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Sample records for head direction cell

  1. Heading-vector navigation based on head-direction cells and path integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubie, John L; Fenton, André A

    2009-05-01

    Insect navigation is guided by heading vectors that are computed by path integration. Mammalian navigation models, on the other hand, are typically based on map-like place representations provided by hippocampal place cells. Such models compute optimal routes as a continuous series of locations that connect the current location to a goal. We propose a "heading-vector" model in which head-direction cells or their derivatives serve both as key elements in constructing the optimal route and as the straight-line guidance during route execution. The model is based on a memory structure termed the "shortcut matrix," which is constructed during the initial exploration of an environment when a set of shortcut vectors between sequential pairs of visited waypoint locations is stored. A mechanism is proposed for calculating and storing these vectors that relies on a hypothesized cell type termed an "accumulating head-direction cell." Following exploration, shortcut vectors connecting all pairs of waypoint locations are computed by vector arithmetic and stored in the shortcut matrix. On re-entry, when local view or place representations query the shortcut matrix with a current waypoint and goal, a shortcut trajectory is retrieved. Since the trajectory direction is in head-direction compass coordinates, navigation is accomplished by tracking the firing of head-direction cells that are tuned to the heading angle. Section 1 of the manuscript describes the properties of accumulating head-direction cells. It then shows how accumulating head-direction cells can store local vectors and perform vector arithmetic to perform path-integration-based homing. Section 2 describes the construction and use of the shortcut matrix for computing direct paths between any pair of locations that have been registered in the shortcut matrix. In the discussion, we analyze the advantages of heading-based navigation over map-based navigation. Finally, we survey behavioral evidence that nonhippocampal

  2. Head direction cell activity in mice: robust directional signal depends on intact otolith organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Ryan M.; Taube, Jeffrey S.

    2009-01-01

    The head direction (HD) cell signal is a representation of an animal's perceived directional heading with respect to its environment. This signal appears to originate in the vestibular system, which includes the semicircular canals and otolith organs. Preliminary studies indicate the semicircular canals provide a necessary component of the HD signal, but involvement of otolithic information in the HD signal has not been tested. The present study was designed to determine the otolithic contribution to the HD signal, as well as to compare HD cell activity of mice to that of rats. HD cell activity in the anterodorsal thalamus was assessed in wild-type C57BL/6J and otoconia-deficient tilted mice during locomotion within a cylinder containing a prominent visual landmark. HD cell firing properties in C57BL/6J mice were generally similar to those in rats. However, in C57BL/6J mice, landmark rotation failed to demonstrate dominant control of the HD signal in 36% of the sessions. In darkness, directional firing became unstable during 42% of the sessions, but landmark control was not associated with HD signal stability in darkness. HD cells were identified in tilted mice, but directional firing properties were not as robust as those of C57BL/6J mice. Most HD cells in tilted mice were controlled by landmark rotation, but showed substantial signal degradation across trials. These results support current models that suggest otolithic information is involved in the perception of directional heading. Furthermore, compared to rats, the HD signal in mice appears to be less reliably anchored to prominent environmental cues. PMID:19176815

  3. T Cell-Tumor Interaction Directs the Development of Immunotherapies in Head and Neck Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Albers

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The competent immune system controls disease effectively due to induction, function, and regulation of effector lymphocytes. Immunosurveillance is exerted mostly by cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs while specific immune suppression is associated with tumor malignancy and progression. In squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, the presence, activity, but also suppression of tumor-specific CTL have been demonstrated. Functional CTL may exert a selection pressure on the tumor cells that consecutively escape by a combination of molecular and cellular evasion mechanisms. Certain of these mechanisms target antitumor effector cells directly or indirectly by affecting cells that regulate CTL function. This results in the dysfunction or apoptosis of lymphocytes and dysregulated lymphocyte homeostasis. Another important tumor-escape mechanism is to avoid recognition by dysregulation of antigen processing and presentation. Thus, both induction of functional CTL and susceptibility of the tumor and its microenvironment to become T cell targets should be considered in CTL-based immunotherapy.

  4. Parallel and convergent processing in grid cell, head-direction cell, boundary cell, and place cell networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, Mark P; Koenig, Julie; Leutgeb, Stefan

    2014-03-01

    The brain is able to construct internal representations that correspond to external spatial coordinates. Such brain maps of the external spatial topography may support a number of cognitive functions, including navigation and memory. The neuronal building block of brain maps are place cells, which are found throughout the hippocampus of rodents and, in a lower proportion, primates. Place cells typically fire in one or few restricted areas of space, and each area where a cell fires can range, along the dorsoventral axis of the hippocampus, from 30 cm to at least several meters. The sensory processing streams that give rise to hippocampal place cells are not fully understood, but substantial progress has been made in characterizing the entorhinal cortex, which is the gateway between neocortical areas and the hippocampus. Entorhinal neurons have diverse spatial firing characteristics, and the different entorhinal cell types converge in the hippocampus to give rise to a single, spatially modulated cell type-the place cell. We therefore suggest that parallel information processing in different classes of cells-as is typically observed at lower levels of sensory processing-continues up into higher level association cortices, including those that provide the inputs to hippocampus. WIREs Cogn Sci 2014, 5:207-219. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1272 Conflict of interest: The authors have declared no conflicts of interest for this article. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. [Radiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: State of the art and future directions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schick, U; Huguet, F; Pointreau, Y; Pradier, O

    2017-10-01

    Therapeutic principles of radiation therapy in head and neck carcinomas will be discussed in this review. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy with concomitant cisplatin should be standard. In case of contraindication to chemotherapy, cetuximab is an option, while hyperfractionation should be considered in patients unfit for concomitant treatment. Concomitant chemotherapy should be administered in the presence of extracapsular extensions and positive margins in the postoperative setting. Current research areas such as desescalation in human papillomavirus-positive tumours, adaptive radiotherapy, radiomics and immunotherapy will also be addressed. Copyright © 2017 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Representation of heading direction in far and near head space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poljac, E.; Berg, A.V. van den

    2003-01-01

    Manipulation of objects around the head requires an accurate and stable internal representation of their locations in space, also during movements such as that of the eye or head. For far space, the representation of visual stimuli for goal-directed arm movements relies on retinal updating, if eye

  7. Medial Entorhinal Grid Cells and Head Direction Cells Rotate with a T-Maze More Often During Less Recently Experienced Rotations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Kishan; Beer, Nathan J.; Keller, Lauren A.; Hasselmo, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Prior studies of head direction (HD) cells indicate strong landmark control over the preferred firing direction of these cells, with few studies exhibiting shifts away from local reference frames over time. We recorded spiking activity of grid and HD cells in the medial entorhinal cortex of rats, testing correlations of local environmental cues with the spatial tuning curves of these cells' firing fields as animals performed continuous spatial alternation on a T-maze that shared the boundaries of an open-field arena. The environment was rotated into configurations the animal had either seen or not seen in the past recording week. Tuning curves of both cell types demonstrated commensurate shifts of tuning with T-maze rotations during less recent rotations, more so than recent rotations. This strongly suggests that animals are shifting their reference frame away from the local environmental cues over time, learning to use a different reference frame more likely reliant on distal or idiothetic cues. In addition, grid fields demonstrated varying levels of “fragmentation” on the T-maze. The propensity for fragmentation does not depend on grid spacing and grid score, nor animal trajectory, indicating the cognitive treatment of environmental subcompartments is likely driven by task demands. PMID:23382518

  8. Heading in the right direction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, Ashok

    2011-01-15

    Statoil has developed a new directional technology which optimizes well positioning for unconsolidated geological formations, which addresses a crucial part for the implementation of a steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) program. This technology includes a rotary steerable system which, combined with an ultra-deep resistivity sensor, provides precise geosteering resulting therefore in in better well reservoir capture and characterization. Using this technique increases drilling efficiency, thus reducing the drilling time. The company's strategy is to provide cutting edge development to the oil sector and they have created a new research center in Calgary.

  9. Direct Head-To-Head Comparison of Cationic Liposome-Mediated Gene Delivery to Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells of Different Human Sources: A Comprehensive Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boura, Joana S.; dos Santos, Francisco; Gimble, Jeffrey M.; Cardoso, Carla M.P.; Madeira, Catarina; Cabral, Joaquim M.S.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Nonviral gene delivery to human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) can be considered a very promising strategy to improve their intrinsic features, amplifying the therapeutic potential of these cells for clinical applications. In this work, we performed a comprehensive comparison of liposome-mediated gene transfer efficiencies to MSC derived from different human sources—bone marrow (BM MSC), adipose tissue-derived cells (ASC), and umbilical cord matrix (UCM MSC). The results obtained using a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-encoding plasmid indicated that MSC isolated from BM and UCM are more amenable to genetic modification when compared to ASC as they exhibited superior levels of viable, GFP+ cells 48 hr post-transfection, 58±7.1% and 54±3.8%, respectively, versus 33±4.7%. For all cell sources, high cell recoveries (≈50%) and viabilities (>85%) were achieved, and the transgene expression was maintained for 10 days. Levels of plasmid DNA uptake, as well as kinetics of transgene expression and cellular division, were also determined. Importantly, modified cells were found to retain their characteristic immunophenotypic profile and multilineage differentiation capacity. By using the lipofection protocol optimized herein, we were able to maximize transfection efficiencies to human MSC (maximum of 74% total GFP+ cells) and show that lipofection is a promising transfection strategy for MSC genetic modification, especially when a transient expression of a therapeutic gene is required. Importantly, we also clearly demonstrated that intrinsic features of MSC from different sources should be taken into consideration when developing and optimizing strategies for MSC engineering with a therapeutic gene. PMID:23360350

  10. Multiple Drosophila Tracking System with Heading Direction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pudith Sirigrivatanawong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Machine vision systems have been widely used for image analysis, especially that which is beyond human ability. In biology, studies of behavior help scientists to understand the relationship between sensory stimuli and animal responses. This typically requires the analysis and quantification of animal locomotion. In our work, we focus on the analysis of the locomotion of the fruit fly D r o s o p h i l a m e l a n o g a s t e r , a widely used model organism in biological research. Our system consists of two components: fly detection and tracking. Our system provides the ability to extract a group of flies as the objects of concern and furthermore determines the heading direction of each fly. As each fly moves, the system states are refined with a Kalman filter to obtain the optimal estimation. For the tracking step, combining information such as position and heading direction with assignment algorithms gives a successful tracking result. The use of heading direction increases the system efficiency when dealing with identity loss and flies swapping situations. The system can also operate with a variety of videos with different light intensities.

  11. Llama-derived single variable domains (nanobodies) directed against chemokine receptor CXCR7 reduce head and neck cancer cell growth in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maussang, David; Mujić-Delić, Azra; Descamps, Francis J; Stortelers, Catelijne; Vanlandschoot, Peter; Stigter-van Walsum, Marijke; Vischer, Henry F; van Roy, Maarten; Vosjan, Maria; Gonzalez-Pajuelo, Maria; van Dongen, Guus A M S; Merchiers, Pascal; van Rompaey, Philippe; Smit, Martine J

    2013-10-11

    The chemokine receptor CXCR7, belonging to the membrane-bound G protein-coupled receptor superfamily, is expressed in several tumor types. Inhibition of CXCR7 with either small molecules or small interference (si)RNA has shown promising therapeutic benefits in several tumor models. With the increased interest and effectiveness of biologicals inhibiting membrane-bound receptors we made use of the "Nanobody platform" to target CXCR7. Previously we showed that Nanobodies, i.e. immunoglobulin single variable domains derived from naturally occurring heavy chain-only camelids antibodies, represent new biological tools to efficiently tackle difficult drug targets such as G protein-coupled receptors. In this study we developed and characterized highly selective and potent Nanobodies against CXCR7. Interestingly, the CXCR7-targeting Nanobodies displayed antagonistic properties in contrast with previously reported CXCR7-targeting agents. Several high affinity CXCR7-specific Nanobodies potently inhibited CXCL12-induced β-arrestin2 recruitment in vitro. A wide variety of tumor biopsies was profiled, showing for the first time high expression of CXCR7 in head and neck cancer. Using a patient-derived CXCR7-expressing head and neck cancer xenograft model in nude mice, tumor growth was inhibited by CXCR7-targeting Nanobody therapy. Mechanistically, CXCR7-targeting Nanobodies did not inhibit cell cycle progression but instead reduced secretion of the angiogenic chemokine CXCL1 from head and neck cancer cells in vitro, thus acting here as inverse agonists, and subsequent angiogenesis in vivo. Hence, with this novel class of CXCR7 inhibitors, we further substantiate the therapeutic relevance of targeting CXCR7 in head and neck cancer.

  12. Self-organizing path integration using a linked continuous attractor and competitive network: path integration of head direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringer, Simon M; Rolls, Edmund T

    2006-12-01

    A key issue is how networks in the brain learn to perform path integration, that is update a represented position using a velocity signal. Using head direction cells as an example, we show that a competitive network could self-organize to learn to respond to combinations of head direction and angular head rotation velocity. These combination cells can then be used to drive a continuous attractor network to the next head direction based on the incoming rotation signal. An associative synaptic modification rule with a short term memory trace enables preceding combination cell activity during training to be associated with the next position in the continuous attractor network. The network accounts for the presence of neurons found in the brain that respond to combinations of head direction and angular head rotation velocity. Analogous networks in the hippocampal system could self-organize to perform path integration of place and spatial view representations.

  13. Direct hydrocarbon fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Scott A.; Lai, Tammy; Liu, Jiang

    2010-05-04

    The direct electrochemical oxidation of hydrocarbons in solid oxide fuel cells, to generate greater power densities at lower temperatures without carbon deposition. The performance obtained is comparable to that of fuel cells used for hydrogen, and is achieved by using novel anode composites at low operating temperatures. Such solid oxide fuel cells, regardless of fuel source or operation, can be configured advantageously using the structural geometries of this invention.

  14. Genetics Home Reference: head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and neck squamous cell carcinoma Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... Consumer Version: Overview of Mouth, Nose, and Throat Cancers Orphanet: Squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck University of Michigan ...

  15. Tactile pavement for guiding walking direction: An assessment of heading direction and gait stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluijter, Nanda; de Wit, Lieke P W; Bruijn, Sjoerd M; Plaisier, Myrthe A

    2015-10-01

    For maintaining heading direction while walking we heavily rely on vision. Therefore, walking in the absence of vision or with visual attention directed elsewhere potentially leads to dangerous situations. Here we investigated whether tactile information from the feet can be used as a (partial) substitute for vision in maintaining a stable heading direction. If so, participants should be better able to keep a constant heading direction on tactile pavement that indicates directionality than on regular flat pavement. However, such a pavement may also be destabilizing. Thus we asked participants to walk straight ahead on regular pavement, and on tactile pavement (tiles with ridges along the walking direction) while varying the amount of vision. We assessed the effects of the type of pavement as well as the amount of vision on the variability of the heading direction as well as gait stability. Both of these measures were calculated from accelerations and angular velocities recorded from a smartphone attached to the participants trunk. Results showed that on tactile pavement participants had a less variations in their heading direction than on regular pavement. The drawback, however, was that the tactile pavement used in this study decreased gait stability. In sum, tactile pavement can be used as a partial substitute for vision in maintaining heading direction, but it can also decrease gait stability. Future work should focus on designing tactile pavement that does provided directional clues, but is less destabilizing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Tactile pavement for guiding walking direction: An assessment of heading direction and gait stability.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pluyter, N.; de Wit, L.P.; Bruijn, S.M.; Plaisier, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    For maintaining heading direction while walking we heavily rely on vision. Therefore, walking in the absence of vision or with visual attention directed elsewhere potentially leads to dangerous situations. Here we investigated whether tactile information from the feet can be used as a (partial)

  17. Path integration of head direction: updating a packet of neural activity at the correct speed using axonal conduction delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Daniel; Stringer, Simon; Rolls, Edmund

    2013-01-01

    The head direction cell system is capable of accurately updating its current representation of head direction in the absence of visual input. This is known as the path integration of head direction. An important question is how the head direction cell system learns to perform accurate path integration of head direction. In this paper we propose a model of velocity path integration of head direction in which the natural time delay of axonal transmission between a linked continuous attractor network and competitive network acts as a timing mechanism to facilitate the correct speed of path integration. The model effectively learns a "look-up" table for the correct speed of path integration. In simulation, we show that the model is able to successfully learn two different speeds of path integration across two different axonal conduction delays, and without the need to alter any other model parameters. An implication of this model is that, by learning look-up tables for each speed of path integration, the model should exhibit a degree of robustness to damage. In simulations, we show that the speed of path integration is not significantly affected by degrading the network through removing a proportion of the cells that signal rotational velocity.

  18. Biased Brownian motion mechanism for processivity and directionality of single-headed myosin-VI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaki, Mitsuhiro; Iwane, Atsuko Hikikoshi; Ikebe, Mitsuo; Yanagida, Toshio

    2008-01-01

    Conventional form to function as a vesicle transporter is not a 'single molecule' but a coordinated 'two molecules'. The coordinated two molecules make it complicated to reveal its mechanism. To overcome the difficulty, we adopted a single-headed myosin-VI as a model protein. Myosin-VI is an intracellular vesicle and organelle transporter that moves along actin filaments in a direction opposite to most other known myosin classes. The myosin-VI was expected to form a dimer to move processively along actin filaments with a hand-over-hand mechanism like other myosin organelle transporters. However, wild-type myosin-VI was demonstrated to be monomer and single-headed, casting doubt on its processivity. Using single molecule techniques, we show that green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fused single-headed myosin-VI does not move processively. However, when coupled to a 200 nm polystyrene bead (comparable to an intracellular vesicle in size) at a ratio of one head per bead, single-headed myosin-VI moves processively with large (40 nm) steps. Furthermore, we found that a single-headed myosin-VI-bead complex moved more processively in a high-viscous solution (40-fold higher than water) similar to cellular environment. Because diffusion of the bead is 60-fold slower than myosin-VI heads alone in water, we propose a model in which the bead acts as a diffusional anchor for the myosin-VI, enhancing the head's rebinding following detachment and supporting processive movement of the bead-monomer complex. This investigation will help us understand how molecular motors utilize Brownian motion in cells.

  19. Devascularization of Head and Neck Paragangliomas by Direct Percutaneous Embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozyer, Umut; Harman, Ali; Yildirim, Erkan; Aytekin, Cuneyt; Akay, Tankut Hakki; Boyvat, Fatih

    2010-01-01

    Preoperative transarterial embolization of head and neck paragangliomas using particulate agents has proven beneficial for decreasing intraoperative blood loss. However, the procedure is often incomplete owing to extensive vascular structure and arteriovenous shunts. We report our experience with embolization of these lesions by means of direct puncture and intratumoral injection of n-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) or Onyx. Ten patients aged 32-82 years who were referred for preoperative embolization of seven carotid body tumors and three jugular paragangliomas were retrospectively analyzed. Intratumoral injections were primarily performed in four cases with multiple small-caliber arterial feeders and adjunctive to transarterial embolization in six cases with incomplete devascularization. Punctures were performed under ultrasound and injections were performed under roadmap fluoroscopic guidance. Detailed angiographies were performed before and after embolization procedures. Control angiograms showed complete or near-complete devascularization in all tumors. Three tumors with multiple small-caliber arterial feeders were treated with primary NBCA injections. One tumor necessitated transarterial embolization after primary injection of Onyx. Six tumors showed regional vascularization from the vasa vasorum or small-caliber branches of the external carotid artery following the transarterial approach. These regions were embolized with NBCA injections. No technical or clinical complications related to embolization procedures occurred. All except one of the tumors were surgically removed following embolization. In conclusion, preoperative devascularization with percutaneous direct injection of NBCA or Onyx is feasible, safe, and effective in head and neck paragangliomas with multiple small-caliber arterial feeders and in cases of incomplete devascularization following transarterial embolization.

  20. Direct Methanol Fuel Cell, DMFC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amornpitoksuk, P.

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Direct Methanol Fuel Cell, DMFC is a kind of fuel cell using methanol as a fuel for electric producing. Methanol is low cost chemical substance and it is less harmful than that of hydrogen fuel. From these reasons it can be commercial product. The electrocatalytic reaction of methanol fuel uses Pt-Ru metals as the most efficient catalyst. In addition, the property of membrane and system designation are also effect to the fuel cell efficient. Because of low power of methanol fuel cell therefore, direct methanol fuel cell is proper to use for the energy source of small electrical devices and vehicles etc.

  1. Head position affects the direction of occlusal force during tapping movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, K; Minami, I; Wada, J; Ikawa, Y; Wakabayashi, N

    2018-05-01

    Despite numerous reports describing the relationship between head position and mandibular movement in human subjects, the direction and magnitude of force at the occlusal contacts have not been investigated in relation to head position. The objective was to investigate the effect of head position on the direction of occlusal force while subjects performed a tapping movement. Twenty-three healthy adult subjects were asked to sit on a chair with their back upright and to perform 15 tapping movements in five different head positions: natural head position (control); forward; backward; and right and left rolled. The direction and magnitude of force were measured using a small triaxial force sensor. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test and Bonferroni test were used to compare head positions in each angle of the anteroposterior axis direction and the lateral axis direction with respect to the superior axis. The force element in the anteroposterior axis shifted to the forward direction in the head position pitched backward, compared with control, pitched forward and rolled left positions (P = .02, tapping movement can be performed in a relaxed position without anteroposterior and lateral loading. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Clinicopathological characteristics of head and neck Merkel cell carcinomas.

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    Knopf, Andreas; Bas, Murat; Hofauer, Benedikt; Mansour, Naglaa; Stark, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    There are still controversies about the therapeutic strategies and subsequent outcome in head and neck Merkel cell carcinoma. Clinicopathological data of 23 Merkel cell carcinomas, 93 cutaneous head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs), 126 malignant melanomas, and 91 primary parotid gland carcinomas were comprehensively analyzed. Merkel cell carcinomas were cytokeratin 20 (CK20)/neuron-specific enolase (NSE)/chromogranin A (CgA)/synaptophysin (Syn)/thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1)/MIB1 immunostained. All Merkel cell carcinomas underwent wide local excision. Parotidectomy/neck dissection was performed in 40%/33% cutaneous Merkel cell carcinoma and 100%/100% in parotid gland Merkel cell carcinoma. Five-year recurrence-free interval (RFI)/overall survival (OS) was significantly higher in malignant melanoma (81/80%) than in cutaneous Merkel cell carcinoma/HNSCC. Interestingly, 5-year RFI/OS was significantly higher in Merkel cell carcinoma (61%/79%) than in HNSCC (33%/65%; p Merkel cell carcinoma and parotid gland carcinomas, nor in the immunohistochemical profile. Five-year RFI/OS was significantly better in cutaneous Merkel cell carcinoma when compared with TNM classification matched HNSCC. Five-year RFI/OS was comparable in parotid gland Merkel cell carcinoma and other primary parotid gland malignancies. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 39: 92-97, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Predicting gaze direction from head pose yaw and pitch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnson, D.O.; Cuijpers, R.H.; Arabnia, H.R.; Deligiannidis, L.; Lu, J.; Tinetti, F.G.; You, J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract - Socially assistive robots (SARs) must be able to interpret non-verbal communication from a human. A person’s gaze direction informs the observer where the visual attention is directed to. Therefore it is useful if a robot can interpret the gaze direction, so that it can assess whether a

  4. Head tilt produced by hemilabyrinthectomy does not depend on the direct vestibulospinal tracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, K; Fukushima, J; Kato, M

    1988-01-01

    Head tilt is one of the most characteristic and enduring symptoms produced by hemilabyrinthectomy and is compensated by the central nervous system with time. In order to study the central mechanisms of compensation of the head tilt, it is first necessary to understand how it is produced. However, its mechanism remains unknown. Experiments were performed in cats to examine whether the direct vestibulocollic pathways are responsible for the head tilt, as suggested by some authors. Hemilabyrinthectomies produced a characteristic head tilt in cats in which the medial and/or one lateral vestibulospinal tracts (VSTs) had been interrupted. The lesions of the medial VST did not influence the preexisting head tilt produced by hemilabyrinthectomies. These results suggest that the head tilt produced by hemilabyrinthectomies does not depend on the activity of the VSTs.

  5. Pulmonary squamous cell carcinoma following head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: Metastasis or second primary?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, Tom W.; Nederlof, Petra M.; van den Brekel, Michiel W. M.; van't Veer, Laura J.; de Jong, Daphne; Hart, August A. M.; van Zandwijk, Nico; Klomp, Houke; Balm, Alfons J. M.; van Velthuysen, Marie-Louise F.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To distinguish a metastasis from a second primary tumor in patients with a history of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and subsequent pulmonary squamous cell carcinoma. Experimental Design: For 44 patients with a primary squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck followed by a

  6. The "where" of social attention: Head and body direction aftereffects arise from representations specific to cue type and not direction alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Rebecca P; Calder, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Human beings have remarkable social attention skills. From the initial processing of cues, such as eye gaze, head direction, and body orientation, we perceive where other people are attending, allowing us to draw inferences about the intentions, desires, and dispositions of others. But before we can infer why someone is attending to something in the world we must first accurately represent where they are attending. Here we investigate the "where" of social attention perception, and employ adaptation paradigms to ascertain how head and body orientation are visually represented in the human brain. Across two experiments we show that the representation of two cues to social attention (head and body orientation) exists at the category-specific level. This suggests that aftereffects do not arise from "social attention cells" discovered in macaques or from abstract representations of "leftness" or "rightness."

  7. Cetuximab And The Head And Neck Squamous Cell Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concu, Riccardo; Cordeiro, Maria Natalia Dias Soeiro

    2018-01-12

    The head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) is the most common type of head and neck cancer (more than 90%), and all over the world more than a half million people have been developing this cancer in the last years. This type of cancer is usually marked by a poor prognosis with a really significant morbidity and mortality. Cetuximab received early favor as an exciting and promising new therapy with relatively mild side effect, and due to this received authorization in the 2004 from the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and in the 2006 from the Food and Drug Association (FDA) for the treatment of patients with squamous cell cancer of the head and neck in combination with radiation therapy for locally advanced disease. In this work we will review the application and the efficacy of the Cetuximab in the treatment of the HNSCC. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. Oxygen microenvironment affects the uptake of nanoparticles in head and neck tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Eunice Y.; Hodge, Sasson; Tai, Katherine; Hou, Huagang; Khan, Nadeem; Hoopes, P. Jack; Samkoe, Kimberley S.

    2013-02-01

    Survival of head and neck cancer patients has not improved in several decades despite advances in diagnostic and therapeutic techniques. Tumor hypoxia in head and neck cancers is a critical factor that leads to poor prognosis, resistance to radiation and chemotherapies, and increased metastatic potential. Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia (mNPHT) is a promising therapy for hypoxic tumors because nanoparticles (NP) can be directly injected into, or targeted to, hypoxic tumor cells and exposed to alternating magnetic fields (AMF) to induce hyperthermia. Magnetic NPHT can improve therapeutic effectiveness by two modes of action: 1) direct killing of hypoxic tumor cells; and 2) increase in tumor oxygenation, which has the potential to make the tumor more susceptible to adjuvant therapies such as radiation and chemotherapy. Prior studies in breast cancer cells demonstrated that a hypoxic microenvironment diminished NP uptake in vitro; however, mNPHT with intratumoral NP injection in hypoxic tumors increased tumor oxygenation and delayed tumor growth. In this study, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell lines were incubated in normoxic, hypoxic, and hyperoxic conditions with iron oxide NP for 4-72 hours. After incubation, the cells were analyzed for iron uptake by mass spectrometry, Prussian blue staining, and electron microscopy. In contrast to breast cancer cells, uptake of NPs was increased in hypoxic microenvironments as compared to normoxic conditions in HNSCC cells. In future studies, we will confirm the effect of the oxygen microenvironment on NP uptake and efficacy of mNPHT both in vitro and in vivo.

  9. Merkel cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takes, R. P.; Balm, A. J.; Loftus, B. M.; Baris, G.; Hilgers, F. J.; Gregor, R. T.

    1994-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare cutaneous tumour that typically arises in the head and neck area of elderly patients. The tumour often follows an aggressive course with frequent local recurrences and (regional) metastases, especially when localized above the clavicles. Five patients with a Merkel

  10. Binaural loudness for artificial-head measurements in directional sound fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivonen, Ville Pekka; Ellermeier, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    The effect of the sound incidence angle on loudness was investigated for fifteen listeners who matched the loudness of sounds coming from five different incidence angles in the horizontal plane to that of the same sound with frontal incidence. The stimuli were presented via binaural synthesis...... by using head-related transfer functions measured for an artificial head. The results, which exhibited marked individual differences, show that loudness depends on the direction from which a sound reaches the listener. The average results suggest a relatively simple rule for combining the two signals...... at the ears of an artificial head for binaural loudness predictions....

  11. Directional resolution of head-related transfer functions required in binaural synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minnaar, Pauli; Plogsties, Jan; Christensen, Flemming

    2005-01-01

    In binaural synthesis a virtual sound source is implemented by convolving an anechoic signal with a pair of head-related transfer functions (HRTFs). In order to represent all possible directions of the sound source with respect to the listener a discrete number of HRTFs are measured and interpola......In binaural synthesis a virtual sound source is implemented by convolving an anechoic signal with a pair of head-related transfer functions (HRTFs). In order to represent all possible directions of the sound source with respect to the listener a discrete number of HRTFs are measured...... and moving sound sources. A criterion was found that predicts the experimental results. This criterion was used to estimate the directional resolution required in binaural synthesis for all directions on the sphere around the head....

  12. Low hydrostatic head electrolyte addition to fuel cell stacks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kothmann, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    A fuel cell and system for supply electrolyte, as well as fuel and an oxidant to a fuel cell stack having at least two fuel cells, each of the cells having a pair of spaced electrodes and a matrix sandwiched therebetween, fuel and oxidant paths associated with a bipolar plate separating each pair of adjacent fuel cells and an electrolyte fill path for adding electrolyte to the cells and wetting said matrices. Electrolyte is flowed through the fuel cell stack in a back and forth fashion in a path in each cell substantially parallel to one face of opposite faces of the bipolar plate exposed to one of the electrodes and the matrices to produce an overall head uniformly between cells due to frictional pressure drop in the path for each cell free of a large hydrostatic head to thereby avoid flooding of the electrodes. The bipolar plate is provided with channels forming paths for the flow of the fuel and oxidant on opposite faces thereof, and the fuel and the oxidant are flowed along a first side of the bipolar plate and a second side of the bipolar plate through channels formed into the opposite faces of the bipolar plate, the fuel flowing through channels formed into one of the opposite faces and the oxidant flowing through channels formed into the other of the opposite faces

  13. Merkel cell carcinoma of the head and neck: poorer prognosis than non-head and neck sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morand, G B; Madana, J; Da Silva, S D; Hier, M P; Mlynarek, A M; Black, M J

    2016-04-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare, aggressive neurocutaneous malignancy. This study investigated whether patients with Merkel cell carcinoma in the head and neck had poorer outcomes than patients with Merkel cell carcinoma located elsewhere. A retrospective study was performed of patients with Merkel cell carcinoma treated at the Jewish General Hospital in Montréal, Canada, from 1993 to 2013. Associations between clinicopathological characteristics and disease-free and disease-specific survival rates were examined according to the Kaplan-Meier method. Twenty-seven patients were identified. Although basic clinicopathological characteristics and treatments were similar between head and neck and non-head and neck Merkel cell carcinoma groups, disease-free and disease-specific survival rates were significantly lower in the head and neck Merkel cell carcinoma group (log-rank test; p = 0.043 and p = 0.001, respectively). Mortality was mainly due to distant metastasis. Patients with head and neck Merkel cell carcinoma had poorer survival rates than patients with non-head and neck Merkel cell carcinoma in our study. The tendency to obtain close margins, a less predictable metastatic pattern, and/or intrinsic tumour factors related to the head and neck may explain this discrepancy.

  14. Cetuximab & Nivolumab in Patients With Recurrent/Metastatic Head & Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-10

    Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus; Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Cancer; Head and Neck Carcinoma

  15. Cancer stem cells in head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trapasso S

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Eugenia Allegra, Serena TrapassoOtolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, University Magna Graecia of Catanzaro, Catanzaro, ItalyAbstract: Cancer stem cells (CSCs, also called "cells that start the tumor," represent in themselves one of the most topical and controversial issues in the field of cancer research. Tumor stem cells are able to self-propagate in vitro (self-renewal, giving rise both to other tumor stem cells and most advanced cells in the line of differentiation (asymmetric division. A final characteristic is tumorigenicity, a fundamental property, which outlines the tumor stem cell as the only cell able to initiate the formation of a tumor when implanted in immune-deficient mice. The hypothesis of a hierarchical organization of tumor cells dates back more than 40 years, but only in 1997, thanks to the work of John Dick and Dominique Bonnet, was there the formal proof of such an organization in acute myeloid leukemia. Following this, many other research groups were able to isolate CSCs, by appropriate selection markers, in various malignancies, such as breast, brain, colon, pancreas, and liver cancers and in melanoma. To date, however, it is not possible to isolate stem cells from all types of neoplasia, particularly in solid tumors. From a therapeutic point of view, the concept of tumor stem cells implies a complete revision of conventional antineoplastic treatment. Conventional cytotoxic agents are designed to target actively proliferating cells. In the majority of cases, this is not sufficient to eliminate the CSCs, which thanks to their reduced proliferative activity and/or the presence of proteins capable of extruding chemotherapeutics from the cell are not targeted. Therefore, the theory of cancer stem cells can pose new paradigms in terms of cancer treatment. Potential approaches, even in the very early experimental stages, relate to the selective inhibition of pathways connected with self-renewal, or more specifically based on

  16. Genetic alterations in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagai M.A.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The genetic alterations observed in head and neck cancer are mainly due to oncogene activation (gain of function mutations and tumor suppressor gene inactivation (loss of function mutations, leading to deregulation of cell proliferation and death. These genetic alterations include gene amplification and overexpression of oncogenes such as myc, erbB-2, EGFR and cyclinD1 and mutations, deletions and hypermethylation leading to p16 and TP53 tumor suppressor gene inactivation. In addition, loss of heterozygosity in several chromosomal regions is frequently observed, suggesting that other tumor suppressor genes not yet identified could be involved in the tumorigenic process of head and neck cancers. The exact temporal sequence of the genetic alterations during head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC development and progression has not yet been defined and their diagnostic or prognostic significance is controversial. Advances in the understanding of the molecular basis of head and neck cancer should help in the identification of new markers that could be used for the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of the disease.

  17. The neuroendocrine (Merkel cell) carcinoma of head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidauer, H.; Altmannsberger, H.M.

    1987-01-01

    The neuroendocrine carcinoma of the skin has its histogenetic origin in Merkel cells and a preference in head and neck area in the seventh decade of life. The definitive diagnosis can be made with a combination of electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry. Merkel cell carcinoma is a primary cutaneous neoplasma and is rarely found on the lips or gingiva. Operation and radiation are the therapy of choice. The value of an additional antineoplastic chemotherapy in the treatment of Merkel cell carcinoma is still controversial. Although long survival times had been described in literature the occurrence of local relapses and metastases demands for frequent controls. (orig.) [de

  18. Multiple squamous cell carcinomas within the head and neck region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Katsuro; Hanazawa, Hideyuki; Sato, Yuichiro; Takahashi, Sugata

    2004-01-01

    Clinical features of multiple squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cases within the head and neck that were treated in our department during the recent 10 years are discussed. Multiple SCCs arose in 6.6% of the cases with primary SCC; 67% of the cases had two carcinomas, and 33% had more than three carcinomas. The most common site of the multiple SCCs was the oral cavity (54%). The most frequent interval between treatment of previous carcinoma and diagnosis of subsequent carcinoma was simultaneous, but more than 5 years' interval was observed in 36% of the patients. The most common initial treatment of the carcinoma was irradiation, but the ratio of surgery increased for subsequent carcinomas. Prognosis of the patients with more than three carcinomas was not worse than that of patients with two carcinomas. Therefore, early diagnosis of the subsequent carcinomas based on careful long-term observation in the head and neck is necessary for follow-up of the patients with SCC of the head and neck. Treatment strategies considering the treatment of subsequent carcinomas are needed for the patients with primary head and neck SCC. (author)

  19. Indications for direct multidirectional or multiplanar electronic reconstructions in CT-scanning of the head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, M.C.; Veiga-Pires, J.A.; Gooskens, R.; Troost, J.

    1982-01-01

    The authors set out to indicate the optimal applications at minimum radiation penalty of both direct multidirectional and multiplanar electronic reconstruction modes in CT-scanning of the head by means of two illustrative case reports of midline congenital tumours. (orig.)

  20. Tumor and Stromal-Based Contributions to Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markwell, Steven M.; Weed, Scott A., E-mail: scweed@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, Program in Cancer Cell Biology, Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)

    2015-02-27

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is typically diagnosed at advanced stages with evident loco-regional and/or distal metastases. The prevalence of metastatic lesions directly correlates with poor patient outcome, resulting in high patient mortality rates following metastatic development. The progression to metastatic disease requires changes not only in the carcinoma cells, but also in the surrounding stromal cells and tumor microenvironment. Within the microenvironment, acellular contributions from the surrounding extracellular matrix, along with contributions from various infiltrating immune cells, tumor associated fibroblasts, and endothelial cells facilitate the spread of tumor cells from the primary site to the rest of the body. Thus far, most attempts to limit metastatic spread through therapeutic intervention have failed to show patient benefit in clinic trails. The goal of this review is highlight the complexity of invasion-promoting interactions in the HNSCC tumor microenvironment, focusing on contributions from tumor and stromal cells in order to assist future therapeutic development and patient treatment.

  1. Using strategic movement to calibrate a neural compass: a spiking network for tracking head direction in rats and robots.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Stratton

    Full Text Available The head direction (HD system in mammals contains neurons that fire to represent the direction the animal is facing in its environment. The ability of these cells to reliably track head direction even after the removal of external sensory cues implies that the HD system is calibrated to function effectively using just internal (proprioceptive and vestibular inputs. Rat pups and other infant mammals display stereotypical warm-up movements prior to locomotion in novel environments, and similar warm-up movements are seen in adult mammals with certain brain lesion-induced motor impairments. In this study we propose that synaptic learning mechanisms, in conjunction with appropriate movement strategies based on warm-up movements, can calibrate the HD system so that it functions effectively even in darkness. To examine the link between physical embodiment and neural control, and to determine that the system is robust to real-world phenomena, we implemented the synaptic mechanisms in a spiking neural network and tested it on a mobile robot platform. Results show that the combination of the synaptic learning mechanisms and warm-up movements are able to reliably calibrate the HD system so that it accurately tracks real-world head direction, and that calibration breaks down in systematic ways if certain movements are omitted. This work confirms that targeted, embodied behaviour can be used to calibrate neural systems, demonstrates that 'grounding' of modelled biological processes in the real world can reveal underlying functional principles (supporting the importance of robotics to biology, and proposes a functional role for stereotypical behaviours seen in infant mammals and those animals with certain motor deficits. We conjecture that these calibration principles may extend to the calibration of other neural systems involved in motion tracking and the representation of space, such as grid cells in entorhinal cortex.

  2. Using strategic movement to calibrate a neural compass: a spiking network for tracking head direction in rats and robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton, Peter; Milford, Michael; Wyeth, Gordon; Wiles, Janet

    2011-01-01

    The head direction (HD) system in mammals contains neurons that fire to represent the direction the animal is facing in its environment. The ability of these cells to reliably track head direction even after the removal of external sensory cues implies that the HD system is calibrated to function effectively using just internal (proprioceptive and vestibular) inputs. Rat pups and other infant mammals display stereotypical warm-up movements prior to locomotion in novel environments, and similar warm-up movements are seen in adult mammals with certain brain lesion-induced motor impairments. In this study we propose that synaptic learning mechanisms, in conjunction with appropriate movement strategies based on warm-up movements, can calibrate the HD system so that it functions effectively even in darkness. To examine the link between physical embodiment and neural control, and to determine that the system is robust to real-world phenomena, we implemented the synaptic mechanisms in a spiking neural network and tested it on a mobile robot platform. Results show that the combination of the synaptic learning mechanisms and warm-up movements are able to reliably calibrate the HD system so that it accurately tracks real-world head direction, and that calibration breaks down in systematic ways if certain movements are omitted. This work confirms that targeted, embodied behaviour can be used to calibrate neural systems, demonstrates that 'grounding' of modelled biological processes in the real world can reveal underlying functional principles (supporting the importance of robotics to biology), and proposes a functional role for stereotypical behaviours seen in infant mammals and those animals with certain motor deficits. We conjecture that these calibration principles may extend to the calibration of other neural systems involved in motion tracking and the representation of space, such as grid cells in entorhinal cortex.

  3. Oriented collagen fibers direct tumor cell intravasation

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Weijing; Chen, Shaohua; Yuan, Wei; Fan, Qihui; Tian, Jianxiang; Wang, Xiaochen; Chen, Longqing; Zhang, Xixiang; Wei, Weili; Liu, Ruchuan; Qu, Junle; Jiao, Yang; Austin, Robert H.; Liu, Liyu

    2016-01-01

    that the local fiber alignment enhanced cell-ECM interactions. Specifically, metastatic MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells followed the local fiber alignment direction during the intravasation into rigid Matrigel (∼10 mg/mL protein concentration).

  4. Effects of PPARα inhibition in head and neck paraganglioma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalba Florio

    Full Text Available Head and neck paragangliomas (HNPGLs are rare tumors that may cause important morbidity, because of their tendency to infiltrate the skull base. At present, surgery is the only therapeutic option, but radical removal may be difficult or impossible. Thus, effective targets and molecules for HNPGL treatment need to be identified. However, the lack of cellular models for this rare tumor hampers this task. PPARα receptor activation was reported in several tumors and this receptor appears to be a promising therapeutic target in different malignancies. Considering that the role of PPARα in HNPGLs was never studied before, we analyzed the potential of modulating PPARα in a unique model of HNPGL cells. We observed an intense immunoreactivity for PPARα in HNPGL tumors, suggesting that this receptor has an important role in HNPGL. A pronounced nuclear expression of PPARα was also confirmed in HNPGL-derived cells. The specific PPARα agonist WY14643 had no effect on HNPGL cell viability, whereas the specific PPARα antagonist GW6471 reduced HNPGL cell viability and growth by inducing cell cycle arrest and caspase-dependent apoptosis. GW6471 treatment was associated with a marked decrease of CDK4, cyclin D3 and cyclin B1 protein expression, along with an increased expression of p21 in HNPGL cells. Moreover, GW6471 drastically impaired clonogenic activity of HNPGL cells, with a less marked effect on cell migration. Notably, the effects of GW6471 on HNPGL cells were associated with the inhibition of the PI3K/GSK3β/β-catenin signaling pathway. In conclusion, the PPARα antagonist GW6471 reduces HNPGL cell viability, interfering with cell cycle and inducing apoptosis. The mechanisms affecting HNPGL cell viability involve repression of the PI3K/GSK3β/β-catenin pathway. Therefore, PPARα could represent a novel therapeutic target for HNPGL.

  5. Effect of cell-phone radiofrequency on angiogenesis and cell invasion in human head and neck cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alahmad, Yaman M; Aljaber, Mohammed; Saleh, Alaaeldin I; Yalcin, Huseyin C; Aboulkassim, Tahar; Yasmeen, Amber; Batist, Gerald; Moustafa, Ala-Eddin Al

    2018-05-13

    Today, the cell phone is the most widespread technology globally. However, the outcome of cell-phone radiofrequency on head and neck cancer progression has not yet been explored. The chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) and human head and neck cancer cell lines, FaDu and SCC25, were used to explore the outcome of cell-phone radiofrequency on angiogenesis, cell invasion, and colony formation of head and neck cancer cells, respectively. Western blot analysis was used to investigate the impact of the cell phone on the regulation of E-cadherin and Erk1/Erk2 genes. Our data revealed that cell-phone radiofrequency promotes angiogenesis of the CAM. In addition, the cell phone enhances cell invasion and colony formation of human head and neck cancer cells; this is accompanied by a downregulation of E-cadherin expression. More significantly, we found that the cell phone can activate Erk1/Erk2 in our experimental models. Our investigation reveals that cell-phone radiofrequency could enhance head and neck cancer by stimulating angiogenesis and cell invasion via Erk1/Erk2 activation. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Intratumoral injection of radioactive holmium-166 microspheres in recurrent head and neck squamous cell carcinoma : preliminary results of first use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Robbert C; van Es, Robert J J; Rosenberg, Antoine J W P; van Nimwegen, Sebastiaan A; Bastiaannet, Remco; de Jong, Hugo W A M; Nijsen, Johannes F W; Lam, Marnix G E H

    BACKGROUND: Limited treatment options exist for patients with locoregional recurrences of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). In the palliative setting, a single session, minimally invasive, and relatively safe therapy is desirable. This case series illustrates the feasibility of a direct

  7. Testing the dual-route model of perceived gaze direction: Linear combination of eye and head cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Yumiko; Mareschal, Isabelle; Clifford, Colin W G

    2016-06-01

    We have recently proposed a dual-route model of the effect of head orientation on perceived gaze direction (Otsuka, Mareschal, Calder, & Clifford, 2014; Otsuka, Mareschal, & Clifford, 2015), which computes perceived gaze direction as a linear combination of eye orientation and head orientation. By parametrically manipulating eye orientation and head orientation, we tested the adequacy of a linear model to account for the effect of horizontal head orientation on perceived direction of gaze. Here, participants adjusted an on-screen pointer toward the perceived gaze direction in two image conditions: Normal condition and Wollaston condition. Images in the Normal condition included a change in the visible part of the eye along with the change in head orientation, while images in the Wollaston condition were manipulated to have identical eye regions across head orientations. Multiple regression analysis with explanatory variables of eye orientation and head orientation revealed that linear models account for most of the variance both in the Normal condition and in the Wollaston condition. Further, we found no evidence that the model with a nonlinear term explains significantly more variance. Thus, the current study supports the dual-route model that computes the perceived gaze direction as a linear combination of eye orientation and head orientation.

  8. Novel Immunotherapeutic Approaches for Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darrin V. Bann

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The immune system plays a key role in preventing tumor formation by recognizing and destroying malignant cells. For over a century, researchers have attempted to harness the immune response as a cancer treatment, although this approach has only recently achieved clinical success. Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC is the sixth most common cancer worldwide and is associated with cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, betel nut use, and human papillomavirus infection. Unfortunately, worldwide mortality from HNSCC remains high, partially due to limits on therapy secondary to the significant morbidity associated with current treatments. Therefore, immunotherapeutic approaches to HNSCC treatment are attractive for their potential to reduce morbidity while improving survival. However, the application of immunotherapies to this disease has been challenging because HNSCC is profoundly immunosuppressive, resulting in decreased absolute lymphocyte counts, impaired natural killer cell function, reduced antigen-presenting cell function, and a tumor-permissive cytokine profile. Despite these challenges, numerous clinical trials testing the safety and efficacy of immunotherapeutic approaches to HNSCC treatment are currently underway, many of which have produced promising results. This review will summarize immunotherapeutic approaches to HNSCC that are currently undergoing clinical trials.

  9. MicroRNA expression profiles of cancer stem cells in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    YATA, KAZUYA; BEDER, LEVENT BEKIR; TAMAGAWA, SHUNJI; HOTOMI, MUNEKI; HIROHASHI, YOSHIHIKO; GRENMAN, REIDAR; YAMANAKA, NOBORU

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that cancer stem cells have essential roles in tumor initiation, progression, metastasis and resistance to chemo-radiation. Recent research has pointed out biological importance of microRNAs in cancer stem cell dysregulation. Total number of mature microRNAs in human genome increased to more than 2,500 with the recent up-date of the database. However, currently no information is available regarding microRNA expression profiles of cancer stem cells in head and nec...

  10. Synthetic Aperture Computation as the Head is Turned in Binaural Direction Finding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan Tamsett

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Binaural systems measure instantaneous time/level differences between acoustic signals received at the ears to determine angles λ between the auditory axis and directions to acoustic sources. An angle λ locates a source on a small circle of colatitude (a lamda circle on a sphere symmetric about the auditory axis. As the head is turned while listening to a sound, acoustic energy over successive instantaneous lamda circles is integrated in a virtual/subconscious field of audition. The directions in azimuth and elevation to maxima in integrated acoustic energy, or to points of intersection of lamda circles, are the directions to acoustic sources. This process in a robotic system, or in nature in a neural implementation equivalent to it, delivers its solutions to the aurally informed worldview. The process is analogous to migration applied to seismic profiler data, and to that in synthetic aperture radar/sonar systems. A slanting auditory axis, e.g., possessed by species of owl, leads to the auditory axis sweeping the surface of a cone as the head is turned about a single axis. Thus, the plane in which the auditory axis turns continuously changes, enabling robustly unambiguous directions to acoustic sources to be determined.

  11. Genetic Susceptibility to Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacko, Martin [Department of Otorhinolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Braakhuis, Boudewijn J.M. [Department of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sturgis, Erich M. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery and Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Boedeker, Carsten C. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, Albert-Ludwigs-University, Freiburg, Germany and Department of Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, HELIOS Hanseklinikum Stralsund, Stralsund (Germany); Suárez, Carlos [Department of Otolaryngology, Hospital Universitario Central de Asturias, Oviedo (Spain); Instituto Universitario de Oncología del Principado de Asturias, Oviedo (Spain); Rinaldo, Alessandra; Ferlito, Alfio [ENT Clinic, University of Udine, Udine (Italy); Takes, Robert P., E-mail: robert.takes@radboudumc.nl [Department of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2014-05-01

    Head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most common cancer worldwide, and its incidence is growing. Although environmental carcinogens and carcinogenic viruses are the main etiologic factors, genetic predisposition obviously plays a risk-modulating role, given that not all individuals exposed to these carcinogens experience the disease. This review highlights some aspects of genetic susceptibility to HNSCC: among others, genetic polymorphisms in biotransformation enzymes, DNA repair pathway, apoptotic pathway, human papillomavirus-related pathways, mitochondrial polymorphisms, and polymorphism related to the bilirubin-metabolized pathway. Furthermore, epigenetic variations, familial forms of HNSCC, functional assays for HNSCC risk assessment, and the implications and perspectives of research on genetic susceptibility in HNSCC are discussed.

  12. Genetic Susceptibility to Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacko, Martin; Braakhuis, Boudewijn J.M.; Sturgis, Erich M.; Boedeker, Carsten C.; Suárez, Carlos; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Ferlito, Alfio; Takes, Robert P.

    2014-01-01

    Head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most common cancer worldwide, and its incidence is growing. Although environmental carcinogens and carcinogenic viruses are the main etiologic factors, genetic predisposition obviously plays a risk-modulating role, given that not all individuals exposed to these carcinogens experience the disease. This review highlights some aspects of genetic susceptibility to HNSCC: among others, genetic polymorphisms in biotransformation enzymes, DNA repair pathway, apoptotic pathway, human papillomavirus-related pathways, mitochondrial polymorphisms, and polymorphism related to the bilirubin-metabolized pathway. Furthermore, epigenetic variations, familial forms of HNSCC, functional assays for HNSCC risk assessment, and the implications and perspectives of research on genetic susceptibility in HNSCC are discussed

  13. Methods of conditioning direct methanol fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Cynthia; Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    2005-11-08

    Methods for conditioning the membrane electrode assembly of a direct methanol fuel cell ("DMFC") are disclosed. In a first method, an electrical current of polarity opposite to that used in a functioning direct methanol fuel cell is passed through the anode surface of the membrane electrode assembly. In a second method, methanol is supplied to an anode surface of the membrane electrode assembly, allowed to cross over the polymer electrolyte membrane of the membrane electrode assembly to a cathode surface of the membrane electrode assembly, and an electrical current of polarity opposite to that in a functioning direct methanol fuel cell is drawn through the membrane electrode assembly, wherein methanol is oxidized at the cathode surface of the membrane electrode assembly while the catalyst on the anode surface is reduced. Surface oxides on the direct methanol fuel cell anode catalyst of the membrane electrode assembly are thereby reduced.

  14. Topographic Pattern Distribution of Head And Neck Squamous Cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FINEPRINT

    value of 71% of SCC in Turkey. Nevertheless a similar report documented a relatively lower value especially in. Yemen where head and neck SCC constituted only 8% of all head and neck cancers. Reports from Yemen revealed that oral cavity SCC was the most common topographic site of all head and. 3 neck cancers.

  15. Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) Induced Head & Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Comprehensive Retrospect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishat, Roquaiya; Ramachandra, Sujatha; Kumar, Harish; Bandyopadhyay, Alokenath

    2015-01-01

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma accounts for the sixth most common malignancy occurring worldwide with tobacco and alcohol being the two well established risk factors. In the recent years, substantial evidence has been obtained that Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) associated head and neck cancers are on the rise. This article provides an insight into the structure of HPV genome, molecular pathogenesis, detection methods and clinical implications of HPV positive Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma. PMID:26266234

  16. Oriented collagen fibers direct tumor cell intravasation

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Weijing

    2016-09-24

    In this work, we constructed a Collagen I-Matrigel composite extracellular matrix (ECM). The composite ECM was used to determine the influence of the local collagen fiber orientation on the collective intravasation ability of tumor cells. We found that the local fiber alignment enhanced cell-ECM interactions. Specifically, metastatic MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells followed the local fiber alignment direction during the intravasation into rigid Matrigel (∼10 mg/mL protein concentration).

  17. A computational study of low-head direct chill slab casting of aluminum alloy AA2024

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Mainul; Begum, Latifa

    2016-04-01

    The steady state casting of an industrial-sized AA2024 slab has been modeled for a vertical low-head direct chill caster. The previously verified 3-D CFD code is used to investigate the solidification phenomena of the said long-range alloy by varying the pouring temperature, casting speed and the metal-mold contact heat transfer coefficient from 654 to 702 °C, 60-180 mm/min, and 1.0-4.0 kW/(m2 K), respectively. The important predicted results are presented and thoroughly discussed.

  18. Lightweight Stacks of Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Sekharipuram; Valdez, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    An improved design concept for direct methanol fuel cells makes it possible to construct fuel-cell stacks that can weigh as little as one-third as much as do conventional bipolar fuel-cell stacks of equal power. The structural-support components of the improved cells and stacks can be made of relatively inexpensive plastics. Moreover, in comparison with conventional bipolar fuel-cell stacks, the improved fuel-cell stacks can be assembled, disassembled, and diagnosed for malfunctions more easily. These improvements are expected to bring portable direct methanol fuel cells and stacks closer to commercialization. In a conventional bipolar fuel-cell stack, the cells are interspersed with bipolar plates (also called biplates), which are structural components that serve to interconnect the cells and distribute the reactants (methanol and air). The cells and biplates are sandwiched between metal end plates. Usually, the stack is held together under pressure by tie rods that clamp the end plates. The bipolar stack configuration offers the advantage of very low internal electrical resistance. However, when the power output of a stack is only a few watts, the very low internal resistance of a bipolar stack is not absolutely necessary for keeping the internal power loss acceptably low.

  19. Human Papilloma Virus in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asvadi Kermani, I; Seifi, SH; Dolatkhah, R; Sakhinia, E; Dastgiri, S; Ebrahimi, A; Lotfy, A; Esmaeili, HA; G, Mohammadi; M, Naderpour; SH, Hajalipour; Haggi A, Asghari; M, Nadri

    2012-01-01

    Background Epidemiologic and molecular evidences have established a strong link between high risk types of Human Papilloma Virus and a subgroup of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas (HNSCC). We evaluated the frequency of HPV positivity in HNSCC and its relationship to demographic and some risk factor variables in an open case- control study. Methods Fourteen recently diagnosed patients with squamous cell cancer of oropharynx, hypopharynx and larynx aged 18-50 years were examined from 2008-2010 in Tabriz, Iran. HPV DNA was extracted from paraffin-embedded blocks of each patient's sample for PCR evaluation. Saliva samples of 94 control cancer-free subjects were collected for DNA analysis. Multivariable logistic regression method was used to calculate odds ratio for case-control comparisons. Results High risk HPV was detected in 6(42.8%) patients, and 6(5.3%) control subjects which was statistically significant (p<0.0001). HPV-18 was the most frequent type both in the cases and controls. HPV-16 DNA was detected in two patients of the case group, but it was not detected in any of the controls. The relation between demographic and risk factor variables was not statistically significant. Conclusion HPV infection has a significant impact on HNSCC. Despite HPV-16 stronger impact, HPV-18 is more likely to cause malignant degeneration in such cancers amongst some communities. It is vital to introduce and conduct immunization schedules in health care systems to protect communities to some extent. PMID:25780535

  20. Immunotherapy for Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskovitz, Jessica; Moy, Jennifer; Ferris, Robert L

    2018-03-03

    Discussion of current strategies targeting the immune system related to solid tumors with emphasis on head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC).This review will outline the current challenges with immunotherapy and future goals for treatment using these agents. Agents targeting immune checkpoint receptors (IR) such as program death 1 (PD1) have been used in the clinical realm for melanoma and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and the use of these agents for these malignancies has provided crucial information about how and why patients respond or not to inhibitory checkpoint receptor blockade therapy (ICR). The anti PD1 agent, nivolumab, was recently approved by the FDA as a standard of care regimen for patients with platinum refractory recurrent/metastatic (R/M) HNSCC. Molecular pathways leading to resistance are starting to be identified, and work is underway to understand the most optimal treatment regimen with incorporation of immunotherapy. ICR has renewed interest in the immunology of cancer, but resistance is not uncommon, and thus understanding of these mechanisms will allow the clinician to appropriately select patients that will benefit from this therapy.

  1. Rotation and direction judgment from visual images head-slaved in two and three degrees-of-freedom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelstein, B D; Ellis, S R

    2000-03-01

    The contribution to spatial awareness of adding a roll degree-of-freedom (DOF) to telepresence camera platform yaw and pitch was examined in an experiment where subjects judged direction and rotation of stationary target markers in a remote scene. Subjects viewed the scene via head-slaved camera images in a head-mounted display. Elimination of the roll DOF affected rotation judgment, but only at extreme yaw and pitch combinations, and did not affect azimuth and elevation judgement. Systematic azimuth overshoot occurred regardless of roll condition. Observed rotation misjudgments are explained by kinematic models for eye-head direction of gaze.

  2. Directional loudness in an anechoic sound field, head-related transfer functions, and binaural summation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivonen, Ville Pekka; Ellermeier, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    planes. Matches were obtained via a two-interval, adaptive forced-choice (2AFC) procedure for three center frequencies (0.4, 1 and 5 kHz) and two overall levels (45 and 65 dB SPL). The results showed that loudness is not constant over sound incidence angles, with directional sensitivity varying over......The effect of sound incidence angle on loudness was investigated using real sound sources positioned in an anechoic chamber. Eight normal-hearing listeners produced loudness matches between a frontal reference location and seven sources placed at other directions, both in the horizontal and median...... a range of up to 10 dB, exhibiting considerable frequency dependence, but only minor effects of overall level. The pattern of results varied substantially between subjects, but was largely accounted for by variations in individual head-related transfer functions. Modeling of binaural loudness based...

  3. Self-Adaptive Correction of Heading Direction in Stair Climbing for Tracked Mobile Robots Using Visual Servoing Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Peng; Song, Aiguo; Song, Zimo; Liu, Yuqing; Jiang, Guohua; Zhao, Guopu

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we describe a heading direction correction algorithm for a tracked mobile robot. To save hardware resources as far as possible, the mobile robot’s wrist camera is used as the only sensor, which is rotated to face stairs. An ensemble heading deviation detector is proposed to help the mobile robot correct its heading direction. To improve the generalization ability, a multi-scale Gabor filter is used to process the input image previously. Final deviation result is acquired by applying the majority vote strategy on all the classifiers’ results. The experimental results show that our detector is able to enable the mobile robot to correct its heading direction adaptively while it is climbing the stairs.

  4. Advances in direct oxidation methanol fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surampudi, S.; Narayanan, S. R.; Vamos, E.; Frank, H.; Halpert, G.; Laconti, Anthony B.; Kosek, J.; Prakash, G. K. Surya; Olah, G. A.

    1993-01-01

    Fuel cells that can operate directly on fuels such as methanol are attractive for low to medium power applications in view of their low weight and volume relative to other power sources. A liquid feed direct methanol fuel cell has been developed based on a proton exchange membrane electrolyte and Pt/Ru and Pt catalyzed fuel and air/O2 electrodes, respectively. The cell has been shown to deliver significant power outputs at temperatures of 60 to 90 C. The cell voltage is near 0.5 V at 300 mA/cm(exp 2) current density and an operating temperature of 90 C. A deterrent to performance appears to be methanol crossover through the membrane to the oxygen electrode. Further improvements in performance appear possible by minimizing the methanol crossover rate.

  5. Identification and characterization of cancer stem cells in human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Jing; Fujisawa, Toshio; Husain, Syed R; Puri, Raj K

    2014-01-01

    Current evidence suggests that initiation, growth, and invasion of cancer are driven by a small population of cancer stem cells (CSC). Previous studies have identified CD44+ cells as cancer stem cells in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). However, CD44 is widely expressed in most cells in HNSCC tumor samples and several cell lines tested. We previously identified a small population of CD24+/CD44+ cells in HNSCC. In this study, we examined whether this population of cells may represent CSC in HNSCC. CD24+/CD44+ cells from HNSCC cell lines were sorted by flow cytometry, and their phenotype was confirmed by qRT-PCR. Their self-renewal and differentiation properties, clonogenicity in collagen gels, and response to anticancer drugs were tested in vitro. The tumorigenicity potential of CD24+/CD44+ cells was tested in athymic nude mice in vivo. Our results show that CD24+/CD44+ cells possessed stemness characteristics of self-renewal and differentiation. CD24+/CD44+ cells showed higher cell invasion in vitro and made higher number of colonies in collagen gels compared to CD24-/CD44+ HNSCC cells. In addition, the CD24+/CD44+ cells were more chemo-resistant to gemcitabine and cisplatin compared to CD24-/CD44+ cells. In vivo, CD24+/CD44+ cells showed a tendency to generate larger tumors in nude mice compared to CD24-/CD44+ cell population. Our study clearly demonstrates that a distinct small population of CD24+/CD44+ cells is present in HNSCC that shows stem cell-like properties. This distinct small population of cells should be further characterized and may provide an opportunity to target HNSCC CSC for therapy

  6. Improved Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Mahlon S.; Ramsey, John C.

    2005-03-08

    A stack of direct methanol fuel cells exhibiting a circular footprint. A cathode and anode manifold, tie-bolt penetrations and tie-bolts are located within the circular footprint. Each fuel cell uses two graphite-based plates. One plate includes a cathode active area that is defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet and outlet cathode manifold. The other plate includes an anode active area defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet and outlet of the anode manifold, where the serpentine channels of the anode are orthogonal to the serpentine channels of the cathode. Located between the two plates is the fuel cell active region.

  7. Effect of the coffee ingredient cafestol on head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotowski, Ulana; Heiduschka, Gregor; Eckl-Dorna, Julia; Kranebitter, Veronika; Stanisz, Isabella; Brunner, Markus; Lill, Claudia; Thurnher, Dietmar; Seemann, Rudolf; Schmid, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Cafestol is a diterpene molecule found in coffee beans and has anticarcinogenic properties. The aim of the study was to examine the effects of cafestol in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells. Three HNSCC cell lines (SCC25, CAL27 and FaDu) were treated with increasing doses of cafestol. Then combination experiments with cisplatin and irradiation were carried out. Drug interactions and possible synergy were calculated using the combination index analysis. Clonogenic assays were performed after irradiation with 2, 4, 6 and 8 Gy, respectively, and the rate of apoptosis was measured with flow cytometry. Treatment of HNSCC cells with cafestol leads to a dose-dependent reduction of cell viability and to induction of apoptosis. Combination with irradiation shows a reduction of clonogenic survival compared to each treatment method alone. In two of the cell lines a significant additive effect was observed. Cafestol is a naturally occurring effective compound with growth-inhibiting properties in head and neck cancer cells. Moreover, it leads to a significant inhibition of colony formation. (orig.) [de

  8. Direct fuel cell product design improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maru, H.C.; Farooque, M. [Energy Research Corp., Danbury, CT (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Significant milestones have been attained towards the technology development field testing and commercialization of direct fuel cell power plant since the 1994 Fuel Cell Seminar. Under a 5-year cooperative agreement with the Department of Energy signed in December 1994, Energy Research Corporation (ERC) has been developing the design for a MW-scale direct fuel cell power plant with input from previous technology efforts and the Santa Clara Demonstration Project. The effort encompasses product definition in consultation with the Fuel Cell Commercialization Group, potential customers, as well as extensive system design and packaging. Manufacturing process improvements, test facility construction, cell component scale up, performance and endurance improvements, stack engineering, and critical balance-of-plant development are also addressed. Major emphasis of this product design improvement project is on increased efficiency, compactness and cost reduction to establish a competitive place in the market. A 2.85 MW power plant with an efficiency of 58% and a footprint of 420 m{sup 2} has been designed. Component and subsystem testing is being conducted at various levels. Planning and preparation for verification of a full size prototype unit are in progress. This paper presents the results obtained since the last fuel cell seminar.

  9. The effect of radiotherapy on NKT cells in patients with advanced head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kouichi; Tanaka, Yuriko; Horiguchi, Shigetoshi; Yamamoto, Shouji; Toshinori, Nakayama; Sugimoto, Akira; Okamoto, Yoshitaka

    2010-10-01

    Cancer immunotherapy with NKT cells is a potential new treatment strategy for advanced head and neck cancer. NKT cell therapy is promising due to its unique anti-tumor activity and higher degree of safety compared to current therapies. Radiotherapy is indispensable as a standard treatment for advanced head and neck cancer. To elucidate the possibility of using NKT cells as an adjuvant immunotherapy with radiotherapy, we examined the effect of radiotherapy on NKT cells in patients with head and neck cancer. The number, IFN-gamma production and proliferation capacity of NKT cells were analyzed before and after 50 Gy radiation therapy in 12 patients with stage IV head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. The cytotoxic activity of NKT cells was examined in vitro. The number of NKT cells in the blood varied widely between patients. After radiation therapy, the population of CD3 T cells decreased significantly, while the NKT cell population remained stable. The number of NKT cells was the same after radiation therapy as before. IFN-gamma production from NKT cells collected just after radiotherapy was impaired after stimulation with exogenous ligand, but the proliferative responses of these NKT cells was enhanced in comparison to those collected before radiation therapy. Furthermore, the proliferated NKT cells displayed a significant level of anti-tumor activity. NKT cells are relatively resistant to radiation and might therefore be suitable for adjuvant immunotherapy to eradicate remnant cancer cells in patients who have undergone radiation therapy.

  10. GLYCAN-DIRECTED CAR-T CELLS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steentoft, Catharina; Migliorini, Denis; King, Tiffany R; Mandel, Ulla; June, Carl H; Posey, Avery D

    2018-01-23

    Cancer immunotherapy is rapidly advancing in the treatment of a variety of hematopoietic cancers, including pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia and diffuse large B cell lymphoma, with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T cells. CARs are genetically encoded artificial T cell receptors that combine the antigen specificity of an antibody with the machinery of T cell activation. However, implementation of CAR technology in the treatment of solid tumors has been progressing much slower. Solid tumors are characterized by a number of challenges that need to be overcome, including cellular heterogeneity, immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment (TME), and, in particular, few known cancer-specific targets. Post-translational modifications that differentially occur in malignant cells generate valid cell surface, cancer-specific targets for CAR-T cells. We previously demonstrated that CAR-T cells targeting an aberrant O-glycosylation of MUC1, a common cancer marker associated with changes in cell adhesion, tumor growth, and poor prognosis, could control malignant growth in mouse models. Here, we discuss the field of glycan-directed CAR-T cells and review the different classes of antibodies specific for glycan-targeting, including the generation of high affinity O-glycopeptide antibodies. Finally, we discuss historic and recently investigated glycan targets for CAR-T cells and provide our perspective on how targeting the tumor glycoproteome and/or glycome will improve CAR-T immunotherapy. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Incidence of Etiologic Factors in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Head and Neck in Ahvaz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheila Nikakhlagh

    2011-01-01

     Conclusion: According to this study, tobacco smoking was the most important etiologic factor and had a strong effect on risk of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Other factors are also important and need more research study.

  12. Radiotherapy plus cetuximab for the squamous cells carcinoma of head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonner, James A.; Harari, Paul M.; Giralt, Jordi; Azarnia, Nozar; Shin, Dong M.; Cohen, Roger B.; Jones, Cristopher U.; Sur, Ranjan; Raben, David; Jassem, Jacek; Ove, Roger; Kies, Merrill S.; Baselga, Jose; Youssoufian, Hagop; Amellal, Nadia; Rowinsky, Eric K.; Ang, K. Kian

    2006-01-01

    A multinational randomized study was realized, to compare radiotherapy alone with radiotherapy combined with cetuximab, a monoclonal antibody against the receiver epidermal growth factor in the treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck locally advanced [es

  13. Clinical Evaluation of Direct Aperture Optimization When Applied to Head-And-Neck IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Stephen; Williams, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    Direct Machine Parameter Optimization (DMPO) is a leaf segmentation program released as an optional item of the Pinnacle planning system (Philips Radiation Oncology Systems, Milpitas, CA); it is based on the principles of direct aperture optimization where the size, shape, and weight of individual segments are optimized to produce an intensity modulated radiation treatment (IMRT) plan. In this study, we compare DMPO to the traditional method of IMRT planning, in which intensity maps are optimized prior to conversion into deliverable multileaf collimator (MLC) apertures, and we determine if there was any dosimetric improvement, treatment efficiency gain, or planning advantage provided by the use of DMPO. Eleven head-and-neck patients treated with IMRT had treatment plans generated using each optimization method. For each patient, the same planning parameters were used for each optimization method. All calculations were performed using Pinnacle version 7.6c software and treatments were delivered using a step-and-shoot IMRT method on a Varian 2100EX linear accelerator equipped with a 120-leaf Millennium MLC (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). Each plan was assessed based on the calculation time, a conformity index, the composite objective value used in the optimization, the number of segments, monitor units (MUs), and treatment time. The results showed DMPO to be superior to the traditional optimization method in all areas. Considerable advantages were observed in the dosimetric quality of DMPO plans, which also required 32% less time to calculate, 42% fewer MUs, and 35% fewer segments than the conventional optimization method. These reductions translated directly into a 29% decrease in treatment times. While considerable gains were observed in planning and treatment efficiency, they were specific to our institution, and the impact of direct aperture optimization on plan quality and workflow will be dependent on the planning parameters, planning system, and

  14. Effects of in vitro lactoferricin and lactoferrin on the head kidney cells of European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax, L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Morgane A; Alexis, Maria N

    2009-08-15

    Antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulating properties of lactoferrin have been demonstrated in mammals and in fish. However, in vivo, lactoferrin is digested by gastric pepsin treatment into the N-terminal derived peptide named lactoferricin. This has been so far overlooked in fish in vitro studies. The aim of the present study was to assess in vitro the effects of both lactoferricin and lactoferrin on the head kidney cells of European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax, L.) in order to determine their potential as dietary additives and to get some insight into their mode of action. In vitro lactoferricin decreased significantly the chemiluminescent response of head kidney cells but did not affect the zymosan-triggered chemiluminescence activity. On the other hand, a high concentration of lactoferrin directly stimulated chemiluminescence but reduced the zymosan-triggered chemiluminescence. The bactericidal activity of head kidney cells was also significantly diminished by pre-incubation with lactoferrin in a dose-dependent manner. Although no significant effect of lactoferricin or lactoferrin was evidenced on head kidney cellular viability, absent or negative effect on the priming of respiratory burst activity suggested that care should be taken when using lactoferrin in the diet of sea bass and high doses should be avoided. Hypotheses about the mechanisms of action of lactoferricin and lactoferrin are presented.

  15. Automatic picking of direct P, S seismic phases and fault zone head waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Z. E.; Ben-Zion, Y.

    2014-10-01

    We develop a set of algorithms for automatic detection and picking of direct P and S waves, as well as fault zone head waves (FZHW), generated by earthquakes on faults that separate different lithologies and recorded by local seismic networks. The S-wave picks are performed using polarization analysis and related filters to remove P-wave energy from the seismograms, and utilize STA/LTA and kurtosis detectors in tandem to lock on the phase arrival. The early portions of P waveforms are processed with STA/LTA, kurtosis and skewness detectors for possible first-arriving FZHW. Identification and picking of direct P and FZHW is performed by a multistage algorithm that accounts for basic characteristics (motion polarities, time difference, sharpness and amplitudes) of the two phases. The algorithm is shown to perform well on synthetic seismograms produced by a model with a velocity contrast across the fault, and observed data generated by earthquakes along the Parkfield section of the San Andreas fault and the Hayward fault. The developed techniques can be used for systematic processing of large seismic waveform data sets recorded near major faults.

  16. Direct lifts of coupled cell networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, A. P. S.; Moreira, C. S.

    2018-04-01

    In networks of dynamical systems, there are spaces defined in terms of equalities of cell coordinates which are flow-invariant under any dynamical system that has a form consistent with the given underlying network structure—the network synchrony subspaces. Given a network and one of its synchrony subspaces, any system with a form consistent with the network, restricted to the synchrony subspace, defines a new system which is consistent with a smaller network, called the quotient network of the original network by the synchrony subspace. Moreover, any system associated with the quotient can be interpreted as the restriction to the synchrony subspace of a system associated with the original network. We call the larger network a lift of the smaller network, and a lift can be interpreted as a result of the cellular splitting of the smaller network. In this paper, we address the question of the uniqueness in this lifting process in terms of the networks’ topologies. A lift G of a given network Q is said to be direct when there are no intermediate lifts of Q between them. We provide necessary and sufficient conditions for a lift of a general network to be direct. Our results characterize direct lifts using the subnetworks of all splitting cells of Q and of all split cells of G. We show that G is a direct lift of Q if and only if either the split subnetwork is a direct lift or consists of two copies of the splitting subnetwork. These results are then applied to the class of regular uniform networks and to the special classes of ring networks and acyclic networks. We also illustrate that one of the applications of our results is to the lifting bifurcation problem.

  17. Clinical implications of hypoxia biomarker expression in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: a systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swartz, Justin E; Pothen, Ajit J; Stegeman, Inge; Willems, Stefan M; Grolman, Wilko

    2015-01-01

    Awareness increases that the tumor biology influences treatment outcome and prognosis in cancer. Tumor hypoxia is thought to decrease sensitivity to radiotherapy and some forms of chemotherapy. Presence of hypoxia may be assessed by investigating expression of endogenous markers of hypoxia (EMH) using immunohistochemistry (IHC). In this systematic review we investigated the effect of EMH expression on local control and survival according to treatment modality in head and neck cancer (head and neck squamous cell carcinoma [HNSCC]). A search was performed in MEDLINE and EMBASE. Studies were eligible for inclusion that described EMH expression in relation to outcome in HNSCC patients. Quality was assessed using the Quality in Prognosis Studies (QUIPS) tool. Hazard ratios for locoregional control and survival were extracted. Forty studies of adequate quality were included. HIF-1a, HIF-2a, CA-IX, GLUT-1, and OPN were identified as the best described EMHs. With exception of HIF-2a, all EMHs were significantly related to adverse outcome in multiple studies, especially in studies where patients underwent single-modality treatment. Positive expression was often correlated with adverse clinical characteristics, including disease stage and differentiation grade. In summary, EMH expression was common in HNSCC patients and negatively influenced their prognosis. Future studies should investigate the effect of hypoxia-modified treatment schedules in patients with high In summary, EMH expression. These may include ARCON, treatment with nimorazole, or novel targeted therapies directed at hypoxic tissue. Also, the feasibility of surgical removal of the hypoxic tumor volume prior to radiotherapy should be investigated

  18. Stem cell treatment for avascular necrosis of the femoral head: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houdek MT

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Matthew T Houdek,1 Cody C Wyles,2 John R Martin,1 Rafael J Sierra11Department of Orthopedic Surgery, 2School of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USAAbstract: Avascular necrosis (AVN of the femoral head is a progressive disease that predominantly affects younger patients. Although the exact pathophysiology of AVN has yet to be elucidated, the disease is characterized by a vascular insult to the blood supply of the femoral head, which can lead to collapse of the femoral head and subsequent degenerative changes. If AVN is diagnosed in the early stages of the disease, it may be possible to attempt surgical procedures which preserve the hip joint, including decompression of the femoral head augmented with concentrated bone marrow. The use of autologous stem cells has shown promise in halting the progression of AVN of the femoral head, and subsequently preventing young patients from undergoing total hip arthroplasty. The purpose of this study was to review the current use of stem cells for the treatment of AVN of the femoral head.Keywords: avascular necrosis, femoral head, osteonecrosis, stem cells, concentrated bone marrow

  19. On numerical modeling of low-head direct chill ingot caster for magnesium alloy AZ31

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mainul Hasan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive 3D turbulent CFD study has been carried out to simulate a Low-Head (LH vertical Direct Chill (DC rolling ingot caster for the common magnesium alloy AZ31. The model used in this study takes into account the coupled laminar/turbulent melt flow and solidification aspects of the process and is based on the control-volume finite-difference approach. Following the aluminum/magnesium DC casting industrial practices, the LH mold is taken as 30 mm with a hot top of 60 mm. The previously verified in-house code has been modified to model the present casting process. Important quantitative results are obtained for four casting speeds, for three inlet melt pouring temperatures (superheats and for three metal-mold contact heat transfer coefficients for the steady state operational phase of the caster. The variable cooling water temperatures reported by the industry are considered for the primary and secondary cooling zones during the simulations. Specifically, the temperature and velocity fields, sump depth and sump profiles, mushy region thickness, solid shell thickness at the exit of the mold and axial temperature profiles at the center and at three strategic locations at the surface of the slab are presented and discussed.

  20. Long head of the biceps brachii tendon: unenhanced MRI versus direct MR arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tadros, Anthony S.; Huang, Brady K. [University of California, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Wymore, Lucas; Hoenecke, Heinz; Fronek, Jan [Scripps Clinic, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, La Jolla, CA (United States); Chang, Eric Y. [VA San Diego Healthcare System, Radiology Service, San Diego, CA (United States); University of California, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2015-09-15

    We sought to determine the diagnostic accuracy of unenhanced MRI and direct MR arthrography (MRA) for evaluation of the intra-articular long head of the biceps brachii tendon (LHBT) using arthroscopy as the gold standard. A retrospective review of patients who underwent shoulder MRI (n = 132) and MRA (n = 67) within 12 months prior to arthroscopy was performed. MR images were independently reviewed by two blinded musculoskeletal radiologists. Routinely recorded arthroscopic photos/videos were reviewed by an orthopedic surgeon. The LHBT was graded as normal, tendinosis, partial thickness tear less or greater than 50 %, and complete tear. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy for tendinosis and tear detection were calculated. MRI correctly diagnosed fewer normal LHBTs compared to MRA (39-54 % versus 74-84 %, respectively; p < 0.005). MRI and MRA did not differ significantly in the diagnosis of tendinosis (18-36 % and 15-38 %, respectively; p > 0.05) and tears (75-83 % and 64-73 %, respectively; p > 0.05). For tendinosis, MRI versus MRA showed 18-36 % and 15-38 % sensitivity, 69-79 % and 83-91 % specificity, 22-28 % and 18-50 % PPV, 74-76 % and 80-86 % NPV, and 61-64 % and 70-81 % accuracy; respectively. For tears, MRI versus MRA showed 75-83 % and 64-73 % sensitivity, 73-75 % and 82-91 % specificity, 66-69 % and 41-62 % PPV, 82-87 % and 92-94 % NPV, and 74-78 % and 79-88 % accuracy; respectively. No significant difference was found between unenhanced MRI and direct MRA for the detection of tendinosis and tears of LHBTs. (orig.)

  1. Long head of the biceps brachii tendon: unenhanced MRI versus direct MR arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tadros, Anthony S.; Huang, Brady K.; Wymore, Lucas; Hoenecke, Heinz; Fronek, Jan; Chang, Eric Y.

    2015-01-01

    We sought to determine the diagnostic accuracy of unenhanced MRI and direct MR arthrography (MRA) for evaluation of the intra-articular long head of the biceps brachii tendon (LHBT) using arthroscopy as the gold standard. A retrospective review of patients who underwent shoulder MRI (n = 132) and MRA (n = 67) within 12 months prior to arthroscopy was performed. MR images were independently reviewed by two blinded musculoskeletal radiologists. Routinely recorded arthroscopic photos/videos were reviewed by an orthopedic surgeon. The LHBT was graded as normal, tendinosis, partial thickness tear less or greater than 50 %, and complete tear. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy for tendinosis and tear detection were calculated. MRI correctly diagnosed fewer normal LHBTs compared to MRA (39-54 % versus 74-84 %, respectively; p < 0.005). MRI and MRA did not differ significantly in the diagnosis of tendinosis (18-36 % and 15-38 %, respectively; p > 0.05) and tears (75-83 % and 64-73 %, respectively; p > 0.05). For tendinosis, MRI versus MRA showed 18-36 % and 15-38 % sensitivity, 69-79 % and 83-91 % specificity, 22-28 % and 18-50 % PPV, 74-76 % and 80-86 % NPV, and 61-64 % and 70-81 % accuracy; respectively. For tears, MRI versus MRA showed 75-83 % and 64-73 % sensitivity, 73-75 % and 82-91 % specificity, 66-69 % and 41-62 % PPV, 82-87 % and 92-94 % NPV, and 74-78 % and 79-88 % accuracy; respectively. No significant difference was found between unenhanced MRI and direct MRA for the detection of tendinosis and tears of LHBTs. (orig.)

  2. Effect of ionizing radiation on the physical biology of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker-Groberg, Sandra M; Bornstein, Sophia; Zilberman-Rudenko, Jevgenia; Schmidt, Mark; Tormoen, Garth W; Kernan, Casey; Thomas, Charles R; Wong, Melissa H; Phillips, Kevin G; McCarty, Owen J T

    2015-09-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth leading cause of cancer worldwide. Although there are numerous treatment options for HNSCC, such as surgery, cytotoxic chemotherapy, molecularly targeted systemic therapeutics, and radiotherapy, overall survival has not significantly improved in the last 50 years. This suggests a need for a better understanding of how these cancer cells respond to current treatments in order to improve treatment paradigms. Ionizing radiation (IR) promotes cancer cell death through the creation of cytotoxic DNA lesions, including single strand breaks, base damage, crosslinks, and double strand breaks (DSBs). As unrepaired DSBs are the most cytotoxic DNA lesion, defining the downstream cellular responses to DSBs are critical for understanding the mechanisms of tumor cell responses to IR. The effects of experimental IR on HNSCC cells beyond DNA damage in vitro are ill-defined. Here we combined label-free, quantitative phase and fluorescent microscopy to define the effects of IR on the dry mass and volume of the HNSCC cell line, UM-SCC-22A. We quantified nuclear and cytoplasmic subcellular density alterations resulting from 8 Gy X-ray IR and correlated these signatures with DNA and γ-H2AX expression patterns. This study utilizes a synergistic imaging approach to study both biophysical and biochemical alterations in cells following radiation damage and will aid in future understanding of cellular responses to radiation therapy.

  3. Silicon Based Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jackie Vincent

    The purpose of this project has been to investigate and fabricate small scale Micro Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (μDMFC). They are investigated as a possible alternative for Zinc-air batteries in small size consumer devices such as hearing aids. In such devices the conventional rechargeable batteries...... such as lithium-ion batteries have insufficiently low energy density. Methanol is a promising fuel for such devices due to the high energy density and ease of refueling compared to charging batteries, making μDMFC a suitable replacement energy source. In this Ph.D. dissertation, silicon micro fabrication...... techniques where utilized to build μDMFCs with the purpose of engineering the structures, both on the micro and nano scales in order to realize a high level of control over the membrane and catalyst components. The work presents four different monolithic fuel cell designs. The primary design is based...

  4. Direct FuelCell/Turbine Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

    2008-09-30

    This report summarizes the progress made in development of Direct FuelCell/Turbine (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plants for generation of clean power at very high efficiencies. The DFC/T system employs an indirectly heated Turbine Generator to supplement fuel cell generated power. The concept extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell by utilizing the fuel cell's byproduct heat in a Brayton cycle. Features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas, minimal emissions, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. Proof-of-concept tests using a sub-MW-class DFC/T power plant at FuelCell Energy's (FCE) Danbury facility were conducted to validate the feasibility of the concept and to measure its potential for electric power production. A 400 kW-class power plant test facility was designed and retrofitted to conduct the tests. The initial series of tests involved integration of a full-size (250 kW) Direct FuelCell stack with a 30 kW Capstone microturbine. The operational aspects of the hybrid system in relation to the integration of the microturbine with the fuel cell, process flow and thermal balances, and control strategies for power cycling of the system, were investigated. A subsequent series of tests included operation of the sub-MW Direct FuelCell/Turbine power plant with a Capstone C60 microturbine. The C60 microturbine extended the range of operation of the hybrid power plant to higher current densities (higher power) than achieved in initial tests using the 30kW microturbine. The proof-of-concept test results confirmed the stability and controllability of operating a fullsize (250 kW) fuel cell stack in combination with a microturbine. Thermal management of the system was confirmed and power plant operation, using the microturbine as the only source of fresh air supply

  5. The small molecule inhibitor QLT0267 Radiosensitizes squamous cell carcinoma cells of the head and neck.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Eke

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The constant increase of cancer cell resistance to radio- and chemotherapy hampers improvement of patient survival and requires novel targeting approaches. Integrin-Linked Kinase (ILK has been postulated as potent druggable cancer target. On the basis of our previous findings clearly showing that ILK transduces antisurvival signals in cells exposed to ionizing radiation, this study evaluated the impact of the small molecule inhibitor QLT0267, reported as putative ILK inhibitor, on the cellular radiation survival response of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells (hHNSCC. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Parental FaDu cells and FaDu cells stably transfected with a constitutively active ILK mutant (FaDu-IH or empty vectors, UTSCC45 cells, ILK(floxed/floxed(fl/fl and ILK(-/- mouse fibroblasts were used. Cells grew either two-dimensionally (2D on or three-dimensionally (3D in laminin-rich extracellular matrix. Cells were treated with QLT0267 alone or in combination with irradiation (X-rays, 0-6 Gy single dose. ILK knockdown was achieved by small interfering RNA transfection. ILK kinase activity, clonogenic survival, number of residual DNA double strand breaks (rDSB; gammaH2AX/53BP1 foci assay, cell cycle distribution, protein expression and phosphorylation (e.g. Akt, p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK were measured. Data on ILK kinase activity and phosphorylation of Akt and p44/42 MAPK revealed a broad inhibitory spectrum of QLT0267 without specificity for ILK. QLT0267 significantly reduced basal cell survival and enhanced the radiosensitivity of FaDu and UTSCC45 cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. QLT0267 exerted differential, cell culture model-dependent effects with regard to radiogenic rDSB and accumulation of cells in the G2 cell cycle phase. Relative to corresponding controls, FaDu-IH and ILK(fl/fl fibroblasts showed enhanced radiosensitivity, which failed to be antagonized by QLT0267. A

  6. Autophagy induction contributes to GDC-0349 resistance in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Yajuan; Peng, Yi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hubei Cancer Hospital, Wuhan (China); Tang, Hao [Department of Pathology, Hubei Cancer Hospital, Wuhan 430071 (China); He, Xiaojun; Wang, Zhaohua [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hubei Cancer Hospital, Wuhan (China); Hu, Desheng, E-mail: hudeshengvvip@sina.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hubei Cancer Hospital, Wuhan (China); Zhou, Xiaoyi, E-mail: zhouxy1218@126.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hubei Cancer Hospital, Wuhan (China)

    2016-08-19

    Dysregulation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling contributes to head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) tumorigenesis and progression. In the current study, we tested the anti-HNSCC cell activity by GDC-0349, a selective ATP-competitive inhibitor of mTOR. We showed that GDC-0349 inhibited proliferation of established and primary human HNSCC cells bearing high-level of p-AKT/p-S6K. Further, it induced caspase-dependent apoptosis in the HNSCC cells. GDC-0349 blocked mTORC1 and mTORC2 activation, yet it simultaneously induced autophagy activation in HNSCC cells. The latter was evidenced by induction of LC3B-II, Beclin-1 and Autophagy-related (ATG)-7, as well as downregulation of p62. Autophagy inhibitors (3-methyladenine and bafilomycin A1) or ATG-7 siRNA dramatically potentiated GDC-0349’s cytotoxicity against HNSCC cells. Intriguingly, we showed that ceramide (C14), a pro-apoptotic sphingolipid, also induced ATG-7 degradation, and sensitized HNSCC cells to GDC-0349. Collectively, the preclinical study provided evidences to support GDC-0349 as a promising anti-HNSCC agent. GDC-0349 sensitization may be achieved via autophagy inhibition. - Highlights: • GDC-0349 inhibits proliferation of HNSCC cells bearing high-level of p-AKT/p-S6K. • GDC-0349 activates caspase-dependent apoptosis in HNSCC cells. • Simultaneous blockage of mTORC1/2 by GDC-0349 induces autophagy activation. • Autophagy inhibitor or ATG-7 siRNA potentiates GDC-0349’s cytotoxicity. • C14 ceramide downregulates ATG-7 and sensitizes HNSCC cells to GDC-0349.

  7. [Lectin-binding patterns and cell kinetics of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoh, T

    1991-01-01

    In order to elucidate the cell characteristics of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas, the cell kinetics and lectin binding patterns were compared with the histological classification and staging of the tumors, using surgically resected materials (maxillary sinus 10, oral cavity 21, pharynx 8, larynx 11). Eight biotinylated lectins (WGA, 1-PHA, ConA, UEA1, RCA1, SBA, DBA, PNA) were applied to the paraffin-embedded sections, and were visualized histochemically by the streptavidin-alkaline phosphatase method. The DNA contents of the isolated carcinoma cells obtained from the adjacent thick sections were evaluated using an epi-illumination cytofluorometer after propidium iodide staining. On lectin histochemistry, the binding pattern of WGA lectin was similar between carcinoma tissues and normal tissues, but the binding was more intense in well differentiated than less differentiated carcinomas. Lymph node metastasis was found to be related to the presence of cells with poor WGA-binding. In the binding patterns of the other lectins, RCA1, SBA and ConA were related to the differentiation of carcinomas, but they were not related to the TNM-classification. DNA cytofluorometry exhibited marked polyploidization, which progressed with the advancement of the clinical and pathological staging of carcinomas. However, the DNA ploidy pattern was not associated with the cell characteristics such as the degree of histological differentiation and the lectin-binding pattern, except that the appearance of aneuploidy had some relationship with the binding-patterns of UEA1 and 1-PHA.

  8. Examination of the protective roles of helmet/faceshield and directionality for human head under blast waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarvghad-Moghaddam, Hesam; Jazi, Mehdi Salimi; Rezaei, Asghar; Karami, Ghodrat; Ziejewski, Mariusz

    2015-01-01

    A parametric study was conducted to delineate the efficacy of personal protective equipment (PPE), such as ballistic faceshields and advanced combat helmets, in the case of a blast. The propagations of blast waves and their interactions with an unprotected head, a helmeted one, and a fully protected finite element head model (FEHM) were modeled. The biomechanical parameters of the brain were recorded when the FEHM was exposed to shockwaves from the front, back, top, and bottom. The directional dependent tissue response of the brain and the variable efficiency of PPE with respect to the blast orientation were two major results of this study.

  9. Selectivity of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonino S. Aricò

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Sulfonic acid-functionalized polymer electrolyte membranes alternative to Nafion® were developed. These were hydrocarbon systems, such as blend sulfonated polyetheretherketone (s-PEEK, new generation perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA systems, and composite zirconium phosphate–PFSA polymers. The membranes varied in terms of composition, equivalent weight, thickness, and filler and were investigated with regard to their methanol permeation characteristics and proton conductivity for application in direct methanol fuel cells. The behavior of the membrane electrode assemblies (MEA was investigated in fuel cell with the aim to individuate a correlation between membrane characteristics and their performance in a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC. The power density of the DMFC at 60 °C increased according to a square root-like function of the membrane selectivity. This was defined as the reciprocal of the product between area specific resistance and crossover. The power density achieved at 60 °C for the most promising s-PEEK-based membrane-electrode assembly (MEA was higher than the benchmark Nafion® 115-based MEA (77 mW·cm−2 vs. 64 mW·cm−2. This result was due to a lower methanol crossover (47 mA·cm−2 equivalent current density for s-PEEK vs. 120 mA·cm−2 for Nafion® 115 at 60 °C as recorded at OCV with 2 M methanol and a suitable area specific resistance (0.15 Ohm cm2 for s-PEEK vs. 0.22 Ohm cm2 for Nafion® 115.

  10. Selectivity of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aricò, Antonino S; Sebastian, David; Schuster, Michael; Bauer, Bernd; D'Urso, Claudia; Lufrano, Francesco; Baglio, Vincenzo

    2015-11-24

    Sulfonic acid-functionalized polymer electrolyte membranes alternative to Nafion(®) were developed. These were hydrocarbon systems, such as blend sulfonated polyetheretherketone (s-PEEK), new generation perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) systems, and composite zirconium phosphate-PFSA polymers. The membranes varied in terms of composition, equivalent weight, thickness, and filler and were investigated with regard to their methanol permeation characteristics and proton conductivity for application in direct methanol fuel cells. The behavior of the membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) was investigated in fuel cell with the aim to individuate a correlation between membrane characteristics and their performance in a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). The power density of the DMFC at 60 °C increased according to a square root-like function of the membrane selectivity. This was defined as the reciprocal of the product between area specific resistance and crossover. The power density achieved at 60 °C for the most promising s-PEEK-based membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) was higher than the benchmark Nafion(®) 115-based MEA (77 mW·cm(-2) vs. 64 mW·cm(-2)). This result was due to a lower methanol crossover (47 mA·cm(-2) equivalent current density for s-PEEK vs. 120 mA·cm(-2) for Nafion(®) 115 at 60 °C as recorded at OCV with 2 M methanol) and a suitable area specific resistance (0.15 Ohm cm² for s-PEEK vs. 0.22 Ohm cm² for Nafion(®) 115).

  11. Human Papilloma Virus Associated Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    OpenAIRE

    Ajila, Vidya; Shetty, Harish; Babu, Subhas; Shetty, Veena; Hegde, Shruthi

    2015-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the commonest causes for mortality and morbidity with squamous cell carcinoma being the sixth most frequent malignant tumour worldwide. In addition to tobacco and alcohol, human papilloma virus (HPV) is associated with a proportion of head and neck cancers. As in cervical cancers, HPV types 16 and 18 are the cause of malignant transformation. HPV-positive cancers of head and neck have unique characteristics such as occurrence in a younger age group, distinct clinical and...

  12. Tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes mediate lysis of autologous squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Jeppe; Rasmussen, N; Claesson, Mogens Helweg

    1995-01-01

    Tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) and tumours from six patients with squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (SCCHN) were investigated. The six tumours all expressed major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antigens both in vivo and as tumor cell lines grown in vitro. In addition...

  13. Lycopene inhibits the cell proliferation and invasion of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Min; Wu, Qundan; Zhang, Min; Huang, Jinbei

    2016-10-01

    Lycopene has been shown to be associated with anticancer effects in numerous tumor types. However, the underlying mechanisms of lycopene in human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) remain to be determined. The present study aimed to investigate the involvement of lycopene overload and the cytotoxic effects of lycopene on HNSCC cells, and to determine the possible mechanisms involved. Treatment with lycopene at a dose of >10 µM for >24 h inhibited the growth of FaDu and Cal27 cells in a time‑ and dose‑dependent manner. The clearest increase in growth inhibition was due to the apoptotic population being significantly increased. The invasion abilities decreased with 25 µM lycopene exerting significant inhibitory effects (Plycopene induced the upregulation of the pro‑apoptotic protein, B‑cell lymphoma‑associated X protein, and therefore, resulted in the inhibition of the protein kinase B and mitogen‑activated protein kinase signaling pathway. These data provided insights into the antitumor activity of lycopene in HNSCC cells.

  14. Overexpression of cyclin D1 correlates with recurrence in a group of forty-seven operable squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michalides, R.; van Veelen, N.; Hart, A.; Loftus, B.; Wientjens, E.; Balm, A.

    1995-01-01

    We evaluated the prognostic significance of overexpression of cyclin D1 in 47 patients with surgically resected squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck. Overexpression of cyclin D1 was detected immunohistochemically using an affinity-purified polyclonal antibody directed against the

  15. Identification, expansion and characterization of cancer cells with stem cell properties from head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaseb, Hatem O. [Department of Human Genetics, University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Department of Clinical Pathology, National Cancer Institute (NCI), Cairo University, Cairo (Egypt); Fohrer-Ting, Helene [Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, 200 Lothrop Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, 450 Technology Drive, Suite 300, Pittsburgh, PA 15219 (United States); Lewis, Dale W. [Department of Human Genetics, University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Lagasse, Eric [Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, 200 Lothrop Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, 450 Technology Drive, Suite 300, Pittsburgh, PA 15219 (United States); Gollin, Susanne M., E-mail: gollin@pitt.edu [Department of Human Genetics, University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA 15232 (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is a major public health concern. Recent data indicate the presence of cancer stem cells (CSC) in many solid tumors, including HNSCC. Here, we assessed the stem cell (SC) characteristics, including cell surface markers, radioresistance, chromosomal instability, and in vivo tumorigenic capacity of CSC isolated from HNSCC patient specimens. We show that spheroid enrichment of CSC from early and short-term HNSCC cell cultures was associated with increased expression of CD44, CD133, SOX2 and BMI1 compared with normal oral epithelial cells. On immunophenotyping, five of 12 SC/CSC markers were homogenously expressed in all tumor cultures, while one of 12 was negative, four of 12 showed variable expression, and two of the 12 were expressed heterogeneously. We showed that irradiated CSCs survived and retained their self-renewal capacity across different ionizing radiation (IR) regimens. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses of parental and clonally-derived tumor cells revealed different chromosome copy numbers from cell to cell, suggesting the presence of chromosomal instability in HNSCC CSC. Further, our in vitro and in vivo mouse engraftment studies suggest that CD44+/CD66− is a promising, consistent biomarker combination for HNSCC CSC. Overall, our findings add further evidence to the proposed role of HNSCC CSCs in therapeutic resistance. - Highlights: • Spheroid enrichment selects cancer stem cells (CSC) from head & neck tumors (HNSCC). • Compared to normal epithelial cells, isolated CSC express increased SC/CSC markers. • Isolated CSC display enhanced radioresistance, clonogenicity and tumorigenicity. • HNSCC CSC express chromosomal instability. • CD44+/CD66− is a promising, consistent biomarker for HNSCC CSC.

  16. Identification, expansion and characterization of cancer cells with stem cell properties from head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaseb, Hatem O.; Fohrer-Ting, Helene; Lewis, Dale W.; Lagasse, Eric; Gollin, Susanne M.

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is a major public health concern. Recent data indicate the presence of cancer stem cells (CSC) in many solid tumors, including HNSCC. Here, we assessed the stem cell (SC) characteristics, including cell surface markers, radioresistance, chromosomal instability, and in vivo tumorigenic capacity of CSC isolated from HNSCC patient specimens. We show that spheroid enrichment of CSC from early and short-term HNSCC cell cultures was associated with increased expression of CD44, CD133, SOX2 and BMI1 compared with normal oral epithelial cells. On immunophenotyping, five of 12 SC/CSC markers were homogenously expressed in all tumor cultures, while one of 12 was negative, four of 12 showed variable expression, and two of the 12 were expressed heterogeneously. We showed that irradiated CSCs survived and retained their self-renewal capacity across different ionizing radiation (IR) regimens. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses of parental and clonally-derived tumor cells revealed different chromosome copy numbers from cell to cell, suggesting the presence of chromosomal instability in HNSCC CSC. Further, our in vitro and in vivo mouse engraftment studies suggest that CD44+/CD66− is a promising, consistent biomarker combination for HNSCC CSC. Overall, our findings add further evidence to the proposed role of HNSCC CSCs in therapeutic resistance. - Highlights: • Spheroid enrichment selects cancer stem cells (CSC) from head & neck tumors (HNSCC). • Compared to normal epithelial cells, isolated CSC express increased SC/CSC markers. • Isolated CSC display enhanced radioresistance, clonogenicity and tumorigenicity. • HNSCC CSC express chromosomal instability. • CD44+/CD66− is a promising, consistent biomarker for HNSCC CSC.

  17. Effect of the coffee ingredient cafestol on head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotowski, Ulana; Heiduschka, Gregor; Eckl-Dorna, Julia; Kranebitter, Veronika; Stanisz, Isabella; Brunner, Markus; Lill, Claudia; Thurnher, Dietmar [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Vienna (Austria); Seemann, Rudolf [Medical University of Vienna, Departement of Cranio-, Maxillofacial- and Oral Surgery, Vienna (Austria); Schmid, Rainer [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiotherapy, Vienna (Austria)

    2015-01-10

    Cafestol is a diterpene molecule found in coffee beans and has anticarcinogenic properties. The aim of the study was to examine the effects of cafestol in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells. Three HNSCC cell lines (SCC25, CAL27 and FaDu) were treated with increasing doses of cafestol. Then combination experiments with cisplatin and irradiation were carried out. Drug interactions and possible synergy were calculated using the combination index analysis. Clonogenic assays were performed after irradiation with 2, 4, 6 and 8 Gy, respectively, and the rate of apoptosis was measured with flow cytometry. Treatment of HNSCC cells with cafestol leads to a dose-dependent reduction of cell viability and to induction of apoptosis. Combination with irradiation shows a reduction of clonogenic survival compared to each treatment method alone. In two of the cell lines a significant additive effect was observed. Cafestol is a naturally occurring effective compound with growth-inhibiting properties in head and neck cancer cells. Moreover, it leads to a significant inhibition of colony formation. (orig.) [German] Cafestol ist ein Diterpen, das in der Kaffeebohne vorkommt und antikanzerogene Eigenschaften besitzt. Ziel der Studie war, die Wirkung von Cafestol auf Kopf-Hals-Tumorzelllinien zu untersuchen. Drei Kopf-Hals-Tumorzelllinien (SCC25, CAL27 und FaDu) wurden mit steigenden Cafestol-Dosen behandelt. Anschliessend fanden Kombinationsexperimente mit Cisplatin und Bestrahlung statt. Die Wechselwirkung zwischen den Substanzen und moegliche synergistische Wirkungen wurden mit dem Combination-Index analysiert. Koloniebildungstests wurden nach Bestrahlung mit 2, 4, 6 und 8 Gy durchgefuehrt. Apoptose wurde mittels Durchflusszytometrie gemessen. Die Behandlung der Kopf-Hals-Tumorzelllinien mit Cafestol fuehrt zu einer dosisabhaengigen Abnahme des Zellueberlebens und zur Induktion von Apoptose. Die Kombination von Cafestol mit Bestrahlung zeigt eine geringere

  18. Direct electron transfer based enzymatic fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, Magnus; Blum, Zoltan; Shleev, Sergey

    2012-01-01

    In this mini-review we briefly describe some historical developments made in the field of enzymatic fuel cells (FCs), discussing important design considerations taken when constructing mediator-, cofactor-, and membrane-less biological FCs (BFCs). Since the topic is rather extensive, only BFCs utilizing direct electron transfer (DET) reactions on both the anodic and cathodic sides are considered. Moreover, the performance of mostly glucose/oxygen biodevices is analyzed and compared. We also present some unpublished results on mediator-, cofactor-, and membrane-less glucose/oxygen BFCs recently designed in our group and tested in different human physiological fluids, such as blood, plasma, saliva, and tears. Finally, further perspectives for BFC applications are highlighted.

  19. Regulatory T cells and their prognostic value for patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bouček, Jan; Mrkvan, Tomáš; Chovanec, M.; Kuchař, M.; Betka, Jaroslav; Bouček, V.; Hladíková, M.; Betka, J.; Eckschlager, T.; Říhová, Blanka

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 14, 1-2 (2010), s. 426-433 ISSN 1582-1838 R&D Projects: GA MZd NR8883; GA MŠk 1M0505 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : regulatory T cell s * head and neck squamous cell carcinoma * tumour markers Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 4.608, year: 2010

  20. Basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma of the head and face.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, L; Khammissa, R A G; Kramer, B; Altini, M; Lemmer, J

    2016-02-05

    Ultraviolet light (UV) is an important risk factor for cutaneous basal cell carcinoma, cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma and cutaneous melanoma of the skin. These cancers most commonly affect persons with fair skin and blue eyes who sunburn rather than suntan. However, each of these cancers appears to be associated with a different pattern of UV exposure and to be mediated by different intracellular molecular pathways.Some melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) gene variants play a direct role in the pathogenesis of cutaneous basal cell carcinoma, cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma and cutaneous melanoma apart from their role in determining a cancer-prone pigmentory phenotype (fair skin, red hair, blue eyes) through their interactions with other genes regulating immuno-inflammatory responses, DNA repair or apoptosis.In this short review we focus on the aetiological role of UV in cutaneous basal cell carcinoma, cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma and cutaneous melanoma of the skin, and on some associated biopathological events.

  1. General principles for treatment planning for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Million, R.R.; Bova, F.J.

    1987-01-01

    Although squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck represents only 5% of all malignancies, the head and neck area is one of the few anatomical areas remaining where radiotherapy is often used as the only modality for cure and often with substantial doses. There are at least 35 separate anatomical sites for origin of squamous cell carcinoma in the upper respiratory tract, and each site has its own distinctive pattern of spread, incidence of regional and distant metastases, and varying stages of presentation. It would be impossible in this short chapter to cover every contingency for treatment planning, and only general principles are outlined

  2. Mechanisms of taste bud cell loss after head and neck irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ha M; Reyland, Mary E; Barlow, Linda A

    2012-03-07

    Taste loss in human patients following radiotherapy for head and neck cancer is a common and significant problem, but the cellular mechanisms underlying this loss are not understood. Taste stimuli are transduced by receptor cells within taste buds, and like epidermal cells, taste cells are regularly replaced throughout adult life. This renewal relies on progenitor cells adjacent to taste buds, which continually supply new cells to each bud. Here we treated adult mice with a single 8 Gy dose of x-ray irradiation to the head and neck, and analyzed taste epithelium at 1-21 d postirradiation (dpi). We found irradiation targets the taste progenitor cells, which undergo cell cycle arrest (1-3 dpi) and apoptosis (within 1 dpi). Taste progenitors resume proliferation at 5-7 dpi, with the proportion of cells in S and M phase exceeding control levels at 5-6 and 6 dpi, respectively, suggesting that proliferation is accelerated and/or synchronized following radiation damage. Using 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine birthdating to identify newborn cells, we found that the decreased proliferation following irradiation reduces the influx of cells at 1-2 dpi, while the robust proliferation detected at 6 dpi accelerates entry of new cells into taste buds. In contrast, the number of differentiated taste cells was not significantly reduced until 7 dpi. These data suggest a model where continued natural taste cell death, paired with temporary interruption of cell replacement, underlies taste loss after irradiation.

  3. Mechanisms of taste bud cell loss after head and neck irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ha M.; Reyland, Mary E.; Barlow, Linda A.

    2012-01-01

    Taste loss in human patients following radiotherapy for head and neck cancer is a common and significant problem, but the cellular mechanisms underlying this loss are not understood. Taste stimuli are transduced by receptor cells within taste buds, and like epidermal cells, taste cells are regularly replaced throughout adult life. This renewal relies on a progenitor cells adjacent to taste buds, which continually supply new cells to each bud. Here we treated adult mice with a single 8 Gy dose of X-ray irradiation to the head and neck, and analyzed taste epithelium at 1–21 days post-irradiation (dpi). We found irradiation targets the taste progenitor cells, which undergo cell cycle arrest (1–3 dpi) and apoptosis (within 1 dpi). Taste progenitors resume proliferation at 5–7 dpi, with the proportion of cells in S and M phase exceeding control levels at 5–6 and 6 dpi, respectively, suggesting that proliferation is accelerated and/or synchronized following radiation damage. Using BrdU birthdating to identify newborn cells, we found that the decreased proliferation following irradiation reduces the influx of cells at 1–2 dpi, while the robust proliferation detected at 6 dpi accelerates entry of new cells into taste buds. By contrast, the number of differentiated taste cells was not significantly reduced until 7 dpi. These data suggest a model where continued natural taste cell death, paired with temporary interruption of cell replacement underlies taste loss after irradiation. PMID:22399770

  4. Application of directional solidification ingot (LSD) in forging of PWR reactor vessel heads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benhamou, C.; Poitrault, I.

    1985-09-01

    Creusot-Loire Industrie uses this type of ingot for manufacture of Framatome 1300 and 1450 MW 4-loop PWR reactor vessel heads. This type of ingot offers a number advantages: improved internal soundness; greater chemical, structural and mechanical homogeneity of the finished part; simplified forging process. After a brief description of the pouring and solidification processes, this paper presents an analysis of the results of examinations performed on the prototype forging, as well as review of results obtained during industrial fabrication of dished heads from LSD ingots. The advantages of the LSD ingot over conventional ingots are discussed in conclusion

  5. Matlab Source Code for Species Transport through Nafion Membranes in Direct Ethanol, Direct Methanol, and Direct Glucose Fuel Cells

    OpenAIRE

    JH, Summerfield; MW, Manley

    2016-01-01

    A simple simulation of chemical species movement is presented. The species traverse a Nafion membrane in a fuel cell. Three cells are examined: direct methanol, direct ethanol, and direct glucose. The species are tracked using excess proton concentration, electric field strength, and voltage. The Matlab computer code is provided.

  6. Enhanced CAR T cell therapy: A novel approach for head and neck cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Songlin; Zhu, Zhao

    2018-05-05

    Head and neck cancer that presents in locally advanced stages often results in a bad prognosis with an increased recurrence rate even after curative resections. Radiation therapy is then applied, with multiple side effects, as adjuvant regional therapy. Because of the high rate of recurrence and mortality, new therapies are needed for patients suffering from head and neck malignant tumors.CAR (chimeric antigen receptor) T cell therapy, which was first devised about 25 years ago, causes the killing or apoptosis of target tumor cells through inducing the secretion of cytokines and granzymes by T cells (Cheadle et al., 2014). CARs are comprised of three canonical domains for antigen recognition, T cell activation, and co-stimulation, and are synthetic receptors that reprogram immune cells for therapeutic treatment of multiple tumors (Sadelain, 2017). This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Slow-cycling stem cells in hydra contribute to head regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niraimathi Govindasamy

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Adult stem cells face the challenge of maintaining tissue homeostasis by self-renewal while maintaining their proliferation potential over the lifetime of an organism. Continuous proliferation can cause genotoxic/metabolic stress that can compromise the genomic integrity of stem cells. To prevent stem cell exhaustion, highly proliferative adult tissues maintain a pool of quiescent stem cells that divide only in response to injury and thus remain protected from genotoxic stress. Hydra is a remarkable organism with highly proliferative stem cells and ability to regenerate at whole animal level. Intriguingly, hydra does not display consequences of high proliferation, such as senescence or tumour formation. In this study, we investigate if hydra harbours a pool of slow-cycling stem cells that could help prevent undesirable consequences of continuous proliferation. Hydra were pulsed with the thymidine analogue 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU and then chased in the absence of EdU to monitor the presence of EdU-retaining cells. A significant number of undifferentiated cells of all three lineages in hydra retained EdU for about 8–10 cell cycles, indicating that these cells did not enter cell cycle. These label-retaining cells were resistant to hydroxyurea treatment and were predominantly in the G2 phase of cell cycle. Most significantly, similar to mammalian quiescent stem cells, these cells rapidly entered cell division during head regeneration. This study shows for the first time that, contrary to current beliefs, cells in hydra display heterogeneity in their cell cycle potential and the slow-cycling cells in this population enter cell cycle during head regeneration. These results suggest an early evolution of slow-cycling stem cells in multicellular animals.

  8. Identification of a Novel Proto-oncogenic Network in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgy, Smitha R; Cangkrama, Michael; Srivastava, Seema; Partridge, Darren; Auden, Alana; Dworkin, Sebastian; McLean, Catriona A; Jane, Stephen M; Darido, Charbel

    2015-09-01

    The developmental transcription factor Grainyhead-like 3 (GRHL3) plays a critical tumor suppressor role in the mammalian epidermis through direct regulation of PTEN and the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway. GRHL3 is highly expressed in all tissues derived from the surface ectoderm, including the oral cavity, raising a question about its potential role in suppression of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). We explored the tumor suppressor role of Grhl3 in HNSCC using a conditional knockout (Grhl3 (∆/-) /K14Cre (+) ) mouse line (n = 26) exposed to an oral chemical carcinogen. We defined the proto-oncogenic pathway activated in the HNSCC derived from these mice and assessed it in primary human HNSCC samples, normal oral epithelial cell lines carrying shRNA to GRHL3, and human HNSCC cell lines. Data were analyzed with two-sided chi square and Student's t tests. Deletion of Grhl3 in oral epithelium in mice did not perturb PTEN/PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling, but instead evoked loss of GSK3B expression, resulting in stabilization and accumulation of c-MYC and aggressive HNSCC. This molecular signature was also evident in a subset of primary human HNSCC and HNSCC cell lines. Loss of Gsk3b in mice, independent of Grhl3, predisposed to chemical-induced HNSCC. Restoration of GSK3B expression blocked proliferation of normal oral epithelial cell lines carrying shRNA to GRHL3 (cell no., Day 8: Scramble ctl, 616±21.8 x 10(3) vs GRHL3-kd, 1194±44 X 10(3), P < .001; GRHL3-kd vs GRHL3-kd + GSK3B, 800±98.84 X 10(3), P = .003) and human HNSCC cells. We defined a novel molecular signature in mammalian HNSCC, suggesting new treatment strategies targeting the GRHL3/GSK3B/c-MYC proto-oncogenic network. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Immunohistochemical biomarkers and FDG uptake on PET/CT in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Gregers Brünnich; Vogelius, Ivan R.; Rasmussen, Jacob H

    2015-01-01

    on the other. A number of previous studies have shown a relationship between glucose transport protein expression and 18F-Fludeoxyglucose (FDG) PET uptake. Here, FDG uptake is analyzed in relation to expression of a selected panel of IHC cancer biomarkers in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC...

  10. Post-therapeutic surveillance strategies in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Digonnet, Antoine; Hamoir, Marc; Andry, Guy; Haigentz, Missak; Takes, Robert P.; Silver, Carl E.; Hartl, Dana M.; Strojan, Primoz; Rinaldo, Alessandra; de Bree, Remco; Dietz, Andreas; Gregoire, Vincent; Paleri, Vinidh; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Vander Poorten, Vincent; Hinni, Michael L.; Rodrigo, Juan P.; Suarez, Carlos; Mendenhall, William M.; Werner, Jochen A.; Genden, Eric M.; Ferlito, Alfio

    The management of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas does not end with the completion of ablative therapy. The oncologic objectives of post-treatment follow-up are to detect recurrences and second primary tumors; beyond that, follow-up should evaluate acute and chronic treatment-related side

  11. Review: Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in sub-Saharan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim Review the literature from 1990 to 2013 to determine known anatomic sites, risk factors, treatments, and outcomes of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods Using a systematic search strategy, literature pertaining to HNSCC in sub-Saharan Africa was reviewed and patient ...

  12. Use of next generation sequencing in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tabatabaeifar, Siavosh; Kruse, Torben A; Thomassen, Mads

    2014-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) can primarily be attributed to alcohol consumption, tobacco use and infection with human papilloma virus. The heterogeneous nature of HNSCC has exposed a lack of tools for clinicians to provide more accurate prognosis. There is a need for biomarkers...

  13. Anticancer activity of drug conjugates in head and neck cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Debatosh; Rahman, Mohammad Aminur; Chen, Zhuo Georgia; Shin, Dong M

    2016-06-01

    Sexually transmitted oral cancer/head and neck cancer is increasing rapidly. Human papilloma virus (HPV) is playing a role in the pathogenesis of a subset of squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck (SCCHN). Paclitaxel is a widely used anticancer drug for breast, ovarian, testicular, cervical, non-small cell lung, head and neck cancer. However, it is water insoluble and orally inactive. We report the synthesis of water soluble nanosize conjugates of paclitaxel, branched PEG, and EGFR-targeting peptide by employing native chemical ligation. We performed a native chemical ligation between the N-hydroxy succinimide (NHS) ester of paclitaxel succinate and cysteine at pH 6.5 to give the cysteine-conjugated paclitaxel derivative. The thiol functionality of cysteine was activated and subsequently conjugated to multiarm thiol-PEG to obtain the paclitaxel branched PEG conjugate. Finally, we conjugated an EGFR-targeting peptide to obtain conjugates of paclitaxel, branched PEG, and EGFR-targeting peptide. These conjugates show anticancer activity against squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck cells (SCCHN, Tu212).

  14. Marijuana use and increased risk of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z F; Morgenstern, H; Spitz, M R; Tashkin, D P; Yu, G P; Marshall, J R; Hsu, T C; Schantz, S P

    1999-12-01

    Marijuana is the most commonly used illegal drug in the United States. In some subcultures, it is widely perceived to be harmless. Although the carcinogenic properties of marijuana smoke are similar to those of tobacco, no epidemiological studies of the relationship between marijuana use and head and neck cancer have been published. The relationship between marijuana use and head and neck cancer was investigated by a case-control study of 173 previously untreated cases with pathologically confirmed diagnoses of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck and 176 cancer-free controls at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center between 1992 and 1994. Epidemiological data were collected by using a structured questionnaire, which included history of tobacco smoking, alcohol use, and marijuana use. The associations between marijuana use and head and neck cancer were analyzed by Mantel-Haenszel methods and logistic regression models. Controlling for age, sex, race, education, alcohol consumption, pack-years of cigarette smoking, and passive smoking, the risk of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck was increased with marijuana use [odds ratio (OR) comparing ever with never users, 2.6; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.1-6.6]. Dose-response relationships were observed for frequency of marijuana use/day (P for trend marijuana use (P for trend marijuana use were observed with cigarette smoking, mutagen sensitivity, and to a lesser extent, alcohol use. Our results suggest that marijuana use may increase the risk of head and neck cancer with a strong dose-response pattern. Our analysis indicated that marijuana use may interact with mutagen sensitivity and other risk factors to increase the risk of head and neck cancer. The results need to be interpreted with some caution in drawing causal inferences because of certain methodological limitations, especially with regard to interactions.

  15. Lactoferricin B reverses cisplatin resistance in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells through targeting PD-L1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pei; Liu, Jinzhong; Li, Wenlu; Li, Shanshan; Han, Xinguang

    2018-05-15

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) ranks among the top most common cancers with a poor prognosis. The mechanism of chemoresistance is still not well known. This study is to investigate the programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression in HNSCC, and test the effect of lactoferricin B (LfcinB) on chemoresistance and its mechanism. We analyzed 510 HNSCC patients in TCGA database and investigated how CD274 expression was related to patient prognosis. PD-L1 was verified from HNSCC samples at local hospital with immunohistochemistry. PD-L1 expression in the acquired cisplatin-resistant HNSCC cells was examined by PCR and WB in order to test PD-L1-induced chemoresistance. LfcinB inoculation in cisplatin-resistant HNSCC cells and in the nude mice was introduced to test the effect of LfcinB on targeting cisplatin resistance and its mechanism. High CD274 mRNA (>125 FPKM) from TCGA database had a significantly reduced 5-year survival rate, and a lower 5-year survival rate in the chemotherapy and radiotherapy-treated patients (P < .05). PD-L1 overexpression was further supported from analysis of 40 HNSCC specimens. PD-L1 and IL-6 in the established cisplatin-resistant HNSCC cells were shown significantly higher (P < .05). IL-6 and PD-L1 expression were partially inhibited by the anti-IL-6/STAT3 antibody. LfcinB displayed a direct cytotoxic effect on cisplatin-resistant HNSCC cells and HNSCC xenografts of cisplatin-resistant cells in the nude mice displayed significant reduction in tumor volume after LfcinB injection (P < .05). Besides, the increase of IL-6 and PD-L1 in cisplatin-resistant HNSCC cells was abolished in vitro by LfcinB (P < .05). PD-L1 expression in HNSCC cells correlates with poor prognosis and chemoresistance, and LfcinB might provide therapeutic potential in HNSCC patients through modulating IL-6 and PD-L1. © 2018 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Silk Film Topography Directs Collective Epithelial Cell Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblatt, Mark I.

    2012-01-01

    The following study provides new insight into how surface topography dictates directed collective epithelial cell sheet growth through the guidance of individual cell movement. Collective cell behavior of migrating human corneal limbal-epithelial cell sheets were studied on highly biocompatible flat and micro-patterned silk film surfaces. The silk film edge topography guided the migratory direction of individual cells making up the collective epithelial sheet, which resulted in a 75% increase in total culture elongation. This was due to a 3-fold decrease in cell sheet migration rate efficiency for movement perpendicular to the topography edge. Individual cell migration direction is preferred in the parallel approach to the edge topography where localization of cytoskeletal proteins to the topography’s edge region is reduced, which results in the directed growth of the collective epithelial sheet. Findings indicate customized biomaterial surfaces may be created to direct both the migration rate and direction of tissue epithelialization. PMID:23185573

  17. Effect of radiotherapy on stem cells in head and neck region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Anu; Krishnan, Manu

    2014-01-01

    Head and neck cancers form a major group of dreaded diseases in India. Radiation therapy is one important treatment modality for this type of cancer. However, inadvertent radiation to normal tissue leads to depletion of its critical stem cells due to genotoxic damage. Cells mostly affected by radiation are rapidly dividing bone marrow and epidermal skin stem cells. The erythroid and myeloid progenitor cells of bone marrow bear the brunt of it causing leucopenia/thrombocytopenia/anemia. Alopecia and pigmentation mark the changes on skin. In brain, two stem cell populations; subgranular and subventricular zones, where neurogenesis occurs throughout life are affected. However, terminally differentiating neurons with low proliferative capacity are spared. In oral tissues, xerostomia is a prominent feature, while dental pulp stem cells undergo senescence. Enamel calcification and tooth root formation are also impaired. Eye shows changes in the limbal stem cells that replace corneal epithelium. All these imply a varied response of stem cells to radiation therapy based on their proliferation capacity; quiescent stem cells being more resistant whereas actively dividing cells, less resistant to radiotherapy. This paper evaluates the differential response of stem cells to radiation therapy in the head and neck area and thereby aims to predict their therapeutic potential. (author)

  18. Development of new membrane materials for direct methanol fuel cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yildirim, M.H.

    2009-01-01

    Development of new membrane materials for direct methanol fuel cells Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) can convert the chemical energy of a fuel directly into electrical energy with high efficiency and low emission of pollutants. DMFCs can be used as the power sources to portable electronic devices

  19. Laser-based direct-write techniques for cell printing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiele, Nathan R; Corr, David T [Biomedical Engineering Department, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States); Huang Yong [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC (United States); Raof, Nurazhani Abdul; Xie Yubing [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, University at Albany, SUNY, Albany, NY (United States); Chrisey, Douglas B, E-mail: schien@rpi.ed, E-mail: chrisd@rpi.ed [Material Science and Engineering Department, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States)

    2010-09-15

    Fabrication of cellular constructs with spatial control of cell location ({+-}5 {mu}m) is essential to the advancement of a wide range of applications including tissue engineering, stem cell and cancer research. Precise cell placement, especially of multiple cell types in co- or multi-cultures and in three dimensions, can enable research possibilities otherwise impossible, such as the cell-by-cell assembly of complex cellular constructs. Laser-based direct writing, a printing technique first utilized in electronics applications, has been adapted to transfer living cells and other biological materials (e.g., enzymes, proteins and bioceramics). Many different cell types have been printed using laser-based direct writing, and this technique offers significant improvements when compared to conventional cell patterning techniques. The predominance of work to date has not been in application of the technique, but rather focused on demonstrating the ability of direct writing to pattern living cells, in a spatially precise manner, while maintaining cellular viability. This paper reviews laser-based additive direct-write techniques for cell printing, and the various cell types successfully laser direct-written that have applications in tissue engineering, stem cell and cancer research are highlighted. A particular focus is paid to process dynamics modeling and process-induced cell injury during laser-based cell direct writing. (topical review)

  20. Laser-based direct-write techniques for cell printing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiele, Nathan R; Corr, David T; Huang Yong; Raof, Nurazhani Abdul; Xie Yubing; Chrisey, Douglas B

    2010-01-01

    Fabrication of cellular constructs with spatial control of cell location (±5 μm) is essential to the advancement of a wide range of applications including tissue engineering, stem cell and cancer research. Precise cell placement, especially of multiple cell types in co- or multi-cultures and in three dimensions, can enable research possibilities otherwise impossible, such as the cell-by-cell assembly of complex cellular constructs. Laser-based direct writing, a printing technique first utilized in electronics applications, has been adapted to transfer living cells and other biological materials (e.g., enzymes, proteins and bioceramics). Many different cell types have been printed using laser-based direct writing, and this technique offers significant improvements when compared to conventional cell patterning techniques. The predominance of work to date has not been in application of the technique, but rather focused on demonstrating the ability of direct writing to pattern living cells, in a spatially precise manner, while maintaining cellular viability. This paper reviews laser-based additive direct-write techniques for cell printing, and the various cell types successfully laser direct-written that have applications in tissue engineering, stem cell and cancer research are highlighted. A particular focus is paid to process dynamics modeling and process-induced cell injury during laser-based cell direct writing. (topical review)

  1. Radiosensitization of head and neck cancer cells by the phytochemical agent sulforaphane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotowski, Ulana; Heiduschka, Gregor; Brunner, Markus; Fahim, Tammer; Thurnher, Dietmar; Czembirek, Cornelia; Eder-Czembirek, Christina; Schmidt, Rainer

    2011-01-01

    Sulforaphane is a naturally occurring compound found in broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables. Recently it gained attention because of its antiproliferative properties in many cancer cell lines. The aim of this study was to investigate whether sulforaphane could act as a radiosensitizer in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines. Four head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines (i.e., (HNSCC) SCC9, SCC25, CAL27, and FADU) were treated with sulforaphane and subsequently irradiated. Then proliferation and clonogenic assays were performed. Apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry. Possible regulation of Akt and Mcl-1 was investigated by western blotting. Sulforaphane and radiation in combination leads to stronger inhibition of cell proliferation and of clonogenic survival than each treatment method alone. Western blot analysis of Akt and Mcl-1 showed no changed expression. Sulforaphane is a promising agent in the treatment of head and neck cancer due to its antiproliferative and radio-sensitizing properties. A combination of sulforaphane and radiation decreases clonogenic survival. Apoptosis is not regulated through Akt or the Mcl-1 protein. (orig.)

  2. Radiosensitization of head and neck cancer cells by the phytochemical agent sulforaphane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotowski, Ulana; Heiduschka, Gregor; Brunner, Markus; Fahim, Tammer; Thurnher, Dietmar [Medical University of Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery; Czembirek, Cornelia; Eder-Czembirek, Christina [Medical University of Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Cranio-, Maxillofacial and Oral Surgery; Schmidt, Rainer [Medical University of Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Radiotherapy and -biology

    2011-09-15

    Sulforaphane is a naturally occurring compound found in broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables. Recently it gained attention because of its antiproliferative properties in many cancer cell lines. The aim of this study was to investigate whether sulforaphane could act as a radiosensitizer in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines. Four head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines (i.e., (HNSCC) SCC9, SCC25, CAL27, and FADU) were treated with sulforaphane and subsequently irradiated. Then proliferation and clonogenic assays were performed. Apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry. Possible regulation of Akt and Mcl-1 was investigated by western blotting. Sulforaphane and radiation in combination leads to stronger inhibition of cell proliferation and of clonogenic survival than each treatment method alone. Western blot analysis of Akt and Mcl-1 showed no changed expression. Sulforaphane is a promising agent in the treatment of head and neck cancer due to its antiproliferative and radio-sensitizing properties. A combination of sulforaphane and radiation decreases clonogenic survival. Apoptosis is not regulated through Akt or the Mcl-1 protein. (orig.)

  3. Receptor-type Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase β Regulates Met Phosphorylation and Function in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiru Xu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC is the sixth most common cancer and has a high rate of mortality. Emerging evidence indicates that hepatocyte growth factor receptor (or Met pathway plays a pivotal role in HNSCC metastasis and resistance to chemotherapy. Met function is dependent on tyrosine phosphorylation that is under direct control by receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatase β (RPTP-β. We report here that RPTP-β expression is significantly downregulated in HNSCC cells derived from metastatic tumors compared to subject-matched cells from primary tumors. Knockdown of endogenous RPTP-β in HNSCC cells from primary tumor potentiated Met tyrosine phosphorylation, downstream mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase pathway activation, cell migration, and invasion. Conversely, restoration of RPTP-β expression in cells from matched metastatic tumor decreased Met tyrosine phosphorylation and downstream functions. Furthermore, we observed that six of eight HNSCC tumors had reduced levels of RPTP-β protein in comparison with normal oral tissues. Collectively, the results demonstrate the importance of RPTP-β in tumor biology of HNSCC through direct dephosphorylation of Met and regulation of downstream signal transduction pathways. Reduced RPTP-β levels, with or without Met overexpression, could promote Met activation in HNSCC tumors.

  4. Individualized directional microphone optimization in hearing aids based on reconstructing the 3D geometry of the head and ear from 2D images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harder, Stine

    head model based on 2D images, the second step is to simulate individual head related transfer functions (HRTFs) based on the estimated 3D head model and the final step is to calculate optimal directional filters based on the simulated HRTFs. The pipeline is employed on a Behind-The-Ear (BTE) hearing...... against non-individual directional filters revealed equally high Articulation-Index weighted Directivity Index (AI-DI) values for our specific test subject. However, measurements on other individuals indicate that the performance of the non-individual filters vary among subjects, and in particular...

  5. Improved local and regional control with radiotherapy for Merkel cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Tobin; Naghavi, Arash O; Messina, Jane L; Kim, Sungjune; Torres-Roca, Javier F; Russell, Jeffery; Sondak, Vernon K; Padhya, Tapan A; Trotti, Andy M; Caudell, Jimmy J; Harrison, Louis B

    2017-01-01

    We hypothesized that radiotherapy (RT) would improve both local and regional control with Merkel cell carcinoma of the head and neck. A single-institution institutional review board-approved study was performed including 113 patients with nonmetastatic Merkel cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Postoperative RT was delivered to the primary tumor bed (71.7% cases) ± draining lymphatics (33.3% RT cases). Postoperative local RT was associated with improved local control (3-year actuarial local control 89.4% vs 68.1%; p = .005; Cox hazard ratio [HR] 0.18; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.06-0.55; p = .002). Similarly, regional RT was associated with improved regional control (3-year actuarial regional control 95.0% vs 66.7%; p = .008; Cox HR = 0.09; 95% CI = 0.01-0.69; p = .02). Regional RT played an important role for both clinical node-negative patients (3-year regional control 100% vs 44.7%; p = .03) and clinical/pathological node-positive patients (3-year regional control 90.9% vs 55.6%; p = .047). Local RT was beneficial for all patients with Merkel cell carcinoma of the head and neck, whereas regional RT was beneficial for clinical node-negative and clinical/pathological node-positive patients. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 39: 48-55, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Hydrolyzed fish proteins modulates both inflammatory and antioxidant gene expression as well as protein expression in a co culture model of liver and head kidney cells isolated from Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holen, Elisabeth; He, Juyun; Araujo, Pedro; Seliussen, Jørgen; Espe, Marit

    2016-07-01

    Hydrolyzed fish proteins (H-pro) contain high concentrations of free amino acids and low molecular peptides that potentially may benefit fish health. The following study aimed to test whether the water-soluble phase of H-pro could attenuate lipopolysaccharide (LPS) provoked inflammation in liver cells and head kidney cells isolated from Atlantic salmon. Cells were grown as mono cultures or co cultures to assess possible crosstalk between immune cells and metabolic cells during treatments. Cells were added media with or without H-pro for 2 days before LPS exposure and harvested 24 h post LPS exposure. Respective cells without H-pro and LPS were used as controls. H-pro alone could affect expression of proteins directly as H-pro increased catalase protein expression in head kidney- and liver cells, regardless of culturing methods and LPS treatment. Leukotriene B4 (LTB4) production was also increased by H-pro in head kidney cells co cultured with liver cells. H-pro increased LPS induced interleukin 1β (IL-1β) transcription in liver cells co cultured with head kidney cells. All cultures of head kidney cells showed a significant increase in IL-1β transcription when treated with H-pro + LPS. H-pro decreased caspase-3 transcription in liver cells cultured co cultured with head kidney cells. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPAR α) was upregulated, regardless of treatment, in liver cells co cultured with head kidney cells clearly showing that culturing method alone affected gene transcription. H-pro alone and together with LPS as an inflammation inducer, affect both antioxidant and inflammatory responses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The Role of Free Tissue Transfer in Merkel Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Londino, A. V.; Miles, B. A.

    2012-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is an uncommon neuroendocrine malignancy with a propensity for the head and neck. It typically presents a symptomatically in elderly Caucasians and is characterized by early local and regional spread. There is currently limited data on the appropriate algorithm for treatment of MCC. However, multimodal therapy with wide surgical excision with or without radiation therapy has become standard of care. The location of the primary tumor and intensive adjuvant therapy is often required, provides a challenge to the reconstructive head and neck surgeon. Occasionally, free tissue transfer reconstructive techniques are employed in the reconstruction of MCC defects. This paper will discuss the role of free tissue transfer as a reconstructive option after surgery for advanced head and neck MCC

  8. Squamous cell carcinoma antigen in serum for monitoring of head and neck and uterine cervical squamous cell carcinomas after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirato, Hiroki; Ichimura, Wataru; Wakushima, Hiroshi; Nishioka, Takashi; Suzuki, Keishiro

    1993-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC-A) in serum was serially measured during follow-up of 96 squamous cell carcinoma patients (75 head and neck cancers and 21 uterine cervical cancers), treated with radiotherapy. In 27 of the patients with head and neck cancer and in 12 of those with cervical cancer SCC-A had also been measured before radiotherapy. In this head and neck carcinoma group, the median level of SCC-A was 1.3 (95% CI: 1.2-1.9) ng/ml before radiotherapy and 1.4 (CI: 1.1-1.5) ng/ml after radiotherapy. In the cervical carcinoma group, the median SCC-A decreased significantly (p<0.001) from a pretreatment value of 7.5 (CI: 3.8-26.3) ng/ml to a posttreatment value of 0.9 (CI:<0.5-1.8) ng/ml. In the total group of 75 head and neck cancers 21 relapses occurred and in 4 of these the relapse was detected at a clinically silent stage by an elevation of serum SCC-A. The same was true for 4 of the 9 relapses that occurred in the total group of uterine cervical cancer. The study suggests that serum SCC-A may be useful for posttreatment monitoring of patients with uterine cervix cancer while its value in head and neck cancer probably is more marginal. (orig.)

  9. The Relationship Between Human Papillomavirus Status and Other Molecular Prognostic Markers in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, Christina S.; Narasimhan, Balasubramanian; Cao Hongbin; Kwok, Shirley; Erickson, Julianna P.; Koong, Albert; Pourmand, Nader; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the relationship between human papillomavirus (HPV) status and known prognostic makers for head and neck cancers including tumor hypoxia, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression and intratumoral T-cell levels and to determine the prognostic impact of these markers by HPV status. Methods and Materials: HPV status in 82 evaluable head and neck squamous cell carcinomas patients was determined by pyrosequencing and related to p16 INK4a staining and treatment outcomes. It was correlated with tumor hypoxia (tumor pO 2 and carbonic anhydrase [CAIX] staining), EGFR status, and intratumoral lymphocyte expression (CD3 staining). Results: Forty-four percent of evaluable tumors had strong HPV signal by pyrosequencing. There was a significant relationship between strong HPV signal and p16 INK4a staining as well as oropharynx location. The strong HPV signal group fared significantly better than others, both in time to progression (TTP, p = 0.008) and overall survival (OS, p = 0.004) for all patients and for the oropharyngeal subset. Positive p16 INK4a staining was associated with better TTP (p = 0.014) and OS (p = 0.00002). There was no relationship between HPV status and tumor pO 2 or CAIX staining. However, HPV status correlated inversely with EGFR reactivity (p = 0.0006) and directly with CD3(+) T-lymphocyte level (p = 0.03). Whereas CAIX and EGFR overexpression were negative prognostic factors regardless of HPV status, CD3(+) T-cell levels was prognostic only in HPV(-) tumors. Conclusion: HPV status was a prognostic factor for progression and survival. It correlated inversely with EGFR expression and directly with T-cell infiltration. The prognostic effect of CAIX and EGFR expression was not influenced by HPV status, whereas intratumoral T-cell levels was significant only for HPV(-) tumors.

  10. Direct methanol feed fuel cell and system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Frank, Harvey A. (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Chun, William (Inventor); Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Improvements to non acid methanol fuel cells include new formulations for materials. The platinum and ruthenium are more exactly mixed together. Different materials are substituted for these materials. The backing material for the fuel cell electrode is specially treated to improve its characteristics. A special sputtered electrode is formed which is extremely porous. The fuel cell system also comprises a fuel supplying part including a meter which meters an amount of fuel which is used by the fuel cell, and controls the supply of fuel based on said metering.

  11. Inhibition of STAT-3 results in greater cetuximab sensitivity in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonner, James A.; Yang, Eddy S.; Trummell, Hoa Q.; Nowsheen, Somaira; Willey, Christopher D.; Raisch, Kevin P.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFr) with the monoclonal antibody cetuximab reduces cell proliferation and survival which correlates with increased DNA damage. Since the signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT-3) is involved in the EGFr-induced signaling pathway, we hypothesized that depletion of STAT-3 may augment cetuximab-induced processes in human head and neck cancer cells. Materials and methods: Human head and neck squamous carcinoma cells (UM-SCC-5) were transfected with short hairpin RNA (shRNA) against STAT-3 (STAT3-2.4 and 2.9 cells). A mutated form of this shRNA was transfected for a control (NEG4.17 cells). Radiosensitivity was assessed by a standard colony formation assay. Proliferation was assessed by daily cell counts following treatment and apoptosis was assessed by an annexin V-FITC assay. The alkaline comet assay was used to assess DNA damage. Results: The STAT-3 knockdown cells (STAT3-2.4 and STAT3-2.9 cells) demonstrated enhanced radiosensitivity compared to control NEG4.17 cells, which correlated with increased apoptosis. Also, the STAT-3 knockdown cells demonstrated decreased proliferation with cetuximab treatments compared to control cells (NEG4.17). The increased cetuximab sensitivity of the STAT-3 knockdown cells correlated with increased apoptosis and DNA damage compared to control cells (NEG4.17). Conclusion: These studies revealed that the greater anti-proliferative effects and increased cytotoxicity of cetuximab in the STAT3-2.4 and STAT3-2.9 cells compared to control NEG4.17 cells, may be a result of STAT3-mediated effects on cellular apoptosis and DNA damage.

  12. Directional differentiation of chicken embryonic stem cells into ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-01

    Aug 1, 2011 ... In this study, the differentiation potential of chicken ES cells was investigated ... Key words: Chicken embryonic stem cells, in vitro, directional differentiation, .... synthesized by using the Revert Aid first strand cDNA synthesis kit.

  13. The Direct Methanol Liquid-Feed Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpert, Gerald

    1997-01-01

    Until the early 1990's the idea of a practical direct methanol fuel cell from transportation and other applications was just that, an idea. Several types of fuel cells that operate under near ambient conditions were under development.

  14. Characterization of the head end cells at the West Valley Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vance, R.F.

    1986-11-01

    The head-end cells at the West Valley Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Plant are characterized in this report. These cells consist of the Process Mechanical Cell (PMC) where irradiated nuclear fuel was trimmed of excess hardware and sheared into short segments; and the General Purpose Cell (GPC) where the segments were collected and stored prior to dissolution, and leached hulls were packaged for disposal. Between 1966 and 1972, while Nuclear Fuels Services operated the plant, these cells became highly contaminated with radioactive materials. The purpose of this characterization work was to develop technical information as a basis of decontamination and decommissioning planning and engineering. It was accomplished by performing remote in-cell visual examinations, radiation surveys, and sampling. Supplementary information was obtained from available written records, out-of-cell inspections, and interviews with plant personnel

  15. Aerosol feed direct methanol fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Valdez, Thomas I. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Improvements to fuel cells include introduction of the fuel as an aerosol of liquid fuel droplets suspended in a gas. The particle size of the liquid fuel droplets may be controlled for optimal fuel cell performance by selection of different aerosol generators or by separating droplets based upon size using a particle size conditioner.

  16. Improved head direction command classification using an optimised Bayesian neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Son T; Nguyen, Hung T; Taylor, Philip B; Middleton, James

    2006-01-01

    Assistive technologies have recently emerged to improve the quality of life of severely disabled people by enhancing their independence in daily activities. Since many of those individuals have limited or non-existing control from the neck downward, alternative hands-free input modalities have become very important for these people to access assistive devices. In hands-free control, head movement has been proved to be a very effective user interface as it can provide a comfortable, reliable and natural way to access the device. Recently, neural networks have been shown to be useful not only for real-time pattern recognition but also for creating user-adaptive models. Since multi-layer perceptron neural networks trained using standard back-propagation may cause poor generalisation, the Bayesian technique has been proposed to improve the generalisation and robustness of these networks. This paper describes the use of Bayesian neural networks in developing a hands-free wheelchair control system. The experimental results show that with the optimised architecture, classification Bayesian neural networks can detect head commands of wheelchair users accurately irrespective to their levels of injuries.

  17. Direct hits to the head during amateur boxing is associated with a rise in serum biomarkers for brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, M R; Myers, T; Evans, P; Davies, B; Cooper, S M; Bhattacharya, K; Grace, F M; Baker, J S

    2011-01-01

    Boxing exposes participants to the physiological response to high intensity exercise and also to direct body and brain trauma. Amateur boxing is increasing and females have also been included in the Olympics. The aim of this study is to assess the stress response and possible brain injury incurred during a match by measuring serum biomarkers associated with stress and cellular brain injury before and after combat. Sixteen male amateur boxers were studied retrospectively. The study population was divided into two groups: (a) a group that received predominantly punches to the head (PTH) and (b) a group that received predominantly punches to the body (PTB). Blood samples were taken before and five minutes after each contest. They were analysed for S-100B, neuron-specific enolase (NSE), creatine kinase (CK) and cortisol. The PTH group received direct contacts to the head (not blocked, parried or avoided) and to the body (n=8, age: 17.6 ± 5.3, years; height: 1.68 ± 0.13, meters; mass: 65.4 ± 20.3, kg). The PTB group received punches to the body including blocked and parried punches, but received no direct punches to the head, (n=8, mean ± SD, age: 19.1 ± 3.2 years; height: 1.70 ± 0.75, meters; mass: 68.5 ± 15 kg). Significant increases (P<0.05) were observed between pre- and post-combat serum concentrations in serum concentrations in PTH of S-100B (0.35 ± 0.61 vs. 0.54 ± 0.73, μg.L-1) NSE (19.7 ± 14 vs.31.1 ± 26.6, ng.ml-1) and cortisol (373 ± 202 vs. 756 ± 93, nmol.L-1). Significant increases (P<0.05) of creatine kinase were recorded in both groups. This study demonstrates significant elevations in neurochemical biomarkers in boxers who received direct blows to the head. However, further work is required to quantify this volumetric brain damage and long term clinical sequelae.

  18. Long term survival following the detection of circulating tumour cells in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, Stuart C; Stephenson, Sally-Anne; Subramaniam, Selva K; Paleri, Vinidh; Ha, Kien; Marnane, Conor; Krishnan, Suren; Rees, Guy

    2009-01-01

    Techniques for detecting circulating tumor cells in the peripheral blood of patients with head and neck cancers may identify individuals likely to benefit from early systemic treatment. Reconstruction experiments were used to optimise immunomagnetic enrichment and RT-PCR detection of circulating tumor cells using four markers (ELF3, CK19, EGFR and EphB4). This method was then tested in a pilot study using samples from 16 patients with advanced head and neck carcinomas. Seven patients were positive for circulating tumour cells both prior to and after surgery, 4 patients were positive prior to but not after surgery, 3 patients were positive after but not prior to surgery and 2 patients were negative. Two patients tested positive for circulating cells but there was no other evidence of tumor spread. Given this patient cohort had mostly advanced disease, as expected the detection of circulating tumour cells was not associated with significant differences in overall or disease free survival. For the first time, we show that almost all patients with advanced head and neck cancers have circulating cells at the time of surgery. The clinical application of techniques for detection of spreading disease, such as the immunomagnetic enrichment RT-PCR analysis used in this study, should be explored further

  19. C2-Ceramide Induces Cell Death and Protective Autophagy in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyuan Zhu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Ceramides are second messengers involved in several intracellular processes in cancer cells, amongst others. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-tumor efficacy of C2-ceramide (C2-Cer; N-acetyl-D-sphingosine by investigating cell death and autophagy in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC cells. C2-Cer showed concentration-dependent cytotoxicity in HN4 and HN30 cell lines. It simultaneously induced caspase-3-independent apoptosis and programmed necrosis. C2-Cer markedly increased the expression level of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3B (LC3B type II associated with protective autophagy. An autophagy inhibitor enhanced C2-Cer-mediated cytotoxicity, while a programmed-necrosis inhibitor produced the opposite effect. Furthermore, C2-Cer up-regulated the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, but down-regulated its downstream substrate phospho-mammalian target of rapamycin (p-mTOR during the autophagy process. These results suggested that C2-Cer exerts anti-tumor effects by inducing programmed apoptosis and necrosis in HNSCC, and these cytotoxic effects are enhanced by an autophagy inhibitor.

  20. Engineering kidney cells: reprogramming and directed differentiation to renal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Michael M; Tosic, Jelena; Pichler, Roman; Arnold, Sebastian J; Lienkamp, Soeren S

    2017-07-01

    Growing knowledge of how cell identity is determined at the molecular level has enabled the generation of diverse tissue types, including renal cells from pluripotent or somatic cells. Recently, several in vitro protocols involving either directed differentiation or transcription-factor-based reprogramming to kidney cells have been established. Embryonic stem cells or induced pluripotent stem cells can be guided towards a kidney fate by exposing them to combinations of growth factors or small molecules. Here, renal development is recapitulated in vitro resulting in kidney cells or organoids that show striking similarities to mammalian embryonic nephrons. In addition, culture conditions are also defined that allow the expansion of renal progenitor cells in vitro. Another route towards the generation of kidney cells is direct reprogramming. Key transcription factors are used to directly impose renal cell identity on somatic cells, thus circumventing the pluripotent stage. This complementary approach to stem-cell-based differentiation has been demonstrated to generate renal tubule cells and nephron progenitors. In-vitro-generated renal cells offer new opportunities for modelling inherited and acquired renal diseases on a patient-specific genetic background. These cells represent a potential source for developing novel models for kidney diseases, drug screening and nephrotoxicity testing and might represent the first steps towards kidney cell replacement therapies. In this review, we summarize current approaches for the generation of renal cells in vitro and discuss the advantages of each approach and their potential applications.

  1. Environmental tobacco smoking, mutagen sensitivity, and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z F; Morgenstern, H; Spitz, M R; Tashkin, D P; Yu, G P; Hsu, T C; Schantz, S P

    2000-10-01

    Although active tobacco smoking has been considered a major risk factor for head and neck cancer, few studies have evaluated environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) and its interaction with mutagen sensitivity on the risk of head and neck cancer. We investigated the relationship between ETS and head and neck cancer in a case-control study of 173 previously untreated cases with pathologically confirmed diagnoses of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck and 176 cancer-free controls at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center between 1992 and 1994. A structured questionnaire was used to collect ETS exposure and other covariates including a history of active tobacco smoking and alcohol use. ETS measures include a history of ETS exposure at home and at workplace. The associations between passive smoking and head and neck cancer were analyzed by Mantel-Haenszel methods and logistic regression models. Additive and multiplicative models were used to evaluate effect modifications between ETS and mutagen sensitivity. The crude odds ratio (OR) for ETS exposure was 2.8 [95% confidence intervals (CI), 1.3-6.0]. Controlling for age, sex, race, education, alcohol consumption, pack-years of cigarette smoking, and marijuana use, the risk of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck was increased with ETS (adjusted OR, 2.4; 95% CI, 0.9-6.8). Dose-response relationships were observed for the degree of ETS exposure; the adjusted ORs were 2.1 (95% CI, 0.7-6.1) for those with moderate exposure and 3.6 (95% CI, 1.1-11.5) for individuals with heavy exposure (P for trend = 0.025), in comparison with those who never had ETS exposures. These associations and the dose-response relationships were still present when the analysis was restricted to nonactive smoking cases and controls (crude OR, 2.2; 95% CI, 0.6-8.4). Crude odds ratios were 1.8 for those with moderate ETS exposure and 4.3 for individuals with heavy ETS exposure among nonsmoking cases and controls (P for trend = 0.008). More

  2. Cisplatin Induces Bmi-1 and Enhances the Stem Cell Fraction in Head and Neck Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Nör

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence has unveiled a subpopulation of highly tumorigenic, multipotent cells capable of self-renewal in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs. These unique cells, named here cancer stem cells (CSCs, proliferate slowly and might be involved in resistance to conventional chemotherapy. We have shown that CSCs are found in perivascular niches and rely on endothelial cell-secreted factors [particularly interleukin-6 (IL-6] for their survival and self-renewal in HNSCC. Here, we hypothesized that cisplatin enhances the stem cell fraction in HNSCC. To address this hypothesis, we generated xenograft HNSCC tumors with University of Michigan-squamous cell carcinoma 22B (UM-SCC-22B cells and observed that cisplatin treatment increased (P = .0013 the fraction of CSCs [i.e., aldehyde dehydrogenase activity high and cluster of differentiation 44 high (ALDHhighCD44high]. Cisplatin promoted self-renewal and survival of CSCs in vitro, as seen by an increase in the number of orospheres in ultralow attachment plates and induction in B lymphoma Mo-MLV insertion region 1 homolog (Bmi-1 and octamer-binding transcription factor 4 expression. Cisplatin-resistant cells expressed more Bmi-1 than cisplatinsensitive cells. IL-6 potentiated cisplatin-induced orosphere formation generated when primary human HNSCC cells were sorted for ALDHhighCD44high immediately after surgery and plated onto ultralow attachment plates. IL-6-induced signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 phosphorylation (indicative of stemness was unaffected by treatment with cisplatin in UM-SCC-22B cells, whereas IL-6-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK phosphorylation (indicative of differentiation processes was partially inhibited by cisplatin. Notably, cisplatin-induced Bmi-1 was inhibited by interleukin-6 receptor blockade in parental and cisplatin-resistant cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that cisplatin enhances the fraction of CSCs

  3. Leader Cells Define Directionality of Trunk, but Not Cranial, Neural Crest Cell Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo Richardson

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Collective cell migration is fundamental for life and a hallmark of cancer. Neural crest (NC cells migrate collectively, but the mechanisms governing this process remain controversial. Previous analyses in Xenopus indicate that cranial NC (CNC cells are a homogeneous population relying on cell-cell interactions for directional migration, while chick embryo analyses suggest a heterogeneous population with leader cells instructing directionality. Our data in chick and zebrafish embryos show that CNC cells do not require leader cells for migration and all cells present similar migratory capacities. In contrast, laser ablation of trunk NC (TNC cells shows that leader cells direct movement and cell-cell contacts are required for migration. Moreover, leader and follower identities are acquired before the initiation of migration and remain fixed thereafter. Thus, two distinct mechanisms establish the directionality of CNC cells and TNC cells. This implies the existence of multiple molecular mechanisms for collective cell migration.

  4. Effects of neratinib and combination with irradiation and chemotherapy in head and neck cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, S; Thurnher, D; Kadletz, L; Seemann, R; Brunner, M; Kotowski, U; Schmid, R; Lill, C; Heiduschka, G

    2016-11-01

    Prognosis of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is still poor. Novel therapeutic approaches are of great interest to improve the effects of radiochemotherapy. We evaluated the effects of tyrosine kinase inhibitor neratinib on HNSCC cell lines CAL27, SCC25 and FaDu as a single agent and in combination with irradiation and chemotherapy. Effects of neratinib were evaluated in HNSCC cell lines CAL27, SCC25 and FaDu. Effect on cell viability of neratinib and combination with cisplatin and irradiation was measured using CCK-8 assays and clonogenic assays. Western blot analysis was performed to distinguish the effect on epithelial growth factor receptor and HER2 expression. Apoptosis was evaluated by flow cytometry analysis. Growth inhibition was achieved in all cell lines, whereas combination of cisplatin and neratinib showed greater inhibition than each agent alone. Apoptosis was induced in all cell lines. Combination of neratinib with irradiation or cisplatin showed significantly increased apoptosis. In clonogenic assays, significant growth inhibition was observed in all investigated cell lines. Neratinib, as a single agent or in combination with chemo-irradiation, may be a promising treatment option for patients with head and neck cancer. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Human Papilloma Virus Associated Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajila, Vidya; Shetty, Harish; Babu, Subhas; Shetty, Veena; Hegde, Shruthi

    2015-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the commonest causes for mortality and morbidity with squamous cell carcinoma being the sixth most frequent malignant tumour worldwide. In addition to tobacco and alcohol, human papilloma virus (HPV) is associated with a proportion of head and neck cancers. As in cervical cancers, HPV types 16 and 18 are the cause of malignant transformation. HPV-positive cancers of head and neck have unique characteristics such as occurrence in a younger age group, distinct clinical and molecular features, and better prognosis as compared to HPV-negative carcinomas. They also possess the potential for prevention by using vaccination. The present review describes in detail the salient features of HPV associated oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), its differences from HPV-negative OSCC, diagnostic features, and recent strategies in prevention and management. PMID:26483987

  6. Human Papilloma Virus Associated Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajila, Vidya; Shetty, Harish; Babu, Subhas; Shetty, Veena; Hegde, Shruthi

    2015-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the commonest causes for mortality and morbidity with squamous cell carcinoma being the sixth most frequent malignant tumour worldwide. In addition to tobacco and alcohol, human papilloma virus (HPV) is associated with a proportion of head and neck cancers. As in cervical cancers, HPV types 16 and 18 are the cause of malignant transformation. HPV-positive cancers of head and neck have unique characteristics such as occurrence in a younger age group, distinct clinical and molecular features, and better prognosis as compared to HPV-negative carcinomas. They also possess the potential for prevention by using vaccination. The present review describes in detail the salient features of HPV associated oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), its differences from HPV-negative OSCC, diagnostic features, and recent strategies in prevention and management.

  7. Susceptibility of human head and neck cancer cells to combined inhibition of glutathione and thioredoxin metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arya Sobhakumari

    Full Text Available Increased glutathione (GSH and thioredoxin (Trx metabolism are mechanisms that are widely implicated in resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapy. The current study determined if simultaneous inhibition of GSH and Trx metabolism enhanced cell killing of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC cells by a mechanism involving oxidative stress. Inhibition of GSH and Trx metabolism with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO and auranofin (AUR, respectively, induced significant decreases in clonogenic survival compared to either drug alone in FaDu, Cal-27 and SCC-25 HNSCC cells in vitro and in vivo in Cal-27 xenografts. BSO+AUR significantly increased glutathione and thioredoxin oxidation and suppressed peroxiredoxin activity in vitro. Pre-treatment with N-acetylcysteine completely reversed BSO+AUR-induced cell killing in FaDu and Cal-27 cells, while catalase and selenium supplementation only inhibited BSO+AUR-induced cell killing in FaDu cells. BSO+AUR decreased caspase 3/7 activity in HNSCC cells and significantly reduced the viability of both Bax/Bak double knockout (DKO and DKO-Bax reconstituted hematopoietic cells suggesting that necrosis was involved. BSO+AUR also significantly sensitized FaDu, Cal-27, SCC-25 and SQ20B cells to cell killing induced by the EGFR inhibitor Erlotinib in vitro. These results support the conclusion that simultaneous inhibition of GSH and Trx metabolism pathways induces oxidative stress and clonogenic killing in HNSCCs and this strategy may be useful in sensitizing HNSCCs to EGFR inhibitors.

  8. Recent Advances in High-Performance Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, S. R.; Chun, W.; Valdez, T. I.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Frank, H.; Surumpudi, S.; Halpert, G.; Kosek, J.; Cropley, C.; La Conti, A. B.; hide

    1996-01-01

    Direct methanol fuel cells for portable power applications have been advanced significantly under DARPA- and ARO-sponsored programs over the last five years. A liquid-feed, direct methanol fuel cell developed under these programs, employs a proton exchange membrane as electrolyte and operates on aqueous solutions of methanol with air or oxygen as the oxidant.

  9. Increase of bcl-2 Protein Expression in Aggressive Basal Cell Carcinoma of Head and Neck

    OpenAIRE

    Cláudia CAZAL; Mariana Roesch ELY; Ana Paula Veras SOBRAL; Wilton Wilney Nascimento PADILHA

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to verify the bcl-2 protein expression in 22 cutaneous basal cell carcinomas (BCC) of the head and neck, and to compare it with its aggressive behavior. Method: Tumors were histologically classified in non-aggressive (BCC 1) and aggressive (BCC 2) and then submitted to the immunohistochemistry technique with the streptavidin-biotin peroxidase method using the anti-bcl-2 antibody. Results: After proceeding to morphological analysis, sixteen tumors (72.7%) w...

  10. Prognostic significance of surgical extranodal extension in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Fumihiko; Mori, Taisuke; Matsumura, Satoko; Matsumoto, Yoshifumi; Fukasawa, Masahiko; Teshima, Masanori; Kobayashi, Kenya; Yoshimoto, Seiichi

    2017-08-01

    Lymph node metastasis with extranodal extension represents one of the most important adverse prognostic factors for survival in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. We propose that extranodal extension occurs to differing extents. The aim of this study was to determine the prognostic significance of extranodal extension in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Two hundred and ninety-eight patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma who underwent surgical resection and neck dissection were included. Cervical lymph nodes were classified into four categories: (i) pathological N negative, (ii) extranodal extension negative, (iii) non-surgical extranodal extension and (iv) surgical extranodal extension. Lymph node metastases were detected in 67.1% of laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer patients and 52.7% of oral cancer patients. The 3-year disease-specific survival rates for patients in the pathological N negative, extranodal extension negative, non-surgical extranodal extension and surgical extranodal extension groups were 90.9%, 79.6%, 63.8% and 48.3%, respectively. In laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer patients, surgical extranodal extension was associated with a significantly poorer disease-specific survival than a pathological N negative, extranodal extension negative or non-surgical extranodal extension status. In oral cancer patients, no significant differences were observed between the non-surgical and surgical extranodal extension groups. However, non-surgical extranodal extension was associated with a poorer disease-specific survival than a pathological N negative or extranodal extension negative status. Surgical extranodal extension was a poor prognostic factor in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. The prognostic significance of surgical extranodal extension differed between laryngeal/hypopharyngeal and oral cancer patients. The clinical significance of surgical extranodal extension was much greater for

  11. Osteonecrosis of the femoral head in sickle cell disease: prevalence, comorbidities, and surgical outcomes in California

    OpenAIRE

    Adesina, Oyebimpe; Brunson, Ann; Keegan, Theresa H. M.; Wun, Ted

    2017-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) is a prevalent complication of sickle cell disease (SCD) that has not been well described in population-based cohort studies. Using California's Office of Statewide Planning and Development discharge databases (1991-2013), we estimated the cumulative incidence of ONFH after accounting for the competing risk of death and used a multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression to identify factors associated with ONFH diagnosis. We also calculated rates ...

  12. Radioresistant head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells: Intracellular signaling, putative biomarkers for tumor recurrences and possible therapeutic targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skvortsov, Sergej; Jimenez, Connie R.; Knol, Jaco C.; Eichberger, Paul; Schiestl, Bernhard; Debbage, Paul; Skvortsova, Ira; Lukas, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Treatment of local and distant head and neck cancer recurrences after radiotherapy remains an unsolved problem. In order to identify potential targets for use in effective therapy of recurrent tumors, we have investigated protein patterns in radioresistant (FaDu-IRR and SCC25-IRR, “IRR cells”) as compared to parental (FaDu and SCC25) head and neck carcinoma cells. Methods and materials: Radiation resistant IRR cells were derived from parental cells after repeated exposure to ionizing radiation 10 times every two weeks at a single dose of 10 Gy, resulting in a total dose of 100 Gy. Protein profiling in parental and IRR cells was carried out using two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) followed by MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. Cell viability, cell migration assays and Western blot analysis were used to confirm results obtained using the proteome approach. Results: Forty-five proteins that were similarly modulated in FaDu-IRR and SCC25-IRR cells compared to parental cells were selected to analyze their common targets. It was found that these either up- or down-regulated proteins are closely related to the enhancement of cell migration which is regulated by Rac1 protein. Further investigations confirmed that Rac1 is up-regulated in IRR cells, and inhibiting its action reduces the migratory abilities of these cells. Additionally, the Rac1 inhibitor exerts cytostatic effects in HNSCC cells, mostly in migratory cells. Conclusions: Based on these results, we conclude that radioresistant HNSCC cells possess enhanced metastatic abilities that are regulated by a network of migration-related proteins. Rac1 protein may be considered as a putative biomarker of HNSCC radiation resistance, and as a potential therapeutic target for treating local and distant HNSCC recurrences.

  13. Radiolabeled cetuximab: dose optimization for epidermal growth factor receptor imaging in a head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeben, B.A.W.; Molkenboer-Kuenen, J.D.M.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Peeters, W.J.M.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Bussink, J.; Boerman, O.C.

    2011-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma could be of value to select patients for EGFR-targeted therapy. We assessed dose optimization of (111) Indium-DTPA-cetuximab ((111) In-cetuximab) for EGFR imaging in a head-and-neck squamous

  14. Immunocompromised and immunocompetent mouse models for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei ZG

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Zhen-ge Lei,1,* Xiao-hua Ren,2,* Sha-sha Wang,3 Xin-hua Liang,3,4 Ya-ling Tang3,5 1Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Stomatological Hospital Affiliated to Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi, 2Department of Stomatology, Sichuan Medical Science Academy and Sichuan Provincial People’s Hospital, 3State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, 4Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, West China College of Stomatology, Sichuan University, 5Department of Oral Pathology, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Mouse models can closely mimic human oral squamous epithelial carcinogenesis, greatly expand the in vivo research possibilities, and play a critical role in the development of diagnosis, monitoring, and treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. With the development of the recent research on the contribution of immunity/inflammation to cancer initiation and progression, mouse models have been divided into two categories, namely, immunocompromised and immunocompetent mouse models. And thus, this paper will review these two kinds of models applied in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma to provide a platform to understand the complicated histological, molecular, and genetic changes of oral squamous epithelial tumorigenesis. Keywords: head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, HNSCC, mouse models, immunocompromised models, immunocompetent models, transgenic models

  15. Mis-specified cells die by an active gene-directed process, and inhibition of this death results in cell fate transformation in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werz, Christian; Lee, Tom V.; Lee, Peter L.; Lackey, Melinda; Bolduc, Clare; Stein, David S.; Bergmann, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Summary Incorrectly specified or mis-specified cells often undergo cell death or are transformed to adopt a different cell fate during development. The underlying cause for this distinction is largely unknown. In many developmental mutants in Drosophila, large numbers of mis-specified cells die synchronously, providing a convenient model for analysis of this phenomenon. The maternal mutant bicoid is particularly useful model with which to address this issue because its mutant phenotype is a combination of both transformation of tissue (acron to telson) and cell death in the presumptive head and thorax regions. We show that a subset of these mis-specified cells die through an active gene-directed process involving transcriptional upregulation of the cell death inducer hid. Upregulation of hid also occurs in oskar mutants and other segmentation mutants. In hid bicoid double mutants, mis-specified cells in the presumptive head and thorax survive and continue to develop, but they are transformed to adopt a different cell fate. We provide evidence that the terminal torso signaling pathway protects the mis-specified telson tissue in bicoid mutants from hid-induced cell death, whereas mis-specified cells in the head and thorax die, presumably because equivalent survival signals are lacking. These data support a model whereby mis-specification can be tolerated if a survival pathway is provided, resulting in cellular transformation. PMID:16280349

  16. Expression of Ku correlates with radiation sensitivities in the head and neck cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Wook; Yu, Eun Sil; Yi, So Lyoung; Son, Se Hee; Kim, Jong Hoon; Ahn, Seung Do; Shin, Seong Soo; Choi, Eun Kyung

    2004-01-01

    DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a serine/threonine kinase consisting of a 470 kDa catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) and a heterodimeric regulatory complex, called Ku, which is composed of 70 kDa (Ku 70) and 86 kDa (Ku 80) proteins. The DNA-PK has been shown to play a pivotal role in rejoining DNA double-strand-breaks (dsb) in mammalian cells. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between the level of Ku expression and radiation sensitivity. Nine head and neck, cancer cell lines showed various intrinsic radiation sensitivities. Among the nine, AMC-HN-3 cell was the most sensitive for X-ray irradiation and AMC-HN-9 cell was the most resistance. The most sensitive and resistant cell lines were selected and the test sensitivity of radiation and expression of Ku were measured. Radiation sensitivity was obtained by colony forming assay and Ku protein expression using Western blot analysis. Ku80 increased expression by radiation, wheras Ku70 did not. Overexpression of Ku80 protein increased radiation resistance in AMC-HN9 cell line. There was a correlation between Ku80 expression and radiation resistance. Ku80 was shown to play an important role in radiation damage response. Induction of Ku80 expression had an important role in DNA damage repair by radiation. Ku80 expression may be an effective predictive assay of radiosensitivity on head and neck cancer

  17. Significant Wave Heights, Periods, and Directions, and Air and Sea Temperature Data from a Directional Waverider Buoy off Diamond Head, Oahu during March-April 2000 (NODC Accession 0000475)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A directional waverider buoy located about one nautical mile south of Diamond Head, Oahu, provided an approximately 10-day time series of wave characteristics and...

  18. The Role of HPV in Head and Neck Cancer Stem Cell Formation and Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark S. Swanson

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell (CSC theory proposes that a minority of tumor cells are capable of self-replication and tumorigenesis. It is these minority of cells that are responsible for cancer metastasis and recurrence in head and neck squamous cell cancers (HNSCC. Human papilloma virus (HPV-related cancer of the oropharynx is becoming more prevalent, which makes understanding of the relationship between HPV and CSCs more important than ever. This relationship is critical because CSC behavior can be predicted based on cell surface markers, which makes them a suitable candidate for targeted therapy. New therapies are an exciting opportunity to advance past the stalled outcomes in HNSCC that have plagued patients and clinicians for several decades.

  19. Cathode-supported hybrid direct carbon fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gil, Vanesa; Gurauskis, Jonas; Deleebeeck, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    The direct conversion of coal to heat and electricity by a hybrid direct carbon fuel cell (HDCFC) is a highly efficient and cleaner technology than the conventional combustion power plants. HDCFC is defined as a combination of solid oxide fuel cell and molten carbonate fuel cell. This work...... investigates cathode-supported cells as an alternative configuration for HDCFC, with better catalytic activity and performance. This study aims to define the best processing route to manufacture highly efficient cathode-supported cells based on La0.75Sr0.25MnO3/yttria-stabilized zirconia infiltrated backbones...

  20. Antiproliferative study of B. javanica extracts against head and neck cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Noor Hidayat Adenan; Zainah Adam; Shafii Khamis; Fazliana Mohd Saaya

    2014-01-01

    Brucea javanica or locally known as Meladapahit, are being used in Malaysia as traditional medicine mainly for the treatment of diabetes mellitus and hypertension. In order to study the potential use of this plant for cancer treatment, we have prepared crude extracts of the leaves and fruits, and assessed them for antiproliferative activities against head and neck cancer cell line which is HTB-43. The dried and ground leaves and fruits of the plant were successively extracted using hexane, chloroform, methanol and water, respectively. Inhibition of growth of the cultured cancer cells line was measured using a standard Micro culture Tetrazolium Technique (MTT) assay. The crude extracts were also subjected to toxicity test using brine shrimp lethality assay. Most of the tested crude extracts exhibited significant antiproliferative activities against the HTB-43 cell with IC 50 ranging from 8.46 μg/ml to 47.25 μg/ml. The chloroform extract from the leaves gave the highest antiproliferative activity (IC 50 , 8.46 μg/ml). Hexane extract from the fruits, aqueous and hexane extracts from B. javanica leaves showed low antiproliferative activities to the HTB-43 cell line with an IC 50 values >100 μg/ml. The chloroform extracts from fruits and leaves and methanol extract from fruits induced toxicity against brine shrimps with LC 50 values of 118.7 μg/ml, 512.44 μg/ml and 75.27 μg/ml respectively. It indicated that bioactive components presence in the crude extracts for its pharmacologic effects against head and neck cancer cells. Methanolic extract of Brucea javanica fruit was selected as the most effective extract to inhibit the growth of head and neck cancer cells (HTB-43) by the two different assays used. (author)

  1. The head module of Mediator directs activation of preloaded RNAPII in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sarah K; Chen, Xu; Huang, Liangqun; Stargell, Laurie A

    2013-12-01

    The successful synthesis of a transcript by RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) is a multistage process with distinct rate-limiting steps that can vary depending on the particular gene. A growing number of genes in a variety of organisms are regulated at steps after the recruitment of RNAPII. The best-characterized Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene regulated in this manner is CYC1. This gene has high occupancy of RNAPII under non-inducing conditions, defining it as a poised gene. Here, we find that subunits of the head module of Mediator, Med18 and Med20, and Med19 are required for activation of transcription at the CYC1 promoter in response to environmental cues. These subunits of Mediator are required at the preloaded promoter for normal levels of recruitment and activity of the general transcription factor TFIIH. Strikingly, these Mediator components are dispensable for activation by the same activator at a different gene, which lacks a preloaded polymerase in the promoter region. Based on these results and other studies, we speculate that Mediator plays an essential role in triggering an inactive polymerase at CYC1 into a productively elongating form.

  2. Oral health activities of early head start teachers directed toward children and parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranz, Ashley M; Rozier, R Gary; Zeldin, Leslie P; Preisser, John S

    2011-01-01

    This cross-sectional study examined Early Head Start (EHS) teachers' oral health program activities and their association with teacher and program characteristics. Self-completed questionnaires were distributed to the staff in all EHS programs in North Carolina. Variables for dental health activities for parents (four items) and children (four items) were constructed as the sum of responses to a 0-4 Likert-type scale (never to very frequently). Ordinary least squares regression models examined the association between teachers' oral health program activities and modifiable teacher (oral health knowledge, values, self-efficacy, dental health training, perceived barriers to dental activities) and program (director and health coordinator knowledge and perceived barriers to dental activities) characteristics. Teachers in the parent (n=260) and child (n=231) analyses were a subset of the 485 staff respondents (98 percent response rate). Teachers engaged in child oral health activities (range = 0-16; mean = 9.0) more frequently than parent activities (range = 0-16; mean = 6.9). Teachers' oral health values, perceived oral health self-efficacy, dental training, and director and health coordinator knowledge were positively associated with oral health activities (P oral health activity in EHS programs is less than optimal. Several characteristics of EHS staff were identified that can be targeted with education interventions. Evidence for effectiveness of EHS interventions needs to be strengthened, but results of this survey provide encouraging findings about the potential effects of teacher training on their oral health practices.

  3. Influence of engineered surface on cell directionality and motility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Qing Yuan; Pang, Stella W; Tong, Wing Yin; Shi, Peng; Lam, Yun Wah; Shi, Jue

    2014-01-01

    Control of cell migration is important in numerous key biological processes, and is implicated in pathological conditions such as cancer metastasis and inflammatory diseases. Many previous studies indicated that cell migration could be guided by micropatterns fabricated on cell culture surfaces. In this study, we designed a polydimethylsiloxane cell culture substrate with gratings punctuated by corners and ends, and studied its effects on the behavior of MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells. MC3T3-E1 cells elongated and aligned with the gratings, and the migration paths of the cells appeared to be guided by the grating pattern. Interestingly, more than 88% of the cells cultured on these patterns were observed to reverse their migration directions at least once during the 16 h examination period. Most of the reversal events occurred at the corners and the ends of the pattern, suggesting these localized topographical features induce an abrupt loss in directional persistence. Moreover, the cell speed was observed to increase temporarily right after each directional reversal. Focal adhesion complexes were more well-established in cells on the angular gratings than on flat surfaces, but the formation of filipodia appeared to be imbalanced at the corners and the ends, possibly leading to the loss of directional persistence. This study describes the first engineered cell culture surface that consistently induces changes in the directional persistence of adherent cells. This will provide an experimental model for the study of this phenomenon and a valuable platform to control the cell motility and directionality, which can be used for cell screening and selection. (paper)

  4. Automatic cell identification and visualization using digital holographic microscopy with head mounted augmented reality devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Timothy; Rawat, Siddharth; Markman, Adam; Javidi, Bahram

    2018-03-01

    We propose a compact imaging system that integrates an augmented reality head mounted device with digital holographic microscopy for automated cell identification and visualization. A shearing interferometer is used to produce holograms of biological cells, which are recorded using customized smart glasses containing an external camera. After image acquisition, segmentation is performed to isolate regions of interest containing biological cells in the field-of-view, followed by digital reconstruction of the cells, which is used to generate a three-dimensional (3D) pseudocolor optical path length profile. Morphological features are extracted from the cell's optical path length map, including mean optical path length, coefficient of variation, optical volume, projected area, projected area to optical volume ratio, cell skewness, and cell kurtosis. Classification is performed using the random forest classifier, support vector machines, and K-nearest neighbor, and the results are compared. Finally, the augmented reality device displays the cell's pseudocolor 3D rendering of its optical path length profile, extracted features, and the identified cell's type or class. The proposed system could allow a healthcare worker to quickly visualize cells using augmented reality smart glasses and extract the relevant information for rapid diagnosis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the integration of digital holographic microscopy with augmented reality devices for automated cell identification and visualization.

  5. Phosphoinositide Kinase-3 Status Associated With Presence or Absence of Human Papillomavirus in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarbrough, Wendell G.; Whigham, Amy; Brown, Brandee; Roach, Michael; Slebos, Robbert

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate phosphoinositide kinase-3 (PI3K) activation in relation to human papillomavirus (HPV) status in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods and Materials: Gene expression microarray data were analyzed to determine differentially expressed genes between HPV(+) and HPV(-) HNSCC. PIK3CA gene expression was confirmed by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction in seven HPV(+) and seven HPV(-) primary HNSCCs. PIK3CA mutation status in three HPV(+) and nine HPV(-) cell lines was determined by polymerase chain reaction amplification of hot spot exons (1, 9, 20) followed by direct sequencing. Results: PIK3CA was overexpressed in HPV(+)-associated HNSCC compared with the expression in HPV(-) HNSCC. Activation of PIK3CA by mutation was found in 1 of the 12 tested HNSCC cell lines. Conclusion: Activation of PI3K by mutation of PIK3CA is rare in HNSCC cell lines and was not found in three HPV(+) cell lines. One mechanism by which HPV-associated HNSCC might activate PI3K is increased expression of PIK3CA

  6. Connective tissue growth factor activates pluripotency genes and mesenchymal-epithelial transition in head and neck cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Cheng-Chi; Hsu, Wen-Hao; Wang, Chen-Chien; Chou, Chun-Hung; Kuo, Mark Yen-Ping; Lin, Been-Ren; Chen, Szu-Ta; Tai, Shyh-Kuan; Kuo, Min-Liang; Yang, Muh-Hwa

    2013-07-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a key mechanism in both embryonic development and cancer metastasis. The EMT introduces stem-like properties to cancer cells. However, during somatic cell reprogramming, mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET), the reverse process of EMT, is a crucial step toward pluripotency. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is a multifunctional secreted protein that acts as either an oncoprotein or a tumor suppressor among different cancers. Here, we show that in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), CTGF promotes the MET and reduces invasiveness. Moreover, we found that CTGF enhances the stem-like properties of HNSCC cells and increases the expression of multiple pluripotency genes. Mechanistic studies showed that CTGF induces c-Jun expression through αvβ3 integrin and that c-Jun directly activates the transcription of the pluripotency genes NANOG, SOX2, and POU5F1. Knockdown of CTGF in TW2.6 cells was shown to reduce tumor formation and attenuate E-cadherin expression in xenotransplanted tumors. In HNSCC patient samples, CTGF expression was positively correlated with the levels of CDH1, NANOG, SOX2, and POU5F1. Coexpression of CTGF and the pluripotency genes was found to be associated with a worse prognosis. These findings are valuable in elucidating the interplay between epithelial plasticity and stem-like properties during cancer progression and provide useful information for developing a novel classification system and therapeutic strategies for HNSCC. ©2013 AACR.

  7. Simulating Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation With a Detailed Anisotropic Human Head Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rampersad, S.; Janssen, A.J.E.M.; Lucka, F.; Aydin, U.; Lanfer, B.; Lew, S.; Wolters, C.H.; Stegeman, D.F.; Oostendorp, T.F.

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a noninvasive brain stimulation technique able to induce long-lasting changes in cortical excitability that can benefit cognitive functioning and clinical treatment. In order to both better understand the mechanisms behind tDCS and possibly improve

  8. Simulating transcranial direct current stimulation with a detailed anisotropic human head model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rampersad, S.M.; Janssen, A.M.; Lucka, F.; Aydin, U.; Lanfer, B.; Lew, S.; Wolters, C.H.; Stegeman, D.F.; Oostendorp, T.F.

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a noninvasive brain stimulation technique able to induce long-lasting changes in cortical excitability that can benefit cognitive functioning and clinical treatment. In order to both better understand the mechanisms behind tDCS and possibly improve

  9. Quad shot - hypofractionated radiotherapy for palliation in advanced squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maqsood, T.; Ali, U.; Arif, S.

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of quad-shot radiation therapy for palliation in locally advanced and metastatic inoperable squamous cell carcinomas of head and neck. Study Design: A quasi-experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: Oncology department, Combined Military Hospital Rawalpindi, from Sep 2012 to Sep 2013. Material and Methods: Thirty five patients were included with histologically confirmed advanced inoperable squamous cell carcinoma in head and neck region, performance status 2 or 3 and survival =3 months. Patients were treated with radiation therapy 14 Gy in four fractions, megavoltage beam, twice daily fractions (at least 6 hours apart), for 2 consecutive days. Symptoms due to cancer (pain and dysphagia) were assessed as per common toxicity criteria adverse event version 4.0 on day 0 before treatment and day 21 after start of treatment. Results: Grades of pain and dysphagia showed significant improvement after treatment with a p-value <0.001. A total of 91.4% patients showed an improvement in grade of pain (32 out of 35 patients) and 45.7% of patients showed improvement in grade of dysphagia (16 out of 35 patients). There was a statistically significant decrease in grades of pain and dysphagia after treatment. Conclusion: The short duration of hypofractionated radiotherapy with Quad Shot was effective with respect to symptom palliation in locally advanced and metastatic inoperable head and neck cancers.

  10. Gastroesophageal reflux disease and odds of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Evan L; Zevallos, Jose P; Olshan, Andrew F

    2016-05-01

    Exposure to excess gastric acid resulting from gastroesophageal reflux disease, also known as acid reflux or heartburn, might contribute to initiation of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, particularly laryngeal cancer. Prior epidemiologic studies have reported inconsistent results. We sought to clarify this relationship using an observational study with a larger available sample size and better-characterized exposure information than most prior studies. A population-based case-control study of head and neck cancer in North Carolina with 1,340 newly diagnosed cases and 1,378 controls matched on age, race, and sex. We used unconditional logistic regression to examine associations between self-reported heartburn and development of overall head and neck cancer as well as development of cancer at specific tumor sites. Subgroup analysis by smoking and alcoholic drinking status was used to make comparisons with a previous study that used a similar study design. Overall, an increased odds of head and neck cancer was not associated with either self-reported history of heartburn symptoms (odds ratio = 0.85; 95% confidence interval 0.68, 1.06) or self-reported medical diagnosis of GERD (OR = 0.89; 95% CI 0.71, 1.11). These patterns held for specific tumor sites. For laryngopharyngeal cancer, we did not detect any associations regardless of joint smoking and alcoholic drinking status. Gastroesophageal reflux does not appear to play a role in development of head and neck cancer. 3b. Laryngoscope, 126:1091-1096, 2016. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  11. Down-regulation of survivin by oxaliplatin diminishes radioresistance of head and neck squamous carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Zakir; Khan, Noor; Tiwari, Ram P.; Patro, Ishan K.; Prasad, G.B.K.S.; Bisen, Prakash S.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Oxaliplatin is integrated in treatment strategies against a variety of cancers including radiation protocols. Herein, as a new strategy we tested feasibility and rationale of oxaliplatin in combination with radiation to control proliferation of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells and discussed survivin-related signaling and apoptosis induction. Methods: Cytotoxicity and apoptosis induced by radiation and/or oxaliplatin were examined in relation to survivin status using two HNSCC cell lines viz., Cal27 and NT8e, and one normal 293-cell line. Survivin gene knockdown by siRNA was also tested in relevance to oxaliplatin-mediated radiosensitization effects. Results: Survivin plays a critical role in mediating radiation-resistance in part through suppression of apoptosis via a caspase-dependent mechanism. Oxaliplatin treatment significantly decreased expression of survivin in cancer cells within 24-72 h. Apoptotic cells and caspase-3 activity were increased parallely with decrease in cell viability, if irradiated during this sensitive period. The cytotoxicity of oxaliplatin and radiation combination was greater than additive. Survivin gene knockdown experiments have demonstrated the role of survivin in radiosensitization of cancer cells mediated by oxaliplatin. Conclusions: Higher expression of survivin is a critical factor for radioresistance in HNSCC cell lines. Pre-treatment of cancer cells with oxaliplatin significantly increased the radiosensitivity through induction of apoptosis by potently inhibiting survivin.

  12. Extending EV Range with Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Steckmann, Kai

    2009-01-01

    Electric cars are the vehicles of the future, and there is a proven hybrid system for extending their mileage. Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) provide safe, lightweight, onboard battery charging that can free car owners from worry about running out of power. The hybrid system includes a DMFC fuel cell, fuel cell cartridge and electric vehicle batteries. The fuel cell operates almost silently with virtually no exhaust, it is immune to extreme weather and the convenient fuel cartridges featu...

  13. Effects of Cetuximab and Erlotinib on the behaviour of cancer stem cells in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setúbal Destro Rodrigues, Maria Fernanda; Gammon, Luke; Rahman, Muhammad M; Biddle, Adrian; Nunes, Fabio Daumas; Mackenzie, Ian C

    2018-03-02

    The therapeutic responses of many solid tumours to chemo- and radio-therapies are far from fully effective but therapies targeting malignancy-related cellular changes show promise for further control. In head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is commonly overexpressed and investigation of agents that block this receptor indicate a limited response when used alone but an ability to enhance the actions of other drugs. The hierarchical stem cell patterns present in tumours generate cellular heterogeneity and this is further complicated by cancer stem cells (CSC) shifting between epithelial (Epi-CSC) and mesenchymal (EMT-CSC) states. To clarify how such heterogeneity influences responses to EGFR blocking, we examined the effects of Cetuximab and Erlotinib on the cell sub-populations in HNSCC cell lines. These agents reduced cell proliferation for all subpopulations but induced little cell death. They did however induce large shifts of cells between the EMT-CSC, Epi-CSC and differentiating cell compartments. Loss of EMT-CSCs reduced cell motility and is expected to reduce invasion and metastasis. EGFR blocking also induced shifts of Epi-CSCs into the differentiating cell compartment which typically has greater sensitivity to chemo/radiation, an effect expected to enhance the overall response of tumour cell populations to adjunctive therapies.

  14. Effects of Cetuximab and Erlotinib on the behaviour of cancer stem cells in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setúbal Destro Rodrigues, Maria Fernanda; Gammon, Luke; Rahman, Muhammad M.; Biddle, Adrian; Nunes, Fabio Daumas; Mackenzie, Ian C.

    2018-01-01

    The therapeutic responses of many solid tumours to chemo- and radio-therapies are far from fully effective but therapies targeting malignancy-related cellular changes show promise for further control. In head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is commonly overexpressed and investigation of agents that block this receptor indicate a limited response when used alone but an ability to enhance the actions of other drugs. The hierarchical stem cell patterns present in tumours generate cellular heterogeneity and this is further complicated by cancer stem cells (CSC) shifting between epithelial (Epi-CSC) and mesenchymal (EMT-CSC) states. To clarify how such heterogeneity influences responses to EGFR blocking, we examined the effects of Cetuximab and Erlotinib on the cell sub-populations in HNSCC cell lines. These agents reduced cell proliferation for all subpopulations but induced little cell death. They did however induce large shifts of cells between the EMT-CSC, Epi-CSC and differentiating cell compartments. Loss of EMT-CSCs reduced cell motility and is expected to reduce invasion and metastasis. EGFR blocking also induced shifts of Epi-CSCs into the differentiating cell compartment which typically has greater sensitivity to chemo/radiation, an effect expected to enhance the overall response of tumour cell populations to adjunctive therapies. PMID:29568372

  15. Hypothyroidism after primary radiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: Normal tissue complication probability modeling with latent time correction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønjom, Marianne Feen; Brink, Carsten; Bentzen, Søren

    2013-01-01

    To develop a normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model of radiation-induced biochemical hypothyroidism (HT) after primary radiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) with adjustment for latency and clinical risk factors.......To develop a normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model of radiation-induced biochemical hypothyroidism (HT) after primary radiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) with adjustment for latency and clinical risk factors....

  16. The Aromatic Head Group of Spider Toxin Polyamines Influences Toxicity to Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, David; Boyle, Glen M; McIntyre, Lachlan; Nolan, Matthew J; Parsons, Peter G; Smith, Jennifer J; Tribolet, Leon; Loukas, Alex; Liddell, Michael J; Rash, Lachlan D; Daly, Norelle L

    2017-10-27

    Spider venoms constitute incredibly diverse libraries of compounds, many of which are involved in prey capture and defence. Polyamines are often prevalent in the venom and target ionotropic glutamate receptors. Here we show that a novel spider polyamine, PA 366 , containing a hydroxyphenyl-based structure is present in the venom of several species of tarantula, and has selective toxicity against MCF-7 breast cancer cells. By contrast, a polyamine from an Australian funnel-web spider venom, which contains an identical polyamine tail to PA 366 but an indole-based head-group, is only cytotoxic at high concentrations. Our results suggest that the ring structure plays a role in the cytotoxicity and that modification to the polyamine head group might lead to more potent and selective compounds with potential as novel cancer treatments.

  17. The Aromatic Head Group of Spider Toxin Polyamines Influences Toxicity to Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Wilson

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Spider venoms constitute incredibly diverse libraries of compounds, many of which are involved in prey capture and defence. Polyamines are often prevalent in the venom and target ionotropic glutamate receptors. Here we show that a novel spider polyamine, PA366, containing a hydroxyphenyl-based structure is present in the venom of several species of tarantula, and has selective toxicity against MCF-7 breast cancer cells. By contrast, a polyamine from an Australian funnel-web spider venom, which contains an identical polyamine tail to PA366 but an indole-based head-group, is only cytotoxic at high concentrations. Our results suggest that the ring structure plays a role in the cytotoxicity and that modification to the polyamine head group might lead to more potent and selective compounds with potential as novel cancer treatments.

  18. Stem cell monitoring with a direct or indirect labeling method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Hwan; Lee, Yong Jin [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The molecular imaging techniques allow monitoring of the transplanted cells in the same individuals over time, from early localization to the survival, migration, and differentiation. Generally, there are two methods of stem cell labeling: direct and indirect labeling methods. The direct labeling method introduces a labeling agent into the cell, which is stably incorporated or attached to the cells prior to transplantation. Direct labeling of cells with radionuclides is a simple method with relatively fewer adverse events related to genetic responses. However, it can only allow short-term distribution of transplanted cells because of the decreasing imaging signal with radiodecay, according to the physical half-lives, or the signal becomes more diffuse with cell division and dispersion. The indirect labeling method is based on the expression of a reporter gene transduced into the cell before transplantation, which is then visualized upon the injection of an appropriate probe or substrate. In this review, various imaging strategies to monitor the survival and behavior change of transplanted stem cells are covered. Taking these new approaches together, the direct and indirect labeling methods may provide new insights on the roles of in vivo stem cell monitoring, from bench to bedside.

  19. 'Goats that stare at men'--revisited: do dwarf goats alter their behaviour in response to eye visibility and head direction of a human?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawroth, Christian; von Borell, Eberhard; Langbein, Jan

    2016-05-01

    Being able to recognise when one is being observed by someone else is thought to be adaptive during cooperative or competitive events. In particular for prey species, this ability should be of use in the context of predation. A previous study reported that goats (Capra aegagrus hircus) alter their behaviour according to the body and head orientation of a human experimenter. During a food anticipation task, an experimenter remained in a particular posture for 30 s before delivering a reward, and the goats' active anticipation and standing alert behaviour were analysed. To further evaluate the specific mechanisms at work, we here present two additional test conditions. In particular, we investigated the effects of the eye visibility and head orientation of a human experimenter on the behaviour of the goats (N = 7). We found that the level of the subjects' active anticipatory behaviour was highest in the conditions where the experimenter was directing his head and body towards the goat ('Control' and 'Eyes closed' conditions), but the anticipatory behaviour was significantly decreased when the body ('Head only') or the head and body of the experimenter were directed away from the subject ('Back' condition). For standing alert, we found no significant differences between the three conditions in which the experimenter was directing his head towards the subject ('Control', 'Eyes closed' and 'Head only'). This lack of differences in the expression of standing alert suggests that goats evaluate the direction of a human's head as an important cue in their anticipatory behaviour. However, goats did not respond to the visibility of the experimenter's eyes alone.

  20. Which features of advanced head and neck basal cell carcinoma are associated with perineural invasion?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Bandiera de Oliveira Santos

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Perineural invasion is a unique route for tumor dissemination. In basal cell carcinomas, the incidence is low, but increases in advanced cases. Its importance is recognized but not fully understood. Objective To compare head and neck basal cell carcinomas with and without perineural invasion. Methods A retrospective medical chart review of multidisciplinary surgeries for basal cell carcinomas that required a head and neck surgery specialist in a tertiary referral center was performed. Clinical-demographics and histopathological features were analyzed. Results Of 354 cases, perineural invasion was present in 23.1%. Larger tumors and morpheaform subtype were statistically related to perineural invasion. Nodular and superficial subtypes were less frequent in positive cases. No significant difference was found in gender, age, ulceration, location, and mixed histology. Conclusion In this series of selected patients with basal cell carcinomas submitted to major resections, perineural invasion was clearly related to morpheaform subtype and to larger tumors. Other classically associated features, such as location in high-risk mask zone of the face, male gender and mixed histology, were not so strongly linked to perineural invasion.

  1. Peroxiredoxin IV Protects Cells From Radiation-Induced Apoptosis in Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jung Je; Chang, Hyo Won; Jeong, Eun-Jeong; Roh, Jong-Lyel; Choi, Seung-Ho; Jeon, Sea-Yuong; Ko, Gyung Hyuck; Kim, Sang Yoon

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Human peroxiredoxins (Prxs) are known as a family of thiol-specific antioxidant enzymes, among which Prx-I and -II play an important role in protecting cells from irradiation-induced cell death. It is not known whether Prx-IV also protects cells from ionizing radiation (IR). Methods and Materials: To evaluate the protective role of Prx-IV in IR, we transfected full-length Prx-IV cDNA into AMC-HN3 cells, which weakly express endogenous Prx-IV, and knocked down the expression of Prx-IV with siRNA methods using AMC-HN7 cells, which express high levels of endogenous Prx-IV. Radiosensitivity profiles in these cells were evaluated using clonogenic assay, FACS analysis, cell viability, and TUNEL assay. Results: Three Prx-IV expressing clones were isolated. Prx-IV regulated intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and made cells more resistant to IR-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, the knockdown of Prx-IV with siRNA made cells more sensitive to IR-induced apoptosis. Conclusion: The results of these studies suggest that Prx-IV may play an important role in protecting cells from IR-induced apoptosis in head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma

  2. Osteoactivin regulates head and neck squamous cell carcinoma invasion by modulating matrix metalloproteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arosarena, Oneida A; Barr, Eric W; Thorpe, Ryan; Yankey, Hilary; Tarr, Joseph T; Safadi, Fayez F

    2018-01-01

    Nearly 60% of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) die of metastases or locoregional recurrence. Metastasis is mediated by cancer cell migration and invasion, which are in part dependent on extracellular matrix degradation by matrix metalloproteinases. Osteoactivin (OA) overexpression plays a role in metastases in several malignancies, and has been shown to upregulate matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression and activity. To determine how OA modulates MMP expression and activity in HNSCC, and to investigate OA effects on cell invasion, we assessed effects of OA treatment on MMP mRNA and protein expression, as well as gelatinase and caseinolytic activity in HNSCC cell lines. We assessed the effects of OA gene silencing on MMP expression, gelatinase and caseinolytic activity, and cell invasion. OA treatment had differential effects on MMP mRNA expression. OA treatment upregulated MMP-10 expression in UMSCC14a (p = 0.0431) and SCC15 (p < 0.0001) cells, but decreased MMP-9 expression in UMSCC14a cells (p = 0.0002). OA gene silencing decreased MMP-10 expression in UMSCC12 cells (p = 0.0001), and MMP-3 (p = 0.0005) and -9 (p = 0.0036) expression in SCC25 cells. In SCC15 and SCC25 cells, OA treatment increased MMP-2 (p = 0.0408) and MMP-9 gelatinase activity (p < 0.0001), respectively. OA depletion decreased MMP-2 (p = 0.0023) and -9 (p < 0.0001) activity in SCC25 cells. OA treatment increased 70 kDa caseinolytic activity in UMSCC12 cells consistent with tissue type plasminogen activator (p = 0.0078). OA depletion decreased invasive capacity of UMSCC12 cells (p < 0.0001). OA's effects on MMP expression in HNSCC are variable, and may promote cancer cell invasion. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. SU-E-T-593: Clinical Evaluation of Direct Aperture Optimization in Head/Neck and Prostate IMRT Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosini, M [King Saud University Hospitals, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); GALAL, M [Hermitage Medical Clinic, Dublin (Ireland); Emam, I [Ain Shams University, Cairo (France); Kamal, G; Algohary, M [Al Azhar University, Cairo (Egypt)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the planning and dosimetric advantages of direct aperture optimization (DAO) over beam-let optimization in IMRT treatment of head and neck (H/N) and prostate cancers. Methods: Five Head and Neck as well as five prostate patients were planned using the beamlet optimizer in Elekta-Xio ver 4.6 IMRT treatment planning system. Based on our experience in beamlet IMRT optimization, PTVs in H/N plans were prescribed to 70 Gy delivered by 7 fields. While prostate PTVs were prescribed to 76 Gy with 9 fields. In all plans, fields were set to be equally spaced. All cases were re-planed using Direct Aperture optimizer in Prowess Panther ver 5.01 IMRT planning system at same configurations and dose constraints. Plans were evaluated according to ICRU criteria, number of segments, number of monitor units and planning time. Results: For H/N plans, the near maximum dose (D2) and the dose that covers 95% D95 of PTV has improved by 4% in DAO. For organs at risk (OAR), DAO reduced the volume covered by 30% (V30) in spinal cord, right parotid, and left parotid by 60%, 54%, and 53% respectively. This considerable dosimetric quality improvement achieved using 25% less planning time and lower number of segments and monitor units by 46% and 51% respectively. In DAO prostate plans, Both D2 and D95 for the PTV were improved by only 2%. The V30 of the right femur, left femur and bladder were improved by 35%, 15% and 3% respectively. On the contrary, the rectum V30 got even worse by 9%. However, number of monitor units, and number of segments decreased by 20% and 25% respectively. Moreover the planning time reduced significantly too. Conclusion: DAO introduces considerable advantages over the beamlet optimization in regards to organs at risk sparing. However, no significant improvement occurred in most studied PTVs.

  4. The effect of cilengitide in combination with irradiation and chemotherapy in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiduschka, G.; Lill, C.; Schneider, S.; Kotowski, U.; Thurnher, D.; Seemann, R.; Kornek, G.; Schmid, R.

    2014-01-01

    Integrins are highly attractive targets in oncology due to their involvement in angiogenesis in a wide spectrum of cancer entities. Among several integrin inhibitors under clinical evaluation, cilengitide is the most promising compound. However, little is known about the cellular processes induced during cilengitide therapy in combination with irradiation and cisplatin in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). The cytostatic effect of cilengitide was assessed by proliferation assay in the three HNSCC cell lines SCC25, FaDu and CAL27. Combination experiments with cisplatin and irradiation were performed. Possible synergistic effects were calculated in combination index (CI) analyses. Colony forming inhibition was investigated in clonogenic assays. Real-time PCR arrays were used to evaluate target protein gene expression patterns. Flow cytometry was used to detect apoptosis. Used alone, cilengitide has only minor cytotoxic effects in HNSCC cell lines. However, combination with cisplatin resulted in synergistic growth inhibition in all three cell lines. Irradiation showed synergism in short-term experiments and in colony forming assays, an additive effect was detected. Real-time PCR assay detected downregulation of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 after exposure of cells to cilengitide. Cilengitide in combination with cisplatin and irradiation may be a feasible option for the treatment of patients with head and neck cancer. However, further investigations are required to understand the exact mechanism that leads to synergistic cytotoxicity. (orig.) [de

  5. Analysis of primary cilia in directional cell migration in fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Søren Tvorup; Veland, Iben; Schwab, Albrecht

    2013-01-01

    summarize selected methods in analyzing ciliary function in directional cell migration, including immunofluorescence microscopy, scratch assay, and chemotaxis assay by micropipette addition of PDGFRα ligands to cultures of fibroblasts. These methods should be useful not only in studying cell migration....... In particular, platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRα) is compartmentalized to the primary cilium to activate signaling pathways that regulate reorganization of the cytoskeleton required for lamellipodium formation and directional migration in the presence of a specific ligand gradient. We...

  6. Inhibition of radiation induced migration of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells by blocking of EGF receptor pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickhard, Anja C; Schlegel, Jürgen; Arnold, Wolfgang; Reiter, Rudolf; Margraf, Johanna; Knopf, Andreas; Stark, Thomas; Piontek, Guido; Beck, Carolin; Boulesteix, Anne-Laure; Scherer, Elias Q; Pigorsch, Steffi

    2011-01-01

    Recently it has been shown that radiation induces migration of glioma cells and facilitates a further spread of tumor cells locally and systemically. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether radiotherapy induces migration in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). A further aim was to investigate the effects of blocking the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and its downstream pathways (Raf/MEK/ERK, PI3K/Akt) on tumor cell migration in vitro. Migration of tumor cells was assessed via a wound healing assay and proliferation by a MTT colorimeritric assay using 3 HNSCC cell lines (BHY, CAL-27, HN). The cells were treated with increasing doses of irradiation (2 Gy, 5 Gy, 8 Gy) in the presence or absence of EGF, EGFR-antagonist (AG1478) or inhibitors of the downstream pathways PI3K (LY294002), mTOR (rapamycin) and MEK1 (PD98059). Biochemical activation of EGFR and the downstream markers Akt and ERK were examined by Western blot analysis. In absence of stimulation or inhibition, increasing doses of irradiation induced a dose-dependent enhancement of migrating cells (p < 0.05 for the 3 HNSCC cell lines) and a decrease of cell proliferation (p < 0.05 for the 3 HNSCC cell lines). The inhibition of EGFR or the downstream pathways reduced cell migration significantly (almost all p < 0.05 for the 3 HNSCC cell lines). Stimulation of HNSCC cells with EGF caused a significant increase in migration (p < 0.05 for the 3 HNSCC cell lines). After irradiation alone a pronounced activation of EGFR was observed by Western blot analysis. Our results demonstrate that the EGFR is involved in radiation induced migration of HNSCC cells. Therefore EGFR or the downstream pathways might be a target for the treatment of HNSCC to improve the efficacy of radiotherapy

  7. Profile of pembrolizumab in the treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: design development and place in therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haque S

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Sulsal Haque,1,2 Mahender Yellu,1,2 Jaskirat Randhawa,1,2 Nooshin Hashemi-Sadraei1,2 1Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Cincinnati, 2University of Cincinnati Cancer Institute, Cincinnati, OH, USA Abstract: Head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC is the sixth most common malignancy worldwide, and despite advances in cytotoxic, surgical and radiation techniques, outcomes are still poor in those with both locally advanced and metastatic diseases. The need for development of better therapeutics along with a greater understanding of the relationship between the immune system and malignancies has led to a new therapeutic modality, immune modulators, particularly checkpoint inhibitors in HNSCC. It is now well recognized that HNSCC circumvents crucial pathways utilized by the immune system to escape surveillance. These hijacked pathways include impairing tumor antigen presentation machinery and co-opting checkpoint receptors. This understanding has led to the development of monoclonal antibodies targeting checkpoint receptors and has resulted in promising outcomes in HNSCC. This article describes the mechanisms that HNSCC utilizes to escape immune surveillance, clinical impact of checkpoint inhibitors (with a focus on pembrolizumab, ongoing studies, and future directions. Keywords: pembrolizumab, head and neck cancer, MK-3475, immunotherapy

  8. SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA OF THE HEAD AND NECK: NEW AVENUES OF TREATMENT?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Braunschweig

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck counts for 3 % of all cancers in men and half of this number less in women with a 5-year survival of 61 %. While the number of laryngeal carcinoma is decreasing, carcinoma of the oral cavity related to an infection by the human papilloma virus (HPV, high-risk subtypes is increasing, especially in younger patients. HPV related squamous cell carcinomas show better survival data, especially in regard to recurrence free rates or secondary carcinoma of adjacent locations. Squamous cell carcinomas related to the presence of HPV DNA material is almost exclusively found in carcinoma of the oral cavity and oropharyngeal mucosa. Much less frequently HPV is present in hypopharyngeal carcinomas and even less number of cases of squamous cell carcinoma with proof for HPV in the nasopharynx and larynx. In case of evidence for HPV DNA; most cases are positively tested for subtype 16, followed by subtype 18. As a surrogate immunhistochemical marker, p16 INK4A is stained positive, cytoplasmic and nuclear. In a small study by ourselves, we found a positive correlation in 100 % of p16 INK4A positivity and positive HPV testing. Oral squamous cell carcinoma is more frequently related to HPV in patients below 50 years of age with a prevalence of ca. 20 %. Whilst HPV high-risk positive carcinomas show very few mutations in single signalling molecules of the downstream receptor tyrosin kinase pathways, HPV negative carcinomas show in many cases a chaotic DNA mutation type with typical mutations in tumor suppressor genes, as p53 and CDKN2A. This pattern is often seen in carcinoma types develop from a summation of accidental mutations often caused by toxins (e.g. inhaled cigarette smoke. However, it is discussed and under investigation whether a subset of head and neck squamous cell carcinomasdevelop from so called driver mutations, as are called mutations in critical members of signalling pathways and receptor tyrosin kinases

  9. Heading in the right direction: thermodynamics-based network analysis and pathway engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataman, Meric; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily

    2015-12-01

    Thermodynamics-based network analysis through the introduction of thermodynamic constraints in metabolic models allows a deeper analysis of metabolism and guides pathway engineering. The number and the areas of applications of thermodynamics-based network analysis methods have been increasing in the last ten years. We review recent applications of these methods and we identify the areas that such analysis can contribute significantly, and the needs for future developments. We find that organisms with multiple compartments and extremophiles present challenges for modeling and thermodynamics-based flux analysis. The evolution of current and new methods must also address the issues of the multiple alternatives in flux directionalities and the uncertainties and partial information from analytical methods. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. 'Goats that stare at men': dwarf goats alter their behaviour in response to human head orientation, but do not spontaneously use head direction as a cue in a food-related context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawroth, Christian; von Borell, Eberhard; Langbein, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Recently, comparative research on the mechanisms and species-specific adaptive values of attributing attentive states and using communicative cues has gained increased interest, particularly in non-human primates, birds, and dogs. Here, we investigate these phenomena in a farm animal species, the dwarf goat (Capra aegagrus hircus). In the first experiment, we investigated the effects of different human head and body orientations, as well as human experimenter presence/absence, on the behaviour of goats in a food-anticipating paradigm. Over a 30-s interval, the experimenter engaged in one of four different postures or behaviours (head and body towards the subject-'Control', head to the side, head and body away from the subject, or leaving the room) before delivering a reward. We found that the level of subjects' active anticipatory behaviour was highest in the control condition and decreased with a decreasing level of attention paid to the subject by the experimenter. Additionally, goats 'stared' (i.e. stood alert) at the experimental set-up for significantly more time when the experimenter was present but paid less attention to the subject ('Head' and 'Back' condition) than in the 'Control' and 'Out' conditions. In a second experiment, the experimenter provided different human-given cues that indicated the location of a hidden food reward in a two-way object choice task. Goats were able to use both 'Touch' and 'Point' cues to infer the correct location of the reward but did not perform above the level expected by chance in the 'Head only' condition. We conclude that goats are able to differentiate among different body postures of a human, including head orientation; however, despite their success at using multiple physical human cues, they fail to spontaneously use human head direction as a cue in a food-related context.

  11. MRI with DWI for the Detection of Posttreatment Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Why Morphologic MRI Criteria Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ailianou, A; Mundada, P; De Perrot, T; Pusztaszieri, M; Poletti, P-A; Becker, M

    2018-04-01

    Although diffusion-weighted imaging combined with morphologic MRI (DWIMRI) is used to detect posttreatment recurrent and second primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, the diagnostic criteria used so far have not been clarified. We hypothesized that precise MRI criteria based on signal intensity patterns on T2 and contrast-enhanced T1 complement DWI and therefore improve the diagnostic performance of DWIMRI. We analyzed 1.5T MRI examinations of 100 consecutive patients treated with radiation therapy with or without additional surgery for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. MRI examinations included morphologic sequences and DWI ( b =0 and b =1000 s/mm 2 ). Histology and follow-up served as the standard of reference. Two experienced readers, blinded to clinical/histologic/follow-up data, evaluated images according to clearly defined criteria for the diagnosis of recurrent head and neck squamous cell carcinoma/second primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma occurring after treatment, post-radiation therapy inflammatory edema, and late fibrosis. DWI analysis included qualitative (visual) and quantitative evaluation with an ADC threshold. Recurrent head and neck squamous cell carcinoma/second primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma occurring after treatment was present in 36 patients, whereas 64 patients had post-radiation therapy lesions only. The Cohen κ for differentiating tumor from post-radiation therapy lesions with MRI and qualitative DWIMRI was 0.822 and 0.881, respectively. Mean ADCmean in recurrent head and neck squamous cell carcinoma/second primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma occurring after treatment (1.097 ± 0.295 × 10 -3 mm 2 /s) was significantly lower ( P .05). Although ADCs were similar in tumors and late fibrosis, morphologic MRI criteria facilitated distinction between the 2 conditions. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and positive and negative likelihood ratios (95% CI) of

  12. A Quest for Initiating Cells of Head and Neck Cancer and Their Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Chao; Köberle, Beate; Kaufmann, Andreas M.; Albers, Andreas E.

    2010-01-01

    The biology of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) and other cancers have been related to cancer stem-like cells (CSC). Specific markers, which vary considerably depending on tumor type or tissue of origin, characterize CSC. CSC are cancer initiating, sustaining and mostly quiescent. Compared to bulk tumors, CSC are less sensitive to chemo- and radiotherapy and may have low immunogenicity. Therapeutic targeting of CSC may improve clinical outcome. HNSCC has two main etiologies: human papillomavirus, a virus infecting epithelial stem cells, and tobacco and alcohol abuse. Here, current knowledge of HNSCC-CSC biology is reviewed and parallels to CSC of other origin are drawn where necessary for a comprehensive picture

  13. Biology and immunology of cancer stem(-like) cells in head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xu; Ma, Chenming; Nie, Xiaobo; Lu, Jianxin; Lenarz, Minoo; Kaufmann, Andreas M; Albers, Andreas E

    2015-09-01

    Immunological approaches against tumors including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) have been investigated for about 50 years. Such immunotherapeutic treatments are still not sufficiently effective for therapy of HNSCC. Despite the existence of immunosurveillance tumor cells may escape from the host immune system by a variety of mechanisms. Recent findings have indicated that cancer stem(-like) cells (CSCs) in HNSCC have the ability to reconstitute the heterogeneity of the bulk tumor and contribute to immunosuppression and resistance to current therapies. With regard to the CSC model, future immunotherapy possibly in combination with other modes of treatment should target this subpopulation specifically to reduce local recurrence and metastasis. In this review, we will summarize recent research findings on immunological features of CSCs and the potential of immune targeting of CSCs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. MicroRNAs in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSCC) and Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiiba, Masashi; Uzawa, Katsuhiro; Tanzawa, Hideki

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, noncoding RNAs which regulate cell differentiation, proliferation, development, cell cycle, and apoptosis. Expression profiling of miRNAs has been performed and the data show that some miRNAs are upregulated or downregulated in cancer. Several studies suggest that the expression profiles of miRNAs are associated with clinical outcomes. However, the set of miRNAs with altered expressing differs depending on the type of cancer, suggesting that it is important to understand which miRNAs are related to which cancers. Therefore, this review aimed to discuss potentially crucial miRNAs in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC)

  15. Hepatitis C virus cell-cell transmission and resistance to direct-acting antiviral agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Fei; Fofana, Isabel; Heydmann, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is transmitted between hepatocytes via classical cell entry but also uses direct cell-cell transfer to infect neighboring hepatocytes. Viral cell-cell transmission has been shown to play an important role in viral persistence allowing evasion from neutralizing antibodies....... In contrast, the role of HCV cell-cell transmission for antiviral resistance is unknown. Aiming to address this question we investigated the phenotype of HCV strains exhibiting resistance to direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) in state-of-the-art model systems for cell-cell transmission and spread. Using HCV...... genotype 2 as a model virus, we show that cell-cell transmission is the main route of viral spread of DAA-resistant HCV. Cell-cell transmission of DAA-resistant viruses results in viral persistence and thus hampers viral eradication. We also show that blocking cell-cell transmission using host...

  16. Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck Region: An Analysis of 171 Cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janjua, O. S.; Qureshi, S. M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To analyze the pattern of presentation of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and margin status for excised specimens in the head and neck region. Study Design. Retrospective cross-sectional. Duration of Study. January 2009 to December 2011. Methodology. The database of the pathology department was searched to identify records of all malignant skin tumors that underwent standard excision with margins. Out of these records, tumors with a diagnosis of BCC in the head and neck region were retrieved and separated. Age, gender, anatomic location, pattern of tumor, and margin status were noted. Results. A total of 171 cases of BCC from various sites of head and neck were retrieved. Male to female ratio was 1.4?:?1. The age ranged from 22 to 90 years. Seventy-six cases presented on right side, 79 on left, and 16 were in the midline. Most common anatomical site was the nose followed by the cheek. Nodular lesions were the most common (46.2%) followed by pigmented variety (18.7%). Margins were clear in 77 (45.1%) cases, involved in 86 (50.2%) cases, and close in 8 (4.7%) cases. Conclusion. Nose was the most common site followed by the cheek. Nodular and pigmented varieties were the most frequent and margins were involved in more than fifty percent of the cases

  17. Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck Region: An Analysis of 171 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Sefvan Janjua

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To analyze the pattern of presentation of basal cell carcinoma (BCC and margin status for excised specimens in the head and neck region. Study Design. Retrospective cross-sectional. Duration of Study. January 2009 to December 2011. Methodology. The database of the pathology department was searched to identify records of all malignant skin tumors that underwent standard excision with margins. Out of these records, tumors with a diagnosis of BCC in the head and neck region were retrieved and separated. Age, gender, anatomic location, pattern of tumor, and margin status were noted. Results. A total of 171 cases of BCC from various sites of head and neck were retrieved. Male to female ratio was 1.4 : 1. The age ranged from 22 to 90 years. Seventy-six cases presented on right side, 79 on left, and 16 were in the midline. Most common anatomical site was the nose followed by the cheek. Nodular lesions were the most common (46.2% followed by pigmented variety (18.7%. Margins were clear in 77 (45.1% cases, involved in 86 (50.2% cases, and close in 8 (4.7% cases. Conclusion. Nose was the most common site followed by the cheek. Nodular and pigmented varieties were the most frequent and margins were involved in more than fifty percent of the cases.

  18. Chemoradiotherapy in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: focus on targeted therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozec, A.; Thariat, J.; Bensadoun, R.J.; Milano, G.

    2008-01-01

    Radiotherapy is an essential treatment for many patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Its association with molecular targeted therapies represents a real progress. Among the recent advances in the molecular targeted therapy of cancer, the applications centred on E.G.F.R. are currently the most promising and the most advanced at clinical level. Considering the set of therapeutic tools targeting E.G.F.R., there are at present two well-identified emerging categories of drugs with monoclonal antibodies, on the one hand, and tyrosine kinase inhibitors, on the other. In many preclinical studies, the combination of anti-E.G.F.R. drugs with irradiation has led to additive or supra-additive cytotoxic effects. Furthermore, anti-angiogenic agents have shown promising results in association with anti-E.G.F.R. drugs and radiotherapy. This research effort has recently produced encouraging clinical results in advanced head and neck cancer with combination of cetuximab (an anti-E.G.F.R. monoclonal antibody) with irradiation with a significant impact on patient survival. Active and efficient clinical research is currently ongoing to determine the place of molecular targeted therapies in the treatment of head and neck cancer, particularly in association with radiotherapy. (authors)

  19. Impact of total radiotherapy dose on survival for head and neck Merkel cell carcinoma after resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sagar A; Qureshi, Muhammad M; Mak, Kimberley S; Sahni, Debjani; Giacalone, Nicholas J; Ezzat, Waleed; Jalisi, Scharukh; Truong, Minh Tam

    2017-07-01

    Head and neck Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is commonly treated with surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for high-risk features. The optimal radiation dose is unknown. One thousand six hundred twenty-five eligible patients with head and neck MCC were identified in the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB). Radiation dose was divided into 3 groups: 30 to 55-70 Gy. Cox regression was used to compare overall survival (OS) between groups, accounting for age, sex, stage, surgery type, margin status, comorbidities, and use of chemotherapy. With a median follow-up of 33.5 months, 3-year OS was 48.9%, 70.3%, and 58.7% for 30 to 55-70 Gy, respectively (P 55-70 Gy (adjusted HR 1.21; 95% CI 1.0-1.46; P = .06) were associated with worse survival. Adjuvant radiation doses within 50-55 Gy may be optimal for head and neck MCC. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Definitive chemoradiotherapy with carboplatin for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasaka, Misako; Zaki, Mark; Issa, Majd; Kim, Harold; Abrams, Judith; Sukari, Ammar

    2017-10-01

    Definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is considered the standard of care for organ preservation and is the only potentially curative therapy for surgically unresectable patients with stage III to IVb locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. In patients with high risks for adverse events utilizing cisplatin, carboplatin has been empirically substituted. The objective of this study was to estimate the locoregional control rate, progression-free survival, overall survival, and adverse events in locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck patients treated with CRT utilizing carboplatin. A retrospective single-arm analysis. Data on consecutive patients who fit the eligibility criteria were collected. Eligible patients were treated with 70 Gy of radiation therapy and at least two cycles of carboplatin (area of curve [AUC] of 5 between January 2007 to December 2013. Fifty-four patients were identified. Overall locoregional control rate was 50% (95% confidence interval [CI] 37%-63%). Median progression-free and overall survival were 21 (CI 11-33) and 40 (CI 33-NA) months, respectively. One-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival were 81% (CI 67%-89%), 59% (CI 41%-73%), and 42% (CI 22%-61%), respectively. Stage III/IVa patients (n = 45) had a median survival of 62 (CI 37-NA months) and 3 years of 71% (CI 53%-84%), whereas stage IVb (n = 9) had a median survival of 31 (CI 4-NA) months and none survived to 3 years. Definitive CRT with carboplatin for locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck was well tolerated and demonstrated comparable results to CRT with cisplatin. 4. Laryngoscope, 127:2260-2264, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  1. The JPL Direct Methanol Liquid-feed PEM Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpert, G.; Surampudi, S.

    1994-01-01

    Recently, there has been a breakthrough in fuel cell technology in the Energy Storage Systems Group at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory with the develpment of a direct methanol, liquid-feed, solid polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell... The methanol liquid-feed, solid polymer electrolyte (PEM) design has numerous system level advantages over the gas-feed design. These include:...

  2. On direct and indirect methanol fuel cells for transportation applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottesfield, S.

    1996-04-01

    Research on direct oxidation methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) and polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) is discussed. Systems considered for transportation applications are addressed. The use of platinum/ruthenium anode electrocatalysts and platinum cathode electrocatalysts in polymer electrolyte DMFCs has resulted in significant performance enhancements.

  3. Reolysin and Histone Deacetylase Inhibition in the Treatment of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alena C. Jaime-Ramirez

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic viruses (OVs are emerging as powerful anti-cancer agents and are currently being tested for their safety and efficacy in patients. Reovirus (Reolysin, a naturally occurring non-pathogenic, double-stranded RNA virus, has natural oncolytic activity and is being tested in phase I–III clinical trials in a variety of tumor types. With its recent US Food and Drug Administration (FDA orphan drug designation for several tumor types, Reolysin is a potential therapeutic agent for various cancers, including head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs, which have a 5-year survival of ∼55%. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis comprise a structurally diverse class of compounds with targeted anti-cancer effects. The first FDA-approved HDACi, vorinostat (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid [SAHA], is currently being tested in patients with head and neck cancer. Recent findings indicate that HDAC inhibition in myeloma cells results in the upregulation of the Reolysin entry receptor, junctional adhesion molecule 1 (JAM-1, facilitating reovirus infection and tumor cell killing both in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we tested the anti-tumor efficacy of HDAC inhibitors AR-42 or SAHA in conjunction with Reolysin in HNSCCs. While HDAC inhibition increased JAM-1 and reovirus entry, the impact of this combination therapy was tested on the development of anti-tumor immune responses.

  4. Elimination of head and neck cancer initiating cells through targeting glucose regulated protein78 signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Chih-Yang

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC is a highly lethal cancer that contains cellular and functional heterogeneity. Previously, we enriched a subpopulation of highly tumorigenic head and neck cancer initiating cells (HN-CICs from HNSCC. However, the molecular mechanisms by which to govern the characteristics of HN-CICs remain unclear. GRP78, a stress-inducible endoplasmic reticulum chaperone, has been reported to play a crucial role in the maintenance of embryonic stem cells, but the role of GRP78 in CICs has not been elucidated. Results Initially, we recognized GRP78 as a putative candidate on mediating the stemness and tumorigenic properties of HN-CICs by differential systemic analyses. Subsequently, cells with GRP78 anchored at the plasma membrane (memGRP78+ exerted cancer stemness properties of self-renewal, differentiation and radioresistance. Of note, xenotransplantation assay indicated merely 100 memGRP78+ HNSCCs resulted in tumor growth. Moreover, knockdown of GRP78 significantly reduced the self-renewal ability, side population cells and expression of stemness genes, but inversely promoted cell differentiation and apoptosis in HN-CICs. Targeting GRP78 also lessened tumorigenicity of HN-CICs both in vitro and in vivo. Clinically, co-expression of GRP78 and Nanog predicted the worse survival prognosis of HNSCC patients by immunohistochemical analyses. Finally, depletion of GRP78 in HN-CICs induced the expression of Bax, Caspase 3, and PTEN. Conclusions In summary, memGRP78 should be a novel surface marker for isolation of HN-CICs, and targeting GRP78 signaling might be a potential therapeutic strategy for HNSCC through eliminating HN-CICs.

  5. Lymph node metastases from squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartelink, H.

    1980-01-01

    A retrospective and a prospective study are described concerning the results of treatment for neck node metastases. The metastases came from squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck region. The possibility of cure by radiotherapy is considered in detail. It appeared that the results of radiotherapy depend on the site of the primary tumour and on its occasional recurrence. From a dose-effect curve and a dose-complication curve it could be estimated that the optimal dose of irradiation was 2000 rets (72 Gray in 7 weeks). (Auth.)

  6. Severe anemia is associated with poor tumor oxygenation in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, Axel; Stadler, Peter; Lavey, Robert S.; Haensgen, Gabriele; Kuhnt, Thomas; Lautenschlaeger, Christine; Feldmann, Horst Juergen; Molls, Michael; Dunst, Juergen

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the relationship between tumor oxygenation and the blood hemoglobin (Hb) concentration in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Methods and Materials: A total of 133 patients with SCCHN underwent pretreatment polarographic pO 2 measurements of their tumors. In 66 patients measurements were also made in sternocleidomastoid muscles. The patients were divided into three groups according to their Hb concentration--severe anemia (Hb 2 . Conclusion: Our data suggest that a low Hb concentration and cigarette smoking contribute to inadequate oxygenation of SCCHN and thus for increased radioresistance. Consequently, Hb correction and abstinence from smoking may significantly improve tumor oxygenation

  7. Prognostic value of FDG PET/CT in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dequanter D

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available D Dequanter,1,2 M Shahla,2 C Aubert,2 Y Deniz,2 P Lothaire2 1Department of Oncology, Laboratory of Experimental Radiotherapy, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium; 2Head and Neck Department, Hôpital André Vésale, CHU de Charleroi, Montigny le Tilleul, Belgium Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT to identify the presence of cervical lymph nodes metastases and extracapsular spread with histologic correlations in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.Methods: The medical records of 54 patients who underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma before surgery were reviewed. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis was performed to differentiate patients with cervical lymph node metastasis from those without lymph node metastasis. The same statistical analysis was done to differentiate cervical lymph nodes with extracapsular spread from those without extracapsular spread.Results: Metastatic disease was diagnosed histologically in 49% (26 of 54 of the patients. Extracapsular spread was present in ten of the 54 patients (19%. When ROC curve analysis and maximum standardized uptake (SUVmax values were used to detect cervical lymph node metastasis, the area under the ROC curve was 0.96 and the optimal cutoff value for SUVmax was 4.05 based on ROC curve analysis. The sensitivity and specificity of SUVmax for the detection of cervical lymph node metastasis using this cutoff point were 92% and 88%, respectively. When ROC curve analysis and SUVmax values were used in order to detect extracapsular spread, the area under the ROC curve was 0.86, and the optimal cutoff value for SUVmax was 4.15 based on ROC curve analysis. Using this cutoff value, the sensitivity and specificity of SUVmax for the detection of extracapsular spread were 83% and 88%, respectively.Conclusion: In our study, a median 18F-FDG PET/CT SUVmax cutoff

  8. Docetaxel in the treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Rapidis

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Alexander Rapidis1, Nicholas Sarlis2, Jean-Louis Lefebvre3, Merrill Kies41Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, Greek Anticancer Institute, Saint Savvas Hospital, Athens, Greece; 2Department of Medical Affairs, Oncology – US Sanofi-Aventis, Bridgewater, NJ, USA; 3Head and Neck Department, Centre Régional de Lutte Contre le Cancer de Lille, Lille, France; 4Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medical Oncology, The University of Texas – M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USAAbstract: Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN presents at a locally advanced (LA stage in many patients. Chemotherapy has been successfully integrated into first-line treatment programs, either during or prior to radiotherapy (RT – the cornerstone modality for local disease control of inoperable disease or when organ preservation is desired. Concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CCRT provides an absolute survival benefit when compared with other types of locoregional therapy that exclude chemotherapy. Nonetheless, distant metastases still represent the most common cause of treatment failure. Consequently, adding induction chemotherapy (ICT to definitive non-surgical local therapies with a curative intent has been vigorously explored in LA SCCHN. Recently, it has been shown that ICT using the combination of the taxane docetaxel with cisplatin–5-fluorouracil provides significant survival benefit over cisplatin–5-FU, when used before either definitive RT (TAX323 trial or carboplatin-based CCRT (TAX324 trial. Docetaxel is also being investigated in metastatic or recurrent (M/R disease, with promising initial results. It is very likely that the future management strategies of SCCHN will incorporate biologic agents as an add-on to docetaxel-containing schemas, administered either as ICT prior to CCRT in the LA setting or for the management of M/R disease.Keywords: chemoradiotherapy, chemotherapy, docetaxel, head and neck carcinoma, induction, locally

  9. Modeling and Simulation of the Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohr, M.; Narayanan, S. R.; Halpert, G.

    1996-01-01

    From intro.: The direct methanol liquid feed fuel cell uses aqueous solutions of methanol as fuel and oxygen or air as the oxidant and uses an ionically conducting polymer membrane such as Nafion(sup r)117 and the electrolyte. This type of direct oxidation cell is fuel versatile and offers significant advantages in terms of simplicity of design and operation...The present study focuses on the results of a phenomenological model based on current understanding of the various processed operating in these cells.

  10. The impact of direct aperture optimization on plan quality and efficiency in complex head and neck IMRT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabatino Marcello

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conventional step&shoot intensity modulated radio therapy (IMRT approaches potentially lead to treatment plans with high numbers of segments and monitor units (MU and, therefore, could be time consuming at the linear accelerator. Direct optimization methods are able to reduce the complexity without degrading the quality of the plan. The aim of this study is the evaluation of different IMRT approaches at standardized conditions for head and neck tumors. Method For 27 patients with carcinomas in the head and neck region a planning study with a 2-step-IMRT system (KonRad, a direct optimization system (Panther DAO and a mixture of both approaches (MasterPlan DSS was created. In order to avoid different prescription doses for boost volumes a simple standardization was realized. The dose was downscaled to 50 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV which included the primary tumor as well as the bilateral lymphatic drainage (cervical and supraclavicular. Dose restrictions for the organs at risk (OAR were downscaled to this prescription from high dose concepts up to 72 Gy. Those limits were defined as planning objectives while reaching definable PTV coverage with a standardized field setup. The parameters were evaluated from the corresponding dose volume histogram (DVH. Special attention was paid to the efficiency of the method, measured by means of calculated MU and required segments. Statistical tests of significance were applied to quantify the differences between the evaluated systems. Results PTV coverage for all systems in terms of V90% and V95% fell short of the requested 100% and 95%, respectively, but were still acceptable (range: 98.7% to 99.1% and 94.2% to 94.7%. Overall for OAR sparing and the burden of healthy tissue with low doses no technique was superior for all evaluated parameters. Differences were found for the number of segments where the direct optimization systems generated less segments. Lowest average numbers of

  11. The impact of direct aperture optimization on plan quality and efficiency in complex head and neck IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabatino, Marcello; Kretschmer, Matthias; Zink, Klemens; Würschmidt, Florian

    2012-01-01

    Conventional step&shoot intensity modulated radio therapy (IMRT) approaches potentially lead to treatment plans with high numbers of segments and monitor units (MU) and, therefore, could be time consuming at the linear accelerator. Direct optimization methods are able to reduce the complexity without degrading the quality of the plan. The aim of this study is the evaluation of different IMRT approaches at standardized conditions for head and neck tumors. For 27 patients with carcinomas in the head and neck region a planning study with a 2-step-IMRT system (KonRad), a direct optimization system (Panther DAO) and a mixture of both approaches (MasterPlan DSS) was created. In order to avoid different prescription doses for boost volumes a simple standardization was realized. The dose was downscaled to 50 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV) which included the primary tumor as well as the bilateral lymphatic drainage (cervical and supraclavicular). Dose restrictions for the organs at risk (OAR) were downscaled to this prescription from high dose concepts up to 72 Gy. Those limits were defined as planning objectives while reaching definable PTV coverage with a standardized field setup. The parameters were evaluated from the corresponding dose volume histogram (DVH). Special attention was paid to the efficiency of the method, measured by means of calculated MU and required segments. Statistical tests of significance were applied to quantify the differences between the evaluated systems. PTV coverage for all systems in terms of V 90% and V 95% fell short of the requested 100% and 95%, respectively, but were still acceptable (range: 98.7% to 99.1% and 94.2% to 94.7%). Overall for OAR sparing and the burden of healthy tissue with low doses no technique was superior for all evaluated parameters. Differences were found for the number of segments where the direct optimization systems generated less segments. Lowest average numbers of MU were 308 by Panther DAO calculated for

  12. Extracellular matrix components direct porcine muscle stem cell behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilschut, Karlijn J.; Haagsman, Henk P.; Roelen, Bernard A.J.

    2010-01-01

    In muscle tissue, extracellular matrix proteins, together with the vasculature system, muscle-residence cells and muscle fibers, create the niche for muscle stem cells. The niche is important in controlling proliferation and directing differentiation of muscle stem cells to sustain muscle tissue. Mimicking the extracellular muscle environment improves tools exploring the behavior of primary muscle cells. Optimizing cell culture conditions to maintain muscle commitment is important in stem cell-based studies concerning toxicology screening, ex vivo skeletal muscle tissue engineering and in the enhancement of clinical efficiency. We used the muscle extracellular matrix proteins collagen type I, fibronectin, laminin, and also gelatin and Matrigel as surface coatings of tissue culture plastic to resemble the muscle extracellular matrix. Several important factors that determine myogenic commitment of the primary muscle cells were characterized by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and immunofluorescence. Adhesion of high PAX7 expressing satellite cells was improved if the cells were cultured on fibronectin or laminin coatings. Cells cultured on Matrigel and laminin coatings showed dominant integrin expression levels and exhibited an activated Wnt pathway. Under these conditions both stem cell proliferation and myogenic differentiation capacity were superior if compared to cells cultured on collagen type I, fibronectin and gelatin. In conclusion, Matrigel and laminin are the preferred coatings to sustain the proliferation and myogenic differentiation capacity of the primary porcine muscle stem cells, when cells are removed from their natural environment for in vitro culture.

  13. Extracellular matrix components direct porcine muscle stem cell behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilschut, Karlijn J. [Department of Farm Animal Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Yalelaan 104, 3584 CM, Utrecht (Netherlands); Haagsman, Henk P. [Department of Infectious Diseases and Immunology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Yalelaan 1, 3584 CL, Utrecht (Netherlands); Roelen, Bernard A.J., E-mail: b.a.j.roelen@uu.nl [Department of Farm Animal Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Yalelaan 104, 3584 CM, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2010-02-01

    In muscle tissue, extracellular matrix proteins, together with the vasculature system, muscle-residence cells and muscle fibers, create the niche for muscle stem cells. The niche is important in controlling proliferation and directing differentiation of muscle stem cells to sustain muscle tissue. Mimicking the extracellular muscle environment improves tools exploring the behavior of primary muscle cells. Optimizing cell culture conditions to maintain muscle commitment is important in stem cell-based studies concerning toxicology screening, ex vivo skeletal muscle tissue engineering and in the enhancement of clinical efficiency. We used the muscle extracellular matrix proteins collagen type I, fibronectin, laminin, and also gelatin and Matrigel as surface coatings of tissue culture plastic to resemble the muscle extracellular matrix. Several important factors that determine myogenic commitment of the primary muscle cells were characterized by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and immunofluorescence. Adhesion of high PAX7 expressing satellite cells was improved if the cells were cultured on fibronectin or laminin coatings. Cells cultured on Matrigel and laminin coatings showed dominant integrin expression levels and exhibited an activated Wnt pathway. Under these conditions both stem cell proliferation and myogenic differentiation capacity were superior if compared to cells cultured on collagen type I, fibronectin and gelatin. In conclusion, Matrigel and laminin are the preferred coatings to sustain the proliferation and myogenic differentiation capacity of the primary porcine muscle stem cells, when cells are removed from their natural environment for in vitro culture.

  14. Impact of uncertain head tissue conductivity in the optimization of transcranial direct current stimulation for an auditory target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Christian; Wagner, Sven; Burger, Martin; van Rienen, Ursula; Wolters, Carsten H.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive brain stimulation technique to modify neural excitability. Using multi-array tDCS, we investigate the influence of inter-individually varying head tissue conductivity profiles on optimal electrode configurations for an auditory cortex stimulation. Approach. In order to quantify the uncertainty of the optimal electrode configurations, multi-variate generalized polynomial chaos expansions of the model solutions are used based on uncertain conductivity profiles of the compartments skin, skull, gray matter, and white matter. Stochastic measures, probability density functions, and sensitivity of the quantities of interest are investigated for each electrode and the current density at the target with the resulting stimulation protocols visualized on the head surface. Main results. We demonstrate that the optimized stimulation protocols are only comprised of a few active electrodes, with tolerable deviations in the stimulation amplitude of the anode. However, large deviations in the order of the uncertainty in the conductivity profiles could be noted in the stimulation protocol of the compensating cathodes. Regarding these main stimulation electrodes, the stimulation protocol was most sensitive to uncertainty in skull conductivity. Finally, the probability that the current density amplitude in the auditory cortex target region is supra-threshold was below 50%. Significance. The results suggest that an uncertain conductivity profile in computational models of tDCS can have a substantial influence on the prediction of optimal stimulation protocols for stimulation of the auditory cortex. The investigations carried out in this study present a possibility to predict the probability of providing a therapeutic effect with an optimized electrode system for future auditory clinical and experimental procedures of tDCS applications.

  15. Macroscopic Modeling of Transport Phenomena in Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anders Christian

    An increasing need for energy efficiency and high energy density has sparked a growing interest in direct methanol fuel cells for portable power applications. This type of fuel cell directly generates electricity from a fuel mixture consisting of methanol and water. Although this technology...... surpasses batteries in important areas, fundamental research is still required to improve durability and performance. Particularly the transport of methanol and water within the cell structure is difficult to study in-situ. A demand therefore exist for the fundamental development of mathematical models...... for studying their transport. In this PhD dissertation the macroscopic transport phenomena governing direct methanol fuel cell operation are analyzed, discussed and modeled using the two-fluid approach in the computational fluid dynamics framework of CFX 14. The overall objective of this work is to extend...

  16. Selective blockade of B7-H3 enhances antitumour immune activity by reducing immature myeloid cells in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Liang; Fan, Teng-Fei; Wu, Lei; Yu, Guang-Tao; Deng, Wei-Wei; Chen, Lei; Bu, Lin-Lin; Ma, Si-Rui; Liu, Bing; Bian, Yansong; Kulkarni, Ashok B; Zhang, Wen-Feng; Sun, Zhi-Jun

    2017-09-01

    Immature myeloid cells including myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and tumour-associated macrophages (TAMs) promote tumour growth and metastasis by facilitating tumour transformation and angiogenesis, as well as by suppressing antitumour effector immune responses. Therefore, strategies designed to reduce MDSCs and TAMs accumulation and their activities are potentially valuable therapeutic goals. In this study, we show that negative immune checkpoint molecule B7-H3 is significantly overexpressed in human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) specimen as compared with normal oral mucosa. Using immunocompetent transgenic HNSCC models, we observed that targeting inhibition of B7-H3 reduced tumour size. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that targeting inhibition of B7-H3 increases antitumour immune response by decreasing immunosuppressive cells and promoting cytotoxic T cell activation in both tumour microenvironment and macroenvironment. Our study provides direct in vivo evidence for a rationale for B7-H3 blockade as a future therapeutic strategy to treat patients with HNSCC. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  17. Treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in elderly patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Keigo; Asato, Ryo; Tsuji, Jun; Kanda, Tomoko; Ushiro, Kohji; Watanabe, Yoshiki; Mori, Yusuke

    2010-01-01

    The object of this study was to clarify the characteristics of treatment for elderly head and neck squamous cell cancer patients. We conducted a chart review of 177 head and neck squamous cell cancer patients who had been treated at Kyoto Medical Center, from 2005 through 2009. All the collected data were analyzed to compare the clinical features and the treatment outcomes between the younger group ( or =75, EG, n=46). Male to female ratio was lower in EG (5.6:1 vs. 1.7:1, p<0.01). C urative treatment was performed in most of the patients with early disease (stage I-II) in both groups (96.7% vs. 90.5%), while the ratio of curative treatment was significantly lower in EG patients with advanced stage disease (stage III-IV) (92.3% vs. 52.0%, p<0.01). There was no significant difference in the frequency of adopted treatment modality (surgery or radiotherapy) between YG and EG. Adjuvant chemotherapy or postoperative radiotherapy was avoided in most of EG patients. Local complication rates after major surgery for advanced cases were similar in both groups (30.8% vs. 27.3%), while a higher systemic complication rate was observed in EG (0% vs. 27.3%). After curative treatment, there was no difference in disease specific three-year survival rates between YG and EG (100% vs. 100% in early stage disease, 65.2% vs. 60.6% in advanced disease, Kaplan-Meier curve). Although treatment of elderly patients with head and neck cancer can be inhibited by poor performance status and/or concomitant diseases, clinical results after curative treatment are comparable to those of younger patients. (author)

  18. Chemovirotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma with EGFR-targeted and CD/UPRT-armed oncolytic measles virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaoui, K; Bossow, S; Grossardt, C; Leber, M F; Springfeld, C; Plinkert, P K; Kalle, C von; Ungerechts, G

    2012-03-01

    First-line treatment of recurrent and/or refractory head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is based on platinum, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and the monoclonal antiEGFR antibody cetuximab. However, in most cases this chemoimmunotherapy does not cure the disease, and more than 50% of HNSCC patients are dying because of local recurrence of the tumors. In the majority of cases, HNSCC overexpress the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and its presence is associated with a poor outcome. In this study, we engineered an EGFR-targeted oncolytic measles virus (MV), armed with the bifunctional enzyme cytosine deaminase/uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (CD/UPRT). CD/UPRT converts 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) into the chemotherapeutic 5-FU, a mainstay of HNSCC chemotherapy. This virus efficiently replicates in and lyses primary HNSCC cells in vitro. Arming with CD/UPRT mediates efficient prodrug activation with high bystander killing of non-infected tumor cells. In mice bearing primary HNSCC xenografts, intratumoral administration of MV-antiEGFR resulted in statistically significant tumor growth delay and prolongation of survival. Importantly, combination with 5-FC is superior to virus-only treatment leading to significant tumor growth inhibition. Thus, chemovirotherapy with EGFR-targeted and CD/UPRT-armed MV is highly efficacious in preclinical settings with direct translational implications for a planned Phase I clinical trial of MV for locoregional treatment of HNSCC.

  19. Directional Cell Migration in Response to Repeated Substratum Stretching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okimura, Chika; Iwadate, Yoshiaki

    2017-10-01

    Crawling migration plays an essential role in a variety of biological phenomena, including development, wound healing, and immune system function. Migration properties such as anterior-posterior polarity, directionality, and velocity are regulated not only by the reception of a chemoattractant but also by sensing mechanical inputs from the external environment. In this review, we describe the mechanical response of migrating cells, particularly under repeated stretching of the elastic substratum, highlighting the fact that there appear to be two independent mechanosensing systems that generate the polarity needed for migration. Cells that have no stress fibers, such as Dictyostelium cells and neutrophil-like differentiated HL-60 cells, migrate perpendicular to the stretching direction via myosin II localization. Cells that do possess stress fibers, however, such as fish keratocytes, migrate parallel to the stretching via a stress-fiber-dependent process.

  20. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Induce Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition in Colon Cancer Cells through Direct Cell-to-Cell Contact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidehiko Takigawa

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that in an orthotopic nude mouse model of human colon cancer, bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs migrated to the tumor stroma and promoted tumor growth and metastasis. Here, we evaluated the proliferation and migration ability of cancer cells cocultured with MSCs to elucidate the mechanism of interaction between cancer cells and MSCs. Proliferation and migration of cancer cells increased following direct coculture with MSCs but not following indirect coculture. Thus, we hypothesized that direct contact between cancer cells and MSCs was important. We performed a microarray analysis of gene expression in KM12SM colon cancer cells directly cocultured with MSCs. Expression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT–related genes such as fibronectin (FN, SPARC, and galectin 1 was increased by direct coculture with MSCs. We also confirmed the upregulation of these genes with real-time polymerase chain reaction. Gene expression was not elevated in cancer cells indirectly cocultured with MSCs. Among the EMT-related genes upregulated by direct coculture with MSCs, we examined the immune localization of FN, a well-known EMT marker. In coculture assay in chamber slides, expression of FN was seen only at the edges of cancer clusters where cancer cells directly contacted MSCs. FN expression in cancer cells increased at the tumor periphery and invasive edge in orthotopic nude mouse tumors and human colon cancer tissues. These results suggest that MSCs induce EMT in colon cancer cells via direct cell-to-cell contact and may play an important role in colon cancer metastasis.

  1. Effect of bleomycin-radiotherapy combination in management of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, P.M.; Shukla, S.N.; Patel, K.M.; Patel, N.L.; Baboo, H.A.; Patel, D.D.

    1981-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma were treated with bleomycin-radiotherapy protocol, 15 mg bleomycin I.V. on alternate days followed by radiation within half an hour. The average total dose of bleomycin was 150 mg. Radiotherapy was given daily. Two patients were lost to follow-up very early in the course of the treatment and were removed from the study for statistical purposes. Thirty-six patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma who were treated with radiotherapy alone during the same period were used as controls. The patients were followed for two years. The incidence of response rate did not differ significantly between regimens; however, the incidence of side effects with bleomycin-radiotherapy, 82.61%, is significantly more than that of radiotherapy alone (52.78%). Median survial time (MST) of those responding to bleomycin-radiotherapy protocol was seven months and 12 days and for radiotherapy responders was six months. Neither the response rate nor the MST improve significantly after pretreatment with bleomycin. On the contrary, the incidence of side effects increased significantly

  2. MR imaging in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck with no palpable lymph nodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yucel, T.; Sennaroglu, L.; Kaya, S.; Saatci, I.; Cekirge, S.; Aydingoz, U.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of MR imaging in the detection of lymph node metastasis in patients with no palpable lymph nodes ('N 0 neck') who have squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck region. Material and Methods: MR neck imagings in 18 patients who underwent neck dissection (bilaterally in 2) for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck region were examined preoperatively for the purpose of detecting lymph node metastases. The imaging features taken into consideration were: size (cutoff point 10 mm), grouping, presence of central necrosis, and appearance of extracapsular spread. The MR examinations comprised spin-echo T1- and T2-weighted sequences. The MR findings were compared with those of surgery and histopathological examination. Results: MR suggested metastatic lymph node involvement in 5 necks. In 2 of these, central necrosis was seen in the enlarged lymph nodes. In a third, a grouping of the lymph nodes was noted. Extracapsular spread was not present. Histopathological examination revealed metastatic lymph nodes in 7 of 20 necks, the rate of clinically occult disease being 35%, and 4 of then had been accurately graded by MR. There was one false-positive MR examination. The MR sensitivity was 57.1% and specificity 92.3%. Conclusion: MR may reveal metastatic lymph nodes in patients with no clinical evidence of metastasis. However, conventional MR techniques are not always sufficient for decision-making on surgery in cases of 'N 0 neck'. (orig.)

  3. Sialic acids in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Bronikowska

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Altered glycosylation is a universal characteristic of cancer cells, and various types of glycan structures are well‑known markers of tumor progression and invasion. The present article discusses this aspect of the role of sialic acid, biosynthesis of sialylglycoconjugates and the genetic basis of its disorder, as well as the effects and the correlation between altered sialylation and clinical prognosis in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC.Only a few studies concerning the level of sialic acid in head and neck tumors have been conducted so far. The conclusions of the published reports dedicated to that problem confirm the presence of elevated levels of total sialic acid in these tumors. The authors do not always agree with the level of free or associated form of sialic acid correlated with tumor size, severity of the condition, and lymph nodes. Comparing the progress that has been made in the diagnosis and treatment of other cancers thanks to extensive work on the role of sialic acids, we come to the conclusion that only further detailed studies of this subject in relation to HNSCC are able to answer the question whether the extent of glycoforms of sialic acid may act as a tumor marker or target of immunotherapy.

  4. Parotid metastasis--an independent prognostic factor for head and neck cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ch'ng, S; Maitra, A; Lea, R; Brasch, H; Tan, S T

    2006-01-01

    Metastatic parotid cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the most common parotid gland malignancy in New Zealand and Australia. The current AJCC TNM staging system does not account for the extent of nodal metastasis. A staging system that separates parotid (P stage) from neck disease (N stage) has been proposed recently. To review the outcome of patients with metastatic head and neck cutaneous SCC treated at our multidisciplinary Head and Neck Service using the proposed staging system. Consecutive patients were culled from our Head and Neck/Skull Base Database, 1990-2004. These patients were restaged according to the proposed staging system: P stage: P0 = no disease in the parotid (i.e., neck disease only); P1 = metastatic node P2=metastatic node > 3 cm and 6 cm, or disease involving the facial nerve or skull base. N stage: N0=no disease in the neck (i.e., parotid disease only); N1 = single ipsilateral metastatic node 3 cm, or contralateral neck involvement. Loco-regional recurrence and disease-specific survival were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method and comparison of graphs made with the log-rank test. Multivariate analysis using the Cox regression model was carried out to assess the impact of various parameters. Sixty-seven patients with metastatic head and neck cutaneous SCC were identified. Thirty-seven patients had parotid metastasis (of whom 13 also had neck disease) while 21 had neck metastasis alone. Nine patients had dermal or soft tissue metastasis. These nine patients were excluded from this series, and data analysis was carried out on the remaining 58 (46 men, 12 women, mean age 71 years) patients. Sixty-seven percent of the patients underwent post-operative adjuvant radiotherapy. The five-year disease-specific survival rate was 54%. Among 56 patients followed up to disease recurrence or for a minimum period of 18 months, the loco-regional recurrence rate was 52%. The presence of parotid disease was an independent prognostic factor on

  5. Electrochemotherapy as a new therapeutic strategy in advanced Merkel cell carcinoma of head and neck region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scelsi, Daniele; Mevio, Niccolò; Bertino, Giulia; Occhini, Antonio; Brazzelli, Valeria; Morbini, Patrizia; Benazzo, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Merkel Cell Carcinoma (MCC) is a rare and aggressive tumour, arising from a cutaneous mechanoceptor cell located in the basal layer of epidermis, with poor prognosis. The treatment of choice for the initial stage of the disease is surgery and/or radiotherapy. The treatment of recurrent or advanced disease is still controversial. We report a case of 84 years old woman with a recurrent MCC of the chin treated with electrochemotherapy (ECT). During the period of 20 months, four sessions of ECT were employed, which resulted in an objective response of the tumour and good quality of residual life. Our case shows the effectiveness of ECT in the treatment of locally advanced MCC of the head and neck region in a patient not suitable for standard therapeutic options

  6. Merkel Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: A Single Institutional Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morand, G.; Vital, D.; Pezier, T.; Holzmann, D.; Huber, G.F.; Roessle, M.; Cozzio, A.

    2013-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare cutaneous malignancy occurring mostly in older immunocompromised Caucasian males. A growing incidence of MCC has been reported in epidemiological studies. Treatment of MCC usually consists of surgical excision, pathological lymph node evaluation, and adjuvant radiotherapy. This paper reports the experience of a single tertiary center institution with 17 head and neck Merkel cell carcinoma patients. Median followup for the cohort was 37.5 months. After five years, recurrence-free survival, disease specific survival, and overall survival were 85%, 90%, and 83%, respectively. Our limited data support the use of adjuvant radiotherapy. We also report two cases of MCC located at the vestibule of the nose and two cases of spontaneous regression after diagnostic biopsy. About 40% of our patients were referred to our center for surgical revision and pathological lymph node evaluation. Increased awareness of MCC and an interdisciplinary approach are essential in the management of MCC.

  7. Economics of Direct Hydrogen Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahadevan, Kathyayani

    2011-10-04

    Battelle's Economic Analysis of PEM Fuel Cell Systems project was initiated in 2003 to evaluate the technology and markets that are near-term and potentially could support the transition to fuel cells in automotive markets. The objective of Battelle?s project was to assist the DOE in developing fuel cell systems for pre-automotive applications by analyzing the technical, economic, and market drivers of direct hydrogen PEM fuel cell adoption. The project was executed over a 6-year period (2003 to 2010) and a variety of analyses were completed in that period. The analyses presented in the final report include: Commercialization scenarios for stationary generation through 2015 (2004); Stakeholder feedback on technology status and performance status of fuel cell systems (2004); Development of manufacturing costs of stationary PEM fuel cell systems for backup power markets (2004); Identification of near-term and mid-term markets for PEM fuel cells (2006); Development of the value proposition and market opportunity of PEM fuel cells in near-term markets by assessing the lifecycle cost of PEM fuel cells as compared to conventional alternatives used in the marketplace and modeling market penetration (2006); Development of the value proposition of PEM fuel cells in government markets (2007); Development of the value proposition and opportunity for large fuel cell system application at data centers and wastewater treatment plants (2008); Update of the manufacturing costs of PEM fuel cells for backup power applications (2009).

  8. Evaluation of epigenetic inactivation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misawa, Yuki; Misawa, Kiyoshi; Kawasaki, Hideya; Imai, Atsushi; Mochizuki, Daiki; Ishikawa, Ryuji; Endo, Shiori; Mima, Masato; Kanazawa, Takeharu; Iwashita, Toshihide; Mineta, Hiroyuki

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the methylation status of the genes encoding the vascular endothelial growth factor receptors and to evaluate the usefulness of VEGFR methylation as a prognostic indicator in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. VEGFR messenger RNA expression and promoter methylation were examined in a panel of cell lines via quantitative reverse transcription and methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Promoter methylation was compared with clinical characteristics in 128 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma samples. The normalized methylation values for the VEGFR1, VEGFR2 and VEGFR3 promoters tended to be higher in the tumour cell lines than in normal tonsil samples, whereas amounts of VEGFR1, VEGFR2 and VEGFR3 messenger RNA were significantly higher. Methylation of the VEGFR1 promoter (p = 0.003; 66/128 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma samples, 52%) and VEGFR3 promoter (p = 0.043; 53/128 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma samples, 41%) significantly correlated with recurrence, whereas methylation of the VEGFR2 promoter significantly correlated with lymph node metastasis (p = 0.046; 47/128 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma samples, 37%). Concurrent methylation of the VEGFR1 and VEGFR3 promoters significantly correlated with reduced disease-free survival (log-rank test, p = 0.009). In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, methylation of the VEGFR1, VEGFR3 and both the VEGFR1 and VEGFR3 promoters independently predicted recurrence (odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals: 3.19, 1.51-6.75 (p = 0.002); 2.24, 1.06-4.76 (p = 0.035); and 2.56, 1.09-6.05 (p = 0.032), respectively). Methylation of the VEGFR promoters predicts poor prognosis in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients.

  9. Basal cell adenocarcinoma of minor salivary and seromucous glands of the head and neck region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, I; Soares, J

    1996-05-01

    Basal cell adenocarcinoma of salivary glands is an uncommon and recently described entity occurring almost exclusively at the major salivary glands. This report provides an overview of the clinicopathologic profile of this neoplasm by including the personal experience on the clinical features, microscopic and ultrastructural characteristics, proliferation activity, and DNA tumor patterns of 12 lesions occurring at the minor salivary glands of the head and neck region, where basal cell adenocarcinoma is probably an underecognized entity, previously reported under different designations. Basal cell adenocarcinoma predominates at the seventh decade without sex preference. The tumors affecting the minor salivary glands occur most frequently at the oral cavity (jugal mucosa, palate) and the upper respiratory tract. The prevalent histologic tumor pattern is represented by solid neoplastic aggregates with a peripheral cell palisading arrangement frequently delineated by basement membrane-like material. The neoplastic clusters are formed by two cell populations: the small dark cell type (that predominates) and a large cell type. Necrosis, either of the comedo or the apoptotic type, is a frequent finding. Perineural growth occurs in 50% of the cases and vascular permeation in 25%. Immunohistochemistry identifies a dual differentiation with a reactivity pattern indicative of ductal epithelial and myoepithelial differentiation, which can be confirmed by electron microscopy. The differential diagnosis of the neoplasm includes its benign counterpart, the basal cell adenoma, solid variant of adenoid cystic carcinoma, undifferentiated carcinoma, and basaloid squamous carcinoma. The tumors recur more frequently than lesions originating in major salivary glands. Mortality is associated with the anatomic site of the lesion, advanced stage, residual neoplasia at surgery, and tumor recurrence. The importance of recognizing basal cell adenocarcinoma outside major salivary glands is

  10. Establishment and characterization of a novel head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell line USC-HN1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebertz, Daniel J; Lechner, Melissa G; Masood, Rizwan; Sinha, Uttam K; Han, Jing; Puri, Raj K; Correa, Adrian J; Epstein, Alan L

    2010-02-22

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is an aggressive and lethal malignancy. Publically available cell lines are mostly of lingual origin, or have not been carefully characterized. Detailed characterization of novel HNSCC cell lines is needed in order to provide researchers a concrete keystone on which to build their investigations. The USC-HN1 cell line was established from a primary maxillary HNSCC biopsy explant in tissue culture. The immortalized cells were then further characterized by heterotransplantation in Nude mice; immunohistochemical staining for relevant HNSCC biomarkers; flow cytometry for surface markers; cytogenetic karyotypic analysis; human papillomavirus and Epstein-Barr virus screening; qRT-PCR for oncogene and cytokine analysis; investigation of activated, cleaved Notch1 levels; and detailed 35,000 gene microarray analysis. Characterization experiments confirmed the human HNSCC origin of USC-HN1, including a phenotype similar to the original tumor. Viral screening revealed no HPV or EBV infection, while western blotting displayed significant upregulation of activated, cleaved Notch1. USC-HN1, a novel immortalized cell line has been derived from a maxillary HNSCC. Characterization studies have shown that the cell line is of HNSCC origin and displays many of the same markers previously reported in the literature. USC-HN1 is available for public research and will further the investigation of HNSCC and the development of new therapeutic modalities.

  11. Left or right? Directions to stem cell engraftment : Directions to stem cell engraftment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belderbos, Mirjam E; Bystrykh, Leonid; de Haan, Gerald

    In this issue of JEM, Wu et al. (https://doi.org/10.1084/jem.20171341) use genetic barcoding of macaque hematopoietic stem cells to demonstrate that, after transplantation, HSCs are very asymmetrically distributed and uncover a thymus-independent pathway for mature T cell production in the bone

  12. Inhibition of Bcl-2 potentiates AZD-2014-induced anti-head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yi; Cui, Jiang-Tao, E-mail: cuijingtaopaper@126.com

    2016-09-02

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a therapeutic target for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Here, we evaluated the activity of AZD-2014, a potent mTOR complex 1/2 (mTORC1/2) dual inhibitor, against HNSCC cells. We showed that AZD-2014 blocked mTORC1/2 activation in established and primary human HNSCC cells, where it was anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic. Yet, AZD-2014 was non-cytotoxic to the human oral epithelial cells with low basal mTORC1/2 activation. In an effect to identify possible AZD-2014 resistance factors, we showed that the anti-apoptosis protein Bcl-2 was upregulated in AZD-2014-resistant SQ20B HNSCC cells. Inhibition of Bcl-2 by ABT-737 (a known Bcl-2 inhibitor) or Bcl-2 shRNA dramatically potentiated AZD-2014 lethality against HNSCC cells. On the other hand, exogenous overexpression of Bcl-2 largely attenuated AZD-2014’s activity against HNSCC cells. For the in vivo studies, we showed that oral gavage of AZD-2014 suppressed SQ20B xenograft growth in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. It also significantly improved mice survival. Importantly, AZD-2014’s anti-HNSCC activity in vivo was potentiated with co-administration of ABT-737. The preclinical results of this study suggest that AZD-2014 could be further tested as a valuable anti-HNSCC agent, either alone or in combination with Bcl-2 inhibitors. - Highlights: • AZD-2014 blocks mTORC1/2 activation in HNSCC cells. • AZD-2014 suppresses HNSCC cell proliferation. • AZD-2014 activates caspase-3 and apoptosis in HNSCC cells. • Bcl-2 is the key resistance factor of AZD-2014 in HNSCC cells. • ABT-737 sensitizes AZD-2014-induced anti-HNSCC activity in vivo.

  13. Inhibition of Bcl-2 potentiates AZD-2014-induced anti-head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yi; Cui, Jiang-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a therapeutic target for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Here, we evaluated the activity of AZD-2014, a potent mTOR complex 1/2 (mTORC1/2) dual inhibitor, against HNSCC cells. We showed that AZD-2014 blocked mTORC1/2 activation in established and primary human HNSCC cells, where it was anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic. Yet, AZD-2014 was non-cytotoxic to the human oral epithelial cells with low basal mTORC1/2 activation. In an effect to identify possible AZD-2014 resistance factors, we showed that the anti-apoptosis protein Bcl-2 was upregulated in AZD-2014-resistant SQ20B HNSCC cells. Inhibition of Bcl-2 by ABT-737 (a known Bcl-2 inhibitor) or Bcl-2 shRNA dramatically potentiated AZD-2014 lethality against HNSCC cells. On the other hand, exogenous overexpression of Bcl-2 largely attenuated AZD-2014’s activity against HNSCC cells. For the in vivo studies, we showed that oral gavage of AZD-2014 suppressed SQ20B xenograft growth in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. It also significantly improved mice survival. Importantly, AZD-2014’s anti-HNSCC activity in vivo was potentiated with co-administration of ABT-737. The preclinical results of this study suggest that AZD-2014 could be further tested as a valuable anti-HNSCC agent, either alone or in combination with Bcl-2 inhibitors. - Highlights: • AZD-2014 blocks mTORC1/2 activation in HNSCC cells. • AZD-2014 suppresses HNSCC cell proliferation. • AZD-2014 activates caspase-3 and apoptosis in HNSCC cells. • Bcl-2 is the key resistance factor of AZD-2014 in HNSCC cells. • ABT-737 sensitizes AZD-2014-induced anti-HNSCC activity in vivo.

  14. A map of directional genetic interactions in a metazoan cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Bernd; Sandmann, Thomas; Horn, Thomas; Billmann, Maximilian; Chaudhary, Varun; Huber, Wolfgang; Boutros, Michael

    2015-03-06

    Gene-gene interactions shape complex phenotypes and modify the effects of mutations during development and disease. The effects of statistical gene-gene interactions on phenotypes have been used to assign genes to functional modules. However, directional, epistatic interactions, which reflect regulatory relationships between genes, have been challenging to map at large-scale. Here, we used combinatorial RNA interference and automated single-cell phenotyping to generate a large genetic interaction map for 21 phenotypic features of Drosophila cells. We devised a method that combines genetic interactions on multiple phenotypes to reveal directional relationships. This network reconstructed the sequence of protein activities in mitosis. Moreover, it revealed that the Ras pathway interacts with the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodelling complex, an interaction that we show is conserved in human cancer cells. Our study presents a powerful approach for reconstructing directional regulatory networks and provides a resource for the interpretation of functional consequences of genetic alterations.

  15. High-Risk Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Veness

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonmelanoma skin cancers (squamous cell and basal cell carcinomas occur at an epidemic rate in many countries with the worldwide incidence increasing. The sun-exposed head and neck are the most frequent sites for these cancers to arise and in most patients diagnosed with a cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, local treatment is usually curative. However, a subset is diagnosed with a high-risk cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. High-risk factors include size (> 2 cm, thickness/depth of invasion (> 4 mm, recurrent lesions, the presence of perineural invasion, location near the parotid gland, and immunosuppression. These patients have a higher risk (> 10–20% of developing metastases to regional lymph nodes (often parotid nodes, and in some cases also of experiencing local morbidity (perineural invasion, based on unfavourable primary lesion and patient factors. Despite treatment, many patients developing metastatic cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma experience mortality and morbidity usually as a consequence of uncontrolled metastatic nodal disease. It is therefore important that clinicians treating nonmelanoma skin cancers have an understanding and awareness of these high-risk patients. The aim of this article is to discuss the factors that define a high-risk patient and to present some of the issues pertinent to their management.

  16. Primary histiocytic sarcoma arising in the head and neck with predominant spindle cell component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao XF

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This is the first case report of Histiocytic Sarcoma (HS with predominant spindle cell component occurring in the head and neck region of a 41-year-old man. The tumor was composed of sheets of large round to oval cells with pleomorphic vesicular nuclei, prominent nucleoli and abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm. Multinucleated forms, numerous mitoses, and tumor necrosis were also noted. Sheets, fascicles, and whorls of spindle cells with spindled to ovoid vesicular nuclei, small to medium-sized distinct nucleoli, and eosinophilic cytoplasm were frequently observed. Immunohistochemical staining in the tumor cells was positive for CD163, CD68, lysozyme, CD45, and NSE. Focal expression of CD4 and S-100 was also noted. Electron microscopy demonstrated an abundance of lysosomes in the cytoplasm of tumor cells. Chromosome study revealed a 57–80 hyperdiploid [7]/46, XY [13] karyotype, including 3 to 4 copies of various chromosomes. The immunohistochemical and ultrastructural findings confirmed the diagnosis of HS.

  17. Inhibition of Glutathione and Thioredoxin Metabolism Enhances Sensitivity to Perifosine in Head and Neck Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrean L. Simons

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The hypothesis that the Akt inhibitor, perifosine (PER, combined with inhibitors of glutathione (GSH and thioredoxin (Trx metabolism will induce cytotoxicity via metabolic oxidative stress in human head and neck cancer (HNSCC cells was tested. PER induced increases in glutathione disulfide (%GSSG in FaDu, Cal-27, and SCC-25 HNSCCs as well as causing significant clonogenic cell killing in FaDu and Cal-27, which was suppressed by simultaneous treatment with N-acetylcysteine (NAC. An inhibitor of GSH synthesis, buthionine sulfoximine (BSO, sensitized Cal-27 and SCC-25 cells to PER-induced clonogenic killing as well as decreased total GSH and increased %GSSG. Additionally, inhibition of thioredoxin reductase activity (TrxRed with auranofin (AUR was able to induce PER sensitization in SCC-25 cells that were initially refractory to PER. These results support the conclusion that PER induces oxidative stress and clonogenic killing in HNSCC cells that is enhanced with inhibitors of GSH and Trx metabolism.

  18. Dynamic simulation of a direct carbonate fuel cell power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernest, J.B. [Fluor Daniel, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States); Ghezel-Ayagh, H.; Kush, A.K. [Fuel Cell Engineering, Danbury, CT (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE) is commercializing a 2.85 MW Direct carbonate Fuel Cell (DFC) power plant. The commercialization sequence has already progressed through construction and operation of the first commercial-scale DFC power plant on a U.S. electric utility, the 2 MW Santa Clara Demonstration Project (SCDP), and the completion of the early phases of a Commercial Plant design. A 400 kW fuel cell stack Test Facility is being built at Energy Research Corporation (ERC), FCE`s parent company, which will be capable of testing commercial-sized fuel cell stacks in an integrated plant configuration. Fluor Daniel, Inc. provided engineering, procurement, and construction services for SCDP and has jointly developed the Commercial Plant design with FCE, focusing on the balance-of-plant (BOP) equipment outside of the fuel cell modules. This paper provides a brief orientation to the dynamic simulation of a fuel cell power plant and the benefits offered.

  19. miR-204 inhibits angiogenesis and promotes sensitivity to cetuximab in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells by blocking JAK2-STAT3 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qingwei; Zhao, Yingying; Wang, Peihua

    2018-03-01

    This study aims to investigate the roles of miR-204 in tumor angiogenesis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Here, we found that miR-204 level was reduced in HNSCC tissues relative to that in normal adjacent tissues. Overexpression of miR-204 promoted tumor angiogenesis in HNSCC cells. Mechanistically, JAK2 was identified as a direct target of miR-204, and miR-204 overexpression blocked JAK2/STAT3 pathway. Moreover, overexpression of JAK2 attenuated the inhibition of miR-204 on tumor angiogenesis of HNSCC. Furthermore, overexpression of miR-204 enhanced sensitivity of cetuximab in HNSCC cells, this effect was attenuated by JAK2 overexpression too. Importantly, JAK2 expression was negatively correlated with miR-204 level in HNSCC tissues. Therefore, miR-204 acts as a tumor suppressor by blocking JAK2/STAT3 pathway in HNSCC cells. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Direct Coal Oxidation in Modified Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deleebeeck, Lisa; Gil, Vanesa; Ippolito, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid direct carbon fuel cells employ a classical solid oxide fuel cell together with carbon dispersed in a carbonate melt on the anode side. In a European project, the utilization of various coals has been investigated with and without addition of an oxidation catalyst to the carbon-carbonate s......Hybrid direct carbon fuel cells employ a classical solid oxide fuel cell together with carbon dispersed in a carbonate melt on the anode side. In a European project, the utilization of various coals has been investigated with and without addition of an oxidation catalyst to the carbon......-carbonate slurry or anode layer. The nature of the coal affects both open circuit voltage and power output. Highest OCV and power densities were observed for bituminous coal and by adding manganese oxide or praseodymium-doped ceria to the carbon/carbonate mixture. Comparing the carbon black fueled performance...... bituminous coal (73 mW/cm2). © 2015 ECS - The Electrochemical Society...

  1. Direct Coal Oxidation in Modified Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deleebeeck, Lisa; Gil, Vanesa; Ippolito, Davide

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid direct carbon fuel cells employ a classical solid oxide fuel cell together with carbon dispersed in a carbonate melt on the anode side. In a European project, the utilization of various coals has been investigated with and without addition of an oxidation catalyst to the carbon-carbonate s......Hybrid direct carbon fuel cells employ a classical solid oxide fuel cell together with carbon dispersed in a carbonate melt on the anode side. In a European project, the utilization of various coals has been investigated with and without addition of an oxidation catalyst to the carbon......-carbonate slurry or anode layer. The nature of the coal affects both open circuit voltage and power output. Highest OCV and power densities were observed for bituminous coal and by adding manganese oxide or praseodymium-doped ceria to the carbon/carbonate mixture. Comparing the carbon black fueled performance...... bituminous coal (73 mW/cm2)....

  2. Incorporating fault zone head wave and direct wave secondary arrival times into seismic tomography: Application at Parkfield, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennington, Ninfa L.; Thurber, Clifford; Peng, Zhigang; Zhang, Haijiang; Zhao, Peng

    2013-03-01

    We present a three-dimensional (3D) P wave velocity (Vp) model of the Parkfield region that utilizes existing P wave arrival time data, including fault zone head waves (FZHWs), and data from direct wave secondary arrivals (DWSAs). The first-arrival and DWSA travel times are obtained as the global- and local-minimum travel time paths, respectively. The inclusion of FZHWs and DWSAs results in as much as a 5% and a 10% increase in the across-fault velocity contrast, respectively, for the Vp model at Parkfield relative to that of Thurber et al. [2006]. Viewed along strike, three pronounced velocity contrast regions are observed: a pair of strong positive velocity contrasts (SW fast), one NW of the 1966 Parkfield earthquake hypocenter and the other SE of the 2004 Parkfield earthquake hypocenter, and a strong negative velocity contrast (NE fast) between the two hypocenters. The negative velocity contrast partially to entirely encompasses peak coseismic slip estimated in several slip models for the 2004 earthquake, suggesting that the negative velocity contrast played a part in defining the rupture patch of the 2004 Parkfield earthquake. Following Ampuero and Ben-Zion (2008), the pattern of velocity contrasts is consistent with the observed bilateral rupture propagation for the 2004 Parkfield earthquake. Although the velocity contrasts also suggest bilateral rupture propagation for the 1966 Parkfield earthquake, the fault is creeping to the NW here, i.e., exhibiting velocity-strengthening behavior. Thus, it is not surprising that rupture propagated only SE during this event.

  3. Filling the gap between traditional Chinese medicine and modern medicine, are we heading to the right direction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiuping; Pei, Lixia; Lu, Jinjian

    2013-06-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), the ancient medicine popular in China and surrounding areas, has been recognized as a typical representative of complementary and alternative medicine. Over long period in clinical practice, especially the progress in basic research, data on the effectiveness and beneficial contribution of TCM herbs to public health and disease control have been accumulated while the quality of the evidence is generally poor. The most common clinical practice of TCM herbs is herb combination called formula which consists of several types of medicinal herbs or minerals, which is quite different from modern medicine. Definitely, tens of hundreds of compounds could be identified in even a small formula. With the regained enthusiasm on natural products based new drug R&D, the proposed multi-target drug discovery strategy, the booming of -omics technologies, and the implementation of ambitious plan of TCM modernization in China, attempts have been made to fill the gap between TCM herbs and modern drugs. However, are we heading to the right direction? Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Path integration of head direction: updating a packet of neural activity at the correct speed using neuronal time constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, D M; Stringer, S M

    2010-07-01

    A key question in understanding the neural basis of path integration is how individual, spatially responsive, neurons may self-organize into networks that can, through learning, integrate velocity signals to update a continuous representation of location within an environment. It is of vital importance that this internal representation of position is updated at the correct speed, and in real time, to accurately reflect the motion of the animal. In this article, we present a biologically plausible model of velocity path integration of head direction that can solve this problem using neuronal time constants to effect natural time delays, over which associations can be learned through associative Hebbian learning rules. The model comprises a linked continuous attractor network and competitive network. In simulation, we show that the same model is able to learn two different speeds of rotation when implemented with two different values for the time constant, and without the need to alter any other model parameters. The proposed model could be extended to path integration of place in the environment, and path integration of spatial view.

  5. A Direct DME High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vassiliev, Anton; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Li, Qingfeng

    2012-01-01

    Dimethyl ether (DME) has been identified as an alternative to methanol for use in direct fuel cells. It combines the advantages of hydrogen in terms of pumpless fuel delivery and high energy density like methanol, but without the toxicity of the latter. The performance of a direct dimethyl ether...... fuel cell suffers greatly from the very low DME-water miscibility. To cope with the problem polybenzimidazole (PBI) based membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) have been made and tested in a vapor fed system. PtRu on carbon has been used as anode catalyst and air at ambient pressure was used as oxidant...

  6. Cotransplantation of bone marrow mononuclear cells and umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells in avascular necrosis of the femoral head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, J; Wu, Z; Huang, L; Chen, J; Wu, C; Wang, S; Deng, Z; Wu, W; Luo, F; Tan, J

    2014-01-01

    We sought to investigate the therapeutic effects of cotransplantation of autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs) and allogeneic umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs) on avascular necrosis of the femoral head (ANFH). In all, 30 patients (49 hips; 24 males and 6 females) with ANFH were enrolled. According to the system of the Association Research Circulation Osseous, there were 24 hips in phase II and 25 hips in phase Ⅲ. Blood supply to the femoral head was evaluated by using digital subtraction angiography. Generally, 60 to 80 mL of autologous BMMNCs and 30 to 50 mL of UC-MSCs were infused into the femoral head artery. Harris scores including pain and joint function were used to evaluate the effects before and 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after transplantation. Computed tomography and radiographs were performed before and 12 months after the treatment. Clinical symptoms of pain and claudication were gradually improved. After the treatment, 93.3% (28/30), 86.7% (26/30), and 86.7% (26/30) of patients showed relief of hip pain, improvement of joint function, and extended walking distances, respectively. The Harris scores were increased significantly at 3, 6, and 12 months posttransplant compared with those pretransplant. In addition, the bone lesions in 89.7% of hips (44/49) were improved as showed on computed tomography after transplantation. Cotransplantation of autologous BMMNCs and allogeneic UC-MSCs showed therapeutic effect on ANFH without severe adverse effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Definitive radiation therapy - alone or combined with drug treatment for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsarov, D.; Mihajlova, I.; Georgiev, D; Lyubomirov, V.; Gesheva, N.; Balabanova, A.; Klenova, A.; Pyrvanova, V.; Atanasov, T.

    2017-01-01

    Goal: To assess the effectiveness of three treatment methods in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck-ultimate radiotherapy (RT) up to 60 Gy, definitive radiation therapy simultaneously with chemotherapy (RT-CT) up to 60 Gy and definitive RT-CT greater than 60 Gy. Material and method: 154 patients with locally advanced head and neck carcinomas, at clinical stage T3-T4 N + M0 are included in the analysis for the period 2009-2016. Radical RT is carried out with a daily dose of 2-2.33 Gy on MV therapy equipment. There were treated as follows: in Group I - 37 patients with RT up to 60 Gy, in Group II - 58 patients with RT-CT up to 60 Gy and simultaneous radiosensitizing CT, weekly Cisplatin 50 mg i.v. or Cetuximab regimen, and Group III - 59 patients with RT-CT and a total dose over 60 Gy. The early dermatological and mucosal toxicity is assessed by the CTCAE v.3 scale. Results: RT in all patients was conducted without interruption. The mean total survival rate in the three groups with RT up to 60 Gy / RT-CT to 60 Gy / RT-CT over 60 Gy is 11 months, 21 months and 27 months respectively, with a statistically significant difference between I and III groups in favor of the latter (p = 0.049). The use of RT-CT with a dose increase above 60 Gy shows an advantage of III g over Group II, which is an extension of the mean overall survival by 61 months (p = 0.21). II-III degree toxicity was observed in II and III - dermatitis and mucositis - at the simultaneous RT-CT (Grade 3> 16%). Conclusions: The application of doses greater than 60 Gy with concurrent radiosensitizing drug treatment in advanced head and neck carcinoma is an effective method for more pronounced but reversible dermatological and mucosal toxicity. [bg

  8. Radiosensitivity and effect of hypoxia in HPV positive head and neck cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sørensen, Brita Singers; Busk, Morten; Olthof, Nadine; Speel, Ernst-Jan; Horsman, Michael R.; Alsner, Jan; Overgaard, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: HPV associated Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSCC) represents a distinct subgroup of HNSCC characterized by a favorable prognosis and a distinct molecular biology. Previous data from the randomized DAHANCA 5 trial indicated that HPV positive tumors did not benefit from hypoxic modifications by Nimorazole during radiotherapy, whereas a significant benefit was observed in the HPV negative tumors. However, more studies have demonstrated equal frequencies of hypoxic tumors among HPV-positive and HPV-negative tumors. The aim of the present study was to determine radiosensitivity, the impact of hypoxia and the effect of Nimorazole in HPV positive and HPV negative cell lines. Materials and method: The used cell lines were: UDSCC2, UMSCC47 and UPCISCC90 (HPV positive) and FaDu DD , UTSCC33 and UTSCC5 (HPV negative). Cells were cultured under normoxic or hypoxic conditions, and gene expression levels of previously established hypoxia induced genes were assessed by qPCR. Cells were irradiated with various doses under normoxia, hypoxia or hypoxia +1 mM Nimorazole, and the clonogenic survival was determined. Results: The HPV positive and HPV negative cell lines exhibited similar patterns of upregulation of hypoxia induced genes in response to hypoxia. The HPV positive cell lines were up to 2.4 times more radiation sensitive than HPV negative cell lines. However, all HPV positive cells displayed the same response to hypoxia in radiosensitivity, with an OER in the range 2.3–2.9, and a sensitizer effect of Nimorazole of 1.13–1.29, similar to HPV negative cells. Conclusions: Although HPV positive cells had a markedly higher radiosensitivity compared to HPV negative cells, they displayed the same relative radioresistance under hypoxia and the same relative sensitizer effect of Nimorazole. The clinical observation that HPV positive patients do not seem to benefit from Nimorazole treatment is not due to inherent differences in hypoxia sensitivity

  9. [Planned neck dissection in the treatment of locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, L; Lou, J L; Wang, K J; Fang, M Y; Fu, Z F

    2018-02-07

    Objective: To investigate the value of planned neck dissection combined with induction chemotherapy and concurrent chemoradiotherapy in regional control and the outcome of locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Methods: A prospective randomized controlled study totally enrolled sixty-four patients of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas(include oropharynx, hypopharynx, and larynx) in stages Ⅳa-Ⅳb with lymph node metastase was were N2-N3. All patients firstly received 2-3 cycles of induction chemotherapy(ICT), then divided into two groups randomly, according to the efficacy of ICT. Group A(the study group) received planned neck dissection(PND) and concurrent chemoradiotherapy(CCRT). Group B(the control group) received concurrent chemoradiotherapy(CCRT). The differences in clinicopathologic features, local recurrence(LR), regional recurrence(RR), disease-free survival(DFS), and overall survival(OS) between the two groups were estimated. SPSS 19.0 software was used to analyze the data. Results: Group A enrolled twenty-one patients, and group B enrolled forty-three patients.The follow-up of all patients were 4-55 months, median follow-up time was 22 months. In study group, two-year OS and DFS were 80.9% and 68.3%, respectively. In control group, two-year OS and DFS were 90.7% and 67.1%, respectively. There was no significant difference in gender( P =0.215), age( P =0.828), primary tumor site( P =0.927), LR( P =0.126), DFS( P =0.710), and OS( P =0.402) between the two groups, while the RR(χ(2)=5.640, P squamous cell carcinoma.

  10. Current state and future of photodynamic therapy for the treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Mimikos

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy has shown promise in the treatment of early head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCC. In photodynamic therapy (PDT, a light sensitive drug (photosensitizer and visible light cause cancer cell death by the creation of singlet oxygen and free radicals, inciting an immune response, and vascular collapse. In this paper, we review several studies that demonstrate the effectiveness of PDT in the treatment of early stage SCC of the head and neck, with some showing a similar response rate to surgery. Two cases are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of PDT. Then, new advances are discussed including the discovery of STAT3 crosslinking as a potential biomarker for PDT response and interstitial PDT for locally advanced cancers. Keywords: Photodynamic therapy, PDT, Squamous cell carcinoma, Head and neck cancer

  11. Increased Dickkopf-1 expression accelerates bone cell apoptosis in femoral head osteonecrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jih-Yang; Wang, Feng-Sheng; Wang, Ching-Jen; Wong, To; Chou, Wen-Yi; Tseng, Shin-Ling

    2010-03-01

    Intensive bone cell apoptosis contributes to osteonecrosis of femoral head (ONFH). Dickkopf-1 (DKK1) reportedly mediates various types of skeletal disorders. This study investigated whether DKK1 was linked to the occurrence of ONFH. Thirty-nine patients with various stages of ONFH were recruited. Bone specimens were harvested from 34 ONFH patients underwent hip arthroplasty, and from 10 femoral neck fracture patients. Bad, Bcl2 TNFalpha, DKK1, Wnt3a, LRP5, and Axin1 expressions were analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR and ELISA. Apoptotic cells were assayed using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate-biotin nick end-labelling (TUNEL). Primary bone-marrow mesenchymal cells were treated with DKK1 RNA interference and recombinant DKK1 protein. ONFH patients with the histories of being administrated corticosteroids and excessive alcohol consumption had significantly higher Bad and DKK1 mRNA expressions in bone tissue and DKK1 abundances in serum than femoral neck fracture patients. Bone cells adjacent to osteonecrotic bone displayed strong DKK1 immunoreactivity and TUNEL staining. Increased DKK1 expression in bone tissue and serum correlated with Bad expression and TUNEL staining. Serum DKK1 abundance correlated with the severity of ONFH. The DKK1 RNA interference and recombinant DKK1 protein regulated Bad expression and apoptosis of primary bone-marrow mesenchymal cells. Knock down of DKK1 reduced dexamethasone-induced apoptosis of mesenchymal cells. Taken together, promoted DKK1 expression was associated with bone cell apoptosis in the occurrence of ONFH patients with the histories of corticosteroid and alcohol intake and progression of ONFH. DKK1 expression in injured tissue provides new insight into ONFH pathogenesis.

  12. Association between tumour volume and recurrence of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazmi, F.N.; Adil, A.; Ghaffar, S.; Ahmed, F.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the prognostic significance of computerized tomography derived tumour volume for squamous cell cancers of the head and neck, treated primarily by surgery. Methods: The retrospective review study comprised 72 patients with head and neck malignancies who were treated primarily by surgery at Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, with/without adjuvant. It was done from May 2007 to November 2008. Each patient was followed up for a minimum of one year to check for recurrence. For statistical analysis SPSS 17 was used. Frequencies, cross-tabulations with chi square tests to find associations, binary logistic regression analysis, Cox regression analysis and receiver operating characteristic curve tests were run on the data. Results: Overall, the median tumour volume for patients with recurrent disease was 52 cm/sup 3/ compared to 22 cm/sup 3/ for those who did not have a recurrence. It was found that large tumour volume was associated with a significantly higher chance of recurrence (p = 0.009). Laryngeal cancers with volumes greater than 46 cm/sup 3/ and oral cancers with volumes greater than 23.1 cm/sup 3/ were associated with poor prognosis. Conclusions: The primary tumour volume can represent an important prognostic factor for treatment outcome. Patients with larger primary tumour volumes should be treated more aggressively. (author)

  13. Degradation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mediates Dasatinib-Induced Apoptosis in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chin Lin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is an important oncoprotein that promotes cell growth and proliferation. Dasatinib, a bcr-abl inhibitor, has been approved clinically for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia and demonstrated to be effective against solid tumors in vitro through Src inhibition. Here, we disclose that EGFR degradation mediated dasatinib-induced apoptosis in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC cells. HNSCC cells, including Ca9-22, FaDu, HSC3, SAS, SCC-25, and UMSCC1, were treated with dasatinib, and cell viability, apoptosis, and underlying signal transduction were evaluated. Dasatinib exhibited differential sensitivities against HNSCC cells. Growth inhibition and apoptosis were correlated with its inhibition on Akt, Erk, and Bcl-2, irrespective of Src inhibition. Accordingly, we found that down-regulation of EGFR was a determinant of dasatinib sensitivity. Lysosome inhibitor reversed dasatinib-induced EGFR down-regulation, and c-cbl activity was increased by dasatinib, indicating that dasatinib-induced EGFR down-regulation might be through c-cbl-mediated lysosome degradation. Increased EGFR activation by ligand administration rescued cells from dasatinib-induced apoptosis, whereas inhibition of EGFR enhanced its apoptotic effect. Estrogen receptor α (ERα was demonstrated to play a role in Bcl-2 expression, and dasatinib inhibited ERα at the pretranslational level. ERα was associated with EGFR in dasatinib-treated HNSCC cells. Furthermore, the xenograft model showed that dasatinib inhibited HSC3 tumor growth through in vivo down-regulation of EGFR and ERα. In conclusion, degradation of EGFR is a novel mechanism responsible for dasatinib-induced apoptosis in HNSCC cells.

  14. NEW OPPORTUNITIES FOR IMMUNE THERAPY IN PATIENTS WITH DISSEMINATED RECURRENT SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA OF THE HEAD AND NECK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Mudunov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma diagnosed with recurrent tumor or distant metastases usually have the worst prognosis. Chemotherapeutic options are very limited in these patients; there is a probability of drug resistance development. The researchers continue to search more effective and less toxic drugs. In the current article, we analyze the results of the latest randomized clinical trials devoted the assessment of novel antitumor immunotherapeutic drugs – PD-1 inhibitors – in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. This studies reveal new possibilities for the treatment of these patients.

  15. Squamous cell carcinomas of the lung and of the head and neck: new insights on molecular characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polo, Valentina; Pasello, Giulia; Frega, Stefano; Favaretto, Adolfo; Koussis, Haralabos; Conte, Pierfranco; Bonanno, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinomas of the lung and of the head and neck district share strong association with smoking habits and are characterized by smoke-related genetic alterations. Driver mutations have been identified in small percentage of lung squamous cell carcinoma. In parallel, squamous head and neck tumors are classified according to the HPV positivity, thus identifying two different clinical and molecular subgroups of disease. This review depicts different molecular portraits and potential clinical application in the field of targeted therapy, immunotherapy and chemotherapy personalization. PMID:26933818

  16. Direct hydrogen fuel cell systems for hybrid vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.; Wang, X.

    Hybridizing a fuel cell system with an energy storage system offers an opportunity to improve the fuel economy of the vehicle through regenerative braking and possibly to increase the specific power and decrease the cost of the combined energy conversion and storage systems. Even in a hybrid configuration it is advantageous to operate the fuel cell system in a load-following mode and use the power from the energy storage system when the fuel cell alone cannot meet the power demand. This paper discusses an approach for designing load-following fuel cell systems for hybrid vehicles and illustrates it by applying it to pressurized, direct hydrogen, polymer-electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) systems for a mid-size family sedan. The vehicle level requirements relative to traction power, response time, start-up time and energy conversion efficiency are used to select the important parameters for the PEFC stack, air management system, heat rejection system and the water management system.

  17. Long-term results of positron emission tomography-directed management of the neck in node-positive head and neck cancer after organ preservation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjövall, Johanna; Chua, Benjamin; Pryor, David; Burmeister, Elizabeth; Foote, Matthew C; Panizza, Benedict; Burmeister, Bryan H; Porceddu, Sandro V

    2015-03-01

    The current study presents the long-term results from a study designed to evaluate a restaging positron emission tomography (PET) directed policy whereby neck dissections were omitted in all node positive head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (N+HNSCC) patients with PET-negative lymph nodes after definitive radiotherapy (RT), with or without chemotherapy. A post-therapy nodal response assessment with PET and computed tomography (CT) was performed in patients who achieved a complete response at the primary site after definitive radiotherapy. Patients with PET-negative lymph nodes were observed regardless of residual CT abnormalities. One hundred and twelve patients, the majority of whom (83 patients, 74%) had oropharyngeal primaries, were treated on protocol. Median follow-up was 62months. Negative and positive predictive values for the restaging PET was 97.1% and 77.8% respectively, with only one patient who was PET-negative after treatment experiencing an isolated nodal relapse. PET-guided management of the neck following organ preservation therapy effectively spares neck dissections in patients with N+HNSCC without compromising isolated nodal control or overall survival. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. hydrogel membrane as electrolyte for direct borohydride fuel cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A direct borohydride fuel cell (DBFC) employing a poly (vinyl alcohol) hydrogel membrane electrolyte (PHME) is reported. The DBFC employs an AB5 Misch metal alloy as anode and a goldplated stainless steel mesh as cathode in conjunction with aqueous alkaline solution of sodium borohydride as fuel and aqueous ...

  19. Direct chromosome-length haplotyping by single-cell sequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Porubský, David; Sanders, Ashley D; van Wietmarschen, Niek; Falconer, Ester; Hills, Mark; Spierings, Diana C J; Bevova, Marianna R; Guryev, Victor; Lansdorp, Peter Michael

    Haplotypes are fundamental to fully characterize the diploid genome of an individual, yet methods to directly chart the unique genetic makeup of each parental chromosome are lacking. Here we introduce single-cell DNA template strand sequencing (Strand-seq) as a novel approach to phasing diploid

  20. The Pore Structure of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Peter Brilner

    2005-01-01

    The pore structure and morphology of direct methanol fuel cell electrodes are characterized using mercury intrusion porosimetry and scanning electron microscopy. It is found that the pore size distributions of printed primer and catalyst layers are largely dictated by the powders used to make...

  1. Directed neuronal differentiation of human embryonic stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noggle Scott A

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have developed a culture system for the efficient and directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (HESCs to neural precursors and neurons. HESC were maintained by manual passaging and were differentiated to a morphologically distinct OCT-4+/SSEA-4- monolayer cell type prior to the derivation of embryoid bodies. Embryoid bodies were grown in suspension in serum free conditions, in the presence of 50% conditioned medium from the human hepatocarcinoma cell line HepG2 (MedII. Results A neural precursor population was observed within HESC derived serum free embryoid bodies cultured in MedII conditioned medium, around 7–10 days after derivation. The neural precursors were organized into rosettes comprised of a central cavity surrounded by ring of cells, 4 to 8 cells in width. The central cells within rosettes were proliferating, as indicated by the presence of condensed mitotic chromosomes and by phosphoHistone H3 immunostaining. When plated and maintained in adherent culture, the rosettes of neural precursors were surrounded by large interwoven networks of neurites. Immunostaining demonstrated the expression of nestin in rosettes and associated non-neuronal cell types, and a radial expression of Map-2 in rosettes. Differentiated neurons expressed the markers Map-2 and Neurofilament H, and a subpopulation of the neurons expressed tyrosine hydroxylase, a marker for dopaminergic neurons. Conclusion This novel directed differentiation approach led to the efficient derivation of neuronal cultures from HESCs, including the differentiation of tyrosine hydroxylase expressing neurons. HESC were morphologically differentiated to a monolayer OCT-4+ cell type, which was used to derive embryoid bodies directly into serum free conditions. Exposure to the MedII conditioned medium enhanced the derivation of neural precursors, the first example of the effect of this conditioned medium on HESC.

  2. Trichostatin A, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, potentiated cytotoxic effect of lionizing radiation in human head and neck cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Ho; Shin, Jin Hee; Chie, Eui Kyu; Wu, Hong Gyun; Kim, Jae Sung; Kim, Il Han; Ha, Sung Whan; Park, Charn Il; Kang, Wee Saing

    2004-01-01

    We have previously reported that human glioblastoma cells are sensitized to radiation-induced death after their exposure to trichostatin A (TSA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDAC-I), prior to the irradiation. We aimed to measure the magnitude of the radiosensitizing effect of TSA in human head and neck cancer cell lines. human head and neck cancer cell lines, HN-3 and HN-9, were exposed to 0, 50, 100, and 200 nM TSA for 18 hr prior to irradiation. Then, the TSA-treated cells were irradiated with 0, 2, 4, 6, and 8 Gy, and cell survival was measured by clonogenic assay. Pre-irradiation exposure to TSA was found to radiosensitize HN-3 and HN-9 cell lines. In HN-9 cells, the fraction surviving after 2 Gy (SF2) was significantly reduced by treatment of TSA at concentration as low as 50 nM. However, a treatment with 200 nM TSA was required to significantly decrease SF2 in the HN-3 cell line. SER of pre-irradiation treatment with 200 nM TSA was 1.84 in HN-3 and 7.24 in HN-9, respectively. Our results clearly showed that human head and neck cancer cell lines can be sensitized to ionizing radiation by pre-irradiation inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) using TSA, and that this potentiation might well be a general phenomenon

  3. Indomethacin sensitive suppressor cell activity in head and neck cancer patients pre- and postirradiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maca, R.D.; Panje, W.R.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of the addition of indomethacin to PHA or Con A stimulated lymphocytes from patients with untreated squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck or from patients with the disease who have just finished irradiation therapy from the disease was quantitated and compared to those of the control group. Lymphocytes from eight of 26 patients with untreated carcinoma were significantly augmented by the addition of indomethacin. The remaining eighteen patients were equal to the controls. For all 17 patients who had just finished extensive field irradiation therapy, significant enhancement of PHA and Con A reactivity by indomethacin was found, which did not appear to be solely a function of low baseline mitogen reactivity. The results of this study support the hypothesis that perhaps patients receiving irradiation therapy may benefit by the oral administration of indomethacin, an approach that needs further consideration

  4. Secondary oesophageal or gastric cancer in patients treated for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenlund Andersen, Anja; Bjerring, Ole Steen; Godballe, Christian

    2016-01-01

    SPM. CONCLUSION: In this study, we confirm that there is an elevated risk of developing oesophageal and gastric cancer in the Danish population of patients with a cancer in the supraglottic or hypopharyngeal region. Therefore, we recommend close follow-up of these patients and a low threshold......INTRODUCTION: Patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) are at an elevated risk of developing second primary malignancies (SPM). Our objectives were to estimate the excess risk of oesophageal and gastric SPMs in patients with malignancies of the pharynx or larynx and, additionally.......004) and hypopharyngeal (OR = 3.9; p cancer compared with 3.4 years (95% CI: 3.1-4.3; range: 0.04-13.7) for patients without...

  5. Diagnosis and Management of Merkel Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: Current Trends and Controversies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swanson, Mark S.; Sinha, Uttam K.

    2014-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma is an aggressive neuroendocrine cutaneous malignancy with a predilection for regional and distant metastasis. This malignancy presents most commonly on the head and neck of elderly Caucasian males, with a higher prevalence in the immunosuppressed. A high index of suspicion must be maintained due to the often asymptomatic presentation. Lip tumors, scalp tumors, local invasion, nodal metastasis, distant metastasis, and lymphovascular invasion are poor prognostic factors. Up to 8.7% of patients present with distant metastasis, and PET-CT is an accurate staging tool with a 90% sensitivity. Combined aggressive surgical resection with adjuvant radiotherapy affords the best regional control rates. The regional lymphatics must be addressed with either sentinel lymph node biopsy, surgery, or elective radiation due to the risk of occult metastasis. Addition of chemotherapy has no proven benefit in locoregional control

  6. Diagnosis and Management of Merkel Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: Current Trends and Controversies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swanson, Mark S.; Sinha, Uttam K., E-mail: sinha@med.usc.edu [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Southern California, 1520 San Pablo St, Suite 4600, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States)

    2014-06-27

    Merkel cell carcinoma is an aggressive neuroendocrine cutaneous malignancy with a predilection for regional and distant metastasis. This malignancy presents most commonly on the head and neck of elderly Caucasian males, with a higher prevalence in the immunosuppressed. A high index of suspicion must be maintained due to the often asymptomatic presentation. Lip tumors, scalp tumors, local invasion, nodal metastasis, distant metastasis, and lymphovascular invasion are poor prognostic factors. Up to 8.7% of patients present with distant metastasis, and PET-CT is an accurate staging tool with a 90% sensitivity. Combined aggressive surgical resection with adjuvant radiotherapy affords the best regional control rates. The regional lymphatics must be addressed with either sentinel lymph node biopsy, surgery, or elective radiation due to the risk of occult metastasis. Addition of chemotherapy has no proven benefit in locoregional control.

  7. Recent progresses in materials for the direct methanol fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamy, C; Leger, J M [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 86 - Poitiers (France)

    1998-12-31

    Research programs are being conducted worldwide to develop a clean, zero emissions electric vehicle. However, even with the most advanced batteries, such as nickel/metal hydride, or lithium ion batteries, the driving range is limited and the recharging time is long. Only fuel cells which can convert chemical energy directly into electrical energy can compete with internal combustion engines. This paper reviewed the recent progress made in the development of a direct methanol fuel cell using the concept developed for the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). It was noted that the electrode materials, at the methanol anode and oxygen cathode need to be improved by using multifunctional electrocatalysts. The development of new temperature resistant proton exchange membranes with good ionic conductivity and low methanol cross-over, which resulted from the need to increase operating temperatures above 100 degrees C was also reviewed. 35 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.

  8. Direct reprogramming of somatic cells into neural stem cells or neurons for neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Shaoping; Lu, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Direct reprogramming of somatic cells into neurons or neural stem cells is one of the most important frontier fields in current neuroscience research. Without undergoing the pluripotency stage, induced neurons or induced neural stem cells are a safer and timelier manner resource in comparison to those derived from induced pluripotent stem cells. In this prospective, we review the recent advances in generation of induced neurons and induced neural stem cells in vitro and in vivo and their potential treatments of neurological disorders.

  9. Specific recommendations for accurate and direct use of PET-CT in PET guided radiotherapy for head and neck sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, C. M.; Convery, D. J.; Greener, A. G.; Pike, L. C.; Baker, S.; Woods, E.; Hartill, C. E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To provide specific experience-based guidance and recommendations for centers wishing to develop, validate, and implement an accurate and efficient process for directly using positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) for the radiotherapy planning of head and neck cancer patients. Methods: A PET-CT system was modified with hard-top couch, external lasers and radiotherapy immobilization and indexing devices and was subject to a commissioning and quality assurance program. PET-CT imaging protocols were developed specifically for radiotherapy planning and the image quality and pathway tested using phantoms and five patients recruited into an in-house study. Security and accuracy of data transfer was tested throughout the whole data pathway. The patient pathway was fully established and tested ready for implementation in a PET-guided dose-escalation trial for head and neck cancer patients. Results: Couch deflection was greater than for departmental CT simulator machines. An area of high attenuation in the couch generated image artifacts and adjustments were made accordingly. Using newly developed protocols CT image quality was suitable to maintain delineation and treatment accuracy. Upon transfer of data to the treatment planning system a half pixel offset between PET and CT was observed and corrected. By taking this into account, PET to CT alignment accuracy was maintained below 1 mm in all systems in the data pathway. Transfer of structures delineated in the PET fusion software to the radiotherapy treatment planning system was validated. Conclusions: A method to perform direct PET-guided radiotherapy planning was successfully validated and specific recommendations were developed to assist other centers. Of major concern is ensuring that the quality of PET and CT data is appropriate for radiotherapy treatment planning and on-treatment verification. Couch movements can be compromised, bore-size can be a limitation for certain immobilization

  10. Specific recommendations for accurate and direct use of PET-CT in PET guided radiotherapy for head and neck sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, C. M., E-mail: christopher.thomas@gstt.nhs.uk; Convery, D. J.; Greener, A. G. [Guy' s and St. Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, Medical Physics Department, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom); Pike, L. C.; Baker, S.; Woods, E. [Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King' s College London, King' s Health Partners, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom); Hartill, C. E. [Guy' s and St. Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, Radiotherapy, Clinical Outpatients Clinic, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To provide specific experience-based guidance and recommendations for centers wishing to develop, validate, and implement an accurate and efficient process for directly using positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) for the radiotherapy planning of head and neck cancer patients. Methods: A PET-CT system was modified with hard-top couch, external lasers and radiotherapy immobilization and indexing devices and was subject to a commissioning and quality assurance program. PET-CT imaging protocols were developed specifically for radiotherapy planning and the image quality and pathway tested using phantoms and five patients recruited into an in-house study. Security and accuracy of data transfer was tested throughout the whole data pathway. The patient pathway was fully established and tested ready for implementation in a PET-guided dose-escalation trial for head and neck cancer patients. Results: Couch deflection was greater than for departmental CT simulator machines. An area of high attenuation in the couch generated image artifacts and adjustments were made accordingly. Using newly developed protocols CT image quality was suitable to maintain delineation and treatment accuracy. Upon transfer of data to the treatment planning system a half pixel offset between PET and CT was observed and corrected. By taking this into account, PET to CT alignment accuracy was maintained below 1 mm in all systems in the data pathway. Transfer of structures delineated in the PET fusion software to the radiotherapy treatment planning system was validated. Conclusions: A method to perform direct PET-guided radiotherapy planning was successfully validated and specific recommendations were developed to assist other centers. Of major concern is ensuring that the quality of PET and CT data is appropriate for radiotherapy treatment planning and on-treatment verification. Couch movements can be compromised, bore-size can be a limitation for certain immobilization

  11. Manipulating directional cell motility using intracellular superparamagnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Michael; Clemons, Tristan D.; Ho, Diwei; Gutiérrez, Lucía; Lázaro, Francisco J.; House, Michael J.; St. Pierre, Timothy G.; Fear, Mark W.; Wood, Fiona M.; Iyer, K. Swaminathan

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the ability for magnetic nanoparticles to influence cellular migration in the presence of an external magnetic field. We found that the direction of migrating keratinocytes can be controlled and the migration speed of fibroblasts can be increased with the internalisation of these nanoparticles in the presence of a magnetic field. The possibility of shepherding cells towards a region of interest through the use of internalized nanoparticles is an attractive prospect for cell tracking, cell therapies, and tissue engineering applications.This study investigated the ability for magnetic nanoparticles to influence cellular migration in the presence of an external magnetic field. We found that the direction of migrating keratinocytes can be controlled and the migration speed of fibroblasts can be increased with the internalisation of these nanoparticles in the presence of a magnetic field. The possibility of shepherding cells towards a region of interest through the use of internalized nanoparticles is an attractive prospect for cell tracking, cell therapies, and tissue engineering applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Nanoparticle characterisation, supporting experimental data, video time course study of cellular uptake of the nanoparticles and complete experimental details are all provided in the ESI. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr06594h

  12. Direct Visualization of De novo Lipogenesis in Single Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junjie; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2014-10-01

    Increased de novo lipogenesis is being increasingly recognized as a hallmark of cancer. Despite recent advances in fluorescence microscopy, autoradiography and mass spectrometry, direct observation of de novo lipogenesis in living systems remains to be challenging. Here, by coupling stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy with isotope labeled glucose, we were able to trace the dynamic metabolism of glucose in single living cells with high spatial-temporal resolution. As the first direct visualization, we observed that glucose was largely utilized for lipid synthesis in pancreatic cancer cells, which occurs at a much lower rate in immortalized normal pancreatic epithelial cells. By inhibition of glycolysis and fatty acid synthase (FAS), the key enzyme for fatty acid synthesis, we confirmed the deuterium labeled lipids in cancer cells were from de novo lipid synthesis. Interestingly, we also found that prostate cancer cells exhibit relatively lower level of de novo lipogenesis, but higher fatty acid uptake compared to pancreatic cancer cells. Together, our results demonstrate a valuable tool to study dynamic lipid metabolism in cancer and other disorders.

  13. Cytotoxic effect of Erythroxylum suberosum combined with radiotherapy in head and neck cancer cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macedo, Taysa B.C.; Torres, Hianne M.; Yamamoto-Silva, Fernanda Paula; Silva, Maria Alves G. [Universidade Federal de Goias (UFG), Goiania, GO (Brazil). Escola de Odontologia; Elias, Silvia T.; Silveira, Damaris; Magalhaes, Perola O.; Lofrano-Porto, Adriana; Guerra, Eliete N.S., E-mail: elieteneves@unb.br [Universidade de Brasilia (UnB), Brasilia, DF (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias da Saude

    2016-01-15

    The mouth and oropharynx cancer is the 6{sup th} most common type of cancer in the world. The treatment may involve surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. More than 50% of drugs against cancer were isolated from natural sources, such as Catharanthus roseus and epipodophyllotoxin, isolated from Podophyllum. The biggest challenge is to maximize the control of the disease, while minimizing morbidity and toxicity to the surrounding normal tissues. The Erythroxylum suberosum is a common plant in the Brazilian Cerrado biome and is popularly known as 'cabelo-de-negro'. The objective of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxic activity of Erythroxylum suberosum plant extracts of the Brazilian Cerrado biome associated with radiotherapy in human cell lines of oral and hypopharynx carcinomas. Cells were treated with aqueous, ethanolic and hexanic extracts of Erythroxylum suberosum and irradiated at 4 Gy, 6 Gy and 8 Gy. Cytotoxicity was evaluated by MTT assay and the absorbance was measured at 570 nm in a Beckman Counter reader. Cisplatin, standard chemotherapy, was used as positive control. The use of Erythroxylum suberosum extracts showed a possible radiosensitizing effect in vitro for head and neck cancer. The cytotoxicity effect in the cell lines was not selective and it is very similar to the effect of standard chemotherapy. The aqueous extract of Erythroxylum suberosum, combined with radiotherapy was the most cytotoxic extract to oral and hypopharynx carcinomas. (author)

  14. Cytotoxic effect of Erythroxylum suberosum combined with radiotherapy in head and neck cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macedo, Taysa B.C.; Torres, Hianne M.; Yamamoto-Silva, Fernanda Paula; Silva, Maria Alves G.; Elias, Silvia T.; Silveira, Damaris; Magalhaes, Perola O.; Lofrano-Porto, Adriana; Guerra, Eliete N.S.

    2016-01-01

    The mouth and oropharynx cancer is the 6 th most common type of cancer in the world. The treatment may involve surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. More than 50% of drugs against cancer were isolated from natural sources, such as Catharanthus roseus and epipodophyllotoxin, isolated from Podophyllum. The biggest challenge is to maximize the control of the disease, while minimizing morbidity and toxicity to the surrounding normal tissues. The Erythroxylum suberosum is a common plant in the Brazilian Cerrado biome and is popularly known as 'cabelo-de-negro'. The objective of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxic activity of Erythroxylum suberosum plant extracts of the Brazilian Cerrado biome associated with radiotherapy in human cell lines of oral and hypopharynx carcinomas. Cells were treated with aqueous, ethanolic and hexanic extracts of Erythroxylum suberosum and irradiated at 4 Gy, 6 Gy and 8 Gy. Cytotoxicity was evaluated by MTT assay and the absorbance was measured at 570 nm in a Beckman Counter reader. Cisplatin, standard chemotherapy, was used as positive control. The use of Erythroxylum suberosum extracts showed a possible radiosensitizing effect in vitro for head and neck cancer. The cytotoxicity effect in the cell lines was not selective and it is very similar to the effect of standard chemotherapy. The aqueous extract of Erythroxylum suberosum, combined with radiotherapy was the most cytotoxic extract to oral and hypopharynx carcinomas. (author)

  15. The p53-reactivating small molecule RITA induces senescence in head and neck cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Ching Chuang

    Full Text Available TP53 is the most commonly mutated gene in head and neck cancer (HNSCC, with mutations being associated with resistance to conventional therapy. Restoring normal p53 function has previously been investigated via the use of RITA (reactivation of p53 and induction of tumor cell apoptosis, a small molecule that induces a conformational change in p53, leading to activation of its downstream targets. In the current study we found that RITA indeed exerts significant effects in HNSCC cells. However, in this model, we found that a significant outcome of RITA treatment was accelerated senescence. RITA-induced senescence in a variety of p53 backgrounds, including p53 null cells. Also, inhibition of p53 expression did not appear to significantly inhibit RITA-induced senescence. Thus, this phenomenon appears to be partially p53-independent. Additionally, RITA-induced senescence appears to be partially mediated by activation of the DNA damage response and SIRT1 (Silent information regulator T1 inhibition, with a synergistic effect seen by combining either ionizing radiation or SIRT1 inhibition with RITA treatment. These data point toward a novel mechanism of RITA function as well as hint to its possible therapeutic benefit in HNSCC.

  16. The p53-reactivating small molecule RITA induces senescence in head and neck cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Hui-Ching; Yang, Liang Peng; Fitzgerald, Alison L; Osman, Abdullah; Woo, Sang Hyeok; Myers, Jeffrey N; Skinner, Heath D

    2014-01-01

    TP53 is the most commonly mutated gene in head and neck cancer (HNSCC), with mutations being associated with resistance to conventional therapy. Restoring normal p53 function has previously been investigated via the use of RITA (reactivation of p53 and induction of tumor cell apoptosis), a small molecule that induces a conformational change in p53, leading to activation of its downstream targets. In the current study we found that RITA indeed exerts significant effects in HNSCC cells. However, in this model, we found that a significant outcome of RITA treatment was accelerated senescence. RITA-induced senescence in a variety of p53 backgrounds, including p53 null cells. Also, inhibition of p53 expression did not appear to significantly inhibit RITA-induced senescence. Thus, this phenomenon appears to be partially p53-independent. Additionally, RITA-induced senescence appears to be partially mediated by activation of the DNA damage response and SIRT1 (Silent information regulator T1) inhibition, with a synergistic effect seen by combining either ionizing radiation or SIRT1 inhibition with RITA treatment. These data point toward a novel mechanism of RITA function as well as hint to its possible therapeutic benefit in HNSCC.

  17. Stem cell- and growth factor-based regenerative therapies for avascular necrosis of the femoral head

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head is a debilitating disease of multifactorial genesis, predominately affects young patients, and often leads to the development of secondary osteoarthritis. The evolving field of regenerative medicine offers promising treatment strategies using cells, biomaterial scaffolds, and bioactive factors, which might improve clinical outcome. Early stages of AVN with preserved structural integrity of the subchondral plate are accessible to retrograde surgical procedures, such as core decompression to reduce the intraosseous pressure and to induce bone remodeling. The additive application of concentrated bone marrow aspirates, ex vivo expanded mesenchymal stem cells, and osteogenic or angiogenic growth factors (or both) holds great potential to improve bone regeneration. In contrast, advanced stages of AVN with collapsed subchondral bone require an osteochondral reconstruction to preserve the physiological joint function. Analogously to strategies for osteochondral reconstruction in the knee, anterograde surgical techniques, such as osteochondral transplantation (mosaicplasty), matrix-based autologous chondrocyte implantation, or the use of acellular scaffolds alone, might preserve joint function and reduce the need for hip replacement. This review summarizes recent experimental accomplishments and initial clinical findings in the field of regenerative medicine which apply cells, growth factors, and matrices to address the clinical problem of AVN. PMID:22356811

  18. An Estimation of Radiobiological Parameters for Head-and-Neck Cancer Cells and the Clinical Implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, X. Sharon; Yang, Qiuhui; Lee, Steve P.; Li, X. Allen; Wang, Dian

    2012-01-01

    In vitro survival measurements using two human head-and-neck cancer (HNC) cell lines were performed. The specially designed split-dose surviving fraction was obtained and fitted to the linear-quadratic formalism. The repair halftime (Tr), the potential doubling time (T d ), α/β and radiosensitivity α, were estimated. Other radiobiological models: EUD, BED, TCP, etc., were used to examine the potential treatment effectiveness of different IMRT techniques. Our data indicated the repair halftime of ~17 min based on two HNC cell lines. The combined α/β, α and T d are α/β = 8.1 ± 4.1 Gy, α = 0.22 ± 0.08 Gy −1 , T d = 4.0 ± 1.8 day, respectively. The prolonged IMRT dose delivery for entire HNC treatment course could possibly result in the loss of biological effectiveness, i.e., the target EUDs decreased by 11% with fraction dose delivery time varying from 5 to 30 min. We determined the sublethal damage repair halftime and other radiobiological parameters for HNC cells, and to evaluate treatment effectiveness of the prolonged dose delivery times associated with different IMRT techniques. The estimated repair halftime for HNC is relatively short and may be comparable to the step-and-shoot IMRT fraction dose delivery time. The effectiveness of IMRT treatment may be improved by reducing the fraction delivery time for HNC treatment

  19. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-18

    Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck; Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Cancer; Head and Neck Sarcoma; Paraganglioma of Head and Neck; Chordoma of Head and Neck; Chondrosarcoma of Head and Neck; Angiofibroma of Head and Neck

  20. Consumption and direct costs of dental care for patients with head and neck cancer: A 16-year cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lexomboon, Duangjai; Karlsson, Pär; Adolfsson, Jan; Ekbom, Anders; Naimi-Akbar, Aron; Bahmanyar, Shahram; Montgomery, Scott; Sandborgh-Englund, Gunilla

    2017-01-01

    Patients with head and neck (H&N) cancer are commonly treated with surgery and/or radiotherapy, which can increase the risk of oral infection, dental caries, and periodontal disease. The present study investigated dental care consumption and costs in patient with H&N cancer before and after the cancer diagnosis. Data from Swedish regional and national registers were used to follow up dental care utilization and dental procedure costs. The analysis included 2,754 patients who had been diagnosed with H&N cancer (exposed cohort) in Stockholm County, Sweden, during 2000-2012 and 13,036 matched persons without cancer (unexposed cohort). The exposed cohort was sub-grouped into irradiated and non-irradiated patients for analysis. The exposed cohort underwent a moderately higher number of dental procedures per year than the unexposed cohort in both the year of the cancer diagnosis and the year after cancer diagnosis; in addition, these numbers were higher in the irradiated than in the non-irradiated subgroup of the exposed cohort. Dental care consumption and costs in the exposed cohort declined over time but remained at a slightly higher level than in the unexposed cohort over the long term (more than two years). Examinations and preventive procedures accounted for most of the higher consumption in the short term (2 years) and at the longer term follow-up. Swedish national insurance subsidized costs for dental treatment, which were highest in the irradiated subgroup and lowest in the unexposed cohort. Direct costs to the patient, however, were similar among the groups. Swedish national health insurance protects patients with H&N cancer from high dental expenditures. Further studies on the cost-effectiveness of preventive dental care for patients are needed.

  1. 14-3-3 zeta is a molecular target in guggulsterone induced apoptosis in Head and Neck cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macha, Muzafar A; Matta, Ajay; Chauhan, SS; Siu, KW Michael; Ralhan, Ranju

    2010-01-01

    The five-year survival rates for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients are less than 50%, and the prognosis has not improved, despite advancements in standard multi-modality therapies. Hence major emphasis is being laid on identification of novel molecular targets and development of multi-targeted therapies. 14-3-3 zeta, a multifunctional phospho-serine/phospho-threonine binding protein, is emerging as an effector of pro-survival signaling by binding to several proteins involved in apoptosis (Bad, FKHRL1 and ASK1) and may serve as an appropriate target for head and neck cancer therapy. Herein, we determined effect of guggulsterone (GS), a farnesoid X receptor antagonist, on 14-3-3 zeta associated molecular pathways for abrogation of apoptosis in head and neck cancer cells. Head and neck cancer cells were treated with guggulsterone (GS). Effect of GS-treatment was evaluated using cell viability (MTT) assay and apoptosis was verified by annexin V, DNA fragmentation and M30 CytoDeath antibody assay. Mechanism of GS-induced apoptosis was determined by western blotting and co-IP assays using specific antibodies. Using in vitro models of head and neck cancer, we showed 14-3-3 zeta as a key player regulating apoptosis in GS treated SCC4 cells. Treatment with GS releases BAD from the inhibitory action of 14-3-3 zeta in proliferating HNSCC cells by activating protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). These events initiate the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis, as revealed by increased levels of cytochrome c in cytoplasmic extracts of GS-treated SCC4 cells. In addition, GS treatment significantly reduced the expression of anti-apoptotic proteins, Bcl-2, xIAP, Mcl1, survivin, cyclin D1 and c-myc, thus committing cells to apoptosis. These events were followed by activation of caspase 9, caspase 8 and caspase 3 leading to cleavage of its downstream target, poly-ADP-ribose phosphate (PARP). GS targets 14-3-3 zeta associated cellular pathways for reducing

  2. Highly efficient destruction of squamous carcinoma cells of the head and neck by photochemical internalization of Ranpirnase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebers, Nora; Holland-Letz, Tim; Welschof, Mona; Høgset, Anders; Jäger, Dirk; Arndt, Michaela A E; Krauss, Jürgen

    2017-11-01

    Photochemical Internalization is a novel drug delivery technology for cancer treatment based on the principle of Photodynamic Treatment. Using a photosensitizer that locates in endocytic vesicles membranes of tumor cells, Photochemical internalization enables cytosolic release of endocytosed antitumor agents in a site-specific manner. The purpose of the present in-vitro study was to explore whether Photochemical Internalization is able to enhance the efficacy of Ranpirnase, a cytotoxic amphibian ribonuclease, for eradication of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Cell viability was measured in 8 primary human cell lines of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck after treatment with Ranpirnase and Photochemical Internalization. For Photochemical Internalization the photosensitizer disulfonated tetraphenyl porphine was incubated with tumor cells followed by exposure to blue light (435 nm). Our study demonstrates significant enhancement of antitumor activity of Ranpirnase by Photochemical Internalization. Treatment responses were heterogeneous between the primary cancer cell lines. Combining Photochemical Internalization with Ranpirnase resulted in 4.6 to 1,940-fold increased cytotoxicity when compared with the ribonuclease alone (P Internalization in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

  3. Autonomous Voltage Oscillations in a Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogueira, Jéssica A.; Peña Arias, Ivonne K.; Hanke-Rauschenbach, Richard; Vidakovic-Koch, Tanja; Varela, Hamilton; Sundmacher, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells fed with H_2/CO mixtures at the anode have a considerably lower performance than fuel cells fed with pure hydrogen. However, when operated in an autonomous oscillatory regime, the overall voltage loss decreases due to a self-cleaning mechanism. Another molecule, also widely used as feed in the fuel cell and susceptible to kinetic instabilities, is methanol. To the best of our knowledge, there are no reports on autonomous voltage oscillations in the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). The purpose of this work was to explore if such instabilities also occur in the DMFC system. Initially, half-cell experiments with a gas diffusion electrode were performed. Then, a DMFC was operated under current control and studied by means of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The half-cell measurements revealed that the induction period for oscillations depends on the mass transfer conditions, where on stagnant electrode the induction time was shorter than in the case of forced convection. The DMFC showed also autonomous voltage oscillations above a certain threshold current. The results obtained by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy give evidence of a negative differential resistance in the fuel cell, hitherto not described in the literature, which can be related to the appearance of oscillations during galvanostatic methanol electro-oxidation. These results open the possibility to evaluate the performance of low-temperature fuel cells fed with carbon-containing fuels under oscillatory operating conditions.

  4. Functional microarray analysis suggests repressed cell-cell signaling and cell survival-related modules inhibit progression of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soares Fernando A

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer shows a great diversity in its clinical behavior which cannot be easily predicted using the currently available clinical or pathological markers. The identification of pathways associated with lymph node metastasis (N+ and recurrent head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC may increase our understanding of the complex biology of this disease. Methods Tumor samples were obtained from untreated HNSCC patients undergoing surgery. Patients were classified according to pathologic lymph node status (positive or negative or tumor recurrence (recurrent or non-recurrent tumor after treatment (surgery with neck dissection followed by radiotherapy. Using microarray gene expression, we screened tumor samples according to modules comprised by genes in the same pathway or functional category. Results The most frequent alterations were the repression of modules in negative lymph node (N0 and in non-recurrent tumors rather than induction of modules in N+ or in recurrent tumors. N0 tumors showed repression of modules that contain cell survival genes and in non-recurrent tumors cell-cell signaling and extracellular region modules were repressed. Conclusions The repression of modules that contain cell survival genes in N0 tumors reinforces the important role that apoptosis plays in the regulation of metastasis. In addition, because tumor samples used here were not microdissected, tumor gene expression data are represented together with the stroma, which may reveal signaling between the microenvironment and tumor cells. For instance, in non-recurrent tumors, extracellular region module was repressed, indicating that the stroma and tumor cells may have fewer interactions, which disable metastasis development. Finally, the genes highlighted in our analysis can be implicated in more than one pathway or characteristic, suggesting that therapeutic approaches to prevent tumor progression should target more than one gene or pathway

  5. Radiation-Induced Dedifferentiation of Head and Neck Cancer Cells Into Cancer Stem Cells Depends on Human Papillomavirus Status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlashi, Erina; Chen, Allen M.; Boyrie, Sabrina; Yu, Garrett; Nguyen, Andrea; Brower, Philip A.; Hess, Clayton B.; Pajonk, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that the radiation response of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive and HPV-negative head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) differs and is not reflected in the radiation response of the bulk tumor populations, that radiation therapy (RT) can dedifferentiate non-stem HNSCC cells into CSCs, and that radiation-induced dedifferentiation depends on the HPV status. Methods and Materials: Records of a cohort of 162 HNSCC patients were reviewed, and their outcomes were correlated with their HPV status. Using a panel of HPV-positive and HPV-negative HNSCC cell lines expressing a reporter for CSCs, we characterized HPV-positive and HPV-negative lines via flow cytometry, sphere-forming capacity assays in vitro, and limiting dilution assays in vivo. Non-CSCs were treated with different doses of radiation, and the dedifferentiation of non-CSCs into CSCs was investigated via flow cytometry and quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction for re-expression of reprogramming factors. Results: Patients with HPV-positive tumors have superior overall survival and local–regional control. Human papillomavirus–positive HNSCC cell lines have lower numbers of CSCs, which inversely correlates with radiosensitivity. Human papillomavirus–negative HNSCC cell lines lack hierarchy owing to enhanced spontaneous dedifferentiation. Non-CSCs from HPV-negative lines show enhanced radiation-induced dedifferentiation compared with HPV-positive lines, and RT induced re-expression of Yamanaka reprogramming factors. Conclusions: Supporting the favorable prognosis of HPV-positive HNSCCs, we show that (1) HPV-positive HNSCCs have a lower frequency of CSCs; (2) RT can dedifferentiate HNSCC cells into CSCs; and (3) radiation-induced dedifferentiation depends on the HPV status of the tumor.

  6. Radiation-Induced Dedifferentiation of Head and Neck Cancer Cells Into Cancer Stem Cells Depends on Human Papillomavirus Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlashi, Erina, E-mail: evlashi@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States); Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States); Chen, Allen M.; Boyrie, Sabrina; Yu, Garrett; Nguyen, Andrea; Brower, Philip A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States); Hess, Clayton B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis, Sacramento, California (United States); Pajonk, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States); Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that the radiation response of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive and HPV-negative head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) differs and is not reflected in the radiation response of the bulk tumor populations, that radiation therapy (RT) can dedifferentiate non-stem HNSCC cells into CSCs, and that radiation-induced dedifferentiation depends on the HPV status. Methods and Materials: Records of a cohort of 162 HNSCC patients were reviewed, and their outcomes were correlated with their HPV status. Using a panel of HPV-positive and HPV-negative HNSCC cell lines expressing a reporter for CSCs, we characterized HPV-positive and HPV-negative lines via flow cytometry, sphere-forming capacity assays in vitro, and limiting dilution assays in vivo. Non-CSCs were treated with different doses of radiation, and the dedifferentiation of non-CSCs into CSCs was investigated via flow cytometry and quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction for re-expression of reprogramming factors. Results: Patients with HPV-positive tumors have superior overall survival and local–regional control. Human papillomavirus–positive HNSCC cell lines have lower numbers of CSCs, which inversely correlates with radiosensitivity. Human papillomavirus–negative HNSCC cell lines lack hierarchy owing to enhanced spontaneous dedifferentiation. Non-CSCs from HPV-negative lines show enhanced radiation-induced dedifferentiation compared with HPV-positive lines, and RT induced re-expression of Yamanaka reprogramming factors. Conclusions: Supporting the favorable prognosis of HPV-positive HNSCCs, we show that (1) HPV-positive HNSCCs have a lower frequency of CSCs; (2) RT can dedifferentiate HNSCC cells into CSCs; and (3) radiation-induced dedifferentiation depends on the HPV status of the tumor.

  7. Opposing function of MYBBP1A in proliferation and migration of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acuña Sanhueza, Gustavo A; Simon, Christian; Hess, Jochen; Faller, Leonie; George, Babitha; Koffler, Jennifer; Misetic, Vinko; Flechtenmacher, Christa; Dyckhoff, Gerhard; Plinkert, Peter P; Angel, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is one of the most prevalent and lethal cancers worldwide and mortality mostly results from loco-regional recurrence and metastasis. Despite its significance, our knowledge on molecular, cellular and environmental mechanisms that drive disease pathogenesis remains largely elusive, and there are limited therapeutic options, with only negligible clinical benefit. We applied global gene expression profiling with samples derived from a recently established mouse model for oral cancer recurrence and identified a list of genes with differential expression between primary and recurrent tumors. One differentially expressed gene codes for Myb-binding protein 1a (MYBBP1A), which is known as a transcriptional co-regulator that physically interacts with nuclear transcription factors, such as NFκB and p53. We confirmed significantly reduced MYBBP1A protein levels on tissue sections of recurrent mouse tumors compared to primary tumors by immunohistochemistry, and found aberrant MYBBP1A protein levels also in tumor samples of HNSCC patients. Interestingly, silencing of MYBBP1A expression in murine SCC7 and in human HNSCC cell lines elicited increased migration but decreased cell growth. We provide experimental evidence that MYBBP1A is an important molecular switch in the regulation of tumor cell proliferation versus migration in HNSCC and it will be a major challenge for the future to proof the concept whether regulation MYBBP1A expression and/or function could serve as a novel option for anti-cancer therapy

  8. SKLB188 inhibits the growth of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma by suppressing EGFR signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzegar, Mansoureh; Ma, Shuang; Zhang, Chao; Chen, Xin; Gu, Ying; Shang, Chaowei; Jiang, Xiaojuan; Yang, Jiao; Nathan, Cherie-Ann; Yang, Shengyong; Huang, Shile

    2017-10-10

    Overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) occurs in approximately 90% of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), and is correlated with poor prognosis. Thus, targeting EGFR is a promising strategy for treatment of HNSCC. Several small molecule EGFR inhibitors have been tested in clinical trials for treatment of HNSCC, but none of them are more effective than the current chemotherapeutic drugs. Thus, it is urgently needed to develop novel EGFR inhibitors for HNSCC treatment. By screening an in-house focused library containing approximately 650 000 known kinase inhibitors and kinase inhibitor-like compounds containing common kinase inhibitor core scaffolds, we identified SKLB188 as a lead compound for inhibition of EGFR. The anticancer effects of SKLB188 on HNSCC cells were investigated by in vitro cell growth, cell cycle and apoptosis assays, as well as in vivo FaDu xenograft mouse model. Molecular docking, in vitro kinase profiling and western blotting were performed to characterise EGFR as the molecular target. SKLB188 inhibited HNSCC cell proliferation by inducing G 1 cell cycle arrest, which was associated with downregulating the expression of Cdc25A, cyclins D1/A and cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK2/4), and upregulating the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors (p21 Cip1 and p27 Kip1 ), leading to decreased phosphorylation of Rb. SKLB188 also induced caspase-dependent apoptosis of HNSCC cells by downregulating the expression of Mcl-1 and survivin. Molecular docking revealed that SKLB188 could bind to the kinase domain of EGFR through hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. In vitro kinase assay showed that SKLB188 inhibited the activity of a recombinant human EGFR very potently (IC 50 =5 nM). Western blot analysis demonstrated that SKLB188 inhibited the phosphorylation of EGFR and its downstream targets, extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (Erk1/2) and Akt in the cells. In addition, SKLB188 dose

  9. Pt -based anode catalysts for direct ethanol fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoyos, Bibian; Sanchez, Carlos; Gonzalez, Javier

    2007-01-01

    In this work it is studied the electro-catalytic behavior of pure platinum and platinum-based alloys with Ru, Sn, Ir, and Os supported on carbon to the ethanol electro-oxidation in aims to develop anodic catalysts for direct ethanol fuel cells, additionally, porous electrodes and membrane electrode assemblies were built for proton exchange membrane fuel cells in which the electrodes were tested. Catalysts characterization was made by cyclic voltammetry whereas the fuel cells behavior tests were made by current-potential polarization curves. in general, all alloys show a lower on-set reaction potential and a higher catalytic activity than pure platinum. However, in the high over potential zone, pure platinum has higher catalytic activity than the alloys. In agreement with these results, the alloys studied here could be useful in fuel cells operating on moderated and low current

  10. Allosteric conformational barcodes direct signaling in the cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussinov, Ruth; Ma, Buyong; Tsai, Chung-Jung; Csermely, Peter

    2013-09-03

    The cellular network is highly interconnected. Pathways merge and diverge. They proceed through shared proteins and may change directions. How are cellular pathways controlled and their directions decided, coded, and read? These questions become particularly acute when we consider that a small number of pathways, such as signaling pathways that regulate cell fates, cell proliferation, and cell death in development, are extensively exploited. This review focuses on these signaling questions from the structural standpoint and discusses the literature in this light. All co-occurring allosteric events (including posttranslational modifications, pathogen binding, and gain-of-function mutations) collectively tag the protein functional site with a unique barcode. The barcode shape is read by an interacting molecule, which transmits the signal. A conformational barcode provides an intracellular address label, which selectively favors binding to one partner and quenches binding to others, and, in this way, determines the pathway direction, and, eventually, the cell's response and fate. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Response of a direct methanol fuel cell to fuel change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leo, T.J. [Dpto de Sistemas Oceanicos y Navales- ETSI Navales, Univ. Politecnica de Madrid, Avda Arco de la Victoria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Raso, M.A.; de la Blanca, E. Sanchez [Dpto de Quimica Fisica I- Fac. CC. Quimicas, Univ. Complutense de Madrid, Avda Complutense s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Navarro, E.; Villanueva, M. [Dpto de Motopropulsion y Termofluidodinamica, ETSI Aeronauticos, Univ. Politecnica de Madrid, Pza Cardenal Cisneros 3, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Moreno, B. [Instituto de Ceramica y Vidrio, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, C/Kelsen 5, Campus de la UAM, 28049 Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-10-15

    Methanol and ethanol have recently received much attention as liquid fuels particularly as alternative 'energy-vectors' for the future. In this sense, to find a direct alcohol fuel cell that able to interchange the fuel without losing performances in an appreciable way would represent an evident advantage in the field of portable applications. In this work, the response of a in-house direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) to the change of fuel from methanol to ethanol and its behaviour at different ambient temperature values have been investigated. A corrosion study on materials suitable to fabricate the bipolar plates has been carried out and either 316- or 2205-duplex stainless steels have proved to be adequate for using in direct alcohol fuel cells. Polarization curves have been measured at different ambient temperature values, controlled by an experimental setup devised for this purpose. Data have been fitted to a model taking into account the temperature effect. For both fuels, methanol and ethanol, a linear dependence of adjustable parameters with temperature is obtained. Fuel cell performance comparison in terms of open circuit voltage, kinetic and resistance is established. (author)

  12. Cell-geometry-dependent changes in plasma membrane order direct stem cell signalling and fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Erlach, Thomas C.; Bertazzo, Sergio; Wozniak, Michele A.; Horejs, Christine-Maria; Maynard, Stephanie A.; Attwood, Simon; Robinson, Benjamin K.; Autefage, Hélène; Kallepitis, Charalambos; del Río Hernández, Armando; Chen, Christopher S.; Goldoni, Silvia; Stevens, Molly M.

    2018-03-01

    Cell size and shape affect cellular processes such as cell survival, growth and differentiation1-4, thus establishing cell geometry as a fundamental regulator of cell physiology. The contributions of the cytoskeleton, specifically actomyosin tension, to these effects have been described, but the exact biophysical mechanisms that translate changes in cell geometry to changes in cell behaviour remain mostly unresolved. Using a variety of innovative materials techniques, we demonstrate that the nanostructure and lipid assembly within the cell plasma membrane are regulated by cell geometry in a ligand-independent manner. These biophysical changes trigger signalling events involving the serine/threonine kinase Akt/protein kinase B (PKB) that direct cell-geometry-dependent mesenchymal stem cell differentiation. Our study defines a central regulatory role by plasma membrane ordered lipid raft microdomains in modulating stem cell differentiation with potential translational applications.

  13. The effect of whole body or total-head x irradiation of the metallophilic cells in the mice spleen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Osamu; Matsueda, Yasutoshi; Mizuguchi, Hiroshi; Moriguchi, Kenzo; Ogata, Kunitoshi; Sugie, Tsuneto

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to clarify morphological changes of the reticuloendothelial cells in the spleen following X-irradiation by Katsura's silver impregnation method. The animals used in this experiment were ddN female mice weighing 20 to 25g. The mice were given X-irradiation to the total-head (1,500R) or whole body (300R). The metallophilic cells in the spleen of control mice were of the small foamy type in the follicle, the large stellate type in the marginal metallophils, the small branching type in the marginal zone and the small foamy or round type in the red pulp, respectively. The metallophilic cells decreased immediately after whole body irradiation and the number of cells returned to normal in from 10 to 14 days. On the other hand, the number of the metallophilic cells in the follicle and the perifollicular region increased immediately after total-head X-irradiation. This state continued for several days. In the marginal zone and red pulp, the number of amoebian type cells appeared from 24 hours after irradiation and the number of cells in total-head irradiation group were more clearly distinguishable than in the whole body irradiated group. (author)

  14. CD147 and AGR2 expression promote cellular proliferation and metastasis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweeny, Larissa, E-mail: larissasweeny@gmail.com [Department of Surgery, University of Alabama, Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, 1670 University Boulevard, Volker Hall G082, Birmingham, Alabama (United States); Liu, Zhiyong; Bush, Benjamin D.; Hartman, Yolanda [Department of Surgery, University of Alabama, Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, 1670 University Boulevard, Volker Hall G082, Birmingham, Alabama (United States); Zhou, Tong [Department of Medicine, Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, 1825 University Boulevard, Shelby Biomedical Research Building 302, Birmingham, Alabama (United States); Rosenthal, Eben L., E-mail: oto@uab.edu [Department of Surgery, University of Alabama, Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, 1670 University Boulevard, Volker Hall G082, Birmingham, Alabama (United States)

    2012-08-15

    The signaling pathways facilitating metastasis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells are not fully understood. CD147 is a transmembrane glycoprotein known to induce cell migration and invasion. AGR2 is a secreted peptide also known to promote cell metastasis. Here we describe their importance in the migration and invasion of HNSCC cells (FADU and OSC-19) in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, knockdown of CD147 or AGR2 decreased cellular proliferation, migration and invasion. In vivo, knockdown of CD147 or AGR2 expression decreased primary tumor growth as well as regional and distant metastasis. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated AGR2 in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma for the first time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We explored the relationship between AGR2 and CD147 for the first time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AGR2 and CD147 appear to co-localize in head and squamous cell carcinoma samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of both AGR2 and CD147 reduced migration and invasion in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of both AGR2 and CD147 decreased metastasis in vivo.

  15. CD147 and AGR2 expression promote cellular proliferation and metastasis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeny, Larissa; Liu, Zhiyong; Bush, Benjamin D.; Hartman, Yolanda; Zhou, Tong; Rosenthal, Eben L.

    2012-01-01

    The signaling pathways facilitating metastasis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells are not fully understood. CD147 is a transmembrane glycoprotein known to induce cell migration and invasion. AGR2 is a secreted peptide also known to promote cell metastasis. Here we describe their importance in the migration and invasion of HNSCC cells (FADU and OSC-19) in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, knockdown of CD147 or AGR2 decreased cellular proliferation, migration and invasion. In vivo, knockdown of CD147 or AGR2 expression decreased primary tumor growth as well as regional and distant metastasis. -- Highlights: ► We investigated AGR2 in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma for the first time. ► We explored the relationship between AGR2 and CD147 for the first time. ► AGR2 and CD147 appear to co-localize in head and squamous cell carcinoma samples. ► Knockdown of both AGR2 and CD147 reduced migration and invasion in vitro. ► Knockdown of both AGR2 and CD147 decreased metastasis in vivo.

  16. Bimodal ex vivo expansion of T cells from patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junker, Niels; Andersen, Mads Hald; Wenandy, Lynn

    2011-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) has proven effective in metastatic melanoma and should therefore be explored in other types of cancer. The aim of this study was to examine the feasibility of potentially expanding clinically relevant quantities of tumor-specific T-cell cu...

  17. Squamous cell carcinoma presenting with trigeminal anesthesia: An uncommon presentation of head & neck cancer with unknown primary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ameer T; Dagher, Walid I; O'Leary, Miriam A; Wein, Richard O

    The differential diagnosis of facial anesthesia is vast. This may be secondary to trauma, neoplasm, both intracranial and extracranial, infection, and neurologic disease. When evaluating a patient with isolated facial anesthesia, the head and neck surgeon often thinks of adenoid cystic carcinoma, which has a propensity for perineural invasion and spread. When one thinks of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma with or without unknown primary, the typical presentation involves dysphagia, odynophagia, weight loss, hoarseness, or more commonly, a neck mass. Squamous cell carcinoma presenting as facial anesthesia and perineural spread, with no primary site is quite rare. Case presentations and review of the literature. Trigeminal anesthesia is an uncommon presentation of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma with unknown primary. We present two interesting cases of invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the trigeminal nerve, with no primary site identified. We will also review the literature of head and neck malignancies with perineural spread and the management techniques for the two different cases presented. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Complex p63 mRNA isoform expression patterns in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thurfjell, N.; Coates, P.J.; Uusitalo, T.

    2004-01-01

    on the role of p63 expression in human tumours, we used quantitative real-time RT-PCR to study individual p63 isoforms in squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (SCCHN). In keeping with previous reports, expression of the deltaN- and p63alpha-isoforms predominated and deltaNp63 mRNA was expressed...

  19. Phase II study of 3-AP Triapine in patients with recurrent or metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nutting, C.M.; Herpen, C.M.L. van; Miah, A.B.; Bhide, S.A.; Machiels, J.P.; Buter, J.; Kelly, C.; Raucourt, D. de; Harrington, K.J.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment options for recurrent or metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) are limited with response rates to cytotoxic chemotherapy of approximately 30% and median survival of 6 months. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In a multicentre phase II study, 32 patients with recurrent or

  20. Is Dosage Important? Examining Head Start Preschoolers' Language and Literacy Learning after One versus Two Years of "ExCELL"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindman, Annemarie H.; Wasik, Barbara A.

    2017-01-01

    The current study examined whether Head Start children who experienced a high-quality preschool intervention, "Exceptional Coaching for Early Language and Literacy" ("ExCELL"), as three-year-olds began the subsequent pre-kindergarten (or four-year-old) year with stronger language and literacy skills than same-age peers who…

  1. Follow-up strategies in head and neck cancer other than upper aerodigestive tract squamous cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Digonnet, Antoine; Hamoir, Marc; Andry, Guy; Vander Poorten, Vincent; Haigentz, Missak; Langendijk, Johannes A.; de Bree, Remco; Hinni, Michael L.; Mendenhall, William M.; Paleri, Vinidh; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Werner, Jochen A.; Takes, Robert P.; Ferlito, Alfio

    Post-therapy follow-up for patients with head and neck cancer other than upper aerodigestive tract squamous cell carcinoma should meet several objectives: to detect both local, regional or distant recurrences, to evaluate acute and long-term treatment-related side effects, to guide the

  2. Data-Driven prioritisation of antibody-drug conjugate targets in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanemaaijer, Saskia H; van Gijn, Stephanie E; Oosting, Sjoukje F; Plaat, Boudewijn E C; Moek, Kirsten L; Schuuring, Ed M; van der Laan, Bernard F A M; Roodenburg, Jan L N; van Vugt, Marcel A T M; van der Vegt, Bert; Fehrmann, Rudolf S N

    BACKGROUND: For patients with recurrent or metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) palliative treatment options that improve overall survival are limited. The prognosis in this group remains poor and there is an unmet need for new therapeutic options. An emerging class of

  3. Sentinel node biopsy in head and neck squamous cell cancer: 5-year follow-up of a European multicenter trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkureishi, Lee W T; Ross, Gary L; Shoaib, Taimur

    2010-01-01

    Sentinel node biopsy (SNB) may represent an alternative to elective neck dissection for the staging of patients with early head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). To date, the technique has been successfully described in a number of small single-institution studies. This report describes...

  4. Phase III study of gefitinib compared with intravenous methotrexate for recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck [corrected].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stewart, J.S.; Cohen, E.E.; Licitra, L.; Herpen, C.M.L. van; Khorprasert, C.; Soulieres, D.; Vodvarka, P.; Rischin, D.; Garin, A.M.; Hirsch, F.R.; Varella-Garcia, M.; Ghiorghiu, S.; Hargreaves, L.; Armour, A.; Speake, G.; Swaisland, A.; Vokes, E.E.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare survival in patients with recurrent or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) treated with gefitinib 250 or 500 mg/day or standard methotrexate. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Four hundred eighty-six patients with recurrent SCCHN were randomly assigned to oral

  5. Non-smoking and non-drinking patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: a distinct population.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farshadpour, F.; Hordijk, G.J.; Koole, R.A.; Slootweg, P.J.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To recognize specific clinicopathological characteristics of non-smoking and non-drinking (NSND) head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients. This can increase our knowledge regarding a potentially different carcinogenesis in these patients. STUDY DESIGN/METHODS: Retrospective

  6. Manufacturing technologies for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gluesen, Andreas; Mueller, Martin; Kimiaie, Nicola; Konradi, Irene; Mergel, Juergen; Stolten, Detlef [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). Inst. of Energy Research - IEF-3: Fuel Cells

    2010-07-01

    Fuel cell research is focussing on increasing power density and lifetime and reducing costs of the whole fuel cell system. In order to reach these aims, it is necessary to develop appropriately designed components outgoing from high quality materials, a suitable manufacturing process and a well balanced system. To make use of the advantages that can be obtained by developing production technology, we are mainly improving the coating and assembling techniques for polymer electrolyte fuel cells, especially Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (DMFCs). Coating is used for making fuel cell electrodes as well as highly conductive contacts. Assembling is used to join larger components like membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) and bipolar units consisting of flow fields and the separator plate, as well as entire stacks. On the one hand a reproducible manufacturing process is required to study fine differences in fuel cell performance affected by new materials or new designs. On the other hand a change in each parameter of the manufacturing process itself can change product properties and therefore affect fuel cell performance. As a result, gas diffusion electrodes (GDEs) are now produced automatically in square-meter batches, the hot-pressing of MEAs is a fully automated process and by pre-assembling the number of parts that have to be assembled in a stack was reduced by a factor of 10. These achievements make DMFC manufacturing more reproducible and less error-prone. All these and further developments of manufacturing technology are necessary to make DMFCs ready for the market. (orig.)

  7. Direct Visualization of DNA Replication Dynamics in Zebrafish Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriya, Kenji; Higashiyama, Eriko; Avşar-Ban, Eriko; Tamaru, Yutaka; Ogata, Shin; Takebayashi, Shin-ichiro; Ogata, Masato; Okumura, Katsuzumi

    2015-12-01

    Spatiotemporal regulation of DNA replication in the S-phase nucleus has been extensively studied in mammalian cells because it is tightly coupled with the regulation of other nuclear processes such as transcription. However, little is known about the replication dynamics in nonmammalian cells. Here, we analyzed the DNA replication processes of zebrafish (Danio rerio) cells through the direct visualization of replicating DNA in the nucleus and on DNA fiber molecules isolated from the nucleus. We found that zebrafish chromosomal DNA at the nuclear interior was replicated first, followed by replication of DNA at the nuclear periphery, which is reminiscent of the spatiotemporal regulation of mammalian DNA replication. However, the relative duration of interior DNA replication in zebrafish cells was longer compared to mammalian cells, possibly reflecting zebrafish-specific genomic organization. The rate of replication fork progression and ori-to-ori distance measured by the DNA combing technique were ∼ 1.4 kb/min and 100 kb, respectively, which are comparable to those in mammalian cells. To our knowledge, this is a first report that measures replication dynamics in zebrafish cells.

  8. Magnetically insulated fission electric cells for direct energy conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slutz, S.A.; Seidel, D.B.; Lipinski, R.J.; Rochau, G.E.; Brown, L.C.

    2003-01-01

    The principles of fission electric cells are reviewed. A detailed Monte Carlo model of the efficiency of a fission electric cell is presented and a theory of magnetically insulated fission electric cells (MIFECs) is developed. It is shown that the low operating voltages observed in previous MIFEC experiments were due to nonoptimal magnetic field profiles. Improved magnetic field profiles are presented. It is further shown that the large electric field present in a MIFEC limits the structure of the cathode and can lead to a displacement instability of the cathode toward the anode. This instability places constraints on the number of cells that can be strung together without some external cathode support. The large electric field stress also leads to electrical surface breakdown of the cathode. It is shown that this leads to the formation of a virtual cathode resulting in geometry constraints for spherical cells. Finally it is shown that the requirements of magnetic insulation and high efficiency leads to very low average density of the fissile material. Thus a reactor using fission electric cells for efficient direct energy conversion will be large and require a very large number of cells. This could be mitigated somewhat by the use of exotic fuels

  9. The effect of cilengitide in combination with irradiation and chemotherapy in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiduschka, G. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Clinical Pharmacology, Vienna (Austria); Lill, C.; Schneider, S.; Kotowski, U.; Thurnher, D. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Vienna (Austria); Seemann, R. [Medical University of Vienna, Craniomaxillofacial and Oral Surgery, Vienna (Austria); Kornek, G. [Medical University of Vienna, Internal Medicine, Vienna (Austria); Schmid, R. [Medical University of Vienna, Radiotherapy and Radiobiology, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-05-15

    Integrins are highly attractive targets in oncology due to their involvement in angiogenesis in a wide spectrum of cancer entities. Among several integrin inhibitors under clinical evaluation, cilengitide is the most promising compound. However, little is known about the cellular processes induced during cilengitide therapy in combination with irradiation and cisplatin in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). The cytostatic effect of cilengitide was assessed by proliferation assay in the three HNSCC cell lines SCC25, FaDu and CAL27. Combination experiments with cisplatin and irradiation were performed. Possible synergistic effects were calculated in combination index (CI) analyses. Colony forming inhibition was investigated in clonogenic assays. Real-time PCR arrays were used to evaluate target protein gene expression patterns. Flow cytometry was used to detect apoptosis. Used alone, cilengitide has only minor cytotoxic effects in HNSCC cell lines. However, combination with cisplatin resulted in synergistic growth inhibition in all three cell lines. Irradiation showed synergism in short-term experiments and in colony forming assays, an additive effect was detected. Real-time PCR assay detected downregulation of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 after exposure of cells to cilengitide. Cilengitide in combination with cisplatin and irradiation may be a feasible option for the treatment of patients with head and neck cancer. However, further investigations are required to understand the exact mechanism that leads to synergistic cytotoxicity. (orig.) [German] Durch ihre Rolle bei der Angiogenese sind Integrine ein attraktives Ziel in der onkologischen Forschung. Der derzeit vielversprechendste Inhibitor dieser Molekuele ist Cilengitide, welches bereits in klinischen Studien getestet wird. Dennoch ist erst wenig ueber die zellulaeren Vorgaenge bekannt, welche durch Cilengitide in Kopf-Hals-Karzinomen (HNSCC) insbesondere in Kombination mit Strahlentherapie und

  10. Concurrent cetuximab, cisplatin, and radiation for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Na; Erjala, Kaisa; Kulmala, Jarmo; Qiu Xueshan; Sundvall, Maria; Elenius, Klaus; Grenman, Reidar

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: For locoregionally advanced HNSCC, chemoradiotherapy with cisplatin or another platinum compound is considered as one of the standard treatment regimes. Cisplatin has improved the loco-regional control, but also increased especially the acute side effects. Cetuximab blocks ligand binding and receptor activation by binding to the extracellular domain of the EGFR. The blockade of EGFR signaling in combination with cytotoxic drugs or with radiotherapy could be a novel effective management with a relatively favourable toxicity for HNSCC. In the present study we have examined in vitro a potentially novel effective management for HNSCC, cetuximab combined with cisplatin and radiotherapy. Materials and methods: Seven head and neck SCC cell lines were studied. Cetuximab concentrations of 0.22-8.20 nM and cisplatin concentrations of 0.038-0.220 μg/ml were used. In order to test the concurrent use of cetuximab, cisplatin and radiation, the cells were treated with the desired drug concentrations immediately after irradiation, plated into 96-well culture plates, and incubated for 4 weeks. The number of positive wells was counted. The PE was calculated and fraction survival data were fitted to the LQ model. AUC value was obtained with numerical integration. The types of interaction were analyzed. Results: Cetuximab and cisplatin constantly induced an additive or supra-additive effect when combined with irradiation in the seven HNSCC cell lines tested. Conclusions: We evaluated concurrent cetuximab, cisplatin, and radiation for HNSCC cell lines. Preliminary efficacy results are encouraging, and further development of this targeted combined modality paradigm is warranted.

  11. Pretreatment oral hygiene habits and survival of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friemel, Juliane; Foraita, Ronja; Günther, Kathrin; Heibeck, Mathias; Günther, Frauke; Pflueger, Maren; Pohlabeln, Hermann; Behrens, Thomas; Bullerdiek, Jörn; Nimzyk, Rolf; Ahrens, Wolfgang

    2016-03-11

    The survival time of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is related to health behavior, such as tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption. Poor oral health (OH), dental care (DC) and the frequent use of mouthwash have been shown to represent independent risk factors for head and neck cancerogenesis, but their impact on the survival of HNSCC patients has not been systematically investigated. Two hundred seventy-six incident HNSCC cases recruited for the ARCAGE study were followed through a period of 6-10 years. Interview-based information on wearing of dentures, gum bleeding, teeth brushing, use of floss and dentist visits were grouped into weighted composite scores, i.e. oral health (OH) and dental care (DH). Use of mouthwash was assessed as frequency per day. Also obtained were other types of health behavior, such as smoking, alcohol drinking and diet, appreciated as both confounding and study variables. Endpoints were progression-free survival, overall survival and tumor-specific survival. Prognostic values were estimated using Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards regression models. A good dental care score, summarizing annual dental visits, daily teeth cleaning and use of floss was associated with longer overall survival time (p = .001). The results of the Cox regression models similarly suggested a higher risk of tumor progression and shortened overall survival in patients with poor dental care, but the results lost their statistical significance after other types of health behavior had been controlled for. Frequent use of mouthwash (≥ 2 times/day) significantly increased the risk of tumor-specific death (HR = 2.26; CI = 1.19-4.32). Alcohol consumption and tobacco smoking were dose-dependently associated with tumor progression and shorter overall survival. Frequent mouthwash use of ≥ 2 times/day seems to elevate the risk of tumor-specific death in HNSCC patients. Good dental care scores are associated with longer overall

  12. Efficacy of weekly docetaxel and concomitant radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Masato; Tsukuda, Mamoru; Kubota, Akira; Kida, Akinori; Okami, Kenji

    2004-01-01

    Docetaxel (DOC) is one of the most promising drugs for head and neck cancer (HNSCC). A phase II trial of concurrent DOC and radiation for HNSCC was conducted to evaluate the therapeutic benefit based on the response and toxicity of the recommended dose schedule. We also studied the prognosis of patients. Patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were entered. All of the patients received radiation with 2.0 Gy single daily fractions up to 60 Gy. DOC was administered weekly for six consecutive weeks during radiotherapy. The recommended dose was decided to be 10 mg/m 2 in a previously reported phase I study. Thirty-nine patients with stage II, III or IV were registered; 35 patients were eligible; 32 patients were evaluable for response, and 34 were evaluable for toxicity. The overall response rate was 96.9%. The prognoses of the complete response (CR) patients were statistically better compared with the partial response (PR) patients. Grade 3 or 4 adverse events consisted of lymphopenia in 64.7%, stomatitis, in 41.2% and anorexia in 20.6% of the patients. Thirty-two of the 35 eligible patients showed high compliance of over 90%, and their toxicities were manageable. Even low-dose DOC shows a strong effect on HNSCC in combination with radiation. The CR patients showed a high survival rate, though the prognosis of non-CR patients was poor. Further treatment for non-CR patients with advanced HNSCC will be needed. (author)

  13. Direct Cytoskeleton Forces Cause Membrane Softening in Red Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-García, Ruddi; López-Montero, Iván; Mell, Michael; Egea, Gustavo; Gov, Nir S.; Monroy, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Erythrocytes are flexible cells specialized in the systemic transport of oxygen in vertebrates. This physiological function is connected to their outstanding ability to deform in passing through narrow capillaries. In recent years, there has been an influx of experimental evidence of enhanced cell-shape fluctuations related to metabolically driven activity of the erythroid membrane skeleton. However, no direct observation of the active cytoskeleton forces has yet been reported to our knowledge. Here, we show experimental evidence of the presence of temporally correlated forces superposed over the thermal fluctuations of the erythrocyte membrane. These forces are ATP-dependent and drive enhanced flickering motions in human erythrocytes. Theoretical analyses provide support for a direct force exerted on the membrane by the cytoskeleton nodes as pulses of well-defined average duration. In addition, such metabolically regulated active forces cause global membrane softening, a mechanical attribute related to the functional erythroid deformability. PMID:26083919

  14. Direct dimethyl ether high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vassiliev, Anton; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Li, Qingfeng

    and suffers from low DME solubility in water. When the DME - water mixture is fed as vapour miscibility is no longer a problem. The increased temperature is more beneficial for the kinetics of the direct oxidation of DME than of methanol. The Open Circuit Voltage (OCV) with DME operation was 50 to 100 m......A high temperature polybenzimidazole (PBI) polymer fuel cell was fed with dimethyl ether (DME) and water vapour mixture on the anode at ambient pressure with air as oxidant. A peak power density of 79 mW/cm2 was achieved at 200°C. A conventional polymer based direct DME fuel cell is liquid fed......V higher than that of methanol, indicating less fuel crossover....

  15. Toward the use of precision medicine for the treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Wang; Xiao, Yandi; Wei, Zihao; Yuan, Yao; Qiu, Min; Sun, Chongkui; Zeng, Xin; Liang, Xinhua; Feng, Mingye; Chen, Qianming

    2017-01-10

    Precision medicine is a new strategy that aims at preventing and treating human diseases by focusing on individual variations in people's genes, environment and lifestyle. Precision medicine has been used for cancer diagnosis and treatment and shows evident clinical efficacy. Rapid developments in molecular biology, genetics and sequencing technologies, as well as computational technology, has enabled the establishment of "big data", such as the Human Genome Project, which provides a basis for precision medicine. Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is an aggressive cancer with a high incidence rate and low survival rate. Current therapies are often aggressive and carry considerable side effects. Much research now indicates that precision medicine can be used for HNSCC and may achieve improved results. From this perspective, we present an overview of the current status, potential strategies, and challenges of precision medicine in HNSCC. We focus on targeted therapy based on cell the surface signaling receptors epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2), and on the PI3K/AKT/mTOR, JAK/STAT3 and RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK cellular signaling pathways. Gene therapy for the treatment of HNSCC is also discussed.

  16. ROLE OF MELATONIN IN EXPRESSION OF MALONDIALDEHYDE ON MICROGLIA CELLS OF RAT INDUCED HEAD INJURY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. I. Nasution

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: brain injury is condition that harm human life. This study examines the application of melatonin in reducing oxidant status and barriers to the formation of cerebral edema in a rat brain injury model. The main purpose of this study is to prove the role of melatonin on the expression of Malondialdehyde (MDA and histological injury in a rat head injury model. Methods: This study was a randomized experimental posttest only control group design. This experimental was carried out on male Sprague Dawley strain Rattus novergicus, aged of 10-12 weeks, and weight of 300 g. Rat brain injury model was performed based on Marmarou (1994.1 Histology were observed using hematoxilen-eosin staining and immunohistochemistry, MDA was assessed using antibodies specific to each MDA protein. Observation and calculation of immunohistochemistry studies were also performed. Results: In this study, histological observation area covers an area of bleeding, number of immune-competent cells and the diameter of the arteries. Histology observation results showed that there is a significant reduction in diameter of arterial blood vessels of the brain injury tissue. Immunohisto-chemistry results showed that there is a significant reduction of MDA expression amount microglia cells of brain injury tissue. Conclusion: From this study, it can be concluded that Melatonin is a potent hydrogen peroxide scavenger that reduce the production of MDA. 

  17. Genomics and advances towards precision medicine for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Waes, Carter; Musbahi, Omar

    2017-10-01

    To provide a review of emerging knowledge from genomics and related basic science, preclinical, and clinical precision medicine studies in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). The Cancer Genome Atlas Network (TCGA) publications, PubMed-based literature review, and ClinicalTrials.gov. TCGA publications, PubMed, and ClinicalTrials.gov were queried for genomics and related basic science, preclinical, and developmental clinical precision medicine studies in HNSCC. TCGA reported comprehensive genomic analyses of 279 HNSCC, defining the landscape and frequency of chromosomal copy number alterations, mutations, and expressed genes that contribute to pathogenesis, prognosis, and resistance to therapy. This provides a road map for basic science and preclinical studies to identify key pathways in cancer and cells of the tumor microenvironment affected by these alterations, and candidate targets for new small molecule and biologic therapies. Recurrent chromosomal abnormalities, mutations, and expression of genes affecting HNSCC subsets are associated with differences in prognosis, and define molecules, pathways, and deregulated immune responses as candidates for therapy. Activity of molecularly targeted agents appears to be enhanced by rational combinations of these agents and standard therapies targeting the complex alterations that affect multiple pathways and mechanisms in HNSCC. NA.

  18. Canine spontaneous head and neck squamous cell carcinomas represent their human counterparts at the molecular level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deli Liu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous canine head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC represents an excellent model of human HNSCC but is greatly understudied. To better understand and utilize this valuable resource, we performed a pilot study that represents its first genome-wide characterization by investigating 12 canine HNSCC cases, of which 9 are oral, via high density array comparative genomic hybridization and RNA-seq. The analyses reveal that these canine cancers recapitulate many molecular features of human HNSCC. These include analogous genomic copy number abnormality landscapes and sequence mutation patterns, recurrent alteration of known HNSCC genes and pathways (e.g., cell cycle, PI3K/AKT signaling, and comparably extensive heterogeneity. Amplification or overexpression of protein kinase genes, matrix metalloproteinase genes, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition genes TWIST1 and SNAI1 are also prominent in these canine tumors. This pilot study, along with a rapidly growing body of literature on canine cancer, reemphasizes the potential value of spontaneous canine cancers in HNSCC basic and translational research.

  19. Perfusion cell culture decreases process and product heterogeneity in a head-to-head comparison with fed-batch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Jason; Lu, Jiuyi; Hollenbach, Myles; Yu, Marcella; Hwang, Chris; McLarty, Jean; Brower, Kevin

    2018-05-30

    In this study, we compared the impacts of fed-batch and perfusion platforms on process and product attributes for IgG1- and IgG4-producing cell lines. A "plug-and-play" approach was applied to both platforms at bench scale, using commercially available basal and feed media, a standard feed strategy for fed-batch, and ATF filtration for perfusion. Product concentration in fed-batch was 2.5 times greater than perfusion, while average productivity in perfusion was 7.5 times greater than fed-batch. PCA revealed more variability in the cell environment and metabolism during the fed-batch run. LDH measurements showed that exposure of product to cell lysate was 7-10 times greater in fed-batch. Product analysis shows larger abundances of neutral species in perfusion, likely due to decreased bioreactor residence times and extracellular exposure. The IgG1 perfusion product also had higher purity and lower half-antibody. Glycosylation was similar across both culture modes. The first perfusion harvest slice for both product types showed different glycosylation than subsequent harvests, suggesting that product quality lags behind metabolism. In conclusion, process and product data indicate that intra-lot heterogeneity is decreased in perfusion cultures. Additional data and discussion is required to understand the developmental, clinical and commercial implications, and in what situations increased uniformity would be beneficial. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Direct methanol feed fuel cell with reduced catalyst loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindler, Andrew (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Improvements to direct feed methanol fuel cells include new protocols for component formation. Catalyst-water repellent material is applied in formation of electrodes and sintered before application of ionomer. A membrane used in formation of an electrode assembly is specially pre-treated to improve bonding between catalyst and membrane. The improved electrode and the pre-treated membrane are assembled into a membrane electrode assembly.

  1. Directed cell migration in the presence of obstacles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grima Ramon

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemotactic movement is a common feature of many cells and microscopic organisms. In vivo, chemotactic cells have to follow a chemotactic gradient and simultaneously avoid the numerous obstacles present in their migratory path towards the chemotactic source. It is not clear how cells detect and avoid obstacles, in particular whether they need a specialized biological mechanism to do so. Results We propose that cells can sense the presence of obstacles and avoid them because obstacles interfere with the chemical field. We build a model to test this hypothesis and find that this naturally enables efficient at-a-distance sensing to be achieved with no need for a specific and active obstacle-sensing mechanism. We find that (i the efficiency of obstacle avoidance depends strongly on whether the chemotactic chemical reacts or remains unabsorbed at the obstacle surface. In particular, it is found that chemotactic cells generally avoid absorbing barriers much more easily than non-absorbing ones. (ii The typically low noise in a cell's motion hinders the ability to avoid obstacles. We also derive an expression estimating the typical distance traveled by chemotactic cells in a 3D random distribution of obstacles before capture; this is a measure of the distance over which chemotaxis is viable as a means of directing cells from one point to another in vivo. Conclusion Chemotactic cells, in many cases, can avoid obstacles by simply following the spatially perturbed chemical gradients around obstacles. It is thus unlikely that they have developed specialized mechanisms to cope with environments having low to moderate concentrations of obstacles.

  2. Reactivity descriptors for direct methanol fuel cell anode catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferrin, Peter; Nilekar, Anand Udaykumar; Greeley, Jeff

    2008-01-01

    oxidation to CO2 are investigated: an indirect mechanism that goes through a CO intermediate and a direct mechanism where methanol is oxidized to CO2 without the formation of a CO intermediate. For the direct mechanism, we find that, because of CO poisoning, only a small current will result on all non......We have investigated the anode reaction in direct methanol fuel cells using a database of adsorption free energies for 16 intermediates on 12 close-packed transition metal surfaces calculated with periodic, self-consistent, density functional theory (DFT-GGA). This database, combined with a simple...... electrokinetic model of the methanol electrooxidation reaction, yields mechanistic insights that are consistent with previous experimental and theoretical studies on Pt, and extends these insights to a broad spectrum of other transition metals. In addition, by using linear scaling relations between...

  3. Porous silicon-based direct hydrogen sulphide fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhafarov, T D; Yuksel, S Aydin

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, the use of Au/porous silicon/Silicon Schottky type structure, as a direct hydrogen sulphide fuel cell is demonstrated. The porous silicon filled with hydrochlorid acid was developed as a proton conduction membrane. The Au/Porous Silicon/Silicon cells were fabricated by first creating the porous silicon layer in single-crystalline Si using the anodic etching under illumination and then deposition Au catalyst layer onto the porous silicon. Using 80 mM H2S solution as fuel the open circuit voltage of 0.4 V was obtained and maximum power density of 30 W/m2 at room temperature was achieved. These results demonstrate that the Au/Porous Silicon/Silicon direct hydrogen sulphide fuel cell which uses H2S:dH2O solution as fuel and operates at room temperature can be considered as the most promising type of low cost fuel cell for small power-supply units.

  4. Low contaminant formic acid fuel for direct liquid fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masel, Richard I [Champaign, IL; Zhu, Yimin [Urbana, IL; Kahn, Zakia [Palatine, IL; Man, Malcolm [Vancouver, CA

    2009-11-17

    A low contaminant formic acid fuel is especially suited toward use in a direct organic liquid fuel cell. A fuel of the invention provides high power output that is maintained for a substantial time and the fuel is substantially non-flammable. Specific contaminants and contaminant levels have been identified as being deleterious to the performance of a formic acid fuel in a fuel cell, and embodiments of the invention provide low contaminant fuels that have improved performance compared to known commercial bulk grade and commercial purified grade formic acid fuels. Preferred embodiment fuels (and fuel cells containing such fuels) including low levels of a combination of key contaminants, including acetic acid, methyl formate, and methanol.

  5. Direct observation of nanoparticle-cancer cell nucleus interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dam, Duncan Hieu M; Lee, Jung Heon; Sisco, Patrick N; Co, Dick T; Zhang, Ming; Wasielewski, Michael R; Odom, Teri W

    2012-04-24

    We report the direct visualization of interactions between drug-loaded nanoparticles and the cancer cell nucleus. Nanoconstructs composed of nucleolin-specific aptamers and gold nanostars were actively transported to the nucleus and induced major changes to the nuclear phenotype via nuclear envelope invaginations near the site of the construct. The number of local deformations could be increased by ultrafast, light-triggered release of the aptamers from the surface of the gold nanostars. Cancer cells with more nuclear envelope folding showed increased caspase 3 and 7 activity (apoptosis) as well as decreased cell viability. This newly revealed correlation between drug-induced changes in nuclear phenotype and increased therapeutic efficacy could provide new insight for nuclear-targeted cancer therapy.

  6. Performance evaluation of direct methanol fuel cells for portable applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashidi, R.; Dincer, I.; Naterer, G.F. [Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, 2000 Simcoe Street North, Oshawa, Ontario (Canada); Berg, P. [Faculty of Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, 2000 Simcoe Street North, Oshawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2009-02-15

    This study examines the feasibility of powering a range of portable devices with a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). The analysis includes a comparison between a Li-ion battery and DMFC to supply the power for a laptop, camcorder and a cell phone. A parametric study of the systems for an operational period of 4 years is performed. Under the assumptions made for both the Li-ion battery and DMFC system, the battery cost is lower than the DMFC during the first year of operation. However, by the end of 4 years of operational time, the DMFC system would cost less. The weight and cost comparisons show that the fuel cell system occupies less space than the battery to store a higher amount of energy. The weight of both systems is almost identical. Finally, the CO{sub 2} emissions can be decreased by a higher exergetic efficiency of the DMFC, which leads to improved sustainability. (author)

  7. High performance direct methanol fuel cell with thin electrolyte membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Nianfang

    2017-06-01

    A high performance direct methanol fuel cell is achieved with thin electrolyte membrane. 320 mW cm-2 of peak power density and over 260 mW cm-2 at 0.4 V are obtained when working at 90 °C with normal pressure air supply. It is revealed that the increased anode half-cell performance with temperature contributes primarily to the enhanced performance at elevated temperature. From the comparison of iR-compensated cathode potential of methanol/air with that of H2/air fuel cell, the impact of methanol crossover on cathode performance decreases with current density and becomes negligible at high current density. Current density is found to influence fuel efficiency and methanol crossover significantly from the measurement of fuel efficiency at different current density. At high current density, high fuel efficiency can be achieved even at high temperature, indicating decreased methanol crossover.

  8. Direction-Specific Impairments in Cervical Range of Motion in Women with Chronic Neck Pain: Influence of Head Posture and Gravitationally Induced Torque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolfsson, Thomas; Björklund, Martin; Svedmark, Åsa; Srinivasan, Divya; Djupsjöbacka, Mats

    2017-01-01

    Cervical range of motion (ROM) is commonly assessed in clinical practice and research. In a previous study we decomposed active cervical sagittal ROM into contributions from lower and upper levels of the cervical spine and found level- and direction-specific impairments in women with chronic non-specific neck pain. The present study aimed to validate these results and investigate if the specific impairments can be explained by the neutral posture (defining zero flexion/extension) or a movement strategy to avoid large gravitationally induced torques on the cervical spine. Kinematics of the head and thorax was assessed in sitting during maximal sagittal cervical flexion/extension (high torque condition) and maximal protraction (low torque condition) in 120 women with chronic non-specific neck pain and 40 controls. We derived the lower and upper cervical angles, and the head centre of mass (HCM), from a 3-segment kinematic model. Neutral head posture was assessed using a standardized procedure. Previous findings of level- and direction-specific impairments in neck pain were confirmed. Neutral head posture was equal between groups and did not explain the direction-specific impairments. The relative magnitude of group difference in HCM migration did not differ between high and low torques conditions, lending no support for our hypothesis that impairments in sagittal ROM are due to torque avoidance behaviour. The direction- and level-specific impairments in cervical sagittal ROM can be generalised to the population of women with non-specific neck pain. Further research is necessary to clarify if torque avoidance behaviour can explain the impairments.

  9. Direction-Specific Impairments in Cervical Range of Motion in Women with Chronic Neck Pain: Influence of Head Posture and Gravitationally Induced Torque.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Rudolfsson

    Full Text Available Cervical range of motion (ROM is commonly assessed in clinical practice and research. In a previous study we decomposed active cervical sagittal ROM into contributions from lower and upper levels of the cervical spine and found level- and direction-specific impairments in women with chronic non-specific neck pain. The present study aimed to validate these results and investigate if the specific impairments can be explained by the neutral posture (defining zero flexion/extension or a movement strategy to avoid large gravitationally induced torques on the cervical spine.Kinematics of the head and thorax was assessed in sitting during maximal sagittal cervical flexion/extension (high torque condition and maximal protraction (low torque condition in 120 women with chronic non-specific neck pain and 40 controls. We derived the lower and upper cervical angles, and the head centre of mass (HCM, from a 3-segment kinematic model. Neutral head posture was assessed using a standardized procedure.Previous findings of level- and direction-specific impairments in neck pain were confirmed. Neutral head posture was equal between groups and did not explain the direction-specific impairments. The relative magnitude of group difference in HCM migration did not differ between high and low torques conditions, lending no support for our hypothesis that impairments in sagittal ROM are due to torque avoidance behaviour.The direction- and level-specific impairments in cervical sagittal ROM can be generalised to the population of women with non-specific neck pain. Further research is necessary to clarify if torque avoidance behaviour can explain the impairments.

  10. 3D cell cultures of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells are radiosensitized by the focal adhesion kinase inhibitor TAE226

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hehlgans, Stephanie; Lange, Inga; Eke, Iris; Cordes, Nils

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a main player in integrin signaling and survival, is frequently overexpressed in human cancers and therefore postulated as potential target in cancer therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the radiosensitizing potential of the FAK inhibitor TAE226 in three-dimensional (3D) tumor cell cultures. Materials and methods: Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells (FaDu, UT-SCC15, UT-SCC45), lung cancer cells (A549), colorectal carcinoma cells (DLD-1, HCT-116) and pancreatic tumor cells (MiaPaCa2, Panc1) were treated with different concentrations of TAE226 (0-1 μm; 1 or 24 h) without or in combination with irradiation (0-6 Gy, X-ray, single dose). Subsequently, 3D clonogenic survival assays (laminin-rich extracellular matrix) and Western blotting (expression/phosphorylation, e.g. FAK, Akt, ERK1/2) were performed. Results: All investigated 3D cell cultures showed a dose-dependent reduction in clonogenic survival by TAE226. Intriguingly, TAE226 only significantly radiosensitized 3D HNSCC cell cultures accompanied by a pronounced dephosphorylation of FAK, Akt and ERK1/2. Conclusions: Our data demonstrate TAE226 as potent FAK inhibitor that enhances the cellular radiosensitivity particularly of HNSCC cells grown in a 3D cell culture model. Future in vitro and in vivo investigations will clarify, to which extent this approach might be clinically relevant for radiotherapy of HNSCC.

  11. Direct effect of curcumin on porcine ovarian cell functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kádasi, Attila; Maruniaková, Nora; Štochmaľová, Aneta; Bauer, Miroslav; Grossmann, Roland; Harrath, Abdel Halim; Kolesárová, Adriana; Sirotkin, Alexander V

    2017-07-01

    Curcuma longa Linn (L.) is a plant widely used in cooking (in curry powder a.o.) and in folk medicine, but its action on reproductive processes and its possible mechanisms of action remain to be investigated. The objective of this study was to examine the direct effects of curcumin, the major Curcuma longa L. molecule, on basic ovarian cell functions such as proliferation, apoptosis, viability and steroidogenesis. Porcine ovarian granulosa cells were cultured with and without curcumin (at doses of 0, 1, 10 and 100μg/ml of medium). Markers of proliferation (accumulation of PCNA) and apoptosis (accumulation of bax) were analyzed by immunocytochemistry. The expression of mRNA for PCNA and bax was detected by RT-PCR. Cell viability was detected by trypan blue exclusion test. Release of steroid hormones (progesterone and testosterone) was measured by enzyme immunoassay (EIA). It was observed that addition of curcumin reduced ovarian cell proliferation (expression of both PCNA and its mRNA), promoted apoptosis (accumulation of both bax and its mRNA), reduced cell viability, and stimulated both progesterone and testosterone release. These observations demonstrate the direct suppressive effect of Curcuma longa L./curcumin on female gonads via multiple mechanisms of action - suppression of ovarian cell proliferation and viability, promotion of their apoptosis (at the level of mRNA transcription and subsequent accumulation of promoters of genes regulating these activities) and release of anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic progesterone and androgen. The potential anti-gonadal action of curcumin should be taken into account by consumers of Curcuma longa L.-containing products. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Salinomycin induces cell death and differentiation in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma stem cells despite activation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and Akt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuo, Selena Z; Blair, Katherine J; Rahimy, Elham; Kiang, Alan; Abhold, Eric; Fan, Jian-Bing; Wang-Rodriguez, Jessica; Altuna, Xabier; Ongkeko, Weg M

    2012-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) are believed to play a crucial role in cancer recurrence due to their resistance to conventional chemotherapy and capacity for self-renewal. Recent studies have reported that salinomycin, a livestock antibiotic, selectively targets breast cancer stem cells 100-fold more effectively than paclitaxel. In our study we sought to determine the effects of salinomycin on head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) stem cells. MTS and TUNEL assays were used to study cell proliferation and apoptosis as a function of salinomycin exposure in JLO-1, a putative HNSCC stem cell culture. MTS and trypan blue dye exclusion assays were performed to investigate potential drug interactions between salinomycin and cisplatin or paclitaxel. Stem cell-like phenotype was measured by mRNA expression of stem cell markers, sphere-forming capacity, and matrigel invasion assays. Immunoblotting was also used to determine expression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers and Akt phosphorylation. Arrays by Illumina, Inc. were used to profile microRNA expression as a function of salinomycin dose. In putative HNSCC stem cells, salinomycin was found to significantly inhibit cell viability, induce a 71.5% increase in levels of apoptosis, elevate the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, and work synergistically with cisplatin and paclitaxel in inducing cell death. It was observed that salinomycin significantly inhibited sphere forming-capability and repressed the expression of CD44 and BMI-1 by 3.2-fold and 6.2-fold, respectively. Furthermore, salinomycin reduced invasion of HNSCC stem cells by 2.1 fold. Contrary to expectations, salinomycin induced the expression of EMT markers Snail, vimentin, and Zeb-1, decreased expression of E-cadherin, and also induced phosphorylation of Akt and its downstream targets GSK3-β and mTOR. These results demonstrate that in HNSCC cancer stem cells, salinomycin can cause cell death and decrease stem cell properties despite activation of both EMT and

  13. Correlation of NF-κB signal pathway with tumor metastasis of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Ming; Xu, Qin; Zhang, Ping; Zhou, Xiao-jian; Zhang, Zhi-yuan; Chen, Wan-tao

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signaling constitutes a key event in the multistep process of carcinogenesis, progression and treatment in many cancer types. However, the significance of NF-κB pathway for complex and tissue-specific aspects of head and neck cancer progression, such as invasion and metastasis, is less understood. The expression of NF-κB p65 in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) clinical specimens by immunohistochemistry. The role of NF-κB activity in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma was determined by western blot, reporter assay and EMSA analysis in vitro and metastasis assays in vivo in different metastatic potential tumor cells. Furthermore, the apoptosis rate and expression of metastasis-related protein such as MMP9 and VEGF were examined by Annexin V/PI staining and Western blot, respectively. A higher level of active nuclear-localized NF-κB was observed in the metastatic SCCHN specimens group (p < 0.01). The NF-κB activities of SCCHN cell lines with different metastatic potentials were then determined and in excellent agreement with results found in SCCHN specimens, highly metastatic SCCHN cell lines expressed high level of NF-κB activity. The treatment of highly metastatic SCCHN cells with NF-κB inhibitors reduced the in vitro cell invasion capacity of the cells without affecting the apoptotic rate. Additionally, the NF-κB inhibitors significantly inhibited the experimental lung metastasis of Tb cells and lymph node metastasis of TL cells in nude mice. Furthermore, the expression of metastasis-related proteins, such as matrix metalloproteinase 9 and vascular endothelial growth factor, was inhibited by pyrrolidine dithiocarbonate. This study suggests that NF-κB activity significantly contributes to tumor hematologic and lymphatic metastases and may aid in the development of early detection methods or therapies targeting non-conventional molecular targets

  14. Cytogenetic damage in circulating lymphocytes and buccal mucosa cells of head-and-neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minicucci, E.M.; Ribeiro, L.R.; Camargo, J.L.V. de; Salvadori, D.M.F.

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated cytogenetic damage by measuring the frequency of micronucleated cells (MNC) in peripheral blood and buccal mucosa of head-and-neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. MNC frequencies were assessed in 31 patients before, during, and after radiotherapy, and in 17 healthy controls matched for gender, age, and smoking habits. Results showed no statistically significant difference between patients and controls prior to radiotherapy in cytokinesis-blocked lymphocytes or buccal mucosa cells. During treatment, increased MNC frequencies were observed in both cell types. Micronucleated lymphocyte levels remained high in samples collected 30 to 140 days after the end of treatment, while MNC frequency in buccal mucosa decreased to values statistically similar to baseline values. There is controversy over the effects of age, smoking habit, tumor stage, and/or metastasis on MNC frequency. However, increased frequency of micronucleated buccal mucosa cells was seen in patients under 60 years old and in those with tumors >4 cm. In conclusion, the data show that radiotherapy has a potent clastogenic effect in circulating lymphocytes and buccal mucosa cells of head-and-neck cancer patients, and that the baseline MNC frequency in these two tissues is not a sensitive marker for head-and neck neoplasm. (author)

  15. Direct and dynamic detection of HIV-1 in living cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Helma

    Full Text Available In basic and applied HIV research, reliable detection of viral components is crucial to monitor progression of infection. While it is routine to detect structural viral proteins in vitro for diagnostic purposes, it previously remained impossible to directly and dynamically visualize HIV in living cells without genetic modification of the virus. Here, we describe a novel fluorescent biosensor to dynamically trace HIV-1 morphogenesis in living cells. We generated a camelid single domain antibody that specifically binds the HIV-1 capsid protein (CA at subnanomolar affinity and fused it to fluorescent proteins. The resulting fluorescent chromobody specifically recognizes the CA-harbouring HIV-1 Gag precursor protein in living cells and is applicable in various advanced light microscopy systems. Confocal live cell microscopy and super-resolution microscopy allowed detection and dynamic tracing of individual virion assemblies at the plasma membrane. The analysis of subcellular binding kinetics showed cytoplasmic antigen recognition and incorporation into virion assembly sites. Finally, we demonstrate the use of this new reporter in automated image analysis, providing a robust tool for cell-based HIV research.

  16. Deterministic direct reprogramming of somatic cells to pluripotency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rais, Yoach; Zviran, Asaf; Geula, Shay; Gafni, Ohad; Chomsky, Elad; Viukov, Sergey; Mansour, Abed AlFatah; Caspi, Inbal; Krupalnik, Vladislav; Zerbib, Mirie; Maza, Itay; Mor, Nofar; Baran, Dror; Weinberger, Leehee; Jaitin, Diego A; Lara-Astiaso, David; Blecher-Gonen, Ronnie; Shipony, Zohar; Mukamel, Zohar; Hagai, Tzachi; Gilad, Shlomit; Amann-Zalcenstein, Daniela; Tanay, Amos; Amit, Ido; Novershtern, Noa; Hanna, Jacob H

    2013-10-03

    Somatic cells can be inefficiently and stochastically reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells by exogenous expression of Oct4 (also called Pou5f1), Sox2, Klf4 and Myc (hereafter referred to as OSKM). The nature of the predominant rate-limiting barrier(s) preventing the majority of cells to successfully and synchronously reprogram remains to be defined. Here we show that depleting Mbd3, a core member of the Mbd3/NuRD (nucleosome remodelling and deacetylation) repressor complex, together with OSKM transduction and reprogramming in naive pluripotency promoting conditions, result in deterministic and synchronized iPS cell reprogramming (near 100% efficiency within seven days from mouse and human cells). Our findings uncover a dichotomous molecular function for the reprogramming factors, serving to reactivate endogenous pluripotency networks while simultaneously directly recruiting the Mbd3/NuRD repressor complex that potently restrains the reactivation of OSKM downstream target genes. Subsequently, the latter interactions, which are largely depleted during early pre-implantation development in vivo, lead to a stochastic and protracted reprogramming trajectory towards pluripotency in vitro. The deterministic reprogramming approach devised here offers a novel platform for the dissection of molecular dynamics leading to establishing pluripotency at unprecedented flexibility and resolution.

  17. MAML1 and TWIST1 co-overexpression promote invasion of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardalan Khales, Sima; Ebrahimi, Ehsan; Jahanzad, Eisa; Ardalan Khales, Sahar; Forghanifard, Mohammad Mahdi

    2018-01-15

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the seventh most common cancer worldwide with considerable morbidity and mortality. Invasion and metastasis of HNSCC is a complex process involving multiple molecules and signaling pathways. Twist Family BHLH Transcription Factor 1 (TWIST1) and Mastermind-like 1 (MAML1) are essential in induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition through direct regulation of implicated molecules in cellular adhesion, migration and invasion. Our aim in this study was to assess the clinical significance of MAML1 and TWIST1 expression in HNSCC, and elucidate the probable correlation between these genes to exhibit their possible associations with progression and metastasis of the disease. The gene expression profile of MAML1 and TWIST1 was assessed in fresh tumoral compared to distant tumor-free tissues of 55 HNSCC patients using quantitative real-time Polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Significant overexpression of MAML1 and TWIST1 mRNA was observed in 49.1% and 38.2% (P ˂ 0.05) of tumor specimens, respectively. Overexpression of MAML1 was associated with vascular invasion (P = 0.048). Concomitant overexpression of MAML1 and TWIST1 was significantly correlated to each other (P = 0.004). Co-overexpression of the genes was significantly correlated to the various clinicopathological indices of poor prognosis including depth of tumor invasion (P < 0.01), lymphatic invasion and grade of tumor cell differentiation (P < 0.05). Significant correlation between MAML1 and TWIST1 in HNSCC was revealed. This study was the first report elucidating MAML1 clinical relevance in HNSCC. These new findings suggest an oncogenic role for concomitant expression of MAML1 and TWIST1 genes in HNSCC invasion and metastasis. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  18. Uptake and fate of surface modified silica nanoparticles in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Besic Gyenge Emina

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC is currently the eighth leading cause of cancer death worldwide. The often severe side effects, functional impairments and unfavorable cosmetic outcome of conventional therapies for HNSCC have prompted the quest for novel treatment strategies, including the evaluation of nanotechnology to improve e.g. drug delivery and cancer imaging. Although silica nanoparticles hold great promise for biomedical applications, they have not yet been investigated in the context of HNSCC. In the present in-vitro study we thus analyzed the cytotoxicity, uptake and intracellular fate of 200-300 nm core-shell silica nanoparticles encapsulating fluorescent dye tris(bipyridineruthenium(II dichloride with hydroxyl-, aminopropyl- or PEGylated surface modifications (Ru@SiO2-OH, Ru@SiO2-NH2, Ru@SiO2-PEG in the human HNSCC cell line UMB-SCC 745. Results We found that at concentrations of 0.125 mg/ml, none of the nanoparticles used had a statistically significant effect on proliferation rates of UMB-SCC 745. Confocal and transmission electron microscopy showed an intracellular appearance of Ru@SiO2-OH and Ru@SiO2-NH2 within 30 min. They were internalized both as single nanoparticles (presumably via clathrin-coated pits or in clusters and always localized to cytoplasmic membrane-bounded vesicles. Immunocytochemical co-localization studies indicated that only a fraction of these nanoparticles were transferred to early endosomes, while the majority accumulated in large organelles. Ru@SiO2-OH and Ru@SiO2-NH2 nanoparticles had never been observed to traffic to the lysosomal compartment and were rather propagated at cell division. Intracellular persistence of Ru@SiO2-OH and Ru@SiO2-NH2 was thus traceable over 5 cell passages, but did not result in apparent changes in cell morphology and vitality. In contrast to Ru@SiO2-OH and Ru@SiO2-NH2 uptake of Ru@SiO2-PEG was minimal even after 24 h. Conclusions Our study is the

  19. A novel membrane-less direct alcohol fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Qingfeng; Chen, Qinghua; Yang, Zheng

    2015-12-01

    Membrane-less fuel cell possesses such advantages as simplified design and lower cost. In this paper, a membrane-less direct alcohol fuel cell is constructed by using multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) supported Pd and ternary PdSnNi composites as the anode catalysts and Fe/C-PANI composite, produced by direct pyrolysis of Fe-doped polyaniline precursor, as the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyst. The alcohols investigated in the present study are methanol, ethanol, n-propanol, iso-propanol, n-butanol, iso-butanol and sec-butanol. The cathode catalyst Fe/C-PANI is electrochemically inactive to oxidation of the alcohols. The performance of the cell with various alcohols in 1 mol L-1 NaOH solution on either Pd/MWCNT or PdSnNi/MWCNT catalyst has been evaluated. In any case, the performance of the cell using the anode catalyst PdSnNi/MWCNT is considerably better than Pd/MWCNT. For the PdSnNi/MWCNT, the maximum power densities of the cell using methanol (0.5 mol L-1), ethanol (0.5 mol L-1), n-propanol (0.5 mol L-1), iso-propanol (0.5 mol L-1), n-butanol (0.2 mol L-1), iso-butanol (0.2 mol L-1) and sec-butanol (0.2 mol L-1) are 0.34, 1.03, 1.07, 0.44, 0.50, 0.31 and 0.15 mW cm-2, respectively.

  20. Spatially patterned matrix elasticity directs stem cell fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chun; DelRio, Frank W.; Ma, Hao; Killaars, Anouk R.; Basta, Lena P.; Kyburz, Kyle A.; Anseth, Kristi S.

    2016-08-01

    There is a growing appreciation for the functional role of matrix mechanics in regulating stem cell self-renewal and differentiation processes. However, it is largely unknown how subcellular, spatial mechanical variations in the local extracellular environment mediate intracellular signal transduction and direct cell fate. Here, the effect of spatial distribution, magnitude, and organization of subcellular matrix mechanical properties on human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSCs) function was investigated. Exploiting a photodegradation reaction, a hydrogel cell culture substrate was fabricated with regions of spatially varied and distinct mechanical properties, which were subsequently mapped and quantified by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The variations in the underlying matrix mechanics were found to regulate cellular adhesion and transcriptional events. Highly spread, elongated morphologies and higher Yes-associated protein (YAP) activation were observed in hMSCs seeded on hydrogels with higher concentrations of stiff regions in a dose-dependent manner. However, when the spatial organization of the mechanically stiff regions was altered from a regular to randomized pattern, lower levels of YAP activation with smaller and more rounded cell morphologies were induced in hMSCs. We infer from these results that irregular, disorganized variations in matrix mechanics, compared with regular patterns, appear to disrupt actin organization, and lead to different cell fates; this was verified by observations of lower alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and higher expression of CD105, a stem cell marker, in hMSCs in random versus regular patterns of mechanical properties. Collectively, this material platform has allowed innovative experiments to elucidate a novel spatial mechanical dosing mechanism that correlates to both the magnitude and organization of spatial stiffness.

  1. Stimulated monocyte IL-6 secretion predicts survival of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olofsson Jan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study was performed in order to determine whether monocyte in vitro function is associated with presence, stage and prognosis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC disease. Methods Prospective study describing outcome, after at least five years observation, of patients treated for HNSCC disease in relation to their monocyte function. Sixty-five patients with newly diagnosed HNSCC and eighteen control patients were studied. Monocyte responsiveness was assessed by measuring levels of monocyte in vitro interleukin (IL-6 and monocyte chemotactic peptide (MCP-1 secretion after 24 hours of endotoxin stimulation in cultures supplied either with 20% autologous serum (AS or serum free medium (SFM. Survival, and if relevant, cause of death, was determined at least 5 years following primary diagnosis. Results All patients, as a group, had higher in vitro monocyte responsiveness in terms of IL-6 (AS (t = 2.03; p t = 2.49; p in vitro monocyte IL-6 endotoxin responsiveness under the SFM condition was associated with decreased survival rate (Hazard ratio (HR = 2.27; Confidence interval (CI = 1.05–4.88; p p p Conclusion In HNSCC patients, changed monocyte in vitro response to endotoxin, as measured by increased IL-6 (SFM and decreased MCP-1 (AS responsiveness, are negative prognostic factors.

  2. New candidate markers of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakurina, G. V.; Kolegova, E. S.; Cheremisina, O. V.; Kulbakin, D. E.; Choinzonov, E. L.

    2017-09-01

    The tumor progression in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is one of the main causes of high mortality of the patients with HNSCC. The tumor progression, particularly the metastasis, is characterized by the changes in the composition, functions and structure of different proteins. We have previously shown that serum of HNSCC patients contains the proteins which regulate various cellular processes—adenylyl cyclase associated protein 1 (CAP1), protein phosphatase 1 B (PPM1B), etc. The levels of CAP1 and PPM1B were determined using the enzyme immunoassay. The results of this study show that CAP1 and PPM1B take a part in the progression of HNSCC. The levels of CAP1 and PPM1B in the tumor and in morphologically normal tissue depended on the prevalence of the tumor process. The CAP1 and PPM1B levels were significantly higher in tumor tissue of the patients with regional metastasis. Our data allow assuming the potential possibility for predicting the outcome of the HNSCC measuring the level of tissue CAP1.

  3. Incompletely resected advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, D.; Johnson, C.R.; Schmidt-Ullrich, R.K.; Sismanis, A.; Neifeld, J.P.; Weber, J.

    1992-01-01

    From 1982-1988, 441 patients were treated at Virginia Medical College for AJC Stage III and IV squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck. On 84 patients is reported, whose tumors were incompletely resected based on histopathological margins of 1mm or less. Of the 84 patients, 49 were treated with surgery alone and 35 received immediate postoperative irradiation to doses of 50-70 Gy. The 2 groups are comparable with respects to stage of disease, age, male/female and racial ratios. This retrospective analysis, based on follow-up of 24- 110 months, gives actuarial locoregional tumor control and survival data. The local control and disease-free survival rates in the combined modality group are significantly superior at the p=0.0006 and p=0.0003 levels, respectively, related to the surgery-alone-group. Patients in the first group also experienced a significantly improved adjusted and overall survival, p=0.005 and p=0.001, respectively. The administration of postoperative irradiation was not associated with an increased rate of complications. The benefit of radiotherapy on survival was only seen when given as postoperative treatment but was lost in patients treated for salvage tumor after tumor recurrence. (author). 17 refs.; 5 figs.; 6 tabs

  4. PHOTODYNAMIC THERAPY FOR HEAD AND NECK BASAL CELL SKIN CANCER WITH ADDITIONAL INTERSTITIAL LASER IRRADIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Kapinus

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the development and evaluation of the effi ciency of photodynamic therapy (PDT with photosensitizer photolon with additional interstitial laser irradiation in patients with head and  neck basal cell skin cancer (BCSC. Treatment was performed in 55  patients. On the fi rst stage, all patients underwent photodynamic  therapy with interstitial irradiation using fl exible optical fi bers with  cylindrical diffuser, on the second stage PDT with distant delivery of  laser at a dose of 50-300 J/cm2 was carried out. During the follow- up period of 6 months to 4 years in 13 (23.6% of the 55 patients a  recurrence of the disease was diagnosed. A higher rate of recurrence was in the group of patients who underwent PDT for recurrent  neoplasms compared with patients with primary disease (37.5% and 4.3%, respectively, in patients with endophytic growth of the tumor compared to patients with exophytic component (30.0% and 16.0%,respectively and in patients with large tumors (up to 2.0 cm – 14.3%, from 2.0 to 5.0 cm – 16.7% and more than 5.0 cm – 54.4%.

  5. Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas Do Not Express EGFRvIII

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melchers, Lieuwe J., E-mail: l.j.melchers@umcg.nl [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Pathology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Clausen, Martijn J.A.M. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Pathology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Mastik, Mirjam F. [Department of Pathology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Slagter-Menkema, Lorian [Department of Pathology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Otorhinolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Langendijk, Johannes A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Laan, Bernard F.A.M. van der [Department of Otorhinolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Wal, Jacqueline E. van der; Vegt, Bert van der [Department of Pathology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Roodenburg, Jan L.N. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Schuuring, Ed [Department of Pathology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: To assess the prevalence of EGFRvIII, a specific variant of EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor), in 3 well-defined cohorts of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods and Materials: Immunohistochemistry for the specific detection of EGFRvIII using the L8A4 antibody was optimized on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue using glioblastoma tissue. It was compared with EGFR and EGFRvIII RNA expression using a specific reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction also optimized for formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue. Tissue microarrays including 531 HNSCCs of various stages with complete clinicopathologic and follow-up data were tested for the presence of EGFRvIII. Results: None of the 531 cases showed EGFRvIII protein expression. Using an immunohistochemistry protocol reported by others revealed cytoplasmic staining in 8% of cases. Reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction for the EGFRvIII transcript of the 28 highest cytoplasmic staining cases, as well as 69 negative cases, did not show expression in any of the tested cases, suggesting aspecific staining by a nonoptimal protocol. Conclusions: The EGFRvIII mutation is not present in HNSCC. Therefore, EGFRvIII does not influence treatment response in HNSCC and is not a usable clinical prognostic marker.

  6. Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas Do Not Express EGFRvIII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melchers, Lieuwe J.; Clausen, Martijn J.A.M.; Mastik, Mirjam F.; Slagter-Menkema, Lorian; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Laan, Bernard F.A.M. van der; Wal, Jacqueline E. van der; Vegt, Bert van der; Roodenburg, Jan L.N.; Schuuring, Ed

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the prevalence of EGFRvIII, a specific variant of EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor), in 3 well-defined cohorts of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods and Materials: Immunohistochemistry for the specific detection of EGFRvIII using the L8A4 antibody was optimized on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue using glioblastoma tissue. It was compared with EGFR and EGFRvIII RNA expression using a specific reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction also optimized for formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue. Tissue microarrays including 531 HNSCCs of various stages with complete clinicopathologic and follow-up data were tested for the presence of EGFRvIII. Results: None of the 531 cases showed EGFRvIII protein expression. Using an immunohistochemistry protocol reported by others revealed cytoplasmic staining in 8% of cases. Reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction for the EGFRvIII transcript of the 28 highest cytoplasmic staining cases, as well as 69 negative cases, did not show expression in any of the tested cases, suggesting aspecific staining by a nonoptimal protocol. Conclusions: The EGFRvIII mutation is not present in HNSCC. Therefore, EGFRvIII does not influence treatment response in HNSCC and is not a usable clinical prognostic marker

  7. A Review of Radiotherapy for Merkel Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.; Poon, I.; Balogh, J.; Tsao, M.; Barnes, E.

    2012-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma of the head and neck (MCCHN) presents a clinical challenge due to its aggressive natural history, unpredictable lymphatic drainage, and high degree of treatment related morbidity. Histological examination of the regional lymph nodes is very important in determining the optimal treatment and is usually achieved by sentinel lymph node biopsy. Radiotherapy plays a critical role in the treatment of most patients with MCCHN. Surgery with adjuvant radiotherapy to the primary tumour site is associated with high local control rates. If lymph nodes are clinically or microscopically positive, adjuvant radiotherapy is indicated to decrease the risk of regional recurrence. The majority of locoregional recurrences occur at the edge or just outside of the radiation field, reflecting both the inherent radiosensitivity of MCC and the importance of relatively large volumes to include "in-transit"dermal lymphatic pathways. When surgical excision of the primary or nodal disease is not feasible, primary radiotherapy alone should be considered as a potentially curative modality and confers good loco-regional control. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy is well tolerated and may further improve outcomes.

  8. Stem cell clinics online: the direct-to-consumer portrayal of stem cell medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Darren; Ogbogu, Ubaka; Taylor, Benjamin; Stafinski, Tania; Menon, Devidas; Caulfield, Timothy

    2008-12-04

    Despite the immature state of stem cell medicine, patients are seeking and accessing putative stem cell therapies in an "early market" in which direct-to-consumer advertising via the internet likely plays an important role. We analyzed stem cell clinic websites and appraised the relevant published clinical evidence of stem cell therapies to address three questions about the direct-to-consumer portrayal of stem cell medicine in this early market: What sorts of therapies are being offered? How are they portrayed? Is there clinical evidence to support the use of these therapies? We found that the portrayal of stem cell medicine on provider websites is optimistic and unsubstantiated by peer-reviewed literature.

  9. Ectopic expression of protein kinase C-β sensitizes head and neck squamous cell carcinoma to diterpene esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Ryan A; D'Souza, Marjorie M A; Pierce, Carly J; Korica, Natasa; Wallwork, Ben; Parsons, Peter G; Panizza, Benedict; Boyle, Glen M

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effect of specific Protein kinase C (PKC) isoform re-expression in solid malignancies, particularly head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines, and the impact this may have on treatment with known activators of PKC. The constitutive expression of PKC isoforms were determined in six head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cell lines. Cytotoxicity of the prototypic phorbol ester, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and the novel diterpene ester PEP005 was established. Viral transduction to re-express PKCβ isoforms in two of these cell lines was performed, and its effect on the sensitivity to the compounds was quantified. Tongue and hypopharyngeal SCC cell lines were resistant to both TPA and PEP005, with the concentration required to inhibit growth by 50% (IC50) being >1,000 ng/ml. CAL-27 (tongue SCC) and FaDu (hypopharyngeal SCC) cell lines re-expressing PKCβI and -βII isoforms demonstrated IC50 of 1-5 ng/ml with TPA or PEP005. Re-expression of PKCβ in head and neck SCC cell lines leads to cells one thousand-times more sensitive to the cytotoxic effects of phorbol or diterpene esters in culture. This highlights the importance of the isoform in tumor progression and presents the potential benefit of these compounds in malignancies expressing the protein, and in combination therapy. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  10. Human papilloma virus prevalence in HIV patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Annabelle; Badoual, Cécile; Hourseau, Muriel; Halimi, Caroline; Pere, Hélène; Dib, Fadia; Barry, Béatrix; Albert, Sébastien

    2016-05-15

    The implication of human papilloma virus (HPV) in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is well established, especially in oropharyngeal SCC. HIV patients have a higher risk of persistent HPV infection. We investigated the role of HPV in HNSCC carcinogenesis in HIV population. Retrospective monocentric study. We studied HIV patients who presented with HNSCC between 1994 and 2014. For each patient, tumor characteristics, HIV disease, and survival information were collected. Tumor HPV testing was performed using p16 immunohistochemistry (IHC), in-situ hybridization and PCR. We assessed the percentage of HPV in this population of HIV patients with HNSCC and compared HIV disease characteristics based on HPV status. Forty-seven patients were included: 11 women/36 men, the median age was 50 years. Tumor HPV testing was performed in 40 patients. Tumors were located in oropharynx (32%), oral cavity (32%), larynx (21%), and hypopharynx (11%). At the time of diagnosis, median CD4 level was 385 cells/μl, 31% of the patients were stage (Centers for Disease Control, stage C). The percentage of HPV linked to HNSCC for all locations in HIV patients was 30% (n = 12). HPV16 accounted for 50% of all HPV genotypes. HPV positive status was associated with a CD4 nadir of less than 200 (P = 0.026), but not with CD4 level at time of diagnosis (P = 0.414). HPV-negative tumors tend to be associated with poorer 5-year overall survival (hazard ratio = 2.9, P = 0.0711). HPV plays a critical role in HNSCC development in HIV population. HIV immunodeficiency may increase HPV persistence and progression of HNSCC.

  11. Rapid, Directed Differentiation of Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells from Human Embryonic or Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Foltz, LP; Clegg, DO

    2017-01-01

    We describe a robust method to direct the differentiation of pluripotent stem cells into retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE). The purpose of providing a detailed and thorough protocol is to clearly demonstrate each step and to make this readily available to researchers in the field. This protocol results in a homogenous layer of RPE with minimal or no manual dissection needed. The method presented here has been shown to be effective for induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) and human embry...

  12. Starclose SE® hemostasis after 6F direct antegrade superficial femoral artery access distal to the femoral head for peripheral endovascular procedures in obese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiliopoulos, Stavros; Kitrou, Panagiotis; Christeas, Nikolaos; Karnabatidis, Dimitris

    2016-01-01

    Direct superficial femoral artery (SFA) antegrade puncture is a valid alternative to common femoral artery (CFA) access for peripheral vascular interventions. Data investigating vascular closure device (VCD) hemostasis of distant SFA 6F access are limited. We aimed to investigate the safety and effectiveness of the Starclose SE® VCD for hemostasis, following direct 6F antegrade SFA access distal to the femoral head. This prospective, single-center study included patients who were not suitable for CFA puncture and were scheduled to undergo peripheral endovascular interventions using direct antegrade SFA 6F access, at least 2 cm below the inferior edge of femoral head. Hemostasis was obtained with the Starclose SE® VCD (Abbott Laboratories). Primary endpoints were successful hemostasis rate and periprocedural (30-day) major complication rate. Secondary endpoint was the rate of minor complications. Clinical and Doppler ultrasound follow-up was performed at discharge and at one month. Between September 2014 and August 2015, a total of 30 patients (21 male; 70.0%) with a mean body mass index of 41.2 kg/m2 were enrolled. Mean age was 72±9 years (range, 67-88 years). Most patients suffered from critical limb ischemia (87.1%) and diabetes (61.3%). Calcifications were present in eight cases (26.6%). Reason for direct SFA puncture was obesity (100%). Successful hemostasis was achieved in 100% of the cases. No major complications were noted after one-month follow-up. Minor complications included two <5 cm hematomas (6.6%) not necessitating treatment. In this prospective study, Starclose SE® VCD was safe and effective for hemostasis of antegrade direct SFA puncture. Uncomplicated hemostasis was achieved even in cases of puncturing 2 to 7 cm below the inferior edge of the femoral head.

  13. The p53 molecule and its prognostic role in squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nylander, K.; Dabelsteen, Erik; Hall, P.A.

    2000-01-01

    and poor patient outcome was found when looking only at patients with laryngeal squamous cell carcinomas. Also, in oral premalignant lesions, expression of p53-positive cells in the suprabasal layers of the epithelium has been seen as an indication of impending malignant development. Concerning......Despite intense research, the 5-year survival rate for patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) is still low. Several different factors have been studied in the search for one or more factors that give important prognostic information at the time of diagnosis. Many recent...

  14. Tuning cell adhesion by direct nanostructuring silicon into cell repulsive/adhesive patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Premnath, Priyatha; Tavangar, Amirhossein; Tan, Bo; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    Developing platforms that allow tuning cell functionality through incorporating physical, chemical, or mechanical cues onto the material surfaces is one of the key challenges in research in the field of biomaterials. In this respect, various approaches have been proposed and numerous structures have been developed on a variety of materials. Most of these approaches, however, demand a multistep process or post-chemical treatment. Therefore, a simple approach would be desirable to develop bio-functionalized platforms for effectively modulating cell adhesion and consequently programming cell functionality without requiring any chemical or biological surface treatment. This study introduces a versatile yet simple laser approach to structure silicon (Si) chips into cytophobic/cytophilic patterns in order to modulate cell adhesion and proliferation. These patterns are fabricated on platforms through direct laser processing of Si substrates, which renders a desired computer-generated configuration into patterns. We investigate the morphology, chemistry, and wettability of the platform surfaces. Subsequently, we study the functionality of the fabricated platforms on modulating cervical cancer cells (HeLa) behaviour. The results from in vitro studies suggest that the nanostructures efficiently repel HeLa cells and drive them to migrate onto untreated sites. The study of the morphology of the cells reveals that cells evade the cytophobic area by bending and changing direction. Additionally, cell patterning, cell directionality, cell channelling, and cell trapping are achieved by developing different platforms with specific patterns. The flexibility and controllability of this approach to effectively structure Si substrates to cell-repulsive and cell-adhesive patterns offer perceptible outlook for developing bio-functionalized platforms for a variety of biomedical devices. Moreover, this approach could pave the way for developing anti-cancer platforms that selectively repel

  15. Tuning cell adhesion by direct nanostructuring silicon into cell repulsive/adhesive patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Premnath, Priyatha, E-mail: priyatha.premnath@ryerson.ca [Micro/Nanofabrication Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, ON, Canada M5B 2K3 (Canada); Tavangar, Amirhossein, E-mail: atavanga@ryerson.ca [Micro/Nanofabrication Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, ON, Canada M5B 2K3 (Canada); Tan, Bo, E-mail: tanbo@ryerson.ca [Nanocharacterization Laboratory, Department of Aerospace Engineering, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, ON, Canada M5B 2K3 (Canada); Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan, E-mail: venkat@ryerson.ca [Micro/Nanofabrication Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, ON, Canada M5B 2K3 (Canada)

    2015-09-10

    Developing platforms that allow tuning cell functionality through incorporating physical, chemical, or mechanical cues onto the material surfaces is one of the key challenges in research in the field of biomaterials. In this respect, various approaches have been proposed and numerous structures have been developed on a variety of materials. Most of these approaches, however, demand a multistep process or post-chemical treatment. Therefore, a simple approach would be desirable to develop bio-functionalized platforms for effectively modulating cell adhesion and consequently programming cell functionality without requiring any chemical or biological surface treatment. This study introduces a versatile yet simple laser approach to structure silicon (Si) chips into cytophobic/cytophilic patterns in order to modulate cell adhesion and proliferation. These patterns are fabricated on platforms through direct laser processing of Si substrates, which renders a desired computer-generated configuration into patterns. We investigate the morphology, chemistry, and wettability of the platform surfaces. Subsequently, we study the functionality of the fabricated platforms on modulating cervical cancer cells (HeLa) behaviour. The results from in vitro studies suggest that the nanostructures efficiently repel HeLa cells and drive them to migrate onto untreated sites. The study of the morphology of the cells reveals that cells evade the cytophobic area by bending and changing direction. Additionally, cell patterning, cell directionality, cell channelling, and cell trapping are achieved by developing different platforms with specific patterns. The flexibility and controllability of this approach to effectively structure Si substrates to cell-repulsive and cell-adhesive patterns offer perceptible outlook for developing bio-functionalized platforms for a variety of biomedical devices. Moreover, this approach could pave the way for developing anti-cancer platforms that selectively repel

  16. Accelerated superfractionated radiotherapy with concomitant boost for locally advanced head-and-neck squamous cell carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, Monica M.; Schmidt-Ullrich, Rupert K.; DiNardo, L.; Manning, Matthew A.; Silverman, L.; Clay, L.; Johnson, Christopher R.; Amir, Cyrus

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: A growing body of evidence supports the efficacy of accelerated superfractionated radiotherapy with concomitant boost for advanced head-and-neck carcinomas. This study represents a single-institution experience, performed to identify the factors influencing tumor control, survival, and toxicity. Methods and Materials: Between 1988 and 1999, 133 patients with primary squamous cell head-and-neck carcinoma underwent accelerated superfractionated radiotherapy using a concomitant boost. The concomitant boost in this regimen was delivered using reduced fields delivered 3 times weekly in a twice-daily schedule during the final phase. The total radiation dose ranged from 64.8 Gy to 76.5 Gy (mean 71.1). Patients were evaluated in follow-up for local control and late toxicity. Multivariate analysis of treatment and patient parameters was performed to evaluate their influence on toxicity, local control, and overall survival. Results: With a mean follow-up of 37 months, the actuarial overall survival rate for the entire group at 5 years was 24% and the local control rate was 57%. The tumor volume was the most significant predictor of local control, such that each 1-cm 3 increase in volume was associated with a 1% decrease in local control. For patients with tumor volumes ≤30 cm 3 vs. >30 cm 3 , the 5-year disease-specific survival rate was 52% and 27% (p = 0.004) and locoregional control rate was 76% and 26% (p<0.001), respectively. Seventy-six patients with a minimum of 12 months and median of 39 months toxicity follow-up were studied for late effects. None of these patients experienced Grade 4 or 5 toxicity. The actuarial rate of significant toxicity (Grade III or greater) was 32% at 5 years. Of the toxicities observed, xerostomia (19%) was the most common. Multivariate analysis revealed N stage and dose as independent predictors of Grade 3 effects. Conclusion: The locoregional control and survival for patients in this institutional experience compare favorably to

  17. Correlation between egfr expression and accelerated proliferation during radiotherapy of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedicini Piernicola

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To investigate the correlation between the expression of Epidermal Growth Factor receptor (EGFr and the reduction of the effective doubling time (TD during radiotherapy treatment and also to determine the dose per fraction to be taken into account when the overall treatment time (OTT is reduced in accelerated radiotherapy of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC. Methods A survey of the published papers comparing 3-years of local regional control rate (LCR for a total of 2162 patients treated with conventional and accelerated radiotherapy and with a pretreatment assessment of EGFr expression, was made. Different values of TD were obtained by a model incorporating the overall time corrected biologically effective dose (BED and a 3-year clinical LCR for high and low EGFr groups of patients (HEGFr and LEGFr, respectively. By obtaining the TD from the above analysis and the sub-sites’ potential doubling time (Tpot from flow cytometry and immunohistochemical methods, we were able to estimate the average TD for each sub-site included in the analysis. Moreover, the dose that would be required to offset the modified proliferation occurring in one day (Dprolif, was estimated. Results The averages of TD were 77 (27-9095% days in LEGFr and 8.8 (7.3-11.095% days in HEGFr, if an onset of accelerated proliferation TK at day 21 was assumed. The correspondent HEGFr sub-sites’ TD were 5.9 (6.6, 5.9 (6.6, 4.6 (6.1, 14.3 (12.9 days, with respect to literature immunohistochemical (flow cytometry data of Tpot for Oral-Cavity, Oro-pharynx, Hypo-pharynx, and Larynx respectively. The Dprolif for the HEGFr groups were 0.33 (0.29, 0.33 (0.29, 0.42 (0.31, 0.14 (0.15 Gy/day if α = 0.3 Gy-1 and α/β = 10 Gy were assumed. Conclusions A higher expression of the EGFr leads to enhanced proliferation. This study allowed to quantify the extent of the effect which EGFr expression has in terms of reduced TD and Dprolif for each head and neck

  18. Correlation between egfr expression and accelerated proliferation during radiotherapy of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedicini, Piernicola; Fiorentino, Alba; Improta, Giuseppina; Storto, Giovanni; Benassi, Marcello; Orecchia, Roberto; Salvatore, Marco; Nappi, Antonio; Strigari, Lidia; Alicia Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara; Alterio, Daniela; Cremonesi, Marta; Botta, Francesca; Vischioni, Barbara; Caivano, Rocchina

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the correlation between the expression of Epidermal Growth Factor receptor (EGFr) and the reduction of the effective doubling time (T D ) during radiotherapy treatment and also to determine the dose per fraction to be taken into account when the overall treatment time (OTT) is reduced in accelerated radiotherapy of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). A survey of the published papers comparing 3-years of local regional control rate (LCR) for a total of 2162 patients treated with conventional and accelerated radiotherapy and with a pretreatment assessment of EGFr expression, was made. Different values of T D were obtained by a model incorporating the overall time corrected biologically effective dose (BED) and a 3-year clinical LCR for high and low EGFr groups of patients (H EGFr and L EGFr ), respectively. By obtaining the T D from the above analysis and the sub-sites’ potential doubling time (T pot ) from flow cytometry and immunohistochemical methods, we were able to estimate the average T D for each sub-site included in the analysis. Moreover, the dose that would be required to offset the modified proliferation occurring in one day (D prolif ), was estimated. The averages of T D were 77 (27-90) 95% days in L EGFr and 8.8 (7.3-11.0) 95% days in H EGFr , if an onset of accelerated proliferation T K at day 21 was assumed. The correspondent H EGFr sub-sites’ T D were 5.9 (6.6), 5.9 (6.6), 4.6 (6.1), 14.3 (12.9) days, with respect to literature immunohistochemical (flow cytometry) data of T pot for Oral-Cavity, Oro-pharynx, Hypo-pharynx, and Larynx respectively. The D prolif for the H EGFr groups were 0.33 (0.29), 0.33 (0.29), 0.42 (0.31), 0.14 (0.15) Gy/day if α = 0.3 Gy -1 and α/β = 10 Gy were assumed. A higher expression of the EGFr leads to enhanced proliferation. This study allowed to quantify the extent of the effect which EGFr expression has in terms of reduced T D and D prolif for each head and neck sub-site

  19. Update on status of direct methanol fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reeve, R.W.

    2002-07-01

    This report reviews the progress in direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) technology since 1995 and examines the opportunities for this technology in various market sectors. The report is divided into two parts. Part A describes the state-of-the-art of DMFC technology, developments in electrocatalysis relevant to DMFCs, single cell and stack performance, and polymer electrolyte membranes. Part B discusses the viability of current DMFCs for portable and automotive applications, and examines some niche markets, eg for remote power applications. Market opportunities, technical issues, applications and competing technologies are summarised. The report draws attention to the outstanding technical issues and recommends further development in a number of areas (eg inexpensive membranes with lower rates of methanol crossover, membranes with lower rates of water permeation, improved power density and methods to ensure solutions do not freeze in cold climates).

  20. Progress toward cell-directed therapy for phenylketonuria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, CO

    2009-01-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is one of the most common inborn errors of metabolism with an annual incidence of approximately 1:16,000 live births in North America. Contemporary therapy relies upon lifelong dietary protein restriction and supplementation with phenylalanine-free medical foods. This therapy is expensive and unpalatable; dietary compliance is difficult to maintain throughout life. Non-adherence to the diet is associated with learning disabilities, adult-onset neurodegenerative disease, and maternal PKU syndrome. The fervent dream of many individuals with PKU is a more permanent cure for this disease. This paper will review ongoing efforts to develop viable cell-directed therapies, in particular cell transplantation and gene therapy, for the treatment of PKU. PMID:18498375

  1. Starting characteristics of direct current motors powered by solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, S.; Appelbaum, J.

    1989-01-01

    Direct current motors are used in photovoltaic systems. Important characteristics of electric motors are the starting to rated current and torque ratios. These ratios are dictated by the size of the solar cell array and are different for the various dc motor types. Discussed here is the calculation of the starting to rated current ratio and starting to rated torque ratio of the permanent magnet, and series and shunt excited motors when powered by solar cells for two cases: with and without a maximum-power-point-tracker (MPPT) included in the system. Comparing these two cases, one gets a torque magnification of about 3 for the permanent magnet motor and about 7 for other motor types. The calculation of the torques may assist the PV system designer to determine whether or not to include an MPPT in the system.

  2. Direct ethanol fuel cells with catalysed metal mesh anodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chetty, Raghuram; Scott, Keith

    2007-01-01

    Platinum based binary and ternary catalysts prepared by thermal decomposition on titanium mesh were characterised and compared in terms of the electrochemical activity for ethanol oxidation. An enhancement in the catalytic activity was observed for the binary catalyst containing tin and ruthenium in their compositions with platinum. The catalysts were tested in single direct ethanol fuel cells and the result obtained with PtRu and PtSn showed that the mesh based electrodes show competitive performance in comparison to the conventional carbon based anodes

  3. Novel Materials for High Efficiency Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carson, Stephen [Arkema Inc.; Mountz, David [Arkema Inc.; He, Wensheng [Arkema Inc.; Zhang, Tao [Arkema Inc.

    2013-12-31

    Direct methanol fuel cell membranes were developed using blends of different polyelectrolytes with PVDF. The membranes showed complex relationships between polyelectrolyte chemistry, morphology, and processing. Although the PVDF grade was found to have little effect on the membrane permselectivity, it does impact membrane conductivity and methanol permeation values. Other factors, such as varying the polyelectrolyte polarity, using varying crosslinking agents, and adjusting the equivalent weight of the membranes impacted methanol permeation, permselectivity, and areal resistance. We now understand, within the scope of the project work completed, how these inter-related performance properties can be tailored to achieve a balance of performance.

  4. Direct determination of phosphatase activity from physiological substrates in cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongyuan Ren

    Full Text Available A direct and continuous approach to determine simultaneously protein and phosphate concentrations in cells and kinetics of phosphate release from physiological substrates by cells without any labeling has been developed. Among the enzymes having a phosphatase activity, tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP performs indispensable, multiple functions in humans. It is expressed in numerous tissues with high levels detected in bones, liver and neurons. It is absolutely required for bone mineralization and also necessary for neurotransmitter synthesis. We provided the proof of concept that infrared spectroscopy is a reliable assay to determine a phosphatase activity in the osteoblasts. For the first time, an overall specific phosphatase activity in cells was determined in a single step by measuring simultaneously protein and substrate concentrations. We found specific activities in osteoblast like cells amounting to 116 ± 13 nmol min(-1 mg(-1 for PPi, to 56 ± 11 nmol min(-1 mg(-1 for AMP, to 79 ± 23 nmol min(-1 mg(-1 for beta-glycerophosphate and to 73 ± 15 nmol min(-1 mg(-1 for 1-alpha-D glucose phosphate. The assay was also effective to monitor phosphatase activity in primary osteoblasts and in matrix vesicles. The use of levamisole--a TNAP inhibitor--served to demonstrate that a part of the phosphatase activity originated from this enzyme. An IC50 value of 1.16 ± 0.03 mM was obtained for the inhibition of phosphatase activity of levamisole in osteoblast like cells. The infrared assay could be extended to determine any type of phosphatase activity in other cells. It may serve as a metabolomic tool to monitor an overall phosphatase activity including acid phosphatases or other related enzymes.

  5. Assessment of occult cervical lymph node metastasis in primary squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck by computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakil, U.

    2015-01-01

    To determine the frequency of occult (node negative) cervical lymph node metastasis in primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, using contrast enhanced computed tomography (CT). Study Design: Cross sectional descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Study was conducted in Department of Radiology, Combined Military Hospital Rawalpindi. Duration of the study was 06 months i.e. from 19th February 2011 to 19th August 2011. Patients and Methods: A total of 141 cases, fulfilling the inclusion criteria, reporting to the radiology department, were included in the study after seeking written informed consent. All patients underwent contrast enhanced CT scan of the neck from base of skull to root of neck using Asteion Whole Body X-ray CT Scanner (Model TSX-021A). Images were evaluated for the presence or absence of cervical lymph node metastasis according to the cervical lymph node metastatic criteria at each level of the neck. Results: Of the 141 patients with clinically no head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, 45.4% were found to have lymph node metastases. Frequency of occult metastases in squamous cell carcinoma of oral cavity was 47.6%, oropharynx 23.5%, larynx 33.3% and hypopharynx 78.6%. Conclusion: In clinically node negative neck, the risk of lymph node metastases is significantly high in patients of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in our population. All patients presenting with node negative neck should undergo CT scans for early detection of occult metastasis. (author)

  6. Anticancer Effect and Apoptosis Induction of Cymbopogon citratus Plant on Head and Neck HTB43 Cancer Cell Lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yen, N.; Zainah Adam; Arapoc, D.J.; Mohamed Zaffar Ali Mohamed Amiroudine; Shafii Khamis

    2016-01-01

    Lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus) is a major crop in Asia, South and Central America, Africa and other tropical countries. It is commonly used as a culinary herb in Asian cuisine and also as medicinal herb in India. The objective of the present study was to investigate the anticancer effect of Cymbopogon citratus essential oil on human head and neck cancer cell lines. Lemongrass essential oil was obtained from fresh lemongrass leaves using the microwave extractor. The yield of the highly purified oil obtained was 0.62 %. The oil was investigated for its in-vitro cytotoxicity and apoptosis induction against human head and neck HTB43 cancer cell lines. The results showed promising cytotoxic effects with IC_5_0 value of 15.42 ± 6.10 μg/ ml (HTB43) respectively. In addition, the essential oil has found inducing apoptotic effect within HTB43 cells (25.71 ± 1.43 %). These preliminary results indicated that the oil had apoptosis-based cytotoxicity against head and neck cancer cells. However, further investigations need to be carried out in order to elucidate the anti-cancer properties of the oil. The phytochemicals properties of the active compounds found in the oil also need to be studied. (author)

  7. Principles and Materials Aspects of Direct Alkaline Alcohol Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eileen Hao Yu

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Direct alkaline alcohol fuel cells (DAAFCs have attracted increasing interest over the past decade because of their favourable reaction kinetics in alkaline media, higher energy densities achievable and the easy handling of the liquid fuels. In this review, principles and mechanisms of DAAFCs in alcohol oxidation and oxygen reduction are discussed. Despite the high energy densities available during the oxidation of polycarbon alcohols they are difficult to oxidise. Apart from methanol, the complete oxidation of other polycarbon alcohols to CO2 has not been achieved with current catalysts. Different types of catalysts, from conventional precious metal catalyst of Pt and Pt alloys to other lower cost Pd, Au and Ag metal catalysts are compared. Non precious metal catalysts, and lanthanum, strontium oxides and perovskite-type oxides are also discussed. Membranes like the ones used as polymer electrolytes and developed for DAAFCs are reviewed. Unlike conventional proton exchange membrane fuel cells, anion exchange membranes are used in present DAAFCs. Fuel cell performance with DAAFCs using different alcohols, catalysts and membranes, as well as operating parameters are summarised. In order to improve the power output of the DAAFCs, further developments in catalysts, membrane materials and fuel cell systems are essential.

  8. The promoter for intestinal cell kinase is head-to-head with F-Box 9 and contains functional sites for TCF7L2 and FOXA factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohn Steven M

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intestinal cell kinase (ICK; GeneID 22858 is a conserved MAPK and CDK-like kinase that is widely expressed in human tissues. Data from the Cancer Genome Anatomy Project indicated ICK mRNA is increased in cancer, and that its expression correlated with expression of mRNA for an uncharacterized F-box protein, FBX9 (GeneID: 26268. ICK and FBX9 genes are arranged head-to-head on opposite strands, with start sites for transcription separated by ~3.3 kb. We hypothesized ICK and FBX9 are potentially important genes in cancer controlled by a bidirectional promoter. Results We assessed promoter activity of the intergenic region in both orientations in cancer cell lines derived from breast (AU565, SKBR3, colon (HCT-15, KM12, and stomach (AGS cancers, as well as in embryonic human kidney (HEK293T cells. The intergenic segment was active in both orientations in all of these lines, and ICK promoter activity was greater than FBX9 promoter activity. Results from deletions and truncations defined a minimal promoter for ICK, and revealed that repressors and enhancers differentially regulate ICK versus FBX9 promoter activity. The ICK promoter contains consensus motifs for several FOX-family transcription factors that align when mouse and human are compared using EMBOSS. FOXA1 and FOXA2 increase luciferase activity of a minimal promoter 10-20 fold in HEK293T cells. Consensus sites for TCF7L2 (TCF4 (Gene Id: 6934 are also present in both mouse and human. The expression of β-catenin increased activity of the minimal promoter ~10 fold. ICK reference mRNAs (NM_014920.3, NM_016513 are expressed in low copy number and increased in some breast cancers, using a ten base tag 5'-TCAACCTTAT-3' specific for both ICK transcripts. Conclusion ICK and FBX9 are divergently transcribed from a bidirectional promoter that is GC-rich and contains a CpG island. A minimal promoter for ICK contains functional sites for β-cateinin/TCF7L2 and FOXA. These data are

  9. Anode catalysts for direct ethanol fuel cells utilizing directly solar light illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Daobao; Wang, Shuxi; Zheng, Peng; Wang, Jian; Zha, Longwu; Hou, Yuanyuan; He, Jianguo; Xiao, Ying; Lin, Huashui; Tian, Zhaowu

    2009-01-01

    Shine a light: A PtNiRu/TiO(2) anode catalyst for direct ethanol fuel cells shows photocatalytic activity. The peak current density for ethanol oxidation under solar light illumination is 2-3 times greater than that in the absence of solar light. Ethanol is oxidized by light-generated holes, and the electrons are collected by the TiO(2) support to generate the oxidation current.Novel PtNiRu/TiO(2) anode catalysts for direct ethanol fuel cells (DEFCs) were prepared from PtNiRu nanoparticles (1:1:1 atomic ratios) and a nanoporous TiO(2) film by a sol-gel and electrodeposition method. The performances of the catalysts for ethanol oxidation were investigated by cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results indicate a remarkable enhancement of activity for ethanol oxidation under solar light illumination. Under solar light illumination, the generated oxidation peak current density is 24.6 mA cm(-2), which is about 2.5 times higher than that observed without solar light (9.9 mA cm(-2)). The high catalytic activity of the PtNiRu/TiO(2) complex catalyst for the electrooxidation of ethanol may be attributed to the modified metal/nanoporous TiO(2) film, and the enhanced electrooxidation of ethanol under solar light may be due to the photogeneration of holes in the modified nanoporous TiO(2) film.

  10. Baseline Face Detection, Head Pose Estimation, and Coarse Direction Detection for Facial Data in the SHRP2 Naturalistic Driving Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paone, Jeffrey R [ORNL; Bolme, David S [ORNL; Ferrell, Regina Kay [ORNL; Aykac, Deniz [ORNL; Karnowski, Thomas Paul [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Keeping a driver focused on the road is one of the most critical steps in insuring the safe operation of a vehicle. The Strategic Highway Research Program 2 (SHRP2) has over 3,100 recorded videos of volunteer drivers during a period of 2 years. This extensive naturalistic driving study (NDS) contains over one million hours of video and associated data that could aid safety researchers in understanding where the driver s attention is focused. Manual analysis of this data is infeasible, therefore efforts are underway to develop automated feature extraction algorithms to process and characterize the data. The real-world nature, volume, and acquisition conditions are unmatched in the transportation community, but there are also challenges because the data has relatively low resolution, high compression rates, and differing illumination conditions. A smaller dataset, the head pose validation study, is available which used the same recording equipment as SHRP2 but is more easily accessible with less privacy constraints. In this work we report initial head pose accuracy using commercial and open source face pose estimation algorithms on the head pose validation data set.

  11. DIRECT ELECTION OF THE HEAD OF REGIONAL URGENCY (DESCRIPTION OF THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE THREE AUTONOMOUS REGIONS ACT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Rahman

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A variety of problem and the political turmoil in some regions election last time appears in the event of a State feedback control Centre to the area. In the new order era regional chief election controversy cannot be released from the intervention Center. Usually the battle's political elite in Jakarta imposes to the area. When the issue blew up in the area, Settlement is the effort, he brought the case to Jakarta. In accordance with the implementation, the Hall of the Central Government has a dominant power in the determination of the head region. Legislative involvement only in the process of being formalistic. It is seen clearly in Article 15 and 16 regarding the appointment of the head region, where only the legislative vote and the results presented at least two names for approval and/or designation from President to Governor, and Minister of the Interior for Regent and Mayor. The aegis of the Centre to all and sundry, who has strong access to the Centre, he will be the winner, either for political affairs, economy, law even though. The most votes is not a legislative guarantee of choice became the head of the area. The Center has the absolute power to determine the opposite although sound support. Conflicts often occur, regional Centre but ended with the defeat of the area

  12. Pt based anode catalysts for direct ethanol fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Weijiang; Zhou, Zhenhua; Song, Shuqin; Li, Wenzhen; Sun, Gongquan; Xin, Qin [Direct Alcohol Fuel Cell Laboratory, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, CAS, P.O. Box 110, Dalian 116023 (China); Tsiakaras, Panagiotis [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Thessalia, Pedion Areos, GR 38334 Volos (Greece) 7

    2003-11-10

    In the present work several Pt-based anode catalysts supported on carbon XC-72R were prepared with a novel method and characterized by means of XRD, TEM and XPS analysis. It was found that all these catalysts are consisted of uniform nanosized particles with sharp distribution and Pt lattice parameter decreases with the addition of Ru or Pd and increases with the addition of Sn or W. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurements and single direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC) tests jointly showed that the presence of Sn, Ru and W enhances the activity of Pt towards ethanol electro-oxidation in the following order: Pt{sub 1}Sn{sub 1}/C>Pt{sub 1}Ru{sub 1}/C>Pt{sub 1}W{sub 1}/C>Pt{sub 1}Pd{sub 1}/C>Pt/C. Moreover, Pt{sub 1}Ru{sub 1}/C further modified by W and Mo showed improved ethanol electro-oxidation activity, but its DEFC performance was found to be inferior to that measured for Pt{sub 1}Sn{sub 1}/C. Under this respect, several PtSn/C catalysts with different Pt/Sn atomic ratio were also identically prepared and characterized and their direct ethanol fuel cell performances were evaluated. It was found that the single direct ethanol fuel cell having Pt{sub 1}Sn{sub 1}/C or Pt{sub 3}Sn{sub 2}/C or Pt{sub 2}Sn{sub 1}/C as anode catalyst showed better performances than those with Pt{sub 3}Sn{sub 1}/C or Pt{sub 4}Sn{sub 1}/C. It was also found that the latter two cells exhibited higher performances than the single cell using Pt{sub 1}Ru{sub 1}/C, which is exclusively used in PEMFC as anode catalyst for both methanol electro-oxidation and CO-tolerance. This distinct difference in DEFC performance between the catalysts examined here would be attributed to the so-called bifunctional mechanism and to the electronic interaction between Pt and additives. It is thought that an amount of -OH{sub ads}, an amount of surface Pt active sites and the conductivity effect of PtSn/C catalysts would determine the activity of PtSn/C with different Pt/Sn ratios. At lower temperature values or at low

  13. Improved Anode for a Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Thomas; Narayanan, Sekharipuram

    2005-01-01

    A modified chemical composition has been devised to improve the performance of the anode of a direct methanol fuel cell. The main feature of the modified composition is the incorporation of hydrous ruthenium oxide into the anode structure. This modification can reduce the internal electrical resistance of the cell and increase the degree of utilization of the anode catalyst. As a result, a higher anode current density can be sustained with a smaller amount of anode catalyst. These improvements can translate into a smaller fuel-cell system and higher efficiency of conversion. Some background information is helpful for understanding the benefit afforded by the addition of hydrous ruthenium oxide. The anode of a direct methanol fuel cell sustains the electro-oxidation of methanol to carbon dioxide in the reaction CH3OH + H2O--->CO2 + 6H(+) + 6e(-). An electrocatalyst is needed to enable this reaction to occur. The catalyst that offers the highest activity is an alloy of approximately equal numbers of atoms of the noble metals platinum and ruthenium. The anode is made of a composite material that includes high-surface-area Pt/Ru alloy particles and a proton-conducting ionomeric material. This composite is usually deposited onto a polymer-electrolyte (proton-conducting) membrane and onto an anode gas-diffusion/current-collector sheet that is subsequently bonded to the proton-conducting membrane by hot pressing. Heretofore, the areal density of noble-metal catalyst typically needed for high performance has been about 8 mg/cm2. However, not all of the catalyst has been utilized in the catalyzed electro-oxidation reaction. Increasing the degree of utilization of the catalyst would make it possible to improve the performance of the cell for a given catalyst loading and/or reduce the catalyst loading (thereby reducing the cost of the cell). The use of carbon and possibly other electronic conductors in the catalyst layer has been proposed for increasing the utilization of the

  14. Compounds From Celastraceae Targeting Cancer Pathways and Their Potential Application in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandes, Camila; Pereira, Ana Maria Soares; Severino, Patricia

    2017-02-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck is one of the most common cancer types worldwide. It initiates on the epithelial lining of the upper aerodigestive tract, at most instances as a consequence of tobacco and alcohol consumption. Treatment options based on conventional therapies or targeted therapies under development have limited efficacy due to multiple genetic alterations typically found in this cancer type. Natural products derived from plants often possess biological activities that may be valuable in the development of new therapeutic agents for cancer treatment. Several genera from the family Celastraceae have been studied in this context. This review reports studies on chemical constituents isolated from species from the Celastraceae family targeting cancer mechanisms studied to date. These results are then correlated with molecular characteristics of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in an attempt to identify constituents with potential application in the treatment of this complex disease at the molecular level.

  15. Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and its correlation with human papillomavirus in people living with HIV: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccarelli, Manuela; Rullo, Emmanuele Venanzi; Facciolà, Alessio; Madeddu, Giordano; Cacopardo, Bruno; Taibi, Rosaria; D'Aleo, Francesco; Pinzone, Marilia Rita; Picerno, Isa; di Rosa, Michele; Visalli, Giuseppa; Condorelli, Fabrizio; Nunnari, Giuseppe; Pellicanò, Giovanni Francesco

    2018-03-30

    Over the last 20 years we assisted to an increase in the mean age of People Living with HIV and their comorbidities. Especially, there was an increase in Human Papillomavirus-related head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Despite their increasing incidence in HIV-positive people, mechanisms that lead to their development and progression are only partially understood. The aim of this review is to identify key data and factors about HPV-related head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in HIV-seropositive patients. Systematic search and review of the relevant literature-peer-reviewed and grey-was conducted using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis (PRISMA) guidelines. We included in our review only the 35 full-text articles we considered the most substantial. It is mandatory to improve our knowledge about the interactions existing between HPV and HIV, and about their actions on oral mucosa immune system.

  16. Direct Carbon Fuel Cell System Utilizing Solid Carbonaceous Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turgut Gur

    2010-04-30

    This 1-year project has achieved most of its objective and successfully demonstrated the viability of the fluidized bed direct carbon fuel cell (FB-DCFC) approach under development by Direct Carbon technologies, LLC, that utilizes solid carbonaceous fuels for power generation. This unique electrochemical technology offers high conversion efficiencies, produces proportionately less CO{sub 2} in capture-ready form, and does not consume or require water for gasification. FB-DCFC employs a specialized solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) arrangement coupled to a Boudouard gasifier where the solid fuel particles are fluidized and reacted by the anode recycle gas CO{sub 2}. The resulting CO is electrochemically oxidized at the anode. Anode supported SOFC structures employed a porous Ni cermet anode layer, a dense yttria stabilized zirconia membrane, and a mixed conducting porous perovskite cathode film. Several kinds of untreated solid fuels (carbon and coal) were tested in bench scale FBDCFC prototypes for electrochemical performance and stability testing. Single cells of tubular geometry with active areas up to 24 cm{sup 2} were fabricated. The cells achieved high power densities up to 450 mW/cm{sup 2} at 850 C using a low sulfur Alaska coal char. This represents the highest power density reported in the open literature for coal based DCFC. Similarly, power densities up to 175 mW/cm{sup 2} at 850 C were demonstrated with carbon. Electrical conversion efficiencies for coal char were experimentally determined to be 48%. Long-term stability of cell performance was measured under galvanostatic conditions for 375 hours in CO with no degradation whatsoever, indicating that carbon deposition (or coking) does not pose any problems. Similar cell stability results were obtained in coal char tested for 24 hours under galvanostatic conditions with no sign of sulfur poisoning. Moreover, a 50-cell planar stack targeted for 1 kW output was fabricated and tested in 95% CO (balance CO{sub 2

  17. Simultaneous transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG): assessing the impact of tDCS on slow cortical magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Cossio, Eliana; Witkowski, Matthias; Robinson, Stephen E; Cohen, Leonardo G; Birbaumer, Niels; Soekadar, Surjo R

    2016-10-15

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) can influence cognitive, affective or motor brain functions. Whereas previous imaging studies demonstrated widespread tDCS effects on brain metabolism, direct impact of tDCS on electric or magnetic source activity in task-related brain areas could not be confirmed due to the difficulty to record such activity simultaneously during tDCS. The aim of this proof-of-principal study was to demonstrate the feasibility of whole-head source localization and reconstruction of neuromagnetic brain activity during tDCS and to confirm the direct effect of tDCS on ongoing neuromagnetic activity in task-related brain areas. Here we show for the first time that tDCS has an immediate impact on slow cortical magnetic fields (SCF, 0-4Hz) of task-related areas that are identical with brain regions previously described in metabolic neuroimaging studies. 14 healthy volunteers performed a choice reaction time (RT) task while whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG) was recorded. Task-related source-activity of SCFs was calculated using synthetic aperture magnetometry (SAM) in absence of stimulation and while anodal, cathodal or sham tDCS was delivered over the right primary motor cortex (M1). Source reconstruction revealed task-related SCF modulations in brain regions that precisely matched prior metabolic neuroimaging studies. Anodal and cathodal tDCS had a polarity-dependent impact on RT and SCF in primary sensorimotor and medial centro-parietal cortices. Combining tDCS and whole-head MEG is a powerful approach to investigate the direct effects of transcranial electric currents on ongoing neuromagnetic source activity, brain function and behavior. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Directive Nanophysical Cues for Regenerative Neural Cell Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Virginia; Tiryaki, Volkan Mujdat; Ahmed, Ijaz; Shreiber, David

    Until recently, implantables such as stents, probes, wafers and scaffolds have been viewed as passive vehicles for the delivery of physical, pharmacological and cellular interventions. Recent research, however, indicates that the physical environments that implantables present supply directive cues in their own right that work in conjunction with biochemical cues and produce a jointly-directed outcome. We will present our research in CNS repairs using advanced scanning probe microscopy, electron microscopies and contact angle measurements to quantitatively describe the nanoscale elasticity, surface roughness, work of adhesion and surface polarity for investigation of scaffold environments. We will also present our research using super-resolution immunocytochemistry and atomic force microscopy to evaluate neural cell morphological responses with associated micro filament, microtubule and intermediate filament expressions, along with results on how and which integrin-family receptors are possibly involved. Finally, we will present our novel application of k-means cluster analysis applied across multiple experimental modalities for quantification of synergistic scaffold properties and cell responses.

  19. A gradient activation method for direct methanol fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Guicheng; Yang, Zhaoyi; Halim, Martin; Li, Xinyang; Wang, Manxiang; Kim, Ji Young; Mei, Qiwen; Wang, Xindong; Lee, Joong Kee

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A gradient activation method was reported firstly for direct methanol fuel cells. • The activity recovery of Pt-based catalyst was introduced into the novel activation process. • The new activation method led to prominent enhancement of DMFC performance. • DMFC performance was improved with the novel activation step by step within 7.5 h. - Abstract: To realize gradient activation effect and recover catalytic activity of catalyst in a short time, a gradient activation method has firstly been proposed for enhancing discharge performance and perfecting activation mechanism of the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). This method includes four steps, i.e. proton activation, activity recovery activation, H_2-O_2 mode activation and forced discharging activation. The results prove that the proposed method has gradually realized replenishment of water and protons, recovery of catalytic activity of catalyst, establishment of transfer channels for electrons, protons, and oxygen, and optimization of anode catalyst layer for methanol transfer in turn. Along with the novel activation process going on, the DMFC discharge performance has been improved, step by step, to more than 1.9 times higher than that of the original one within 7.5 h. This method provides a practicable activation way for the real application of single DMFCs and stacks.

  20. Photodynamic mechanisms induced by a combination of hypericin and a chlorin based-photosensitizer in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Gyenge Emina Besic; Lüscher Daniel; Forny Patrick; Antoniol Martina; Geisberger Georg; Walt Heinrich; Patzke Greta; Maake Caroline

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate photodynamic therapy (PDT) effects mediated by hypericin and a liposomal meso tetrahydroxyphenyl chlorin (mTHPC) derivative with focus on their 1:1 mixture on head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines. Absorption excitation and photobleaching were monitored using fluorescence spectrometry showing the same spectral patterns for the mixture as measured for single photosensitizers. In the mixture mTHPC showed a prolonged photo stability. Singlet oxyg...

  1. Tumor-Volume Simulation During Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer Using a Four-Level Cell Population Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chvetsov, Alexei V.; Dong Lei; Palta, Jantinder R.; Amdur, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a fast computational radiobiologic model for quantitative analysis of tumor volume during fractionated radiotherapy. The tumor-volume model can be useful for optimizing image-guidance protocols and four-dimensional treatment simulations in proton therapy that is highly sensitive to physiologic changes. Methods: The analysis is performed using two approximations: (1) tumor volume is a linear function of total cell number and (2) tumor-cell population is separated into four subpopulations: oxygenated viable cells, oxygenated lethally damaged cells, hypoxic viable cells, and hypoxic lethally damaged cells. An exponential decay model is used for disintegration and removal of oxygenated lethally damaged cells from the tumor. Results: We tested our model on daily volumetric imaging data available for 14 head-and-neck cancer patients treated with an integrated computed tomography/linear accelerator system. A simulation based on the averaged values of radiobiologic parameters was able to describe eight cases during the entire treatment and four cases partially (50% of treatment time) with a maximum 20% error. The largest discrepancies between the model and clinical data were obtained for small tumors, which may be explained by larger errors in the manual tumor volume delineation procedure. Conclusions: Our results indicate that the change in gross tumor volume for head-and-neck cancer can be adequately described by a relatively simple radiobiologic model. In future research, we propose to study the variation of model parameters by fitting to clinical data for a cohort of patients with head-and-neck cancer and other tumors. The potential impact of other processes, like concurrent chemotherapy, on tumor volume should be evaluated.

  2. Multicenter validation of recursive partitioning analysis classification for patients with squamous cell head and neck carcinoma treated with surgery and postoperative radiotherapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonkman, A.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Terhaard, C.H.J.; Hoebers, F.J.; Ende, P.L. van den; Wijers, O.B.; Verhoef, C.G.; Jong, M. de; Leemans, C.R.; Langendijk, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: To validate the recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) classification system for squamous cell head and neck cancer as recently reported by the VU University Medical Center. METHODS AND MATERIALS: In eight Dutch head and neck cancer centers, data necessary to classify patients according to

  3. Erythropoietin receptor is not a surrogate marker for tumor hypoxia and does not correlate with survival in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogsteen, I.J.; Peeters, W.J.M.; Marres, H.A.M.; Rijken, P.F.J.W.; Hoogen, F.J.A. van den; Kogel, A.J. van der; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To evaluate erythropoietin receptor (EPOR) expression in human head and neck squamous cell carcinomas and correlate this to the presence of tumor hypoxia and treatment outcome. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Eighty-five patients with locally advanced tumors of the head and neck were

  4. Association of Oral Microbiome With Risk for Incident Head and Neck Squamous Cell Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Richard B; Ahn, Jiyoung; Fan, Xiaozhou; Peters, Brandilyn A; Ma, Yingfei; Yang, Liying; Agalliu, Ilir; Burk, Robert D; Ganly, Ian; Purdue, Mark P; Freedman, Neal D; Gapstur, Susan M; Pei, Zhiheng

    2018-03-01

    Case-control studies show a possible relationship between oral bacteria and head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC). Prospective studies are needed to examine the temporal relationship between oral microbiome and subsequent risk of HNSCC. To prospectively examine associations between the oral microbiome and incident HNSCC. This nested case-control study was carried out in 2 prospective cohort studies: the American Cancer Society Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort (CPS-II) and the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial (PLCO). Among 122 004 participants, 129 incident patient cases of HNSCC were identified during an average 3.9 years of follow-up. Two controls per patient case (n = 254) were selected through incidence density sampling, matched on age, sex, race/ethnicity, and time since mouthwash collection. All participants provided mouthwash samples and were cancer-free at baseline. Oral microbiome composition and specific bacterial abundances were determined through bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Overall oral microbiome composition and specific taxa abundances were compared for the case group and the control group, using PERMANOVA and negative binomial generalized linear models, respectively, controlling for age, sex, race, cohort, smoking, alcohol, and oral human papillomavirus-16 status. Taxa with a 2-sided false discovery rate (FDR)-adjusted P-value (q-value) <.10 were considered significant. Incident HNSCC. The study included 58 patient cases from CPS-II (mean [SD] age, 71.0 [6.4] years; 16 [27.6%] women) and 71 patient cases from PLCO (mean [SD] age, 62.7 [4.8] years; 13 [18.3%] women). Two controls per patient case (n = 254) were selected through incidence density sampling, matched on age, sex, race/ethnicity, and time since mouthwash collection. Head and neck squamous cell cancer cases and controls were similar with respect to age, sex, and race. Patients in the case group were more often current tobacco

  5. A microfluidic direct formate fuel cell on paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copenhaver, Thomas S; Purohit, Krutarth H; Domalaon, Kryls; Pham, Linda; Burgess, Brianna J; Manorothkul, Natalie; Galvan, Vicente; Sotez, Samantha; Gomez, Frank A; Haan, John L

    2015-08-01

    We describe the first direct formate fuel cell on a paper microfluidic platform. In traditional membrane-less microfluidic fuel cells (MFCs), external pumping consumes power produced by the fuel cell in order to maintain co-laminar flow of the anode stream and oxidant stream to prevent mixing. However, in paper microfluidics, capillary action drives flow while minimizing stream mixing. In this work, we demonstrate a paper MFC that uses formate and hydrogen peroxide as the anode fuel and cathode oxidant, respectively. Using these materials we achieve a maximum power density of nearly 2.5 mW/mg Pd. In a series configuration, our MFC achieves an open circuit voltage just over 1 V, and in a parallel configuration, short circuit of 20 mA absolute current. We also demonstrate that the MFC does not require continuous flow of fuel and oxidant to produce power. We found that we can pre-saturate the materials on the paper, stop the electrolyte flow, and still produce approximately 0.5 V for 15 min. This type of paper MFC has potential applications in point-of-care diagnostic devices and other electrochemical sensors. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Passive direct methanol fuel cells for portable electronic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achmad, F.; Kamarudin, S.K.; Daud, W.R.W.; Majlan, E.H.

    2011-01-01

    Due to the increasing demand for electricity, clean, renewable energy resources must be developed. Thus, the objective of the present study was to develop a passive direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) for portable electronic devices. The power output of six dual DMFCs connected in series with an active area of 4 cm 2 was approximately 600 mW, and the power density of the DMFCs was 25 mW cm -2 . The DMFCs were evaluated as a power source for mobile phone chargers and media players. The results indicated that the open circuit voltage of the DMFC was between 6.0 V and 6.5 V, and the voltage under operating conditions was 4.0 V. The fuel cell was tested on a variety of cell phone chargers, media players and PDAs. The cost of energy consumption by the proposed DMFC was estimated to be USD 20 W -1 , and the cost of methanol is USD 4 kW h. Alternatively, the local conventional electricity tariff is USD 2 kW h. However, for the large-scale production of electronic devices, the cost of methanol will be significantly lower. Moreover, the electricity tariff is expected to increase due to the constraints of fossil fuel resources and pollution. As a result, DMFCs will become competitive with conventional power sources.

  7. Parathyroid Hormone Directs Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Cell Fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yi; Hanai, Jun-Ichi; Le, Phuong T; Bi, Ruiye; Maridas, David; DeMambro, Victoria; Figueroa, Carolina A; Kir, Serkan; Zhou, Xuedong; Mannstadt, Michael; Baron, Roland; Bronson, Roderick T; Horowitz, Mark C; Wu, Joy Y; Bilezikian, John P; Dempster, David W; Rosen, Clifford J; Lanske, Beate

    2017-03-07

    Intermittent PTH administration builds bone mass and prevents fractures, but its mechanism of action is unclear. We genetically deleted the PTH/PTHrP receptor (PTH1R) in mesenchymal stem cells using Prx1Cre and found low bone formation, increased bone resorption, and high bone marrow adipose tissue (BMAT). Bone marrow adipocytes traced to Prx1 and expressed classic adipogenic markers and high receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (Rankl) expression. RANKL levels were also elevated in bone marrow supernatant and serum, but undetectable in other adipose depots. By cell sorting, Pref1 + RANKL + marrow progenitors were twice as great in mutant versus control marrow. Intermittent PTH administration to control mice reduced BMAT significantly. A similar finding was noted in male osteoporotic patients. Thus, marrow adipocytes exhibit osteogenic and adipogenic characteristics, are uniquely responsive to PTH, and secrete RANKL. These studies reveal an important mechanism for PTH's therapeutic action through its ability to direct mesenchymal cell fate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Study of Galfenol direct cytotoxicity and remote microactuation in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Estevez, Carolina; Blanquer, Andreu; Dulal, Prabesh; Pérez Del Real, Rafael; Duch, Marta; Ibáñez, Elena; Barrios, Leonardo; Murillo, Gonzalo; Torras, Núria; Nogués, Carme; Stadler, Bethanie J H; Plaza, José A; Esteve, Jaume

    2017-09-01

    Remote microactuators are of great interest in biology and medicine as minimally-invasive tools for cellular stimulation. Remote actuation can be achieved by active magnetostrictive transducers which are capable of changing shape in response to external magnetic fields thereby creating controlled displacements. Among the magnetostrictive materials, Galfenol, the multifaceted iron-based smart material, offers high magnetostriction with robust mechanical properties. In order to explore these capabilities for biomedical applications, it is necessary to study the feasibility of material miniaturization in standard fabrication processes as well as evaluate the biocompatibility. Here we develop a technology to fabricate, release, and suspend Galfenol-based microparticles, without affecting the integrity of the material. The morphology, composition and magnetic properties of the material itself are characterized. The direct cytotoxicity of Galfenol is evaluated in vitro using human macrophages, osteoblast and osteosarcoma cells. In addition, cytotoxicity and actuation of Galfenol microparticles in suspension are evaluated using human macrophages. The biological parameters analyzed indicate that Galfenol is not cytotoxic, even after internalization of some of the particles by macrophages. The microparticles were remotely actuated forming intra- and extracellular chains that did not impact the integrity of the cells. The results propose Galfenol as a suitable material to develop remote microactuators for cell biology studies and intracellular applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Direct measurement of helical cell motion of the spirochete leptospira.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Shuichi; Leshansky, Alexander; Magariyama, Yukio; Namba, Keiichi; Kudo, Seishi

    2014-01-07

    Leptospira are spirochete bacteria distinguished by a short-pitch coiled body and intracellular flagella. Leptospira cells swim in liquid with an asymmetric morphology of the cell body; the anterior end has a long-pitch spiral shape (S-end) and the posterior end is hook-shaped (H-end). Although the S-end and the coiled cell body called the protoplasmic cylinder are thought to be responsible for propulsion together, most observations on the motion mechanism have remained qualitative. In this study, we analyzed the swimming speed and rotation rate of the S-end, protoplasmic cylinder, and H-end of individual Leptospira cells by one-sided dark-field microscopy. At various viscosities of media containing different concentrations of Ficoll, the rotation rate of the S-end and protoplasmic cylinder showed a clear correlation with the swimming speed, suggesting that these two helical parts play a central role in the motion of Leptospira. In contrast, the H-end rotation rate was unstable and showed much less correlation with the swimming speed. Forces produced by the rotation of the S-end and protoplasmic cylinder showed that these two helical parts contribute to propulsion at nearly equal magnitude. Torque generated by each part, also obtained from experimental motion parameters, indicated that the flagellar motor can generate torque >4000 pN nm, twice as large as that of Escherichia coli. Furthermore, the S-end torque was found to show a markedly larger fluctuation than the protoplasmic cylinder torque, suggesting that the unstable H-end rotation might be mechanically related to changes in the S-end rotation rate for torque balance of the entire cell. Variations in torque at the anterior and posterior ends of the Leptospira cell body could be transmitted from one end to the other through the cell body to coordinate the morphological transformations of the two ends for a rapid change in the swimming direction. Copyright © 2014 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc

  10. Direct imaging of APP proteolysis in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parenti, Niccoló; Del Grosso, Ambra; Antoni, Claudia; Cecchini, Marco; Corradetti, Renato; Pavone, Francesco S; Calamai, Martino

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a multifactorial disorder caused by the interaction of genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors. The formation of cytotoxic oligomers consisting of A β peptide is widely accepted as being one of the main key events triggering the development of Alzheimer's disease. A β peptide production results from the specific proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Deciphering the factors governing the activity of the secretases responsible for the cleavage of APP is still a critical issue. Kits available commercially measure the enzymatic activity of the secretases from cells lysates, in vitro . By contrast, we have developed a prototypal rapid bioassay that provides visible information on the proteolytic processing of APP directly in living cells. APP was fused to a monomeric variant of the green fluorescent protein and a monomeric variant of the red fluorescent protein at the C-terminal and N-terminal (mChAPPmGFP), respectively. Changes in the proteolytic processing rate in transfected human neuroblastoma and rat neuronal cells were imaged with confocal microscopy as changes in the red/green fluorescence intensity ratio. The significant decrease in the mean red/green ratio observed in cells over-expressing the β -secretase BACE1, or the α -secretase ADAM10, fused to a monomeric blue fluorescent protein confirms that the proteolytic site is still accessible. Specific siRNA was used to evaluate the contribution of endogenous BACE1. Interestingly, we found that the degree of proteolytic processing of APP is not completely homogeneous within the same single cell, and that there is a high degree of variability between cells of the same type. We were also able to follow with a fluorescence spectrometer the changes in the red emission intensity of the extracellular medium when BACE1 was overexpressed. This represents a complementary approach to fluorescence microscopy for rapidly detecting changes in the proteolytic processing

  11. Stimulated monocyte IL-6 secretion predicts survival of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heimdal, John-Helge; Kross, Kenneth; Klementsen, Beate; Olofsson, Jan; Aarstad, Hans Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    This study was performed in order to determine whether monocyte in vitro function is associated with presence, stage and prognosis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) disease. Prospective study describing outcome, after at least five years observation, of patients treated for HNSCC disease in relation to their monocyte function. Sixty-five patients with newly diagnosed HNSCC and eighteen control patients were studied. Monocyte responsiveness was assessed by measuring levels of monocyte in vitro interleukin (IL)-6 and monocyte chemotactic peptide (MCP)-1 secretion after 24 hours of endotoxin stimulation in cultures supplied either with 20% autologous serum (AS) or serum free medium (SFM). Survival, and if relevant, cause of death, was determined at least 5 years following primary diagnosis. All patients, as a group, had higher in vitro monocyte responsiveness in terms of IL-6 (AS) (t = 2.03; p < 0.05) and MCP-1 (SFM) (t = 2.49; p < 0.05) compared to controls. Increased in vitro monocyte IL-6 endotoxin responsiveness under the SFM condition was associated with decreased survival rate (Hazard ratio (HR) = 2.27; Confidence interval (CI) = 1.05–4.88; p < 0.05). The predictive value of monocyte responsiveness, as measured by IL-6, was also retained when adjusted for age, gender and disease stage of patients (HR = 2.67; CI = 1.03–6.92; p < 0.05). With respect to MCP-1, low endotoxin-stimulated responsiveness (AS), analysed by Kaplan-Meier method, predicted decreased survival (χ = 4.0; p < 0.05). In HNSCC patients, changed monocyte in vitro response to endotoxin, as measured by increased IL-6 (SFM) and decreased MCP-1 (AS) responsiveness, are negative prognostic factors

  12. Incremental Prognostic Value of Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Histogram Analysis in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoxia; Yuan, Ying; Ren, Jiliang; Shi, Yiqian; Tao, Xiaofeng

    2018-03-26

    We aimed to investigate the incremental prognostic value of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) histogram analysis in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and integrate it into a multivariate prognostic model. A retrospective review of magnetic resonance imaging findings was conducted in patients with pathologically confirmed HNSCC between June 2012 and December 2015. For each tumor, six histogram parameters were derived: the 10th, 50th, and 90th percentiles of ADC (ADC 10 , ADC 50 , and ADC 90 ); mean ADC values (ADC mean ); kurtosis; and skewness. The clinical variables included age, sex, smoking status, tumor volume, and tumor node metastasis stage. The association of these histogram and clinical variables with overall survival (OS) was determined. Further validation of the histogram parameters as independent biomarkers was performed using multivariate Cox proportional hazard models combined with clinical variables, which was compared to the clinical model. Models were assessed with C index and receiver operating characteristic curve analyses for the 12- and 36-month OS. Ninety-six patients were eligible for analysis. Median follow-up was 877 days (range, 54-1516 days). A total of 29 patients died during follow-up (30%). Patients with higher ADC values (ADC 10  > 0.958 × 10 -3 mm 2 /s, ADC 50  > 1.089 × 10 -3 mm 2 /s, ADC 90  > 1.152 × 10 -3 mm 2 /s, ADC mean  > 1.047 × 10 -3 mm 2 /s) and lower kurtosis (≤0.967) were significant predictors of poor OS (P histogram analysis has incremental prognostic value in patients with HNSCC and increases the performance of a multivariable prognostic model in addition to clinical variables. Copyright © 2018 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A phase II study of primary reirradiation in squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langendijk, Johannes A.; Kasperts, Nicolien; Leemans, Charles R.; Doornaert, Patricia; Slotman, Ben J.

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: In this prospective study, the effect of a second course of primary radiotherapy on locoregional control, survival and toxicity was investigated, in patients who underwent a second course of high dose irradiation for second primary or locoregional recurrent squamous cell head and neck carcinoma (HNSCC) in a previously irradiated area. Patients and methods: A total of 34 patients with second primary (n=26) or locoregional recurrent (n=8) tumours were treated with a second course of high dose radiotherapy. Patients were selected for re-irradiation in case of inoperable and/or unresectable tumours. In most cases, the target volume for re-irradiation was confined to the gross tumour volume (GTV). No elective radiotherapy was applied in the former high-dose area. A total dose of 46 Gy was applied to elective areas with a boost up to 60 Gy with conventional fractionation. The median follow-up period was 32 months. Results: The locoregional control rate after 2 years was 27%. The 3-year overall survival was 22%. The most frequently reported acute side-effect was acute mucositis resulting in swallowing complaints. Pharyngeal and oesophageal late morbidity was also the most important late side-effect. In general, acute and late radiation-induced morbidity remained within acceptable limits. Conclusions: In conclusion, primary re-irradiation appears to be feasible in terms of acute and late radiation-induced toxicity. To improve outcome in terms locoregional control and survival, future studies should be focussed on optimising radiation schedules and the addition of concomitant chemotherapy

  14. Association between GSTM1 and GSTT1 allelic variants and head and neck squamous cell cancinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUNDS: GSTM1 and GSTT1 are involved in the detoxification of carcinogens such as smoking by-products, and polymorphisms in these two genes with a result of loss of enzyme activity may increase risk of carcinogenesis. Although many epidemiological studies have investigated the association between GSTM1 or GSTT1 null genotype and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC, the results remain conflicting. To elucidate the overall association of GSTM1, GSTT1 and HNSCC, we included all available studies and performed this meta-analysis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A dataset including 42 articles for GSTM1, 32 articles for GSTT1, and 15 articles for GSTM1 and GSTT1 in combination were identified by a search in PubMed. Associations beween HNSCC and polymorphisms of GSTM1 and GSTT1 alone and in combination were analysed by software RevMan 5.1. Stratification analysis on ethnicity and smoking status, sensitivity analysis, heterogeneity among studies and their publication bias were also tested. Association was found in overall analysis between HNSCC and GSTM1 and GSTT1 null genotype. Stratified by ethnicity, we found increased risks of HNSCC in carriers with GSTM1 null genotype in Asian, GSTT1 null genotype in South American, and dual null genotype in European and Asian. When stratified by smoking, a more significant association of GSTM1 null genotype with HNSCC risk was observed in smokers. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This meta-analysis presented additional evidence of the association between GSTM1 and GSTT1 polymorphisms and HNSCC risk.

  15. Patient Choice of Nonsurgical Treatment Contributes to Disparities in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parhar, Harman S; Anderson, Donald W; Janjua, Arif S; Durham, J Scott; Prisman, Eitan

    2018-06-01

    Objectives There are well-established outcome disparities among different demographic groups with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). We aimed to investigate the potential contribution of patient choice of nonsurgical treatment to these disparities by estimating the rate of this phenomenon, identifying its predictors, and estimating the effect on cancer-specific survival. Study Design Retrospective nationwide analysis. Settings Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Database (2004-2014). Subjects and Methods Patients with HNSCC, who were recommended for primary surgery, were included. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify demographic and clinical factors associated with patient choice of nonsurgical treatment, and Kaplan Meier/Cox regression was used to analyze survival. Results Of 114,506 patients with HNSCC, 58,816 (51.4%) were recommended for primary surgery, and of those, 1550 (2.7%) chose nonsurgical treatment. Those who chose nonsurgical treatment were more likely to be older (67.1 ± 12.6 vs 63.6 ± 13.1, P unmarried (OR married, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.44-0.58), had an advanced tumor, and had a hypopharyngeal or laryngeal primary. Choice of nonsurgical treatment imparted a 2.16-fold (95% CI, 2.02-2.30) increased risk of cancer-specific death. Conclusion Of the patients, 2.7% chose nonsurgical treatment despite a provider recommendation that impairs survival. Choice of nonsurgical treatment is associated with older age, having Black or Asian ethnicity, being unmarried, having an advanced stage tumor, and having a primary site in the hypopharynx or larynx. Knowledge of these disparities may help providers counsel patients and help patients make informed decisions.

  16. Early processing variations in selective attention to the color and direction of moving stimuli during 30 days head-down bed rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin-Jie; He, Si-Yang; Niu, Dong-Bin; Guo, Jian-Ping; Xu, Yun-Long; Wang, De-Sheng; Cao, Yi; Zhao, Qi; Tan, Cheng; Li, Zhi-Li; Tang, Guo-Hua; Li, Yin-Hui; Bai, Yan-Qiang

    2013-11-01

    Dynamic variations in early selective attention to the color and direction of moving stimuli were explored during a 30 days period of head-down bed rest. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded at F5, F6, P5, P6 scalp locations in seven male subjects who attended to pairs of bicolored light emitting diodes that flashed sequentially to produce a perception of movement. Subjects were required to attend selectively to a critical feature of the moving target, e.g., color or direction. The tasks included: a no response task, a color selective response task, a moving direction selective response task, and a combined color-direction selective response task. Subjects were asked to perform these four tasks on: the 3rd day before bed rest; the 3rd, 15th and 30th day during the bed rest; and the 5th day after bed rest. Subjects responded quickly to the color than moving direction and combined color-direction response. And they had a longer reaction time during bed rest on the 15th and 30th day during bed rest after a relatively quicker response on the 3rd day. Using brain event-related potentials technique, we found that in the color selective response task, the mean amplitudes of P1 and N1 for target ERPs decreased in the 3rd day during bed rest and 5th day after bed rest in comparison with pre-bed rest, 15th day and 30th day during bed rest. In the combined color-direction selective response task, the P1 latencies for target ERPs on the 3rd and 30th day during bed rest were longer than on the 15th day during bed rest. As 3rd day during bed rest was in the acute adaptation period and 30th day during bed rest was in the relatively adaptation stage of head-down bed rest, the results help to clarify the effects of bed rest on different task loads and patterns of attention. It was suggested that subjects expended more time to give correct decision in the head-down tilt bed rest state. A difficulty in the recruitment of brain resources was found in feature selection task

  17. Direct Differentiation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells into Haploid Spermatogenic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles A. Easley, IV

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs have been shown to differentiate into primordial germ cells (PGCs but not into spermatogonia, haploid spermatocytes, or spermatids. Here, we show that hESCs and hiPSCs differentiate directly into advanced male germ cell lineages, including postmeiotic, spermatid-like cells, in vitro without genetic manipulation. Furthermore, our procedure mirrors spermatogenesis in vivo by differentiating PSCs into UTF1-, PLZF-, and CDH1-positive spermatogonia-like cells; HIWI- and HILI-positive spermatocyte-like cells; and haploid cells expressing acrosin, transition protein 1, and protamine 1 (proteins that are uniquely found in spermatids and/or sperm. These spermatids show uniparental genomic imprints similar to those of human sperm on two loci: H19 and IGF2. These results demonstrate that male PSCs have the ability to differentiate directly into advanced germ cell lineages and may represent a novel strategy for studying spermatogenesis in vitro.

  18. SU-F-SPS-03: Direct Measurement of Organ Doses Resulting From Head and Cervical Spine Trauma CT Protocols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carranza, C; Lipnharski, I; Quails, N; Correa, N; Rill, L; Arreola, M [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: This retrospective study analyzes the exposure history of emergency department (ED) patients undergoing head and cervical spine trauma computed tomography (CT) studies. This study investigated dose levels received by trauma patients and addressed any potential concerns regarding radiation dose issues. Methods: Under proper IRB approval, a cohort of 300 trauma cases of head and cervical spine trauma CT scans received in the ED was studied. The radiological image viewing software of the hospital was used to view patient images and image data. The following parameters were extracted: the imaging history of patients, the reported dose metrics from the scanner including the volumetric CT Dose Index (CTDIvol) and Dose Length Product (DLP). A postmortem subject was scanned using the same scan techniques utilized in a standard clinical head and cervical spine trauma CT protocol with 120 kVp and 280 mAs. The CTDIvol was recorded for the subject and the organ doses were measured using optically stimulated luminescent (OSL) dosimeters. Typical organ doses to the brain, thyroid, lens, salivary glands, and skin, based on the cadaver studies, were then calculated and reported for the cohort. Results: The CTDIvol reported by the CT scanner was 25.5 mGy for the postmortem subject. The average CTDIvol from the patient cohort was 34.1 mGy. From these metrics, typical average organ doses in mGy were found to be: Brain (44.57), Thyroid (33.40), Lens (82.45), Salivary Glands (61.29), Skin (47.50). The imaging history of the cohort showed that on average trauma patients received 26.1 scans over a lifetime. Conclusion: The average number of scans received on average by trauma ED patients shows that radiation doses in trauma patients may be a concern. Available dose tracking software would be helpful to track doses in trauma ED patients, highlighting the importance of minimizing unnecessary scans and keeping doses ALARA.

  19. Effect of the Premalignant and Tumor Microenvironment on Immune Cell Cytokine Production in Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Sara D. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Medical University of South Carolina, 173 Ashley Avenue, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); De Costa, Anna-Maria A. [Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University of South Carolina, 135 Rutledge Avenue, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, 96 Jonathan Lucas Street, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Young, M. Rita I., E-mail: rita.young@va.gov [Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University of South Carolina, 135 Rutledge Avenue, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, 96 Jonathan Lucas Street, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Medical Research Service (151), Ralph H. Johnson Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 109 Bee Street, Charleston, SC 29401 (United States)

    2014-04-02

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is marked by immunosuppression, a state in which the established tumor escapes immune attack. However, the impact of the premalignant and tumor microenvironments on immune reactivity has yet to be elucidated. The purpose of this study was to determine how soluble mediators from cells established from carcinogen-induced oral premalignant lesions and HNSCC modulate immune cell cytokine production. It was found that premalignant cells secrete significantly increased levels of G-CSF, RANTES, MCP-1, and PGE{sub 2} compared to HNSCC cells. Splenocytes incubated with premalignant supernatant secreted significantly increased levels of Th1-, Th2-, and Th17-associated cytokines compared to splenocytes incubated with HNSCC supernatant. These studies demonstrate that whereas the premalignant microenvironment elicits proinflammatory cytokine production, the tumor microenvironment is significantly less immune stimulatory and may contribute to immunosuppression in established HNSCC.

  20. Radiosensitization of head/neck sqaumous cell carcinoma by adenovirus-mediated expression of the Nbs1 protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhee, Juong G.; Li, Daqing; Suntharalingam, Mohan; Guo Chuanfa; O'Malley, Bert W.; Carney, James P.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Local failure and toxicity to adjacent critical structures is a significant problem in radiation therapy of cancers of the head and neck. We are developing a gene therapy based method of sensitizing head/neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) to radiation treatment. As patients with the rare hereditary disorder, Nijmegen breakage syndrome, show radiation sensitivity we hypothesized that tumor-specific disruption of the function of the Nbs1 protein would lead to enhanced cellular sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Experimental Procedures: We constructed two recombinant adenoviruses by cloning the full-length Nbs1 cDNA as well as the C-terminal 300 amino acids of Nbs1 into an adenovirus backbone under the control of a CMV promoter. The resulting adenoviruses were used to infect HNSCC cell line JHU011. These cells were evaluated for expression of the viral based constructs and assayed for clonogenic survival following radiation exposure. Results: Exposure of cells expressing Nbs1-300 to ionizing radiation resulted in a small reduction in survival relative to cells infected with control virus. Surprisingly, expression of full-length Nbs1 protein resulted in markedly enhanced sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Furthermore, the use of a fractionated radiation scheme following virus infection demonstrates that expression of full-length Nbs1 protein results in significant reduction in cell survival. Conclusions: These results provide a proof of principle that disruption of Nbs1 function may provide a means of enhancing the radiosensitivity of head and neck tumors. Additionally, this work highlights the Mre11 complex as an attractive target for development of radiation sensitizers

  1. Rate dependent direct inverse hysteresis compensation of piezoelectric micro-actuator used in dual-stage hard disk drive head positioning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Arifur; Al Mamun, Abdullah; Yao, Kui

    2015-08-01

    The head positioning servo system in hard disk drive is implemented nowadays using a dual-stage actuator—the primary stage consisting of a voice coil motor actuator providing long range motion and the secondary stage controlling the position of the read/write head with fine resolution. Piezoelectric micro-actuator made of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) has been a popular choice for the secondary stage. However, PZT micro-actuator exhibits hysteresis—an inherent nonlinear characteristic of piezoelectric material. The advantage expected from using the secondary micro-actuator is somewhat lost by the hysteresis of the micro-actuator that contributes to tracking error. Hysteresis nonlinearity adversely affects the performance and, if not compensated, may cause inaccuracy and oscillation in the response. Compensation of hysteresis is therefore an important aspect for designing head-positioning servo system. This paper presents a new rate dependent model of hysteresis along with rigorous analysis and identification of the model. Parameters of the model are found using particle swarm optimization. Direct inverse of the proposed rate-dependent generalized Prandtl-Ishlinskii model is used as the hysteresis compensator. Effectiveness of the overall solution is underscored through experimental results.

  2. Heads Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Connect with Us HEADS UP Apps Reshaping the Culture Around Concussion in Sports Get HEADS UP on Your Web Site Concussion ... HEADS UP on your web site! Create a culture of safety for young athletes Officials, learn how you can ... UP to Providers HEADS UP to Youth Sports HEADS UP to School Sports HEADS UP to ...

  3. Direction, site and the muzzle target distance of bullet in the head and neck at close range as an indication of suicide or homicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwanjutha, T

    1988-05-01

    Direction, site and muzzle target distance can indicate suicide or homicide. This conclusion can be drawn from autopsies of 57 cases of suicide and 68 cases of homicide by handgun fired at close range to the head and neck together with going to the crimescene in some cases. This study was carried out in Bangkok during the period from January 1983 to January 1986. In order to determine whether it was suicide or homicide, the path of the bullet, the site, the muzzle target distance must be considered. The angle of the bullet would be either elevated (from below upward), horizontal or an angle of depression (from above downward). For suicide, the direction of the bullet should be at an angle of elevation in the majority of cases. The position of the handgun in relation to the head in suicide was most often in tight contact and near contact. For homicide, the direction of the bullet should be horizontal in most cases. The bullet was at close range in the majority of the cases. There are 8 common sites for suicide and homicide and 10 different sites in the case of homicide which are at neck, left cheek, left aural region, lip, left occipital area orbit, chin, left eyebrow, submental and nose.

  4. T-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia in a double yellow-headed Amazon parrot (Amazona ochrocephala oratrix).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osofsky, Anna; Hawkins, Michelle G; Foreman, Oded; Kent, Michael S; Vernau, William; Lowenstine, Linda J

    2011-12-01

    An adult, male double yellow-headed Amazon parrot (Amazona ochrocephala oratrix) was diagnosed with chronic lymphocytic leukemia based on results of a complete blood cell count and cytologic examination of a bone marrow aspirate. Treatment with oral chlorambucil was attempted, but no response was evident after 40 days. The bird was euthanatized, and the diagnosis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia was confirmed on gross and microscopic examination of tissues. Neoplastic lymphocytes were found in the bone marrow, liver, kidney, testes, and blood vessels. Based on CD3-positive immunocytochemical and immunohistochemical immunophenotyping, the chronic lymphocytic leukemia was determined to be of T-cell origin.

  5. Centchroman inhibits proliferation of head and neck cancer cells through the modulation of PI3K/mTOR Pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, Vikas Kumar; Gara, Rishi Kumar; Bhatt, M.L.B.; Sahu, D.P.; Mishra, Durga Prasad

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Centchroman (CC) inhibits cellular proliferation in HNSCC cells through the dual inhibition of PI3/mTOR pathway. → CC treatment also inhibits STAT3 activation and alters expression of proteins involved in cell cycle regulation and DNA repair response in HNSCC cells. → CC exhibits anti-proliferative activity in a variety of non-HNSCC cancer cell lines and is devoid of cytotoxicity to normal cell types of diverse origins. -- Abstract: Centchroman (CC; 67/20; INN: Ormeloxifene) is a non-steroidal antiestrogen extensively used as a female contraceptive in India. In the present study, we report the anti-proliferative effect of CC in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells. CC inhibited cell proliferation in a dose dependent manner at 24 h of treatment. Further studies showed that CC treatment induced apoptosis, inhibited Akt/mTOR and signal transducers and activators of transcription protein 3 (STAT3) signaling, altered proteins associated with cell cycle regulation and DNA damage and inhibited colony forming efficiency of HNSCC cells. In addition, CC displayed anti-proliferative activity against a variety of non-HNSCC cell lines of diverse origin. The ability of CC to serve as a dual-inhibitor of Akt/mTOR and STAT3 signaling warrants further studies into its role as a therapeutic strategy against HNSCC.

  6. Clinical values for abnormal {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in the head and neck region of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hwan Seo [Department of Otolaryngology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae Seung [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Roh, Jong-Lyel, E-mail: rohjl@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Otolaryngology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Seung-Ho; Nam, Soon Yuhl [Department of Otolaryngology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Yoon [Department of Otolaryngology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Biomedical Research Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Abnormal {sup 18}F-FDG uptakes in the head and neck (HN) region can be carefully interpreted as being index primary, second primary cancer (SP) or benign. • {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT identified 91.9% primary HN squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). • The specificity and negative predictive value of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for identification of SP were as high as 98.7% and 99.3%, respectively. • Proper detection of primary tumors and SP in the HN region may promote appropriate therapeutic planning of HNSCC patients. - Abstract: Purpose: Fluorine 18-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) is used to identify index or second primary cancer (SP) of the head and neck (HN) through changes in {sup 18}F-FDG uptake. However, both physiologic and abnormal lesions increase {sup 18}F-FDG uptake. Therefore, we evaluated {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in the HN region to determine clinical values of abnormal tracer uptake. Methods: A prospective study approved by the institutional review board was conducted in 314 patients with newly diagnosed HN squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and informed consent was obtained from all enrolled patients. The patients received initial staging workups including {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and biopsies. All lesions with abnormal HN {sup 18}F-FDG uptake were recorded and most of those were confirmed by biopsies. Diagnostic values for abnormal {sup 18}F-FDG uptake were calculated. Results: Abnormal {sup 18}F-FDG uptake was identified in primary tumors from 285 (91.9%) patients. False-negative results were obtained for 22.3% (23/103) T1 tumors and 2.2% (2/93) T2 tumors (P < 0.001). Thirty-eight regions of abnormal {sup 18}F-FDG uptake were identified in 36 (11.5%) patients: the thyroid (n = 13), maxillary sinus (n = 7), palatine tonsil (n = 6), nasopharynx (n = 5), parotid gland (n = 2) and others (n = 5). Synchronous SP of the HN was identified in eight (2.5%) patients: the thyroid (n = 5), palatine

  7. Clinical values for abnormal 18F-FDG uptake in the head and neck region of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hwan Seo; Kim, Jae Seung; Roh, Jong-Lyel; Choi, Seung-Ho; Nam, Soon Yuhl; Kim, Sang Yoon

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Abnormal 18 F-FDG uptakes in the head and neck (HN) region can be carefully interpreted as being index primary, second primary cancer (SP) or benign. • 18 F-FDG PET/CT identified 91.9% primary HN squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). • The specificity and negative predictive value of 18 F-FDG PET/CT for identification of SP were as high as 98.7% and 99.3%, respectively. • Proper detection of primary tumors and SP in the HN region may promote appropriate therapeutic planning of HNSCC patients. - Abstract: Purpose: Fluorine 18-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) is used to identify index or second primary cancer (SP) of the head and neck (HN) through changes in 18 F-FDG uptake. However, both physiologic and abnormal lesions increase 18 F-FDG uptake. Therefore, we evaluated 18 F-FDG uptake in the HN region to determine clinical values of abnormal tracer uptake. Methods: A prospective study approved by the institutional review board was conducted in 314 patients with newly diagnosed HN squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and informed consent was obtained from all enrolled patients. The patients received initial staging workups including 18 F-FDG PET/CT and biopsies. All lesions with abnormal HN 18 F-FDG uptake were recorded and most of those were confirmed by biopsies. Diagnostic values for abnormal 18 F-FDG uptake were calculated. Results: Abnormal 18 F-FDG uptake was identified in primary tumors from 285 (91.9%) patients. False-negative results were obtained for 22.3% (23/103) T1 tumors and 2.2% (2/93) T2 tumors (P < 0.001). Thirty-eight regions of abnormal 18 F-FDG uptake were identified in 36 (11.5%) patients: the thyroid (n = 13), maxillary sinus (n = 7), palatine tonsil (n = 6), nasopharynx (n = 5), parotid gland (n = 2) and others (n = 5). Synchronous SP of the HN was identified in eight (2.5%) patients: the thyroid (n = 5), palatine tonsil (n = 2), and epiglottis (n = 1). The sensitivity and

  8. A novel direct carbon fuel cell by approach of tubular solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Renzhu; Zhao, Chunhua; Li, Junliang; Zeng, Fanrong; Wang, Shaorong; Wen, Tinglian; Wen, Zhaoyin [CAS Key Laboratory of Materials for Energy Conversion, Shanghai Inorganic Energy Materials and Power Source Engineering Center, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (SICCAS), 1295 Dingxi Road, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2010-01-15

    A direct carbon fuel cell based on a conventional anode-supported tubular solid oxide fuel cell, which consisted of a NiO-YSZ anode support tube, a NiO-ScSZ anode functional layer, a ScSZ electrolyte film, and a LSM-ScSZ cathode, has been successfully achieved. It used the carbon black as fuel and oxygen as the oxidant, and a preliminary examination of the DCFC has been carried out. The cell generated an acceptable performance with the maximum power densities of 104, 75, and 47 mW cm{sup -2} at 850, 800, and 750 C, respectively. These results demonstrate the feasibility for carbon directly converting to electricity in tubular solid oxide fuel cells. (author)

  9. Infectious rotavirus enters cells by direct cell membrane penetration, not by endocytosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaljot, K.T.; Shaw, R.D.; Greenberg, H.B.; Rubin, D.H.

    1988-01-01

    Rotaviruses are icosahedral viruses with a segmented, double-stranded RNA genome. They are the major cause of severe infantile infectious diarrhea. Rotavirus growth in tissue culture is markedly enhanced by pretreatment of virus with trypsin. Trypsin activation is associated with cleavage of the viral hemagglutinin (viral protein 3 [VP3]; 88 kilodaltons) into two fragments (60 and 28 kilodaltons). The mechanism by which proteolytic cleavage leads to enhanced growth is unknown. To determine whether trypsin treatment affected rotavirus internalization, the authors studied the kinetics of entry of infectious rhesus rotavirus (RRV) into MA104 cells. Trypsin-activated RRV was internalized with a half-time of 3 to 5 min, while nonactivated virus disappeared from the cell surface with a half-time of 30 to 50 min. In contrast to trypsin-activated RRV, loss of nonactivated RRV from the cell surface did not result in the appearance of infection, as measured by plaque formation. Purified trypsin-activated RRV added to cell monolayers at pH 7.4 mediated 51 Cr, [ 14 C]choline, and [ 3 H]inositol released from prelabeled MA104 cells. This release could be specifically blocked by neutralizing antibodies to VP3. These results suggest that MA104 cell infection follows the rapid entry of trypsin-activated RRV by direct cell membrane penetration. Cell membrane penetration of infectious RRV is initiated by trypsin cleavage of VP3. Neutralizing antibodies can inhibit this direct membrane penetration

  10. Infectious rotavirus enters cells by direct cell membrane penetration, not by endocytosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaljot, K.T.; Shaw, R.D.; Greenberg, H.B. (Stanford Univ. School of Medicine, CA (USA) Palo Alto Veterans Administration Medical Center, CA (USA)); Rubin, D.H. (Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (USA))

    1988-04-01

    Rotaviruses are icosahedral viruses with a segmented, double-stranded RNA genome. They are the major cause of severe infantile infectious diarrhea. Rotavirus growth in tissue culture is markedly enhanced by pretreatment of virus with trypsin. Trypsin activation is associated with cleavage of the viral hemagglutinin (viral protein 3 (VP3); 88 kilodaltons) into two fragments (60 and 28 kilodaltons). The mechanism by which proteolytic cleavage leads to enhanced growth is unknown. To determine whether trypsin treatment affected rotavirus internalization, the authors studied the kinetics of entry of infectious rhesus rotavirus (RRV) into MA104 cells. Trypsin-activated RRV was internalized with a half-time of 3 to 5 min, while nonactivated virus disappeared from the cell surface with a half-time of 30 to 50 min. In contrast to trypsin-activated RRV, loss of nonactivated RRV from the cell surface did not result in the appearance of infection, as measured by plaque formation. Purified trypsin-activated RRV added to cell monolayers at pH 7.4 mediated {sup 51}Cr, ({sup 14}C)choline, and ({sup 3}H)inositol released from prelabeled MA104 cells. This release could be specifically blocked by neutralizing antibodies to VP3. These results suggest that MA104 cell infection follows the rapid entry of trypsin-activated RRV by direct cell membrane penetration. Cell membrane penetration of infectious RRV is initiated by trypsin cleavage of VP3. Neutralizing antibodies can inhibit this direct membrane penetration.

  11. Direct Adaptive Aircraft Control Using Dynamic Cell Structure Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Charles C.

    1997-01-01

    A Dynamic Cell Structure (DCS) Neural Network was developed which learns topology representing networks (TRNS) of F-15 aircraft aerodynamic stability and control derivatives. The network is integrated into a direct adaptive tracking controller. The combination produces a robust adaptive architecture capable of handling multiple accident and off- nominal flight scenarios. This paper describes the DCS network and modifications to the parameter estimation procedure. The work represents one step towards an integrated real-time reconfiguration control architecture for rapid prototyping of new aircraft designs. Performance was evaluated using three off-line benchmarks and on-line nonlinear Virtual Reality simulation. Flight control was evaluated under scenarios including differential stabilator lock, soft sensor failure, control and stability derivative variations, and air turbulence.

  12. Membranes for direct ethanol fuel cells: An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakaria, Z.; Kamarudin, S.K.; Timmiati, S.N.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • DEFCs have emerged as alternative energy source. • But many issue need to be addressed. • This paper describes current problem and advancement of membrane in DEFC. - Abstract: Direct ethanol fuel cells (DEFCs) are attractive as a power source options because ethanol is a nontoxic, leading to ease of handling and a high energy density fuel, leading to high system energy density. However, to provide practical DEFCs power source there are several issues that still must be addressed including low power density, effect of ethanol crossover on efficiency of fuel utilization, electrical, mechanical and thermal stability and water uptake of the DEFCs electrolyte membrane. This paper describes the proton exchange membrane and alkaline exchange membrane for DEFCs, focusing on current problems and advancements in DEFC membranes. It also presents the specifications and performances of the membranes used in DEFC.

  13. Development of an electrode for direct methanol fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramzia, A. M. S.; Iqbal, J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the efficient use of platinum catalyst ruthenium with in the anode of a Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC). This is achieved by depositing platinum and ruthenium nano-particles on the pre-refluxed multi-walled carbon nano-tubes (MWCNT): MWCNTs were synthesized using the Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) with floating catalyst technique. The synthesized carbon nano tubes (CNT) were refluxed in 12M nitric acid to produce anchoring sites on the surface of the CNT. The platinum and ruthenium nano-particles were in a ratio of (3.1). These particles are deposited on the surface of the CNT at 60 wt % by reduction in ethylene glycol. Transmission micrograph (TEM) and scanning electron micrograph (SEM) images show the success of the deposition method. (author)

  14. Thin Film Catalyst Layers for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witham, C. K.; Chun, W.; Ruiz, R.; Valdez, T. I.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2000-01-01

    One of the primary obstacles to the widespread use of the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is the high cost of the catalyst. Therefore, reducing the catalyst loading well below the current level of 8-12 mg/cm 2 would be important to commercialization. The current methods for preparation of catalyst layers consisting of catalyst, ionomer and sometimes a hydrophobic additive are applied by either painting, spraying, decal transfer or screen printing processes. Sputter deposition is a coating technique widely used in manufacturing and therefore particularly attractive. In this study we have begun to explore sputtering as a method for catalyst deposition. Present experiments focus on Pt-Ru catalyst layers for the anode.

  15. GATA-1 directly regulates Nanog in mouse embryonic stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Wen-Zhong; Ai, Zhi-Ying [College of Life Sciences, Northwest A& F University, Yangling 712100 (China); Key Laboratory of Animal Biotechnology, Ministry of Agriculture, Northwest A& F University, Yangling 712100 (China); Wang, Zhi-Wei [School of Life Sciences and Medical Center, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China); Chen, Lin-Lin [College of Life Sciences, Northwest A& F University, Yangling 712100 (China); Key Laboratory of Animal Biotechnology, Ministry of Agriculture, Northwest A& F University, Yangling 712100 (China); Guo, Ze-Kun, E-mail: gzknwaf@126.com [College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A& F University, Yangling 712100 (China); Key Laboratory of Animal Biotechnology, Ministry of Agriculture, Northwest A& F University, Yangling 712100 (China); Zhang, Yong, E-mail: zylabnwaf@126.com [College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A& F University, Yangling 712100 (China); Key Laboratory of Animal Biotechnology, Ministry of Agriculture, Northwest A& F University, Yangling 712100 (China)

    2015-09-25

    Nanog safeguards pluripotency in mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). Insight into the regulation of Nanog is important for a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that control pluripotency of mESCs. In a silico analysis, we identify four GATA-1 putative binding sites in Nanog proximal promoter. The Nanog promoter activity can be significantly repressed by ectopic expression of GATA-1 evidenced by a promoter reporter assay. Mutation studies reveal that one of the four putative binding sites counts for GATA-1 repressing Nanog promoter activity. Direct binding of GATA-1 on Nanog proximal promoter is confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation. Our data provide new insights into the expanded regulatory circuitry that coordinates Nanog expression. - Highlights: • The Nanog proximal promoter conceives functional element for GATA-1. • GATA-1 occupies the Nanog proximal promoter in vitro and in vivo. • GATA-1 transcriptionally suppresses Nanog.

  16. Relating Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Performance to Measurements in a Liquid Half Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christoffer Mølleskov; Tynelius, Oskar; Lund-Olesen, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) could act as a replacement for batteries in low power electronics. For instance, micro—DMFC’s could be used to power hearing instruments[1]. The power output of a DMFC is limited by the sluggish kinetics of both the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) on the anode ...... Cells Bull. 2012 (2012) 12–16. doi:10.1016/S1464-2859(12)70367-X....

  17. Orthovoltage X-rays for Postoperative Treatment of Resected Basal Cell Carcinoma in the Head and Neck Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duinkerken, Charlotte W; Lohuis, Peter J F M; Crijns, Marianne B; Navran, Arash; Haas, Rick L M; Hamming-Vrieze, Olga; Klop, W Martin C; van den Brekel, Michiel W M; Al-Mamgani, Abrahim

    Surgery is the golden standard for treating basal cell carcinomas. In case of positive tumor margins or recurrent disease, postoperative adjuvant or salvaging therapy is suggested to achieve good local control. To retrospectively report on local control and toxicity of postoperative radiotherapy by means of orthovoltage X-rays for residual or recurrent basal cell carcinoma after surgery in the head and neck area. Sixty-six surgically resected residual or recurrent basal cell carcinomas of the head and neck region were irradiated postoperatively by means of orthovoltage X-rays at the Netherlands Cancer Institute between January 2000 and February 2015. After a median follow-up duration of 30.5 months, only 5 recurrences were reported. The 5-year local control rates at 1, 3, and 5 years were 100%, 87%, and 87%, respectively. The 5-year local control rate was 92% for immediate postoperative radiotherapy of incompletely resected basal cell carcinomas, 90% for recurrences after 1 previously performed excision, and 71% for multiple recurrences, namely, a history of more than 1 excision ( P = .437). Acute toxicity healed spontaneously within 3 months. Late toxicities were mild. Radiotherapy by means of orthovoltage X-ray is an excellent alternative for re-excision in case of incompletely resected or recurrent basal cell carcinomas that are at risk of serious functional and cosmetic impairments after re-excision, with a 5-year local control rate of 87% and a low toxicity profile.

  18. Combination of thalidomide and cisplatin in an head and neck squamous cell carcinomas model results in an enhanced antiangiogenic activity in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasvari, Gergely P; Dyckhoff, Gerhard; Kashfi, Farzaneh; Lemke, Britt; Lohr, Jennifer; Helmke, Burkhard M; Schirrmacher, Volker; Plinkert, Peter K; Beckhove, Philipp; Herold-Mende, Christel C

    2007-10-15

    Thalidomide is an immunomodulatory, antiangiogenic drug. Although there is evidence that it might be more effective in combination with chemotherapy the exact mechanism of action is unclear. Therefore, we investigated its effect in combination with metronomically applied cisplatin in a xenotransplant mouse model characteristic for advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinomas, its possible synergistic action in vitro, and which tumor-derived factors might be targeted by thalidomide. Although thalidomide alone was ineffective, a combined treatment with low-dose cisplatin inhibited significant tumor growth, proliferation and angiogenesis in vivo as well as migration and tube formation of endothelial cells in vitro. Noteworthy, the latter effect was enhanced after coapplication of cisplatin in nontoxic doses. An inhibitory effect on tumor cell migration was also observed suggesting a direct antitumor effect. Although thalidomide alone did not influence cell proliferation, it augmented antiproliferative response after cisplatin application emphasizing the idea of a potentiated effect when both drugs are combined. Furthermore, we could show that antiangiogenic effects of thalidomide are related to tumor-cell derived factors including vascular endothelial growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor and Il-8 some known and with, granulocyte colony stimulating growth factor and granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating growth factor, some new target molecules of thalidomide. Altogether, our findings reveal new insights into thalidomide-mediated antitumor and antiangiogenic effects and its interaction with cytostatic drugs. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Microarray analysis of serum mRNA in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma at whole-genome scale

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čapková, M.; Šáchová, Jana; Strnad, Hynek; Kolář, Michal; Hroudová, Miluše; Chovanec, M.; Čada, Z.; Štefl, M.; Valach, J.; Kastner, J.; Smetana, K. Jr.; Plzák, J.

    -, April 23 (2014) ISSN 2314-6141 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NT13488 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Microarray Analysis * Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma * whole-genome scale Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  20. Cell-free mitochondrial DNA copy number variation in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: A study of non-invasive biomarker from Northeast India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manish; Srivastava, Shilpee; Singh, Seram Anil; Das, Anup Kumar; Das, Ganesh Chandra; Dhar, Bishal; Ghosh, Sankar Kumar; Mondal, Rosy

    2017-10-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma is the most commonly diagnosed cancer worldwide. The lifestyle, food habits, and customary practices manifest the Northeast Indian population toward higher susceptibility to develop head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Here, we have investigated the association of smoke and smokeless tobacco, and alcohol with copy number variation of cell-free mitochondrial DNA and cell-free nuclear DNA in cases and controls. Cell-free DNA from plasma was isolated from 50 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cases and 50 controls with informed written consent using QIAamp Circulating Nucleic Acid Kit. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was done for copy number variation in cell-free mitochondrial DNA and cell-free nuclear DNA. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to evaluate the diagnostic application between the two study groups using clinicopathological parameters. The levels of cell-free nuclear DNA and cell-free mitochondrial DNA of cases in association with smoke and smokeless tobacco, alcohol with smoking (p squamous cell carcinoma cases and controls, we distinguished cell-free mitochondrial DNA (cutoff: 19.84 raw Ct; sensitivity: 84%; specificity: 100%; p < 0.001) and cell-free nuclear DNA (cutoff: 463,282 genomic equivalent/mL; sensitivity: 53%; specificity: 87%; p < 0.001). The copy number variation in cases (cell-free nuclear DNA: 5451.66 genomic equivalent/mL and cell-free mitochondrial DNA: 29,103,476.15 genomic equivalent/mL) and controls (cell-free nuclear DNA: 1650.9 genomic equivalent/mL and cell-free mitochondrial DNA: 9,189,312.54 genomic equivalent/mL), respectively. Our result indicates that the cell-free mitochondrial DNA content is highly associated with smoke and smokeless tobacco, betel quid chewing, and alcohol which shows greater promises, holding the key characteristics of diagnostic biomarkers, that is, minimal invasiveness, high specificity, and sensitivity.

  1. Recovery Act: Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell for Mobile Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, James H. [University of North Florida; Cox, Philip [University of North Florida; Harrington, William J [University of North Florida; Campbell, Joseph L [University of North Florida

    2013-09-03

    ABSTRACT Project Title: Recovery Act: Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell for Mobile Computing PROJECT OBJECTIVE The objective of the project was to advance portable fuel cell system technology towards the commercial targets of power density, energy density and lifetime. These targets were laid out in the DOE’s R&D roadmap to develop an advanced direct methanol fuel cell power supply that meets commercial entry requirements. Such a power supply will enable mobile computers to operate non-stop, unplugged from the wall power outlet, by using the high energy density of methanol fuel contained in a replaceable fuel cartridge. Specifically this project focused on balance-of-plant component integration and miniaturization, as well as extensive component, subassembly and integrated system durability and validation testing. This design has resulted in a pre-production power supply design and a prototype that meet the rigorous demands of consumer electronic applications. PROJECT TASKS The proposed work plan was designed to meet the project objectives, which corresponded directly with the objectives outlined in the Funding Opportunity Announcement: To engineer the fuel cell balance-of-plant and packaging to meet the needs of consumer electronic systems, specifically at power levels required for mobile computing. UNF used existing balance-of-plant component technologies developed under its current US Army CERDEC project, as well as a previous DOE project completed by PolyFuel, to further refine them to both miniaturize and integrate their functionality to increase the system power density and energy density. Benefits of UNF’s novel passive water recycling MEA (membrane electrode assembly) and the simplified system architecture it enabled formed the foundation of the design approach. The package design was hardened to address orientation independence, shock, vibration, and environmental requirements. Fuel cartridge and fuel subsystems were improved to ensure effective fuel

  2. Conformational and functional analysis of the C-terminal globular head of the reovirus cell attachment protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, R; Horne, D; Strong, J E; Leone, G; Pon, R T; Yeung, M C; Lee, P W

    1991-06-01

    We have been investigating structure-function relationships in the reovirus cell attachment protein sigma 1 using various deletion mutants and protease analysis. In the present study, a series of deletion mutants were constructed which lacked 90, 44, 30, 12, or 4 amino acids from the C-terminus of the 455-amino acid-long reovirus type 3 (T3) sigma 1 protein. The full-length and truncated sigma 1 proteins were expressed in an in vitro transcription/translation system and assayed for L cell binding activity. It was found that the removal of as few as four amino acids from the C-terminus drastically affected the cell binding function of the sigma 1 protein. The C-terminal-truncated proteins were further characterized using trypsin, chymotrypsin, and monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. Our results indicated that the C-terminal portions of the mutant proteins were misfolded, leading to a loss in cell binding function. The N-terminal fibrous tail of the proteins was unaffected by the deletions as was sigma 1 oligomerization, further illustrating the discrete structural and functional roles of the N- and C-terminal domains of sigma 1. In an attempt to identify smaller, functional peptides, full-length sigma 1 expressed in vitro was digested with trypsin and subsequently with chymotrypsin under various conditions. The results clearly demonstrated the highly stable nature of the C-terminal globular head of sigma 1, even when separated from the N-terminal fibrous tail. We concluded that: (1) the C-terminal globular head of sigma 1 exists as a compact, protease-resistant oligomeric structure; (2) an intact C-terminus is required for proper head folding and generation of the conformationally dependent cell binding domain.

  3. Tumor microenvironment in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas: predictive value and clinical relevance of hypoxic markers. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogsteen, Ilse J; Marres, Henri A M; Bussink, Johan; van der Kogel, Albert J; Kaanders, Johannes H A M

    2007-06-01

    Hypoxia and tumor cell proliferation are important factors determining the treatment response of squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck. Successful approaches have been developed to counteract these resistance mechanisms although usually at the cost of increased short- and long-term side effects. To provide the best attainable quality of life for individual patients and the head and neck cancer patient population as a whole, it is of increasing importance that tools be developed that allow a better selection of patients for these intensified treatments. A literature review was performed with special focus on the predictive value and clinical relevance of endogenous hypoxia-related markers. New methods for qualitative and quantitative assessment of functional microenvironmental parameters such as hypoxia, proliferation, and vasculature have identified several candidate markers for future use in predictive assays. Hypoxia-related markers include hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1alpha, carbonic anhydrase IX, glucose transporters, erythropoietin receptor, osteopontin, and others. Although several of these markers and combinations of markers are associated with treatment outcome, their clinical value as predictive factors remains to be established. A number of markers and marker profiles have emerged that may have potential as a predictive assay. Validation of these candidate assays requires testing in prospective trials comparing standard treatment against experimental treatments targeting the related microregional constituent. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck, 2007.

  4. Quality of life assessment in patients treated for metastatic cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, A Y; Palme, C E; Wang, J T; Morgan, G J; Gebski, V; Gilchrist, J; Veness, M J

    2013-07-01

    Treatment for metastatic cutaneous head and neck squamous cell carcinoma is usually multimodal and associated with morbidity. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of treatment on patients' quality of life. Cross-sectional survey of 42 patients (35 men, 7 women) at least 6 months after metastatic cutaneous head and neck squamous cell carcinoma treatment, using two standardised quality of life questionnaires: the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy - Head and Neck questionnaire and the Facial Disability Index, with statistical analysis to identify potential predictors of outcome. Female gender correlated with significantly lower Facial Disability Index physical function scores (p = 0.017). Alcohol consumption correlated with significantly better scores for Functional Assessment social well-being (p = 0.016), general total score (p = 0.041) and overall total score (p = 0.033), and for Facial Disability Index physical function (p = 0.034). Marital status, education, employment, chemotherapy, time from last treatment, parotidectomy and facial nerve sacrifice did not affect quality of life. The commonest patient complaints were dry mouth (76 per cent), altered voice quality and strength (55 per cent), and physical appearance (45 per cent). Female gender predicts worse quality of life, while alcohol consumption (versus none) predicted for better quality of life.

  5. Improved Cathode Structure for a Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Thomas; Narayanan, Sekharipuram

    2005-01-01

    An improved cathode structure on a membrane/electrode assembly has been developed for a direct methanol fuel cell, in a continuing effort to realize practical power systems containing such fuel cells. This cathode structure is intended particularly to afford better cell performance at a low airflow rate. A membrane/electrode assembly of the type for which the improved cathode structure was developed (see Figure 1) is fabricated in a process that includes brush painting and spray coating of catalyst layers onto a polymer-electrolyte membrane and onto gas-diffusion backings that also act as current collectors. The aforementioned layers are then dried and hot-pressed together. When completed, the membrane/electrode assembly contains (1) an anode containing a fine metal black of Pt/Ru alloy, (2) a membrane made of Nafion 117 or equivalent (a perfluorosulfonic acid-based hydrophilic, proton-conducting ion-exchange polymer), (3) a cathode structure (in the present case, the improved cathode structure described below), and (4) the electrically conductive gas-diffusion backing layers, which are made of Toray 060(TradeMark)(or equivalent) carbon paper containing between 5 and 6 weight percent of poly(tetrafluoroethylene). The need for an improved cathode structure arises for the following reasons: In the design and operation of a fuel-cell power system, the airflow rate is a critical parameter that determines the overall efficiency, cell voltage, and power density. It is desirable to operate at a low airflow rate in order to obtain thermal and water balance and to minimize the size and mass of the system. The performances of membrane/electrode assemblies of prior design are limited at low airflow rates. Methanol crossover increases the required airflow rate. Hence, one way to reduce the required airflow rate is to reduce the effect of methanol crossover. Improvement of the cathode structure - in particular, addition of hydrophobic particles to the cathode - has been

  6. Small cell carcinoma of the head and neck: A comparative study by primary site based on population data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Edward C; Alonso, Jose E; Tajudeen, Bobby A; Arshi, Armin; Mallen-St Clair, Jon; St John, Maie A

    2017-08-01

    Small cell carcinoma (SmCC) of the head and neck is an extremely rare neuroendocrine malignancy. In this study, we describe the incidence and determinants of survival of patients with SmCC of the head and neck between the years of 1973 and 2012 using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database as differed by primary site. Retrospective, population-based cohort study. A total of 237 cases of SmCC of the head and neck were identified, which was divided into sinonasal primaries (n = 82) and all other head and neck primaries (n = 155). Clinicopathologic and epidemiologic variables were analyzed as predictors of overall survival (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) based on the Kaplan-Meier method. More than half of sinonasal primaries presented with Kadish stage C or D. On multivariate analysis, surgery was the only independent predictor of improved DSS (P = .008) for sinonasal primaries; in contrast, radiation therapy was a favorable prognosticator for OS (P = .007) and DSS (P = .043) in extrasinonasal sites. Comparison of survival between sinonasal primaries and all other sites demonstrated that sinonasal SmCC had uniformly better OS (P = .002) and DSS (P = .006). SmCC in the head and neck remains rare, and sinonasal primaries appear to have improved survival compared to other sites. Based on these results, optimal treatment for sinonasal SmCC appears to be surgical therapy, whereas radiation therapy is the preferred treatment for SmCC of other primary sites, particularly the larynx. 4. Laryngoscope, 127:1785-1790, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  7. New ETFE-based membrane for direct methanol fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saarinen, V.; Kallio, T.; Paronen, M.; Tikkanen, P.; Rauhala, E.; Kontturi, K.

    2005-01-01

    The investigated membranes are based on 35-bar μ m thick commercial poly(ethylene-alt-tetrafluoroethylene) (ETFE) films. The films were made proton conductive by means of irradiation treatment followed by sulfonation. These membranes have exceptionally low water uptake and excellent dimensional stability. The new membranes are investigated widely in a laboratory-scale direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). The temperature range used in the fuel cell tests was 30-85-bar o C and the measurement results were compared to those of the Nafion ( R)115 membrane. Also methanol permeability through the ETFE-based membrane was measured as a function of temperature, resulting in values less than 10% of the corresponding values for Nafion ( R)115, which was considerably thicker than the experimental membrane. Methanol crossover was reported to decrease when the thickness of the membrane increases, so the ETFE-based membrane compares favourably to Nafion ( R) membranes. The maximum power densities achieved with the experimental ETFE-based membrane were about 40-65% lower than the corresponding values of the Nafion ( R)115 membrane, because of the lower conductivity and noticeably higher IR-losses. Chemical and mechanical stability of the ETFE-based membrane appeared to be promising since it was tested over 2000-bar h in the DMFC without any performance loss

  8. Improved Flow-Field Structures for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurau, Bogdan [Nuvant Systems Inc., Crown Point, IN (United States)

    2013-05-31

    The direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is ideal if high energy-density liquid fuels are required. Liquid fuels have advantages over compressed hydrogen including higher energy density and ease of handling. Although state-of-the-art DMFCs exhibit manageable degradation rates, excessive fuel crossover diminishes system energy and power density. Although use of dilute methanol mitigates crossover, the concomitant lowering of the gross fuel energy density (GFED) demands a complex balance-of-plant (BOP) that includes higher flow rates, external exhaust recirculation, etc. An alternative approach is redesign of the fuel delivery system to accommodate concentrated methanol. NuVant Systems Inc. (NuVant) will maximize the GFED by design and assembly of a DMFC that uses near neat methanol. The approach is to tune the diffusion of highly concentrated methanol (to the anode catalytic layer) to the back-diffusion of water formed at the cathode (i.e. in situ generation of dilute methanol at the anode layer). Crossover will be minimized without compromising the GFED by innovative integration of the anode flow-field and the diffusion layer. The integrated flow-field-diffusion-layers (IFDLs) will widen the current and potential DMFC operating ranges and enable the use of cathodes optimized for hydrogen-air fuel cells.

  9. Direct fuel cell - A high proficiency power generator for biofuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, P.S.; Steinfeld, G.; Baker, B.S.

    1994-01-01

    Conversion of renewable bio-based resources into energy offers significant benefits for our environment and domestic economic activity. It also improves national security by displacing fossil fuels. However, in the current economic environment, it is difficult for biofuel systems to compete with other fossil fuels. The biomass-fired power plants are typically smaller than 50 MW, lower in electrical efficiencies (<25%) and experience greater costs for handling and transporting the biomass. When combined with fuel cells such as the Direct Fuel Cell (DFC), biofuels can produce power more efficiently with negligible environmental impact. Agricultural and other waste biomass can be converted to ethanol or methane-rich biofuels for power generation use in the DFC. These DFC power plants are modular and factory assembled. Due to their electrochemical (non-combustion) conversion process, these plants are environmentally friendly, highly efficient and potentially cost effective, even in sizes as small as a few meagawatts. They can be sited closer to the source of the biomass to minimize handling and transportation costs. The high-grade waste heat available from DFC power plants makes them attractive in cogeneration applications for farming and rural communities. The DFC potentially opens up new markets for biofuels derived from wood, grains and other biomass waste products

  10. Experimental investigation two phase flow in direct methanol fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mat, M. D.; Kaplan, Y.; Celik, S.; Oeztural, A.

    2007-01-01

    Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) have received many attentions specifically for portable electronic applications since it utilize methanol which is in liquid form in atmospheric condition and high energy density of the methanol. Thus it eliminates the storage problem of hydrogen. It also eliminates humidification requirement of polymeric membrane which is a problem in PEM fuel cells. Some electronic companies introduced DMFC prototypes for portable electronic applications. Presence of carbon dioxide gases due to electrochemical reactions in anode makes the problem a two phase problem. A two phase flow may occur at cathode specifically at high current densities due to the excess water. Presence of gas phase in anode region and liquid phase in cathode region prevents diffusion of fuel and oxygen to the reaction sites thus reduces the performance of the system. Uncontrolled pressure buildup in anode region increases methanol crossover through membrane and adversely effect the performance. Two phase flow in both anode and cathode region is very effective in the performance of DMYC system and a detailed understanding of two phase flow for high performance DMFC systems. Although there are many theoretical and experimental studies available on the DMFC systems in the literature, only few studies consider problem as a two-phase flow problem. In this study, an experimental set up is developed and species distributions on system are measured with a gas chromatograph. System performance characteristics (V-I curves) is measured depending on the process parameters (temperature, fuel ad oxidant flow rates, methanol concentration etc)

  11. Tyrosine kinase domain mutations of EGFR gene in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vatte C

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Chittibabu Vatte,1 Ali M Al Amri,2 Cyril Cyrus,1 Shahanas Chathoth,1 Sadananda Acharya,3 Tariq Mohammad Hashim,4 Zhara Al Ali,2 Saleh Tawfeeq Alshreadah,2 Ahmed Alsayyah,4 Amein K Al-Ali5 1Department of Genetic Research, Institute for Research and Medical Consultation, University of Dammam, Dammam, 2Department of Internal Medicine, King Fahd Hospital of the University, University of Dammam, Al-Khobar, 3Department of Stemcell Research, Institute for Research and Medical Consultation, 4Department of Pathology, King Fahd Hospital of the University, University of Dammam, Al-Khobar, 5Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, University of Dammam, Dammam, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Background: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is a commonly altered gene that is identified in various cancers, including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC. Therefore, EGFR is a promising molecular marker targeted by monoclonal antibodies and small molecule inhibitors targeting the tyrosine kinase (TK domain. Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the spectrum of mutations in exons 18, 19, 20, and 21 of the EGFR gene in HNSCC patients. Materials and methods: This retrospective study included 47 confirmed HNSCC cases. Mutations in the TK domain, exons 18, 19, 20, and 21 of the EGFR gene, were detected by Scorpion® chemistry and ARMS® technologies on Rotor-Gene Q real-time polymerase chain reaction.Results: The tumors exhibited EGFR-TK domain mutations in 57% of cases. Four cases of T790M mutations were reported for the first time among HNSCC patients. Out of the total mutations, L861Q (exon 21, exon 20 insertions and deletions of exon 19 accounted for the majority of mutations (21%, 19%, and 17%, respectively. EGFR mutation status was correlated with the higher grade (P=0.026 and advanced stage (P=0.034 of HNSCC tumors.Conclusion: Higher frequency of EGFR-TK domain mutations together with the presence of the T790M mutation suggests

  12. Distant Metastases in Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao Min, E-mail: min.yao@uhhospitals.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States); Lu Minggen [School of Public Health, University of Nevada at Reno, Reno, NV (United States); Savvides, Panayiotis S. [Department of Medicine, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States); Rezaee, Rod; Zender, Chad A.; Lavertu, Pierre [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States); Buatti, John M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Machtay, Mitchell [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the pattern and risk factors for distant metastases in head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) after curative treatment with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective study of 284 HNSCC patients treated in a single institution with IMRT. Sites included were oropharynx (125), oral cavity (70), larynx (55), hypopharynx (17), and unknown primary (17). American Joint Committee on Cancer stage distribution includes I (3), II (19), III (42), and IV (203). There were 224 males and 60 females with a median age of 57. One hundred eighty-six patients were treated with definitive IMRT and 98 postoperative IMRT. One hundred forty-nine patients also received concurrent cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Results: The median follow-up for all patients was 22.8 months (range, 0.07-77.3 months) and 29.5 months (4.23-77.3 months) for living patients. The 3-year local recurrence-free survival, regional recurrence-free survival, locoregional recurrence-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, and overall survival were 94.6%, 96.4%, 92.5%, 84.1%, and 68.95%, respectively. There were 45 patients with distant metastasis. In multivariate analysis, distant metastasis was strongly associated with N stage (p = 0.046), T stage (p < 0.0001), and pretreatment maximum standardized uptake value of the lymph node (p = 0.006), but not associated with age, gender, disease sites, pretreatment standardized uptake value of the primary tumor, or locoregional control. The freedom from distant metastasis at 3 years was 98.1% for no factors, 88.6% for one factor, 68.3% for two factors, and 41.7% for three factors (p < 0.0001 by log-rank test). Conclusion: With advanced radiation techniques and concurrent chemotherapy, the failure pattern has changed with more patients failing distantly. The majority of patients with distant metastases had no local or regional failures, indicating that these patients might have microscopic distant

  13. Engineering the human pluripotent stem cell microenvironment to direct cell fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazeltine, Laurie B; Selekman, Joshua A; Palecek, Sean P

    2013-11-15

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), including both embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, offer a potential cell source for research, drug screening, and regenerative medicine applications due to their unique ability to self-renew or differentiate to any somatic cell type. Before the full potential of hPSCs can be realized, robust protocols must be developed to direct their fate. Cell fate decisions are based on components of the surrounding microenvironment, including soluble factors, substrate or extracellular matrix, cell-cell interactions, mechanical forces, and 2D or 3D architecture. Depending on their spatio-temporal context, these components can signal hPSCs to either self-renew or differentiate to cell types of the ectoderm, mesoderm, or endoderm. Researchers working at the interface of engineering and biology have identified various factors which can affect hPSC fate, often based on lessons from embryonic development, and they have utilized this information to design in vitro niches which can reproducibly direct hPSC fate. This review highlights culture systems that have been engineered to promote self-renewal or differentiation of hPSCs, with a focus on studies that have elucidated the contributions of specific microenvironmental cues in the context of those culture systems. We propose the use of microsystem technologies for high-throughput screening of spatial-temporal presentation of cues, as this has been demonstrated to be a powerful approach for differentiating hPSCs to desired cell types. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Direct fuel cell power plants: the final steps to commercialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Donald R.

    Since the last paper presented at the Second Grove Fuel Cell Symposium, the Energy Research Corporation (ERC) has established two commercial subsidiaries, become a publically-held firm, expanded its facilities and has moved the direct fuel cell (DFC) technology and systems significantly closer to commercial readiness. The subsidiaries, the Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE) and Fuel Cell Manufacturing Corporation (FCMC) are perfecting their respective roles in the company's strategy to commercialize its DFC technology. FCE is the prime contractor for the Santa Clara Demonstration and is establishing the needed marketing, sales, engineering, and servicing functions. FCMC in addition to producing the stacks and stack modules for the Santa Clara demonstration plant is now upgrading its production capability and product yields, and retooling for the final stack scale-up for the commercial unit. ERC has built and operated the tallest and largest capacities-to-date carbonate fuel cell stacks as well as numerous short stacks. While most of these units were tested at ERC's Danbury, Connecticut (USA) R&D Center, others have been evaluated at other domestic and overseas facilities using a variety of fuels. ERC has supplied stacks to Elkraft and MTU for tests with natural gas, and RWE in Germany where coal-derived gas were used. Additional stack test activities have been performed by MELCO and Sanyo in Japan. Information from some of these activities is protected by ERC's license arrangements with these firms. However, permission for limited data releases will be requested to provide the Grove Conference with up-to-date results. Arguably the most dramatic demonstration of carbonate fuel cells in the utility-scale, 2 MW power plant demonstration unit, located in the City of Santa Clara, California. Construction of the unit's balance-of-plant (BOP) has been completed and the installed equipment has been operationally checked. Two of the four DFC stack sub-modules, each

  15. Direct imaging of APP proteolysis in living cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niccoló Parenti

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease is a multifactorial disorder caused by the interaction of genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors. The formation of cytotoxic oligomers consisting of Aβ peptide is widely accepted as being one of the main key events triggering the development of Alzheimer’s disease. Aβ peptide production results from the specific proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP. Deciphering the factors governing the activity of the secretases responsible for the cleavage of APP is still a critical issue. Kits available commercially measure the enzymatic activity of the secretases from cells lysates, in vitro. By contrast, we have developed a prototypal rapid bioassay that provides visible information on the proteolytic processing of APP directly in living cells. APP was fused to a monomeric variant of the green fluorescent protein and a monomeric variant of the red fluorescent protein at the C-terminal and N-terminal (mChAPPmGFP, respectively. Changes in the proteolytic processing rate in transfected human neuroblastoma and rat neuronal cells were imaged with confocal microscopy as changes in the red/green fluorescence intensity ratio. The significant decrease in the mean red/green ratio observed in cells over-expressing the β-secretase BACE1, or the α-secretase ADAM10, fused to a monomeric blue fluorescent protein confirms that the proteolytic site is still accessible. Specific siRNA was used to evaluate the contribution of endogenous BACE1. Interestingly, we found that the degree of proteolytic processing of APP is not completely homogeneous within the same single cell, and that there is a high degree of variability between cells of the same type. We were also able to follow with a fluorescence spectrometer the changes in the red emission intensity of the extracellular medium when BACE1 was overexpressed. This represents a complementary approach to fluorescence microscopy for rapidly detecting changes in the

  16. Architectural patterns of p16 immunohistochemical expression associated with cancer immunity and prognosis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Hyang Joo; Kim, Eun Kyung; Heo, Su Jin; Cho, Byoung Chul; Kim, Hye Ryun; Yoon, Sun Och

    2017-11-01

    We evaluated the expression patterns of p16, which is used as a surrogate marker of HPV infection in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), in regard to their biological and prognostic implications. p16 expression patterns and infiltrated immune cells were analyzed through immunohistochemistry of p16, CD3, CD8, PD-1, FOXP3, and CD163 on surgically resected HNSCCs (n = 393). Patterns of p16 immunoexpression were defined as STRONG (strong, diffuse expression in cytoplasm, and nucleus in >70% of tumor cells), MARGINAL (expression restricted to tumor margins), MOSAIC (ragged, discontinued expression), NUCLEAR (expression in nuclei only), and ABSENT (no expression). The STRONG pattern was more frequent in the oropharynx, and the MARGINAL pattern was noted only in the oral cavity. MOSAIC and NUCLEAR patterns were noted at variable sites. No two patterns of p16 expression showed the same immune cell composition of CD3+ T cells, CD8+ cytotoxic T cells, PD-1+ T cells, FOXP3+ regulatory T cells, and CD163+ macrophages. In overall and disease-free survival analyses, the STRONG pattern showed the most favorable prognosis, while the NUCLEAR pattern had the worst prognosis. HNSCC anatomical sites, tumor-related immune cell components, and patient outcomes were associated with p16 expression patterns. Each architectural pattern of p16 expression may be related to different biological and prognostic phenotypes. © 2017 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Elevated expression of MMP-13 and TIMP-1 in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas may reflect increased tumor invasiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culhaci, Nil; Metin, Kubilay; Copcu, Eray; Dikicioglu, Emel

    2004-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases [MMPs], which degrade the extracellular matrix, play an important role in the invasion and metastasis of squamous cell carcinomas. One MMP, MMP-13, is thought to play a central role in MMP activation. The purpose of this study was to investigate MMP-13 and TIMP-1 expression in squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck and to relate these levels of expression to histologic patterns of invasion. This study included T1 lesions obtained via biopsy from the larynx, tongue, and skin/mucosa of 78 patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. The relationship between expression of MMP-13 and TIMP-1 and the mode of tumor invasion [MI] was evaluated immunohistochemically, using breast carcinoma tissue as a positive control. Increased expression was observed in highly invasive tumors, as reflected by the significant correlation between the degree of staining for MMP-13 or TIMP-1 and MI grade [p < 0.05]. There was no significant relationship between the degree of staining for MMP-13 or TIMP-1 and patient age, sex, tumor site, or tumor histologic grade. In addition, levels of staining for MMP-13 did not correlate with levels of staining for TIMP-1. The expression of MMP-13 and TIMP-1 appears to play an important role in determining the invasive capacity of squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck. Whereas additional studies are needed to confirm these findings, evaluating expression of these MMPs in small biopsy samples may be useful in determining the invasive capacity of these tumors at an earlier stage

  18. Pain as sign of recurrent disease in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, M.; Balm, A. J.; Hilgers, F. J.; Tan, I. B.

    2001-01-01

    The role of pain in head and neck cancer is seldom addressed. This retrospective study examined in a group of 190 curatively treated patients to what extent pain complaints should be considered to be the first sign of recurrent disease. The research population exists of 95 patients with a recurrent

  19. LOCAL POLITICAL DYNAMICS IN THE GENERAL ELECTION DIRECTLY CONDUCTED TO VOTE FOR DISTRICT HEADS (PILKADA IN BADUNG REGENCY IN 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anak Agung Gede Oka Wisnumurti

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The general election directly conducted to vote for the regent and vice regent(Pemilihan Kepala Daerah, abbreviated to Pilkada by the people in Badung Regency in2005 was the first one. The people’s direct involvement in the local political life movedhighly dynamically. The struggle for power by various strengths affected variousdimensions of the people’s lives; therefore, it is interesting to investigate the localpolitical dynamics in the Pilkada directly conducted in Badung Regency in 2005 in theperspective of cultural studies. There are three problems formulated in this study. Theyare (1 what was the dynamics of the Pilkada directly conducted in Badung Regency in2005 like?; (2 how the relation of strengths affected the local political dynamics in thePilkada directly conducted in Badung Regency in 2005?; (3 what were the implicationsand meanings of the local political dynamics of the Pilkada directly conducted in BadungRegency in 2005?The results of the study show that fluctuative changes took place continuouslywith regard to the form and functions of societal structure. Culturally, the people’sideology changed from being mono centric into being multi centric. The relation ofstrengths became segmented into three main strengths forming a new formation ofstrength referred to as trisula. This led to an institutional configuration, differentiation ofpower and locality sedimentation, and provided meanings to competition and tolerance,emancipatory, political comodification, adaptive leadership and local democratic culturalstrengthening.

  20. Nano-Engineered Catalysts for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myung, Nosang; Narayanan, Sekharipuram; Wiberg, Dean

    2008-01-01

    Nano-engineered catalysts, and a method of fabricating them, have been developed in a continuing effort to improve the performances of direct methanol fuel cells as candidate power sources to supplant primary and secondary batteries in a variety of portable electronic products. In order to realize the potential for high energy densities (as much as 1.5 W h/g) of direct methanol fuel cells, it will be necessary to optimize the chemical compositions and geometric configurations of catalyst layers and electrode structures. High performance can be achieved when catalyst particles and electrode structures have the necessary small feature sizes (typically of the order of nanometers), large surface areas, optimal metal compositions, high porosity, and hydrophobicity. The present method involves electrodeposition of one or more catalytic metal(s) or a catalytic-metal/polytetrafluoroethylene nanocomposite on an alumina nanotemplate. The alumina nanotemplate is then dissolved, leaving the desired metal or metal/polytetrafluoroethylene-composite catalyst layer. Unlike some prior methods of making fine metal catalysts, this method does not involve processing at elevated temperature; all processing can be done at room temperature. In addition, this method involves fewer steps and is more amenable to scaling up for mass production. Alumina nanotemplates are porous alumina membranes that have been fabricated, variously, by anodizing either pure aluminum or aluminum that has been deposited on silicon by electronbeam evaporation. The diameters of the pores (7 to 300 nm), areal densities of pores (as much as 7 x 10(exp 10)sq cm), and lengths of pores (up to about 100 nm) can be tailored by selection of fabrication conditions. In a given case, the catalytic metal, catalytic metal alloy, or catalytic metal/ polytetrafluoroethylene composite is electrodeposited in the pores of the alumina nanotemplate. The dimensions of the pores, together with the electrodeposition conditions

  1. Evidence-based radiation oncology in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corvo, Renzo

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Historically, radiation therapy (RT) has been an available treatment option for patients with early resectable head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and the sole therapy for those with unresectable or inoperable disease. Recently, four noteworthy strategies have emerged for the improvement of therapeutic outcome in the curative treatment of HNSCC: they include the development of altered fractionation radiotherapy, integration of chemotherapy with radiotherapy, incorporation of intensity-modulated radiotherapy and the introduction of targeted biological therapy. These strategies are briefly reviewed in an effort to help interpret evidence-based data and to facilitate clinical-decision making in a clinical context. Materials and methods: For patients with early stage HNSCC no level 1 study exists in which radiation therapy is compared with conservative surgery for the evaluation of local control or survival. Only evidence from prospective and retrospective cohort studies is available to evaluate the role external radiotherapy and/or brachytherapy currently play in limited disease. For patients with locally advanced HNSCC the recommendations to address the questions about better treatment in resectable and unresectable tumors are based on more than 100 randomized Phase III trials included in six meta-analyses on chemo-radiotherapy and/or altered fractionation. Data from phase II trials and cohort studies help interpret the advances in intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Results: External radiotherapy and/or brachytherapy are crucial treatment options in patients with early stage HNSCC. For patients with locally advanced HNSCC, where outcome with conventional radiotherapy is poor, meta-analyses and collective data showed that loco-regional control may be improved at high level of evidence by altered fractionation radiotherapy, chemo-radiotherapy with concomitant approach or association of selected hypoxic cell radiosensitizer with

  2. Spheroid Culture of Head and Neck Cancer Cells Reveals an Important Role of EGFR Signalling in Anchorage Independent Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunholz, Diana; Saki, Mohammad; Niehr, Franziska; Öztürk, Merve; Borràs Puértolas, Berta; Konschak, Robert; Budach, Volker; Tinhofer, Ingeborg

    2016-01-01

    In solid tumours millions of cells are shed into the blood circulation each day. Only a subset of these circulating tumour cells (CTCs) survive, many of them presumable because of their potential to form multi-cellular clusters also named spheroids. Tumour cells within these spheroids are protected from anoikis, which allows them to metastasize to distant organs or re-seed at the primary site. We used spheroid cultures of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell lines as a model for such CTC clusters for determining the role of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in cluster formation ability and cell survival after detachment from the extra-cellular matrix. The HNSCC cell lines FaDu, SCC-9 and UT-SCC-9 (UT-SCC-9P) as well as its cetuximab (CTX)-resistant sub-clone (UT-SCC-9R) were forced to grow in an anchorage-independent manner by coating culture dishes with the anti-adhesive polymer poly-2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate (poly-HEMA). The extent of apoptosis, clonogenic survival and EGFR signalling under such culture conditions was evaluated. The potential of spheroid formation in suspension culture was found to be positively correlated with the proliferation rate of HNSCC cell lines as well as their basal EGFR expression levels. CTX and gefitinib blocked, whereas the addition of EGFR ligands promoted anchorage-independent cell survival and spheroid formation. Increased spheroid formation and growth were associated with persistent activation of EGFR and its downstream signalling component (MAPK/ERK). Importantly, HNSCC cells derived from spheroid cultures retained their clonogenic potential in the absence of cell-matrix contact. Addition of CTX under these conditions strongly inhibited colony formation in CTX-sensitive cell lines but not their resistant subclones. Altogether, EGFR activation was identified as crucial factor for anchorage-independent survival of HNSCC cells. Targeting EGFR in CTC cluster formation might represent an attractive anti

  3. IL-6 Inhibition With MEDI5117 Decreases The Fraction of Head and Neck Cancer Stem Cells and Prevents Tumor Recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsey A. Finkel

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC exhibit a small population of uniquely tumorigenic cancer stem cells (CSC endowed with self-renewal and multipotency. We have recently shown that IL-6 enhances the survival and tumorigenic potential of head and neck cancer stem cells (i.e. ALDHhighCD44high cells. Here, we characterized the effect of therapeutic inhibition of IL-6 with a novel humanized anti-IL-6 antibody (MEDI5117 using three low-passage patient-derived xenograft (PDX models of HNSCC. We observed that single agent MEDI5117 inhibited the growth of PDX-SCC-M1 tumors (P < .05. This PDX model was generated from a previously untreated HNSCC. In contrast, MEDI5117 was not effective at reducing overall tumor volume for PDX models representing resistant disease (PDX-SCC-M0, PDX-SCC-M11. Low dose MEDI5117 (3 mg/kg consistently decreased the fraction of cancer stem cells in PDX models of HNSCC when compared to IgG-treated controls, as follows: PDX-SCC-M0 (P < .001, PDX-SCC-M1 (P < .001, PDX-SCC-M11 (P = .04. Interestingly, high dose MEDI5117 (30 mg/kg decreased the CSC fraction in the PDX-SCC-M11 model (P = .002, but not in PDX-SCC-M0 and PDX-SCC-M1. MEDI5117 mediated a dose-dependent decrease in the number of orospheres generated by ALDHhighCD44high cells cultured in ultra-low attachment plates (P < .05, supporting an inhibitory effect on head and neck cancer stem cells. Notably, single agent MEDI5117 reduced the overall recurrence rate of PDX-SCC-M0, a PDX generated from the local recurrence of human HNSCC. Collectively, these data demonstrate that therapeutic inhibition of IL-6 with low-dose MEDI5117 decreases the fraction of cancer stem cells, and that adjuvant MEDI5117 inhibits recurrence in preclinical models of HNSCC.

  4. Hederagenin Induces Apoptosis in Cisplatin-Resistant Head and Neck Cancer Cells by Inhibiting the Nrf2-ARE Antioxidant Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Hye; Baek, Seungho; Shin, Daiha; Lee, Jaewang; Roh, Jong-Lyel

    2017-01-01

    Acquired resistance to cisplatin is the most common reason for the failure of cisplatin chemotherapy. Hederagenin, triterpenoids extracted from ivy leaves, exhibits antitumor activity in various types of cancer. However, the therapeutic potential of hederagenin in head and neck cancer (HNC) has remained unclear. Therefore, we examined the effects of hederagenin in cisplatin-resistant HNC cells and characterized its molecular mechanisms of action in this context. We evaluated the effects of hederagenin treatment on cell viability, apoptosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, glutathione levels, mitochondrial membrane potential (Δ Ψ m), and protein and mRNA expression in HNC cells. The antitumor effect of hederagenin in mouse tumor xenograft models was also analyzed. Hederagenin selectively induced cell death in both cisplatin-sensitive and cisplatin-resistant HNC cells by promoting changes in Δ Ψ m and inducing apoptosis. Hederagenin inhibited the Nrf2-antioxidant response element (ARE) pathway and activated p53 in HNC cells, thereby enhancing ROS production and promoting glutathione depletion. These effects were reversed by the antioxidant trolox. Hederagenin activated intrinsic apoptotic pathways via cleaved PARP, cleaved caspase-3, and Bax. The selective inhibitory effects of hederagenin were confirmed in cisplatin-resistant HNC xenograft models. These data suggest that hederagenin induces cell death in resistant HNC cells via the Nrf2-ARE antioxidant pathway.

  5. Hederagenin Induces Apoptosis in Cisplatin-Resistant Head and Neck Cancer Cells by Inhibiting the Nrf2-ARE Antioxidant Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Hye Kim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Acquired resistance to cisplatin is the most common reason for the failure of cisplatin chemotherapy. Hederagenin, triterpenoids extracted from ivy leaves, exhibits antitumor activity in various types of cancer. However, the therapeutic potential of hederagenin in head and neck cancer (HNC has remained unclear. Therefore, we examined the effects of hederagenin in cisplatin-resistant HNC cells and characterized its molecular mechanisms of action in this context. We evaluated the effects of hederagenin treatment on cell viability, apoptosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS production, glutathione levels, mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm, and protein and mRNA expression in HNC cells. The antitumor effect of hederagenin in mouse tumor xenograft models was also analyzed. Hederagenin selectively induced cell death in both cisplatin-sensitive and cisplatin-resistant HNC cells by promoting changes in ΔΨm and inducing apoptosis. Hederagenin inhibited the Nrf2-antioxidant response element (ARE pathway and activated p53 in HNC cells, thereby enhancing ROS production and promoting glutathione depletion. These effects were reversed by the antioxidant trolox. Hederagenin activated intrinsic apoptotic pathways via cleaved PARP, cleaved caspase-3, and Bax. The selective inhibitory effects of hederagenin were confirmed in cisplatin-resistant HNC xenograft models. These data suggest that hederagenin induces cell death in resistant HNC cells via the Nrf2-ARE antioxidant pathway.

  6. Dosimetric Factors Associated With Long-Term Dysphagia After Definitive Radiotherapy for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caudell, Jimmy J.; Schaner, Philip E.; Desmond, Renee A.; Meredith, Ruby F.; Spencer, Sharon A.; Bonner, James A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Intensification of radiotherapy and chemotherapy for head-and-neck cancer may lead to increased rates of dysphagia. Dosimetric predictors of objective findings of long-term dysphagia were sought. Methods and Materials: From an institutional database, 83 patients were identified who underwent definitive intensity-modulated radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, after exclusion of those who were treated for a second or recurrent head-and-neck primary lesion, had locoregional recurrence at any time, had less than 12 months of follow-up, or had postoperative radiotherapy. Dosimetric parameters were analyzed relative to three objective endpoints as a surrogate for severe long-term dysphagia: percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube dependence at 12 months, aspiration on modified barium swallow, or pharyngoesophageal stricture requiring dilation. Results: Mean dose greater than 41 Gy and volume receiving 60 Gy (V 60 ) greater than 24% to the larynx were significantly associated with PEG tube dependence and aspiration. V 60 greater than 12% to the inferior pharyngeal constrictor was also significantly associated with increased PEG tube dependence and aspiration. V 65 greater than 33% to the superior pharyngeal constrictor or greater than 75% to the middle pharyngeal constrictor was associated with pharyngoesophageal stricture requiring dilation. Conclusions: Doses to the larynx and pharyngeal constrictors predicted long-term swallowing complications, even when controlled for other clinical factors. The addition of these structures to intensity-modulated radiotherapy optimization may reduce the incidence of dysphagia, although cautious clinical validation is necessary.

  7. Oral sex and human papilloma virus-related head and neck squamous cell cancer: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ankit; Malik, Akshat; Garg, Apurva; Mair, Manish; Nair, Sudhir; Chaturvedi, Pankaj

    2017-11-01

    Head neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality all around the world. Just like tobacco and alcohol, Human papilloma virus (HPV) infection is now recognized to play a role in the pathogenesis of a subset of HNSCCs. Unprotected sexual behaviours with the HPV carrier plays an important role in transmission of this virus. The global incidence of head and neck cancers is declining, but the incidence of HPV related head and neck cancers is rapidly increasing over the last few decades. However, most institutions do not mandate documentation of sexual history or counselling of patients regarding sexual practices like they do for tobacco and alcohol addictions in HNSCC patients. The aim of this review of literature is to analyse if there is a strong evidence to correlate oral sex with HPV related HNSCC and counsel the patient's regarding sexual behaviours. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  8. Performance of a passive direct ethanol fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, J. P.; Falcão, D. S.; Oliveira, V. B.; Pinto, A. M. F. R.

    2014-06-01

    Ethanol emerges as an attractive fuel since it is less toxic and has higher energy density than methanol and can be produced from biomass. Direct ethanol fuel cells (DEFCs) appear as a good choice for producing sustainable energy for portable applications. However, they are still far from attaining acceptable levels of power output, since their performance is affected by the slow electrochemical ethanol oxidation and water and ethanol crossover. In the present work, an experimental study on the performance of a passive DEFC is described. Tailored MEAs (membrane electrode assembly) with different catalyst loadings, anode diffusion layers and membranes were tested in order to select optimal working conditions at high ethanol concentrations and low ethanol crossover. The performance increased with an increase of membrane and anode diffusion layer thicknesses and anode catalyst loading. A maximum power density of 1.33 mW cm-2, was obtained using a Nafion 117 membrane, 4 mg cm-2 of Pt-Ru and 2 mg cm-2 of Pt on the anode and cathode catalyst layers, ELAT as anode diffusion layer, carbon cloth as cathode diffusion layer and an ethanol concentration of 2 M. As far as the authors are aware this is the first work reporting an experimental optimization of passive DEFCs.

  9. New Catalysts for Direct Methanol Oxidation Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adzic, Radoslav

    1998-08-01

    A new class of efficient electrocatalytic materials based on platinum - metal oxide systems has been synthetized and characterized by several techniques. Best activity was found with NiWO{sub 4}-, CoWO{sub 4}-, and RuO{sub 2}- sr¡pported platinum catalysts. A very similar activity at room temperature was observed with the electrodes prepared with the catalyst obtained from International Fuel Cells Inc. for the same Pt loading. Surprisingly, the two tungstates per se show a small activity for methanol oxidation without any Pt loading. Synthesis of NiWO{sub 4} and CoWO{sub 4} were carried out by solid-state reactions. FTIR spectroscopy shows that the tungstates contain a certain amount of physically adsorbed water even after heating samples at 200{degrees}C. A direct relationship between the activity for methanol oxidation and the amount of adsorbed water on those oxides has been found. The Ru(0001) single crystal shows a very small activity for CO adsorption and oxidation, in contrast to the behavior of polycrystalline Ru. In situ extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) and x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) showed that the OH adsorption on Ru in the Pt-Ru alloy appears to be the limiting step in methanol oxidation. This does not occur for Pt-RuO{SUB 2} electrocatalyst, which explains its advantages over the Pt-Ru alloys. The IFCC electrocatalyst has the properties of the Pt-Ru alloy.

  10. Modified SPEEK membranes for direct ethanol fuel cell

    KAUST Repository

    Maab, Husnul

    2010-07-01

    Membranes with low ethanol crossover were prepared aiming their application for direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC). They were based on (1) sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) coated with carbon molecular sieves (CMS) and (2) on SPEEK/PI homogeneous blends. The membranes were characterized concerning their water and ethanol solution uptake, water and ethanol permeability in pervaporation experiments and their performance in DEFC tests. The ethanol permeabilities for the CMS-coated (180 nm and 400 nm thick layers) SPEEK were 8.5 and 3.1 x 10(-10) kg m s(-1) m(-2) and for the homogeneous SPEEK/PI blends membranes with 10, 20 and 30 wt.% of PI were 4.4, 1.0 and 0.4 x 10(-10) kg m s(-1) m(-2) respectively, which is 2- to 50-fold lower than that for plain SPEEK (19 x 10(-10) kg m s(-1) m(-2)). Particularly the SPEEK/PI membranes had substantially better performance than Nafion 117 membranes in DEFC tests at 60 degrees C and 90 degrees C. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Novel Anode Catalyst for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Basri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available PtRu catalyst is a promising anodic catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs but the slow reaction kinetics reduce the performance of DMFCs. Therefore, this study attempts to improve the performance of PtRu catalysts by adding nickel (Ni and iron (Fe. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs are used to increase the active area of the catalyst and to improve the catalyst performance. Electrochemical analysis techniques, such as energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX, X-ray diffraction (XRD, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, are used to characterize the kinetic parameters of the hybrid catalyst. Cyclic voltammetry (CV is used to investigate the effects of adding Fe and Ni to the catalyst on the reaction kinetics. Additionally, chronoamperometry (CA tests were conducted to study the long-term performance of the catalyst for catalyzing the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR. The binding energies of the reactants and products are compared to determine the kinetics and potential surface energy for methanol oxidation. The FESEM analysis results indicate that well-dispersed nanoscale (2–5 nm PtRu particles are formed on the MWCNTs. Finally, PtRuFeNi/MWCNT improves the reaction kinetics of anode catalysts for DMFCs and obtains a mass current of 31 A g−1 catalyst.

  12. Novel anode catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basri, S; Kamarudin, S K; Daud, W R W; Yaakob, Z; Kadhum, A A H

    2014-01-01

    PtRu catalyst is a promising anodic catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) but the slow reaction kinetics reduce the performance of DMFCs. Therefore, this study attempts to improve the performance of PtRu catalysts by adding nickel (Ni) and iron (Fe). Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are used to increase the active area of the catalyst and to improve the catalyst performance. Electrochemical analysis techniques, such as energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), are used to characterize the kinetic parameters of the hybrid catalyst. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) is used to investigate the effects of adding Fe and Ni to the catalyst on the reaction kinetics. Additionally, chronoamperometry (CA) tests were conducted to study the long-term performance of the catalyst for catalyzing the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR). The binding energies of the reactants and products are compared to determine the kinetics and potential surface energy for methanol oxidation. The FESEM analysis results indicate that well-dispersed nanoscale (2-5 nm) PtRu particles are formed on the MWCNTs. Finally, PtRuFeNi/MWCNT improves the reaction kinetics of anode catalysts for DMFCs and obtains a mass current of 31 A g(-1) catalyst.

  13. Combined inhibition of EMMPRIN and epidermal growth factor receptor prevents the growth and migration of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shinsuke; Ishikawa, Kazuo

    2014-03-01

    It has been reported that the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression is associated with the extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) in some solid tumors; however, the relationship of EMMPRIN with EGFR in head and neck cancers is not fully understood. To determine the relationship between EMMPRIN and EGFR in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), HNSCC cells were stimulated with epidermal growth factor (EGF), a ligand of EGFR. EMMPRIN expression in HNSCC cells was upregulated by EGF. In addition, EGF stimulation induced HNSCC cell invasion and MMP-9 expression. This increase in invasion and MMP-9 expression was abrogated by downmodulation of EMMPRIN. Furthermore, to determine the effects of combined EMMPRIN and EGFR targeting in HNSCC, HNSCC cells were treated with an EMMPRIN function-blocking antibody and the EGFR inhibitor AG1478. This combined treatment resulted in greater inhibition of HNSCC cell proliferation and migration compared with the individual agents alone. These results suggest that EMMPRIN mediates EGFR-induced tumorigenicity and that combined targeting of EMMPRIN and EGFR may be an efficacious treatment approach.

  14. New bimetallic EMF cell shows promise in direct energy conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesson, J. C.; Shimotake, H.

    1968-01-01

    Concentration cell, based upon a thermally regenerative cell principle, produces electrical energy from any large heat source. This experimental bimetallic EMF cell uses a sodium-bismuth alloy cathode and a pure liquid sodium anode. The cell exhibits reliability, corrosion resistance, and high current density performance.

  15. Long Term Performance Study of a Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Fed with Alcohol Blends

    OpenAIRE

    Teresa J. Leo; Miguel A. Raso; Emilio Navarro; Eleuterio Mora

    2013-01-01

    The use of alcohol blends in direct alcohol fuel cells may be a more environmentally friendly and less toxic alternative to the use of methanol alone in direct methanol fuel cells. This paper assesses the behaviour of a direct methanol fuel cell fed with aqueous methanol, aqueous ethanol and aqueous methanol/ethanol blends in a long term experimental study followed by modelling of polarization curves. Fuel cell performance is seen to decrease as the ethanol content rises, and subsequent opera...

  16. Optimum Performance of Direct Hydrogen Hybrid Fuel Cell Vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

    2009-01-01

    Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technology is one of the most attractive candidates for transportation applications due to its inherently high efficiency and high power density. However, the fuel cell system efficiency can suffer because of the need for forced air supply and water-cooling systems. Hence the operating strategy of the fuel cell system can have a significant impact on the fuel cell system efficiency and thus vehicle fuel economy. The key issues are how the fuel cell b...

  17. The human HECA interacts with cyclins and CDKs to antagonize Wnt-mediated proliferation and chemoresistance of head and neck cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowejko, Albert, E-mail: Albert.Dowejko@klinik.uni-regensburg.de [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Bauer, Richard; Bauer, Karin [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Mueller-Richter, Urs D.A. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Plastic Surgery, University of Wuerzburg, Pleicherwall 2, 97070 Wuerzburg (Germany); Reichert, Torsten E. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany)

    2012-03-10

    There is a growing evidence that the human homologue of the Drosophila headcase (HECA) plays an important role in human carcinogenesis. So far specific protein interaction partners and affected signaling pathways of HECA are still elusive. In a recent study we showed that HECA overexpression in oral squamous-cell carcinoma (OSCC) keratinocytes has tumor suppressive effects resulting in a recuperation of cell cycle control concerning the entry and progression of S-phase, G2- and M-phase. Currently, quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemical analysis of primary tumor tissue from OSCC patients demonstrate that HECA expression is markedly decreased compared to normal control patients with abundant HECA expression. Additionally, there is nearly no HECA expression in OSCC metastases. Here, we show that HECA expression is negatively controlled by the Wnt-pathway and TCF4, a Wnt related transcription factor, binds to the HECA promoter. Furthermore, immunocytochemistry reveals colocalization of HECA with the cyclin dependent kinase CDK9. Immunoprecipitation experiments and proximity ligation assays further reveal an interaction of HECA with CDK2, CDK9, Cyclin A and Cyclin K, a direct transcriptional target of the p53 tumor suppressor. Silencing HECA in OSCC cell lines leads to a significant increase of cell division and a markedly increased resistance against the chemotherapeutic cisplatin. On the contrary, HECA overexpressing OSCC cell lines show decreased resistance of OSCC cells against cisplatin. Therefore, HECA could be considered as future therapeutic agent against Wnt-dependent tumor progression. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HECA is a new cell cycle regulator with anti-tumor features in head and neck cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer During tumor progression HECA mRNA and protein expression decrease. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The HECA promotor is a direct target of the Wnt/beta-catenin/TCF-pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The HECA protein

  18. Goniometer head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzhazairov-Kakhramanov, V.; Berger, V.D.; Kadyrzhanov, K.K.; Zarifov, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    The goniometer head is an electromechanical instrument that performs the independent transfer of a testing sample on three coordinate axes (X, Y, Z) within limits of ±8 mm and independent rotation relative of these directions. The instrument comprises a sample holder, bellows component and three electrometer drives. The sample holder rotates around the axes X and Y, and is installed on the central arm which rotates around axis Z. One characteristic of this instrument is its independence which allows its use in any camera for researches in the field of radiation physics. 2 figs

  19. The role of social cues in the deployment of spatial attention: Head-body relationships automatically activate directional spatial codes in a Simon task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona ePomianowska

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The role of body orientation in the orienting and allocation of social attention was examined using an adapted Simon paradigm. Participants categorized the facial expression of forward facing, computer-generated human figures by pressing one of two response keys, each located left or right of the observers’ body midline, while the orientation of the stimulus figure’s body (trunk, arms, and legs, which was the task-irrelevant feature of interest, was manipulated (oriented towards the left or right visual hemifield with respect to the spatial location of the required response. We found that when the orientation of the body was compatible with the required response location, responses were slower relative to when body orientation was incompatible with the response location. This reverse compatibility effect suggests that body orientation is automatically processed into a directional spatial code, but that this code is based on an integration of head and body orientation within an allocentric-based frame of reference. Moreover, we argue that this code may be derived from the motion information implied in the image of a figure when head and body orientation are incongruent. Our results have implications for understanding the nature of the information that affects the allocation of attention for social orienting.

  20. E-cadherin expression and prognosis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: evidence from 19 published investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren X

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Xusheng Ren,1,2 Jianning Wang,2 Xuefen Lin,1,3 Xuxia Wang1,3 1Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Stomatological Hospital of Shandong University, 2Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Jinan Stomatological Hospital, 3Shandong Province Key Laboratory of Oral Tissue Regeneration, Stomatological Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China Objective: The objective of this study was to review the published literature and investigate whether E-cadherin gene is a prognostic factor in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma by conducting a meta-analysis.Methods: Studies were identified from the databases Embase, Medline, and Cochrane Library by using the keywords “E-cadherin gene” and “head and neck cancer”. Overall survival (OS and disease-free survival (DFS were the primary outcome measurements.Results: Our literature review identified 1,458 articles; 19 studies with a total number of 2,012 cases were eligible for inclusion in the meta-analysis. The hazard ratio (HR for OS of patients with decreased expression of E-cadherin gene was 0.57 (95% CI =0.37, 0.89; P=0.000. However, statistical heterogeneity was unacceptably high (I2=74.5%, P=0.000. After sensitivity analysis, heterogeneity became acceptable, and the effect measure was still significant (I2=7.0%; HR =0.52; 95% CI =0.40, 0.66; P=0.000. The HR for DFS was 0.53 (95% CI =0.42, 0.67; P=0.000.Conclusion: This meta-analysis showed clear evidence that high E-cadherin gene expression is a positive prognostic factor of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, resulting in better OS and DFS. However, this conclusion must be interpreted with caution due to a few limitations. Keywords: E-cadherin gene, prognosis, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, immunohistochemistry 

  1. Stem Cell Therapy for Avascular Necrosis of Femoral Head in Sickle Cell Disease: Report of 11 Cases and Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadat-Ali, Mir; Azam, Md Q; Elshabouri, Ezzat M; Tantawy, Ahmad M; Acharya, Sadananda

    2017-11-30

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is quite common in eastern Saudi Arabia and Avascular necrosis of femoral head (ANFH) occurs in 30% of the young patients leading to early joint arthroplasty. This study was conducted to assess the benefits of injection of osteoblasts in the avascular lesions of the head of femur. A preset technique was used, 10 CC of bone marrow aspiration was performed under local anesthesia and aseptic technique. Osteoblasts were separated from the bone marrow cells. The avascular area was drilled and 10 million osteoblasts were transplanted at the lesion site. Patients were seen in the out patient clinic after two weeks for removal of the suture and addressed the questionnaire and examined for the range of movement. The follow up MRI was performed at 4 months. The average age was 20.2±3.9 years. The mean hemoglobin S was 81.6±4.8 percent. Quality of Life Score for Chronic Hip Disease was assessed and found at 8.6 (1 being the severe limitation and 10 being normal), whereas Harris hip score improved from 41.7±5.1 to 88.93±3.6 (p avascular lesions. The short term results were good and we believe the injection of osteoblast in the avascular lesion of head of femur is a less invasive procedure devoid of any untoward complications and merits such treatment in large patient group with longer follow up.

  2. Increased radiosensitivity of HPV-positive head and neck cancer cell lines due to cell cycle dysregulation and induction of apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arenz, Andrea; Ziemann, Frank; Wittig, Andrea; Preising, Stefanie; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; Mayer, Christina; Wagner, Steffen; Klussmann, Jens-Peter; Wittekindt, Claus; Dreffke, Kirstin

    2014-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV)-related head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) respond favourably to radiotherapy as compared to HPV-unrelated HNSCC. We investigated DNA damage response in HPV-positive and HPV-negative HNSCC cell lines aiming to identify mechanisms, which illustrate reasons for the increased sensitivity of HPV-positive cancers of the oropharynx. Radiation response including clonogenic survival, apoptosis, DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair, and cell cycle redistribution in four HPV-positive (UM-SCC-47, UM-SCC-104, 93-VU-147T, UPCI:SCC152) and four HPV-negative (UD-SCC-1, UM-SCC-6, UM-SCC-11b, UT-SCC-33) cell lines was evaluated. HPV-positive cells were more radiosensitive (mean SF2: 0.198 range: 0.22-0.18) than HPV-negative cells (mean SF2: 0.34, range: 0.45-0.27; p = 0.010). Irradiated HPV-positive