WorldWideScience

Sample records for head injured patients

  1. Missed posterior dislocation of the hip in a head-injured patient with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Head injury increases the risk of missed diagnosis by making patient-derived history impossible. The risk of missing a posterior dislocation of the hip in a head-injured patient is aggravated when an ipsilateral femoral shaft fracture co-exists. Adequate radiological evaluation of bone and joints is therefore of ...

  2. Role of T2 weighted magnetic resonance image in chronic phase of head injured patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uzura, Masahiko; Taguchi, Yoshio; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Chiba, Syunmei; Matsuzawa, Motoshi

    2002-01-01

    In neuroimaging studies of head injury, addition of echo planar imaging (EPI) T2-weighted images (WI) to routine MR images has been useful in demonstrating small hemorrhagic lesions as magnetic susceptibility artifacts (MSAs). MSAs are often found in the acute or subacute phases of head injured patients with diffuse axonal injury. We studied MSAs in follow-up MR images of patients with diffuse brain injury and discuss the role of EPI T2-WI in patients with chronic phase of head injured patients. This series consisted of 20 patients with diffuse brain injury diagnosed clinically. Their head CT findings were classified into Diffuse Injury I or II according to the CT classification of Marshall et al. All patients underwent long-term follow-up MR examinations. MR findings in chronic phase were divided into three categories in terms of MSAs: group A, MSAs remaining even after disappearance of small traumatic lesions in both T2-WI and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images (11 cases); group B, MSA (s) that disappeared in association with disappearance of small traumatic lesions (4 cases); and group C, MSAs that remained but could not be differentiated from non-traumatic lesions such as hemorrhagic lacunae or cavernoma (5 cases). Adding EPI T2-WI to routine MR images can provide useful information in visualizing old traumatic lesions of the brain in patients with diffuse brain injury even if no neuroimaging studies in acute or subacute phase. (author)

  3. Nonhemorrhagic brain lesions detected by magnetic resonance imaging in closed head injured patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Yoshihiro; Hiraide, Atsushi; Yoshioka, Toshiji; Sugimoto, Tadashi; Ichimura, Teruhisa; Saito, Akira; Ohno, Yoshioki.

    1990-01-01

    This study evaluated the diagnostic usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 83 closed head injured patients in whom CT failed to detect focal intra or extraaxial hematoma and/or apparent brain contusion. The patients were divided into three groups on the basis of unconsciousness duration: Group 1 comprised 50 patients diagnosed as having classical cerebral concussion; group 2 comprised 19 patients who presented to the hospital with 6-hr unconsciousness and was recovered within a week; and group 3 comprised 14 patients whose unconsciousness persisted for a week or more. There was no CT evidence of abnormal findings for group 1; and intraventricular hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage were visualized on CT in 26% and 16%, respectively, for group 2 and 71% and 14% for group 3. Intraaxial nonhemorrhagic lesions were detected on T2-weighted MRI. According to high signal intensity, diffuse axonal injury and cortical contusion could be distinguished; i.e., in the former the corpus callosum, basal ganglia, or brain stem showed a high signal intensity, and in the latter the frontal, temporal, or parietal lobe adjacent to the skull showed a low signal intensity. T2-weighted MRI revealed cortical contusion in 6% for group 1, 37% for group 2, and 14% for group 3; and diffuse axonal injury in 42% for group 2 and 79% for group 3. For 62 patients with normal CT findings, diffuse axonal injury was detected in 88%. There was a good correlation between intraventricular hemorrhage on CT and diffuse axonal injury on MRI. In conclusion, T2-weighted MRI was significantly superior to CT in detecting nonhemorrhagic lesions, and it was of great help for predicting neurologic recovery in closed head injured patients without apparent focal lesions on CT. (N.K.)

  4. Metabolic crisis in severely head-injured patients: is ischemia just the tip of the iceberg?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carre, Emilie; Ogier, Michael; Boret, Henry; Montcriol, Ambroise; Bourdon, Lionel; Jean-Jacques, Risso

    2013-10-11

    Ischemia and metabolic crisis are frequent post-traumatic secondary brain insults that negatively influence outcome. Clinicians commonly mix up these two types of insults, mainly because high lactate/pyruvate ratio (LPR) is the common marker for both ischemia and metabolic crisis. However, LPR elevations during ischemia and metabolic crisis reflect two different energetic imbalances: ischemia (Type 1 LPR elevations with low oxygenation) is characterized by a drastic deprivation of energetic substrates, whereas metabolic crisis (Type 2 LPR elevations with normal or high oxygenation) is associated with profound mitochondrial dysfunction but normal supply of energetic substrates. The discrimination between ischemia and metabolic crisis is crucial because conventional recommendations against ischemia may be detrimental for patients with metabolic crisis. Multimodal monitoring, including microdialysis and brain tissue oxygen monitoring, allows such discrimination, but these techniques are not easily accessible to all head-injured patients. Thus, a new "gold standard" and adapted medical education are required to optimize the management of patients with metabolic crisis.

  5. Metabolic crisis in severely head-injured patients: is ischemia just the tip of the iceberg?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie eCarre

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Ischemia and metabolic crisis are frequent post-traumatic secondary brain insults that negatively influence outcome. Clinicians commonly mix up these two types of insults, mainly because high lactate/pyruvate ratio (LPR is the common marker for both ischemia and metabolic crisis. However, LPR elevations during ischemia and metabolic crisis reflect two different energetic imbalances: ischemia (Type 1 LPR elevations with low oxygenation is characterized by a drastic deprivation of energetic substrates, whereas metabolic crisis (Type 2 LPR elevations with normal or high oxygenation is associated with profound mitochondrial dysfunction but normal supply of energetic substrates. The discrimination between ischemia and metabolic crisis is crucial because conventional recommendations against ischemia may be detrimental for patients with metabolic crisis. Multimodal monitoring, including microdialysis and brain tissue oxygen monitoring, allows such discrimination, but these techniques are not easily accessible to all head-injured patients. Thus, a new gold standard and adapted medical education are required to optimize the management of patients with metabolic crisis.

  6. The Effects of Endotracheal Suctioning with Manual Hyperventilation on Cerebrovascular Status of Closed Head Injured Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-02-02

    PERFORMING ORGANIZATION 6b. OFFICE SYMBOL 7a. NAME OF MONITORING ORGANIZATION AFIT STUDENT AT (if applicable) AFIT/CIA Univ of MDI 6c. ADDRESS (City, State...Medicine, Pediatrics, ICU USAF Regional Hospital RAF Lakenheath, England 1987-Present Graduate Student Air Force Institute of Technology University...open or closed head injury to determine the acute physiologic alterations in cerebrovascular status that occurred during chest physiotherapy (CPT). ICP

  7. The effect of level of processing on perceptual and conceptual priming: control versus closed-head-injured patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakil, E; Sigal, J

    1997-07-01

    Twenty-four closed-head-injured (CHI) and 24 control participants studied two word lists under shallow (i.e., nonsemantic) and deep (i.e., semantic) encoding conditions. They were then tested on free recall, perceptual priming (i.e., perceptual partial word identification) and conceptual priming (i.e., category production) tasks. Previous findings have demonstrated that memory in CHI is characterized by inefficient conceptual processing of information. It was thus hypothesized that the CHI participants would perform more poorly than the control participants on the explicit and on the conceptual priming tasks. On these tasks the CHI group was expected to benefit to a lesser degree from prior deep encoding, as compared to controls. The groups were not expected to significantly differ from each other on the perceptual priming task. Prior deep encoding was not expected to improve the perceptual priming performance of either group. All findings were as predicted, with the exception that a significant effect was not found between groups for deep encoding in the conceptual priming task. The results are discussed (1) in terms of their theoretical contribution in further validating the dissociation between perceptual and conceptual priming; and (2) in terms of the contribution in differentiating between amnesic and CHI patients. Conceptual priming is preserved in amnesics but not in CHI patients.

  8. [Carotid artery injury: value of Doppler screening in head injured patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terminassian, A; Bonnet, F; Guerrini, P; Ricolfi, F; Delaunay, F; Beydon, L; Catoire, P

    1992-01-01

    A case is reported of a patient with a traumatic aneurysm of the intracranial part of the carotid artery occurring after a traffic accident. The patient was admitted in coma (Glasgow score 5), and presented with a depressed fracture of the frontal and parietal bones, a fracture of the left petrous pyramid and of the left anterior clinoid process, as well as of the right tympanic bone and temporomandibular joint. The borders of the left carotid canal seemed unaltered. Despite the lack of localised neurological signs, cervical and transcranial Doppler ultrasonography was carried out. Intracranial carotid blood flow was found to be altered on both sides. Angiography showed a false carotid aneurysm on the left side (carotid siphon portion C3), and a moderate irregular stenosis of the C2 part on the right. There were no brain lesions on the CT scan. Prophylactic treatment with heparin was started. The patient recovered normal consciousness within a fortnight. The false aneurysm increased in volume and was treated by embolisation. Flow speeds in the carotid siphons also returned to normal. The usefulness of routine screening of patients with petrous bone fractures with Doppler ultrasound is discussed.

  9. Present status of severe head injured patients with an admission glasgow coma scale score of 3 based on the Japan neurotrauma data bank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uzura, Masahiko

    2011-01-01

    Severe head injured patients presenting with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 3 have been hesitated to treat aggressively. We analyzed present status of patients with GCS score of 3 from the Project 2004 in the Japan Neurotrauma Data Bank. Among 1,101 cases registered, 805 cases with GCS score of 8 or less on admission. Of those, 215 cases with GCS score of 3 were classified the survival group (51 cases) and the dead group (164 cases) and compared each group. These results showed that the characteristics associated with favorable outcome including absence of cardiopulmonary arrest, no abnormality of pupil findings, stable condition of respiration and circulation, serum glucose level (less than 184 mg/dl), absence of initial CT findings including skull base fracture, pneumocephalus and subarachnoid hemorrhage, no serious extracranial injures including Injury Severity Scale score of less than 25, critic al care including intracranial pressure monitoring and temperature management. We suggest that it is important to treat brain and systemic problems aggressively in severe head injured patients with GCS score of 3. (author)

  10. Considerations for the head-injured air-evacuated patient: a case report of frontal sinus fracture and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helling, Eric; McKinlay, Alex J

    2005-07-01

    Head and neck injuries are not uncommon in combat environments and may be increasing due to survivable injuries from the use of kevlar helmets and body armor. With the current capability of rapid evacuation from the battlefield, acutely injured patients with frontal sinus injuries may undergo further barometric challenges. Proper care during transport can prevent the occurrence of secondary injury (increased intracranial pressure, tension pneumocephalus) that would complicate the patient's management at the next level of care. Management principles (importance of low-level flight/pressurized cabin, preflight use of decongestants, avoidance of valsalva, and ability to manage complications either procedurally or by landing) are reviewed. In addition, we propose a simple mechanism for pressure equilibration of a compromised frontal sinus during air evacuation using an angiocatheter placed through the wound before closure.

  11. Memory for the perceptual and semantic attributes of information in pure amnesic and severe closed-head injured patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlesimo, Giovanni A; Bonanni, Rita; Caltagirone, Carlo

    2003-05-01

    This study investigated the hypothesis that brain damaged patients with memory disorder are poorer at remembering the semantic than the perceptual attributes of information. Eight patients with memory impairment of different etiology and 24 patients with chronic consequences of severe closed-head injury were compared to similarly sized age- and literacy-matched normal control groups on recognition tests for the physical aspect and the semantic identity of words and pictures lists. In order to avoid interpretative problems deriving from different absolute levels of performance, study conditions were manipulated across subjects to obtain comparable accuracy on the perceptual recognition tests in the memory disordered and control groups. The results of the Picture Recognition test were consistent with the hypothesis. Indeed, having more time for the stimulus encoding, the two memory disordered groups performed at the same level as the normal subjects on the perceptual test but significantly lower on the semantic test. Instead, on the Word Recognition test, following study condition manipulation, patients and controls performed similarly on both the perceptual and the semantic tests. These data only partially support the hypothesis of the study; rather they suggest that in memory disordered patients there is a reduction of the advantage, exhibited by normal controls, of retrieving pictures over words (picture superiority effect).

  12. Comparison of respiratory quotient and resting energy expenditure in two regimens of enteral feeding - continuous vs. intermittent in head-injured critically ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indubala Maurya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Measurement of respiratory quotient (RQ and resting energy expenditure (REE has been shown to be helpful in designing nutritional regimens. There is a paucity of the literature describing the impact of a feeding regimen on the energy expenditure patterns. Therefore, we studied the effect of continuous vs. intermittent feeding regimen in head-injured patients on mechanical ventilation on RQ and REE . Methods: After institutional ethical approval, this randomized study was conducted in 40 adult male patients with head injury requiring controlled mode of ventilation. Patients were randomly allocated into two groups. Group C: Feeds (30 kcal/kg/day were given for 18 h/day, with night rest for 6 h. Group I: Six bolus feeds (30 kcal/kg/day were given three hourly for 18 h with night rest for 6 h. RQ and REE were recorded every 30 min for 24 h. Blood sugar was measured 4 hourly. Other adverse effects such as feed intolerance, aspiration were noted. Results: Demographic profile and SOFA score were comparable in the two groups. Base line RQ (0.8 vs. 0.86 and REE (1527 vs. 1599 kcal/day were comparable in both the groups (P>0.05. RQ was comparable in both groups during the study period at any time of the day (P>0.05. Base line RQ was compared with all other RQ values measured every half hour and fluctuation from the base line value was insignificant in both groups (P>0.05. REE was comparable in both the groups throughout the study period (P>0.5. Adequacy of feeding as assessed by EI/MREE was 105.7% and 105.3% in group C and group I, respectively. There was no significant difference in the blood sugar levels between the two groups (P>0.05. Conclusion: We found from our study that RQ, REE, and blood sugar remain comparable with two regimens of enteral feeding - continuous vs. intermittent in neurosurgical patients on ventilator support in a ICU setup.

  13. Expert medical testimony for your injured patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Gerald J

    2013-10-01

    Many injured patients sustain some type of loss. If someone else is responsible for the injury, the injured patient can pursue compensation for this loss. In the course of treating an injured patient, you may be asked to participate in the legal process to resolve such claims. The basic components of a personal injury claim are reviewed. An overview of the legal process will help clarify your role in the legal process. Enhanced understanding will allow you to provide important medical testimony for your injured patient.

  14. Nursing care of the thermally injured patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfving, U

    1980-01-01

    Team work is required in the treatment of the thermally injured patient--nursing staff being part of the team. The nurses are with the patient for 24 hours a day and they have to understand the objectives of all other members of the team involved in the treatment as well as thoroughly mastering their own work. For the nursing staff the care of the thermally injured patient is a challenge. The work demands strong motivation and interest--it includes at times painful treatment, isolation and also constant alertness. It is important that the nursing staff is given continuous training so that they are able to give the required care efficiently and to keep up active interest. Practical work is the best way of getting aquainted with the complex forms of treatment of the thermally injured patient. It also lessens the fear of a badly burned patient. Nursing care of the thermally injured patient consists of good basic care, local attention and active observation. The basic care consists of basic hygiene, diet, observation of the patient's psychological condition, giving emotional support, encouraging initiative physiotherapy and postural treatment.

  15. The critically ill injured patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cereda, Maurizio; Weiss, Yoram G; Deutschman, Clifford S

    2007-03-01

    Patients admitted to the ICU after severe trauma require frequent procedures in the operating room, particularly in cases where a damage control strategy is used. The ventilatory management of these patients in the operating room can be particularly challenging. These patients often have severely impaired respiratory mechanics because of acute lung injury and abdominal compartment syndrome. Consequently, the pressure and flow generation capabilities of standard anesthesia ventilators may be inadequate to support ventilation and gas exchange. This article presents the problems that may be encountered in patients who have severe abdominal and lung injuries, and the current management concepts used in caring for these patients in the critical care setting, to provide guidelines for the anesthetist faced with these patients in the operating room.

  16. Head and face injuries and helmet use among injured motorcyclists with road accidents in Isfahan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Dadkhah

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIM: The study aimed to assess the frequency of head and face injuries in motorcyclists who had an accident and to find out the relationship between helmet use and frequency of these injuries. METHODS: A cross-sectional study with multi-stage sampling method provides data on the injured motorcyclists with road accidents. Data came from a registration form which has documented information of each injured person who had a road accident and hospitalized in the biggest hospital of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Iran (Al-Zahra. All the registration forms were surveyed for hospitalization period, treatment costs, severity of injury, and date of accident during 2010 (n = 1626. Later, among the list of injured motorcyclists during the last 3 months of the registration form, 125 cases were randomly selected and interviewed by phone regarding occurrence of the head and face injuries and whether wearing helmet during the accident. Confidence intervals (CI, Chi-square, and Phi and Cramer’s correlation coefficient were applied. The ethical approval was provided. RESULTS: Accident by motorcycle was 31.0% of all road accidents. The frequency of motorcycle accidents was higher in the autumn and among 21-25 year olds. The mean period of hospitalization was 4.3 days and the mean of hospital costs was about 9000000 Rials [about 8200 United States dollar (USD, in 2010]. Of motorcyclist, 35.0% reported they were helmeted when they had the accident. The frequency of head and face injuries was 51.0% among all the injured motorcyclists, 22.0% and 78.0% among the helmeted and non-helmeted motorcyclists, respectively (P = 0.009, r = -0.267. CONCLUSION: Motorcycle accidents comprise a large number of road accidents and cause substantial morbidity and financial impact for the community members. Head and face injuries are the most common trauma in motorcyclists, and the injury rate is higher among non-helmeted motorcyclists.

  17. Cause of Mortality in Thermally Injured Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    11 patients, Cladosporium species from nine patients, Penicillium species from seven patients, and Phycomycetes ( mucor species and rhizopus species...infecting organisms were filamentous fungi, Aspergillus species in 16 and Mucor species in two, and in four patients C(nlida species were the causative...surface. Twelve, or 75 %, of the 16 patients with Aspergillus wound infections died but, somewhat surprisingly, both of the patients with mucor species

  18. Long-term functional health status of severely injured patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holtslag, H. R.; Post, M. W.; Lindeman, E.; Van der Werken, Chr.

    Background: Studies of the consequences of major trauma have traditionally focused on mortality rates. The aims of this study were, firstly, to investigate the long-term functional health status in a large, unselected group of severely injured patients and to compare this with normative data, and

  19. Coagulopathy: Its Pathophysiology and Treatment in the Injured Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-30

    death. In fact, in their series, 77% of brain-injured patients who died had a coagulopathy at the time of hospital admission.8 Similarly, Faringer et...coagulation process. Arch Surg 1996;131:923–927. 9. Faringer PD, Mullins RJ, Johnson RL, Trunkey DD. Blood component supplementation during massive

  20. Recovery of an injured fornix in a stroke patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Sang Seok; Jang, Sung Ho

    2013-11-01

    Knowledge about recovery of an injured fornix following brain injury is limited. We describe here a patient who showed recovery of an injured fornix following stroke. A 57-year-old female patient underwent coiling for a ruptured anterior communicating cerebral artery aneurysm, and conservative management for subarachnoid and intraventricular haemorrhage. The patient showed severe cognitive impairment 6 weeks after onset. However, her cognition showed continuous improvement with time; based on the Mini-Mental State Examination and the Memory Assessment Scale, her cognition was within the normal range 7 months after onset. Findings from diffusion tensor tractography at 6 weeks and 7 months showed discontinuations in both columns of the fornix. The proximal portion of both crus also showed discontinuation on diffusion tensor tractography at 6 weeks and 7 months; however, on 7-month diffusion tensor tractography, the end of the fornical body was shown to be connected to the splenium of the corpus callosum and then branched to the right medial temporal lobe and right thalamus. The unusual neural connection between the injured fornix and the thalamus appears to be a recovery phenomenon, which allows the injured fornix and the medial temporal lobe to obtain cholinergic innervation from cholinergic nuclei in the brainstem rather than from cholinergic nuclei in the basal forebrain.

  1. Thromboembolic Complications in Thermally Injured Patients,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-12-01

    profilaxis con brdld vanec entre 0.4% et 7%. La signification cliniquc de ces heparina, militan en contra de su uso rutinario, excepto en Ev~nements est...centros adopten rutinariamente la profilaxis 8. Purdue, G.F., Hunt, J.L.: Pulmonary emboli in burned patients. J. con heparina de baja dosificaci6n. Se

  2. Diagnostic imaging of the acutely injured patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berquist, T.H.

    1985-01-01

    This book provides an analysis of pathophysiologic concepts of trauma and reviews the effectiveness of the available imaging modalities in acute trauma of various organ system. Topics covered are chest injuries; abdominal trauma; fractures of long bones; the foot and ankle; the knee; hand and wrist; the elbow; the shoulder; the pelvis hips; the spine; the skull and facial trauma and the clinical assessment of multiple injuries patients. Comparative evaluation of diagnostic techniques of radiography is discussed. Normal anatomy and bone fractures along with soft-tissue injuries are described

  3. Ventilator Technologies Sustain Critically Injured Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Consider this scenario: A soldier has been critically wounded in a sudden firefight in a remote region of Afghanistan. The soldier s comrades attend to him and radio for help, but the soldier needs immediate medical expertise and treatment that is currently miles away. The connection between medical support for soldiers on the battlefield and astronauts in space may not be immediately obvious. But when it comes to providing adequate critical care, NASA and the military have very similar operational challenges, says Shannon Melton of NASA contractor Wyle Integrated Science and Engineering. Melton works within Johnson Space Center s Space Medicine Division, which supports astronaut crew health before, during, and after flight. In space, we have a limited number of care providers, and those providers are not always clinicians with extensive medical training. We have limited room to provide care, limited consumables, and our environment is not like that of a hospital, she says. The Space Medicine Division s Advanced Projects Group works on combining the expertise of both clinicians and engineers to develop new capabilities that address the challenges of medical support in space, including providing care to distant patients. This field, called telemedicine, blends advanced communications practices and technologies with innovative medical devices and techniques to allow caregivers with limited or no medical experience to support a patient s needs. NASA, just by its nature, has been doing remote medicine since the beginning of the Space Program, says Melton, an engineer in the Advanced Projects Group. Since part of NASA s mandate is to transfer the results of its technological innovation for the benefit of the public, the Agency has worked with doctors and private industry to find ways to apply the benefits of space medicine on Earth. In one such case, a NASA partnership has resulted in new technologies that may improve the quality of emergency medicine for wounded

  4. Recovery of injured Broca's portion of arcuate fasciculus in the dominant hemisphere in a patient with traumatic brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Jang, Sung Ho; Ha, Ji Wan; Kim, Hyun Young; Seo, You Sung

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Recovery of injured AF in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) has not been reported. In this study, we report on a patient with TBI who recovered from an injury to Broca's portion of AF in the dominant hemisphere, diagnosed by diffusion tensor tractography (DTT). Patient concerns: A 28-year-old right-handed male patient suffered head trauma resulting from sliding while riding a motorcycle. Diagnoses: He was diagnosed with a traumatic contusional hemorrhage in the le...

  5. Diagnostic radiology on multiple injured patients: interdisciplinary management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linsenmaier, U.; Pfeifer, K.J.; Kanz, K.G.; Mutschler, W.

    2001-01-01

    The presence of a radiologist within the admitting area of an emergency department and his capability as a member of the trauma team have a major impact on the role of diagnostic radiology in trauma care. The knowledge of clinical decision criteria, algorithms, and standards of patient care are essential for the acceptance within a trauma team. We present an interdisciplinary management concept of diagnostic radiology for trauma patients, which comprises basic diagnosis, organ diagnosis, radiological ABC, and algorithms of early clinical care. It is the result of a prospective study comprising over 2000 documented multiple injured patients. The radiologist on a trauma team should support trauma surgery and anesthesia in diagnostic and clinical work-up. The radiological ABC provides a structured approach for diagnostic imaging in all steps of the early clinical care of the multiple injured patient. Radiological ABC requires a reevaluation in cases of equivocal findings or difficulties in the clinical course. Direct communication of radiological findings with the trauma team enables quick clinical decisions. In addition, the radiologist can priority-oriented influence the therapy by using interventional procedures. The clinical radiologist is an active member of the interdisciplinary trauma team, not only providing diagnostic imaging but also participating in clinical decisions. (orig.) [de

  6. Reconstruction of Injured Carotid Artery in a Comatose Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arben Zenelaj

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A man 30 years old,was brought to the emergency department after being injured on the left side of the neck area.Massive bleeding from the wound caused by glass was observed.The patient was in cerebral coma and hemorrahagic shock.The eye pupils remained isochoric during and after the operation.He was taken immediately at the surgery room.The bleeding was stopped by using external compression.Exposure of the left neck blood vessels was carried out.The left common carotid artery and internal jugular vein was revealed.A provisory Pruitt-Inahara shunt was put in the common carotid artery,while teh injured vein was ligated.The suture of the left common carotid artery using Prolen 6-0 completed the procedure.After the surgery the patient was transferred to the intensive care unit.About two hours later he woke up,conscious.The left thoracic drainage because of the hemothorax was applied in the second postoperative day.The patient was lively and discharged from the hospitall in the 14-th postoperative day.The right facial paresis and mild left side hemiparesis persisted.Two months after the event no residual neurologic deficits were observed. [Cukurova Med J 2014; 39(3.000: 598-601

  7. [A case of traumatic middle meningeal arteriovenous fistula on the side of the head opposite to the injured side].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Satoru; Takasato, Yoshio; Masaoka, Hiroyuki; Hayakawa, Takanori; Otani, Naoki; Yoshino, Yoshikazu; Yatsushige, Hiroshi; Sugawara, Takashi; Aoyagi, Chikashi; Suzuki, Go

    2009-10-01

    A rare case of a traumatic middle meningeal arteriovenous fistula on the side of the head opposite to the injured side was reported. A 21-year-old man was admitted to our hospital after a traffic accident in which the right side of his head was hit. CT scans and MR images on admission showed a right temporal bone fracture, traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage, and a left frontal lobe contusion. Three months after the head injury, he complained of tinnitus and exophthalmos. One year after the head injury, left external carotid angiograms showed a dural arteriovenous fistula fed by the left dilated middle meningeal artery and draining into the middle meningeal vein. Early filling of the sphenoparietal sinus, cavernous sinus, superior ophthalmic vein, and the cortical vein were also detected. Transarterial embolization of the left middle meningeal fistula was performed, resulting in the disappearance of the lesion. The postoperative course was uneventful.

  8. Management of Sexual Disorders in Spinal Cord Injured Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander R Vaccaro

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injured (SCI patients have sexual disorders including erectile dysfunction (ED, impotence, priapism, ejaculatory dysfunction and infertility. Treatments for erectile dysfunction include four steps. Step 1 involves smoking cessation, weight loss, and increasing physical activity. Step 2 is phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDE5I such as Sildenafil (Viagra, intracavernous injections of Papaverine or prostaglandins, and vacuum constriction devices. Step 3 is a penile prosthesis, and Step 4 is sacral neuromodulation (SNM. Priapism can be resolved spontaneously if there is no ischemia found on blood gas measurement or by Phenylephrine. For anejaculatory dysfunction, massage, vibrator, electrical stimulation and direct surgical biopsy can be used to obtain sperm which can then be used for intra-uterine or in-vitro fertilization. Infertility treatment in male SCI patients involves a combination of the above treatments for erectile and anejaculatory dysfunctions. The basic approach to and management of sexual dysfunction in female SCI patients are similar as for men but do not require treatment for erectile or ejaculatory problems.

  9. Employment among Spinal Cord Injured Patients Living in Turkey: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunduz, Berrin; Erhan, Belgin; Bardak, Ayse Nur

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the rate of employment and to establish the factors affecting vocational status in spinal cord injured patients living in Turkey. One hundred and fifty-two traumatic spinal cord injured patients older than 18 years with injury duration of at least 1 year and living in the community were included in the study;…

  10. A model to predict progression in brain-injured patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tommasino, N; Forteza, D; Godino, M; Mizraji, R; Alvarez, I

    2014-11-01

    The study of brain death (BD) epidemiology and the acute brain injury (ABI) progression profile is important to improve public health programs, organ procurement strategies, and intensive care unit (ICU) protocols. The purpose of this study was to analyze the ABI progression profile among patients admitted to ICUs with a Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) ≤8, as well as establishing a prediction model of probability of death and BD. This was a retrospective analysis of prospective data that included all brain-injured patients with GCS ≤8 admitted to a total of four public and private ICUs in Uruguay (N = 1447). The independent predictor factors of death and BD were studied using logistic regression analysis. A hierarchical model consisting of 2 nested logit regression models was then created. With these models, the probabilities of death, BD, and death by cardiorespiratory arrest were analyzed. In the first regression, we observed that as the GCS decreased and age increased, the probability of death rose. Each additional year of age increased the probability of death by 0.014. In the second model, however, BD risk decreased with each year of age. The presence of swelling, mass effect, and/or space-occupying lesion increased BD risk for the same given GCS. In the presence of injuries compatible with intracranial hypertension, age behaved as a protective factor that reduced the probability of BD. Based on the analysis of the local epidemiology, a model to predict the probability of death and BD can be developed. The organ potential donation of a country, region, or hospital can be predicted on the basis of this model, customizing it to each specific situation.

  11. MRI findings in acute diffuse axonal injured patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hidetaka

    2001-01-01

    Diffuse axonal injury (DAI) in the acute stage was clinically evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is considered superior to computed tomography (CT) in detecting parenchymal brain lesions. MRI was disadvantageous, however, to patients suffering from acute severe head injury because of the long time required to construct imaging and unstable patient vital signs. We conducted MRI safely under a high magnetic field (1.5 tesla) in acute DAI by close observation and with nonmagnetic respirator and electrocardiographic monitoring. MRI was conducted in 95 patients diagnosed with DAI classified into mild (14), moderate (17) and severe (64) DAI by criteria established by Gennarelli (1986). In patients with mild or moderate DAI, CT revealed no lesion in the parenchymal area although MRI detected lesions in every case, mainly in cortical white matter or basal ganglia. In patients with severe DAI, CT revealed parenchymal lesions in 14 although MRI detected further lesions in cortical white matter, basal ganglia, corpus callosum and brainstem in every case. These results correspond well to the experimental model Gennarelli's. This study concluded that MRI was useful in assessing acute DAI patients. (author)

  12. O que lembra o paciente com TCE sobre o período de hospitalização? Lo que recuerda el enfermero com TCE sobre el periodo de hospitalización? Head injured patients: what they recall about their hospitalization time?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Alves

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Trata-se da análise das lembranças do período de internação referidas pelos pacientes que sofreram TCE de diferentes gravidades. O estudo foi realizado no ambulatório de Trauma de Crânio do Instituto Central do HC-FMUSP com amostra de 45 pacientes conscientes e capazes de manter entrevista. Predominaram pacientes do sexo masculino, adultos jovens, que tiveram como causas acidentes de trânsito e quedas. A maioria (86,0% informou ter ficado desacordada em diferentes tempos de duração e nada recordar deste período. Naqueles que sempre estiveram alertas ou que acordaram ainda internados as lembranças relacionaram-se com ter visto, sentido, ouvido ou reagido a sons e procedimentos.Se estudiaron los recuerdos que enfermos de TCE de distinta gravedad tienen del periodo de hospitalización. El estudio fue realizado en el servicio de consulta externa de traumatismo del Cráneo del Instituto Central del HC - FMUSP y fueron entrevistados 45 enfermos conscientes y capaces de contestar preguntas. La mayoría de los enfermos eran del sexo masculino, jóvenes y víctimas de accidentes de tránsito y caídas. La mayoría de los enfermos (86% dijeron no estar despiertos en todos los momentos y que no se recordaban de nada del periodo. Los recuerdos relatados por los que estuvieron despiertos y también por aquellos que se despertaron durante la hospitalización, eran sobre todo mirar, sentir, oír o reaccionar a sonidos y procedimientos.Traumatic brain injured (TBI patients with different trauma severity were analyzed about their recollection concerning the period of hospitalization. The study was carried out in the Head Injury Outpatient Clinic at the Central Institute of the FMUSP Hospital including 45 conscious patients able to sustain an interview. Most patients were male, young adults with the major cause of trauma such as traffic accidents and falls. Most patients (86% reported uncosciouness state of different time duration in their

  13. Correlation study of podocyte injur y and kidney function in patients with acute kidney injur y

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-Gang Feng

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the correlation between the podocyte injury indexes in urine such as nephrin, desmin, P-cadherin, podocin, podocalyxin and CD2-associated protein (CD2AP and the kidney function in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI. Methods: A total of 120 severe postsurgical patients treated in the Intensive Care Unit of our hospital from May 2012 to October 2015 were selected and divided into AKI group (n = 38 and non-AKI group (n = 82 according to the diagnostic criteria of AKI. After admission to the Intensive Care Unit for 24 h, their blood samples were collected to detect the contents of serum creatinine (Scr, serum urea (SUrea, b2-microglobulin (b2-MG and cystatin C (Cys-C, and urine samples were collected to detect the contents of kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1, liver-type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP, Netrin-1, nephrin, desmin, P-cadherin, podocin, podocalyxin and CD2AP. Results: For patients in AKI group, the contents of Scr, SUrea, b2-MG and Cys-C in their blood samples and the contents of KIM-1, L-FABP, Netrin-1, nephrin, desmin, Pcadherin, podocin, podocalyxin and CD2AP in their urine samples were both significantly higher than those in non-AKI group. The contents of nephrin, desmin, P-cadherin, podocin, podocalyxin and CD2AP in urine samples and contents of Scr, SUrea, b2-MG, Cys-C and neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin in blood samples were positively correlated with the contents of KIM-1, L-FABP, and Netrin-1 in urine. Conclusions: Contents of podocyte injury molecules in urine of patients with acute kidney injury such as nephrin, desmin, P-cadherin, podocin, podocalyxin and CD2AP raised remarkably and the changes were consistent with the changes of kidney function indexes in the blood and urine samples.

  14. Collecting core data in severely injured patients using a consensus trauma template: an international multicentre study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringdal, Kjetil G; Lossius, Hans Morten; Jones, J Mary

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: No worldwide, standardised definitions exist for documenting, reporting, and comparing data from severely injured trauma patients. This study evaluated the feasibility of collecting the data variables of the international consensus-derived Utstein Trauma Template. METHODS:...

  15. Evaluation of bronchiectasis in war chemically-injured patients via high resolution computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Jalli

    2017-12-01

    Discussion and conclusion: Findings of chest HRCT demonstrated tubular bronchiectasis was the most frequent type of this disease that involve the chemically injured patients and RLL had been the most frequently involved lobe of the lung with bronchiectasis.

  16. Not a NICE CT protocol for the acutely head injured child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willis, A.P.; Latif, S.A.A.; Chandratre, S.; Stanhope, B.; Johnson, K.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To assess the impact of the introduction of the Birmingham Children's Hospital (BCH) head injury computed tomography (CT) guidelines, when compared with the National Institute of Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines, on the number of children with head injuries referred from the Emergency Department (ED) undergoing a CT examination of the head. Material and methods: All children attending BCH ED over a 6-month period with any severity of head injury were included in the study. ED case notes were reviewed and data were collected on a specifically designed proforma. Indications for a CT examination according to both NICE and BCH head injury guidelines and whether or not CT examinations were performed were recorded. Results: A total of 1428 children attended the BCH ED following a head injury in the 6-month period. The median age was 4 years (range 6 days to 15 years) and 65% were boys. Four percent of children were referred for a CT using BCH guidelines and were appropriately examined. If the NICE guidelines had been strictly adhered to a further 8% of children would have undergone a CT examination of the head. All of these children were discharged without complication. The remaining 88% had no indication for CT examination by either BCH or NICE and appropriately did not undergo CT. Conclusions: Adherence to the NICE head injury guidelines would have resulted in a three-fold increase in the total number of CT examinations of the head. The BCH head injury guidelines are both safe and appropriate in the setting of a large children's hospital experienced in the management of children with head injuries

  17. Alcohol consumption, blood alcohol concentration level and guideline compliance in hospital referred patients with minimal, mild and moderate head injuries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harr, Marianne Efskind; Heskestad, Ben; Ingebrigtsen, Tor

    2011-01-01

    In 2000 the Scandinavian Neurotrauma Committee published guidelines for safe and cost-effective management of minimal, mild and moderate head injured patients.The aims of this study were to investigate to what extent the head injury population is under the influence of alcohol, and to evaluate...... whether the physicians' compliance to the guidelines is affected when patients are influenced by alcohol....

  18. Prehospital transport of spinal cord-injured patients in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... most patients (55.4%) lying on their back during transfer. The majority of the patients (75%) had been taken to at least one other hospital before arriving at our casualty departments. The mortality rate was 16.7%. Multivariate analysis after adjusting for age, gender and means of transportation revealed that age (odds ratio ...

  19. Facial Expression Recognition for Traumatic Brain Injured Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilyas, Chaudhary Muhammad Aqdus; Nasrollahi, Kamal; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the issues associated with facial expression recognition of Traumatic Brain Insured (TBI) patients in a realistic scenario. These patients have restricted or limited muscle movements with reduced facial expressions along with non-cooperative behavior, impaired reason...

  20. Management of blunt liver trauma in 134 severely injured patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hommes, Martijn; Navsaria, Pradeep H; Schipper, Inger B; Krige, J E J; Kahn, D; Nicol, Andrew John

    2015-05-01

    In haemodynamic stable patients without an acute abdomen, nonoperative management (NOM) of blunt liver injuries (BLI) has become the standard of care with a reported success rate of between 80 and 100%. Concern has been expressed about the potential overuse of NOM and the fact that failed NOM is associated with higher mortality rate. The aim of this study was to evaluate factors that might indicate the need for surgical intervention, and to assess the efficacy of NOM. A single centre prospective study between 2008 and 2013 in a level-1 Trauma Centre. One hundred thirty four patients with BLI were diagnosed on CT-scan or at laparotomy. The median ISS was 25 (range 16-34). Thirty five (26%) patients underwent an early exploratory laparotomy. The indication for surgery was haemodynamic instability in 11 (31%) patients, an acute abdomen in 16 (46%), and 8 (23%) patients had CT findings of intraabdominal injuries, other than the hepatic injury, that required surgical repair. NOM was initiated in 99 (74%) patients, 36 patients had associated intraabdominal solid organ injuries. Seven patients developed liver related complications. Five (5%) patients required a delayed laparotomy (liver related (3), splenic injury (2)). NOM failure was not related to the presence of shock on admission (p=1000), to the grade of liver injury (p=0.790) or associated intraabdominal injuries (p=0.866). Physiologic behaviour or CT findings dictated the need for operative intervention. NOM of BLI has a high success rate (95%). Nonoperative management of BLI should be considered in patients who respond to resuscitation, irrespective of the grade of liver trauma. Associated intraabdominal solid organ injuries do not exclude NOM. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [Classification of severely injured patients in the G-DRG System 2008].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhra, C; Franz, D; Roeder, N; Vordemvenne, T; Raschke, M J

    2009-05-01

    Since the introduction of a per-case reimbursement system in Germany (German Diagnosis-Related Groups, G-DRG), the correct reimbursement for the treatment of severely injured patients has been much debated. While the classification of a patient in a polytrauma DRG follows different rules than the usual clinical definition, leading to a high number of patients not grouped as severely injured by the system, the system was also criticized in 2005 for its shortcomings in financing the treatment of severely injured patients. The development of financial reimbursement will be discussed in this paper. 167 patients treated in 2006 and 2007 due to a severe injury at the University-Hospital Münster and grouped into a polytrauma-DRG were included in this study. For each patient, cost-equivalents were estimated. For those patients treated in 2007 (n=110), exact costs were calculated following the InEK cost-calculation method. The reimbursement was calculated using the G-DRG-Systems of 2007, 2008 and 2009. Cost-equivalents/costs and clinical parameters were correlated. A total of 167 patients treated in 2006 and 2007 for a severe injury at the Münster University Hospital and grouped into a polytrauma DRG were included in this study. Cost equivalents were estimated for each patient. For those patients treated in 2007 (n=110), exact costs were calculated following the InEK (Institute for the Hospital Remuneration System) cost calculation method. Reimbursement was calculated using the G-DRG systems of 2007, 2008 and 2009. Cost equivalents/costs and clinical parameters were correlated. With the ongoing development of the G-DRG system, reimbursement for the treatment of severely injured patient has improved, but the amount of underfinancing remains substantial. As treatment of severely injured patients must be reimbursed using the G-DRG system, this system must be further adapted to better meet the needs of severely injured patients. Parameters such as total surgery time, injury

  2. Return to work and quality of life in severely injured patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, R. B.; Van der Sluis, C. K.; Ten Duis, H. J.

    2006-01-01

    Background. Little is known about the long-term consequences of severe injuries in terms of return to productivity and quality of life. Methods. In this study we focused on the return to work status and quality of life in 53 severely injured patients (AIS/ISS >= 16, mean ISS 24, range 16 - 54), mean

  3. Return to work and quality of life in severely injured patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, R. B.; Van der Sluis, C. K.; Ten Duis, H. J.

    Background. Little is known about the long-term consequences of severe injuries in terms of return to productivity and quality of life. Methods. In this study we focused on the return to work status and quality of life in 53 severely injured patients (AIS/ISS >= 16, mean ISS 24, range 16 - 54), mean

  4. The relationship between physical and psychological complaints and quality of life in severely injured patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Delft-Schreurs, K.; van Delft-Schreurs, C.C.H.M.; van Son, M.A.C.; de Jongh, M.A.C.; Lansink, K.W.W.; de Vries, J.; Verhofstad, M.H.J.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was two-fold. The first goal was to investigate which variables were associated with the remaining physical limitations of severely injured patients after the initial rehabilitation phase. Second, we investigated whether physical limitations were attributable to the

  5. The relationship between physical and psychological complaints and quality of life in severely injured patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Delft-Schreurs, K. (Katinka); C.C.H.M. van Delft-Schreurs (C. C H M); M.A.C. van Son; M.A.C. de Jongh (Mariska); K.W.W. Lansink (Koen); J. de Vries (Jolanda); M.H.J. Verhofstad (Michiel)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: The purpose of this study was two-fold. The first goal was to investigate which variables were associated with the remaining physical limitations of severely injured patients after the initial rehabilitation phase. Second, we investigated whether physical limitations were

  6. Pattern of Pressure Sores in Spinal Injured Patients with in the First ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Before 2006, all our spinal injured patients were nursed on conventional form mattress without pressure redistributing support surface. Pressure sore was a common complication and was a major contributing factor to prolonged hospitalization. Aim: The aim of this study is to determine the pattern of pressure ...

  7. Assesment of Osteoporosis in Medulla Spinalis Injured Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuhal Bayırlı Karakoyun

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To investigate the relationship between osteoporosis and demographic features, clinical characteristics,risk factors in younger SCI patients. Materials and Methods: Between January-June 2009, all SCI patients admitted to our hospital evaluated and 58 patients who were younger than 50 years who had osteoporosis were enrolled.Patients age, gender, educational status, duration of injury, smoking, sunlight exposure and dietary habits were questioned. Neurological level, completeness, ambulation status and spasticity were assessed. Relationship between these findings with the severity of osteoporosis has been viewed. Results: There were 19 women. Mean age was 35,7 years. The mean time since injury were 117.7 months. 42 patients were paraplegia (17 complete, 16 were tetraplegia (4 complete.The most common osteoporotic site where the legs. There was no correlation between BMD values with age. In men, the legs and total body BMD were significantly lower.The effect of educational level on BMD was not found. No significant correlation was found between time since injury and BMD. In paraplegics, femoral neck and total femur Z-scores were significantly lower. In tetraplegics, Z scores of the arms were lower, but was not significant. Lumbar BMD values of complete patients were significantly lower than incompletes. Sunlight exposure and consumption of milk/milk products had not a significant positive effect on BMD. 8 patients had therapeutic ambulation, whereas 23 of them had community ambulation. Ambulation status of patients and the presence of spasticity was no effect on BMD. There was no significant correlation between BMD and the severity of spasticity. Smokers (n=19, bone density was lower in all regions except for femoral neck but were not significantly. Conclusion: Male gender, paraplegia, and incompleteness negatively effects the bone density. Age, time since injury, education level, spasticity, ambulation level, smoking, sunlight exposure and

  8. The prevalence and impact of prescription controlled substance use among injured patients at a Level I trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Robert; Bozeman, Matthew; Miller, Keith Roy; Smith, Jason Wayne; Harbrecht, Brian; Franklin, Glen; Benns, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    There has been increasing attention focused on the epidemic of prescription drug use in the United States, but little is known about its effects in trauma. The purpose of this study was to define the prevalence of prescription controlled substance use among trauma patients and determine its effects on outcome. A retrospective review of all patients admitted to a Level 1 trauma center from January 1, 2011, to December 31, 2011, was performed. Patients dying within 24 hours or without home medication reconciliations were excluded. Data review included preexisting benzodiazepine or narcotic use, sex, age, mechanism of injury, Injury Severity Scores (ISSs), intensive care unit (ICU) and overall length of stay, ventilator days, and overall cost. SAS version 9.3 was used for the analysis, and p ≤ 0.05 was considered significant. A total of 1,700 patients met inclusion criteria. Of these, 340 (20.0%) were on prescription narcotics and/or benzodiazepines at the time of admission. Patients in the narcotic/benzodiazepine group were significantly older (48 years vs. 43 years) and more likely to be women (43.7% vs. 28.9%). There was no difference in mechanism, ISS, or the presence of head injury between groups. Both ICU length of stay (3.3 days vs. 2.1 days) and total length of stay (7.8 days vs. 6.1 days) were significantly longer in patients on outpatient narcotics and/or benzodiazepines. Excluding severely injured patients, the need for mechanical ventilation was also increased among outpatient controlled substance users (15.8% vs. 11.0%). There is a substantial prevalence of preexisting controlled substance use (20%) among patients at our Level 1 trauma center. Preexisting controlled substance use is associated with longer total hospital and ICU stays. Among mildly to moderately injured patients, preinjury controlled substance is also associated with the need for mechanical ventilation. Prognostic study, level III.

  9. Common generic measures of health related quality of life in injured patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, David; Morshed, Saam

    2011-03-01

    The measurement of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) through generic outcome instruments is important for comparisons of populations across disease states and interventions. The growing number of questionnaires available has made selection and interpretation more difficult. Profile instruments such as the SF-36 and Sickness Impact Profile provide insight into various domains of health with established population norms. Preference-based measures, including the EQ-5D, Health Utilities Index, SF-6D, and QWB-SA are used to generate utility scores, which can be used for cost-effectiveness analysis and therefore have particular relevance in health policy. Both types of generic measures have been used in clinical trials in injured populations to assess the relative impact of interventions on quality-of-life. Comparisons of internal consistency and test-retest reliability across measures reveal minimal differences between instruments, and reported values are acceptable for group comparisons but insufficient for individual clinical use. There is a dearth of studies evaluating the validity of these measures in the trauma population, but available data suggest most of the available instruments are acceptable. Populations that may require special consideration are patients with head, spinal cord, and upper-extremity injuries. Practical issues to consider in selecting a questionnaire include time for completion, which ranges from less than 2 min for the EQ-5D to 20-30 min for the Sickness Impact Profile. Selection of the appropriate measure ultimately depends largely on the population to be studied and whether utility-estimation is desired. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [The challenge of adequate reimbursement for the seriously injured patient in the German DRG system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, D; Lefering, R; Siebert, H; Windolf, J; Roeder, N; Mahlke, L

    2013-02-01

    Critically injured patients are a very heterogeneous group, medically and economically. Their treatment is a major challenge for both the medical care and the appropriate financial reimbursement. Systematic underfunding can have a significant impact on the quality of patient care. In 2009 the German Trauma Society and the DRG-Research Group of the University Hospital Muenster initialised a DRG evaluation project to analyse the validity of case allocation of critically injured patients within the German DRG system versions 2008 and 2011 with additional consideration of clinical data from the trauma registry of the German Trauma Society. Severe deficits within the G-DRG structure were identified and specific solutions were designed and realised. A retrospective analysis was undertaken of standardised G-DRG data (§ 21 KHEntgG) including case-related cost data from 3 362 critically injured patients in the periods 2007 and 2008 from 10 university hospitals and 7 large municipal hospitals. For 1 241 cases of the sample, complementary detailed information was available from the trauma registry of the German Trauma Society to monitor the case allocation of critically injured patients within the G-DRG system. Analyses of coding and grouping, performance of case allocation, and the homogeneity of costs in the G-DRG versions 2008 and 2011 were done. The following situations were found: (i) systematic underfunding of trauma patients in the G-DRG-Version 2008, especially trauma patients with acute paraplegia; (ii) participation in the official G-DRG development for 2011 with 13 proposals which were largely realised; (ii) the majority of cases with cost-covering in the G-DRG version 2011; (iv) significant improvements in the quality of statistical criteria; (v) overfunded trauma patients with high intensive care costs; (vi) underfunding for clinically relevant critically injured patients not identified in the G-DRG system. The quality of the G-DRG system is measured by the

  11. A novel first aid stretcher for immobilization and transportation of spine injured patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan-Sheng; Feng, Ya-Ping; Xie, Jia-Xin; Luo, Zhuo-Jing; Shen, Cai-Hong; Niu, Fang; Zou, Jian; Tang, Shao-Feng; Hao, Jiang; Xu, Jia-Xiang; Xiao, Li-Ping; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Zhu, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Effective immobilization and transportation are vital to the life-saving acute medical care needed when treating critically injured people. However, the most common types of stretchers used today are wrought with problems that can lead to further medical complications, difficulty in employment and rescue, and ineffective transitions to hospital treatment. Here we report a novel first aid stretcher called the "emergency carpet", which solves these problems with a unique design for spine injured patients. Polyurethane composite material, obtained by a novel process of manually mixing isocyanate and additives, can be poured into a specially designed fabric bag and allowed to harden to form a rigid human-shaped stretcher. The effectiveness of the emergency carpet was examined in the pre-hospital management of victims with spinal fractures. Additionally, it was tested on flat ground and complex terrain as well as in the sea and air. We demonstrated that the emergency carpet can be assembled and solidified on the scene in 5 minutes, providing effective immobilization to the entire injured body. With the protection of the emergency carpet, none of the 20 patients, who were finally confirmed to have spinal column fracture or dislocation, had any neurological deterioration during transportation. Furthermore, the carpet can be handled and transported by multiple means under differing conditions, without compromising immobilization. Finally, the emergency carpet allows the critically injured patient to receive multiple examinations such as X-ray, CT, and MRI without being removed from the carpet. Our results demonstrate that the emergency carpet has ideal capabilities for immobilization, extrication, and transportation of the spine injured patients. Compared with other stretchers, it allows for better mobility, effective immobilization, remarkable conformity to the body, and various means for transportation. The emergency carpet is promising for its intrinsic advantages in

  12. A novel first aid stretcher for immobilization and transportation of spine injured patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Sheng Liu

    Full Text Available Effective immobilization and transportation are vital to the life-saving acute medical care needed when treating critically injured people. However, the most common types of stretchers used today are wrought with problems that can lead to further medical complications, difficulty in employment and rescue, and ineffective transitions to hospital treatment. Here we report a novel first aid stretcher called the "emergency carpet", which solves these problems with a unique design for spine injured patients. Polyurethane composite material, obtained by a novel process of manually mixing isocyanate and additives, can be poured into a specially designed fabric bag and allowed to harden to form a rigid human-shaped stretcher. The effectiveness of the emergency carpet was examined in the pre-hospital management of victims with spinal fractures. Additionally, it was tested on flat ground and complex terrain as well as in the sea and air. We demonstrated that the emergency carpet can be assembled and solidified on the scene in 5 minutes, providing effective immobilization to the entire injured body. With the protection of the emergency carpet, none of the 20 patients, who were finally confirmed to have spinal column fracture or dislocation, had any neurological deterioration during transportation. Furthermore, the carpet can be handled and transported by multiple means under differing conditions, without compromising immobilization. Finally, the emergency carpet allows the critically injured patient to receive multiple examinations such as X-ray, CT, and MRI without being removed from the carpet. Our results demonstrate that the emergency carpet has ideal capabilities for immobilization, extrication, and transportation of the spine injured patients. Compared with other stretchers, it allows for better mobility, effective immobilization, remarkable conformity to the body, and various means for transportation. The emergency carpet is promising for its

  13. [Delayed rupture of the spleen in a multiply injured patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lică, I; Venter, M D; Mehic, R; Marian, R; Ionescu, G

    1997-01-01

    The authors present a case of delayed rupture of the spleen in a polytraumatised patient. This entity was defined as a late occurrence of signs and symptoms attributed to splenic injury not detected by diagnostic computed tomographic scanning during the initial examination. The mechanisms in which the delayed rupture of the spleen occurs are discussed and the conclusion is that the delayed rupture of the spleen represent a real clinical entity.

  14. A cross-sectional study of psychological complaints and quality of life in severely injured patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Delft-Schreurs, C C H M; van Bergen, J J M; van de Sande, P; Verhofstad, M H J; de Vries, J; de Jongh, M A C

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the incidence of psychological complaints and the relationship of these complaints with the quality of life (QOL) and accident- and patient-related factors among severely injured patients after the rehabilitation phase. Patients of 18 years or older with an injury severity score above 15 were included 15-53 months after their accident. Accident and patient characteristics were obtained from questionnaires and the trauma registry. Several questionnaires (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Impact of Events Scale, and Cognitive Failure Questionnaire) were used to determine the symptoms of psychological problems (anxiety or depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, or subjective cognitive complaints, respectively). The World Health Organization Quality of Life-Bref was used to determine QOL. A reference group of the Dutch general population was used for comparison of QOL scores. The participation rate was 62 % (n = 173). At the time of the study, 30.1 % (n = 52) of the investigated patients had psychological complaints. No relation between psychological complaints and somatic severity or type of injury was found. Patients who were employed before the accident or resumed working reported less psychological complaints. Use of any medication before the accident and treatment for pre-accidental psychological problems were positively related to psychological complaints afterwards. QOL of severely injured patients was impaired in comparison with the general Dutch population, but only for those with psychological complaints. Psychological complaints seem to be an important and underestimated factor for a decreased QOL among severely injured patients.

  15. Correlations of sleep disorders with severity of obstructive airway disease in mustard gas-injured patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahedi, Ensieh; Taheri, Saeed; Alaedini, Farshid; Poursaleh, Zohreh; Ameli, Javad; Ghanei, Mostafa

    2012-06-01

    Mustard gas has serious adverse effects on several organs and functions in humans. In this study, we analyzed potential correlations between obstructive airway disease and sleep disorders in Iranian mustard gas-injured patients. We enrolled 30 male mustard gas-injured veterans and civilians from the Chemical Warfare Exposure Clinic at Baqiyatallah Hospital, Tehran. All the subjects underwent comprehensive polysomnographic and spirometric evaluations for diagnosis of sleep disorders. Patients were categorized into three groups according to the severity of their obstructive airway disease based on the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) criteria: group 1 (GOLD I and II), group 2 (GOLD III), and group 3 (GOLD IV). Patients with less severe obstructive airway disease had significantly higher rate of hypopnea (p = 0.05) and AHI (p = 0.05). The number of REM events was significantly higher in patients with less severe airway disease (p = 0.028). Stage 1 sleep among patients with higher FEV1 significantly constituted a higher proportion of sleep, and stage 4 sleep was significantly longer in patients with higher DLCO (p = 0.043, both). We found that sleep parameters in SM-exposed patients have some relations with spirometric parameters. Future studies with large patient populations are needed for confirmation of our results, and therapeutic interventions are needed to evaluate endeavors we can do to enhance health and quality of life in our mustard gas-injured population.

  16. Multiple injuries after earthquakes: a retrospective analysis on 1,871 injured patients from the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu-Ping, Zhao; Rodriguez-Llanes, Jose Manuel; Qi, Wu; van den Oever, Barbara; Westman, Lina; Albela, Manuel; Liang, Pan; Gao, Chen; De-Sheng, Zhang; Hughes, Melany; von Schreeb, Johan; Guha-Sapir, Debarati

    2012-05-17

    Multiple injuries have been highlighted as an important clinical dimension of the injury profile following earthquakes, but studies are scarce. We investigated the pattern and combination of injuries among patients with two injuries following the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake. We also described the general injury profile, causes of injury and socio-demographic characteristics of the injured patients. A retrospective hospital-based analysis of 1,871 earthquake injured patients, totaling 3,177 injuries, admitted between 12 and 31 May 2008 to the People's Hospital of Deyang city (PHDC). An electronic, webserver-based database with International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-10-based classification of earthquake-related injury diagnoses (IDs), anatomical sites and additional background variables of the inpatients was used. We analyzed this dataset for injury profile and number of injuries per patient. We then included all patients (856) with two injuries for more in-depth analysis. Possible spatial anatomical associations were determined a priori. Cross-tabulation and more complex frequency matrices for combination analyses were used to investigate the injury profile. Out of the 1,871 injured patients, 810 (43.3%) presented with a single injury. The rest had multiple injuries; 856 (45.8%) had two, 169 (9.0%) patients had three, 32 (1.7%) presented with four injuries, while only 4 (0.2%) were diagnosed with five injuries. The injury diagnoses of patients presenting with two-injuries showed important anatomical intra-site or neighboring clustering, which explained 49.1% of the combinations. For fractures, the result was even more marked as spatial clustering explained 57.9% of the association pattern. The most frequent combination of IDs was a double-fracture, affecting 20.7% of the two-injury patients (n = 177). Another 108 patients (12.6%) presented with fractures associated with crush injury and organ-soft tissue injury. Of the 3,177 injuries, 1,476 (46.5%) were

  17. Characterization of wound infections among patients injured during the 2011 Libyan conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dau, A A; Tloba, S; Daw, M A

    2013-04-01

    Few studies have analysed the bacterial pathogenesis of infections associated with war-wound in the Eastern Mediterranean region. We analysed surgical wound infections of 1200 patients injured during the Libyan conflict in 2011 and admitted to the emergency services at Tripoli medical centre. Culture swabs or surgical wound debridement samples were collected and cultures were identified and tested for antimicrobial resistance. Of the 1200 patients studied, 498 (42%) were infected with at least 1 pathogen and 57 with >2 pathogens. The most common species were Acinetobacter spp. (isolated from 144 patients), coagulase-negative staphylococci (122), Escherichia coli (107), Pseudomnonas aeruginosa (92) and Klebsiella spp. (86). A high level of resistance to the antibiotics tested was found, especially among Acinetobacter spp. Multi-drug-resistant Gram-negative bacilli were an important complicating factor in wound infections associated with war injuries among injured patients in Libya. Effective policies are needed to control and treat such infections particularly in trauma and emergency services.

  18. A cost analysis of conservative management of spinal cord-injured patients in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawu, A A; Olawepo, A; Salami, A O O; Kuranga, S A; Abdulhameed, S; Esenwah, V C

    2011-11-01

    A prospective study. To determine the cost of acute phase of injury (ASCI) among spinal cord-injured patients managed conservatively in Nigeria. Gwagwalada, Abuja. Over a 1-year period (1 January 2009 to 31 December 2009), the cost of ASCI of consecutive spinal cord-injured patients, gainfully employed preinjury, who paid the hospital bill directly from their purses and could estimate their daily income, and who were managed conservatively for 6 weeks before discharge to rehabilitation, was prospectively examined. A total of 34 cases of spinal cord-injured patients with a mean age of 35.4 ± 12.8 years were included in this study. The mean cost of ASCI over 6 weeks was $1598.29, an average of 6.4-232.8% of patients' annual income where >50% of the people live on less than a dollar a day. The mean cost of hospitalization was 14.9% of the total cost of ASCI in this study. It was significantly more expensive to treat tetraplegics compared with paraplegics. This study identified the cost of acute phase of spinal cord injury in Nigeria to assist clinicians in planning treatment that could reduce financial burden on the patients but optimize patients' care.

  19. Emotional Labour of Caregivers Confronted With Aggressive Brain-injured Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huet, Magali; Dany, Lionel; Apostolidis, Thémistoklis

    2018-06-01

    Aggressive behaviours are common with people who have suffered brain injuries and induce difficult emotions among certified nursing assistants and medical-psychological assistants who take care of them. These caregivers carry out emotional labour whose content and strategies are little known. The study explores the emotional labour of certified nursing assistants and medical-psychological assistants faced with the aggressive behaviours of brain-injured patients. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 37 caregivers. Interviews were analysed via a thematic content analysis. The analysis shows that the emotional labour of caregivers varies in accordance with the state of "consciousness" or "non-consciousness" that they attribute to the brain-injured patient with regard to this aggressive behaviour. This is a deep acting strategy. Moreover, caregivers shut off their emotions in order not to transmit them to the patient. This surface acting has the first objective for the caregiver of maintaining control of the situation and a second objective of protecting the patient emotionally and therefore of being perceived as a "good" caregiver. Emotional labour also meets a need to preserve the professional self-image and professional status negatively affected in the interaction with the aggressive brain-injured patient. Our study specifies the different strategies of the emotional labour of caregivers and their circumstances of use when they are confronted with aggressive behaviour by brain-injured patients. Targeted support for this emotional labour, such as training and practical analysis, is essential for the development of care practices promoting a caring relationship. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Patients with severe head trauma who talk and then deteriorate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isayama, Kazuo; Nakazawa, Shozo; Kobayashi, Shiro; Yokota, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Yukio; Yajima, Kouzo; Yano, Masami; Otsuka, Toshibumi

    1987-08-01

    Patients with severe head trauma who talk and then deteriorate (or die) are analyzed by means of clinical signs, computerized tomography (CT), and outcome. The twelve severely head-injured patients had an initial verbal score on the Glasgow coma scale (GCS) of 3 or more and a GCS score of 9 or more. There were 8 male and 4 female patients. The ages of these patients ranged from 23 to 85 years (average age 60.9 years); nine of the patients were older than 60 years of age. An initial CT revealed subdural hematoma in 7 cases and traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage in 8 cases. Serial CT could be used for 9 cases; delayed intracerebral hematoma was found in 5 patients, and acute cerebral swelling, in 3 patients. The elderly tended to have the hematoma, while the young tended to have acute cerebral swelling. Concerning the Glasgow outcome scale of cases of head trauma who talk and then deteriorate three months after trauma, there was moderate disability in 2 cases and a persistent vegetative state in one, while 9 had died.

  1. Recovery of injured Broca's portion of arcuate fasciculus in the dominant hemisphere in a patient with traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sung Ho; Ha, Ji Wan; Kim, Hyun Young; Seo, You Sung

    2017-12-01

    Recovery of injured AF in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) has not been reported. In this study, we report on a patient with TBI who recovered from an injury to Broca's portion of AF in the dominant hemisphere, diagnosed by diffusion tensor tractography (DTT). A 28-year-old right-handed male patient suffered head trauma resulting from sliding while riding a motorcycle. He was diagnosed with a traumatic contusional hemorrhage in the left frontal lobe, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and subdural hemorrhage in the left fronto-temporal lobe. He underwent craniectomy on the left fronto-temporal area, and hematoma removal for the subdural hemorrhage in the neurosurgery department of a university hospital. Two weeks after the injury, he was transferred to the rehabilitation department of another university hospital. He showed severe aphasia and brain MRI showed leukomalactic lesion in the left frontal lobe. The result WAB for the patient showed severe aphasia, with an aphasia quotient of 45.3 percentile. However, his aphasia improved rapidly by 9 months with an aphasia quotient at the 100.0 percentile. 2-week DTT detected discontinuity in the subcortical white matter at the branch to Broca's area of left AF. By contrast, on 9-month DTT, the discontinued portion of left AF was elongated to the left Broca's area. Recovery of injured Broca's portion of AF in the dominant hemisphere along with excellent improvement of aphasia was demonstrated in a patient with TBI. This study has important implications in brain rehabilitation because the mechanism of recovery from aphasia following TBI has not been elucidated. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Acute lung injury and the acute respiratory distress syndrome in the injured patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakowitz Magdalena

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome are clinical entities of multi-factorial origin frequently seen in traumatically injured patients requiring intensive care. We performed an unsystematic search using PubMed and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews up to January 2012. The purpose of this article is to review recent evidence for the pathophysiology and the management of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome in the critically injured patient. Lung protective ventilation remains the most beneficial therapy. Future trials should compare intervention groups to controls receiving lung protective ventilation, and focus on relevant outcome measures such as duration of mechanical ventilation, length of intensive care unit stay, and mortality.

  3. The relationship between physical and psychological complaints and quality of life in severely injured patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Delft-Schreurs, C C H M; van Son, M A C; de Jongh, M A C; Lansink, K W W; de Vries, J; Verhofstad, M H J

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was two-fold. The first goal was to investigate which variables were associated with the remaining physical limitations of severely injured patients after the initial rehabilitation phase. Second, we investigated whether physical limitations were attributable to the association between psychological complaints and quality of life in this patient group. Patients who were 18 years or older and who had an injury severity score (ISS)>15 completed a set of questionnaires at one time-point after their rehabilitation phase (15-53 months after their trauma). The Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment (SMFA) questionnaire was used to determine physical limitations. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Dutch Impact of Event Scale and the Cognitive Failure Questionnaire were used to determine psychological complaints, and the World Health Organization Quality of Life assessment instrument-BREF was used to measure general Quality of Life (QOL). Differences in physical limitations were investigated for several trauma- and patient-related variables using non-parametric independent-sample Mann-Whitney U tests. Multiple linear regression was performed to investigate whether the decreased QOL of severely injured patients with psychological complaints could be explained by their physical limitations. Older patients, patients with physical complaints before the injury, patients with higher ISS scores, and patients who had an injury of the spine or of the lower extremities reported significantly more physical problems. Additionally, patients with a low education level, patients who were living alone, and those who were unemployed reported significantly more long-term physical problems. Severely injured patients without psychological complaints reported significantly less physical limitations than those with psychological complaints. The SMFA factor of Lower extremity dysfunction was a confounder of the association between psychological complaints

  4. Differences in kinematics of single leg squatting between anterior cruciate ligament-injured patients and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, J; Muneta, T; Ju, Y J; Sekiya, I

    2010-01-01

    Seventy to eighty percent of all anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are due to non-contact injury mechanisms. It has been reported that the majority of injuries due to single leg landing come from valgus positioning of the lower leg. Preventing valgus positioning during single leg landing is expected to help reduce the number of ACL injuries. We found that many ACL-deficient patients cannot perform stable single leg squatting. Therefore, we performed 3D motion analysis of the single-legged half squat for ACL-injured patients to evaluate its significance as a risk factor for ACL injuries. We evaluated the relative angles between the body, thigh, and lower leg using an electromagnetic device during single leg half squatting performed by 63 ACL-injured patients (32 males, 31 females) the day before ACL reconstruction and by 26 healthy control subjects with no knee problems. The uninjured leg of ACL-injured male subjects demonstrated significantly less external knee rotation than that of the dominant leg of the male control. The uninjured leg of ACL-injured female subjects demonstrated significantly more external hip rotation and knee flexion and less hip flexion than that of the dominant leg of the female control. Comparing injured and uninjured legs, the injured leg of male subjects demonstrated significantly less external knee and hip rotation, less knee flexion, and more knee varus than that of the uninjured leg of male subjects. The injured leg of female subjects demonstrated more knee varus than that of the uninjured leg of female subjects. Regarding gender differences, female subjects demonstrated significantly more external hip rotation and knee valgus than male subjects did in both the injured and uninjured legs (P < 0.05). The current kinematic study exhibited biomechanical characteristics of female ACL-injured subjects compared with that of control groups. Kinematic correction during single leg half squat would reduce ACL reinjury in female ACL-injured

  5. Effectiveness of prehospital trauma triage systems in selecting severely injured patients: Is comparative analysis possible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rein, Eveline A J; van der Sluijs, Rogier; Houwert, R Marijn; Gunning, Amy C; Lichtveld, Rob A; Leenen, Luke P H; van Heijl, Mark

    2018-01-27

    In an optimal trauma system, prehospital trauma triage ensures transport of the right patient to the right hospital. Incorrect triage results in undertriage and overtriage. The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate and compare prehospital trauma triage system quality worldwide and determine effectiveness in terms of undertriage and overtriage for trauma patients. A systematic search of Pubmed/MEDLINE, Embase, and Cochrane Library databases was performed, using "trauma", "trauma center," or "trauma system", combined with "triage", "undertriage," or "overtriage", as search terms. All studies describing ground transport and actual destination hospital of patients with and without severe injuries, using prehospital triage, published before November 2017, were eligible for inclusion. To assess the quality of these studies, a critical appraisal tool was developed. A total of 33 articles were included. The percentage of undertriage ranged from 1% to 68%; overtriage from 5% to 99%. Older age and increased geographical distance were associated with undertriage. Mortality was lower for severely injured patients transferred to a higher-level trauma center. The majority of the included studies were of poor methodological quality. The studies of good quality showed poor performance of the triage protocol, but additional value of EMS provider judgment in the identification of severely injured patients. In most of the evaluated trauma systems, a substantial part of the severely injured patients is not transported to the appropriate level trauma center. Future research should come up with new innovative ways to improve the quality of prehospital triage in trauma patients. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Cerebral Glucose Metabolism and Sedation in Brain-injured Patients: A Microdialysis Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertle, Daniel N; Santos, Edgar; Hagenston, Anna M; Jungk, Christine; Haux, Daniel; Unterberg, Andreas W; Sakowitz, Oliver W

    2015-07-01

    Disturbed brain metabolism is a signature of primary damage and/or precipitates secondary injury processes after severe brain injury. Sedatives and analgesics target electrophysiological functioning and are as such well-known modulators of brain energy metabolism. Still unclear, however, is how sedatives impact glucose metabolism and whether they differentially influence brain metabolism in normally active, healthy brain and critically impaired, injured brain. We therefore examined and compared the effects of anesthetic drugs under both critical (1 mmol/L) extracellular brain glucose levels. We performed an explorative, retrospective analysis of anesthetic drug administration and brain glucose concentrations, obtained by bedside microdialysis, in 19 brain-injured patients. Our investigations revealed an inverse linear correlation between brain glucose and both the concentration of extracellular glutamate (Pearson r=-0.58, P=0.01) and the lactate/glucose ratio (Pearson r=-0.55, P=0.01). For noncritical brain glucose levels, we observed a positive linear correlation between midazolam dose and brain glucose (Pbrain glucose levels, extracellular brain glucose was unaffected by any type of sedative. These findings suggest that the use of anesthetic drugs may be of limited value in attempts to influence brain glucose metabolism in injured brain tissue.

  7. Vulnerable, but strong: The spinal cord-injured patient during rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angel, Sanne

    2010-01-01

    A traumatic spinal cord injury affects the body to an extent that the patient requires the assistance of others to survive and recover. The rehabilitation phase puts the patient in a vulnerable position and involves a considerable amount of strength on the patient's part. The aim of this paper...... is to explore the vulnerability of the spinal cord patient and how this vulnerability connects to the necessary strength, as the patient struggles to survive the injury and get through the rehabilitation. The circumstances of 12 traumatic spinal cord-injured patients were observed in the rehabilitation unit...... and after discharge. A phenomenological-hermeneutic narrative approach applying Ricoeur's theory was used. Data were collected by field observation and interviews during the first 2 years after the spinal cord injury. The patient's strength during the rehabilitation was portrayed by their endurance and from...

  8. Technology Use, Preferences, and Capacity in Injured Patients at Risk for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Cory M; Van Eaton, Erik G; Russo, Joan E; Kelly, Victoria C; Jurkovich, Gregory J; Darnell, Doyanne A; Whiteside, Lauren K; Wang, Jin; Parker, Lea E; Payne, Thomas H; Mooney, Sean D; Bush, Nigel; Zatzick, Douglas F

    2017-01-01

    This investigation comprehensively assessed the technology use, preferences, and capacity of diverse injured trauma survivors with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. A total of 121 patients participating in a randomized clinical trial (RCT) of stepped collaborative care targeting PTSD symptoms were administered baseline one-, three-, and six-month interviews that assessed technology use. Longitudinal data about the instability of patient cell phone ownership and phone numbers were collected from follow-up interviews. PTSD symptoms were also assessed over the course of the six months after injury. Regression analyses explored the associations between cell phone instability and PTSD symptoms. At baseline, 71.9% (n = 87) of patients reported current cell phone ownership, and over half (58.2%, n = 46) of these patients possessed basic cell phones. Only 19.0% (n = 23) of patients had no change in cell phone number or physical phone over the course of the six months postinjury. In regression models that adjusted for relevant clinical and demographic characteristics, cell phone instability was associated with higher six-month postinjury PTSD symptom levels (p risk for the development of PTSD have unique technology use patterns, including high rates of cell phone instability. These observations should be strongly considered when developing technology-supported interventions for injured patients with PTSD.

  9. Recovery of forward stepping in spinal cord injured patients does not transfer to untrained backward stepping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Renato; Ivanenko, Yuri P; Zago, Myrka; Molinari, Marco; Scivoletto, Giorgio; Lacquaniti, Francesco

    2004-08-01

    Six spinal cord injured (SCI) patients were trained to step on a treadmill with body-weight support for 1.5-3 months. At the end of training, foot motion recovered the shape and the step-by-step reproducibility that characterize normal gait. They were then asked to step backward on the treadmill belt that moved in the opposite direction relative to standard forward training. In contrast to healthy subjects, who can immediately reverse the direction of walking by time-reversing the kinematic waveforms, patients were unable to step backward. Similarly patients were unable to perform another untrained locomotor task, namely stepping in place on the idle treadmill. Two patients who were trained to step backward for 2-3 weeks were able to develop control of foot motion appropriate for this task. The results show that locomotor improvement does not transfer to untrained tasks, thus supporting the idea of task-dependent plasticity in human locomotor networks.

  10. Nine-point plan to improve care of the injured patient: A case study from Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachani, Abdulgafoor M; Botchey, Isaac; Paruk, Fatima; Wako, Daniel; Saidi, Hassan; Aliwa, Bethuel; Kibias, Simon; Hyder, Adnan A

    2017-12-01

    Injury rates in low- and middle-income countries are among the greatest in the world, with >90% of unintentional injury occurring in low- or middle-income countries. The risk of death from injuries is 6 times more in low- and middle-income countries than in high-income countries. This increased rate of injury is partly due to the lack of availability and access to timely and appropriate medical care for injured individuals. Kenya, like most low- and middle-income countries, has seen a 5-fold increase in injury fatalities throughout the past 4 decades, in large part related to the absence of a coordinated, integrated system of trauma care. We aimed to assess the trauma-care system in Kenya and to develop and implement a plan to improve it. A trauma system profile was performed to understand the landscape for the care of the injured patient in Kenya. This process helped identify key gaps in care ranging from prehospital to hospital-based care. In response to this observation, a 9-point plan to improve trauma care in Kenya was developed and implemented in close collaboration with local stakeholders. The 9-point plan was centered on engagement of the stakeholders, generation of key data to guide and improve services, capacity development for prehospital and hospital care, and strengthening policy and legislation. There is an urgent need for coordinated strategies to provide appropriate and timely medical care to injured individuals in low- or middle-income countries to decrease the burden of injuries and related fatalities. Our work in Kenya shows that such an integrated system of trauma care could be achieved through a step-by-step integrated and multifaceted approach that emphasizes engagement of local stakeholders and evidence-based approaches to ensure effectiveness, efficiency, and sustainability of system-wide improvements. This plan and lessons learned in its development and implementation could be adaptable to other similar settings to improve the care of the

  11. Endothelial glycocalyx shedding and vascular permeability in severely injured trauma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahbar, Elaheh; Cardenas, Jessica C; Baimukanova, Gyulnar

    2015-01-01

    of trauma patients. METHODS: Plasma samples were collected from 5 healthy consented volunteers and 22 severely injured trauma patients upon admission to the emergency department. ELISA assays were performed to quantify shed HA, HS, CS and syndecan-1 in plasma. A colloid osmometer and Electric Cell......-substrate Impedance Sensing (ECIS) system were used to measure plasma colloid osmotic pressure (COP) and cell permeability, respectively. Thrombin generation was measured using a calibrated automated thrombogram (CAT). Initial vital signs, routine laboratory values, and injury severity scores (ISS) were recorded. Non......COP (≤16 mmHg) had significantly increased syndecan-1 and HA compared to those with normal COP, which corresponded to increased cell permeability via ECIS. CS and HS did not vary between COP groups. Lastly, patients with low COP displayed reduced peak thrombin...

  12. Improving working memory performance in brain-injured patients using hypnotic suggestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindeløv, Jonas K.; Overgaard, Rikke; Overgaard, Morten

    2017-01-01

    be effectively restored by suggesting to hypnotized patients that they have regained their pre-injury level of working memory functioning. Following four 1-h sessions, 27 patients had a medium-sized improvement relative to 22 active controls (Bayes factors of 342 and 37.5 on the two aggregate outcome measures...... group was crossed over to the working memory suggestion and showed superior improvement. By the end of the study, both groups reached a performance level at or above the healthy population mean with standardized mean differences between 1.55 and 2.03 relative to the passive control group. We conclude...... that, if framed correctly, hypnotic suggestion can effectively improve working memory following acquired brain injury. The speed and consistency with which this improvement occurred, indicate that there may be a residual capacity for normal information processing in the injured brain....

  13. Guillain-Barre syndrome: A possibility in a spinal cord injured patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagatsinh Yogendrasinh

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A 28-year-old male had paraplegia as a result of fracture dislocation of T12/L1 six years ago. He was functioning independently until four weeks ago, when he started complaining of trunkal paraesthesia which later progressed to include the upper extremities. The initial diagnosis was that of posttraumatic syringomyelia (PTS. While awaiting the MRI scan he developed weakness of upper limbs. The weakness restricted his self-care activities including transfers. The MRI did not show any evidence of syringomyelia. Neurological consultation and assessment yielded provisional diagnosis of Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS. The patient was treated with immunoglobulins and regained 90% of his previous neurological status. This case is reported to raise awareness among clinicians to include the possibility of the GBS in the differential diagnosis of progressive neurological loss on top of existing neurological deficiency in spinal cord injured patients.

  14. Bioimpedance measurement of body water correlates with measured volume balance in injured patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosemurgy, A S; Rodriguez, E; Hart, M B; Kurto, H Z; Albrink, M H

    1993-06-01

    Bioimpedance technology is being used increasingly to determine drug volume of distribution, body water status, and nutrition repletion. Its accuracy in patients experiencing large volume flux is not established. To address this, we undertook this prospective study in 54 consecutive seriously injured adults who had emergency celiotomy soon after arrival in the emergency department. Bioimpedance measurements were obtained in the emergency department before the patient was transported to the operating room, on completion of celiotomy, and 24 hours and 48 hours after celiotomy. Bioimpedance measurements of body water were compared with measured fluid balance. If insensible losses are subtracted from measured fluid balance, the percentage of body weight, which is body water determined by bioimpedance, closely follows fluid flux. This study supports the use of bioimpedance measurements in determining total body water even during periods of surgery, blood loss, and vigorous resuscitation.

  15. Prevalence and consequences of positive blood alcohol levels among patients injured at work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin A Foster

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim of this study was to characterize positive blood alcohol among patients injured at work, and to compare the severity of injury and outcome of blood alcohol concentration (BAC positive and negative patients. Settings and Design: A retrospective cohort study was performed at a Level 1 academic trauma center. Patients injured at work between 01/01/07 and 01/01/12 and admitted with positive (BAC+ vs negative (BAC- blood alcohol were compared using bivariate analysis. Results: Out of 823, 319 subjects were tested for BAC (38.8%, of whom 37 were BAC+ (mean 0.151 g/dL, range 0.015-0.371 g/dL. Age (41 years, sex (97.2% men, race, intensive care unit (ICU and hospital length of stay (LOS, and mortality were similar between groups. Nearly half of BAC+ cases were farming injuries (18, 48.6%: Eight involved livestock, five involved all-terrain vehicles (ATVs, three involved heavy equipment, one fell, and one had a firearm injury. Eight (21.6% were construction site injuries involving falls from a roof or scaffolding, five (13.5% were semi-truck collisions, four (10.8% involved falls from a vehicle in various settings, and two (5.4% were crush injuries at an oilfield. BAC+ subjects were less likely to be injured in construction sites and oilfields, including vehicle-related falls (2.3 vs 33.9%, P < 0.0001. Over half of BAC+ (n = 20, 54% subjects were alcohol dependent; three (8.1% also tested positive for cocaine on admission. No BAC+ subjects were admitted to rehabilitation compared to 33 (11.7% of BAC- subjects. Workers′ compensation covered a significantly smaller proportion of BAC+ patients (16.2 vs 61.0%, P < 0.0001. Conclusions: Alcohol use in the workplace is more prevalent than commonly suspected, especially in farming and other less regulated industries. BAC+ is associated with less insurance coverage, which probably affects resources available for post-discharge rehabilitation and hospital reimbursement.

  16. Accuracy of prehospital triage protocols in selecting severely injured patients: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rein, Eveline A J; Houwert, R Marijn; Gunning, Amy C; Lichtveld, Rob A; Leenen, Luke P H; van Heijl, Mark

    2017-08-01

    Prehospital trauma triage ensures proper transport of patients at risk of severe injury to hospitals with an appropriate corresponding level of trauma care. Incorrect triage results in undertriage and overtriage. The American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma recommends an undertriage rate below 5% and an overtriage rate below 50% for prehospital trauma triage protocols. To find the most accurate prehospital trauma triage protocol, a clear overview of all currently available protocols and corresponding outcomes is necessary. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the current literature on all available prehospital trauma triage protocols and determine accuracy of protocol-based triage quality in terms of sensitivity and specificity. A search of Pubmed, Embase, and Cochrane Library databases was performed to identify all studies describing prehospital trauma triage protocols before November 2016. The search terms included "trauma," "trauma center," or "trauma system" combined with "triage," "undertriage," or "overtriage." All studies describing protocol-based triage quality were reviewed. To assess the quality of these type of studies, a new critical appraisal tool was developed. In this review, 21 articles were included with numbers of patients ranging from 130 to over 1 million. Significant predictors for severe injury were: vital signs, suspicion of certain anatomic injuries, mechanism of injury, and age. Sensitivity ranged from 10% to 100%; specificity from 9% to 100%. Nearly all protocols had a low sensitivity, thereby failing to identify severely injured patients. Additionally, the critical appraisal showed poor quality of the majority of included studies. This systematic review shows that nearly all protocols are incapable of identifying severely injured patients. Future studies of high methodological quality should be performed to improve prehospital trauma triage protocols. Systematic review, level III.

  17. The burden of infection in severely injured trauma patients and the relationship with admission shock severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Elaine; Davenport, Ross; Willett, Keith; Brohi, Karim

    2014-03-01

    Infection following severe injury is common and has a major impact on patient outcomes. The relationship between patient, injury, and physiologic characteristics with subsequent infections is not clearly defined. The objective of this study was to characterize the drivers and burden of all-cause infection in critical care trauma patients. A prospective cohort study of severely injured adult patients admitted to critical care was conducted. Data were collected prospectively on patient and injury characteristics, baseline physiology, coagulation profiles, and blood product use. Patients were followed up daily for infectious episodes and other adverse outcomes while in the hospital. Three hundred patients (Injury Severity Score [ISS] >15) were recruited. In 48 hours or less, 29 patients (10%) died, leaving a cohort of 271. One hundred forty-one patients (52%) developed at least one infection. Three hundred four infections were diagnosed overall. Infection and noninfection groups were matched for age, sex, mechanism, and ISS. Infection rates were greater with any degree of admission shock and threefold higher in the most severely shocked cohort (p < 0.01). In multivariate analysis, base deficit (odds ratio [OR], 1.78, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.48-1.94; p < 0.001) and lactate (OR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.10-1.69; p = 0.05) were independently associated with the development of infection. Outcomes were significantly worse for the patients with infection. In multivariate logistic regression, infection was the only factor independently associated with multiple-organ failure (p < 0.001; OR, 15.4; 95% CI, 8.2-28.9; r = 0.402), ventilator-free days (p < 0.001; β, -4.48; 95% CI, -6.7 to -2.1; r = 0.245), critical care length of stay (p < 0.001; β, 13.2; 95% CI, 10.0-16.4; r = 0.466), and hospital length of stay (p < 0.001; β, 31.1; 95% CI, 24.0-38.2; r = 0.492). Infectious complications are a burden for severely injured patients and occur early in the critical care stay

  18. Incidence of traumatic carotid and vertebral artery dissections: results of cervical vessel computed tomography angiogram as a mandatory scan component in severely injured patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schicho A

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Andreas Schicho,1 Lukas Luerken,1 Ramona Meier,1 Antonio Ernstberger,2 Christian Stroszczynski,1 Andreas Schreyer,1 Lena-Marie Dendl,1 Stephan Schleder1 1Department of Radiology, 2Department of Trauma Surgery, University Medical Center, Regensburg, Germany Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the true incidence of cervical artery dissections (CeADs in trauma patients with an Injury Severity Score (ISS of ≥16, since head-and-neck computed tomography angiogram (CTA is not a compulsory component of whole-body trauma computed tomography (CT protocols. Patients and methods: A total of 230 consecutive trauma patients with an ISS of ≥16 admitted to our Level I trauma center during a 24-month period were prospectively included. Standardized whole-body CT in a 256-detector row scanner included a head-and-neck CTA. Incidence, mortality, patient and trauma characteristics, and concomitant injuries were recorded and analyzed retrospectively in patients with carotid artery dissection (CAD and vertebral artery dissection (VAD. Results: Of the 230 patients included, 6.5% had a CeAD, 5.2% had a CAD, and 1.7% had a VAD. One patient had both CAD and VAD. For both, CAD and VAD, mortality is 25%. One death was caused by fatal cerebral ischemia due to high-grade CAD. A total of 41.6% of the patients with traumatic CAD and 25% of the patients with VAD had neurological sequelae. Conclusion: Mandatory head-and-neck CTA yields higher CeAD incidence than reported before. We highly recommend the compulsory inclusion of a head-and-neck CTA to whole-body CT routines for severely injured patients. Keywords: polytrauma, carotid artery, vertebral artery, dissection, blunt trauma, computed tomography angiogram

  19. [Hospital-based psychological first aid provided to patients injured in the Lushan earthquake].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Min; Li, Xiao-Lin; Li, Jing; Huang, Xue-Hua; Tao, Qing-Lan; Luo, Xi

    2015-04-01

    In the aftermath of the 7.0 earthquake that struck Lushan in China's Sichuan Province on April 20, 2013, a psychological crisis intervention working group was established in a hospital that was treating earthquake victims. Patients at this hospital received psychological first aid that was delivered in accordance with scientific, systematic, and standardized principles. This first aid employed a "rooting mode" methodology and was designed as a supportive psychological intervention. Mental assessment results showed that the general mental health, acute stress reactions, and anxiety and depression status of all of the 131 injured who received the psychological intervention had significantly improved (p first aid, the approach used to organize the working groups, the main contents of the intervention, specific methods used, and intervention outcomes. This information is provided as a reference for providing localized psychological assistance in the aftermath of a disaster incident.

  20. Evaluation of blood and serum markers in spinal cord injured patients with pressure sores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurcay, Eda; Bal, Ajda; Gurcay, Ahmet G; Cakci, Aytul

    2009-03-01

    To evaluate blood and serum markers in traumatic spinal cord injured (SCI) patients, with and without pressure sores. This cross-sectional study was performed at the Ministry of Health Diskapi Yildirim Beyazit, and Numune Education and Research Hospitals, Ankara, Turkey, from 2006-2008. A total of 23 SCI patients with pressure sores (group I) and a control group of 25 SCI patients without pressure sores (group II) were evaluated. Characteristics of sores were examined with respect to duration, location, grade, tissue types, surface area, and exudate amount. Recorded laboratory parameters included erythrocyte sedimentation rates (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Htc), lymphocytes, white blood cells (WBC), red blood cells (RBC), serum iron, transferrin, total iron-binding capacity (TIBC), ferritin, total protein, albumin, vitamin B12, and zinc. The most common pressure sore location was the sacrum (38%). Compared to the control group, the patients with pressure sores showed anemia with reduced serum iron, transferrin, TIBC, and increased ferritin. They also had increased ESR, CRP, and WBC and reduced lymphocytes, total protein, albumin and zinc. Statistically significant correlations were found between CRP, Hb, Htc, lymphocytes, RBC, WBC, and serum protein levels, and grade of pressure sores. Clinicians should regularly screen patients with respect to blood and serum markers, in order to determine any risks for pressure sores, and they should perform immediate preventive measures based on the patient's condition.

  1. Tranexamic acid use in severely injured civilian patients and the effects on outcomes: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Elaine; Davenport, Ross; Willett, Keith; Brohi, Karim

    2015-02-01

    To characterize the relationship between tranexamic acid (TXA) use and patient outcomes in a severely injured civilian cohort, and to determine any differential effect between patients who presented with and without shock. TXA has demonstrated survival benefits in trauma patients in an international randomized control trial and the military setting. The uptake of TXA into civilian major hemorrhage protocols (MHPs) has been variable. The evidence gap in mature civilian trauma systems is limiting the widespread use of TXA and its potential benefits on survival. Prospective cohort study of severely injured adult patients (Injury severity score > 15) admitted to a civilian trauma system during the adoption phase of TXA into the hospital's MHP. Outcomes measured were mortality, multiple organ failure (MOF), venous thromboembolism, infection, stroke, ventilator-free days (VFD), and length of stay. Patients receiving TXA (n = 160, 42%) were more severely injured, shocked, and coagulopathic on arrival. TXA was not independently associated with any change in outcome for either the overall or nonshocked cohorts. In multivariate analysis, TXA was independently associated with a reduction in MOF [odds ratio (OR) = 0.27, confidence interval (CI): 0.10-0.73, P = 0.01] and was protective for adjusted all-cause mortality (OR = 0.16 CI: 0.03-0.86, P = 0.03) in shocked patients. TXA as part of a major hemorrhage protocol within a mature civilian trauma system provides outcome benefits specifically for severely injured shocked patients.

  2. Recovery of an injured cingulum concurrent with improvement of short-term memory in a patient with mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sung Ho; Kim, Seong Ho; Seo, Jeong Pyo

    2018-01-01

    We reported on a patient with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) who showed recovery of an injured cingulum concurrent with improvement of short-term memory, which was demonstrated on follow-up diffusion tensor tractography (DTT). A 55-year-old male patient suffered head trauma resulting from falling from approximately 2 m while working at a construction site. The patient showed mild memory impairment (especially short-term memory impairment) at 3 months after onset: Memory Assessment Scale (global memory: 95 (37%ile), short-term memory: 75 (5%ile), verbal memory: 80 (9%ile) and visual memory: 112 (79%ile)). By contrast, at 2 years after onset, his mild memory impairment had improved to a normal state: Memory Assessment Scale (global memory: 104 (61%ile), short-term memory: 95 (37%ile), verbal memory: 101 (53%ile) and visual memory: 106 (66%ile)). On 3-month DTT, discontinuation of the right anterior cingulum was observed over the genu of the corpus callosum, while on 2-year DTT, the discontinued right anterior cingulum was elongated to the right basal forebrain. In conclusion, recovery of an injured cingulum concurrent with improvement of short-term memory was demonstrated in a patient with mild TBI.

  3. Otolith function in patients with head trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Dae; Park, Moo Kyun; Lee, Byung Don; Park, Ji Yun; Lee, Tae Kyung; Sung, Ki-Bum

    2011-10-01

    This study evaluates the otolith function of patients with head trauma, postulating that otolith dysfunction is a cause of nonspecific dizziness after head trauma. We prospectively enrolled 28 patients referred within 3 months after head trauma between March 2007 and December 2009. Pure tone audiometry, caloric testing and otolith function tests, including cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potential (cVEMP) and subjective visual vertical (SVV) tests, were performed on all patients. The relationship between otolith function and otologic symptoms was analyzed. Of the 28 patients with head trauma, 18 complained of dizziness and 12 experienced hearing loss, including 6 patients who complained of both. On defining otolith dysfunction as an abnormal cVEMP or abnormal SVV, a significant difference in otolith dysfunction existed between the groups with and without dizziness [72 (13/18) vs. 20% (2/10)]. In contrast, no significant difference in otolith dysfunction was detected between the abnormal and normal hearing groups. A significant number of the patients who complained of nonspecific dizziness after trauma had abnormal otolith function. After trauma, when patients complain of dizziness, vestibular function tests, including otolith function tests, should be considered.

  4. Temporary balloon occlusion as therapy for uncontrollable arterial hemorrhage in multiply injured patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieger, J.; Linsenmaier, U.; Rock, C.; Pfeifer, K.J.; Euler, E.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Presentation of temporary balloon occlusion as an interventional radiological method for managing hemorrhage in multiply injured patients with uncontrollable loss of blood. Method: Temporary, non-selective arterial occlusion by introduction of a balloon catheter contralaterally to the source of bleeding has been performed since 1992 on 7 patients with multiple injuries, hemorrhagic shock requiring reanimation, and angiographic demonstration of an arterial hemorrhage in the supply region of the internal iliac artery with complex pelvic fracture. In each case a PTA balloon catheter was introduced transfemorally, non-selectively positioned proximal to the bleeding source, and left in place for 24-48 h under manometric control. Control angiographies were performed prior to catheter removal. Results: The bleeding was stopped immediately in all 7 patients. The hemodynamic stability made transport and thus further surgical management and/or a short-term treatment in the intensive-care station possible. Control angiographies confirmed that the bleeding had stopped in all patients. Conclusions: We recommend temporary balloon occlusion as a rapid and effective method for the management of bleeding in otherwise uncontrollable traumatic hemorrhages in the supply region of the internal iliac artery. (orig.) [de

  5. Diagnostic radiology on multiple injured patients: interdisciplinary management; Radiologische Diagnostik beim Polytrauma: interdisziplinaeres Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linsenmaier, U.; Pfeifer, K.J. [Inst. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Klinikum der Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Kanz, K.G.; Mutschler, W. [Chirurgische Klinik Innenstadt, Klinikum der Univ. Muenchen, (Germany)

    2001-06-01

    The presence of a radiologist within the admitting area of an emergency department and his capability as a member of the trauma team have a major impact on the role of diagnostic radiology in trauma care. The knowledge of clinical decision criteria, algorithms, and standards of patient care are essential for the acceptance within a trauma team. We present an interdisciplinary management concept of diagnostic radiology for trauma patients, which comprises basic diagnosis, organ diagnosis, radiological ABC, and algorithms of early clinical care. It is the result of a prospective study comprising over 2000 documented multiple injured patients. The radiologist on a trauma team should support trauma surgery and anesthesia in diagnostic and clinical work-up. The radiological ABC provides a structured approach for diagnostic imaging in all steps of the early clinical care of the multiple injured patient. Radiological ABC requires a reevaluation in cases of equivocal findings or difficulties in the clinical course. Direct communication of radiological findings with the trauma team enables quick clinical decisions. In addition, the radiologist can priority-oriented influence the therapy by using interventional procedures. The clinical radiologist is an active member of the interdisciplinary trauma team, not only providing diagnostic imaging but also participating in clinical decisions. (orig.) [German] Die Anwesenheit des Radiologen im Schockraum und dessen Teamfaehigkeit bestimmen den Status der diagnostischen Radiologie in der Traumaversorgung. Voraussetzung zur Mitarbeit im interdisziplinaeren Traumateam ist die detaillierte Kenntnis der wesentlichen Entscheidungskriterien, Algorithmen und Behandlungsablaeufe. Das hier vorgestellte interdisziplinaere Managementkonzept der radiologischen Diagnostik beim Polytrauma mit Basisdiagnostik, Organdiagnostik, radiologischer ABC-Regel und Algorithmen zur fruehklinischen Behandlung beruht auf einer prospektiven Polytraumastudie mit

  6. Onset of Coagulation Function Recovery Is Delayed in Severely Injured Trauma Patients with Venous Thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCully, Belinda H; Connelly, Christopher R; Fair, Kelly A; Holcomb, John B; Fox, Erin E; Wade, Charles E; Bulger, Eileen M; Schreiber, Martin A

    2017-07-01

    Altered coagulation function after trauma can contribute to development of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Severe trauma impairs coagulation function, but the trajectory for recovery is not known. We hypothesized that enhanced, early recovery of coagulation function increases VTE risk in severely injured trauma patients. Secondary analysis was performed on data from the Pragmatic Randomized Optimal Platelet and Plasma Ratio (PROPPR) trial, excluding patients who died within 24 hours or were on pre-injury anticoagulants. Patient characteristics, adverse outcomes, and parameters of platelet function and coagulation (thromboelastography) were compared from admission to 72 hours between VTE (n = 83) and non-VTE (n = 475) patients. A p value value (48 vs 24 hours), α-angle (no recovery), maximum amplitude (24 vs 12 hours), and clot lysis at 30 minutes (48 vs 12 hours). Platelet function recovery mediated by arachidonic acid (72 vs 4 hours), ADP (72 vs 12 hours), and collagen (48 vs 12 hours) was delayed in VTE patients. The VTE patients had lower mortality (4% vs 13%; p < 0.05), but fewer hospital-free days (0 days [interquartile range 0 to 8 days] vs 10 days [interquartile range 0 to 20 days]; p < 0.05) and higher complication rates (p < 0.05). Recovery from platelet dysfunction and coagulopathy after severe trauma were delayed in VTE patients. Suppressed clot lysis and compensatory mechanisms associated with altered coagulation that can potentiate VTE formation require additional investigation. Copyright © 2017 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Characteristics and Outcomes of Patients Injured in Road Traffic Crashes and Transported by Emergency Medical Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Ying Huang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the injury characteristics and mortality of patients transported by emergency medical services (EMS and hospitalized for trauma following a road traffic crash, data obtained from the Trauma Registry System were retrospectively reviewed for trauma admissions between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2013 in a Level I trauma center. Of 16,548 registered patients, 3978 and 1440 patients injured in road traffic crashes were transported to the emergency department by EMS and non-EMS, respectively. Patients transported by EMS had lower Glasgow coma scale (GCS scores and worse hemodynamic measures. Compared to patients transported by non-EMS, more patients transported by EMS required procedures (intubation, chest tube insertion, and blood transfusion at the emergency department. They also sustained a higher injury severity, as measured by the injury severity score (ISS and the new injury severity score (NISS. Lastly, in-hospital mortality was higher among the EMS than the non-EMS group (1.8% vs. 0.3%, respectively; p < 0.001. However, we found no statistically significant difference in the adjusted odds ratio (AOR for mortality among patients transported by EMS after adjustment for ISS (AOR 4.9, 95% CI 0.33–2.26, indicating that the higher incidence of mortality was likely attributed to the patients’ higher injury severity. In addition, after propensity score matching, logistic regression of 58 well-matched pairs did not show a significant influence of transportation by EMS on mortality (OR: 0.578, 95% CI: 0.132–2.541 p = 0.468.

  8. Distributed plasticity of locomotor pattern generators in spinal cord injured patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Renato; Ivanenko, Yuri P; Zago, Myrka; Molinari, Marco; Scivoletto, Giorgio; Castellano, Vincenzo; Macellari, Velio; Lacquaniti, Francesco

    2004-05-01

    Recent progress with spinal cord injured (SCI) patients indicates that with training they can recover some locomotor ability. Here we addressed the question of whether locomotor responses developed with training depend on re-activation of the normal motor patterns or whether they depend on learning new motor patterns. To this end we recorded detailed kinematic and EMG data in SCI patients trained to step on a treadmill with body-weight support (BWST), and in healthy subjects. We found that all patients could be trained to step with BWST in the laboratory conditions, but they used new coordinative strategies. Patients with more severe lesions used their arms and body to assist the leg movements via the biomechanical coupling of limb and body segments. In all patients, the phase-relationship of the angular motion of the different lower limb segments was very different from the control, as was the pattern of activity of most recorded muscles. Surprisingly, however, the new motor strategies were quite effective in generating foot motion that closely matched the normal in the laboratory conditions. With training, foot motion recovered the shape, the step-by-step reproducibility, and the two-thirds power relationship between curvature and velocity that characterize normal gait. We mapped the recorded patterns of muscle activity onto the approximate rostrocaudal location of motor neuron pools in the human spinal cord. The reconstructed spatiotemporal maps of motor neuron activity in SCI patients were quite different from those of healthy subjects. At the end of training, the locomotor network reorganized at both supralesional and sublesional levels, from the cervical to the sacral cord segments. We conclude that locomotor responses in SCI patients may not be subserved by changes localized to limited regions of the spinal cord, but may depend on a plastic redistribution of activity across most of the rostrocaudal extent of the spinal cord. Distributed plasticity underlies

  9. The effect of computerized tailored brief advice on at-risk drinking in subcritically injured trauma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neumann, Tim; Neuner, Bruno; Weiss-Gerlach, Edith

    2006-01-01

    One-third of injured patients treated in the emergency department (ED) have an alcohol use disorder (AUD). Few are screened and receive counseling because ED staff have little time for additional tasks. We hypothesized that computer technology can screen and provide an intervention that reduces at...

  10. Association between gene expression biomarkers of immunosuppression and blood transfusion in severely injured polytrauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrance, Hew Dt; Brohi, Karim; Pearse, Rupert M; Mein, Charles A; Wozniak, Eva; Prowle, John R; Hinds, Charles J; OʼDwyer, Michael J

    2015-04-01

    To explore the hypothesis that blood transfusion contributes to an immunosuppressed phenotype in severely injured patients. Despite trauma patients using disproportionately large quantities of blood and blood products, the immunomodulatory effects of blood transfusion in this group are inadequately described. A total of 112 ventilated polytrauma patients were recruited. Messenger RNA (mRNA) was extracted from PAXGene tubes collected within 2 hours of the trauma, at 24 hours, and at 72 hours. T-helper cell subtype specific cytokines and transcription factors were quantified using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Median injury severity score was 29. Blood transfusion was administered to 27 (24%) patients before the 2-hour sampling point. Transfusion was associated with a greater immediate rise in IL-10 (P = 0.003) and IL-27 (P = 0.04) mRNA levels. Blood products were transfused in 72 (64%) patients within the first 24 hours. There was an association between transfusion at 24 hours and higher IL-10 (P < 0.0001), lower Foxp3 (P = 0.01), GATA3 (P = 0.006), and RORγt (P = 0.05) mRNA levels at 24 hours. There were greater reductions in T-bet (P = 0.03) mRNA levels and lesser increases in TNFα (P = 0.015) and IFNγ (P = 0.035) at 24 hours in those transfused. Multiple regression models confirmed that the transfusion of blood products was independently associated with altered patterns of gene expression. Blood stream infections occur in 15 (20.8%) of those transfused in the first 24 hours, compared with 1 patient (2.5%) not transfused (OR = 10.3 [1.3-81], P = 0.008). The primarily immunosuppressive inflammatory response to polytrauma may be exacerbated by the transfusion of blood products. Furthermore, transfusion was associated with an increased susceptibility to nosocomial infections.

  11. Nutrition in Patients with Head Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcu Totur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The need of energy increases by 40% in patients with a head trauma, when compared to people who are living a normal life. This ratio reaches to 200% in some cases. It is important to give a nutrition support which can satisfy the energy need resulted from the hypermetabolic and hypercatabolic states and that is enough to help to fix the immunologic state and achieve a better result in healing the injury. When oral nutrition is not possible in the patient with a head trauma, their energy need is satisfied through enteral and parenteral nutrition. Though parenteral nutrition had held an important role in feeding patients with head trauma, enteral nutrition is applied much more widely today. Enteral and parenteral nutrition both has their own advantages and disadvantages. In the clinical and laboratory studies that had been held, it was found that enteral nutrition improved the systemic immunity, decreased the incidence of the major infectious complications, decreased the metabolic response to trauma, protected the intestinal mucosa, and protected the ecologic balance of the microflora. In this article, it is investigated through the importance of the feeding in patients with a head trauma and reasons to chose enteral nutrition

  12. Robot-assisted arm assessments in spinal cord injured patients: a consideration of concept study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urs Keller

    Full Text Available Robotic assistance is increasingly used in neurological rehabilitation for enhanced training. Furthermore, therapy robots have the potential for accurate assessment of motor function in order to diagnose the patient status, to measure therapy progress or to feedback the movement performance to the patient and therapist in real time. We investigated whether a set of robot-based assessments that encompasses kinematic, kinetic and timing metrics is applicable, safe, reliable and comparable to clinical metrics for measurement of arm motor function. Twenty-four healthy subjects and five patients after spinal cord injury underwent robot-based assessments using the exoskeleton robot ARMin. Five different tasks were performed with aid of a visual display. Ten kinematic, kinetic and timing assessment parameters were extracted on joint- and end-effector level (active and passive range of motion, cubic reaching volume, movement time, distance-path ratio, precision, smoothness, reaction time, joint torques and joint stiffness. For cubic volume, joint torques and the range of motion for most joints, good inter- and intra-rater reliability were found whereas precision, movement time, distance-path ratio and smoothness showed weak to moderate reliability. A comparison with clinical scores revealed good correlations between robot-based joint torques and the Manual Muscle Test. Reaction time and distance-path ratio showed good correlation with the "Graded and Redefined Assessment of Strength, Sensibility and Prehension" (GRASSP and the Van Lieshout Test (VLT for movements towards a predefined position in the center of the frontal plane. In conclusion, the therapy robot ARMin provides a comprehensive set of assessments that are applicable and safe. The first results with spinal cord injured patients and healthy subjects suggest that the measurements are widely reliable and comparable to clinical scales for arm motor function. The methods applied and results can

  13. Link for Injured Kids: A Patient-Centered Program of Psychological First Aid After Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Marizen; Toussaint, Maisha; Woods-Jaeger, Briana; Harland, Karisa; Wetjen, Kristel; Wilgenbusch, Tammy; Pitcher, Graeme; Jennissen, Charles

    2017-08-01

    Injury, the most common type of pediatric trauma, can lead to a number of adverse psychosocial outcomes, including posttraumatic stress disorder. Currently, few evidence-based parent programs exist to support children hospitalized after a traumatic injury. Using methods in evaluation and intervention research, we completed a formative research study to develop a new program of psychological first aid, Link for Injured Kids, aimed to educate parents in supporting their children after a severe traumatic injury. Using qualitative methods, we held focus groups with parents and pediatric trauma providers of children hospitalized at a Level I Children's Hospital because of an injury in 2012. We asked focus group participants to describe reactions to trauma and review drafts of our intervention materials. Health professionals and caregivers reported a broad spectrum of emotional responses by their children or patients; however, difficulties were experienced during recovery at home and upon returning to school. All parents and health professionals recommended that interventions be offered to parents either in the emergency department or close to discharge among admissions. Results from this study strongly indicate a need for posttrauma interventions, particularly in rural settings, to support families of children to address the psychosocial outcomes in the aftermath of an injury. Findings presented here describe the process of intervention development that responds to the needs of an affected population.

  14. Evaluation of radiation dose in 64-row whole-body CT of multiple injured patients compared to 4-row CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrieder, A.; Geyer, L.L.; Koerner, M.; Deak, Z.; Wirth, S.; Reiser, M.; Linsenmaier, U.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate radiation exposure in whole-body CT (WBCT) of multiple injured patients comparing 4-row multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) to 64-row MDCT. Materials and Methods: 200 WBCT studies were retrospectively evaluated: 92 4-row MDCT scans and 108 64-row MDCT scans. Each CT protocol was optimized for the particular CT system. The scan length, CT dose index (CTDI), and dose length product (DLP) were recorded and analyzed for radiation exposure. The mean effective dose was estimated based on conversion factors. Student's t-test was used for statistical analysis. Results: The mean CTDI vol values (mGy) of the thorax and abdomen were significantly reduced with 64-row MDCT (10.2 ± 2.5 vs. 11.4 ± 1.4, p < 0.001; 14.2 ± 3.7 vs. 16.1 ± 1.7, p < 0.001). The DLP values (mGy x cm) of the head and thorax were significantly increased with 64-row MDCT (1305.9 ± 201.1 vs. 849.8 ± 90.9, p < 0,001; 504.4 ± 134.4 vs. 471.5 ± 74.1, p = 0.030). The scan lengths (mm) were significantly increased with 64-row MDCT: head 223.6 ± 35.8 vs. 155.5 ± 12.3 (p < 0.001), thorax 427.4 ± 44.5 vs. 388.3 ± 57.5 (p < 0.001), abdomen 520.3 ± 50.2 vs. 490.8 ± 51.6 (p < 0.001). The estimated mean effective doses (mSv) were 22.4 ± 2.6 (4-row MDCT) and 24.1 ± 4.6 (64-row MDCT; p = 0.001), resulting in a percentage increase of 8 %. Conclusion: The radiation dose per slice of the thorax and abdomen can be significantly decreased by using 64-row MDCT. Due to the technical advances of modern 64-row MDCT systems, the scan field can be adapted to the clinical demands and, if necessary, enlarged without time loss. As a result, the estimated mean effective dose might be increased in WBCT. (orig.)

  15. ‘Studying Injured Minds’ - The Vietnam Head Injury Study and 40 years of brain injury research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa eRaymont

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The study of those who have sustained traumatic brain injuries (TBI during military conflicts has greatly facilitated research in the fields of neuropsychology, neurosurgery, psychiatry, neurology and neuroimaging. The Vietnam Head Injury Study (VHIS is a prospective, long-term follow-up study of a cohort of 1,221 Vietnam veterans with mostly penetrating brain injuries, which has stretched over more than 40 years. The scope of this study, both in terms of the types of injury and fields of examination, has been extremely broad. It has been instrumental in extending the field of TBI research and in exposing pressing medical and social issues that affect those who suffer such injuries. This review summarizes the history of conflict-related TBI research and the VHIS to date, as well as the vast range of important findings the VHIS has established.

  16. Injuries, negative consequences, and risk behaviors among both injured and uninjured emergency department patients who report using alcohol and marijuana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woolard Robert

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brief intervention (BI to reduce hazardous drinking and negative consequences such as injury has been effective when given in the emergency department (ED. The effectiveness and effect of BI has varied between injured and uninjured ED patients. This study compares injured and uninjured ED patients who admit to alcohol and marijuana use to determine their need and their readiness for BI. Patients and Methods: Participants volunteered to enter a randomized controlled trial of BI to reduce hazardous alcohol and marijuana use. Adult ED patients who had had alcohol in the last month and smoked marijuana in the last year were recruited. Those patients who were admitted to hospital, were under police custody, or were seeking treatment for substance use or psychiatric disorder were excluded. Research assistants interviewed participants using a validated questionnaire. Data were analyzed using SAS (version 9.1. Binominal tests of proportions, t-test analyses, and transformations were conducted as appropriate. Results: Injured (n = 249 and uninjured (n = 266 study participants reported very high, statistically equivalent (P > 0.05, rates of binge drinking (4-5 days/month, marijuana use (13 days/month, driving under the influence of marijuana or alcohol (>49% in the last 3 months, injury (>83% in the last year, and other negative consequences (>64% in the last 3 months prior to their ED visit. These behaviors and the consequences demonstrate a need for change. Both injured and uninjured subjects were ready to change (>56% and confident they could change (>91% alcohol and marijuana use. Discussion: ED patients who admit to alcohol and marijuana use also use other hazardous substances and participate in high-risk behaviors. In both injured and uninjured patients who admit using alcohol and marijuana, the ED visit is an opportunity to deliver BI to reduce alcohol and marijuana use and associated risk behaviors and the subsequent injury and

  17. Evaluation of Severity Score in Patients with Lower Limb and Pelvic Fractures Injured in Motor Vehicle Front-Impact Collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokalp, Mehmet Ata; Hekimoglu, Yavuz; Gozen, Abdurrahim; Guner, Savas; Asirdizer, Mahmut

    2016-12-01

    BACKGROUND Lower limb and pelvic injuries and fractures occur at a very high incidence in motor vehicle accidents. In this study, the characteristics (e.g., body side, bone location, and fracture severity) of lower limb and pelvic fractures that occurred during front-impact collisions were correlated with the injured patients' sex, age, and position in the vehicle. MATERIAL AND METHODS We retrospectively evaluated 191 patients (136 males, 55 females) who were injured in motor vehicle accidents, specifically in frontal collisions. RESULTS This study revealed that most of lower limb and pelvic fractures occurred in males (71.2%; p=.000), 19-36 years old (55.5%; p=.000), small vehicles (86.4%; p=.000), and rear seat passengers (49.2%; p=.000). Fractures most commonly occurred in the left side of the body (46.6%; p=.000) and upper legs (37.7%; p=.000). Severity scores were higher (2.76) in males than females (2.07). No statistically significant was found in severity scores of patients and other personal characteristics and fracture features of patients with lower limb and pelvic fractures who were injured in a vehicle during front-impact collisions (p>0.05). CONCLUSIONS The results of this study will be useful for the automobile industry, forensics and criminal scientists, and for trauma research studies.

  18. Rehabilitation of Traumatic Brain Injured Patients: Patient Mood Analysis from Multimodal Video

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilyas, Chaudhary Muhammad Aqdus; Nasrollahi, Kamal; Rehm, Matthias

    2018-01-01

    and long short term memory on RGB and thermal data that were collected in challenging scenarios from real patients. It automatically identifies the patient's facial expressions, and inform experts or trainers that "it is the time" to start rehabilitation session....

  19. Adoption of the 2006 Field Triage Decision Scheme for Injured Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasser, Scott

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: When emergency medical services (EMS providers respond to the scene of an injury, they must decide where to transport the injured patients for further evaluation and treatment. This is done through a process known as “field triage”, whereby a patient’s injuries are matched to the most appropriate hospital. In 2005-2006 the National Expert Panel on Field Triage, convened by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, revised the 1999 American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma Field Triage Decision Scheme. This revision, the 2006 Field Triage Decision Scheme, was published in 2006.Methods: State Public Health departments’ and EMS’ external websites were evaluated to ascertain the current status of implementation of the 2006 Field Triage Decision Scheme.Results: Information regarding field triage was located for 41 states. In nine states no information regarding field triage was available on their websites. Of the 41 states where information was located, seven were classified as “full adopters” of the 2006 Field Triage Decision Scheme; nine were considered “partial adopters”; 17 states were found to be using a full version or modification of the 1999 Field Triage Decision Scheme; and eight states were considered to be using a different protocol or scheme for field triage.Conclusion: Many states have adopted the 2006 Decision Scheme (full or partial. Further investigation is needed to determine the reasons why some states do not adopt the guidelines. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(3:275-283.

  20. The impact of mild induced hypothermia on the rate of transfusion and the mortality in severely injured patients: a retrospective multi-centre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Kai Oliver; Held, Leonhard; Kraus, Andrea; Hildebrand, Frank; Mommsen, Philipp; Mica, Ladislav; Wanner, Guido A; Steiger, Peter; Moos, Rudolf M; Simmen, Hans-Peter; Sprengel, Kai

    2016-10-06

    Although under discussion, induced hypothermia (IH) is an established therapy for patients with cardiac arrest or traumatic brain injuries. The influences on coagulopathy and bleeding tendency in severely injured patients (SIP) with concomitant traumatic brain injury are most widely unclear. Therefore, the aim of this study was to quantify the effect of mild IH in SIP with concomitant severe traumatic brain injuries on transfusion rate and mortality. In this retrospective multi-centre study, SIP from three European level-1 trauma centres with an ISS ≥16 between 2009 and 2011 were included. At hospital A, patients qualified for IH with age ≤70 years and a severe head injury with an abbreviated injury scale (AIS Head ) of ≥3. IH was defined as target core body temperature of 35 °C. Hypothermic patients were matched with two patients, one from hospital B and one from hospital C using age and AIS Head . The effect of IH on the transfusion rate, complications and mortality was quantified with 95 % confidence intervals (CI). Patients not treated with IH in hospital A and those from hospital B and C, who were not matched, were used to adjust the CI for the effect of inter-hospital therapy protocol differences. Mean age of patients in the IH-group (n = 43) was 35.7 years, mean ISS 30 points and sex distribution showed 83.7 % male. Mean age of matched patients in the normotherm-group (n = 86) was 36.7 years, mean ISS 33 points and there were 75.6 % males. For the hypothermic patients, we pointed out an estimate of mean difference for the number of transfused units of packed red blood cells as well as for mortality which does not indicate a decrease in the benefit gained by hypothermia. It is suggested that hypothermic patients tend to a higher rate of lung failure and thromboembolisms. Though tending to an increased rate of complications, there is no evidence for a difference in both; rate of transfusion and mortality in SIP. Mild IH as an option for

  1. [What kind of health information search the spinal cord injured patients from Spain on the internet?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bea-Muñoz, Manuel; Medina-Sánchez, María; Flórez-García, Mariano

    2015-04-16

    Internet is an alternative for health education to the population. Spinal cord injured individuals usually consult the Internet about their health problems. To identify the health information sources, the more consulted items and the confidence in Internet information of a group of spinal cord injured individuals from Spain. A survey to spinal cord injured individuals from Spain was conducted, with a questionnaire in Google Drive. It was accessible with a link in ASPAYM-Asturias web page. The questionnaire included epidemiological data and information about Internet use and confidence in its contents. 121 individuals answered the survey, 64% male, with an average age of 45 years. The predominant aetiology was traumatic (70%) and 72% were paraplegics. 83% prefer to consult health care providers directly. More of 70% of the sample searches health problems on the Internet, mostly web pages in Spanish. The preferred item was 'orthopaedic materials and wheelchairs'. 27% of the sample trusts in the Internet information and 32% don't. This research provides information about Internet use of spinal cord injured individuals in Spain. Although we have to admit some bias in the study, more than 70% of the sample searches health problems on the Internet, mostly web pages in Spanish. About one in four individuals trust in information from Internet and most of the sample prefers recommendations directly from healthcare professionals.

  2. The role of resilience in the recovery of the burn-injured patient: an integrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kornhaber R

    2016-05-01

    component influencing the recovery from burns trauma, it still remains a broad construct within the burns framework. Regular assessment of resilience in burn-injured patients is recommended in clinical practice in addition to longitudinal and intervention studies to best inform patient care. Keywords: resilience, burn injury, rehabilitation, optimism, tenacity, review

  3. Teamwork in Trauma: System Adjustment to a Protocol for the Management of Multiply Injured Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallier, Heather A; Moore, Timothy A; Como, John J; Dolenc, Andrea J; Steinmetz, Michael P; Wagner, Karl G; Smith, Charles E; Wilczewski, Patricia A

    2015-11-01

    We developed a protocol to determine the timing of definitive fracture care based on the adequacy of resuscitation. Inception of this project required a multidisciplinary group, including physicians from anesthesiology, general trauma and critical care, neurosurgery, orthopaedic spine, and orthopaedic trauma. The purposes of this study were to review our initial experience with adherence to protocol recommendations and to assess barriers to implementation. Prospective. Level 1 trauma center. Definitive fixation of pelvis, acetabulum, spine, and femur fractures within 36 hours of injury, based on laboratory parameters for acidosis. Three hundred five consecutive skeletally mature patients with Injury Severity Score ≥ 16 (mean, 26.4) and 346 fractures of the proximal or diaphyseal femur (n = 152), pelvic ring (n = 56), acetabulum (n = 44), and/or spine (n = 94) were treated surgically. Adherence to the protocol was defined as definitive fixation within 36 hours of injury in resuscitated patients. All patients were adequately resuscitated within that time. Patient demographic and injury characteristics, date and time of presentation, and reasons for delay were recorded. Two hundred fifty-one patients (82%) with 287 fractures were treated according to the protocol, whereas 54 patients (18%) with 59 fractures were definitively stabilized on a delayed basis (mean, 90 hours). Delay was not related to patient age, Injury Severity Score, day of week, or time of presentation. Before implementation of this protocol, 76% were treated on a delayed basis, demonstrating improvement for each fracture type: spine (79% of previous patients with delay), pelvis (57%), acetabulum (72%), and femur (22%); all P < 0.0001 for more frequently delayed surgery before the protocol. Surgeon choice to delay the procedure accounted for 67% of reasons for delay. Other reasons included intensivist choice (13%), operating room availability (7.4%), patient choice (3.7%), severe head injury (5

  4. The effect of nightly nasal CPAP treatment on nocturnal hypoxemia and sleep disorders in mustard gas-injured patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahedi, Ensieh; Fazeli Varzaneh, Ali Reza; Ghanei, Mostafa; Afsharpaiman, Shahla; Poursaleh, Zohre

    2014-12-01

    Sleep-related breathing disorders are associated with unusual respiratory pattern or an abnormal reduction in gas exchange during sleep that is common in sulfur mustard (SM) exposure. We compared 57 Iranian male patients injured with SM and had any complaints of sleep problems with an age-matched group of 21 Iranian male patients who had complaints of sleep problems and were not chemically injured; this group had Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) above 10 and whom referred for polysomnography. Split-night studies were performed for patients with diagnostic polysomnography for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and respiratory events. We then studied respiratory events including episodes of OSA, apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) and respiratory disturbance index (RDI). The mean age in mustard-exposed patients was 48.14±8.04 years and in age-matched group, 48.19±8.39 years. In mustard exposed patients, there were statistical differences for the episodes of OSA (p=0.001), AHI (p=0.001), and RDI (p=0.001) between two segments of split-night studies. In the age-matched group, there were statistically differences for each parameter (episodes of OSA (p=0.001), AHI (p=0.001), and RDI (p=0.001)). There were no significant differences between two groups. This study indicated that the incidence of respiratory events and nocturnal hypoxemia during sleep in mustard-exposed patients were high and treatment with CPAP significantly reduced all these events.

  5. Dissecting inflammatory complications in critically injured patients by within-patient gene expression changes: a longitudinal clinical genomics study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keyur H Desai

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Trauma is the number one killer of individuals 1-44 y of age in the United States. The prognosis and treatment of inflammatory complications in critically injured patients continue to be challenging, with a history of failed clinical trials and poorly understood biology. New approaches are therefore needed to improve our ability to diagnose and treat this clinical condition.We conducted a large-scale study on 168 blunt-force trauma patients over 28 d, measuring ∼400 clinical variables and longitudinally profiling leukocyte gene expression with ∼800 microarrays. Marshall MOF (multiple organ failure clinical score trajectories were first utilized to organize the patients into five categories of increasingly poor outcomes. We then developed an analysis framework modeling early within-patient expression changes to produce a robust characterization of the genomic response to trauma. A quarter of the genome shows early expression changes associated with longer-term post-injury complications, captured by at least five dynamic co-expression modules of functionally related genes. In particular, early down-regulation of MHC-class II genes and up-regulation of p38 MAPK signaling pathway were found to strongly associate with longer-term post-injury complications, providing discrimination among patient outcomes from expression changes during the 40-80 h window post-injury.The genomic characterization provided here substantially expands the scope by which the molecular response to trauma may be characterized and understood. These results may be instrumental in furthering our understanding of the disease process and identifying potential targets for therapeutic intervention. Additionally, the quantitative approach we have introduced is potentially applicable to future genomics studies of rapidly progressing clinical conditions.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00257231

  6. Computerised tomographic patterns in patients with head injury at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-04-15

    Apr 15, 2011 ... The clinical severity of head injury is classified based on ... head injury include road traffic accidents (RTA), assaults, ... information in the management of patients with head ... Materials and Methods ... The right cerebral hemisphere was involved in 13 cases .... Nerve palsies – 3rd, 5th, 6th cranial nerves. 3.

  7. Head and Neck Cancer—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head and neck cancers include cancers in the larynx (voice box), throat, lips, mouth, nose, and salivary glands. Start here to find information on head and neck cancer treatment in adults and children, causes and prevention, screening, research, and statistics.

  8. Metabolic Crisis in Severely Head-Injured Patients: Is Ischemia Just the Tip of the Iceberg?

    OpenAIRE

    Carre, Emilie; Ogier, Michael; Boret, Henry; Montcriol, Ambroise; Bourdon, Lionel; Jean-Jacques, Risso

    2013-01-01

    Ischemia and metabolic crisis are frequent post-traumatic secondary brain insults that negatively influence outcome. Clinicians commonly mix up these two types of insults, mainly because high lactate/pyruvate ratio (LPR) is the common marker for both ischemia and metabolic crisis. However, LPR elevations during ischemia and metabolic crisis reflect two different energetic imbalances: ischemia (Type 1 LPR elevations with low oxygenation) is characterized by a drastic deprivation of energetic s...

  9. [Optimized resource mobilization and quality of treatment of severely injured patients through a structured trauma room alarm system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spering, C; Roessler, M; Kurlemann, T; Dresing, K; Stürmer, K M; Lehmann, W; Sehmisch, S

    2017-12-12

    The treatment of severely injured patients in the trauma resuscitation unit (TRU) requires an interdisciplinary and highly professional trauma team approach. The complete team needs to be waiting for the patient in the TRU on arrival. Treating severely injured patients in the TRU, the trauma team connects the initial preclinical emergency stabilization with the subsequent sophisticated treatment. Thus, the trauma team depends on concise information from the emergency personnel at the scene to provide its leader with further information as well as an accurate alarm including all departments necessary to stabilize the patient in the TRU. Aiming at an accurate and most efficient trauma team alarm, this study was designed to provide and analyze an alarm system which mobilizes the trauma team in a stepwise fashion depending on the pattern of injuries and the threat to life. The trauma team alarm system was analyzed in a prospective data acquisition at a level I trauma center over a period of 12 months. Evaluation followed the acquisition phase and provided comparison to the status prior to the establishment of the alarm system. All items underwent statistical testing using t‑tests (p  0.01). The duration from arrival of the patient in the TRU to the initial multislice computed tomography (CT) scan was reduced by 6 min while the total period of treatment in the TRU was reduced by 17 min. After the alarm system to gradually mobilize the trauma team was put into action, team members left the TRU if unneeded prior to finishing the initial treatment in only 4% of the cases. The patient fatality rate was 8.8% (injury severity score, ISS = 23 points) after establishment of the alarm system compared to 12.9% (ISS = 25 points) before. The implementation of an accurate and patient status-based alarm system to mobilize the trauma team can improve the quality of treatment while the duration of treatment of the severely injured patients in the TRU can be decreased. It

  10. Personality change following head injury: assessment with the NEO Five-Factor Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lannoo, E; de Deyne, C; Colardyn, F; de Soete, G; Jannes, C

    1997-11-01

    We evaluated personality change following head injury in 68 patients at 6 months postinjury using the NEO Five-Factor Inventory to assess the five personality dimensions of the Five-Factor Model of Personality. All items had to be rated twice, once for the preinjury and once for the current status. Twenty-eight trauma patients with injuries to other parts of the body than the head were used as controls. For the head-injured group, 63 relatives also completed the questionnaire. The results showed no differences between the ratings of head-injured patients and the ratings of trauma control patients. Both groups showed significant change in the personality dimensions Neuroticism, Extraversion, and Conscientiousness. Compared to their relatives, head-injured patients report a smaller change in Extraversion and Conscientiousness. Changes were not reported on the Openness and Agreeableness scales, by neither the head-injured or their relatives, nor by the trauma controls.

  11. Iris reconstruction combined with iris-claw intraocular lens implantation for the management of iris-lens injured patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shufang; Wang, Mingling; Xiao, Tianlin; Zhao, Zhenquan

    2016-03-01

    To study the efficiency and safety of iris reconstruction combined with iris-claw intraocular lens (IOL) implantation in the patients with iris-lens injuries. Retrospective, noncomparable consecutive case series study. Eleven patients (11 eyes) following iris-lens injuries underwent iris reconstructions combined with iris-claw IOL implantations. Clinical data, such as cause and time of injury, visual acuity (VA), iris and lens injuries, surgical intervention, follow-up period, corneal endothelial cell count, and optical coherence tomography, were collected. Uncorrected VA (UCVA) in all injured eyes before combined surgery was equal to or iris returned to its natural round shape or smaller pupil, and the iris-claw IOLs in the 11 eyes were well-positioned on the anterior surface of reconstructed iris. No complications occurred in those patients. Iris reconstruction combined with iris-claw IOL implantation is a safe and efficient procedure for an eye with iris-lens injury in the absence of capsular support.

  12. Evaluation of the occurrence and diagnose definitions for Nocturnal Polyuria in Spinal Cord Injured patients during rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viaene, Annick; Denys, Marie-Astrid; Goessaert, An-Sofie; Claeys, Jana; Raes, Ann; Roggeman, Saskia; Everaert, Karel

    2017-11-03

    Little is known about the occurrence of nocturnal polyuria in spinal cord injured (SCI) patients and the definitions which are preferable in this population. To determine the occurrence of nocturnal polyuria (NP) in spinal cord injured patients during in-patient rehabilitation in the Ghent University Hospital. To study the influence of different time periods (daytime, bed rest and sleep) on the accuracy of the existing diagnose definitions for NP specifically for this type of patients. Retrospective study using patient records. SCI patients during hospital based rehabilitation between 2011 and 2014. Seventy-four SCI patients were selected and their records of frequency-volume charts were examined, after exclusion of unreliable data, forty-seven patients were retained for the current study. Retrospective study using data from frequency-volume charts of either two or three days from patients with SCI. Nocturnal urine production (NUP) and nocturnal polyuria index (NPi) were calculated. There was a significant increase in diuresis, calculated as urine production, between day time and bed rest (p=0.008) and between day time and sleep (p=0.001). All patients showed nocturnal polyuria during a 12-hour night time period (including both bed rest and sleep) and 39 patients showed nocturnal polyuria during the 8 hour period of sleep. There was no significant difference in mean urine production between bed rest and sleep. Prevalence of NP did not significantly differ between the complete or incomplete SCI patients or between patients with higher and lower SCI levels. This study showed that the occurrence of nocturnal polyuria in patients with SCI is high and that it is important to consider which definitions of NP are used for diagnosis. Increase in diuresis is observed during bed rest and sleep and the diagnose is correctly estimated when nocturnal urine production definitions are used in both time periods. In accordance with what was expected, diagnose of NP was

  13. Radiologic head CT interpretation errors in pediatric abusive and non-abusive head trauma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kralik, Stephen F.; Finke, Whitney; Wu, Isaac C.; Ho, Chang Y.; Hibbard, Roberta A.; Hicks, Ralph A.

    2017-01-01

    Pediatric head trauma, including abusive head trauma, is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this research was to identify and evaluate radiologic interpretation errors of head CTs performed on abusive and non-abusive pediatric head trauma patients from a community setting referred for a secondary interpretation at a tertiary pediatric hospital. A retrospective search identified 184 patients <5 years of age with head CT for known or potential head trauma who had a primary interpretation performed at a referring community hospital by a board-certified radiologist. Two board-certified fellowship-trained neuroradiologists at an academic pediatric hospital independently interpreted the head CTs, compared their interpretations to determine inter-reader discrepancy rates, and resolved discrepancies to establish a consensus second interpretation. The primary interpretation was compared to the consensus second interpretation using the RADPEER trademark scoring system to determine the primary interpretation-second interpretation overall and major discrepancy rates. MRI and/or surgical findings were used to validate the primary interpretation or second interpretation when possible. The diagnosis of abusive head trauma was made using clinical and imaging data by a child abuse specialist to separate patients into abusive head trauma and non-abusive head trauma groups. Discrepancy rates were compared for both groups. Lastly, primary interpretations and second interpretations were evaluated for discussion of imaging findings concerning for abusive head trauma. There were statistically significant differences between primary interpretation-second interpretation versus inter-reader overall and major discrepancy rates (28% vs. 6%, P=0.0001; 16% vs. 1%, P=0.0001). There were significant differences in the primary interpretation-second interpretation overall and major discrepancy rates for abusive head trauma patients compared to non-abusive head trauma

  14. Radiologic head CT interpretation errors in pediatric abusive and non-abusive head trauma patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kralik, Stephen F.; Finke, Whitney; Wu, Isaac C.; Ho, Chang Y. [Indiana University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Hibbard, Roberta A.; Hicks, Ralph A. [Indiana University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Section of Child Protection Programs, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2017-07-15

    Pediatric head trauma, including abusive head trauma, is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this research was to identify and evaluate radiologic interpretation errors of head CTs performed on abusive and non-abusive pediatric head trauma patients from a community setting referred for a secondary interpretation at a tertiary pediatric hospital. A retrospective search identified 184 patients <5 years of age with head CT for known or potential head trauma who had a primary interpretation performed at a referring community hospital by a board-certified radiologist. Two board-certified fellowship-trained neuroradiologists at an academic pediatric hospital independently interpreted the head CTs, compared their interpretations to determine inter-reader discrepancy rates, and resolved discrepancies to establish a consensus second interpretation. The primary interpretation was compared to the consensus second interpretation using the RADPEER trademark scoring system to determine the primary interpretation-second interpretation overall and major discrepancy rates. MRI and/or surgical findings were used to validate the primary interpretation or second interpretation when possible. The diagnosis of abusive head trauma was made using clinical and imaging data by a child abuse specialist to separate patients into abusive head trauma and non-abusive head trauma groups. Discrepancy rates were compared for both groups. Lastly, primary interpretations and second interpretations were evaluated for discussion of imaging findings concerning for abusive head trauma. There were statistically significant differences between primary interpretation-second interpretation versus inter-reader overall and major discrepancy rates (28% vs. 6%, P=0.0001; 16% vs. 1%, P=0.0001). There were significant differences in the primary interpretation-second interpretation overall and major discrepancy rates for abusive head trauma patients compared to non-abusive head trauma

  15. Are patient specific meshes required for EIT head imaging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehl, Markus; Aristovich, Kirill; Faulkner, Mayo; Holder, David

    2016-06-01

    Head imaging with electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is usually done with time-differential measurements, to reduce time-invariant modelling errors. Previous research suggested that more accurate head models improved image quality, but no thorough analysis has been done on the required accuracy. We propose a novel pipeline for creation of precise head meshes from magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography scans, which was applied to four different heads. Voltages were simulated on all four heads for perturbations of different magnitude, haemorrhage and ischaemia, in five different positions and for three levels of instrumentation noise. Statistical analysis showed that reconstructions on the correct mesh were on average 25% better than on the other meshes. However, the stroke detection rates were not improved. We conclude that a generic head mesh is sufficient for monitoring patients for secondary strokes following head trauma.

  16. Microdialysate concentration changes do not provide sufficient information to evaluate metabolic effects of lactate supplementation in brain-injured patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dienel, G. A.; Rothman, D. L.; Nordström, Carl-Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral microdialysis is a widely used clinical tool for monitoring extracellular concentrations of selected metabolites after brain injury and to guide neurocritical care. Extracellular glucose levels and lactate/pyruvate ratios have high diagnostic value because they can detect hypoglycemia an....... In such cases, lactate will not be metabolizable and lactate flooding may be harmful. More rigorous approaches are required to evaluate metabolic and physiological effects of administration of hypertonic sodium lactate to brain-injured patients.......Cerebral microdialysis is a widely used clinical tool for monitoring extracellular concentrations of selected metabolites after brain injury and to guide neurocritical care. Extracellular glucose levels and lactate/pyruvate ratios have high diagnostic value because they can detect hypoglycemia...... and deficits in oxidative metabolism, respectively. In addition, patterns of metabolite concentrations can distinguish between ischemia and mitochondrial dysfunction, and are helpful to choose and evaluate therapy. Increased intracranial pressure can be life-threatening after brain injury, and hypertonic...

  17. CENTRAL SENSITIZATION AND MEDICATION IN SPINAL CORD INJURED IN-PATIENTS. A CROSS-SECTIONAL CLINICAL STUDY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendahl, A; Kasch, Helge

    Background and aims: A major proportion of spinal cord injured subjects (SCIS) suffers from chronic pain. A majority with neuropathic pain, being: shooting, burning and stabbing. Neurological examination reveals signs of central sensitization (CS) e.g. allodynia and hyperalgesia. CS plays...... an important role in maintained neuropathic pain conditions and may lead to or be induced by analgesics. Medication-overuse-headaches (MOH) alter CNS pain processing systems, and the situation is reversed after discontinuation of headache medication. Aim: To determine the occurrence of CS and conditions...... pressure algometry, Von Frey filaments and pinprick test. Patients fulfill McGill Pain Questionnaire and the International SCI pain data-set. All participants undergo examination of the Pressure Pain Detection Threshold, Pressure Pain Tolerance Threshold, Mechanical Detection Threshold, and Wind...

  18. [Development of an integrative cognitive rehabilitation program for brain injured patients in the post-acute stage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyun Soo; Kim, Young Ran; Seo, Wha Sook; Seo, Yeon Ok

    2005-04-01

    This study was conducted to develop a comprehensive cognitive rehabilitation program that can be easily applied to brain injured patients by family members or nurses in community or hospital settings. A Systemic literature review design was used. Thirty-three related studies were reviewed. Based on the results of the literature review, the training tasks for attention were designated to enhancing 4 hierarchical areas, i.e., focused, selective, alternating, and divided attention. On the other hand, the memory rehabilitation tasks mainly consisted of mnemonic skills, such as the association method which helps patients memorize given information by linking together common attributes, the visual imagery method, and self-instruction method. The problem solving rehabilitation program included a task of games or plays which stimulated the patients' curiosity and interest. The training tasks for problem solving were to encourage the process of deriving reasonable solutions for a problematic situation resembling real problems that the patients were faced with in their everyday life. It is expected that the cognitive rehabilitation program developed from this study could help patients having difficulty in their every day life, due to a reduced cognitive ability resulting from brain injury, to effectively adapt to every day life.

  19. Symptom-Based Treatment of Neuropathic Pain in Spinal Cord-Injured Patients: A Randomized Crossover Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Kyunghoon; Oh, Yoongul; Lee, Sang-Hyuk; Ryu, Ju Seok

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the differences in medication effect according to pain characteristics in spinal cord-injured patients. This study is a prospective, randomized, crossover study. Fifty-five patients and 66 locations of neuropathic pain were included. Pain was classified into four spontaneous characteristics and three evoked pain characteristics. Oxcarbazepine (Na channel blocker) and pregabalin (calcium channel α2-δ ligand medication) were tried. Patients were divided into two groups: evoked pain present and evoked pain absent. Overall average visual analog scale was obtained. Oxcarbazepine was significantly more effective for patients without evoked pain than in those with it for electrical, burning, and pricking pain. The effect of pregabalin was not different regarding the presence or absence of evoked pain for all pain categories, except burning pain. In patients with evoked pain, pregabalin was shown to be significantly more effective for electrical pain, allodynia, and heat hyperalgesia than oxcarbazepine. In the evoked pain absent group, oxcarbazepine showed greater improvement than pregabalin but was not significant. In summary, the phenotype of neuropathic pain was associated with the efficacy of different pharmacologic treatments. Symptom-based treatment, therefore, can lead to more efficient analgesia.

  20. Hemodynamic responses to dexmedetomidine in critically injured intubated pediatric burned patients: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shank, Erik S; Sheridan, Robert L; Ryan, Colleen M; Keaney, Timothy J; Martyn, J A Jeevendra

    2013-01-01

    Because of ineffectiveness and tolerance to benzodiazepines and opioids developing with time, drugs acting via other receptor systems (eg, α-2 agonists) have been advocated in burn patients to improve sedation and analgesia. This study in severely burned pediatric subjects examined the hemodynamic consequences of dexmedetomidine (Dex) administration. Eight intubated patients with ≥20 to 79% TBSA burns were studied between 7 and 35 days after injury. After baseline measurements of mean arterial blood pressure and heart rhythm were taken, each patient received a 1.0 µg/kg bolus of Dex followed by an ascending dose infusion protocol (0.7-2.5 µg/kg/hr), with each dose administered for 15 minutes. There was significant hypotension (27±7.5%, average drop in mean arterial pressure [MAP] ± SD), and a decrease in heart rate (HR; 19% ± 7, average drop in HR ± SD). The average HR decreased from 146 beats per minute to 120. No bradycardia (HR patients, the MAP decreased to patients, three patients completed the study receiving the highest infusion dose of Dex (2.5 µg/kg/hr), whereas in 2 patients the infusion part of the study was begun, but the study was stopped due to persistent hypotension (MAP burn patients.

  1. Bladder stones in catheterized spinal cord-injured patients in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-04-26

    Apr 26, 2011 ... Conclusions: This study shows that a large number of SCI patients have an indwelling urethral catheter and suggests that ultrasound scan for the presence of stone should be schedule in a catheterized SCI patient if catheter encrustation or a positive urine culture of P. mirabilis is noted. Key words: Bladder ...

  2. The needs of families accompanying injured patients into the emergency department in a tertiary hospital in Gauteng.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botes, Meghan L; Langley, Gayle

    2016-06-24

    Families are not prepared for traumatic injuries of loved ones. Emergency nurses have the important role of caring for patients and families in this time of crisis. Family needs in the critical care setting have been explored using the Critical Care Family Needs Inventory (CCFNI), however little is known about family needs in the emergency department. This study sought to determine the needs of family members accompanying injured patients into the emergency department, and if these needs were met. A quantitative, descriptive, study was conducted in a level 1 trauma facility in Johannesburg, South Africa. The population included families of patients admitted to the emergency department, sampling 100 participants. The instrument, based on the CCFNI, was validated in a pilot study in Melbourne, Australia and re-evaluated using the Cronbach Alpha validity test to ensure internal consistency.Five themes were explored: 'meaning', 'proximity', 'communication', 'comfort' and 'support' and data were analysed using descriptive statistics. Responses to open-ended questions were analysed using content analysis. Permission from the Human Research Ethics Committee was granted and participants were ensured confidentiality and the option for counselling if required. Themes ranked highly important were 'meaning' and 'communication'. Satisfaction was highest for 'meaning'. Low satisfaction levels for 'communication' were found. Issues regarding prolonged time spent in the emergency department and discrimination were raised. These findings have a negative impact on the family's satisfaction with care and it is recommended that the nurse's role in family care be further explored and emphasised.

  3. Randomized clinical trial of pigtail catheter versus chest tube in injured patients with uncomplicated traumatic pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulvatunyou, N; Erickson, L; Vijayasekaran, A; Gries, L; Joseph, B; Friese, R F; O'Keeffe, T; Tang, A L; Wynne, J L; Rhee, P

    2014-01-01

    Small pigtail catheters appear to work as well as the traditional large-bore chest tubes in patients with traumatic pneumothorax, but it is not known whether the smaller pigtail catheters are associated with less tube-site pain. This study was conducted to compare tube-site pain following pigtail catheter or chest tube insertion in patients with uncomplicated traumatic pneumothorax. This prospective randomized trial compared 14-Fr pigtail catheters and 28-Fr chest tubes in patients with traumatic pneumothorax presenting to a level I trauma centre from July 2010 to February 2012. Patients who required emergency tube placement, those who refused and those who could not respond to pain assessment were excluded. Primary outcomes were tube-site pain, as assessed by a numerical rating scale, and total pain medication use. Secondary outcomes included the success rate of pneumothorax resolution and insertion-related complications. Forty patients were enrolled. Baseline characteristics of 20 patients in the pigtail catheter group were similar to those of 20 patients in the chest tube group. No patient had a flail chest or haemothorax. Pain scores related to chest wall trauma were similar in the two groups. Patients with a pigtail catheter had significantly lower mean(s.d.) tube-site pain scores than those with a chest tube, at baseline after tube insertion (3.2(0.6) versus 7.7(0.6); P pneumothorax, use of a 14-Fr pigtail catheter is associated with reduced pain at the site of insertion, with no other clinically important differences noted compared with chest tubes. NCT01537289 (http://clinicaltrials.gov). © 2013 BJS Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Bone scan as a screening test for missed fractures in severely injured patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K-J; Jung, K; Kim, J; Kwon, J

    2014-12-01

    In many cases, patients with severe blunt trauma have multiple fractures throughout the body. These fractures are not often detectable by history or physical examination, and their diagnosis can be delayed or even missed. Thus, screening test fractures of the whole body is required after initial management. We performed this study to evaluate the reliability of bone scans for detecting missed fractures in patients with multiple severe traumas and we analyzed the causes of missed fractures by using bone scan. A bone scan is useful as a screening test for fractures of the entire body of severe trauma patients who are passed the acute phase. We reviewed the electronic medical records of severe trauma patients who underwent a bone scan from September 2009 to December 2010. Demographic and medical data were compared and statistically analyzed to determine whether missed fractures were detected after bone scan in the two groups. A total of 382 patients who had an injury severity score [ISS] greater than 16 points with multiple traumas visited the emergency room. One hundred and thirty-one patients underwent bone scan and 81 patients were identified with missed fractures by bone scan. The most frequent location for missed fractures was the rib area (55 cases, 41.98%), followed by the extremities (42 cases, 32.06%). The missed fractures that required surgery or splint were most common in extremities (11 cases). In univariate analysis, higher ISS scores and mechanism of injury were related with the probability that missed fractures would be found with a bone scan. The ISS score was statistically significant in multivariate analysis. Bone scan is an effective method of detecting missed fractures among patients with multiple severe traumas. Level IV, retrospective study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Rehabilitation and multiple limb amputations: A clinical report of patients injured in combat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melcer, Ted; Pyo, Jay; Walker, Jay; Quinn, Kimberly; Lebedda, Martin; Neises, Kamaran; Nguyen, Christina; Galarneau, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This clinical report describes the outpatient rehabilitation program for patients with multiple limb amputations enrolled in the Comprehensive Combat and Complex Casualty Care facility at the Naval Medical Center San Diego. Injury-specific data for 29 of these patients wounded by blast weaponry in Afghanistan in 2010 or 2011 were captured by the Expeditionary Medical Encounter Database at the Naval Health Research Center and were reviewed for this report. Their median Injury Severity Score was 27 (N = 29; range, 11-54). Patients averaged seven moderate to serious injuries (Abbreviated Injury Scale scores ≥2), including multiple injuries to lower limbs and injuries to the torso and/or upper limbs. All patients received care from numerous clinics, particularly physical therapy during the first 6 mo postinjury. Clinic use generally declined after the first 6 mo with the exception of prosthetic devices and repairs. The clinical team implemented the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory, 4th Revision (MPAI-4) to assess functioning at outpatient program initiation and discharge (n = 23). At program discharge, most patients had improved scores for the MPAI-4 items assessing mobility, pain, and transportation, but not employment. Case reports described rehabilitation for two patients with triple amputations and illustrated multispecialty care and contrasting solutions for limb prostheses.

  6. One hundred injured patients a day: multicenter emergency room surveillance of trauma in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyder, A A; He, S; Zafar, W; Mir, M U; Razzak, J A

    2017-07-01

    Injuries increasingly contribute to the global burden of disease in low- and middle-income countries. This study presents results from a large-scale surveillance study on injury from several urban emergency departments (EDs) in Pakistan. The objective is to document the burden of injuries that present to the healthcare system in Pakistan and to test the feasibility of an ED-based injury and trauma surveillance system. Cross-sectional study conducted using active surveillance approach. This study included EDs of seven tertiary care hospitals in Pakistan. The data were collected between November 2010 and March 2011. All patients presenting with injuries to the participating EDs were enrolled. The study was approved by the Institutional Review Boards of the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, Aga Khan University, and all participating sites. The study recorded 68,390 patients; 93.8% were from the public hospitals. There were seven male for every three female patients, and 50% were 20-39 years of age. About 69.3% were unintentional injuries. Among injuries with a known mechanism (19,102), 51.1% were road traffic injuries (RTIs) and 17.5% were falls. Female, patients aged 60 years or older, patients transferred by ambulance, patients who had RTIs, and patients with intentional injuries were more likely to be hospitalized. The study is the first to use standardized methods for regular collection of multiple ED data in Pakistan. It explored the pattern of injuries and the feasibility to develop and implement facility-based systems for injury and acute illness in countries like Pakistan. Copyright © 2017 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Active cooling in traumatic brain-injured patients: a questionable therapy?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grände, P-O; Reinstrup, P; Rommer, Bertil Roland

    2009-01-01

    -quality trials are considered, TBI patients treated with active cooling were more likely to die, a conclusion supported by a recent high-quality Canadian trial on children. Still, there is a belief that a modified protocol with a shorter time from the accident to the start of active cooling, longer cooling...... and rewarming time and better control of blood pressure and intracranial pressure would be beneficial for TBI patients. This belief has led to the instigation of new trials in adults and in children, including these types of protocol adjustments. The present review provides a short summary of our present...... knowledge of the use of active cooling in TBI patients, and presents some tentative explanations as to why active cooling has not been shown to be effective for outcome after TBI. We focus particularly on the compromised circulation of the penumbra zone, which may be further reduced by the stress caused...

  8. The Role of Oxidative Stress in Severity of Obstructive Pulmonary Complications in Sputum of Sulfur Mustard-Injured Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Heydari

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sulfur mustard (SM is a strong bifunctional alkylating agent that causes delayed complications in organs such as lung. Oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis and progression of many pulmonary diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the oxidative stress in sputum of SM exposed patients with mild, moderate and severe pulmonary dysfunction and assessing their relationship with pulmonary function. Methods: In this cross–sectional study, oxidative stress biomarkers in sputum were examined on 26 patients with SM-induced bronchiolitis obliterans (9 mild, 14 moderate and 3 severe and 12 matched healthy controls referred to Baqiyatallah Hospital, Tehran between October 2015 and April 2016. Results: Sputum superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione S-transferase activities and malondialdehyde level in moderate and severe groups were significantly higher than in the control group (P=0.002, P=0.004, P=0.014 and P=0.009, respectively. Glutathione (GSH level in moderate (22.29%, P=0.025 and severe (45.07%, P=0.004 groups were significantly lower than the control. A decreased in GSH level in severe (41.7% groups was observed as compared with the mild group. Pearson analysis revealed strong correlations between disease severity and oxidative stress biomarkers in sputum of patients with moderate and severe injuries. Conclusions: Oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of patients with moderate and severe pulmonary dysfunction following SM exposure. The presence of enhanced oxidative stress relates to the decline lung function and the progression of the disease. Sputum induction in SM-injured patients can be used to the assessment of the antioxidant status of bronchial secretions.

  9. Bladder stones in catheterized spinal cord-injured patients in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The objective was to determine the incidence of bladder stones in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) and to assess if catheter encrustation or positive urinary culture of Proteus mirabilis is predictive of bladder stones. Background: Bladder stones are common urological complication in those with SCI managed ...

  10. Femoral intercondylar notch shape and dimensions in ACL-injured patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eck, Carola F.; Martins, Cesar A. Q.; Vyas, Shail M.; Celentano, Umberto; van Dijk, C. Niek; Fu, Freddie H.

    2010-01-01

    The femoral intercondylar notch has been an anatomic site of interest as it houses the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The objective of this study was to arthroscopically evaluate the femoral notch in patients with known ACL injury. This evaluation included establishing a classification for notch

  11. Free T4, Free T3, and Reverse T3 in Critically Ill, Thermally Injured Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    with myxedema suggest that the pituitary was either suppressed by steroids or coma , that is, T, concentrations in a range of 0.25 mcg per other factors...tyrosine in patients with altered thyroid function. J. C(i. of tyrosine in thyrotoxicosis and myxedema . Metabolism, 20: Endocrinol., 24: 691, 1964. .384-391

  12. Early ICU Standardized Rehabilitation Therapy for the Critically Injured Burn Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    care hospitalization in elderly patients with chronic critical illness. Med Care 2013;51(1):4–10 18 Cox CE, Martinu T, Sathy SJ, et al. Expectations...sixth vital sign”. J Geriatr Phys Ther 2009;32(2):46–49 125 Troosters T, Gosselink R, Decramer M. Six minute walking distance in healthy elderly subjects...of a return to a pre-hospital level of reduced muscle function in pa- tients with underlying neuromyopathies or sarcopenia ? Answering these questions

  13. Bioinformatic Analysis of Potential Biomarkers for Spinal Cord Injured Patients With Intractable Neuropathic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yimin; Ye, Fang; Huang, Chanyan; Xue, Faling; Li, Yingyuan; Gao, Shaowei; Qiu, Zeting; Li, Si; Chen, Qinchang; Zhou, Huaqiang; Song, Yiyan; Huang, Wenqi; Tan, Wulin; Wang, Zhongxing

    2018-03-15

    Neuropathic pain is one of the common complications after spinal cord injury (SCI), affecting patients' life quality. The molecular mechanism for neuropathic pain after SCI is still unclear. We aimed to discover potential genes and MicroRNAs(miRNAs) related to neuropathic pain by bioinformatics method. Microarray data of GSE69901 were obtained from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database. Peripheral blood samples from patients with or without neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury (SCI) were collected. 12 samples with neuropathic pain and 13 samples without pain as control were included in the downloaded microarray. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between neuropathic pain group and control group were detected using GEO2R online tool. Functional enrichment analysis of DEGs was performed using DAVID database. Protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was constructed from STRING database. MiRNAs targeting these DEGs were obtained from miRNet database. A merged miRNA-DEG network was constructed and analyzed with Cytoscape software. Total 1134 DEGs were identified between patients with or without neuropathic pain(case and control) and 454 biological processes were enriched. We identified 4 targeted miRNAs, including mir-204-5p, mir-519d-3p, mir-20b-5p, mir-6838-5p, which may be the potential biomarker for SCI patients. Protein modification and regulation biological process of central nervous system may be a risk factor of in SCI patients. Certain genes and miRNAs may be potential biomarkers for the prediction of and potential targets for prevention and treatment of neuropathic pain after SCI.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal. http

  14. Hamstring Activity in the Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injured Patient: Injury Implications and Comparison With Quadriceps Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Rachel M; Lundberg, Hannah; Wimmer, Markus A; Forsythe, Brian; Bach, Bernard R; Verma, Nikhil N; Cole, Brian J

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the potential causes of diminished knee extension after acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury using both surface electromyography (sEMG) analysis of the quadriceps and hamstrings, and gait analysis to assess muscle action and tone. Consecutive patients with an acute ACL tear underwent sEMG and gait analysis within 2 weeks of injury, before ACL reconstruction. Standard motion analysis techniques were used and sEMG data were collected simultaneously with gait data. T-tests were used to determine differences between the ACL-deficient and control subjects in knee flexion angles, peak external knee joint moments, and total time that a muscle was activated ("on") during gait. External knee moments were expressed as a percentage of body weight times height. Ten patients (mean age 24 ± 4 years) were included at a mean 10.2 days between injury and analysis; 10 uninjured, matched control subjects were included for comparison. There were significant increases in minimum flexion angle at heel strike (5.92 ± 3.39 v -3.49 ± 4.55, P hamstring activity "on" time during gait (P > .05). In patients with acute ACL injury, the ACL-deficient limb does not reach as much extension as controls. Although the rectus femoris is "on" for shorter periods during the gait cycle, there is no difference in hamstring time on during gait. This information may help clinicians better understand muscle function and gait patterns in the acute time period after ACL injury. Level III, case control study. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Diagnosing pelvic osteomyelitis beneath pressure ulcers in spinal cord injured patients: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunel, A-S; Lamy, B; Cyteval, C; Perrochia, H; Téot, L; Masson, R; Bertet, H; Bourdon, A; Morquin, D; Reynes, J; Le Moing, V

    2016-03-01

    There is no consensus on a diagnostic strategy for osteomyelitis underlying pressure ulcers. We conducted a prospective study to assess the accuracy of multiple bone biopsies and imaging to diagnose pelvic osteomyelitis. Patients with clinically suspected osteomyelitis beneath pelvic pressure ulcers were enrolled. Bone magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and surgical bone biopsies (three or more for microbiology and one for histology per ulcer) were performed. Bacterial osteomyelitis diagnosis relied upon the association of positive histology and microbiology (at least one positive culture for non-commensal microorganisms or three or more for commensal microorganisms of the skin). From 2011 to 2014, 34 patients with 44 pressure ulcers were included. Bacterial osteomyelitis was diagnosed for 28 (82.3%) patients and 35 (79.5%) ulcers according to the composite criterion. Discrepancy was observed between histology and microbiology for 5 (11.4%) ulcers. Most common isolates were Staphylococcus aureus (77.1%), Peptostreptococcus (48.6%) and Bacteroides (40%), cultured in three or more samples in 42.9% of ulcers for S. aureus and ≥20% for anaerobes. Only 2.8% of ulcers had three or more positive specimens with coagulase-negative staphylococci, group B Streptococcus, and nil with enterococci and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus and group milleri Streptococcus were recovered from one sample in 22.8%, 11.4% and 11.4% of ulcers, respectively. Agreement was poor between biopsies and MRI (κ 0.2). Sensitivity of MRI was 94.3% and specificity was 22.2%. The diagnosis of pelvic osteomyelitis relies on multiple surgical bone biopsies with microbiological and histological analyses. At least three bone samples allows the detection of pathogens and exclusion of contaminants. MRI is not routinely useful for diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Video-Enhanced Telemedicine Improves the Care of Acutely Injured Burn Patients in a Rural State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibbenmeyer, Lucy; Kluesner, Karen; Wu, Hongqian; Eid, Anas; Heard, Jason; Mann, Benjamin; Pauley, Alison; Peek-Asa, Corrine

    The acute care of burn patients is critical and can be a daunting experience for emergency personnel because of the scarcity of burn injuries. Telemedicine that incorporates a visual component can provide immediate expertise in the treatment and management of these injuries. The authors sought to evaluate the addition of video telemedicine to our current telephone burn transfer program. During a 2-year period, 282 patients, 59.4% of all burn patients transferred from outside hospitals, were enrolled in the study. In addition to the scripted call with the charge nurse (ChargeRN) and the accepting physician, nine hospitals also transmitted video images of the wounds before transfer as part of a store and forward telemedicine transfer program (77, 27.6%). The accuracy of burn size estimations (BSA burned) and management changes (fluid requirements, transfer mode, and final disposition) were analyzed between the telephones-only sites (T only) and the video-enhanced sites. Referringstaff participating in video-enhanced telemedicine were sent a Google survey assessing their experience the following day. The referring staff (Referringstaff) was correct in their burn assessment 20% of the time. Video assessment improved the ChargeRN BSA burned and resulted in more accurate fluid resuscitation (P = .030), changes in both transportation mode (P = .042), and disposition decisions (P = .20). The majority of the Referringstaff found that video-enhanced telemedicine helped them communicate with the burn staff more effectively (3.4 ± 0.37, scale 1-4). This study reports the successful implementation of video-enhanced telemedicine pilot project in a rural state. Video-enhanced telemedicine using a store and forward process improved burn size estimation and facilitated management changes. Although not quantitatively assessed, the low cost of the system coupled with the changes in transportation and disposition strongly suggests a decrease in healthcare costs associated with

  17. Heading perception in patients with advanced retinitis pigmentosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Peli, Eli; Warren, William H.

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: We investigated whether retinis pigmentosa (RP) patients with residual visual field of < 100 degrees could perceive heading from optic flow. METHODS: Four RP patients and four age-matched normally sighted control subjects viewed displays simulating an observer walking over a ground. In experiment 1, subjects viewed either the entire display with free fixation (full-field condition) or through an aperture with a fixation point at the center (aperture condition). In experiment 2, patients viewed displays of different durations. RESULTS: RP patients' performance was comparable to that of the age-matched control subjects: heading judgment was better in the full-field condition than in the aperture condition. Increasing display duration from 0.5 s to 1 s improved patients' heading performance, but giving them more time (3 s) to gather more visual information did not consistently further improve their performance. CONCLUSIONS: RP patients use active scanning eye movements to compensate for their visual field loss in heading perception; they might be able to gather sufficient optic flow information for heading perception in about 1 s.

  18. Preclinical evidence supporting the clinical development of central pattern generator-modulating therapies for chronic spinal cord-injured patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre eGuertin

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Ambulation or walking is one of the main gaits of locomotion. In terrestrial animals, it may be defined as a series of rhythmic and bilaterally coordinated movement of the limbs which creates a forward movement of the body. This applies regardless of the number of limbs - from arthropods with six or more limbs to bipedal primates. These fundamental similarities among species may explain why comparable neural systems and cellular properties have been found, thus far, to control in similar ways locomotor rhythm generation in most animal models. The aim of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of the known structural and functional features associated with central nervous system (CNS networks that are involved in the control of ambulation and other stereotyped motor patterns - specifically Central Pattern Generators (CPGs that produce basic rhythmic patterned outputs for locomotion, micturition, ejaculation, and defecation. Although there is compelling evidence of their existence in humans, CPGs have been most studied in reduced models including in vitro isolated preparations, genetically-engineered mice and spinal cord-transected animals. Compared with other structures of the CNS, the spinal cord is generally considered as being well-preserved phylogenetically. As such, most animal models of SCI should be considered as valuable tools for the development of novel pharmacological strategies aimed at modulating spinal activity and restoring corresponding functions in chronic spinal cord-injured patients.

  19. The needs of families accompanying injured patients into the emergency department in a tertiary hospital in Gauteng

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghan L. Botes

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Families are not prepared for traumatic injuries of loved ones. Emergency nurses have the important role of caring for patients and families in this time of crisis. Family needs in the critical care setting have been explored using the Critical Care Family Needs Inventory (CCFNI, however little is known about family needs in the emergency department. Objectives: This study sought to determine the needs of family members accompanying injured patients into the emergency department, and if these needs were met. Methods: A quantitative, descriptive, study was conducted in a level 1 trauma facility in Johannesburg, South Africa. The population included families of patients admitted to the emergency department, sampling 100 participants. The instrument, based on the CCFNI, was validated in a pilot study in Melbourne, Australia and re-evaluated using the Cronbach Alpha validity test to ensure internal consistency. Five themes were explored: ‘meaning’, ‘proximity’, ‘communication’, ‘comfort’ and ‘support’ and data were analysed using descriptive statistics. Responses to open-ended questions were analysed using content analysis. Permission from the Human Research Ethics Committee was granted and participants were ensured confidentiality and the option for counselling if required. Results: Themes ranked highly important were ‘meaning’ and ‘communication’. Satisfaction was highest for ‘meaning’. Low satisfaction levels for ‘communication’ were found. Issues regarding prolonged time spent in the emergency department and discrimination were raised. Conclusion: These findings have a negative impact on the family’s satisfaction with care and it is recommended that the nurse’s role in family care be further explored and emphasised. Keywords: Family needs, emergency department, emergency nurses

  20. Violations of macro- and micronutrient support in patients with nodular thyroid pathology from regions injured after the Chornobyl accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.I. Kravchenko

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. The purpose of our study was to determine the state of macro- and micronutrient support of patients with nodular thyroid pathology from the regions injured after the Chornobyl accident. Materials and methods. 65 habitants of the Chernihiv area were examined: 40 — without thyroid pathology (15 men and 25 women aged 36.62 ± 0.60 years, and 25 (5 men and 20 women — with the diagnosed nodular goiter. Results. Research of urinary iodine excretion showed that a median in the control group was 95.6 µg/l, among patients with nodular goiter — 89.3 µg/l, indicating the presence of moderate iodine deficiency. Blood thyroglobulin level in patients of control group was 9.26 ± 0.99 ng/l, among patients with nodular goiter — 23.03 ± 4.70 ng/l. Thyroid-stimulating hormone level higher than 4.0 mIU/l was in 8.9 % of patients with nodular goiter and in 5.0 % of persons from the control group. The data of ultrasonic researches demonstrated that the average thyroid volume in patients of control group was 10.1 ± 0.3 cm3, among patients with nodular goiter — 18.6 ± 1.7 cm3. In the group of patients with nodular goiter, the decreased (p < 0.0001 level of macronutrients in blood plasma was detected: calcium was 67.26 ± 3.21 µg/l and magnesium — 14.88 ± 0.35 µg/l, as well as of microelements: zinc content was 0.72 ± 0.04 µg/l (p < 0.0001 and iron — 0.54 ± 0.06 µg/l (p < 0.05, in comparison with the results in the control group. Conclusions. The relative risk (χ2 criterion for the four-course table of connectivity with Fisher’s correction of nodular goiter development at subzero content of calcium was 2.24 (95% confidence interval (CI 1.58–2.61, the risk of nodular goiter development at subzero levels of magnesium — 2.56 (95% CI 1.77–3.03.

  1. The evaluation of behavioural changes in brain-injured patients: SOFMER recommendations for clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prouteau, A; Stéfan, A; Wiart, L; Mazaux, J M

    2016-02-01

    Behavioural changes are the main cause of difficulties in interpersonal relationships and social integration among traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients. The Société française de médecine physique et réadaptation (SOFMER) decided to develop recommendations for the treatment and care provision for these problem under the auspices of the French health authority, the Haute Autorité de la santé (HAS). Assessment of behaviour is essential to describe, understand and define situations, assess any change and suggest lines for intervention. The relationship of these behavioural changes with the brain lesion is likewise of crucial importance in legal and forensic expertise. Using a literature review and expert opinions, the aim was to define the optimal conditions for the collection of data on behavioural changes in individuals having sustained brain trauma, to identify the situations in which they arise, to review the instruments available, and to suggest lines of intervention. A literature search identified 981 articles, among which 122 on the target subject were selected and analysed in detail and confronted with the experience of professionals and user representatives. A first draft of the recommendations was produced by the working group, and then submitted to a review group for opinions and complements. The literature on this subject is heterogeneous, and presents low levels of evidence. No article enabled the development of recommendations above the "expert opinion" level. After prior clarification of the aims of the evaluation, it is recommended first to carefully describe the changes in behaviour, from patient and third-person narratives, and where possible from direct observations. The information enabling the description of the phenomena occurring should be collected by different individuals (multi-source evaluation): the patient, his or her close circle, and professionals with different training backgrounds (multidisciplinary evaluation). The analysis of

  2. Computed tomography findings in patients with mild head trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanei Taheri, M.; Hemadi, H.; Sajadinasab, M.; Sharifi, G.; Jalali, A. H.; Shakiba, M.

    2007-01-01

    To determine the frequency of computed tomography (CT) findings in patients with mild head trauma. Patients and Methods: In this cross-sectional study conducted between September 2005 and April 2006, 708 patients with mild head trauma as defined by a Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) of 13-15, were underwent standard clinical examination and cranial CT. Results The mean±SD age of our patients was 26.8±19.03 years (range: 1 month to 89 years). 489 (68.9%) patients were male and 219 (30.8%) were female. GSC was 13 in 1%. 14 in 4.6% and 15 in 94.4% of patients. The most common mechanism of trauma was car accident and falling down, each of which happened for 132 patients (18.6%). The most common findings on CT were subgaleal hematomas in 213(30%) and intracranial lesions were seen in 41 patients(5.8%) :among them 37 were male. Among intracranial lesions, the most common finding was epidural hematoma in 18 patients followed by hemorrhagic contusion in 13 patients. lntracranial lesions were observed in 28.6% of patients with GCS of 13: in 15.25% with GCS of 14 and in 5.1% with GCS of 15 (P=.002). conclusion: Many of patients with GCS equal to 15 after head trauma have considerable intracranial and minor focal neurologic signs revealed by careful physical examination could be a good marker of these lesions

  3. Emergency airway management in critically injured patients: a survey of U.S. aero-medical transport programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Dorsha N; Voskresensky, Igor V; Jack, Meg; Cotton, Bryan A

    2009-06-01

    Pre-hospital airway management represents the intervention most likely to impact outcomes in critically injured patients. As such, airway management issues dominate quality improvement (QI) reviews of aero-medical programs. The purpose of this study was to evaluate current practice patterns of airway management in trauma among U.S. aero-medical service (AMS) programs. The Association of Air Medical Services (AAMS) Resource Guide from 2005 to 2006 was utilized to identify the e-mail addresses of all directors of U.S. aero-medical transport programs. Program directors from 182 U.S. aero-medical programs were asked to participate in an anonymous, web-based survey of emergency airway management protocols and practices. Non-responders to the initial request were contacted a second time by e-mail. 89 programs responded. 98.9% have rapid sequence intubation (RSI) protocols. 90% use succinylcholine, 70% use long-acting neuromuscular blockers (NMB) within their RSI protocol. 77% have protocols for mandatory in-flight sedation but only 13% have similar protocols for maintenance paralytics. 60% administer long-acting NMB immediately after RSI, 13% after confirmation of neurological activity. Given clinical scenarios, however, 97% administer long-acting NMB to patients with scene and in-flight Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) of 3, even for brief transport times. The majority of AMS programs have well defined RSI and in-flight sedation protocols, while protocols for in-flight NMB are uncommon. Despite this, nearly all programs administer long-acting NMB following RSI, irrespective of GCS or flight time. Given the impact of in-flight NMB on initial assessment, early intervention, and injury severity scoring, a critical appraisal of current AMS airway management practices appears warranted.

  4. Withholding and withdrawing of life support from patients with severe head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callahan, J G; Fink, C; Pitts, L H; Luce, J M

    1995-09-01

    To characterize the withholding or withdrawing of life support from patients with severe head injury. San Francisco General Hospital, a city and county hospital with a Level I trauma center. A standardized questionnaire was used to collect data on demographics and functional outcome of severely head-injured (Glasgow Coma Score of family members. Forty-seven patients who were admitted to a medical-surgical intensive care unit over a 1-yr period. Twenty-four patients had life support withheld or withdrawn, and 23 patients did not. Physician and family separately assessed patient's probable functional outcome, degree of communication between them, reasons important in recommending or deciding on discontinuation of life support, and the result of action taken. Six months later, the families reviewed the process of their decision, how well physician(s) had communicated, and what might have improved communication. Of 24 patients with life support discontinued, 22 died; two were discharged from the hospital. Twenty-three of the 24 patients had a poor prognosis on admission. Of the 23 patients who were continued on life support for the duration of their hospitalization, ten had a poor (p Family's assessment of prognosis agreed with physician's assessment in 22 of the 24 patients from whom life support was discontinued (p families' assessments. Physicians' considerations in recommending limitation of care and families' considerations in making decisions were the same, primarily an inevitably poor prognosis. Neither physician nor families cited cost or availability of care as a deciding factor. Two families disagreed with the recommendation to limit care after initial agreement because the patients' prognosis improved from "likely death" to "vegetative." Care was therefore continued, and both patients remained vegetative 6 months after admission to the hospital and discharge to chronic care facilities. Life support is commonly withheld or withdrawn from patients with severe

  5. Assessing participation in the ACL injured population: Selecting a patient reported outcome measure on the basis of measurement properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letchford, Robert; Sparkes, Valerie; van Deursen, Robert W M

    2015-06-01

    A return to pre injury activity participation remains a common but often elusive goal following ACL injury. Investigations to improve our understanding of participation restrictions are limited by inconsistent use of insufficiently investigated measurement tools. The aim of this study was to follow the consensus based standards for the selection of health measurement instruments (COSMIN) guideline to provide a comparative evaluation of four patient reported outcomes (PROMs) on the basis of measurement properties. This will inform recommendations for measuring participation of ACL injured subjects, particularly in the United Kingdom (UK) National Health Service (NHS). Thirteen criteria were compiled from the COSMIN guideline. These included reliability, measurement error, content validity, construct validity, responsiveness and interpretability. Data from 51 subjects collected as part of a longitudinal observational study of recovery over the first year following ACLR was used in the analysis. Of the thirteen criteria, the required standard was met in 11 for Tegner, 11 for International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), 6 for Cincinnati Sports Activity Scale (CSAS) and 6 for Marx. The two weaknesses identified for the Tegner are more easily compensated for during interpretation than those in the IKDC; for this reason the Tegner is the recommended PROM. The Tegner activity rating scale performed consistently well in respect of all measurement properties in this sample, with clear benefits over the other PROMs. The measurement properties presented should be used to inform implementation and interpretation of this outcome measure in clinical practice and research. Level II prospective study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Avascular necrosis of the femoral head in HIV infected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Almeida Matos

    Full Text Available Avascular necrosis (AVN of the femoral head is an emerging complication in HIV infected patients. It has been suggested that the increased incidence of AVN in this population may be caused by an increased prevalence of predisposing factors for osteonecrosis, including protease inhibitors, hyperlipidemia, corticosteroid use, alcohol and intravenous drug abuse. The aim of this study was to assess the risk factors for avascular necrosis developing in the femoral head of HIV infected individuals. This study consisted of meta-analysis of the secondary data extracted from current literature. The selected articles allowed two study groups to be drawn up for comparison. Group 1 comprised 324 individuals infected by the HIV virus, who did not present femoral head AVN. Group 2 comprised 32 HIV positive patients, who presented femoral head AVN. The parameters used for analysis were as follows: age, gender, sexual preference, use of intravenous drugs, time of diagnosis, CD4+ cell count, use of antiretroviral agents and duration, serum cholesterol and serum triglycerides. The present study found a statistically significant association between hypertriglyceridemia, hypercholesterolemia, sexual preference and intravenous drug abuse. The authors concluded that femoral head osteonecrosis is associated with hyperlipidemia (hypercholesterolemia and hypertriglyceridemia and intravenous drug abuse. This study supports the hypothesis that protease inhibitors play a role in the development of osteonecrosis through a tendency to cause hyperlipidemia.

  7. Internet-based prevention of posttraumatic stress symptoms in injured trauma patients: design of a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mouthaan, Joanne; Sijbrandij, Marit; Reitsma, Johannes B.; Gersons, Berthold P. R.; Olff, Miranda

    2011-01-01

    Injured trauma victims are at risk of developing Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and other post-trauma psychopathology. So far, interventions using cognitive behavioral techniques (CBT) have proven most efficacious in treating early PTSD in highly symptomatic individuals. No early intervention

  8. Patient Specific Modeling of Head-Up Tilt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, Nakeya; Wright, Andrew; Mehlsen, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    Short term cardiovascular responses to head-up tilt (HUT) experiments involve complex cardiovascular regulation in order to maintain blood pressure at homeostatic levels. This manuscript presents a patient specific compartmental model developed to predict dynamic changes in heart rate and arterial...

  9. Preradiation dental decisions in patients with head and neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruins, H.H. (Hubert Herman)

    2001-01-01

    This thesis presents a series of studies that investigated preradiation dental decision making in patients with head and neck cancer. In Chapter 1, it is ascertained that in view of the risk for oral sequelae resulting from high-dose radiotherapy, special attention to preradiation dental planning

  10. Early rehabilitation in Resurfacing, standard and large head THA patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penny, Jeannette Østergaard; Varmarken, Jens-Erik; Ovesen, Ole

    2009-01-01

    in the resurfacing patient may impair the early rehabilitation. We aimed to investigate early differences in rehabilitation parameters amongst the different groups. Materials and methods We randomized to resurfacing (n=20), standard 28 mm THA (n=19) and large head MoM THA (n=12). We recorded operation time, blood...

  11. [Psychological care of patients with head and neck cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moya, Mélanie

    2015-09-01

    Treatments for head and neck cancers are generally complex and debilitating. Surgery, often mutilating, profoundly affects the relationship between oneself and others and causes verbal communication, breathing and swallowing difficulties. The functional and aesthetic sequelae are a constant reminder to the patient of the disease and make them conscious of their appearance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, M.; Knottenbelt, J. D.; Peden, M. M.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess risk factors for important neurosurgical effects in patients who reattend after head injury. DESIGN--Retrospective study. SUBJECTS--606 patients who reattended a trauma unit after minor head injury. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Intracranial abnormality detected on computed tomography or the need for neurosurgical intervention. RESULTS--Five patients died: two from unrelated causes and three from raised intracranial pressure. On multiple regression analysis the only significant predictor for both abnormality on computed tomography (14.4% of reattenders) and the need for operation (5% of reattenders) was vault fracture seen on the skull radiograph (P personality change, and seizures were significantly associated only with abnormality on computed tomography. Headache, dizziness, nausea, and vomiting were common in reattenders but were found to have no independent significance. CONCLUSIONS--All patients who reattend after head injury should undergo computed tomography as at least 14% of scans can be expected to yield positive results. Where this facility is not available patients with predictors for operation should be urgently referred for neurosurgical opinion. Other patients can be readmitted and need referral only if symptoms persist despite symptomatic treatment or there is neurological deterioration while under observation. These patients are a high risk group and should be treated seriously. PMID:8520273

  13. Effects of a radiation dose reduction strategy for computed tomography in severely injured trauma patients in the emergency department: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Soo Hyun

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severely injured trauma patients are exposed to clinically significant radiation doses from computed tomography (CT imaging in the emergency department. Moreover, this radiation exposure is associated with an increased risk of cancer. The purpose of this study was to determine some effects of a radiation dose reduction strategy for CT in severely injured trauma patients in the emergency department. Methods We implemented the radiation dose reduction strategy in May 2009. A prospective observational study design was used to collect data from patients who met the inclusion criteria during this one year study (intervention group from May 2009 to April 2010. The prospective data were compared with data collected retrospectively for one year prior to the implementation of the radiation dose reduction strategy (control group. By comparison of the cumulative effective dose and the number of CT examinations in the two groups, we evaluated effects of a radiation dose reduction strategy. All the patients met the institutional adult trauma team activation criteria. The radiation doses calculated by the CT scanner were converted to effective doses by multiplication by a conversion coefficient. Results A total of 118 patients were included in this study. Among them, 33 were admitted before May 2009 (control group, and 85 were admitted after May 2009 (intervention group. There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding baseline characteristics, such as injury severity and mortality. Additionally, there was no difference between the two groups in the mean number of total CT examinations per patient (4.8 vs. 4.5, respectively; p = 0.227. However, the mean effective dose of the total CT examinations per patient significantly decreased from 78.71 mSv to 29.50 mSv (p Conclusions The radiation dose reduction strategy for CT in severely injured trauma patients effectively decreased the cumulative effective dose of the total

  14. Prospective Study on Noninvasive Assessment of Intracranial Pressure in Traumatic Brain-Injured Patients: Comparison of Four Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardim, Danilo; Robba, Chiara; Donnelly, Joseph; Bohdanowicz, Michal; Schmidt, Bernhard; Damian, Maxwell; Varsos, Georgios V; Liu, Xiuyun; Cabeleira, Manuel; Frigieri, Gustavo; Cabella, Brenno; Smielewski, Peter; Mascarenhas, Sergio; Czosnyka, Marek

    2016-04-15

    Elevation of intracranial pressure (ICP) may occur in many diseases, and therefore the ability to measure it noninvasively would be useful. Flow velocity signals from transcranial Doppler (TCD) have been used to estimate ICP; however, the relative accuracy of these methods is unclear. This study aimed to compare four previously described TCD-based methods with directly measured ICP in a prospective cohort of traumatic brain-injured patients. Noninvasive ICP (nICP) was obtained using the following methods: 1) a mathematical "black-box" model based on interaction between TCD and arterial blood pressure (nICP_BB); 2) based on diastolic flow velocity (nICP_FVd); 3) based on critical closing pressure (nICP_CrCP); and 4) based on TCD-derived pulsatility index (nICP_PI). In time domain, for recordings including spontaneous changes in ICP greater than 7 mm Hg, nICP_PI showed the best correlation with measured ICP (R = 0.61). Considering every TCD recording as an independent event, nICP_BB generally showed to be the best estimator of measured ICP (R = 0.39; p area under the curve [AUC] = 0.66; p AUC (0.70; p AUC = 0.64; p > 0.05). nICP_PI was not related to measured ICP using any of the above statistical indicators. We also introduced a new estimator (nICP_Av) based on the average of three methods (nICP_BB, nICP_FVd, and nICP_CrCP), which overall presented improved statistical indicators (R = 0.47; p AUC = 0.73; p < 0.05). nICP_PI appeared to reflect changes in ICP in time most accurately. nICP_BB was the best estimator for ICP "as a number." nICP_Av demonstrated to improve the accuracy of measured ICP estimation.

  15. Functional survival after acute care for severe head injury at a designated trauma center in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedict B.T. Taw

    2012-07-01

    Conclusion: Multidisciplinary neurorehabilitation service is an important component of comprehensive trauma care. Despite significant early mortalities, a proportion of severely head-injured patients who survive acute care may achieve good long-term functional recovery.

  16. Internet-based prevention of posttraumatic stress symptoms in injured trauma patients: design of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne Mouthaan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Injured trauma victims are at risk of developing Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD and other post-trauma psychopathology. So far, interventions using cognitive behavioral techniques (CBT have proven most efficacious in treating early PTSD in highly symptomatic individuals. No early intervention for the prevention of PTSD for all victims has yet proven effective. In the acute psychosocial care for trauma victims, there is a clear need for easily applicable, accessible, cost-efficient early interventions. Objective: To describe the design of a randomized controlled trial (RCT evaluating the effectiveness of a brief Internet-based early intervention that incorporates CBT techniques with the aim of reducing acute psychological distress and preventing long-term PTSD symptoms in injured trauma victims. Method: In a two armed RCT, 300 injured trauma victims from two Level-1 trauma centers in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, will be assigned to an intervention or a control group. Inclusion criteria are: being 18 years of age or older, having experienced a traumatic event according to the diagnostic criteria of the DSM-IV and understanding the Dutch language. The intervention group will be given access to the intervention's website (www.traumatips.nl, and are specifically requested to login within the first month postinjury. The primary clinical study outcome is PTSD symptom severity. Secondary outcomes include symptoms of depression and anxiety, quality of life, and social support. In addition, a cost-effectiveness analysis of the intervention will be performed. Data are collected at one week post-injury, prior to first login (baseline, and at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months. Analyses will be on an intention-to-treat basis. Discussion: The results will provide more insight into the effects of preventive interventions in general, and Internet-based early interventions specifically, on acute stress reactions and PTSD, in an injured population, during the

  17. The ACT Alert: preliminary results of a novel protocol to assess geriatric head trauma patients on anticoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittenhouse, Katelyn; Rogers, Amelia; Clark, Elizabeth; Horst, Michael; Adams, William; Bupp, Katherine; Shertzer, Weston; Miller, Jo Ann; Chandler, Roxanne; Rogers, Frederick B

    2015-04-01

    In busy emergency departments (EDs), elderly patients on anticoagulation (AC) sustaining minor injuries who are triaged to a lower priority for evaluation are at risk for potentially serious consequences. We sought to determine if a novel ED protocol prioritizes workup and improves outcome. In a Pennsylvania-verified Level II trauma center, the ACT (AntiCoagulation and Trauma) Alert was implemented in March 2012. Triage parameters include: age 65 years or older, AC agents, Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) 13 or greater, and head trauma 24 hours or less. ACT Alerts are announced overhead in the ED and require assessment by an ED physician, nurse, and phlebotomist in 15 minutes or less. Furthermore, they necessitate Point of Care international normalized ratio (INR) 20 minutes or less and head computed tomography (CT) scan 30 minutes or less. Positive CT findings mandate trauma service consultation. ACT Alert patients from March to December 2012 were compared with ED patients 65 years or older, GCS 13 or greater, on AC with the same chief complaints as ACT Alerts from June 2011 to February 2012 (control). A P value ≤ 0.05 was considered significant. Of 752 study patients, 415 were ACT and 337 were controls. There were no significant differences between groups in age, elevated INR, or head bleeds. ACT patients had significantly shorter median times from ED arrival to INR (ACT 13 minutes vs control 80 minutes; P ACT 35 minutes vs control 65 minutes; P ACT had a significantly shorter median length of stay (LOS) (ACT 3.7 days vs control 5.0 days; P ACT Alert improves ED throughput and reduces hospital LOS while effectively identifying at-risk, mildly head injured geriatric patients on AC.

  18. A patient positioning system in head and neck irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bormann, U.; Strauch, B.; Schmitt, G.

    1986-01-01

    A holding system is presented which allows a good, easy, and reproducable positioning of the patient in percutanous head and neck radiotherapy. The patients are lying comfortably on a neck support and are fixed in such a way that they are not able to turn in a lateral or longitudinal direction. The distance chin-jugulum can be easily determined by an integrated measuring tape. Due to the use of UV ink and UV lamps, the field marking of the patient's skin cannot be seen in the spectrum of visible light. (orig.) [de

  19. Hypothyroidism after radiotherapy for head and neck cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozawa, Hiroyuki; Saito, Hideyuki; Inagaki, Kouji; Mizutari, Kunio

    2004-01-01

    We report two cases of hypothyroidism with clinical symptoms that occurred after radiotherapy for cancer of the head and neck. The first patient underwent total laryngectomy without thyroidectomy for laryngeal cancer and partial gastrectomy for gastric cancer. Radiation of the neck was carried out postoperatively. Two years later, he developed chest pain and pericardial effusion was detected, leading to a diagnosis of myxedema due to hypothyroidism. The second patient received radiotherapy alone for laryngeal carcinoma. Two months later, a low serum sodium concentration and anemia were detected, both of which proved difficult to correct. The cause of these changes was found subsequently to be hypothyroidism. From the experience of these 2 cases, we measured thyroid function in 37 patients who had received neck radiation for head and neck cancers at our hospital over the past 10 years. In 13 of the 37 patients (35%), hypothyroidism was observed. The prevalence of hypothyroidism was higher in the 13 patients treated with both radiation and surgery, with 6 (46%) showing this condition, compared with 7 of the 24 patients (29%) who received radiation alone. The risk factor responsible for hypothyroidism was not evident from statistical analysis of these cases. We consider that thyroid function should be evaluated periodically in patients who have received neck radiotherapy, as it is often difficult to diagnose hypothyroidism from clinical symptoms. (author)

  20. Surgical palliation of unresectable pancreatic head cancer in elderly patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sang Il; Kim, Hyung Ook; Son, Byung Ho; Yoo, Chang Hak; Kim, Hungdai; Shin, Jun Ho

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To determine if surgical biliary bypass would provide improved quality of residual life and safe palliation in elderly patients with unresectable pancreatic head cancer. METHODS: Nineteen patients, 65 years of age or older, were managed with surgical biliary bypass (Group A). These patients were compared with 19 patients under 65 years of age who were managed with surgical biliary bypass (Group B). In addition, the results for group A were compared with those obtained from 17 patients, 65 years of age or older (Group C), who received percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage to evaluate the quality of residual life. RESULTS: Five patients (26.0%) in Group A had complications, including one intraabdominal abscess, one pulmonary atelectasis, and three wound infections. One death (5.3%) occurred on postoperative day 3. With respect to morbidity, mortality, and postoperative hospitalization, no statistically significant difference was noted between Groups A and B. The number of readmissions and the rate of recurrent jaundice were lower in Group A than in Group C, to a statistically significant degree (P = 0.019, P = 0.029, respectively). The median hospital-free survival period and the median overall survival were also significantly longer in Group A (P = 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively). CONCLUSION: Surgical palliation does not increase the morbidity or mortality rates, but it does increase the survival rate and improve the quality of life in elderly patients with unresectable pancreatic head cancer. PMID:19248198

  1. To compare the effects of multiple sessions of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy in neurological improvement in head injury patients: A prospective randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amlendu Yadav

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT is used to improve functional outcome following brain injuries. Different number of sessions of HBOT have been reported but the frequency of HBOT sessions in head injured patients has not been standardized. We planned this prospective randomized study with an aim to compare the neurological effects of 10, 20 and 30 sessions of HBOT in the head injured patients. Materials and Methods: After review board approval, this study was conducted in 60 head injury patients with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS score ≤ 9. All patients were resuscitated, stabilized and received neurological care according to institutional protocol. Patients were randomly allotted to-Group H10 (n-20-which received 10 sittings of HBOT, Group H20 (n-20-which received 20 sittings of HBOT, Group H30 (n-30-which received 30 sittings of HBOT. GCS score was recorded after every 10 sittings and at 30 days from initiation of HBOT. Improvement Global rating and Glasgow outcome scale (GOS were recorded after 30 days. Results: The maximum improvement in GCS scores was seen in group H30. The difference in the average improvement global rating scale was significant between group H10 and group H20, between group H10 and group H30 but was comparable between groups H20 and H30. The GOS was better after 30 sessions as compared to 10 sessions. Patients of all groups showed improvement in spasticity but group H30 showed a maximum improvement. Conclusion: A minimum of 30 HBOT sessions should be considered in head injury patients to show improvement with HBOT. Progressive improvement in GCS scores, GOS, spasticity, mood swings was better seen with increased number of HBOT sessions.

  2. Head and neck multidisciplinary team meetings: Effect on patient management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Markus; Gore, Sinclair M; Read, Rebecca L; Alexander, Ashlin; Mehta, Ankur; Elliot, Michael; Milross, Chris; Boyer, Michael; Clark, Jonathan R

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was for us to present our findings on the prospectively audited impact of head and neck multidisciplinary team meetings on patient management. We collected clinical data, the pre-multidisciplinary team meeting treatment plan, the post-multidisciplinary team meeting treatment plans, and follow-up data from all patients discussed at a weekly multidisciplinary team meeting and we recorded the changes in management. One hundred seventy-two patients were discussed in 39 meetings. In 52 patients (30%), changes in management were documented of which 20 (67%) were major. Changes were statistically more likely when the referring physician was a medical or radiation oncologist, when the initial treatment plan did not include surgery, and when the histology was neither mucosal squamous cell cancer nor a skin malignancy. Compliance to the multidisciplinary team meeting treatment recommendation was 84% for all patients and 70% for patients with changes in their treatment recommendation. Head and neck multidisciplinary team meetings changed management in almost a third of the cases. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Occupational Therapy for the Head and Neck Cancer Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Priscilla; Hashmi, Mahjabeen

    2018-01-01

    Occupational therapy is a health profession concerned with promoting health and well-being through occupation. A diagnosis of head and neck cancer (HNC) often invokes fear and anxiety because of the potential negative impact of the diagnosis and/or treatment on lifestyle and well-being. Occupational therapists perform a unique and important role in addressing quality of life concerns for HNC patients through applied expertise in lifestyle management, facilitating the use of positive coping strategies and daily routine management. Occupational therapy concurrently assists HNC patients to effectively manage the debilitating stress and anxiety associated with HNC diagnosis, treatment, and recovery while facilitating a return to prior or adapted daily routines.

  4. A pair-matched comparison of return to pivoting sports at 1 year in ACL-injured patients after a nonoperative versus operative treatment course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindem, Hege; Eitzen, Ingrid; Moksnes, Håvard; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn; Risberg, May Arna

    2013-01-01

    Background The wish to return to level I pivoting sports is a major indication of ACL-reconstruction. Patients usually return to pivoting sports between 6 months and 1 year postoperatively, but no matched study has so far examined 1-year return to sport rates in nonoperatively and operatively treated ACL-injured patients. Hypothesis ACL-injured patients following a nonoperative treatment course, including recommendation of activity modification, will have lower return to pivoting sport rates than operatively treated patients 1 year after baseline testing/surgery, when matched by preinjury sports activity, age and sex. Study Design Pair-matched cohort study Methods Sixty-nine nonoperatively treated ACL-injured patients were pair-matched with 69 operatively treated patients (n=138), based on specific preinjury sport, age and sex. Nonoperatively treated patients were recommended not to return to level I sports. Patients were defined as nonoperatively or operatively treated according to their status at follow-up. The baseline and follow-up testing included registration of sports participation, KT-1000 measurements, 4 hop tests, and patient-reported outcome measures. McNemar’s test and paired t-tests or Wilcoxon’s test were used to compare outcomes of nonoperatively and operatively treated patients. Results No significant baseline differences were found. At 12.9±1.2 months (mean ± standard deviation) after baseline testing (nonoperative) and 12.7±1.2 months after surgery (operative), there was no significant difference in overall return to sport rates (nonoperative: 68.1 %, operative: 68.1 %, p=1.000), or in return to level I sport rates (nonoperative: 54.8 %, operative: 61.9 %, p=0.664). Nonoperatively treated patients who participated in level I sports prior to injury had a significantly lower return to sport rate (54.8 %) than nonoperatively treated patients who participated in level II sports (88.9 %, p=0.003). The nonoperatively treated patients had

  5. Taste dysfunction in irradiated patients with head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Wen-Kai; Yamamoto, Tomoya; Komiyama, Sohtaro

    2002-01-01

    Taste disorders caused by radiation therapy for head and neck cancer are common. This prospective study of 40 patients with head and neck cancer assessed changes in taste sensations during radiation therapy. The relationship between the time course and the degree of taste disorder was studied. The taste recognition threshold and supra-threshold taste intensity performance for the four basic tastes were measured using the whole-mouth taste method before, during, and after radiation therapy. Bitter taste was affected most. An increase in threshold for sweet taste depended upon whether the tip of tongue was included within the radiation field. The slope of the taste intensity performance did not change during or after radiotherapy. The pattern of salivary dysfunction was different from that of taste dysfunction. The main cause of taste disorders during radiation support the hypothesis that taste dysfunction is due to damage to the taste buds in the radiation field. (author)

  6. Taste dysfunction in irradiated patients with head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Wen-Kai; Yamamoto, Tomoya; Komiyama, Sohtaro [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine; Inokuchi, Akira [Saga Medical School (Japan)

    2002-04-01

    Taste disorders caused by radiation therapy for head and neck cancer are common. This prospective study of 40 patients with head and neck cancer assessed changes in taste sensations during radiation therapy. The relationship between the time course and the degree of taste disorder was studied. The taste recognition threshold and supra-threshold taste intensity performance for the four basic tastes were measured using the whole-mouth taste method before, during, and after radiation therapy. Bitter taste was affected most. An increase in threshold for sweet taste depended upon whether the tip of tongue was included within the radiation field. The slope of the taste intensity performance did not change during or after radiotherapy. The pattern of salivary dysfunction was different from that of taste dysfunction. The main cause of taste disorders during radiation support the hypothesis that taste dysfunction is due to damage to the taste buds in the radiation field. (author)

  7. The implications of alcohol intoxication and the Uniform Policy Provision Law on trauma centers; a national trauma data bank analysis of minimally injured patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keeffe, Terence; Shafi, Shahid; Sperry, Jason L; Gentilello, Larry M

    2009-02-01

    Alcohol intoxication may confound the initial assessment of trauma patients, resulting in increased use of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, thereby increasing hospital costs. The Uniform Policy Provision Law (UPPL) exists in many states and allows insurance companies to deny payment for medical treatment for alcohol-related injuries. If intoxication increases resource utilization, these denials compound the financial burden of alcohol use on trauma centers. We hypothesized that patients injured while under the influence of alcohol require more diagnostic tests, procedures, and hospital admissions, leading to higher hospital charges. The National Trauma Databank (2000-2004) was analyzed to identify adult trauma patients (age > or = 16 years) who were discharged alive, had a length of stay laws that penalize trauma centers for identifying intoxicated patients should be repealed in states where they exist.

  8. Comparison of outcomes in severely injured patients between a South Korean trauma center and matched patients treated in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kyoungwon; Matsumoto, Shokei; Smith, Alan; Hwang, Kyungjin; Lee, John Cook-Jong; Coimbra, Raul

    2018-06-05

    The South Korean government recently developed a master plan for establishing a national trauma system based on the implementation of regional trauma centers. We aimed to compare outcomes between severely injured patients treated at a recently established South Korean trauma center and matched patients treated in American level-1 trauma centers. Two cohorts were selected from an institutional trauma database at Ajou University Medical Center (AUMC) and the American National Trauma Data Bank. Adult patients with an Injury Severity Score of ≥9 were included. Patients were matched based on covariates that affect mortality, using 1:1 propensity score matching. We compared outcomes between the two datasets and performed survival analyses. We created 1,451 and 2,103 matched pairs for the pre-trauma center and post-trauma center periods, respectively. The in-hospital mortality rate was higher in the institutional trauma database pre-trauma center period compared with the American National Trauma Data Bank (11.6% versus 8.1%, P<.001). However, the mortality rate decreased in the institutional trauma database post-trauma center period and was similar to that in the American National Trauma Data Bank (6.9% versus 6.8%, P=.903). Being treated at Ajou University Medical Center Trauma Center was significantly associated with higher mortality during the pre-trauma center period (OR: 1.842, 95% CI: 1.336-2.540; P<.001), although no significant association was observed during the post-trauma center period (OR: 1.102, 95% CI: 0.827-1.468; P=.509). The mortality rate improved after a trauma center was established in a South Korean hospital and is similar to that from matched cases treated at American level-1 trauma centers. Thus, creating trauma centers and a regional trauma system may improve outcomes in major trauma cases. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of a radiation dose reduction strategy for computed tomography in severely injured trauma patients in the emergency department: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo Hyun; Jung, Seung Eun; Oh, Sang Hoon; Park, Kyu Nam; Youn, Chun Song

    2011-11-03

    Severely injured trauma patients are exposed to clinically significant radiation doses from computed tomography (CT) imaging in the emergency department. Moreover, this radiation exposure is associated with an increased risk of cancer. The purpose of this study was to determine some effects of a radiation dose reduction strategy for CT in severely injured trauma patients in the emergency department. We implemented the radiation dose reduction strategy in May 2009. A prospective observational study design was used to collect data from patients who met the inclusion criteria during this one year study (intervention group) from May 2009 to April 2010. The prospective data were compared with data collected retrospectively for one year prior to the implementation of the radiation dose reduction strategy (control group). By comparison of the cumulative effective dose and the number of CT examinations in the two groups, we evaluated effects of a radiation dose reduction strategy. All the patients met the institutional adult trauma team activation criteria. The radiation doses calculated by the CT scanner were converted to effective doses by multiplication by a conversion coefficient. A total of 118 patients were included in this study. Among them, 33 were admitted before May 2009 (control group), and 85 were admitted after May 2009 (intervention group). There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding baseline characteristics, such as injury severity and mortality. Additionally, there was no difference between the two groups in the mean number of total CT examinations per patient (4.8 vs. 4.5, respectively; p = 0.227). However, the mean effective dose of the total CT examinations per patient significantly decreased from 78.71 mSv to 29.50 mSv (p trauma patients effectively decreased the cumulative effective dose of the total CT examinations in the emergency department. But not effectively decreased the number of CT examinations.

  10. Predictors of Pain among Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuman, Andrew G.; Terrell, Jeffrey E.; Light, Emily; Wolf, Gregory T.; Bradford, Carol R.; Chepeha, Douglas; Jiang, Yunyun; McLean, Scott; Ghanem, Tamer A.; Duffy, Sonia A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Pain is a strong contributor to cancer patients’ quality of life. The objective of this study was to determine predictors of pain 1 year after the diagnosis of head and neck cancer. Design Prospective, multi-site cohort study. Setting Three academically-affiliated medical centers. Patients Previously untreated patients with carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract (n=374). Main Outcome Measures Participants were surveyed pre-treatment and 1 year thereafter. Multivariate analyses were conducted to determine predictors of the SF-36 bodily pain score 1 year after diagnosis. Results The mean SF-36 bodily pain score at 1 year was 65, compared to 61 at diagnosis (p=.004), compared to 75 among population norms (lower scores indicate worse pain). Variables independently associated with pain included pre-treatment pain score (p<0.001), less education (p=0.02), neck dissection (p=0.001), feeding tube (p=0.05), xerostomia (p<0.001), depressive symptoms (p<0.001), taking more pain medication (p<0.001), less physical activity (p=.02), and poor sleep quality (p=0.006). Current smoking and problem drinking were marginally significant (p=0.07 and 0.08, respectively). Conclusions Aggressive pain management may be indicated for head and neck cancer patients who undergo neck dissections, complain of xerostomia, require feeding tubes, and have medical comorbidities. Treatment of modifiable risk factors such as depression, poor sleep quality, tobacco and alcohol abuse may also reduce pain and improve quality of life among head and neck cancer patients. PMID:23165353

  11. Indications for computed tomography in patients with mild head injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Kenichiro; Wada, Kojiro; Takahara, Takashi; Shirotani, Toshiki

    2007-01-01

    The factors affecting outcome were analyzed in 1,064 patients, 621 males and 443 females aged 10 to 104 years (mean 46±23 years), with mild head injury (Glasgow Coma Scale [GCS] score≥14) but no neurological signs presenting within 6 hours after injury. Intracranial lesion was found in 4.7% (50/1,064), and 0.66% (7/1,064) required surgical treatment. The Japan Coma Scale (JCS) and GCS assessments were well correlated (r=0.797). Multivariate analysis revealed significant correlations between computed tomography (CT) abnormality and age≥60 years, male sex, JCS score≥1, alcohol consumption, headache, nausea/vomiting, and transient loss of consciousness (LOC)/amnesia. Univariate analysis revealed that pedestrian in a motor vehicle accident, falling from height, and mechanisms of injuries except blows were correlated to intracranial injury. No significant correlations were found between craniofacial soft tissue injury and intracranial injury. Patients with occipital impact, nonfrontal impact, or skull fracture were more likely have intracranial lesions. Bleeding tendency was not correlated with CT abnormality. The following indications were proposed for CT: JCS score>0, presence of accessory symptoms (headache, nausea/vomiting, LOC/amnesia), and age≥60 years. These criteria would reduce the frequency of CT by 29% (309/1,064). Applying these indications to subsequent patients with GCS scores 14-15, 114 of 168 patients required CT, and intracranial lesions were found in 13. Two refused CT. Fifty-four of the 168 patients did not need CT according to the indications, but 38 of the 54 patients actually underwent CT because of social reasons (n=21) or patient request (n=17). These indications for CT including JCS may be useful in the management of patients with mild head injury. (author)

  12. Nerve trauma of the lower extremity: evaluation of 60,422 leg injured patients from the TraumaRegister DGU® between 2002 and 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huckhagel, Torge; Nüchtern, Jakob; Regelsberger, Jan; Gelderblom, Mathias; Lefering, Rolf

    2018-05-15

    Nerve lesions are well known reasons for reduced functional capacity and diminished quality of life. By now only a few epidemiological studies focus on lower extremity trauma related nerve injuries. This study reveals frequency and characteristics of nerve damages in patients with leg trauma in the European context. Sixty thousand four hundred twenty-two significant limb trauma cases were derived from the TraumaRegister DGU® between 2002 and 2015. The TR-DGU is a multi- centre database of severely injured patients. We compared patients with additional nerve injury to those with intact neural structures for demographic data, trauma mechanisms, concomitant injuries, treatment and outcome parameters. Approximately 1,8% of patients with injured lower extremities suffer from additional nerve trauma. These patients were younger (mean age 38,1 y) and more likely of male sex (80%) compared to the patients without nerve injury (mean age 46,7 y; 68,4% male). This study suggests the peroneal nerve to be the most frequently involved neural structure (50,9%). Patients with concomitant nerve lesions generally required a longer hospital stay and exhibited a higher rate for subsequent rehabilitation. Peripheral nerve damage was mainly a consequence of motorbike (31,2%) and car accidents (30,7%), whereas leg trauma without nerve lesion most frequently resulted from car collisions (29,6%) and falls (29,8%). Despite of its low frequency nerve injury remains a main cause for reduced functional capacity and induces high socioeconomic expenditures due to prolonged rehabilitation and absenteeism of the mostly young trauma victims. Further research is necessary to get insight into management and long term outcome of peripheral nerve injuries.

  13. Use of the Trauma Embolic Scoring System (TESS) to predict symptomatic deep vein thrombosis and fatal and non-fatal pulmonary embolism in severely injured patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, K M; Rao, S; Rittenhouse, K J; Rogers, F B

    2014-11-01

    Fatal pulmonary embolism is the third most common cause of death after major trauma. We hypothesised that the Trauma Embolic Scoring System (TESS) would have adequate calibration and discrimination in a group of severely injured trauma patients in predicting venous thromboembolism (VTE), and could be used to predict fatal and non-fatal symptomatic pulmonary embolism. Calibration and discrimination of the TESS were assessed by the slope and intercept of the calibration curve and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, respectively. Of the 357 patients included in the study, 74 patients (21%) developed symptomatic VTE after a median period of 14 days following injury. The TESS predicted risks of VTE were higher among patients who developed VTE than those who did not (14 versus 9%, P=0.001) and had a moderate ability to discriminate between patients who developed VTE and those who did not (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve 0.71, 95% confidence interval 0.65 to 0.77). The slope and intercept of the calibration curve were 2.76 and 0.34, respectively, suggesting that the predicted risks of VTE were not sufficiently extreme and overall, underestimated the observed risks of VTE. Using 5% predicted risk of VTE as an arbitrary cut-point, TESS had a high sensitivity and negative predictive value (both ≥0.97) in excluding fatal and non-fatal pulmonary embolism. The TESS had a reasonable ability to discriminate between patients who developed VTE and those who did not and may be useful to select different strategies to prevent VTE in severely injured patients.

  14. Scoring irradiation mucositis in head and neck cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spijkervet, F.K.L.; Panders, A.K. (Departments of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospital Groningen (Netherlands)); Saene, H.K.F. van (Medical Microbiology, University of Liverpool (UK)); Vermey, A. (Department of Surgery Oncology Division, University Hospital Groningen (Netherlands)); Mehta, D.M. (Department of Radiotherapy, University Hospital Groningen (Netherlands))

    1989-01-01

    Irradiation mucositis is defined as an inflammatory-like process of the oropharyngeal mucosa following therapeutic irradiation of patients who have head and neck cancer. Clinically, it is a serious side effect because severe mucositis can cause generalized problems (weight loss, nasogastic tube feedings) and interferes with the well-being of the patient seriously. Grading mucositis is important for the evaluation of preventive and therapeutic measures. The object of this study was to develop a scoring method based on local mucositis signs only. Four clinical local signs of mucositis were used in this score: white discoloration, erythema, pseudomembranes and ulceration. Mucositis of the oral cavity was calcualted during conventional irradiation protocol for 8 distinguishable areas using the 4 signs and their extent. A prospective evaluation of this method in 15 irradiated head and neck cancer patients displayed an S-curve reflecting a symptomless first irradiation week, followed by a rapid and steady increase of white discoloration, erythema and pseudomembranes during the second and third week. Oral candidiasis, generalized symptoms such as weight loss and the highest mucositis scores were seen after 3 weeks irradiation. The novel mucositis scoring method may be of value in studying the effect of hygiene programs, topical application of disinfectans or antibiotics on oral mucositis. (author).

  15. Scoring irradiation mucositis in head and neck cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spijkervet, F.K.L.; Panders, A.K.; Saene, H.K.F. van; Vermey, A.; Mehta, D.M.

    1989-01-01

    Irradiation mucositis is defined as an inflammatory-like process of the oropharyngeal mucosa following therapeutic irradiation of patients who have head and neck cancer. Clinically, it is a serious side effect because severe mucositis can cause generalized problems (weight loss, nasogastic tube feedings) and interferes with the well-being of the patient seriously. Grading mucositis is important for the evaluation of preventive and therapeutic measures. The object of this study was to develop a scoring method based on local mucositis signs only. Four clinical local signs of mucositis were used in this score: white discoloration, erythema, pseudomembranes and ulceration. Mucositis of the oral cavity was calcualted during conventional irradiation protocol for 8 distinguishable areas using the 4 signs and their extent. A prospective evaluation of this method in 15 irradiated head and neck cancer patients displayed an S-curve reflecting a symptomless first irradiation week, followed by a rapid and steady increase of white discoloration, erythema and pseudomembranes during the second and third week. Oral candidiasis, generalized symptoms such as weight loss and the highest mucositis scores were seen after 3 weeks irradiation. The novel mucositis scoring method may be of value in studying the effect of hygiene programs, topical application of disinfectans or antibiotics on oral mucositis. (author)

  16. Link for Injured Kids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Marizen; Toussaint, Maisha; Woods-Jaeger, Briana; Harland, Karisa; Wetjen, Kristel; Wilgenbusch, Tammy; Pitcher, Graeme; Jennissen, Charles

    2017-01-01

    Objective Injury, the most common type of pediatric trauma, can lead to a number of adverse psychosocial outcomes, including posttraumatic stress disorder. Currently, few evidence-based parent programs exist to support children hospitalized after a traumatic injury. Using methods in evaluation and intervention research, we completed a formative research study to develop a new program of psychological first aid, Link for Injured Kids, aimed to educate parents in supporting their children after a severe traumatic injury. Methods Using qualitative methods, we held focus groups with parents and pediatric trauma providers of children hospitalized at a Level I Children's Hospital because of an injury in 2012. We asked focus group participants to describe reactions to trauma and review drafts of our intervention materials. Results Health professionals and caregivers reported a broad spectrum of emotional responses by their children or patients; however, difficulties were experienced during recovery at home and upon returning to school. All parents and health professionals recommended that interventions be offered to parents either in the emergency department or close to discharge among admissions. Conclusions Results from this study strongly indicate a need for posttrauma interventions, particularly in rural settings, to support families of children to address the psychosocial outcomes in the aftermath of an injury. Findings presented here describe the process of intervention development that responds to the needs of an affected population. PMID:26428077

  17. An electromechanical, patient positioning system for head and neck radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostyn, Mark; Dwyer, Thomas; Miller, Matthew; King, Paden; Sacks, Rachel; Cruikshank, Ross; Rosario, Melvin; Martinez, Daniel; Kim, Siyong; Yeo, Woon-Hong

    2017-09-01

    In cancer treatment with radiation, accurate patient setup is critical for proper dose delivery. Improper arrangement can lead to disease recurrence, permanent organ damage, or lack of disease control. While current immobilization equipment often helps for patient positioning, manual adjustment is required, involving iterative, time-consuming steps. Here, we present an electromechanical robotic system for improving patient setup in radiotherapy, specifically targeting head and neck cancer. This positioning system offers six degrees of freedom for a variety of applications in radiation oncology. An analytical calculation of inverse kinematics serves as fundamental criteria to design the system. Computational mechanical modeling and experimental study of radiotherapy compatibility and x-ray-based imaging demonstrates the device feasibility and reliability to be used in radiotherapy. An absolute positioning accuracy test in a clinical treatment room supports the clinical feasibility of the system.

  18. Migration from full-head mask to "open-face" mask for immobilization of patients with head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guang; Lovelock, D Michael; Mechalakos, James; Rao, Shyam; Della-Biancia, Cesar; Amols, Howard; Lee, Nancy

    2013-09-06

    To provide an alternative device for immobilization of the head while easing claustrophobia and improving comfort, an "open-face" thermoplastic mask was evaluated using video-based optical surface imaging (OSI) and kilovoltage (kV) X-ray radiography. A three-point thermoplastic head mask with a precut opening and reinforced strips was developed. After molding, it provided sufficient visible facial area as the region of interest for OSI. Using real-time OSI, the head motion of ten volunteers in the new mask was evaluated during mask locking and 15minutes lying on the treatment couch. Using a nose mark with reference to room lasers, forced head movement in open-face and full-head masks (with a nose hole) was compared. Five patients with claustrophobia were immobilized with open-face masks, set up using OSI and kV, and treated in 121 fractions, in which 61 fractions were monitored during treatment using real-time OSI. With the open-face mask, head motion was found to be 1.0 ± 0.6 mm and 0.4° ± 0.2° in volunteers during the experiment, and 0.8 ± 0.3 mm and 0.4° ± 0.2° in patients during treatment. These agree with patient motion calculated from pre-/post-treatment OSI and kV data using different anatomical landmarks. In volunteers, the head shift induced by mask-locking was 2.3 ± 1.7 mm and 1.8° ± 0.6°, and the range of forced movements in the open-face and full-head masks were found to be similar. Most (80%) of the volunteers preferred the open-face mask to the full-head mask, while claustrophobic patients could only tolerate the open-face mask. The open-face mask is characterized for its immobilization capability and can immobilize patients sufficiently (< 2 mm) during radiotherapy. It provides a clinical solution to the immobilization of patients with head and neck (HN) cancer undergoing radiotherapy, and is particularly beneficial for claustrophobic patients. This new open-face mask is readily adopted in radiotherapy clinic as a superior alternative to

  19. Can PRP effectively treat injured tendons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, James H-C

    2014-01-01

    PRP is widely used to treat tendon and other tissue injuries in orthopaedics and sports medicine; however, the efficacy of PRP treatment on injured tendons is highly controversial. In this commentary, I reason that there are many PRP- and patient-related factors that influence the outcomes of PRP treatment on injured tendons. Therefore, more basic science studies are needed to understand the mechanism of PRP on injured tendons. Finally, I suggest that better understanding of the PRP action mechanism will lead to better use of PRP for the effective treatment of tendon injuries in clinics.

  20. When thoughts become action: an fMRI paradigm to study volitional brain activity in non-communicative brain injured patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boly, M; Coleman, M R; Davis, M H; Hampshire, A; Bor, D; Moonen, G; Maquet, P A; Pickard, J D; Laureys, S; Owen, A M

    2007-07-01

    The assessment of voluntary behavior in non-communicative brain injured patients is often challenging due to the existence of profound motor impairment. In the absence of a full understanding of the neural correlates of consciousness, even a normal activation in response to passive sensory stimulation cannot be considered as proof of the presence of awareness in these patients. In contrast, predicted activation in response to the instruction to perform a mental imagery task would provide evidence of voluntary task-dependent brain activity, and hence of consciousness, in non-communicative patients. However, no data yet exist to indicate which imagery instructions would yield reliable single subject activation. The aim of the present study was to establish such a paradigm in healthy volunteers. Two exploratory experiments evaluated the reproducibility of individual brain activation elicited by four distinct mental imagery tasks. The two most robust mental imagery tasks were found to be spatial navigation and motor imagery. In a third experiment, where these two tasks were directly compared, differentiation of each task from one another and from rest periods was assessed blindly using a priori criteria and was correct for every volunteer. The spatial navigation and motor imagery tasks described here permit the identification of volitional brain activation at the single subject level, without a motor response. Volunteer as well as patient data [Owen, A.M., Coleman, M.R., Boly, M., Davis, M.H., Laureys, S., Pickard J.D., 2006. Detecting awareness in the vegetative state. Science 313, 1402] strongly suggest that this paradigm may provide a method for assessing the presence of volitional brain activity, and thus of consciousness, in non-communicative brain-injured patients.

  1. Computed tomography findings in head trauma in Sokoto (North ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This retrospective study was carried out to present the pattern of injuries seen using computed tomography (CT scan) in head injured patients and to highlight the role, played by this modality of investigation in the management of these patients at the department of Radiology, Usman DanFodio University Teaching ...

  2. Characteristics of Syntactic Comprehension Deficits Following Closed Head Injury versus Left Cerebrovascular Accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler-Hinz, Susan; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Two studies examined the ability to assign thematic roles and to coindex referentially dependent noun phrases in closed head injured adults (N=20), adult stroke patients (N=20), and normal adults (N=20). Results suggested that syntactic comprehension disturbances are similar following left cerebral hemisphere infarction and closed head injury.…

  3. Time pressure management as a compensatory strategy training after closed head injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fasotti, L; Kovacs, F; Eling, PATM; Brouwer, WH

    Following severe closed head injury, deficits in speed of information processing are common. As a result, many head-injured patients experience a feeling of "information overload" in daily tasks that once were relatively easy. Many remedial programmes have been designed that treat different aspects

  4. Monitoring the injured brain: registered, patient specific atlas models to improve accuracy of recovered brain saturation values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Michael; Belli, Antonio; Davies, David; Lucas, Samuel J. E.; Su, Zhangjie; Dehghani, Hamid

    2015-07-01

    The subject of superficial contamination and signal origins remains a widely debated topic in the field of Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS), yet the concept of using the technology to monitor an injured brain, in a clinical setting, poses additional challenges concerning the quantitative accuracy of recovered parameters. Using high density diffuse optical tomography probes, quantitatively accurate parameters from different layers (skin, bone and brain) can be recovered from subject specific reconstruction models. This study assesses the use of registered atlas models for situations where subject specific models are not available. Data simulated from subject specific models were reconstructed using the 8 registered atlas models implementing a regional (layered) parameter recovery in NIRFAST. A 3-region recovery based on the atlas model yielded recovered brain saturation values which were accurate to within 4.6% (percentage error) of the simulated values, validating the technique. The recovered saturations in the superficial regions were not quantitatively accurate. These findings highlight differences in superficial (skin and bone) layer thickness between the subject and atlas models. This layer thickness mismatch was propagated through the reconstruction process decreasing the parameter accuracy.

  5. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy for elderly head and neck cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Masato

    2012-01-01

    Among head and neck cancers, cases affecting elderly people are increasing. Radical treatment is sometimes difficult in advanced cases of elderly patients. With progressive cancer, because radical surgery is often difficult, radiotherapy is chosen and may be used together with chemotherapy when overall status is good. However, according to the meta-analysis of Pignon et al., the chemoradiotherapy for elderly patients 71 years old or older, the hazard ratio becomes approximately 0.95, and there is little chemotherapy combined effect. In terms of 5-year survival rate, chemotherapy combined effect is -0.7%. Chemotherapy effect in elderly patients is not clear in past clinical trials. We examined 50 cases 75 years or older treated mainly by radiotherapy at Tokyo Medical Center between February, 2003 and August, 2011. In all, 21 of the 50 patients died, including four who died due to other cancers, while pneumonia accounted for five other deaths. These results suggested that various complications are often present and multiple primary cancers often occur in elderly people. With chemotherapy for elderly people, the effect of radiotherapy treatment and quality of life of the patients should be considered fully based on characteristics of elderly people, and a treatment plan devised accordingly. It is also necessary to undertake care after treatment. (author)

  6. Pattern of head and neck cancers among patients attending ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lack of baseline data in Tanzania concerning head and ... that there is a synergistic effect of alcohol consumption and tobacco use in causing head and neck cancers ... risk factors, while radiation around the head and neck is associated with ...

  7. Serum prognostic biomarkers in head and neck cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ho-Sheng; Siddiq, Fauzia; Talwar, Harvinder S; Chen, Wei; Voichita, Calin; Draghici, Sorin; Jeyapalan, Gerald; Chatterjee, Madhumita; Fribley, Andrew; Yoo, George H; Sethi, Seema; Kim, Harold; Sukari, Ammar; Folbe, Adam J; Tainsky, Michael A

    2014-08-01

    A reliable estimate of survival is important as it may impact treatment choice. The objective of this study is to identify serum autoantibody biomarkers that can be used to improve prognostication for patients affected with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Prospective cohort study. A panel of 130 serum biomarkers, previously selected for cancer detection using microarray-based serological profiling and specialized bioinformatics, were evaluated for their potential as prognostic biomarkers in a cohort of 119 HNSCC patients followed for up to 12.7 years. A biomarker was considered positive if its reactivity to the particular patient's serum was greater than one standard deviation above the mean reactivity to sera from the other 118 patients, using a leave-one-out cross-validation model. Survival curves were estimated according to the Kaplan-Meier method, and statistically significant differences in survival were examined using the log rank test. Independent prognostic biomarkers were identified following analysis using multivariate Cox proportional hazards models. Poor overall survival was associated with African Americans (hazard ratio [HR] for death = 2.61; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.58-4.33; P = .000), advanced stage (HR = 2.79; 95% CI: 1.40-5.57; P = .004), and recurrent disease (HR = 6.66; 95% CI: 2.54-17.44; P = .000). On multivariable Cox analysis adjusted for covariates (race and stage), six of the 130 markers evaluated were found to be independent prognosticators of overall survival. The results shown here are promising and demonstrate the potential use of serum biomarkers for prognostication in HNSCC patients. Further clinical trials to include larger samples of patients across multiple centers may be warranted. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  8. Cerebral Blood Flow and Transcranial Doppler Sonography Measurements of CO(2)-Reactivity in Acute Traumatic Brain Injured Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinstrup, Peter; Ryding, Erik Hilmer; Asgeirsson, Bogi

    2013-01-01

    measurements and cerebrovascular reactivity to hypocapnia were simultaneously evaluated in 27 patients with acute TBI. Measurements were performed preoperatively during controlled normocapnia and hypocapnia in patients scheduled for hematoma evacuation under general anesthesia. MAIN FINDING AND CONCLUSION...

  9. Artificial neural networks: Predicting head CT findings in elderly patients presenting with minor head injury after a fall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusenberry, Michael W; Brown, Charles K; Brewer, Kori L

    2017-02-01

    To construct an artificial neural network (ANN) model that can predict the presence of acute CT findings with both high sensitivity and high specificity when applied to the population of patients≥age 65years who have incurred minor head injury after a fall. An ANN was created in the Python programming language using a population of 514 patients ≥ age 65 years presenting to the ED with minor head injury after a fall. The patient dataset was divided into three parts: 60% for "training", 20% for "cross validation", and 20% for "testing". Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy were determined by comparing the model's predictions to the actual correct answers for each patient. On the "cross validation" data, the model attained a sensitivity ("recall") of 100.00%, specificity of 78.95%, PPV ("precision") of 78.95%, NPV of 100.00%, and accuracy of 88.24% in detecting the presence of positive head CTs. On the "test" data, the model attained a sensitivity of 97.78%, specificity of 89.47%, PPV of 88.00%, NPV of 98.08%, and accuracy of 93.14% in detecting the presence of positive head CTs. ANNs show great potential for predicting CT findings in the population of patients ≥ 65 years of age presenting with minor head injury after a fall. As a good first step, the ANN showed comparable sensitivity, predictive values, and accuracy, with a much higher specificity than the existing decision rules in clinical usage for predicting head CTs with acute intracranial findings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Abnormal head turn in a patient with Brown's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Waveren, M; Krzizok, T; Besch, D

    2008-08-01

    We report on an eight-year-old boy, who was presented in our clinic because of head turn. The cause of the tortecollis (ocular or general) in this case was and still cannot be explained. Only by applying extensive prism adaptation tests it was possible to prove the ocular character of the head turn. An eight-year-old boy with Brown's syndrome was referred to us because of a head tilt to the left side. Six months previously surgery on the M. obl. superior of the right eye was performed in another clinic. No improvement of the head tilt could be observed after the operation. In addition, an exotropia became decompensated. Under a 3-day occlusion of one eye, no change of the head turn and the squint could be measured. No other cause of the head turn could be found by an orthopaedist and a paediatrist. Under a prism of 20 cm/m basis in and 10 cm/m basis against the positive vertical deviation, the head tilt decreased, so that we decided to do a second surgery. The head tilting had not resumed at one year after the surgery. Although the initial diagnostic findings ruled out an ocular cause, it was possible to lessen the head tilting with the aid of the prism adaptation test. This case study emphasises the usefulness of a prism adaptation test of several days duration in order to validate an ocular cause of head turn and to determine an adequate indication for surgery.

  11. Nutrition management for head and neck cancer patients improves clinical outcome and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Richter, Urs; Betz, C; Hartmann, S; Brands, R C

    2017-12-01

    Up to 80% of patients with head and neck cancers are malnourished because of their lifestyle and the risk factors associated with this disease. Unfortunately, nutrition management systems are not implemented in most head and neck cancer clinics. Even worse, many head and neck surgeons as well as hospital management authorities disregard the importance of nutrition management in head and neck cancer patients. In addition, the often extensive resection and reconstruction required for tumors in the upper aerodigestive tract pose special challenges for swallowing and sufficient food intake, placing special demands on nutrition management. This article presents the basics of perioperative metabolism and nutrition management of head and neck cancer patients and makes recommendations for clinical practice. Implementing a nutrition management system in head and neck cancer clinics will improve the clinical outcome and the survival of the patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A comparison of severely injured trauma patients admitted to level 1 trauma centres in Queensland and Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijboer, Johanna M. M.; Wullschleger, Martin E.; Nielsen, Susan E.; McNamee, Anitia M.; Lefering, Rolf; ten Duis, Hendrik-Jan; Schuetz, Michael A.

    Background: The allocation of a trauma network in Queensland is still in the developmental phase. In a search for indicators to improve trauma care both locally as state-wide, a study was carried out comparing trauma patients in Queensland to trauma patients in Germany, a country with 82.4 million

  13. Experienced emotional burden in caregivers: psychometric properties of the Involvement Evaluation Questionnaire in caregivers of brain injured patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurtsen, Gert J.; Meijer, Ron; van Heugten, Caroline M.; Martina, Juan D.; Geurts, Alexander C. H.

    2010-01-01

    To examine the psychometric properties (internal consistency, discriminant validity, and responsiveness) of the Involvement Evaluation Questionnaire for Brain Injury measuring emotional burden in caregivers of patients with chronic acquired brain injury. Inception cohort study. Caregivers of chronic

  14. Experienced emotional burden in caregivers: psychometric properties of the Involvement Evaluation Questionnaire in caregivers of brain injured patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurtsen, G.J.; Meijer, R.; Heugten, C.M. van; Martina, J.D.; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the psychometric properties (internal consistency, discriminant validity, and responsiveness) of the Involvement Evaluation Questionnaire for Brain Injury measuring emotional burden in caregivers of patients with chronic acquired brain injury. DESIGN: Inception cohort study.

  15. Use of methylnaltrexone to induce laxation in acutely injured patients with burns and necrotizing soft-tissue infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Kelly; Lin, Hsin; Faraklas, Iris; Morris, Stephen; Cochran, Amalia; Saffle, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    The routine use of high-dose opioids for analgesia in patients with acute burns and soft-tissue injuries often leads to the development of opioid-induced constipation. The opioid antagonist methylnaltrexone (MLTX) reverses narcotic-related ileus without affecting systemic pain treatment. The authors' burn center developed a bowel protocol that included administration of MLTX for relief of opioid-induced constipation after other methods failed. The authors performed a retrospective review of patients with acute burns or necrotizing soft-tissue infections, who had been given subcutaneous MLTX to induce laxation. All patients who received MLTX were included and all administrations of the drug were included in the analysis. The primary outcome examined was time to laxation from drug administration. Forty-eight patients received MLTX a total of 112 times. Six patients were admitted with soft-tissue injuries and the rest suffered burns with an average TBSA of 17%. The median patient age was 41 years and the majority (75%) were men. Administration of a single dose of MLTX resulted in laxation within 4 hours in 38% of cases, and within 24 hours in 68%. Patients given MLTX received an average of 174 mg morphine equivalents daily for pain control. MLTX was given after an average of 52 hours since the last bowel movement. As this experience has evolved, it has been incorporated into an organized bowel protocol, which includes MLTX administration after other laxatives have failed. MLTX is an effective laxation agent in patients with burn and soft-tissue injuries, who have failed conventional agents.

  16. Case report on the clinical results of a combined cellular therapy for chronic spinal cord injured patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moviglia, G A; Varela, G; Brizuela, J A; Moviglia Brandolino, M T; Farina, P; Etchegaray, G; Piccone, S; Hirsch, J; Martinez, G; Marino, S; Deffain, S; Coria, N; Gonzáles, A; Sztanko, M; Salas-Zamora, P; Previgliano, I; Aingel, V; Farias, J; Gaeta, C A; Saslavsky, J; Blasseti, N

    2009-06-01

    With the intention to ameliorate the clinical condition of patients with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI), a program that combines three cell therapies and an appropriate neurorehabilitation program were used to recreate and enhance the natural conditions of SCI repair. Vascularization recovery is approached by selective artery infusion of BMMNCs (bone marrow mononuclear cells) to the disrupted area. Eighteen days later, with the aim to restore the specific inflammatory activity, an i.v. infusion of spinal cord specific ETCs (effector T cells) is carried out. With the intention of supplying cellular components for the process of repair, an infusion of autologous neural stem cells (NSCs) through selective feeding artery infusion is carried out, followed by an appropriate neurorehabilitation program. A total of eight ASIA (American Spinal Injury Association) A patients (five with jeopardized brachial plexus and three without) received the treatment. No severe adverse events was observed in any of the receptor patients: five patients evolved from ASIA A to ASIA D and regained the ability to stand up and, with varying effectiveness, to walk; two patients remained in the same condition, but exhibited motor and sensitive improvements; and one patient could not be evaluated. These reports suggest that the biological characteristics of acute SCI may be recreated in a comprehensive, safe and effective manner.

  17. [The psychopathology of the unawareness of cognitive impairments and behavioral limitations in traumatic brain-injured patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenheim-Gluckman, H; Fayol, P; de Collasson, P; Dumond, J J; Azouvi, P

    2003-02-01

    To explore the unawareness of cognitive impairments and behavioral limitations using a psychopathological approach. Fifteen patients with chronic severe TBI. Outpatient TBI rehabilitation programs in three different centers. Case reports. The data from semi-structured interviews with the patients and their families, at least six months after the accident, were compared with data supplied by the Patient Competency Rating Scale (PCRS) and the Neurobehavioral Rating Scale-Revised (NRS-R). Nine patients demonstrated unawareness of their limitations according to the PCRS (Group I), whereas six did not (Group II). Psychic phenomena specific to patients of group I were found. Some of these were specific to brain injury, such as the lack of representation of cognitive impairments and behavioral limitations or the difficulty to integrate the brain-injury into one's psychic space. Others were not specific to brain injury such as mourning process difficulties, personality characteristics, defense mechanisms. Several psychic phenomena coexisted in the same patient. This study shows the complexity of unawareness of cognitive impairments and behavioral limitations and makes future clinical and theoretical definition indispensable.

  18. 5. Factors associated with Outcome in Patients Admitted with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RICHY

    in-hospital outcomes of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) ... percentage points lower than an earlier study done at ... Severity of injury; this is determined by use of ..... 10. Management Protocol in head injured patients at. UTH. Neurosurgical unit ...

  19. Is Early Appropriate Care of axial and femoral fractures appropriate in multiply-injured elderly trauma patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, M S; Dolenc, A J; Moore, T A; Vallier, H A

    2016-09-26

    Previous work established resuscitation parameters that minimize complications with early fracture management. This Early Appropriate Care (EAC) protocol was applied to patients with advanced age to determine if they require unique parameters to mitigate complications. Between October 2010 and March 2013, 376 consecutive skeletally mature patients with unstable fractures of the pelvis, acetabulum, thoracolumbar spine, and/or proximal or diaphyseal femur fractures were treated at a level I trauma center and were prospectively studied. Patients aged ≤30 years (n = 114), 30 to 60 years (n = 184), and ≥60 years (n = 37) with Injury Severity Scores (ISS) ≥16 and unstable fractures of the pelvis, acetabulum, spine, and/or diaphyseal femur were treated within 36 h, provided they showed evidence of adequate resuscitation. ISS, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), and American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification were determined. Lactate, pH, and base excess (BE) were measured at 8-h intervals. Complications included pneumonia, pulmonary embolism (PE), acute renal failure, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), multiple organ failure (MOF), deep vein thrombosis, infection, sepsis, and death. Patients ≤30 years old (y/o) were more likely to sustain gunshot wounds (p = 0.039), while those ≥60 y/o were more likely to fall from a height (p = 0.002). Complications occurred at similar rates for patients ≤30 y/o, 30 to 60 y/o, and ≥60 y/o. There were no differences in lactate, pH, or BE at the time of surgery. For patients ≤30 y/o, there were increased overall complications if pH was <7.30 (p = 0.042) or BE <-6.0 (p = 0.049); patients ≥60 y/o demonstrated more sepsis if BE was <-6.0 (p = 0.046). EAC aims to definitively manage axial and femoral shaft fractures once patients have been adequately resuscitated to minimize complications. EAC is associated with comparable complication rates in young and elderly

  20. The ethical and legal aspects of palliative sedation in severely brain-injured patients: a French perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puybasset Louis

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To fulfill their crucial duty of relieving suffering in their patients, physicians may have to administer palliative sedation when they implement treatment-limitation decisions such as the withdrawal of life-supporting interventions in patients with poor prognosis chronic severe brain injury. The issue of palliative sedation deserves particular attention in adults with serious brain injuries and in neonates with severe and irreversible brain lesions, who are unable to express pain or to state their wishes. In France, treatment limitation decisions for these patients are left to the physicians. Treatment-limitation decisions are made collegially, based on the presence of irreversible brain lesions responsible for chronic severe disorders of consciousness. Before these decisions are implemented, they are communicated to the relatives. Because the presence and severity of pain cannot be assessed in these patients, palliative analgesia and/or sedation should be administered. However, palliative sedation is a complex strategy that requires safeguards to prevent a drift toward hastening death or performing covert euthanasia. In addition to the law on patients' rights at the end of life passed in France on April 22, 2005, a recent revision of Article 37 of the French code of medical ethics both acknowledges that treatment-limitation decisions and palliative sedation may be required in patients with severe brain injuries and provides legal and ethical safeguards against a shift towards euthanasia. This legislation may hold value as a model for other countries where euthanasia is illegal and for countries such as Belgium and Netherlands where euthanasia is legal but not allowed in patients incapable of asking for euthanasia but in whom a treatment limitation decision has been made.

  1. The ethical and legal aspects of palliative sedation in severely brain-injured patients: a French perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    To fulfill their crucial duty of relieving suffering in their patients, physicians may have to administer palliative sedation when they implement treatment-limitation decisions such as the withdrawal of life-supporting interventions in patients with poor prognosis chronic severe brain injury. The issue of palliative sedation deserves particular attention in adults with serious brain injuries and in neonates with severe and irreversible brain lesions, who are unable to express pain or to state their wishes. In France, treatment limitation decisions for these patients are left to the physicians. Treatment-limitation decisions are made collegially, based on the presence of irreversible brain lesions responsible for chronic severe disorders of consciousness. Before these decisions are implemented, they are communicated to the relatives. Because the presence and severity of pain cannot be assessed in these patients, palliative analgesia and/or sedation should be administered. However, palliative sedation is a complex strategy that requires safeguards to prevent a drift toward hastening death or performing covert euthanasia. In addition to the law on patients' rights at the end of life passed in France on April 22, 2005, a recent revision of Article 37 of the French code of medical ethics both acknowledges that treatment-limitation decisions and palliative sedation may be required in patients with severe brain injuries and provides legal and ethical safeguards against a shift towards euthanasia. This legislation may hold value as a model for other countries where euthanasia is illegal and for countries such as Belgium and Netherlands where euthanasia is legal but not allowed in patients incapable of asking for euthanasia but in whom a treatment limitation decision has been made. PMID:21303504

  2. The ethical and legal aspects of palliative sedation in severely brain-injured patients: a French perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Antoine; Claudot, Frédérique; Audibert, Gérard; Mertes, Paul-Michel; Puybasset, Louis

    2011-02-08

    To fulfill their crucial duty of relieving suffering in their patients, physicians may have to administer palliative sedation when they implement treatment-limitation decisions such as the withdrawal of life-supporting interventions in patients with poor prognosis chronic severe brain injury. The issue of palliative sedation deserves particular attention in adults with serious brain injuries and in neonates with severe and irreversible brain lesions, who are unable to express pain or to state their wishes. In France, treatment limitation decisions for these patients are left to the physicians. Treatment-limitation decisions are made collegially, based on the presence of irreversible brain lesions responsible for chronic severe disorders of consciousness. Before these decisions are implemented, they are communicated to the relatives. Because the presence and severity of pain cannot be assessed in these patients, palliative analgesia and/or sedation should be administered. However, palliative sedation is a complex strategy that requires safeguards to prevent a drift toward hastening death or performing covert euthanasia. In addition to the law on patients' rights at the end of life passed in France on April 22, 2005, a recent revision of Article 37 of the French code of medical ethics both acknowledges that treatment-limitation decisions and palliative sedation may be required in patients with severe brain injuries and provides legal and ethical safeguards against a shift towards euthanasia. This legislation may hold value as a model for other countries where euthanasia is illegal and for countries such as Belgium and Netherlands where euthanasia is legal but not allowed in patients incapable of asking for euthanasia but in whom a treatment limitation decision has been made.

  3. [Decision making and executive function in severe traumatic brain injured patients: validation of a decision-making task and correlated features].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiederkehr, S; Barat, M; Dehail, P; de Sèze, M; Lozes-Boudillon, S; Giroire, J-M

    2005-02-01

    At the chronic stage, severe traumatic brain injured (TBI) patients experience difficulty in making decisions. Several studies have demonstrated the involvement of the prefrontal cortex, in particular the orbitofrontal region, in decision-making. The aim of the present study was to validate a decision-making task in this population and to ascertain whether the components of their dysexecutive syndrome may affect their decision-making and lead to difficulties for social rehabilitation. Fifteen TBI patients and 15 controlled subjects matched for age, sex and years of education were assessed by a battery of executive tests (GREFEX) and by the gambling task (GT). The TBI subjects performed significantly worse than the controlled group in five out of six GREFEX tests. The TBI choices are significantly more disadvantageous than the choices of the control group when considering the three last blocks of 20 cards of the GT. The GT total score correlated significantly with execution time of the Stroop interference condition and the Trail Making Task B, as well as with the two measures (correct sequence span and number of crossed boxes) of the double condition of Baddeley's task. We postulate that executive functioning (supervisory attentional system) influence performance in the gambling task through mechanisms of inhibitory control, divided attention and working memory. Thus, this task seems to be determined by multiple factors; the process of decision-making may depend on frontal integrity.

  4. Sequential computerized tomography changes and related final outcome in severe head injury patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobato, R.D.; Gomez, P.A.; Alday, R.

    1997-01-01

    The authors analyzed the serial computerized tomography (CT) findings in a large series of severely head injured patients in order to assess the variability in gross intracranial pathology through the acute posttraumatic period and determine the most common patterns of CT change. A second aim was to compare the prognostic significance of the different CT diagnostic categories used in the study (Traumatic Coma Data Bank CT pathological classification) when gleaned either from the initial (postadmission) or the control CT scans, and determine the extent to which having a second CT scan provides more prognostic information than only one scan. 92 patients (13.3 % of the total population) died soon after injury. Of the 587 who survived long enough to have at least one control CT scan 23.6 % developed new diffuse brain swelling, and 20.9 % new focal mass lesions most of which had to be evacuated. The relative risk for requiring a delayed operation as related to the diagnostic category established by using the initial CT scans was by decreasing order: diffuse injury IV (30.7 %), diffuse injury III (30.5 %), non evacuated mass (20 %), evacuated mass (20.2 %), diffuse injury II (12.1 %), and diffuse injury I (8.6 %). Overall, 51.2 % of the patients developed significant CT changes (for worse or better) occurring either spontaneously or following surgery, and their final outcomes were more closely related to the control than to the initial CT diagnoses. In fact, the final outcome was more accurately predicted by using the control CT scans (81.2 % of the cases) than by using the initial CT scans (71.5 % of the cases only). Since the majority of relevant CT changes developed within 48 hours after injury a pathological categorization made by using an early control CT scan seems to be most useful for prognostic purposes. Prognosis associated with the CT pathological categories used in the study was similar independently of the moment of the acute posttraumatic period at which

  5. Effectiveness of a Very Early Stepping Verticalization Protocol in Severe Acquired Brain Injured Patients: A Randomized Pilot Study in ICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazzitta, Giuseppe; Zivi, Ilaria; Valsecchi, Roberto; Bonini, Sara; Maffia, Sara; Molatore, Katia; Sebastianelli, Luca; Zarucchi, Alessio; Matteri, Diana; Ercoli, Giuseppe; Maestri, Roberto; Saltuari, Leopold

    2016-01-01

    Verticalization was reported to improve the level of arousal and awareness in patients with severe acquired brain injury (ABI) and to be safe in ICU. We evaluated the effectiveness of a very early stepping verticalization protocol on their functional and neurological outcome. Consecutive patients with Vegetative State or Minimally Conscious State were enrolled in ICU on the third day after an ABI. They were randomized to undergo conventional physiotherapy alone or associated to fifteen 30-minute sessions of verticalization, using a tilt table with robotic stepping device. Once stabilized, patients were transferred to our Neurorehabilitation unit for an individualized treatment. Outcome measures (Glasgow Coma Scale, Coma Recovery Scale revised -CRSr-, Disability Rating Scale-DRS- and Levels of Cognitive Functioning) were assessed on the third day from the injury (T0), at ICU discharge (T1) and at Rehab discharge (T2). Between- and within-group comparisons were performed by the Mann-Whitney U test and Wilcoxon signed-rank test, respectively. Of the 40 patients enrolled, 31 completed the study without adverse events (15 in the verticalization group and 16 in the conventional physiotherapy). Early verticalization started 12.4±7.3 (mean±SD) days after ABI. The length of stay in ICU was longer for the verticalization group (38.8 ± 15.7 vs 25.1 ± 11.2 days, p = 0.01), while the total length of stay (ICU+Neurorehabilitation) was not significantly different (153.2 ± 59.6 vs 134.0 ± 61.0 days, p = 0.41). All outcome measures significantly improved in both groups after the overall period (T2 vs T0, pverticalization protocol, started since the acute stages, improves the short-term and long-term functional and neurological outcome of ABI patients. clinicaltrials.gov NCT02828371.

  6. Training-induced improvements in postural control are accompanied by alterations in cerebellar white matter in brain injured patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Drijkoningen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated whether balance control in young TBI patients can be promoted by an 8-week balance training program and whether this is associated with neuroplastic alterations in brain structure. The cerebellum and cerebellar peduncles were selected as regions of interest because of their importance in postural control as well as their vulnerability to brain injury. Young patients with moderate to severe TBI and typically developing (TD subjects participated in balance training using PC-based portable balancers with storage of training data and real-time visual feedback. An additional control group of TD subjects did not attend balance training. Mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy were determined with diffusion MRI scans and were acquired before, during (4 weeks and at completion of training (8 weeks together with balance assessments on the EquiTest® System (NeuroCom which included the Sensory Organization Test, Rhythmic Weight Shift and Limits of Stability protocols. Following training, TBI patients showed significant improvements on all EquiTest protocols, as well as a significant increase in mean diffusivity in the inferior cerebellar peduncle. Moreover, in both training groups, diffusion metrics in the cerebellum and/or cerebellar peduncles at baseline were predictive of the amount of performance increase after training. Finally, amount of training-induced improvement on the Rhythmic Weight Shift test in TBI patients was positively correlated with amount of change in fractional anisotropy in the inferior cerebellar peduncle. This suggests that training-induced plastic changes in balance control are associated with alterations in the cerebellar white matter microstructure in TBI patients.

  7. Training-induced improvements in postural control are accompanied by alterations in cerebellar white matter in brain injured patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drijkoningen, David; Caeyenberghs, Karen; Leunissen, Inge; Vander Linden, Catharine; Leemans, Alexander; Sunaert, Stefan; Duysens, Jacques; Swinnen, Stephan P

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether balance control in young TBI patients can be promoted by an 8-week balance training program and whether this is associated with neuroplastic alterations in brain structure. The cerebellum and cerebellar peduncles were selected as regions of interest because of their importance in postural control as well as their vulnerability to brain injury. Young patients with moderate to severe TBI and typically developing (TD) subjects participated in balance training using PC-based portable balancers with storage of training data and real-time visual feedback. An additional control group of TD subjects did not attend balance training. Mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy were determined with diffusion MRI scans and were acquired before, during (4 weeks) and at completion of training (8 weeks) together with balance assessments on the EquiTest® System (NeuroCom) which included the Sensory Organization Test, Rhythmic Weight Shift and Limits of Stability protocols. Following training, TBI patients showed significant improvements on all EquiTest protocols, as well as a significant increase in mean diffusivity in the inferior cerebellar peduncle. Moreover, in both training groups, diffusion metrics in the cerebellum and/or cerebellar peduncles at baseline were predictive of the amount of performance increase after training. Finally, amount of training-induced improvement on the Rhythmic Weight Shift test in TBI patients was positively correlated with amount of change in fractional anisotropy in the inferior cerebellar peduncle. This suggests that training-induced plastic changes in balance control are associated with alterations in the cerebellar white matter microstructure in TBI patients.

  8. The Trauma Time-Out: Evaluating the Effectiveness of Protocol-Based Information Dissemination in the Traumatically Injured Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Heather R; Fitzgerald, Michael; Howard, Brett; Jarrard, Joey; Vaughn, Danny

    Procedural time-outs are widely accepted safety standards that are protocolized in nearly all hospital systems. The trauma time-out, however, has been largely unstudied in the existing literature and does not have a standard protocol outlined by any of the major trauma surgery organizations. The goal of this study was to evaluate our institution's use of the trauma time-out and assess how trauma team members viewed its effectiveness. A multiple-answer survey was sent to trauma team members at a Level I trauma center. Questions included items directed at background, experience, opinions, and write-in responses. Most responders were experienced trauma team members who regularly participated in trauma codes. All respondents noted the total time required to complete the time-out was less than 5 min, with the majority saying it took less than 1 min. Seventy-five percent agreed that trauma time-outs should continue, with 92% noting that it improved understanding of patient presentation and prehospital evaluation. Seventy-seven percent said it improved understanding of other team member's roles, and 75% stated it improved patient care. Subgroups of physicians and nurses were statistically similar; yet, physicians did note that it improved their understanding of the team member's function more frequently than nurses. The trauma time-out can be an excellent tool to improve patient care and team understanding of the incoming trauma patient. Although used widely at multiple levels of trauma institutions, development of a documented protocol can be the next step in creating a unified safety standard.

  9. Outcome of severely injured trauma patients at a designated trauma centre in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Ka Kit Gilberto; Ho, Wendy; Tong, King Hung Daniel; Yuen, Wai Key

    2010-05-20

    The Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR) of the People's Republic of China (PRC) has seen significant changes in its trauma service over the last ten years including the implementation of a regional trauma system. The author's institution is one of the five trauma centres designated in 2003. This article reports our initial clinical experience. A prospective single-centre trauma registry from January 2004 to December 2008 was reviewed. The primary clinical outcome measure was hospital mortality. The Trauma and Injury Severity Score (TRISS) methodology was used for bench-marking with the North America Major Trauma Outcome Study (MTOS) database. There were 1451 patients. The majority (83.9%) suffered from blunt injury. The overall mortality rate was 7.8%. Severe injury, defined as the Injury Severity Score > 15, occurred in 22.5% of patients, and was associated with a mortality rate of 31.6%. A trend of progressive improvement was noted. The M-statistic was 0.99, indicating comparable case-mix with the MTOS. The Z- and W-statistics of each individual year revealed fewer, but not significantly so, number of survivors than expected. Trauma centre designation was feasible in the HKSAR and was associated with a gradual improvement in patient care. Trauma system implementation may be considered in regions equipped with the necessary socio-economic and organizational set-up.

  10. The insight and challenge of reflexive practice in an ethnographic study of black traumatically injured patients in Philadelphia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacoby, Sara F

    2017-07-01

    The integrity of critical ethnography requires engagement in reflexive practice at all phases of the research process. In this discussion paper, I explore the insights and challenges of reflexive practice in an ethnographic study of the recovery experiences of black trauma patients in a Philadelphia hospital. Observation and interviews were conducted with twelve patients who were admitted to trauma-designated units of the hospital over the course of a year. During fieldwork, I learned the ways that my background as a professional nurse structured my way of being in clinical space and facilitated a particular interpretation of clinical culture. In analysis, reflection on subjectivities through which I designed this ethnographic research allowed me to see beyond my preconceived and theoretically informed perspective to permit unexpected features of the field to emerge. Reflexive practice also guided my reconciliation of key practical and epistemological differences between clinical ethnographic research and the anthropologic tradition in which it is rooted. I conclude that with careful reflection to the subjectivities that influence the research process, interdisciplinary clinically relevant applied interpretations of critical ethnographic work can be used to generate detailed knowledge across contexts in clinical care, nursing practice, and patient experiences. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. [Using the polymerase chain reaction to Borrelia burgdorferi infection in localized scleroderma injure (morphea), in Venezuelan patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza-León, Fabiola; Arocha, Francisco; Hassanhi, Manzur; Arévalo, Julio

    2010-09-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi is the causative agent of Lyme Borreliosis, an infectious multisystemic disease transmitted to humans by the Ixodes ticks bite. A possible association of Borrelia burgdorferi with localized scleroderma has been postulated. However, published data do not provide unequivocal results. Previous serologic analysis of patients with localized scleroderma in South American countries (including Venezuela), have been reported as yielding some reactivity. The present study looked for evidence of Borrelia burgdorferi infection in venezuelan patients with localized scleroderma, using the polymerase chain reaction to analyze 21 skin samples of patients with this skin condition. The results were negative in all the samples studied. Our data do not support an association of Borrelia burgdorferi infection and the sclerotic lesions of localized scleroderma; but do not rule out the possibility of a relationship between localized scleroderma and an unknown geno-specie of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex, a different Borrelia specie or a different spirochetal organism, as the etiological agents of the skin lesions in this area.

  12. Effectiveness of a Very Early Stepping Verticalization Protocol in Severe Acquired Brain Injured Patients: A Randomized Pilot Study in ICU.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Frazzitta

    Full Text Available Verticalization was reported to improve the level of arousal and awareness in patients with severe acquired brain injury (ABI and to be safe in ICU. We evaluated the effectiveness of a very early stepping verticalization protocol on their functional and neurological outcome.Consecutive patients with Vegetative State or Minimally Conscious State were enrolled in ICU on the third day after an ABI. They were randomized to undergo conventional physiotherapy alone or associated to fifteen 30-minute sessions of verticalization, using a tilt table with robotic stepping device. Once stabilized, patients were transferred to our Neurorehabilitation unit for an individualized treatment. Outcome measures (Glasgow Coma Scale, Coma Recovery Scale revised -CRSr-, Disability Rating Scale-DRS- and Levels of Cognitive Functioning were assessed on the third day from the injury (T0, at ICU discharge (T1 and at Rehab discharge (T2. Between- and within-group comparisons were performed by the Mann-Whitney U test and Wilcoxon signed-rank test, respectively.Of the 40 patients enrolled, 31 completed the study without adverse events (15 in the verticalization group and 16 in the conventional physiotherapy. Early verticalization started 12.4±7.3 (mean±SD days after ABI. The length of stay in ICU was longer for the verticalization group (38.8 ± 15.7 vs 25.1 ± 11.2 days, p = 0.01, while the total length of stay (ICU+Neurorehabilitation was not significantly different (153.2 ± 59.6 vs 134.0 ± 61.0 days, p = 0.41. All outcome measures significantly improved in both groups after the overall period (T2 vs T0, p<0.001 all, as well as after ICU stay (T1 vs T0, p<0.004 all and after Neurorehabilitation (T2 vs T1, p<0.004 all. The improvement was significantly better in the experimental group for CRSr (T2-T0 p = 0.033, T1-T0 p = 0.006 and (borderline for DRS (T2-T0 p = 0.040, T1-T0 p = 0.058.A stepping verticalization protocol, started since the acute stages, improves the

  13. Effectiveness of a Very Early Stepping Verticalization Protocol in Severe Acquired Brain Injured Patients: A Randomized Pilot Study in ICU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonini, Sara; Maffia, Sara; Molatore, Katia; Sebastianelli, Luca; Zarucchi, Alessio; Matteri, Diana; Ercoli, Giuseppe; Maestri, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Verticalization was reported to improve the level of arousal and awareness in patients with severe acquired brain injury (ABI) and to be safe in ICU. We evaluated the effectiveness of a very early stepping verticalization protocol on their functional and neurological outcome. Methods Consecutive patients with Vegetative State or Minimally Conscious State were enrolled in ICU on the third day after an ABI. They were randomized to undergo conventional physiotherapy alone or associated to fifteen 30-minute sessions of verticalization, using a tilt table with robotic stepping device. Once stabilized, patients were transferred to our Neurorehabilitation unit for an individualized treatment. Outcome measures (Glasgow Coma Scale, Coma Recovery Scale revised -CRSr-, Disability Rating Scale–DRS- and Levels of Cognitive Functioning) were assessed on the third day from the injury (T0), at ICU discharge (T1) and at Rehab discharge (T2). Between- and within-group comparisons were performed by the Mann-Whitney U test and Wilcoxon signed-rank test, respectively. Results Of the 40 patients enrolled, 31 completed the study without adverse events (15 in the verticalization group and 16 in the conventional physiotherapy). Early verticalization started 12.4±7.3 (mean±SD) days after ABI. The length of stay in ICU was longer for the verticalization group (38.8 ± 15.7 vs 25.1 ± 11.2 days, p = 0.01), while the total length of stay (ICU+Neurorehabilitation) was not significantly different (153.2 ± 59.6 vs 134.0 ± 61.0 days, p = 0.41). All outcome measures significantly improved in both groups after the overall period (T2 vs T0, p<0.001 all), as well as after ICU stay (T1 vs T0, p<0.004 all) and after Neurorehabilitation (T2 vs T1, p<0.004 all). The improvement was significantly better in the experimental group for CRSr (T2-T0 p = 0.033, T1-T0 p = 0.006) and (borderline) for DRS (T2-T0 p = 0.040, T1-T0 p = 0.058). Conclusions A stepping verticalization

  14. Treatment of Childhood Head and Neck Cancer - Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Find diagnosis, staging, and treatment information for these head and neck cancers: hypopharynx, larynx, lip and oral cavity, neck cancer with occult primary, nasopharynx, oropharynx, paranasal sinus and nasal cavity, and salivary gland cancer.

  15. Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer in Adults - Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Find diagnosis, staging, and treatment information for these head and neck cancers: hypopharynx, larynx, lip and oral cavity, neck cancer with occult primary, nasopharynx, oropharynx, paranasal sinus and nasal cavity, and salivary gland cancer.

  16. Evaluation of radiation dose in 64-row whole-body CT of multiple injured patients compared to 4-row CT; Evaluation der Strahlendosis bei Polytrauma-CT-Untersuchungen eines 64-Zeilen-CT im Vergleich zur 4-Zeilen-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrieder, A.; Geyer, L.L.; Koerner, M.; Deak, Z.; Wirth, S.; Reiser, M.; Linsenmaier, U. [Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: To evaluate radiation exposure in whole-body CT (WBCT) of multiple injured patients comparing 4-row multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) to 64-row MDCT. Materials and Methods: 200 WBCT studies were retrospectively evaluated: 92 4-row MDCT scans and 108 64-row MDCT scans. Each CT protocol was optimized for the particular CT system. The scan length, CT dose index (CTDI), and dose length product (DLP) were recorded and analyzed for radiation exposure. The mean effective dose was estimated based on conversion factors. Student's t-test was used for statistical analysis. Results: The mean CTDI{sub vol} values (mGy) of the thorax and abdomen were significantly reduced with 64-row MDCT (10.2 {+-} 2.5 vs. 11.4 {+-} 1.4, p < 0.001; 14.2 {+-} 3.7 vs. 16.1 {+-} 1.7, p < 0.001). The DLP values (mGy x cm) of the head and thorax were significantly increased with 64-row MDCT (1305.9 {+-} 201.1 vs. 849.8 {+-} 90.9, p < 0,001; 504.4 {+-} 134.4 vs. 471.5 {+-} 74.1, p = 0.030). The scan lengths (mm) were significantly increased with 64-row MDCT: head 223.6 {+-} 35.8 vs. 155.5 {+-} 12.3 (p < 0.001), thorax 427.4 {+-} 44.5 vs. 388.3 {+-} 57.5 (p < 0.001), abdomen 520.3 {+-} 50.2 vs. 490.8 {+-} 51.6 (p < 0.001). The estimated mean effective doses (mSv) were 22.4 {+-} 2.6 (4-row MDCT) and 24.1 {+-} 4.6 (64-row MDCT; p = 0.001), resulting in a percentage increase of 8 %. Conclusion: The radiation dose per slice of the thorax and abdomen can be significantly decreased by using 64-row MDCT. Due to the technical advances of modern 64-row MDCT systems, the scan field can be adapted to the clinical demands and, if necessary, enlarged without time loss. As a result, the estimated mean effective dose might be increased in WBCT. (orig.)

  17. Variations in the intensive use of head CT for elderly patients with hemorrhagic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekelis, Kimon; Fisher, Elliott S; Labropoulos, Nicos; Zhou, Weiping; Skinner, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the variability in head computed tomographic (CT) scanning in patients with hemorrhagic stroke in U.S. hospitals, its association with mortality, and the number of different physicians consulted. The study was approved by the Committee for the Protection of Human Subjects at Dartmouth College. A retrospective analysis of the Medicare fee-for-service claims data was performed for elderly patients admitted for hemorrhagic stroke in 2008-2009, with 1-year follow-up through 2010. Risk-adjusted primary outcome measures were mean number of head CT scans performed and high-intensity use of head CT (six or more head CT scans performed in the year after admission). We examined the association of high-intensity use of head CT with the number of different physicians consulted and mortality. A total of 53 272 patients (mean age, 79.6 years; 31 377 women [58.9%]) with hemorrhagic stroke were identified in the study period. The mean number of head CT scans conducted in the year after admission for stroke was 3.4; 8737 patients (16.4%) underwent six or more scans. Among the hospitals with the highest case volume (more than 50 patients with hemorrhagic stroke), risk-adjusted rates ranged from 8.0% to 48.1%. The correlation coefficient between number of physicians consulted and rates of high-intensity use of head CT was 0.522 (P mortality was found for patients undergoing six or more head CT scans (odds ratio, 0.84; 95% confidence interval: 0.69, 1.02). High rates of head CT use for patients with hemorrhagic stroke are frequently observed, without an association with decreased mortality. A higher number of physicians consulted was associated with high-intensity use of head CT. © RSNA, 2014 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  18. Resting position of the head and malocclusion in a group of patients with cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Mihi, Victoria; Orellana, Lorena M.; Silvestre-Rangil, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral palsy are found as a result of these disorders, along with associated neuromuscular functional alterations that affect the resting position of the head. In this context, the resting position of the head could be responsible for several skeletal and dental occlusal disorders among patients with cerebral palsy. Objective: To assess the presence of malocclusions in patients with cerebral palsy, define the most frequent types of malocclusions, and evaluate how the resting position of the head may be implicated in the development of such malocclusions. Study design: Forty-four patients aged between 12-55 years (18 males and 26 females) were studied. Occlusal conditions, the Dental Aesthetic Index (DAI), changes in the resting position of the head, and breathing and swallowing functions were assessed. Results: Orthodontic treatment was required by 70.8% of the patients, the most frequent malocclusions being molar class II, open bite and high overjet. These individuals showed altered breathing and swallowing functions, as well as habit and postural disorders. The resting position of the head, especially the hyperextended presentation, was significantly correlated to high DAI scores. Conclusions: The results obtained suggest that patients with cerebral palsy are more susceptible to present malocclusions, particularly molar class II malocclusion, increased open bite, and high overjet. Such alterations in turn are more common in patients with a hyperextended position of the head. Key words:Cerebral palsy, malocclusion, head position, disabled patients. PMID:24596627

  19. Incidence and clinical findings of benign, inflammatory disease in patients resected for presumed pancreatic head cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gulik, T. M.; Reeders, J. W.; Bosma, A.; Moojen, T. M.; Smits, N. J.; Allema, J. H.; Rauws, E. A.; Offerhaus, G. J.; Obertop, H.; Gouma, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The differentiation between cancer and benign disease in the pancreatic head is difficult. The aim of this study was to examine common features in a group of patients that had undergone pancreatoduodenectomy for a benign, inflammatory lesion misdiagnosed as pancreatic head cancer.

  20. Nurse-led psychosocial interventions in follow-up care for head and neck cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Goeij, IC

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Head and neck cancer and its treatment frequently results in long-term physical problems, such as dry mouth, difficulty eating, impaired speech and/or altered shoulder function. In part because of these persisting problems, head and neck cancer patients are prone to deteriorated

  1. Determinants of Patient-Centered Financial Stress in Patients With Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Jonas A; Kung, Sunny; O'Connor, Jeremy; Yap, Bonnie J

    2017-04-01

    To prospectively estimate patient-centered financial stress and its relationship with health care utilization in patients with head and neck cancer. This was a survey-based, longitudinal, prospective study of treatment-naïve patients with stage III, IVa, or IVb locally advanced head and neck cancer at a single-institution tertiary care hospital from May 2013 to November 2014. With 121 patients approached, 73 (60%) agreed to participate. Self-reported data were collected on demographics, income, wealth, cost-coping strategies, out-of-pocket costs, supportive medication compliance, and perceived social isolation. Health care utilization was measured by hospital admissions and outpatient appointments on a 6-month timeline. Logistic regression models were constructed to identify factors associated with use of cost-coping strategies. Covariates included all demographics, measures of income, wealth, out-of-pocket costs, indirect costs, and perceived social isolation. Fifty-one patients (69%) relied on at least one coping strategy. On multivariable analysis, Medicaid patients were more likely than privately insured patients to use cost-coping strategies (odds ratio, 42.3; P = .0042). Decreased wealth ( P = .002) and higher total out-of-pocket costs ( P = .003) were independently associated with using cost-coping strategies. Patients with high perceived social isolation were also more likely to use cost-coping strategies (odds ratio, 11.5; P = .01). Patients with high perceived social isolation were more likely to report nonadherence to supportive medications (21.4 v 5.45 days over 6 months; P = .0278) and missed appointments (seven v three; P = .0077). A majority of patients used at least one cost-coping strategy during their treatment, highlighting the financial stress that patients experience. Perceived social isolation is an important social determinant of increased medication nonadherence, missed appointments, and use of cost-coping strategies. Interventions should

  2. Supportive care for head and neck cancer patients receiving radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenda, Sadamoto

    2015-01-01

    Recently (chemo-)radiotherapy has been widely used in head and neck cancer with definite evidence. As long survivor has increased, social problems associated with late toxicity have become more. Late toxicities induced by radiotherapy for head and neck lesion are often severe. Xerostomia is one of the severe late toxicities conventionally and dysphagia after chemoradiotherapy is a new topic. Some industrial development (ex. Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy: IMRT) play a great role in toxicity management. Multidisciplinary approach (cooperation between not only physicians but also nurses and dentists) is necessary to control toxicities. The research of supportive care will be needed same as definitive treatment in the future. (author)

  3. Quantitative Approach Based on Wearable Inertial Sensors to Assess and Identify Motion and Errors in Techniques Used during Training of Transfers of Simulated c-Spine-Injured Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Lebel

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with suspected spinal cord injuries undergo numerous transfers throughout treatment and care. Effective c-spine stabilization is crucial to minimize the impacts of the suspected injury. Healthcare professionals are trained to perform those transfers using simulation; however, the feedback on the manoeuvre is subjective. This paper proposes a quantitative approach to measure the efficacy of the c-spine stabilization and provide objective feedback during training. Methods. 3D wearable motion sensors are positioned on a simulated patient to capture the motion of the head and trunk during a training scenario. Spatial and temporal indicators associated with the motion can then be derived from the signals. The approach was developed and tested on data obtained from 21 paramedics performing the log-roll, a transfer technique commonly performed during prehospital and hospital care. Results. In this scenario, 55% of the c-spine motion could be explained by the difficulty of rescuers to maintain head and trunk alignment during the rotation part of the log-roll and their difficulty to initiate specific phases of the motion synchronously. Conclusion. The proposed quantitative approach has the potential to be used for personalized feedback during training sessions and could even be embedded into simulation mannequins to provide an innovative training solution.

  4. Predictors of poor outcomes after significant chest trauma in multiply injured patients: a retrospective analysis from the German Trauma Registry (Trauma Register DGU®).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Stephan; Biberthaler, Peter; Delhey, Patrick; Trentzsch, Heiko; Winter, Hauke; van Griensven, Martijn; Lefering, Rolf; Huber-Wagner, Stefan

    2014-09-03

    Blunt thoracic trauma is one of the critical injury mechanisms in multiply injured trauma victims. Although these patients present a plethora of potential structural damages to vital organs, it remains debated which injuries actually influence outcome and thereby should be addressed initially. Hence, the aim of this study was to identify the influence of critical structural damages on mortality. All patients in the database of the TraumaRegister DGU® (TR-DGU) from 2002-2011 with AIS Chest ≥ 2, blunt trauma, age of 16 or older and an ISS ≥ 16 were analyzed. Outcome parameters were in-hospital mortality as well as ventilation time in patients surviving the initial 14 days after trauma. 22613 Patients were included (mean ISS 30.5 ± 12.6; 74.7% male; Mean Age 46.1 ± 197 years; mortality 17.5%; mean duration of ventilation 7.3 ± 11.5; mean ICU stay 11.7 ± 14.1 days). Only a limited number of specific injuries had a significant impact on survival. Major thoracic vessel injuries (AIS ≥5), bilateral lung contusion, bilateral flail chest, structural heart injury (AIS ≥3) significantly influence mortality in study patients. Several extrathoracic factors (age, blood transfusion, systolic blood pressure and extrathoracic severe injuries) were also predictive of increased mortality. Most injuries of the thoracic wall had no or only a moderate effect on the duration of ventilation. Injuries to the lung (laceration, contusion or pneumothoraces) had a moderate prolonging effect. Cardiac injuries and severe injuries to the thoracic vessels induced a substantially prolonged ventilation interval. We demonstrate quantitatively the influence of specific structural damages of the chest on critical outcome parameters. While most injuries of the chest wall have no or only limited impact in the study collective, injuries to the lung overall show adverse outcome. Injuries to the heart or thoracic vessels have a devastating prognosis following blunt

  5. Immunotherapy for head and neck cancer patients: shifting the balance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turksma, A.W.; Braakhuis, B.J.M.; Bloemena, E.; Meijer, C.J.L.M.; Leemans, C.R.; Hooijberg, E.

    2013-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma is the sixth most common cancer in the western world. Over the last few decades little improvement has been made to increase the relatively low 5-year survival rate. This calls for novel and improved therapies. Here, we describe opportunities in immunotherapy

  6. Pre-Hospital Care Management of a Potential Spinal Cord Injured Patient: A Systematic Review of the Literature and Evidence-Based Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Henry; Singh, Jeffrey; Nathens, Avery; MacDonald, Russell D.; Travers, Andrew; Tallon, John; Fehlings, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract An interdisciplinary expert panel of medical and surgical specialists involved in the management of patients with potential spinal cord injuries (SCI) was assembled. Four key questions were created that were of significant interest. These were: (1) what is the optimal type and duration of pre-hospital spinal immobilization in patients with acute SCI?; (2) during airway manipulation in the pre-hospital setting, what is the ideal method of spinal immobilization?; (3) what is the impact of pre-hospital transport time to definitive care on the outcomes of patients with acute spinal cord injury?; and (4) what is the role of pre-hospital care providers in cervical spine clearance and immobilization? A systematic review utilizing multiple databases was performed to determine the current evidence about the specific questions, and each article was independently reviewed and assessed by two reviewers based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. Guidelines were then created related to the questions by a national Canadian expert panel using the Delphi method for reviewing the evidence-based guidelines about each question. Recommendations about the key questions included: the pre-hospital immobilization of patients using a cervical collar, head immobilization, and a spinal board; utilization of padded boards or inflatable bean bag boards to reduce pressure; transfer of patients off of spine boards as soon as feasible, including transfer of patients off spinal boards while awaiting transfer from one hospital institution to another hospital center for definitive care; inclusion of manual in-line cervical spine traction for airway management in patients requiring intubation in the pre-hospital setting; transport of patients with acute traumatic SCI to the definitive hospital center for care within 24 h of injury; and training of emergency medical personnel in the pre-hospital setting to apply criteria to clear patients of cervical spinal injuries, and immobilize patients

  7. Temporary balloon occlusion as therapy for uncontrollable arterial hemorrhage in multiply injured patients; Temporaere Ballonokklusion als Therapie unkontrollierbarer arterieller Blutungen bei Polytraumapatienten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieger, J.; Linsenmaier, U.; Rock, C.; Pfeifer, K.J. [Abt. fuer Radiologie, Klinikum Innenstadt, Ludwig-Maximilian-Univ., Muenchen (Germany); Euler, E. [Chirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik, Klinikum Innenstadt, Ludwig-Maximilian-Univ., Muenchen (Germany)

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Presentation of temporary balloon occlusion as an interventional radiological method for managing hemorrhage in multiply injured patients with uncontrollable loss of blood. Method: Temporary, non-selective arterial occlusion by introduction of a balloon catheter contralaterally to the source of bleeding has been performed since 1992 on 7 patients with multiple injuries, hemorrhagic shock requiring reanimation, and angiographic demonstration of an arterial hemorrhage in the supply region of the internal iliac artery with complex pelvic fracture. In each case a PTA balloon catheter was introduced transfemorally, non-selectively positioned proximal to the bleeding source, and left in place for 24-48 h under manometric control. Control angiographies were performed prior to catheter removal. Results: The bleeding was stopped immediately in all 7 patients. The hemodynamic stability made transport and thus further surgical management and/or a short-term treatment in the intensive-care station possible. Control angiographies confirmed that the bleeding had stopped in all patients. Conclusions: We recommend temporary balloon occlusion as a rapid and effective method for the management of bleeding in otherwise uncontrollable traumatic hemorrhages in the supply region of the internal iliac artery. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Vorstellung der temporaeren Ballonokklusion als interventionell-radiologischer Methode zur Blutungskontrolle bei Polytraumapatienten mit unkontrollierbarem Blutverlust. Methode: Temporaerer, nicht-selektiver arterieller Gefaessverschluss mit kontralateral der Blutungsquellen eingefuehrten PTA-Ballonkathetern bei seit 1992 insgesamt 7 Patienten mit Polytrauma, reanimationspflichtigem haemorrhagischem Schock und angiographischem Nachweis einer arteriellen Blutung im Versorgungsgebiet der A. iliaca interna im Rahmen einer komplexen Beckenfraktur. Transfemoral wurde jeweils ein PTA-Ballonkatheter eingefuehrt, nicht selektiv proximal der Blutungsquelle

  8. The Impact of Smoking and Smoking Cessation on Wound Healing in Spinal Cord-Injured Patients With Pressure Injuries: A Retrospective Comparison Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Cheryl A; Selleck, Cynthia; Chen, Yuying; Tang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of implementing evidence-based guidelines on smoking cessation in persons with spinal cord injuries and pressure injuries. We also evaluated the impact of smoking on pressure injury healing in this population. The sample population included 158 spinal cord-injured patients with pressure injuries (29 females and 129 males). There were 83 in the control group and 75 in the intervention group, with a mean age of 44 years in both groups. The research setting was an outpatient wound clinic located in a large medical center in the southeastern United States. A retrospective chart review was completed. Data were reviewed 6 months before and 6 months after implementation of the US Department of Health and Human Services Clinical Practice Guidelines for Treating Tobacco Use and Dependence. We evaluated the number and size of wounds, achievement of smoking cessation, and demographic information. Forty-eight percent of the control group participants and 57% of the intervention group participants smoked cigarettes at baseline. Smoking cessation doubled with the use of the clinical practice guidelines (P = .03). Smokers presented with a greater number of pressure injuries than nonsmokers. They experienced a mean increase rather than reduction in wound size. Nearly half (45.5%) of the intervention group participants who desired to have surgery had it performed, compared with only 34.9% of the control group participants (P = .35). Our findings demonstrate a positive influence with use of clinical practice guidelines to help individuals stop smoking. Results also confirm findings of previous studies supporting the negative impact of smoking on pressure injury healing in persons with spinal cord injuries.

  9. Oral complications in the head and neck radiation patient. Introduction and scope of the problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, Lena

    2002-01-01

    Head and neck cancer arises in the upper aerodigestive tract, most commonly in the oral cavity, pharynx, and larynx. The anatomy and physiology of this region are uniquely complex, and the function and appearance are critical to patients' self-image and quality of life. Head and neck cancer is re...... care for these patients. New developments in radiotherapy techniques are expected to lead to even higher cure rates and fewer side effects in patients with head and neck cancer....... survival but has also increased treatment side effects. A dedicated multidisciplinary team of oncologist, head and neck surgeon, dentist, nurse, dietician, physical therapist, social worker and in some instances plastic surgeon, prosthodontist, and psychologist is needed to provide the optimal supportive...

  10. Incidence and risk factors of refeeding syndrome in head and neck cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Stine Ostenfeldt; Kristensen, Marianne Boll; Wessel, Irene

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the incidence rates of refeeding phenomena (defined as a decline in p-phosphate) and refeeding syndrome (RFS; defined as development of clinical symptoms in addition to a decline in p-phosphate) in head and neck cancer patients, and to identify risk factors. Fifty......-four head and neck cancer patients referred for surgery were included. Forty-six potential risk factors were registered at the baseline, and p-phosphate was measured at Days 2, 4, and 7. Eleven patients (20%) developed RFS, and twenty-eight (52%) developed refeeding phenomena. At baseline, these patients...... presented a higher prevalence of head and neck pain, eating difficulties, higher p-phosphate levels, lower p-transferrin levels, and, in men, lower b-hemoglobin levels. Patients who developed symptoms had a decline in p-phosphate ≥0.22 mmol/l. At baseline, these patients had higher p-phosphate levels...

  11. Variations in the Presentation of Aphasia in Patients with Closed Head Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dara Oliver Kavanagh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Impairments of speech and language are important consequences of head injury as they compromise interaction between the patient and others. A large spectrum of communication deficits can occur. There are few reports in the literature of aphasia following closed head injury despite the common presentation of closed head injury. Herein we report two cases of closed head injuries with differing forms of aphasia. We discuss their management and rehabilitation and present a detailed literature review on the topic. In a busy acute surgical unit one can dismiss aphasia following head injury as behaviour related to intoxication. Early recognition with prolonged and intensive speech and language rehabilitation therapy yields a favourable outcome as highlighted in our experience. These may serve as a reference for clinicians faced with this unusual outcome.

  12. Variations in the presentation of aphasia in patients with closed head injuries.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kavanagh, Dara Oliver

    2012-01-31

    Impairments of speech and language are important consequences of head injury as they compromise interaction between the patient and others. A large spectrum of communication deficits can occur. There are few reports in the literature of aphasia following closed head injury despite the common presentation of closed head injury. Herein we report two cases of closed head injuries with differing forms of aphasia. We discuss their management and rehabilitation and present a detailed literature review on the topic. In a busy acute surgical unit one can dismiss aphasia following head injury as behaviour related to intoxication. Early recognition with prolonged and intensive speech and language rehabilitation therapy yields a favourable outcome as highlighted in our experience. These may serve as a reference for clinicians faced with this unusual outcome.

  13. Head and neck cancer in HIV patients and their parents: a Danish cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsig, Frederik N; Gerstoft, Jan; Kronborg, Gitte

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism for the increased risk of head and neck cancer (HNC) observed in HIV patients is controversial. We hypothesized that family-related risk factors increase the risk of HNC why we estimated the risk of this type of cancer in both HIV patients and their parents.......The mechanism for the increased risk of head and neck cancer (HNC) observed in HIV patients is controversial. We hypothesized that family-related risk factors increase the risk of HNC why we estimated the risk of this type of cancer in both HIV patients and their parents....

  14. Head movement during CT brain perfusion acquisition of patients with suspected acute ischemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahmi, F.; Beenen, L.F.M.; Streekstra, G.J.; Janssen, N.Y.; Jong, H.W. de; Riordan, A.; Roos, Y.B.; Majoie, C.B.; Bavel, E. van; Marquering, H.A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Computed Tomography Perfusion (CTP) is a promising tool to support treatment decision for acute ischemic stroke patients. However, head movement during acquisition may limit its applicability. Information of the extent of head motion is currently lacking. Our purpose is to qualitatively and quantitatively assess the extent of head movement during acquisition. Methods: From 103 consecutive patients admitted with suspicion of acute ischemic stroke, head movement in 220 CTP datasets was qualitatively categorized by experts as none, minimal, moderate, or severe. The movement was quantified using 3D registration of CTP volume data with non-contrast CT of the same patient; yielding 6 movement parameters for each time frame. The movement categorization was correlated with National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score and baseline characteristic using multinomial logistic regression and student's t-test respectively. Results: Moderate and severe head movement occurred in almost 25% (25/103) of all patients with acute ischemic stroke. The registration technique quantified head movement with mean rotation angle up to 3.6° and 14°, and mean translation up to 9.1 mm and 22.6 mm for datasets classified as moderate and severe respectively. The rotation was predominantly in the axial plane (yaw) and the main translation was in the scan direction. There was no statistically significant association between movement classification and NIHSS score and baseline characteristics. Conclusions: Moderate or severe head movement during CTP acquisition of acute stroke patients is quite common. The presented registration technique can be used to automatically quantify the movement during acquisition, which can assist identification of CTP datasets with excessive head movement

  15. Head movement during CT brain perfusion acquisition of patients with suspected acute ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahmi, F., E-mail: f.fahmi@amc.uva.nl [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Physics, AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Beenen, L.F.M., E-mail: l.f.beenen@amc.uva.nl [Department of Radiology, AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Streekstra, G.J., E-mail: g.j.streekstra@amc.uva.nl [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Physics, AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Janssen, N.Y., E-mail: n.n.janssen@amc.uva.nl [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Physics, AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Jong, H.W. de, E-mail: H.W.A.M.deJong@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Radiology, UMC Utrecht, 3584CX, Utrecht (Netherlands); Riordan, A., E-mail: alan.riordan@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, UMC Utrecht, 3584CX, Utrecht (Netherlands); Roos, Y.B., E-mail: y.b.roos@amc.uva.nl [Department of Neurology, AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Majoie, C.B., E-mail: c.b.majoie@amc.uva.nl [Department of Radiology, AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bavel, E. van, E-mail: e.vanbavel@amc.uva.nl [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Physics, AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Marquering, H.A., E-mail: h.a.marquering@amc.uva.nl [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Physics, AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Radiology, AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-12-01

    Objective: Computed Tomography Perfusion (CTP) is a promising tool to support treatment decision for acute ischemic stroke patients. However, head movement during acquisition may limit its applicability. Information of the extent of head motion is currently lacking. Our purpose is to qualitatively and quantitatively assess the extent of head movement during acquisition. Methods: From 103 consecutive patients admitted with suspicion of acute ischemic stroke, head movement in 220 CTP datasets was qualitatively categorized by experts as none, minimal, moderate, or severe. The movement was quantified using 3D registration of CTP volume data with non-contrast CT of the same patient; yielding 6 movement parameters for each time frame. The movement categorization was correlated with National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score and baseline characteristic using multinomial logistic regression and student's t-test respectively. Results: Moderate and severe head movement occurred in almost 25% (25/103) of all patients with acute ischemic stroke. The registration technique quantified head movement with mean rotation angle up to 3.6° and 14°, and mean translation up to 9.1 mm and 22.6 mm for datasets classified as moderate and severe respectively. The rotation was predominantly in the axial plane (yaw) and the main translation was in the scan direction. There was no statistically significant association between movement classification and NIHSS score and baseline characteristics. Conclusions: Moderate or severe head movement during CTP acquisition of acute stroke patients is quite common. The presented registration technique can be used to automatically quantify the movement during acquisition, which can assist identification of CTP datasets with excessive head movement.

  16. Outcome after re-irradiation of head and neck cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platteaux, Nele; Dirix, Piet; Vanstraelen, Bianca; Nuyts, Sandra [University Hospitals Leuven, Campus Gasthuisberg (Belgium). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively report the outcome of head and neck cancer patients following re-irradiation. Patients and Methods: A total of 51 patients with recurrent or second primary head and neck cancer received re-irradiation at Leuven University Hospital. Survival and locoregional control were calculated. Doses to organs at risk were retrieved from dose-volume histograms. Radiation-related toxicities were reported. Results: The 2-year actuarial overall survival rate was 30%. On univariate analysis, surgery before re-irradiation and high radiation dose were associated with superior survival. Grade 3 acute and grade 3 or more late toxicity occurred in respectively 29.4% and 35.3% of the patients. Conclusion: Re-irradiation in head and neck cancer patients is feasible with acceptable late toxicity, although the survival remains poor. (orig.)

  17. A CLINICAL STUDY OF OCULAR MANIFESTATIONS IN PATIENTS OF HEAD INJURY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhas Shamrao Sarawade

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND This study aims to record the prevalence and pattern of various ophthalmic manifestations in patients of head injury and to attempt a correlation between the ocular signs, neurological signs and final outcome. MATERIALS AND METHODS Hundred and twenty patients with head injury having ocular findings, presenting from December 2014 to July 2016, were taken for study. Detailed ophthalmological examination of the patients was carried out and the results of the study are depicted in the form of percentages, graphs and charts. RESULTS The most common cause of head injury found in our study was road traffic accident. The commonest eye finding was oedema and ecchymosis of eyelids. Prime causal factors affecting visual acuity found in our study were corneal tear, globe rupture, optic nerve injury and avulsion of eyeball. CONCLUSION Head injuries with ocular manifestations occur in younger age group. Road traffic accident was the most common cause. Males have to work outside their home for their jobs more than that of females. So they are more prone to accidents. Oedema and ecchymosis of eyelids constitute the most common ocular finding. Patients with mild ocular injuries pointed towards good visual prognosis. Most of them had mild head injury and hence good prognosis in terms of survival of the patient. The patients with severe ocular injuries like corneal tear, globe rupture and optic nerve injury showed poor visual prognosis.

  18. Liposomal treatment of xerostomia, odor, and taste abnormalities in patients with head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiser, Clemens; Hofauer, Benedikt; Scherer, Elias; Schukraft, Johannes; Knopf, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Smell and taste disorders, sicca symptoms, can be detected in patients with head and neck cancer. The purpose of this study was to assess the utility of local liposomal application in the treatment of patients with head and neck cancers. Ninety-eight patients with head and neck cancer were included in this study. The groups were defined as: group 1 = only surgery; group 2 = surgery + adjuvant radiochemotherapy; and group 3 = primarily radiochemotherapy. All patients had finished cancer treatment and received liposomal sprays for the nose and mouth for 2 months (LipoNasal, LipoSaliva; Optima Pharmaceutical GmbH, Germany) and suffered from taste and smell disorders. We performed tests with "Sniffin' Sticks," "Taste Strips," and a xerostomia questionnaire before and after treatment. After application of liposomes, patients demonstrated a statistically significant increase in smell and taste, and reduced xerostomia. Our results demonstrate that using nonpharmaceutical liposomal sprays improve smell, taste, and symptoms of xerostomia in patients with head and neck cancer. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: E1232-E1237, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. A survey of a population of anaesthesiologists from South India regarding practices for rapid sequence intubation in patients with head injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyen Parida

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Evidence and utility of the individual steps of the rapid sequence induction and tracheal intubation protocols have been debated, especially in the setting of traumatic brain injury. The purpose of this survey was to determine preferences in the current approach to rapid sequence intubation ( RSI in head injury patients among a population of anaesthesiologists from South India. Methods: A questionnaire was E-mailed to all the members of the Indian Society of Anaesthesiologists′ South Zone Chapter to ascertain their preferences, experience and comfort level with regard to their use of rapid sequence intubation techniques in adult patients with head injury. Participants were requested to indicate their practices for RSI technique for a head-injured patient upon arrival at the Emergency Medical Services department of their hospital. Results: The total response rate was 56.9% (530/932. Of the total respondents, 35% of the clinicians used cricoid pressure routinely, most respondents (68% stated that they pre-oxygenate the patients for about 3 min prior to RSI, thiopentone (61% and propofol (34% were commonly used prior to intubation. Rocuronium was the muscle relaxant of choice for RSI among the majority (44%, compared to succinylcholine (39%. Statistical analyses were performed after the initial entry onto a spreadsheet. Data were summarised descriptively using frequency distribution. Conclusion: In a rapid sequence intubation situation, the practice differed significantly among anaesthesiologists. Owing to disagreements and paucity of evidence-based data regarding the standards of RSI, it is apparent that RSI practice still has considerable variability in clinical practice.

  20. [Description of the severely injured in the DRG system: is treatment of the severely injured still affordable?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahlke, L; Lefering, R; Siebert, H; Windolf, J; Roeder, N; Franz, D

    2013-11-01

    Due to the heterogeneity of severely injured patients (multiple trauma) it is difficult to assign them to homogeneic diagnosis-related groups (DRG). In recent years this has led to a systematic underfunding in the German reimbursement system (G-DRG) for cases of multiply injured patients. This project aimed to improve the reimbursement by modifying the case allocation algorithms of multiply injured patients within the G-DRG system. A retrospective analysis of standardized G-DRG data according to §21 of the Hospital Reimbursement Act (§ 21 KHEntgG) including case-related cost data from 3,362 critically injured patients from 2007 and 2008 from 10 university hospitals and 7 large municipal hospitals was carried out. For 1,241 cases complementary detailed information was available from the trauma registry of the German Trauma Society to monitor the case allocation of multiply injured patients within the G-DRG system. Analysis of coding and grouping, performance of case allocation and the homogeneity of costs in the G-DRG versions 2008-2012 was carried out. The results showed systematic underfunding of trauma patients in the G-DRG version 2008 but adequate cost covering in the majority of cases with the G-DRG versions 2011 and 2012. Cost coverage was foundfor multiply injured patients from the clinical viewpoint who were identified as multiple trauma by the G-DRG system. Some of the overfunded trauma patients had high intensive care costs. Also there was underfunding for multiple injured patients not identified as such in the G-DRG system. Specific modifications of the G-DRG allocation structures could increase the appropriateness of reimbursement of multiply injured patients. Data-based analysis is an essential prerequisite for a constructive development of the G-DRG system and a necessary tool for the active participation of medical specialist societies.

  1. Association Between Preoperative Nutritional Status and Postoperative Outcome in Head and Neck Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, John S L; Seto, Alfred; Li, George K H

    2017-04-01

    Head and neck cancer patients treated with surgery often experience significant postoperative morbidities. Administering preoperative nutritional intervention may improve surgical outcomes, but there is currently a paucity of data reviewing the association between preoperative nutritional status and postoperative outcome. It is therefore of importance to investigate this association among head and neck cancer patients. To assess the association between preoperative nutritional status and postoperative outcome in head and neck cancer patients treated with surgery, a retrospective study of 70 head and neck cancer patients who were surgically treated between 2013 and 2014 in a tertiary referral head and neck surgery center in Hong Kong was conducted. Clinical data regarding preoperative nutritional status and postoperative outcome were retrieved from a computer record system. Logistic and linear regressions were used to analyze the appropriate parameters. A higher preoperative albumin level was associated with lower rates of postoperative complications and better wound healing (P cancer patients, preoperative intervention strategies that boost albumin levels could be considered for improving surgical outcome.

  2. Multiple bony lesions other than femoral heads on {sup 99m}Tc-MDP bone scan in patients with avascular necrosis of the femoral head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yun Young; Yang, Seoung Oh; Moon, Dae Hyuk; Ryu, Jin Sook; Weon, Young Cheol; Shin, Myung Jin; Lee, Soo Ho; Lee, Hee Kyung [Asan Medical Center, Ulsan Univ. College of Medicine, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Chun, Hae Kyung [St. Francisco Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-03-01

    To evaluate the clinical significance of the multiple increased uptake lesions other than in femoral heads as seen on whole body bone scan in patients with avascular necrosis of femoral heads. One hundred and seventy three patients with clinical diagnosis of avascular necrosis of the emoral head underwent a bone scan using Tc-99m MDP. Increased uptake lesions other than in femoral heads were evaluated, including frequency and common sites of in volvement, and correlated with clinical information and plain radiographic findings. Two hundred patients without AVN, who had undergone a bone scan, were included as a control group. Increased uptake lesions in extrafemoral head locations were found in 36 of 173 patients(20.8%); the location of 79 lesions was other than the femoral head. This result is statistically different from patients without avascular necrosis of femoral head(p<0.0001). The most common site of involvement was the knee joint area(62.5%). Other lesions were located in the mid-shafts of the long bones of the lower extremities, calcaneus, proximal humerus, etc., in order of decreasing frequency. Plain radiographs of 17 lesions were nonspecific, except for three lesions showing definite changes associated with avascular necrosis. The risk factors included alcoholism, the prolonged use of steroids, renal transplantation, herbal medication and working as a working as deep-sea diver. Most patients did not complain of pain, except for two with irreversible osteonecrotic changes as seen on plain radiograph. in patients with avascular necrosis of the femur, increased uptake lesions other than in the femoral head as seen on bone scan, may represent the early stage of osteonecrosis, which shows a characteristic appearance on bone scan. In order to aveid possible misdiagnoses of multiple extrafemoral lesions as bony metastasis or traumatic lesions, in patients with avascular necrosis of the femur these should be carefully evaluated.

  3. Multiple bony lesions other than femoral heads on 99mTc-MDP bone scan in patients with avascular necrosis of the femoral head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yun Young; Yang, Seoung Oh; Moon, Dae Hyuk; Ryu, Jin Sook; Weon, Young Cheol; Shin, Myung Jin; Lee, Soo Ho; Lee, Hee Kyung; Chun, Hae Kyung

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical significance of the multiple increased uptake lesions other than in femoral heads as seen on whole body bone scan in patients with avascular necrosis of femoral heads. One hundred and seventy three patients with clinical diagnosis of avascular necrosis of the emoral head underwent a bone scan using Tc-99m MDP. Increased uptake lesions other than in femoral heads were evaluated, including frequency and common sites of in volvement, and correlated with clinical information and plain radiographic findings. Two hundred patients without AVN, who had undergone a bone scan, were included as a control group. Increased uptake lesions in extrafemoral head locations were found in 36 of 173 patients(20.8%;the location of 79 lesions was other than the femoral head, This result is statistically different from patients without avascular necrosis of femoral head(p<0.0001). The most common site of involvement was the knee joint area(62.5%). Other lesions were located in the mid-shafts of the long bones of the lower extremities, calcaneus, proximal humerus, etc., in order of decreasing frequency. Plain radiographs of 17 lesions were nonspecific, except for three lesions showing definite changes associated with avascular necrosis. The risk factors included alcoholism, the prolonged use of steroids, renal transplantation, herbal medication and working as a working as deep-sea diver. Most patients did not complain of pain, except for two with irreversible osteonecrotic changes as seen on plain radiograph. in patients with avascular necrosis of the femur, increased uptake lesions other than in the femoral head as seen on bone scan, may represent the early stage of osteonecrosis, which shows a characteristic appearance on bone scan. In order to aveid possible misdiagnoses of multiple extrafemoral lesions as bony metastasis or traumatic lesions, in patients with avascular necrosis of the femur these should be carefully evaluated

  4. Incidence of hospital referred head injuries in Norway: a population based survey from the Stavanger region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heskestad, Ben; Baardsen, Roald; Helseth, Eirik

    2009-01-01

    it with previous Norwegian studies. METHODS: All head injured patients referred to Stavanger University Hospital during a one-year period (2003) were registered in a partly prospective and partly retrospective study. The catchment area for the hospital is strictly defined to a local population of 283...

  5. High prevalence of cachexia in newly diagnosed head and neck cancer patients: an exploratory study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager-Wittenaar, Harriët; Dijkstra, Pieter; Dijkstra, Gerard; Bijzet, Johan; Langendijk, Johannes A.; van der Laan, Bernard; Roodenburg, Jan

    2017-01-01

    In patients with cancer, weight loss can be related to simple starvation, disturbed metabolism, or both. In patients with head and neck cancer (HNC), weight loss often is attributed to simple starvation because the obvious oral symptoms are known to hinder dietary intake. In this population,

  6. High prevalence of cachexia in newly diagnosed head and neck cancer patients : An exploratory study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager-Wittenaar, Harriet; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Dijkstra, Gerard; Bijzet, Johan; Langendijk, Johannes A.; van der Laan, Bernard F. A. M.; Roodenburg, Jan L. N.

    Objective: In patients with cancer, weight loss can be related to simple starvation, disturbedmetabolism, or both. In patients with head and neck cancer (HNC), weight loss often is attributed to simple starvation because the obvious oral symptoms are known to hinder dietary intake. In this

  7. Epidemiological features of 1 281 patients with head injuries arising from the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Chao-hua

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: To analyze the epidemiologi-cal features of patients with head injuries in the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake. Methods: Medical records of patients with head inju-ries who were admitted to 14 hospitals in Deyang, Mianyang and Chengdu cities after the earthquake were retrospec-tively analyzed. The patients’ age, gender, cause of injury, diagnosis, and outcome were analyzed retrospectively. Results: A total of 1 281 patients with 807 males and 474 females were included. According to Glasgow Coma Scale score at admission, 1 029 patients presented with mild injury, 161 moderate injury and 91 severe injury. The major cause of injuries (83% was bruise by collapsed buildings. Open head injuries accounted for 60.8%. A total of 720 pa-tients underwent surgical treatment. Good recovery was achieved in 1 056 patients, moderate disability in 106, se-vere disability in 71, coma in 29 and death in 19. Conclusions: In this series, male patients were more than female patients. The main cause of injury was hit by falling objects due to building collapse. Minor and open craniocerebral injuries were most common. The epidemio-logical features of head injuries in Wenchuan earthquake may be helpful to preparation for future rescue. Key words: Brain injuries; Epidemiology; Earthquakes; Rescue work

  8. Nilotinib induced avascular necrosis of femoral head in an adult chronic myeloid leukemia patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thekkudan, Shinto Francis; Nityanand, Soniya

    2018-06-01

    We report a rare case of avascular necrosis of femoral head (AVNFH) in an adult chronic myeloid leukemia - chronic phase (CML-CP) patient during due course of therapy with second line Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor (TKI), Nilotinib. A high index of clinical suspicion should be kept in any symptomatic CML patient on TKI's.

  9. Assessment of nutritional status and quality of life in patients treated for head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevost, V; Joubert, C; Heutte, N; Babin, E

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify tools for the assessment of nutritional status in head and neck cancer patients, to evaluate the impact of malnutrition on therapeutic management and quality of life and to propose a simple screening approach adapted to routine clinical practice. The authors conducted a review of the literature to identify tools for the assessment of nutritional status in head and neck cancer patients published in French and English. Articles were obtained from the PubMed database and from the references of these articles and selected journals, using the keywords: "nutritional assessment", and "head and neck" and "cancer". Anthropometric indices, laboratory parameters, dietary intake assessment, clinical scores and nutritional risk scores used in patients with head and neck cancers are presented. The relevance of these tools in clinical practice and in research is discussed, together with the links between nutritional status and quality of life. This article is designed to help teams involved in the management of patients with head and neck cancer to choose the most appropriate tools for assessment of nutritional status according to their resources and their objectives. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Relationship between ABO blood groups and head and neck cancer among Greek patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakava, Kassiani; Karelas, Ioannis; Koutrafouris, Ioannis; Damianidis, Savvas; Stampouloglou, Paulos; Papadakis, Georgios; Xenos, Antonios; Krania, Foteini; Sarof, Paulos; Tasopoulos, Georgios; Petridis, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    We examined the association of ABO blood groups with the different types of head and neck cancers. 195 diagnosed cases and 801 controls were selected from a Greek tertiary cancer center. Information regarding type of head and neck cancer and ABO blood group was collected and registered. The O blood group was found to be most prevalent followed by A, B and AB among the controls, whereas blood group A followed by O, B and AB was most prevalent among cancer patients. The difference among the distribution between the cases and controls was statistically significant in blood group A (pblood group A had 1.52-fold higher risk of developing head and neck cancer compared to people of other blood groups. Blood group A was found to be a potential risk factor for the development of head and neck cancers.

  11. Pre- and postirradiation care of the mouth in head and neck cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, M.A.; Lownie, J.F.

    1982-01-01

    Radiotherapy plays an important role in the treatment of head and neck cancer. The effects of radiotherapy on the oral hard and soft tissues may range from a mild mucositis to severe caries and osteoradionecrosis. It is the responsibility of the dentist to treat and prevent the severe sequelae which may arise. This paper outlines the effects of radiotherapy on the oral structures and discusses the dental treatment of the patient during radiotherapy. Emphasis is placed on the prevention of complications. The head and neck cancer patient must be thoroughly examined by the dentist and treatment planning may then be divided into pre-irradiaton treatment, treatment during irradiation and post-irradiation treatment. The dentist thus forms an essential member of the team treating patients with head and neck cancer [af

  12. Pre- and postirradiation care of the mouth in head and neck cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, M A; Lownie, J F [University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa). Dept. of Surgery

    1982-08-01

    Radiotherapy plays an important role in the treatment of head and neck cancer. The effects of radiotherapy on the oral hard and soft tissues may range from a mild mucositis to severe caries and osteoradionecrosis. It is the responsibility of the dentist to treat and prevent the severe sequelae which may arise. This paper outlines the effects of radiotherapy on the oral structures and discusses the dental treatment of the patient during radiotherapy. Emphasis is placed on the prevention of complications. The head and neck cancer patient must be thoroughly examined by the dentist and treatment planning may then be divided into pre-irradiaton treatment, treatment during irradiation and post-irradiation treatment. The dentist thus forms an essential member of the team treating patients with head and neck cancer.

  13. The influence of severe malnutrition on rehabilitation in patients with severe head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dénes, Zoltán

    2004-10-07

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the consequences of severe malnutrition in patients with severe head injury during rehabilitation. The data were collected from medical records of patients admitted to the neurorehabilitation unit over the last 5 years. Twenty of 1850 patients had severe malnutrition, the body mass index (BMI) of these patients were under 15 (10-14) kg/m2. The majority of patients suffered traumatic brain damage (17/20). Thirteen patients arrived with percutaneous endoscopic gastrotomy /PEG, three nasogastric tube in 3 cases we placed PEG. The nutritional strategy included a high-calorie diet, by means of bolus feeding five times during the day, continuous feeding during the night; the daily intake target being more than 2500 kcal. During rehabilitation treatment the majority of patients (13/20) revealed weight gain with a rate of 0.5-2 kg/week. The following complications were treated during the rehabilitation phase: 20 pressure sores, 20 contractures, 11 urinal infections, 6 cases of pneumonia, 2 of purulent bronchitis, 6 of sepsis, 1 penoscrotal abscess, epidydymitis, and 1 case of purulent arthritis. The patients required total assistance at the time of admission. At discharge 10 patients remained completely dependent, 6 patients needed minimal assistance, and 4 patients could perform daily activities independently. The average length of stay in our unit was 78/6-150/days. Patients with head injury suffering from severe malnutrition exhibit serious complications at the time of admission as well as during rehabilitation treatment. The patients were very difficult to mobilize. The length of stay at the rehabilitation unit was 28 days longer when complicated by malnutrition, than head injuries showing normal nutritional status. These findings underline the importance of adequate nutrition in patients with head injury in both the acute ward and in the rehabilitation unit.

  14. Time of elevation of head of bed for patients receiving mechanical ventilation and its related factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí-Hereu, L; Arreciado Marañón, A

    The semirecumbent position is a widespread recommendation for the prevention of pneumonia associated with mechanical ventilation. To identify the time of elevation of head of bed for patients under mechanical ventilation and the factors related to such elevation in an intensive care unit. An observational, descriptive cross-sectional study. Conducted in an intensive care unit of a tertiary hospital from April to June 2015. The studied population were mechanically ventilated patients. Daily hours in which patients remained with the head of the bed elevated (≥30°), socio-demographic data and clinical variables were recorded. 261 head elevation measurements were collected. The average daily hours that patients remained at ≥30° was 16h28' (SD ±5h38'), equivalent to 68.6% (SD ±23.5%) of the day. Factors related to elevations ≥30° for longer were: enteral nutrition, levels of deep sedation, cardiac and neurocritical diagnostics. Factors that hindered the position were: sedation levels for agitation and abdominal pathologies. Sex, age and ventilation mode did not show a significant relationship with bed head elevation. Although raising the head of the bed is an easy to perform, economical and measurable preventive measure, its compliance is low due to specific factors specific related o the patient's clinical condition. Using innovations such as continuous measurement of the head position helps to evaluate clinical practice and allows to carry out improvement actions whose impact is beneficial to the patient. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Enfermería Intensiva y Unidades Coronarias (SEEIUC). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Patient size and x-ray technique factors in head computed tomography examinations. I. Radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huda, Walter; Lieberman, Kristin A.; Chang, Jack; Roskopf, Marsha L.

    2004-01-01

    We investigated how patient age, size and composition, together with the choice of x-ray technique factors, affect radiation doses in head computed tomography (CT) examinations. Head size dimensions, cross-sectional areas, and mean Hounsfield unit (HU) values were obtained from head CT images of 127 patients. For radiation dosimetry purposes patients were modeled as uniform cylinders of water. Dose computations were performed for 18x7 mm sections, scanned at a constant 340 mAs, for x-ray tube voltages ranging from 80 to 140 kV. Values of mean section dose, energy imparted, and effective dose were computed for patients ranging from the newborn to adults. There was a rapid growth of head size over the first two years, followed by a more modest increase of head size until the age of 18 or so. Newborns have a mean HU value of about 50 that monotonically increases with age over the first two decades of life. Average adult A-P and lateral dimensions were 186±8 mm and 147±8 mm, respectively, with an average HU value of 209±40. An infant head was found to be equivalent to a water cylinder with a radius of ∼60 mm, whereas an adult head had an equivalent radius 50% greater. Adult males head dimensions are about 5% larger than for females, and their average x-ray attenuation is ∼20 HU greater. For adult examinations performed at 120 kV, typical values were 32 mGy for the mean section dose, 105 mJ for the total energy imparted, and 0.64 mSv for the effective dose. Increasing the x-ray tube voltage from 80 to 140 kV increases patient doses by about a factor of 5. For the same technique factors, mean section doses in infants are 35% higher than in adults. Energy imparted for adults is 50% higher than for infants, but infant effective doses are four times higher than for adults. CT doses need to take into account patient age, head size, and composition as well as the selected x-ray technique factors

  16. Complementary medicine use in patients with head and neck cancer in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Amin, Mohamed

    2010-08-01

    The objectives of the study were: first, to determine the prevalence of traditional medicine (TM) and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use in head and neck cancer patients in Ireland; second, to educate ourselves on the plethora of CAM\\/TM options available to patients outside the dominion of conventional medicine. The study design consisted of a cross-sectional survey carried out in three head and neck cancer centres. Self-administered questionnaires were distributed to 110 head and neck cancer patients attending the three cancer centres and data were collected for statistical analysis. A total of 106 patients completed the questionnaire; 21.7% of the participants used CAM\\/TM since their diagnosis with head and neck cancer. CAM\\/TM usage was higher in female (34.3%) than in male patients (16.2%). CAM\\/TM use was more common in the 41-50-year age group, in patients with higher educational levels and those holding strong religious beliefs, and also in married than single patients. The most common types of CAM\\/TM used were spiritual and laying on of hands. The most common reasons reported for using CAM\\/TM were to counteract the ill effects of treatment and increase the body\\'s ability to fight cancer. Sources of information on CAM\\/TM were friends (65%), family (48%) and media (21%). This survey reveals a high prevalence of CAM\\/TM use in head and neck cancer patients, hence emphasising the need for otolaryngologists to educate themselves on the various therapies available to be able to provide informative advice. There is an urgent need for evidence-based investigation of various CAM\\/TM therapies currently offered to patients.

  17. Use of complementary and alternative medicine in head and neck cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, C M; Ng, A; Loh, K S

    2010-05-01

    To determine the prevalence and profile of patients who use complementary and alternative medicine, within a cohort of head and neck cancer patients. Cross-sectional survey. Ninety-three consecutive head and neck cancer patients being followed up at the department of otolaryngology head and neck surgery were surveyed using an interviewer-administered questionnaire. The prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine use was 67.8 per cent. Patients who used complementary and alternative medicine were more likely to be female, better educated and younger, compared with non-users. A total of 82.5 per cent (52/63) perceived complementary and alternative medicine to be effective, even though they were aware of the lack of research and endorsement by their physician regarding such medicine. The use of complementary and alternative medicine by head and neck cancer patients is common, regardless of efficacy or cost. Clinicians should routinely ask patients about their use of complementary and alternative medicine, to facilitate communication and enable appropriate use of such medicine.

  18. Intracranial traumatic lesion risk factors in elderly patients with minor head injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kochi, Masato; Hori, Shigeaki

    2011-01-01

    The authors conducted a retrospective analysis of the risk factors of intracranial traumatic lesions in elderly patients with minor head injury. Sixty-nine elderly patients with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores of 13-15 after head injury who had presented within 24 hours of trauma and admitted to hospital were included in this study. The indications for admission were a GCS score of 13 or 14 on presentation, loss of consciousness, retrograde or posttraumatic amnesia, local neurological deficit, severe headache and vomiting, dangerous mechanism of injury, skull fracture and abnormal CT findings. The relationship between the clinical findings and intracranial traumatic lesions was analized by univariate and multivariate analysis. The relationship between the clinical findings and surgical intervention was also analized by the same methods in those who had intracranial traumatic lesions. The mean and median age of patients were 81.1 and 83 years, respectively. Of 69 patients, 41 had intracranial traumatic lesions present on their CT scan. Of these, 6 needed surgical intervention. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 13 and a loss of consciousness at injury were identified as independent risk factors of intracranial traumatic lesions in elderly patients with minor head injury and a dangerous mechanism of injury was identified as an independent risk factor of surgical intervention in those who had traumatic intracranial lesions. Our results offer useful information for evaluating patients with minor head injury in Japan's aging society. (author)

  19. Accuracy and Coverage of Diagnosis and Procedural Coding of Severely Injured Patients in the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register: Comparison to Patient Files and the Helsinki Trauma Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinänen, M; Brinck, T; Handolin, L; Mattila, V M; Söderlund, T

    2017-09-01

    The Finnish Hospital Discharge Register data are frequently used for research purposes. The Finnish Hospital Discharge Register has shown excellent validity in single injuries or disease groups, but no studies have assessed patients with multiple trauma diagnoses. We aimed to evaluate the accuracy and coverage of the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register but at the same time validate the data of the trauma registry of the Helsinki University Hospital's Trauma Unit. We assessed the accuracy and coverage of the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register data by comparing them to the original patient files and trauma registry files from the trauma registry of the Helsinki University Hospital's Trauma Unit. We identified a baseline cohort of patients with severe thorax injury from the trauma registry of the Helsinki University Hospital's Trauma Unit of 2013 (sample of 107 patients). We hypothesized that the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register would lack valuable information about these patients. Using patient files, we identified 965 trauma diagnoses in these 107 patients. From the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register, we identified 632 (65.5%) diagnoses and from the trauma registry of the Helsinki University Hospital's Trauma Unit, 924 (95.8%) diagnoses. A total of 170 (17.6%) trauma diagnoses were missing from the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register data and 41 (4.2%) from the trauma registry of the Helsinki University Hospital's Trauma Unit data. The coverage and accuracy of diagnoses in the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register were 65.5% (95% confidence interval: 62.5%-68.5%) and 73.8% (95% confidence interval: 70.4%-77.2%), respectively, and for the trauma registry of the Helsinki University Hospital's Trauma Unit, 95.8% (95% confidence interval: 94.5%-97.0%) and 97.6% (95% confidence interval: 96.7%-98.6%), respectively. According to patient records, these patients were subjects in 249 operations. We identified 40 (16.1%) missing operation codes from the Finnish Hospital

  20. Delayed life-threatening subdural hematoma after minor head injury in a patient with severe coagulopathy: a case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelen, Marc; Nederkoorn, Paul J.; Smits, Marion; van de Beek, Diederik

    2009-01-01

    Minor head injury is a frequent cause for neurologic consultation and imaging. Most patients with minor head injury will make an uneventful recovery, but in a very small proportion of these patients life threatening intracranial complications occur. We describe a patient on oral anticoagulation

  1. Delayed life-threatening subdural hematoma after minor head injury in a patient with severe coagulopathy: A case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Engelen (Marc); P.J. Nederkoorn (Paul); M. Smits (Marion); D. van de Beek (Diederik)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractMinor head injury is a frequent cause for neurologic consultation and imaging. Most patients with minor head injury will make an uneventful recovery, but in a very small proportion of these patients life threatening intracranial complications occur. We describe a patient on oral

  2. Pediatric patients with severe head injury in Japan Neurotrauma Data Bank. Analysis of the prognostic factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miki, Tamotsu; Haraoka, Jo

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical characteristics of the pediatric patients in the Japan Neurotrauma Data Bank: Project 2004. Project 2004 consisted of severe head injury patients with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 8 or less on admission or during course and patients who were operated for traumatic intracranial lesion between 2004-2006. The subjects were 101 pediatric patients aged 15 years old or less (mean: 7.8 y/o). We retrospectively examined the patients' age, GCS, cause of injury, duration and time of patient transfer, pupillary abnormality, body temperature, serum glucose level, Injury Severity Score (ISS) excluding cranio-cervical score, skull fracture, CT classification of the Traumatic Coma Data Bank (TCDB), main lesion of focal brain injury on CT, and traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) on CT. The mortality rate in children is lower than in adults: 18.8% vs. 39.7%. The factors that correlated to the poor outcome in pediatric patients are lower GCS score on admission, pupillary abnormality, hyperglycemia (more than 200 mg/dl), complications of severe other organ injury, diffuse injury III according to classification of CT, acute subdural hematoma and SAH. Pathophysiologically pediatric patients are not miniatures of adult patients. The data of Project 2004 is extremely significant and indicates the profile of one general view of pediatric patients with severe head injury in Japan. However, further collection of data and careful analysis are necessary for standardizing pediatric head trauma care. (author)

  3. Posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms in newly diagnosed patients with head and neck cancer and their partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posluszny, Donna M; Dougall, Angela Liegey; Johnson, Jonas T; Argiris, Athanassios; Ferris, Robert L; Baum, Andrew; Bovbjerg, Dana H; Dew, Mary Amanda

    2015-09-01

    Head and neck cancer is a life-threatening illness requiring aversive treatments. Despite clear potential for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in both patients and their partners, research is scant. Newly diagnosed patients and partners (number of dyads = 42) completed questionnaires to assess symptoms of PTSD, anxiety, and depression, as well as demographic, medical, and attitudinal variables. Partners had higher average levels of PTSD symptoms than patients (p = .023). More partners (28.6%) met criteria for estimated PTSD caseness than did patients (11.9%). There were no significant differences in levels of other anxiety or depression symptoms. Perceived threat of disease appeared to be a stronger correlate of PTSD symptom levels than medical variables in patients and partners. A diagnosis of head and neck cancer elicits significant levels of PTSD symptoms in patients, and even higher levels among partners. Identified correlates of distress, including perceived threat of disease, are potential intervention targets. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Demographics of Patients with Double-headed Pterygium and Surgical Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulya Duman

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To analyze demographic and ophthalmologic characteristics of patients with double-headed pterygium in the Mediterranean region of Turkey and to evaluate their surgical outcomes. Materials and Methods: Records of all patients who underwent surgery for pterygium in Antalya Atatürk State Hospital between November 2012 and March 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with pterygia on both sides of the cornea (nasal and temporal were included in the study. Patients with less than six months of follow-up were excluded. Age, occupation and smoking status of patients, recurrence of pterygium and any existing complications in records were evaluated. Fibrovascular proliferation more than 0.5 mm over the cornea was accepted as recurrence. Results: Eight (5% of 158 patients who underwent pterygium surgery were diagnosed with double-headed pterygium. Six (75% of the patients were male and two (25% were female. Mean age was 42.63 (26-71 years. It was recorded that all patients had worked under the sun for at least 5 hours a day. No intra-operative or post-operative complications were found. Mean follow-up time after surgery was 12 (6-21 months and no recurrence was detected. Conclusion: Pterygium, especially double-headed pterygium is mostly seen in warm climates and individuals who work outdoors. Dividing the free conjunctival autograft into two and suturing in place of the excised pterygium on both sides of the cornea is a good choice in these patients.

  5. Pituitary dysfunction in adult patients after cranial irradiation for head and nasopharyngeal tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appelman-Dijkstra, Natasha M.; Malgo, Frank; Neelis, Karen J.; Coremans, Ida; Biermasz, Nienke R.; Pereira, Alberto M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pituitary insufficiency after radiotherapy in the hypothalamic pituitary region is a well-known complication. However, endocrine assessments are not incorporated in the follow-up after cranial irradiation for head and neck tumours. Aim of the study: To evaluate pituitary function in patients cranially irradiated for non-pituitary tumours. Patients and methods: Evaluation of pituitary function in all available patients treated at our centre with cranial radiotherapy for head and neck tumours. Results: We included 80 patients. Forty patients were treated for cerebral tumours, 15 for nasopharyngeal tumours, and 25 for different tumours like meningioma or cerebral metastasis. Mean age was 47.5 (18.6–89.7) years. Mean radiation dose delivered at the pituitary region was 56.27 Gy (40.0–70.0). Pituitary insufficiency was present in 16 patients within 2 years after irradiation 23/49 patients (47%) after 5 years and 27/45 (60%) after 10 years and 31/35 patients (89%) after 15 years. Conclusion: Pituitary insufficiency is highly prevalent in adult patients treated with cranial radiotherapy for head and nasopharyngeal tumours. These prevalence rates are comparable to those observed after radiotherapy for pituitary tumours. Because hormone replacement of endocrine deficits improves quality of life and prevents potential severe complications, such as Addisonian crises, periodical evaluation of pituitary function is advocated

  6. Survival of patients with head and neck cancer. Impact of physical status and comorbidities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadat, F. [Friedrich Alexander Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Clinic of Radiotherapy; Wienke, A. [Martin Luther Univ. Halle-Wittenberg, Halle/Saale (Germany). Inst. of Medical Epidemiology; Dunst, J. [Schleswig-Holstein Univ., Luebeck (Germany). Clinic of Radiotherapy; Kuhnt, T. [Rostock Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2012-01-15

    Prognostic factors (e.g., gender, tumor stage, and hypoxia) have an impact on survival in patients with head and neck cancer. Thus, the impact of physical status and comorbidities on treatment decision and survival were evaluated. Patients and methods A total of 169 primary, inoperable patients with squamous cell cancer of the head and neck were retrospectively investigated. Patients were treated with hyperfractionated accelerated radio(chemo)therapy (HARcT) or hypofractionated radio(chemo)therapy (HypoRcT). Depending on the individual patient's situation (Karnofsky Performance Index, KPI), treatment for patients with a KPI of 80-100% was generally radiochemotherapy and for patients with a KPI {<=} 70% treatment was radiotherapy alone. In addition, all comorbidities were evaluated. Uni- and multivariate proportional hazards model were used, and overall survival (OS) was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results Treatment consisted of HARcT for 76 patients (45%), HART for 28 patients (17%), HypoRcT for 14 patients(8%), and HypoRT for 51 patients (30%). Of the patients, 107 patients (63%) presented with a KPI of 80-100%. OS (20%) was significantly better for patients with a KPI of 80-100%, while the OS for patients with a KPI {<=} 70% was 8% (p < 0.001). Good KPI, total irradiation dose (> 70 Gy), and chemotherapy were significant prognostic factors for better OS. Conclusion Our retrospective analysis shows that performance status with dependency on comorbidities was an independent risk factor for OS. (orig.)

  7. Survival of patients with head and neck cancer. Impact of physical status and comorbidities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadat, F.; Wienke, A.; Dunst, J.; Kuhnt, T.

    2012-01-01

    Prognostic factors (e.g., gender, tumor stage, and hypoxia) have an impact on survival in patients with head and neck cancer. Thus, the impact of physical status and comorbidities on treatment decision and survival were evaluated. Patients and methods A total of 169 primary, inoperable patients with squamous cell cancer of the head and neck were retrospectively investigated. Patients were treated with hyperfractionated accelerated radio(chemo)therapy (HARcT) or hypofractionated radio(chemo)therapy (HypoRcT). Depending on the individual patient's situation (Karnofsky Performance Index, KPI), treatment for patients with a KPI of 80-100% was generally radiochemotherapy and for patients with a KPI ≤ 70% treatment was radiotherapy alone. In addition, all comorbidities were evaluated. Uni- and multivariate proportional hazards model were used, and overall survival (OS) was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results Treatment consisted of HARcT for 76 patients (45%), HART for 28 patients (17%), HypoRcT for 14 patients(8%), and HypoRT for 51 patients (30%). Of the patients, 107 patients (63%) presented with a KPI of 80-100%. OS (20%) was significantly better for patients with a KPI of 80-100%, while the OS for patients with a KPI ≤ 70% was 8% (p 70 Gy), and chemotherapy were significant prognostic factors for better OS. Conclusion Our retrospective analysis shows that performance status with dependency on comorbidities was an independent risk factor for OS. (orig.)

  8. Prognostic significance of surgical extranodal extension in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Fumihiko; Mori, Taisuke; Matsumura, Satoko; Matsumoto, Yoshifumi; Fukasawa, Masahiko; Teshima, Masanori; Kobayashi, Kenya; Yoshimoto, Seiichi

    2017-08-01

    Lymph node metastasis with extranodal extension represents one of the most important adverse prognostic factors for survival in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. We propose that extranodal extension occurs to differing extents. The aim of this study was to determine the prognostic significance of extranodal extension in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Two hundred and ninety-eight patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma who underwent surgical resection and neck dissection were included. Cervical lymph nodes were classified into four categories: (i) pathological N negative, (ii) extranodal extension negative, (iii) non-surgical extranodal extension and (iv) surgical extranodal extension. Lymph node metastases were detected in 67.1% of laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer patients and 52.7% of oral cancer patients. The 3-year disease-specific survival rates for patients in the pathological N negative, extranodal extension negative, non-surgical extranodal extension and surgical extranodal extension groups were 90.9%, 79.6%, 63.8% and 48.3%, respectively. In laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer patients, surgical extranodal extension was associated with a significantly poorer disease-specific survival than a pathological N negative, extranodal extension negative or non-surgical extranodal extension status. In oral cancer patients, no significant differences were observed between the non-surgical and surgical extranodal extension groups. However, non-surgical extranodal extension was associated with a poorer disease-specific survival than a pathological N negative or extranodal extension negative status. Surgical extranodal extension was a poor prognostic factor in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. The prognostic significance of surgical extranodal extension differed between laryngeal/hypopharyngeal and oral cancer patients. The clinical significance of surgical extranodal extension was much greater for

  9. Dental problems of the patients with head and neck cancer after radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizutani, Kimishige; Koseki, Yonoshin [Osaka Dental Univ. (Japan); Inoue, Toshihiko [and others

    1996-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to demonstrate dental problems such as changes of saliva flow rates (ml/min), taste sensation and DMF-teeth (D: decay, M: missing, F: filling) after radiation therapy for the patients with head and neck cancer. Between January 1990 and April 1995, a total of 56 patients with head and neck cancer after radiation therapy was reviewed to demonstrate dental problems at the Department of Oral Radiology, Osaka Dental University Hospital. The results were as follows. In the case of 7 inpatients with head and neck cancer (nasopharynx: 3, mouth floor: 2, tongue: 2), non-stimulating saliva flow rates for 5 minutes was nearly equal to 0 ml at the level of 60 Gy/6 weeks to 80 Gy/8 weeks. In the scoring system of the taste sensation after radiation therapy for 23 patients with oral cancer (tongue: 18, mouth floor: 5), distribution of the patients with 3 points (3 points stand for patients feel good as well as pretreatment) was 91% for sweetness, 78% for sharpness, 96% for bitterness and 96% for acidity, respectively. Concerning DMF-teeth after radiation therapy for 26 patients with head and neck cancer (nasopharynx: 10, oropharynx: 8, tongue: 8), changes of DMF-Teeth of the group of nasopharynx and oropharynx was more higher than that of the group of tongue comparing to report on the survey of dental diseases in Japan, 1993 as control. We emphasize that these data are more effective to improve their oral environments and to up their recognition for oral cavity in the patients with head and neck cancer pre or post-irradiation. (author).

  10. Dental problems of the patients with head and neck cancer after radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizutani, Kimishige; Koseki, Yonoshin; Inoue, Toshihiko

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to demonstrate dental problems such as changes of saliva flow rates (ml/min), taste sensation and DMF-teeth (D: decay, M: missing, F: filling) after radiation therapy for the patients with head and neck cancer. Between January 1990 and April 1995, a total of 56 patients with head and neck cancer after radiation therapy was reviewed to demonstrate dental problems at the Department of Oral Radiology, Osaka Dental University Hospital. The results were as follows. In the case of 7 inpatients with head and neck cancer (nasopharynx: 3, mouth floor: 2, tongue: 2), non-stimulating saliva flow rates for 5 minutes was nearly equal to 0 ml at the level of 60 Gy/6 weeks to 80 Gy/8 weeks. In the scoring system of the taste sensation after radiation therapy for 23 patients with oral cancer (tongue: 18, mouth floor: 5), distribution of the patients with 3 points (3 points stand for patients feel good as well as pretreatment) was 91% for sweetness, 78% for sharpness, 96% for bitterness and 96% for acidity, respectively. Concerning DMF-teeth after radiation therapy for 26 patients with head and neck cancer (nasopharynx: 10, oropharynx: 8, tongue: 8), changes of DMF-Teeth of the group of nasopharynx and oropharynx was more higher than that of the group of tongue comparing to report on the survey of dental diseases in Japan, 1993 as control. We emphasize that these data are more effective to improve their oral environments and to up their recognition for oral cavity in the patients with head and neck cancer pre or post-irradiation. (author)

  11. Direct to Operating Room Trauma Resuscitation Decreases Mortality Among Severely Injured Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieck, Minna M; Cunningham, Aaron J; Behrens, Brandon; Ohm, Erika T; Maxwell, Bryan G; Hamilton, Nicholas A; Adams, M Christopher; Cole, Frederick J; Jafri, Mubeen A

    2018-03-16

    Expediting evaluation and intervention for severely injured patients has remained a mainstay of advanced trauma care. One technique, direct to operating room (DOR) resuscitation, for selective adult patients has demonstrated decreased mortality. We sought to investigate the application of this protocol in children. All DOR pediatric patients from 2009-2016 at a pediatric Level I Trauma Center were identified. DOR criteria included penetrating injury, chest injuries, amputations, significant blood loss, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and surgeon discretion. Demographics, injury patterns, interventions, and outcomes were analyzed. Observed mortality was compared to expected mortality, calculated using Trauma Injury Severity Score (TRISS) methodology, with two-tailed t-tests and a p-value 15, 33% had GCS≤8, and 9% were hypotensive. The most commonly injured body regions were external (66%), head (34%), chest (30%), and abdomen (27%). Sixty-seven patients (82%) required emergent procedural intervention, most commonly wound exploration/repair (35%), central venous access (22%), tube thoracostomy (19%) and laparotomy (18%). Predictors of intervention were ISS>15 (odds ratio=14, p=0.013) and GCS<9 (odds ratio=8.5, p=0.044). The survival rate to discharge for DOR patients was 84% compared with an expected survival of 79% (TRISS) (p=0.4). The greatest improvement relative to expected mortality was seen in the subgroup with penetrating trauma (84.5% vs. 74.4%, p=0.002). A selective policy of resuscitating the most severely injured children in the operating room can decrease mortality. Patients suffering penetrating trauma with the highest ISS and diminished GCS have the greatest benefit. Trauma centers with appropriate resources should evaluate implementing similar policies. Level II. Diagnostic tests or criteria.

  12. Influence of prayer and prayer habits on outcome in patients with severe head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannemreddy, Prasad; Bryan, Kris; Nanda, Anil

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the study is to evaluate the effect of prayers on the recovery of the unconscious patients admitted after traumatic brain injury. A retrospective study of patients with severe head injury was conducted. The Glasgow Coma Scale and Glasgow Outcome Scale scores were examined along with age, gender, smoking, and alcohol intake. There were 13 patients who received prayer and 13 who did not receive prayer during the hospital stay with almost identical mean Glasgow Coma Scale score. The prayer group stayed in the hospital for more days (P = .03). On multivariate analysis, patients' age (P = .01), admission Glasgow Coma Scale score (P = .009), and prayer habits (P = .007) were significant factors. Patients with prayers habits recovered better following severe head injury. The role of intercessory prayer needs further studies in larger groups.

  13. Effect of sildenafil on erectile dysfunction in spinal Cord injured ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of sildenafil on erectile dysfunction in spinal Cord injured patients. ... Trauma was the etiology in 87.5% of the cases (44% were road accidents). 12/16 patients were paraplegics (10 above ... in SCI patients. This approach is compatible with the efforts to improve the quality of life and rehabilitation of these patients.

  14. Reduction of xerostomia in head and neck cancer patients. A critical review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanley, O.; Leech, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Radical radiotherapy given with or without concurrent chemotherapy is the main treatment modality in non-surgical patients for the management of squamous cell carcinoma in the head and neck. Xerostomia, which results from reduced salivary production is a debilitating side-effect of radiation therapy to these patients. Xerostomia may greatly impact on quality of life for head and neck cancer patients for up to 24 months post-radiation therapy. Such effects include difficulties in fundamental daily activities such as speech, mastication and swallowing. It is believed that modulated techniques provide better sparing to surrounding salivary glands. The aim of this critical review of the literature is to investigate what advantage intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can provide over 3 dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) in reducing xerostomia in this subset of patients. Search methodology: An extensive literature search was undertaken to compare the incidence of grade 2 or worse xerostomia in HNSCC patients treated with IMRT or 3DCRT (±chemotherapy). Results: Studies reported a lower incidence of grade 2 or worse xerostomia with IMRT over patients treated with 3DCRT. The highest incidence of xerostomia was reported at 6 months following the completion of radiotherapy treatment. The incidence of xerostomia in patients declined with time, in both patients treated with IMRT and those of the 3DCRT cohort. The incidence of xerostomia was greater in the acute setting than in the late. Conclusion: An IMRT technique can consistently reduce grade 2 or worse xerostomia in head and neck cancer patients over conformal techniques. This will not compromise dose homogeneity or dose coverage. IMRT should remain the standard of care for head and neck patients. - Highlights: • IMRT technique can consistently reduce grade 2 or worse xerostomia in head and neck cancer patients over 3DCRT. • IMRT does not compromise the treatment's dose homogeneity or

  15. Computed Tomography of Patients with Head Trauma following ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    METHODS: Retrospective analysis of cranial computed tomography (CT) films, request cards, duplicate copy of radiology reports, soft copy CT images and case notes of 61 patients who underwent cranial CT scan on account of road traffic accidents. The study CT scans were performed at the radiology department of ...

  16. Characterization of patients with head trauma and traumatic axonal injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosquera Betancourt, Dra.C. Gretel; Van Duc, Dr. Hanh; Casares Delgado, Dr. Jorge Alejandro; Hernández González, Dr. Erick Héctor

    2016-01-01

    Background: traumatic axonal injury is characterized by multifocal lesions, consequences of primary, secondary and tertiary damage which is able to cause varying degrees of disability. Objective: to characterize patients with traumatic axonal injury. Methods: a cross-sectional analytical study was conducted from January 2014 to December 2015. The target population was composed of 35 patients over age 18 whose diagnosis was traumatic axonal injury type I and IV of the Marshall computed tomographic (CT) classification. With the data collected from medical records revisions and direct observation, a database was created in SPSS for its processing through univariate and multivariate techniques. Results: male patients between 18 and 30 years old without bad habits prevailed. Most of the patients survived and death was associated with the presence of severe traumatic axonal injury, Marshall computed tomographic (CT) classification degree III, complications and presence of trauma in thorax, abdomen and cervical spine. Conclusions: diagnosis of traumatic axonal injury is based on the clinical radiological correlation based on images from tomography and it is confirmed by Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Histological study shows injuries that are not demonstrated in the most advanced radiological studies. Its prevention is the most fundamental base in medical assistance, followed by neurocritical attention oriented by neuromonitoring. (author)

  17. Prehospital endotracheal intubation and chest tubing does not prolong the overall resuscitation time of severely injured patients: a retrospective, multicentre study of the Trauma Registry of the German Society of Trauma Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulla, Martin; Helm, Matthias; Lefering, Rolf; Walcher, Felix

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether prehospital endotracheal intubation (ETI) and chest tube placement is unnecessarily time consuming in severely injured patients. A retrospective, multicentre study including all adult patients (ISS ≥9; 2002-7) of the Trauma Registry of the German Society of Trauma Surgery who were not secondarily transferred to a trauma centre and received a definitive airway and a chest tube. Creating four groups: AA (n=963) receiving ETI and chest tube on scene, AB (n=1547) ETI performed in the prehospital setting but chest tubing later in the emergency department (ED) and BB (n=640) receiving both procedures in the ED. The BA collective (ETI performed in the ED, but chest tubing on scene) was excluded from the study because of the small sample size (n=41). The trauma resuscitation time (TRT), demographic data, injuries, treatment and outcome of the remaining three collectives were compared. The prehospital TRT of the AA collective was longer than the AB and BB subgroups (80±37 min vs 77±44 min 65±46 min; pchest tube placement do not prolong the total TRT of severely injured patients.

  18. Prehospital resuscitation with hypertonic saline-dextran modulates inflammatory, coagulation and endothelial activation marker profiles in severe traumatic brain injured patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morrison Laurie J

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traumatic brain injury (TBI initiates interrelated inflammatory and coagulation cascades characterized by wide-spread cellular activation, induction of leukocyte and endothelial cell adhesion molecules and release of soluble pro/antiinflammatory cytokines and thrombotic mediators. Resuscitative care is focused on optimizing cerebral perfusion and reducing secondary injury processes. Hypertonic saline is an effective osmotherapeutic agent for the treatment of intracranial hypertension and has immunomodulatory properties that may confer neuroprotection. This study examined the impact of hypertonic fluids on inflammatory/coagulation cascades in isolated head injury. Methods Using a prospective, randomized controlled trial we investigated the impact of prehospital resuscitation of severe TBI (GCS vs 0.9% normal saline (NS, on selected cellular and soluble inflammatory/coagulation markers. Serial blood samples were drawn from 65 patients (30 HSD, 35 NS at the time of hospital admission and at 12, 24, and 48-h post-resuscitation. Flow cytometry was used to analyze leukocyte cell-surface adhesion (CD62L, CD11b and degranulation (CD63, CD66b molecules. Circulating concentrations of soluble (sL- and sE-selectins (sL-, sE-selectins, vascular and intercellular adhesion molecules (sVCAM-1, sICAM-1, pro/antiinflammatory cytokines [tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α and interleukin (IL-10], tissue factor (sTF, thrombomodulin (sTM and D-dimers (D-D were assessed by enzyme immunoassay. Twenty-five healthy subjects were studied as a control group. Results TBI provoked marked alterations in a majority of the inflammatory/coagulation markers assessed in all patients. Relative to control, NS patients showed up to a 2-fold higher surface expression of CD62L, CD11b and CD66b on polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs and monocytes that persisted for 48-h. HSD blunted the expression of these cell-surface activation/adhesion molecules at all time-points to

  19. Oral care for patients with head and neck cancer in Hokkaido University Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hata, Hironobu; Yamazaki, Yutaka; Imamachi, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    We have been providing oral care for patients with head and neck cancer in Hokkaido University Hospital since 2007. In this paper, we report clinical statistics of the 254 head and neck cancer patients who received oral care. About 80 percent of these patients were treated with radiation therapy, so it is important to cope with adverse events related to such therapy. Oral care is helpful for cancer patients when it is started as soon as possible (at least 1 week before radiation therapy is started). The percentage of patients who could start oral care 4 days before radiation therapy gradually increased to about 60 percent by fiscal 2009. In fiscal 2010, the percentage decreased to its lowest level of 37.9 percent. To start oral care for all patients 7 days before irradiation, we are going to change our system and start oral care in the outpatient period. In their hometowns, oral care was continued for only 19 (27.0 percent) of the 74 patients who could not visit our hospital. An important task for our project is to establish a medical cooperation system for discharged patients treated for head and neck cancer. (author)

  20. Stereotactic radiosurgery may contribute to overall survival for patients with recurrent head and neck carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawaguchi, Koji; Sato, Kengo; Horie, Akihisa; Iketani, Susumu; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Nakatani, Yasunori; Sato, Junichi; Hamada, Yoshiki

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the effect of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in the treatment of advanced, recurrent lesions for head and neck carcinoma both with and without lymph node involvement. Between April 2006 and July 2007, 22 patients (mean age 67 years) with advanced, recurrent head and neck carcinoma were treated with stereotactic radiosurgery. All of the patients except one had biopsy confirmed disease prior to stereotactic radiosurgery. Patients included 3 rT2, 8 rT3, and 9 rT4; 8 of the patients had lymph node metastases. Marginal SRS doses were 20-42 Gy delivered in two to five fractions. Starting one month after SRS, all patients received S-1 oral chemotherapy for one year. At an overall median follow-up of 24 months (range, 4-39 months), for the 14 locally recurrent patients without lymph node metastases, 9 patients (64.3%) had a complete response (CR), 1 patient (7.1%) had a partial response (PR), 1 patient (7.1%) had stable disease (SD), and 3 patients (21.4%) had progressive disease (PD). For the 8 patients with lymph node metastases, 1 patient with a single retropharyngeal (12.5%) had CR; the remaining 7 patients (87.5%) all progressed. Nine patients have died from their cancer. The overall actuarial 2-year survival for the patients with and without lymph node metastases is 12.5% and 78.6%, respectively. These results show the benefit of stereotactic radiosurgery salvage treatment for advanced, recurrent lesions, without lymph node metastases in previously irradiated head and neck cancer

  1. Study of cerebral circulation for patients with head injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Mitsuru; Aoki, Yoshinori; Noguchi, Yoshitaka; Haga, Daisuke; Seiki, Yoshikatsu; Machida, Keiichi

    2004-01-01

    Severe traumatic brain injury is widely known to cause a dynamic cerebral blood flow (CBF). Especially, decrease of CBF has been reported. In the present study we measured the CBF, the mean transit time (MTT) and the cerebral blood volume (CBV). Our purpose was to investigate the possibility to estimate the outcome with use of these physiological parameters, and the relationship between the clinical condition of the patients and these parameters. In 24 patients with traumatic brain injury, Xe-CT and Perfusion CT were performed at the same time in the phase II (Day 1-3). We measured CBF by using Xe-CT and MTT by using Perfusion CT and calculated CBV by using AZ-7000W98 computer system. We evaluated the relationship between these values and outcome, grading on admission and discussed the usefulness of deciding on courses of treatment. The results were correlated with the outcome and values of CBF and MTT. Significant differences in CBF and MTT were found between favorable outcome group (good recovery (GR) and moderate disability (MD)) and poor outcome group (severe disability (SD), vegetative state (VS) and dead (D)). We could estimate the outcome of patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) by analyzing values of CBF and MTT. The probability was 78%. (authors)

  2. The effect of radiotherapy on NKT cells in patients with advanced head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kouichi; Tanaka, Yuriko; Horiguchi, Shigetoshi; Yamamoto, Shouji; Toshinori, Nakayama; Sugimoto, Akira; Okamoto, Yoshitaka

    2010-10-01

    Cancer immunotherapy with NKT cells is a potential new treatment strategy for advanced head and neck cancer. NKT cell therapy is promising due to its unique anti-tumor activity and higher degree of safety compared to current therapies. Radiotherapy is indispensable as a standard treatment for advanced head and neck cancer. To elucidate the possibility of using NKT cells as an adjuvant immunotherapy with radiotherapy, we examined the effect of radiotherapy on NKT cells in patients with head and neck cancer. The number, IFN-gamma production and proliferation capacity of NKT cells were analyzed before and after 50 Gy radiation therapy in 12 patients with stage IV head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. The cytotoxic activity of NKT cells was examined in vitro. The number of NKT cells in the blood varied widely between patients. After radiation therapy, the population of CD3 T cells decreased significantly, while the NKT cell population remained stable. The number of NKT cells was the same after radiation therapy as before. IFN-gamma production from NKT cells collected just after radiotherapy was impaired after stimulation with exogenous ligand, but the proliferative responses of these NKT cells was enhanced in comparison to those collected before radiation therapy. Furthermore, the proliferated NKT cells displayed a significant level of anti-tumor activity. NKT cells are relatively resistant to radiation and might therefore be suitable for adjuvant immunotherapy to eradicate remnant cancer cells in patients who have undergone radiation therapy.

  3. Quantifying gait quality in patients with large-head and conventional total hip arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Carsten; Penny, Jeannette Østergaard; Nielsen, Dennis Brandborg

    2015-01-01

    We used the Gait Deviation Index (GDI) as method to compare preoperative to postoperative gait changes after uncemented 50mm(median) large-head and 28/32mmtotal hip arthroplasty (THA). We also identified predictors of improvements in GDI. Gait analysis and patient-reported (WOMAC) datawere record...

  4. The Prevalence of Xerostomia Occurrence after Doing Radiation Therapy in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barunawaty Yunus

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Xerostomia is one side effect of radiation therapy that most commonly affects head and neck. This situation is a symptom and not a disease which is generally associated with reduced saliva. For patients this situation is not pleasant and for dentist, this symptom is considered as a challenging case. This research intended to know the prevalence of xerostomia after radiation therapy in cancer patients with head and neck area. The subjects of this study were patients with head and neck area cancer who underwent radiotherapy treatment at Hasanuddin University teaching hospital, subjects were then taken saliva before and after given a total dose of 20 Gy and a total dose of 40 Gy. The analysis of the data processed by the computer program and the Wilcoxon test significance level is accepted when p<0.05. The mean bulk saliva before radiotherapy was higher than average rainfall saliva after radiotherapy total dose of 20 Gy and 40 Gy. Radiotherapy of the head and neck area total dose of 20 Gy and 40 Gy may affect rainfall saliva so that patients feel the symptoms of xerostomia.

  5. The radiotherapy effect on the quality of life of patients with head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Namie Okino; Dias, Adriana Marques; Zago, Marcia Maria Fontao

    2006-01-01

    In cases of head and neck cancer, surgical advances in combination with radiotherapy (RT) have brought an increase in patients' probability of cure. RT is widely used and aims to destroy cancer cells in order to reduce or eliminate a malignant tumor. However, RT also causes major changes in patients' quality of life during and after treatment. The current study aims to evaluate the side effects of RT in patients with head and neck cancer and its influence on quality of life. The study population included head and neck cancer patients submitted to RT at the University of Sao Paulo Hospital in Ribeirao Preto, Brazil. Data were collected with the FACT H and N instrument and McMaster University's Questionnaire for head and neck RT and submitted to quantitative statistical analysis using SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences). The main side effects of RT that affected physical quality of life were related to salivation and nutritional problems, while the predominant emotional problems were depression and anxiety. (author)

  6. Resting energy expenditure in head and neck cancer patients before and during radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langius, Jacqueline A. E.; Kruizenga, Hinke M.; Uitdehaag, Bernard M. J.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Doornaert, Patricia; Leemans, C. Rene; Weijs, Peter J. M.

    Background & aims: Weight loss is a frequently observed problem in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) during radiotherapy. It is still to be assessed whether hypermetabolism is contributing to this problem. The aim of this study was to investigate hypermetabolism before radiotherapy, and

  7. Avascular necrosis of the femoral head in HIV positive patients-an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    26 consecutive patients (37 hips) with avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head treated surgically at our institution from 1999 to 2008 were reviewed . The aims of the study were to evaluate the risk factors associated with AVN in HIV positive and HIV negative individuals, and assess early response to total hip ...

  8. Understanding behavioral mechanisms for physical activity in head and neck cancer patients: a qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sealy, Martine; Stuiver, M.M.; Midtgard, Julie; van der Schans, Cees; Roodenburg, Jan L N; Jager-Wittenaar, Harriët

    2017-01-01

    Rationale: Head and neck cancer (HNC) patients often have adverse changes in body composition. Loss of muscle mass and strength frequently occur, even when dietary intake is adequate. Nascent evidence suggests that a healthy lifestyle, including adequate physical activity (PA) and diet, may prevent

  9. Radiation dose, driving performance, and cognitive function in patients with head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuen, Hon K.; Sharma, Anand K.; Logan, William C.; Gillespie, M. Boyd; Day, Terry A.; Brooks, Johnell O.

    2008-01-01

    Seven head and neck cancer patients participated in a driving evaluation in a driving simulator. Radiation dose on the temporal lobes was moderately associated with time to complete a cognitive test and with driving performance. Results indicated that incidental irradiation may contribute to a decrease in cognition and in unsafe driving performance, which seems to be time-dependent

  10. Medical marijuana use in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients treated with radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, David A; Nabavizadeh, Nima; Romer, Jeanna L; Chen, Yiyi; Holland, John M

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to better understand why patients with history of head and neck cancer (HNC) treated with radiotherapy are using medical marijuana (MM). Established HNC quality of life questionnaires and our own MM quality of life questionnaire were sent to 15 HNC patients treated at our institution who reported using MM. Patients are clinically disease free and currently using MM to manage long-term side effects after curative HNC treatment. There was a 100 % response rate. Median time from treatment was 45 months (21-136 months). Most patients smoked marijuana (12 patients), while others reported ingestion (4 patients), vaporizing (3 patients), and use of homemade concentrated oil (1 patient). Six patients reported prior recreational marijuana use before diagnosis. MM provided benefit in altered sense, weight maintenance, depression, pain, appetite, dysphagia, xerostomia, muscle spasm, and sticky saliva. HNC patients report MM use to help with long-term side effects of radiotherapy.

  11. Radiation-injured bowel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Localio, S.A.; Pachter, H.L.; Gouge, T.H.

    1979-01-01

    Radiation enteropathy is an insidious, progressive disease that is seen with increasing frequency. Serious disabilities may develop after years of gestation. Those patients who require surgery are treated by control of sepsis, correction of metabolic abnormalities, and reversal of protein/calorie malnutrition prior to definitive surgery. The treatment of choice is resection with anastomosis, but recurrences may occur many years later in intestine grossly normal at the time of surgery.

  12. Migration from full‐head mask to “open‐face” mask for immobilization of patients with head and neck cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelock, D. Michael; Mechalakos, James; Rao, Shyam; Della‐Biancia, Cesar; Amols, Howard; Lee, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    To provide an alternative device for immobilization of the head while easing claustrophobia and improving comfort, an “open‐face” thermoplastic mask was evaluated using video‐based optical surface imaging (OSI) and kilovoltage (kV) X‐ray radiography. A three‐point thermoplastic head mask with a precut opening and reinforced strips was developed. After molding, it provided sufficient visible facial area as the region of interest for OSI. Using real‐time OSI, the head motion of ten volunteers in the new mask was evaluated during mask locking and 15 minutes lying on the treatment couch. Using a nose mark with reference to room lasers, forced head movement in open‐face and full‐head masks (with a nose hole) was compared. Five patients with claustrophobia were immobilized with open‐face masks, set up using OSI and kV, and treated in 121 fractions, in which 61 fractions were monitored during treatment using real‐time OSI. With the open‐face mask, head motion was found to be 1.0 ± 0.6 mm and 0.4° ± 0.2° in volunteers during the experiment, and 0.8 ± 0.3 mm and 0.4° ± 0.2° in patients during treatment. These agree with patient motion calculated from pre‐/post‐treatment OSI and kV data using different anatomical landmarks. In volunteers, the head shift induced by mask‐locking was 2.3 ± 1.7 mm and 1.8° ± 0.6°, and the range of forced movements in the open‐face and full‐head masks were found to be similar. Most (80%) of the volunteers preferred the open‐face mask to the full‐head mask, while claustrophobic patients could only tolerate the open‐face mask. The open‐face mask is characterized for its immobilization capability and can immobilize patients sufficiently (face mask is readily adopted in radiotherapy clinic as a superior alternative to the standard full‐head mask. PACS numbers: 87.19.xj, 87.63.L‐, 87.59.‐e, 87.55.tg, 87.55.‐x PMID:24036878

  13. The role of physical activity and nutritional intake on nutritional status in patients with head and neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martine Sealy

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition is a frequent problem in patients with head and neck cancer. Prevention or timely treatment of malnutrition is of great importance because deteriorated nutritional status can have a negative effect on clinical outcome in head and neck cancer patients. Malnutrition can be viewed as a

  14. The role of physical activity and nutritional intake on nutritional status in patients with head and neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sealy, Martine

    Malnutrition is a frequent problem in patients with head and neck cancer. Prevention or timely treatment of malnutrition is of great importance because deteriorated nutritional status can have a negative effect on clinical outcome in head and neck cancer patients. Malnutrition is a multidimensional

  15. Quetiapine Induced Acute Dystonia in a patient with History of severe Head Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Robert G. Bota; Joanne W. Witkowski

    2010-01-01

    A patient with a history of severe head injury 10 years ago regained ability to walk after years of being bound to a wheelchair. During the last psychiatric hospitalization, quetiapine was increased to therapeutic dose using a normal titration. As a result the patient developed dystonia of multiple muscle groups requiring 4 days of hospitalization for remittance of symptoms. In this paper, we take a close look at the literature concerning extrapiramidal symptoms (EPS) in this context, and we ...

  16. Alterations in taste distinguishing in patients irradiated for malignant tumours of head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimo, J.; Parkanyiova, V.; Polcikova, E.

    1976-01-01

    In 20 patients treated with percutaneous gamma radiotherapy for carcinomas of the head or the neck, alterations were studied in taste following radiation doses of 1,000; 2,000; 3,000; 4,000; 5,000; and 6,000 rads. It was found that with increasing radiation doses the patients lost the ability of distinguishing sweet, salty, sour and bitter qualities, in that order. (L.O.)

  17. In a bad place: Carers of patients with head and neck cancer experiences of travelling for cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balfe, Myles; Keohane, Kieran; O' Brien, Katie; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael; Maguire, Rebecca; Hanly, Paul; O' Sullivan, Eleanor; Sharp, Linda

    2017-10-01

    To explore the effect that treatment-related commuting has on carers of patients with head and neck cancer. Semi-structured interviews, thematically analysed, with 31 carers. Treatment-related commuting had a considerable impact on carers of patients with head and neck cancer, both in practical terms (economic costs, disruption) and also in psychological terms. Many carers of patients with head and neck cancer described becoming distressed by their commute. Some carers from large urban cities appeared to have hidden commuting burdens. Some carers respond to commuting stress by 'zoning out' or becoming 'like zombies'. Treatment-related travel for head and neck cancer can have significant practical and psychological impacts. Health professionals should be aware of the impacts that commuting can have on head and neck caregivers. Health services may be able to take practical steps, such as providing subsidized parking, to address head and neck carergivers' difficulties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The protective role of carotenoids and polyphenols in patients with head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Ping Chang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck cancer is a critical global health problem and approximately 650,000 patients per year are diagnosed with this type of cancer. In addition, head and neck cancer exhibits a high recurrence rate, readily causing second primary cancers in other locations, often yielding a poor prognosis. Current medical and surgical treatment options result in considerable impairment of speaking and swallowing functions, with side effects such as nausea, vomiting, bone marrow suppression, and renal damage, thereby impairing patients' quality of life. Thus, developing a prevention and therapeutic intervention strategy for head and neck cancer is vital. Phytochemicals have been shown to have a unique ability to protect cells from damage and modulation of cell repair. The chemopreventive activities of phytochemicals have also been demonstrated to be associated with their antioxidant properties and the induction and stimulation of intercellular communication via gap junctions, which play a role in the regulation of cancer cell cycle, differentiation, apoptosis, and stagnate cancer cell growth. Phytochemicals can also regulate cancer cell signaling pathways, reduce the invasion and metastasis of cancer cells, and protect normal cells during treatment, thus reducing the damage caused by chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The most studied of the chemopreventive effects of phytochemicals are the carotenoids and phenolics. In this review, we investigated the multiple mechanisms of carotenoids and polyphenols (PPs for use in preventing head and neck cancer, reducing the side effects of chemotherapy and radiotherapy, improving patient survival rates, and reducing the occurrence rate of second primary cancers.

  19. Clinical and Radiographic Outcomes of Unipolar and Bipolar Radial Head Prosthesis in Patients with Radial Head Fracture: A Systemic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongwei; Wang, Ziyang; Shang, Yongjun

    2018-06-01

    To compare clinical outcomes of unipolar and bipolar radial head prosthesis in the treatment of patients with radial head fracture. Medline, Cochrane, EMBASE, Google Scholar databases were searched until April 18, 2016 using the following search terms: radial head fracture, elbow fracture, radial head arthroplasty, implants, prosthesis, unipolar, bipolar, cemented, and press-fit. Randomized controlled trials, retrospective, and cohort studies were included. The Mayo elbow performance score (MEPS), disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand (DASH) score, radiologic assessment, ROM, and grip strength following elbow replacement were similar between prosthetic devices. The pooled mean excellent/good ranking of MEPS was 0.78 for unipolar and 0.73 for bipolar radial head arthroplasty, and the pooled mean MEPS was 86.9 and 79.9, respectively. DASH scores for unipolar and bipolar prosthesis were 19.0 and 16.3, respectively. Range of motion outcomes were similar between groups, with both groups have comparable risk of flexion arc, flexion, extension deficit, rotation arc, pronation, and supination (p values bipolar prosthesis). However, bipolar radial head prosthesis was associated with an increased chance of heterotopic ossification and lucency (p values ≤0.049) while unipolar prosthesis was not (p values ≥0.088). Both groups had risk for development of capitellar osteopenia or erosion/wear (p values ≤0.039). Unipolar and bipolar radial head prostheses were similar with respect to clinical outcomes. Additional comparative studies are necessary to further compare different radial head prostheses used to treat radial head fracture.

  20. Idiopathic Avascular Necrosis of First Metatarsal Head in a Pediatric Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Young-Uk; Choi, Jang-Seok; Kong, Gyu-Min; Ha, Byung-Ho

    Idiopathic avascular necrosis of the first metatarsal head rarely occurs in pediatrics. The present case of avascular necrosis of the first metatarsal head occurred in a 13-year-old male who came to the clinic with a 9-month history of pain in the first metatarsophalangeal joint. Conservative treatment had been applied for 9 months, but the pain had not been relieved. Therefore, surgical treatment, including decompression and debridement, was performed in the first metatarsal head of the patient. After 6 months of follow-up monitoring, full range of motion of the first metatarsophalangeal joint was observed, and the pain had disappeared. No any other complications had developed during 18 months of follow-up monitoring. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Toxicity of Head-and-Neck Radiation Therapy in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanfilippo, Nicholas J.; Mitchell, James; Grew, David; DeLacure, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the acute morbidity of high dose head and neck RT and CRT in patients with infected with HIV. Methods and Materials: All HIV-positive patients who underwent radiation therapy for head and neck cancer in our department between 2004 and 2008 were reviewed. Treatment related data were examined. All treatments were delivered with megavoltage photon beams or electron beams. Patients were evaluated by an attending radiation oncologist for toxicity and response on a weekly basis during therapy and monthly after treatment in a multidisciplinary clinic. Acute toxicities were recorded using the Radiation Therapy and Oncology Group (RTOG) common toxicity criteria. Response to treatment was based on both physical exam as well as post-treatment imaging as indicated. Results: Thirteen patients who underwent RT with a diagnosis of HIV were identified. Median age was 53 years and median follow-up was 22 months. Twelve had squamous cell carcinoma and one had lymphoproliferative parotiditis. Median radiation dose was 66.4 Gy and median duration of treatment was 51 days. The median number of scheduled radiotherapy days missed was zero (range 0 to 7). One patient (8%) developed Grade 4 confluent moist desquamation. Eight patients (61%) developed Grade 3 toxicity. Conclusion: Based on our results, HIV-positive individuals appear to tolerate treatment for head and neck cancer, with toxicity similar to that in HIV-negative individuals.

  2. Prophylactic treatment of mycotic mucositis in radiotherapy of patients with head and neck cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koc, M.; Aktas, E. [Ataturk Univ., Erzurum (Turkey). Medical School

    2003-02-01

    Patients undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck cancer are at increased risk of developing oral candidiasis. The objective of this study was to investigate the clinical Candida mucositis and interruptions in radiotherapy in patients suffering from head and neck cancer, receiving fluconazole in comparison with a control group without specific prophylaxis. Eighty consecutive patients were randomized in a prospective double-blind trial of prophylactic oral fluconazole or treatment with the same drug when mycotic infections appeared. Adult head and neck cancer patients who were undergoing treatment with radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy, radiotherapeutic coverage of the entire oropharynx and oral cavity at least 3 cm anterior to the retromolar trigone and receiving a total dose of more than 6000 cGy and Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) >70 were included in the study. Group A received radiation therapy plus fluconazole (Fluzole 100 mg/day) starting from the sixth irradiation session throughout the treatment; 40 patients in group B received the same baseline treatment, but were given fluconazole only when mycotic infections appeared. We evaluated 37 patients in group A and the first 37 patients were evaluated in group B. Three of the patients in group A (8.1%) and 14 of the patients in group B (37.8%) demonstrated clinical candidasis. Radiotherapy was interrupted in all of these patients. The differences between the two groups were statistically significant with respect to clinical candidiasis (P=0.005). The median discontinuation time was 5 days (range, 3-7 days) in group A and 7 days (range, 4-10 days) in group B. The median dose resulting in clinical candidiasis was 3200 cGy (range, 2200-5800 cGy) in all groups. In the fluconazole group it was 4200 cGy and in the control group 2800 cGy. These results suggest that patients undergoing head and neck radiation therapy are at risk of developing candidiasis and that fluconazole may be used to reduce the frequency of

  3. Prophylactic treatment of mycotic mucositis in radiotherapy of patients with head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koc, M.; Aktas, E.

    2003-01-01

    Patients undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck cancer are at increased risk of developing oral candidiasis. The objective of this study was to investigate the clinical Candida mucositis and interruptions in radiotherapy in patients suffering from head and neck cancer, receiving fluconazole in comparison with a control group without specific prophylaxis. Eighty consecutive patients were randomized in a prospective double-blind trial of prophylactic oral fluconazole or treatment with the same drug when mycotic infections appeared. Adult head and neck cancer patients who were undergoing treatment with radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy, radiotherapeutic coverage of the entire oropharynx and oral cavity at least 3 cm anterior to the retromolar trigone and receiving a total dose of more than 6000 cGy and Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) >70 were included in the study. Group A received radiation therapy plus fluconazole (Fluzole 100 mg/day) starting from the sixth irradiation session throughout the treatment; 40 patients in group B received the same baseline treatment, but were given fluconazole only when mycotic infections appeared. We evaluated 37 patients in group A and the first 37 patients were evaluated in group B. Three of the patients in group A (8.1%) and 14 of the patients in group B (37.8%) demonstrated clinical candidasis. Radiotherapy was interrupted in all of these patients. The differences between the two groups were statistically significant with respect to clinical candidiasis (P=0.005). The median discontinuation time was 5 days (range, 3-7 days) in group A and 7 days (range, 4-10 days) in group B. The median dose resulting in clinical candidiasis was 3200 cGy (range, 2200-5800 cGy) in all groups. In the fluconazole group it was 4200 cGy and in the control group 2800 cGy. These results suggest that patients undergoing head and neck radiation therapy are at risk of developing candidiasis and that fluconazole may be used to reduce the frequency of

  4. Effect of gender and sports on the risk of full-thickness articular cartilage lesions in anterior cruciate ligament-injured knees: a nationwide cohort study from Sweden and Norway of 15 783 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Røtterud, Jan Harald; Sivertsen, Einar A; Forssblad, Magnus; Engebretsen, Lars; Årøen, Asbjørn

    2011-07-01

    The presence of an articular cartilage lesion in anterior cruciate ligament-injured knees is considered a predictor of osteoarthritis. This study was undertaken to evaluate risk factors for full-thickness articular cartilage lesions in anterior cruciate ligament-injured knees, in particular the role of gender and the sport causing the initial injury. Cohort study (prognosis); Level of evidence, 2. Primary unilateral anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions prospectively registered in the Swedish and the Norwegian National Knee Ligament Registry during 2005 through 2008 were included (N = 15 783). Logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate risk factors for cartilage lesions. A total of 1012 patients (6.4%) had full-thickness cartilage lesions. The median time from injury to surgery was 9 months (range, 0 days-521 months). Male patients had an increased odds of full-thickness cartilage lesions compared with females (odds ratio = 1.22; 95% confidence interval, 1.04-1.42). In males, team handball had an increase in the odds of full-thickness cartilage lesions compared with soccer (odds ratio = 2.36; 95% confidence interval, 1.33-4.19). Among female patients, no sport investigated showed a significant decrease or increase in the odds of full-thickness cartilage lesions. The odds of a full-thickness cartilage lesion increased by 1.006 (95% confidence interval, 1.005-1.008) for each month elapsed from time of injury until anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction when all patients were considered, while time from injury to surgery did not affect the odds significantly in those patients reconstructed within 1 year of injury (odds ratio = 0.98; 95% confidence interval, 0.95-1.02). Previous surgery increased the odds of having a full-thickness cartilage lesion (odds ratio = 1.40; 95% confidence interval, 1.21-1.63). One year of increasing patient age also increased the odds (odds ratio = 1.05; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-1.06). Male gender is associated with an

  5. Evaluation of intrafraction patient movement for CNS and head and neck IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Siyong; Akpati, Hilary C.; Kielbasa, Jerrold E.; Li, Jonathan G.; Liu, Chihray; Amdur, Robert J.; Palta, Jatinder R.

    2004-01-01

    Intrafraction patient motion is much more likely in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) than in conventional radiotherapy primarily due to longer beam delivery times in IMRT treatment. In this study, we evaluated the uncertainty of intrafraction patient displacement in CNS and head and neck IMRT patients. Immobilization is performed in three steps: (1) the patient is immobilized with thermoplastic facemask, (2) the patient displacement is monitored using a commercial stereotactic infrared IR camera (ExacTrac, BrainLab) during treatment, and (3) repositioning is carried out as needed. The displacement data were recorded during beam-on time for the entire treatment duration for 5 patients using the camera system. We used the concept of cumulative time versus patient position uncertainty, referred to as an uncertainty time histogram (UTH), to analyze the data. UTH is a plot of the accumulated time during which a patient stays within the corresponding movement uncertainty. The University of Florida immobilization procedure showed an effective immobilization capability for CNS and head and neck IMRT patients by keeping the patient displacement less than 1.5 mm for 95% of treatment time (1.43 mm for 1, and 1.02 mm for 1, and less than 1.0 mm for 3 patients). The maximum displacement was 2.0 mm

  6. Cachexia at diagnosis is associated with poor survival in head and neck cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orell-Kotikangas, Helena; Österlund, Pia; Mäkitie, Outi; Saarilahti, Kauko; Ravasco, Paula; Schwab, Ursula; Mäkitie, Antti A

    2017-07-01

    One third of the patients had cachexia with an association of significantly shorter survival. These results suggest that combining HGS and MAMA seems to be a practical method to screen cachexia in patients with head and neck cancer and may also be used when assessing their prognosis. The aim of this study was to analyze the hypothesis that cachexia defined as both low mid-arm muscle area (MAMA) and handgrip strength (HGS) is associated with decreased survival in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Sixty-five consecutive patients with primary HNSCC were enrolled prior to cancer therapy. Cachexia was defined as low handgrip strength (HGS) and low mid-arm muscle area (MAMA). Nutritional status was assessed by patient-generated subjective global assessment (PG-SGA) and sarcopenia by low MAMA. Biochemical parameters reflecting nutritional status and S-25-OHD were measured. Cachexia was seen in 31% and sarcopenia in 46% of patients. Altogether, 34% of patients were malnourished. Disease-free survival was 13 months (3-62) in cachectic patients, compared with 66 months (31-78) in non-cachectic patients (p = 0.009). S-25-OHD was 28 nmol/l in cachectic patients, compared with 46 nmol/l in non-cachectic patients (p = 0.009) and prealbumin 187 mg/l and 269 mg/l, respectively (p < 0.001).

  7. Counseling Is Effective for Smoking Cessation in Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemp, Ingrid; Wangsmo Steffenssen, Mia Charlotte; Bakholdt, Vivi T.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this systematic review was to describe the efficacy of smoking cessation counseling and the resulting quit rate in patients with head and neck cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A systematic literature search was conducted in the PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane databases. Predictor...... variables were smoking cessation counseling and smoking cessation interventions. The outcome was smoking cessation. Data collection and quality assessment were performed independently by 2 of the authors. Selected publications were assessed for potential risk of bias, and the level of evidence was evaluated...... in patients who received smoking cessation counseling compared with those who received usual care. CONCLUSIONS: This review shows that counseling supplemented with nicotine replacement therapy increases the possibility for smoking cessation in patients with head and neck cancer....

  8. Quetiapine Induced Acute Dystonia in a patient with History of severe Head Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G. Bota

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A patient with a history of severe head injury 10 years ago regained ability to walk after years of being bound to a wheelchair. During the last psychiatric hospitalization, quetiapine was increased to therapeutic dose using a normal titration. As a result the patient developed dystonia of multiple muscle groups requiring 4 days of hospitalization for remittance of symptoms. In this paper, we take a close look at the literature concerning extrapiramidal symptoms (EPS in this context, and we suggest that in patients with a history of head injury, it is warranted to consider a slower titration of antipsychotic medications, including ones that are considered having a lower risk of EPS such as quetiapine.

  9. Automatic Calculation of Hydrostatic Pressure Gradient in Patients with Head Injury: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Laura; Shaw, Martin; Piper, Ian; Arvind, D K; Hawthorne, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    The non-surgical management of patients with traumatic brain injury is the treatment and prevention of secondary insults, such as low cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP). Most clinical pressure monitoring systems measure pressure relative to atmospheric pressure. If a patient is managed with their head tilted up, relative to their arterial pressure transducer, then a hydrostatic pressure gradient (HPG) can act against arterial pressure and cause significant errors in calculated CPP.To correct for HPG, the arterial pressure transducer should be placed level with the intracranial pressure transducer. However, this is not always achieved. In this chapter, we describe a pilot study investigating the application of speckled computing (or "specks") for the automatic monitoring of the patient's head tilt and subsequent automatic calculation of HPG. In future applications this will allow us to automatically correct CPP to take into account any HPG.

  10. An observational study of compliance with the Scandinavian guidelines for management of minimal, mild and moderate head injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heskestad, Ben; Waterloo, Knut; Ingebrigtsen, Tor

    2012-01-01

    The Scandinavian guidelines for management of minimal, mild and moderate head injuries were developed to provide safe and cost effective assessment of head injured patients. In a previous study conducted one year after publication and implementation of the guidelines (2003), we showed low...... compliance, involving over-triage with computed tomography (CT) and hospital admissions. The aim of the present study was to investigate guideline compliance after an educational intervention....

  11. Malnutrition and refeeding syndrome prevention in head and neck cancer patients: from theory to clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaderbay, Akil; Atallah, Ihab; Fontaine, Eric; Chobert-Bakouline, Marine; Schmitt, Stephanie; Mitariu, Philipp; Righini, Christian Adrien

    2018-05-01

    The goal of this review is to raise awareness about refeeding syndrome (RFS) and to give a comprehensive presentation of recent guidelines and latest scientific data about nutritional management among head and neck cancer (HNC) patients while focusing on RFS prevention. A review of literature for nutritional assessment and RFS management was conducted. Electronic searches of Medline, Cochrane, PubMed and Embase databases for articles published in peer-reviewed journals were conducted from February to September 2017 using the keywords: "nutrition assessment", "head and neck cancer", "refeeding syndrome" and "guidelines". Articles, reviews, book references as well as national and international guidelines in English and French were included. The prevalence of malnutrition is high in HNC patients and a large number of them will need artificial nutritional support or refeeding intervention. RFS is characterized by fluid and electrolyte imbalance associated with clinical manifestations induced by rapid refeeding after a period of malnutrition or starvation. Regarding risk factors for malnutrition and RFS, HNC patients are particularly vulnerable. However, RFS remains unrecognized among head and neck surgeons and medical teams. Practical data are summarized to help organizing nutritional assessment and refeeding interventions. It also summarizes preventive measures to reduce RFS incidence and morbidity in HNC population. Nutritional assessment and early refeeding interventions are crucial for HNC patients care. As prevention is the key for RFS management, early identification of patients with high risks is crucial and successful nutritional management requires a multidisciplinary approach.

  12. Motives that head and neck cancer patients have for contacting a specialist nurse - an empirical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salander, Pär; Isaksson, Joakim; Granström, Brith; Laurell, Göran

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to systematically explore the motives for patients with head and neck cancer to contact a specialist nurse during two years postdiagnosis. Research focusing on the role of specialist nurses in cancer care almost exclusively concern cancers other than head and neck cancer. Qualitative, descriptive study based on the contacts between patients with head and neck cancer and a specialist nurse. Patients were invited to contact a specialist nurse by telephone. The specialist nurse took systematic field notes, that is, she registered who contacted her, the nature of the call and the outcome. Sixty patients were included. In descending order, the motives for contact were questions about practical and uncomplicated matters, consultations about medical troubles/worries, presenting a report of the patient's situation, requests for additional information about the treatment plan and requests for medical information. The pattern of the patients' motivations for calling was not related to medical or social factors, suggesting that the initiative to make contact is very much a question of the complexity of individual life circumstances. Very few referrals were sent from the specialist nurse to other professionals. The specialist nurse turned out to be more than just a coordinator of health-care resources. The findings bring up questions about the potential of the nurse's function as a coordinator, but also as a potential attachment figure, and questions about the nurse's relationships to other professionals. When implementing a specialist nurse function, it is important to decide whether the function should be inspired by a broader relational perspective. In addition to the indispensible competence and experience in the clinical field of head and neck cancer, training in counselling and acquaintance with object-relational psychology will then be desirable. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Clinical value of somatostatin receptor imaging in patients with suspected head and neck paragangliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Matthias; Dietlein, Markus; Weber, Kerstin; Moka, Detlef; Schicha, Harald [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Universitaet zu Koeln, Joseph-Stelzmann-Strasse 9, 50924 Koeln (Germany); Fischer, Eva; Michel, Olaf; Stennert, Eberhard [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Hals-, Nasen- und Ohrenheilkunde, Universitaet zu Koeln, Koeln (Germany)

    2002-12-01

    Paragangliomas or glomus tumours of the head and neck region are rare somatostatin receptor-expressing neuroendocrine tumours. Precise preoperative diagnosis is of special importance in order to adequately weigh the potential benefit of the operation against the inherent risks of the procedure. In this study, the clinical value of somatostatin receptor imaging was assessed in 19 patients who underwent somatostatin receptor scintigraphy because of known or suspected paraganglioma of the head and neck region. The results were compared with the results of computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging, histology and clinical follow-up. [{sup 111}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1}]-octreotide scintigraphy was performed 4-6 and 24 h after i.v. injection of 140-220 MBq {sup 111}In-octreotide. Whole-body and planar images as well as single-photon emission tomography images were acquired and lesions were graded according to qualitative tracer uptake. Somatostatin receptor imaging was positive in nine patients, identifying paragangliomas for the first time in three patients and recurrent disease in six patients. In one patient, a second, previously unknown paraganglioma site was identified. Negative results were obtained in ten patients. These patients included one suffering from chronic hyperplastic otitis externa, one with granuloma tissue and an organised haematoma, one with an acoustic neuroma, one with an asymmetric internal carotid artery, two with ectasia of the bulbus venae jugularis and one with a jugular vein thrombosis. In two patients with a strong family history of paraganglioma, individual involvement could be excluded. In only one patient did somatostatin receptor imaging and magnetic resonance imaging yield false negative results in respect of recurrent paraganglioma tissue. It is concluded that somatostatin receptor scintigraphy provides important information in patients with suspected paragangliomas of the head and neck region and has a strong impact on further

  14. Maladaptation of cerebral perfusion in the spinal cord injured individuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Ihn Ho; Chun, Kyung A.; Lee, Hyoung Woo; Ahn, Sang Ho; Hayashida, Kohei [National Cardiovascular Center, Osaka (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the tilt-induced alteration of cerebral perfusion of spinal cord injured individuals. Supine and upright sitting brain SPECT was performed using a 1-day protocol with {sup 99m}Tc-ethylcysteinate dimer (ECD) in 11 SCI individuals (mean age, 32.6 y), with lesions between C3 and T4, ad 5 AB individuals (mean age, 31.4 y). The patients rested on a wheelchair in the supine position. Then, they sat up and, at the same time 555MBq of ECD was injected. The upright SPECT was done. Finally, 740MBq of ECD was injected and supine SPECT was performed again. The SPECT data were acquired with dual head gamma camera (E-cam, Siemens). For semiquantitative analysis, 14 ROIs were drawn on the brain. In the SCI individuals, the radiotracer uptake in the frontal, temporal and parietal areas were significantly decreased in the upright SPECT. No postural changes was evident in the occipital lobe, basal ganglia and thalamus in the SCI individuals. In the AB individuals, there were no such changes on the upright SPECT. Postural cerebral hypoperfusion in the frontal, temporal and parietal areas in the SCI individuals might relate to maladaptation of the vascular response during the upright position.

  15. DO GENERAL MEDICAL PRACTITIONERS EXAMINE INJURED RUNNERS?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Videbæk, Solvej; Jensen, A V; Rasmussen, S

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: General Medical Practitioners (GMP) in Denmark perform clinical examinations of patients with musculoskeletal pain. However, the prevalence proportion of examinations caused by running-related injuries remains unknown. PURPOSE: The primary purpose of the present study was to estimate...... the prevalence proportion of consultations in general medical practice caused by running-related injuries. The secondary purpose was to estimate the prevalence proportion of injured runners, who consult their GMP, that are referred to additional examinations or treatments. STUDY DESIGN: A survey-based study...

  16. Pre-Radiation dental considerations and management for head and neck cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kufta, Kenneth; Forman, Michael; Swisher-McClure, Samuel; Sollecito, Thomas P; Panchal, Neeraj

    2018-01-01

    Treatment of head and neck cancer (HNC) is accompanied by a high rate of morbidity, and complications can have a lifelong, profound impact on both patients and caregivers. Radiation-related injury to the hard and soft tissue of the head and neck can significantly decrease patients' quality of life. The purpose of this study is to provide patent-specific guidelines for managing the oral health and related side effects of HNC patients treated with radiation therapy. Based on reviewed articles retrieved on the PubMed database, guidelines for management of the oral health of this patient population were organized into three separate categories: cancer, patient, and dentition. The location, type, and staging of the cancer, along with the radiation used to treat the cancer significantly impact dental treatment. Several unique patient characteristics such as motivation, presence of support system, socioeconomic status, nutrition, and race have all been found to affect outcomes. Dental disease and available supportive dental management was found to significantly impact treatment and quality of life in this patient population. By comprehensively assessing unique cancer, patient, and dental-related factors, this review provides individualized evidence-based guidelines on the proper management of this complex and vulnerable patient population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Review of the patient positioning reproducibility in head-and-neck radiotherapy using Statistical Process Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Sarah J; Herst, Patries M; Louwe, Robert J W

    2018-05-01

    A remarkable improvement in patient positioning was observed after the implementation of various process changes aiming to increase the consistency of patient positioning throughout the radiotherapy treatment chain. However, no tool was available to describe these changes over time in a standardised way. This study reports on the feasibility of Statistical Process Control (SPC) to highlight changes in patient positioning accuracy and facilitate correlation of these changes with the underlying process changes. Metrics were designed to quantify the systematic and random patient deformation as input for the SPC charts. These metrics were based on data obtained from multiple local ROI matches for 191 patients who were treated for head-and-neck cancer during the period 2011-2016. SPC highlighted a significant improvement in patient positioning that coincided with multiple intentional process changes. The observed improvements could be described as a combination of a reduction in outliers and a systematic improvement in the patient positioning accuracy of all patients. SPC is able to track changes in the reproducibility of patient positioning in head-and-neck radiation oncology, and distinguish between systematic and random process changes. Identification of process changes underlying these trends requires additional statistical analysis and seems only possible when the changes do not overlap in time. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The role of dentistry other than oral care in patients undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidenobu Matsuzaki

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The usefulness of dental approaches, such as oral management, has gained recognition among patients treated for head and neck cancer. In particular, oral management plays a very important role before, during, and after treatment in patients undergoing radiotherapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of both. However, specialized dentistry knowledge and techniques that are useful for patients undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck cancer have yet to be reported. Therefore, in this review article, our aim is to introduce dental approaches in radiotherapy for patients with head and neck cancer that have been developed and are currently being used at our institute.

  19. Can Predictive Modeling Identify Head and Neck Oncology Patients at Risk for Readmission?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Amy M; Casper, Keith A; Peter, Kay St; Wilson, Keith M; Mark, Jonathan R; Collar, Ryan M

    2018-05-01

    Objective Unplanned readmission within 30 days is a contributor to health care costs in the United States. The use of predictive modeling during hospitalization to identify patients at risk for readmission offers a novel approach to quality improvement and cost reduction. Study Design Two-phase study including retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data followed by prospective longitudinal study. Setting Tertiary academic medical center. Subjects and Methods Prospectively collected data for patients undergoing surgical treatment for head and neck cancer from January 2013 to January 2015 were used to build predictive models for readmission within 30 days of discharge using logistic regression, classification and regression tree (CART) analysis, and random forests. One model (logistic regression) was then placed prospectively into the discharge workflow from March 2016 to May 2016 to determine the model's ability to predict which patients would be readmitted within 30 days. Results In total, 174 admissions had descriptive data. Thirty-two were excluded due to incomplete data. Logistic regression, CART, and random forest predictive models were constructed using the remaining 142 admissions. When applied to 106 consecutive prospective head and neck oncology patients at the time of discharge, the logistic regression model predicted readmissions with a specificity of 94%, a sensitivity of 47%, a negative predictive value of 90%, and a positive predictive value of 62% (odds ratio, 14.9; 95% confidence interval, 4.02-55.45). Conclusion Prospectively collected head and neck cancer databases can be used to develop predictive models that can accurately predict which patients will be readmitted. This offers valuable support for quality improvement initiatives and readmission-related cost reduction in head and neck cancer care.

  20. Emotions and coping of patients with head and neck cancers after diagnosis: A qualitative content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannathan, A; Juvva, S

    2016-01-01

    Patients suffering with head and neck cancers are observed to have a relatively high risk of developing emotional disturbances after diagnosis and treatment. These emotional concerns can be best understood and explored through the method of content analysis or qualitative data. Though a number of qualitative studies have been conducted in the last few years in the field of psychosocial oncology, none have looked at the emotions experienced and the coping by head and neck cancer patients. Seventy-five new cases of postsurgery patients of head and neck cancers were qualitatively interviewed regarding the emotions experienced and coping strategies after diagnosis. Qualitative content analysis of the in-depth interviews brought out that patients experienced varied emotions on realizing that they were suffering from cancer, the cause of which could be mainly attributed to three themes: 1) knowledge of their illness; 2) duration of untreated illness; and 3) object of blame. They coped with their emotions by either: 1) inculcating a positive attitude and faith in the doctor/treatment, 2) ventilating their emotions with family and friends, or 3) indulging in activities to divert attention. The results brought out a conceptual framework, which showed that an in-depth understanding of the emotions - Their root cause, coping strategies, and spiritual and cultural orientations of the cancer survivor - Is essential to develop any effective intervention program in India.

  1. Multidisciplinary Service Utilization Pattern by Advanced Head and Neck Cancer Patients: A Single Institution Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline C. Junn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To analyze the patterns and associations of adjunctive service visits by head and neck cancer patients receiving primary, concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Methods. Retrospective chart review of patients receiving adjunctive support during a uniform chemoradiation regimen for stages III-IV head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Univariate and multivariate models for each outcome were obtained from simple and multivariate linear regression analyses. Results. Fifty-two consecutive patients were assessed. Female gender, single marital status, and nonprivate insurance were factors associated with an increased number of social work visits. In a multivariate analysis, female gender and marital status were related to increased social work services. Female gender and stage IV disease were significant for increased nursing visits. In a multivariate analysis for nursing visits, living greater than 20 miles between home and hospital was a negative predictive factor. Conclusion. Treatment of advanced stage head and neck cancer with concurrent chemoradiation warrants a multidisciplinary approach. Female gender, single marital status, and stage IV disease were correlated with increased utilization of social work and nursing services. Distance over 20 miles from the center was a negative factor. This information may help guide the treatment team to allocate resources for the comprehensive care of patients.

  2. Effect of ionizing radiation on the taste function of patients submitted to head and neck radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Amaro Ilidio Vespasiano; Galante, Celio

    2011-01-01

    Objective: to evaluate the effects of ionizing radiation on the taste function in patients submitted to radiotherapy in the head and neck region. Materials and methods: twenty patients diagnosed with head and neck tumors and undergoing treatment in the Division of Radiotherapy at Santa Casa de Misericordia de Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil, were selected. For their taste function testing, four solutions were manipulated with salt (NaCl), sugar (sucrose), citric acid (for acidity), and urea (for bitterness), at three different (low, medium and high) concentrations. Weekly tests were performed during the first three weeks of radiotherapy, with random administration of the solutions (three drops each) respecting the order of their concentration levels (low, medium and high). After the application of each solution, the patient reported which flavor he/she tasted. Results: a statistically significant difference was observed in the loss of taste function as the results in the 1st and 4th weeks of treatment were compared, with salty solution at the three concentration levels, with the sweet solution at low and medium concentrations, and with the sour and bitter solutions, only at low concentration. Conclusion: ionizing radiation alters the taste function of patients submitted to head and neck radiotherapy. (author)

  3. Effect of ionizing radiation on the taste function of patients submitted to head and neck radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Amaro Ilidio Vespasiano [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil); Galante, Celio [Santa Casa de Misericordia de Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Div. de Radioterapia; Manzi, Flavio Ricardo, E-mail: manzi@pucminas.b [Pontificia Universidade Catolica de Minas Gerais (PUC-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-09-15

    Objective: to evaluate the effects of ionizing radiation on the taste function in patients submitted to radiotherapy in the head and neck region. Materials and methods: twenty patients diagnosed with head and neck tumors and undergoing treatment in the Division of Radiotherapy at Santa Casa de Misericordia de Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil, were selected. For their taste function testing, four solutions were manipulated with salt (NaCl), sugar (sucrose), citric acid (for acidity), and urea (for bitterness), at three different (low, medium and high) concentrations. Weekly tests were performed during the first three weeks of radiotherapy, with random administration of the solutions (three drops each) respecting the order of their concentration levels (low, medium and high). After the application of each solution, the patient reported which flavor he/she tasted. Results: a statistically significant difference was observed in the loss of taste function as the results in the 1st and 4th weeks of treatment were compared, with salty solution at the three concentration levels, with the sweet solution at low and medium concentrations, and with the sour and bitter solutions, only at low concentration. Conclusion: ionizing radiation alters the taste function of patients submitted to head and neck radiotherapy. (author)

  4. Patient size and x-ray technique factors in head computed tomography examinations. II. Image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huda, Walter; Lieberman, Kristin A.; Chang, Jack; Roskopf, Marsha L.

    2004-01-01

    We investigated how patient head characteristics, as well as the choice of x-ray technique factors, affect lesion contrast and noise values in computed tomography (CT) images. Head sizes and mean Hounsfield unit (HU) values were obtained from head CT images for five classes of patients ranging from the newborn to adults. X-ray spectra with tube voltages ranging from 80 to 140 kV were used to compute the average photon energy, and energy fluence, transmitted through the heads of patients of varying size. Image contrast, and the corresponding contrast to noise ratios (CNRs), were determined for lesions of fat, muscle, and iodine relative to a uniform water background. Maintaining a constant image CNR for each lesion, the patient energy imparted was also computed to identify the x-ray tube voltage that minimized the radiation dose. For adults, increasing the tube voltage from 80 to 140 kV changed the iodine HU from 2.62x10 5 to 1.27x10 5 , the fat HU from -138 to -108, and the muscle HU from 37.1 to 33.0. Increasing the x-ray tube voltage from 80 to 140 kV increased the percentage energy fluence transmission by up to a factor of 2. For a fixed x-ray tube voltage, the percentage transmitted energy fluence in adults was more than a factor of 4 lower than for newborns. For adults, increasing the x-ray tube voltage from 80 to 140 kV improved the CNR for muscle lesions by 130%, for fat lesions by a factor of 2, and for iodine lesions by 25%. As the size of the patient increased from newborn to adults, lesion CNR was reduced by about a factor of 2. The mAs value can be reduced by 80% when scanning newborns while maintaining the same lesion CNR as for adults. Maintaining the CNR of an iodine lesion at a constant level, use of 140 kV increases the energy imparted to an adult patient by nearly a factor of 3.5 in comparison to 80 kV. For fat and muscle lesions, raising the x-ray tube voltage from 80 to 140 kV at a constant CNR increased the patient dose by 37% and 7

  5. Swallowing therapy and progressive resistance training in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hajdú, Sara F; Wessel, Irene; Johansen, Christoffer

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Head and neck cancer (HNC) patients are often challenged by treatment induced dysphagia and trismus. Traditionally, rehabilitation is initiated when loss of function has already occurred. There is increasing evidence that it is of benefit to patients to initiate an early rehabilitation...... process before and during treatment. HNC patients have a unique set of functional challenges such as pre- and post-treatment dysphagia, pain and weight loss. The aim of the trial is to investigate the effects of swallowing and mouth-opening exercises combined with progressive resistance training (PRT...

  6. Effect of irradiation upon the bacterial flora in patients with head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rice, D.H.; Gill, G.

    1979-01-01

    Twenty-two consecutive patients with cancer of the head and neck, who were to receive a full tumoricidal dose of irradiation to a field that included the oral cavity and pharynx, were studied to determine the effect of the irradiation on their local bacterial flora. Aerobic cultures were taken prior to, at the completion of, and one month after the completion of their irradiation. The percentage of patients with potentially pathogenic organisms increased dramatically as the effect of the irradiation increased. This change in the local flora has obvious implications concerning the increased incidence of postoperative wound infections in patients who have received prior irradiation

  7. Changes in the Submandibular Gland in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer After Radiation Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uchiyama, Y.; Kreiborg, Sven; Murakami, Shumei

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to assess the impairment of the submandibular gland, in terms of changes in volume by computed tomography (CT) and CT value, which was the mean pixel value at a region of interest, in a group of patients with head and neck cancer treated with radiation therapy (RT......). Patients and Methods: Eleven patients treated with RT, where the effective radiation dose to the submandibular gland was known, were included in the study. CT scanning was performed both before and after RT. The average follow-up period after RT was 555 days (range=107-1231 days). Results: The mean volume...

  8. Dental needs in Brazilian patients subjected to head and neck radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales, Ana Carolina de Mesquita Netto; Esteves, Sérgio Carlos Barros; Jorge, Jacks; Almeida, Oslei Paes de; Lopes, Márcio Ajudarte

    2009-01-01

    In spite of its recognized benefits in the treatment of malignant tumors, radiation therapy have several side effects in the head and neck region. The evaluation of oral conditions by a dentist is important to prevent or minimize these problems. The aim of this retrospective review was to analyze the dental needs in 357 patients who received radiotherapy in the head and neck region and were treated at Orocentro/FOP/UNICAMP, between January 1990 and December 2004. Review of patient files showed that dental examination before radiotherapy was not performed in 148 patients (41.5%) and was done in 209 patients (58.5%). From the total of examined patients, 94 (45%) did not require dental procedures at the moment of examination, while 115 (55%) presented some sort of dental need. Following the patients after the radiotherapy, it was observed that the group of patients that was evaluated before radiation presented less need of restorations, root canal filling and dental extractions than those who were not evaluated. The results of this study confirm that the evaluation of oral conditions prior to radiotherapy is essential to minimize the dental needs, emphasizing the importance of the dentist in the multidisciplinary team that treats cancer patients.

  9. Dental needs in Brazilian patients subjected to head and neck radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosales, Ana Carolina de Mesquita Netto; Jorge, Jacks; Almeida, Oslei Paes de; Lopes, Marcio Ajudarte

    2009-01-01

    In spite of its recognized benefits in the treatment of malignant tumors, radiation therapy have several side effects in the head and neck region. The evaluation of oral conditions by a dentist is important to prevent or minimize these problems. The aim of this retrospective review was to analyze the dental needs in 357 patients who received radiotherapy in the head and neck region and were treated at Orocentro/FOP/UNICAMP, between January 1990 and December 2004. Review of patient files showed that dental examination before radiotherapy was not performed in 148 patients (41.5%) and was done in 209 patients (58.5%). From the total of examined patients, 94 (45%) did not require dental procedures at the moment of examination, while 115 (55%) presented some sort of dental need. Following the patients after the radiotherapy, it was observed that the group of patients that was evaluated before radiation presented less need of restorations, root canal filling and dental extractions than those who were not evaluated. The results of this study confirm that the evaluation of oral conditions prior to radiotherapy is essential to minimize the dental needs, emphasizing the importance of the dentist in the multidisciplinary team that treats cancer patients. (author)

  10. Survival of patients with head and neck cancer. Impact of physical status and comorbidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadat, F; Wienke, A; Dunst, J; Kuhnt, T

    2012-01-01

    Prognostic factors (e.g., gender, tumor stage, and hypoxia) have an impact on survival in patients with head and neck cancer. Thus, the impact of physical status and comorbidities on treatment decision and survival were evaluated. A total of 169 primary, inoperable patients with squamous cell cancer of the head and neck were retrospectively investigated. Patients were treated with hyperfractionated accelerated radio(chemo)therapy (HARcT) or hypofractionated radio(chemo)therapy (HypoRcT). Depending on the individual patient's situation (Karnofsky Performance Index, KPI), treatment for patients with a KPI of 80-100% was generally radiochemotherapy and for patients with a KPI ≤ 70% treatment was radiotherapy alone. In addition, all comorbidities were evaluated. Uni- and multivariate proportional hazards model were used, and overall survival (OS) was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Treatment consisted of HARcT for 76 patients (45%), HART for 28 patients (17%), HypoRcT for 14 patients(8%), and HypoRT for 51 patients (30%). Of the patients, 107 patients (63%) presented with a KPI of 80-100%. OS (20%) was significantly better for patients with a KPI of 80-100%, while the OS for patients with a KPI ≤ 70% was 8% (p KPI, total irradiation dose (> 70 Gy), and chemotherapy were significant prognostic factors for better OS. Our retrospective analysis shows that performance status with dependency on comorbidities was an independent risk factor for OS.

  11. Prospective Study of Psychosocial Distress Among Patients Undergoing Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Allen M.; Jennelle, Richard; Grady, Victoria; Tovar, Adrienne; Bowen, Kris; Simonin, Patty; Tracy, Janice; McCrudden, Dale; Stella, Jonathan R.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the prevalence of psychosocial distress among patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT) for head and neck cancer and to examine the association between depression and anxiety and demographic and medical variables. Methods and Materials: A total of 40 patients (25 men and 15 women) with nonmetastatic head and neck cancer were enrolled in this prospective study and underwent RT administered with definitive (24 patients) or postoperative (16 patients) intent. Twenty patients (50%) received concurrent chemotherapy. All patients completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and Beck Depression Inventory-II instrument before RT, on the last day of RT, and at the first follow-up visit. The effect of patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factors on psychosocial distress was analyzed. Results: The prevalence of mild to severe pre-RT depression was 58% and 45% using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-D and Beck Depression Inventory-II scale, respectively. The prevalence of severe pre-RT anxiety was 7%. The depression levels, as determined by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and Beck Depression Inventory-II instrument increased significantly during RT and remained elevated at the first follow-up visit (p < 0.001 for both). The variables that were significantly associated with post-RT depression included a greater pre-RT depression level, employment status (working at enrollment), younger age (<55 years), single marital status, and living alone (p < 0.05, for all). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that an alarming number of patients undergoing RT for head and neck cancer have symptoms suggestive of psychosocial distress even before beginning treatment. This proportion increases significantly during RT. Studies investigating the role of antidepressants and/or psychiatric counseling might be warranted in the future

  12. HYSTOMORPHOLOGIC CHANGES IN INJURED MENISCI IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Bogatov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the work was studying histological changes in the injured menisci in children. The histological evaluation of injured menisci received during arthroscopy was performed. The prescription of injury varied from several days till 3 years. It was shown that injured fragment of the meniscus is viable up to 3 months since trauma. It was also obvious that active migration of the meniscus cells occur in the injured fragment and microvessels are seen in 50% of the meniscus tissues.

  13. [Validation of the German version of Eating Assessment Tool for head and neck cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaretsky, Eugen; Steinbach-Hundt, Silke; Pluschinski, Petra; Grethel, Isabel

    2018-04-10

    The assessment of subjective swallowing complaints constitutes an important element in a multidimensional, modern management of head and neck cancer patients suffering from dysphagia. For this purpose, an internationally recognized and validated 10-item questionnaire EAT-10 is used that was developed and validated by Belafski et al. in 2008. The purpose of the present study is the translation of EAT-10 into the German language and its validation for head and neck cancer patients. After the translation of EAT-10 into German according to the guidelines for the translation of foreign measuring instruments, a validation of gEAT-10 was carried out on the basis of the sample of 210 head and neck cancer patients. The reliability was determined by means of the internal consistency (Cronbach's Alpha) and item-total correlations (Spearman). The construct validity was verified by the uni- and multivariate analyses of the distribution of gEAT-10 total scores depending on gender, age, BMI, tumor stage and localization as well as type of the oncological therapy. The internal consistency amounted to α = .94, the item-total correlations varied between ρ = .59 and ρ = .85. No significant associations between gEAT-10 total scores and gender as well as age were identified in univariate calculations. Such associations were found for BMI, tumor stage and localization as well as type of the oncological therapy. However, only the tumor stage yielded a significant result in a regression. The gEAT-10 was shown to be a reliable and construct valid questionnaire for the assessment of subjective swallowing complaints in patients with head and neck cancer. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Prevalence and risk factors of depressive disorder in caregivers of patients with head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu; Lin, Pao-Yen; Chien, Chih-Yen; Fang, Fu-Min

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the prevalence and risk factors of depressive disorder in caregivers of patients with head and neck cancer. Study subjects were recruited from a multidisciplinary outpatient clinic for head and neck cancer in a medical center from February to July 2012. Caregivers of patients with head and neck cancer were enrolled and assessed using the Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM-IV, Clinician Version, the Short Form 36 Health Survey, and the Family APGAR index. The main aim of the study was to examine the difference in demographic data and clinical characteristics between the caregivers with and without depressive disorders. In addition, a stepwise forward model of logistic regression was used to test the possible risk factors. One hundred and forty-three caregivers were included in the study. The most prevalent psychiatric disorder was depressive disorder (14.7%), followed by adjustment disorder (13.3%). Nearly one-third of the caregivers had a psychiatric diagnosis. By using logistic regression analysis, it was found that unemployment (odds ratio (OR) = 3.16; 95% CI, 1.04-9.68), lower social functioning (OR = 1.43; 95% CI, 1.18-1.72), and lower educational level (OR = 1.16; 95% CI, 1.01-1.34) were significant risk factors for the depressive disorder. The clinical implication of our results is the value of using the standardized structured interview for early diagnosis of depressive disorder in caregivers of head and neck cancer patients. Early screening and management of depression in these caregivers will raise their quality of life and capability to care patients. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Acupuncture for the prevention of radiation-induced xerostomia in patients with head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio do Prado Florence Braga

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of acupuncture in minimizing the severity of radiation-induced xerostomia in patients with head and neck cancer. A total of 24 consecutive patients receiving > 5000 cGy radiotherapy (RT involving the major salivary glands bilaterally were assigned to either the preventive acupuncture group (PA, n = 12, treated with acupuncture before and during RT, or the control group (CT, n = 12, treated with RT and not receiving acupuncture. After RT completion, clinical response was assessed in all patients by syalometry, measuring the resting (RSFR and stimulated (SSFR salivary flow rates, and by the visual analogue scale (VAS regarding dry mouth-related symptoms. Statistical analyses were performed with repeated-measures using a mixed-effect modeling procedure and analysis of variance. An alpha level of 0.05 was accepted for statistical significance. Although all patients exhibited some degree of impairment in salivary gland functioning after RT, significant differences were found between the groups. Patients in the PA group showed improved salivary flow rates (RSFR, SSFR; p < 0.001 and decreased xerostomia-related symptoms (VAS, p < 0.05 compared with patients in the CT group. Although PA treatment did not prevent the oral sequelae of RT completely, it significantly minimized the severity of radiation-induced xerostomia. The results suggest that acupuncture focused in a preventive approach can be a useful therapy in the management of patients with head and neck cancer undergoing RT.

  16. Postradiotherapy quality of life for head-and-neck cancer patients is independent of xerostomia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringash, Jolie; Warde, Padraig; Lockwood, Gina; O'Sullivan, Brian; Waldron, John; Cummings, Bernard

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the relationship between quality of life (QOL) and xerostomia over time for patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT) for head-and-neck cancer in a prospective clinical trial. Methods and materials: Patients with head-and-neck cancer were randomized to pilocarpine (n = 65) vs. placebo (n = 65) during RT. QOL was measured using the McMaster Head and Neck Radiotherapy Questionnaire (HNRQ). Xerostomia was measured on a linear analog scale. No statistically significant differences were observed between arms; all 130 patients were analyzed together. Results: Baseline QOL data were obtained for 98.5% of participants. The baseline HNRQ score of 5.7 declined significantly to 4.0 (p <0.0001) by RT Week 6 and returned to baseline (5.8) by 6 months after treatment. This represents a large, clinically important change of 1.7 of 7 (24%; effect size 1.34). The decline in HNRQ score during RT paralleled the onset of xerostomia on the linear analog scale (r = 0.36 at 1 month). After treatment, the QOL scores recovered without improvement in xerostomia. The trajectory of the linear analog scale score resembled that of the HNRQ's single xerostomia question (r = 0.75 at 1 month). Conclusion: Quality of life recovers to baseline after RT, despite persistent xerostomia. Either a response shift occurs or xerostomia in the absence of acute mucositis has a relatively small influence on overall QOL

  17. Audiological findings in patients treated with radio- and concomitant chemotherapy for head and neck tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dell'Aringa, Ana Helena B; Isaac, Myrian L; Arruda, Gustavo V; Esteves, Maria Carolina BN; Dell'Aringa, Alfredo Rafael; Júnior, José Luis S; Rodrigues, Alexandre F

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the functionality of the auditory system in patients who underwent radiotherapy and chemotherapy treatment with cisplatin to treat head and neck tumors. Case series with planned data collection. From May 2007 to May 2008 by the Department of Otorhinolaryngology and the Department of Oncology/Radiotherapy at Faculdade de Medicina de Marília. Audiological evaluation (Pure Tone Audiometry (air and bone conduction), Speech Audiometry, Tympanometry, Acoustic Reflex testing and Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions) was performed in 17 patients diagnosed with head and neck neoplasia and treated with chemotherapy, using cisplatin, and radiotherapy. 12 left ears (70.5%) and 11 right ears (64.7%) presented bilateral decreased hearing soon after the treatment for the frequency 1 kHz (mild auditory damage) and for the frequency 8 kHz (more significant auditory damage). Patients with head and neck cancer submitted to the conventional radiotherapy treatment, combined with the chemotherapy with cisplatin, presented a high incidence of decreased hearing by the end of treatment. Strong evidence was observed linking auditory alteration to the amount of radiotherapy treatment

  18. Indomethacin sensitive suppressor cell activity in head and neck cancer patients pre- and postirradiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maca, R.D.; Panje, W.R.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of the addition of indomethacin to PHA or Con A stimulated lymphocytes from patients with untreated squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck or from patients with the disease who have just finished irradiation therapy from the disease was quantitated and compared to those of the control group. Lymphocytes from eight of 26 patients with untreated carcinoma were significantly augmented by the addition of indomethacin. The remaining eighteen patients were equal to the controls. For all 17 patients who had just finished extensive field irradiation therapy, significant enhancement of PHA and Con A reactivity by indomethacin was found, which did not appear to be solely a function of low baseline mitogen reactivity. The results of this study support the hypothesis that perhaps patients receiving irradiation therapy may benefit by the oral administration of indomethacin, an approach that needs further consideration

  19. Fatigue During Head-And-Neck Radiotherapy: Prospective Study on 117 Consecutive Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja; Santoro, Luigi; Alterio, Daniela; Franchi, Benedetta; Fiore, Maria Rosaria; Fossati, Piero; Kowalczyk, Anna; Canino, Paola; Ansarin, Mohssen; Orecchia, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Fatigue is an underevaluated cancer-related and treatment-related symptom. We analyzed fatigue in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A total of 117 patients were enrolled (mean age, 58 years). Radiation therapy (median dose, 66 Gy) was given with either exclusive or postoperative intent in 52 and 65 patients, respectively. Chemotherapy (CT) was added before and/or during RT in 61 patients. The patients completed a 20-item questionnaire (Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory [MFI-20]) before, during (weekly), and after RT. The impact of patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factors on fatigue was evaluated with unifactorial and multifactorial tests. Results: Fatigue level increased during RT reaching a maximum at Week 6 and then slowly decreased. In multivariate stepwise regression analysis age (inversely related, p < 0.05), psychologic disorders (p < 0.005), and previous head-and-neck surgery (inversely related, p < 0.005) were correlated with higher pre-RT fatigue level. Pre-RT fatigue score (p < 0.0001), induction and/or concomitant CT (p = 0.035), need of cortisone during RT (p = 0.005), and thyroid disorders (p = 0.032) were correlated with higher during-RT fatigue level. Pre-RT fatigue score (p < 0.0001), induction and/or concomitant CT (p < 0.001), and need of cortisone during RT (p < 0.005) were correlated with higher post-RT fatigue level. No impact of gender, performance status, comorbidities other than psychologic and thyroid, tumor stage/site, RT intent, dose, volume, duration, or toxicity was observed. Conclusion: Fatigue affects all patients undergoing RT for head-and-neck cancer, reaches maximum score at the 6th week of RT, and slowly decreases thereafter. Age, thyroid dysfunction, psychologic disorders, pre-RT fatigue score, CT, and cortisone use are correlated with RT-related fatigue levels

  20. An evidence-based recommendation on bed head elevation for mechanically ventilated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niël-Weise, Barbara S; Gastmeier, Petra; Kola, Axel; Vonberg, Ralf P; Wille, Jan C; van den Broek, Peterhans J

    2011-01-01

    A semi-upright position in ventilated patients is recommended to prevent ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and is one of the components in the Ventilator Bundle of the Institute for Health Care Improvement. This recommendation, however, is not an evidence-based one. A systematic review on the benefits and disadvantages of semi-upright position in ventilated patients was done according to PRISMA guidelines. Then a European expert panel developed a recommendation based on the results of the systematic review and considerations beyond the scientific evidence in a three-round electronic Delphi procedure. Three trials (337 patients) were included in the review. The results showed that it was uncertain whether a 45° bed head elevation was effective or harmful with regard to the occurrence of clinically suspected VAP, microbiologically confirmed VAP, decubitus and mortality, and that it was unknown whether 45° elevation for 24 hours a day increased the risk for thromboembolism or hemodynamic instability. A group of 22 experts recommended elevating the head of the bed of mechanically ventilated patients to a 20 to 45° position and preferably to a ≥ 30° position as long as it does not pose risks or conflicts with other nursing tasks, medical interventions or patients' wishes. Although the review failed to prove clinical benefits of bed head elevation, experts prefer this position in ventilated patients. They made clear that the position of a ventilated patient in bed depended on many determinants. Therefore, given the scientific uncertainty about the benefits and harms of a semi-upright position, this position could only be recommended as the preferred position with the necessary restrictions.

  1. Treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in elderly patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Keigo; Asato, Ryo; Tsuji, Jun; Kanda, Tomoko; Ushiro, Kohji; Watanabe, Yoshiki; Mori, Yusuke

    2010-01-01

    The object of this study was to clarify the characteristics of treatment for elderly head and neck squamous cell cancer patients. We conducted a chart review of 177 head and neck squamous cell cancer patients who had been treated at Kyoto Medical Center, from 2005 through 2009. All the collected data were analyzed to compare the clinical features and the treatment outcomes between the younger group ( or =75, EG, n=46). Male to female ratio was lower in EG (5.6:1 vs. 1.7:1, p<0.01). C urative treatment was performed in most of the patients with early disease (stage I-II) in both groups (96.7% vs. 90.5%), while the ratio of curative treatment was significantly lower in EG patients with advanced stage disease (stage III-IV) (92.3% vs. 52.0%, p<0.01). There was no significant difference in the frequency of adopted treatment modality (surgery or radiotherapy) between YG and EG. Adjuvant chemotherapy or postoperative radiotherapy was avoided in most of EG patients. Local complication rates after major surgery for advanced cases were similar in both groups (30.8% vs. 27.3%), while a higher systemic complication rate was observed in EG (0% vs. 27.3%). After curative treatment, there was no difference in disease specific three-year survival rates between YG and EG (100% vs. 100% in early stage disease, 65.2% vs. 60.6% in advanced disease, Kaplan-Meier curve). Although treatment of elderly patients with head and neck cancer can be inhibited by poor performance status and/or concomitant diseases, clinical results after curative treatment are comparable to those of younger patients. (author)

  2. Extremes of shock index predicts death in trauma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen R Odom

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: We noted a bimodal relationship between mortality and shock index (SI, the ratio of heart rate to systolic blood pressure. Aims: To determine if extremes of SI can predict mortality in trauma patients. Settings and Designs: Retrospective evaluation of adult trauma patients at a tertiary care center from 2000 to 2012 in the United States. Materials and Methods: We examined the SI in trauma patients and determined the adjusted mortality for patients with and without head injuries. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive statistics and multivariable logistic regression. Results: SI values demonstrated a U-shaped relationship with mortality. Compared with patients with a SI between 0.5 and 0.7, patients with a SI of 1.3 had an odds ratio of death of 3.1. (95% CI 1.6–5.9. Elevated SI is associated with increased mortality in patients with isolated torso injuries, and is associated with death at both low and high values in patients with head injury. Conclusion: Our data indicate a bimodal relationship between SI and mortality in head injured patients that persists after correction for various co-factors. The distribution of mortality is different between head injured patients and patients without head injuries. Elevated SI predicts death in all trauma patients, but low SI values only predict death in head injured patients.

  3. The role of whole-body computed tomography in the diagnosis of thoracic injuries in severely injured patients - a retrospective multi-centre study based on the trauma registry of the German trauma society (TraumaRegister DGU®).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Patricia; Kulla, Martin; Kerwagen, Fabian; Lefering, Rolf; Friemert, Benedikt; Palm, Hans-Georg

    2017-08-15

    Thoracic injuries are a leading cause of death in polytrauma patients. Early diagnosis and treatment are of paramount importance. Whole-body computed tomography (WBCT) has largely replaced traditional imaging techniques such as conventional radiographs and focused computed tomography (CT) as diagnostic tools in severely injured patients. It is still unclear whether WBCT has led to higher rates of diagnosis of thoracic injuries and thus to a change in outcomes. In a retrospective study based on the trauma registry of the German Trauma Society (TraumaRegister DGU ® ), we analysed data from 16,545 patients who underwent treatment in 59 hospitals between 2002 and 2012 (ISS ≥ 9). The 3 years preceding and the 3 years following the introduction of WBCT as a standard imaging modality for the investigation of severely injured patients were assessed for every hospital. Accordingly, patients were assigned to either the pre-WBCT or the WBCT group. We compared the numbers of thoracic injuries and the outcomes of patients before and after the routine use of WBCT. A total of 13,564 patients (pre-WBCT: n = 5005, WBCT: n = 8559) were included. Relevant thoracic injuries were detected in 47.8%. There were no major differences between the patient groups in injury severity (pre-WBCT: median ISS 21; WBCT: median ISS 22), injury patterns and demographics. After the introduction of WBCT, only minor changes were observed regarding the rates of most thoracic injuries. Clinically relevant injuries were pulmonary contusions (pre-WBCT: 18.5%; WBCT: 28.7%), injuries to the lung parenchyma (pre-WBCT: 12.6%; WBCT: 5.9%), multiple rib fractures (pre-WBCT: 10.6%; WBCT: 21.6%), and pneumothoraces (pre-WBCT: 17.3%; WBCT: 21.6%). The length of stay in the intensive care unit (pre-WBCT: 10.8 days; WBCT: 9.7 days) and in hospital (pre-WBCT: 26.2 days; WBCT: 23.3 days) decreased. There was no difference in overall mortality (pre-WBCT: 15.5%; WBCT: 15.6%). The routine use of WBCT in the

  4. Effect of Pretreatment Anemia on Treatment Outcome of Concurrent Radiochemotherapy in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortin, Andre; Wang Changshu; Vigneault, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of anemia on outcome of treatment with radiochemotherapy in patients with head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: The data of 196 patients with Stage II-IV head-and-neck cancer treated with concomitant cisplatin-based radiochemotherapy were retrospectively reviewed. Anemia was defined according to World Health Organization criteria as hemoglobin 140 g/L. Conclusions: Anemia was strongly associated with local control and survival in this cohort of patients with head-and-neck cancer receiving radiochemotherapy

  5. Noncompliance to guidelines in head and neck cancer treatment; associated factors for both patient and physician

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dronkers, Emilie A. C.; Mes, Steven W.; Wieringa, Marjan H.; Schroeff, Marc P. van der; Baatenburg de Jong, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Decisions on head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treatment are widely recognized as being difficult, due to high morbidity, often involving vital functions. Some patients may therefore decline standard, curative treatment. In addition doctors may propose alternative, nonstandard treatments. Little attention is devoted, both in literature and in daily practice, to understanding why and when HNSCC patients or their physicians decline standard, curative treatment modalities. Our objective is to determine factors associated with noncompliance in head and neck cancer treatment for both patients and physicians and to assess the influence of patient compliance on prognosis. We did a retrospective study based on the medical records of 829 patients with primary HNSCC, who were eligible for curative treatment and referred to our hospital between 2010 and 2012. We analyzed treatment choice and reasons for nonstandard treatment decisions, survival, age, gender, social network, tumor site, cTNM classification, and comorbidity (ACE27). Multivariate analysis using logistic regression methods was performed to determine predictive factors associated with non-standard treatment following physician or patient decision. To gain insight in survival of the different groups of patients, we applied a Cox regression analysis. After checking the proportional hazards assumption for each variable, we adjusted the survival analysis for gender, age, tumor site, tumor stage, comorbidity and a history of having a prior tumor. 17 % of all patients with a primary HNSCC did not receive standard curative treatment, either due to nonstandard treatment advice (10 %) or due to the patient choosing an alternative (7 %). A further 3 % of all patients refused any type of therapy, even though they were considered eligible for curative treatment. Elderliness, single marital status, female gender, high tumor stage and severe comorbidity are predictive factors. Patients declining standard treatment

  6. Oral adverse events to radiotherapy in geriatric patients with head and neck cancer. INOR. 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Heredia, Gilda L.; Miranda Tarrago, Josefa; Lence Anta, Juan; Chong Chu, Ivon

    2009-01-01

    For every million people newly diagnosed with cancer, up to 400,000 may have oral complications. The trend toward increasing age of the population and the need to keep patients in good oral health requires prior dental care in patients with cancer who are subjected to various treatments onco specific. We tried to show adverse reactions early and late treatment related radiation the existing oral health status in patients with head and neck cancer. We performed a prospective study of patients diagnosed with head and neck cancer treated with radiation in the period from January to December 2008, at the National Institute of Oncology and Radiobiology. 100 patients were examined. Adverse events were collected and their intensity, classified according to CTC version 3.1. 70 patients were initially evaluated as being deficient in the oral health status. Xerostomia and mucositis immediate adverse events were more frequent and intense, while the caries postradiation and consequential events were delayed with greater frequency. We found an association between oral health status and the occurrence of adverse events, which resulted in treatment interruptions. The persistent oral conditions determine the duration and intensity of adverse events mouth of Radiotherapy, which leads to treatment interruptions, with implications for therapeutic results. (Author)

  7. Radioprotective effect of Punica granatum extract in head and neck cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amulya, T.M.; Bhandary, Satheesh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    To study protective role of pomegranate extract on radiation induced dermatitis and mucositis in head and neck cancer patients, a prospective, clinical, double blind case control study was carried out. 60 patients (30 active and controls) undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck cancer were studied for 12 months. Patients in study group were given whole fruit pomegranate extract. Each capsule contained 300 mg of whole fruit extract, each capsule contains 40% polyphenols and 27% punicalagin. Each patient was given 2 capsules every day for a period of 6 to 7 weeks. The skin and mucosal changes was graded according to the Acute Radiation Morbidity Scoring criteria (RTOG) for skin and mucous membrane. Among the 30 patients who received the pomegranate extract, 27 had grade 1, 2 had grade 2 and 1 had grade 3 dermatitis. Whereas those who did not receive the extract, 20 had grade 2 dermatitis, 7 had grade 3 dermatitis and 3 had grade 4 dermatitis. Among the 30 patients who received the pomegranate extract, 10 had grade 0, 17 had grade 1 and 3 had grade 2 mucositis. Whereas of those who did not receive the extract, 21 had grade 2 mucositis, 9 had grade 3 mucositis. The results were statistically significant. Our study is one of the first study in humans to demonstrate the effectiveness of pomegranate extract in preventing radiation dermatitis and mucositis. (author)

  8. Interactive eBooks in educating patients and their families about head injury regardless of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahyouni, Ronald; Mahmoodi, Amin; Mahmoodi, Amir; Huang, Melissa; Tran, Diem Kieu; Chen, Jefferson W

    2017-05-01

    Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is a common and debilitating injury that is particularly prevalent in patients over 60. Given the influence of head injury on dementia (and vice versa), and the increased likelihood of ground-level falls, elderly patients are vulnerable to TBI. Educational interventions can increase knowledge and influence preventative activity to decrease the likelihood of further TBI. We sought to determine the efficacy of interactive tablet-based educational interventions in elderly patients on self-reported knowledge. Patients and family members, ages 20-90, presenting to a NeuroTrauma clinic completed a pre-survey to assess baseline TBI or concussion knowledge, depending on their diagnosis. Participants then received an interactive electronic book (eBook), or a text-based pamphlet with identical information, and completed a post-survey to test interim knowledge improvement. All participants (n=180), regardless of age, had significantly higher post-survey scores (peBook (n=39) scored lower than their younger counterparts despite higher pre-survey scores (peBook (n=20, 90) significantly improved on the post-survey (peBook (p<0.01, 95% CI). We demonstrated that interactive educational interventions are effective in the elderly TBI population. Enhanced educational awareness in the elderly population, especially patients at risk or with prior TBI, may prevent further head injury by educating patients on the importance of avoiding further head injury and taking precautionary measures to decrease the likelihood of further injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Incidence and risk factors of hypomagnesemia in head and neck cancer patients treated with cetuximab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Enokida

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Hypomagnesemia is a common adverse event during cetuximab (Cmab treatment. However, few reports have investigated the incidence and risk factors of hypomagnesemia in head and neck cancer patients treated with Cmab. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 131 head and neck cancer patients who received Cmab-containing therapy. Main eligibility criteria were ≥3 Cmab administrations, no prior EGFR-directed therapy, and no prophylactic Mg supplementation.Results Median baseline serum Mg level and number of Cmab administrations were 2.2 mg/dl and eight, respectively. Overall incidence of hypomagnesemia was 50.4% (grade 1, 46.6%; grade 2, 3.1%; grade 3, 0%; grade 4, 0.8% and differed between patients treated with palliative chemotherapy and bioradiation (Cmab and radiation (63% vs. 24%; p<0.01. Independent risk factors were low baseline serum Mg [Odds ratio (OR 161.988, 95% confidence interval (CI 9.436-2780.895], ≥7 Cmab administrations (OR 3.56, 95% CI 1.16-13.98, and concurrent administration of platinum (cisplatin; OR 23.695, 95% CI 5.219-107.574, carboplatin; OR 5.487, 95% CI 1.831-16.439. Respective incidence of hypomagnesemia in patients in high- (concurrent platinum and ≥7 Cmab administrations and low-risk (no concurrent platinum and <7 Cmab administrations groups was 66.0% and 6.6% (P<0.001, OR 28.0. Conclusion Cmab is associated with a significant risk of hypomagnesemia in patients with head and neck cancer with longer term administration and concurrent platinum therapy. High-risk patients should be treated with particular care.

  10. The unipolar ASR : Viable option in unsalvageable femoral head conditions in the young patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marya SKS

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The management of unsalvageable femoral head conditions in the young patient has remained an unresolved dilemma. Articular surface replacement of the hip has recently made some headway in terms of providing near-normal hip joint mechanics and function. However, this surgery has been limited to early stages of arthritis only with reasonable maintenance of head-neck congruity and morphology. Femoral neck fractures, osteonecrosis with large segment collapse, advanced arthritis with femoral incongruity, etc are traditional contraindications to the resurfacing technique. Methods: We present here a report on our series of 20 cases of unsalvageable femoral heads in young patients (age range, 27 to 52yrs, over a twelve month period (Aug 2004 to Jul 2005, treated with the unipolar ASR prosthesis. Fifteen patients (two had bilateral hip pathology had primary or secondary arthritis (degenerative, post-traumatic, ankylosing spondylitis and post-avascular necrosis while three had old operated femoral neck fractures. All patients underwent hip replacement surgery using the Unipolar ASR prosthesis. Results: Clinical and radiological results at 6-month follow up have been very encouraging and warrant further study. At an average of 4 months post-operatively, patients were able to squat, sit on the ground and perform light sporting activities. Conclusions: The Unipolar ASR prosthesis is an extension of the articular resurfacing technique employing similar principles (large size bearings, metal-on-metal interfaces, and has incorporated the advantages of the uncemented technique. We propose that this technique be more frequently used so as to brighten the prognosis of the young active patient with unsalvageable hip conditions, especially in the Asian scenario.

  11. A novel approach to patient self-monitoring of sonographic examinations using a head-mounted display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Masaharu; Kihara, Kazunori; Yoshida, Soichiro; Ito, Masaya; Takeshita, Hideki; Ishioka, Junichiro; Matsuoka, Yoh; Numao, Noboru; Saito, Kazutaka; Fujii, Yasuhisa

    2015-01-01

    Patients' use of a head-mounted display during their sonographic examinations could provide them with information about their diseases in real time and might help improve "patient-centered care." We conducted this prospective study to evaluate the feasibility of a modern head-mounted display for patient self-monitoring of sonographic examinations. In November and December 2013, 58 patients were enrolled. Patients wore a head-mounted display (HMZ-T2; Sony Corporation, Tokyo, Japan) during their sonographic examinations and watched their own images in real time. After the sonographic examinations, the patients completed a questionnaire, in which they evaluated the utility of the head-mounted display, their understanding of their diseases, their satisfaction with using the head-mounted display, and any adverse events. Until November 26, 2013, patients' names were requested on the questionnaire; after that date, the questionnaire was changed to be anonymous. Of the 58 patients, 56 (97%) elected to participate in this study. The head-mounted display was reported to have good image quality by 42 patients (75%) and good wearability by 39 (70%). Thirty-six patients (64%) reported they had deepened their understanding of their diseases. There were no major complications, and only 2 patients (4%) had mild eye fatigue. There was no significant association between questionnaire results and patient characteristics. None of the questionnaire results changed significantly after the questionnaire was made anonymous. The use of a modern head-mounted display by patients during sonographic examinations provided good image quality with acceptable wearability. It could deepen their understanding of their diseases and help develop patient-centered care. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  12. Prevalence and management of pulmonary comorbidity in patients with lung and head and neck cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottlieb, Magnus; Marsaa, Kristoffer; Godtfredsen, Nina S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The simultaneous presence of cancer and other medical conditions (comorbidity) is frequent. Cigarette smoking is the major risk factor for as well head and neck cancer (HNC) and lung cancer (LC) as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). COPD is the most common comorbidity in LC...... guidelines. Secondary outcome was feasibility, i.e. the proportion of eligible patients that accepted follow-up in the pulmonary clinic for 24 weeks in addition to oncological treatment. The design of the randomized trail is described in detail. RESULTS: In total 130 patients of whom 65% had LC and 35% HNC...

  13. Analysis of endodontic therapy in patients irradiated for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seto, B.G.; Beumer, J. III; Kagawa, T.; Klokkevold, P.; Wolinsky, L.

    1985-01-01

    The outcome of endodontic therapy in 16 patients irradiated for head and neck cancer was studied. Thirty-five postradiation endodontically treated teeth (54 roots) were included in the study. The follow-up period ranged from 6 months to 54 months. At the time of last follow-up, 46 of 54 roots were being maintained. No osteoradionecroses were seen in association with teeth that had been endodontically treated. From this review, it is clear that endodontic therapy is a viable method of treating diseased teeth in patients irradiated for oral neoplasms

  14. Periodontal aspects of patients subjected to the radiotherapy in region of head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogueira Moreira, Allyson; Bueno, Audrey C.

    2007-01-01

    Mouth cancer is the sixth most frequent type in the world's population, affecting mostly developing countries. The treatment of choice for this neoplasm is the surgery associated with radiotherapy and / or chemotherapy, which often cause mouth adverse effects. The periodontal reaction to the suffering irradiation morphological and histological alterations decreased the ability of repairing and increased vulnerability to infections. The mouth conditions of the patients who will undergo cancer therapy should be assessed prior to initiation of treatment, mainly to prevent complications. This study aimed to do a literature review on the development of periodontal disease in patients undergoing radiotherapy in head and neck region [es

  15. The outcome after head injury in patients with radiologically demonstrated brain contusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eide, P.K.; Tysnes, O.B.

    1993-01-01

    The early and late outcome was evaluated in head injury patients who presented brain contusion(s) on the cranial CT scan and in patients hospitalized for concussion. There was a high degree of concurrence between mortality and CT findings. Late complaints were common among cases of concussion of the brain. However, the frequency of impaired memory and concentration, speech problems, paresis and epileptic seizures was increased in cases where the CT scan showed brain contusion. Adaptive and social functioning was most impaired in cases with multifocal contusions in both hemispheres. 16 refs., 5 tabs

  16. Assessment of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) in head and neck cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakuta, Risako; Matsuura, Kazuto; Noguchi, Tetsuya; Katagiri, Katsunori; Imai, Takayuki; Ishida, Eichi; Saijyo, Shigeru; Kato, Kengo

    2011-01-01

    As nutrition support for head and neck cancer patients who receive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and whose oral cavity or pharynx is exposed to radiation, we perform percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube placement. We examined 235 patients who underwent PEG in our division between January 2003 and December 2009. For 64% of them, the purpose of performing PEG was nutrition support for CRT, of whom 74% actually used the tube. However, the situation varied according to the primary sites of patients. Forty-four percent of laryngeal cancer patients who underwent PEG actually used the tube, which was a significantly lower rate than others. Also, 81% of them removed the PEG tube within one year. These findings suggest that PEG-tube placement for nutrition support is not indispensable for all CRT cases. Therefore, we recommend performing PEG for oral, oropharyngeal, and hypopharyngeal cancer patients. (author)

  17. Secondary oesophageal or gastric cancer in patients treated for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenlund Andersen, Anja; Bjerring, Ole Steen; Godballe, Christian

    2016-01-01

    SPM. CONCLUSION: In this study, we confirm that there is an elevated risk of developing oesophageal and gastric cancer in the Danish population of patients with a cancer in the supraglottic or hypopharyngeal region. Therefore, we recommend close follow-up of these patients and a low threshold......INTRODUCTION: Patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) are at an elevated risk of developing second primary malignancies (SPM). Our objectives were to estimate the excess risk of oesophageal and gastric SPMs in patients with malignancies of the pharynx or larynx and, additionally.......004) and hypopharyngeal (OR = 3.9; p cancer compared with 3.4 years (95% CI: 3.1-4.3; range: 0.04-13.7) for patients without...

  18. Sentence comprehension following moderate closed head injury in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leikin, Mark; Ibrahim, Raphiq; Aharon-Peretz, Judith

    2012-09-01

    The current study explores sentence comprehension impairments among adults following moderate closed head injury. It was hypothesized that if the factor of syntactic complexity significantly affects sentence comprehension in these patients, it would testify to the existence of syntactic processing deficit along with working-memory problems. Thirty-six adults (18 closed head injury patients and 18 healthy controls matched in age, gender, and IQ) participated in the study. A picture-sentence matching task together with various tests for memory, language, and reading abilities were used to explore whether sentence comprehension impairments exist as a result of a deficit in syntactic processing or of working-memory dysfunction. Results indicate significant impairment in sentence comprehension among adults with closed head injury compared with their non-head-injured peers. Results also reveal that closed head injury patients demonstrate considerable decline in working memory, short-term memory, and semantic knowledge. Analysis of the results shows that memory impairment and syntactic complexity contribute significantly to sentence comprehension difficulties in closed head injury patients. At the same time, the presentation mode (spoken or written language) was found to have no effect on comprehension among adults with closed head injury, and their reading abilities appear to be relatively intact.

  19. Dental and nutritional management of the head and neck cancer patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W. Robert; Sandow, Pamela L.; Moore, Giselle J.

    1997-01-01

    This course will examine the expected acute and late normal tissue toxicities associated with the delivery of high dose radiation therapy to the head and neck region. The purpose of this course will be to identify strategies to reduce radiotherapy-related toxicity without compromising adequate tumor treatment. A multidisciplinary approach will be emphasized and the following topics will be addressed: 1) Appropriate dental evaluation prior to the institution of treatment, oral care during radiation therapy and management of dental complications following completion of treatment. 2) Treatment techniques that accurately localize the target tissue, displace normal tissues from high dose volume and reduce the volume of normal tissue included in the radiation portals. 3) The investigative use of radioprotective agents. 4) The nutritional management of head and neck cancer patients including enteral and parenteral nutrition. 5) The use of medications to reduce the severity of acute symptomatology before, during and after radiation therapy

  20. Cervical vertebral column morphology and head posture in preorthodontic patients with anterior open bite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Phong; Sarauw, Martin Toft; Sonnesen, Liselotte

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Cervical vertebral column morphology and head posture were examined and related to craniofacial morphology in preorthodontic children and adolescents with anterior open bite. METHODS: One hundred eleven patients (ages, 6-18 years) with an anterior open bite of more than 0 mm were...... posture were made on profile radiographs. RESULTS: Deviations in the cervical vertebral column morphology occurred in 23.7% of the subjects in the skeletal open-bite group and in 19.2% in the dentoalveolar open-bite group, but the difference was not significant. Head posture was significantly more...... extended in the skeletal open-bite group compared with the dentoalveolar open-bite group (craniovertical angle [Mx/VER], P posture was associated with craniofacial morphology: extended posture was associated with a large cranial base angle...

  1. Dental and nutritional management of the head and neck cancer patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W. Robert; Sandow, Pamela L.; Moore, Giselle J.

    1996-01-01

    This course will examine the expected acute and late normal tissue toxicities associated with the delivery of high dose radiation therapy to the head and neck region. The purpose of this course will be to identify strategies to reduce radiotherapy-related toxicity without compromising adequate tumor treatment. A multidisciplinary approach will be emphasized and the following topics will be addressed: 1) Appropriate dental evaluation prior to the institution of treatment, oral care during radiation therapy and management of dental complications following completion of treatment. 2) Treatment techniques that accurately localize the target tissue, displace normal tissues from high dose volume and reduce the volume of normal tissue included in the radiation portals. 3) The investigative use of radioprotective agents. 4) The nutritional management of head and neck cancer patients including enteral and parenteral nutrition. 5) The use of medications to reduce the severity of acute symptomatology before, during and after radiation therapy

  2. The Impact of Radiation Treatment Time on Survival in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaikh, Talha; Handorf, Elizabeth A.; Murphy, Colin T.; Mehra, Ranee; Ridge, John A.; Galloway, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of radiation treatment time (RTT) in head and neck cancers on overall survival (OS) in the era of chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: Patients with diagnoses of tongue, hypopharynx, larynx, oropharynx, or tonsil cancer were identified by use of the National Cancer Database. RTT was defined as date of first radiation treatment to date of last radiation treatment. In the definitive setting, prolonged RTT was defined as >56 days, accelerated RTT was defined as 49 days, accelerated RTT was defined as <40 days, and standard RTT was defined as 40 to 49 days. We used χ"2 tests to identify predictors of RTT. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to compare OS among groups. Cox proportional hazards model was used for OS analysis in patients with known comorbidity status. Results: 19,531 patients were included; 12,987 (67%) had a standard RTT, 4,369 (34%) had an accelerated RTT, and 2,165 (11%) had a prolonged RTT. On multivariable analysis, accelerated RTT (hazard ratio [HR] 0.84; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.73-0.97) was associated with an improved OS, and prolonged RTT (HR 1.25; 95% CI 1.14-1.37) was associated with a worse OS relative to standard RTT. When the 9,200 (47%) patients receiving definitive concurrent chemoradiation were examined, prolonged RTT (HR 1.29; 95% CI 1.11-1.50) was associated with a worse OS relative to standard RTT, whereas there was no significant association between accelerated RTT and OS (HR 0.76; 95% CI 0.57-1.01). Conclusion: Prolonged RTT is associated with worse OS in patients receiving radiation therapy for head and neck cancer, even in the setting of chemoradiation. Expeditious completion of radiation should continue to be a quality metric for the management of head and neck malignancies.

  3. Effect of psychosocial distress on outcome for head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Allen M; Hsu, Sophia; Felix, Care; Garst, Jordan; Yoshizaki, Taeko

    2018-03-01

    To determine the impact of pretreatment psychosocial distress on compliance to radiation therapy (RT) and clinical outcomes for patients with head and neck cancer STUDY DESIGN: Self-reported responses to the mood and anxiety domains of the University of Washington Quality of Life instrument were reviewed among 133 patients with newly diagnosed head and neck cancer prior to initiating RT. Varying definitions were used (total number of unexpectedly missed RT days, >5 days continuous interruption of RT outside of weekends, >10 days continuous interruption of RT, and failure to complete prescribed course of RT) to analyze the effect of psychosocial disruption on compliance. Survival was determined using the Kaplan-Meier method. The prevalence of pretreatment depression and anxiety was 23% and 47%, respectively. Continuous RT breaks >5 days occurred in 46%, 33%, 10%, 9%, and 0% of patients whose mood was rated as "extremely depressed," "somewhat depressed," "neither in a good mood or depressed," "generally good," and "excellent," respectively (P = .0016). The corresponding proportion of patients who did not complete their planned RT was 23%, 11%, 5%, and 3%, and 0%, respectively (P = .043). The 2-year overall survival of patients who were "extremely depressed" or "somewhat depressed" at baseline was 71% versus 86% for all others (P = .026). Depression was independently associated with decreased overall survival on logistical regression analysis. Pretreatment depression predicted for decreased RT compliance and inferior survival for head and neck cancer. Additional research to overcome potential barriers to treatment in this setting may be warranted. 4. Laryngoscope, 128:641-645, 2018. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  4. Progressive Epidural Hematoma in Patients with Head Trauma: Incidence, Outcome, and Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Progressive epidural hematoma (PEDH after head injury is often observed on serial computerized tomography (CT scans. Recent advances in imaging modalities and treatment might affect its incidence and outcome. In this study, PEDH was observed in 9.2% of 412 head trauma patients in whom two CT scans were obtained within 24 hours of injury, and in a majority of cases, it developed within 3 days after injury. In multivariate logistic regression, patient gender, age, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS score at admission, and skull fracture were not associated with PEDH, whereas hypotension (odds ratio (OR 0.38, 95% confidence interval (CI 0.17–0.84, time interval of the first CT scanning (OR 0.42, 95% CI 0.19–0.83, coagulopathy (OR 0.36, 95% CI 0.15–0.85, or decompressive craniectomy (DC (OR 0.46, 95% CI 0.21–0.97 was independently associated with an increased risk of PEDH. The 3-month postinjury outcome was similar in patients with PEDH and patients without PEDH (χ2=0.07, P=0.86. In conclusion, epidural hematoma has a greater tendency to progress early after injury, often in dramatic and rapid fashion. Recognition of this important treatable cause of secondary brain injury and the associated risk factors may help identify the group at risk and tailor management of patients with TBI.

  5. Influence of body composition on survival in patients with head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnell, Lucy Hynds; Sperry, Steven M; Anderson, Carryn M; Pagedar, Nitin A

    2016-04-01

    Recent evidence has suggested links between obesity and outcomes for various types of cancer. This study investigates the impact that body composition has on survival in patients with head and neck cancer. Data prospectively collected from 578 patients were analyzed using Cox regression models to determine independent associations that pretreatment body mass index (BMI) and 3-month weight change have on observed survival. Higher BMIs were associated with better survival (p < .001). Five-year rates ranged from 33.8% for underweight to 75.3% for overweight/obese patients. Patients with stable weight had the highest 5-year rate (72.6%; p = .019), whereas patients who gained ≥5% had worse survival (45.8%) than those who lost ≥5% (65.8%). BMI independently predicted survival, whereas weight change was not an independent predictor. This demonstrated association between BMI and survival provides useful information when offering prognoses and investigating optimal treatments © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: E261-E267, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Evaluation of some oral postradiotherapy sequelae in patients treated for head and neck tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubira, Cassia Maria Fischer; Devides, Nadia Juliana; Ubeda, Liliane Torsani; Lauris, Jose Roberto; Rubira-Bullen, Izabel Regina Fischer; Damante, Jose Humberto

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the oral sequelae of radiotherapy in patients treated between 1999 and 2003 for head and neck tumors. One-hundred patients (24 women, 76 men) ranging in age from 30 to 83 years (mean 59.2 years) were examined. Time since radiotherapy ranged from 1 to 72 months (mean 28 months). The total mean radiation dose received by the patients was 5,955 cGy. The evaluation protocol included anamnesis, intraoral and extraoral examination, measurement of stimulated salivary flow and salivary pH. Symptoms reported by the patients included dry mouth (68%), dysphagia (38%), and dysgeusia (30%). In 64% of the patients, the mean stimulated salivary flow rate was less than 0.7 ml/min. The mean salivary pH was 6.97 (± 0.714). Stimulated salivary flow increased with increasing postradiotherapy time (p < 0.05). The prevalence of mucositis was associated with higher radiation doses (p < 0.05), and the prevalence of atrophic candidiasis was related to a longer post-treatment period (p < 0.05). Two cases of recurrence of the primary tumor were detected during the study. The main effect of radiotherapy in the head and neck region was a reduction of the salivary flow rate, even though our study demonstrated that there was a modest late improvement of the salivary flow. (author)

  7. Detection of treatment setup errors between two CT scans for patients with head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezzell, Leah C.; Hansen, Eric K.; Quivey, Jeanne M.; Xia Ping

    2007-01-01

    Accuracy of treatment setup for head and neck patients undergoing intensity-modulated radiation therapy is of paramount importance. The conventional method using orthogonal portal images can only detect translational setup errors while the most frequent setup errors for head and neck patients could be rotational errors. With the rapid development of image-guided radiotherapy, three-dimensional images are readily acquired and can be used to detect both translational and rotational setup errors. The purpose of this study is to determine the significance of rotational variations between two planning CT scans acquired for each of eight head and neck patients, who experienced substantial weight loss or tumor shrinkage. To this end, using a rigid body assumption, we developed an in-house computer program that utilizes matrix transformations to align point bony landmarks with an incremental best-fit routine. The program returns the quantified translational and rotational shifts needed to align the scans of each patient. The program was tested using a phantom for a set of known translational and rotational shifts. For comparison, a commercial treatment planning system was used to register the two CT scans and estimate the translational errors for these patients. For the eight patients, we found that the average magnitudes and standard deviations of the rotational shifts about the transverse, anterior-posterior, and longitudinal axes were 1.7±2.3 deg., 0.8±0.7 deg., and 1.8±1.1 deg., respectively. The average magnitudes and standard deviations of the translational shifts were 2.5±2.6 mm, 2.9±2.8 mm, 2.7±1.7 mm while the differences detected between our program and the CT-CT fusion method were 1.8±1.3 mm, 3.3±5.4 mm, and 3.0±3.4 mm in the left-right, anterior-posterior, and superior-inferior directions, respectively. A trend of larger rotational errors resulting in larger translational differences between the two methods was observed. In conclusion, conventional

  8. Acute renal failure following contrast injection for head computerized tomography in two patients with diabetic nephropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsunaga, Hiroshi; Sando, Hiroyuki; Nunokawa, Tomoo; Murakami, Tooru; Miyakawa, Yuzo

    1981-01-01

    Two cases of diabetes mellitus with renal and retinal involvement developed acute renal failure after undergoing head computerized tomography. The first case was a 62-year-old male who had been diagnosed as having diabetes 25 years before. He had diabetic retinopathy of Scott IIIb. Before head computerized tomography, the serum BUN was 37 mg/dl, and creatinine was 4.1 mg/dl. Oliguria began immediately after the scanning and confinued for 48 hr. The serum levels of BUN and creatinine rose to 106 and 7.7 mg/dl, respectively. Case 2 was a 49-year-old male who had been diagnosed as having diabetes 15 years before. He showed Scott IIb and IV retinopathy. The BUN and creatinine levels in the serum were 32 and 2.3 mg/dl, respectively. After receiving head computerized tomography, he developed oliguria and remained oliguric for 48 hr. During that period, the serum levels of BUN and creatinin were elevated to 112 and 7.5 mg/dl, respectively. Fortunately, both of these patients recovered from the oliguria without resorting to hemodialysis. The iodine contrast medium routinely used for contrast enhancement in the head computerized tomography was implicated in the acute renal failure of these patients. Only elevn cases have so far been reported in the literature who developed acute renal failure following computerized tomography. In view of the three or four times greater dosis of iodine contrast medium employed in computerized tomography compared to intravenous pyelography, the acute incidence of such complications might be much higher. Among the thirteen cases including the two reported here, as many as eight were diabetic. It is well recongnized that the incidence of acute renal failure after intravenous pyelography is particularly high in cases of diabetic nephropathy. (author)

  9. Vestibular stimulation after head injury: effect on reaction times and motor speech parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, A

    1989-01-01

    Earlier studies by other authors indicate that vestibular stimulation may improve attention and dysarthria in head injured patients. In the present study of five severely head injured patients and five controls, the effect of vestibular stimulation on reaction times (reflecting attention) and some...... motor speech parameters (reflecting dysarthria) was investigated. After eight weeks with regular stimulation, it was concluded that reaction time changes were individual and consistent for a given subject. Only occasionally were they shortened after stimulation. However, reaction time was lengthened...... in three cases, prohibiting further stimulation in one case. Motion sickness was prohibitive in a second case. However, after-stimulation increase of phonation time and/or vital capacity was found in one patient and four controls. Oral diadochokinetic rates were slowed in several cases. Collectively, when...

  10. Dose assessment of the patient and the helper in emergency head computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Rong-Chou; Yu, Cheng-Ching; Hsu, Fang-Yuh; Chen, Tou-Rong; Hsu, Shih-Ming; Tyan, Yeu-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) becomes more and more important and is frequently used in modern diagnostic techniques. CT offers an effective diagnosis on lesion and pathology; however, it also delivers a radiation dose to patients. Besides, in some special emergency cases, the patient may require someone to help him in the examination room to perform the head CT, due to the patient lost intellectual and operational capacity. This study evaluated the delivered radiation dose and the risk of radiation-induced cancer for the patient and for the helper after carrying out the emergent head CT examination. A Rando phantom with thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) chips inside relevant organs was used to simulate the patient during head CT examination. An effective dose of 2.06 ± 0.16 mSv and 1.46 ± 0.07 mSv without and with wearing the lead apron were found respectively, considering ICRP 60 recommendation. ICRP 103 recommendations the readings would have been 1.29 ± 0.15 mSv and 0.71 ± 0.04 mSv. The effective dose determined from the dose-length product (DLP) method (2.19 mSv) was similar to the value (2.06 ± 0.16 mSv) estimated by TLD method considering the ICRP 60 recommendation (without lead apron). Assuming a 5% total risk for fatal cancer per Sv in the general population, risk of radiation-induced cancer for patients were 1.03 × 10 −2 % (without lead apron) and 7.80 × 10 −3 % (with lead apron) for ICRP 60, and were 6.45 × 10 −3 % (without lead apron) and 3.55 × 10 −3 % (with lead apron) for ICRP 103. The dose received by the helper was assessed by wearing a personal badge. The helper during emergent head CT examination may receive a personal dose equivalent (H p (10)) of 19.36 ± 5.89 μSv and 138.81 ± 101.28 μSv with and without lead apron, respectively, at distance of 0.3–1 m from the center of CT scanner. Based on the observed dose reduction of a factor of 7.17 we recommend that helpers wear lead apron in the CT examination room.

  11. Dental management for head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy: comprehensive patient based planning--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higham, Paola; Quek, Samuel; Cohen, Harold V

    2009-01-01

    Medical management of the head and neck cancer patient (HNCP) most often will include radiation therapy to the head and neck region. HNCPs with malignant disease require judicious dental treatment planning prior to radiation therapy (RT) and/or chemotherapy. RT can result in a multitude of adverse effects, both reversible and irreversible. We report a case of a patient with squamous cell carcinoma of the throat above the larynx (supraglottic), who did not adhere to dental treatment recommendations for both pre- and post radiation dental management. The focus of this case report is to create awareness within the clinician that, in addition to evaluating the patient for the disease related issues that may affect the oral cavity and dentition, a total management plan should include factors beyond the structural oral problems related to the cancer. Final treatment plans for the HNCP should include medical assessment of past dental history, oral hygiene, potential compliance, or lack of, to dental care recommendations, the emotional state of the patient, socio-economic status of the patient (lifestyle, cost of care), future quality of life, the medical and/or life prognosis of the patient.

  12. Oral candidiasis in patients receiving radiation therapy for head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zeyi; Kiyuna, Asanori; Hasegawa, Masahiro; Nakasone, Isamu; Hosokawa, Atsushi; Suzuki, Mikio

    2010-08-01

    To investigate oral candidiasis in patients with head and neck cancer before, during, and after radiation therapy, and to explore its association with clinical oropharyngeal symptoms. A cohort study. University hospital. Subjects who received radiation therapy (RT) for the treatment of head and neck cancer were divided into two groups: an oral cavity irradiated group (OIRR group, n = 29) and an oral cavity nonirradiated group (ONIRR group, n = 17). A control group consisted of 18 healthy subjects. Patients were examined for signs of oral candidiasis before, during, immediately after, and one month after RT. Mouth and throat soreness (MTS), dysphagia, and xerostomia were evaluated by self-reported questionnaires, and associations between oral candidiasis and these symptoms were analyzed. The incidence of oral candidiasis during RT was significantly higher in the OIRR group (55.2%) than in the ONIRR group (11.8%). Similarly, the occurrence of xerostomia during RT was significantly higher in the OIRR group (86.2%) than in the ONIRR group (52.9%). In the OIRR group, the mean MTS score at the 20th fraction of RT was significantly higher in patients with candidiasis (mean +/- SD, 5.8 +/- 2.1) than in those with RT-induced mucositis without candidiasis (3.7 +/- 2.0). In the OIRR group, 65.2 percent of patients who experienced dysphagia developed oral candidiasis, compared with only 10 percent in the ONIRR group. Oral candidiasis concurrent with oral mucositis due to RT may increase oropharyngeal discomfort during RT. Copyright (c) 2010 American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Characteristics of associated craniofacial trauma in patients with head injuries: An experience with 100 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra Prasad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Facial fractures and concomitant cranial injuries carry the significant potential for mortality and neurological morbidity mainly in young adults. Aims and Objectives: To analyze the characteristics of head injuries and associated facial injuries, the management options and outcome following cranio-facial trauma. Methods: This retrospective review was performed at Justice K. S. Hegde Charitable Hospital, and associated A. B. Shetty Memorial Institute of Dental sciences, Deralakatte, Mangalore. Following Ethical Committee approval, hospital charts and radiographs of 100 consecutive patients of cranio-facial trauma managed at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Neurosurgery between January 2004 and December 2004 were reviewed. Results: Majority of the patients were in the 2nd to 4th decade (79% with a male to female ratio of -8.09:1. Road traffic accidents were the common cause of craniofacial trauma in present study (54% followed by fall from height (30%. Loss of consciousness was the most common clinical symptom (62% followed by headache (33%. Zygoma was the most commonly fractured facial bone 48.2% (alone 21.2%, in combination 27.2%. Majority of patients had mild head injury and managed conservatively in present series. Causes of surgical intervention for intracranial lesions were compound depressed fracture, contusion and intracranial hematoma. Operative indications for facial fractures were displaced facial bone fractures. Major causes of mortality were associated systemic injuries. Conclusion: Adult males are the most common victims in craniofacial trauma, and road traffic accidents were responsible for the majority. Most of the patients sustained mild head injuries and were managed conservatively. Open reduction and internal fixation with miniplates was used for displaced facial bone fractures.

  14. Changes of satisfaction with appearance and working status for head and neck tumour patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hsueh-Erh

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this survey was to examine changes of satisfaction with appearance and working status of head and neck tumour patients after tumour excision and micro-reconstructive surgery. Most research related to head and neck tumour reconstruction deals with surgical techniques and complications. No reports discussed impact on personal appearance and working status. This is a retrospective cross-sectional study design with systematical sampling. One questionnaire which included three instruments was mailed to patients selected systematically from a patient list; 525 questionnaires were mailed to the potential participants and 125 returned. However, only 97 effective questionnaires were analysed. Non-parametric statistics such as Spearman correlation, Wilcoxon signed rank test, Kolmogorov-Smirnov Z test and Kruskal-Wallis test were performed as the data were not normally distributed. Participants reported that they were least satisfied with their face (mean = 2.88 SD 1.34). Compared with presurgery condition, the satisfaction with current appearance was significantly lower (Wilcoxon signed rank test, Z = -6.39, p jobs after cancer treatments. Their major reason for job change was discomfort caused by cancer treatment. Gender, employment status, type of job, type of treatment, age, duration from last radiotherapy and number of treatment modalities had an impact on satisfaction with appearance. Compared with presurgery, satisfaction with personal appearance did change negatively even after micro-reconstructive surgery had been conducted. In addition, certain participants changed their jobs because of cancer treatments. We should include job rehabilitation and body image into the daily care of head and neck cancer patients. For example, participants could learn how to use cosmetic strategies to improve their facial appearance during OPD follow-up. Thus, the negative impact might be reduced.

  15. Evaluation of femoral head viability via bone scintigraphy in the postoperative pediatric patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parikh, Ashishkumar K.; Washington, Eleby R.; Spottswood, Stephanie E.; Bobbey, Adam J.

    2018-01-01

    Evaluating postoperative patients with hardware is challenging following surgical intervention for hip maladies such as femoral neck fractures and slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE). These children are at increased risk of developing avascular necrosis, and imaging may be requested to confirm or exclude this diagnosis. Children with Legg-Calve-Perthes disease can be monitored for restoration of blood flow to the capital femoral epiphysis to guide management and help with prognosis. Although MRI is sensitive for detecting early avascular necrosis, the presence of hardware degrades image quality. This report examines the utility of bone scans for evaluating femoral head perfusion in children who have undergone surgery for femoral neck fractures, SCFE or Legg-Calve-Perthes disease. A retrospective review of 20 patients (22 scans) after fixation for femoral neck fracture, SCFE or Legg-Calve-Perthes disease from 2012 to 2015 was performed. The bone scan findings were correlated with the intraoperative findings or clinical follow-up. Twenty-one of the 22 (95%) bone scans in 19 of the 20 (95%) patients demonstrated findings consistent with clinical outcomes and/or the intraoperative appearance of the femoral head. Four of 20 patients (20%) had bone scan features of avascular necrosis, defined as ''absent'' or ''moderately diminished'' femoral head activity, which were confirmed intraoperatively and resulted in poor outcomes. Radionuclide imaging of hips in the postoperative setting is a valuable modality for assessing the risk of avascular necrosis, a complication of femoral neck fractures and SCFE and for evaluating the restoration of flow to the capital femoral epiphyses of children with Legg-Calve-Perthes disease. (orig.)

  16. Bone marrow oedema on MR imaging indicates ARCO stage 3 disease in patients with AVN of the femoral head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Reinhard; Kraus, Tobias M; Schaeffeler, Christoph; Torka, Sebastian; Schlitter, Anna Melissa; Specht, Katja; Haller, Bernhard; Waldt, Simone; Rechl, Hans; Rummeny, Ernst J; Woertler, Klaus

    2014-09-01

    To test the hypothesis that bone marrow oedema (BME) observed on MRI in patients with avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head represents an indicator of subchondral fracture. Thirty-seven symptomatic hips of 27 consecutive patients (53% women, mean age 49.2) with AVN of the femoral head and associated BME on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging were included. MR findings were correlated with computed tomography (CT) of the hip and confirmed by histopathological examination of the resected femoral head. Imaging studies were analysed by two radiologists with use of the ARCO classification. On MR imaging a fracture line could be identified in 19/37 (51%) cases, which were classified as ARCO stage 3 (n = 15) and stage 4 (n = 4). The remaining 18/37 (49%) cases were classified as ARCO stage 2. However, in all 37/37 (100%) cases a subchondral fracture was identified on CT, indicating ARCO stage 3/4 disease. The extent of subchondral fractures and the femoral head collapse was graded higher on CT as compared to MRI (P AVN, BME of the femoral head represents a secondary sign of subchondral fracture and thus indicates ARCO stage 3 disease. BME on MRI in AVN of femoral head indicates a subchondral fracture. BME in AVN of the femoral head represents ARCO stage 3/4 disease. CT identifies subchondral fractures and femoral head collapse better than MR imaging. This knowledge helps to avoid understaging and to trigger adequate treatment.

  17. Factors Associated With External and Internal Lymphedema in Patients With Head-and-Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng Jie, E-mail: jie.deng@vanderbilt.edu [School of Nursing, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Ridner, Sheila H. [School of Nursing, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Dietrich, Mary S. [School of Nursing, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Department of Biostatistics, School of Medicine, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Wells, Nancy; Wallston, Kenneth A. [School of Nursing, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Sinard, Robert J.; Cmelak, Anthony J.; Murphy, Barbara A. [Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, Tennessee (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine factors associated with the presence of secondary external and internal lymphedema in patients with head-and-neck cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: The sample included 81 patients {>=}3 months after HNC treatment. Physical and endoscopic examinations were conducted to determine if participants had external, internal, and/or combined head-and-neck lymphedema. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the factors associated with the presence of lymphedema. Results: The following factors were statistically significantly associated with presence of lymphedema: (1) location of tumor associated with presence of external (P=.009) and combined lymphedema (P=.032); (2) time since end of HNC treatment associated with presence of external (P=.004) and combined lymphedema (P=.005); (3) total dosage of radiation therapy (P=.010) and days of radiation (P=.017) associated with the presence of combined lymphedema; (4) radiation status of surgical bed was associated with the presence of internal lymphedema, including surgery with postoperative radiation (P=.030) and (salvage) surgery in the irradiated field (P=.008); and (5) number of treatment modalities associated with external (P=.002), internal (P=.039), and combined lymphedema (P=.004). No demographic, health behavior-related, or comorbidity factors were associated with the presence of lymphedema in the sample. Conclusions: Select tumor and treatment parameters are associated with increased occurrence of lymphedema in patients with HNC. Larger and longitudinal studies are needed to identify adjusted effects and causative risk factors contributing to the development of lymphedema in patients with HNC.

  18. Nutritional Interventions in Head and Neck Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemoradiotherapy: A Narrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Bossola

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present review aimed to define the role of nutritional interventions in the prevention and treatment of malnutrition in HNC patients undergoing CRT as well as their impact on CRT-related toxicity and survival. Head and neck cancer patients are frequently malnourished at the time of diagnosis and prior to the beginning of treatment. In addition, chemo-radiotherapy (CRT causes or exacerbates symptoms, such as alteration or loss of taste, mucositis, xerostomia, fatigue, nausea and vomiting, with consequent worsening of malnutrition. Nutritional counseling (NC and oral nutritional supplements (ONS should be used to increase dietary intake and to prevent therapy-associated weight loss and interruption of radiation therapy. If obstructing cancer and/or mucositis interfere with swallowing, enteral nutrition should be delivered by tube. However, it seems that there is not sufficient evidence to determine the optimal method of enteral feeding. Prophylactic feeding through nasogastric tube or percutaneous gastrostomy to prevent weight loss, reduce dehydration and hospitalizations, and avoid treatment breaks has become relatively common. Compared to reactive feeding (patients are supported with oral nutritional supplements and when it is impossible to maintain nutritional requirements enteral feeding via a NGT or PEG is started, prophylactic feeding does not offer advantages in terms of nutritional outcomes, interruptions of radiotherapy and survival. Overall, it seems that further adequate prospective, randomized studies are needed to define the better nutritional intervention in head and neck cancer patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy.

  19. The use of radiologically placed gastroctomy tubes in head and neck cancer patients receiving radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyldesley, Scott; Sheehan, Finbarr; Munk, Peter; Tsang, Victor; Skarsgard, David; Bowman, Carol A.; Hobenshield, Shirley E.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Patients undergoing radiotherapy to the head and neck area frequently experience radiation reactions that can markedly restrict oral intake, require hospitalization, and occasionally cause treatment interruptions. The Vancouver Cancer Center (VCC) has recently employed radiologically placed gastrostomy tubes (G-tubes) in the management of this problem. A review of the patients on whom this procedure had been performed is the subject of this review. Methods and Materials: Thirty-four patients had gastrostomy tubes inserted under radiologic guidance. This group is compared to a control group matched for age, sex, irradiated volume, and radiation dose, who did not have gastrostomy tubes. Patients with gastrostomy tubes were divided into two categories: (a) patients who had tubes inserted in anticipation of severe reactions, and (b) patients who developed severe radiation reactions necessitating nutritional support. Results: The gastrostomy group consisted of 65% males with an average age of 59 years and stage range of II (12%), III (24%), and IV (65%). In both the elective group and the nonelective group, patients maintained their weight at 95 to 97% of the pretreatment weight, at follow-up of 6 weeks and 3 months. This compared with an average weight loss in the control group of 9% at 6 weeks and 12% at 3 months. The length of hospitalization was a mean of 4.9 days in the elective group and 19 days in the nonelective group. Complication were low compared to those documented in the literature, but included two tube migrations, two aspirations, and one gastrointestinal bleed. Conclusions: We believe that gastrostomy tubes contribute significantly to the management of patients with head and neck cancer, particularly in maintenance of nutrition, and they may decrease the need for hospitalization

  20. Oropharyngeal candidiasis and resistance to antifungal drugs in patients receiving radiation for head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Rad DMD, MSc

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Oropharyngeal candidiasis is a common infection in patient receiving radiotherapy for head and neckcancer. Accurate and rapid identification of candida species is very important in clinical laboratory, because theincidence of candidiasis continues to rise after radiotherapy. The genus Candida has about 154 species that showdifferent level of resistance to antifungal drugs and have high degree of phenotypic similarity. The aim of this study wasto investigate oral yeast colonization and infection and resistance to antifungal drugs in these patients.METHODS: Thirty patients receiving a 6-week course of radiation therapy for treatment of head and neck cancer at theOncology Unit in Shafa Hospital, in 2008, were enrolled in the study. Specimens from patients were cultured weeklyfor Candida. All isolates were plated on CHROM agar and RPMI-based medium. They were subcultured and submittedfor antifungal susceptibility testing (nystatin, fluconazole, clotrimazole and ketoconazole and molecular typing.RESULTS: Infection (clinical and microbiological evidence occurred in 50% of the patients and Candida colonization(only microbiological evidence occurred in 70% of subjects in the first week. Candida albicans alone was isolated in94.9% of patient visits with positive cultures. Candida tropicalis was isolated from 5.1% of patient visits with positivecultures. All isolates were susceptible to nystatin, but did not respond to the other antifungal drugsCONCLUSIONS: The irradiation-induced changes of the intraoral environment such as xerostomia lead to increasedintraoral colonization by Candida species. All yeast isolates were susceptible to nystatin. Thus prophylactic therapywith nystatin should be considered for these patients.

  1. Radiography of the acutely injured shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neep, M.J.; Aziz, A.

    2011-01-01

    Routine radiological examination of the acute shoulder has been unchanged in radiology departments for many years. At UCLH (University College London Hospitals, UK) this examination consists of two projections, an AP (antero-posterior) and an LS (lateral scapula). Following a review of the related literature and the possible advantages of an axial style projection, a study was performed to evaluate whether a new projection named modified trauma axial (MTA) shoulder projection could replace the existing LS projection in the routine examination of the acute shoulder. A retrospective analysis of 244 acute shoulder examinations over a 5-month period was performed. AP, LS and MTA projections were taken with paired AP and LS, and AP and MTA radiographs were reported separately. 97 traumatic abnormalities were reported using AP and MTA whilst only 64 abnormalities were reported using AP and LS views. The MTA projection demonstrated it was significant for evaluating articular surfaces of the humeral head and glenoid, defects in the humeral head, greater tuberosity fractures, glenoid fractures and fractures of the acromion. It was established that if the LS projection was replaced with the MTA view no traumatic pathologies would have been overlooked and in fact there was a 52% increase in traumatic abnormalities detected. Use of a chi-squared test demonstrated a highly significant difference in the number of traumatic abnormalities detected between the two pairs of projection combinations (p = 0.0004). Based on this study and the examined literature the routine examination of the acutely injured shoulder is recommended to include the AP and MTA projections only.

  2. Information architecture for a patient-specific dashboard in head and neck tumor boards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeser, Alexander; Gaebel, Jan; Dietz, Andreas; Wiegand, Susanne; Oeltze-Jafra, Steffen

    2018-03-28

    Overcoming the flaws of current data management conditions in head and neck oncology could enable integrated information systems specifically tailored to the needs of medical experts in a tumor board meeting. Clinical dashboards are a promising method to assist various aspects of the decision-making process in such cognitively demanding scenarios. However, in order to provide extensive and intuitive assistance to the participating physicians, the design and development of such a system have to be user-centric. To accomplish this task, conceptual methods need to be performed prior to the technical development and integration stages. We have conducted a qualitative survey including eight clinical experts with different levels of expertise in the field of head and neck oncology. According to the principles of information architecture, the survey focused on the identification and causal interconnection of necessary metrics for information assessment in the tumor board. Based on the feedback by the clinical experts, we have constructed a detailed map of the required information items for a tumor board dashboard in head and neck oncology. Furthermore, we have identified three distinct groups of metrics (patient, disease and therapy metrics) as well as specific recommendations for their structural and graphical implementation. By using the information architecture, we were able to gather valuable feedback about the requirements and cognitive processes of the tumor board members. Those insights have helped us to develop a dashboard application that closely adapts to the specified needs and characteristics, and thus is primarily user-centric.

  3. Dasatinib Induced Avascular Necrosis of Femoral Head in Adult Patient with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A. Yassin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML is a myeloproliferative neoplasm characterized by the presence of the Philadelphia (Ph chromosome resulting from the reciprocal translocation t(9;22(q34;q11. The molecular consequence of this translocation is the generation of the BCR-ABL fusion gene, which encodes a constitutively active protein tyrosine kinase. The oncogenic protein tyrosine kinase, which is located in the cytoplasm, is responsible for the leukemia phenotype through the constitutive activation of multiple signaling pathways involved in the cell cycle and in adhesion and apoptosis. Avascular necrosis of the femoral head (AVNFH is not a specific disease. It occurs as a complication or secondary to various causes. These conditions probably lead to impaired blood supply to the femoral head. The diagnosis of AVNFH is based on clinical findings and is supported by specific radiological manifestations. We reported a case of a 34-year-old Sudanese female with CML who developed AVNFH after receiving dasatinib as a second-line therapy. Though the mechanism by which dasatinib can cause avascular necrosis (AVN is not clear, it can be postulated because of microcirculatory obstruction of the femoral head. To the best of our knowledge and after extensive literature search, this is the first reported case of AVNFH induced by dasatinib in a patient with CML.

  4. Head and neck reconstruction in the elderly patient: a safe procedure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Maximilian; Baumeister, Philipp; Jacobi, Christian

    2017-08-01

    Demographic changes strongly affect industrialized countries. While free tissue transfer was initially believed to be beneficial only for younger patients, there is an increasing number of elderly patients requiring microvascular operations in our aging society. Medical and surgical risks for head and neck cancer patients over a certain age who undergo free tissue transfer has hardly been investigated. A retrospective mono-center cohort study was performed. All patients with the age 75 or higher undergoing microvascular operations were reviewed. Patient characteristics including the ASA-status, the ACE-27-score, flap survival and postoperative medical and surgical complications were evaluated. The Clavien-Dindo-classification system for postoperative complications was applied to assess the severity of the complications. A total of 31 patients with an average age of 78.8 years were included. 4 patients suffered from venous congestion and had to undergo revision surgery. All flaps could successfully be salvaged. Higher ASA-status and ACE-score were significantly associated with postoperative medical and surgical complications and a higher severity of the complications. However , neither age nor operating time had influence on the complication rate. Microvascular free tissue transfer can be performed with a high degree of security in selected elderly patients. However, serious medical complications remain a concern, correlating strongly with high ASA and ACE-score. Careful patient selection is mandatory to reduce complications to a minimum.

  5. Change in signal intensity on MRI of fat in the head of markedly emaciated patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, K.; Ishikawa, K.; Sakai, K.

    2001-01-01

    The amount of fat in various parts of the body decreases in emaciated patients, but responds differently to disease processes. The order of disappearance of fat in various parts of the head has rarely been studied with MRI. We imaged ten patients with anorexia nervosa and one cachectic patient with a psychiatric disorder with a 1.5 T imager. Signal intensities of bone marrow of the skull, subcutaneous tissue, and orbits were assessed on T1- and T2-weighted images, and correlated with the body mass index (BMI) and haemoglobin concentration (Hb). On T1-weighted images, five patients (BMI 15.6-17.8 kg/m 2 , mean 16.6 kg/m 2 ; Hb 10.1-14.2 g/dl, mean 13.8 g/dl) showed the normal pattern of fat. One (BMI 13.6 kg/m 2 , Hb 10.4 g/dl) lost the high signal of bone marrow, but high signal of subcutaneous tissue and the orbits was preserved. High signal from bone marrow and subcutaneous tissue disappeared in three patients (BMI 11.5-13.5 kg/m 2 , mean 12.5 kg/m 2 ; Hb 7.9-9.7 g/dl, mean 8.7 g/dl), but orbital high signal was preserved. The remaining two patients (BMI 9.3 and 13.5 kg/m 2 , mean 11.5 kg/m 2 ; Hb 7.6 and 8.9 g/dl, mean 8.3 g/dl) showed complete loss of high signal from fat in the head. The order of disappearance of fat (bone marrow, subcutaneous fat, then orbits) correlated with both BMI and Hb. Atrophy of bone marrow was demonstrated on T2-weighted images in five patients with BMI 13.5 kg/m 2 or less, and Hb 9.7 g/dl or less. (orig.)

  6. Radiation-related vocal fold palsy in patients with head and neck carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaruchinda, Pariyanan; Jindavijak, Somjin; Singhavarach, Natchavadee

    2012-05-01

    Recurrent laryngeal nerve damage is a rare complication after receiving conventional radiotherapy for treatment of head and neck cancers and will always be underestimated. The purpose of the present study was to focus on the prevalence of vocal cord paralysis after irradiation and the natural history in those patients. All patients who received more than 60 Gy radiation dose of convention radiotherapy for treatment of head and neck carcinoma from Phramongkutklao Hospital and Nation Cancer Institute of Thailand were recruited in the present study duringfollow-up period between May 2006-December 2007. The subjects had to have good mobility of bilateral vocal cords with no recurrence or persistent tumor before the enrollment. Baseline characteristic and the associated symptoms of the recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis were recorded. Laryngeal examinations were done byfiberoptic laryngoscope and in suspicious cases; stroboscope and/or laryngeal electromyography were also performed. The vocal fold paralysis was diagnosed by reviewing recorded VDO by 2 laryngologist who were not involved in the present study. 70 patients; 51 male and 19female were recruited. 5 patients (7.14%) were diagnosed to have vocal cord paralysis and 2 patients (2.86%) were found to have vocal cord paresis confirmed by electromyography. Most of them were the patients with nasopharyngeal cancers (6/7) with the only one had oropharyngeal cancer (1/7). All of the paralysis/paresis was unilateral lesion; 4 on the left and 3 on the right side. The duration from the patients completed radiotherapy to the time of the diagnosis of vocal cord palsy was 14-35 months. The measure of agreement or Kappa value with 95% CI was 0.818 +/- 0.245. Associated symptoms of vocal cord palsy are hoarseness (100%), dysphagia (28.6%) and aspiration (28.6%). A significant number of vocal fold palsy may occur in patients with head and neck carcinoma after receiving conventional radiotherapy. Subcutaneous fibrosis or

  7. In-hospital mortality pattern of severely injured children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Do, Hien Quoc; Steinmetz, Jacob; Rasmussen, Lars S

    2012-01-01

    the mortality pattern of severely injured children admitted to a Danish level I trauma centre. METHODS: We included trauma patients aged 15 years or less, who subsequent a trauma team activation were admitted during the 9-year period 1999-2007. Data were collected prospectively for subjects who had a length...

  8. Plasma chromogranin A levels are increased in a small portion of patients with hereditary head and neck paragangliomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Duinen, Nicolette; Kema, Ido P.; Romijn, Johannes A.; Corssmit, Eleonora P. M.

    2011-01-01

    The majority of patients with head and neck paragangliomas (HNPGL) have biochemically silent tumours. Chromogranin A (CgA) is a tumour marker for neuroendocrine tumours. To assess the role of CgA as a tumour marker in patients with hereditary HNPGL. We included 95 consecutive patients with

  9. Plasma chromogranin A levels are increased in a small portion of patients with hereditary head and neck paragangliomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Duinen, Nicolette; Kema, Ido P.; Romijn, Johannes A.; Corssmit, Eleonora P. M.

    P>Context The majority of patients with head and neck paragangliomas (HNPGL) have biochemically silent tumours. Chromogranin A (CgA) is a tumour marker for neuroendocrine tumours. Objective To assess the role of CgA as a tumour marker in patients with hereditary HNPGL. Patients and Methods We

  10. Quality of life for patients treated for head and neck carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maingon, P.; Crehange, G.; Ligey-Bartolomeu, A.; Chamois, J.; Truc, G.; Bonnetain, F.; Bruchon, Y.; Romanet, P.

    2010-01-01

    A large consensus admits that quality of life is a multi-factorial concept including at least physical, psychical and social dimensions of the disease as well as symptoms related to the disease and to the requested treatments. Quality of life is actually considered as one of the major assessment criteria for taking care of patients with cancer and to evaluate results of clinical trials. Self-evaluation by the patient is considered as the gold standard to evaluate the clinical symptoms. This evaluation is not unambiguous. Medical doctors underestimate patients' symptoms. In the field of surgery, development of organ preservation strategies should be considered as one of the major improvement observed in the modern era of head and neck oncology. The role of xerostomia, the most frequent complication reported after head and neck radiation therapy, is major in this field. However, odynophagia is considered as the most detrimental component of quality of life. Radiation oncologists should realize the role of these parameters in order to include these concepts as relevant in the global evaluation of treatments. (authors)

  11. Comparison of different patient positioning strategies to minimize shoulder girdle artifacts in head and neck CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Stefan; Meindl, Thomas; Treitl, Marcus; Pfeifer, Klaus-Jürgen; Reiser, Maximilian

    2006-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze different patient positioning strategies for minimizing artifacts of the shoulder girdle in head and neck CT. Standardized CT examinations of three positioning groups were compared (P: patients pushed their shoulders downwards; D: similar optimization by a pulling device; N: no particular positioning optimization). Parameters analyzed were the length of the cervical spine not being superimposed by the shoulder girdle as well as noise in the supraclavicular space. In groups P and D, the portion of the cervical spine not superimposed was significantly larger than in group N (P: 10.4 cm; D: 10.6 cm; N: 8.5 cm). At the supraclavicular space, noise decreased significantly (P: 12.5 HU; D: 12.1 HU; N: 17.7 HU). No significant differences between the two position-optimized groups (P and D) were detected. Optimized shoulder positioning by the patient increases image quality in CT head and neck imaging. The use of a pulling device offers no additional advantages.

  12. [Avascular necrosis of the femoral head in a patient with severe aplastic anaemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plichta, Piotr; Pawelec, Katarzyna

    2011-01-01

    Avascular necrosis (AVN) is a pathological condition associated with numerous processes. Most frequent causes of ischaemia of the femoral head include trauma, corticosteroid therapy, radiation therapy, alcoholism, Gaucher's disease, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis. Corticosteroid therapy is considered the most frequent risk factor for developing avascular necrosis. In this paper we report a case of a 19-year old female patient who developed avascular necrosis of the right femoral head following treatment of severe aplastic anaemia. Clinical symptoms included groin pain and fever, painful abduction and internal rotation, tenderness over the right hip joint. The plain X-ray was not specific. However magnetic resonance imaging of the hip revealed changes characteristic for avascular necrosis. Conservative treatment was administrated. Two years after the onset of first clinical symptoms the patient is able to walk without pain, although the range of motion of the right hip joint is partially diminished. We evaluated the possible risk factors of AVN, diagnostic methods and prognosis. The onset of avascular necrosis should be considered as one of the relevant complications in patients with severe aplastic anaemia following immunosuppressive treatment.

  13. Fast vigilance decrement in closed head injury patients as reflected by the mismatch negativity (MMN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaipio, M L; Novitski, N; Tervaniemi, M; Alho, K; Ohman, J; Salonen, O; Näätänen, R

    2001-05-25

    Event-related potentials (ERPs) were measured from 24 chronic closed head injury (CHI) patients and 18 age- and education-matched controls. The oddball paradigm was applied while subjects were watching a silent movie. The standard (p=0.8) sound of 75 ms duration had a basic frequency of 500 Hz with harmonic partials of 1000 Hz and 1500 Hz, whereas these frequencies for the pitch deviant were each 10% higher. The frequencies of the duration deviant matched with those of the standard but was 25 ms in duration. The MMN (mismatch negativity), generated by the brain's automatic auditory change-detector mechanism, was elicited by both deviants. No significant differences in the MMN latency or amplitude for either pitch or duration deviants were found between the groups. However, the MMN amplitude for the pitch deviant decreased in the patient group during the experiment considerably faster than in controls, suggesting a faster vigilance decrement in the patients.

  14. Subchondral insufficiency fracture of the femoral head in a patient with alkaptonuria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, Takahiro; Shida, Jun-ichi; Inokuchi, Akihiko; Arizono, Takeshi [Kyushu Central Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Fukuoka-city (Japan); Yamamoto, Takuaki [Kyushu University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka-city (Japan)

    2014-06-15

    We report a patient with alkaptonuria accompanied by bilateral rapidly destructive arthrosis of the hip. The destruction of the left hip joint with its severe functional impairment necessitated total hip arthroplasty (THA). The outcome was satisfactory. Both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and pathologic findings were compatible with a subchondral insufficiency fracture. A year and half later, during a follow-up visit, the patient complained of right coxalgia. Radiography showed that the right femoral head had already disappeared, requiring THA of the right hip. Although there have been a few reports of rapid destructive hip osteoarthritis associated with ochronotic arthropathy, the pathogenesis of the destructive change is not clear. Subchondral insufficiency fracture was diagnosed on MR imaging and pathologically confirmed in our patient with alkaptonuria, suggesting that subchondral insufficiency fracture is one of the causes of ochronotic hip destruction. (orig.)

  15. Subchondral insufficiency fracture of the femoral head in a patient with alkaptonuria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Takahiro; Shida, Jun-ichi; Inokuchi, Akihiko; Arizono, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Takuaki

    2014-01-01

    We report a patient with alkaptonuria accompanied by bilateral rapidly destructive arthrosis of the hip. The destruction of the left hip joint with its severe functional impairment necessitated total hip arthroplasty (THA). The outcome was satisfactory. Both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and pathologic findings were compatible with a subchondral insufficiency fracture. A year and half later, during a follow-up visit, the patient complained of right coxalgia. Radiography showed that the right femoral head had already disappeared, requiring THA of the right hip. Although there have been a few reports of rapid destructive hip osteoarthritis associated with ochronotic arthropathy, the pathogenesis of the destructive change is not clear. Subchondral insufficiency fracture was diagnosed on MR imaging and pathologically confirmed in our patient with alkaptonuria, suggesting that subchondral insufficiency fracture is one of the causes of ochronotic hip destruction. (orig.)

  16. Subchondral insufficiency fracture of the femoral head in a patient with alkaptonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Takuaki; Shida, Jun-ichi; Inokuchi, Akihiko; Arizono, Takeshi

    2014-06-01

    We report a patient with alkaptonuria accompanied by bilateral rapidly destructive arthrosis of the hip. The destruction of the left hip joint with its severe functional impairment necessitated total hip arthroplasty (THA). The outcome was satisfactory. Both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and pathologic findings were compatible with a subchondral insufficiency fracture. A year and half later, during a follow-up visit, the patient complained of right coxalgia. Radiography showed that the right femoral head had already disappeared, requiring THA of the right hip. Although there have been a few reports of rapid destructive hip osteoarthritis associated with ochronotic arthropathy, the pathogenesis of the destructive change is not clear. Subchondral insufficiency fracture was diagnosed on MR imaging and pathologically confirmed in our patient with alkaptonuria, suggesting that subchondral insufficiency fracture is one of the causes of ochronotic hip destruction.

  17. Measuring cognitive assessment and intervention burden in patients with acquired brain injured:  Development of the ”How Much is Too Much” questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Tomaszczyk

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To design and preliminarily test a questionnaire intended to measure patient treatment burden resulting from participation in cognitive assessments and interventions. Methods: An expert consensus process was used to develop the concept of patient treatment burden and to determine the first set of questionnaire items and administration protocol. The pilot questionnaire was administered to 20 patients with mild to severe acquired brain injuries on completion of a 2-h or longer neuropsychological assessment. Following preliminary testing, the questionnaire was revised and re-evaluated by a second expert panel and content validity was assessed. Results: Burden was defined as psychologically and/or physically aversive symptoms in response to cognitive assessment or intervention. The first questionnaire contained 21 items assigned to 3 categories: physical, cognitive, and emotional. Eighty-five percent of patients endorsed symptom level increases, with “tired/fatigued” the most frequently endorsed item (80% of patients. Instructions and test items were easily understood, and the questionnaire was quick to administer. Content validity ratio (CVR of the revised questionnaire yielded 23 acceptable items and a subset met the highest CVR threshold (>0.78. Conclusion: This patient-reported outcome will ultimately help patients give voice to aversive experiences, and help clinicians and researchers to monitor and adapt assessments/treatments appropriately. Future steps in development are described.

  18. Computed Tomography Profile and its Utilization in Head Injury Patients in Emergency Department: A Prospective Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana Waganekar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Based on Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS, head injury can be classified as minor (GCS 13–15, moderate (GCS 9–12, and severe (GCS 3–8. There is a lot of controversy in the use of computed tomography (CT in head injury patients. Aims: This study was intended to estimate the rate of CT positivity in head injury patients and to define the criteria for doing CT in head injury patients. Settings and Design: This was a prospective observational study in the emergency department (ED over a 12-month period. Subjects and Methods: Study involved all head injury patients attending ED. Risk factors studied were a loss of consciousness (LOC, vomiting, seizures, ear bleed, nosebleed, external injuries, and alcohol intoxication. Statistical Analysis Used: Comparison of CT positivity with the patient's demographics and clinical characteristics was carried out using Chi-square. Results: A total of 1782 patients were included in this study. Overall CT positivity was 50.9%. In minor head injury (MHI, CT positivity rate was 38%. The study showed significant association of CT positivity with five variables: LOC >5 min, vomiting, seizures, ear bleed, and nosebleed. Conclusions: From the study, we recommend following: CT is indicated in all patients with moderate and severe head injury (GCS ≤12. Low threshold for taking CT is advisable in elderly and alcohol-intoxicated patients. In MHI, CT is indicated if any one of the following risk factors are present: LOC >5 min, history of vomiting, history of seizures, history of ear bleed, and history of nosebleed.

  19. NEW OPPORTUNITIES FOR IMMUNE THERAPY IN PATIENTS WITH DISSEMINATED RECURRENT SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA OF THE HEAD AND NECK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Mudunov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma diagnosed with recurrent tumor or distant metastases usually have the worst prognosis. Chemotherapeutic options are very limited in these patients; there is a probability of drug resistance development. The researchers continue to search more effective and less toxic drugs. In the current article, we analyze the results of the latest randomized clinical trials devoted the assessment of novel antitumor immunotherapeutic drugs – PD-1 inhibitors – in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. This studies reveal new possibilities for the treatment of these patients.

  20. Do general medical practitioners examine injured runners?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Solvej Videbæk; Jensen, A V; Rasmussen, Sten

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: General Medical Practitioners (GMP) in Denmark perform clinical examinations of patients with musculoskeletal pain. However, the prevalence proportion of examinations caused by running-related injuries remains unknown. PURPOSE: The primary purpose of the present study was to estimate...... the prevalence proportion of consultations in general medical practice caused by running-related injuries. The secondary purpose was to estimate the prevalence proportion of injured runners, who consult their GMP, that are referred to additional examinations or treatments. STUDY DESIGN: A survey-based study....... METHODS: An online survey was distributed in October and November 2015 to more than 370 GMPs in Denmark and completed by 27. RESULTS: The median prevalence proportion of consultations caused by running-related injuries in the prior two weeks was 0.80% [25th percentile = 0.00%; 75th percentile = 1...

  1. Survival benefit of pancreaticoduodenectomy in a Japanese fashion for a limited group of patients with pancreatic head cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takao, Sonshin; Shinchi, Hiroyuki; Maemura, Kosei; Kurahara, Hiroshi; Natsugoe, Shoji; Aikou, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical benefit of pancreaticoduodenectomy in a Japanese fashion for patients with pancreatic head cancer. One hundred and one patients underwent pancreatectomy for pancreatic head cancer between 1980 and 2001. Of these, 40 patients in the extended resection (ER) group had an extended lymphadenectomy and neural plexus dissection as a Japanese fashion, while 61 patients in the conventional resection (CR) group. Tumor status, morbidity, mortality, survival and pattern of recurrence were retrospectively studied. The incidence of R0 operations in the ER group was higher than that in the CR group (pJapanese fashion with an adequate extended resection might bring a survival benefit for patients with pStage IIA or IIB pancreatic head cancer.

  2. Tumor blood flow and systemic shunting in patients receiving intraarterial chemotherapy for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheeler, R.H.; Ziessman, H.A.; Medvec, B.R.; Juni, J.E.; Thrall, J.H.; Keyes, J.W.; Pitt, S.R.; Baker, S.R.

    1986-01-01

    Radionuclide techniques have been used to estimate the systemic shunt and to quantitate blood flow to the tumor and a reference normal tissue in nine patients undergoing intraarterial chemotherapy for head and neck cancer. The systemic shunt was calculated as the percentage of pulmonary trapping of intraarterially injected /sup 99m/Tc-labeled macroaggregated albumin. The mean systemic shunt in the 12 separate arteries studied was 23 +/- 13% (SE) (range 8-43%). Quantitative blood flow was determined from the slope of the washout curve of intraarterially injected 133 Xe. The mean tumor blood flow was 13.6 +/- 6.7 ml/100 g/min, while the mean blood flow to the scalp was 4.2 +/- 2.1 ml/100 g/min providing a mean tumor/normal tissue ratio of 3.9 +/- 2.7. An estimate of blood flow distribution was obtained by calculating the ratio of counts/pixel in the tumor mass versus the remainder of the head as determined by single photon emission computed tomography following an intraarterial injection of /sup 99m/Tc-labeled macroaggregated albumin. The mean ratio of tumor to normal tissue perfusion by this technique was 5.6 +/- 3.7. These techniques have allowed noninvasive determination of the blood flow parameters associated with intraarterial chemotherapy. At least part of the therapeutic advantage of regional chemotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer is due to a tumor/normal tissue blood flow ratio that favors drug delivery to the tumor contained within the infused volume

  3. High prevalence of cachexia in newly diagnosed head and neck cancer patients: An exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jager-Wittenaar, Harriët; Dijkstra, Pieter U; Dijkstra, Gerard; Bijzet, Johan; Langendijk, Johannes A; van der Laan, Bernard F A M; Roodenburg, Jan L N

    2017-03-01

    In patients with cancer, weight loss can be related to simple starvation, disturbed metabolism, or both. In patients with head and neck cancer (HNC), weight loss often is attributed to simple starvation because the obvious oral symptoms are known to hinder dietary intake. In this population, cachexia remains a relatively unexplored phenomenon. The aim of this study was to explore the prevalence of cachexia and precachexia in patients with newly diagnosed HNC. Fifty-nine patients with newly diagnosed HNC were asked to participate in the prospective cohort study, from which only baseline data were used in the analyses. Measurements were performed 1 wk before cancer treatment, that is, cachexia status by Fearon's cancer-specific framework, dietary intake, muscle mass, muscle strength, and biochemical markers (C-reactive protein, albumin, hemoglobin, interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α) were assessed. Data of 26 patients were included in the analyses (59% participation rate). Forty-two percent of the patients (n = 12) were classified as cachectic and 15% (n = 4) as precachectic. Muscle mass depletion was significantly more frequent in cachectic patients (67%) than in noncachectic patients (14%; P = 0.014). No differences in inflammatory markers were observed between cachectic and noncachectic patients. This exploratory study suggested a high prevalence of cachexia (42%) in patients with newly diagnosed HNC. Although a large study is needed to further elucidate the role of cachexia in patients with HNC, the data presented here suggest that cachexia is a common problem in this patient population, which has therapeutic and prognostic implications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Pattern of brain computed tomography findings of adult patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    two adult head injured patients referred to the Radiology department for brain CT over a 3-year period was done. The patients were scanned using Toshiba Aquilion 64 slice spiral CT scan machine, data was collected using a proforma and ...

  5. Patient and staff assessment of an audiovisual education tool for head and neck radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, Lyndon; McAndrew, Alison; Tse, Karen; Rakaric, Peter; Cummings, Bernard; Cashell, Angela

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand and compare patient and staff perceptions of a video-based preparatory education tool for head and neck radiotherapy. Patients and staff completed a questionnaire assessing their perceptions of whether the education tool was relevant, clear, complete and reassuring. Staff rated the video's accuracy and anticipated impact on future patient information needs. Demographic information was collected. Open-ended questions were used to elicit additional feedback. Quantitative responses from 50 patients and 48 staff were very positive and not significantly different between the two groups. Content analysis of the qualitative data provided insight into the information and approaches valued by patients and staff and how these differed. Staff members were more critical of the production quality and completeness of information related to procedures and treatment side effects. Patients valued seeing procedures acted out and desired more information about what these experiences would feel like and how to engage in self-care. Although staff-driven development may be an effective method of designing the content and approach of a preparatory education video, care should be taken to consider differences between patient and staff perceptions of information needs.

  6. Effect of amifostine on patient assessed clinical benefit in irradiated head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasserman, Todd; Mackowiak, John I.; Brizel, David M.; Oster, Wolfgang; Zhang, Jianliang; Peeples, Patricia J.; Sauer, Rolf

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if head and neck (H/N) cancer patients receiving daily amifostine during radiation therapy (RT) experienced clinical benefit (improvement in their ability to carry out normal functions with reduced discomfort) compared to nonamifostine treated patients. Methods and Materials: This was an open-label, multi-institutional randomized trial in 303 H/N cancer patients treated with RT +amifostine. Clinical benefit was measured using an 8-item validated Patient Benefit Questionnaire (PBQ) during and up to 11 months after RT. Results: 301 patients completed one or more PBQ assessments. Amifostine patients had significantly better PBQ scores (p < 0.05) than controls. The improvement in PBQ scores was most significant during chronic xerostomia. Conclusions: Amifostine use results in improved Patient Benefit Questionnaire (PBQ) scores, which is indicative of improved oral toxicity related outcomes and improved clinical benefit. Less oral toxicity should lead to preservation of late dental and oral health, and improvements in activities such as diet, nutrition, and sleep

  7. Pretreatment organ function in patients with advanced head and neck cancer: clinical outcome measures and patients' views

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasch Coen RN

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aim of this study is to thoroughly assess pretreatment organ function in advanced head and neck cancer through various clinical outcome measures and patients' views. Methods A comprehensive, multidimensional assessment was used, that included quality of life, swallowing, mouth opening, and weight changes. Fifty-five patients with stage III-IV disease were entered in this study prior to organ preserving (chemoradiation treatment. Results All patients showed pretreatment abnormalities or problems, identified by one or more of the outcome measures. Most frequent problems concerned swallowing, pain, and weight loss. Interestingly, clinical outcome measures and patients' perception did no always concur. E.g. videofluoroscopy identified aspiration and laryngeal penetration in 18% of the patients, whereas only 7 patients (13% perceived this as problematic; only 2 out of 7 patients with objective trismus actually perceived trismus. Conclusion The assessment identified several problems already pre-treatment, in this patient population. A thorough assessment of both clinical measures and patients' views appears to be necessary to gain insight in all (perceived pre-existing functional and quality of life problems.

  8. Radiological diagnosis in patients with head injury alone or in combination with multiple trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieger, J.; Linsenmaier, U.; Pfeifer, K.J.; Reiser, M.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose. Head injury alone or in combination with multiple trauma is the main cause of death and severe disability in individuals under 45 years old. This review is intended to describe the relevant imaging modalities, to analyze their specific value and limitations and to illustrate the most important radiologic findings. The indications for diagnostic imaging within the context of an interdisciplinary linkage of diagnostic and therapeutic measures are discussed.Material and methods. Recent publications are analyzed and compared to the experiences of our own hospital. In terms of a critical synoptic assessment the currently best standard of care is described in consideration of an interdisciplinary care concept.Results. Radiologic imaging modalities crucially contribute to the complete injury assessment and provide an indispensable basis for any therapeutic decision. Comprehensive neuromonitoring and reliable demonstration of delayed or secondary brain damage is impossible without modern imaging technology. Computed tomography (CT) further continues to be the most important imaging modality, while magnetic resonance imaging despite it's partly superior diagnostic informations remains reserved to particular diagnostic problems.Conclusions. Suitable constructive prerequisites, an interdisciplinary care concept and integration of the radiologist in hospital-adapted diagnostic and therapeutic algorithms significantly improves the outcome of patients with acute head injury. Beside the correct diagnosis itself the time to establish a diagnosis above all has a crucial impact on successful management and good outcome of these patients. (orig.) [de

  9. Validation of an educative manual for patients with head and neck cancer submitted to radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Oliveira de Almeida Marques da Cruz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: develop the content and face validation of an educative manual for patients with head and neck cancer submitted to radiation therapy. Method: descriptive methodological research. The Theory of Psychometrics was used for the validation process, developed by 15 experts in the theme area of the educative manual and by two language and publicity professionals. A minimum agreement level of 80% was considered to guarantee the validity of the material. Results: the items addressed in the assessment tool of the educative manual were divided in three blocks: objectives, structure and format, and relevance. Only one item, related to the sociocultural level of the target public, obtained an agreement rate <80%, and was reformulated based on the participants' suggestions. All other items were considered appropriate and/or complete appropriate in the three blocks proposed: objectives - 92.38%, structure and form - 89.74%, and relevance - 94.44%. Conclusion: the face and content validation of the educative manual proposed were attended to. This can contribute to the understanding of the therapeutic process the head and neck cancer patient is submitted to during the radiation therapy, besides supporting clinical practice through the nursing consultation.

  10. Viability of dental implants in head and neck irradiated patients: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zen Filho, Edson Virgílio; Tolentino, Elen de Souza; Santos, Paulo Sérgio Silva

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the safety of dental implants placed in irradiated bone and to discuss their viability when placed post-radiotherapy (RT). A systematic review was performed to answer the questions: "Are dental implants in irradiated bone viable?" and "What are the main factors that influence the loss of implants in irradiated patients?" The search strategy resulted in 8 publications. A total of 331 patients received 1237 implants, with an overall failure rate of 9.53%. The osseointegration success rates ranged between 62.5% and 100%. The optimal time interval between irradiation and dental implantation varied from 6 to 15 months. The interval time between RT and implant placement and the radiation doses are not associated with significant implant failure rates. The placement of implants in irradiated bone is viable, and head and neck RT should not be considered as a contraindication for dental rehabilitation with implants. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: E2229-E2240, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Does IGRT ensure target dose coverage of head and neck IMRT patients?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graff, Pierre; Hu Weigang; Yom, Sue S.; Pouliot, Jean

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) ensures dose coverage to the target, and to assess the dosimetric impact of anatomic changes using megavoltage cone-beam CT (MVCBCT) for patient positioning during head and neck IMRT. Methods and materials: Forty-eight MVCBCT from 10 head and neck IMRT/IGRT patients were analyzed off-line. Target volumes and organs at risk (OARs) contours delineated on CT were transferred and adjusted on MVCBCT images. Each MVCBCT was processed to allow dose recalculation, resulting in 469 dose–volume histograms (DVHs). The concept of dosimetric latitude was introduced to provide a clinical perspective. Results: MVCBCT target DVHs showed a moderate level of difference in D95 (dose to ⩾95% of volume), generally less than a 5% difference from the planned dose. Delivered-dose increases to the spinal cord and brainstem showed no apparent time trend. The 4 mm margin around OARs was a useful precaution to prevent exceeding critical dose thresholds. The parotid glands showed progressive increases in mean dose related to shrinkage of the external contours. Conclusion: IGRT repositioning ensured target volume coverage, but significant dose variations were observed for OARs. The dosimetric impact of anatomic changes during radiotherapy was of lesser importance than the effects of IGRT repositioning.

  12. Minor head injury in anticoagulated patients: a 6-year retrospective analysis in an emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Riccardi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The appropriate management of minor head injury (MHI in patients receiving oral anticoagulant (OAC is unclear. In this retrospective study, we focused on elderly patients (>65 years treated with OAC, presented to our emergency department with MHI between 2004 and 2010. Three hundred and six patients with MHI were taking OAC: we documented 7.19% hemorrhages at the first computed tomography (C; 18.19% deaths; 50.1% spontaneous reabsorptions; 22.73% deteriorations of intracranial bleeding without surgical intervention (for clinical comorbidity, and 4.55% neurosurgical interventions. We documented a second positive CT scan in 2 patients (1.51% who had no symptoms and remained asymptomatic during observation. In both cases, intracranial bleeding resolved spontaneously. The mean international normalized ratio (INR value was 2.26, higher in the group of patients with bleeding (2.74 than in the group without bleeding (2.19. We found a significant increased risk in patients with posttraumatic loss of consciousness [odds ratio (OR 28.3], diffuse headache (OR 14.79, vomiting (OR 14.2 and neurological signs (OR 5.27. We did not reach significance in patients with post-traumatic amnesia. Our data confirm the need for a CT scan of any patients on OAC with MHI. None of our patients developed any symptoms or signs during observation, and only 2 patients developed an intracranial hemorrhage in the second CT scan with a favorable evolution. Our data need to be confirmed with an observational study, but we suggest that the second CT could be reserved for patients developing symptoms and signs during observation. We also underline the role of the INR in the stratification of risk.

  13. Ways of understanding the encounter with head and neck cancer patients in the hospital dental team--a phenomenographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röing, Marta; Hirsch, J-M; Holmström, Inger

    2006-10-01

    Head and neck cancer is the sixth most common malignancy in the world. Fifty percent of the patients can be cured by surgery, radiotherapy or a combination approach. Head and neck cancer is life-threatening, and treatment may leave the patient with visible facial disfigurements and impairment of functions such as speech and eating. This affects not only the patient, but may arouse difficult feelings in the treatment staff. Dental personnel are involved in all facets of treatment, yet they have no specific training in cancer care. The aim of this study was to describe the variation in ways dental personnel understand and experience the encounter with head and neck cancer patients, as the way of understanding a certain phenomenon is judged to be fundamental to the way we act and form our beliefs. Twenty members of hospital dental teams were interviewed. The interviews focused on experiences of the encounter with head and neck cancer patients. A qualitative research approach, phenomenography, was used in analysing the interviews. The encounter was perceived in three qualitatively different ways: as an act of caring, as a serious and responsible task and as an overwhelming emotional situation. The results indicate that hospital dental personnel are not able to lean on education and professional training in finding ways of dealing with situations with strong emotional impact. This has implications for the treatment of patients with head and neck cancer, as well as education of dental personnel.

  14. Quality of life during early radiotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer and pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schaller A

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Anne Schaller,1 Elena Dragioti,1 Gunilla M Liedberg,2 Britt Larsson1 1Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre, County Council of Östergötland, Linköping, 2Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden Background: Patients with head and neck cancer (HNC have a potentially severe diagnosis and often suffer from tumor-related pain as well as from adverse side effects of treatment such as radiotherapy (RT. Knowledge about quality of life (QoL during early RT in this group is limited and should be assessed in relation to diagnosis and treatment.Purpose: The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to identify potential factors that may influence QoL in patients with HNC during the early stages of RT (no later than two weeks of ongoing RT. We hypothesized that pain intensity, pain interference, catastrophizing, and mood disturbances are associated with QoL during early RT.Patients and methods: In this study, 54 patients (53% of eligible patients diagnosed with HNC were consecutively recruited from the regular flow to the Pain and Rehabilitation Center at Linköping University. The patients completed self-reported questionnaires on sociodemographics, pain intensity, pain interference, anxiety, depression, pain catastrophizing, and QoL.Results: The patients in this study scored high for QoL, low for pain intensity, and low for pain interference. The patients reported minor depressive symptoms and anxiety symptoms. Regression analyses showed that pain intensity and depressive symptoms negatively influenced QoL. Conclusion: No later than two weeks of RT, pain intensity and depression negatively influenced QoL in patients with HNC. Early screening for pain and depression in a targeted preventive strategy might maintain QoL during the course of the RT for patients with HNC. This assumption needs to

  15. The Impact of Radiation Treatment Time on Survival in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaikh, Talha [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Handorf, Elizabeth A. [Department of Biostatistics, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Murphy, Colin T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Mehra, Ranee [Department of Medical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Ridge, John A. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Galloway, Thomas J., E-mail: Thomas.Galloway@fccc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of radiation treatment time (RTT) in head and neck cancers on overall survival (OS) in the era of chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: Patients with diagnoses of tongue, hypopharynx, larynx, oropharynx, or tonsil cancer were identified by use of the National Cancer Database. RTT was defined as date of first radiation treatment to date of last radiation treatment. In the definitive setting, prolonged RTT was defined as >56 days, accelerated RTT was defined as <47 days, and standard RTT was defined as 47 to 56 days. In the postoperative setting, prolonged RTT was defined as >49 days, accelerated RTT was defined as <40 days, and standard RTT was defined as 40 to 49 days. We used χ{sup 2} tests to identify predictors of RTT. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to compare OS among groups. Cox proportional hazards model was used for OS analysis in patients with known comorbidity status. Results: 19,531 patients were included; 12,987 (67%) had a standard RTT, 4,369 (34%) had an accelerated RTT, and 2,165 (11%) had a prolonged RTT. On multivariable analysis, accelerated RTT (hazard ratio [HR] 0.84; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.73-0.97) was associated with an improved OS, and prolonged RTT (HR 1.25; 95% CI 1.14-1.37) was associated with a worse OS relative to standard RTT. When the 9,200 (47%) patients receiving definitive concurrent chemoradiation were examined, prolonged RTT (HR 1.29; 95% CI 1.11-1.50) was associated with a worse OS relative to standard RTT, whereas there was no significant association between accelerated RTT and OS (HR 0.76; 95% CI 0.57-1.01). Conclusion: Prolonged RTT is associated with worse OS in patients receiving radiation therapy for head and neck cancer, even in the setting of chemoradiation. Expeditious completion of radiation should continue to be a quality metric for the management of head and neck malignancies.

  16. Three-dimensional MRI Analysis of Femoral Head Remodeling After Reduction in Patients With Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukagoshi, Yuta; Kamada, Hiroshi; Kamegaya, Makoto; Takeuchi, Ryoko; Nakagawa, Shogo; Tomaru, Yohei; Tanaka, Kenta; Onishi, Mio; Nishino, Tomofumi; Yamazaki, Masashi

    2018-05-02

    Previous reports on patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) showed that the prereduced femoral head was notably smaller and more nonspherical than the intact head, with growth failure observed at the proximal posteromedial area. We evaluated the shape of the femoral head cartilage in patients with DDH before and after reduction, with size and sphericity assessed using 3-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We studied 10 patients with unilateral DDH (all female) who underwent closed reduction. Patients with avascular necrosis of the femoral head on the plain radiograph 1 year after reduction were excluded. 3D MRI was performed before reduction and after reduction, at 2 years of age. 3D-image analysis software was used to reconstruct the multiplanes. After setting the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes in the software (based on the femoral shaft and neck axes), the smallest sphere that included the femoral head cartilage was drawn, the diameter was measured, and the center of the sphere was defined as the femoral head center. We measured the distance between the center and cartilage surface every 30 degrees on the 3 reconstructed planes. Sphericity of the femoral head was calculated using a ratio (the distance divided by each radius) and compared between prereduction and postreduction. The mean patient age was 7±3 and 26±3 months at the first and second MRI, respectively. The mean duration between the reduction and second MRI was 18±3 months. The femoral head diameter was 26.7±1.5 and 26.0±1.6 mm on the diseased and intact sides, respectively (P=0.069). The ratios of the posteromedial area on the axial plane and the proximoposterior area on the sagittal plane after reduction were significantly larger than before reduction (P<0.01). We demonstrated that the size of the reduced femoral head was nearly equal to that of the intact femoral head and that the growth failure area of the head before reduction, in the proximal posteromedial

  17. A study about teeth extraction of irradiated patients by head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Kack; Park, Hyung Kook [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    Radiation therapy, in addition to its therapeutic effects, cause several complications in oral region. As a result of radiation, the blood supply to bone is decreased, and large areas of hypocellular, hypovascular, hypoxic tissue are created that are devoid of functioning fibroblasts and osteobasts. Therefore, the extraction of teeth after irradiation to the jaws has generally been regarded as a potentially hazardous procedure because of the possible initiation of osteradionecrosis. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy appears to assist in salvaging irradiated tissue by tissue angioneogenesis in marginally viable tissue induced by high oxygen tissue level. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is beneficial for patients at risk for the development of osteoradionecrosis, such as irradiated patients requiring tooth extraction. We obtained good results when extraction is performed with hyperbaric oxygen therapy in 17 cases with head and neck malignancy and present results with review of literatures. (author). 35 refs., 2 tabs.

  18. Survey of Usual Practice: Dysphagia Therapy in Head & Neck Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krisciunas, Gintas P.; Sokoloff, William; Stepas, Katherine; Langmore, Susan E.

    2012-01-01

    There is no standardized dysphagia therapy for head and neck cancer patients and scant evidence to support any particular protocol, leaving institutions and individual speech language pathologists (SLPs) to determine their own protocols based on “typical” practices or anecdotal evidence. To gain an understanding of current usual practices, a national internet-based survey was developed and disseminated to SLPs who treat HNC patients. From a random sample of 4,000 ASHA SID 13 members, 1,931 fit the inclusion criteria, and 759 complete responses were recorded for a 39.3% response rate. Results were analyzed by institution type as well as by individual clinical experience. While some interesting trends emerged from the data, a lack of uniformity and consensus regarding best practices was apparent. This is undoubtedly due to a paucity of research adequately addressing the efficacy of any one therapy for dysphagia in the HNC population. PMID:22456699

  19. Coping strategies of nurses in the care of patients with head and neck neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naira Agostini Rodrigues dos Santos

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To understand and describe the experience of the development of coping strategies during the professional life of nurses providing care to patients with facial image alteration. METHOD Descriptive qualitative study with a hermeneutic-dialectic framework conducted in the head and neck ward of a reference hospital in Rio de Janeiro, with the participation of eight nurses and data produced through semi-structured interviews conducted between June and August 2013. RESULTS Three major impressions were found: initial estrangement and complexity, consisting in the care given to patients with facial image alteration; a threshold between estrangement and coping, corresponding to the emergence of coping strategies during care; and image-likeness as a (recognition of the individual with facial image alteration in the development and consolidation of coping strategies during care. CONCLUSION Among other contributions, the identification and understanding of coping strategies may contribute to better qualify nursing education and care.

  20. A study about teeth extraction of irradiated patients by head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong Kack; Park, Hyung Kook

    1996-12-01

    Radiation therapy, in addition to its therapeutic effects, cause several complications in oral region. As a result of radiation, the blood supply to bone is decreased, and large areas of hypocellular, hypovascular, hypoxic tissue are created that are devoid of functioning fibroblasts and osteobasts. Therefore, the extraction of teeth after irradiation to the jaws has generally been regarded as a potentially hazardous procedure because of the possible initiation of osteradionecrosis. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy appears to assist in salvaging irradiated tissue by tissue angioneogenesis in marginally viable tissue induced by high oxygen tissue level. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is beneficial for patients at risk for the development of osteoradionecrosis, such as irradiated patients requiring tooth extraction. We obtained good results when extraction is performed with hyperbaric oxygen therapy in 17 cases with head and neck malignancy and present results with review of literatures. (author). 35 refs., 2 tabs

  1. FBX dosimetry for point dose measurements in head and neck cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balraj, A.; Thakur, P.K.; Bhatnagar, S.; Vidyasagar, P.B.; Nirhali, Amit; Semwal, M.K.

    2007-01-01

    FBX dosimeter is mainly based on the determination of the radiation dose from the chemical changes produced in an irradiated medium, which can be measured by Spectrophotometry or Colorimetry, for which adequate FBX solution of 2 ml required for measuring the optical density (OD). To measure the point dose using 2 ml solution may lead to error in the measured dose since the solution may occupy 2 cc volume of the point measured. In head and neck carcinoma patients, the treatment area involves curvatures. Fixing 2 ml vial at the body surface is difficult and leads to give wrong readings. In this study we have measured the entrance and exit dose by filling 0.5 ml solution in a flexible catheter and placed at a point in the patient body surface during the radiation treatment. The solution was diluted adding 1.5 ml distilled water to measure the OD in the colorimeter

  2. BNCT of 3 cases of spontaneous head and neck cancer in feline patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, M.; Trivillin, V.A.; Heber, E.M.; Angeles Cantarelli, Maria de los; Itoiz, M.E.; Nigg, D.W.; Rebagliati, R.J.; Batistoni, Daniel; Schwint, A.E. E-mail: schwint@cnea.gov.ar

    2004-11-01

    Having demonstrated BPA-BNCT induced control of experimental squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) of the hamster cheek pouch mucosa with no damage to normal tissue we explored the feasibility and safety of treating spontaneous head and neck tumors, with particular focus on SCC, of terminal feline patients with low dose BPA-BNCT employing the thermal beam of the RA-1 Reactor within a preclinical context. The biodistribution studies showed that, in all three cases evaluated, BPA delivered absolute boron values to tumor in the range that proved therapeutically useful in the experimental model of SCC. BPA-BNCT studies showed no radiotoxic effects, partial tumor control in terms of impaired growth and partial necrosis, an improvement in clinical condition and prolonged survival beyond the terminal condition of the feline patients at the time of recruitment.

  3. Immunological reactivity of patients with malignant tumor of the head and neck, 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaguchi, Kosaku; Okuda, Minoru; Tomiyama, Shunichi

    1981-01-01

    Before and after two different methods of treatment (operation and radiation), humoral and cellular immunities were examined in patients with head and neck cancer. Variation of immunological reactivity exhibited different patterns between the two groups, even when malignant tumors disappeared. In the operation group, humoral immunities were elevated in terms of the serum levels of α 2 -globulin, complement (CH 50 ), IgA, IgG and Carcinoembrionic Antigen (CEA). Cellular immunities, however, showed no change. In the irradiation group, humoral immunities were not changed, but cellular immunities were significantly depressed showing decreases in the number of peripheral lymphocytes and in the degree of PHA-induced lymphocyte transformation. The above-mentioned patterns of immunological changes were observed in patients without cancer as well. The elevated humoral immunity in the operation group recovered to the pre-treatment level within a few months, whereas the suppressed cellular immunity in the irradiation group was presumed to persist for a longer time. (author)

  4. Supportive use of megestrol acetate (Megace) with head/neck and lung cancer patients receiving radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McQuellon, Richard P.; Moose, Dawn B.; Russell, Gregory B.; Case, L. Douglas; Greven, Katherine; Stevens, Michael; Shaw, Edward G.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to measure the effect of megestrol acetate (MA) on weight loss and quality of life (QOL) in patients with cancer of the lung or head and neck undergoing curative radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: This was a Phase III, placebo-controlled, double-blind randomized study. Patients received either 800 mg/day of MA (20 milliliters po qAM) or placebo over a 12-week period. Patients received radiation of the head and neck or thorax using a dose of at least 50 Gy, either alone or with chemotherapy. Weight was assessed weekly, whereas QOL was assessed at baseline and at 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Results: Patient characteristics on the MA arm (16 lung, 12 head/neck; mean age: 60 years) were similar to those on the placebo arm (17 lung, 11 head/neck; mean age: 65.8 years). Patients in the MA group had a mean weight loss over 12 weeks of 2.7 pounds, whereas the placebo group had a mean weight loss of 10.6 pounds. There was a significant time by treatment interaction (p=0.001), with the difference in weight between treatment groups being most pronounced after 6 weeks. Although overall QOL was similar in both arms of the study, several QOL subscale items did differ significantly. Compared to the placebo-treated patients, head-and-neck cancer patients in the MA arm reported the ability to eat as much as they liked (p=0.02 at 12 weeks), and lung cancer patients in the MA arm reported significantly better appetite at 4 weeks (p=0.03) and 8 weeks (p=0.001). Conclusion: MA used prophylactically is useful as an appetite stimulant; it can help patients maintain weight over the course of curative radiotherapy of the head and neck or lung and can improve specific aspects of QOL

  5. The potential of eHealth in otorhinolaryngology-head and neck surgery: patients' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holderried, Martin; Ernst, C; Holderried, F; Rieger, M; Blumenstock, G; Tropitzsch, A

    2017-07-01

    The use of modern information and communication technologies (ICT) in daily life has significantly increased during the last several years. These essential online technologies have also found their way into the healthcare system. The use of modern ICT for health reasons can be summarized by the term 'eHealth'. Despite the potential importance of eHealth in the field of otorhinolaryngology (ORL), there is little understanding of patients' attitudes towards the deeper integration of these technologies into intersectoral care. The aim of this study was to gain a better understanding of patients' attitudes towards the use of modern ICT for intersectoral communication and information transfer in the field of ORL. Therefore, a structured interview was developed by an interdisciplinary team of otorhinolaryngologists, public health researchers, and information technology (IT) specialists. Overall, 211 ORL patients were interviewed at the Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Tuebingen University Hospital, Germany, and 203 of these patients completed the interview. This study revealed ORL patients' perspectives on the potential of eHealth, especially for appointment scheduling, appointment reminders, and intersectoral communication of personal medical information. Furthermore, this study provides evidence that data security and the impacts of eHealth on the physician-patient relationship and on treatment quality warrant special attention in future research.

  6. Usage of prophylactic radiologically inserted gastrostomy in head and neck cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallinson, P.I.; Tun, J. Kyaw; Byass, O.R.; Cast, J.E.I.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To assess outcomes and usage rate of prophylactic radiologically inserted gastrostomy (RIG) in head and neck cancer (HNC) patients. Materials and methods: Outcome data of all HNC patients who underwent prophylactic RIG over a 22-month period (November 2007 to September 2009) in a tertiary referral centre were collected retrospectively. Thirty-day mortality, major and minor complication rates, and subsequent usage of the RIG were analysed. Results: Fifty-one HNC patients underwent prophylactic RIG. Three minor and no major immediate complications were identified. Sixteen minor and three major complications at 30-days were identified. Three (5.9%) major complications were identified. There was one death due to disease progression and not RIG insertion. The RIG was not used in 17.7% of patients post-procedure. Conclusion: Prophylactic RIG in HNC patients has a comparable mortality rate to RIG insertion in HNC patients with mixed indications. However, the number of cases where the gastrostomy is not used raises important concerns and warrants further investigation.

  7. Comparison of dental health of patients with head and neck cancer receiving IMRT vs conventional radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Victor M; Liu, Yuan F; Rafizadeh, Sassan; Tajima, Tracey; Nabili, Vishad; Wang, Marilene B

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the dental health of patients with head and neck cancer who received comprehensive dental care after intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) compared with radiation therapy (RT). Historical cohort study. Veteran Affairs (VA) hospital. In total, 158 patients at a single VA hospital who were treated with RT or IMRT between 2003 and 2011 were identified. A complete dental evaluation was performed prior to radiation treatment, including periodontal probing, tooth profile, cavity check, and mobility. The dental treatment plan was formulated to eliminate current and potential dental disease. The rates of dental extractions, infections, caries, mucositis, xerostomia, and osteoradionecrosis (ORN) were analyzed, and a comparison was made between patients treated with IMRT and those treated with RT. Of the 158 patients, 99 were treated with RT and 59 were treated with IMRT. Compared with those treated with IMRT, significantly more patients treated with RT exhibited xerostomia (46.5% vs 16.9%; P radiation treatment (32.2% vs 11.1%; P = .002; OR, 3.8; 95% CI, 1.65-8.73). Patients who were treated with IMRT had fewer instances of dental disease, more salivary flow, and fewer requisite posttreatment extractions compared with those treated with RT. The number of posttreatment extractions has been reduced with the advent of IMRT and more so with a complete dental evaluation prior to treatment.

  8. Bone marrow oedema on MR imaging indicates ARCO stage 3 disease in patients with AVN of the femoral head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, Reinhard; Schaeffeler, Christoph; Waldt, Simone; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Woertler, Klaus [Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Munich (Germany); Kraus, Tobias M. [Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Orthopaedics, Munich (Germany); Berufsgenossenschaftliche Unfallklinik Tuebingen, Department of Trauma and Orthopaedics, Tuebingen (Germany); Torka, Sebastian [Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Orthopaedics, Munich (Germany); Berufsgenossenschaftliche Unfallklinik Murnau, Department of Trauma and Orthopaedics, Murnau (Germany); Schlitter, Anna Melissa; Specht, Katja [Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Institute of Pathology, Munich (Germany); Haller, Bernhard [Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Institute of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, Munich (Germany); Rechl, Hans [Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Orthopaedics, Munich (Germany)

    2014-09-15

    To test the hypothesis that bone marrow oedema (BME) observed on MRI in patients with avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head represents an indicator of subchondral fracture. Thirty-seven symptomatic hips of 27 consecutive patients (53 % women, mean age 49.2) with AVN of the femoral head and associated BME on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging were included. MR findings were correlated with computed tomography (CT) of the hip and confirmed by histopathological examination of the resected femoral head. Imaging studies were analysed by two radiologists with use of the ARCO classification. On MR imaging a fracture line could be identified in 19/37 (51 %) cases, which were classified as ARCO stage 3 (n = 15) and stage 4 (n = 4). The remaining 18/37 (49 %) cases were classified as ARCO stage 2. However, in all 37/37 (100 %) cases a subchondral fracture was identified on CT, indicating ARCO stage 3/4 disease. The extent of subchondral fractures and the femoral head collapse was graded higher on CT as compared to MRI (P < 0.05). Histopathological analysis confirmed bone necrosis and subchondral fractures. In patients with AVN, BME of the femoral head represents a secondary sign of subchondral fracture and thus indicates ARCO stage 3 disease. circle BME on MRI in AVN of femoral head indicates a subchondral fracture. (orig.)

  9. Bone marrow oedema on MR imaging indicates ARCO stage 3 disease in patients with AVN of the femoral head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, Reinhard; Schaeffeler, Christoph; Waldt, Simone; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Woertler, Klaus; Kraus, Tobias M.; Torka, Sebastian; Schlitter, Anna Melissa; Specht, Katja; Haller, Bernhard; Rechl, Hans

    2014-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that bone marrow oedema (BME) observed on MRI in patients with avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head represents an indicator of subchondral fracture. Thirty-seven symptomatic hips of 27 consecutive patients (53 % women, mean age 49.2) with AVN of the femoral head and associated BME on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging were included. MR findings were correlated with computed tomography (CT) of the hip and confirmed by histopathological examination of the resected femoral head. Imaging studies were analysed by two radiologists with use of the ARCO classification. On MR imaging a fracture line could be identified in 19/37 (51 %) cases, which were classified as ARCO stage 3 (n = 15) and stage 4 (n = 4). The remaining 18/37 (49 %) cases were classified as ARCO stage 2. However, in all 37/37 (100 %) cases a subchondral fracture was identified on CT, indicating ARCO stage 3/4 disease. The extent of subchondral fractures and the femoral head collapse was graded higher on CT as compared to MRI (P < 0.05). Histopathological analysis confirmed bone necrosis and subchondral fractures. In patients with AVN, BME of the femoral head represents a secondary sign of subchondral fracture and thus indicates ARCO stage 3 disease. circle BME on MRI in AVN of femoral head indicates a subchondral fracture. (orig.)

  10. Evaluation of xerostomia following intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head and neck cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seok Ho; Kim, Tae Hyun; Chie, Eui Kyu

    2004-01-01

    This study was done to evaluate xerostomia following intensity modulated radiotherapy for patients with head and neck cancer, and to analyze the correlation between the dosimetric parameters and xerostomia parameters. From February till October 2003, 13 patients with 3 months of follow-up were evaluated for xerostomia after being treated for head and neck cancer with IMRT. Their median age was 57 years (range:43 ∼ 77). Xerostomia were assessed with a 4-question xerostomia questionnaire score (XQS) and a test for salivary flow rates (unstimulated and stimulated). The patients were also given a validated LENT SOMA scale (LSC) questionnaire. The evaluations were completed before radiation therapy (pre-RT) and at 1 and. 3 months after radiation therapy (RT). We evaluated xerostomia at pre-RT, 1 and, 3 months after RT. The association between the xerostomia parameters (XQS and LSC) and salivary flow rates (unstimulated and stimulated: USFR and SSFR) was assessed at 1 and 3 months after RT. All 13 patients showed no significant changes in XQS, LSC and Salivary Flow rates. As a result, we couldn't find out about xerostomia development. Based on the total mean parotid dose, 3,500 cGy, we divided these patients into two groups. The 8 patients (< 3,500 cGy) showed no significant changes in XQS, LSC and Salivary Flow rates. However, in 5 patients (≥ 3,500 cGy), there was a significant increase in USFR and, SSFR at 3 months after RT, and for the XQS and, LSC at 1 and 3 months after RT. The correlation between XQS and, LSC, and USFR and, SSFR in all patients (13) was significant at 3 months after RT. The correlation had a tendency to the decrease for USFR and, SSFR in proportion to the increase of XQS and, LSC. Base on the results of this study, IMRT seem to be an effective treatment to significantly decrease the xerostomia. XQS and, LSC seem to be a effective tool for predicting the xerostomia. A total parotid gland mean dose of < 3,500 cGy should be a planning goal if

  11. Patterns of Care for Elderly Patients With Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juarez, Jesus E; Choi, Jehee; St John, Maie; Abemayor, Elliot; TenNapel, Mindi; Chen, Allen M

    2017-07-15

    To compare patterns of care for elderly patients aged ≥70 years with locally advanced head and neck cancer versus those of younger patients treated for the same disease. The medical records of 421 consecutive patients over the age of 50 years treated at a single institution between April 2011 and June 2016 for stage III/IV squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were reviewed. The primary treatment approach was compared using a t test statistic among 3 age cohorts: 50 to 59 years (118 patients); 60 to 69 years (152 patients); and 70 years and older (151 patients). Logistical regression was used to determine variables that influenced the likelihood of receiving surgery versus nonsurgical treatment, as well as radiation alone versus chemoradiation. There was no difference in sex, T stage, N stage, Karnofsky performance status, or the number of chronic comorbid conditions among the 3 age cohorts (P>.05 for all). A greater proportion of elderly patients aged ≥70 years were treated by radiation alone compared with those aged 50 to 59 and 60 to 69 years (44% vs 16% and 24%, P=.01). Increasing age was associated with a greater likelihood of receiving primary nonsurgical versus surgical treatment (odds ratio 1.023, 95% confidence interval 1.004-1.042) and radiation alone compared with chemoradiation (odds ratio 1.054; 95% confidence interval 1.034-1.075). Ten chemotherapy regimens were used concurrently with radiation for patients aged ≥70 years, including carboplatin/paclitaxel (19%), carboplatin/cetuximab (19%), cisplatin (17%), and cetuximab (17%). Despite similar performance status and comorbidity burden compared with their younger counterparts, patients aged ≥70 years were more commonly treated with less-aggressive strategies, including radiation alone. The variability of concurrent chemotherapy regimens used further suggests that the standard of care remains to be defined for this population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Pretreatment oral hygiene habits and survival of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friemel, Juliane; Foraita, Ronja; Günther, Kathrin; Heibeck, Mathias; Günther, Frauke; Pflueger, Maren; Pohlabeln, Hermann; Behrens, Thomas; Bullerdiek, Jörn; Nimzyk, Rolf; Ahrens, Wolfgang

    2016-03-11

    The survival time of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is related to health behavior, such as tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption. Poor oral health (OH), dental care (DC) and the frequent use of mouthwash have been shown to represent independent risk factors for head and neck cancerogenesis, but their impact on the survival of HNSCC patients has not been systematically investigated. Two hundred seventy-six incident HNSCC cases recruited for the ARCAGE study were followed through a period of 6-10 years. Interview-based information on wearing of dentures, gum bleeding, teeth brushing, use of floss and dentist visits were grouped into weighted composite scores, i.e. oral health (OH) and dental care (DH). Use of mouthwash was assessed as frequency per day. Also obtained were other types of health behavior, such as smoking, alcohol drinking and diet, appreciated as both confounding and study variables. Endpoints were progression-free survival, overall survival and tumor-specific survival. Prognostic values were estimated using Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards regression models. A good dental care score, summarizing annual dental visits, daily teeth cleaning and use of floss was associated with longer overall survival time (p = .001). The results of the Cox regression models similarly suggested a higher risk of tumor progression and shortened overall survival in patients with poor dental care, but the results lost their statistical significance after other types of health behavior had been controlled for. Frequent use of mouthwash (≥ 2 times/day) significantly increased the risk of tumor-specific death (HR = 2.26; CI = 1.19-4.32). Alcohol consumption and tobacco smoking were dose-dependently associated with tumor progression and shorter overall survival. Frequent mouthwash use of ≥ 2 times/day seems to elevate the risk of tumor-specific death in HNSCC patients. Good dental care scores are associated with longer overall

  13. Factors Associated With External and Internal Lymphedema in Patients With Head-and-Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Jie; Ridner, Sheila H.; Dietrich, Mary S.; Wells, Nancy; Wallston, Kenneth A.; Sinard, Robert J.; Cmelak, Anthony J.; Murphy, Barbara A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine factors associated with the presence of secondary external and internal lymphedema in patients with head-and-neck cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: The sample included 81 patients ≥3 months after HNC treatment. Physical and endoscopic examinations were conducted to determine if participants had external, internal, and/or combined head-and-neck lymphedema. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the factors associated with the presence of lymphedema. Results: The following factors were statistically significantly associated with presence of lymphedema: (1) location of tumor associated with presence of external (P=.009) and combined lymphedema (P=.032); (2) time since end of HNC treatment associated with presence of external (P=.004) and combined lymphedema (P=.005); (3) total dosage of radiation therapy (P=.010) and days of radiation (P=.017) associated with the presence of combined lymphedema; (4) radiation status of surgical bed was associated with the presence of internal lymphedema, including surgery with postoperative radiation (P=.030) and (salvage) surgery in the irradiated field (P=.008); and (5) number of treatment modalities associated with external (P=.002), internal (P=.039), and combined lymphedema (P=.004). No demographic, health behavior-related, or comorbidity factors were associated with the presence of lymphedema in the sample. Conclusions: Select tumor and treatment parameters are associated with increased occurrence of lymphedema in patients with HNC. Larger and longitudinal studies are needed to identify adjusted effects and causative risk factors contributing to the development of lymphedema in patients with HNC.

  14. Factors associated with external and internal lymphedema in patients with head-and-neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jie; Ridner, Sheila H; Dietrich, Mary S; Wells, Nancy; Wallston, Kenneth A; Sinard, Robert J; Cmelak, Anthony J; Murphy, Barbara A

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine factors associated with the presence of secondary external and internal lymphedema in patients with head-and-neck cancer (HNC). The sample included 81 patients ≥3 months after HNC treatment. Physical and endoscopic examinations were conducted to determine if participants had external, internal, and/or combined head-and-neck lymphedema. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the factors associated with the presence of lymphedema. The following factors were statistically significantly associated with presence of lymphedema: (1) location of tumor associated with presence of external (P=.009) and combined lymphedema (P=.032); (2) time since end of HNC treatment associated with presence of external (P=.004) and combined lymphedema (P=.005); (3) total dosage of radiation therapy (P=.010) and days of radiation (P=.017) associated with the presence of combined lymphedema; (4) radiation status of surgical bed was associated with the presence of internal lymphedema, including surgery with postoperative radiation (P=.030) and (salvage) surgery in the irradiated field (P=.008); and (5) number of treatment modalities associated with external (P=.002), internal (P=.039), and combined lymphedema (P=.004). No demographic, health behavior-related, or comorbidity factors were associated with the presence of lymphedema in the sample. Select tumor and treatment parameters are associated with increased occurrence of lymphedema in patients with HNC. Larger and longitudinal studies are needed to identify adjusted effects and causative risk factors contributing to the development of lymphedema in patients with HNC. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Postoperative symbiotic in patients with head and neck cancer: a double-blind randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lages, Priscilla C; Generoso, Simone V; Correia, Maria Isabel T D

    2018-01-01

    Studies on the 'gut origin of sepsis' have suggested that stressful insults, such as surgery, can affect intestinal permeability, leading to bacterial translocation. Symbiotics have been reported to be able to improve gut permeability and modulate the immunologic system, thereby decreasing postoperative complications. Therefore we aimed to evaluate the postoperative use of symbiotics in head and neck cancer surgical patients for intestinal function and permeability, as well as the postoperative outcomes. Patients were double-blind randomised into the symbiotic (n 18) or the control group (n 18). Samples were administered twice a day by nasoenteric tube, starting on the 1st postoperative day until the 5th to 7th day, and comprised 109 colony-forming units/ml each of Lactobacillus paracasei, L. rhamnosus, L. acidophilus, and Bifidobacterium lactis plus 6 g of fructo-oligosaccharides, or a placebo (6 g of maltodextrin). Intestinal function (day of first evacuation, total stool episodes, stool consistency, gastrointestinal tract symptoms and gut permeability by diamine oxidase (DAO) enzyme) and postoperative complications (infectious and non-infectious) were assessed. Results of comparison of the pre- and postoperative periods showed that the groups were similar for all outcome variables. In all, twelve patients had complications in the symbiotic group v. nine in the control group (P>0·05), and the preoperative-postoperative DAO activity ranged from 28·5 (sd 15·4) to 32·7 (sd 11·0) ng/ml in the symbiotic group and 35·2 (sd 17·7) to 34·1 (sd 12·0) ng/ml in the control group (P>0·05). In conclusion, postoperative symbiotics did not impact on intestinal function and postoperative outcomes of head and neck surgical patients.

  16. High levels of soluble VEGF receptor 1 early after trauma are associated with shock, sympathoadrenal activation, glycocalyx degradation and inflammation in severely injured patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostrowski, Sisse R; Sørensen, Anne Marie; Windeløv, Nis Agerlin

    2012-01-01

    The level of soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (sVEGFR1) is increased in sepsis and strongly associated with disease severity and mortality. Endothelial activation and damage contribute to both sepsis and trauma pathology. Therefore, this study measured sVEGFR1 levels in trauma...... patients upon hospital admission hypothesizing that sVEGFR1 would increase with higher injury severity and predict a poor outcome....

  17. Intraspinal Pressure Monitoring in a Patient with Spinal Cord Injury Reveals Different Intradural Compartments: Injured Spinal Cord Pressure Evaluation (ISCoPE) Study.

    OpenAIRE

    Phang, I; Papadopoulos, MC

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We recently described a technique for monitoring intraspinal pressure (ISP) after traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI). This is analogous to intracranial pressure monitoring after brain injury. We showed that, after severe TSCI, ISP at the injury site is elevated as the swollen cord is compressed against the dura. METHODS: In a patient with complete thoracic TSCI, we sequentially monitored subdural ISP above the injury, at the injury site, and below the injury intraoperatively. Pos...

  18. Radioimmunoassay of serum creatine kinase BB as index of brain damage after head injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, J P; Jones, H M; Hitchcock, R; Adams, N; Thompson, R J [Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Cambridge (UK)

    1980-09-20

    Brain-type creatine kinase isoenzyme (CK-BB) was measured by radioimmunoassay in the serum of 54 patients with head injuries. CK-BB was not detectable in 476 out of 1006 controls, the remaining 530 normal samples containing a mean of 1.5 +- SDO.75 ..mu..g/l. The mean CK-BB concentrations in patients with mild, moderate, and fatal head injuries were all significantly higher than the control value (p<0.01 in each instance). Patients with serious head injury had serum concentrations many times the normal value, in two cases within 30 minutes after impact. Fatally injured patients continued to have high serum concentrations several days after injury. In less serious cases values approached normal within two or three days. Every patient with evidence of cerebral laceration, bruising, or swelling had a serum CK-BB concentration above normal. Raised concentrations were found in 14 out of 22 patients with concussion only. Thus the serum CK-BB concentration appears to be a sensitive index of brain damage and may prove useful in the management and follow-up of head-injured patients.

  19. Radioimmunoassay of serum creatine kinase BB as index of brain damage after head injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, J.P.; Jones, H.M.; Hitchcock, R.; Adams, N.; Thompson, R.J.

    1980-01-01

    Brain-type creatine kinase isoenzyme (CK-BB) was measured by radioimmunoassay in the serum of 54 patients with head injuries. CK-BB was not detectable in 476 out of 1006 controls, the remaining 530 normal samples containing a mean of 1.5 +- SDO.75 μg/l. The mean CK-BB concentrations in patients with mild, moderate, and fatal head injuries were all significantly higher than the control value (p<0.01 in each instance). Patients with serious head injury had serum concentrations many times the normal value, in two cases within 30 minutes after impact. Fatally injured patients continued to have high serum concentrations several days after injury. In less serious cases values approached normal within two or three days. Every patient with evidence of cerebral laceration, bruising, or swelling had a serum CK-BB concentration above normal. Raised concentrations were found in 14 out of 22 patients with concussion only. Thus the serum CK-BB concentration appears to be a sensitive index of brain damage and may prove useful in the management and follow-up of head-injured patients. (author)

  20. Management of minor head injury in patients receiving oral anticoagulant therapy: a prospective study of a 24-hour observation protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menditto, Vincenzo G; Lucci, Moira; Polonara, Stefano; Pomponio, Giovanni; Gabrielli, Armando

    2012-06-01

    Patients receiving warfarin who experience minor head injury are at risk of intracranial hemorrhage, and optimal management after a single head computed tomography (CT) scan is unclear. We evaluate a protocol of 24-hour observation followed by a second head CT scan. In this prospective case series, we enrolled consecutive patients receiving warfarin and showing no intracranial lesions on a first CT scan after minor head injury treated at a Level II trauma center. We implemented a structured clinical pathway, including 24-hour observation and a CT scan performed before discharge. We then evaluated the frequency of death, admission, neurosurgery, and delayed intracranial hemorrhage. We enrolled and observed 97 consecutive patients. Ten refused the second CT scan and were well during 30-day follow-up. Repeated CT scanning in the remaining 87 patients revealed a new hemorrhage lesion in 5 (6%), with 3 subsequently hospitalized and 1 receiving craniotomy. Two patients discharged after completing the study protocol with 2 negative CT scan results were admitted 2 and 8 days later with symptomatic subdural hematomas; neither received surgery. Two of the 5 patients with delayed bleeding at 24 hours had an initial international normalized ratio greater than 3.0, as did both patients with delayed bleeding beyond 24 hours. The relative risk of delayed hemorrhage with an initial international normalized ratio greater than 3.0 was 14 (95% confidence interval 4 to 49). For patients receiving warfarin who experience minor head injury and have a negative initial head CT scan result, a protocol of 24-hour observation followed by a second CT scan will identify most occurrences of delayed bleeding. An initial international normalized ratio greater than 3 suggests higher risk. Copyright © 2011 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials and video head impulse test in patients with vertigo, dizziness and imbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorić, Magdalena Krbot; Adamec, Ivan; Pavičić, Tin; Pavlović, Ivan; Ruška, Berislav; Crnošija, Luka; Habek, Mario

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP) and video head impulse test (vHIT) results in patients presenting with vertigo and dizziness. We retrospectively analyzed data of all patients with the chief complaint of vertigo, dizziness, or imbalance that underwent VEMP and vHIT from January 2015 to January 2016. A total of 117 patients (73 females, mean age 53.92±16.76) fulfilled inclusion criteria: group 1 included patients with the final diagnosis of vestibular neuritis (VN) (N=31 (16 right and 15 left VN)), group 2 included patients with the final diagnosis of vertigo of central origin (N=23) and group 3 included patients with the final diagnosis of unspecified dizziness (N=63). There was significant correlation between oVEMP asymmetry and asymmetry of the lateral canals 60ms gains on vHIT (r=0.225, p=0.026). Significant correlation between oVEMP and vHIT asymmetry was present in VN patients (r=0.749, p<0.001), while no correlation was found in the groups 2 and 3. oVEMP and vHIT lateral canals asymmetries were significantly greater in patients with vestibular neuritis. Furthermore, positive correlations of oVEMP amplitudes with 60ms gain of the lateral semicircular canal and slope of the anterior semicircular canal on vHIT, and cVEMP with slope of the posterior semicircular canal on the vHIT were found. These changes were significantly more pronounced in patients with vestibular neuritis. In conclusion, VEMPs and vHIT data should be used complementarily; asymmetry on both tests strongly supports peripheral vestibular system involvement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Concomitant Use of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation and Computer-Assisted Training for the Rehabilitation of Attention in Traumatic Brain Injured Patients: Behavioral and Neuroimaging Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacco, Katiuscia; Galetto, Valentina; Dimitri, Danilo; Geda, Elisabetta; Perotti, Francesca; Zettin, Marina; Geminiani, Giuliano C

    2016-01-01

    Divided attention (DA), the ability to distribute cognitive resources among two or more simultaneous tasks, may be severely compromised after traumatic brain injury (TBI), resulting in problems with numerous activities involved with daily living. So far, no research has investigated whether the use of non-invasive brain stimulation associated with neuropsychological rehabilitation might contribute to the recovery of such cognitive function. The main purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of 10 transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) sessions combined with computer-assisted training; it also intended to explore the neural modifications induced by the treatment. Thirty-two patients with severe TBI participated in the study: 16 were part of the experimental group, and 16 part of the control group. The treatment included 20' of tDCS, administered twice a day for 5 days. The electrodes were placed on the dorso-lateral prefrontal cortex. Their location varied across patients and it depended on each participant's specific area of damage. The control group received sham tDCS. After each tDCS session, the patient received computer-assisted cognitive training on DA for 40'. The results showed that the experimental group significantly improved in DA performance between pre- and post-treatment, showing faster reaction times (RTs), and fewer omissions. No improvement was detected between the baseline assessment (i.e., 1 month before treatment) and the pre-training assessment, or within the control group. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data, obtained on the experimental group during a DA task, showed post-treatment lower cerebral activations in the right superior temporal gyrus (BA 42), right and left middle frontal gyrus (BA 6), right postcentral gyrus (BA 3) and left inferior frontal gyrus (BA 9). We interpreted such neural changes as normalization of previously abnormal hyperactivations.

  3. Concomitant use of transcranial Direct Current Stimulation and computer-assisted training for the rehabilitation of attention in traumatic brain injured patients: behavioral and neuroimaging results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katiuscia eSacco

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Divided attention, the ability to distribute cognitive resources among two or more simultaneous tasks, may be severely compromised after traumatic brain injury (TBI, resulting in problems with numerous activities involved with daily living. So far, no research has investigated whether the use of non-invasive brain stimulation associated with neuropsychological rehabilitation might contribute to the recovery of such cognitive function. The main purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of 10 tDCS sessions combined with computer-assisted training; it also intended to explore the neural modifications induced by the treatment. Thirty-two patients with severe TBI participated in the study: sixteen were part of the experimental group, and sixteen part of the control group. The treatment included 20’ of tDCS, administered twice a day for 5 days. The electrodes were placed on the dorso-lateral prefrontal cortex. Their location varied across patients and it depended on each participant’s specific area of damage. The control group received sham tDCS. After each tDCS session, the patient received computer-assisted cognitive training on divided attention for 40’. The results showed that the experimental group significantly improved in divided attention performance between pre- and post-treatment, showing faster reaction times, and fewer omissions. No improvement was detected between the baseline assessment (i.e., one month before treatment and the pre-training assessment, or within the control group. Functional magnetic resonance imaging data, obtained on the experimental group during a divided attention task, showed post-treatment lower cerebral activations in the right superior temporal gyrus (BA 42, right and left middle frontal gyrus (BA 6, right postcentral gyrus (BA 3 and left inferior frontal gyrus (BA 9. We interpreted such neural changes as normalization of previously abnormal hyperactivations.

  4. Phase II study of 3-AP Triapine in patients with recurrent or metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nutting, C.M.; Herpen, C.M.L. van; Miah, A.B.; Bhide, S.A.; Machiels, J.P.; Buter, J.; Kelly, C.; Raucourt, D. de; Harrington, K.J.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment options for recurrent or metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) are limited with response rates to cytotoxic chemotherapy of approximately 30% and median survival of 6 months. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In a multicentre phase II study, 32 patients with recurrent or

  5. Goal processes & self-efficacy related to psychological distress in head & neck cancer patients and their partners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Offerman, Marinella P. J.; Schroevers, Maya J.; van der Velden, Lilly-Ann; de Boer, Maarten F.; Pruyn, Jean F. A.

    Purpose and objective of the research: In this cross-sectional study we used a self-regulation perspective to better understand the experience of psychological distress in head & neck (H&N) cancer patients and their partners. We examined which goals they valued and the extent to which patients and

  6. Non-smoking and non-drinking patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: a distinct population.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farshadpour, F.; Hordijk, G.J.; Koole, R.A.; Slootweg, P.J.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To recognize specific clinicopathological characteristics of non-smoking and non-drinking (NSND) head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients. This can increase our knowledge regarding a potentially different carcinogenesis in these patients. STUDY DESIGN/METHODS: Retrospective

  7. Cost-Utility of Stepped Care Targeting Psychological Distress in Patients With Head and Neck or Lung Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Femke; Krebber, Anna M H; Coupé, Veerle M H; Cuijpers, Pim; de Bree, Remco; Becker-Commissaris, Annemarie; Smit, Egbert F; van Straten, Annemieke; Eeckhout, Guus M; Beekman, Aartjan T F; Leemans, C René; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M

    2017-01-01

    Purpose A stepped care (SC) program in which an effective yet least resource-intensive treatment is delivered to patients first and followed, when necessary, by more resource-intensive treatments was found to be effective in improving distress levels of patients with head and neck cancer or lung

  8. Stimulated monocyte IL-6 secretion predicts survival of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olofsson Jan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study was performed in order to determine whether monocyte in vitro function is associated with presence, stage and prognosis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC disease. Methods Prospective study describing outcome, after at least five years observation, of patients treated for HNSCC disease in relation to their monocyte function. Sixty-five patients with newly diagnosed HNSCC and eighteen control patients were studied. Monocyte responsiveness was assessed by measuring levels of monocyte in vitro interleukin (IL-6 and monocyte chemotactic peptide (MCP-1 secretion after 24 hours of endotoxin stimulation in cultures supplied either with 20% autologous serum (AS or serum free medium (SFM. Survival, and if relevant, cause of death, was determined at least 5 years following primary diagnosis. Results All patients, as a group, had higher in vitro monocyte responsiveness in terms of IL-6 (AS (t = 2.03; p t = 2.49; p in vitro monocyte IL-6 endotoxin responsiveness under the SFM condition was associated with decreased survival rate (Hazard ratio (HR = 2.27; Confidence interval (CI = 1.05–4.88; p p p Conclusion In HNSCC patients, changed monocyte in vitro response to endotoxin, as measured by increased IL-6 (SFM and decreased MCP-1 (AS responsiveness, are negative prognostic factors.

  9. Skin dose measurements using MOSFET and TLD for head and neck patients treated with tomotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinhikar, Rajesh A.; Murthy, Vedang; Goel, Vineeta; Tambe, Chandrashekar M.; Dhote, Dipak S.; Deshpande, Deepak D.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to estimate skin dose for the patients treated with tomotherapy using metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). In vivo measurements were performed for two head and neck patients treated with tomotherapy and compared to TLD measurements. The measurements were subsequently carried out for five days to estimate the inter-fraction deviations in MOSFET measurements. The variation between skin dose measured with MOSFET and TLD for first patient was 2.2%. Similarly, the variation of 2.3% was observed between skin dose measured with MOSFET and TLD for second patient. The tomotherapy treatment planning system overestimated the skin dose as much as by 10-12% when compared to both MOSFET and TLD. However, the MOSFET measured patient skin doses also had good reproducibility, with inter-fraction deviations ranging from 1% to 1.4%. MOSFETs may be used as a viable dosimeter for measuring skin dose in areas where the treatment planning system may not be accurate.

  10. Institutional clinical trial accrual volume and survival of patients with head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuthrick, Evan J; Zhang, Qiang; Machtay, Mitchell; Rosenthal, David I; Nguyen-Tan, Phuc Felix; Fortin, André; Silverman, Craig L; Raben, Adam; Kim, Harold E; Horwitz, Eric M; Read, Nancy E; Harris, Jonathan; Wu, Qian; Le, Quynh-Thu; Gillison, Maura L

    2015-01-10

    National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines recommend patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) receive treatment at centers with expertise, but whether provider experience affects survival is unknown. The effect of institutional experience on overall survival (OS) in patients with stage III or IV HNC was investigated within a randomized trial of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG 0129), which compared cisplatin concurrent with standard versus accelerated fractionation radiotherapy. As a surrogate for experience, institutions were classified as historically low- (HLACs) or high-accruing centers (HHACs) based on accrual to 21 RTOG HNC trials (1997 to 2002). The effect of accrual volume on OS was estimated by Cox proportional hazards models. Median RTOG accrual (1997 to 2002) at HLACs was four versus 65 patients at HHACs. Analysis included 471 patients in RTOG 0129 (2002 to 2005) with known human papillomavirus and smoking status. Patients at HLACs versus HHACs had better performance status (0: 62% v 52%; P = .04) and lower T stage (T4: 26.5% v 35.3%; P = .002) but were otherwise similar. Radiotherapy protocol deviations were higher at HLACs versus HHACs (18% v 6%; P accounting for radiotherapy protocol deviations. Institutional experience substantially influences survival in locally advanced HNC. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  11. Radiographic Study on the Bony Changes of Mandibular Condyle Head in Temporomandibular Disorder Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Moo Soon; You, Dong Soo

    1989-01-01

    The author has studied radiographic bony changes of mandibular condyle head in temporomandibular disorder patients using Oblique lateral transcranial projection, Orthopantomography, and Tomography. The bony change types and the frequencies of occurrence and the incidences of bony changes in three different radiographic techniques were examined. The coincidences of body change types between the Oblique lateral transcranial projection and the lateral part of Tomogram, the Orthopantomogram and the medial part of Tomogram were also examined. The results were as follows: 1. The mean age of patients was 31.7 years and under 40 years were 24 patients, women were 27 patients, men were 4 patients. 2. The observable cases of bony changes in all three radiographic techniques were 19 cases (50%) of 38 cases and the observable cases of bony changes in only Tomography were 5 cases (13.2%). 3. The most frequent radiographic bony change type was osteophyte and next orders were flattening, erosion, concavity. 4. The positional incidences of bony changes in Tomogram were 31 cases in lateral part and 27 cases in central part. 5. The coincidence of bony change types between the oblique lateral transcranial projection and the lateral part of Tomogram was 80%, and the coincidence between the Orthopantomogram and the medial part of Tomogram was 76.9%.

  12. Issues Faced by Family Caregivers of Hospice Patients with Head and Neck Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Susan C; Rodriguez, Carmen; Wang, Hsiao-Lan; Elliott, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore issues reported by caregivers of Head and Neck cancer (HNC) patients newly admitted to hospice homecare. 26 caregivers providing hospice homecare to patients with HNC were induded. Caregiver depressive symptoms, social support and perceived health data were analyzed. The caregivers reported few depressive symptoms, good perceived social support, and good perceived health; however, there was large variation in the group with some individuals having significant problems. Caregivers appeared to be doing well physically, emotionally and socially, but baseline data were used, so follow-up data are needed. Further research is warranted. Family caregivers also are affected by the experience of cancer and may have depressive symptoms needing assessment and management. Hospice patients with HNC have a variety of symptoms specific to their disease and treatment that need assessment and management by their family caregivers. Caregivers of HNC patients in hospice and palliative care need and deserve attention from hospice providers as they care for patients.

  13. Skin dose measurements using MOSFET and TLD for head and neck patients treated with tomotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinhikar, Rajesh A; Murthy, Vedang; Goel, Vineeta; Tambe, Chandrashekar M; Dhote, Dipak S; Deshpande, Deepak D

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to estimate skin dose for the patients treated with tomotherapy using metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). In vivo measurements were performed for two head and neck patients treated with tomotherapy and compared to TLD measurements. The measurements were subsequently carried out for five days to estimate the inter-fraction deviations in MOSFET measurements. The variation between skin dose measured with MOSFET and TLD for first patient was 2.2%. Similarly, the variation of 2.3% was observed between skin dose measured with MOSFET and TLD for second patient. The tomotherapy treatment planning system overestimated the skin dose as much as by 10-12% when compared to both MOSFET and TLD. However, the MOSFET measured patient skin doses also had good reproducibility, with inter-fraction deviations ranging from 1% to 1.4%. MOSFETs may be used as a viable dosimeter for measuring skin dose in areas where the treatment planning system may not be accurate.

  14. Avascular necrosis of femoral and humeral heads in a HIV (+) patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ubysz, R.; Wojtycha-Kwasnica, B.; Higersberger, J.

    2004-01-01

    Osteonecrosis (AVN-avascular necrosis) has been reported to occur occasionally among HIV-infected patient. The number of incidences appears to be rising. The hip is most commonly involved and often bilaterally. Osteonecrosis occurred more frequently in case of those patients who used systemically corticosteroids or testosterone, with hiperlipidemia, alcoholism and immune reconstruction. Case Report: A 28- year - old man, presented with a 2-years history of pain involving both hip joints and shoulders. Over the following weeks the pain was progressive. The patient had a history of HIV for 10 years before. He had a history of steroid use due to cerebellitis (3 years before). No other manifestations of AIDS was presented. The radiographs and CT examination presented irregular areas of increased endosteal density and with fragmentation femoral and humeral heads. Osteonecrosis in HIV (+) patients is most commonly associated with steroid use. HIV infected patients with persistent joints pain should be evaluated for this serious complication. Plain radiographs and TK examination help to establish the diagnosis. (author)

  15. Translational Research in Enteral and Parenteral Nutrition Support for Patients with Severe Head Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fa-liang LIN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To explore the key points of the translational research in enteral and pareenteral nutrition support for patients with severe head injury (SHI, and to analyze the influence of different nutritional support routes on the prognosis of SHI patients. Methods: Totally 141 patients with severe craniocerebral injury were selected as study subjects, 47 cases for each group, and were given early enteral nutrition (EEN, delayed enteral nutrition (DEN, and parenteral nutrition (PN, respectively. The effect of different nutritional support routes on SHI patients was observed. Results: After 14 d of treatment, Glasgow coma scale (GCS scores of 3 groups were higher than treatment before (P<0.01, and with statistical differences among groups (P<0.05, or P<0.01. The levels of serum albumin, total serum protein and hemoglobin were higher in EEN group than the other groups (P<0.01. The level of serum albumin was lower in PN group than in DEN group (P<0.05. There were statistical differences in the incidence of complications among three groups (χ2=9.2487, P=0.0098. Conclusion: EEN support is more conductive to the improvement of the nutrition status, reduction of the incidence of complications, and promotion of the prognosis of SHI patients than DEN and PN.

  16. Dietary intake in head and neck irradiated patients with permanent dry mouth symptoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeckstroem, I.; Funegard, U.; Andersson, I.; Franzen, L.; Johansson, I. [Umeaa Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology

    1995-07-01

    Radiotherapy of the head and neck region, which includes the major and minor salivary glands in the radiation field, usually leads to temporary or permanent xerostomia. This may affect eating and increase the risk of inadequate intake of energy and nutrients. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of radiotherapy-induced xerostomia on energy and nutrient intake in individuals treated for malignancies in the head and neck region. The dietary intake of 24 patients with a low chewing stimulated whole saliva flow rate (< 0.5 ml/min) and in age and sex matched controls with normal flow rate (>1.0 ml/min) was recorded for 7 days. The average daily energy intake was nearly 300 kcal lower in the irradiated patients with dry mouth symptoms than in the control group. The mean intake in the former group was 1925 kcal per day whereas the control group had an intake of 2219 kcal per day. Irradiated patients with dry mouth symptoms had significantly lower mean intakes of vitamin A, {beta}-carotene, vitamin E, vitamin B{sub 6}, folacine, iron and zinc than those in the control group. There was also a lower intake of vitamin C, but this was not statistically significant. The intake of vitamins A and C exceeded or reached the levels recommended in the Swedish Nutritional recommendations, but the average intakes of fibre, iron, {beta}-carotene, vitamin E, zinc, selenium, and iron did not reach recommended levels, in neither the experimental nor the control group. (Author).

  17. Dental and nutritional management of the head and neck cancer patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W. Robert; Sandow, Pamela L.; Moore, Giselle J.

    1995-01-01

    This course will examine the expected acute and late normal tissue toxicities associated with the delivery of high dose radiation therapy to the head and neck region. The purpose of this course will be to identify strategies to reduce radiotherapy-related toxicity without compromising adequate tumor treatment. A multidisciplinary approach will be emphasized and the following topics will be addressed: 1) Appropriate dental evaluation prior to the institution of treatment, oral care during radiation therapy and management of dental complications following completion of treatment. 2) Treatment techniques that accurately localize the target tissue, displace normal tissues from high dose volume and reduce the volume of normal tissue included in the radiation portals. 3) The investigative use of radioprotective agents. 4) Optimal integration of radiotherapy with surgery and/or chemotherapy. 5) The nutritional management of head and neck cancer patients including enteral and parenteral nutrition. 6) The use of medications to reduce the severity of acute symptomatology before, during and after radiation therapy

  18. Collagen Type III Metabolism Evaluation in Patients with Malignant Head and Neck Cancer Treated with Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaudia Mazurek

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation affects the metabolism of key proteins of extracellular matrix including type III collagen, an important component of human skin. The aim of the work is an analysis of the impact of radical and palliative radiotherapy on collagen type III synthesis in patients with head and neck cancer. The test group consisted of 56 males with histopathologically confirmed head and neck cancer, for whom radiotherapy was applied as a form of radical or palliative treatment. The level of procollagen III aminoterminal propeptide (PIIINP, which is a marker of collagen type III synthesis, was determined in blood serum before radiotherapy, immediately following radiotherapy, and 3 months after it was finished. As a result of radical radiotherapy a statistically significant decrease of PIIINP levels in serum (p<0.0001 was observed, both immediately after the radiotherapy and 3 months after the end of the treatment. Also the palliative radiotherapy caused a significant decrease of PIIINP right after the treatment (p=0.0052, as well as during the examination performed 3 months later (p=0.0004. The achieved results suggest that PIIINP can be used as a marker helpful in assessing radiation damage to connective tissue.

  19. Intraparenchymal hemorrhage segmentation from clinical head CT of patients with traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Snehashis; Wilkes, Sean; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Butman, John A.; Pham, Dzung L.

    2015-03-01

    Quantification of hemorrhages in head computed tomography (CT) images from patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) has potential applications in monitoring disease progression and better understanding of the patho-physiology of TBI. Although manual segmentations can provide accurate measures of hemorrhages, the processing time and inter-rater variability make it infeasible for large studies. In this paper, we propose a fully automatic novel pipeline for segmenting intrapa