changes of up to six seen in the physical anthropomorphic phantom for axial translations. Defect width was also seen to significantly increase. The

  13. 99mTc-HMPAO Brain SPECT in Patients with Post-Traumatic Organic Mental Disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kang Wook; Lee, Dong Jin; Shong, Min Ho; Kang, Min Hee; Ghi, Ick Sung; Shin, Young Tai; Ro, Heung Kyu

    1994-01-01

    It is well known that 99m Tc-HMPAO brain SPECT can reflect the functional lesions better than X-ray computerized tomography(CT) and magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) in the cerebral disorders. In order to evaluate the clinical utilities of 99m Tc-HMPAO brain SPECT in patients with post-traumatic chronic organic mental disorder(OMD). We included 28 patients diagnosed as OMD in department of psychiatry after traumatic head injury. And we compared the results of 99m Tc-HMPAO SPECT with those of MRI, EEG and MINI mental status examination(MMSE). The results were as follows 1) All patients diagnosed as OMD showed diffuse or focal decreased cerebral perfusion on 99m Tc-HMPAO SPECT. 2) Most frequent lesion on brain 99m Tc-HMPAO SPECT was decreased perfusion on both frontal lobe. And most frequent lesion on brain 99m Tc-HMPAO SPECT was decreased perfusion on both frontal lobe. And most frequent lesion on brain 99m Tc-HMPAO SPECT showing normal brain MRI result was also decreased both frontal perfusion. 3) Eight of 28 patients showed focal brain MRI lesions(4 small frontal hygroma, 3 small cerebral infarction and 1 cerebellar encephalomalacia) which were not detected in brain 99m Tc-HMPAO SPECT. 4) The patients showing less than 20 points on MMSE disclosed abnormal results of EEG more frequently than those disclosing more than 20 points. In conclusion, we think that 99m Tc-HMPAO brain SPECT is sensitive method to detect functional lesions of the brains in patients with chronic post-traumatic organic mental disorder.

  14. Dedicated pinhole SPECT of intestinal neutrophil recruitment in a mouse model of dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennink, Roelof J.; Hamann, Jörg; de Bruin, Kora; ten Kate, Fiebo J. W.; van Deventer, Sander J. H.; te Velde, Anje A.

    2005-01-01

    Evaluating the efficacy of therapy in experimental inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) requires information about inflammatory activity in bowel segments or leukocyte recruitment and about kinetics in the follow-up of treatment. This study evaluated a noninvasive scintigraphic technique able to assess

  15. A study of the decoding of multiple pinhole coded aperture RI tomographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Takeo; Kobayashi, Akitoshi; Nishiyama, Yutaka

    1980-01-01

    The authors constructed a Multiple Pinhole Coded Aperture (MPCA) and developed related decoding software. When simple coordinate transformation was performed, omission of points and shifting of counts occurred. By selecting various tomographic planes and collecting count for each tomographic depth from the shadowgram, a solution to these problems was found. The counts from the central portion of the tomographic image from the MPCA were incorrectly high, this was rectified by a correction function to improve the uniformity correction program of the γ-camera. Depth resolution of the tomographic image improved in proportion to the area encompassed by the pinhole configuration. An MPCA with a uniform arrangement of pinholes (e, g, pinholes in an arrangement parallel to the X-axis or the Y-axis) yielded decoded tomographic images of inferior quality. Optimum results were obtained with a ring-shaped arrangement yielding clinically applicable tomographic images even for large objects. (author)

  16. Time resolved x-ray pinhole photography of compressed laser fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attwood, D.T.

    1976-01-01

    Use of the Livermore x-ray streak camera to temporally record x-ray pinhole images of laser compressed targets is described. Use is made of specially fabricated composite x-ray pinholes which are near diffraction limited for 6 A x-rays, but easily aligned with a He--Ne laser of 6328 A wavelength. With a 6 μm x-ray pinhole, the overall system can be aligned to 5 μm accuracy and provides implosion characteristics with space--time resolutions of approximately 6 μm and 15 psec. Acceptable criteria for pinhole alignment, requisite x-ray flux, and filter characteristics are discussed. Implosion characteristics are presented from our present experiments with 68 μm diameter glass microshell targets and 0.45 terawatt, 70 psec Nd laser pulses. Final implosion velocities in excess of 3 x 10 7 cm/sec are evident

  17. Pinhole Breaches in Spent Fuel Containers: Improvements to Conservative Models of Aerosol Release and Plugging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casella, Andrew M.; Loyalka, Sudarsham K.; Hanson, Brady D.

    2007-01-01

    By taking the differential forms of transport and equations of state, the equations describing aerosol transport in pinhole breaches can be solved directly using continuous models. The results are compared with discrete models.

  18. Plugging Effects on Depressurization Time in Dry Storage Containers with Pinhole Breaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casella, Andrew M.; LOYALKA, SUDARSHAN K.; Hanson, Brady D.

    2006-01-01

    As continuation on previous work, we now examine the effect that aerosol deposition may have on plugging pinhole breaches in spent fuel containers. A model is developed considering only diffusive settling

  19. Studies of closure phenomena in pinholes irradiated by Nd laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auerbach, J.M.; Holmes, N.C.; Hunt, J.T.; Linford, G.J.

    1978-08-21

    The plasma closure of spatial filter pinholes is a critical parameter in the performance of high energy glass laser systems. Using 50 to 100 J, 300 psec FWHM laser pulses on the Janus laser, an investigation has been made on closure effects in 300 ..mu..m to 500 ..mu..m diameter pinholes of various materials and thicknesses. Calorimetry measurements have yielded data on pinhole transmission and intensity loading on the periphery of the pinhole. Ultrafast streak photography measurements indicate effective closure velocities of 2 x 10/sup 7/ cm/sec to 5 x 10/sup 7/ cm/sec. Scattered light measurements have shown the transmission loss through a typical spatial filter configuration to be primarily refractive in nature.

  20. Studies of closure phenomena in pinholes irradiated by Nd laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auerbach, J.M.; Holmes, N.C.; Hunt, J.T.; Linford, G.J.

    1978-01-01

    The plasma closure of spatial filter pinholes is a critical parameter in the performance of high energy glass laser systems. Using 50 to 100 J, 300 psec FWHM laser pulses on the Janus laser, an investigation has been made on closure effects in 300 μm to 500 μm diameter pinholes of various materials and thicknesses. Calorimetry measurements have yielded data on pinhole transmission and intensity loading on the periphery of the pinhole. Ultrafast streak photography measurements indicate effective closure velocities of 2 x 10 7 cm/sec to 5 x 10 7 cm/sec. Scattered light measurements have shown the transmission loss through a typical spatial filter configuration to be primarily refractive in nature

  1. 111In-cetuximab-F(ab')2 SPECT and 18F-FDG PET for prediction and response monitoring of combined-modality treatment of human head and neck carcinomas in a mouse model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, L.K. van; Boerman, O.C.; Franssen, G.M.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Bussink, J.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas with radiotherapy and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor cetuximab shows an improved response in a subgroup of patients. The aim of this study was to noninvasively monitor treatment response by visualizing systemically accessible

  2. Early Response Monitoring with 18F-FDG PET and Cetuximab-F(ab')2-SPECT After Radiotherapy of Human Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas in a Mouse Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, L.K. van; Boerman, O.C.; Franssen, G.M.; Lok, J.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Bussink, J.

    2014-01-01

    Only a subset of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) benefit from radiotherapy and concurrent epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor therapy with cetuximab, indicating the need for patient selection. The aim of this study was to visualize the change in

  3. Patient restraining device for the pinhole collimator and gamma scintillation camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kay, T.D.

    1977-01-01

    A patient restraining device for use with the pinhole collimator of a conventional Gamma Scintillation Camera, the restraining device being made of an adapter ring and a patient holder. The adapter ring is secured directly to the pinhole collimator while the holder is adjustably mounted on the adapter. The adapter ring is so designed to accommodate a variety of holders so as to enable the scanning of many different areas of a patient's anatomy by the scintillation camera

  4. High-speed photography of light beams transmitted through pinhole targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaonan, D.; Haien, He.; Lian, C.; Huifang, Z.; Zhijian, Z.

    1988-01-01

    A method of high speed photography is presented. It was designed and performed in order to study temporal behaviors of plasma closure effects of pinhole targets in laser plasma experiments. A series of high speed photographs were taken for the laser beam transmitted through the pinhole targets. Spatially resolved and integrated temporal histories of closure effects were observed, respectively. Some physical information about closure effect and closure speed have been studied

  5. Comparison of fan beam, slit-slat and multi-pinhole collimators for molecular breast tomosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Roosmalen, Jarno; Beekman, Freek J; Goorden, Marlies C

    2018-05-16

    Recently, we proposed and optimized dedicated multi-pinhole molecular breast tomosynthesis (MBT) that images a lightly compressed breast. As MBT may also be performed with other types of collimators, the aim of this paper is to optimize MBT with fan beam and slit-slat collimators and to compare its performance to that of multi-pinhole MBT to arrive at a truly optimized design. Using analytical expressions, we first optimized fan beam and slit-slat collimator parameters to reach maximum sensitivity at a series of given system resolutions. Additionally, we performed full system simulations of a breast phantom containing several tumours for the optimized designs. We found that at equal system resolution the maximum achievable sensitivity increases from pinhole to slit-slat to fan beam collimation with fan beam and slit-slat MBT having on average a 48% and 20% higher sensitivity than multi-pinhole MBT. Furthermore, by inspecting simulated images and applying a tumour-to-background contrast-to-noise (TB-CNR) analysis, we found that slit-slat collimators underperform with respect to the other collimator types. The fan beam collimators obtained a similar TB-CNR as the pinhole collimators, but the optimum was reached at different system resolutions. For fan beam collimators, a 6-8 mm system resolution was optimal in terms of TB-CNR, while with pinhole collimation highest TB-CNR was reached in the 7-10 mm range.

  6. Molecular imaging agents for SPECT (and SPECT/CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnanasegaran, Gopinath; Ballinger, James R.

    2014-01-01

    The development of hybrid single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) cameras has increased the diagnostic value of many existing single photon radiopharmaceuticals. Precise anatomical localization of lesions greatly increases diagnostic confidence in bone imaging of the extremities, infection imaging, sentinel lymph node localization, and imaging in other areas. Accurate anatomical localization is particularly important prior to surgery, especially involving the parathyroid glands and sentinel lymph node procedures. SPECT/CT plays a role in characterization of lesions, particularly in bone scintigraphy and radioiodine imaging of metastatic thyroid cancer. In the development of novel tracers, SPECT/CT is particularly important in monitoring response to therapies that do not result in an early change in lesion size. Preclinical SPECT/CT devices, which actually have spatial resolution superior to PET/CT devices, have become essential in characterization of the biodistribution and tissue kinetics of novel tracers, allowing coregistration of serial studies within the same animals, which serves both to reduce biological variability and reduce the number of animals required. In conclusion, SPECT/CT increases the utility of existing radiopharmaceuticals and plays a pivotal role in the evaluation of novel tracers. (orig.)

  7. Molecular imaging agents for SPECT (and SPECT/CT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnanasegaran, Gopinath [Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Ballinger, James R. [Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-15

    The development of hybrid single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) cameras has increased the diagnostic value of many existing single photon radiopharmaceuticals. Precise anatomical localization of lesions greatly increases diagnostic confidence in bone imaging of the extremities, infection imaging, sentinel lymph node localization, and imaging in other areas. Accurate anatomical localization is particularly important prior to surgery, especially involving the parathyroid glands and sentinel lymph node procedures. SPECT/CT plays a role in characterization of lesions, particularly in bone scintigraphy and radioiodine imaging of metastatic thyroid cancer. In the development of novel tracers, SPECT/CT is particularly important in monitoring response to therapies that do not result in an early change in lesion size. Preclinical SPECT/CT devices, which actually have spatial resolution superior to PET/CT devices, have become essential in characterization of the biodistribution and tissue kinetics of novel tracers, allowing coregistration of serial studies within the same animals, which serves both to reduce biological variability and reduce the number of animals required. In conclusion, SPECT/CT increases the utility of existing radiopharmaceuticals and plays a pivotal role in the evaluation of novel tracers. (orig.)

  8. Assessment of anatomic relation between pulmonary perfusion and morphology in pulmonary emphysema with breath-hold SPECT-CT fusion images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suga, Kazuyoshi; Kawakami, Yasuhiko; Iwanaga, Hideyuki; Hayashi, Noriko; Seto, Akiko; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    2008-01-01

    Anatomic relation between pulmonary perfusion and morphology in pulmonary emphysema was assessed on deep-inspiratory breath-hold (DIBrH) perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-CT fusion images. Subjects were 38 patients with pulmonary emphysema and 11 non-smoker controls, who successfully underwent DIBrH and non-BrH perfusion SPECT using a dual-headed SPECT system during the period between January 2004 and June 2006. DIBrH SPECT was three-dimensionally co-registered with DIBrH CT to comprehend the relationship between lung perfusion defects and CT low attenuation areas (LAA). By comparing the appearance of lung perfusion on DIBrH with non-BrH SPECT, the correlation with the rate constant for the alveolar-capillary transfer of carbon monoxide (DLCO/VA) was compared between perfusion abnormalities on these SPECTs and LAA on CT. DIBrH SPECT provided fairly uniform perfusion in controls, but significantly enhanced perfusion heterogeneity when compared with non-BrH SPECT in pulmonary emphysema patients (P<0.001). The reliable DIBrH SPECT-CT fusion images confirmed more extended perfusion defects than LAA on CT in majority (73%) of patients. Perfusion abnormalities on DIBrH SPECT were more closely correlated with DLCO/VA than LAA on CT (P<0.05). DIBrH SPECT identifies affected lungs with perfusion abnormality better than does non-BrH SPECT in pulmonary emphysema. DIBrH SPECT-CT fusion images are useful for more accurately localizing affected lungs than morphologic CT alone in this disease. (author)

  9. Imaging fusion (SPECT/CT) in degenerative disease of spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernal, P.; Ucros, G.; Bermudez, S.; Ocampo, M.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Objective: To determine the utility of Fusion Imaging SPECT/CT in degenerative pathology of the spine and to establish the impact of the use of fusion imaging in spinal pain due to degenerative changes of the spine. Materials and methods: 44 Patients (M=21, F=23) average age of 63 years and with degenerative pathology of spine were sent to Diagnosis Imaging department in FSFB. Bone scintigraphy (SPECT), CT of spine (cervical: 30%, Lumbar 70%) and fusion imaging were performed in all of them. Bone scintigraphy was carried out in a gamma camera Siemens Diacam double head attached to ESOFT computer. The images were acquired in matrix 128 x 128, 20 seg/imag, 64 images. CT of spine was performed same day or two days after in Helycoidal Siemens somatom emotion CT. The fusion was done in a Dicom workstation in sagital, axial and coronal reconstruction. The findings were evaluated by 2 Nuclear Medicine physicians and 2 radiologists of the staff of FSFB in an independent way. Results: Bone scan (SPECT) and CT of 44 patients were evaluated. CT showed facet joint osteoarthrities in 27 (61.3%) patients, uncovertebral joint arthrosis in 7 (15.9%), bulging disc in 9(20.4%), spinal nucleus lesion in 7(15.9%), osteophytes in 9 (20.4%), spinal foraminal stenosis in 7 (15.9%), spondylolysis/spondylolisthesis in 4 (9%). Bone scan showed facet joint osteoarthrities in 29 (65.9%), uncovertebral joint arthrosis in 4 (9%), osteophytes in 9 (20.4%) and normal 3 (6.8%). The imaging fusion showed coincidence findings (main lesion in CT with high uptake in scintigraphy) in 34 patients (77.2%) and no coincidence in 10 (22.8%). In 15 (34.09%) patients the fusion provided additional information. The analysis of the findings of CT and SPECT showed similar results in most of the cases and the fusion didn't provide additional information but it allowed to confirm the findings but when the findings didn't match where the CT showed several findings and SPECT only one area with high uptake

  10. Voxel-by-voxel analysis of ECD-brain SPECT can separate penumbra from irreversibly damaged tissue at the acute phase of stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darcourt, J.; Migneco, O.; David, O.; Bussiere, F.; Mahagne, M.H.; Dunac, A.; Baron, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    Aim. At the acute phase of ischemic stroke, the target of treatment is still salvageable hypoperfused cerebral tissue; so called penumbra. We tested the possibility of separating on early ECD brain SPECT penumbral voxels (P) from irreversibly damaged damaged tissue (IDT). We used ECD which is not only a perfusion tracer but also a metabolic marker. Materials and methods. We prospectively studied 18 patients who underwent ECD-SPECT within the 12 hours following a first-ever acute middle cerebral artery stroke. Neurological evaluation was performed using the Orgogozo's scale at admission and 3 months later in order to calculate and evolution index (IE%) (Martinez-Vila et al.). SPECT data were obtained using a triple head camera equipped with fan beam collimators one hour after injection of 1000 MBq of 99mTc-ECD. On reconstructed images gray matter voxels were automatically segmented. Contralateral healthy hemisphere was used as reference leading to the identification of 3 cortical voxel types: normal (N-SPECT) above 80%; penumbra (P-SPECT) between 80% and 40% and IDT (IDT-SPECT) below 40%. 10 patients also underwent a T2 weighted 3D MRI study at 3 months. Cortical voxels with hypersignal served as reference for IDT (IDT-MRI) the others were considered normal (N-MRI). SPECT and MRI data were co-registered. Therefore each voxel belonged to one of 6 categories (3 SPECT x 2 MRI). Results. (1) The SPECT thresholds were validated on the MRI subgroup. 99% of the N-SPECT voxels were normal on late MRI. 84% of IDT-SPECT voxels corresponded to IDT-MRI. 89% of P-SPECT voxels were normal on late MRI and 11% corresponded to IDT on late MRI. Other categories of voxels (N-SPECT IDT-MRI and IDT-SPECT N-MRI) represented less than 5%. (2) Percentages of each voxel SPECT type was correlated with the EI% on the entire population (Spearman test). P-SPECT extent correlated with EI% improvement (p<0.001) and IDT-SPECT with EI% worsening (p<0.001). Conclusion. Analysis of ECD cortical

  11. SPECT in Focal Epilepsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roderick Duncan

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain perfusion changes during seizures were first observed in the 1930s. Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT was developed in the 1970s, and tracers suitable for the imaging of regional cerebral perfusion (rCP became available in the 1980s. The method was first used to study rCP in the interictal phase, and this showed areas of low perfusion in a proportion of cases, mainly in patients with temporal lobe epilepsies. However, the trapping paradigm of tracers such as hexamethyl propyleneamine oxime (HMPAO provided a practicable method of studying changes in rCP during seizures, and a literature was established in the late 1980s and early 1990s showing a typical sequence of changes during and after seizures of mesial temporal lobe origin; the ictal phase was associated with large increases in perfusion throughout the temporal lobe, with first the lateral, then the mesial temporal lobe becoming hypoperfused in the postictal phase. Activation and inhibition of other structures, such as the basal ganglia and frontal cortex, were also seen. Studies of seizures originating elsewhere in the brain have shown a variety of patterns of change, according to the structures involved. These changes have been used practically to aid the process of localisation of the epileptogenic zone so that epilepsy surgery can be planned.

  12. Organ volume estimation using SPECT

    CERN Document Server

    Zaidi, H

    1996-01-01

    Knowledge of in vivo thyroid volume has both diagnostic and therapeutic importance and could lead to a more precise quantification of absolute activity contained in the thyroid gland. In order to improve single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) quantitation, attenuation correction was performed according to Chang's algorithm. The dual-window method was used for scatter subtraction. We used a Monte Carlo simulation of the SPECT system to accurately determine the scatter multiplier factor k. Volume estimation using SPECT was performed by summing up the volume elements (voxels) lying within the contour of the object, determined by a fixed threshold and the gray level histogram (GLH) method. Thyroid phantom and patient studies were performed and the influence of 1) fixed thresholding, 2) automatic thresholding, 3) attenuation, 4) scatter, and 5) reconstruction filter were investigated. This study shows that accurate volume estimation of the thyroid gland is feasible when accurate corrections are perform...

  13. Invisible Base Electrode Coordinates Approximation for Simultaneous SPECT and EEG Data Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, L.; Goszczynska, H.; Zalewska, E.; Bajera, A.; Krolicki, L.

    2014-04-01

    This work was performed as part of a larger research concerning the feasibility of improving the localization of epileptic foci, as compared to the standard SPECT examination, by applying the technique of EEG mapping. The presented study extends our previous work on the development of a method for superposition of SPECT images and EEG 3D maps when these two examinations are performed simultaneously. Due to the lack of anatomical data in SPECT images it is a much more difficult task than in the case of MRI/EEG study where electrodes are visible in morphological images. Using the appropriate dose of radioisotope we mark five base electrodes to make them visible in the SPECT image and then approximate the coordinates of the remaining electrodes using properties of the 10-20 electrode placement system and the proposed nine-ellipses model. This allows computing a sequence of 3D EEG maps spanning on all electrodes. It happens, however, that not all five base electrodes can be reliably identified in SPECT data. The aim of the current study was to develop a method for determining the coordinates of base electrode(s) missing in the SPECT image. The algorithm for coordinates approximation has been developed and was tested on data collected for three subjects with all visible electrodes. To increase the accuracy of the approximation we used head surface models. Freely available model from Oostenveld research based on data from SPM package and our own model based on data from our EEG/SPECT studies were used. For data collected in four cases with one electrode not visible we compared the invisible base electrode coordinates approximation for Oostenveld and our models. The results vary depending on the missing electrode placement, but application of the realistic head model significantly increases the accuracy of the approximation.

  14. Invisible Base Electrode Coordinates Approximation for Simultaneous SPECT and EEG Data Visualization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowalczyk L.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This work was performed as part of a larger research concerning the feasibility of improving the localization of epileptic foci, as compared to the standard SPECT examination, by applying the technique of EEG mapping. The presented study extends our previous work on the development of a method for superposition of SPECT images and EEG 3D maps when these two examinations are performed simultaneously. Due to the lack of anatomical data in SPECT images it is a much more difficult task than in the case of MRI/EEG study where electrodes are visible in morphological images. Using the appropriate dose of radioisotope we mark five base electrodes to make them visible in the SPECT image and then approximate the coordinates of the remaining electrodes using properties of the 10-20 electrode placement system and the proposed nine-ellipses model. This allows computing a sequence of 3D EEG maps spanning on all electrodes. It happens, however, that not all five base electrodes can be reliably identified in SPECT data. The aim of the current study was to develop a method for determining the coordinates of base electrode(s missing in the SPECT image. The algorithm for coordinates approximation has been developed and was tested on data collected for three subjects with all visible electrodes. To increase the accuracy of the approximation we used head surface models. Freely available model from Oostenveld research based on data from SPM package and our own model based on data from our EEG/SPECT studies were used. For data collected in four cases with one electrode not visible we compared the invisible base electrode coordinates approximation for Oostenveld and our models. The results vary depending on the missing electrode placement, but application of the realistic head model significantly increases the accuracy of the approximation.

  15. Normal anatomy of lung perfusion SPECT scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskowitz, G.W.; Levy, L.M.

    1987-01-01

    Ten patients studies for possible pulmonary embolic disease had normal lung perfusion planar and SPECT scintigraphy. A computer program was developed to superimpose the CT scans on corresponding SPECT images. Superimposition of CT scans on corresponding SPECT transaxial cross-sectional images, when available, provides the needed definition and relationships of adjacent organs. SPECT transaxial sections provide clear anatomic definition of perfusion defects without foreground and background lung tissue superimposed. The location, shape, and size of the perfusion defects can be readily assessed by SPECT. An algorithm was developed for the differentiation of abnormal pulmonary perfusion patterns from normal structures on variation

  16. Radiopharmaceuticals for SPECT cancer detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernov, V. I., E-mail: chernov@oncology.tomsk.ru; Medvedeva, A. A., E-mail: tickayaAA@oncology.tomsk.ru; Zelchan, R. V., E-mail: r.zelchan@yandex.ru; Sinilkin, I. G., E-mail: sinilkinig@oncology.tomsk.ru [Tomsk Cancer Research Institute, Kooperativny Street 5, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenin Avenue 30, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Stasyuk, E. S.; Larionova, L. A. [Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenin Avenue 30, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Slonimskaya, E. M.; Choynzonov, E. L. [Tomsk Cancer Research Institute, Kooperativny Street 5, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-02

    The purpose of the study was to assess the efficacy of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with {sup 199}Tl and {sup 99}mTc-MIBI in the detection of breast, laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers. A total of 220 patients were included into the study: 120 patients with breast lesions (100 patients with breast cancer and 20 patients with benign breast tumors) and 100 patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal diseases (80 patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer and 20 patients with benign laryngeal/hypopharyngeal lesions). No abnormal {sup 199}Tl uptake was seen in all patients with benign breast and laryngeal lesions, indicating a 100% specificity of {sup 199}Tl SPECT. In the breast cancer patients, the increased {sup 199}Tl uptake in the breast was visualized in 94.8% patients, {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI—in 93.4% patients. The increased {sup 199}Tl uptake in axillary lymph nodes was detected in 60% patients, and {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI—in 93.1% patients. In patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer, the sensitivity of SPECT with {sup 199}Tl and {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI was 95%. The {sup 199}Tl SPECT sensitivity in identification of regional lymph node metastases in the patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer was 75% and the {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI SPECT sensitivity was 17%. The data obtained showed that SPECT with {sup 199}Tl and {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI can be used as one of the additional imaging methods in detection of tumors.

  17. A SPECT demonstrator—revival of a gamma camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valastyán, I.; Kerek, A.; Molnár, J.; Novák, D.; Végh, J.; Emri, M.; Trón, L.

    2006-07-01

    A gamma camera has been updated and converted to serve as a demonstrator for educational purposes. The gantry and the camera head were the only part of the system that remained untouched. The main reason for this modernization was to increase the transparency of the gamma camera by partitioning the different logical building blocks of the system and thus providing access for inspection and improvements throughout the chain. New data acquisition and reconstruction software has been installed. By taking these measures, the camera is now used in education and also serves as a platform for tests of new hardware and software solutions. The camera is also used to demonstrate 3D (SPECT) imaging by collecting 2D projections from a rotatable cylindrical phantom. Since the camera head is not attached mechanically to the phantom, the effect of misalignment between the head and the rotation axis of the phantom can be studied.

  18. A SPECT demonstrator-revival of a gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valastyan, I.; Kerek, A.; Molnar, J.; Novak, D.; Vegh, J.; Emri, M.; Tron, L.

    2006-01-01

    A gamma camera has been updated and converted to serve as a demonstrator for educational purposes. The gantry and the camera head were the only part of the system that remained untouched. The main reason for this modernization was to increase the transparency of the gamma camera by partitioning the different logical building blocks of the system and thus providing access for inspection and improvements throughout the chain. New data acquisition and reconstruction software has been installed. By taking these measures, the camera is now used in education and also serves as a platform for tests of new hardware and software solutions. The camera is also used to demonstrate 3D (SPECT) imaging by collecting 2D projections from a rotatable cylindrical phantom. Since the camera head is not attached mechanically to the phantom, the effect of misalignment between the head and the rotation axis of the phantom can be studied

  19. Establishment study of the in vivo imaging analysis with small animal imaging modalities (micro-PET and micro-SPECT/CT) for bio-drug development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Beomsu; Park, Sanghyeon; Park, Jeonghoon; Jo, Sungkee; Jung, Uhee; Kim, Seolwha; Lee, Yunjong; Choi, Daeseong

    2011-01-15

    In this study, we established the image acquisition and analysis procedures of micro-PET, SPECT/CT using the experimental animal (mouse) for the development of imaging assessment method for the bio-drug. We examined the micro-SPECT/CT, PET imaging study using the Siemens Inveon micro-multimodality system (SPECT/CT) and micro-PET with {sup 99m}Tc-MDP, DMSA, and {sup 18}F-FDG. SPECT imaging studies using 3 types of pinhole collimators. 5-MWB collimator was used for SPECT image study. To study whole-body distribution, {sup 99m}Tc-MDP SPECT image study was performed. We obtained the fine distribution image. And the CT images was obtained to provide the anatomical information. And then these two types images are fused. To study specific organ uptake, we examined {sup 99}mTc-DMSA SPECT/CT imaging study. We also performed the PET image study using U87MG tumor bearing mice and {sup 18}F-FDG. The overnight fasting, warming and anesthesia with 2% isoflurane pretreatment enhance the tumor image through reducing the background uptake including brown fat, harderian gland and skeletal muscles. Also we got the governmental approval for use of x-ray generator for CT and radioisotopes as sealed and open source. We prepared the draft of process procedure for the experimental animal imaging facility. These research results can be utilized as a basic image study protocols and data for the image assessment of drugs including biological drug.

  20. Applications of multi-pinhole gamma camera collimation to tomography and image enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, D.R.

    1981-01-01

    Recently, multi-pinhole gamma camera collimation has been introduced in the field of emission tomography. This collimation process simultaneously produces several images covering a limited angular range, which may then be recombined to obtain tomographic slices of the object imaged. This study has investigated a possible method for improving the images obtained by this technique by two multi-pinhole views taken 90 0 apart. During the course of this work, multi-pinhole collimation was also applied to in vivo imaging of the disintegration of tablets. Collimmators were designed and built both for tomography and imaging tablet disintegration, and computer programs were written to reconstruct the images by simple backprojection and by filtered backprojection. The use of multi-pinhole collimators to image the disintegration of tablets in vivo was clearly demonstrated. Phantom tests done in vitro were capable of imaging defects as small as 5 mm 2 , while images made with real tablets both in vitro and in vivo readily showed the onset and progress of the tablet disintegration. Further experiments are planned using this technique to measure gastric emptying times disintegration times of various tablet formulations. Limitations of multi-pinhole technique included problems such as limited ranges of viewing and artifacts introduced due to incomplete sampling

  1. Pinhole diffraction holography for fabrication of high-resolution Fresnel zone plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Sankha S; Solak, Harun H; David, Christian; van der Veen, J Friso

    2014-01-27

    Fresnel zone plates (FZPs) play an essential role in high spatial resolution x-ray imaging and analysis of materials in many fields. These diffractive lenses are commonly made by serial writing techniques such as electron beam or focused ion beam lithography. Here we show that pinhole diffraction holography has potential to generate FZP patterns that are free from aberrations and imperfections that may be present in alternative fabrication techniques. In this presented method, FZPs are fabricated by recording interference pattern of a spherical wave generated by diffraction through a pinhole, illuminated with coherent plane wave at extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelength. Fundamental and practical issues involved in formation and recording of the interference pattern are considered. It is found that resolution of the produced FZP is directly related to the diameter of the pinhole used and the pinhole size cannot be made arbitrarily small as the transmission of EUV or x-ray light through small pinholes diminishes due to poor refractive index contrast found between materials in these spectral ranges. We also find that the practical restrictions on exposure time due to the light intensity available from current sources directly imposes a limit on the number of zones that can be printed with this method. Therefore a trade-off between the resolution and the FZP diameter exists. Overall, we find that this method can be used to fabricate aberration free FZPs down to a resolution of about 10 nm.

  2. Contribution of ictal- and interictal brain SPECT to the diagnostic work-up of epileptic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dondi, M.; Salgarello, M.; Zoboli, S.; Cidda, C.; Nanni, C.; Rubboli, G.; Meletti, S.; Volpi, L.; Tassinari, C.A.

    2002-01-01

    Aim of the study: We aimed at assessing the contribution of brain SPECT to the diagnostic work-up of patients admitted to the Intensive Epilepsy Monitoring Unit (IEMU) by evaluating concordance of SPECT results with clinical diagnosis (DX) at IEMU admittance (Adm-DX) and at hospital discharge (Disch-DX). Materials and methods: 48 consecutive patients were enrolled in this study and submitted to both ictal and inter-ictal brain SPECT, carried out by means of a three-head system. Before ictal studies, patients were video-EEG monitored in the IEMU. 740 MBq of Tc99m ECD were injected during seizures and imaging performed within 45-60 minutes. For interictal studies, injection was given after at least a 24-hours seizure-free interval. Slices were reconstructed along the orbito-meatal line as well as along the temporal cut. Possible epileptic foci were identified by visual comparison of ictal and interictal studies. Clinical data: Out of the 48 cases, 27 were diagnosed as temporal lobe epilepsies (TLE). Of these, 15 had an Adm-DX of lateralization, whereas 12 were not lateralized according to standardized clinical and EEG criteria. Frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE) was diagnosed in 11 patients, another group of 3 was classified as cryptogenetic (CRYP), while the remaining 7 cases did not fall into any of the previous groups (OTH). SPECT results: in TLE, ictal/interictal SPECT results were congruent with Adm-Dx in 13/27 cases (48%) whereas congruence was found with 25 out of 27 (92%) of Disch-DX. In FLE, concordance between SPECT and clinical diagnosis remained unchanged (9/11 in comparison to either Adm-DX or Disch-DX). CRYPT patients had no lateralization at Adm-DX, while Dis-DX was concordant with SPECT in 2/3 cases. The group labeled as OTH showed concordance SPECT with Adm-DX in 0/7 cases, as opposed to 5/7 of Disch-DX. On the whole, SPECT results were concordant with Adm-DX in 34/48 cases (71%) but concordance was much higher with Dis-DX (41/48; 85%). Conclusions: Brain

  3. PET and SPECT in psychiatry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O.; Otte, Andreas; Vries, Erik F.J. de; Waarde, Aren van

    2014-01-01

    Covers classical psychiatric disorders as well as other subjects such as suicide, sleep, eating disorders, and autism. Emphasis on a multidisciplinary approach. Written by internationally acclaimed experts. PET and SPECT in Psychiatry showcases the combined expertise of renowned authors whose dedication to the investigation of psychiatric disease through nuclear medicine technology has achieved international recognition. The classical psychiatric disorders as well as other subjects - such as suicide, sleep, eating disorders, and autism - are discussed and the latest results in functional neuroimaging are detailed. Most chapters are written jointly by a clinical psychiatrist and a nuclear medicine expert to ensure a multidisciplinary approach. This state of the art compendium will be valuable to all who have an interest in the field of neuroscience, from the psychiatrist and the radiologist/nuclear medicine specialist to the interested general practitioner and cognitive psychologist. It is the first volume of a trilogy on PET and SPECT imaging in the neurosciences; other volumes will focus on PET and SPECT in neurology and PET and SPECT of neurobiological systems.

  4. SPECT og PET i neurobiologien

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulson, O.B.; Lassen, N.A.

    1997-01-01

    PET (positron emission tomography) and SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) are isotopic methods in which the distribution is registered of radiolabelled tracers given in such small amounts that they are without effect on the organism or the organism's disposal of them. Thus, a series...

  5. PET and SPECT in psychiatry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O. [University Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Ghent Univ. (Belgium); Otte, Andreas [Univ. of Applied Sciences Offenburg (Germany). Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology; Vries, Erik F.J. de; Waarde, Aren van (eds.) [University Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging

    2014-09-01

    Covers classical psychiatric disorders as well as other subjects such as suicide, sleep, eating disorders, and autism. Emphasis on a multidisciplinary approach. Written by internationally acclaimed experts. PET and SPECT in Psychiatry showcases the combined expertise of renowned authors whose dedication to the investigation of psychiatric disease through nuclear medicine technology has achieved international recognition. The classical psychiatric disorders as well as other subjects - such as suicide, sleep, eating disorders, and autism - are discussed and the latest results in functional neuroimaging are detailed. Most chapters are written jointly by a clinical psychiatrist and a nuclear medicine expert to ensure a multidisciplinary approach. This state of the art compendium will be valuable to all who have an interest in the field of neuroscience, from the psychiatrist and the radiologist/nuclear medicine specialist to the interested general practitioner and cognitive psychologist. It is the first volume of a trilogy on PET and SPECT imaging in the neurosciences; other volumes will focus on PET and SPECT in neurology and PET and SPECT of neurobiological systems.

  6. Clinical impact of SPECT-CT in the diagnosis and surgical management of hyper-parathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokmak, Handan; Demirkol, Mehmet Onur; Alagöl, Faruk; Tezelman, Serdar; Terzioglu, Tarik

    2014-01-01

    Hyper-functioning parathyroid glands with autonomous overproduction of PTH is the most frequent cause of hypercalcemia in outpatient populations with primary hyper-parathyroidism. It is generally caused by a solitary adenoma in 80%-90% of patients. Despite the various methodologies that are available for preoperative localization of parathyroid lesions, there is still no certain preoperative imaging algorithm to guide a surgical approach prior to the management of primary hyper-parathyroidism (P-HPT). Minimally invasive surgery has replaced the traditional bilateral neck exploration (BNE) as the initial approach in parathyroidectomy at many referral hospitals worldwide. In our study, we investigated diagnostic contributions of SPECT-CT combined with conventional planar scintigraphy in the detection of hyper-functioning parathyroid gland localization, since planar imaging has limitations. We also evaluated the efficacy of preoperative USG in adding to initial diagnostic imaging algorithms to localize a parathyroid adenoma. A total of 256 consecutive surgically naive patients with hyper-parathyroidism diagnosis were included in the following preoperative localization study. The study consisted of 256 consecutive patients with HPT, with a selected 154 patients who had neck surgery with definitive histology reports. All patients had 99mTc-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (99mTc-MIBI) double-phase scintigraphy. The SPECT-CT procedure, combined with standard 99mTc-MIBI planar parathyroid scintigraphy with a pinhole and parallel-hole collimator to evaluate whether the SPECT-CT procedure was able to provide additional information in the localization of the pathology, caused hyper-parathyroidism in both P-HPT and S-HPT. In the 154 P-HPT patients, 168 lesions (142 adenomas including 2 intrathyroidal and 2 double adenoma, 2 carcinoma, and 22 hyperplastic glands (four patients had MEN I, each with four hyperplastic glands)), were found at surgery. SPECT-CT detected more lesions than

  7. Effect of bypass on the motor activation SPECT compared to the acetazolamide SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawaguchi, Shoichiro; Iwahashi, Hideaki; Sakaki, Toshisuke; Imai, Teruhiko; Ohishi, Hajime [Nara Medical Univ., Kashihara (Japan)

    2002-03-01

    The authors evaluated and analyzed motor activation single photon emission computed tomography (M-SPECT) in ischemic cerebrovascular disease compared to resting and acetazolamide (ACZ) activated SPECT studies. Seventeen cases with STA-MCA bypass performed for ischemic cerebrovascular disease were examined. The SPECT studies consisting of resting, ACZ activation, and motor activation stages were performed before bypass, at 1 month, and 3 months after bypass. The result of the M-SPECT was expressed as negative or positive. Before bypass: In all 17 cases, SPECT studies of the affected side showed reduction of resting cerebral blood flow (CBF) and reduction of cerebrovascular reserve capacity (CVRC). Eight cases were positive in the M-SPECT study. One week after bypass: The resting CBF increased in seven cases. Four showed preoperative positive M-SPECT. Eight cases showed improvement of the CVRC. Twelve cases were positive in M-SPECT, and two were negative in the preoperative M-SPECT. Three months after bypass: Thirteen cases showed improvement in the resting CBF, and fourteen cases showed improvement of the CVRC. Fourteen cases were positive in the M-SPECT, and among these, 6 were negative in the preoperative M-SPECT. There was a discrepancy between the improvement in CVRC and M-SPECT. M-SPECT study can provide information about the degree of hemodynamic compromise and effect of bypass surgery. (author)

  8. Effect of bypass on the motor activation SPECT compared to the acetazolamide SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawaguchi, Shoichiro; Iwahashi, Hideaki; Sakaki, Toshisuke; Imai, Teruhiko; Ohishi, Hajime

    2002-01-01

    The authors evaluated and analyzed motor activation single photon emission computed tomography (M-SPECT) in ischemic cerebrovascular disease compared to resting and acetazolamide (ACZ) activated SPECT studies. Seventeen cases with STA-MCA bypass performed for ischemic cerebrovascular disease were examined. The SPECT studies consisting of resting, ACZ activation, and motor activation stages were performed before bypass, at 1 month, and 3 months after bypass. The result of the M-SPECT was expressed as negative or positive. Before bypass: In all 17 cases, SPECT studies of the affected side showed reduction of resting cerebral blood flow (CBF) and reduction of cerebrovascular reserve capacity (CVRC). Eight cases were positive in the M-SPECT study. One week after bypass: The resting CBF increased in seven cases. Four showed preoperative positive M-SPECT. Eight cases showed improvement of the CVRC. Twelve cases were positive in M-SPECT, and two were negative in the preoperative M-SPECT. Three months after bypass: Thirteen cases showed improvement in the resting CBF, and fourteen cases showed improvement of the CVRC. Fourteen cases were positive in the M-SPECT, and among these, 6 were negative in the preoperative M-SPECT. There was a discrepancy between the improvement in CVRC and M-SPECT. M-SPECT study can provide information about the degree of hemodynamic compromise and effect of bypass surgery. (author)

  9. Measuring Beam Sizes and Ultra-Small Electron Emittances Using an X-ray Pinhole Camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elleaume, P; Fortgang, C; Penel, C; Tarazona, E

    1995-09-01

    A very simple pinhole camera set-up has been built to diagnose the electron beam emittance of the ESRF. The pinhole is placed in the air next to an Al window. An image is obtained with a CCD camera imaging a fluorescent screen. The emittance is deduced from the size of the image. The relationship between the measured beam size and the electron beam emittance depends upon the lattice functions alpha, beta and eta, the screen resolution, pinhole size and photon beam divergence. The set-up is capable of measuring emittances as low as 5 pm rad and is presently routinely used as both an electron beam imaging device and an emittance diagnostic.

  10. Collimated proton acceleration in light sail regime with a tailored pinhole target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, H. Y.; Zepf, M. [Helmholtz Institute Jena, Fröbelstieg 3, 07743 Jena (Germany); Yan, X. Q. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology and Key Lab of High Energy Density Physics Simulation, CAPT, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-06-15

    A scheme for producing collimated protons from laser interactions with a diamond-like-carbon + pinhole target is proposed. The process is based on radiation pressure acceleration in the multi-species light-sail regime [B. Qiao et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 155002 (2010); T. P. Yu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 065002 (2010)]. Particle-in-cell simulations demonstrate that transverse quasistatic electric field at TV/m level can be generated in the pinhole. The transverse electric field suppresses the transverse expansion of protons effectively, resulting in a higher density and more collimated proton beam compared with a single foil target. The dependence of the proton beam divergence on the parameters of the pinhole is also investigated.

  11. Collimated proton acceleration in light sail regime with a tailored pinhole target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H. Y.; Zepf, M.; Yan, X. Q.

    2014-01-01

    A scheme for producing collimated protons from laser interactions with a diamond-like-carbon + pinhole target is proposed. The process is based on radiation pressure acceleration in the multi-species light-sail regime [B. Qiao et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 155002 (2010); T. P. Yu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 065002 (2010)]. Particle-in-cell simulations demonstrate that transverse quasistatic electric field at TV/m level can be generated in the pinhole. The transverse electric field suppresses the transverse expansion of protons effectively, resulting in a higher density and more collimated proton beam compared with a single foil target. The dependence of the proton beam divergence on the parameters of the pinhole is also investigated

  12. Optimising performance of a confocal fluorescence microscope with a differential pinhole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakade, Rohan; Walker, John G; Phillips, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR)-resolution trade-off is of great importance to bio-imaging applications where the aim is to image the sample using as little light as possible without significantly sacrificing image quality. In this paper the inherent SNR-resolution tradeoff in Confocal Fluorescence Microscopy (CFM) systems is presented by means of an effective tradeoff curve. A CFM system that employs a differential pinhole detection scheme has recently been shown to offer increased resolution, but at the expense of SNR. An optimum profile for the differential pinhole is identified in this paper that offers improved performance over a conventional (circular pinhole) system. The performance enhancement is illustrated through computer simulation. (paper)

  13. Applications of multi-pinhole gamma camera collimation to tomography and image enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, D. R.

    1981-06-01

    Multi-pinhole gamma camera collimation was introduced in the field of emission tomography. This collimation process simultaneously produces several images covering a limited angular range, which may then be recombined to obtain tomographic slices of the object imaged. A possible method for improving the images obtained by this technique by combining two multi-pinhole views taken 90 deg apart was investigated. Collimators were designed and built both for tomography and imaging tablet disintegration, and computer programs were written to reconstruct the images by simple backprojection and by filtered backprojection. The use of multi-pinhole collimators to image the disintegration of tablets in vivo was clearly demonstrated. Phantom tests done in vitro were capable of imaging defects as small as 5 sq mm, while images made with real tablets both in vitro and in vivo readily showed the onset and progress of the tablet disintegration.

  14. Mnemonic activation by SPECT; Activation mnesique en TEMP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Migneco, O.; Darcourt, J.; Benoit, M; Malandain, G.; Thirion, J.P.; Robert, Ph.; Vidal, R.; Desvignes, Ph.; Benoliel, J.; Ayache, N.; Bussiere, F. [Universite de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, INRIA (France)

    1997-12-31

    Data of literature show that SPECT is able to detect cerebral activations induced by sensory-motor stimuli. The facts are not clearly established in what concerns the cognitive activations the amplitude of which is lower. We have studied an activation paradigm such as the Grober and Bruschke test which implies the long term explicit memory. It comprises a visual presentation of words followed by their indexed recall. By using a two-day protocol, 2 SPECTs were achieved in 4 healthy right-handed voluntaries as follows: one of activation (A) and one of control (B). The fifth subject benefited by a SPECT B and of an MRI. The injection for the examination A has been done during the indexed recall stage and for the examination B at the moment when the patient repeated several times the same 3 words. The SPECT data were collected 1 hour after the injection of 370 MBq of ECD making use of a 3-head camera equipped with UHR fan collimators and ending by a LMH on the reconstructed images of 8 mm. The MRI has been achieved by means of a Signa 1.5 Tesla magnet. The SPECT A and B of the subjects 1 to 4 were matched elastically to that of the subject 5 and that of the subject 5 was rigidly matched on its MRI. In this way the individual activation cards of the 4 subjects could be averaged and superimposed on the MRI of the 5. subject. One observes an internal temporal activation (maximal activation of left tonsil, +25% and right uncus, +23%) and a right cingulum activation (maximal activation, +25%), in agreement with the neuro-physiological data. The elastic matching makes possible the inter-subject averaging, what increases the signal-to-noise ratio of activation. The inter-modality rigid matching facilitates the anatomical localisation of the activation site. With these adapted tools, the cognitive activation is thus possible by SPECT and opens perspectives for early diagnosis of neurological troubles, namely of Alzheimer`s disease

  15. SPECT-CT bone scintigraphy in cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergieva, S; Alexandrova, A.; Nikolova, N.; Dimcheva, M.; Baichev, G.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: SPECT-CT study allows the precise correlation between functional and morphological data on the same image. Methods: Whole body bone scan (WBBS) is a diagnostic modality still firmly established as a valuable tool to assess skeleton abnormalities. CT is an imaging method for characterizing destruction of the bone spongy lesions, their consolidation or calcium accumulation. This fact allows differentiation of the osteolytic metastases from the osteosclerotic and mixed lesions and also from degenerative ones. Whole body bone scan followed by SPECT-CT scanning increases the accuracy of the study and potentially accelerates the diagnosis of the patient based on a single imaging session. This is especially important in cancer patients. Results and discussion: After retrospectively review of WBBS and SPECT-CT fused images 141 bone lesions in 89 pts were analyzed The skeletal findings with previously uncertain character were classified as definitely benign, indeterminate or definitely malignant. 1. 47 (33%) of all lesions in 36 pts could be correlated with benign degenerative findings on SPECT-CT images. 5 (3%) lesions in 3 of these pts were indeterminate on the SPECT-CT images. They were localized in the area of articulation parts and corpus of the thoracic vertebra and ribs. After additional MRT examination and 6 months follow-up these changes were considered degenerative: osteopathy changes and presence of spondyloarthrosis and osteochondrosis; compression fractures due to advanced osteoporosis. These pts were with prolonged chormono/chemotherapy; chronic inflammatory disease of the coxofemoral articulation, coxarthrosis, aseptic necrosis of the femoral head and postoperative sacroiliitis; post-traumatic fractures or surgical intervention; hyperplastic degenerative lesions in the skeleton and asymmetrical pelvic bone structures due to M. Paget. 2. 41 (28,1%) single osseous metastatic spots (up to 3 foci) were scanned in 31 pts. 3. 13 (10

  16. Reference Range of Functional Data of Gated Myocardial Perfusion SPECT by Quantitative Gated SPECT of Cedars-Sinai and 4D-MSPECT of Michigan University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Do Young; Kim, Moo Hyun; Kim, Young Dae [College of Medicine, Univ. of Donga, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    Various programs have been developed for gating of myocardial perfusion SPECT. Among the those program, the most popular program is the Quantitative Gated SPECT (QGS)? developed by Cedars-Sinai hospital and most recently released program is 4D-MSPECT? developed by university of Michigan. It is important to know the reference range of the functional data of gated myocardial perfusion SPECT because it is necessary to determine abnormality of individual patient and echocardiographic data is different from those of gated SPECT. Tc-99m MIBI gated myocardial perfusion SPECT image was reconstructed by dual head gamma camera (Siemens, BCAM, esoft) as routine procedure and analyzed using QGS? and 4D-MSPECT? program. All patients (M: F=9: 18, Age 69{+-}9 yrs) showed normal myocardial perfusion. The patients with following characteristics were excluded: previous angina or MI history, ECG change with Q wave or ST-T change, diabetes melitius, hypercholesterolemia, typical chest pain, hypertension and cardiomyopathy. Pre-test likelihood of all patients was low. (1) In stress gated SPECT by QGS?, EDV was 73{+-}25 ml, ESV 25{+-}14 ml, EF 67{+-}11 % and area of first frame of gating 106.4{+-}21cm{sup 2}. In rest gated SPECT, EDV was 76{+-}26 ml, ESV 27{+-}15 ml, EF 66{+-}12 and area of first frame of gating 108{+-}20cm{sup 2}. (2) In stress gated SPECT by 4D-MSPECT?, EDV was 76{+-}28 ml, ESV 23{+-}16 ml, EF 72{+-}11 %, mass 115{+-}24 g and ungated volume 42{+-}15 ml. In rest gated SPECT, EDV was 75{+-}27 ml, ESV 23{+-}12 ml, EF 71{+-}9%, mass 113{+-}25g and ungate dvolume 42{+-}15 ml, (3) s-EDV, s-EF, r-ESV and r-EF were significantly different between QGS? and 4D-MSPECT? (each p=0.016, p<0.001. p=0.003 and p=0.001). We determined the normal reference range of functional parameters by QGS? and 4D-MSPECT? program to diagnose individually the abnormality of patients. And the reference ranges have to adopted to be patients by each specific gating program.

  17. Clinical evaluation of SPECT in cerebrovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshibuchi, Masao; Satoh, Mitsutaka; Kanda, Tetsuro; Nishi, Fumiaki; Yamane, Kanji; Fujimatsu, Masahiko; Edamitsu, Satoshi; Anno, Yasuro; Ohtake, Hisashi.

    1989-01-01

    In 131 patients with cerebrovascular disease, regional cerebral blood flow were determined by 123 I-IMP (N-isopropyl ( 123 I)-iodoamphetamine) or 99m Tc-HM-PAO ( 99m Tc (d, 1)-hexamethyl propyleneamine oxime) SPECT and findings were compared with those of X-CT or MRI. The perfusion deficit detected by SPECT was larger than the deficit by X-CT or MRI in every case. The perfusion deficit area was more clearly demonstrated by SPECT than by X-CT or MRI in patients with acute cerebral infarction. The hypoperfusion area determined by 123 I-IMP SPECT was wider than that by 99m Tc-HM-PAO SPECT. The crossed cerebellar diaschisis was observed in 56 out of 131 cases (43%). The results of operation were quantitatively evaluated by 123 I-IMP SPECT in 25 patients. (author)

  18. Clinical utility of SPECT neuroimaging in the diagnosis and treatment of traumatic brain injury: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyrus A Raji

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: This systematic review evaluated the clinical utility of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT in traumatic brain injury (TBI. METHODS: After defining a PICO Statement (Population, Intervention, Comparison and Outcome Statement, PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses criteria were applied to identify 1600 articles. After screening, 374 articles were eligible for review. Inclusion for review was focus on SPECT in the setting of mild, moderate, or severe TBI with cerebral lobar specificity of SPECT findings. Other inclusion criteria were comparison modalities in the same subjects and articles in English. Foreign language articles, SPECT studies that did not include comparison modalities, and case reports were not included for review. RESULTS: We identified 19 longitudinal and 52 cross-sectional studies meeting inclusion criteria. Three longitudinal studies examined diagnostic predictive value. The first showed positive predictive value increases from initial SPECT scan shortly after trauma to one year follow up scans, from 59% to 95%. Subsequent work replicated these results in a larger cohort. Longitudinal and cross sectional studies demonstrated SPECT lesion localization not detected by CT or MRI. The most commonly abnormal regions revealed by SPECT in cross-sectional studies were frontal (94% and temporal (77% lobes. SPECT was found to outperform both CT and MRI in both acute and chronic imaging of TBI, particularly mild TBI. It was also found to have a near 100% negative predictive value. CONCLUSIONS: This review demonstrates Level IIA evidence (at least one non-randomized controlled trial for the value of SPECT in TBI. Given its advantages over CT and MRI in the detection of mild TBI in numerous studies of adequate quality, and given its excellent negative predictive value, it may be an important second test in settings where CT or MRI are negative after a closed head injury with post

  19. Clinical utility of SPECT neuroimaging in the diagnosis and treatment of traumatic brain injury: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raji, Cyrus A; Tarzwell, Robert; Pavel, Dan; Schneider, Howard; Uszler, Michael; Thornton, John; van Lierop, Muriel; Cohen, Phil; Amen, Daniel G; Henderson, Theodore

    2014-01-01

    This systematic review evaluated the clinical utility of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in traumatic brain injury (TBI). After defining a PICO Statement (Population, Intervention, Comparison and Outcome Statement), PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) criteria were applied to identify 1600 articles. After screening, 374 articles were eligible for review. Inclusion for review was focus on SPECT in the setting of mild, moderate, or severe TBI with cerebral lobar specificity of SPECT findings. Other inclusion criteria were comparison modalities in the same subjects and articles in English. Foreign language articles, SPECT studies that did not include comparison modalities, and case reports were not included for review. We identified 19 longitudinal and 52 cross-sectional studies meeting inclusion criteria. Three longitudinal studies examined diagnostic predictive value. The first showed positive predictive value increases from initial SPECT scan shortly after trauma to one year follow up scans, from 59% to 95%. Subsequent work replicated these results in a larger cohort. Longitudinal and cross sectional studies demonstrated SPECT lesion localization not detected by CT or MRI. The most commonly abnormal regions revealed by SPECT in cross-sectional studies were frontal (94%) and temporal (77%) lobes. SPECT was found to outperform both CT and MRI in both acute and chronic imaging of TBI, particularly mild TBI. It was also found to have a near 100% negative predictive value. This review demonstrates Level IIA evidence (at least one non-randomized controlled trial) for the value of SPECT in TBI. Given its advantages over CT and MRI in the detection of mild TBI in numerous studies of adequate quality, and given its excellent negative predictive value, it may be an important second test in settings where CT or MRI are negative after a closed head injury with post-injury neurological or psychiatric symptoms.

  20. SPECT and PET imaging in epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semah, F.

    2007-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging are very useful for the management of patients with medically refractory partial epilepsy. Presurgical evaluation of patients with medically refractory partial epilepsy often included PET imaging using FDG. The use of SPECT in these patients adds some more information and gives the clinicians the possibility of having ictal imaging. Furthermore, PET and SPECT imaging are performed to better understand the pathophysiology of epilepsy. (authors)

  1. Avascular Necrosis of Bone after Renal Transplantation - Prevalence and Usefulness of Bone SPECT -

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yun Young; Yang, Seoung Oh; Ryuu, Jin Sook; Moon, Dae Hyuk; Lee, Hee Kyung [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-09-15

    Avascular necrosis(AVN) of bone can be resulted from various causes that disturb vascular supply to bone tissue, including steroid therapy after renal transplantation. In this study, we determine the prevalence of the avascular necrosis of bone after renal transplantation and compare the role of the bone scan, SPECT and MRI. In 301 patients with transplanted kidney, the prevalence of avascular necrosis was determined clinically. Site of bone necrosis was evaluated by clinical symptom, bone scan, SPECT and MRI. Bone scan was done in all patients with AVN. Bone SPECT and MRI were done in six cases; and MRI was done in two cases. The prevalence of AVN was 3.3% (10/301), and the site of AVN was 16 femoral heads in 10 patients (bilateral: 60%) and bilateral calcaneal tuberosity in one patient. Bone scan showed typical AVN (cold area with surrounding hot uptake) in 13 lesions, only hot uptake in three lesions (including two calcaneal tuberosities), decreased uptake in one lesion, and normal in one lesion. Decreased uptake and normal lesion showed an equivocal cold area without surrounding hot uptake on SPECT. A symptomatic patient with positive bone SPECT showed normal finding on MRI. The prevalence of AVN of bone after renal transplantation was 3.3%, and whole body bone scan showed multiple bone involvement. Two symptomatic hip joints without definite lesion on whole body bone scan or MRI showed cold defect on SPECT. Therefore, we conclude that bone SPECT should be performed in a symptomatic patient with negative bone scan or MRI in case with high risk of AVN after renal transplantation.

  2. Avascular Necrosis of Bone after Renal Transplantation - Prevalence and Usefulness of Bone SPECT -

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yun Young; Yang, Seoung Oh; Ryuu, Jin Sook; Moon, Dae Hyuk; Lee, Hee Kyung

    1995-01-01

    Avascular necrosis(AVN) of bone can be resulted from various causes that disturb vascular supply to bone tissue, including steroid therapy after renal transplantation. In this study, we determine the prevalence of the avascular necrosis of bone after renal transplantation and compare the role of the bone scan, SPECT and MRI. In 301 patients with transplanted kidney, the prevalence of avascular necrosis was determined clinically. Site of bone necrosis was evaluated by clinical symptom, bone scan, SPECT and MRI. Bone scan was done in all patients with AVN. Bone SPECT and MRI were done in six cases; and MRI was done in two cases. The prevalence of AVN was 3.3% (10/301), and the site of AVN was 16 femoral heads in 10 patients (bilateral: 60%) and bilateral calcaneal tuberosity in one patient. Bone scan showed typical AVN (cold area with surrounding hot uptake) in 13 lesions, only hot uptake in three lesions (including two calcaneal tuberosities), decreased uptake in one lesion, and normal in one lesion. Decreased uptake and normal lesion showed an equivocal cold area without surrounding hot uptake on SPECT. A symptomatic patient with positive bone SPECT showed normal finding on MRI. The prevalence of AVN of bone after renal transplantation was 3.3%, and whole body bone scan showed multiple bone involvement. Two symptomatic hip joints without definite lesion on whole body bone scan or MRI showed cold defect on SPECT. Therefore, we conclude that bone SPECT should be performed in a symptomatic patient with negative bone scan or MRI in case with high risk of AVN after renal transplantation.

  3. Examination of attenuation correction method for cerebral blood Flow SPECT Using MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, Takashi; Takahashi, Masaaki

    2009-01-01

    Authors developed a software for attenuation correction using MR imaging (MRAC) (Toshiba Med. System Engineer.) based on the idea that precision of AC could be improved by the head contour in MRI T2-weighted images (T2WI) obtained before 123 I-iofetamine (IMP) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) for cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurement. In the present study, this MRAC was retrospectively evaluated by comparison with the previous standard AC methods derived from transmission CT (TCT) and X-CT which overcoming the problem of sinogram threshold Chang method but still having cost and patient exposure issues. MRAC was essentially performed in the Toshiba GMS5500/PI processor where 3D registration was conducted with images of SPECT and MRI of the same patient. The gamma camera for 123 I-IMP SPECT and 99m TcO 4 - TCT was Toshiba 3-detector GCA9300A equipped with the above processor for MRAC and with low energy high resolution (LEHR) fan beam collimator. Machines for MRI and CT were Siemens-Asahi Meditech. MAGNETOM Symphony 1.5T and SOMATOM plus4, respectively. MRAC was examined in 8 patients with images of T1WI, TCT and SPECT, and in 18 of T2WI, CT and SPECT. Evaluation was made by comparison of attenuation coefficients (μ) by the 4 methods. As a result, the present MRAC was found to be closer to AC by TCT and CT than by the Chang method since MRAC, due to exact imaging of the head contour, was independent on radiation count, and was thought to be useful for improving the precision of CBF SPECT. (K.T.)

  4. Stereotactic imaging for radiotherapy: accuracy of CT, MRI, PET and SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karger, Christian P; Hipp, Peter; Henze, Marcus; Echner, Gernot; Hoess, Angelika; Schad, Lothar; Hartmann, Guenther H

    2003-01-01

    CT, MRI, PET and SPECT provide complementary information for treatment planning in stereotactic radiotherapy. Stereotactic correlation of these images requires commissioning tests to confirm the localization accuracy of each modality. A phantom was developed to measure the accuracy of stereotactic localization for CT, MRI, PET and SPECT in the head and neck region. To this end, the stereotactically measured coordinates of structures within the phantom were compared with their mechanically defined coordinates. For MRI, PET and SPECT, measurements were performed using two different devices. For MRI, T1- and T2-weighted imaging sequences were applied. For each measurement, the mean radial deviation in space between the stereotactically measured and mechanically defined position of target points was determined. For CT, the mean radial deviation was 0.4 ± 0.2 mm. For MRI, the mean deviations ranged between 0.7 ± 0.2 mm and 1.4 ± 0.5 mm, depending on the MRI device and the imaging sequence. For PET, mean deviations of 1.1 ± 0.5 mm and 2.4 ± 0.3 mm were obtained. The mean deviations for SPECT were 1.6 ± 0.5 mm and 2.0 ± 0.6 mm. The phantom is well suited to determine the accuracy of stereotactic localization with CT, MRI, PET and SPECT in the head and neck region. The obtained accuracy is well below the physical resolution for CT, PET and SPECT, and of comparable magnitude for MRI. Since the localization accuracy may be device dependent, results obtained at one device cannot be generalized to others

  5. Clinical assessment of SPECT/CT co-registration image fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Wen; Luan Zhaosheng; Peng Yong

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Study the methodology of the SPECT/CT co-registration image fusion, and Assessment the Clinical application value. Method: 172 patients who underwent SPECT/CT image fusion during 2001-2003 were studied, 119 men, 53 women. 51 patients underwent 18FDG image +CT, 26 patients underwent 99m Tc-RBC Liver pool image +CT, 43 patients underwent 99mTc-MDP Bone image +CT, 18 patients underwent 99m Tc-MAA Lung perfusion image +CT. The machine is Millium VG SPECT of GE Company. All patients have been taken three steps image: X-ray survey, X-ray transmission and nuclear emission image (Including planer imaging, SPECT or 18 F-FDG of dual head camera) without changing the position of the patients. We reconstruct the emission image with X-ray map and do reconstruction, 18FDG with COSEM and 99mTc with OSEM. Then combine the transmission image and the reconstructed emission image. We use different process parameters in deferent image methods. The accurate rate of SPECT/CT image fusion were statistics, and compare their accurate with that of single nuclear emission image. Results: The nuclear image which have been reconstructed by X-ray attenuation and OSEM are apparent better than pre-reconstructed. The post-reconstructed emission images have no scatter lines around the organs. The outline between different issues is more clear than before. The validity of All post-reconstructed images is better than pre-reconstructed. SPECT/CT image fusion make localization have worthy bases. 138 patients, the accuracy of SPECT/CT image fusion is 91.3% (126/138), whereas 60(88.2%) were found through SPECT/CT image fusion, There are significant difference between them(P 99m Tc- RBC-SPECT +CT image fusion, but 21 of them were inspected by emission image. In BONE 99m Tc -MDP-SPECT +CT image fusion, 4 patients' removed bone(1-6 months after surgery) and their relay with normal bone had activity, their morphologic and density in CT were different from normal bones. 11 of 20 patients who could

  6. HMPAO-SPECT in cerebral seizures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruenwald, F.; Bockisch, A.; Reichmann, K.; Ammari, B.; Hotze, A.; Biersack, H.J.; Durwen, H.; Buelau, P.; Elger, C.E.; Rohde, A.; Penin, H.

    1988-01-01

    In nine patients with suspected psychogenic seizures and in three patients with proven epileptic seizures HMPAO-SPECT was performed prior to and during seizure. In the patients with lateron-proven psychogenic seizures no, or only slight, changes of regional cerebral blood flow were found. Patients with proven epilepsy revealed partly normal findings interictally but during seizure a markedly increased circumscript blood flow was found in all patients. Even though PET is superior to SPECT with respect to spatial resolution, in the diagnosis of seizures HMPAO-SPECT has the advantage of enabling injection of the tracer during the seizure and the performance of the SPECT study subsequently. (orig.) [de

  7. Imaging of mild traumatic brain injury using 57Co and 99mTc HMPAO SPECT as compared to other diagnostic procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audenaert, Kurt; Jansen, Hugo M L; Otte, Andreas; Peremans, Kathelijne; Vervaet, Myriam; Crombez, Roger; de Ridder, Leo; van Heeringen, Cees; Thirot, Joel; Dierckx, Rudi; Korf, Jaap

    2003-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is usually assessed with the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), CT and EEG. TBI can result from either the primary mechanical impact or secondary (ischemic) brain damage, in which calcium (Ca) plays a pivotal role. This study was undertaken to compare the applicability of SPECT using 57Co as a Ca-tracer in patients with mild traumatic brain injury. 8 patients with mild TBI (GCS 15) were clinically examined and studied with EEG, neuropsychological testing (NPT) and SPECT within 2 days post-TBI. After i.v.-administration of 37 MBq (1 mCi) 57Co (effective radiation dose 0.34 mSv x MBq(-1); 1.24 rem x mCi(-1); physical half-life 270 days, biological half-life 37.6 h), single-headed SPECT (12 h pi) was performed, consecutively followed by standard 925 MBq (25 mCi) Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT. In 6 of the 8 patients, baseline NPT and SPECT showed focal abnormalities in the affected frontal and temporal brain regions, which were in good topographical accordance. CT and EEG did not detect (structural) lesions in any of these cases. Single-headed 57Co-SPECT is able to show the site and extent of brain damage in patients with mild TBI, even in the absence of structural lesions. It may confirm and localize NPT findings. The predictive value of 57Co-SPECT should be assessed in larger patient series.

  8. MediSPECT: Single photon emission computed tomography system for small field of view small animal imaging based on a CdTe hybrid pixel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accorsi, R.; Autiero, M.; Celentano, L.

    2007-01-01

    We describe MediSPECT, a new scanner developed at University and INFN Napoli, for SPECT studies on small animals with a small field of view (FOV) and high spatial resolution. The CdTe pixel detector (a 256x256 matrix of 55 μm square pixels) operating in single photon counting for detection of gamma-rays with low and medium energy (e.g. 125 I, 27-35 keV, 99m Tc, 140 keV), is bump bonded to the Medipix2 readout chip. The FOV of the MediSPECT scanner with a coded aperture mask collimator ranges from 6.3 mm (system spatial resolution 110 μm at 27-35 keV) to 24.3 mm. With a 0.30 mm pinhole the FOV ranges from 2.4 to 29 mm (where the system spatial resolution is 1.0 mm at 27-35 keV and 2.0 mm at 140 keV). MediSPECT will be used for in vivo imaging of small organs or tissue structures in mouse, e.g., brain, thyroid, heart or tumor

  9. PINEX-2: pinhole-TV imaging of fuel ejection from an internally vented capsule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berzins, G.J.; Lumpkin, A.H.

    1979-01-01

    The LASL pinhole-intensified TV system was used at the TREAT reactor to image an internally vented, fuel-ejection capsule designed and built by HEDL. Several improvements in the imaging system over PINEX-1 were incorporated. A sequence of 16-ms TV frames shows axial expansion, expulsion of fuel from the pin, and retention of clad integrity during the time of coverage

  10. Stability Measurements for Alignment of the NIF Neutron Imaging System Pinhole Array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fittinghoff, D.N.; Bower, D.E.; Drury, O.B.; Dzenitis, J.M.; Frank, M.; Buckles, R.A.; Munson, C.; Wilde, C.H.

    2011-01-01

    The alignment system for the National Ignition Facility's neutron imaging system has been commissioned and measurements of the relative stability of the 90-315 DIM, the front and the back of the neutron imaging pinhole array and an exploding pusher target have been made using the 90-135 and the 90-258 opposite port alignment systems. Additionally, a laser beam shot from the neutron-imaging Annex and reflected from a mirror at the back of the pinhole array was used to monitor the pointing of the pinhole. Over a twelve hour period, the relative stability of these parts was found to be within ∼ ±18 (micro)m rms even when using manual methods for tracking the position of the objects. For highly visible features, use of basic particle tracking techniques found that the front of the pinhole array was stable relative to the 90-135 opposite port alignment camera to within ±3.4 (micro)m rms. Reregistration, however, of the opposite port alignment systems themselves using the target alignment sensor was found to change the expected position of target chamber center by up to 194 (micro)m.

  11. Reflections on Using Pinhole Photography as a Pedagogical and Methodological Tool with Adolescents in Wild Nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socha, Teresa; Potter, Tom; Potter, Stephanie; Jickling, Bob

    2016-01-01

    This paper shares our experiences using pinhole photography with adolescents as both a pedagogical tool to support and deepen adolescent experiences in wild nature, and as a visual methodological tool to elucidate their experiences. Reflecting on a journey that explored the nature-based experiences of two adolescents on a family canoe trip in…

  12. SPECT of aged backache patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Shigehiko; Nishikimi, Junzo; Mizuno, Naokado; Watanabe, Kentaro; Kondo, Masaki; Ozaki, Satoshi; Urasaki, Tetsuya; Muro, Toshiyuki [Prefectural Tajimi Hospital, Gifu (Japan)

    1995-12-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using {sup 99m}Tc-HMDP was performed on 53 middle-aged or elderly patients (male 20, female, 33; age range, 40-80 years old) with lumbago, i.e., 25 patients with lumbar spondylosis, 15 with lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis, 4 with spondylolytic spondylolisthesis, 3 with compression fracture, 3 with pulurent spondylitis, 2 with spondylous osteoporosis, and 1 with spinal osteodesmosis. {sup 99m}Tc-HMDP (740 MBq) was intravenously injected and regular SPECT was performed at 3 hours. Gamma camera was performed for about 10 seconds with 5deg intervals, and 36 steps (180deg) of collection was completed after about 6 minutes. The radioisotope accumulation, the presence or absence of sthenia, and its site were evaluated. Forty-seven (88.7%) patients showed excessive accumulation, i.e., 40 (75.5%) in peripheral vertebral osteophyte, 31 (58.5%) in vertebral articulations, and 10 (18.9%) in whole vertebral body. Significantly increased bilateral excessive accumulation was admitted in the vertebral articulations of sliding disc in degenerative spondylolisthesis. SPECT is considered useful in understanding the pathophysiology of degenerative lumber diseases. (S.Y.).

  13. SPECT of aged backache patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Shigehiko; Nishikimi, Junzo; Mizuno, Naokado; Watanabe, Kentaro; Kondo, Masaki; Ozaki, Satoshi; Urasaki, Tetsuya; Muro, Toshiyuki

    1995-01-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using 99m Tc-HMDP was performed on 53 middle-aged or elderly patients (male 20, female, 33; age range, 40-80 years old) with lumbago, i.e., 25 patients with lumbar spondylosis, 15 with lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis, 4 with spondylolytic spondylolisthesis, 3 with compression fracture, 3 with pulurent spondylitis, 2 with spondylous osteoporosis, and 1 with spinal osteodesmosis. 99m Tc-HMDP (740 MBq) was intravenously injected and regular SPECT was performed at 3 hours. Gamma camera was performed for about 10 seconds with 5deg intervals, and 36 steps (180deg) of collection was completed after about 6 minutes. The radioisotope accumulation, the presence or absence of sthenia, and its site were evaluated. Forty-seven (88.7%) patients showed excessive accumulation, i.e., 40 (75.5%) in peripheral vertebral osteophyte, 31 (58.5%) in vertebral articulations, and 10 (18.9%) in whole vertebral body. Significantly increased bilateral excessive accumulation was admitted in the vertebral articulations of sliding disc in degenerative spondylolisthesis. SPECT is considered useful in understanding the pathophysiology of degenerative lumber diseases. (S.Y.)

  14. Labeled receptor ligands for spect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kung, H.F.

    1989-01-01

    Receptor specific imaging agents for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) can potentially be useful in the understanding of basic biochemistry and pharmacology of receptors. SPECT images may also provide tools for evaluation of density and binding kinetics of a specific receptor, information important for diagnosis and patient management. Basic requirements for receptor imaging agents are: (a) they are labeled with short-lived isotopes, (b) they show high selectivity and specific uptake, (c) they exhibit high target/background ratio, and (d) they can be modeled to obtain quantitative information. Several good examples of CNS receptor specific ligands labeled with I-123 have been developed, including iodoQNB, iodoestrogen iodobenzadiazepine, iodobenazepine, iodobenzamides for muscarinic, estrogen benzadiazepine, D-1 and D-2 dopamine receptors. With the advent of newer and faster SPECT imaging devices, it may be feasible to quantitate the receptor density by in vivo imaging techniques. These new brain imaging agents can provide unique diagnostic information, which may not be available through other imaging modalities, such as CT and MRI

  15. The current status of SPECT or SPECT/CT in South Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Ik Dong; Choi, Eun Kyung; Chung, Yong An [Dept. of Radiology, Incheon Saint Mary' s HospitalThe Catholic University of Korea, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The first step to nuclear medicine in Korea started with introduction of the gamma camera in 1969. Although planar images with the gamma camera give important functional information, they have the limitations that result from 2-dimensional images. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) due to its 3-dimensional image acquisition is superior to earlier planar gamma imaging in image resolution and diagnostic accuracy. As demand for a hybrid functional and anatomical imaging device has increased, integrated SPECT/CT systems have been used. In Korea, SPECT/CT was for the first time installed in 2003. SPECT/CT can eliminate many possible pitfalls on SPECT-alone images, making better attenuation correction and thereby improving image quality. Therefore, SPECT/CT is clinically preferred in many hospitals in various aspects. More recently, additional SPECT/CT images taken from the region with equivocal uptake on planar images have been helpful in making precise interpretation as part of their clinical workup in postoperative thyroid cancer patients. SPECT and SPECT/CT have various advantages, but its clinical application has gradually decreased in recent few years. While some researchers investigated the myocardial blood flow with cardiac PET using F-18 FDG or N-13 ammonia, myocardial perfusion SPECT is, at present, the radionuclide imaging study of choice for the risk stratification and guiding therapy in the coronary artery disease patients in Korea. New diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals for AD have received increasing attention; nevertheless, brain SPECT will remain the most reliable modality evaluating cerebral perfusion.

  16. Motion correction in neurological fan beam SPECT using motion tracking and fully 3D reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulton, R.R.; Hutton, B.; Eberl, S.; Meikle, S.; Braun, M.; Westmead Hospital, Westmead, NSW; University of Technology, Sydney, NSW

    1998-01-01

    Full text: We have previously proposed the use of fully three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction and continuous monitoring of head position to correct for motion artifacts in neurological SPECT and PET. Knowledge of the motion during acquisition provided by a head tracking system can be used to reposition the projection data in space in such a way as to negate motion effects during reconstruction. The reconstruction algorithm must deal with variations in the projection geometry resulting from differences in the timing and nature of motion between patients. Rotational movements about any axis other than the camera's axis of rotation give rise to projection geometries which necessitate the use of a fully 3D reconstruction algorithm. Our previous work with computer simulations assuming parallel hole collimation demonstrated the feasibility of correcting for motion. We have now refined our iterative 3D reconstruction algorithm to support fan beam data and attenuation correction, and developed a practical head tracking system for use on a Trionix Triad SPECT system. The correction technique has been tested in fan beam SPECT studies of the 3D Hoffman brain phantom. Arbitrary movements were applied to the phantom during acquisition and recorded by the head tracker which monitored the position and orientation of the phantom throughout the study. 3D reconstruction was then performed using the motion data provided by the tracker. The accuracy of correction was assessed by comparing the corrected images with a motion free study acquired immediately beforehand, visually and by calculating mean squared error (MSE). Motion correction reduced distortion perceptibly and, depending on the motions applied, improved MSE by up to an order of magnitude. 3D reconstruction of the 128x128x128 data set took 20 minutes on a SUN Ultra 1 workstation. The results of these phantom experiments suggest that the technique can effectively compensate for head motion under clinical SPECT imaging

  17. Determination of hyperactive areas of Cortex Cerebri with using brain SPECT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepien, A.; Pawlus, J.; Wasilewska-Radwanska, M.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was the assessment of the ability to apply of SPECT technique to determination of hyperactive areas of cortex cerebri. Analysis included 50 patients (mean aged 44 - 58). Brain SPECT scanning was performed after 1 hour after the intravenous injection of 740 MBq of ethylcisteinate dimmer labeled 99m Technetium (99mTc-ECD) with the use one-head gamma camera with a low-energy, ultra-high resolution collimator. Qualitative and quantitative analysis was performed using specialised software. In 20 cases normal biodistribution of the radiotracer was observed (hyperactive areas in cerebellum and occiput). In patients with psychiatric and neurological disturbances hyperactive areas were visualized in 25 cases in temporal lobes, in 4 cases in parietal lobes and in 1 patient in frontal area and basal ganglia. It is concluded that a number of factors limit the wide-scale use of SPECT, including the sophistication of imaging equipment (single-head cameras are inferior to the newer multihead units) and the experience of the physicians interpreting the scans and utilizing the data. In many diseases physicians do not know which areas of the patient's brain according disorders. Brain SPECT study can be a very useful tool to evaluation of hyperactive areas of cortex cerebri. This technique visualization of cortex cerebri completes standard analysis of disorders of brain activity

  18. Design and evaluation of a mobile bedside PET/SPECT imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studenski, Matthew Thomas

    Patients confined to an intensive care unit, the emergency room, or a surgical suite are managed without nuclear medicine procedures such as positron emission tomography (PET) or single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). These studies have diagnostic value which can greatly benefit the physician's treatment of the patient but require that the patient is moved to a scanner. This dissertation examines the feasibility of an economical PET/SPECT system that can be brought to the bedside of an immobile patient for imaging. We chose to focus on cardiac SPECT imaging including perfusion imaging using 99mTc tracers and viability imaging using 18F tracers first because of problems arising from positioning a detector beneath a patient's bed, a requirement for the opposed detector orientation in PET imaging. Second, SPECT imaging acquiring over the anterior 180 degrees of the patient results in reduced attenuation effects due to the heart's location in the anterior portion of the body. Four studies were done to assess the clinical feasibility of the mobile system; 1) the performance of the system was evaluated in SPECT mode at both 140 keV (99mTc tracers) and 511 keV (positron emitting tracers), 2) a dynamic cardiac phantom was used to develop and test image acquisition and processing methods for the system at both energies, 3) a high energy pinhole collimator was designed to reduce the effects of high energy photon penetration through the parallel hole collimator, and 4) we estimated the radiation dose to persons that would be in the vicinity of a patient to ensure that the effective dose is below the regulatory limit. With these studies, we show that the mobile system provides an economical means of bringing nuclear medicine to an immobile patient while staying below the regulatory dose limit to other persons. The system performed well at both 140 keV and 511 keV and provided viable images of a phantom myocardium at both energies. The system does not achieve the

  19. SPECT/CT and pulmonary embolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortensen, Jann [Copenhagen University Hospital, Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); The Faroese National Hospital, Department of Medicine, Torshavn (Faroe Islands); Gutte, Henrik [Copenhagen University Hospital, Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Herlev Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Copenhagen (Denmark); University of Copenhagen, Cluster for Molecular Imaging, Faculty of Health Sciences, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2014-05-15

    Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is diagnosed either by ventilation/perfusion (V/P) scintigraphy or pulmonary CT angiography (CTPA). In recent years both techniques have improved. Many nuclear medicine centres have adopted the single photon emission CT (SPECT) technique as opposed to the planar technique for diagnosing PE. SPECT has been shown to have fewer indeterminate results and a higher diagnostic value. The latest improvement is the combination of a low-dose CT scan with a V/P SPECT scan in a hybrid tomograph. In a study comparing CTPA, planar scintigraphy and SPECT alone, SPECT/CT had the best diagnostic accuracy for PE. In addition, recent developments in the CTPA technique have made it possible to image the pulmonary arteries of the lungs in one breath-hold. This development is based on the change from a single-detector to multidetector CT technology with an increase in volume coverage per rotation and faster rotation. Furthermore, the dual energy CT technique is a promising modality that can provide functional imaging in combination with anatomical information. Newer high-end CT scanners and SPECT systems are able to visualize smaller subsegmental emboli. However, consensus is lacking regarding the clinical impact and treatment. In the present review, SPECT and SPECT in combination with low-dose CT, CTPA and dual energy CT are discussed in the context of diagnosing PE. (orig.)

  20. Can perfusion SPECT aid CTPA interpretation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gradinscak, D. J.; Roach, P.; Bailey, E.; Kueh, S.

    2009-01-01

    Full text:Objective: To determine whether fusion of perfusion SPECT and CTPA improves the diagnostic accuracy of CTPA. Methods: 35 patients with suspected PE who underwent both CTPA and SPECT V/Q within 48 hours were included. Of these, the majority (n=30) had PE as determined by the V/Q SPECT scan and the others (n=5) were negative for PE. The clinical reports of CTPA were reviewed and pulmonary emboli tabulated based on anatomical location. A second radiologist, blinded to the results of the clinical read and the V/Q SPECT scan, reviewed the CTPA with and without perfusion SPECT fusion for assistance. Results: A total 57 PE were reported on the clinical reports and 60 PE identified on the blinded read. Fused CTPA/perfursion SPECT images identified a further 5 PE not identified on the clinical read (8% increase) and 2 PE not identified on the blinded read (3% increase). The additional emboli detected resulted in a change in final diagnosis from PE negative to PE positive in 2 patients (6%) compared with the clinical read and 1 patient (3%) compared with the blinded read without SPECT fusion. Conclusion: Fused CTPA-SPECT perfusion improves the sensitivity of CTPA for the detection of PE in a small number of patients. Fused data may help guide the radiologist to identify sites of PE on CTPA.

  1. Clinical applications of SPECT-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmadzadehfar, Hojjat; Biersack, Hans-Juergen (eds.) [University Hospital Bonn (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    2014-06-01

    Covers the full spectrum of clinical applications of SPECT/CT in diagnosis of benign and malignant diseases. Includes chapters on the use of SPECT/CT for dosimetry and for therapy planning. Completely up to date. Many helpful illustrations. SPECT/CT cameras have considerably improved diagnostic accuracy in recent years. Such cameras allow direct correlation of anatomic and functional information, resulting in better localization and definition of scintigraphic findings. In addition to this anatomic referencing, CT coregistration provides superior quantification of radiotracer uptake based on the attenuation correction capabilities of CT. Useful applications of SPECT/CT have been identified not only in oncology but also in other specialties such as orthopedics and cardiology. This book covers the full spectrum of clinical applications of SPECT/CT in diagnosis and therapy planning of benign and malignant diseases. Opening chapters discuss the technology and physics of SPECT/CT and its use for dosimetry. The role of SPECT/CT in the imaging of a range of pathologic conditions is then addressed in detail. Applications covered include, among others, imaging of the thyroid, bone, and lungs, imaging of neuroendocrine tumors, cardiac scintigraphy, and sentinel node scintigraphy. Individual chapters are also devoted to therapy planning in selective internal radiation therapy of liver tumors and bremsstrahlung SPECT/CT. Readers will find this book to be an essential and up-to-date source of information on this invaluable hybrid imaging technique.

  2. Iodine-131 imaging using 284 keV photons with a small animal CZT-SPECT system dedicated to low-medium-energy photon detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Akihiro; Gotoh, Kumiko; Shimamoto, Masako; Hasegawa, Koki; Okada, Seiji

    2016-02-01

    Iodine-131 is widely used for radionuclide therapy because of its β-particle and for diagnostic imaging employing its principal gamma ray. Since that principal gamma ray has the relatively high energy of 364 keV, small animal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging systems may be required to possess the ability to image such higher energy photons. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of imaging I-131 using its 284 keV photons instead of its 364 keV photons in a small animal SPECT imaging system dedicated to the detection of low-medium-energy photons (below 300 keV). The imaging system used was a commercially available preclinical SPECT instrument with CZT detectors that was equipped with multi-pinhole collimators and was accompanied by a CT imager. An energy window for I-131 imaging was set to a photopeak of 284 keV with a low abundance compared with 364 keV photons. Small line sources and two mice, one of each of two types, that were injected with NaI-131 were scanned. Although higher counts occurred at the peripheral region of the reconstructed images due to the collimator penetration by the 364 keV photons, the shape of the small line sources could be well visualized. The measured spatial resolution was relatively poor (~1.9 mm for full width at half maximum and ~3.9 mm for full width at tenth maximum). However, a good linear correlation between SPECT values and the level of I-131 radioactivity was observed. Furthermore, the uptake of NaI-131 to the thyroid gland for the two mice was clearly identified in the 3D-SPECT image fused with the X-ray CT image. We conclude that the use of an energy window set on the photopeak of 284 keV and the multi-pinhole collimator may permit I-131 imaging for a preclinical CZT-SPECT system that does not have the ability to acquire images using the 364 keV photons.

  3. Heads Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Connect with Us HEADS UP Apps Reshaping the Culture Around Concussion in Sports Get HEADS UP on Your Web Site Concussion ... HEADS UP on your web site! Create a culture of safety for young athletes Officials, learn how you can ... UP to Providers HEADS UP to Youth Sports HEADS UP to School Sports HEADS UP to ...

  4. MR guided spatial normalization of SPECT scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crouch, B.; Barnden, L.R.; Kwiatek, R.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: In SPECT population studies where magnetic resonance (MR) scans are also available, the higher resolution of the MR scans allows for an improved spatial normalization of the SPECT scans. In this approach, the SPECT images are first coregistered to their corresponding MR images by a linear (affine) transformation which is calculated using SPM's mutual information maximization algorithm. Non-linear spatial normalization maps are then computed either directly from the MR scans using SPM's built in spatial normalization algorithm, or, from segmented TI MR images using DARTEL, an advanced diffeomorphism based spatial normalization algorithm. We compare these MR based methods to standard SPECT based spatial normalization for a population of 27 fibromyalgia patients and 25 healthy controls with spin echo T 1 scans. We identify significant perfusion deficits in prefrontal white matter in FM patients, with the DARTEL based spatial normalization procedure yielding stronger statistics than the standard SPECT based spatial normalization. (author)

  5. Brain imaging during seizure: ictal brain SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kottamasu, Sambasiva Rao

    1997-01-01

    The role of single photon computed tomography (SPECT) in presurgical localization of medically intractable complex partial epilepsy (CPE) in children is reviewed. 99m Technetium neurolite, a newer lipophylic agent with a high first pass brain extraction and little or no redistribution is injected during a seizure, while the child is monitored with a video recording and continuous EEG and SPECT imaging is performed in the next 1-3 hours with the images representing regional cerebral profusion at the time of injection. On SPECT studies performed with radiopharmaceutical injected during a seizure, ictal focus is generally hypervascular. Other findings on ictal brain SPECT include hypoperfusion of adjacent cerebral cortex and white matter, hyperperfusion of contralateral motor cortex, hyperperfusion of ipsilateral basal ganglia and thalamus, brain stem and contralateral cerebellum. Ictal brain SPECT is non-invasive, cost effective and highly sensitive for localization of epileptic focus in patients with intractable CPE. (author)

  6. Use of 3D reconstruction to correct for patient motion in SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulton, R.R.; Hutton, B.F.; Braun, M.; Ardekani, B.; Larkin, R.

    1994-01-01

    Patient motion occurring during data acquisition in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) can cause serious reconstruction artefacts. We have developed a new approach to correct for head motion in brain SPECT. Prior to motion, projections are assigned to conventional projections. When head motion occurs, it is measured by a motion monitoring system, and subsequent projection data are mapped 'virtual' projections. The appropriate position of each virtual projection is determined by applying the converse of the patient's accumulated motion to the actual camera projection. Conventional and virtual projections, taken together, form a consistent set that can be reconstructed using a three-dimensional (3D) algorithm. The technique has been tested on a range of simulated rotational movements, both within and out of the transaxial plane. For all simulated movements, the motion corrected images exhibited better agreement with a motion free reconstruction than did the uncorrected images. (Author)

  7. Investigation of dynamic SPECT measurements of the arterial input function in human subjects using simulation, phantom and human studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winant, Celeste D.; Aparici, Carina Mari; Zelnik, Yuval R.; Reutter, Bryan W.; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Bacharach, Stephen L.; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2012-01-01

    -likelihood expectation-maximization (4D ML-EM) reconstructions gave more accurate reconstructions than did standard frame-by-frame static 3D ML-EM reconstructions. The SPECT/P results showed that 4D ML-EM reconstruction gave higher and more accurate estimates of K1 than did 3D ML-EM, yielding anywhere from a 44% underestimation to 24% overestimation for the three patients. The SPECT/D results showed that 4D ML-EM reconstruction gave an overestimation of 28% and 3D ML-EM gave an underestimation of 1% for K1. For the patient study the 4D ML-EM reconstruction provided continuous images as a function of time of the concentration in both ventricular cavities and myocardium during the 2 min infusion. It is demonstrated that a 2 min infusion with a two-headed SPECT system rotating 180° every 54 s can produce measurements of blood pool and myocardial TACs, though the SPECT simulation studies showed that one must sample at least every 30 s to capture a 1 min infusion input function.

  8. Investigation of dynamic SPECT measurements of the arterial input function in human subjects using simulation, phantom and human studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winant, Celeste D; Aparici, Carina Mari; Bacharach, Stephen L; Gullberg, Grant T; Zelnik, Yuval R; Reutter, Bryan W; Sitek, Arkadiusz

    2012-01-01

    maximum-likelihood expectation-maximization (4D ML-EM) reconstructions gave more accurate reconstructions than did standard frame-by-frame static 3D ML-EM reconstructions. The SPECT/P results showed that 4D ML-EM reconstruction gave higher and more accurate estimates of K 1 than did 3D ML-EM, yielding anywhere from a 44% underestimation to 24% overestimation for the three patients. The SPECT/D results showed that 4D ML-EM reconstruction gave an overestimation of 28% and 3D ML-EM gave an underestimation of 1% for K 1 . For the patient study the 4D ML-EM reconstruction provided continuous images as a function of time of the concentration in both ventricular cavities and myocardium during the 2 min infusion. It is demonstrated that a 2 min infusion with a two-headed SPECT system rotating 180° every 54 s can produce measurements of blood pool and myocardial TACs, though the SPECT simulation studies showed that one must sample at least every 30 s to capture a 1 min infusion input function. (paper)

  9. Quantitative Analysis of cardiac SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nekolla, S.G.; Bengel, F.M.

    2004-01-01

    The quantitative analysis of myocardial SPECT images is a powerful tool to extract the highly specific radio tracer uptake in these studies. If compared to normal data bases, the uptake values can be calibrated on an individual basis. Doing so increases the reproducibility of the analysis substantially. Based on the development over the last three decades starting from planar scinitigraphy, this paper discusses the methods used today incorporating the changes due to tomographic image acquisitions. Finally, the limitations of these approaches as well as consequences from most recent hardware developments, commercial analysis packages and a wider view of the description of the left ventricle are discussed. (orig.)

  10. SPECT og PET i neurobiologien

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulson, O.B.; Lassen, N.A.

    1997-01-01

    PET (positron emission tomography) and SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) are isotopic methods in which the distribution is registered of radiolabelled tracers given in such small amounts that they are without effect on the organism or the organism's disposal of them. Thus, a series...... of important biological processes in the intact organism can be studied. The methods have been used in many disciplines but in particular for neurobiological research on the brain--e.g., the brain's regional blood circulation and mapping of the brain's functional structure. The methods have also been used...

  11. Technetium-99m-HMPAO SPECT in the evaluation of patients with a remote history of traumatic brain injury: a comparison with x-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, B G; Ichise, M; Chung, D G; Kirsh, J C; Franks, W

    1992-01-01

    The functional imaging modality has potential for demonstrating parenchymal abnormalities not detectable by traditional morphological imaging. Fifty-three patients with a remote history of traumatic brain injury (TBI) were studied with SPECT using 99mTc-hexamethylpropyleneamineoxime (HMPAO) and x-ray computed tomography (CT). Overall, 42 patients (80%) showed regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) deficits by HMPAO SPECT, whereas 29 patients (55%) showed morphological abnormalities by CT. Out of 20 patients with minor head injury, 12 patients (60%) showed rCBF deficits and 5 patients (25%) showed CT abnormalities. Of 33 patients with major head injury, 30 patients (90%) showed rCBF deficits and 24 patients (72%) showed CT abnormalities. Thus, HMPAO SPECT was more sensitive than CT in detecting abnormalities in patients with a history of TBI, particularly in the minor head injury group. In the major head injury group, three patients showed localized cortical atrophy by CT and normal rCBF by HMPAO SPECT. In the evaluation of TBI patients, HMPAO SPECT is a useful technique to demonstrate regional brain dysfunction in the presence of morphological integrity as assessed by CT.

  12. Comparison of benzodiazepine receptor SPECT and 18F-FDG PET using a coincidence detection camera in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wissmeyer, M.; Geiger, L.; Luescher, D.; Krause, T.; Loevblad, K.; Donati, F.; Wielepp, J.P.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The aim of this preliminary study was to compare the results of benzodiazepine receptor (BDR) SPECT using 123 I-Iomazenil with those of 18 F-FDG (FDG) PET obtained on a double-headed gamma camera with a coincidence detection system in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). We evaluated 6 patients (4 female, 2 male; age range 26-54 years, average 43.5 years) with therapy-refractory TLE due to mesiotemporal sclerosis or other focal brain anomalies. To delineate the epileptogenic zone, clinical evaluation, ictal and interictal surface EEG using the international 10-20 system, brain MRI, interictal CBF SPECT using 99m Tc-ECD, BDR SPECT and FDG coincidence PET were performed. The CBF SPECT, BDR SPECT and coincidence PET scans were viewed independently by 2 observers considering the regional cerebral blood flow, BDR density and FDG uptake asymmetry in the temporal lobe visually as none (0), low (1), moderate (2) and high (3). Ictal and interictal EEG recordings located the epileptogenic focus in all patients in the temporal region. Both the BDR SPECT and the FDG coincidence PET located the epileptogenic focus correctly in circumscribed areas of the temporal lobe in all patients, whereas brain MRI revealed focal anomalies only in 5 of 6 cases . The lateralization to the right (n=4) and left hemisphere (n=2) by interictal CBF SPECT, BDR SPECT and FDG coincidence PET corresponded to the EEG findings in all patients. The visual consideration of the asymmetry revealed a slightly but not statistically significant higher value for the FDG coincidence PET (observer 1: mean 2.333, SD 0.516; observer 2: mean 2.000, SD 0.632) than for the BDR SPECT (observer 1: mean 1.667, SD 1.033; observer 2: mean 1.833, SD 0.753). Visual consideration of the interictal CBF SPECT revealed mean values of 2.000 for both observers. The inter-observer variability was higher in the BDR SPECT than in the FDG coincidence PET and the interictal CBF SPECT, but the difference was not

  13. Geometric Calibration and Image Reconstruction for a Segmented Slant-Hole Stationary Cardiac SPECT System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yanfei; Yu, Zhicong; Zeng, Gengsheng L

    2015-06-01

    A dedicated stationary cardiac single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system with a novel segmented slant-hole collimator has been developed. The goal of this paper is to calibrate this new imaging geometry with a point source. Unlike the commercially available dedicated cardiac SPECT systems, which are specialized and can be used only to image the heart, our proposed cardiac system is based on a conventional SPECT system but with a segmented slant-hole collimator replacing the collimator. For a dual-head SPECT system, 2 segmented collimators, each with 7 sections, are arranged in an L-shaped configuration such that they can produce a complete cardiac SPECT image with only one gantry position. A calibration method was developed to estimate the geometric parameters of each collimator section as well as the detector rotation radius, under the assumption that the point source location is calculated using the central-section data. With a point source located off the rotation axis, geometric parameters for each collimator section can be estimated independently. The parameters estimated individually are further improved by a joint objective function that uses all collimator sections simultaneously and incorporates the collimator symmetry information. Estimation results and images reconstructed from estimated parameters are presented for both simulated and real data acquired from a prototype collimator. The calibration accuracy was validated by computer simulations with an error of about 0.1° for the slant angles and about 1 mm for the rotation radius. Reconstructions of a heart-insert phantom did not show any image artifacts of inaccurate geometric parameters. Compared with the detector's intrinsic resolution, the estimation error is small and can be ignored. Therefore, the accuracy of the calibration is sufficient for cardiac SPECT imaging. © 2015 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  14. SPECT of the brain: Present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazio, F.; Lenzi, G.L.

    1986-01-01

    In both PET and SPECT, most of the studies and the models have been addressed to two organs: brain and heart. So far, brain has certainly been investigated more. The several comparisons between planar scintigraphy and SPECT, between X-ray TCT and SPECT, and also between PET and SPECT, have tended to consider SPECT a cheap but scarcely useful tool for a nuclear medicine section. Again the authors feel that this is due to the fact that SPECT is really a ''physiological tomography'', with little known about its physiology or how it is measured. Thus the present state of the art of SPECT of the brain is characterized by a collection of data and reports on brain imaging and by a slowly growing basic understanding of the utilized modes. The introduction of a new brain-imaging radiopharmaceutical is immediately signaled by its ''first clinical application'' without parallel studies on the kinetics, the metabolic degradation, and the real suitability of the molecule as a tracer for measurement of regional CBF. Only a few attempts seek to narrow this discussion between clinic and biology, and the authors like to emphasize the need for nuclear medicine people to dedicate more time and effort

  15. "Planaltina in the Hole of Aluminum": production and consumption of pinhole photographs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Soares Mendes

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes a photographic exhibition consisting of 15 images created by pinhole technique, which stimulates a critical thinking about photojournalism practice and consumption. The exhibition in the internet (www.fosfoto.com and at the Artistic and Historic Museum of Planaltina (Brazilian Federal District happened in May 2009. Participants were asked to interpret the photographs and rewrite temporary captions. The 1.860 proposed captions indicates the public’s interest to participate, discuss and interpret the pictures.

  16. Real-time monitoring and verification of in vivo high dose rate brachytherapy using a pinhole camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan, Jun; Macey, Daniel J.; Pareek, Prem N.; Brezovich, Ivan A.

    2001-01-01

    We investigated a pinhole imaging system for independent in vivo monitoring and verification of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment. The system consists of a high-resolution pinhole collimator, an x-ray fluoroscope, and a standard radiographic screen-film combination. Autofluoroscopy provides real-time images of the in vivo Ir-192 HDR source for monitoring the source location and movement, whereas autoradiography generates a permanent record of source positions on film. Dual-pinhole autoradiographs render stereo-shifted source images that can be used to reconstruct the source dwell positions in three dimensions. The dynamic range and spatial resolution of the system were studied with a polystyrene phantom using a range of source strengths and dwell times. For the range of source activity used in HDR brachytherapy, a 0.5 mm diameter pinhole produced sharp fluoroscopic images of the source within the dynamic range of the fluoroscope. With a source-to-film distance of 35 cm and a 400 speed screen-film combination, the same pinhole yielded well recognizable images of a 281.2 GBq (7.60 Ci) Ir-192 source for dwell times in the typical clinical range of 2 to 400 s. This 0.5 mm diameter pinhole could clearly resolve source positions separated by lateral displacements as small as 1 mm. Using a simple reconstruction algorithm, dwell positions in a phantom were derived from stereo-shifted dual-pinhole images and compared to the known positions. The agreement was better than 1 mm. A preliminary study of a patient undergoing HDR treatment for cervical cancer suggests that the imaging method is clinically feasible. Based on these studies we believe that the pinhole imaging method is capable of providing independent and reliable real-time monitoring and verification for HDR brachytherapy

  17. 3D dual-virtual-pinhole assisted single particle tracking microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Ye; Wang, Yifan; Zhou, Xin; Kuang, Cuifang; Liu, Xu

    2014-01-01

    We propose a novel approach for high-speed, three-dimensional single particle tracking (SPT), which we refer to as dual-virtual-pinhole assisted single particle tracking microscopy (DVPaSPTM). DVPaSPTM system can obtain axial information of the sample without optical or mechanical depth scanning, so as to offer numbers of advantages including faster imaging, improved efficiency and a great reduction of photobleaching and phototoxicity. In addition, by the use of the dual-virtual-pinhole, the effect that the quantum yield exerts to the fluorescent signal can be eliminated, which makes the measurement independent of the surroundings and increases the accuracy of the result. DVPaSPTM system measures the intensity within different virtual pinholes of which the radii are given by the host computer. Axial information of fluorophores can be measured by the axial response curve through the ratio of intensity signals. We demonstrated the feasibility of the proposed method by a series of experiments. Results showed that the standard deviation of the axial measurement was 19.2 nm over a 2.5 μm range with 30 ms temporal resolution. (papers)

  18. System geometry optimization for molecular breast tomosynthesis with focusing multi-pinhole collimators

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Roosmalen, Jarno; Beekman, Freek J.; Goorden, Marlies C.

    2018-01-01

    Imaging of 99mTc-labelled tracers is gaining popularity for detecting breast tumours. Recently, we proposed a novel design for molecular breast tomosynthesis (MBT) based on two sliding focusing multi-pinhole collimators that scan a modestly compressed breast. Simulation studies indicate that MBT has the potential to improve the tumour-to-background contrast-to-noise ratio significantly over state-of-the-art planar molecular breast imaging. The aim of the present paper is to optimize the collimator-detector geometry of MBT. Using analytical models, we first optimized sensitivity at different fixed system resolutions (ranging from 5 to 12 mm) by tuning the pinhole diameters and the distance between breast and detector for a whole series of automatically generated multi-pinhole designs. We evaluated both MBT with a conventional continuous crystal detector with 3.2 mm intrinsic resolution and with a pixelated detector with 1.6 mm pixels. Subsequently, full system simulations of a breast phantom containing several lesions were performed for the optimized geometry at each system resolution for both types of detector. From these simulations, we found that tumour-to-background contrast-to-noise ratio was highest for systems in the 7 mm-10 mm system resolution range over which it hardly varied. No significant differences between the two detector types were found.

  19. X-ray pinhole camera setups used in the Atomki ECR Laboratory for plasma diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rácz, R., E-mail: rracz@atomki.hu; Biri, S.; Pálinkás, J. [Institute for Nuclear Research (Atomki), Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Bem tér 18/C, H-4026 Debrecen (Hungary); Mascali, D.; Castro, G.; Caliri, C.; Gammino, S. [Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Romano, F. P. [Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); CNR, Istituto per i Beni Archeologici e Monumentali, Via Biblioteca 4, 95124 Catania (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    Imaging of the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasmas by using CCD camera in combination with a pinhole is a non-destructive diagnostics method to record the strongly inhomogeneous spatial density distribution of the X-ray emitted by the plasma and by the chamber walls. This method can provide information on the location of the collisions between warm electrons and multiple charged ions/atoms, opening the possibility to investigate the direct effect of the ion source tuning parameters to the plasma structure. The first successful experiment with a pinhole X-ray camera was carried out in the Atomki ECR Laboratory more than 10 years ago. The goal of that experiment was to make the first ECR X-ray photos and to carry out simple studies on the effect of some setting parameters (magnetic field, extraction, disc voltage, gas mixing, etc.). Recently, intensive efforts were taken to investigate now the effect of different RF resonant modes to the plasma structure. Comparing to the 2002 experiment, this campaign used wider instrumental stock: CCD camera with a lead pinhole was placed at the injection side allowing X-ray imaging and beam extraction simultaneously. Additionally, Silicon Drift Detector (SDD) and High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors were installed to characterize the volumetric X-ray emission rate caused by the warm and hot electron domains. In this paper, detailed comparison study on the two X-ray camera and detector setups and also on the technical and scientific goals of the experiments is presented.

  20. Monte Carlo evaluation of scattering correction methods in 131I studies using pinhole collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    López Díaz, Adlin; San Pedro, Aley Palau; Martín Escuela, Juan Miguel; Rodríguez Pérez, Sunay; Díaz García, Angelina

    2017-01-01

    Scattering is quite important for image activity quantification. In order to study the scattering factors and the efficacy of 3 multiple window energy scatter correction methods during 131 I thyroid studies with a pinhole collimator (5 mm hole) a Monte Carlo simulation (MC) was developed. The GAMOS MC code was used to model the gamma camera and the thyroid source geometry. First, to validate the MC gamma camera pinhole-source model, sensibility in air and water of the simulated and measured thyroid phantom geometries were compared. Next, simulations to investigate scattering and the result of triple energy (TEW), Double energy (DW) and Reduced double (RDW) energy windows correction methods were performed for different thyroid sizes and depth thicknesses. The relative discrepancies to MC real event were evaluated. Results: The accuracy of the GAMOS MC model was verified and validated. The image’s scattering contribution was significant, between 27-40 %. The discrepancies between 3 multiple window energy correction method results were significant (between 9-86 %). The Reduce Double Window methods (15%) provide discrepancies of 9-16 %. Conclusions: For the simulated thyroid geometry with pinhole, the RDW (15 %) was the most effective. (author)

  1. Development of a high sensitivity pinhole type gamma camera using semiconductors for low dose rate fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Yuichiro; Takahashi, Isao; Ishitsu, Takafumi; Tadokoro, Takahiro; Okada, Koichi; Nagumo, Yasushi; Fujishima, Yasutake; Yoshida, Akira; Umegaki, Kikuo

    2018-06-01

    We developed a pinhole type gamma camera, using a compact detector module of a pixelated CdTe semiconductor, which has suitable sensitivity and quantitative accuracy for low dose rate fields. In order to improve the sensitivity of the pinhole type semiconductor gamma camera, we adopted three methods: a signal processing method to set the discriminating level lower, a high sensitivity pinhole collimator and a smoothing image filter that improves the efficiency of the source identification. We tested basic performances of the developed gamma camera and carefully examined effects of the three methods. From the sensitivity test, we found that the effective sensitivity was about 21 times higher than that of the gamma camera for high dose rate fields which we had previously developed. We confirmed that the gamma camera had sufficient sensitivity and high quantitative accuracy; for example, a weak hot spot (0.9 μSv/h) around a tree root could be detected within 45 min in a low dose rate field test, and errors of measured dose rates with point sources were less than 7% in a dose rate accuracy test.

  2. X-ray pinhole camera setups used in the Atomki ECR Laboratory for plasma diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rácz, R; Biri, S; Pálinkás, J; Mascali, D; Castro, G; Caliri, C; Romano, F P; Gammino, S

    2016-02-01

    Imaging of the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasmas by using CCD camera in combination with a pinhole is a non-destructive diagnostics method to record the strongly inhomogeneous spatial density distribution of the X-ray emitted by the plasma and by the chamber walls. This method can provide information on the location of the collisions between warm electrons and multiple charged ions/atoms, opening the possibility to investigate the direct effect of the ion source tuning parameters to the plasma structure. The first successful experiment with a pinhole X-ray camera was carried out in the Atomki ECR Laboratory more than 10 years ago. The goal of that experiment was to make the first ECR X-ray photos and to carry out simple studies on the effect of some setting parameters (magnetic field, extraction, disc voltage, gas mixing, etc.). Recently, intensive efforts were taken to investigate now the effect of different RF resonant modes to the plasma structure. Comparing to the 2002 experiment, this campaign used wider instrumental stock: CCD camera with a lead pinhole was placed at the injection side allowing X-ray imaging and beam extraction simultaneously. Additionally, Silicon Drift Detector (SDD) and High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors were installed to characterize the volumetric X-ray emission rate caused by the warm and hot electron domains. In this paper, detailed comparison study on the two X-ray camera and detector setups and also on the technical and scientific goals of the experiments is presented.

  3. SPECT Myocardial Blood Flow Quantitation Concludes Equivocal Myocardial Perfusion SPECT Studies to Increase Diagnostic Benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lung-Ching; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Chen, Ing-Jou; Ku, Chi-Tai; Chen, Yen-Kung; Hsu, Bailing

    2016-01-01

    Recently, myocardial blood flow quantitation with dynamic SPECT/CT has been reported to enhance the detection of coronary artery disease in human. This advance has created important clinical applications to coronary artery disease diagnosis and management for areas where myocardial perfusion PET tracers are not available. We present 2 clinical cases that undergone a combined test of 1-day rest/dipyridamole-stress dynamic SPECT and ECG-gated myocardial perfusion SPECT scans using an integrated imaging protocol and demonstrate that flow parameters are capable to conclude equivocal myocardial perfusion SPECT studies, therefore increasing diagnostic benefits to add value in making clinical decisions.

  4. Quantitation of myocardial blood flow and myocardial flow reserve with {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi dynamic SPECT/CT to enhance detection of coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Bailing [University of Missouri-Columbia, Nuclear Science and Engineering Institute, Columbia, MO (United States); Chen, Fu-Chung; Chen, Chien-Cheng [Show Chwan Memorial Hospital, Section of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Changhua (China); Wu, Tao-Cheng [Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Section of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Taipei (China); Huang, Wen-Sheng [Changhua Christian Hospital, Department of Medical Research and Department of Nuclear Medicine, Changhua (China); Hou, Po-Nien [Chang Bing Show Chwan Memorial Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Lukong Town, Changhua Shien (China); Hung, Guang-Uei [Chang Bing Show Chwan Memorial Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Lukong Town, Changhua Shien (China); Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Science, Taichung (China); China Medical University, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Science, Taichung (China)

    2014-12-15

    Conventional dual-head single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT systems capable of fast dynamic SPECT (DySPECT) imaging have a potential for flow quantitation. This study introduced a new method to quantify myocardial blood flow (MBF) and myocardial flow reserve (MFR) with DySPECT scan and evaluated the diagnostic performance of detecting coronary artery disease (CAD) compared with perfusion using invasive coronary angiography (CAG) as the reference standard. This study included 21 patients with suspected or known CAD who had received DySPECT, ECG-gated SPECT (GSPECT), and CAG (13 with ≥50 % stenosis in any vessel; non-CAD group: 8 with patent arteries or <50 % stenosis). DySPECT and GSPECT scans were performed on a widely used dual-head SPECT/CT scanner. The DySPECT imaging protocol utilized 12-min multiple back-and-forth gantry rotations during injections of {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi (MIBI) tracer at rest or dipyridamole-stress stages. DySPECT images were reconstructed with full physical corrections and converted to the physical unit of becquerels per milliliter. Stress MBF (SMBF), rest MBF (RMBF), and MFR were quantified by a one-tissue compartment flow model using time-activity curves derived from DySPECT images. Perfusion images were processed for GSPECT scan and interpreted to obtain summed stress score (SSS) and summed difference score (SDS). Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analyses were conducted to evaluate the diagnostic performance of flow and perfusion. Using the criteria of ≥50 % stenosis as positive CAD, areas under the ROC curve (AUCs) of flow assessment were overall significantly greater than those of perfusion. For patient-based analysis, AUCs for MFR, SMBF, SSS, and SDS were 0.91 ± 0.07, 0.86 ± 0.09, 0.64 ± 0.12, and 0.59 ± 0.13. For vessel-based analysis, AUCs for MFR, SMBF, SSS, and SDS were 0.81 ± 0.05, 0.76 ± 0.06, 0.62 ± 0.07, and 0.56 ± 0.08, respectively. The preliminary data suggest that MBF quantitation with a

  5. Design and development of a high resolution animal SPECT scanner dedicated for rat and mouse imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajedi, Salar; Zeraatkar, Navid; Moji, Vahideh; Farahani, Mohammad Hossein; Sarkar, Saeed; Arabi, Hossein; Teymoorian, Behnoosh; Ghafarian, Pardis; Rahmim, Arman; Reza Ay, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    A dedicated small-animal SPECT system, HiReSPECT, was designed and developed to provide a high resolution molecular imaging modality in response to growing research demands. HiReSPECT is a dual-head system mounted on a rotating gantry. The detection system is based on pixelated CsI(Na) scintillator crystals coupled to two Hamamatsu H8500 Position Sensitive Photomultiplier Tubes in each head. Also, a high resolution parallel-hole collimator is applied to every head. The dimensions of each head are 50 mm×100 mm, enabling sufficient transaxial and axial fields-of-view (TFOV and AFOV), respectively, for coverage of the entire mouse in single-bed position imaging. However, a 50 mm TFOV is not sufficient for transaxial coverage of rats. To address this, each head can be rotated by 90 degrees in order to align the larger dimension of the heads with the short body axis, allowing tomographic data acquisition for rats. An innovative non-linear recursive filter was used for signal processing/detection. Resolution recovery was also embedded in the modified Maximum-Likelihood Expectation Maximization (MLEM) image reconstruction code to compensate for Collimator-Detector Response (CDR). Moreover, an innovative interpolation algorithm was developed to speed up the reconstruction code. The planar spatial resolution at the head surface and the image spatial resolutions were 1.7 mm and 1.2–1.6 mm, respectively. The measurements followed by post-processing showed that the observed count rate at 20% count loss is about 42 kcps. The system sensitivity at the collimator surface for heads 1 and 2 were 1.32 cps/µCi and 1.25 cps/µCi, respectively. The corresponding values were 1.18 cps/µCi and 1.02 cps/µCi at 8 cm distance from the collimator surfaces. In addition, whole-body scans of mice demonstrated appropriate imaging capability of the HiReSPECT

  6. Myocardial SPECT in children with sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maunoury, C.; Hallaj, I.; Barritault, L.; Acar, P.; Montalembert, M. de

    2002-01-01

    Aim: While cerebral and bones strokes are well documented in children with sickle cell disease (SCD), impairment of myocardial perfusion is an unknown complication. Conventional techniques such as exercise testing and echocardiography have a low sensitivity and specificity to detect myocardial ischemia in patients with SCD. The aim of this prospective study was to assess myocardial perfusion with 201 Tl SPECT in children with SCD. Materials and Methods: Twenty-two patients, aged 12 ± 4 years, were included. Myocardial perfusion was assessed by 201 Tl SPECT after stress and 3 hours later after reinjection on a single head gammacamera equipped with a LEAP collimator (64x64 matrix size format, 30 projections over 180 0 , 30 seconds per step). Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was assessed by equilibrium radionuclide angiography at rest on the same day. Results: Myocardial perfusion was impaired in 13/22 patients: 8 had reversible defects and 5 had fixed defects. The left ventricular cavity was dilated in 13/22 patients. The mean LVEF was 63 ± 9%. There was no relationship between myocardial perfusion and left ventricular dilation or function. Conclusion: Myocardial perfusion is frequently impaired in children with SCD. Treatment with hydroxyurea should be considered in SCD patients with perfusion defects

  7. SPECT quantification of 123I - and - CIT in Parkinsonism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larcos, G.; Shaffi, M.; Hutton, B.F.; Hatton, R.; Kyme, A.; Fung, V.S.C.; Morris, J.G.L.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Evaluation of presynaptic dopaminergic function using 2B-carboxymethoxy-3B-(4-[ 123 I] iodophenyl) tropane ( 123 I-and-CIT) SPECT has employed subjective or semi-quantitative methods. Our hypothesis is that disease classification in Parkinsonism may be improved by partial volume correction and co-registration with MRI. We studied seven patients (pts) with IPD (four men, three women, mean age=54.5+/-10.9 yrs; Hoehn and Yahr stage range 1-3; Schwab and England scale range: 30-100 [mean=67.1+/-26.9]) and two controls with 123 I- - CIT using 110-150 MBq and a dual-head camera equipped with fan-beam collimation. SPECT was registered to MRI and then aligned to a reference template. Specific to non-specific dopaminergic binding (UR) was calculated for the putamen and caudate nucleus, as well as the fractional volume (FV; fraction of the Structure affected) and residual uptake ratio (RUR; count density in area/remnant apparently unaffected by disease). Parameters that were statistically significant were the putamen (p; but not caudate) UR, FV and RUR. We conclude that: (a) it is possible to distinguish dopaminergic activity within the putamen from caudate using MRI image co-registration and (b) parameters other than UR may discriminate IPD from normal subjects and other entities. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  8. Sci—Thur PM: Imaging — 05: Calibration of a SPECT/CT camera for quantitative SPECT with 99mTc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaudin, Émilie; Montégiani, Jean-François; Després, Philippe; Beauregard, Jean-Mathieu

    2014-01-01

    While quantitation is the norm in PET, it is not widely available yet in SPECT. This work's aim was to calibrate a commercially available SPECT/CT system to perform quantitative SPECT. Counting sensitivity, dead-time (DT) constant and partial volume effect (PVE) of the system were assessed. A dual-head Siemens SymbiaT6 SPECT/CT camera equipped with low energy high-resolution collimators was studied. 99m Tc was the radioisotope of interest because of its wide usage in nuclear medicine. First, point source acquisitions were performed (activity: 30–990MBq). Further acquisitions were then performed with a uniform Jaszczak phantom filled with water at high activity (25–5000MBq). PVE was studied using 6 hot spheres (diameters: 9.9–31.2 mm) filled with 99m Tc (2.8MBq/cc) in the Jaszczak phantom, which was: (1) empty, (2) water-filled and (3) water-filled with low activity (0.1MBq/cc). The data was reconstructed with the Siemens's Flash3D iterative algorithm with 4 subsets and 8 iterations, attenuation-correction (AC) and scatter-correction (SC). DT modelling was based on the total spectrum counting rate. Sensitivity was assessed using AC-SC reconstructed SPECT data. Sensitivity and DT for the sources were 99.51±1.46cps/MBq and 0.60±0.04µs. For the phantom, sensitivity and DT were 109.9±2.3cps/MBq and 0.62±0.13µs. The recovery-coefficient varied from 5% for the 9.9mm, to 80% for the 31.2mm spheres. With our calibration methods, both sensitivity and DT constant of the SPECT camera had little dependence on the object geometry and attenuation. For small objects of known size, recovery-coefficient can be applied to correct PVE. Clinical quantitative SPECT appears to be possible and has many potential applications

  9. Segmented slant hole collimator for stationary cardiac SPECT: Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yanfei; Yu, Zhicong; Zeng, Gengsheng L

    2015-09-01

    This work is a preliminary study of a stationary cardiac SPECT system. The goal of this research is to propose a stationary cardiac SPECT system using segmented slant-hole collimators and to perform computer simulations to test the feasibility. Compared to the rotational SPECT, a stationary system has a benefit of acquiring temporally consistent projections. The most challenging issue in building a stationary system is to provide sufficient projection view-angles. A GATE (GEANT4 application for tomographic emission) Monte Carlo model was developed to simulate a two-detector stationary cardiac SPECT that uses segmented slant-hole collimators. Each detector contains seven segmented slant-hole sections that slant to a common volume at the rotation center. Consequently, 14 view-angles over 180° were acquired without any gantry rotation. The NCAT phantom was used for data generation and a tailored maximum-likelihood expectation-maximization algorithm was used for image reconstruction. Effects of limited number of view-angles and data truncation were carefully evaluated in the paper. Simulation results indicated that the proposed segmented slant-hole stationary cardiac SPECT system is able to acquire sufficient data for cardiac imaging without a loss of image quality, even when the uptakes in the liver and kidneys are high. Seven views are acquired simultaneously at each detector, leading to 5-fold sensitivity gain over the conventional dual-head system at the same total acquisition time, which in turn increases the signal-to-noise ratio by 19%. The segmented slant-hole SPECT system also showed a good performance in lesion detection. In our prototype system, a short hole-length was used to reduce the dead zone between neighboring collimator segments. The measured sensitivity gain is about 17-fold over the conventional dual-head system. The gate Monte Carlo simulations confirm the feasibility of the proposed stationary cardiac SPECT system with segmented slant

  10. Segmented slant hole collimator for stationary cardiac SPECT: Monte Carlo simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Yanfei, E-mail: ymao@ucair.med.utah.edu [Department of Radiology, Utah Center for Advanced Imaging Research (UCAIR), University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84108 and Department of Bioengineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Yu, Zhicong [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Zeng, Gengsheng L. [Department of Radiology, Utah Center for Advanced Imaging Research (UCAIR), University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84108 and Department of Engineering, Weber State University, Ogden, Utah 84408 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: This work is a preliminary study of a stationary cardiac SPECT system. The goal of this research is to propose a stationary cardiac SPECT system using segmented slant-hole collimators and to perform computer simulations to test the feasibility. Compared to the rotational SPECT, a stationary system has a benefit of acquiring temporally consistent projections. The most challenging issue in building a stationary system is to provide sufficient projection view-angles. Methods: A GATE (GEANT4 application for tomographic emission) Monte Carlo model was developed to simulate a two-detector stationary cardiac SPECT that uses segmented slant-hole collimators. Each detector contains seven segmented slant-hole sections that slant to a common volume at the rotation center. Consequently, 14 view-angles over 180° were acquired without any gantry rotation. The NCAT phantom was used for data generation and a tailored maximum-likelihood expectation-maximization algorithm was used for image reconstruction. Effects of limited number of view-angles and data truncation were carefully evaluated in the paper. Results: Simulation results indicated that the proposed segmented slant-hole stationary cardiac SPECT system is able to acquire sufficient data for cardiac imaging without a loss of image quality, even when the uptakes in the liver and kidneys are high. Seven views are acquired simultaneously at each detector, leading to 5-fold sensitivity gain over the conventional dual-head system at the same total acquisition time, which in turn increases the signal-to-noise ratio by 19%. The segmented slant-hole SPECT system also showed a good performance in lesion detection. In our prototype system, a short hole-length was used to reduce the dead zone between neighboring collimator segments. The measured sensitivity gain is about 17-fold over the conventional dual-head system. Conclusions: The GATE Monte Carlo simulations confirm the feasibility of the proposed stationary cardiac

  11. Assessment of congenital heart disease by a thallium-201 SPECT study in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Iwao; Nakajima, Kenichi; Taki, Junichi; Taniguchi, Mitsuru; Bunko, Hisashi; Tonami, Norihisa; Hisada, Kinichi; Ohno, Takashi

    1993-01-01

    The characteristics of correlation between the right-to-left ventricular systolic pressure ratios (RVp/LVp) and the thallium-201 right-to-left ventricular ( 201 Tl R/L) count ratios was investigated in children with various congenital heart diseases. High-resolution three-headed SPECT system equipped with either parallel-hole or fan-beam collimators was used. In a total of 102 patients, the correlation between RVp/LVp and 201 Tl R/L average count ratios was good in both planar (r=0.89, p=0.0001) and SPECT studies (r=0.80, p=0.0001). Quantitative analysis of myocardial uptake by SPECT demonstrated the characteristic pattern of each disease as well as the differences in the right ventricular overload types. When the linear regression analysis was performed in each heart disease, ventricular septal defect showed most excellent correlation. Complex heart anomalies also showed positive correlation (r=0.51, p=0.05) with RVp/LVp, and it can be used to estimate right ventricular pressure. After surgical treatment of tetralogy of Fallot and pulmonary stenosis, the decrease of 201 Tl R/L count ratio was in accordance with improvement of right ventricular overload. We conclude that 201 Tl SPECT study can be a good indicator for estimation of right ventricular pressure. (author)

  12. Brain SPECT of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS): a blinded visual analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casse, R.; Chew, G.; Barnden, L.; DelFante, P.; Burnet, R.; Kwiatek, R.; Chew, J.; Behin-Ain, S.; Unger, S.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a debilitating and complex disorder characterised by profound fatigue and neuropsychiatric dysfunction. Previous studies with cerebral perfusion SPECT (rCBF) scans have yielded conflicting results. Most were performed with inhomogeneous patient populations and the findings were not based on a blinded visual analysis. To address this, HMPAO SPECT on a triple head gamma camera was performed on a group of 59 subjects. This group included 32 subjects (16-61 years, 24F and 8M) with moderate CFS based on the Fukuda criteria not on medication and not depressed and 27 normal volunteers (20-56 years, 16F and 11 M). Two blinded reviewers (RC and GC) separately assessed the SPECT studies. 28 brain structures were scored as either definitely abnormal(1), possibly abnormal(2) or normal(3-5). Abnormal results were only found in the temporal lobes and brainstem. The results (Sensitivity/Specificity) based on scores 1 or 2, show that that abnormal score yielded acceptable specificity but low sensitivity. Scores 1 or 2 improved sensitivity but reduced the specificity. This shows that visual analysis of brain SPECT is not a reliable discriminant test for CFS, although quantitative analysis with statistical parametric mapping (SPM) has demonstrated significant abnormalities. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  13. Triangular SPECT system for 3-D total organ volume imaging: Design concept and preliminary imaging results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, C.B.; Anderson, J.; Covic, J.

    1985-01-01

    SPECT systems based on 2-D detectors for projection data collection and filtered back-projection image reconstruction have the potential for true 3-D imaging, providing contiguous slice images in any orientation. Anger camera-based SPECT systems have the natural advantage supporting planar imaging clinical procedures. However, current systems suffer from two drawbacks; poor utilization of emitted photons, and inadequate system design for SPECT. A SPECT system consisting of three rectangular cameras with radial translation would offer the variable cylindrical FOV of 25 cm to 40 cm diameter allowing close detector access to the object. This system would provide optimized imaging for both brain and body organs in terms of sensitivity and resolution. For brain imaging a tight detector triangle with fan beam collimation, matching detector UFOV to the head, allows full 2 π utilization of emitted photons, resulting in >4 times sensitivity increase over the single detector system. Minification of intrinsic detector resolution in fan beam collimation further improves system resolution. For body organ imaging the three detectors with parallel hole collimators, rotating in non-circular orbit, provide both improved resolution and three-fold sensitivity increase. Practical challenges lie in ensuring perfect image overlap from three detectors without resolution degradation and artifact generation in order to benefit from the above improvements. An experimental system has been developed to test the above imaging concept and we have successfully demonstrated the superior image quality of the overlapped images. Design concept will be presented with preliminary imaging results

  14. Frameless image registration of X-ray CT and SPECT by volume matching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yuko; Kihara, Tomohiko; Yui, Nobuharu; Kinoshita, Fujimi; Kamimura, Yoshitsugu; Yamada, Yoshifumi.

    1998-01-01

    Image registration of functional (SPECT) and morphological (X-ray CT/MRI) images is studied in order to improve the accuracy and the quantity of the image diagnosis. We have developed a new frameless registration method of X-ray CT and SPECT image using transmission CT image acquired for absorption correction of SPECT images. This is the automated registration method and calculates the transformation matrix between the two coordinate systems of image data by the optimization method. This registration method is based on the similar physical property of X-ray CT and transmission CT image. The three-dimensional overlap of the bone region is used for image matching. We verified by a phantom test that it can provide a good result of within two millimeters error. We also evaluated visually the accuracy of the registration method by the application study of SPECT, X-ray CT, and transmission CT head images. This method can be carried out accurately without any frames. We expect this registration method becomes an efficient tool to improve image diagnosis and medical treatment. (author)

  15. SPECT assay of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaszczak, R.J.

    1992-02-01

    The long-term goal of this research project is to develop methods to improve the utility of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECI) to quantify the biodistribution of monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) labeled with clinically relevant radionuclides ( 123 I, 131 I, and 111 In) and with another radionuclide, 211 At, recently used in therapy. We describe here our progress in developing quantitative SPECT methodology for 111 In and 123 I. We have focused our recent research thrusts on the following aspects of SPECT: (1) The development of improved SPECT hardware, such as improved acquisition geometries. (2) The development of better reconstruction methods that provide accurate compensation for the physical factors that affect SPECT quantification. (3) The application of carefully designed simulations and experiments to validate our hardware and software approaches

  16. SPECT quantification of regional radionuclide distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaszczak, R.J.; Greer, K.L.; Coleman, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    SPECT quantification of regional radionuclide activities within the human body is affected by several physical and instrumental factors including attenuation of photons within the patient, Compton scattered events, the system's finite spatial resolution and object size, finite number of detected events, partial volume effects, the radiopharmaceutical biokinetics, and patient and/or organ motion. Furthermore, other instrumentation factors such as calibration of the center-of-rotation, sampling, and detector nonuniformities will affect the SPECT measurement process. These factors are described, together with examples of compensation methods that are currently available for improving SPECT quantification. SPECT offers the potential to improve in vivo estimates of absorbed dose, provided the acquisition, reconstruction, and compensation procedures are adequately implemented and utilized. 53 references, 2 figures

  17. Comparison of planar scanning and single photon emission computed tomography in the diagnosis of avascular necrosis of the femoral head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feiglin, D.H.I.; Levine, M.; Stulberg, B.; Pflanze, W.; O'Donnell, J.K.; Belhobek, G.H.; Go, R.T.; MacIntyre, W.J.

    1986-01-01

    Thirty-nine patients were investigated for avascular necrosis of the femoral head. All hips were studied by plain x-ray and MR imaging, 70 hips studied by radionuclide bone scanning, and 38 were studied by single photon emission CT (SPECT). Core biopsies of the femoral heads from 32 hips were examined. No one reference standard for noninvasive diagnosis of this disease is available. The sensitivity and specificity of the radionuclide studies with respect to SPECT were 77% and 100%; of SPECT with respect to pathologic confirmation, 100% and 57%; of MR imaging with respect to pathologic studies, 100% and 66%. Pathologic sampling is subject to error and may give false negative results with spuriously low specificities for imaging modalities. SPECT is recommended as the radionuclide imaging procedure of choice for detecting avascular necrosis of the femoral head

  18. Brain SPECT imaging in temporal lobe epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krausz, Y.; Yaffe, S.; Atlan, H.; Cohen, D.; Konstantini, S.; Meiner, Z.

    1991-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy is diagnosed by clinical symptoms and signs and by localization of an epileptogenic focus. A brain SPECT study of two patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, using 99m Tc-HMPAO, was used to demonstrate a perfusion abnormality in the temporal lobe, while brain CT and MRI were non-contributory. The electroencephalogram, though abnormal, did not localize the diseased area. The potential role of the SPECT study in diagnosis and localization of temporal lobe epilepsy is discussed. (orig.)

  19. Role of brain SPECT in epilepsy exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biraben, A.; Bernard, AM.

    1996-01-01

    The management of epileptic patients is currently developing in relation with the introduction of video EEG and the opening of medical centers dedicated to epilepsy. The role of SPECT is now well established to assess the temporal and spatial dynamic phenomena during seizures. Ictal SPECT has technical and organisational requirements but is a very sensitive method, which appears to be superior to other available imaging techniques. (author)

  20. Technical approach to improvement of SPECT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukukita, Hiroyoshi

    1985-01-01

    At present, a large number of SPECT systems are being widely used in Japan, hence, it is reasonable for us to know the physical and imaging characteristics of these SPECT devices, and also to recommend the optimum utility of SPECT systems. For this reason, a survey respect of characteristics of the commercialy available SPECT devices was carried out. In addition to this, various factors which have significant influence over SPECT image quality, such as, data acquisition matrix, reconstruction filter, γ-ray attenuation correction and daily quality control procedure, were also investigated. The materials used for this study are PET/SPECT phantom, Alderson liver phantom filled with Tc-99m solution, and either LFOV-E or ZLC-7500 interfaced to Scintipac 2400 minicomputer with 256 K byte of memory. Following are the results of this study. 1) The suitable data acquisition procedure was 128 x 128 matrix for linear sampling and approximately 64 views for angular sampling. 2) Reconstructed image using pre-processing filter with Wiener and Butterworth filters provided high quality image as compared with the Ramp filter. 3) Weighted backprojection method (WBP) proposed by Tanaka was superior to other methods, such as Sorenson method and Chang method in the object with non-uniform distribution of radionuclide. 4) It was found that uniformity correction of gamma camera and precise adjustment of the center of rotation are most important to maintain the images with a high quality. (author)

  1. Utility of combined high-resolution bone SPECT and MRI for the identification of rheumatoid arthritis patients with high-risk for erosive progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchbender, Christian, E-mail: christian.buchbender@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Moorenstr. 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Sewerin, Philipp, E-mail: philipp.sewerin@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Rheumatology, Moorenstr. 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Mattes-György, Katalin, E-mail: katalin.mattes@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Moorenstr. 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Miese, Falk, E-mail: falk.miese@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Moorenstr. 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Wittsack, Hans-Joerg, E-mail: hans-joerg.wittsack@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Moorenstr. 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Specker, Christof, E-mail: c.specker@kliniken-essen-sued.de [Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Kliniken Essen-Sud, Propsteistrasse 2, D-45239 Essen (Germany); Antoch, Gerald, E-mail: antoch@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Moorenstr. 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Müller, Hans-Wilhelm, E-mail: HansW.Mueller@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Moorenstr. 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Schneider, Matthias, E-mail: matthias.schneider@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Rheumatology, Moorenstr. 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Scherer, Axel, E-mail: scherer@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Moorenstr. 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Ostendorf, Benedikt, E-mail: ostendorf@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Rheumatology, Moorenstr. 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany)

    2013-02-15

    Objectives: To evaluate the utility of sequentially acquired, post hoc fused, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and multi-pinhole single photon emission computed tomography (MPH-SPECT) with technetium-99m-labeled disphosphonates (Tc99m-DPD) for the identification of finger joints with later erosive progression in early rheumatoid arthritis (ERA) patients. Methods: Ten consecutive ERA patients prospectively underwent MPH-SPECT and MRI of metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints prior to and after 6 months methotrexate therapy. Tc99m-DPD uptake was measured at proximal and distal MCP sites using regional analysis. The course of joint pathologies was scored according to the Rheumatoid Arthritis MRI Score (RAMRIS) criteria. Results: The frequency of increased Tc99m-DPD uptake, synovitis and bone marrow edemadecreased under MTX therapy; but the number of bone erosions increased. Joints with progressive and new erosions on follow-up had a higher baseline Tc99m-DPD uptake (2.64 ± 1.23 vs. 1.43 ± 0.91) (p = 0.02). Conclusions: Joints with erosive progression are characterized by an early increased Tc99m-DPD uptake, even in absence of MRI bone pathologies. Tc99m-DPD MPH-SPECT might thus be of additional value to morphological MRI for the identification of RA patients with a high risk for erosive progression.

  2. Triple Detector SPECT Imaging with 99mTc-DMSA in Adult Patients with Urinary Tract Infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Jin Sook; Bea, Woon Gyu; Moon, Dae Hyuk; Lee, Myung Hae; Kim, Soon Bae; Park, Su Kil; Park, Jung Sik; Hong, Chang Gi; Cho, Kyung Sik

    1992-01-01

    Although early diagnosis of urinary tract infection is important, the radiologic evaluation is still controversial because of the low sensitivity and the lack of cost-effectiveness. This study was carried out to evaluate the clinical utility of high resolution triple head 99m Tc-DMSA SPECT imaging in urinary tract infection. We prospectively performed 99m Tc-DMSA planar and SPECT imaging, ultrasound of kidney (US), intravenous pyelography (IVP) and voiding cystourethrography (VCU) in all 60 adult patients with UTI [26 with first episode of acute pyelonephritis (APN), 22 with recurrent APN, and 12 persistent asymptomatic pyuria] and 25 normal persons. To assess reversibility of the renal cortical defect (RCD), 99m Tc-DMSA SPECT was repeated 1 to 8 months later in those patients with abnormal initial findings. Overall detection rate of 99m Tc-DMSA SPECT imaging was 83% (50/60), but planar, US, IVP and VCU showed abnormal findings in 68%, 28%, 32% and 13%, respectively. 25 out of 27 patients with normal or single RCD were all normal in other radiological studies. Only two patients showed vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) on VCU (grade I) and mild hydronephrosis on IVP. But, high proportion of those with multiple RCD showed abnormal findings on US (17/33), IVP (18/33), and VCU (7/33): 67% in any of these 3 studies. Especially, 3 out 7 patients with VUR showed multiple RCD on 99m Tc-DMSA SPECT without any abnormality on IVP or US. 25 normal persons showed normal findings in all studies except one false positive finding on 99m Tc-DMSA SPECT imaging. Follow-up 99m Tc-DMSA SPECT was done in 28 patients (13 with single RCD, 15 with multiple RCD). All 13 patients with single RCD showed improvement. Those with multiple RCD presented improvement in 4, no change in 10, and aggravation in 1 on follow-up studies. With these results, we conclude: 1) 99m Tc-DMSA SPECT imaging is superior to planar imaging, US, IVP or VCU in detection of renal lesion in urinary tract infection. 99m Tc

  3. Compensation for nonuniform attenuation in SPECT brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glick, S.J.; King, M.A.; Pan, T.S.; Soares, E.J.

    1996-01-01

    Accurate compensation for photon attenuation is needed to perform quantitative brain single-photon-emission computed tomographic (SPECT) imaging. Bellini's attenuation-compensation method has been used with a nonuniform attenuation map to account for the nonuniform attenuation properties of the head. Simulation studies using a three-dimensional (3-D) digitized anthropomorphic brain phantom were conducted to compare quantitative accuracy of reconstructions obtained with the nonuniform Bellini method to that obtained with the Chang method and to iterative reconstruction using maximum-likelihood expectation maximization (ML-EM). Using the Chang method and assuming the head to be a uniform attenuator gave reconstructions with an average bias of approximately 6-8%, whereas using the Bellini or the iterative ML-EM method with a nonuniform attenuation map gave an average bias of approximately 1%. The computation time required to implement nonuniform attenuation compensation with the Bellini algorithm is approximately equivalent to the time required to perform one iteration of ML-EM. Thus, using the Bellini method with a nonuniform attenuation map provides accurate compensation for photon attenuation within the head, and the method can be implemented in computation times suitable for routine clinical use

  4. Clinical evaluation of stress thallium spect in ischemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sui, Osamu; Kimura, Nazuna; Soeki; Takeshi; Takeichi, Naoki; Shinohara, Hisanori; Tamura, Yoshiyuki; Fukuda, Nobuo

    1997-01-01

    Thallium SPECT was performed in patients with significant coronary artery stenosis, 67 cases were after maximal exercise and 74 cases were during coronary vasodilation induced by ATP (adenosine triphosphate) infusion. In patients suspected of angina pectoris, the sensitivity, specificity and predictive accuracy for detection of coronary artery disease (CAD) were 88%, 78% and 82% for exercise SPECT, and 100%, 72% and 84% for ATP SPECT studies, respectively. In patients with old myocardial infarction, these were 73%, 100% and 88% for exercise SPECT and 71%, 100% and 81% for ATP SPECT. These were 75%, 49% and 60% for treadmill exercise test in the patient group including both angina and myocardial infarction. For detection of diseased vessels, the diagnostic accuracy for left anterior descending artery and right coronary artery lesions was almost equal for ATP and exercise SPECT study, but ATP SPECT study was more sensitive than exercise SPECT study in detection of left circumflex artery lesions. ATP as well as exercise SPECT studies occasionally gave false positive results in patients with single-vessel disease. ATP as well as exercise SPECT studies underestimated the severity of multi-vessel disease. In general, the results of ATP SPECT imaging were highly concordant with the results of exercise SPECT imaging. ATP stress thallium SPECT imaging provided a safe and highly accurate diagnostic tool for detection of CAD. (author)

  5. Small-animal SPECT and SPECT/CT: application in cardiovascular research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golestani, Reza; Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O. [University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Groningen (Netherlands); Wu, Chao [University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Groningen (Netherlands); University Medical Center Utrecht, Image Sciences Institute and Rudolf Magnus Institute of Neurosciences, Utrecht (Netherlands); Tio, Rene A. [University Medical Center Groningen, Thorax Center, Department of Cardiology, Groningen (Netherlands); University Medical Center Groningen, Cardiovascular Imaging Group, P.O. Box 30001, Groningen (Netherlands); Zeebregts, Clark J. [University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Surgery, Division of Vascular Surgery, Groningen (Netherlands); University Medical Center Groningen, Cardiovascular Imaging Group, P.O. Box 30001, Groningen (Netherlands); Petrov, Artiom D. [University of California, Irvine, Division of Cardiology, School of Medicine, Irvine, California (United States); Beekman, Freek J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Image Sciences Institute and Rudolf Magnus Institute of Neurosciences, Utrecht (Netherlands); Delft University of Technology, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Section Radiation Detection and Medical Imaging, Delft (Netherlands); MILabs, Utrecht (Netherlands); Boersma, Hendrikus H. [University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Groningen (Netherlands); University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Clinical and Hospital Pharmacy, Hanzeplein 1, P.O. Box 30001, Groningen (Netherlands); University Medical Center Groningen, Cardiovascular Imaging Group, P.O. Box 30001, Groningen (Netherlands); Slart, Riemer H.J.A. [University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Groningen (Netherlands); University Medical Center Groningen, Cardiovascular Imaging Group, P.O. Box 30001, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2010-09-15

    Preclinical cardiovascular research using noninvasive radionuclide and hybrid imaging systems has been extensively developed in recent years. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is based on the molecular tracer principle and is an established tool in noninvasive imaging. SPECT uses gamma cameras and collimators to form projection data that are used to estimate (dynamic) 3-D tracer distributions in vivo. Recent developments in multipinhole collimation and advanced image reconstruction have led to sub-millimetre and sub-half-millimetre resolution SPECT in rats and mice, respectively. In this article we review applications of microSPECT in cardiovascular research in which information about the function and pathology of the myocardium, vessels and neurons is obtained. We give examples on how diagnostic tracers, new therapeutic interventions, pre- and postcardiovascular event prognosis, and functional and pathophysiological heart conditions can be explored by microSPECT, using small-animal models of cardiovascular disease. (orig.)

  6. Small-animal SPECT and SPECT/CT: application in cardiovascular research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golestani, Reza; Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O.; Wu, Chao; Tio, Rene A.; Zeebregts, Clark J.; Petrov, Artiom D.; Beekman, Freek J.; Boersma, Hendrikus H.; Slart, Riemer H.J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Preclinical cardiovascular research using noninvasive radionuclide and hybrid imaging systems has been extensively developed in recent years. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is based on the molecular tracer principle and is an established tool in noninvasive imaging. SPECT uses gamma cameras and collimators to form projection data that are used to estimate (dynamic) 3-D tracer distributions in vivo. Recent developments in multipinhole collimation and advanced image reconstruction have led to sub-millimetre and sub-half-millimetre resolution SPECT in rats and mice, respectively. In this article we review applications of microSPECT in cardiovascular research in which information about the function and pathology of the myocardium, vessels and neurons is obtained. We give examples on how diagnostic tracers, new therapeutic interventions, pre- and postcardiovascular event prognosis, and functional and pathophysiological heart conditions can be explored by microSPECT, using small-animal models of cardiovascular disease. (orig.)

  7. Quantitation of cerebral blood volume by 99mTc-DTPA-HSA SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Yusuke; Machida, Kikuo; Momose, Toshimitsu

    1992-01-01

    The characteristics of technetium-99m diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid human serum albumin ( 99m Tc-DTPA-HSA) as an agent for quantitation of cerebral blood volume (CBV) were examined. The radioactivity after decay correction as a percentage of the activity at 10 minutes was 84.3±1.3% at 120 minutes after the injection of 99m Tc-DTPA-HSA. Radioactivity was found exclusively in plasma, with little in blood cells. The blood retention of 99m Tc-DTPA-HSA is sufficient, and its use in the quantitation of CBV omits the need for centrifugation of the blood sample. CBV quantified using the tracer and a SPECT system with a single-head rotating gamma camera was 4.09±0.60 ml/100g brain, similar to values reported previously. Two serial SPECT scans provided similar images, and the CBV values determined by the two scans were closely correlated (p 99m Tc-DTPA-HSA has useful properties for quantitative CBV measurement and that quantitation of CBV by 99m Tc-DTPA-HSA SPECT is feasible using a system with a single-head rotating gamma camera. (author)

  8. Differential diagnosis of regional cerebral hyperfixation of TC-99m HMPAO on SPECT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirazi, P.; Konopka, L.; Crayton, J.W. [Loyola Univ. Medical Center, Maywood, IL (United States)] [and others

    1994-05-01

    Accurate diagnostic evaluation of patients with neurologic and neuropsychiatric disease is important because early treatment may halt disease progression and prevent impairment or disability. Cerebral hyperfixation of HMPAO has been ascribed to luxury perfusion following ischemic infarction. The present study sought to identify other conditions that also display radiotracer hyperfixation in order to develop a differential diagnosis of this finding on SPECT imaging. Two hundred fifty (n=250) successive cerebral SPECT images were reviewed for evidence of HMPAO hyperfixation. Hyperfixation was defined as enhanced focal perfusion surrounded by a zone of diminished or normal cerebral perfusion. All patients were scanned after intravenous injection of 25 mCi Tc-99m HMPAO. Volume-rendered and oblique images were obtained with a Trionix triple-head SPECT system using ultra high resolution fan beam collimators. Thirteen (13/250; 5%) of the patients exhibited regions of HMPAO hyperfixation. CT or MRI abnormalities were detected in 6/13 cases. Clinical diagnoses in these patients included intractable psychosis, post-traumatic stress disorder, alcohol and narcotic dependence, major depression, acute closed-head trauma, hypothyroidism, as well as subacute ischemic infarction. A wide variety of conditions may be associated with cerebral hyperfixation of HMPAO. These conditions include neurologic and psychiatric diagnoses, and extend the consideration of hyperfixation beyond ischemic infarction. Consequently, a differential diagnosis of HMPAO hyperfixation may be broader than originally considered, and this may suggest a fundamental role for local cerebral hyperperfusion. Elucidation of the fundamental mechanism(s) for cerebral hyperperfusion requires further investigation.

  9. Pinhole aperture point backlighter development experiments on Trident, 9-13, 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanier, N.E.; Murphy, Thomas J.

    2001-01-01

    Pinhole aperture point backlighter (PAPBL) imaging has been used on experiments on Omega, but results have been compromised by large backgrounds. This technique has advantages over traditional area backlighting/pinhole imaging, and the Omega experiments could benefit from this capability, but Omega time is expensive and not the place for developing diagnostic techniques if they can be developed on Trident instead. PAPBL, shot from Direct Drive Cylinder Mix experiments on Omega (DDCYLMIX 00-1, January 18 and 19, 2000). (See LA-UR-00-4187, Post-Shot Report, Direct Drive Cylinder Mix). In this campaign, they used Trident to obtain clean PAPBL images. Having accomplished that, they attempted to replicate the noise environment of Omega by producing hot electrons and having them impinge on material to produce high-energy x-rays similar to those that might be produced by hot electrons impinging on diagnostics or target positioner components on Omega. Backlighter target design was based, to some degree, on that shown by Bullock et al. at the 42nd Annual APS-DPP Meeting in Quebec City, Quebec, Canada, October 23-27, 2000. (A.B. Bullock et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 45,(7) 359 (2000); A.B. Bullock et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 72, 690 (2001).) We accomplished this to some degree and then attempted, with some success, to obtain a good PAPBL image in the presence of this noise. Results of this work suggest methods that might reduce the background noise in Omega PAPBL images. The goals are to obtain a pinhole aperture point backlighter (PAPBL) image on Trident and develop a method to simulate the high-energy background contribution to PAPBL imnages seen on Omega experients in order to allow future experiments to optimize signal-to-noise in PAPBL imaging.

  10. Robust Pinhole-free Li3N Solid Electrolyte Grown from Molten Lithium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanbin Li

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Lithium metal is the ultimate anode choice for high energy density rechargeable lithium batteries. However, it suffers from inferior electrochemical performance and safety issues due to its high reactivity and the growth of lithium dendrites. It has long been desired to develop a materials coating on Li metal, which is pinhole-free, mechanically robust without fracture during Li metal deposition and stripping, and chemically stable against Li metal and liquid electrolytes, all while maintaining adequate ionic conductivity. However, such an ideal material coating has yet to be found. Here we report a novel synthesis method by reacting clean molten lithium foil directly with pure nitrogen gas to generate instantaneously a pinhole-free and ionically conductive α-Li3N film directly bonded onto Li metal foil. The film consists of highly textured large Li3N grains (tens of μm with (001 crystalline planes parallel to the Li metal surface. The bonding between textured grains is strong, resulting in a mechanically robust film which does not crack even when bent to a 0.8 cm curvature radius and is found to maintain pinhole-free coverage during Li metal deposition and stripping. The measured ionic conductivity is up to 5.2 × 10–4 S cm–1, sufficient for maintaining regular current densities for controllable film thicknesses ranging from 2 to 30 μm. This Li3N coating is chemically stable, isolating the reactive metallic lithium from liquid electrolyte, prevents continuous electrolyte consumption during battery cycling, and promotes dendrite-free uniform lithium plating/stripping underneath. We demonstrated Li|Li4Ti5O12 cells with stable and flat potential profiles for 500 cycles without capacity decay or an increase in potential hysteresis.

  11. Imaging of dopamine transporters in rats using high-resolution pinhole single-photon emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booij, Jan; Bruin, Kora de; Habraken, Jan B.A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, F2N, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Voorn, Pieter [Department of Anatomy, Vrije Universiteit Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2002-09-01

    To date, the vast majority of investigations on the dopaminergic system in small animals have been in vitro studies. In comparison with in vitro studies, single-photon emission tomography (SPET) or positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of the dopaminergic system in small animals has the advantage of permitting repeated studies within the same group of animals. Dopamine transporter imaging is a valuable non-invasive tool with which to investigate the integrity of dopaminergic neurons. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of assessing dopamine transporter density semi-quantitatively in rats using a recently developed high-resolution pinhole SPET system. This system was built exclusively for imaging of small animals. In this unique single-pinhole system, the animal rotates instead of the collimated detector. The system has proven to have a high spatial resolution. We performed SPET imaging with [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT to quantify striatal dopamine transporters in rat brain. In all seven studied control rats, symmetrical striatal binding to dopamine transporters was seen 2 h after injection of the radiotracer, with striatal-to-cerebellar binding ratios of approximately 3.5. In addition, test/retest variability of the striatal-to-cerebellar binding ratios was studied and found to be 14.5%. Finally, in unilaterally 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats, striatal binding was only visible on the non-lesioned side. Quantitative analysis revealed that striatal-to-cerebellar SPET ratios were significantly lower on the lesioned (mean binding ratio 2.2{+-}0.2) than on the non-lesioned (mean ratio 3.1{+-}0.4) side. The preliminary results of this study indicate that semi-quantitative assessment of striatal dopamine transporter density using our recently developed high-resolution single-pinhole SPET system is feasible in living rat brain. (orig.)

  12. Design of common software for quality control of SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiaohua; Gao Ruzhen; Chen Shengzu

    1993-01-01

    The goal of this study is to design a common testing system for SPECT quality control according to NEMA standard. Using the system, the performances of different types of SPECT can be tested, so that the acceptance testing, performance comparing and routine quality control for SPECT can be normalized. The system was based on IBM PC series of microcomputer. Testing data are acquired from various types of SPECT, then transferred into IBM PC through interface and tested with an unique testing program. Two parts were included: interface and SPECT testing program. It emphatically studied the managing program of RS232 interface, designing skills and the mathematic patterns of SPECT testing program. The system which was composed of 11 subroutines can be used to measure the performances for both gamma camera and SPECT. The system was tested on OMEGA 500/MCS 560 SPECT and the results showed that it is effective, accurate and easy to use

  13. SPECT/CT workflow and imaging protocols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckers, Catherine [University Hospital of Liege, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Oncological Imaging, Department of Medical Physics, Liege (Belgium); Hustinx, Roland [University Hospital of Liege, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Oncological Imaging, Department of Medical Physics, Liege (Belgium); Domaine Universitaire du Sart Tilman, Service de Medecine Nucleaire et Imagerie Oncologique, CHU de Liege, Liege (Belgium)

    2014-05-15

    Introducing a hybrid imaging method such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT greatly alters the routine in the nuclear medicine department. It requires designing new workflow processes and the revision of original scheduling process and imaging protocols. In addition, the imaging protocol should be adapted for each individual patient, so that performing CT is fully justified and the CT procedure is fully tailored to address the clinical issue. Such refinements often occur before the procedure is started but may be required at some intermediate stage of the procedure. Furthermore, SPECT/CT leads in many instances to a new partnership with the radiology department. This article presents practical advice and highlights the key clinical elements which need to be considered to help understand the workflow process of SPECT/CT and optimise imaging protocols. The workflow process using SPECT/CT is complex in particular because of its bimodal character, the large spectrum of stakeholders, the multiplicity of their activities at various time points and the need for real-time decision-making. With help from analytical tools developed for quality assessment, the workflow process using SPECT/CT may be separated into related, but independent steps, each with its specific human and material resources to use as inputs or outputs. This helps identify factors that could contribute to failure in routine clinical practice. At each step of the process, practical aspects to optimise imaging procedure and protocols are developed. A decision-making algorithm for justifying each CT indication as well as the appropriateness of each CT protocol is the cornerstone of routine clinical practice using SPECT/CT. In conclusion, implementing hybrid SPECT/CT imaging requires new ways of working. It is highly rewarding from a clinical perspective, but it also proves to be a daily challenge in terms of management. (orig.)

  14. SPECT/CT workflow and imaging protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckers, Catherine; Hustinx, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Introducing a hybrid imaging method such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT greatly alters the routine in the nuclear medicine department. It requires designing new workflow processes and the revision of original scheduling process and imaging protocols. In addition, the imaging protocol should be adapted for each individual patient, so that performing CT is fully justified and the CT procedure is fully tailored to address the clinical issue. Such refinements often occur before the procedure is started but may be required at some intermediate stage of the procedure. Furthermore, SPECT/CT leads in many instances to a new partnership with the radiology department. This article presents practical advice and highlights the key clinical elements which need to be considered to help understand the workflow process of SPECT/CT and optimise imaging protocols. The workflow process using SPECT/CT is complex in particular because of its bimodal character, the large spectrum of stakeholders, the multiplicity of their activities at various time points and the need for real-time decision-making. With help from analytical tools developed for quality assessment, the workflow process using SPECT/CT may be separated into related, but independent steps, each with its specific human and material resources to use as inputs or outputs. This helps identify factors that could contribute to failure in routine clinical practice. At each step of the process, practical aspects to optimise imaging procedure and protocols are developed. A decision-making algorithm for justifying each CT indication as well as the appropriateness of each CT protocol is the cornerstone of routine clinical practice using SPECT/CT. In conclusion, implementing hybrid SPECT/CT imaging requires new ways of working. It is highly rewarding from a clinical perspective, but it also proves to be a daily challenge in terms of management. (orig.)

  15. Microlens Array/Pinhole Mask to Suppress Starlight for Direct Exoplanet Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Neil

    Direct imaging of habitable exoplanets is a key priority of NASA’s Astrophysics roadmap, “Enduring Quests, Daring Visions.” A coronagraphic starlight suppression system situated on a large space telescope offers a viable path to achieving this goal. This type of instrument is central to both the LUVOIR and HabEx mission concepts currently under study for the 2020 Decadal Survey. To directly image an Earth-like exoplanet, an instrument must be sensitive to objects ten billion times dimmer than their parent star. Advanced coronagraphs are designed to modify the shape of the star’s image so that it does not overwhelm the planet's light. Coronagraphs are complex to design and fabricate, tend to sacrifice a significant portion of the exoplanet light entering the telescope, and are highly sensitive to errors in the telescope. The proposed work reduces the demands on the coronagraph and its sensitivity to errors in the telescope, by changing how we implement optics in the spectrograph following the coronagraph. Through optical analysis and modeling, we have found that a microlens array with a specially arranged pattern of pinholes can suppress residual starlight in the scientific image after the coronagraph by more than two orders of magnitude. This added layer of starlight rejection could be used to relax the extreme observatory stability requirements for exo-Earth imaging applications, for example shifting the wavefront stability requirement from a few picometers to a few nanometers. Ultimately this translates to the instrument detecting and spectrally characterizing more exoplanets than a conventional coronagraph system. This microlens/pinhole concept is also compatible with starshadebased starlight suppression systems. The proposed microlens/pinhole device is entirely passive and augments the performance of existing coronagraph designs, while potentially reducing their cost and risk for mission implementation. Our APRA proposal would support a testbed

  16. Differential diagnosis of trampoline fracture from osteomyelitis by bone scan with pinhole collimator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthé, Mathieu; Mestas, Danielle; Canavese, Federico; Samba, Antoine; Cachin, Florent

    2014-02-01

    A 2-year-old girl with recent history of trampoline fall presented to the A&E Department for complete functional impairment of the left lower extremity and fever. Blood examination revealed an inflammatory syndrome, while plain radiographs were normal. As magnetic resonance imaging was unavailable, a bone scintigraphy was performed. While standard acquisition found an intense uptake focused on the left proximal tibial metaphysis whose appearance was suggestive of acute hematogenous osteomyelitis, complementary acquisition with the pinhole collimator demonstrated that this abnormal uptake was clearly distinct from the cartilage growth plate. One month follow-up radiographs showed a fracture that confirmed the diagnosis of trampoline fracture.

  17. Preoperative 4D CT Localization of Nonlocalizing Parathyroid Adenomas by Ultrasound and SPECT-CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinson, Andrew M; Lee, David R; Hobbs, Bradley A; Fitzgerald, Ryan T; Bodenner, Donald L; Stack, Brendan C

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate 4-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) for the localization of parathyroid adenomas previously considered nonlocalizing on ultrasound and single-photon emission CT with CT scanning (SPECT-CT). To measure radiation exposure associated with 4D-CT and compared it with SPECT-CT. Case series with chart review. University tertiary hospital. Nineteen adults with primary hyperparathyroidism who underwent preoperative 4D CT from November 2013 through July 2014 after nonlocalizing preoperative ultrasound and technetium-99m SPECT-CT scans. Sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, and accuracy of 4D CT were evaluated. Nineteen patients (16 women and 3 men) were included with a mean age of 66 years (range, 39-80 years). Mean preoperative parathyroid hormone level was 108.5 pg/mL (range, 59.3-220.9 pg/mL), and mean weight of the excised gland was 350 mg (range, 83-797 mg). 4D CT sensitivity and specificity for localization to the patient's correct side of the neck were 84.2% and 81.8%, respectively; accuracy was 82.9%. The sensitivity for localizing adenomas to the correct quadrant was 76.5% and 91.5%, respectively; accuracy was 88.2%. 4D CT radiation exposure was significantly less than the radiation associated with SPECT-CT (13.8 vs 18.4 mSv, P = 0.04). 4D CT localizes parathyroid adenomas with relatively high sensitivity and specificity and allows for the localization of some adenomas not observed on other sestamibi-based scans. 4D CT was also associated with less radiation exposure when compared with SPECT-CT based on our study protocol. 4D CT may be considered as first- or second-line imaging for localizing parathyroid adenomas in the setting of primary hyperparathyroidism. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  18. Dosimetry estimation of SPECT/CT for iodine 123-labeled metaiodobenzylguanidine in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida Mhiri

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the additional radiation exposure in terms of effective dose incurred by patients in the CT (computed tomography portion of 123I-MIBG (123II-metaiodobenzylguanidine study with SPECT/CT (Single photon emission computed tomography associated to computed tomography in some pediatric patients of our department. Methods: Data from 123II-MIBG scans comprising 50 children were presented in this study. The contribution of total effective dose imparted by the nuclear tracer and patient's age was calculated. Effective dose from the CT portion of the examination is also estimated.SPECT acquisitions were performed with a dual-headed SPECT unit with an integrated 2-slice CT scanner (Symbia T E-Cam, Siemens Medical Systems, Erlangen, Germany. The CT acquisition were performed using a tube current modulation system (Care Dose 4D. Parameters used were: tube current of 30 - 60 mAs, slice thickness of 3-5 mm, and tube voltage of 110 kV. Results: Our results show that SPECT dosimetry depends on administered activity and patient’s age and weight. For CT scan, effective dose is affected by tube current (mA, tube potential (kVp, rotation speed, pitch, slice thickness, patient mass, and the exact volume of the patient that is being imaged. Conclusion: For children, 123II-MIBG study with SPECT/CT should be performed using the lowest available voltage and current. A sensible choice of these two parameters used can significantly reduce radiation dose, without any compromise in the quality of the diagnostic information.

  19. Potential pitfalls of steatopygia on bone imaging using Tc99m MDP and role of SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elgazzar, H; Elsaid, M; Omar, A; Al-Maskery, IB

    2004-01-01

    Body habbitus influence the quality of bone scintigraphy. Steatopygia (steato: fat, pygia: buttocks) may affect the quality of bone scan since it may lead to diagnostic pitfalls. Objective: The objective of this prospective study is to evaluate the effects of steatopygia on the appearance of the lumbar spine on bone scan and the role of SPECT in overcoming fat attenuation artifact if present. Method: Bone scintigraphy, including whole body bone scan, spot views and SPECT of the lumber spine, using a dual head gamma camera, were performed on thirty adult obese patients (13 males, 17 females) with an average weight of 90 kg. referred to the department for routine bone scan. Each patient was injected intravenously with 0.25 mCi/kg (9.25 Mbq of Tc-99m MDP, and their weight and height of each patient were recorded. Whole body scan was performed using 256 X 1024 matrix size and 8 min/meter speed. SPECT was performed using 128 X 128 matrix size, 20 second-32 projections and elliptical orbit around the lumbar spine. Spot views were acquired using 256X256 matrix size for 1000 Kcounts. Results: Twenty patients (67%) (6 males, 14 females) showed steatopygia with attenuation at the lower lumber vertebrae. Diminished uptake in the lower lumbar spine and edge effect artifacts were noted on planar images mimicking abnormalities. SPECT, especially in the sagittal axis, resolved these artifacts. Conclusion: Steatopygia should be considered in the interpretation of bone scans of obese patients to avoid diagnostic pitfalls. Adding SPECT of the lumber spine to the planar imaging improves the diagnostic accuracy in obese patients by overcoming the steatopygia effect seen on whole body and spot planar images. (authors)

  20. Indeterminate lesions on planar bone scintigraphy in lung cancer patients: SPECT, CT or SPECT-CT?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Punit; Kumar, Rakesh; Singh, Harmandeep; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Malhotra, Arun; Julka, Pramod Kumar; Thulkar, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to compare the role of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), computed tomography (CT) and SPECT-CT of selected volume in lung cancer patients with indeterminate lesions on planar bone scintigraphy (BS). The data of 50 lung cancer patients (53 ± 10.3 years; range 30-75; male/female 38/12) with 65 indeterminate lesions on planar BS (January 2010 to November 2010) were retrospectively evaluated. All of them underwent SPECT-CT of a selected volume. SPECT, CT and SPECT-CT images were independently evaluated by two experienced readers (experience in musculoskeletal imaging, including CT: 5 and 7 years) in separate sessions. A scoring scale of 1 to 5 was used, in which 1 is definitely metastatic, 2 is probably metastatic, 3 is indeterminate, 4 is probably benign and 5 is definitely benign. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated for each modality, taking a score ≤2 as metastatic. With receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, areas under the curve (AUC) were calculated for each modality and compared. Clinical and imaging follow-up and/or histopathology were taken as reference standard. For both readers SPECT was inferior to CT (P = 0.004, P = 0.022) and SPECT-CT (P = 0.003, P = 0.037). However, no significant difference was found between CT and SPECT-CT for reader 1 (P = 0.847) and reader 2 (P = 0.592). The findings were similar for lytic as well as sclerotic lesions. Moderate inter-observer agreement was seen for SPECT images (κ = 0.426), while almost perfect agreement was seen for CT (κ = 0.834) and SPECT-CT (κ = 0.971). CT alone and SPECT-CT are better than SPECT for accurate characterisation of indeterminate lesions on planar BS in lung cancer patients. CT alone is not inferior to SPECT-CT for this purpose and might be preferred because of shorter acquisition time and wider availability. (orig.)

  1. Advantage of fan beam collimators for contrast recovery of hyperfixation in clinical SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vera, P.

    1997-01-01

    The influence of the collimator on the contrast recovery of hyperfixation was studied using a dual-headed single photon emission computer tomography (SPECT) system with standard clinical acquisition parameters. Three parallel collimator sets and two fan beam collimator sets were tested with a Jaszczak phantom. The six spheres of the phantom were filled with 99m Tc, and four background levels were progressively obtained by adding radioactivity to the cylinder of the phantom, providing four hyperfixation levels. The effects of angular sampling and reconstruction filters have been tested. The statistical analysis was performed with analysis of variance (ANOVA). This study demonstrates the advantage of ultra-high resolution fan beam collimators for contrast recovery of hyperfixation with SPECT when using 64 projections over 360 degree, in particular when the contrast is low. The authors also demonstrate that fan beam collimators permit smaller size hyperfixation detection

  2. Programmable electronics for low-cost small animal PET/SPECT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerra, Pedro; Rubio, Jose L.; Kontaxakis, Georgios; Ortuno, Juan E.; Ledesma, Maria J.; Santos, Andres

    2006-01-01

    This work describes and characterizes the detector module of a novel positron/single photon emission (PET/SPECT) scanner for small animals. This detector consists of a YAP/LSO phoswich, a photomultiplier and acquisition front-end, and will be used as building block of a low-cost hybrid tomograph. The front-end processes data sampled at a fixed frequency, where a state-of-the-art programmable device estimates scintillation pulse parameters by means of digital algorithms. Finally, the estimated properties of the proposed detector module are used to model a rotating four-head scanner. The performance of the proposed PET/SPECT scanner is estimated and first results are promising in both modalities, deserving further research and optimization

  3. Clinical applications of SPECT/CT: advantages and limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigo, P.

    2006-01-01

    The application of hybrid SPECT cameras in Nuclear Medicine follows the revolutionary introduction of PET/CT. This review focuses on the advantages and limitations of SPECT/CT in its various clinical indications. It appears that SPECT/CT will be a clear factor of progress for Nuclear Medicine. (author)

  4. SPECT in patients with cortical visual loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, I E; Galetta, S L; Gray, L G; Moster, M; Atlas, S W; Maurer, A H; Alavi, A

    1993-09-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with 99mTc-hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (HMPAO) was used to investigate changes in cerebral blood flow in seven patients with cortical visual impairment. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) was the cause of cortical damage in two patients, cerebral ischemia in two patients and carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning, status epilepticus and Alzheimer's Disease (AD) each in three separate patients. The SPECT scans of the seven patients were compared to T2-weighted magnetic resonance image (MRI) scans of the brain to determine the correlation between functional and anatomical findings. In six of the seven patients, the qualitative interpretation of the SPECT studies supported the clinical findings (i.e., the visual field defect) by revealing altered regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in the appropriate regions of the visual pathway. MR scans in all of the patients, on the other hand, were either normal or disclosed smaller lesions than those detected by SPECT. We conclude that SPECT may reveal altered rCBF in patients with cortical visual impairment of various etiologies, even when MRI studies are normal or nondiagnostic.

  5. Noninvasive evaluation of ischemic stroke with SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, C.R.; Malik, M.M.; Gomez, S.M.; Wingkun, E.C.

    1988-01-01

    Technetium Tc 99m DTPA single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) brain scans of 20 patients with acute ischemic stroke were reviewed retrospectively and compared with clinical and radiologic (CT) data. Fourteen of the patients had abnormal SPECT studies. The abnormal findings were demonstrated by static views in eight patients, by the flow study in one patient, and by both sets of images in the other five patients. All abnormalities correlated with the clinical syndrome of presentation, and only two of the patients had no corresponding lesions on CT. Of the six patients with normal SPECT scans, two had abnormal CT studies, and in the other four, no lesions were shown at all. The ability of /sup 99m/Tc DTPA SPECT to display cerebral infarctions appears to be, at best, comparable to that of CT. SPECT also provides qualitative information regarding flow dynamics in the affected hemisphere of some patients (6/20 in our review). This, we believe, represents the objective demonstration of the preexisting insufficient collateral flow in the hemisphere at risk for ischemic stroke

  6. 111In-cetuximab-F(ab')2 SPECT imaging for quantification of accessible epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) in HNSCC xenografts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, L.K. van; Hoeben, B.A.W.; Stegeman, H.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Franssen, G.M.; Boerman, O.C.; Bussink, J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Immunohistochemical epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression does not correlate with treatment response in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). Aim was to apply the tracer (111)In-cetuximab-F(ab')2 for EGFR microSPECT imaging and to investigate if tracer

  7. Degradation sources of CdTe thin film PV: CdCl{sub 2} residue and shunting pinholes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorji, Nima E. [University of Bologna, Department of Electrical, Electronics and Information Engineering, Bologna (Italy)

    2014-09-15

    The present work considers two observable phenomena through the experimental fabrication and electrical characterization of the rf-sputtered CdS/CdTe thin film solar cells that extremely reduce the overall conversion efficiency of the device: CdCl{sub 2} residue on the surface of the semiconductor and shunting pinholes. The former happens through nonuniform treatment of the As-deposited solar cells before annealing at high temperature and the latter occurs by shunting pinholes when the cell surface is shunted by defects, wire-like pathways or scratches on the metallic back contact caused from the external contacts. Such physical problems may be quite common in the experimental activities and reduce the performance down to 4-5 % which leads to dismantle the device despite its precise fabrication. We present our electrical characterization on the samples that received wet CdCl{sub 2} surface treatment (uniform or nonuniform) and are damaged by the pinholes. (orig.)

  8. Dopamine transporter imaging with [I-123]IPT SPECT in normal controls and Parkinson's patients: Feasibility study of a simplified SPECT scan protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H. J.; Bong, J. K.; Nam, K. P.; Yang, S. O.; Moon, D. H.; Ryu, J. S.; Lee, H. K.

    1997-01-01

    [I-123]IPT has been used to measure changes in dopamine trasnporters with Parkinson's patients (PP). However, 2 hrs of imaging time without movement of patient's head partially limits its widespread use in routine clinical SPECT protocol. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of a simplified IPT SPECT scan protocol using three 10 min scan data obtained at 0-10, 55-65, and 110-120 min postinjection and compared to current protocol using 23 scans obtained from O-120 min to quantify dopamine transporter binding in normal controls (NC) and PP. IPT labeled with 6.74±0.88mCi of I-123 was intravenously injected into 12 NC (age: 41±9) and 22 PP (age : 55±8) and the 5 min dynamic SPECT data were acquired for 2 hrs with Trionix triple-headed SPECT camera. SPECT images were reconstructed and attenuation corrected. [I-123] IPT quickly penetratd the blood-brain barrier and began to Ioacalize higher concentrations at the basal ganglia at 20 min after injection. The transporter parameter was measured using a variation of graphical analysis (VGA) and area ratio method (ARM) that derive the distribution volume ratios (R v =V 3 /V 2 for VGA, R A =V 3 /V 2 for ARM ) from multiple scan data without blood data, R v ' and R A ' measured from three 10 min scan data and compared with R v and R A measured from 23 scans for both NC and PP, (R v ', R v ') or NC and PP were (1.83±0.29, 2.21±0.34) and (0.63±0.34, 0.77±0.31), respectively. (R v ', R A ) for NC and PP were (1.11±0.22, 1.62±0.28) and (0.43±0.21, 0.65±0.24), respectively, Both (R v ', R v ) and (R A ', R A ) for NC were clearly separated from those for PP. R' v and R' A underestimated R v and R A by 18.4% and 33.5%, respectively, but R v ' and R A ' showed excellent correlations with R v (r=0.95) and R A (r=0.97), respectively. The results indicate that the three 10 min scan protocol may be feasible and allows us to differentiate dopamine transporter parameters in PP from those in NC

  9. Quantitative organ visualization using SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kircos, L.T.; Carey, J.E. Jr.; Keyes, J.W. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Quantitative organ visualization (QOV) was performed using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Organ size was calculated from serial, contiguous ECT images taken through the organ of interest with image boundaries determined using a maximum directional gradient edge finding technique. Organ activity was calculated using ECT counts bounded by the directional gradient, imaging system efficiency, and imaging time. The technique used to perform QOV was evaluated using phantom studies, in vivo canine liver, spleen, bladder, and kidney studies, and in vivo human bladder studies. It was demonstrated that absolute organ activity and organ size could be determined with this system and total imaging time restricted to less than 45 min to an accuracy of about +/- 10% providing the minimum dimensions of the organ are greater than the FWHM of the imaging system and the total radioactivity within the organ of interest exceeds 15 nCi/cc for dog-sized torsos. In addition, effective half-lives of approximately 1.5 hr or greater could be determined

  10. Contrast detail phantom for SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabrejas, M.L. de; Arashiro, J G; Giannone, C. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Camuyrano, M; Nohara, G [Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Facultad Ciencias Exactas

    1996-06-01

    A new low variable contrast phantom for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was constructed, tested and compared with other existing phantoms. It contains simulated cylindrical lesions of four different diameters (D{sub i}), embedded in a cylindrical scattering medium and a uniform section to evaluate tomographic uniformity. The concentration of tracer in the simulated lesions and the scattering medium (background) can be varied to simulate hot and cold lesions. Different applications of the phantom were tested, including determination of the minimum object contrast (OCm) necessary to detect lesions as a function of lesion size, lesion type (hot or cold) and acquisition and processing protocols by visual inspection. This parameter allows categorization of instruments comparing an `image quality index` (IQI). Preliminary comparison with the Britten contrast processing method showed that the detectable OCm was of the same order of magnitude, but the presented device seems more suitable for training and intercomparison purposes. The constructed phantom, of simple design, has proved to be useful for acquisition and processing condition evaluation, OCm estimation and external quality control. (author). 11 refs, 4 figs.

  11. A study of the decoding of multiple pinhole coded aperture RI tomographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Takeo; Kobayashi, Akitoshi; Nishiyama, Yutaka; Akagi, Kiyoshi; Uehata, Hiroshi

    1981-01-01

    In order to obtain a radioisotope (RI) tomographic image, there are various, methods, including the RCT method, Time Modulate method, and Multiple Pinhole Coded Aperture (MPCA) method and others. The MPCA method has several advantages. Using the MPCA method, there is no need to move either the detector or the patient, Furthermore, the generally used γ-camera may be used without any alterations. Due to certain problems in reconstructing the tomographic image, the use of the MPCA method in clinical practice is limited to representation of small organs (e.g. heart) using the 7-Pinhole collimator. This research presents an experimental approach to overcome the problems in reconstruction of tomographic images of large organs (organs other than the heart, such as the brain, liver, lung etc.) by introducing a reconstruction algorithm and correction software into the MPCA method. There are 2 main problems in MPCA image reconstruction: (1) Due to the rounding-off procedure, there is both point omission and shifting of point coordinates. (2) The central portion is characterized by high-counts. Both of these problems were solved by incorporating a reconstruction algorithm and a correction function. The resultant corrected tomographic image was processed using a filter derived from subjecting a PSF to a Fourier transform. Thus, it has become possible to obtain a high-quality tomographic image of large organs for clinical use. (author)

  12. Air-supplied pinhole discharge in aqueous solution for the inactivation of Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suganuma, Ryota; Yasuoka, Koichi

    2018-04-01

    An air-supplied pinhole discharge in aqueous solution has been developed to provide a short-lived and odorless bactericide to replace current conventional disinfectants such as O3, ClO-, HClO, and ClO2. The pinhole discharge that was initiated inside a water bubble generated hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and nitrous acid (HNO2) simultaneously. The concentrations of H2O2, HNO2, and HNO3 were 16.3, 13.9, and 17.4 mg/L, respectively when flow rates of NaCl solution and air were 72 and 12.5 mL/min, respectively. The pH value of the solution was 3.87, and HO2 radicals were generated from the reaction of H2O2 with HNO2. The efficacy of sterilization of discharge-treated water was evaluated by changing the acetic solutions. A 4-orders-of-magnitude decrease in Escherichia coli survival rate was observed after treatment with a sodium citrate solution of pH 3.2 for 60 s.

  13. Evaluation of commercial nickel-phosphorus coating for ultracold neutron guides using a pinhole bottling method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattie, R. W.; Adamek, E. R.; Brenner, T.; Brandt, A.; Broussard, L. J.; Callahan, N. B.; Clayton, S. M.; Cude-Woods, C.; Currie, S. A.; Geltenbort, P.; Ito, T. M.; Lauer, T.; Liu, C. Y.; Majewski, J.; Makela, M.; Masuda, Y.; Morris, C. L.; Ramsey, J. C.; Salvat, D. J.; Saunders, A.; Schroffenegger, J.; Tang, Z.; Wei, W.; Wang, Z.; Watkins, E.; Young, A. R.; Zeck, B. A.

    2017-11-01

    We report on the evaluation of commercial electroless nickel phosphorus (NiP) coatings for ultracold neutron (UCN) transport and storage. The material potential of 50 μm thick NiP coatings on stainless steel and aluminum substrates was measured to be VF = 213(5 . 2) neV using the time-of-flight spectrometer ASTERIX at the Lujan Center. The loss per bounce probability was measured in pinhole bottling experiments carried out at ultracold neutron sources at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center and the Institut Laue-Langevin. For these tests a new guide coupling design was used to minimize gaps between the guide sections. The observed UCN loss in the bottle was interpreted in terms of an energy independent effective loss per bounce, which is the appropriate model when gaps in the system and upscattering are the dominate loss mechanisms, yielding a loss per bounce of 1 . 3(1) × 10-4. We also present a detailed discussion of the pinhole bottling methodology and an energy dependent analysis of the experimental results.

  14. Accelerated median root prior reconstruction for pinhole single-photon emission tomography (SPET)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohlberg, Antti [Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Kuopio University Hospital, PO Box 1777 FIN-70211, Kuopio (Finland); Ruotsalainen, Ulla [Institute of Signal Processing, DMI, Tampere University of Technology, PO Box 553 FIN-33101, Tampere (Finland); Watabe, Hiroshi [National Cardiovascular Center Research Institute, 5-7-1 Fujisihro-dai, Suita City, Osaka 565-8565 (Japan); Iida, Hidehiro [National Cardiovascular Center Research Institute, 5-7-1 Fujisihro-dai, Suita City, Osaka 565-8565 (Japan); Kuikka, Jyrki T [Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Kuopio University Hospital, PO Box 1777 FIN-70211, Kuopio (Finland)

    2003-07-07

    Pinhole collimation can be used to improve spatial resolution in SPET. However, the resolution improvement is achieved at the cost of reduced sensitivity, which leads to projection images with poor statistics. Images reconstructed from these projections using the maximum likelihood expectation maximization (ML-EM) algorithms, which have been used to reduce the artefacts generated by the filtered backprojection (FBP) based reconstruction, suffer from noise/bias trade-off: noise contaminates the images at high iteration numbers, whereas early abortion of the algorithm produces images that are excessively smooth and biased towards the initial estimate of the algorithm. To limit the noise accumulation we propose the use of the pinhole median root prior (PH-MRP) reconstruction algorithm. MRP is a Bayesian reconstruction method that has already been used in PET imaging and shown to possess good noise reduction and edge preservation properties. In this study the PH-MRP algorithm was accelerated with the ordered subsets (OS) procedure and compared to the FBP, OS-EM and conventional Bayesian reconstruction methods in terms of noise reduction, quantitative accuracy, edge preservation and visual quality. The results showed that the accelerated PH-MRP algorithm was very robust. It provided visually pleasing images with lower noise level than the FBP or OS-EM and with smaller bias and sharper edges than the conventional Bayesian methods.

  15. How risky are pinholes in gloves? A rational appeal for the integrity of gloves for isolators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessler, Angela; Stärk, Alexandra; Sigwarth, Volker; Moirandat, Claude

    2011-01-01

    Isolators provide a high degree of protection for the product and/or the environment and operators in pharmaceutical production, as well as for analytical and sterility testing. Gloves allow for performing testing and for easy access to the process. Due to their nature-thin plastic, highly flexible-and their risk of puncture or rupture, they are regarded as one of the main potential sources of contamination. Glove integrity testing is therefore a main issue and has been addressed by many regulations such as those imposed by the USP, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and Pharmaceutical Inspection Convention. This paper presents a short overview of different glove integrity test procedures and their ability to detect leaking gloves. Additionally, extensive microbiological tests have been performed to give more evidence and cross-correlation to physical testing. Most of the physical tests have limitations either in detecting pinholes and/or they are difficult to implement for routine testing. Microbiological tests are only applicable for evaluation and validation purposes, but not for routine testing, because they are time-consuming and do not allow immediate action. Routine visual verification of gloves by trained personnel turns out to be a very reliable technique. Additional microbiological tests supported by microbiological environmental monitoring helped to develop a new concept presented here on how to handle gloves with pinholes. It is proposed not to automatically consider a pinhole in a glove as a breach in isolator integrity, but to consider any action in view of controlling and monitoring the effective bioload on the outside of the gloves. With the combination of semi-automatic physical testing with independent protocol, visual inspection, and control of bioload through microbiological environmental monitoring potential contamination, risks can be minimized and maximum safety maintained. Isolators are enclosure designs to protect critical handling and

  16. SPECT I-123 iodoamphetamine brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tikofsky, R.S.; Liebman, A.; Hellman, R.S.; Collier, B.D.; Voslar, A.M.

    1988-01-01

    SPECT/IMP studies of 100 patients with a presumptive diagnosis of dementia were performed with a rotating gamma camera 15-20 minutes after intravenous injection of 3.5 mCi of IMP. Of these studies, 43 were interpreted as normal for age; 28 demonstrated decreased but not absent activity bilaterally in posterior parietal/occipital regions (consistent with Alzheimer-type dementia); 28 showed unilateral abnormalities in regional cerebral blood flow consistent with cerebrovascular disease; and one had mixed findings. Based on SPECT/IMP results, further diagnostic testing and/or management would be altered for 72% of patients, suggesting that SPECT/IMP provides valuable data, not available on clinical examination, to guide the evaluation and management of demented patients

  17. Stereotactic radiosurgery planning with ictal SPECT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackerly, T.; RMIT University, Bundoora, VIC; Geso, M.; O'Keefe, G.; Smith, R.

    2004-01-01

    This paper is motivated by a clinical requirement to utilise ictal SPECT images for target localisation in stereotactic radiosurgery treatment planning using the xknife system which only supports CT and MRI images. To achieve this, the SPECT images were converted from raw (pixel data only) format into a part 10 compliant DICOM CT fileset. The minimum requirements for the recasting of a raw format image as DICOM CT or MRI data set are described in detail. The method can be applied to the importation of raw format images into any radiotherapy treatment planning system that supports CT or MRI import. It is demonstrated that the combination of the low spatial resolution SPECT images, depicting functional information, with high spatial resolution MRI images, which show the structural information, is suitable for stereotactic radiosurgery treatment planning. Copyright (2004) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  18. Formation of nano-sized pinholes array in thin Ni film on MgO(100) substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin Chuan; Naramoto, Hiroshi; Xu Yonghua; Kitazawa, Sin-iti; Narumi, Kazumasa; Sakai, Seiji

    2003-10-22

    We have grown thin Ni films with various thicknesses on polished MgO(100) single crystal substrates in an e-gun evaporation system. The morphology of the as-deposited films was characterized with atomic force microscopy. Pinholes with average diameter of 5-10 nm are found in the film with thickness from 1 to 15 nm, and pinholes array was observed in the film 10 nm thick. The origin of such structure formation is discussed in terms of the elastic strain energy.

  19. Note: Diagnosing femtosecond laser-solid interactions with monochromatic Kα imager and x-ray pinhole camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, X. X.; Li, Y. T.; Liu, F.; Du, F.; Wang, S. J.; Chen, L. M.; Zhang, L.; Zheng, Y.; Liu, X.; Liu, X. L.; Wang, Z. H.; Ma, J. L.; Wei, Z. Y.; Liu, B. C.; Zhang, J.

    2011-01-01

    An x-ray pinhole camera and a monochromatic K α imager are used to measure the interactions of intense femtosecond laser pulses with Cu foil targets. The two diagnostics give different features in the spot size and the laser energy scaling, which are resulted from different physical processes. Under our experimental conditons, the K α emission is mainly excited by the fast electrons transporting inside the cold bulk target. In contrast, the x-ray pinhole signals are dominated by the broadband thermal x-ray emission from the hot plasma at the front target surface.

  20. Estimation of the total effective dose from low-dose CT scans and radiopharmaceutical administrations delivered to patients undergoing SPECT/CT explorations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montes, C.; Hernandez, J.; Gomez-Caminero, F.; Garcia, S.; Martin, C.; Rosero, A.; Tamayo, P.

    2013-01-01

    Hybrid imaging, such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT, is used in routine clinical practice, allowing coregistered images of the functional and structural information provided by the two imaging modalities. However, this multimodality imaging may mean that patients are exposed to a higher radiation dose than those receiving SPECT alone. The study aimed to determine the radiation exposure of patients who had undergone SPECT/CT examinations and to relate this to the Background Equivalent Radiation Time (BERT). 145 SPECT/CT studies were used to estimate the total effective dose to patients due to both radiopharmaceutical administrations and low-dose CT scans. The CT contribution was estimated by the Dose-Length Product method. Specific conversion coefficients were calculated for SPECT explorations. The radiation dose from low-dose CTs ranged between 0.6 mSv for head and neck CT and 2.6 mSv for whole body CT scan, representing a maximum of 1 year of background radiation exposure. These values represent a decrease of 80-85% with respect to the radiation dose from diagnostic CT. The radiation exposure from radiopharmaceutical administration varied from 2.1 mSv for stress myocardial perfusion SPECT to 26 mSv for gallium SPECT in patients with lymphoma. The BERT ranged from 1 to 11 years. The contribution of low-dose CT scans to the total radiation dose to patients undergoing SPECT/CT examinations is relatively low compared with the effective dose from radiopharmaceutical administration. When a CT scan is only acquired for anatomical localization and attenuation correction, low-dose CT scan is justified on the basis of its lower dose. (author)

  1. Electric Field Reconstruction in the Image Plane of a High-Contrast Coronagraph Using a Set of Pinholes Around the Lyot Plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giveon, Amir; Kern, Brian; Shaklan, Stuart; Wallace, Kent; Noecker, Charley

    2012-01-01

    The pair-wise estimation has been used now on various testbeds with different coronagraphs with the best contrast results to date. Pinholes estimate has been implemented and ready to be tested in closed loop correction. Pinholes estimate offers an independent method. We hope to improve the calibration process to gain better estimates.

  2. SPECT and PET imaging in epilepsia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landvogt, C.

    2007-01-01

    In preoperative localisation of epileptogenic foci, nuclear medicine diagnostics plays a crucial role. FDG-PET is used as first line diagnostics. In case of inconsistent MRI, EEG and FDG-PET findings, 11 C-Flumazenil-PET or ictal and interictal perfusion-SPECT should be performed. Other than FDG, Flumazenil can help to identify the extend of the region, which should be resected. To enhance sensitivity and specificity, further data analysis using voxelbased statistical analyses or SISCOM (substraction ictal SPECT coregistered MRI) should be performed

  3. Scatter and attenuation correction in SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljungberg, Michael

    2004-01-01

    The adsorbed dose is related to the activity uptake in the organ and its temporal distribution. Measured count rate with scintillation cameras is related to activity through the system sensitivity, cps/MBq. By accounting for physical processes and imaging limitations we can measure the activity at different time points. Correction for physical factor, such as attenuation and scatter is required for accurate quantitation. Both planar and SPECT imaging can be used to estimate activities for radiopharmaceutical dosimetry. Planar methods have been the most widely used but is a 2D technique. With accurate modelling for imagine in iterative reconstruction, SPECT methods will prove to be more accurate

  4. Motor activation SPECT for the neurosurgical diseases. Clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi; Kawaguchi, Shoichiro; Sakaki, Toshisuke; Imai, Teruhiko; Ohishi, Hajime

    1999-01-01

    We evaluated and analyzed the motor activation single photon emission computed tomography (M-SPECT) findings on patients with ischemic cerebrovascular diseases (CVD). The M-SPECT studies were carried out on 91 patients with ischemic cerebrovascular diseases. The M-SPECT study was performed using the finger opposition task in each case. The SPECT images were superimposed on the magnetic resonance images (MRIs) for each case using Image Fusion Software. The result of the M-SPECT was expressed as positive or negative. The cases with a marked increase of blood flow in the sensorio-motor cortex after the finger opposition task were categorized as positive, and those cases showing no marked increase of blood flow were categorized as negative. Among the 91 cases examined, 53 (58%) were categorized as positive in the M-SPECT study. Among the negative M-SPECT cases treated with revascularization surgery, there were some cases showing positive M-SPECT results postoperatively. The cases without any revascularization surgery did not change the M-SPECT findings in each during the follow-up period. The M-SPECT procedure for examining intracranial lesions could provide the cortical localization of the motor function. The M-SPECT procedure in the ischemic CVDs contributes to knowledge about the choices of treatment and the evaluation of the treatment result. (author)

  5. Motor activation SPECT for the neurosurgical diseases. Clinical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi; Kawaguchi, Shoichiro; Sakaki, Toshisuke; Imai, Teruhiko; Ohishi, Hajime [Nara Medical Univ., Kashihara (Japan)

    1999-08-01

    We evaluated and analyzed the motor activation single photon emission computed tomography (M-SPECT) findings on patients with ischemic cerebrovascular diseases (CVD). The M-SPECT studies were carried out on 91 patients with ischemic cerebrovascular diseases. The M-SPECT study was performed using the finger opposition task in each case. The SPECT images were superimposed on the magnetic resonance images (MRIs) for each case using Image Fusion Software. The result of the M-SPECT was expressed as positive or negative. The cases with a marked increase of blood flow in the sensorio-motor cortex after the finger opposition task were categorized as positive, and those cases showing no marked increase of blood flow were categorized as negative. Among the 91 cases examined, 53 (58%) were categorized as positive in the M-SPECT study. Among the negative M-SPECT cases treated with revascularization surgery, there were some cases showing positive M-SPECT results postoperatively. The cases without any revascularization surgery did not change the M-SPECT findings in each during the follow-up period. The M-SPECT procedure for examining intracranial lesions could provide the cortical localization of the motor function. The M-SPECT procedure in the ischemic CVDs contributes to knowledge about the choices of treatment and the evaluation of the treatment result. (author)

  6. Advances in SPECT Instrumentation (Including Small Animal Scanners). Chapter 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Domenico, G.; Zavattini, G.

    2009-01-01

    Fundamental major efforts have been devoted to the development of positron emission tomography (PET) imaging modality over the last few decades. Recently, a novel surge of interest in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) technology has occurred, particularly after the introduction of the hybrid SPECT-CT imaging system. This has led to a flourishing of investigations in new types of detectors and collimators, and to more accurate refinement of reconstruction algorithms. Along with SPECT-CT, new, fast gamma cameras have been developed for dedicated cardiac imaging. The existing gap between PET and SPECT in sensitivity and spatial resolution is progressively decreasing, and this trend is particularly apparent in the field of small animal imaging where the most important advances have been reported in SPECT tomographs. An outline of the basic features of SPECT technology, and of recent developments in SPECT instrumentation for both clinical applications and basic biological research on animal models is described. (author)

  7. Evaluation of usefulness of bone SPECT for lumbar spondylolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Osamu; Hashimoto, Manabu; Tomura, Noriaki; Watarai, Jiro

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of 99m Tc-MDP SPECT (bone SPECT) for lumbar spondylolysis. We analyzed 11 cases with 17 lesions. All cases were compared using plain radiography, computed tomography (CT), planar bone scintigraphy (PBS), and bone SPECT. Four lesions that showed a wide defect on CT were negative on bone SPECT and may have been chronic lesions. Thirteen lesions that were positive on bone SPECT were narrow or showed no defect on CT and may have been early lesions. Two cases showed no defect on CT but were positive on bone SPECT, and one of them progressed to bilateral spondylolysis after one year. This may have been a very early lesion. Thus bone SPECT is useful for the diagnosis of lumbar spondylolysis, especially in its early stage. (author)

  8. Evaluation of usefulness of bone SPECT for lumbar spondylolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Osamu; Hashimoto, Manabu; Tomura, Noriaki; Watarai, Jiro [Akita Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of {sup 99m}Tc-MDP SPECT (bone SPECT) for lumbar spondylolysis. We analyzed 11 cases with 17 lesions. All cases were compared using plain radiography, computed tomography (CT), planar bone scintigraphy (PBS), and bone SPECT. Four lesions that showed a wide defect on CT were negative on bone SPECT and may have been chronic lesions. Thirteen lesions that were positive on bone SPECT were narrow or showed no defect on CT and may have been early lesions. Two cases showed no defect on CT but were positive on bone SPECT, and one of them progressed to bilateral spondylolysis after one year. This may have been a very early lesion. Thus bone SPECT is useful for the diagnosis of lumbar spondylolysis, especially in its early stage. (author)

  9. Evaluation of parathyroid imaging methods with 99mTc-MIBI. The comparison of planar images obtained using a pinhole collimator and a parallel-hole collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Hirofumi; Iwasaki, Ryuichiro; Hashimoto, Jun; Nakamura, Kayoko; Kunieda, Etsuo; Sanmiya, Toshikazu; Kubo, Atsushi; Ogawa, Koichi; Inagaki, Kazutoshi

    1999-01-01

    Parathyroid scintigraphy with 99m Tc-MIBI was performed using two kinds of collimators, namely, a pinhole one and a parallel-hole one, to evaluate which one was more suitable for the detection of hyperfunctioning parathyroid lesions. In the studies using 99m Tc source, the pinhole collimator showed better efficiency and spatial resolution in the distance where the parathyroid scan are actually performed. In the phantom study, the nodular activities modeling parathyroid lesions were visualized better on the images obtained using the pinhole collimator. In clinical studies for 30 patients suspicious of hyperparathyroidism, hyperfunctioning parathyroid nodules were better detected when the pinhole collimator was used. In conclusion, the pinhole collimator was thought to be more suitable for parathyroid scintigraphy with 99m Tc-MIBI than the parallel-hole collimator. (author)

  10. Evaluation of parathyroid imaging methods with {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI. The comparison of planar images obtained using a pinhole collimator and a parallel-hole collimator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Hirofumi; Iwasaki, Ryuichiro; Hashimoto, Jun; Nakamura, Kayoko; Kunieda, Etsuo; Sanmiya, Toshikazu; Kubo, Atsushi [Keio Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine; Ogawa, Koichi; Inagaki, Kazutoshi

    1999-07-01

    Parathyroid scintigraphy with {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI was performed using two kinds of collimators, namely, a pinhole one and a parallel-hole one, to evaluate which one was more suitable for the detection of hyperfunctioning parathyroid lesions. In the studies using {sup 99m}Tc source, the pinhole collimator showed better efficiency and spatial resolution in the distance where the parathyroid scan are actually performed. In the phantom study, the nodular activities modeling parathyroid lesions were visualized better on the images obtained using the pinhole collimator. In clinical studies for 30 patients suspicious of hyperparathyroidism, hyperfunctioning parathyroid nodules were better detected when the pinhole collimator was used. In conclusion, the pinhole collimator was thought to be more suitable for parathyroid scintigraphy with {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI than the parallel-hole collimator. (author)

  11. Clinical application of cardiac SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Shigeyuki

    1999-01-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has replaced planar imaging techniques for myocardial scintigraphy. Thallium-201 was the dominant agent employed for myocardial perfusion imaging. Today new technetium-99m labelled radionuclides have been used as excellent alternatives to 201 Tl for detection of coronary artery disease, prognostification, and even assessment of myocardial viability. Pharmacologic stress imaging using either dipyridamole, adenosine or dobutamine is a substitute for exercise stress. Accurate determination of myocardial viability is vitally important for clinical decision making for patients with LV dysfunction who will most benefit from revascularization. Stunned and hibernated myocardium may result in profound regional LTV dysfunction in absence of necrosis. The various approach such as stress-redistribution-reinjection imaging, rest-redistribution imaging and stress-redistribution-24 hours delayed imaging has been utilized to assess myocardial viability with 201 Tl. Quantitative assessment of 99m Tc MIBI uptake reflect the degree of viability. 123 I-Metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), an analog of norepinephrine, has been used for scintigraphic assessment of regional cardiac adrenergic innervation. Cardiac sympathetic denervation, assessed by 123 I-MIBG, due to ischemia in non-Q myocardial infarction and unstable angina has been shown. Quantitative cardiac MIBG scintigram was shown to have prognostic value in patients with severe congestive heart failure. 23 I-BMIPP (ρ-methyl-iodophenyl pentadecanoic acid) has been used to assess myocardial fatty acid utilization. BMIPP has the memory function of ischemia in unstable angina, since decreased BMIPP uptake persists several days after ischemic episode. Nuclear cardiology in Japan has experienced an expansion in the techniques including use of new radionuclides, 99m Tc perfusion agents, 123 I-MIBG and 23 I-BMIPP and in associated clinical application to the various cardiac diseases

  12. Application of SPECT to psychiatry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Hiroshi

    1999-01-01

    Brain perfusion SPECT using 99m Tc-ethyl-cysteinate dimer ( 99m Tc-ECD) was applied to psychiatric diseases with aid of statistical parametric mapping (SPM) for analysis of data. To evaluate influence of aging on brain perfusion, noninvasive measurements of cerebral blood flow using 99m Tc-ECD were performed in 53 normal volunteers, age 18 to 87 years old. Mean cerebral blood flow (mCBF) was 43.9±5.0 ml/100 g/min and showed weak negative correlation with aging (r=0.451). Perisylvian cerebral cortices and medial frontal areas including anterior cingulate gyri showed greater negative correlation than other areas. These findings suggest the necessity of age-matched control regional CBF (rCBF) data to investigate rCBF abnormality in patients. Four drug-naive schizophrenic patients showed flow decrease in bilateral frontal and superior temporal areas and a left infero-posterior temporal area. Haloperidol administration induced flow decrease in bilateral frontal and left parietal areas, while flow increase in bilateral striatal and right hippocampal areas. Ten aged depressive patients showed flow decrease in bilateral frontal and left temporo-parietal areas. Even after remission patients showed flow decrease in the left frontal area as compared with normal subjects. Remission induced flow increase in the right frontal, right parietal, and right orbitofrontal areas compared with depression. These results suggest that CBF measurements using 99m Tc-ECD were useful for objective evaluation of regional abnormality in brain function in psychiatric diseases. (author)

  13. Three-dimensional total variation norm for SPECT reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, Mikael; Bone, Dianna; Elmqvist, H.

    2001-01-01

    The total variation (TV) norm has been described in literature as a method for reducing noise in two-dimensional (2D) images. At the same time, the TV-norm is very good at recovering edges in images, without introducing ringing or edge artefacts. It has also been proposed as a 2D regularisation function in Bayesian reconstruction, implemented in an expectation maximisation (EM) algorithm, and called TV-EM. The TV-EM was developed for 2D SPECT imaging, and the algorithm is capable of smoothing noise while maintaining edges without introducing artefacts. We have extended the TV-norm to take into account the third spatial dimension, and developed an iterative EM algorithm based on the three-dimensional (3D) TV-norm, which we call TV3D-EM. This takes into account the correlation between transaxial sections in SPECT, due to system resolution. We have compared the 2D and 3D algorithms using reconstructed images from simulated projection data. Phantoms used were a homogeneous sphere, and a 3D head phantom based on the Shepp-Logan phantom. The TV3D-EM algorithm yielded somewhat lower noise levels than TV-EM. The noise in the TV3D-EM had similar correlation in transaxial and longitudinal sections, which was not the case for TV-EM, or any 2D reconstruction method. In particular, longitudinal sections from TV3D-EM were perceived as less noisy when compared to TV-EM. The use of 3D reconstruction should also be advantageous if compensation for distant dependent collimator blurring is incorporated in the iterative algorithm

  14. Accuracy evaluation of fusion of CT, MR, and SPECT images using commercially available software packages (SRS PLATO and IFS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mongioj, Valeria; Brusa, Anna; Loi, Gianfranco; Pignoli, Emanuele; Gramaglia, Alberto; Scorsetti, Marta; Bombardieri, Emilio; Marchesini, Renato

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: A problem for clinicians is to mentally integrate information from multiple diagnostic sources, such as computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR), and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), whose images give anatomic and metabolic information. Methods and Materials: To combine this different imaging procedure information, and to overlay correspondent slices, we used commercially available software packages (SRS PLATO and IFS). The algorithms utilize a fiducial-based coordinate system (or frame) with 3 N-shaped markers, which allows coordinate transformation of a clinical examination data set (9 spots for each transaxial section) to a stereotactic coordinate system. The N-shaped markers were filled with fluids visible in each modality (gadolinium for MR, calcium chloride for CT, and 99m Tc for SPECT). The frame is relocatable, in the different acquisition modalities, by means of a head holder to which a face mask is fixed so as to immobilize the patient. Position errors due to the algorithms were obtained by evaluating the stereotactic coordinates of five sources detectable in each modality. Results: SPECT and MR position errors due to the algorithms were evaluated with respect to CT: Δx was ≤ 0.9 mm for MR and ≤ 1.4 mm for SPECT, Δy was ≤ 1 mm and ≤ 3 mm for MR and SPECT, respectively. Maximal differences in distance between estimated and actual fiducial centers (geometric mismatch) were in the order of the pixel size (0.8 mm for CT, 1.4 mm for MR, and 1.8 mm for SPECT). In an attempt to distinguish necrosis from residual disease, the image fusion protocol was studied in 35 primary or metastatic brain tumor patients. Conclusions: The image fusion technique has a good degree of accuracy as well as the potential to improve the specificity of tissue identification and the precision of the subsequent treatment planning

  15. SPECT in psychiatry; Die Bedeutung der Hirn-SPECT in der Psychiatrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasper, S [Universitaetsklinik fuer Psychiatrie, Wien (Austria); Gruenwald, F [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Danos, P [Psychiatrische Universitaetsklinik, Bonn (Germany); Walter, H [Universitaetsklinik fuer Psychiatrie, Wien (Austria); Klemm, E [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Bruecke, T [Universitaetsklinik fuer Neurologie, Wien (Austria); Podreka, I [Universitaetsklinik fuer Neurologie, Wien (Austria); Biersack, H J [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    1994-10-01

    In the last fifteen years different attempts have been undertaken to understand the biological basis of major psychiatric disorders. One important tool to determine patterns of brain dysfunction is single emission computed tomography (SPECT). Whereas SPECT investigations are already a valuable diagnostic instrument for the diagnosis of dementia of the Alzheimer Type (DAT) there have not been consistent findings that can be referred to as specific for any other particular psychiatric diagnostic entity. Nevertheless, SPECT studies have been able to demonstrate evidence of brain dysfunction in patients with schizophrenia, depression, anxiety disorders, and substance abuse in which other methods showed no clear abnormality of brain function. Our manuscript reviews the data which are currently available in the literature and stresses the need for further studies, especially for prediction and monitoring psychiatric treatment modalities. (orig.) [Deutsch] In den vergangenen 15 Jahren wurde durch verschiedene methodologische Ansaetze versucht, die biologischen Ursachen psychiatrischer Erkrankungen naeher zu erforschen. Als eine bedeutende Methode hat sich dabei die Single-Photonen-Emissions-Computertomographie (SPECT) herausgestellt. Waehrend die SPECT-Untersuchungen bereits Eingang in die Routinediagnostik bei Demenzen vom Alzheimer-Typ gefunden haben, konnten fuer weitere psychiatrische Erkrankungen noch keine eindeutigen Befunde etabliert werden. Mit der SPECT-Methode ist es jedoch gelungen, funktionelle Veraenderungen des Gehirns von psychiatrischen Erkrankungen darzustellen, wie z.B. Schizophrenie, Depression, Angsterkrankungen bzw. Substanzmissbrauch. In Forschungsprotokollen wird durch die SPECT-Methode versucht, abzuklaeren, inwieweit es moeglich ist, innerhalb der Erkrankungsentitaeten psychiatrischer Erkrankungen oder auch diese uebergreifend eine Subklassifizierung zu finden und evtl. Gehirnsysteme ausfindig zu machen, die mit einer spezifischen

  16. 99mTc-ECD dynamic SPECT in 'luxury perfusion' of subacute stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogasawara, Kuniaki; Fujiwara, Satoru; Yoshimoto, Takashi.

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the cerebral pharmacokinetics of 99m Tc-ethyl cysteinate dimer ( 99m Tc-ECD) at blood flow levels beyond the normal range, we investigated 'luxury perfusion' in subacute stroke, ictal hyperperfusion in epilepsy and post-decompressive hyperemia in head trauma. All 7 patients showed a hyperactive area on SPECT studies using 99m Tc-HM-PAO. 99m Tc-ECD static image demonstrated a hyperactive area in both epilepsy and head trauma, and a hypoactive area in 'luxury perfusion.' On the dynamic SPECT of 99m Tc-ECD in both epilepsy and head trauma, brain distribution of the tracer was determined within 2 min postinjection and remained stable for up to 1 hour; however, 'luxury perfusion' area showed a change from initial hyperactivity to late hypoactivity with the passage of time. The time activity curve in 'luxury perfusion' area demonstrated a steep decrease of counts/pixel for up to 4-5 minutes postinjection, and a moderate decrease in the following phase. The early wash-out mechanism of 99m Tc-ECD from 'luxury perfusion' area can be described by a biexponential function including an initial steep decrease representing the rapid loss of the lipophilic complexes which were not metabolized in injured brain tissue. (author)

  17. Improved image quality for asymmetric double-focal cone-beam SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Z.J.; Tsui, B.M.W.

    1993-01-01

    To optimize both spatial resolution and detection efficiency in brain SPECT imaging using a rectangular camera, an asymmetric double-focal cone-beam collimator is proposed with the focal points located near the base plane of the patient's head. To fit the entire head into the field-of-view of the collimator with dimensions of 50cmx40cm and at a radius-of-rotation of 15 cm, the focal lengths of the collimator are 55 and 70 cm, respectively, in the transverse and axial directions. With this geometry, the artifacts in the reconstructed image produced by the Feldkamp algorithm are more severe compared to those in a symmetric cone-beam geometry, due to the larger vertex angle between the top of the head and the base plane. To improve the reconstructed image quality, a fully three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction algorithm developed previously for single-focal cone-beam SPECT was extended to the asymmetric double-focal cone-beam geometry. The algorithm involves nonstationary 2D filtering and a reprojection technique for estimation of the missing data caused by a single-orbit cone-beam geometry. The results from simulation studies with the 3D Defrise slab phantom demonstrated that the fully 3D algorithm provided a much improved image quality in terms of reduced slice-to-slice cross talks and shape elongation compared to that produced by the conventional Feldkamp algorithm

  18. Mechanistic study on black and grey spot growth in OLEDs performed on laser-ablated pinholes in the cathode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijer, P. van de; Bouten, P.C.P.; Fledderus, H.; Janssen, R.R.; Winter, S.H.P.M. de; Akkerman, H.B.

    2017-01-01

    Local laser ablation of the cathode of OLEDs has been applied to create a population of pinholes of the same size. This enables the direct comparison at different conditions of black spots and grey spots in the emission of OLEDs as a result of water ingress into the device. We confirmed earlier

  19. Adrenal imaging with 131I-Adosterol (NCL-6-131I) by diverging and pinhole methods, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajo, Masayuki

    1982-01-01

    The analysis of the adrenal diverging and pinhole images with 131 I-Adosterol was made to establish adrenal imaging patterns, in 43 patients with various adrenal disorders, 4 with adrenal adjacent tumors and one with arrhenoblastoma of the ovary whose images were also included. From this analysis and review of literature, three principles (1. Accumulation in cortical tumors, 2. Relation to endogenous ACTH and 3. Nonaccumulation in noncortical tumors) and several additional factors to make various adrenal imaging patterns with 131 I-iodocholesterols could be induced. The accuracy of locating the adrenal tumor-bearing glands was 97% (28/29) with pinhole images and 70% (21/30) with diverging images in baseline conditions. Various adrenal high/low ratios could not be used as confidential indicators to locate the tumorbearing glands, especially in primary aldosteronism, although the left higher ratios on both views showed high discrepancy between normal and abnormal subjects. The ''Pinhole method'' is recommended as a simple technique of adrenal imaging, because it provides a high-resolution adrenal image which results in a high diagnostic value. A pinhole collimator is available in any institute which has a gamma camera. (author)

  20. Another look at volume self-calibration: calibration and self-calibration within a pinhole model of Scheimpflug cameras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornic, Philippe; Le Besnerais, Guy; Champagnat, Frédéric; Illoul, Cédric; Cheminet, Adam; Le Sant, Yves; Leclaire, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    We address calibration and self-calibration of tomographic PIV experiments within a pinhole model of cameras. A complete and explicit pinhole model of a camera equipped with a 2-tilt angles Scheimpflug adapter is presented. It is then used in a calibration procedure based on a freely moving calibration plate. While the resulting calibrations are accurate enough for Tomo-PIV, we confirm, through a simple experiment, that they are not stable in time, and illustrate how the pinhole framework can be used to provide a quantitative evaluation of geometrical drifts in the setup. We propose an original self-calibration method based on global optimization of the extrinsic parameters of the pinhole model. These methods are successfully applied to the tomographic PIV of an air jet experiment. An unexpected by-product of our work is to show that volume self-calibration induces a change in the world frame coordinates. Provided the calibration drift is small, as generally observed in PIV, the bias on the estimated velocity field is negligible but the absolute location cannot be accurately recovered using standard calibration data. (paper)

  1. PET and SPECT of neurobiological systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O. [Groningen Univ. (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Gent Univ. (Belgium). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Otte, Andreas [Univ. of Applied Sciences, Offenburg (Germany). Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology; Vries, Erik F.J. de; Waarde, Aren van (eds.) [Groningen Univ. (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging

    2014-04-01

    Addresses a variety of aspects of neurotransmission in the brain. Details the latest results in probe development. Emphasis on a multidisciplinary approach. Written by internationally acclaimed experts. PET and SPECT of Neurobiological Systems combines the expertise of renowned authors whose dedication to the development of novel probes and techniques for the investigation of neurobiological systems has achieved international recognition. Various aspects of neurotransmission in the brain are discussed, such as visualization and quantification of (more than 20 different) neuroreceptors, neuroinflammatory markers, transporters, and enzymes as well as neurotransmitter synthesis, ?-amyloid deposition, cerebral blood flow, and the metabolic rate of glucose. The latest results in probe development are also detailed. Most chapters are written jointly by radiochemists and nuclear medicine specialists to ensure a multidisciplinary approach. This state of the art compendium will be valuable to anyone in the field of clinical or preclinical neuroscience, from the radiochemist and radiologist/nuclear medicine specialist to the interested neurobiologist and general practitioner. It is the second volume of a trilogy on PET and SPECT imaging in the neurosciences. Other volumes focus on PET and SPECT in psychiatry and PET and SPECT in neurology''.

  2. Chilaiditi's syndrome demonstrated by SPECT/CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalini S Perumal

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Chilaiditi’s syndrome is a rare condition commonly diagnosed as an incidental radiological finding. The aim of this report is to show the role of SPECT-CT in this syndrome and state the functional and anatomical role of this hybrid imaging modality. Materials and Methods: A case report. Results: A 49-year-old female patient was referred for gallium-67 citrate for a possible granulomatous myositis and underwent SPECT-CT of the abdomen to assess the area of decreased gallium uptake on planar images of the liver. The combined SPECT and CT modality demonstrated findings consistent with the clinical evidence of Chilaiditi’s syndrome. The anatomical part of this hybrid modality made it easier to evaluate the area of gallium lack of uptake which was due to air in the colon. Conclusion: This case does not only show the role of SPECT-CT in this syndrome but also suggest that the use of such modality should be considered whenever available in the evaluation of patients in whom the localization of active disease becomes imperative.

  3. SPECT and PET in Eating Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Waarde, Aren; Audenaert, Kurt; Busatto, Geraldo F.; Buchpiguel, Carlos; Dierckx, Rudi; Dierckx, Rudi AJO; Otte, Andreas; de Vries, Erik FJ; van Waarde, Aren; den Boer, Johan A

    2014-01-01

    Medical imaging techniques like PET and SPECT have been applied for investigation of brain function in anorexia and bulimia nervosa. Regional abnormalities have been detected in cerebral blood flow, glucose metabolism, the availability of several neurotransmitter receptors (serotonin 1A and 2A,

  4. Methodology for ventilation/perfusion SPECT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bajc, Marika; Neilly, Brian; Miniati, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    Ventilation/perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (V/Q SPECT) is the scintigraphic technique of choice for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism and many other disorders that affect lung function. Data from recent ventilation studies show that the theoretic advantages of Technegas ov...

  5. Brain SPECT with Tl-201 DDC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruine, J.F. de.

    1988-01-01

    The development, animal and human experiments and the first clinical results of a new blood flow tracer thallium-201 diethyldithiocarbamate (Tl-201 DDC) are discussed for functional brain imaging with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). 325 refs.; 43 figs.; 22 tabs

  6. Multi-dimensional diagnostics of high power ion beams by Arrayed Pinhole Camera System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuike, K.; Miyamoto, S.; Shirai, N.; Akiba, T.; Nakai, S.; Imasaki, K.; Yamanaka, C.

    1993-01-01

    The authors developed multi-dimensional beam diagnostics system (with spatially and time resolution). They used newly developed Arrayed Pinhole Camera (APC) for this diagnosis. The APC can get spatial distribution of divergence and flux density. They use two types of particle detectors in this study. The one is CR-39 can get time integrated images. The other one is gated Micro-Channel-Plate (MCP) with CCD camera. It enables time resolving diagnostics. The diagnostics systems have resolution better than 10mrad divergence, 0.5mm spatial resolution on the objects respectively. The time resolving system has 10ns time resolution. The experiments are performed on Reiden-IV and Reiden-SHVS induction linac. The authors get time integrated divergence distributions on Reiden-IV proton beam. They also get time resolved image on Reiden-SHVS

  7. Lasers and laser applications. Imaging implosion dynamics: The x-ray pinhole/streak camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attwood, D.T.

    1976-01-01

    A Livermore-developed x-ray-sensitive streak camera was combined with a unique x-ray pinhole camera to make dynamic photographs of laser-irradiated fusion target implosions. These photographs show x radiation emitted from the imploding shell during its 100-ps implosion; they are the first continuous observations of an imploding laser-driven fusion capsule. The diagnostic system has a time resolution of 15 ps and a spatial resolution of about 6 μm. Results agree very well with those predicted by our LASNEX calculations, confirming that the essential physics are correctly described in the code and providing further confidence in the soundness of this approach to inertial confinement fusion

  8. Fabricating Pinhole-Free YSZ Sub-Microthin Films by Magnetron Sputtering for Micro-SOFCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Hill

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Submicron thin yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ films were prepared on a variety of substrates with different surface morphologies by magnetron sputtering followed by thermal oxidation. Pinholes were observed in the films deposited on nanoporous alumina substrates. Initial dense Y/Zr films developed nanocracks after thermal oxidation on smooth Si wafer substrates. At optimal sputtering and oxidation conditions, smooth and crack/pore-free films were achieved on Si wafer substrates. The thin YSZ films exhibited fully ionic conduction with ionic conductivities, and activation energy corroborated well with the values from commercial YSZ plates. The thin YSZ films can be utilized in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs for intermediate temperature operations.

  9. Iodine-123 iodobenzofuran (I-123 IBF) SPECT in patients with parkinsonism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakabeppu, Yoshiaki; Nakajo, Masayuki; Mitsuda, Mitsuru; Tsuchimochi, Shinsaku; Tani, Atsushi; Osame, Mitsuhiro [Kagoshima Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1999-12-01

    Iodine-123 benzofuran (I-123 IBF) is a dopaminergic antagonist which is suitable for SPECT imaging of D2 receptors. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential usefulness of semi-quantitative parameters obtained from brain SPECT data of I-123 IBF for differential diagnosis in patients with parkinsonism (PN). Subjects were 10 patients with PN: 2 patients with striato-nigral degeneration (SND), 5 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), 2 patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and one patient with olivo-ponto-cerebellar atrophy (OPCA). The data were acquired with a triple-head gamma camera at 2 hours after intravenous injection of 167 MBq of I-123 IBF. Transverse images were reconstructed by means of filtered backprojection, and attenuation correction was performed by Chang's method ({mu}=0.08). The basal ganglia-to-frontal cortex ratio (GFR) and the basal ganglia-to-occipital cortex ratio (GOR) on slices of 5 different thicknesses were calculated. The GFR and GOR were lower in the SND group than in the other disease groups in all slices with different thicknesses (7.2 mm, 14.4 mm, 21.6 mm, 28.8 mm and 43.2 mm). The semiquantitative parameters (GFR and GOR) obtained from brain SPECT data at 2 hours after intravenous injection of I-123 IBF may be useful for differential diagnosis in patients with PN. (author)

  10. Iodine-123 iodobenzofuran (I-123 IBF) SPECT in patients with parkinsonism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakabeppu, Yoshiaki; Nakajo, Masayuki; Mitsuda, Mitsuru; Tsuchimochi, Shinsaku; Tani, Atsushi; Osame, Mitsuhiro

    1999-01-01

    Iodine-123 benzofuran (I-123 IBF) is a dopaminergic antagonist which is suitable for SPECT imaging of D2 receptors. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential usefulness of semi-quantitative parameters obtained from brain SPECT data of I-123 IBF for differential diagnosis in patients with parkinsonism (PN). Subjects were 10 patients with PN: 2 patients with striato-nigral degeneration (SND), 5 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), 2 patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and one patient with olivo-ponto-cerebellar atrophy (OPCA). The data were acquired with a triple-head gamma camera at 2 hours after intravenous injection of 167 MBq of I-123 IBF. Transverse images were reconstructed by means of filtered backprojection, and attenuation correction was performed by Chang's method (μ=0.08). The basal ganglia-to-frontal cortex ratio (GFR) and the basal ganglia-to-occipital cortex ratio (GOR) on slices of 5 different thicknesses were calculated. The GFR and GOR were lower in the SND group than in the other disease groups in all slices with different thicknesses (7.2 mm, 14.4 mm, 21.6 mm, 28.8 mm and 43.2 mm). The semiquantitative parameters (GFR and GOR) obtained from brain SPECT data at 2 hours after intravenous injection of I-123 IBF may be useful for differential diagnosis in patients with PN. (author)

  11. Ventilation-perfused studies using SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwijnenburg, A.

    1989-01-01

    A method for the quantitative analysis of ventilation-perfusion SPECT studies is decribed and an effort is made to evaluate its usefullness. The technical details of the emthod are described. In the the transaxial reconstructions of the tomographic studies the contour of the lungs is detected and regional values of lung volume, ventilation, perfusion and ventilation-perfusion ratios are calculated. The method is operator independent. The lung volume calculations from the SPECT studies are validated by comparing them with lung volume measurements using the helium dilution technique. A good correlation (r=0.91) was found between the two volumes. SPECT volume was greater than the volume measured with helium dilution, which was attributed to non-gas-containing structures in the. lungs. The use of ventilation-perfusion ratio SPECT is described to evaluate the effect of ionizing radiation on the lungs in patients treated with mantle field irradiation for Hodgkin's disease. Perfusion changes appear as early as 2 months after the start of irradiation. Ventilation changes appear later and relatively minor. No changes are seen outside the radiation portals. The ventilation-perfusion inequality in pulmonary sarcoidosis is treated. It is suggested that the decrease D LCO in these patients may be partly due to an even distribution of ventilation perfusion ratios. An effort is made to establish the properties of a new tracer used for the assessment of the metabolic function of the pulmonary endothelium. The lung uptake of I-123 IMP mimics the distribution of a perfusion tracer and it is suggested that this tracer may be useful for the early detection of pulmonary vascular damage, even when blood flow is still intact. Some aspects of the use of Kr-81m as a ventilation tracer are discussed as well as the effect of noise on Kr-81m SPECT reconstructions. (author). 146 refs.; 39 figs.; 8 tabs

  12. The predictive value of single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography for sentinel lymph node localization in head and neck cutaneous malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remenschneider, Aaron K; Dilger, Amanda E; Wang, Yingbing; Palmer, Edwin L; Scott, James A; Emerick, Kevin S

    2015-04-01

    Preoperative localization of sentinel lymph nodes in head and neck cutaneous malignancies can be aided by single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT); however, its true predictive value for identifying lymph nodes intraoperatively remains unquantified. This study aims to understand the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of SPECT/CT in sentinel lymph node biopsy for cutaneous malignancies of the head and neck. Blinded retrospective imaging review with comparison to intraoperative gamma probe confirmed sentinel lymph nodes. A consecutive series of patients with a head and neck cutaneous malignancy underwent preoperative SPECT/CT followed by sentinel lymph node biopsy with a gamma probe. Two nuclear medicine physicians, blinded to clinical data, independently reviewed each SPECT/CT. Activity within radiographically defined nodal basins was recorded and compared to intraoperative gamma probe findings. Sensitivity, specificity, and negative and positive predictive values were calculated with subgroup stratification by primary tumor site. Ninety-two imaging reads were performed on 47 patients with cutaneous malignancy who underwent SPECT/CT followed by sentinel lymph node biopsy. Overall sensitivity was 73%, specificity 92%, positive predictive value 54%, and negative predictive value 96%. The predictive ability of SPECT/CT to identify the basin or an adjacent basin containing the single hottest node was 92%. SPECT/CT overestimated uptake by an average of one nodal basin. In the head and neck, SPECT/CT has higher reliability for primary lesions of the eyelid, scalp, and cheek. SPECT/CT has high sensitivity, specificity, and negative predictive value, but may overestimate relevant nodal basins in sentinel lymph node biopsy. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  13. Neuro-Spect and neuropsychological test in the differential diagnosis of dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marroni, B.M.; Louzada, A.G.; Andrea, S.A.; Raupp, A.A.; Sprinz, C.S.; Marroni, S.M.; Canani, L.C.; Zagoury, E.Z.; Borneman, C.B.

    2002-01-01

    Background/Aim: The role of the Neuro-Spect scintigraphy as a diagnostic tool in central nervous system diseases is well established. However, the simultaneous application of a neuro-psychological test (NPT) may be used to enhance the diagnostic accuracy of the test. The aim of this study was to test if the concomitant use of the NPT may be used to improve the differential diagnostic accuracy of the scintigraphy. Methods: A total of 144 cerebral perfusion studies (CPS) (Tc-ECD, 1110 MBq) were performed between March and October 2001. From this total 63 patients with non-specific complains of memory loss formed the study group. Patients with cancer, psychiatric disturbs or craniotomies were excluded. For analysis the patients were divided in 3 subgroups according to the major complain: a) memory deficit, b) depression and C) organic syndrome that included patients with cerebral stroke, occult hydrocephalus and head trauma. All patients submitted to the Neuro-Spect underwent a simultaneous NPT. The NPT included the following tests: Digit Span (WAIS-R), verbal fluency, clock drawing task, Minimental State Examination (MMSE) and Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT). Well-established criteria, such as symmetry and concentration of the Tc-ECD were used for evaluation of the CPS. Concordance of the findings in the CPS and the anatomic lesion was used to reinforce the final conclusions. A scale for Alzheimer's Like Dementia (ALD) from 1 to 8 was developed (where 1=normal and 8 suggests ALD) using as reference the study of Holmann BL. Results: The NPT showed a positive correlation with the Neuro-Spect's probability scale. The tests with the best correlation were the verbal fluency (p<0.001), RAVLT and the memory recall (p<0.01). The MMSE did not show association with the Neuro-Spect probability scale. Conclusions: There is a positive association between the NPT and the Neuro-Spect. These results suggest that the NPT added to the Neuro-Spect may the be useful in the

  14. Clinical significance of brain SPECT abnormalities of thalami and cerebellum in cerebral palsy with normal MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, C. H.; Lim, S. Y.; Lee, I. Y.; Kim, O. H.; Bai, M. S.; Kim, S. J.; Yoon, S. N.; Cho, C. W.

    1997-01-01

    The cerebral palsy(CP) encephalopathies are often of uncertain etiology and various functional image findings comparing with anatomical image findings have been reported. However, only a few have mentioned its clinical implications. The purpose of our report is to compare clinical severity and functional SPECT abnormalities of thalami and cerebellum in CP patients with normal MRI. Thirty six CP patients with bilateral spastic palsy who had normal MRI and brain SPECT were studied from July 1996 to September 1997. The patients' age at the time of SPECT was 22.84±17.69 months. The patients were divided into two groups according to motor quotient(MQ); moderate defect (>50MQ : n=27 MQ=22.78±10.36), mild defect ( 2 test. Brain SPECT was performed following IV administration of 0.05-0.1 mCi/kg (minimum 2.0 mCi) of Tc-99m ECD and chloral hydrate sedation (50-80 mg/kg p.o) using a triple head system (MS 3, Siemens). Interpretation of brain SPECT was visual analysis: severe decrease is defined when the defect is moderate to marked and mild decrease in rCBF as mild. Seven of 36 (19.4%) showed unilateral or bilateral moderate decrease in rCBF in thalami, 20(55.6%) showed mild decrease, and 9(25.0%) showed no decreased rCBF. All 7 who had moderate thalamic defect reveled moderate motor defect clinically. Ten of 36(27.9%) revealed unilateral or bilateral moderate rCBF defect, 23 (63.9%) depicted mild defect, and 3(8.3%) showed no defect. Sixteen with moderate thalamic rCBF defect showed moderate motor defect in 15 patients. There was statistically significant (p=0.02605) relationship between rCBF defect and motor defect in our CP patients. In conclusion, brain SPECT appears sensitive, non-invasive tool in the evaluation as well as in the prognostication of bilateral spastic cerebral palsy patients and deserves further study using larger number of patients

  15. Clinical significance of brain SPECT abnormalities of thalami and cerebellum in cerebral palsy with normal MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, C. H.; Lim, S. Y.; Lee, I. Y.; Kim, O. H.; Bai, M. S.; Kim, S. J.; Yoon, S. N.; Cho, C. W. [College of Medicine, Ajou Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    The cerebral palsy(CP) encephalopathies are often of uncertain etiology and various functional image findings comparing with anatomical image findings have been reported. However, only a few have mentioned its clinical implications. The purpose of our report is to compare clinical severity and functional SPECT abnormalities of thalami and cerebellum in CP patients with normal MRI. Thirty six CP patients with bilateral spastic palsy who had normal MRI and brain SPECT were studied from July 1996 to September 1997. The patients' age at the time of SPECT was 22.84{+-}17.69 months. The patients were divided into two groups according to motor quotient(MQ); moderate defect (>50MQ : n=27 MQ=22.78{+-}10.36), mild defect (<50MQ : n=9, MQ=66.11{+-}13.87). The degree of rCBF decrease between the two groups was evaluated by {chi}{sup 2} test. Brain SPECT was performed following IV administration of 0.05-0.1 mCi/kg (minimum 2.0 mCi) of Tc-99m ECD and chloral hydrate sedation (50-80 mg/kg p.o) using a triple head system (MS 3, Siemens). Interpretation of brain SPECT was visual analysis: severe decrease is defined when the defect is moderate to marked and mild decrease in rCBF as mild. Seven of 36 (19.4%) showed unilateral or bilateral moderate decrease in rCBF in thalami, 20(55.6%) showed mild decrease, and 9(25.0%) showed no decreased rCBF. All 7 who had moderate thalamic defect reveled moderate motor defect clinically. Ten of 36(27.9%) revealed unilateral or bilateral moderate rCBF defect, 23 (63.9%) depicted mild defect, and 3(8.3%) showed no defect. Sixteen with moderate thalamic rCBF defect showed moderate motor defect in 15 patients. There was statistically significant (p=0.02605) relationship between rCBF defect and motor defect in our CP patients. In conclusion, brain SPECT appears sensitive, non-invasive tool in the evaluation as well as in the prognostication of bilateral spastic cerebral palsy patients and deserves further study using larger number of patients.

  16. SPECT/CT imaging in children with papillary thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hwa-Young; Gelfand, Michael J.; Sharp, Susan E.

    2011-01-01

    SPECT/CT improves localization of single photon-emitting radiopharmaceuticals. To determine the utility of SPECT/CT in children with papillary thyroid carcinoma. 20 SPECT/CT and planar studies were reviewed in 13 children with papillary thyroid carcinoma after total thyroidectomy. Seven studies used I-123 and 13 used I-131, after elevating TSH by T4 deprivation or intramuscular thyrotropin alfa. Eight children had one study and five children had two to four studies. Studies were performed at initial post-total thyroidectomy evaluation, follow-up and after I-131 treatment doses. SPECT/CT was performed with a diagnostic-quality CT unit in 13 studies and a localization-only CT unit in 7. Stimulated thyroglobulin was measured (except in 2 cases with anti-thyroglobulin antibodies). In 13 studies, neck activity was present but poorly localized on planar imaging; all foci of uptake were precisely localized by SPECT/CT. Two additional foci of neck uptake were found on SPECT/CT. SPECT/CT differentiated high neck uptake from facial activity. In six studies (four children), neck uptake was identified as benign by SPECT/CT (three thyroglossal duct remnants, one skin contamination, two by precise anatomical CT localization). In two children, SPECT/CT supported a decision not to treat with I-131. When SPECT/CT was unable to identify focal uptake as benign, stimulated thyroglobulin measurements were valuable. In three of 13 studies with neck uptake, SPECT/CT provided no useful additional information. SPECT/CT precisely localizes neck iodine uptake. In small numbers of patients, treatment is affected. SPECT/CT should be used when available in thyroid carcinoma patients. (orig.)

  17. Evaluation of diagnostic efficiency of intelligence program for automatic diagnosis of circumferential profiles of myocardial short axial SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunko, Hisashi; Tada, Akira; Nakajima, Kenichi; Taki, Junichi; Kojima, Kazuhiko.

    1984-01-01

    Quantitative diagnosis using circumferential profile (CFP) is widely employed for Tl-201 myocardial imaging. However, its diagnostic efficiency is susceptible to the number and composition of the confirmed normal (CN) group. Intelligence program for CFP data file and automatic diagnosis (CAD), which was previously developed by us, was modified for creating universal data file (d-base) and evaluated its diagnostic efficiency for myocardial short axial images according to the number of CNs. CAD consists of following 3 major functions: (1) CFP data filing to d-base, (2) modification and correction of file data, and (3) automatic diagnosis of CFP. When function (1) or (2) is completed, new diagnostic criteria (mean-2 sd) are generated automatically using CN data in the d-base at that time. Because of this function, diagnostic criteria are changeable according to the number of CNs. Sensitivity (TP) and specificity (TN) of CAD program for Tl-201 7-pinhole images of 16 normals and 17 ischemic heart diseases (IHDs) were 100%, 44% (CN = 4), 88%, 94% (CN = 8 or 16) and 88%, 100% (CN = 12), respectively. Diagnostic efficiency reached plateau in more than 8 CNs. Although number of patients were limited (8 CNs and 6 IHDs), results of CAD for short axial SPECT showed consistent tendency with 7-pinhole images. In conclusion, intelligence program is necessary for automatic diagnosis using quantitative criteria under the clinical condition of daily increasing informations. Automatic diagnosis of CFP using CAD program is simple, effective and useful for interpretation of Tl-201 myocardial short axial images. CAD program is applicable to any quantitative distribution study using CFPs. (author)

  18. Performance assessment of the single photon emission microscope: high spatial resolution SPECT imaging of small animal organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mejia

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The single photon emission microscope (SPEM is an instrument developed to obtain high spatial resolution single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT images of small structures inside the mouse brain. SPEM consists of two independent imaging devices, which combine a multipinhole collimator, a high-resolution, thallium-doped cesium iodide [CsI(Tl] columnar scintillator, a demagnifying/intensifier tube, and an electron-multiplying charge-coupling device (CCD. Collimators have 300- and 450-µm diameter pinholes on tungsten slabs, in hexagonal arrays of 19 and 7 holes. Projection data are acquired in a photon-counting strategy, where CCD frames are stored at 50 frames per second, with a radius of rotation of 35 mm and magnification factor of one. The image reconstruction software tool is based on the maximum likelihood algorithm. Our aim was to evaluate the spatial resolution and sensitivity attainable with the seven-pinhole imaging device, together with the linearity for quantification on the tomographic images, and to test the instrument in obtaining tomographic images of different mouse organs. A spatial resolution better than 500 µm and a sensitivity of 21.6 counts·s-1·MBq-1 were reached, as well as a correlation coefficient between activity and intensity better than 0.99, when imaging 99mTc sources. Images of the thyroid, heart, lungs, and bones of mice were registered using 99mTc-labeled radiopharmaceuticals in times appropriate for routine preclinical experimentation of <1 h per projection data set. Detailed experimental protocols and images of the aforementioned organs are shown. We plan to extend the instrument's field of view to fix larger animals and to combine data from both detectors to reduce the acquisition time or applied activity.

  19. Performance assessment of the single photon emission microscope: high spatial resolution SPECT imaging of small animal organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mejia, J.; Reis, M.A.; Miranda, A.C.C.; Batista, I.R.; Barboza, M.R.F.; Shih, M.C.; Fu, G.; Chen, C.T.; Meng, L.J.; Bressan, R.A.; Amaro, E. Jr

    2013-01-01

    The single photon emission microscope (SPEM) is an instrument developed to obtain high spatial resolution single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images of small structures inside the mouse brain. SPEM consists of two independent imaging devices, which combine a multipinhole collimator, a high-resolution, thallium-doped cesium iodide [CsI(Tl)] columnar scintillator, a demagnifying/intensifier tube, and an electron-multiplying charge-coupling device (CCD). Collimators have 300- and 450-µm diameter pinholes on tungsten slabs, in hexagonal arrays of 19 and 7 holes. Projection data are acquired in a photon-counting strategy, where CCD frames are stored at 50 frames per second, with a radius of rotation of 35 mm and magnification factor of one. The image reconstruction software tool is based on the maximum likelihood algorithm. Our aim was to evaluate the spatial resolution and sensitivity attainable with the seven-pinhole imaging device, together with the linearity for quantification on the tomographic images, and to test the instrument in obtaining tomographic images of different mouse organs. A spatial resolution better than 500 µm and a sensitivity of 21.6 counts·s -1 ·MBq -1 were reached, as well as a correlation coefficient between activity and intensity better than 0.99, when imaging 99m Tc sources. Images of the thyroid, heart, lungs, and bones of mice were registered using 99m Tc-labeled radiopharmaceuticals in times appropriate for routine preclinical experimentation of <1 h per projection data set. Detailed experimental protocols and images of the aforementioned organs are shown. We plan to extend the instrument's field of view to fix larger animals and to combine data from both detectors to reduce the acquisition time or applied activity

  20. Performance assessment of the single photon emission microscope: high spatial resolution SPECT imaging of small animal organs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mejia, J. [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Instituto do Cérebro, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Reis, M.A. [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Instituto do Cérebro, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Laboratório Interdisciplinar de Neurociências Clínicas, Departamento de Psiquiatria, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Miranda, A.C.C. [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Instituto do Cérebro, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Batista, I.R. [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Instituto do Cérebro, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Laboratório Interdisciplinar de Neurociências Clínicas, Departamento de Psiquiatria, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Barboza, M.R.F.; Shih, M.C. [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Instituto do Cérebro, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fu, G. [GE Global Research, Schenectady, NY (United States); Chen, C.T. [Department of Radiology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Meng, L.J. [Department of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Bressan, R.A. [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Instituto do Cérebro, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Laboratório Interdisciplinar de Neurociências Clínicas, Departamento de Psiquiatria, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Amaro, E. Jr [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Instituto do Cérebro, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-11-06

    The single photon emission microscope (SPEM) is an instrument developed to obtain high spatial resolution single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images of small structures inside the mouse brain. SPEM consists of two independent imaging devices, which combine a multipinhole collimator, a high-resolution, thallium-doped cesium iodide [CsI(Tl)] columnar scintillator, a demagnifying/intensifier tube, and an electron-multiplying charge-coupling device (CCD). Collimators have 300- and 450-µm diameter pinholes on tungsten slabs, in hexagonal arrays of 19 and 7 holes. Projection data are acquired in a photon-counting strategy, where CCD frames are stored at 50 frames per second, with a radius of rotation of 35 mm and magnification factor of one. The image reconstruction software tool is based on the maximum likelihood algorithm. Our aim was to evaluate the spatial resolution and sensitivity attainable with the seven-pinhole imaging device, together with the linearity for quantification on the tomographic images, and to test the instrument in obtaining tomographic images of different mouse organs. A spatial resolution better than 500 µm and a sensitivity of 21.6 counts·s{sup -1}·MBq{sup -1} were reached, as well as a correlation coefficient between activity and intensity better than 0.99, when imaging {sup 99m}Tc sources. Images of the thyroid, heart, lungs, and bones of mice were registered using {sup 99m}Tc-labeled radiopharmaceuticals in times appropriate for routine preclinical experimentation of <1 h per projection data set. Detailed experimental protocols and images of the aforementioned organs are shown. We plan to extend the instrument's field of view to fix larger animals and to combine data from both detectors to reduce the acquisition time or applied activity.

  1. Assessment of vascularization within hydroxyapatite ocular implant by bone scintigraphy: compartive analysis of planar and SPECT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Seok Tae; Sohn, Myung Hee; Park, Soon Ah

    1999-01-01

    Complete fibrovascular ingrowth within the hydroxyapatite ocular implant is necessary for peg drilling which is performed to prevent infection and to provide motility to the ocular prosthesis. We compared planar bone scintigraphy and SPECT for the evaluation of the vascularization within hydroxyapatite ocular implants. Seventeen patients (M:F=12:5, mean age: 50.4±17.5 years) who had received a coralline hydroxyapatite ocular implant after enucleation surgery were enrolled. Patients underwent Tc-99m MDP planar bone and SPECT imaging by dual head gamma camera after their implant surgery (interval: 197±81 days). Uptake on planar and SPECT images was graded visually as less than (grade 1), equal to (grade 2), and greater than (grade 3) nasal bridge activity. Quantitative ratio of implanted to non-implanted intraorbital activity was also measured. Vascularization within hydroxyapatite implants was confirmed by slit lamp examination and ocular movement. All but three patients were considered to be vascularized within hydroxyapatite implants. In visual analysis of planar image and SPECT, grade 1 was noted in 9/18 (50%) and 6/18 (33%), respectively. Grade 2 pattern 7/18 (39%) and 4/18 (22%), and grade 3 pattern was 2/18 (11%) and 8/18 (44%) respectively. When grade 2 or 3 was considered to be positive for vascularization, the sensitivity of planar and SPECT imaging were 60% (9/15) and 80% (12/15), respectively. In 3 patients with incomplete vascularization, both planar and SPECT showed grade 1 uptake. The orbital activity ratios on planar imaging were not significantly different between complete and incomplete vascularization (1.96±9.87 vs 1.17±0.08 , p>0.05), however, it was significantly higher on SPECT in patients with complete vascularization (8.44±5.45 vs 2.20±0.87, p<0.05). In the assessment of fibrovascular ingrowth within ocular implants by Tc-99m MDP bone scintigraphy, SPECT image appears to be more effective than planar scintigraphy

  2. Serial assessment of left ventricular function in various patient groups with Tl-201 gated myocardial perfusion SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Lingge; Kadoya, Masumi; Momose, Mitsuhiro; Kurozumi, Masahiro; Matsushita, Tsuyoshi; Yamada, Akira

    2007-01-01

    The present study was performed to assess stress-related left ventricular (LV) function variations in various patient groups and to determine if they were affected by sex or the type of stress experienced. We used thallium (Tl)-201 gated myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) for the analysis. A total of 270 patients were examined by electrocardiography-gated myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging to assess LV function. After injection of Tl-201 at a dose of 111 MBq at peak stress, SPECT scans were acquired at 10 min (after stress) and 3 h (rest) after injection on a three-headed camera. In the normal perfusion group, the mean LV ejection fraction (LVEF) was significantly higher, and both the end-diastolic volume index (EDVI) and end-systolic volume index (ESVI) were significantly lower in women than in men (P<0.05). Poststress stunning occurred in 29 of 98 patients (30.0%) in the ischemia group and in 42 of 90 patients (46.7%) in the fixed group. There was a significant difference in poststress stunning between bicycle ergometer stress and dipyridamole stress (P<0.05). In patients with normal perfusion, LVEF, EDVI, and ESVI determined by gated Tl-201 SPECT should be corrected for sex. In addition, the influence of the type of stress should be considered when assessing stress-related LV function variations. (author)

  3. Statistical parametric mapping of Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT cerebral perfusion in the normal elderly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turlakow, A.; Scott, A.M.; Berlangieri, S.U.; Sonkila, C.; Wardill, T.D.; Crowley, K.; Abbott, D.; Egan, G.F.; McKay, W.J.; Hughes, A.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: The clinical value of Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT cerebral blood flow studies in cognitive and neuropsychiatric disorders has been well described. Currently, interpretation of these studies relies on qualitative or semi- quantitative techniques. The aim of our study is to generate statistical measures of regional cerebral perfusion in the normal elderly using statistical parametric mapping (Friston et al, Wellcome Department of Cognitive Neurology, London, UK) in order to facilitate the objective analysis of cerebral blood flow studies in patient groups. A cohort of 20 healthy, elderly volunteers, aged 68 to 81 years, was prospectively selected on the basis of normal physical examination and neuropsychological testing. Subjects with risk factors, or a history of cognitive impairment were excluded from our study group. All volunteers underwent SPECT cerebral blood flow imaging, 30 minutes following the administration of 370 MBq Tc-99m HMPAO, on a Trionix Triad XLT triple-headed scanner (Trionix Research Laboratory Twinsburg, OH) using high resolution, fan-beam collimators resulting in a system resolution of 10 mm full width at half-maximum (FWHM). The SPECT cerebral blood flow studies were analysed using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) software specifically developed for the routine statistical analysis of functional neuroimaging data. The SPECT images were coregistered with each individual's T1-weighted MR volume brain scan and spatially normalized to standardised Talairach space. Using SPM, these data were analyzed for differences in interhemispheric regional cerebral blood flow. Significant asymmetry of cerebral perfusion was detected in the pre-central gyrus at the 95th percentile. In conclusion, the interpretation of cerebral blood flow studies in the elderly should take into account the statistically significant asymmetry in interhemispheric pre-central cortical blood flow. In the future, clinical studies will be compared to statistical data sets in age

  4. Statistical parametric mapping of Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT cerebral perfusion in the normal elderly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turlakow, A.; Scott, A.M.; Berlangieri, S.U.; Sonkila, C.; Wardill, T.D.; Crowley, K.; Abbott, D.; Egan, G.F.; McKay, W.J.; Hughes, A. [Austin and Repatriation Medical Centre, Heidelberg, VIC (Australia). Departments of Nuclear Medicine and Centre for PET Neurology and Clinical Neuropsychology

    1998-06-01

    Full text: The clinical value of Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT cerebral blood flow studies in cognitive and neuropsychiatric disorders has been well described. Currently, interpretation of these studies relies on qualitative or semi- quantitative techniques. The aim of our study is to generate statistical measures of regional cerebral perfusion in the normal elderly using statistical parametric mapping (Friston et al, Wellcome Department of Cognitive Neurology, London, UK) in order to facilitate the objective analysis of cerebral blood flow studies in patient groups. A cohort of 20 healthy, elderly volunteers, aged 68 to 81 years, was prospectively selected on the basis of normal physical examination and neuropsychological testing. Subjects with risk factors, or a history of cognitive impairment were excluded from our study group. All volunteers underwent SPECT cerebral blood flow imaging, 30 minutes following the administration of 370 MBq Tc-99m HMPAO, on a Trionix Triad XLT triple-headed scanner (Trionix Research Laboratory Twinsburg, OH) using high resolution, fan-beam collimators resulting in a system resolution of 10 mm full width at half-maximum (FWHM). The SPECT cerebral blood flow studies were analysed using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) software specifically developed for the routine statistical analysis of functional neuroimaging data. The SPECT images were coregistered with each individual`s T1-weighted MR volume brain scan and spatially normalized to standardised Talairach space. Using SPM, these data were analyzed for differences in interhemispheric regional cerebral blood flow. Significant asymmetry of cerebral perfusion was detected in the pre-central gyrus at the 95th percentile. In conclusion, the interpretation of cerebral blood flow studies in the elderly should take into account the statistically significant asymmetry in interhemispheric pre-central cortical blood flow. In the future, clinical studies will be compared to statistical data sets in age

  5. Development of a lead x-ray compensation method in simultaneous Tl-201 SPECT ampersand Tc-99m TCT using a flood source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motomura, N.; Ichihara, T.; Hasegawa, H.

    1996-01-01

    Several studies have been reported about simultaneous single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and transmission computed tomography (TCT) to obtain the attenuation map needed for non-uniform attenuation compensation methods. To perform SPECT/TCT scans, there are some TCT source and collimator configurations. In the TCT system utilizing a flood source and parallel beam collimator, the advantages are a large field-of-view without truncation, no lateral motion of the source as in the case for the scanning line method, and no fixed source position for the method with a convergent collimator. However the disadvantages of the flood source method are significant scatter component, and blockage of the detector with the flood source attached in multiple-head SPECT systems

  6. Head Lice

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nits. You should also use hot water to wash any bed linens, towels, and clothing recently worn by the person who had head lice. Vacuum anything that can’t be washed, such as the couch, carpets, your child’s car seat, and any stuffed animals. Because head lice ...

  7. Radionuclide mass transfer rates from a pinhole in a waste container for an inventory-limited and a constant concentration source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeNeveu, D.M.

    1996-03-01

    Analytical solutions for transient and steady state diffusive mass transfer rates from a pinhole in a waste container are developed for constant concentration and inventory-limited source conditions. Mass transport in three media are considered, inside the pinhole (medium 2), outside the container (medium 3) and inside the container (medium 1). Simple equations are developed for radionuclide mass transfer rates from a pinhole. It is shown that the medium with the largest mass transfer resistance need only be considered to provide a conservative estimate of mass transfer rates. (author) 11 refs., 3 figs

  8. The Clinical Role of 99mTc-(V)-DMSA Imaging in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Sun Kun; Lee, Jae Tae; Park, June Sik

    1995-01-01

    99m Tc-(V)-DMSA is a tumor seeking agent that has been used to image medullary carcinoma of thyroid, soft tissue sarcoma and lung cancer. This study was designed to assess the clinical role of DMSA in the diagnosis of head and neck cancers. We has evaluated the diagnostic efficacy of planar and SPECT imaging using 99m Tc-(V)-DMSA. Sixty-eight patients with head and neck mass were included in this study. All subjects were diagnosed by biopsy or surgery. Planar and SPECT images were obtained at 2 or 3 hour after intravenous injection of 740 MBq(20 mCi) 99m Tc-(V)-DMSA. Seventeen patients also underwent SPECT imaging using dual head camera. The diagnostic sensitivity of 99m Tc-(V)-DMSA planar and SPECT imaging was 65% and 90%, and specificity was 80% and 66%, respectively. The sensitivity of planar imaging in squamous cell carcinoma was similar to overall sensitivity. Six metastatic lesion were first diagnosed by scintigraphy. But benign lesions such as Kikuchi syndrome, tuberculous lymphadenitis also revealed increased uptake. 99m Tc-(V)-DMSA imaging seems to be a promising method in the evaluation of patients with head and neck mass. We recommend SPECT imaging to delineate anatomic localization of the lesion.

  9. Functional neuroimaging in epilepsy: FDG-PET and SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Kun; Lee, Dong Soo

    2003-01-01

    Finding epileptogenic zone is the most important step for the successful epilepsy surgery. F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) can be used in the localization of epileptogenic foci. In medial temporal lobe epilepsy, the diagnostic sensitivity of FDG-PET and ictal SPECT is excellent. However, detection of hippocampal sclerosis by MRI is so certain that use of FDG-PET and ictal SPECT in medial temporal lobe epilepsy is limited for some occasions. In neocortical epilepsy, the sensitivities of FDG-PET or ictal SPECT are fair. However, FDG-PET and ictal SPECT can have a crucial role in the localization of epileptogenic foci for non-lesional neocortical epilepsy. Interpretation of FDG-PET has been recently advanced by voxel-based analysis and automatic volume of interest analysis based on a population template. Both analytical methods can aid the objective diagnosis of epileptogenic foci. lctal SPECT was analyzed using subtraction methods and voxel-based analysis. Rapidity of injection of tracers, ictal EEG findings during injection of tracer, and repeated ictal SPECT were important technical issues of ictal SPECT. SPECT can also be used in the evaluation of validity of Wada test

  10. Functional neuroimaging in epilepsy: FDG-PET and SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Kun; Lee, Dong Soo [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-02-01

    Finding epileptogenic zone is the most important step for the successful epilepsy surgery. F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) can be used in the localization of epileptogenic foci. In medial temporal lobe epilepsy, the diagnostic sensitivity of FDG-PET and ictal SPECT is excellent. However, detection of hippocampal sclerosis by MRI is so certain that use of FDG-PET and ictal SPECT in medial temporal lobe epilepsy is limited for some occasions. In neocortical epilepsy, the sensitivities of FDG-PET or ictal SPECT are fair. However, FDG-PET and ictal SPECT can have a crucial role in the localization of epileptogenic foci for non-lesional neocortical epilepsy. Interpretation of FDG-PET has been recently advanced by voxel-based analysis and automatic volume of interest analysis based on a population template. Both analytical methods can aid the objective diagnosis of epileptogenic foci. lctal SPECT was analyzed using subtraction methods and voxel-based analysis. Rapidity of injection of tracers, ictal EEG findings during injection of tracer, and repeated ictal SPECT were important technical issues of ictal SPECT. SPECT can also be used in the evaluation of validity of Wada test.

  11. Influence of void on image quality of industrial SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J G; Jung, S H; Kim, J B; Moon, J; Kim, C H

    2013-01-01

    Industrial single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a promising technique to determine the dynamic behavior of industrial process media and has been developed in the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. The present study evaluated the influence of a void, which is presence in multiphase reactors of industrial process, on the image quality of an industrial SPECT. The results are very encouraging; that is, the performance of the industrial SPECT system is little influenced by the presence of a void, which means that industrial SPECT is an appropriate tool to estimate the dynamic characteristics of the process media in a water-air phase bubble column with a static gas sparger

  12. The effect of Compton scattering on quantitative SPECT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, J.W.; Jaszczak, R.J.; Starmer, C.F.

    1982-01-01

    A Monte Carlo code has been developed to simulate the response of a SPECT system. The accuracy of the code has been verified and has been used in this research to study and illustrate the effects of Compton scatter on quantitative SPECT measurements. The effects of Compton scattered radiation on gamma camera response have been discussed by several authors, and will be extended to rotating gamma camera SPECT systems. The unique feature of this research includes the pictorial illustration of the Compton scattered and the unscattered components of the photopeak data on SPECT imaging by simulating phantom studies with and without Compton scatter

  13. Methods of gated-blood-pool-spect data processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosa, I.; Mester, J.; Tanaka, M.; Csernay, L.; Mate, E.; Szasz, K.

    1991-01-01

    Three techniques of gated SPECT were evaluated. The methods of Integral SPECT (ISPECT), enddyastole-endsystole SPECT (ED-ES SPECT) and Fourier SPECT were adapted and developed on the Hungarian nuclear medicine data processing system microSEGAMS. The methods are based on data reduction before back projection which results in processing times acceptable for the clinical routine. The clinical performance of the introduced techniques was tested in 10 patients with old posterior myocardial infarction and in 5 patients without cardiac disease. The left ventricular ejection faction determined by ISPECT correlated well with the planar values. The correlation coefficient was 0.89. The correlation coefficient of EF values determined by ED-ES SPECT and planar radionuclide ventriculography was lower (0.70). For the identification of left ventricular wall motion abnormalities ED-ES SPECT and Fourier SPECT exhibited a favourable performance, but ISPECT only moderate suitability. In the detection of regional phase delay Fourier-SPECT demonstrated higher sensitivity than the planar radionuclide ventriculography. (author) 4 refs.; 3 figs.; 2 tabs

  14. I-123 Iofetamine SPECT scan in children with neurological disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flamini, J.R.; Konkol, R.J.; Wells, R.G.; Sty, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    I-123 Iofetamine (IMP) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging of the brain in 42 patients (ages 14 days to 23 years) was compared with other localizing studies in children with neurological diseases. All had an EEG and at least one imaging study of the brain (computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or both). Seventy-eight percent of the patients had an EEG within 24-72 hours of the IMP-SPECT scan. Thirty-five (83%) had a history of seizures, and the remainder had other neurological conditions without a history of seizures. In most cases, a normal EEG reading with normal CT or MRI result predicted a normal SPECT study. When the EEG was abnormal the majority of the IMP-SPECT scans were abnormal and localized the abnormality to the same region. A comparison with CT and MRI showed that structural abnormalities involving the cortex were usually well demonstrated with IMP-SPECT imaging. Structural lesions confined to the white matter were generally not detectable with IMP-SPECT. In a few cases, SPECT scans revealed abnormalities in deep brain areas not identified by EEG. IMP-SPECT imaging is a valuable technique for the detection and localization of abnormal cerebral metabolic activity in children with seizure disorders. A correlation with CT or MRI is essential for proper interpretation of abnormalities detected with IMP SPECT imaging

  15. Usefulness of hybrid SPECT/CT for the {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy in a case of cranial osteomyelitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruni, Chiara; Padovano, Federico; Travascio, Laura; Schillaci, Orazio; Simonetti, Giovanni [University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy). Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Molecular Imaging, Interventional Radiology and Radiotherapy]. E-mail: chiarabruni79@hotmail.com

    2008-12-15

    Cranial osteomyelitis is a potentially fatal lesion. White blood cell scanning (WBC) with {sup 99m}Tc-hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (HMPAO) has proven highly sensitive and specific in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with suspected osteomyelitis. In this report we show the usefulness of SPECT and transmission CT performed simultaneously using a hybrid imaging device for the functional anatomic mapping of soft tissue and cranial bone infections. {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO-labeled leukocytes scintigraphy was performed on an elderly diabetic man with an intracranial mass lesion and with suspected temporal bone infection. Planar scans were acquired 30 min, 4 h, and 24 h after injection. SPECT/CT was obtained 6 h after tracer injection, using a dual-head camera coupled with a low-power X-ray tube. The scintigraphic results were matched with the results of surgery and of clinical follow-up. The planar images alone were true-positives for abscess in this patient. SPECT/CT improves the accuracy of {sup 99m}Tc- HMPAO scintigraphy especially in discriminating between soft-tissue and bone involvement. In fact, SPECT/CT also showed temporal bone osteomyelitis. This result indicates that SPECT/CT performed using a hybrid device can improve imaging with {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO-labeled leukocytes in patients with suspected osteomyelitis by providing accurate anatomic localization and precise definition of the extent of infection. (author)

  16. Usefulness of hybrid SPECT/CT for the 99mTc-HMPAO-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy in a case of cranial osteomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Bruni

    Full Text Available Cranial osteomyelitis is a potentially fatal lesion. White blood cell scanning (WBC with 99mTc-hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (HMPAO has proven highly sensitive and specific in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with suspected osteomyelitis. In this report we show the usefulness of SPECT and transmission CT performed simultaneously using a hybrid imaging device for the functional anatomic mapping of soft tissue and cranial bone infections. 99mTc-HMPAO-labeled leukocytes scintigraphy was performed on an elderly diabetic man with an intracranial mass lesion and with suspected temporal bone infection. Planar scans were acquired 30 min, 4 h, and 24 h after injection. SPECT/CT was obtained 6 h after tracer injection, using a dual-head camera coupled with a low-power X-ray tube. The scintigraphic results were matched with the results of surgery and of clinical follow-up. The planar images alone were true-positives for abscess in this patient. SPECT/CT improves the accuracy of99mTc-HMPAO scintigraphy especially in discriminating between soft-tissue and bone involvement. In fact, SPECT/CT also showed temporal bone osteomyelitis. This result indicates that SPECT/CT performed using a hybrid device can improve imaging with 99mTc-HMPAO-labeled leukocytes in patients with suspected osteomyelitis by providing accurate anatomic localization and precise definition of the extent of infection.

  17. Relation between lung perfusion defects and intravascular clots in acute pulmonary thromboembolism: assessment with breath-hold SPECT-CT pulmonary angiography fusion images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suga, Kazuyoshi; Yasuhiko, Kawakami; Iwanaga, Hideyuki; Tokuda, Osamu; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    2008-09-01

    The relation between lung perfusion defects and intravascular clots in acute pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) was comprehensively assessed on deep-inspiratory breath-hold (DIBrH) perfusion SPECT-computed tomographic pulmonary angiography (CTPA) fusion images. Subjects were 34 acute PTE patients, who had successfully performed DIBrH perfusion SPECT using a dual-headed SPECT and a respiratory tracking system. Automated DIBrH SPECT-CTPA fusion images were used to assess the relation between lung perfusion defects and intravascular clots detected by CTPA. DIBrH SPECT visualized 175 lobar/segmental or subsegmental defects in 34 patients, and CTPA visualized 61 intravascular clots at variable locations in 30 (88%) patients, but no clots in four (12%) patients. In 30 patients with clots, the fusion images confirmed that 69 (41%) perfusion defects (20 segmental, 45 subsegmental and 4 lobar defects) of total 166 defects were located in lung territories without clots, although the remaining 97 (58%) defects were located in lung territories with clots. Perfusion defect was absent in lung territories with clots (one lobar branch and three segmental branches) in four (12%) of these patients. In four patients without clots, nine perfusion defects including four segmental ones were present. Because of unexpected dissociation between intravascular clots and lung perfusion defects, the present fusion images will be a useful adjunct to CTPA in the diagnosis of acute PTE.

  18. Measurement of lung water with SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, R.Y.L.; Ficken, V.J.; Ekeh, S.U.; Ryals, C.J.; Allen, E.W.; Basmadjian, G.

    1990-01-01

    This paper investigates the use of iodoantipyrine (IAP) labeled with radioactive iodine (I-123) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) to measure lung water. I-123 IAP was injected intravenously to six New Zealand White rabbits under anesthesia. After 1 hour, Tc-99m macroaggregates of albumin (MAA) were injected. SPECT imaging was performed in dual-energy mode. After a blood sample was drawn, the animals were sacrificed, and the lungs were removed. Blood samples were assayed for radioactivity. The lungs were weighed, dried, and weighted again to determine water content. The product of area defined by MAA in a tomogram and IAP count rate of central pixels of that region in the corresponding tomogram was taken as the relative amount of IAP in each lung

  19. Methodology for ventilation/perfusion SPECT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bajc, Marika; Neilly, Brian; Miniati, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    radiolabeled liquid aerosols are not restricted to the presence of obstructive lung disease. Radiolabeled macroaggregated human albumin is the imaging agent of choice for perfusion scintigraphy. An optimal combination of nuclide activities and acquisition times for ventilation and perfusion, collimators......Ventilation/perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (V/Q SPECT) is the scintigraphic technique of choice for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism and many other disorders that affect lung function. Data from recent ventilation studies show that the theoretic advantages of Technegas over......, and imaging matrix yields an adequate V/Q SPECT study in approximately 20 minutes of imaging time. The recommended protocol based on the patient remaining in an unchanged position during the initial ventilation study and the perfusion study allows presentation of matching ventilation and perfusion slices...

  20. New SPECT and PET dementia tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vergote, J.; Chalon, S.; Emond, P.; Vercouillie, J.; Guilloteau, D.; Vergote, J.; Guilloteau, D.; Pappata, J.S.

    2009-01-01

    Single photon emission tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) are techniques to study in vivo neurotransmitter systems, neuro inflammation and amyloid deposits in normal human brain and in dementia. These methods used to explore the integrity of dopaminergic, cholinergic and serotonergic systems in Alzheimer's disease and in other dementias allowed to understand how the neurotransmission was modified in these disorders. Progress in the understanding of pathophysiological and clinical signs of dementia requires an evolution of the radioligands used to carry out an increasingly early and differential diagnosis in addition to monitoring the progression of disease and the effects of therapies. New emerging radiotracers for neuro inflammation or amyloid deposits are essential. In this article, new SPECT and PET tracers are presented. (authors)

  1. SPECT/CT in pediatric patient management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadel, Helen R.

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid SPECT/CT imaging is becoming the standard of care in pediatric imaging. Indications are mainly for oncologic imaging including mIBG scintigraphy for neuroblastoma and I-123 post surgical imaging of children with thyroid carcinoma, bone scintigraphy for back pain, children referred from sports medicine and neurodevelopmentally delayed children presenting with pain symptoms. The studies provide improved diagnostic accuracy, and oncologic imaging that includes optimized CT as part of the SPECT/CT study may decrease the number of studies and sedation procedures an individual child may need. The studies, however, must be tailored on an individual basis as the addition of the CT study can increase exposure to the child and should only be performed after appropriate justification and with adherence to optimized low dose pediatric protocols. (orig.)

  2. Silicon Detectors for PET and SPECT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Eric R.

    Silicon detectors use state-of-the-art electronics to take advantage of the semiconductor properties of silicon to produce very high resolution radiation detectors. These detectors have been a fundamental part of high energy, nuclear, and astroparticle physics experiments for decades, and they hold great potential for significant gains in both PET and SPECT applications. Two separate prototype nuclear medicine imaging systems have been developed to explore this potential. Both devices take advantage of the unique properties of high resolution pixelated silicon detectors, designed and developed as part of the CIMA collaboration and built at The Ohio State University. The first prototype is a Compton SPECT imaging system. Compton SPECT, also referred to as electronic collimation, is a fundamentally different approach to single photon imaging from standard gamma cameras. It removes the inherent coupling of spatial resolution and sensitivity in mechanically collimated systems and provides improved performance at higher energies. As a result, Compton SPECT creates opportunities for the development of new radiopharmaceuticals based on higher energy isotopes as well as opportunities to expand the use of current isotopes such as 131I due to the increased resolution and sensitivity. The Compton SPECT prototype consists of a single high resolution silicon detector, configured in a 2D geometry, in coincidence with a standard NaI scintillator detector. Images of point sources have been taken for 99mTc (140 keV), 131I (364keV), and 22Na (511 keV), demonstrating the performance of high resolution silicon detectors in a Compton SPECT system. Filtered back projection image resolutions of 10 mm, 7.5 mm, and 6.7 mm were achieved for the three different sources respectively. The results compare well with typical SPECT resolutions of 5-15 mm and validate the claims of improved performance in Compton SPECT imaging devices at higher source energies. They also support the potential of

  3. Hybrid SPECT/CT imaging in neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarmiello, Andrea; Giovannini, Elisabetta; Meniconi, Martina; Cuccurullo, Vincenzo; Gaeta, Maria Chiara

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the SPECT/CT hybrid modality has led to a rapid development of imaging techniques in nuclear medicine, opening new perspectives for imaging staff and patients as well. However, while, the clinical role of positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) is well consolidated, the diffusion and the consequent value of single-photon emission tomography-computed tomography (SPECT-CT) has yet to be weighed, Hence, there is a need for a careful analysis, comparing the "potential" benefits of the hybrid modality with the "established" ones of the standalone machine. The aim of this article is to analyze the impact of this hybrid tool on the diagnosis of diseases of the central nervous system, comparing strengths and weaknesses of both modalities through the use of SWOT analysis.

  4. SPECT/CT in pediatric patient management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadel, Helen R. [British Columbia Children' s Hospital, University of British Columbia, Pediatric Radiologist and Nuclear Medicine Physician, Division of Nuclear Medicine Department of Radiology, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2014-05-15

    Hybrid SPECT/CT imaging is becoming the standard of care in pediatric imaging. Indications are mainly for oncologic imaging including mIBG scintigraphy for neuroblastoma and I-123 post surgical imaging of children with thyroid carcinoma, bone scintigraphy for back pain, children referred from sports medicine and neurodevelopmentally delayed children presenting with pain symptoms. The studies provide improved diagnostic accuracy, and oncologic imaging that includes optimized CT as part of the SPECT/CT study may decrease the number of studies and sedation procedures an individual child may need. The studies, however, must be tailored on an individual basis as the addition of the CT study can increase exposure to the child and should only be performed after appropriate justification and with adherence to optimized low dose pediatric protocols. (orig.)

  5. Types of traumatic brain injury and regional cerebral blood flow assessed by [sup 99m]Tc-HMPAO SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamakami, Iwao; Yamaura, Akira; Isobe, Katsumi [Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1993-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between focal and diffuse traumatic brain injury (TBI) and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), rCBF changes in the first 24 hours post-trauma were studied in 12 severe head trauma patients using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with [sup 99m]technetium-hexamethyl propyleneamine oxime (HMPAO). Patients were classified as focal or diffuse TBI based on x-ray computed tomographic (X-CT) findings and neurological signs. In six patients with focal damage, SPECT demonstrated: (1) perfusion defect (focal severe ischemia) in the brain region larger than the brain contusion by X-CT, (2) hypoperfusion (focal CBF reduction) in the brain region without abnormality by X-CT, and (3) localized hyperperfusion (focal CBF increase) in the surgically decompressed brain after decompressive craniectomy. Focal damage may be associated with a heterogeneous CBF change by causing various focal CBF derangements. In six patients with diffuse damage, SPECT revealed hypoperfusion in only one patient. Diffuse damage may be associated with a homogeneous CBF change by rarely causing focal CBF derangements. The type of TBI, focal or diffuse, determines the type of CBF change, heterogeneous or homogeneous, in the acute severe head trauma patient. (author).

  6. Types of traumatic brain injury and regional cerebral blood flow assessed by 99mTc-HMPAO SPECT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakami, I; Yamaura, A; Isobe, K

    1993-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between focal and diffuse traumatic brain injury (TBI) and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), rCBF changes in the first 24 hours post-trauma were studied in 12 severe head trauma patients using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with 99mtechnetium-hexamethyl propyleneamine oxime. Patients were classified as focal or diffuse TBI based on x-ray computed tomographic (X-CT) findings and neurological signs. In six patients with focal damage, SPECT demonstrated 1) perfusion defect (focal severe ischemia) in the brain region larger than the brain contusion by X-CT, 2) hypoperfusion (focal CBF reduction) in the brain region without abnormality by X-CT, and 3) localized hyperperfusion (focal CBF increase) in the surgically decompressed brain after decompressive craniectomy. Focal damage may be associated with a heterogeneous CBF change by causing various focal CBF derangements. In six patients with diffuse damage, SPECT revealed hypoperfusion in only one patient. Diffuse damage may be associated with a homogeneous CBF change by rarely causing focal CBF derangements. The type of TBI, focal or diffuse, determines the type of CBF change, heterogeneous or homogeneous, in the acute severe head trauma patient.

  7. Types of traumatic brain injury and regional cerebral blood flow assessed by 99mTc-HMPAO SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamakami, Iwao; Yamaura, Akira; Isobe, Katsumi

    1993-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between focal and diffuse traumatic brain injury (TBI) and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), rCBF changes in the first 24 hours post-trauma were studied in 12 severe head trauma patients using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with 99m technetium-hexamethyl propyleneamine oxime (HMPAO). Patients were classified as focal or diffuse TBI based on x-ray computed tomographic (X-CT) findings and neurological signs. In six patients with focal damage, SPECT demonstrated: 1) perfusion defect (focal severe ischemia) in the brain region larger than the brain contusion by X-CT, 2) hypoperfusion (focal CBF reduction) in the brain region without abnormality by X-CT, and 3) localized hyperperfusion (focal CBF increase) in the surgically decompressed brain after decompressive craniectomy. Focal damage may be associated with a heterogeneous CBF change by causing various focal CBF derangements. In six patients with diffuse damage, SPECT revealed hypoperfusion in only one patient. Diffuse damage may be associated with a homogeneous CBF change by rarely causing focal CBF derangements. The type of TBI, focal or diffuse, determines the type of CBF change, heterogeneous or homogeneous, in the acute severe head trauma patient. (author)

  8. Adaptive Angular Sampling for SPECT Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Nan; Meng, Ling-Jian

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical approach for performing adaptive angular sampling in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. It allows for a rapid determination of the optimum sampling strategy that minimizes image variance in regions-of-interest (ROIs). The proposed method consists of three key components: (a) a set of close-form equations for evaluating image variance and resolution attainable with a given sampling strategy, (b) a gradient-based algor...

  9. Neuropharmacological studies with SPECT in neuropsychiatric disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinz, Andreas; Jones, Douglas W.; Raedler, Thomas; Coppola, Richard; Knable, Michael B.; Weinberger, Daniel R. E-mail: weinberd@intra.nimh.nih.gov

    2000-10-01

    The last decade saw a rapid development of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) from a tool to assess cerebral blood flow to the study of specific neurotransmitter systems. Because of the relatively long half-life of SPECT radioisotopes, it is practical to measure the availability of neuroreceptors and transporters in conditions approaching equilibrium. The cost-efficiency of SPECT allowed studies in relatively large samples of patients with various neuropsychiatric disorders. We have applied this approach in studies of dopaminergic, serotonergic, and muscarinergic neurotransmission in patients with dementia, extrapyramidal disorders, schizophrenia, and alcoholism. No simple associations were observed between a single defect in one neurotransmitter system and a certain neuropsychiatric disease. Instead, complex dysfunction of several neurotransmitter systems in multiple, partially connected brain circuits have been implicated. Treatment effects also have been characterized. Microdialysis and neurotransmitter depletion studies showed that most radioligands and endogenous neurotransmitters compete for binding at receptors and transporters. Future research directions include the assessment of endogenous neurotransmitter concentrations measured by depletion studies and of genetic effects on neuroreceptor and transporter expression.

  10. Individual patient dosimetry using quantitative SPECT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, J.; Oliva, J.; Baum, R.; Fisher, S.

    2002-01-01

    An approach is described to provide individual patient dosimetry for routine clinical use. Accurate quantitative SPECT imaging was achieved using appropriate methods. The volume of interest (VOI) was defined semi-automatically using a fixed threshold value obtained from phantom studies. The calibration factor to convert the voxel counts from SPECT images into activity values was determine from calibrated point source using the same threshold value as in phantom studies. From selected radionuclide the dose within and outside a sphere of voxel dimension at different distances was computed through dose point-kernels to obtain a discrete absorbed dose kernel representation around the volume source with uniform activity distribution. The spatial activity distribution from SPECT imaging was convolved with this kernel representation using the discrete Fourier transform method to yield three-dimensional absorbed dose rate distribution. The accuracy of dose rates calculation was validated by software phantoms. The absorbed dose was determined by integration of the dose rate distribution for each volume of interest (VOI). Parameters for treatment optimization such as dose rate volume histograms and dose rate statistic are provided. A patient example was used to illustrate our dosimetric calculations

  11. Neuropharmacological studies with SPECT in neuropsychiatric disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinz, Andreas; Jones, Douglas W.; Raedler, Thomas; Coppola, Richard; Knable, Michael B.; Weinberger, Daniel R.

    2000-01-01

    The last decade saw a rapid development of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) from a tool to assess cerebral blood flow to the study of specific neurotransmitter systems. Because of the relatively long half-life of SPECT radioisotopes, it is practical to measure the availability of neuroreceptors and transporters in conditions approaching equilibrium. The cost-efficiency of SPECT allowed studies in relatively large samples of patients with various neuropsychiatric disorders. We have applied this approach in studies of dopaminergic, serotonergic, and muscarinergic neurotransmission in patients with dementia, extrapyramidal disorders, schizophrenia, and alcoholism. No simple associations were observed between a single defect in one neurotransmitter system and a certain neuropsychiatric disease. Instead, complex dysfunction of several neurotransmitter systems in multiple, partially connected brain circuits have been implicated. Treatment effects also have been characterized. Microdialysis and neurotransmitter depletion studies showed that most radioligands and endogenous neurotransmitters compete for binding at receptors and transporters. Future research directions include the assessment of endogenous neurotransmitter concentrations measured by depletion studies and of genetic effects on neuroreceptor and transporter expression

  12. Blood lipid levels and SPECT of myocardium perfusion to type 2 asymptomatic diabetic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pena Quian, Yamile; Fernandez-Britto Rodriguez, Jose; Coca Perez, Marco A; Batista Cuellar, Juan F; Rochela Vazquez, Luis Manuel

    2006-01-01

    SPECT, coronary angiography and laboratories test were performed on 31 asymptomatic type 2 diabetes patients, in order to determine the relationship among the lipid levels in blood and the results of the SPECT. Patients were classified in two groups (positive SPECT or negative SPECT). Simple descriptive statistics were calculated for all variables in both groups. Positive SPECT was detected in 35,5% of the patients and negative SPECT in 64,5%.The coronary angiography and SPECT showed good correlation. Low values of HDLc showed significant association with the positive results of the SPECT. The logistical regression showed an increment of the capacity to predict a positive SPECT if the values of HDLc are used. Conclusion: The present investigation demonstrated a significant association among the low levels of HDLc in blood and the positive results of the SPECT. The low values of HDLc could predict the possibility of a positive SPECT in asymptomatic diabetic type 2 patients (au)

  13. A specially designed cut-off gamma camera for high resolution SPECT of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, S.A.; Bergstrand, G.; Bergstedt, H.; Berg, J.; Flygare, O.; Schnell, P.O.; Anderson, N.; Lagergren, C.

    1984-01-01

    A modern gamma camera system for Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) has been modified in order to optimize examinations of the head. By cutting off a part of the detector housing at one edge, it has been possible to rotate the camera close to the skull, still covering the entire brain and the skull base. The minimum radius of rotation used was thereby reduced, in the mean, from 21.2 cm to 13.0 cm in examination of 18 patients. In combination with an adjustment of the 64 x 64 acquisition matrix to a field of view of 26x26 cm/sup 2/, the spatial resolution improved from 18.6 mm (FWHM) to 12.6 +- 0.3 mm (FWHM) using the conventional LEGP-collimator and to 10.4 +- 0.3 mm (FWHM) using the LEHR-collimator. No other modification than a slight cut of the light guide was made in the internal construction of the camera. Thus, the physical properties of the detector head are not essentially changed from those of a non-modified unit. The improved spatial resolution of the cut-off camera SPECT-system implies certain clinical advantages in studies of the brain, the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-space and the skull base

  14. The manifestation of 18F-FDG imaging of coincidence SPECT in benign pulmonary diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao Jisheng; Liu Jinjun; Wu Jiyong; Pan Huizhong; Wang Huoqiang; Shen Yi; Shi Degang

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study the uptake of the 18 F-FDG in the benign pulmonary diseases with dual head SPECT coincidence detection system. Methods: Scanning were performed with dual head SPECT coincidence detection system for patients with pulmonary diseases,the uptake and the imaging characteristic of the diseases were analysed. Results: 1) In 28 tuberculosis (TB) patients, 19 cases with a negative imaging (68%, 19/28), whereas 9 cases with a positive result (32%, 9/28). The T/N value of the TB is 1.7 +- 1.2, but the T/N of the lung cancer is 4.1 +- 2.4, significantly different from them. In the skin PPD test, 9 cases with positive scans showed a 16.2 (12 - 22) mm diameter red spot, but 7 cases of negative scans with a 8.6 (0 - 15) mm diameter, both also have a significant difference. 2) Out of the 8 patients suffered from sarcoidosis, among them 5 active stage with positive scans, whereas another 3 remission cases with negative results. 3) In 18 inflammation cases, positive imagings were showed in 6 patients with cryptococcosis, mycoplasma pneumonia, mycosis, organized pneumonia, lung abscess and bacteria pneumonia. Conclusions: In some benign pulmonary diseases, 18 F-FDG imaging can be positive also. Analysing the characteristic of the imaging could rise specificity in lung cancer and also give some new clues to treatment of these benign pulmonary diseases

  15. Interictal Spect with Tc-99m ECD studies in migraine patients. Role of Spect in the diagnosis of migraine with ura in headache-free periods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, F.M.; Martinez, J.J.; Bermudez, M.C.; Fernandez, B.; Delgado, J.; Martin, A.; Padilla, O.; Nieto, R.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: The migraine is one of the neurological alterations more frequent provoking a discharge morbility and big inconveniences the one that endures it. The presence of brain perfusion abnormalities during the pain-free intervals of migraine even is fueling of controversies being so numerous the supporters of its existence as whom they deny it. This study was aimed at assessing the presence of cerebral perfusion abnormalities also during the interictal phase and the role of SPECT with Tc99 ECD on diagnosis of this migrainous patients. Materials And Methods: We studied 20 patients (16 woman and 4 man) with diagnose of migraine with aura during a periods without headache and 20 apareaded controls for age and sex of this patients.Was realized brain spect with 925 MBq Tc99m-ECD on a two heads rotating gamma camera (Piker Axis) equipped with a fan-beam collimator. The images were reconstructed using a filter Mezt and presented in courts in the three axes and reconstruction in three dimensions and later they were analyzed by two observers. Results: We found 14 of the patients (70%) with images of focal hypoperfusion with clear interhemispheric asymmetry while on control groups only two have this find (10%) being this difference statistically significant. The part of the brain more affected was the occipital one, though also they predominated over the more widespread hipocaptations. Conclusion: The brain Spect is a useful technology to identify the patients with migraine, being able to be used in the periods without pain. The boss of perfusion in the patients is the located hypoperfusion and is significantly different from that of the controls, It can be explained by an impaired regional cerebral vascular autoregulation may exist even during headache-free intervals in patients suffering from migraine. Future studies must be realized to determine if it exists relation between the zone of hypoperfusion and the type of present symptomatology in the aura

  16. SPECT and PET imaging in epilepsia; SPECT und PET in der Diagnostik von Epilepsien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landvogt, C. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2007-09-15

    In preoperative localisation of epileptogenic foci, nuclear medicine diagnostics plays a crucial role. FDG-PET is used as first line diagnostics. In case of inconsistent MRI, EEG and FDG-PET findings, {sup 11}C-Flumazenil-PET or ictal and interictal perfusion-SPECT should be performed. Other than FDG, Flumazenil can help to identify the extend of the region, which should be resected. To enhance sensitivity and specificity, further data analysis using voxelbased statistical analyses or SISCOM (substraction ictal SPECT coregistered MRI) should be performed.

  17. Dopamine-transporter SPECT and Dopamine-D2-receptor SPECT in basal ganglia diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesse, S.; Barthel, H.; Seese, A.; Sabri, O.

    2007-01-01

    The basal ganglia comprise a group of subcortical nuclei, which are essential for motor control. Dysfunction of these areas, especially in dopaminergic transmission, results in disordered movement and neurological diseases such as Parkinson's disease, Wilson's disease, or Huntington disease. Positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) have enhanced the understanding of the underlying pathophysiology, but they much more contribute to the early differential diagnosis of patients suffering from Parkinsonian syndrome in routine care. The present article provides dopamine transporter and D 2 receptor SPECT findings in selected movement disorders. (orig.)

  18. Reconstruction of quasimonochromatic images for multispectral x-ray imaging with a pinhole array and a flat Bragg mirror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumi, N.; Barbee, T. W.; Koch, J. A.; Mancini, R. C.; Welser, L. A.

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a software package for reconstruction of quasimonochromatic images from a multiple monochromatic x-ray imager for inertial confinement fusion implosions. The instrument consists of a pinhole array, a multilayer Bragg mirror, and an image detector. The pinhole array projects hundreds of images onto the detector after reflection off the multilayer Bragg mirror, which introduces spectral dispersion along the reflection axis. The quasimonochromatic images of line emissions and continuum emissions can be used for measurement of temperature and density maps of implosion plasmas. In this article, we describe a computer-aided processing technique for systematic reconstruction of quasimonochromatic images from raw data. This technique provides flexible spectral bandwidth selection and allows systematic subtraction of continuum emission from line emission images

  19. Tomographic and analog 3-D simulations using NORA. [Non-Overlapping Redundant Image Array formed by multiple pinholes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, L. I.; Trombka, J. I.; Bielefeld, M. J.; Seltzer, S. M.

    1984-01-01

    The results of two computer simulations demonstrate the feasibility of using the nonoverlapping redundant array (NORA) to form three-dimensional images of objects with X-rays. Pinholes admit the X-rays to nonoverlapping points on a detector. The object is reconstructed in the analog mode by optical correlation and in the digital mode by tomographic computations. Trials were run with a stick-figure pyramid and extended objects with out-of-focus backgrounds. Substitution of spherical optical lenses for the pinholes increased the light transmission sufficiently that objects could be easily viewed in a dark room. Out-of-focus aberrations in tomographic reconstruction could be eliminated using Chang's (1976) algorithm.

  20. Single order soft X-ray diffraction with quasi-random radius pinhole array spectroscopic photon sieves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Qiang-Qiang; Wei Lai; Yang Zu-Hua; Qian Feng; Fan Quan-Ping; Zhang Bo; Gu Yu-Qiu; Cao Lei-Feng

    2014-01-01

    A novel single order diffraction grating in the soft X-ray region, called quasi-random radius pinhole array spectroscopic photon sieves (QRSPS), is proposed in this paper. This new grating is composed of pinholes on a substrate, whose radii are quasi-random, while their centers are regular. Analysis proves that its transmittance function across the grating bar is similar to that of sinusoidal transmission gratings. Simulation results show that the QRSPS can suppress higher-order diffraction effectively. And the QRSPS would still retain its characteristic of single order diffraction when we take the effect of X-ray penetration into account. These properties indicate that the QRSPS can be used in the soft X-ray spectra measurement. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  1. The feasibility study on 3-dimensional fluorescent x-ray computed tomography using the pinhole effect for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunaguchi, Naoki; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Zeniya, Tsutomu

    2013-01-01

    We propose a 3-dimensional fluorescent x-ray computed tomography (CT) pinhole collimator, aimed at providing molecular imaging with quantifiable measures and sub-millimeter spatial resolution. In this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of this concept and investigate imaging properties such as spatial resolution, contrast resolution and quantifiable measures, by imaging physical phantoms using a preliminary imaging system developed with monochromatic synchrotron x rays constructed at the BLNE-7A experimental line at KEK, Japan.

  2. Head Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a severe blow to the head can still knock the brain into the side of the skull ... following certain precautions and taking a break from sports and other activities that make symptoms worse. Playing ...

  3. Qualitative evaluation of Chang method of attenuation correction on heart SPECT by using custom made heart phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takavar, A.; Eftekhari, M.; Beiki, D.; Saghari, M.; Mostaghim, N.; Sohrabi, M.

    2003-01-01

    SPECT detects γ- rays from administrated radiopharmaceutical within the patient body. γ-rays pass through different tissues before reaching detectors and are attenuated. Attenuation can cause artifacts; therefore different and used to minimize attenuation effects. In our study efficacy of Chang method was evaluated for attenuation purpose, using a custom made heart phantom. Due to different tissues surrounding heart, evaluation is not uniform more over activity distribution around heart is also non- uniform. In Chang method distribution of radioactivity and attenuation due to the surrounding tissue is considered uniform. Our phantom is a piece of plastic producing similar SPECT image as left ventricle. A dual head, ADAC system was used in our study. Images were taken by 180 d ig C (limited angle) and 360 d ig C (total rotation). Images are compared with and without attenuation correction. Our results indicate that Chang attenuation correction method is not capable of eliminating attenuation artifact completely in particular attenuation effects caused by breast

  4. Obtaining absolute spatial flux measurements with a time-resolved pinhole camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, K.L.; Porter, J.L.; Ruggles, L.E.; Fehl, D.L.; Chandler, G.A.; Vargas, M.; Mix, L.P.; Simpson, W.W.; Deeney, C.; Chrien, R.E.; Idzorek, G.C.

    1999-01-01

    A technique is described to determine the spatial x-ray flux emitted from a hohlraum wall and subsequently transmitted through a diagnostic hole. This technique uses x-ray diodes, bolometers, and a time-resolved pinhole camera to determine the spatial flux of x rays emitted through a hohlraum close-quote s diagnostic hole. The primary motivation for this analysis was the relatively long duration, nearly 100 ns, of the x-ray drive present in z-pinch driven hohlraums. This radiation causes plasma to ablate from the hohlraum walls surrounding the diagnostic hole and results in a partial obscuration that reduces the effective area over which diagnostics view the radiation. The effective change in area leads to an underestimation of the wall temperature when nonimaging diagnostics such as x-ray diodes and bolometers are used to determine power and later to infer a wall temperature. An analysis similar to the one described below is then necessary to understand the radiation environment present in x-ray driven hohlraums when these diagnostics are used and hole closure is important. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  5. Estimation of signal intensity for online measurement X-ray pinhole camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Jianjun; Liu Shenye; Yang Guohong; Yu Yanning

    2009-01-01

    The signal intensity was estimated for on-line measurement X-ray pinhole camera with CCD as measurement equipment. The X-ray signal intensity counts after the attenuation of thickness-varied Be filters and different material flat mirrors respectively were estimated using the energy spectrum of certain laser prototype and the quantum efficiency curve of PI-SX1300 CCD camera. The calculated results indicate that Be filters no thicker than 200 μm can only reduce signal intensity by one order of magnitude, and so can Au flat mirror with 3 degree incident angle, Ni, C and Si flat mirrors with 5 degree incident angle,but the signal intensity counts for both attenuation methods are beyond the saturation counts of the CCD camera. We also calculated the attenuation of signal intensity for different thickness Be filters combined with flat mirrors, indicates that the combination of Be filters with the thickness between 20 and 40 μm and Au flat mirror with 3 degree incident angle or Ni flat mirror with 5 degree incident angle is a good choice for the attenuation of signal intensity. (authors)

  6. Novel energy resolving x-ray pinhole camera on Alcator C-Moda)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pablant, N. A.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Bitter, M.; Brandstetter, S.; Eikenberry, E.; Ellis, R.; Hill, K. W.; Hofer, P.; Schneebeli, M.

    2012-10-01

    A new energy resolving x-ray pinhole camera has been recently installed on Alcator C-Mod. This diagnostic is capable of 1D or 2D imaging with a spatial resolution of ≈1 cm, an energy resolution of ≈1 keV in the range of 3.5-15 keV and a maximum time resolution of 5 ms. A novel use of a Pilatus 2 hybrid-pixel x-ray detector [P. Kraft et al., J. Synchrotron Rad. 16, 368 (2009), 10.1107/S0909049509009911] is employed in which the lower energy threshold of individual pixels is adjusted, allowing regions of a single detector to be sensitive to different x-ray energy ranges. Development of this new detector calibration technique was done as a collaboration between PPPL and Dectris Ltd. The calibration procedure is described, and the energy resolution of the detector is characterized. Initial data from this installation on Alcator C-Mod is presented. This diagnostic provides line-integrated measurements of impurity emission which can be used to determine impurity concentrations as well as the electron energy distribution.

  7. Preliminary study on X-ray fluorescence computed tomography imaging of gold nanoparticles: Acceleration of data acquisition by multiple pinholes scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaya, Tenta; Sunaguchi, Naoki; Seo, Seung-Jum; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Zeniya, Tsutomu; Kim, Jong-Ki; Yuasa, Tetsuya

    2018-04-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have recently attracted attention in nanomedicine as novel contrast agents for cancer imaging. A decisive tomographic imaging technique has not yet been established to depict the 3-D distribution of GNPs in an object. An imaging technique known as pinhole-based X-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) is a promising method that can be used to reconstruct the distribution of GNPs from the X-ray fluorescence emitted by GNPs. We address the acceleration of data acquisition in pinhole-based XFCT for preclinical use using a multiple pinhole scheme. In this scheme, multiple projections are simultaneously acquired through a multi-pinhole collimator with a 2-D detector and full-field volumetric beam to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of the projections; this enables fast data acquisition. To demonstrate the efficacy of this method, we performed an imaging experiment using a physical phantom with an actual multi-pinhole XFCT system that was constructed using the beamline AR-NE7A at KEK. The preliminary study showed that the multi-pinhole XFCT achieved a data acquisition time of 20 min at a theoretical detection limit of approximately 0.1 Au mg/ml and at a spatial resolution of 0.4 mm.

  8. Technical Note: Development of a 3D printed subresolution sandwich phantom for validation of brain SPECT analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negus, Ian S.; Holmes, Robin B.; Thorne, Gareth C.; Saunders, Margaret; Jordan, Kirsty C.; Nash, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To make an adaptable, head shaped radionuclide phantom to simulate molecular imaging of the brain using clinical acquisition and reconstruction protocols. This will allow the characterization and correction of scanner characteristics, and improve the accuracy of clinical image analysis, including the application of databases of normal subjects. Methods: A fused deposition modeling 3D printer was used to create a head shaped phantom made up of transaxial slabs, derived from a simulated MRI dataset. The attenuation of the printed polylactide (PLA), measured by means of the Hounsfield unit on CT scanning, was set to match that of the brain by adjusting the proportion of plastic filament and air (fill ratio). Transmission measurements were made to verify the attenuation of the printed slabs. The radionuclide distribution within the phantom was created by adding 99m Tc pertechnetate to the ink cartridge of a paper printer and printing images of gray and white matter anatomy, segmented from the same MRI data. The complete subresolution sandwich phantom was assembled from alternate 3D printed slabs and radioactive paper sheets, and then imaged on a dual headed gamma camera to simulate an HMPAO SPECT scan. Results: Reconstructions of phantom scans successfully used automated ellipse fitting to apply attenuation correction. This removed the variability inherent in manual application of attenuation correction and registration inherent in existing cylindrical phantom designs. The resulting images were assessed visually and by count profiles and found to be similar to those from an existing elliptical PMMA phantom. Conclusions: The authors have demonstrated the ability to create physically realistic HMPAO SPECT simulations using a novel head-shaped 3D printed subresolution sandwich method phantom. The phantom can be used to validate all neurological SPECT imaging applications. A simple modification of the phantom design to use thinner slabs would make it suitable for

  9. Technical Note: Development of a 3D printed subresolution sandwich phantom for validation of brain SPECT analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negus, Ian S.; Holmes, Robin B.; Thorne, Gareth C.; Saunders, Margaret [Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, Bristol BS28HW (United Kingdom); Jordan, Kirsty C. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G11XQ (United Kingdom); Nash, David A. [Department of Medical Physics, Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Portsmouth PO63LY (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-15

    Purpose: To make an adaptable, head shaped radionuclide phantom to simulate molecular imaging of the brain using clinical acquisition and reconstruction protocols. This will allow the characterization and correction of scanner characteristics, and improve the accuracy of clinical image analysis, including the application of databases of normal subjects. Methods: A fused deposition modeling 3D printer was used to create a head shaped phantom made up of transaxial slabs, derived from a simulated MRI dataset. The attenuation of the printed polylactide (PLA), measured by means of the Hounsfield unit on CT scanning, was set to match that of the brain by adjusting the proportion of plastic filament and air (fill ratio). Transmission measurements were made to verify the attenuation of the printed slabs. The radionuclide distribution within the phantom was created by adding {sup 99m}Tc pertechnetate to the ink cartridge of a paper printer and printing images of gray and white matter anatomy, segmented from the same MRI data. The complete subresolution sandwich phantom was assembled from alternate 3D printed slabs and radioactive paper sheets, and then imaged on a dual headed gamma camera to simulate an HMPAO SPECT scan. Results: Reconstructions of phantom scans successfully used automated ellipse fitting to apply attenuation correction. This removed the variability inherent in manual application of attenuation correction and registration inherent in existing cylindrical phantom designs. The resulting images were assessed visually and by count profiles and found to be similar to those from an existing elliptical PMMA phantom. Conclusions: The authors have demonstrated the ability to create physically realistic HMPAO SPECT simulations using a novel head-shaped 3D printed subresolution sandwich method phantom. The phantom can be used to validate all neurological SPECT imaging applications. A simple modification of the phantom design to use thinner slabs would make it suitable

  10. Frequencies and implications of discordant findings of interictal SPECT and itcal SPECT in patients with intractable epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D. S.; Lee, S. K.; Jeong, J. K.; Lee, M. C.; Ko, C. S.

    1997-01-01

    Interictal SPECT could be used at best as a reference image to ictal SPECT, and cause sometimes confusion if it had given unexplained discordant findings from ictal SPECT. We investigated implications of discordant findings which occurred in 26 among 268 which found their epileptogenic zones using ictal EEG and/or operative outcome. Sensitivity of interictal SPECT was only 36%. Among these 268, 69 patients had no structural lesions on MR, 14 of whom had decreased perfusion on interictal SPECT (8 trues and 6 falses (adjacent or contralateral)). Structural lesion were found in 199 on MR, 103 of whom had decreased perfusion (89 trues and 14 falses). Among 26 having discordant cases, 10 interictal SPECT were proved wrong after operation and/or invasive EEG and the other 16 were on speculation using PET and ictal EEG. Ictal hyperperfusion was observed in 14 patients in these interictal SPECT. Six ictal studies were found postictal accompanied by contralateral propagation or not. Two patients had dual pathology, and the remaining 2 unknown. Interictal SPECT was done on the 2nd day after ictal study(24), the 3rd day (18), the 4th day(16), the 5th day (23). Four among 24 interictal studies (17%) of the 2nd day and the other 4 among 57 of 3rd to 5th day revealed ictal hyperperfusion on interictal SPECT. Six interictal studies (2.7% among 221) acquired on the indifferent day showed also ictal hyperperfusion. We could suggest that the next day is not desirable for interictal SPECT after ictal study, as ictal hyperperfusion on interictal study confounded more than postictal findings of ictal SPECT in the discrete localization than reassuring ictal study

  11. Frequencies and implications of discordant findings of interictal SPECT and itcal SPECT in patients with intractable epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D S; Lee, S K; Jeong, J K; Lee, M C; Ko, C S [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    Interictal SPECT could be used at best as a reference image to ictal SPECT, and cause sometimes confusion if it had given unexplained discordant findings from ictal SPECT. We investigated implications of discordant findings which occurred in 26 among 268 which found their epileptogenic zones using ictal EEG and/or operative outcome. Sensitivity of interictal SPECT was only 36%. Among these 268, 69 patients had no structural lesions on MR, 14 of whom had decreased perfusion on interictal SPECT (8 trues and 6 falses (adjacent or contralateral)). Structural lesion were found in 199 on MR, 103 of whom had decreased perfusion (89 trues and 14 falses). Among 26 having discordant cases, 10 interictal SPECT were proved wrong after operation and/or invasive EEG and the other 16 were on speculation using PET and ictal EEG. Ictal hyperperfusion was observed in 14 patients in these interictal SPECT. Six ictal studies were found postictal accompanied by contralateral propagation or not. Two patients had dual pathology, and the remaining 2 unknown. Interictal SPECT was done on the 2nd day after ictal study(24), the 3rd day (18), the 4th day(16), the 5th day (23). Four among 24 interictal studies (17%) of the 2nd day and the other 4 among 57 of 3rd to 5th day revealed ictal hyperperfusion on interictal SPECT. Six interictal studies (2.7% among 221) acquired on the indifferent day showed also ictal hyperperfusion. We could suggest that the next day is not desirable for interictal SPECT after ictal study, as ictal hyperperfusion on interictal study confounded more than postictal findings of ictal SPECT in the discrete localization than reassuring ictal study.

  12. Limited role of I-123 IPT SPECT in differentiating essential tremor from early stage of Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Y. H.; Yoon, M. J.; Lee, J. D.; Kim, J. H.; Lee, E.; Kim, H. S.; Choi, T. H.

    2002-01-01

    The study was to assess clinically applicable cut-off value in differential diagnosis among early stage of Parkinson's disease(PD) and essential tremor(ET) and normal control(NL) groups on I-123 IPT SPECT using dual head gamma camera both quantitatively and qualitatively. 50 NL (mean age 27.9), 20 early PD patients (mean age 58.2), 30 advanced PD patients (mean age 63.1) and 20 ET patients (mean age 39.9) were included and performed brain SPECT 2 hours after administration of I-123 IPT using dual head gamma camera. Recostructed SPECT data were assessed for specific/nonspecific binding ratio of striatum using (RBG-OCC/OCC, LBG-OCC/OCC) ratio. RBG-OCC/OCC and LBG-OCC/OCC ratio was decreased with increasing grade of H-Y stage in PD. Mean value of specific/nonspecific binding ratio was significantly different between advanced PD group and NL group. However, significant overlap of striatal specific/nonspecific bonding ratio were observed between early PD group and ET group. Suggested cut-off value of striatal binding ratio which can diagnose PD would be 2.1. Although I-123 IPT SPECT may be a useful method for the diagnosis of advanced PD and objective evaluation of progress of clinical stages, care should be made in the differential diagnosis of subclinical and early stage of PD and other motor distubances mimicking PD such as ET in view of significant overlap in striatal I-123 IPT specific/nonspecific binding ratio

  13. Pre-evaluation study in SPECT images using a phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebelo, Marina de Sa; Furuie, Sergio Shiguemi; Abe, Rubens; Moura, Lincoln

    1996-01-01

    An alternative solution for the reconstruction of SPECT images using a Poisson Noise Model is presented. The proposed algorithm was applied on a real phantom and compared to the standard clinical procedures. Results have shown that the proposed method improves the quality of the SPECT images

  14. Ictal cerebral perfusion patterns in partial epilepsy: SPECT subtraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyang Woon; Hong, Seung Bong; Tae, Woo Suk; Kim, Sang Eun; Seo, Dae Won; Jeong, Seung Cheol; Yi, Ji Young; Hong, Seung Chyul

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the various ictal perfusion patterns and find the relationships between clinical factors and different perfusion patterns. Interictal and ictal SPECT and SPECT subtraction were performed in 61 patients with partial epilepsy. Both positive images showing ictal hyperperfusion and negative images revealing ictal hypoperfusion were obtained by SPECT subtraction. The ictal perfusion patterns of subtracted SPECT were classified into focal hyperperfusion, hyperperfusion-plus, combined hyperperfusion-hypoperfusion, and focal hypoperfusion only. The concordance rates with epileptic focus were 91.8% in combined analysis of ictal hyperperfusion and hypoperfusion images of subtracted SPECT, 85.2% in hyperperfusion images only of subtracted SPECT, and 68.9% in conventional ictal SPECT analysis. Ictal hypoperfusion occurred less frequently in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) than extratemporal lobe epilepsy. Mesial temporal hyperperfusion alone was seen only in mesial TLE while lateral temporal hyperperfusion alone was observed only in neocortical TLE. Hippocampal sclerosis had much lower incidence of ictal hypoperfusion than any other pathology. Some patients showed ictal hypoperfusion at epileptic focus with ictal hyperperfusion in the neighboring brain regions where ictal discharges propagated. Hypoperfusion as well as hyperperfusion in ictal SPECT should be considered for localizing epileptic focus. Although the mechanism of ictal hypoperfusion could be an intra-ictal early exhaustion of seizure focus or a steal phenomenon by the propagation of ictal discharges to adjacent brain areas, further study is needed to elucidate it.=20

  15. Ictal cerebral perfusion patterns in partial epilepsy: SPECT subtraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyang Woon; Hong, Seung Bong; Tae, Woo Suk; Kim, Sang Eun; Seo, Dae Won; Jeong, Seung Cheol; Yi, Ji Young; Hong, Seung Chyul [Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-06-01

    To investigate the various ictal perfusion patterns and find the relationships between clinical factors and different perfusion patterns. Interictal and ictal SPECT and SPECT subtraction were performed in 61 patients with partial epilepsy. Both positive images showing ictal hyperperfusion and negative images revealing ictal hypoperfusion were obtained by SPECT subtraction. The ictal perfusion patterns of subtracted SPECT were classified into focal hyperperfusion, hyperperfusion-plus, combined hyperperfusion-hypoperfusion, and focal hypoperfusion only. The concordance rates with epileptic focus were 91.8% in combined analysis of ictal hyp