WorldWideScience

Sample records for hdr heissdampfreaktor dynamic

  1. High dynamic range (HDR) virtual bronchoscopy rendering for video tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, Teo; Choi, Jae

    2007-03-01

    In this paper, we present the design and implementation of a new rendering method based on high dynamic range (HDR) lighting and exposure control. This rendering method is applied to create video images for a 3D virtual bronchoscopy system. One of the main optical parameters of a bronchoscope's camera is the sensor exposure. The exposure adjustment is needed since the dynamic range of most digital video cameras is narrower than the high dynamic range of real scenes. The dynamic range of a camera is defined as the ratio of the brightest point of an image to the darkest point of the same image where details are present. In a video camera exposure is controlled by shutter speed and the lens aperture. To create the virtual bronchoscopic images, we first rendered a raw image in absolute units (luminance); then, we simulated exposure by mapping the computed values to the values appropriate for video-acquired images using a tone mapping operator. We generated several images with HDR and others with low dynamic range (LDR), and then compared their quality by applying them to a 2D/3D video-based tracking system. We conclude that images with HDR are closer to real bronchoscopy images than those with LDR, and thus, that HDR lighting can improve the accuracy of image-based tracking.

  2. High Brightness HDR Projection Using Dynamic Freeform Lensing

    KAUST Repository

    Damberg, Gerwin

    2016-05-03

    Cinema projectors need to compete with home theater displays in terms of image quality. High frame rate and spatial resolution as well as stereoscopic 3D are common features today, but even the most advanced cinema projectors lack in-scene contrast and, more important, high peak luminance, both of which are essential perceptual attributes of images appearing realistic. At the same time, HDR image statistics suggest that the average image intensity in a controlled ambient viewing environment such as the cinema can be as low as 1% for cinematic HDR content and not often higher than 18%, middle gray in photography. Traditional projection systems form images and colors by blocking the source light from a lamp, therefore attenuating between 99% and 82% of light, on average. This inefficient use of light poses significant challenges for achieving higher peak brightness levels. In this work, we propose a new projector architecture built around commercially available components, in which light can be steered to form images. The gain in system efficiency significantly reduces the total cost of ownership of a projector (fewer components and lower operating cost), and at the same time increases peak luminance and improves black level beyond what is practically achievable with incumbent projector technologies. At the heart of this computational display technology is a new projector hardware design using phase modulation in combination with a new optimization algorithm that is capable of on-the-fly computation of freeform lens surfaces. © 2016 ACM.

  3. The high dynamic range pixel array detector (HDR-PAD): Concept and design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanks, Katherine S.; Philipp, Hugh T.; Weiss, Joel T.; Becker, Julian; Tate, Mark W. [Laboratory of Atomic and Solid State Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Gruner, Sol M., E-mail: smg26@cornell.edu [Laboratory of Atomic and Solid State Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2016-07-27

    Experiments at storage ring light sources as well as at next-generation light sources increasingly require detectors capable of high dynamic range operation, combining low-noise detection of single photons with large pixel well depth. XFEL sources in particular provide pulse intensities sufficiently high that a purely photon-counting approach is impractical. The High Dynamic Range Pixel Array Detector (HDR-PAD) project aims to provide a dynamic range extending from single-photon sensitivity to 10{sup 6} photons/pixel in a single XFEL pulse while maintaining the ability to tolerate a sustained flux of 10{sup 11} ph/s/pixel at a storage ring source. Achieving these goals involves the development of fast pixel front-end electronics as well as, in the XFEL case, leveraging the delayed charge collection due to plasma effects in the sensor. A first prototype of essential electronic components of the HDR-PAD readout ASIC, exploring different options for the pixel front-end, has been fabricated. Here, the HDR-PAD concept and preliminary design will be described.

  4. Tone compatibility between HDR displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bist, Cambodge; Cozot, Rémi; Madec, Gérard; Ducloux, Xavier

    2016-09-01

    High Dynamic Range (HDR) is the latest trend in television technology and we expect an in ux of HDR capable consumer TVs in the market. Initial HDR consumer displays will operate on a peak brightness of about 500-1000 nits while in the coming years display peak brightness is expected to go beyond 1000 nits. However, professionally graded HDR content can range from 1000 to 4000 nits. As with Standard Dynamic Range (SDR) content, we can expect HDR content to be available in variety of lighting styles such as low key, medium key and high key video. This raises concerns over tone-compatibility between HDR displays especially when adapting to various lighting styles. It is expected that dynamic range adaptation between HDR displays uses similar techniques as found with tone mapping and tone expansion operators. In this paper, we survey simple tone mapping methods of 4000 nits color-graded HDR content for 1000 nits HDR displays. We also investigate tone expansion strategies when HDR content graded in 1000 nits is displayed on 4000 nits HDR monitors. We conclude that the best tone reproduction technique between HDR displays strongly depends on the lighting style of the content.

  5. Video Enhancement and Dynamic Range Control of HDR Sequences for Automotive Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Ramponi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available CMOS video cameras with high dynamic range (HDR output are particularly suitable for driving assistance applications, where lighting conditions can strongly vary, going from direct sunlight to dark areas in tunnels. However, common visualization devices can only handle a low dynamic range, and thus a dynamic range reduction is needed. Many algorithms have been proposed in the literature to reduce the dynamic range of still pictures. Anyway, extending the available methods to video is not straightforward, due to the peculiar nature of video data. We propose an algorithm for both reducing the dynamic range of video sequences and enhancing its appearance, thus improving visual quality and reducing temporal artifacts. We also provide an optimized version of our algorithm for a viable hardware implementation on an FPGA. The feasibility of this implementation is demonstrated by means of a case study.

  6. A review of the HDR research programme; HDR-tutkimusohjelman tulosten arviointi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talja, H.; Koski, K.; Rintamaa, R. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland); Keskinen, R. [Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, Helsinki (Finland)

    1995-10-01

    In the German HDR (Heissdampfreaktor, hot steam reactor) reactor safety programme, experiments and simulating numerical analyses have been undertaken since 1976 to study the integrity and safety of light water reactors under operational and faulted conditions. The last experiments of the programme were conducted in 1991. The post test analyses have been finished by March 1994 and the last final reports were obtained a few months later. The report aims to inform the utilities and the regulatory body of Finland about the contents of the lokset HDR research programme and to consider the applicability of the results to safety analyses of Finnish nuclear power plants. The report centers around the thermal shock and piping component experiments within the last or third phase of the HDR programme. Investigations into severe reactor accidents, fire safety and non-destructive testing, also conducted during the third phase, are not considered. The report presents a review of the following experiment groups: E21 (crack growth under corrosive conditions, loading due to thermal stratification), E22 (leak rate and leak detection experiments of through-cracked piping), E23 (thermal transient and stratification experiments for a pipe nozzle), E31 (vibration of cracked piping due to blow down and closure of isolation valve), E32 (seismically induced vibrations of cracked piping), E33 (condensation phenomena in horizontal piping during emergency cooling). A comprehensive list of reference reports, received by VTT and containing a VTT more detailed description, is given for each experiment group. The review is focused on the loading conditions and their theoretical modelling. A comparison of theoretical and experimental results is presented for each experiment group. The safety margins are finally assessed with special reference to leak-before-break, a well known principle for assuring the integrity of primary circuit piping of nuclear power plants. (orig.) (71 figs., 5 tabs.).

  7. A review of the HDR research programme; HDR-tutkimusohjelman tulosten arviointi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talja, H.; Koski, K.; Rintamaa, R. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland); Keskinen, R. [Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, Helsinki (Finland)

    1995-10-01

    In the German HDR (Heissdampfreaktor, hot steam reactor) reactor safety programme, experiments and simulating numerical analyses have been undertaken since 1976 to study the integrity and safety of light water reactors under operational and faulted conditions. The last experiments of the programme were conducted in 1991. The post test analyses have been finished by March 1994 and the last final reports were obtained a few months later. The report aims to inform the utilities and the regulatory body of Finland about the contents of the lokset HDR research programme and to consider the applicability of the results to safety analyses of Finnish nuclear power plants. The report centers around the thermal shock and piping component experiments within the last or third phase of the HDR programme. Investigations into severe reactor accidents, fire safety and non-destructive testing, also conducted during the third phase, are not considered. The report presents a review of the following experiment groups: E21 (crack growth under corrosive conditions, loading due to thermal stratification), E22 (leak rate and leak detection experiments of through-cracked piping), E23 (thermal transient and stratification experiments for a pipe nozzle), E31 (vibration of cracked piping due to blow down and closure of isolation valve), E32 (seismically induced vibrations of cracked piping), E33 (condensation phenomena in horizontal piping during emergency cooling). A comprehensive list of reference reports, received by VTT and containing a VTT more detailed description, is given for each experiment group. The review is focused on the loading conditions and their theoretical modelling. A comparison of theoretical and experimental results is presented for each experiment group. The safety margins are finally assessed with special reference to leak-before-break, a well known principle for assuring the integrity of primary circuit piping of nuclear power plants. (orig.) (71 figs., 5 tabs.).

  8. Live HDR video streaming on commodity hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamee, Joshua; Hatchett, Jonathan; Debattista, Kurt; Chalmers, Alan

    2015-09-01

    High Dynamic Range (HDR) video provides a step change in viewing experience, for example the ability to clearly see the soccer ball when it is kicked from the shadow of the stadium into sunshine. To achieve the full potential of HDR video, so-called true HDR, it is crucial that all the dynamic range that was captured is delivered to the display device and tone mapping is confined only to the display. Furthermore, to ensure widespread uptake of HDR imaging, it should be low cost and available on commodity hardware. This paper describes an end-to-end HDR pipeline for capturing, encoding and streaming high-definition HDR video in real-time using off-the-shelf components. All the lighting that is captured by HDR-enabled consumer cameras is delivered via the pipeline to any display, including HDR displays and even mobile devices with minimum latency. The system thus provides an integrated HDR video pipeline that includes everything from capture to post-production, archival and storage, compression, transmission, and display.

  9. HDR ühest kaadrist? / Janno Loide

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Loide, Janno

    2008-01-01

    HDR-töötluse (High dynamic range - pildi kõrge dünaamiline ulatus) ja toonide kohandamise (tone mapping) meetodite kasutamisest pildi digitaalsel salvestusel ning sobiva hele-tumeduse leidmisel loodusfotode parema kvaliteedi saamiseks

  10. The general solution to HDR rendering

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, John

    2012-03-01

    Our High-Dynamic-Range (HDR) world is the result of nonuniform illumination. We like to believe that 21st century technology makes it possible to accurately reproduce any scene. On further study, we find that scene rendition remains a best compromise. Despite all the remarkable accomplishments in digital imaging, we cannot capture and reproduce the light in the world exactly. With still further study, we find that accurate reproduction is not necessary. We need an interdisciplinary study of image making - painting, photography and image processing - to find the general solution. HDR imaging would be very confusing, without two observations that resolve many paradoxes. First, optical veiling glare, that depends on the scene content, severely limits the range of light on cameras' sensors, and on retinas. Second, the neural spatial image processing in human vision counteracts glare with variable scene dependent responses. The counter actions of these optical and neural processes shape the goals of HDR imaging. Successful HDR increases the apparent contrast of details lost in the shadows and highlights of conventional images. They change the spatial relationships by altering the local contrast of edges and gradients. The goal of HDR imaging is displaying calculated appearance, rather than accurate light reproduction. By using this strategy we can develop universal algorithms that process all images, LDR and HDR, achromatic and color, by mimicking human vision. The study of the general solution for HDR imaging incorporates painting photography, vision research, color constancy and digital image processing.

  11. Data report of a pretest analysis of soil-structure interaction and structural response in low-amplitude explosive testing (50 KG) of the heissdampfreaktor (HDR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughan, D.K.; Sandler, I.; Rubin, D.; Isenberg, J.; Nikooyeh, H.

    1979-11-29

    This report describes a three-dimensional nonlinear TRANAL finite element analysis of a nuclear reactor subjected to ground shaking from a buried 50 kg explosive source. The analysis is a pretest simulation of a test event which was scheduled to be conducted in West Germany on 3 November 1979.

  12. Evaluating HDR photos using Web 2.0 technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Guoping; Mei, Yujie; Duan, Jiang

    2011-01-01

    High dynamic range (HDR) photography is an emerging technology that has the potential to dramatically enhance the visual quality and realism of digital photos. One of the key technical challenges of HDR photography is displaying HDR photos on conventional devices through tone mapping or dynamic range compression. Although many different tone mapping techniques have been developed in recent years, evaluating tone mapping operators prove to be extremely difficult. Web2.0, social media and crowd-sourcing are emerging Internet technologies which can be harnessed to harvest the brain power of the mass to solve difficult problems in science, engineering and businesses. Paired comparison is used in the scientific study of preferences and attitudes and has been shown to be capable of obtaining an interval-scale ordering of items along a psychometric dimension such as preference or importance. In this paper, we exploit these technologies for evaluating HDR tone mapping algorithms. We have developed a Web2.0 style system that enables Internet users from anywhere to evaluate tone mapped HDR photos at any time. We adopt a simple paired comparison protocol, Internet users are presented a pair of tone mapped images and are simply asked to select the one that they think is better or click a "no difference" button. These user inputs are collected in the web server and analyzed by a rank aggregation algorithm which ranks the tone mapped photos according to the votes they received. We present experimental results which demonstrate that the emerging Internet technologies can be exploited as a new paradigm for evaluating HDR tone mapping algorithms. The advantages of this approach include the potential of collecting large user inputs under a variety of viewing environments rather than limited user participation under controlled laboratory environments thus enabling more robust and reliable quality assessment. We also present data analysis to correlate user generated qualitative

  13. Photogrammetric Exploitation of Hdr Images for Cultural Heritage Documentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntregka; Georgopoulos; Quintero

    2013-07-01

    Basic goal of this project is to investigate and therefore highlight the usefulness of High Dynamic Range Images for photogrammetric applications in the field of Cultural Heritage Documentation. Scenes with High Dynamic range - difference between the brightest and the darkest parts - is impossible to be recorded without loss of details and texture in dark areas (due to underexposure) and in bright areas (due to overexposure) because of digital sensor's limitation in high dynamic range recording. In digital recording, the most recent and effective solution is High Dynamic Range Images (HDRI). These images are created by merging multiple images of the same scene, each of which has been taken with different shutter speed and thus providing a better range of images with different exposures. An HDR image alone is overcoming the loss of information caused by unfavorable lighting conditions. In photogrammetric applications, images have to be of high quality and represent faithfully the scene they depict. For applications of Cultural Heritage Documentation, where during image acquisition lighting conditions might be difficult, HDR technology can positively contribute to the acquisition of images of better quality and, consequently, to the creation of orthophotos with no radiometric problems. In this paper, a detailed reference to HDRI technology is made and also the geometric reliability and photogrammetric applicability of HDR images is examined and confirmed. In addition, an example of photogrammetric application in Cultural Heritage Documentation is presented and evaluated.

  14. The history of HDR research and development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duchane, D.

    1998-12-31

    An energy source rivaling the sun exists in the form of the heat emanating from the interior of the earth. Although limited quantities of this geothermal energy are produced today by bringing natural hot fluids to the surface, most of the earth`s heat is trapped in hot dry rock (HDR). The application of hydraulic fracturing technology to tap this vast HDR resource was pioneered by Los Alamos National Laboratory beginning in 1970. Since that time, engineered geothermal reservoirs have been constructed and operated at numerous locations around the world. Major work at the US HDR facility at Fenton Hill, NM, and at the British HDR site in Cornwall, UK, has been completed, but advanced HDR field work continues at two sites on the island of Honshu in Japan and at Soultz in northeastern France. In addition, plans are currently being completed for the construction of an HDR system on the continent of Australia. Over the past three decades the worldwide research and development effort has taken HDR from its early conceptual stage to its present state as a demonstrated technology that is on the verge of becoming commercially feasible. Extended flow tests in the United States, Japan, and Europe have proven that sustained operation of HDR reservoirs is possible. In support of these field tests, an international body of scientists and engineers have pursued a variety of innovative approaches for assessing HDR resources, constructing and characterizing engineered geothermal reservoirs, and operating HDR systems. Taken together, these developments form a strong base upon which to build the practical HDR systems that will provide clean energy for the world in the 21st century.

  15. Analysis of visual quality improvements provided by known tools for HDR content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaehwan; Alshina, Elena; Lee, JongSeok; Park, Youngo; Choi, Kwang Pyo

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the visual quality of different solutions for high dynamic range (HDR) compression using MPEG test contents is analyzed. We also simulate the method for an efficient HDR compression which is based on statistical property of the signal. The method is compliant with HEVC specification and also easily compatible with other alternative methods which might require HEVC specification changes. It was subjectively tested on commercial TVs and compared with alternative solutions for HDR coding. Subjective visual quality tests were performed using SUHD TVs model which is SAMSUNG JS9500 with maximum luminance up to 1000nit in test. The solution that is based on statistical property shows not only improvement of objective performance but improvement of visual quality compared to other HDR solutions, while it is compatible with HEVC specification.

  16. Evaluation of the effectiveness of HDR tone-mapping operators for photogrammetric applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossella Suma

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The ability of High Dynamic Range (HDR imaging to capture the full range of lighting in a scene has meant that it is being increasingly used for Cultural Heritage (CH applications. Photogrammetric techniques allow the semi-automatic production of 3D models from a sequence of images. Current photogrammetric methods are not always effective in reconstructing images under harsh lighting conditions, as significant geometric details may not have been captured accurately within under- and over-exposed regions of the image. HDR imaging offers the possibility to overcome this limitation, however the HDR images need to be tone mapped before they can be used within existing photogrammetric algorithms. In this paper we evaluate four different HDR tone-mapping operators (TMOs that have been used to convert raw HDR images into a format suitable for state-of-the-art algorithms, and in particular keypoint detection techniques. The evaluation criteria used are the number of keypoints, the number of valid matches achieved and the repeatability rate. The comparison considers two local and two global TMOs. HDR data from four CH sites were used: Kaisariani Monastery (Greece, Asinou Church (Cyprus, Château des Baux (France and Buonconsiglio Castle (Italy.

  17. HDR Efex Pro After the Shoot

    CERN Document Server

    Sholik, Stan

    2011-01-01

    A concise, on-the-go guide to the new HDR Efex Pro imaging toolkit for photographers Now that you've gone mobile and HDR, you want to be able to download and enhance your favorite photos on the run, without having to return to the mother ship (i.e., your desktop computer). This book shows you just how to do that using the amazing HDR Efex Pro, the image editing toolset from Nik Software. In brilliant color and using plenty of show-stopping examples, this practical guide explains all tools and features. Follow numbered steps and you'll soon be handling things like alignment, ghosting control, h

  18. FV10: an efficient single-layer approach to HDR coding, with backward compatibility options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topiwala, Pankaj; Dai, Wei; Krishnan, Madhu

    2016-09-01

    High Dynamic Range and Wide Color Gamut (HDR/WCG) video is now at the forefront of modern broadcast and other video delivery systems. The efficient transmission and display of such video over diverse networks and systems is an important problem. This paper presents a novel, state of the art approach in HDR/WCG video coding (called FV10) which uses a new, fully automatic video data adaptive regrading process, which converts HDR to Standard Dynamic Range (SDR). Our method differs from one developed recently in standards committees (the Joint Collaborative Team on Video Coding, or JCT-VC, of ITU|ISO/IEC), based on the HEVC Main10 Profile as the core codec, which is an HDR10 compliant system ("anchor"). FV10 also works entirely within the framework of HEVC Main10 Profile, but makes greater use of existing SEI messages. Reconstructed video using our methods show a subjective visual quality superior to the output of an example HDR10 anchor. Moreover, a usable backwards compatible SDR video is obtained as a byproduct in the processing chain, allowing service efficiencies. Representative objective results for the system include: results for RGB-PSNR, DE100, MD100, tOSNR-XYZ were -46.0%, -21.6%, -29.6%, 16.2% respectively.

  19. A Survey on the Acceptance and the Use of HDR Photography Among Croatian Photographers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Strgar Kurecic

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The emerging field of high dynamic range (HDR imaging is directly linked to diverse existing disciplines such as radiometry, photometry, colorimetry and colour appearance - each dealing with specific aspects of light and its perception by humans. Although the idea is not new, it has not been widely used until just a few years ago when digital cameras gained popularity and the computers processing power increased significantly. Now this photographic technique is widely spread and used, but even more often – misused. A research was conducted by means of a questionnaire in order to get some actual information about how Croatian photographers see the HDR photography and how they employ it. The results of the survey proved that indeed a great interest exists in the technique, but that many photographers are scared away from the HDR photography because of the misconception that the artificial look is an unavoidable side effect of the HDR processing. The fact is, however, that the final HDR image is a result of the tone mapping process and post-corrections and adjustments, entirely dependent on the photographer’s intent and vision, as well as his understanding of various adjustments available. The results of the questionnaire have also pointed out to other widely spread misconceptions which are discussed in this paper.

  20. Hdr Imaging for Feature Detection on Detailed Architectural Scenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontogianni, G.; Stathopoulou, E. K.; Georgopoulos, A.; Doulamis, A.

    2015-02-01

    3D reconstruction relies on accurate detection, extraction, description and matching of image features. This is even truer for complex architectural scenes that pose needs for 3D models of high quality, without any loss of detail in geometry or color. Illumination conditions influence the radiometric quality of images, as standard sensors cannot depict properly a wide range of intensities in the same scene. Indeed, overexposed or underexposed pixels cause irreplaceable information loss and degrade digital representation. Images taken under extreme lighting environments may be thus prohibitive for feature detection/extraction and consequently for matching and 3D reconstruction. High Dynamic Range (HDR) images could be helpful for these operators because they broaden the limits of illumination range that Standard or Low Dynamic Range (SDR/LDR) images can capture and increase in this way the amount of details contained in the image. Experimental results of this study prove this assumption as they examine state of the art feature detectors applied both on standard dynamic range and HDR images.

  1. HDR IMAGING FOR FEATURE DETECTION ON DETAILED ARCHITECTURAL SCENES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kontogianni

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available 3D reconstruction relies on accurate detection, extraction, description and matching of image features. This is even truer for complex architectural scenes that pose needs for 3D models of high quality, without any loss of detail in geometry or color. Illumination conditions influence the radiometric quality of images, as standard sensors cannot depict properly a wide range of intensities in the same scene. Indeed, overexposed or underexposed pixels cause irreplaceable information loss and degrade digital representation. Images taken under extreme lighting environments may be thus prohibitive for feature detection/extraction and consequently for matching and 3D reconstruction. High Dynamic Range (HDR images could be helpful for these operators because they broaden the limits of illumination range that Standard or Low Dynamic Range (SDR/LDR images can capture and increase in this way the amount of details contained in the image. Experimental results of this study prove this assumption as they examine state of the art feature detectors applied both on standard dynamic range and HDR images.

  2. User's manual for HDR3 computer code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arundale, C.J.

    1982-10-01

    A description of the HDR3 computer code and instructions for its use are provided. HDR3 calculates space heating costs for a hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal space heating system. The code also compares these costs to those of a specific oil heating system in use at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Flight Center at Wallops Island, Virginia. HDR3 allows many HDR system parameters to be varied so that the user may examine various reservoir management schemes and may optimize reservoir design to suit a particular set of geophysical and economic parameters.

  3. Next stages in HDR technology development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duchane, D.V.

    1993-03-01

    Twenty years of research and development have brought HDR heat mining technology from the purely conceptual stage to the establishment of an engineering-scale heat mine at Fenton Hill, NM. In April 1992, a long-term flow test (LTFT) of the HDR reservoir at Fenton Hill was begun. The test was carried out under steady-state conditions on a continuous basis for four months, but a major equipment failure in late July forced a temporary suspension of operations. Even this short test provided valuable information and extremely encouraging results as summarized below: There was no indication of thermal drawdown of the reservoir. There was evidence of increasing access to hot rock with time. Water consumption was in the rangki of 10--12%. Measured pumping costs were $0.003 per kilowatt of energy produced. Temperature logs conducted in the reservoir production zone during and after the flow test confirmed the fact that there was no decline in the average temperature of the fluid being produced from the reservoir. In fact, tracer testing showed that the fluid was taking more indirect pathways and thus contacting a greater amount of hot rock as the test progressed. Water usage quickly dropped to a level of 10--15 gallons per minute, an amount equivalent to about 10--12% of the injected fluid volume. At a conversion rate of 10--15%, these would translate to effective ``fuel costs`` of 2--3{cents} per kilowatt hour of electricity production potential. The completion of the LTFT will set the stage for commercialization of HDR but will not bring HDR technology to maturity. Relatively samples extensions of the current technology may bring significant improvements in efficiency, and these should be rapidly investigated. In the longer run, advanced operational concepts could further improve the efficiency of HDR energy extraction and may even offer the possibility of cogeneration schemes which solve both energy and water problems throughout the world.

  4. Dosimetry revisited for the HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source model mHDR-v2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granero, Domingo; Vijande, Javier; Ballester, Facundo; Rivard, Mark J. [Radiation Physics Department, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, E-46014 Valencia (Spain); Department of Atomic, Molecular, and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, E-46100 Burjassot (Spain) and IFIC, CSIC-University of Valencia, E-46100 Burjassot (Spain); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: Recently, the manufacturer of the HDR {sup 192}Ir mHDR-v2 brachytherapy source reported small design changes (referred to herein as mHDR-v2r) that are within the manufacturing tolerances but may alter the existing dosimetric data for this source. This study aimed to (1) check whether these changes affect the existing dosimetric data published for this source; (2) obtain new dosimetric data in close proximity to the source, including the contributions from {sup 192}Ir electrons and considering the absence of electronic equilibrium; and (3) obtain scatter dose components for collapsed cone treatment planning system implementation. Methods: Three different Monte Carlo (MC) radiation transport codes were used: MCNP5, PENELOPE2008, and GEANT4. The source was centrally positioned in a 40 cm radius water phantom. Absorbed dose and collision kerma were obtained using 0.1 mm (0.5 mm) thick voxels to provide high-resolution dosimetry near (far from) the source. Dose-rate distributions obtained with the three MC codes were compared. Results: Simulations of mHDR-v2 and mHDR-v2r designs performed with three radiation transport codes showed agreement typically within 0.2% for r{>=}0.25 cm. Dosimetric contributions from source electrons were significant for r<0.25 cm. The dose-rate constant and radial dose function were similar to those from previous MC studies of the mHDR-v2 design. The 2D anisotropy function also coincided with that of the mHDR-v2 design for r{>=}0.25 cm. Detailed results of dose distributions and scatter components are presented for the modified source design. Conclusions: Comparison of these results to prior MC studies showed agreement typically within 0.5% for r{>=}0.25 cm. If dosimetric data for r<0.25 cm are not needed, dosimetric results from the prior MC studies will be adequate.

  5. Aquarious Mountain Area, Arizona: APossible HDR Prospect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, F.G.; Laughlin, A.W.

    1979-05-01

    Exploration for Hot Dry Rock (HDR) requires the ability to delineate areas of thermal enhancement. It is likely that some of these areas will exhibit various sorts of anomalous conditions such as seismic transmission delays, low seismic velocities, high attenuation of seismic waves, high electrical conductivity in the crust, and a relatively shallow depth to Curie point of Magnetization. The Aquarius Mountain area of northwest Arizona exhibits all of these anomalies. The area is also a regional Bouguer gravity low, which may indicate the presence of high silica type rocks that often have high rates of radioactive heat generation. The one deficiency of the area as a HDR prospect is the lack of a thermal insulating blanket.

  6. Secure High Dynamic Range Images

    OpenAIRE

    Med Amine Touil; Noureddine Ellouze

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a tone mapping algorithm is proposed to produce LDR (Limited Dynamic Range) images from HDR (High Dynamic Range) images. In the approach, non-linear functions are applied to compress the dynamic range of HDR images. Security tools will be then applied to the resulting LDR images and their effectiveness will be tested on the reconstructed HDR images. Three specific examples of security tools are described in more details: integrity verification using hash function to compute loc...

  7. HDR Pathological Image Enhancement Based on Improved Bias Field Correction and Guided Image Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingjiao Sun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathological image enhancement is a significant topic in the field of pathological image processing. This paper proposes a high dynamic range (HDR pathological image enhancement method based on improved bias field correction and guided image filter (GIF. Firstly, a preprocessing including stain normalization and wavelet denoising is performed for Haematoxylin and Eosin (H and E stained pathological image. Then, an improved bias field correction model is developed to enhance the influence of light for high-frequency part in image and correct the intensity inhomogeneity and detail discontinuity of image. Next, HDR pathological image is generated based on least square method using low dynamic range (LDR image, H and E channel images. Finally, the fine enhanced image is acquired after the detail enhancement process. Experiments with 140 pathological images demonstrate the performance advantages of our proposed method as compared with related work.

  8. Impact Analysis of Baseband Quantizer on Coding Efficiency for HDR Video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Chau-Wai; Su, Guan-Ming; Wu, Min

    2016-10-01

    Digitally acquired high dynamic range (HDR) video baseband signal can take 10 to 12 bits per color channel. It is economically important to be able to reuse the legacy 8 or 10-bit video codecs to efficiently compress the HDR video. Linear or nonlinear mapping on the intensity can be applied to the baseband signal to reduce the dynamic range before the signal is sent to the codec, and we refer to this range reduction step as a baseband quantization. We show analytically and verify using test sequences that the use of the baseband quantizer lowers the coding efficiency. Experiments show that as the baseband quantizer is strengthened by 1.6 bits, the drop of PSNR at a high bitrate is up to 1.60dB. Our result suggests that in order to achieve high coding efficiency, information reduction of videos in terms of quantization error should be introduced in the video codec instead of on the baseband signal.

  9. The Ansel Adams zone system: HDR capture and range compression by chemical processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, John J.

    2010-02-01

    We tend to think of digital imaging and the tools of PhotoshopTM as a new phenomenon in imaging. We are also familiar with multiple-exposure HDR techniques intended to capture a wider range of scene information, than conventional film photography. We know about tone-scale adjustments to make better pictures. We tend to think of everyday, consumer, silver-halide photography as a fixed window of scene capture with a limited, standard range of response. This description of photography is certainly true, between 1950 and 2000, for instant films and negatives processed at the drugstore. These systems had fixed dynamic range and fixed tone-scale response to light. All pixels in the film have the same response to light, so the same light exposure from different pixels was rendered as the same film density. Ansel Adams, along with Fred Archer, formulated the Zone System, staring in 1940. It was earlier than the trillions of consumer photos in the second half of the 20th century, yet it was much more sophisticated than today's digital techniques. This talk will describe the chemical mechanisms of the zone system in the parlance of digital image processing. It will describe the Zone System's chemical techniques for image synthesis. It also discusses dodging and burning techniques to fit the HDR scene into the LDR print. Although current HDR imaging shares some of the Zone System's achievements, it usually does not achieve all of them.

  10. Speedup of optimization-based approach to local backlight dimming of HDR displays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burini, Nino; Nadernejad, Ehsan; Korhonen, Jari

    2012-01-01

    Local backlight dimming in Liquid Crystal Displays (LCD) is a technique for reducing power consumption and simultaneously increasing contrast ratio to provide a High Dynamic Range (HDR) image reproduction. Several backlight dimming algorithms exist with focus on reducing power consumption, while...... also be beneficial in conjunction with other approaches, such as an algorithm based on gradient descent, also presented here. All the proposals have been compared against other known approaches on simulated edge- and direct-lit displays, and the results show that the optimal distortion level can...

  11. FVP10: enhancements of VPX for SDR/HDR applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topiwala, Pankaj; Dai, Wei; Krishnan, Madhu

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes a study to investigate possible ways to improve the VPX codecs in the context of both 8-bit SDR video and 10-bit HDR video content, for two types of applications: streaming and high quality (near lossless) coding for content contribution editing. For SDR content, the following tools are investigated: (a) lapped biorthogonal transforms for near lossless applications; and (b) optimized resampling filter pairs for adaptive resolution coding in streaming applications. For HDR content, a data adaptive grading technique in conjunction with the VP9/VP10 encoder is studied. Both the objective metrics (measured using BD rate) and informal subjective visual quality assessments are recorded. It is asserted that useful improvements are possible in each of these categories. In particular, substantial value is offered in the coding of HDR content, and especially in creating a coding scheme offering backwards compatibility with SDR.

  12. Improved High Dynamic Range Image Reproduction Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    András Rövid

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available High dynamic range (HDR of illumination may cause serious distortions andother problems in viewing and further processing of digital images. This paper describes anew algorithm for HDR image creation based on merging images taken with differentexposure time. There are many fields, in which HDR images can be used advantageously,with the help of them the accuracy, reliability and many other features of the certain imageprocessing methods can be improved.

  13. Stereo Vision-Based High Dynamic Range Imaging Using Differently-Exposed Image Pair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Won-Jae; Ji, Seo-Won; Kang, Seok-Jae; Jung, Seung-Won; Ko, Sung-Jea

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a high dynamic range (HDR) imaging method based on the stereo vision system is presented. The proposed method uses differently exposed low dynamic range (LDR) images captured from a stereo camera. The stereo LDR images are first converted to initial stereo HDR images using the inverse camera response function estimated from the LDR images. However, due to the limited dynamic range of the stereo LDR camera, the radiance values in under/over-exposed regions of the initial main-view (MV) HDR image can be lost. To restore these radiance values, the proposed stereo matching and hole-filling algorithms are applied to the stereo HDR images. Specifically, the auxiliary-view (AV) HDR image is warped by using the estimated disparity between initial the stereo HDR images and then effective hole-filling is applied to the warped AV HDR image. To reconstruct the final MV HDR, the warped and hole-filled AV HDR image is fused with the initial MV HDR image using the weight map. The experimental results demonstrate objectively and subjectively that the proposed stereo HDR imaging method provides better performance compared to the conventional method. PMID:28640235

  14. Stereo Vision-Based High Dynamic Range Imaging Using Differently-Exposed Image Pair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won-Jae Park

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a high dynamic range (HDR imaging method based on the stereo vision system is presented. The proposed method uses differently exposed low dynamic range (LDR images captured from a stereo camera. The stereo LDR images are first converted to initial stereo HDR images using the inverse camera response function estimated from the LDR images. However, due to the limited dynamic range of the stereo LDR camera, the radiance values in under/over-exposed regions of the initial main-view (MV HDR image can be lost. To restore these radiance values, the proposed stereo matching and hole-filling algorithms are applied to the stereo HDR images. Specifically, the auxiliary-view (AV HDR image is warped by using the estimated disparity between initial the stereo HDR images and then effective hole-filling is applied to the warped AV HDR image. To reconstruct the final MV HDR, the warped and hole-filled AV HDR image is fused with the initial MV HDR image using the weight map. The experimental results demonstrate objectively and subjectively that the proposed stereo HDR imaging method provides better performance compared to the conventional method.

  15. Color appearance and color rendering of HDR scenes: an experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parraman, Carinna; Rizzi, Alessandro; McCann, John J.

    2009-01-01

    In order to gain a deeper understanding of the appearance of coloured objects in a three-dimensional scene, the research introduces a multidisciplinary experimental approach. The experiment employed two identical 3-D Mondrians, which were viewed and compared side by side. Each scene was subjected to different lighting conditions. First, we used an illumination cube to diffuse the light and illuminate all the objects from each direction. This produced a low-dynamicrange (LDR) image of the 3-D Mondrian scene. Second, in order to make a high-dynamic range (HDR) image of the same objects, we used a directional 150W spotlight and an array of WLEDs assembled in a flashlight. The scenes were significant as each contained exactly the same three-dimensional painted colour blocks that were arranged in the same position in the still life. The blocks comprised 6 hue colours and 5 tones from white to black. Participants from the CREATE project were asked to consider the change in the appearance of a selection of colours according to lightness, hue, and chroma, and to rate how the change in illumination affected appearance. We measured the light coming to the eye from still-life surfaces with a colorimeter (Yxy). We captured the scene radiance using multiple exposures with a number of different cameras. We have begun a programme of digital image processing of these scene capture methods. This multi-disciplinary programme continues until 2010, so this paper is an interim report on the initial phases and a description of the ongoing project.

  16. CT-based interstitial HDR brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolotas, C.; Baltas, D.; Zamboglou, N. [Staedtische Kliniken Offenbach (Germany). Strahlenklinik

    1999-09-01

    Purpose: Development, application and evaluation of a CT-guided implantation technique and a fully CT-based treatment planning procedure for brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A brachytherapy procedure based on CT-guided implantation technique and CT-based treatment planning has been developed and clinical evaluated. For this purpose a software system (PROMETHEUS) for the 3D reconstruction of brachytherapy catheters and patient anatomy using only CT scans has been developed. An interface for the Nucletron PLATO BPS treatment planning system for optimization and calculation of dose distribution has been devised. The planning target volume(s) are defined as sets of points using contouring tools and are used for optimization of the 3D dose distribution. Dose-volume histogram based analysis of the dose distribution (COIN analysis) enables a clinically realistic evaluation of the brachytherapy application to be made. The CT-guided implantation of catheters and the CT-based treatment planning procedure has been performed for interstitial brachytherapy and for different tumor sites in 197 patients between 1996 and 1997. Results: The accuracy of the CT reconstruction was tested using first a quality assurance phantom and second, a simulated interstitial implant of 12 needles. These were compared with the results of reconstruction using radiographs. Both methods gave comparable results with regard to accuracy, but the CT based reconstruction was faster. Clinical feasibility was proved in pre-irradiated recurrences of brain tumors, in pretreated recurrences or metastatic disease, and in breast carcinomas. The tumor volumes treated were in the range 5.1 to 2,741 cm{sup 3}. Analysis of implant quality showed a slightly significant lower COIN value for the bone implants, but no differences with respect to the planning target volume. Conclusions: The Offenbach system, incorporating the PROMETHEUS software for interstitial HDR brachytherapy has proved to be extremely valuable

  17. Secure High Dynamic Range Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Med Amine Touil

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a tone mapping algorithm is proposed to produce LDR (Limited Dynamic Range images from HDR (High Dynamic Range images. In the approach, non-linear functions are applied to compress the dynamic range of HDR images. Security tools will be then applied to the resulting LDR images and their effectiveness will be tested on the reconstructed HDR images. Three specific examples of security tools are described in more details: integrity verification using hash function to compute local digital signatures, encryption for confidentiality, and scrambling technique.

  18. Shadow Attenuation With High Dynamic Range Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadow often interferes with accurate image analysis. To mitigate shadow effects in near-earth imagery (2 m above ground level), we created high dynamic range (HDR) nadir images and used them to measure grassland ground cover. HDR composites were created by merging three differentially-exposed image...

  19. Interstitial brachytherapy for carcinoma of the tongue using microselectron-HDR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizutani, Kimishige; Koseki, Yonoshin [Osaka Dental Univ. (Japan); Inoue, Toshihiko; Inoue, Takehiro; Yoshida, Ken; Kakimoto, Naoya; Murakami, Shumei; Furukawa, Souhei; Tanaka, Yoshihiro

    2001-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the treatment results of high dose rate (HDR) interstital brachytherapy (ISBT) for early (T1N0, T2N0) mobile tongue cancer using micorSelectron-HDR. From January 1993 through January 1999, a total of 63 patients with squamous cell carcinomas of the early mobile tongue were treated with microSelectron-HDR (HDR: high dose rate) interstitial brachytherapy at the Department of Radiology, Osaka University Medical School. Tumors were located at the lateral border and ventral surface of the mobile tongue. Nineteen percent of all cases were treated with a combination of prior external radiation and HDR ISBT. Eighty-one percent of all cases were treated with HDR ISBT alone. In the case of HDR ISBT alone, all of which were administered a total dose of 54 Gy/9 fractions/5 days or 60 Gy/10 fractions/8 days. In a combined therapy with an external dose of 30 Gy to 40 Gy, HDR ISBT was given at a total dose of 42-48 Gy. The local control rate was 84% for HDR ISBT alone and 75% for combined therapy. The difference in the results of HDR ISBT alone and combined therapy was not significant. Nodal metastasis of patients with T1 was 29% (5/17), and that of T2 was 47% (16/34) in the HDR ISBT-alone group and 25% (3/12) in the combined therapy group. HDR ISBT is useful and easily applied under local anesthesia to early or superficial lesions of the mobile tongue. In addition, this method can eliminate radiation exposure to the medical staff. (author)

  20. Drilling and Completion of the Urach III HDR Test Well

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, U.; Ernst, P. L.

    1981-01-01

    The hot dry rock (HDR) test well, urach III, was drilled and completed in 1979. The borehole is located in Southwest Germany in the geothermal anomaly of Urach. The purpose of project Urach was to study drilling and completion problems of HDR wells and to provide a test site for a HDR research program. The Urach III borehole was drilled to a total depth of 3,334 meters (10,939 feet), penetrating 1,700 meters (5,578 feet) into the granitic basement. Extensive coring was required to provide samples for geophysical and geochemical studies. Positive displacement downhole motors were used for coring and normal drilling operations. It was found that these motors in combination with the proper bits gave better results than conventional rotary drilling. Loss of circulation was encountered not only in sedimentary rocks but also in the granite. After drilling and completion of the borehole, a number of hydraulic fracturing experiments were performed in the open hole as well as in the cased section of Urach III. A circulation loop was established by using the single-borehole concept. It is not yet clear whether new fractures have actually been generated or preexisting joints and fissures have been reactivated. Evaluation of the results of this first step is almost completed and the planning of Phase II of the Urach project is under way.

  1. Monte Carlo evaluation of kerma in an HDR brachytherapy bunker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Calatayud, J [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, and IFIC, CSIC-University of Valencia, Burjassot (Spain); Granero, D [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, and IFIC, CSIC-University of Valencia, Burjassot (Spain); Ballester, F [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, and IFIC, CSIC-University of Valencia, Burjassot (Spain); Casal, E [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, and IFIC, CSIC-University of Valencia, Burjassot (Spain); Crispin, V [FIVO, Fundacion Instituto Valenciano De OncologIa, Valencia (Spain); Puchades, V [Grupo IMO-SFA, Madrid (Spain); Leon, A [Department of Chemistry and Nuclear Engineering, Polytechnic University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Verdu, G [Department of Chemistry and Nuclear Engineering, Polytechnic University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain)

    2004-12-21

    In recent years, the use of high dose rate (HDR) after-loader machines has greatly increased due to the shift from traditional Cs-137/Ir-192 low dose rate (LDR) to HDR brachytherapy. The method used to calculate the required concrete and, where appropriate, lead shielding in the door is based on analytical methods provided by documents published by the ICRP, the IAEA and the NCRP. The purpose of this study is to perform a more realistic kerma evaluation at the entrance maze door of an HDR bunker using the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. The Monte Carlo results were validated experimentally. The spectrum at the maze entrance door, obtained with Monte Carlo, has an average energy of about 110 keV, maintaining a similar value along the length of the maze. The comparison of results from the aforementioned values with the Monte Carlo ones shows that results obtained using the albedo coefficient from the ICRP document more closely match those given by the Monte Carlo method, although the maximum value given by MC calculations is 30% greater. (note)

  2. Simultaneous radiochemotherapy and endoluminal HDR brachytherapy in esophageal cancer; Simultane Radiochemotherapie mit intraluminaler HDR-Brachytherapie des Oesophaguskarzinoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patonay, P.; Naszaly, A.; Mayer, A. [Hauptstaedtisches Zentrum fuer Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie, Budapest (Hungary)

    2007-02-15

    Purpose: to study efficacy and toxicity of radiochemotherapy in esophageal cancer including initial endoluminal high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT). Patients and methods: between 01/1995 and 06/2005, 61 patients with esophageal cancer were treated preoperatively with definitive and palliative intent. Treatment started with intraluminal HDR-BT for recanalization of the esophagus (single fraction size of 8 Gy in 0.5 cm depth, three times, q7d) followed by external-beam radiation therapy (50 Gy total dose, 5 x 2 Gy/week, 25 fractions in 5 weeks). Chemotherapy was started simultaneously with external irradiation (three courses of cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil, q21d). Results: swallowing function improved in 55/61 patients (dysphagia classification according to the RTOG), and worsened in 6/61 patients, respectively. Median duration of symptomatic improvement was 11 months, median follow-up 12 months (range 3-68 months). Following simultaneous radiochemotherapy, tumor resectability was achieved in 7/25 patients of the neoadjuvant group, and the histological specimen showed complete remission in 6/7 patients. Conclusion: these results indicate a favorable effect of simultaneous radiochemotherapy starting with endoluminal HDR-after-loading-(AL-)BT in esophageal cancer. (orig.)

  3. High dynamic range images for enhancing low dynamic range content

    OpenAIRE

    Banterle, Francesco; Dellepiane, Matteo; Scopigno, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    This poster presents a practical system for enhancing the quality of Low Dynamic Range (LDR) videos using High Dynamic Range (HDR) background images. Our technique relies on the assumption that the HDR information is static in the video footage. This assumption can be valid in many scenarios where moving subjects are the main focus of the footage and do not have to interact with moving light sources or highly reflective objects. Another valid scenario is teleconferencing via webcams, where th...

  4. Hdr reactor containment fire modeling with Br12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rockett, J.A.; Keski-Rahkonen, O.; Heikkilae, L.

    1992-01-01

    Fire tests at the German test reactor, HDR, were simulated using a Japanese zone model code, BRI2. Eight and ten room models of the containment building were developed. Critical phenomena occurring during simulation were explored. BRI2 can be used for this type of work but care must be exercised where a side wind increases entrainment by the fire plume. Horizontal vents were described by effective vertical vents. The effect of location of the vent to the ambient was found critical during severely oxygen limited burning. (Copyright (c) Valtion teknillinen tutkimuskeskus (VTT) 1992.)

  5. Seismic investigations of the HDR Safety Program. Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malcher, L.; Schrammel, D. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany); Steinhilber, H. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Betriebsfestigkeit (LBF), Darmstadt (Germany); Kot, C.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1994-08-01

    The primary objective of the seismic investigations, performed at the HDR facility in Kahl/Main, FRG was to validate calculational methods for the seismic evaluation of nuclear-reactor systems, using experimental data from an actual nuclear plant. Using eccentric mass shaker excitation the HDR soil/structure system was tested to incipient failure, exhibiting highly nonlinear response and demonstrating that structures not seismically designed can sustain loads equivalent to a design basin earthquake (DBE). Load transmission from the structure to piping/equipment indicated significant response amplifications and shifts to higher frequencies, while the response of tanks/vessels depended mainly on their support conditions. The evaluation of various piping support configurations demonstrated that proper system design (for a given spectrum) rather than number of supports or system stiffness is important to limiting pipe greens. Piping at loads exceeding the DBE eightfold still had significant margins and failure is improbable inspite of multiple support failures. The mean value for pipe damping, even under extreme loads, was found to be about 4%. Comparison of linear and nonlinear computational results with piping response measurements showed that predictions have a wide scatter and do not necessarily yield conservative responses underpredicting, in particular, peak support forces. For the soil/structure system the quality of the predictions did not depend so much on the complexity of the modeling, but rather on whether the model captured the salient features and nonlinearities of the system.

  6. WE-E-BRD-01: HDR Brachytherapy I: Overview of Clinical Application and QA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Libby, B [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Showalter, T

    2014-06-15

    With the increased usage of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy and the introduction of dedicated image guided brachytherapy suites, it is necessary to review the processes and procedures associated with safely delivering these treatments in the expedited time scales that dedicated treatment suites afford. The speakers will present the clinical aspects of switching from LDR to HDR treatments, including guidelines for patient selection, and the clinical outcomes comparing LDR to HDR. The speakers will also discuss the HDR treatment process itself, because the shortened clinical timeline involved with a streamlined scan/plan/treat workflow can introduce other issues. Safety and QA aspects involved with the streamlined process, including increased personnel required for parallel tasks, and possible interfering tasks causing delays in patient treatments will also be discussed. Learning Objectives: To understand the clinical aspects of HDR Brachytherapy, including common clinical indications, patient selection, and the evolving evidence in support of this therapeutic modality To review the current prominent clinical trials for HDR brachytherapy To interpret the established guidelines for HDR brachytherapy quality assurance for implementation into practical clinical settings. To introduce the basic requirements for image guided brachytherapy.

  7. Dosimetric analysis and comparison of IMRT and HDR brachytherapy in treatment of localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murali, V; Kurup, P G G; Mahadev, P; Mahalakshmi, S

    2010-04-01

    Radical radiotherapy is one of the options for the management of prostate cancer. In external beam therapy, 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) are the options for delivery of increased radiation dose, as vital organs are very close to the prostate and a higher dose to these structures leads to an increased toxicity. In brachytherapy, low dose rate brachytherapy with permanent implant of radioactive seeds and high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR) with remote after loaders are available. A dosimetric analysis has been made on IMRT and HDR brachytherapy plans. Ten cases from each IMRT and HDR brachytherapy have been taken for the study. The analysis includes comparison of conformity and homogeneity indices, D100, D95, D90, D80, D50, D10 and D5 of the target. For the organs at risk (OAR), namely rectum and bladder, V100, V90 and V50 are compared. In HDR brachytherapy, the doses to 1 cc and 0.1 cc of urethra have also been studied. Since a very high dose surrounds the source, the 300% dose volumes in the target and within the catheters are also studied in two plans, to estimate the actual volume of target receiving dose over 300%. This study shows that the prescribed dose covers 93 and 92% of the target volume in IMRT and HDR brachytherapy respectively. HDR brachytherapy delivers a much lesser dose to OAR, compared to the IMRT. For rectum, the V50 in IMRT is 34.0cc whilst it is 7.5cc in HDR brachytherapy. With the graphic optimization tool in HDR brachytherapy planning, the dose to urethra could be kept within 120% of the target dose. Hence it is concluded that HDR brachytherapy may be the choice of treatment for cancer of prostate in the early stage.

  8. Dosimetric analysis and comparison of IMRT and HDR brachytherapy in treatment of localized prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murali V

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Radical radiotherapy is one of the options for the management of prostate cancer. In external beam therapy, 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT are the options for delivery of increased radiation dose, as vital organs are very close to the prostate and a higher dose to these structures leads to an increased toxicity. In brachytherapy, low dose rate brachytherapy with permanent implant of radioactive seeds and high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR with remote after loaders are available. A dosimetric analysis has been made on IMRT and HDR brachytherapy plans. Ten cases from each IMRT and HDR brachytherapy have been taken for the study. The analysis includes comparison of conformity and homogeneity indices, D100, D95, D90, D80, D50, D10 and D5 of the target. For the organs at risk (OAR, namely rectum and bladder, V100, V90 and V50 are compared. In HDR brachytherapy, the doses to 1 cc and 0.1 cc of urethra have also been studied. Since a very high dose surrounds the source, the 300% dose volumes in the target and within the catheters are also studied in two plans, to estimate the actual volume of target receiving dose over 300%. This study shows that the prescribed dose covers 93 and 92% of the target volume in IMRT and HDR brachytherapy respectively. HDR brachytherapy delivers a much lesser dose to OAR, compared to the IMRT. For rectum, the V50 in IMRT is 34.0cc whilst it is 7.5cc in HDR brachytherapy. With the graphic optimization tool in HDR brachytherapy planning, the dose to urethra could be kept within 120% of the target dose. Hence it is concluded that HDR brachytherapy may be the choice of treatment for cancer of prostate in the early stage.

  9. A dosimetric selectivity intercomparison of HDR brachytherapy, IMRT and helical tomotherapy in prostate cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermesse, Johanne; Biver, Sylvie; Jansen, Nicolas; Coucke, Philippe [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Liege Univ. Hospital (Belgium); Lenaerts, Eric [Dept. of Medical Physics, Liege Univ. Hospital (Belgium); De Patoul, Nathalie; Vynckier, Stefaan [Dept. of Medical Physics, St Luc Univ. Hospital, Brussels (Belgium); Scalliet, Pierre [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, St Luc Univ. Hospital, Brussels (Belgium); Nickers, Philippe [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Oscar Lambret Center, Lille (France)

    2009-11-15

    Background and purpose: dose escalation in order to improve the biochemical control in prostate cancer requires the application of irradiation techniques with high conformality. The dosimetric selectivity of three radiation modalities is compared: high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT), intensity-modulated radiation radiotherapy (IMRT), and helical tomotherapy (HT). Patients and methods: ten patients with prostate adenocarcinoma treated by a 10-Gy HDR-BT boost after external-beam radiotherapy were investigated. For each patient, HDR-BT, IMRT and HT theoretical treatment plans were realized using common contour sets. A 10-Gy dose was prescribed to the planning target volume (PTV). The PTVs and critical organs' dose-volume histograms obtained were compared using Student's t-test. Results: HDR-BT delivers spontaneously higher mean doses to the PTV with smaller cold spots compared to IMRT and HT. 33% of the rectal volume received a mean HDR-BT dose of 3.86 {+-} 0.3 Gy in comparison with a mean IMRT dose of 6.57 {+-} 0.68 Gy and a mean HT dose of 5.58 {+-} 0.71 Gy (p < 0.0001). HDR-BT also enables to better spare the bladder. The hot spots inside the urethra are greater with HDR-BT. The volume of healthy tissue receiving 10% of the prescribed dose is reduced at least by a factor of 8 with HDR-BT (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: HDR-BT offers better conformality in comparison with HT and IMRT and reduces the volume of healthy tissue receiving a low dose. (orig.)

  10. Guest editorial : high dynamic range imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Luís Paulo; Debattista, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    High Dynamic Range (HDR) imagery is a step-change in imaging technology that is not limited to the 8-bits per pixel for each color channel that traditional or low-dynamic range digital images have been constrained to. These restrictions have meant that the current and relatively novel imaging technologies including stereoscopic, HD and ultraHD imaging do not provide an accurate representation of the lighting available in a real world environment. HDR technology has enabled the capture, sto...

  11. Microseismicity and Stimulated Hydrogeologic Structures in HDR/HWR Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niitsuma, H.

    2006-12-01

    Fluid injection to enhance productivity in oil and geothermal reservoir has been widely conducted since 1980's. The fluid injection is also one of the key technologies to create artificial circulation system in Hot Dry Rock (HDR)/ Hot Wet Rock (HWR) geothermal development. It is advantageous for understanding fluid induced faulting to analyze the subsurface response during the fluid injections, because the injection processes are controlled and hydraulic data are recorded. Some of this information can be obtained from well logs such as flow, temperature, pressure, BHTV, FMI, etc. However, they only provide restricted information near the well. Microseismic monitoring is currently the best available method for obtaining three-dimensional information about reservoirs and fracture systems at locations remote from boreholes. The primary problem of the method is its location accuracy. When located with conventional location algorithms, the events are frequently seen to be distributed as a cloud with little macro- or microstructure. It is difficult to meaningfully correlate such images with logging data of existing wells. Therefore, information on detailed reservoir structure, fracture orientation, and hydraulic behavior cannot be obtained from the application of conventional microseismic location techniques. There have been considerable improvements in microseismic mapping technology in these fifteen years. Various techniques to reduce location error have been developed which include collapsing, doublet/multiplet analysis, double-difference method, and multiplet-clustering analysis. These high resolution mapping techniques demonstrate that the diffuse clouds obtained using conventional techniques are largely artefacts of location error, and reveal macro- and microstructures within the cloud that can be correlated with geological and hydraulic structures identified from well logs. These high-resolution seismic mapping techniques have been applied to the microseismic data

  12. Gafchromic film dosimetry of a new HDR  192Ir brachytherapy source

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ayoobian, Navid; Asl, Akbar Sarabi; Poorbaygi, Hosein; Javanshir, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    High‐dose‐rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a popular modality for treating cancers of the prostate, cervix, endometrium, breast, skin, bronchus, esophagus, and head and neck as well as soft‐tissue sarcomas...

  13. Penile cancer brachytherapy HDR mould technique used at the Holycross Cancer Center

    OpenAIRE

    Matys, Robert; Kubicka-Mendak, Iwona; Łyczek, Jarosław; Pawłowski, Piotr; Stawiarska, Iwona; Miedzinska, Joanna; Banatkiewicz, Paweł; Łaskawska-Wiatr, Aldona; Wittych, Justyna

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this pictorial essay is to present the mould based HDR brachytherapy technique used at the Holycross Cancer Center for penile cancer patients. We use images to describe this method step by step.

  14. Penile cancer brachytherapy HDR mould technique used at the Holycross Cancer Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matys, Robert; Kubicka-Mendak, Iwona; Lyczek, Jarosław; Pawłowski, Piotr; Stawiarska, Iwona; Miedzinska, Joanna; Banatkiewicz, Paweł; Laskawska-Wiatr, Aldona; Wittych, Justyna

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this pictorial essay is to present the mould based HDR brachytherapy technique used at the Holycross Cancer Center for penile cancer patients. We use images to describe this method step by step.

  15. HDR Brachytherapy Dose Distribution is Influenced by the Metal Material of the Applicator

    OpenAIRE

    Chin-Hui Wu; Yi-Jen Liao; An-Cheng Shiau; Hsin-Yu Lin; Yen-Wan Hsueh Liu; Shih-Ming Hsu

    2015-01-01

    Applicators containing metal have been widely used in recent years when applying brachytherapy to patients with cervical cancer. However, the high dose rate (HDR) treatment-planning system (TPS) that is currently used in brachytherapy still assumes that the treatment environment constitutes a homogeneous water medium and does not include a dose correction for the metal material of the applicator. The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the HDR 192Ir dose distribution in cervical can...

  16. Study of the workload to be applied in the shielding calculation in HDR brachytherapy facilities with IR-192; Estudio de la carga de trabajo a aplicar en el calculo de blindajes en instalaciones de braquiterapia HDR con IR-192

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pujades-Clamarchirant, M. C.; Perez-Calatayud, J.; Ballester, F.; Gimeno, J.; Granero, D.; Camacho, C.; Carmona, V.; Lliso, F.; Vijande, J.

    2011-07-01

    The design of shielding facilities high rate brachytherapy (HDR) requires an estimate of the workload (w) . The aim of this study was to evaluate the W typical service HDR BT with a high number of applications and their impact on the final thickness the shielding of the room. To do this, a review of patients treated in our center HDR W has been evaluated and studied their impact on the shielding design of the facility.

  17. SU-F-BRA-04: Prostate HDR Brachytherapy with Multichannel Robotic System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph, F Maria; Podder, T [University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States); Yu, Y [Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy is gradually becoming popular in treating patients with prostate cancers. However, placement of the HDR needles at desired locations into the patient is challenging. Application of robotic system may improve the accuracy of the clinical procedure. This experimental study is to evaluate the feasibility of using a multichannel robotic system for prostate HDR brachytherapy. Methods: In this experimental study, the robotic system employed was a 6-DOF Multichannel Image-guided Robotic Assistant for Brachytherapy (MIRAB), which was designed and fabricated for prostate seed implantation. The MIRAB has the provision of rotating 16 needles while inserting them. Ten prostate HDR brachytherapy needles were simultaneously inserted using MIRAB into a commercially available prostate phantom. After inserting the needles into the prostate phantom at desired locations, 2mm thick CT slices were obtained for dosimetric planning. HDR plan was generated using Oncetra planning system with a total prescription dose of 34Gy in 4 fractions. Plan quality was evaluated considering dose coverage to prostate and planning target volume (PTV), with 3mm margin around prostate, as well as the dose limit to the organs at risk (OARs) following the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) guidelines. Results: From the CT scan, it is observed that the needles were inserted straight into the desired locations and they were adequately spaced and distributed for a clinically acceptable HDR plan. Coverage to PTV and prostate were about 91% (V100= 91%) and 96% (V100=96%), respectively. Dose to 1cc of urethra, rectum, and bladder were within the ABS specified limits. Conclusion: The MIRAB was able to insert multiple needles simultaneously into the prostate precisely. By controlling the MIRAB to insert all the ten utilized needles into the prostate phantom, we could achieve the robotic HDR brachytherapy successfully. Further study for assessing the system

  18. Source geometry factors for HDR 192Ir brachytherapy secondary standard well-type ionization chamber calibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipley, D. R.; Sander, T.; Nutbrown, R. F.

    2015-03-01

    Well-type ionization chambers are used for measuring the source strength of radioactive brachytherapy sources before clinical use. Initially, the well chambers are calibrated against a suitable national standard. For high dose rate (HDR) 192Ir, this calibration is usually a two-step process. Firstly, the calibration source is traceably calibrated against an air kerma primary standard in terms of either reference air kerma rate or air kerma strength. The calibrated 192Ir source is then used to calibrate the secondary standard well-type ionization chamber. Calibration laboratories are usually only equipped with one type of HDR 192Ir source. If the clinical source type is different from that used for the calibration of the well chamber at the standards laboratory, a source geometry factor, ksg, is required to correct the calibration coefficient for any change of the well chamber response due to geometric differences between the sources. In this work we present source geometry factors for six different HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources which have been determined using Monte Carlo techniques for a specific ionization chamber, the Standard Imaging HDR 1000 Plus well chamber with a type 70010 HDR iridium source holder. The calculated correction factors were normalized to the old and new type of calibration source used at the National Physical Laboratory. With the old Nucletron microSelectron-v1 (classic) HDR 192Ir calibration source, ksg was found to be in the range 0.983 to 0.999 and with the new Isodose Control HDR 192Ir Flexisource ksg was found to be in the range 0.987 to 1.004 with a relative uncertainty of 0.4% (k = 2). Source geometry factors for different combinations of calibration sources, clinical sources, well chambers and associated source holders, can be calculated with the formalism discussed in this paper.

  19. HDR reservoir flow impedance and potentials for impedance reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DuTeau, R.; Brown, D.

    1993-06-01

    The data from flow tests which employed two different production zones in a well at Fenton Hill indicates the flow impedance of a wellbore zone damaged by rapid depressurization was altered, possibly by pressure spallation, which appears to have mechanically propped the joint apertures of outlet flow paths intersecting the altered wellbore. The rapid depressurization and subsequent flow test data derived from the damaged well has led to the hypothesis that pressure spallation and the resultant mechanical propping of outlet flow paths reduced the outlet flow impedance of the damaged wellbore. Furthermore, transient pressure data shows the largest pressure drop between the injection and production wellheads occurs near the production wellbore, so lowering the outlet impedance by increasing the apertures of outlet flow paths will have the greatest effect on reducing the overall reservoir impedance. Fenton Hill data also reveals that increasing the overall reservoir pressure dilates the apertures of flow paths, which likewise serves to reduce the reservoir impedance. Data suggests that either pressure dilating the wellbore connected joints with high production wellhead pressure, or mechanically propping open the outlet flow paths will increase the near-wellbore permeability. Finally, a new method for calculating and comparing near-wellbore outlet impedances has been developed. Further modeling, experimentation, and engineered reservoir modifications, such as pressure dilation and mechanical propping, hold considerable potential for significantly improving the productivity of HDR reservoirs.

  20. The curvHDR method for gating flow cytometry samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wand Matthew P

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-throughput flow cytometry experiments produce hundreds of large multivariate samples of cellular characteristics. These samples require specialized processing to obtain clinically meaningful measurements. A major component of this processing is a form of cell subsetting known as gating. Manual gating is time-consuming and subjective. Good automatic and semi-automatic gating algorithms are very beneficial to high-throughput flow cytometry. Results We develop a statistical procedure, named curvHDR, for automatic and semi-automatic gating. The method combines the notions of significant high negative curvature regions and highest density regions and has the ability to adapt well to human-perceived gates. The underlying principles apply to dimension of arbitrary size, although we focus on dimensions up to three. Accompanying software, compatible with contemporary flow cytometry infor-matics, is developed. Conclusion The method is seen to adapt well to nuances in the data and, to a reasonable extent, match human perception of useful gates. It offers big savings in human labour when processing high-throughput flow cytometry data whilst retaining a good degree of efficacy.

  1. IMPACT OF TONE MAPPING IN HIGH DYNAMIC RANGE IMAGE COMPRESSION

    OpenAIRE

    Narwaria, Manish; Perreira Da Silva, Matthieu; Le Callet, Patrick; Pépion, Romuald

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Tone mapping or range reduction is often used in High Dynamic Range (HDR) visual signal compression to take advantage of the existing image/video coding architectures. Thus, it is important to study the impact of tone mapping on the visual quality of decompressed HDR visual signals. To our knowledge, most of the existing studies focus only on the quality loss in the resultant low dynamic range (LDR) signal (obtained via tone mapping) and typically employ LDR displays f...

  2. BrachyView, a novel in-body imaging system for HDR prostate brachytherapy: Experimental evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safavi-Naeini, M.; Han, Z.; Alnaghy, S.; Cutajar, D.; Petasecca, M.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Rosenfeld, A. B., E-mail: anatoly@uow.edu.au [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong 2522 (Australia); Franklin, D. R. [Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Technology, Sydney 2007 (Australia); Bucci, J. [St George Hospital Cancer Care Centre, Kogarah 2217 (Australia); Carrara, M. [Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan 20133 (Italy); Zaider, M. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: This paper presents initial experimental results from a prototype of high dose rate (HDR) BrachyView, a novel in-body source tracking system for HDR brachytherapy based on a multipinhole tungsten collimator and a high resolution pixellated silicon detector array. The probe and its associated position estimation algorithms are validated and a comprehensive evaluation of the accuracy of its position estimation capabilities is presented. Methods: The HDR brachytherapy source is moved through a sequence of positions in a prostate phantom, for various displacements in x, y, and z. For each position, multiple image acquisitions are performed, and source positions are reconstructed. Error estimates in each dimension are calculated at each source position and combined to calculate overall positioning errors. Gafchromic film is used to validate the accuracy of source placement within the phantom. Results: More than 90% of evaluated source positions were estimated with an error of less than one millimeter, with the worst-case error being 1.3 mm. Experimental results were in close agreement with previously published Monte Carlo simulation results. Conclusions: The prototype of HDR BrachyView demonstrates a satisfactory level of accuracy in its source position estimation, and additional improvements are achievable with further refinement of HDR BrachyView’s image processing algorithms.

  3. Hardware-based smart camera for recovering high dynamic range video from multiple exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapray, Pierre-Jean; Heyrman, Barthélémy; Ginhac, Dominique

    2014-10-01

    In many applications such as video surveillance or defect detection, the perception of information related to a scene is limited in areas with strong contrasts. The high dynamic range (HDR) capture technique can deal with these limitations. The proposed method has the advantage of automatically selecting multiple exposure times to make outputs more visible than fixed exposure ones. A real-time hardware implementation of the HDR technique that shows more details both in dark and bright areas of a scene is an important line of research. For this purpose, we built a dedicated smart camera that performs both capturing and HDR video processing from three exposures. What is new in our work is shown through the following points: HDR video capture through multiple exposure control, HDR memory management, HDR frame generation, and representation under a hardware context. Our camera achieves a real-time HDR video output at 60 fps at 1.3 megapixels and demonstrates the efficiency of our technique through an experimental result. Applications of this HDR smart camera include the movie industry, the mass-consumer market, military, automotive industry, and surveillance.

  4. SU-D-19A-07: Dosimetric Comparison of HDR Plesiotherapy and Electron Beam Therapy for Superficial Lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, A; Jacob, D; Andreou, K; Raben, A; Chen, H; Koprowski, C; Mourtada, F [Christiana Care Hospital, Newark, DE (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Large superficial (skin, soft tissue sarcoma) lesions located on curved areas are hard to treat with electrons. The Freiburg Flap (Nucletron, Netherlands) is a flexible mesh style surface which can be easily shaped to fit curved surfaces for reproducible HDR fraction delivery. To understand the fundamental dosimetric differences, a dosimetric comparison was made between HDR plesiotherapy (Freiburg applicator for lesions over 4cm) and external electron beam radiotherapy over cases with varying target curvature (both stylized and clinical cases). Methods: Four stylized cases with variable complexity were created using artificial DICOM axial CT slices and RT structures (a square and three curved structures on a 4.5cm radius cylinder). They were planned using Oncentra v4.3 and exported to Pinnacle v9.6 for electrons planning. The HDR source dwell positions were optimized for the best coverage of the targets using graphical optimization. Electron treatment plans were created in Pinnacle using the same CT and RT structures of three HDR cases with surface lesions previously treated with the Freiburg flap. The En face electron plans used 6-12 MeV electrons and 0.5–1 cm bolus was added to increase surface dose. The electron plans were prescribed to an isodose line to conform to the target. Results: For all lesions, the average target dose coverage was similar (D90ave of 100% for HDR vs 101% for electrons). For lesions with high curvature, the HDR coverage was better (D90 102% vs D90 97% for electron). For all cases, adjacent structures high dose region was lower for HDR than electrons (D1cc 100% for HDR vs D1cc 111% for electrons). Conclusion: HDR plesiotherapy offers excellent target conformity for superficial targets similar to electrons. However, for lesions with complex curved surfaces, HDR has the advantage to achieve better dose distributions using graphical optimization to spare adjacent normal tissue while maximizing target coverage.

  5. Trans-Pacific HDR Satellite Communications Experiment Phase-2 Project Plan and Experimental Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Eddie; Kadowaki, Naoto; Yoshimura, Naoko; Takahashi, Takashi; Yoshikawa, Makoto; Bergman, Larry; Bhasin, Kul

    2000-01-01

    The trans-Pacific high data rate (TP-HDR) satellite communications experiment was proposed at the Japan-U.S. Cooperation in Space (JUCS) Program Workshop held in Hawaii in 1993 and remote high definition video post-production was demonstrated as the first phase trial. ATM-based 45 Mbps trans-Pacific link was established in the first phase, and the following experiments with 155 Mbps was planned as the phase 2. This paper describes the experimental network configuration and project plan of TP-HDR experiment phase 2. Additional information is provided in the original.

  6. Oxidative Stress Markers in Prostate Cancer Patients after HDR Brachytherapy Combined with External Beam Radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Alina Woźniak; Rafał Masiak; Michał Szpinda; Celestyna Mila-Kierzenkowska; Bartosz Woźniak; Roman Makarewicz; Anna Szpinda

    2012-01-01

    Assessment of oxidative stress markers was perfomed in prostate cancer (PCa) patients subjected to high-dose brachytherapy (HDR) with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Sixty men with PCa were subjected to combined two-fraction treatment with HDR (tot. 20 Gy) and EBRT (46 Gy). Blood samples were taken before treatment, immediately afterwards, after 1.5–3 months, and approx. 2 years. Control group consisted of 30 healthy men. Erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase activity in the patients was lowe...

  7. Management of a HDR brachytherapy system in the Hospital Juarez of Mexico; Gestion de un sistema de braquiterapia HDR een el Hospital Juarez de Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano F, A.G.; Ramirez R, G.; Gil G, R. [Hospital Juarez de Mexico, Av. l.P.N. 5160, Col. Magdalena de las Salinas, 07760 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Azorin N, J. [UAM-I, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Rivera M, T. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Unidad Legaria del IPN, Av. Legaria 694, Col. Irrigacion, 11500 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    Full text: In the Hospital Juarez of Mexico, it is carried out a project to implement a Brachytherapy system with high dose rate (HDR) through a Management quality program. In our work center this treatment modality in patients with cervicouterine cancer is used (CaCu), and constantly it is necessary to carry out improvements in the procedures, with the purpose of optimizing them and in consequence to complete the principles of the Radiological Protection, guaranteeing this way, an attention with the quality and safety, such that allow to diminish the risks to the patients and to assure that the received dose in critical organs it finds inside the permitted therapeutic limits, without commit the radiosensitive response of healthy organs. In this work an analysis of the implementation of this system is presented, detailing the procedures so much in the technological infrastructure like human and indicating the necessary technical and operative requirements to reach an adequate practice in HDR brachytherapy. (Author)

  8. External radiation and HDR-brachytherapy in the treatment of breast cancer. Externe Bestrahlung und interstitielle HDR-Brachytherapie in der Bestrahlung des Mammakarzinoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Track, C. (Abt. fuer Radioonkologie, Krankenhaus der Barmherzigen Schwestern, Linz (Austria)); Seewald, D.H. (Abt. fuer Radioonkologie, Krankenhaus der Barmherzigen Schwestern, Linz (Austria)); Zoidl, J.P. (Abt. fuer Radioonkologie, Krankenhaus der Barmherzigen Schwestern, Linz (Austria)); Hammer, J. (Abt. fuer Radioonkologie, Krankenhaus der Barmherzigen Schwestern, Linz (Austria))

    1994-04-01

    In the breast conserving management of mammary cancer a high-dose-rate (HDR)-Iridium-192 source is used for interstitial boosting of the primary tumor site after external radiotherapy. We want to show the clinical results and side effects and to demonstrate the safe use of a HDR source. From December 1984 until November 1988, 154 patients with breast cancer stage T1-2, N0-1 were treated by conservative surgery and radiation. A dose of 45 to 50 Gy was given to the whole breast by external radiotherapy, and the previous tumor area was boosted by an interstitial implant with Iridium-192 HDR. We applied 10 Gy in one or two fractions. The mean follow-up period of survivors is 76 months (range 57 to 107 months). In 36 patients failures occured: eight patients (5%) developed local recurrences, 31 patients (20%) had distant metastases, and 19 (12%) died with cancer. The Kaplan-Meier estimation for five year overall survival is 86.9%, for disease-specific survival 89.3%, for local control 95.8%, and for disease free survival 80.1%. The most frequent late effects were telangiectasia (11%), fibrotic masses in the previous tumor area (6.5%), and lymphedema of the arm (6.5%). No serious complications could be observed. (orig./MG)

  9. Does HDR Pre-Processing Improve the Accuracy of 3D Models Obtained by Means of two Conventional SfM-MVS Software Packages? The Case of the Corral del Veleta Rock Glacier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro Gómez-Gutiérrez

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The accuracy of different workflows using Structure-from-Motion and Multi-View-Stereo techniques (SfM-MVS is tested. Twelve point clouds of the Corral del Veleta rock glacier, in Spain, were produced with two different software packages (123D Catch and Agisoft Photoscan, using Low Dynamic Range images and High Dynamic Range compositions (HDR for three different years (2011, 2012 and 2014. The accuracy of the resulting point clouds was assessed using benchmark models acquired every year with a Terrestrial Laser Scanner. Three parameters were used to estimate the accuracy of each point cloud: the RMSE, the Cloud-to-Cloud distance (C2C and the Multiscale-Model-to-Model comparison (M3C2. The M3C2 mean error ranged from 0.084 m (standard deviation of 0.403 m to 1.451 m (standard deviation of 1.625 m. Agisoft Photoscan overcome 123D Catch, producing more accurate and denser point clouds in 11 out 12 cases, being this work, the first available comparison between both software packages in the literature. No significant improvement was observed using HDR pre-processing. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the geometrical accuracy of 3D models obtained using LDR and HDR compositions are compared. These findings may be of interest for researchers who wish to estimate geomorphic changes using SfM-MVS approaches.

  10. Cortical depth-dependent temporal dynamics of the BOLD response in the human brain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Siero, Jeroen CW; Petridou, Natalia; Hoogduin, Hans; Luijten, Peter R; Ramsey, Nick F

    2011-01-01

    .... In this study, we characterize the temporal dynamics of the hemodynamic response (HDR) across cortical depth in the human primary motor and visual cortex, at 7T and using very short stimuli and with high spatial and temporal resolution...

  11. Calibration of well-type chambers in Brazil using {sup 192}Ir HDR sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Carlos Frederico Estrada; Pires, Evandro Jesus; David, Mariano Gazineu; Almeida, Carlos Eduardo de, E-mail: cfealves@gmail.com, E-mail: evjpires@gmail.com, E-mail: marianogd08@gmail.com, E-mail: cea71@yahoo.com.br [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ/LCR), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Ciencias Radiologicas; Di Prinzio, Renato, E-mail: rprinzio@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    The results obtained by performing of a traceable calibration service for well-type reentrant ionization chamber for HDR 192Ir sources used in brachytherapy physical procedures at the Laboratorio de Ciencias Radiologicas from Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro -LCR/UERJ are described. (author)

  12. An automated optimization tool for high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy with divergent needle pattern

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borot, Maxence; Maenhout, M.; de Senneville, B. Denis; Hautvast, G.; Binnekamp, D.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; van Vulpen, M.; Moerland, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Focal high-dose-rate (HDR) for prostate cancer has gained increasing interest as an alternative to whole gland therapy as it may contribute to the reduction of treatment related toxicity. For focal treatment, optimal needle guidance and placement is warranted. This can be achieved under MR guidance.

  13. A gEUD-based inverse planning technique for HDR prostate brachytherapy: Feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giantsoudi, D. [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of Texas Health Sciences Center, San Antonio, Texas 78229 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Baltas, D. [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Strahlenklinik, Klinikum Offenbach GmbH, 63069 Offenbach (Germany); Nuclear and Particle Physics Section, Physics Department, University of Athens, 15701 Athens (Greece); Karabis, A. [Pi-Medical Ltd., Athens 10676 (Greece); Mavroidis, P. [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of Texas Health Sciences Center, San Antonio, Texas 78299 and Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, 17176 (Sweden); Zamboglou, N.; Tselis, N. [Strahlenklinik, Klinikum Offenbach GmbH, 63069 Offenbach (Germany); Shi, C. [St. Vincent' s Medical Center, 2800 Main Street, Bridgeport, Connecticut 06606 (United States); Papanikolaou, N. [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of Texas Health Sciences Center, San Antonio, Texas 78299 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to study the feasibility of a new inverse planning technique based on the generalized equivalent uniform dose for image-guided high dose rate (HDR) prostate cancer brachytherapy in comparison to conventional dose-volume based optimization. Methods: The quality of 12 clinical HDR brachytherapy implants for prostate utilizing HIPO (Hybrid Inverse Planning Optimization) is compared with alternative plans, which were produced through inverse planning using the generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD). All the common dose-volume indices for the prostate and the organs at risk were considered together with radiobiological measures. The clinical effectiveness of the different dose distributions was investigated by comparing dose volume histogram and gEUD evaluators. Results: Our results demonstrate the feasibility of gEUD-based inverse planning in HDR brachytherapy implants for prostate. A statistically significant decrease in D{sub 10} or/and final gEUD values for the organs at risk (urethra, bladder, and rectum) was found while improving dose homogeneity or dose conformity of the target volume. Conclusions: Following the promising results of gEUD-based optimization in intensity modulated radiation therapy treatment optimization, as reported in the literature, the implementation of a similar model in HDR brachytherapy treatment plan optimization is suggested by this study. The potential of improved sparing of organs at risk was shown for various gEUD-based optimization parameter protocols, which indicates the ability of this method to adapt to the user's preferences.

  14. Dwell time modulation restrictions do not necessarily improve treatment plan quality for prostate HDR brachytherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balvert, M.; Gorissen, B.L.; den Hertog, D.; Hoffmann, A.L.

    2015-01-01

    Inverse planning algorithms for dwell time optimisation in interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy may produce solutions with large dwell time variations within catheters, which may result in undesirable selective high-dose subvolumes. Extending the dwell time optimisation model with a dwell

  15. Photometric and Colorimeric Comparison of HDR and Spctrally Resolved Rendering Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amdemeskel, Mekbib Wubishet; Soreze, Thierry Silvio Claude; Thorseth, Anders

    2016-01-01

    used a scene similar to the cornel box (CUPCG, 1998) but with a spectrally controllable LED light source, neutral grey walls and a colour checker board for colorimetric assessments. The luminance value and colour information of the HDR camera and rendering images are used for the comparison...

  16. SU-E-T-574: Fessiblity of Using the Calypso System for HDR Interstitial Catheter Reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, J S; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: It is always a challenge to reconstruct the interstitial catheter for high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy on patient CT or MR images. This work aims to investigate the feasibility of using the Calypso system (Varian Medical, CA) for HDR catheter reconstruction utilizing its accuracy on tracking the electromagnetic transponder location. Methods: Experiment was done with a phantom that has a HDR interstitial catheter embedded inside. CT scan with a slice thickness of 1.25 mm was taken for this phantom with two Calypso beacon transponders in the catheter. The two transponders were connected with a wire. The Calypso system was used to record the beacon transponders’ location in real time when they were gently pulled out with the wire. The initial locations of the beacon transponders were used for registration with the CT image and the detected transponder locations were used for the catheter path reconstruction. The reconstructed catheter path was validated on the CT image. Results: The HDR interstitial catheter was successfully reconstructed based on the transponders’ coordinates recorded by the Calypso system in real time when the transponders were pulled in the catheter. After registration with the CT image, the shape and location of the reconstructed catheter are evaluated against the CT image and the result shows an accuracy of 2 mm anywhere in the Calypso detectable region which is within a 10 cm X 10 cm X 10 cm cubic box for the current system. Conclusion: It is feasible to use the Calypso system for HDR interstitial catheter reconstruction. The obstacle for its clinical usage is the size of the beacon transponder whose diameter is bigger than most of the interstitial catheters used in clinic. Developing smaller transponders and supporting software and hardware for this application is necessary before it can be adopted for clinical use.

  17. 3D workflow for HDR image capture of projection systems and objects for CAVE virtual environments authoring with wireless touch-sensitive devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prusten, Mark J.; McIntyre, Michelle; Landis, Marvin

    2006-02-01

    A 3D workflow pipeline is presented for High Dynamic Range (HDR) image capture of projected scenes or objects for presentation in CAVE virtual environments. The methods of HDR digital photography of environments vs. objects are reviewed. Samples of both types of virtual authoring being the actual CAVE environment and a sculpture are shown. A series of software tools are incorporated into a pipeline called CAVEPIPE, allowing for high-resolution objects and scenes to be composited together in natural illumination environments [1] and presented in our CAVE virtual reality environment. We also present a way to enhance the user interface for CAVE environments. The traditional methods of controlling the navigation through virtual environments include: glove, HUD's and 3D mouse devices. By integrating a wireless network that includes both WiFi (IEEE 802.11b/g) and Bluetooth (IEEE 802.15.1) protocols the non-graphical input control device can be eliminated. Therefore wireless devices can be added that would include: PDA's, Smart Phones, TabletPC's, Portable Gaming consoles, and PocketPC's.

  18. Evaluation of the Kerma at the entrance of the labyrin thin in facilities with Co-60 HDR brachytherapy; Evaluacion del Kerma en la entrada del laberinto en instalaciones de braquiterapia de HDR con Co-60

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pujades, M. C.; Granero, D.; Ballester, F.; Perez-Calatayud, J.; Vijande, J.

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the kerma's collision at the entrance of the labyrinth adapting the methodology of the NCRP-151 to a bunker of brachytherapy with Co-60, similar to the one carried out in a previous work with HDR Ir-192. To validate the result is simulated using techniques Monte Carlo (MC) two typical designs of HDR with Co-60 bunker. (Author)

  19. Evaluation of High Dynamic Range Photography as a Luminance Mapping Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inanici, Mehlika; Galvin, Jim

    2004-12-30

    The potential, limitations, and applicability of the High Dynamic Range (HDR) photography technique is evaluated as a luminance mapping tool. Multiple exposure photographs of static scenes are taken with a Nikon 5400 digital camera to capture the wide luminance variation within the scenes. The camera response function is computationally derived using the Photosphere software, and is used to fuse the multiple photographs into HDR images. The vignetting effect and point spread function of the camera and lens system is determined. Laboratory and field studies have shown that the pixel values in the HDR photographs can correspond to the physical quantity of luminance with reasonable precision and repeatability.

  20. The Oryza sativa Regulator HDR1 Associates with the Kinase OsK4 to Control Photoperiodic Flowering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuehui Sun

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Rice is a facultative short-day plant (SDP, and the regulatory pathways for flowering time are conserved, but functionally modified, in Arabidopsis and rice. Heading date 1 (Hd1, an ortholog of Arabidopsis CONSTANS (CO, is a key regulator that suppresses flowering under long-day conditions (LDs, but promotes flowering under short-day conditions (SDs by influencing the expression of the florigen gene Heading date 3a (Hd3a. Another key regulator, Early heading date 1 (Ehd1, is an evolutionarily unique gene with no orthologs in Arabidopsis, which acts as a flowering activator under both SD and LD by promoting the rice florigen genes Hd3a and RICE FLOWERING LOCUST 1 (RFT1. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of the flowering regulator Heading Date Repressor1 (HDR1 in rice. The hdr1 mutant exhibits an early flowering phenotype under natural LD in a paddy field in Beijing, China (39°54'N, 116°23'E, as well as under LD but not SD in a growth chamber, indicating that HDR1 may functionally regulate flowering time via the photoperiod-dependent pathway. HDR1 encodes a nuclear protein that is most active in leaves and floral organs and exhibits a typical diurnal expression pattern. We determined that HDR1 is a novel suppressor of flowering that upregulates Hd1 and downregulates Ehd1, leading to the downregulation of Hd3a and RFT1 under LDs. We have further identified an HDR1-interacting kinase, OsK4, another suppressor of rice flowering under LDs. OsK4 acts similarly to HDR1, suppressing flowering by upregulating Hd1 and downregulating Ehd1 under LDs, and OsK4 can phosphorylate HD1 with HDR1 presents. These results collectively reveal the transcriptional regulators of Hd1 for the day-length-dependent control of flowering time in rice.

  1. The Oryza sativa Regulator HDR1 Associates with the Kinase OsK4 to Control Photoperiodic Flowering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xuehui; Zhang, Zhiguo; Wu, Jinxia; Cui, Xuean; Feng, Dan; Wang, Kai; Xu, Ming; Zhou, Li; Han, Xiao; Gu, Xiaofeng; Lu, Tiegang

    2016-03-01

    Rice is a facultative short-day plant (SDP), and the regulatory pathways for flowering time are conserved, but functionally modified, in Arabidopsis and rice. Heading date 1 (Hd1), an ortholog of Arabidopsis CONSTANS (CO), is a key regulator that suppresses flowering under long-day conditions (LDs), but promotes flowering under short-day conditions (SDs) by influencing the expression of the florigen gene Heading date 3a (Hd3a). Another key regulator, Early heading date 1 (Ehd1), is an evolutionarily unique gene with no orthologs in Arabidopsis, which acts as a flowering activator under both SD and LD by promoting the rice florigen genes Hd3a and RICE FLOWERING LOCUST 1 (RFT1). Here, we report the isolation and characterization of the flowering regulator Heading Date Repressor1 (HDR1) in rice. The hdr1 mutant exhibits an early flowering phenotype under natural LD in a paddy field in Beijing, China (39°54'N, 116°23'E), as well as under LD but not SD in a growth chamber, indicating that HDR1 may functionally regulate flowering time via the photoperiod-dependent pathway. HDR1 encodes a nuclear protein that is most active in leaves and floral organs and exhibits a typical diurnal expression pattern. We determined that HDR1 is a novel suppressor of flowering that upregulates Hd1 and downregulates Ehd1, leading to the downregulation of Hd3a and RFT1 under LDs. We have further identified an HDR1-interacting kinase, OsK4, another suppressor of rice flowering under LDs. OsK4 acts similarly to HDR1, suppressing flowering by upregulating Hd1 and downregulating Ehd1 under LDs, and OsK4 can phosphorylate HD1 with HDR1 presents. These results collectively reveal the transcriptional regulators of Hd1 for the day-length-dependent control of flowering time in rice.

  2. Dosimetry in HDR brachytherapy with Fricke-gel layers and Fricke-gel catheters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambarini, G; Carrara, M; Negri, A; Invernizzi, M; Tenconi, C; Scotti, A; Pirola, L; Borroni, M; Tomatis, S; Fallai, C, E-mail: grazia.gambarini@mi.infn.i

    2010-11-01

    Fricke-gel layer dosimeters (FGLD) and Fricke gel dosimetric catheters (FGDC) have been designed and tested with the aim of enquiring their suitability for HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source control and for in-vivo dose verification during treatment. Anisotropy function measurements have been carried out with FGLDs in which a thin plastic tube has been placed in for the {sup 192}Ir source insertion. FGDCs are constituted by plastic tubes (3 mm of external diameter and 13 cm of length) filled with the dosimeter-gel. Absorbed dose images and profiles were attained by means of optical analysis. Dedicated software has been developed both for achieving anisotropy function values and for obtaining reliable results in visible light absorbance measurements across the thin cylindrical dosimeters. Preparation and analysis procedures have been optimised. The results confirm that the proposed methods are very promising for HDR brachytherapy dosimetry.

  3. Dosimetric equivalence of non-standard high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy catheter patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Cunha, J Adam M; Pouliot, Jean

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether alternative HDR prostate brachytherapy catheter patterns can result in improved dose distributions while providing better access and reducing trauma. Methods: Prostate HDR brachytherapy uses a grid of parallel needle positions to guide the catheter insertion. This geometry does not easily allow the physician to avoid piercing the critical structures near the penile bulb nor does it provide position flexibility in the case of pubic arch interference. On CT data from ten previously-treated patients new catheters were digitized following three catheter patterns: conical, bi-conical, and fireworks. The conical patterns were used to accommodate a robotic delivery using a single entry point. The bi-conical and fireworks patterns were specifically designed to avoid the critical structures near the penile bulb. For each catheter distribution, a plan was optimized with the inverse planning algorithm, IPSA, and compared with the plan used for treatment. Irrelevant of catheter geometry, a p...

  4. Dwell position inaccuracy in the Varian GammaMed HDR ring applicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Robin L; Liu, Tianxiao

    2010-09-07

    Varian has issued two Product Notification Letters warning of known inaccuracies in dwell positions for their GammaMed HDR ring applicator. This inaccuracy was measured for two sets of applicators. Autoexposed radiographs were taken of the HDR source at different dwell positions and analyzed per Varian recommendations using tools within the BrachyVision treatment planning program. Comparison between programmed and actual dwell positions showed the actual positions shifted distally by an average of 0.34 cm (0.17 cm-0.59 cm) across all positions in all rings. A correction method was developed and tested. During planning, the tip of the ring was extrapolated distally beyond its actual position in the patient image set and a proximal offset of the same distance was applied to the dwell positions. A global shift of 0.3 mm corrected all but the most proximal actual dwell position to within +2 mm of the planned position.

  5. Quality control for cervical cancer treatments on Hdr brachytherapy with Ir-192

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarino B, G.; Cogollo P, R.; Paez M, M., E-mail: lvarinog@hotmail.com [Universidad de Cordoba, Physics and Electronics Department, Carrera 6 No. 76-103, Monteria, Cordoba (Colombia)

    2013-10-01

    This work, developed at the National Cancer Institute in partnership with Universidad Nacional de Colombia located in Bogota, Colombia, presents the results of simulations of cervical cancer treatments, on Hdr brachytherapy with Ir-192, using as a physical simulator a natural female pelvis bone with soft tissue elaborated with the experimental material JJT. The doses were measured experimentally, prior to dosimetric characterization, with crystal thermoluminescence 100 LiF: Mg, Ti, located in the organs at risk: rectum and bladder. On the other hand, these treatments were planned and calculated theoretically by the system Micro-Selectron Hdr, with Plato brachytherapy software V 14.1 from the Netherlands Nucletron, and doses obtained in the same organs were compared with experimental results using dosimeters. The comparison of these results shows the correlation degree between the planning of dosimetric treatments and the experimental results, making the process in a form of quality control in vivo, of this type of procedure. (Author)

  6. Dosimetric study of surface applicators of HDR brachytherapy GammaMed Plus equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes-Rivera, E., E-mail: eric-1985@fisica.ugto.mx, E-mail: modesto@fisica.ugto.mx, E-mail: uvaldoreyes@fisica.ugto.mx; Sosa, M., E-mail: eric-1985@fisica.ugto.mx, E-mail: modesto@fisica.ugto.mx, E-mail: uvaldoreyes@fisica.ugto.mx; Reyes, U., E-mail: eric-1985@fisica.ugto.mx, E-mail: modesto@fisica.ugto.mx, E-mail: uvaldoreyes@fisica.ugto.mx; Jesús Bernal-Alvarado, José de, E-mail: bernal@fisica.ugto.mx, E-mail: theo@fisica.ugto.mx, E-mail: gil@fisica.ugto.mx; Córdova, T., E-mail: bernal@fisica.ugto.mx, E-mail: theo@fisica.ugto.mx, E-mail: gil@fisica.ugto.mx; Gil-Villegas, A., E-mail: bernal@fisica.ugto.mx, E-mail: theo@fisica.ugto.mx, E-mail: gil@fisica.ugto.mx [División de Ciencias e Ingenierías, Universidad de Guanajuato, 37150 León, Gto. (Mexico); Monzón, E., E-mail: emonzon@imss.gob.mx [Unidad de Alta Especialidad No.1, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Léon, Gto. (Mexico)

    2014-11-07

    The cone type surface applicators used in HDR brachytherapy for treatment of small skin lesions are an alternative to be used with both electron beams and orthovoltage X-ray equipment. For a good treatment planning is necessary to know the dose distribution of these applicators, which can be obtained by experimental measurement and Monte Carlo simulation as well. In this study the dose distribution of surface applicators of 3 and 3.5 cm diameter, respectively of HDR brachytherapy GammaMed Plus equipment has been estimated using the Monte Carlo method, MCNP code. The applicators simulated were placed on the surface of a water phantom of 20 × 20 × 20 cm and the dose was calculated at depths from 0 to 3 cm with increments of 0.25 mm. The dose profiles obtained at depth show the expected gradients for surface therapy.

  7. Monte Carlo derivation of AAPM TG-43 dosimetric parameters for GZP6 Co-60 HDR sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabrizi, Sanaz Hariri; Asl, Alireza Kamali; Azma, Zohreh

    2012-04-01

    Cobalt 60 source is generally available on high dose rate (HDR) afterloading equipment especially for treatment of gynecological lesions. The GZP6 remote afterloader (Nuclear Power Institute of China) utilizes (60)Co sources for treatment of intracavitary and intraluminal malignancies. In this study, the AAPM TG-43 dosimetric parameters of three sources in GZP6 system have been studied using MCNP4C Monte Carlo (MC) code; and the results are compared with other available (60)Co HDR sources. The presented parameters consist of air kerma strength, dose rate constant, radial dose function and anisotropy function. They show less than 1% uncertainty. The TG-43 based dosimetry data can be used not only to validate the dedicated treatment planning software (TPS), but also to introduce new complementary software to enhance the system performance in gynecological treatments.

  8. Introducing a Public Stereoscopic 3D High Dynamic Range (SHDR) Video Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banitalebi-Dehkordi, Amin

    2017-03-01

    High dynamic range (HDR) displays and cameras are paving their ways through the consumer market at a rapid growth rate. Thanks to TV and camera manufacturers, HDR systems are now becoming available commercially to end users. This is taking place only a few years after the blooming of 3D video technologies. MPEG/ITU are also actively working towards the standardization of these technologies. However, preliminary research efforts in these video technologies are hammered by the lack of sufficient experimental data. In this paper, we introduce a Stereoscopic 3D HDR database of videos that is made publicly available to the research community. We explain the procedure taken to capture, calibrate, and post-process the videos. In addition, we provide insights on potential use-cases, challenges, and research opportunities, implied by the combination of higher dynamic range of the HDR aspect, and depth impression of the 3D aspect.

  9. SU-E-J-270: Study of PET Response to HDR Brachytherapy of Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, R; Le, Y; Armour, E; Efron, J; Azad, N; Wahl, R; Gearhart, S; Herman, J [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Dose-response studies in radiation therapy are typically using single response values for tumors across ensembles of tumors. Using the high dose rate (HDR) treatment plan dose grid and pre- and post-therapy FDG-PET images, we look for correlations between voxelized dose and FDG uptake response in individual tumors. Methods: Fifteen patients were treated for localized rectal cancer using 192Ir HDR brachytherapy in conjunction with surgery. FDG-PET images were acquired before HDR therapy and 6–8 weeks after treatment (prior to surgery). Treatment planning was done on a commercial workstation and the dose grid was calculated. The two PETs and the treatment dose grid were registered to each other using non-rigid registration. The difference in PET SUV values before and after HDR was plotted versus absorbed radiation dose for each voxel. The voxels were then separated into bins for every 400 cGy of absorbed dose and the bin average values plotted similarly. Results: Individual voxel doses did not correlate with PET response; however, when group into tumor subregions corresponding to dose bins, eighty percent of the patients showed a significant positive correlation (R2 > 0) between PET uptake difference in the targeted region and the absorbed dose. Conclusion: By considering larger ensembles of voxels, such as organ average absorbed dose or the dose bins considered here, valuable information may be obtained. The dose-response correlations as measured by FDG-PET difference potentially underlines the importance of FDG-PET as a measure of response, as well as the value of voxelized information.

  10. Pudendal nerve block in HDR-brachytherapy patients: do we really need general or regional anesthesia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenck, Marcus; Schenck, Catarina; Rübben, Herbert; Stuschke, Martin; Schneider, Tim; Eisenhardt, Andreas; Rossi, Roberto

    2013-04-01

    In male patients, the pudendal block was applied only in rare cases as a therapy of neuralgia of the pudendal nerve. We compared pudendal nerve block (NPB) and combined spinal-epidural anesthesia (CSE) in order to perform a pain-free high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy in a former pilot study in 2010. Regarding this background, in the present study, we only performed the bilateral perineal infiltration of the pudendal nerve. In 25 patients (71.8 ± 4.18 years) suffering from a high-risk prostate carcinoma, we performed the HDR-brachytherapy with the NPB. The perioperative compatibility, the subjective feeling (German school marks principle 1-6), subjective pain (VAS 1-10) and the early postoperative course (mobility, complications) were examined. All patients preferred the NPB. There was no change of anesthesia form necessary. The expense time of NPB was 10.68 ± 2.34 min. The hollow needles (mean 24, range 13-27) for the HDR-brachytherapy remained on average 79.92 ± 12.41 min. During and postoperative, pain feeling was between 1.4 ± 1.08 and 1.08 ± 1.00. A transurethral 22 French Foley catheter was left in place for 6 h. All patients felt the bladder catheter as annoying, but they considered postoperative mobility as more important as complete lack of pain. The subjective feeling was described as 2.28 ± 0.74. Any side effects or complications did not appear. Bilateral NPB is a safe and effective analgesic option in HDR-brachytherapy and can replace CSE. It offers the advantage of almost no impaired mobility of the patient and can be performed by the urologist himself. Using transrectal ultrasound guidance, the method can be learned quickly.

  11. Interactive multiobjective optimization for anatomy-based three-dimensional HDR brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruotsalainen, Henri [Department of Physics and Mathematics, University of Eastern Finland, PO Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio (Finland); Miettinen, Kaisa [Department of Mathematical Information Technology, PO Box 35 (Agora), FI-40014 University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Palmgren, Jan-Erik; Lahtinen, Tapani, E-mail: henrimatias.ruotsalainen@gmail.co [Department of Oncology, Kuopio University Hospital, PO Box 1777, FI-70211 Kuopio (Finland)

    2010-08-21

    In this paper, we present an anatomy-based three-dimensional dose optimization approach for HDR brachytherapy using interactive multiobjective optimization (IMOO). In brachytherapy, the goals are to irradiate a tumor without causing damage to healthy tissue. These goals are often conflicting, i.e. when one target is optimized the other will suffer, and the solution is a compromise between them. IMOO is capable of handling multiple and strongly conflicting objectives in a convenient way. With the IMOO approach, a treatment planner's knowledge is used to direct the optimization process. Thus, the weaknesses of widely used optimization techniques (e.g. defining weights, computational burden and trial-and-error planning) can be avoided, planning times can be shortened and the number of solutions to be calculated is small. Further, plan quality can be improved by finding advantageous trade-offs between the solutions. In addition, our approach offers an easy way to navigate among the obtained Pareto optimal solutions (i.e. different treatment plans). When considering a simulation model of clinical 3D HDR brachytherapy, the number of variables is significantly smaller compared to IMRT, for example. Thus, when solving the model, the CPU time is relatively short. This makes it possible to exploit IMOO to solve a 3D HDR brachytherapy optimization problem. To demonstrate the advantages of IMOO, two clinical examples of optimizing a gynecologic cervix cancer treatment plan are presented.

  12. Characterization of HDR Ir-192 source for 3D planning system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonseca, Gabriel P.; Yoriyaz, Helio; Antunes, Paula C.G.; Siqueira, Paulo T.D., E-mail: gabriel.fonseca@usp.b, E-mail: hyoriyaz@ipen.b, E-mail: ptsiquei@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rubo, Rodrigo [Universidade de Sao Paulo (HC/FMUSP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Servico de Radioterapia; Minamisawa, Renato A., E-mail: renato.minamisawa@psi.c [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Ferreira, Louise A. [Universidade Estadual de Maringa (UEM), PR (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina

    2011-07-01

    Brachytherapy treatment involves surgical or cavitary insertion of radioactive sources for diseases treatments, such as: lung, gynecologic or prostate cancer. This technique has great ability to administer high doses to the tumor, with adjacent normal tissue preservation equal or better than external beam radiation therapy. Several innovations have been incorporated in this treatment technique, such as, 3D treatment planning system and computer guided sources. In detriment to scientific advances there are no protocols that relate dose with tumor volume, organs or A point, established by ICRU38 and used to prescribe dose in treatment planning system. Several international studies, like as EMBRACE, the multicentre international study, has been trying to correlate the dose volume using 3D planning systems and medical images, as those obtained by CT or MRI, to establish treatment protocols. With the objective of analyzing the 3D dose distribution, a micro Selectron-HDR remote afterloading device for high dose-rate (HDR) was characterized in the present work. Through the data provided by the manufacturer the source was simulated, using the MCNP5 code to calculate American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group No. 43 report (AAPM TG43) specified parameters. The simulations have shown great agreement when compared to the ONCENTRA planning system results and those provided by literature. The micro Selectron-HDR remote afterloading device will be utilized to simulate 3D dose distribution through CT images processed by an auxiliary software which process DICOM images. (author)

  13. Determination of the Fricke G value for HDR {sup 192}Ir sources using ionometric measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, L.; Coelho, M.; Almeida, C.E. de [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Ciencias Radiologicas; Gavazza, S. [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy using {sup 192}Ir is widely accepted as an important treatment option, and it thus requires an accurate dosimetry standard. However, a dosimetry standard for the direct measurement of absolute dose to water is currently not available. The dose to water conversion is calculated via the dose rate constant {Lambda} and several correction factors accounting for the scatter, attenuation, and anisotropy of the dose distribution, among other effects. Two potentially useful procedures have been reported, including one by Sarfehnia et al. [3,4], which used a water-based calorimeter with an uncertainty of 1.9% for k=1, and a second by Austerlitz et al. and de Almeida et al., which used Fricke dosimetry with estimated uncertainties of 3.9% for k=1 and 1.4% for k=1, respectively. Chemical dosimetry using a standard FeSO{sub 4} solution has shown potential to be a reliable standard of absorbed dose for the HDR {sup 192}Ir source. A major uncertainty is associated with the G values reported by Fregene, which had a numerical value of 1.1 %. However, that reference provided very little detail of the experimental procedures for the {sup 192}Ir source. The G value may be obtained by using a calorimeter or ionometric measurements. In the absence of calorimetric data, this paper makes an attempt to measure the G value for the HDR {sup 192}Ir sources using ionometric measurements and recommendations from dosimetry protocols. (author)

  14. NOTE: Monte Carlo evaluation of kerma in an HDR brachytherapy bunker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Calatayud, J.; Granero, D.; Ballester, F.; Casal, E.; Crispin, V.; Puchades, V.; León, A.; Verdú, G.

    2004-12-01

    In recent years, the use of high dose rate (HDR) after-loader machines has greatly increased due to the shift from traditional Cs-137/Ir-192 low dose rate (LDR) to HDR brachytherapy. The method used to calculate the required concrete and, where appropriate, lead shielding in the door is based on analytical methods provided by documents published by the ICRP, the IAEA and the NCRP. The purpose of this study is to perform a more realistic kerma evaluation at the entrance maze door of an HDR bunker using the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. The Monte Carlo results were validated experimentally. The spectrum at the maze entrance door, obtained with Monte Carlo, has an average energy of about 110 keV, maintaining a similar value along the length of the maze. The comparison of results from the aforementioned values with the Monte Carlo ones shows that results obtained using the albedo coefficient from the ICRP document more closely match those given by the Monte Carlo method, although the maximum value given by MC calculations is 30% greater.

  15. Prostate CT segmentation method based on nonrigid registration in ultrasound-guided CT-based HDR prostate brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaofeng, E-mail: xyang43@emory.edu; Rossi, Peter; Ogunleye, Tomi; Marcus, David M.; Jani, Ashesh B.; Curran, Walter J.; Liu, Tian [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); Mao, Hui [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The technological advances in real-time ultrasound image guidance for high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy have placed this treatment modality at the forefront of innovation in cancer radiotherapy. Prostate HDR treatment often involves placing the HDR catheters (needles) into the prostate gland under the transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guidance, then generating a radiation treatment plan based on CT prostate images, and subsequently delivering high dose of radiation through these catheters. The main challenge for this HDR procedure is to accurately segment the prostate volume in the CT images for the radiation treatment planning. In this study, the authors propose a novel approach that integrates the prostate volume from 3D TRUS images into the treatment planning CT images to provide an accurate prostate delineation for prostate HDR treatment. Methods: The authors’ approach requires acquisition of 3D TRUS prostate images in the operating room right after the HDR catheters are inserted, which takes 1–3 min. These TRUS images are used to create prostate contours. The HDR catheters are reconstructed from the intraoperative TRUS and postoperative CT images, and subsequently used as landmarks for the TRUS–CT image fusion. After TRUS–CT fusion, the TRUS-based prostate volume is deformed to the CT images for treatment planning. This method was first validated with a prostate-phantom study. In addition, a pilot study of ten patients undergoing HDR prostate brachytherapy was conducted to test its clinical feasibility. The accuracy of their approach was assessed through the locations of three implanted fiducial (gold) markers, as well as T2-weighted MR prostate images of patients. Results: For the phantom study, the target registration error (TRE) of gold-markers was 0.41 ± 0.11 mm. For the ten patients, the TRE of gold markers was 1.18 ± 0.26 mm; the prostate volume difference between the authors’ approach and the MRI-based volume was 7.28% ± 0

  16. Prostate CT segmentation method based on nonrigid registration in ultrasound-guided CT-based HDR prostate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Rossi, Peter; Ogunleye, Tomi; Marcus, David M.; Jani, Ashesh B.; Mao, Hui; Curran, Walter J.; Liu, Tian

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The technological advances in real-time ultrasound image guidance for high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy have placed this treatment modality at the forefront of innovation in cancer radiotherapy. Prostate HDR treatment often involves placing the HDR catheters (needles) into the prostate gland under the transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guidance, then generating a radiation treatment plan based on CT prostate images, and subsequently delivering high dose of radiation through these catheters. The main challenge for this HDR procedure is to accurately segment the prostate volume in the CT images for the radiation treatment planning. In this study, the authors propose a novel approach that integrates the prostate volume from 3D TRUS images into the treatment planning CT images to provide an accurate prostate delineation for prostate HDR treatment. Methods: The authors’ approach requires acquisition of 3D TRUS prostate images in the operating room right after the HDR catheters are inserted, which takes 1–3 min. These TRUS images are used to create prostate contours. The HDR catheters are reconstructed from the intraoperative TRUS and postoperative CT images, and subsequently used as landmarks for the TRUS–CT image fusion. After TRUS–CT fusion, the TRUS-based prostate volume is deformed to the CT images for treatment planning. This method was first validated with a prostate-phantom study. In addition, a pilot study of ten patients undergoing HDR prostate brachytherapy was conducted to test its clinical feasibility. The accuracy of their approach was assessed through the locations of three implanted fiducial (gold) markers, as well as T2-weighted MR prostate images of patients. Results: For the phantom study, the target registration error (TRE) of gold-markers was 0.41 ± 0.11 mm. For the ten patients, the TRE of gold markers was 1.18 ± 0.26 mm; the prostate volume difference between the authors’ approach and the MRI-based volume was 7.28% ± 0

  17. Tolerance and efficacy of preoperative intracavitary HDR brachytherapy in IB and IIA cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialas, Brygida; Fijalkowski, Marek; Raczek-Zwierzycka, Katarzyna

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this work is to analyze the efficacy and tolerance of preoperative intracavitary HDR brachytherapy (HDR-BT) in patients with IB and IIA cervical cancer. Material and methods 139 patients with cervical cancer IB-IIA with preoperative HDR-BT, out of which 60 patients with cervical cancer IB (43.2%) and 79 with IIA (56.8%) were treated since 1996 to 2002. In preoperative BT total dose to point A ranged from 30-45 Gy in 6-9 fractions twice a week. The fraction dose was 4-5 Gy at point A. Six weeks after BT all patients underwent radical Wertheim-Meigs hysterectomy. Patients with disadvantageous risk factors or with positive specimen histology had a complementary therapy: external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) given to the whole pelvic volume in daily fractions of 2 Gy up to total dose of 36-52 Gy (20 patients) or EBRT with cisplatin-based chemotherapy with the dose of 30-40 mg/m2 in 5-7 fractions given weekly (7 patients) or chemotherapy (6 patients). Acute and late radiation toxicity was evaluated according to EORTC/RTOG. Results In postoperative specimen histopathology the number of 114 women (82%) had tumor-free specimen within brachytherapy target (in cervix and cavity), 96 women (60.1%) had tumor-free specimen both in and outside brachytherapy target (lymph nodes, parametra, adnexis). The 5-year and 10-year DFS were 93.8% and 88% for IB and 89.7% and 64.7% for IIA respectively. 7.9% of patients developed acute toxicity both in rectum and bladder (only in I and II grade of EORTC/RTOG). Late severe complication occurred in rectum in 2.2% of patients and in bladder 1.4%. Conclusions 1. Preoperative HDR-BT in patients with IB and IIA cervical cancer is an effective and well tolerated therapy with acceptable rate of side effects. 2. Preoperative HDR-BT followed by surgery in a group without risk factors is a sufficient treatment option with no additional adjuvant therapy requirement.

  18. Source geometry factors for HDR ¹⁹²Ir brachytherapy secondary standard well-type ionization chamber calibrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipley, D R; Sander, T; Nutbrown, R F

    2015-03-21

    Well-type ionization chambers are used for measuring the source strength of radioactive brachytherapy sources before clinical use. Initially, the well chambers are calibrated against a suitable national standard. For high dose rate (HDR) (192)Ir, this calibration is usually a two-step process. Firstly, the calibration source is traceably calibrated against an air kerma primary standard in terms of either reference air kerma rate or air kerma strength. The calibrated (192)Ir source is then used to calibrate the secondary standard well-type ionization chamber. Calibration laboratories are usually only equipped with one type of HDR (192)Ir source. If the clinical source type is different from that used for the calibration of the well chamber at the standards laboratory, a source geometry factor, k(sg), is required to correct the calibration coefficient for any change of the well chamber response due to geometric differences between the sources. In this work we present source geometry factors for six different HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy sources which have been determined using Monte Carlo techniques for a specific ionization chamber, the Standard Imaging HDR 1000 Plus well chamber with a type 70010 HDR iridium source holder. The calculated correction factors were normalized to the old and new type of calibration source used at the National Physical Laboratory. With the old Nucletron microSelectron-v1 (classic) HDR (192)Ir calibration source, ksg was found to be in the range 0.983 to 0.999 and with the new Isodose Control HDR (192)Ir Flexisource k(sg) was found to be in the range 0.987 to 1.004 with a relative uncertainty of 0.4% (k = 2). Source geometry factors for different combinations of calibration sources, clinical sources, well chambers and associated source holders, can be calculated with the formalism discussed in this paper.

  19. Automatic Level Control for Video Cameras towards HDR Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de With PeterHN

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We give a comprehensive overview of the complete exposure processing chain for video cameras. For each step of the automatic exposure algorithm we discuss some classical solutions and propose their improvements or give new alternatives. We start by explaining exposure metering methods, describing types of signals that are used as the scene content descriptors as well as means to utilize these descriptors. We also discuss different exposure control types used for the control of lens, integration time of the sensor, and gain control, such as a PID control, precalculated control based on the camera response function, and propose a new recursive control type that matches the underlying image formation model. Then, a description of commonly used serial control strategy for lens, sensor exposure time, and gain is presented, followed by a proposal of a new parallel control solution that integrates well with tone mapping and enhancement part of the image pipeline. Parallel control strategy enables faster and smoother control and facilitates optimally filling the dynamic range of the sensor to improve the SNR and an image contrast, while avoiding signal clipping. This is archived by the proposed special control modes used for better display and correct exposure of both low-dynamic range and high-dynamic range images. To overcome the inherited problems of limited dynamic range of capturing devices we discuss a paradigm of multiple exposure techniques. Using these techniques we can enable a correct rendering of difficult class of high-dynamic range input scenes. However, multiple exposure techniques bring several challenges, especially in the presence of motion and artificial light sources such as fluorescent lights. In particular, false colors and light-flickering problems are described. After briefly discussing some known possible solutions for the motion problem, we focus on solving the fluorescence-light problem. Thereby, we propose an algorithm for

  20. High Dynamic Range Processing for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukerkar, Preeti A.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To minimize feature loss in T1- and T2-weighted MRI by merging multiple MR images acquired at different TR and TE to generate an image with increased dynamic range. Materials and Methods High Dynamic Range (HDR) processing techniques from the field of photography were applied to a series of acquired MR images. Specifically, a method to parameterize the algorithm for MRI data was developed and tested. T1- and T2-weighted images of a number of contrast agent phantoms and a live mouse were acquired with varying TR and TE parameters. The images were computationally merged to produce HDR-MR images. All acquisitions were performed on a 7.05 T Bruker PharmaScan with a multi-echo spin echo pulse sequence. Results HDR-MRI delineated bright and dark features that were either saturated or indistinguishable from background in standard T1- and T2-weighted MRI. The increased dynamic range preserved intensity gradation over a larger range of T1 and T2 in phantoms and revealed more anatomical features in vivo. Conclusions We have developed and tested a method to apply HDR processing to MR images. The increased dynamic range of HDR-MR images as compared to standard T1- and T2-weighted images minimizes feature loss caused by magnetization recovery or low SNR. PMID:24250788

  1. High dynamic range processing for magnetic resonance imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy H Hung

    Full Text Available To minimize feature loss in T1- and T2-weighted MRI by merging multiple MR images acquired at different TR and TE to generate an image with increased dynamic range.High Dynamic Range (HDR processing techniques from the field of photography were applied to a series of acquired MR images. Specifically, a method to parameterize the algorithm for MRI data was developed and tested. T1- and T2-weighted images of a number of contrast agent phantoms and a live mouse were acquired with varying TR and TE parameters. The images were computationally merged to produce HDR-MR images. All acquisitions were performed on a 7.05 T Bruker PharmaScan with a multi-echo spin echo pulse sequence.HDR-MRI delineated bright and dark features that were either saturated or indistinguishable from background in standard T1- and T2-weighted MRI. The increased dynamic range preserved intensity gradation over a larger range of T1 and T2 in phantoms and revealed more anatomical features in vivo.We have developed and tested a method to apply HDR processing to MR images. The increased dynamic range of HDR-MR images as compared to standard T1- and T2-weighted images minimizes feature loss caused by magnetization recovery or low SNR.

  2. Latent evidence detection using a combination of near infrared and high dynamic range photography: an example using bloodstains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanese, John; Montes, Ronald

    2011-11-01

    In this paper, we use bloodstains to illustrate an approach for identifying latent evidence on dark cloth using near infrared (NIR) photography combined with high dynamic range (HDR) photography techniques. NIR photography alone has been used to capture latent evidence that cannot be seen in normal ambient light. HDR techniques combine multiple bracketed photographs of the same image to increase the dynamic range of the photograph which can provide greater contrast. Using NIR photography alone, we were able to detect a bloodstain up to a 1/16 dilution, an improvement over previous studies. Combining NIR photography with the HDR process resulted in a noticeable increase in visibility up to 1/16 dilution when compared to NIR photographs alone. At 1/32 dilution, we were able to detect bloodstains that were not visible using NIR alone. NIR is a useful tool for imaging latent evidence, and combining NIR with HDR consistently provides better results over NIR alone.

  3. A study on room design and radiation safety around room for Co-60 after loading HDR brachytherapy unit converted from room for Ir-192 after loading HDR brachytherapy unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Om Prakash Gurjar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Use of Co-60 source in place of Ir-192 in high dose rate brachytherapy unit (HDR unit has come for discussion in recent publications. Co-60 based system has been advocated for centers which have fewer brachytherapy procedures as it has comparative economically and administrative advantage. This study has direct practical application for such institutions, which are at the cusp of moving from Ir-192 to Co-60 based brachytherapy. Aims: Conversion of Ir-192 HDR room to Co-60 HDR room and to analyze radiation safety around the room. Materials and Methods: Uniform thickness of 15 cm concrete was added to all walls (except one wall adjoining to linear accelerator bunker to convert existing room forIr-192 HDR unit to suitable room for Co-60 HDR unit. Radiation survey around room was done. Actual and calculated wall thicknesses were compared. Results: Radiation survey data indicates that modified room is suitable for Co-60 HDR unit and all values are in full conformity to annual dose limits mentioned in Safety Code for Radiation Therapy Sources (SCRTS, Atomic Energy Regulatory Body (AERB; the regulatory body in India. Also, modified wall thicknesses are appropriate for annual design dose limits mentioned in Safety Report Series No. 47 of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA. However, console wall thickness (0.45 m is less than the calculated thickness (0.53 m for instantaneous dose rate (IDR design dose limit (7.5 ΅Sv/h as perabove safety report of IAEA. Conclusions: The modified wall thicknesses are appropriate for annual design dose limits. However, console wall thickness is less than the required thickness for IDR design dose limit. It has been suggested to add 2.64 cm steel on console wall. It has been found that design dose limits should be considered while making room layout plan and regulatory body should add these constraints inSCRTS.

  4. Overexpression and Suppression of Artemisia annua 4-Hydroxy-3-Methylbut-2-enyl Diphosphate Reductase 1 Gene (AaHDR1) Differentially Regulate Artemisinin and Terpenoid Biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dongming; Li, Gui; Zhu, Yue; Xie, De-Yu

    2017-01-01

    4-Hydroxy-3-methylbut-2-enyl diphosphate reductase (HDR) catalyzes the last step of the 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4- phosphate (MEP) pathway to synthesize isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). To date, little is known regarding effects of an increase or a decrease of a HDR expression on terpenoid and other metabolite profiles in plants. In our study, an Artemisia annua HDR cDNA (namely AaHDR1) was cloned from leaves. Expression profiling showed that it was highly expressed in leaves, roots, stems, and flowers with different levels. Green florescence protein fusion and confocal microscope analyses showed that AaHDR1 was localized in chloroplasts. The overexpression of AaHDR1 increased contents of artemisinin, arteannuin B and other sesquiterpenes, and multiple monoterpenes. By contrast, the suppression of AaHDR1 by anti-sense led to opposite results. In addition, an untargeted metabolic profiling showed that the overexpression and suppression altered non-polar metabolite profiles. In conclusion, the overexpression and suppression of AaHDR1 protein level in plastids differentially affect artemisinin and other terpenoid biosynthesis, and alter non-polar metabolite profiles of A. annua. Particularly, its overexpression leading to the increase of artemisinin production is informative to future metabolic engineering of this antimalarial medicine. PMID:28197158

  5. High dynamic range imaging sensors and architectures

    CERN Document Server

    Darmont, Arnaud

    2013-01-01

    Illumination is a crucial element in many applications, matching the luminance of the scene with the operational range of a camera. When luminance cannot be adequately controlled, a high dynamic range (HDR) imaging system may be necessary. These systems are being increasingly used in automotive on-board systems, road traffic monitoring, and other industrial, security, and military applications. This book provides readers with an intermediate discussion of HDR image sensors and techniques for industrial and non-industrial applications. It describes various sensor and pixel architectures capable

  6. Interactive Augmentation of Live Images using a HDR Stereo Camera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Anhenn

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Adding virtual objects to real environments plays an important role in todays computer graphics: Typical examples are virtual furniture in a real room and virtual characters in real movies. For a believable appearance, consistent lighting of the virtual objects is required. We present an augmented reality system that displays virtual objects with consistent illumination and shadows in the image of a simple webcam. We use two high dynamic range video cameras with fisheye lenses permanently recording the environment illumination. A sampling algorithm selects a few bright parts in one of the wide angle images and the corresponding points in the second camera image. The 3D position can then be calculated using epipolar geometry. Finally, the selected point lights are used in a multi pass algorithm to draw the virtual object with shadows. To validate our approach, we compare the appearance and shadows of the synthetic objects with real objects.

  7. Dosimetry evaluation of SAVI-based HDR brachytherapy for partial breast irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoharan Sivasubramanian

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI with high dose rate (HDR brachytherapy offers an excellent compact course of radiation due to its limited number of fractions for early-stage carcinoma of breast. One of the recent devices is SAVI (strut-adjusted volume implant, which has 6, 8 or 10 peripheral source channels with one center channel. Each channel can be differentially loaded. This paper focuses on the treatment planning, dosimetry and quality assurance aspects of HDR brachytherapy implant with GammaMed Plus HDR afterloader unit. The accelerated PBI balloon devices normally inflate above 35 cc range, and hence these balloon type devices cannot be accommodated in small lumpectomy cavity sizes. CT images were obtained and 3-D dosimetric plans were done with Brachyvision planning system. The 3-D treatment planning and dosimetric data were evaluated with planning target volume (PTV_eval V90, V95, V150, V200 skin dose and minimum distance to skin. With the use of the SAVI 6-1 mini device, we were able to accomplish an excellent coverage - V90, V95, V150 and V200 to 98%, 95%, 37 cc (<50 cc volume and 16 cc (<20 cc volume, respectively. Maximum skin dose was between 73% and 90%, much below the prescribed dose of 34 Gy. The minimum skin distance achieved was 5 to 11 mm. The volume that received 50% of the prescribed radiation dose was found to be lower with SAVI. The multi-channel SAVI-based implants reduced the maximum skin dose to markedly lower levels as compared to other modalities, simultaneously achieving best dose coverage to target volume. Differential-source dwell-loading allows modulation of the radiation dose distribution in symmetric or asymmetric opening of the catheter shapes and is also advantageous in cavities close to chest wall.

  8. European HDR research programme at Soultz-sous-Forets (France) 1987-1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baria, R.; Baumgaertner, J.; Gerard, A. [SOCOMINE, Projet Geothermique, Soultz-sous-Forets (France); Jung, R. [BGR, Hannover (Germany); Garnish, J. [DGXII, European Commission, Brussels (Belgium)

    1999-10-01

    The site at Soultz-sous-Forets (France) has been selected as the future European HDR research site (Garnish, J., Baria, R., Baumgaertner, J., Gerard, A., 1994. GRC Trans. 18, 431-438; Baria, R., 1990. Proceedings of Camborne School of Mines. International HDR Conference, June 1989, p. 613. Robertson Scientific Publications, London). Since 1987, extensive testing of the underground has been carried out using a single well (GPK1), initially to a depth of 2000 m and then to a depth of around 3590 m. From 1995 onwards the testing of the underground has utilized two deep wells. The hydraulic tests carried out in 1993-1994 demonstrated the potential of the site as a future European Scientific Prototype. In particular, the tests showed that in the Rhine graben the fracture network in the basement is well-developed, with a degree of permeability. While some minor fluid movement occurs naturally, hydraulic simulation has been shown to increase substantially the overall transmissivity. The Soultz site has been used for testing a modified or alternative facet of the concept of HDR developed in recent years. The geological setting also offers other advantages in terms of relatively low stimulation pressures, a characteristic that may simplify the task of developing a promising circulation system. A second deep well (GPK2) was drilled late in 1994, with the aim of developing circulation between the two deep wells. In 1995, GPK2 was stimulated for the first time and a short circulation test was attempted between the two deep wells. During 1996, GPK2 was stimulated again using higher flow rates to improve the injectivity further. It is planned to install the necessary infrastructure to carry out, during 1997, a 4-month circulation test at around 25 kg/s, using a downhole pump to produce from GPK2 and reinjecting the produced fluid into GPK1.

  9. SU-E-T-149: Brachytherapy Patient Specific Quality Assurance for a HDR Vaginal Cylinder Case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbiere, J; Napoli, J; Ndlovu, A [Hackensack Univ Medical Center, Hackensack, NJ (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Commonly Ir-192 HDR treatment planning system commissioning is only based on a single absolute measurement of source activity supplemented by tabulated parameters for multiple factors without independent verification that the planned distribution corresponds to the actual delivered dose. The purpose on this work is to present a methodology using Gafchromic film with a statistically valid calibration curve that can be used to validate clinical HDR vaginal cylinder cases by comparing the calculated plan dose distribution in a plane with the corresponding measured planar dose. Methods: A vaginal cylinder plan was created with Oncentra treatment planning system. The 3D dose matrix was exported to a Varian Eclipse work station for convenient extraction of a 2D coronal dose plane corresponding to the film position. The plan was delivered with a sheet of Gafchromic EBT3 film positioned 1mm from the catheter using an Ir-192 Nucletron HDR source. The film was then digitized with an Epson 10000 XL color scanner. Film analysis is performed with MatLab imaging toolbox. A density to dose calibration curve was created using TG43 formalism for a single dwell position exposure at over 100 points for statistical accuracy. The plan and measured film dose planes were registered using a known dwell position relative to four film marks. The plan delivered 500 cGy to points 2 cm from the sources. Results: The distance to agreement of the 500 cGy isodose between the plan and film measurement laterally was 0.5 mm but can be as much as 1.5 mm superior and inferior. The difference between the computed plan dose and film measurement was calculated per pixel. The greatest errors up to 50 cGy are near the apex. Conclusion: The methodology presented will be useful to implement more comprehensive quality assurance to verify patient-specific dose distributions.

  10. SU-E-T-169: Characterization of Pacemaker/ICD Dose in SAVI HDR Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalavagunta, C; Lasio, G; Yi, B; Zhou, J; Lin, M [Univ. of Maryland School Of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: It is important to estimate dose to pacemaker (PM)/Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD) before undertaking Accelerated Partial Breast Treatment using High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Kim et al. have reported HDR PM/ICD dose using a single-source balloon applicator. To the authors knowledge, there have so far not been any published PM/ICD dosimetry literature for the Strut Adjusted Volume Implant (SAVI, Cianna Medical, Aliso Viejo, CA). This study aims to fill this gap by generating a dose look up table (LUT) to predict maximum dose to the PM/ICD in SAVI HDR brachytherapy. Methods: CT scans for 3D dosimetric planning were acquired for four SAVI applicators (6−1-mini, 6−1, 8−1 and 10−1) expanded to their maximum diameter in air. The CT datasets were imported into the Elekta Oncentra TPS for planning and each applicator was digitized in a multiplanar reconstruction window. A dose of 340 cGy was prescribed to the surface of a 1 cm expansion of the SAVI applicator cavity. Cartesian coordinates of the digitized applicator were determined in the treatment leading to the generation of a dose distribution and corresponding distance-dose prediction look up table (LUT) for distances from 2 to 15 cm (6-mini) and 2 to 20 cm (10–1).The deviation between the LUT doses and the dose to the cardiac device in a clinical case was evaluated. Results: Distance-dose look up table were compared to clinical SAVI plan and the discrepancy between the max dose predicted by the LUT and the clinical plan was found to be in the range (−0.44%, 0.74%) of the prescription dose. Conclusion: The distance-dose look up tables for SAVI applicators can be used to estimate the maximum dose to the ICD/PM, with a potential usefulness for quick assessment of dose to the cardiac device prior to applicator placement.

  11. Salvage prostate HDR brachytherapy combined with interstitial hyperthermia for local recurrence after radiation therapy failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukielka, A.M.; Hetnal, M.; Dabrowski, T.; Walasek, T.; Brandys, P.; Reinfuss, M. [Centre of Oncology, M. Sklodowska - Curie Institute, Krakow Branch, Department of Radiotherapy, Krakow (Poland); Nahajowski, D.; Kudzia, R.; Dybek, D. [Centre of Oncology, M. Sklodowska - Curie Institute, Krakow Branch, Department of Medical Physics, Department of Radiotherapy, Krakow (Poland)

    2014-02-15

    The aim of the present retrospective study is to evaluate toxicity and early clinical outcomes of interstitial hyperthermia (IHT) combined with high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy as a salvage treatment in patients with biopsy-confirmed local recurrence of prostate cancer after previous external beam radiotherapy. Between September 2008 and March 2013, 25 patients with local recurrence of previously irradiated prostate cancer were treated. The main eligibility criteria for salvage prostate HDR brachytherapy combined with interstitial hyperthermia were biopsy confirmed local recurrence and absence of nodal and distant metastases. All patients were treated with a dose of 30 Gy in 3 fractions at 21-day intervals. We performed 62 hyperthermia procedures out of 75 planned (83 %). The aim of the hyperthermia treatment was to heat the prostate to 41-43 C for 60 min. Toxicity for the organs of the genitourinary system and rectum was assessed according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE, v. 4.03). Determination of subsequent biochemical failure was based on the Phoenix definition (nadir + 2 ng/ml). The median age was 71 years (range 62-83 years), the median initial PSA level was 16.3 ng/ml (range 6.37-64 ng/ml), and the median salvage PSA level was 2.8 ng/ml (1.044-25.346 ng/ml). The median follow-up was 13 months (range 4-48 months). The combination of HDR brachytherapy and IHT was well tolerated. The most frequent complications were nocturia, weak urine stream, urinary frequency, hematuria, and urgency. Grade 2 rectal hemorrhage was observed in 1 patient. No grade 3 or higher complications were observed. The 2-year Kaplan-Meier estimate of biochemical control after salvage treatment was 74 %. The PSA in 20 patients decreased below the presalvage level, while 11 patients achieved a PSA nadir < 0.5 ng/ml. All patients are still alive. Of the 7 patients who experienced biochemical failure, bone metastases were found in 2 patients. IHT in combination

  12. 3-D conformal HDR brachytherapy as monotherapy for localized prostate cancer. A pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, T.; Baltas, D.; Kurek, R.; Roeddiger, S.; Kontova, M.; Anagnostopoulos, G.; Skazikis, G.; Zamboglou, N. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach/Main (Germany); Dannenberg, T.; Buhleier, T.; Tunn, U. [Dept. of Urology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach/Main (Germany)

    2004-04-01

    Purpose: pilot study to evaluate feasibility, acute toxicity and conformal quality of three-dimensional (3-D) conformal high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy as monotherapy for localized prostate cancer using intraoperative real-time planning. Patients and methods: between 05/2002 and 05/2003, 52 patients with prostate cancer, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) {<=} 10 ng/ml, Gleason score {<=} 7 and clinical stage {<=} T2a were treated. Median PSA was 6.4 ng/ml and median Gleason score 5. 24/52 patients had stage T1c and 28/52 stage T2a. For transrectal ultrasound-(TRUS-)guided transperineal implantation of flexible plastic needles into the prostate, the real-time HDR planning system SWIFT trademark was used. After implantation, CT-based 3-D postplanning was performed. All patients received one implant for four fractions of HDR brachytherapy in 48 h using a reference dose (D{sub ref}) of 9.5 Gy to a total dose of 38.0 Gy. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were analyzed to evaluate the conformal quality of each implant using D{sub 90}, D{sub 10} urethra, and D{sub 10} rectum. Acute toxicity was evaluated using the CTC (common toxicity criteria) scales. Results: median D{sub 90} was 106% of D{sub ref} (range: 93-115%), median D{sub 10} urethra 159% of D{sub ref} (range: 127-192%), and median D{sub 10} rectum 55% of D{sub ref} (range: 35-68%). Median follow-up is currently 8 months. In 2/52 patients acute grade 3 genitourinary toxicity was observed. No gastrointestinal toxicity > grade 1 occurred. Conclusion: 3-D conformal HDR brachytherapy as monotherapy using intraoperative real-time planning is a feasible and highly conformal treatment for localized prostate cancer associated with minimal acute toxicity. Longer follow-up is needed to evaluate late toxicity and biochemical control. (orig.)

  13. Spatial imaging in color and HDR: prometheus unchained

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, John J.

    2013-03-01

    The Human Vision and Electronic Imaging Conferences (HVEI) at the IS and T/SPIE Electronic Imaging meetings have brought together research in the fundamentals of both vision and digital technology. This conference has incorporated many color disciplines that have contributed to the theory and practice of today's imaging: color constancy, models of vision, digital output, high-dynamic-range imaging, and the understanding of perceptual mechanisms. Before digital imaging, silver halide color was a pixel-based mechanism. Color films are closely tied to colorimetry, the science of matching pixels in a black surround. The quanta catch of the sensitized silver salts determines the amount of colored dyes in the final print. The rapid expansion of digital imaging over the past 25 years has eliminated the limitations of using small local regions in forming images. Spatial interactions can now generate images more like vision. Since the 1950's, neurophysiology has shown that post-receptor neural processing is based on spatial interactions. These results reinforced the findings of 19th century experimental psychology. This paper reviews the role of HVEI in color, emphasizing the interaction of research on vision and the new algorithms and processes made possible by electronic imaging.

  14. Quality control of the breast cancer treatments on Hdr brachytherapy with TLD-100

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres H, F. [Universidad de Cordoba, Materials and Applied Physics Group, 230002 Monteria, Cordoba (Colombia); De la Espriella V, N. [Universidad de Cordoba, Grupo Avanzado de Materiales y Sistemas Complejos, 230002 Monteria, Cordoba (Colombia); Sanchez C, A., E-mail: franciscotorreshoyos@yahoo.com [Universidad de Cordoba, Departamento de Enfermeria, 230002 Monteria, Cordoba (Colombia)

    2014-07-01

    An anthropomorphic Phantom, a female trunk, was built with a natural bone structure and experimental material coated, glycerin and water-based material called JJT to build soft tissue equivalent to the muscle of human tissue, and a polymer (styrofoam) to build the lung as critical organ to simulate the treatment of breast cancer, with high dose rate brachytherapy (Hdr) and sources of Ir-192. The treatments were planned and calculated for the critical organ: Lung, and injury of 2 cm in diameter in breast with Micro Selectron Hdr system and the software Plato Brachytherapy V 14.1 of the Nucletron (Netherlands) which uses the standard protocol of radiotherapy for brachytherapy treatments. The dose experimentally measured with dosimeters TLD-100 LiF: Mg; Ti, which were previously calibrated, were placed in the same positions and bodies mentioned above, with less than 5% uncertainty. The reading dosimeters was carried out in a Harshaw TLD 4500. The results obtained for calculated treatments, using the standard simulator, and the experimental with TLD-100, show a high concordance, as they are on average a ± 1.1% making process becomes in a quality control of this type of treatments. (Author)

  15. Comparison of 60Co and 192Ir sources in HDR brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Zwierzchowski

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper compares the isotopes 60Co and 192Ir as radiation sources for high-dose-rate (HDR afterloadingbrachytherapy. The smaller size of 192Ir sources made it the preferred radionuclide for temporary brachytherapy treatments.Recently also 60Co sources have been made available with identical geometrical dimensions. This paper comparesthe characteristics of both nuclides in different fields of brachytherapy based on scientific literature. In an additionalpart of this paper reports from medical physicists of several radiation therapy institutes are discussed. The purposeof this work is to investigate the advantages or disadvantages of both radionuclides for HDR brachytherapy due to theirphysical differences. The motivation is to provide useful information to support decision-making procedures in theselection of equipment for brachytherapy treatment rooms. The results of this work show that no advantages or disadvantagesexist for 60Co sources compared to 192Ir sources with regard to clinical aspects. Nevertheless, there are potentiallogistical advantages of 60Co sources due to its longer half-life (5.3 years vs. 74 days, making it an interesting alternativeespecially in developing countries.

  16. Variability of marker-based rectal dose evaluation in HDR cervical brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhou; Jaggernauth, Wainwright; Malhotra, Harish K; Podgorsak, Matthew B

    2010-01-01

    In film-based intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer, position of the rectal markers may not accurately represent the anterior rectal wall. This study was aimed at analyzing the variability of rectal dose estimation as a result of interfractional variation of marker placement. A cohort of five patients treated with multiple-fraction tandem and ovoid high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy was studied. The cervical os point and the orientation of the applicators were matched among all fractional plans for each patient. Rectal points obtained from all fractions were then input into each clinical treated plan. New fractional rectal doses were obtained and a new cumulative rectal dose for each patient was calculated. The maximum interfractional variation of distances between rectal dose points and the closest source positions was 1.1 cm. The corresponding maximum variability of fractional rectal dose was 65.5%. The percentage difference in cumulative rectal dose estimation for each patient was 5.4%, 19.6%, 34.6%, 23.4%, and 13.9%, respectively. In conclusion, care should be taken when using rectal markers as reference points for estimating rectal dose in HDR cervical brachytherapy. The best estimate of true rectal dose for each fraction should be determined by the most anterior point among all fractions.

  17. Oxidative Stress Markers in Prostate Cancer Patients after HDR Brachytherapy Combined with External Beam Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Woźniak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of oxidative stress markers was perfomed in prostate cancer (PCa patients subjected to high-dose brachytherapy (HDR with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT. Sixty men with PCa were subjected to combined two-fraction treatment with HDR (tot. 20 Gy and EBRT (46 Gy. Blood samples were taken before treatment, immediately afterwards, after 1.5–3 months, and approx. 2 years. Control group consisted of 30 healthy men. Erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase activity in the patients was lower than in healthy subjects by 34% (, 50% (, 30% (, and 61% (, respectively, at all periods. No significant differences were found by comparing superoxide dismutase and catalase activity in PCa patients with that of the controls. After 2 years of the end of treatment, the activity of studied enzymes demonstrated a decreasing tendency versus before therapy. Blood plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS concentration was higher than in the controls at all periods, while erythrocyte TBARS decreased after 2 years to control levels. The results confirm that in the course of PCa, imbalance of oxidant-antioxidant processes occurs. The therapy did not alter the levels of oxidative stress markers, which may prove its applicability. Two years is too short a period to restore the oxidant-antioxidant balance.

  18. Interactive, multi-modality image registrations for combined MRI/MRSI-planned HDR prostate brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galen Reed

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study presents the steps and criteria involved in the series of image registrations used clinically during the planning and dose delivery of focal high dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy of the prostate. Material and methods: Three imaging modalities – Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI, Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging (MRSI, and Computed Tomography (CT – were used at different steps during the process. MRSI is used for identification of dominant intraprosatic lesions (DIL. A series of rigid and nonrigid transformations were applied to the data to correct for endorectal-coil-induced deformations and for alignment with the planning CT. Mutual information was calculated as a morphing metric. An inverse planning optimization algorithm was applied to boost dose to the DIL while providing protection to the urethra, penile bulb, rectum, and bladder. Six prostate cancer patients were treated using this protocol. Results: The morphing algorithm successfully modeled the probe-induced prostatic distortion. Mutual information calculated between the morphed images and images acquired without the endorectal probe showed a significant (p = 0.0071 increase to that calculated between the unmorphed images and images acquired without the endorectal probe. Both mutual information and visual inspection serve as effective diagnostics of image morphing. The entire procedure adds less than thirty minutes to the treatment planning. Conclusion: This work demonstrates the utility of image transformations and registrations to HDR brachytherapy of prostate cancer.

  19. HDR Brachytherapy Dose Distribution is Influenced by the Metal Material of the Applicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chin-Hui; Liao, Yi-Jen; Shiau, An-Cheng; Lin, Hsin-Yu; Hsueh Liu, Yen-Wan; Hsu, Shih-Ming

    2015-12-11

    Applicators containing metal have been widely used in recent years when applying brachytherapy to patients with cervical cancer. However, the high dose rate (HDR) treatment-planning system (TPS) that is currently used in brachytherapy still assumes that the treatment environment constitutes a homogeneous water medium and does not include a dose correction for the metal material of the applicator. The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the HDR (192)Ir dose distribution in cervical cancer patients when performing brachytherapy using a metal-containing applicator. Thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) measurements and Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) code were used to explore the doses to the rectum and bladder when using a Henschke applicator containing metal during brachytherapy. When the applicator was assumed to be present, the absolute dose difference between the TLD measurement and MCNPX simulation values was within approximately 5%. A comparison of the MCNPX simulation and TPS calculation values revealed that the TPS overestimated the International Commission of Radiation Units and Measurement (ICRU) rectum and bladder reference doses by 57.78% and 49.59%, respectively. We therefore suggest that the TPS should be modified to account for the shielding effects of the applicator to ensure the accuracy of the delivered doses.

  20. Implementation of the technique of partial irradiation accelerated the breast with high doses (HDR) brachytherapy; Puesta en marcha de la tecnica de irradiacion parcial acelerada de la mama con braquterapia de alta tasa de dosis (HDR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina Lopez, M. Y.; Pardo Perez, E.; Castro Novais, J.; Martinez Ortega, J.; Ruiz Maqueda, S.; Cerro Penalver, E. del

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this work is presents procedure carried out in our Centre for the implementation of the accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI, accelerated partial-breast irradiation) with high-rate brachytherapy (HDR), using plastic tubes as applicators. Carried out measures, the evaluation of the dosimetric parameters analyzing and presenting the results. (Author)

  1. A study of optimization techniques in HDR brachytherapy for the prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokharel, Ghana Shyam

    Several studies carried out thus far are in favor of dose escalation to the prostate gland to have better local control of the disease. But optimal way of delivery of higher doses of radiation therapy to the prostate without hurting neighboring critical structures is still debatable. In this study, we proposed that real time high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy with highly efficient and effective optimization could be an alternative means of precise delivery of such higher doses. This approach of delivery eliminates the critical issues such as treatment setup uncertainties and target localization as in external beam radiation therapy. Likewise, dosimetry in HDR brachytherapy is not influenced by organ edema and potential source migration as in permanent interstitial implants. Moreover, the recent report of radiobiological parameters further strengthen the argument of using hypofractionated HDR brachytherapy for the management of prostate cancer. Firstly, we studied the essential features and requirements of real time HDR brachytherapy treatment planning system. Automating catheter reconstruction with fast editing tools, fast yet accurate dose engine, robust and fast optimization and evaluation engine are some of the essential requirements for such procedures. Moreover, in most of the cases we performed, treatment plan optimization took significant amount of time of overall procedure. So, making treatment plan optimization automatic or semi-automatic with sufficient speed and accuracy was the goal of the remaining part of the project. Secondly, we studied the role of optimization function and constraints in overall quality of optimized plan. We have studied the gradient based deterministic algorithm with dose volume histogram (DVH) and more conventional variance based objective functions for optimization. In this optimization strategy, the relative weight of particular objective in aggregate objective function signifies its importance with respect to other objectives

  2. Adaptive error detection for HDR/PDR brachytherapy: Guidance for decision making during real-time in vivo point dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kertzscher Schwencke, Gustavo Adolfo Vladimir; Andersen, Claus E.; Tanderup, Kari

    2014-01-01

    Purpose:This study presents an adaptive error detection algorithm (AEDA) for real-timein vivo point dosimetry during high dose rate (HDR) or pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy (BT) where the error identification, in contrast to existing approaches, does not depend on an a priori reconstruction...

  3. Balloon-based adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer: comparison between {sup 99m}Tc and HDR {sup 192}Ir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro de; Lima, Carla Flavia de; Cuperschmid, Ethel Mizrahy, E-mail: tprcampos@pq.cnpq.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2016-03-15

    Objective: To perform a comparative dosimetric analysis, based on computer simulations, of temporary balloon implants with {sup 99m}Tc and balloon brachytherapy with high-dose-rate (HDR) {sup 192}Ir, as boosts to radiotherapy. We hypothesized that the two techniques would produce equivalent doses under pre-established conditions of activity and exposure time. Materials and methods: simulations of implants with {sup 99m}Tc-filled and HDR {sup 192}Ir-filled balloons were performed with the Siscodes/MCNP5, modeling in voxels a magnetic resonance imaging set related to a young female. Spatial dose rate distributions were determined. In the dosimetric analysis of the protocols, the exposure time and the level of activity required were specified. Results: the {sup 99m}Tc balloon presented a weighted dose rate in the tumor bed of 0.428 cGy.h{sup -1}.mCi{sup -1} and 0.190 cGyh{sup -1} at the balloon surface and at 8-10 mm from the surface, respectively, compared with 0.499 and 0.150 cGyh{sup -1}.mCi{sup -1}, respectively, for the HDR {sup 192}Ir balloon. An exposure time of 24 hours was required for the {sup 99m}Tc balloon to produce a boost of 10.14 Gy with 1.0 Ci, whereas only 24 minutes with 10.0 Ci segments were required for the HDR {sup 192}Ir balloon to produce a boost of 5.14 Gy at the same reference point, or 10.28 Gy in two 24-minutes fractions. Conclusion: temporary {sup 99m}Tc balloon implantation is an attractive option for adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer, because of its availability, economic viability, and similar dosimetry in comparison with the use of HDR {sup 192}Ir balloon implantation, which is the current standard in clinical practice. (author)

  4. Balloon-based adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer: comparison between 99mTc and HDR 192Ir*

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Campos, Tarcísio Passos Ribeiro; de Lima, Carla Flavia; Cuperschmid, Ethel Mizrahy

    2016-01-01

    Objective To perform a comparative dosimetric analysis, based on computer simulations, of temporary balloon implants with 99mTc and balloon brachytherapy with high-dose-rate (HDR) 192Ir, as boosts to radiotherapy. We hypothesized that the two techniques would produce equivalent doses under pre-established conditions of activity and exposure time. Materials and Methods Simulations of implants with 99mTc-filled and HDR 192Ir-filled balloons were performed with the Siscodes/MCNP5, modeling in voxels a magnetic resonance imaging set related to a young female. Spatial dose rate distributions were determined. In the dosimetric analysis of the protocols, the exposure time and the level of activity required were specified. Results The 99mTc balloon presented a weighted dose rate in the tumor bed of 0.428 cGy.h-1.mCi-1 and 0.190 cGyh-1.mCi-1 at the balloon surface and at 8-10 mm from the surface, respectively, compared with 0.499 and 0.150 cGyh-1.mCi-1, respectively, for the HDR 192Ir balloon. An exposure time of 24 hours was required for the 99mTc balloon to produce a boost of 10.14 Gy with 1.0 Ci, whereas only 24 minutes with 10.0 Ci segments were required for the HDR 192Ir balloon to produce a boost of 5.14 Gy at the same reference point, or 10.28 Gy in two 24-minutes fractions. Conclusion Temporary 99mTc balloon implantation is an attractive option for adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer, because of its availability, economic viability, and similar dosimetry in comparison with the use of HDR 192Ir balloon implantation, which is the current standard in clinical practice. PMID:27141131

  5. Vaginal-cuff control and toxicity results of a daily HDR brachytherapy schedule in endometrial cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos, I; Rovirosa, A; Ascaso, C; Valduvieco, I; Herreros, A; Castilla, L; Sabater, S; Holub, K; Pahisa, J; Biete, A; Arenas, M

    2016-09-01

    To analyze the vaginal-cuff local control (VCC) and toxicity in postoperative endometrial carcinoma patients (EC) underwent high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) administered daily. 154 consecutive patients received postoperative HDR-BT for EC from January 2007 to September 2011. FIGO-staging I-IIIC2 patients were divided into two groups according to risk classification: Group 1 (94/154) included high-risk or advanced disease patients and Group 2 (60/154) included intermediate-risk EC patients. Group 1 underwent external beam irradiation (EBI) plus HDR-BT (2 fractions of 5 Gy) and Group 2 underwent HDR-BT alone (4 fractions of 5 Gy). Toxicity evaluation was done with RTOG scores for bladder and rectum, and the objective criteria of LENT-SOMA for vagina. With a median follow-up of 46.7 months (36.6-61 months) only two patients developed vaginal-cuff recurrence in Group 1 (2.1 %) and none in group 2 (0 %). Early toxicity in Group 1 appeared 5.3 % in rectum, 7.5 % in bladder (G1-G2) and 2.1 % in vagina (G1); late toxicity was present in 7.3 % in rectum (all G1-G2 but 1 G3) and in 27.7 % in vagina (all G1-G2 but one G4). In Group 2, 6.7 % developed acute G1-G2 bladder and 6.6 % acute vaginal (G1-G2) toxicity. No late rectal or bladder toxicity was observed; 21.7 % of G1-G2 presented late problems in vagina. The present HDR-BT schedule of 2 fractions of 5 Gy after EBI and 4 fractions of 5 Gy administered daily showed excellent results in terms of VCC and toxicity.

  6. A Structural-Thermal Model of the Karkonosze Pluton (Sudetes Mountains, SW Poland) for Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujakowski, Wiesław; Barbacki, Antoni; Miecznik, Maciej; Pająk, Leszek; Skrzypczak, Robert

    2016-12-01

    The main objective of this study was to develop a spatial temperature distribution of the Karkonosze Pluton to indicate optimum locations for HDR systems at drillable depth. HDR geothermal technology makes it possible to extract heat from the Earth in areas where no hydro-geothermal resources are present. To produce electricity in a binary cycle, system temperatures of > 100°C are usually required. In this paper, the authors have analysed the potential opportunities for applying HDR technology in the area of the Karkonosze Pluton, which is regarded as an optimum location for the application of the HDR concept (due to the potential for stimulation offered by the mechanical properties of the granites, radiogenic heat production, modern tectonic activity, and the thickness of the pluton). The model used in the analysis, which takes into account a hypothetical assessment of the manner and paths of fluid migration within the pluton, provides an insight into the spatial distribution of subsurface temperatures. It thus allows the location of relatively shallow high-temperature zones, which are optimal for the efficient application of HDR technology, to be identified. With respect to this technology, the Szklarska Poręba area and the NE part of the pluton seem to be better targets than the Cieplice central area, where the model indicated much lower temperatures (e.g. at a depth of 5,000 m, estimated temperatures in the vicinity of Szklarska Poręba were about 185°C and in the vicinity of Cieplice they were about 140°C).

  7. Balloon-based adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer: comparison between (99m)Tc and HDR (192)Ir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Campos, Tarcísio Passos Ribeiro; de Lima, Carla Flavia; Cuperschmid, Ethel Mizrahy

    2016-01-01

    To perform a comparative dosimetric analysis, based on computer simulations, of temporary balloon implants with (99m)Tc and balloon brachytherapy with high-dose-rate (HDR) (192)Ir, as boosts to radiotherapy. We hypothesized that the two techniques would produce equivalent doses under pre-established conditions of activity and exposure time. Simulations of implants with (99m)Tc-filled and HDR (192)Ir-filled balloons were performed with the Siscodes/MCNP5, modeling in voxels a magnetic resonance imaging set related to a young female. Spatial dose rate distributions were determined. In the dosimetric analysis of the protocols, the exposure time and the level of activity required were specified. The (99m)Tc balloon presented a weighted dose rate in the tumor bed of 0.428 cGy.h(-1).mCi(-1) and 0.190 cGyh(-1).mCi(-1) at the balloon surface and at 8-10 mm from the surface, respectively, compared with 0.499 and 0.150 cGyh(-1).mCi(-1), respectively, for the HDR (192)Ir balloon. An exposure time of 24 hours was required for the (99m)Tc balloon to produce a boost of 10.14 Gy with 1.0 Ci, whereas only 24 minutes with 10.0 Ci segments were required for the HDR (192)Ir balloon to produce a boost of 5.14 Gy at the same reference point, or 10.28 Gy in two 24-minutes fractions. Temporary (99m)Tc balloon implantation is an attractive option for adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer, because of its availability, economic viability, and similar dosimetry in comparison with the use of HDR (192)Ir balloon implantation, which is the current standard in clinical practice.

  8. MRS-guided HDR brachytherapy boost to the dominant intraprostatic lesion in high risk localised prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazi Aleksandra

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is known that the vast majority of prostate cancers are multifocal. However radical radiotherapy historically treats the whole gland rather than individual cancer foci. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS can be used to non-invasively locate individual cancerous tumours in prostate. Thus an intentionally non-uniform dose distribution treating the dominant intraprostatic lesion to different dose levels than the remaining prostate can be delivered ensuring the maximum achievable tumour control probability. The aim of this study is to evaluate, using radiobiological means, the feasibility of a MRS-guided high dose rate (HDR brachytherapy boost to the dominant lesion. Methods Computed tomography and MR/MRS were performed for treatment planning of a high risk localised prostate cancer. Both were done without endorectal coil, which distorts shape of prostate during the exams. Three treatment plans were compared: - external beam radiation therapy (EBRT only - combination of EBRT and HDR brachytherapy - combination of EBRT and HDR brachytherapy with a synchronous integrated boost to the dominant lesion The criteria of plan comparison were: the minimum, maximum and average doses to the targets and organs at risk; dose volume histograms; biologically effective doses for organs at risk and tumour control probability for the target volumes consisting of the dominant lesion as detected by MR/MRS and the remaining prostate volume. Results Inclusion of MRS information on the location of dominant lesion allows a safe increase of the dose to the dominant lesion while dose to the remaining target can be even substantially decreased keeping the same, high tumour control probability. At the same time an improved urethra sparing was achieved comparing to the treatment plan using a combination of EBRT and uniform HDR brachytherapy. Conclusions MRS-guided HDR brachytherapy boost to dominant lesion has the potential to spare the normal tissue

  9. Neodadjuvante und adjuvante Kurzzeit-Hormontherapie in Kombination mit konformaler HDR-Brachytherapie beim Prostatakarzinom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin T

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Zielsetzung: Auswertung der Behandlungsergebnisse der neoadjuvanten und adjuvanten Kurzzeit-Hormontherapie kombiniert mit konformaler HDR-Brachytherapie und externer Radiotherapie beim Prostatakarzinom. Patienten und Methoden: Von 01/97 bis 09/99 behandelten wir 102 Patienten mit Prostatakarzinomen im Stadium T1–3 N0 M0. Im Stadium T1–2 befanden sich 71, im Stadium T3 31 Patienten. Der mediane prätherapeutische PSA-Wert betrug 15,3 ng/ml. Nach ultraschallgesteuerter transrektaler Implantation von vier Afterloadingnadeln erfolgte die CT-gestützte 3D-Brachytherapie- Planung. Alle Patienten erhielten vier HDR-Implantate mit einer Referenzdosis von 5 Gy oder 7 Gy pro Implantat. Die Zeit zwischen jedem Implantat betrug jeweils 14 Tage. Nach der Brachytherapie folgte die externe Radiotherapie bis 39,6 Gy oder 45,0 Gy. Alle Patienten erhielten eine neoadjuvante und adjuvante Kurzzeit-Hormontherapie, die 2–19 Monate vor der Brachytherapie eingeleitet und 3 Monate nach Abschluß der externen Radiotherapie abgesetzt wurde (mediane Dauer: 9 Monate. Ergebnisse: Die mediane Nachbeobachtungszeit war 2,6 Jahre (range: 2,0–4,1 Jahre. Die biochemische Kontrollrate betrug 82 % nach 3 Jahren. Bei 14/102 Patienten registrierten wir ein biochemisches Rezidiv, bei 5/102 Patienten ein klinisches Rezidiv. Das Gesamtüberleben betrug 90 %, das krankheitsspezifische Überleben 98,0 % nach 3 Jahren. Ein Patient entwickelte eine prostato-urethro-rektale Fistel als späte Grad 4-Toxizität. Akute Grad-3 Toxizitäten traten bei 4 %, späte Grad-3 Toxizitäten bei 5 % der Patienten auf. Schlußfolgerung: Die neoadjuvante und adjuvante Kurzzeit-Hormontherapie kombiniert mit konformaler HDR-Brachytherapie und externer Radiotherapie erweist sich als sichere und wirksame Behandlungsmodalität beim Prostatakarzinom mit minimalen behandlungsbedingten Toxizitäten und einer vielversprechenden biochemischen Kontrollrate nach medianer Nachbeobachtungszeit von 2,6 Jahren.

  10. Low Dynamic Range Solutions to the High Dynamic Range Imaging Problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shanmuganathan RAMAN; Subhasis CHAUDHURI

    2010-01-01

    While capturing a real world scene using a common digital camera,due to limitations of the sensar dynamic range,we will not be able to capture the entire dynamic range of the soene.This problem is evident while capturing a picture of a scene which has both brightly and poorly illumninated regions.High Dynamic Range (HDR) imaging aims to recover the entire dynamic range of the scene by compositing multi-exposure images.Tone reproduction is required for displaying HDR images as the corresponding Low Dynamic Range(LDR) images on common displays.This paper discusses novel approaches to reconstruct LDR images directly from multi-exposure images.It is assumed that there is no knowledge of camera response function and other caraera settings.At last,it is explained how this task can be achieved effectively for static and dynamic scenes.

  11. High Dynamic Range Beam Imaging with Two Simultaneously Sampling CCDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evtushenko, Pavel [JLAB; Douglas, David R. [JLAB; Legg, Robert A. [JLAB; Tennant, Christopher D. [JLAB

    2013-05-01

    Transverse beam profile measurement with sufficiently high dynamic range (HDR) is a key diagnostic to measure the beam halo, understand its sources and evolution. In this contribution we describe our initial experience with the HDR imaging of the electron beam at the JLab FEL. On contrary to HDR measurements made with wire scanners in counting mode, which provide only two or three 1D projections of transverse beam distribution, imaging allows to measure the distribution itself. That is especially important for non-equilibrium beams in the LINACs. The measurements were made by means of simultaneous imaging with two CCD sensors with different exposure time. Two images are combined then numerically in to one HDR image. The system works as an online tool providing HDR images at 4 Hz. An optically polished YAG:Ce crystal with the thickness of 100 {micro}m was used for the measurements. When tested with a laser beam images with the DR of about 10{sup 5} were obtained. With the electron beam the DR was somewhat smaller due to the limitations in the time structure of the tune-up beam macro pulse.

  12. High Dynamic Range Beam Imaging with Two Simultaneously Sampling CCDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evtushenko, Pavel E. [JLAB; Douglas, David R. [JLAB

    2013-06-01

    Transverse beam profile measurement with sufficiently high dynamic range (HDR) is a key diagnostic to measure the beam halo, understand its sources and evolution. In this contribution we describe our initial experience with the HDR imaging of the electron beam at the JLab FEL. On contrary to HDR measurements made with wire scanners in counting mode, which provide only two or three 1D projections of transverse beam distribution, imaging allows to measure the distribution itself. That is especially important for non-equilibrium beams in the LINACs. The measurements were made by means of simultaneous imaging with two CCD sensors with different exposure time. Two images are combined then numerically in to one HDR image. The system works as an online tool providing HDR images at 4 Hz. An optically polished YAG:Ce crystal with the thickness of 100 {micro}m was used for the measurements. When tested with a laser beam images with the DR of about 10{sup 5} were obtained. With the electron beam the DR was somewhat smaller due to the limitations in the time structure of the tune-up beam macro pulse.

  13. Custom-designed mouthpiece for HDR brachytherapy of embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma of the soft palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekwelundu, Emmanuel; Krasin, Matthew J; Farr, Jonathan B

    2014-10-01

    This paper describes the design and fabrication of the mouthpiece used for high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy of a cancerous lesion in the soft palate of a pediatric patient. A custom mouth guard made with Thermo-forming material (Clear - Mouthguard) similar to those used by athletes, with a bite section, alveolar sulcus, hard and soft palate sections was made. Markers were placed around the lesion using a color transfer applicator and the impression transferred to the mouthpiece. Ten catheters arranged in a plane were placed on the inferior side (concave part) of the mouthpiece, and held in place by stitching each to the mouthpiece. Two pieces of lead (Pb) sheets with total thickness of 5.7 mm were placed beneath the catheters. Wax was used to create additional distance between the tongue and the catheters, and the entire assembly was covered with wax.

  14. A BrachyPhantom for verification of dose calculation of HDR brachytherapy planning system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Austerlitz, C. [Clinica Diana Campos, Recife, PE 52020-030 (Brazil); Campos, C. A. T. [Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro, RJ 22451-900 (Brazil)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To develop a calibration phantom for {sup 192}Ir high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy units that renders possible the direct measurement of absorbed dose to water and verification of treatment planning system.Methods: A phantom, herein designated BrachyPhantom, consists of a Solid Water™ 8-cm high cylinder with a diameter of 14 cm cavity in its axis that allows the positioning of an A1SL ionization chamber with its reference measuring point at the midheight of the cylinder's axis. Inside the BrachyPhantom, at a 3-cm radial distance from the chamber's reference measuring point, there is a circular channel connected to a cylindrical-guide cavity that allows the insertion of a 6-French flexible plastic catheter from the BrachyPhantom surface. The PENELOPE Monte Carlo code was used to calculate a factor, P{sub sw}{sup lw}, to correct the reading of the ionization chamber to a full scatter condition in liquid water. The verification of dose calculation of a HDR brachytherapy treatment planning system was performed by inserting a catheter with a dummy source in the phantom channel and scanning it with a CT. The CT scan was then transferred to the HDR computer program in which a multiple treatment plan was programmed to deliver a total dose of 150 cGy to the ionization chamber. The instrument reading was then converted to absorbed dose to water using the N{sub gas} formalism and the P{sub sw}{sup lw} factor. Likewise, the absorbed dose to water was calculated using the source strength, S{sub k}, values provided by 15 institutions visited in this work.Results: A value of 1.020 (0.09%, k= 2) was found for P{sub sw}{sup lw}. The expanded uncertainty in the absorbed dose assessed with the BrachyPhantom was found to be 2.12% (k= 1). To an associated S{sub k} of 27.8 cGy m{sup 2} h{sup −1}, the total irradiation time to deliver 150 cGy to the ionization chamber point of reference was 161.0 s. The deviation between the absorbed doses to water assessed with

  15. HDR Brachytherapy in the Management of High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Masson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available High-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy is used with increasing frequency for the treatment of prostate cancer. It is a technique which allows delivery of large individual fractions to the prostate without exposing adjacent normal tissues to unacceptable toxicity. This approach is particularly favourable in prostate cancer where tumours are highly sensitive to dose escalation and to increases in radiotherapy fraction size, due to the unique radiobiological behaviour of prostate cancers in contrast with other malignancies. In this paper we discuss the rationale and the increasing body of clinical evidence for the use of this technique in patients with high-risk prostate cancer, where it is combined with external beam radiotherapy. We highlight practical aspects of delivering treatment and discuss toxicity and limitations, with particular reference to current practice in the United Kingdom.

  16. HDR Brachytherapy in the Management of High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Susan; Persad, Raj; Bahl, Amit

    2012-01-01

    High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy is used with increasing frequency for the treatment of prostate cancer. It is a technique which allows delivery of large individual fractions to the prostate without exposing adjacent normal tissues to unacceptable toxicity. This approach is particularly favourable in prostate cancer where tumours are highly sensitive to dose escalation and to increases in radiotherapy fraction size, due to the unique radiobiological behaviour of prostate cancers in contrast with other malignancies. In this paper we discuss the rationale and the increasing body of clinical evidence for the use of this technique in patients with high-risk prostate cancer, where it is combined with external beam radiotherapy. We highlight practical aspects of delivering treatment and discuss toxicity and limitations, with particular reference to current practice in the United Kingdom. PMID:22461791

  17. Monte Carlo dosimetric study of the BEBIG Co-60 HDR source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballester, F [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics and IFIC, University of Valencia-CSIC, Dr Moliner 50, E46100 Burjassot (Spain); Granero, D [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics and IFIC, University of Valencia-CSIC, Dr Moliner 50, E46100 Burjassot (Spain); Perez-Calatayud, J [' La Fe' University Hospital, Radiotherapy Department, Avda Campanar 21, E46009 Valencia (Spain); Casal, E [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics and IFIC, University of Valencia-CSIC, Dr Moliner 50, E46100 Burjassot (Spain); Agramunt, S [ITIC, Hospital ClInica Benidorm, Avd. Alfonso Puchades 8, E03500 Benidorm (Spain); Cases, R [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics and IFIC, University of Valencia-CSIC, Dr Moliner 50, E46100 Burjassot (Spain)

    2005-11-07

    Although not as widespread as Ir-192, Co-60 is also available on afterloading equipment devoted to high dose rate brachytherapy, mainly addressed to the treatment of gynaecological lesions. The purpose of this study is to obtain the dosimetric parameters of the Co-60 source used by the BEBIG MultiSource remote afterloader (BEBIG GmbH, Germany) for which there are no dosimetric data available in the literature. The Monte Carlo code GEANT4 has been used to obtain the TG43 parameters and the 2D dose rate table in Cartesian coordinates of the BEBIG Co-60 HDR source. The dose rate constant, radial dose function and anisotropy function have been calculated and are presented in a tabular form as well as a detailed 2D dose rate table in Cartesian coordinates. These dosimetric datasets can be used as input data and to validate the treatment planning system calculations. (note)

  18. NOTE: Monte Carlo dosimetric study of the BEBIG Co-60 HDR source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballester, F.; Granero, D.; Pérez-Calatayud, J.; Casal, E.; Agramunt, S.; Cases, R.

    2005-11-01

    Although not as widespread as Ir-192, Co-60 is also available on afterloading equipment devoted to high dose rate brachytherapy, mainly addressed to the treatment of gynaecological lesions. The purpose of this study is to obtain the dosimetric parameters of the Co-60 source used by the BEBIG MultiSource remote afterloader (BEBIG GmbH, Germany) for which there are no dosimetric data available in the literature. The Monte Carlo code GEANT4 has been used to obtain the TG43 parameters and the 2D dose rate table in Cartesian coordinates of the BEBIG Co-60 HDR source. The dose rate constant, radial dose function and anisotropy function have been calculated and are presented in a tabular form as well as a detailed 2D dose rate table in Cartesian coordinates. These dosimetric datasets can be used as input data and to validate the treatment planning system calculations.

  19. IMMEDIATE RESULTS OF CONFORMIC HDR BRACHYTHERAPY USING THE MULTISOURCE APPARATUS FOR ORAL MUCOSAL TUMORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Lozhkov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In February to August 2011, the Chelyabinsk District Clinical Oncology Dispensary performed combined radiotherapy using conformic HDR brachytherapy (BT with daily dose fractionaton on a Multisource apparatus in 10 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral mucosa. An algorithm for planning conformic BT was developed, by combining the data of multislice spiral computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, by using the inverse procedures for dose calculation, and by choosing the parameters of plan assessment. No complications or severe toxic reactions were noted. The immediate results of the treatment were studied. A complete effect was obtained in 4 patients with Stages I−II. There was process stabilization in 2 patients and continued tumor growth in 1 case. Recurrent tumor was diagnosed in 2 cases following 3 and 9 months. The enhanced efficiency of BT was associated with the increased accuracy of tumor imaging.

  20. Mixed integer programming improves comprehensibility and plan quality in inverse optimization of prostate HDR-brachytherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Gorissen, Bram L; Hoffmann, Aswin L

    2014-01-01

    Current inverse treatment planning methods that optimize both catheter positions and dwell times in prostate HDR brachytherapy use surrogate linear or quadratic objective functions that have no direct interpretation in terms of dose-volume histogram (DVH) criteria, do not result in an optimum or have long solution times. We decrease the solution time of existing linear and quadratic dose-based programming models (LP and QP, respectively) to allow optimizing over potential catheter positions using mixed integer programming. An additional average speed-up of 75% can be obtained by stopping the solver at an early stage, without deterioration of the plan quality. For a fixed catheter configuration, the dwell time optimization model LP solves to optimality in less than 15 seconds, which confirms earlier results. We propose an iterative procedure for QP that allows to prescribe the target dose as an interval, while retaining independence between the solution time and the number of dose calculation points. This iter...

  1. An automated optimization tool for high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy with divergent needle pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borot de Battisti, M.; Maenhout, M.; de Senneville, B. Denis; Hautvast, G.; Binnekamp, D.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; van Vulpen, M.; Moerland, M. A.

    2015-10-01

    Focal high-dose-rate (HDR) for prostate cancer has gained increasing interest as an alternative to whole gland therapy as it may contribute to the reduction of treatment related toxicity. For focal treatment, optimal needle guidance and placement is warranted. This can be achieved under MR guidance. However, MR-guided needle placement is currently not possible due to space restrictions in the closed MR bore. To overcome this problem, a MR-compatible, single-divergent needle-implant robotic device is under development at the University Medical Centre, Utrecht: placed between the legs of the patient inside the MR bore, this robot will tap the needle in a divergent pattern from a single rotation point into the tissue. This rotation point is just beneath the perineal skin to have access to the focal prostate tumor lesion. Currently, there is no treatment planning system commercially available which allows optimization of the dose distribution with such needle arrangement. The aim of this work is to develop an automatic inverse dose planning optimization tool for focal HDR prostate brachytherapy with needle insertions in a divergent configuration. A complete optimizer workflow is proposed which includes the determination of (1) the position of the center of rotation, (2) the needle angulations and (3) the dwell times. Unlike most currently used optimizers, no prior selection or adjustment of input parameters such as minimum or maximum dose or weight coefficients for treatment region and organs at risk is required. To test this optimizer, a planning study was performed on ten patients (treatment volumes ranged from 8.5 cm3to 23.3 cm3) by using 2-14 needle insertions. The total computation time of the optimizer workflow was below 20 min and a clinically acceptable plan was reached on average using only four needle insertions.

  2. Sci-Sat AM(2): Brachy-01: A novel HDR Ir-192 brachytherapy water calorimeter standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarfehnia, A; Seuntjens, J

    2008-07-01

    Parameters influencing the accuracy of absorbed dose measurements for HDR 192Ir brachytherapy using water calorimetry were investigated with the goal to develop a novel primary absorbed dose to water standard. To provide greater stability, flexibility, and accuracy in the source-detector distance dsrc-det positioning and measurement, a new spring-loaded catheter holder composed of two concentric cylindrical sleeves with multiple orthogonal adjusting screws was developed. The absorbed dose from Nucletron microSelectron-HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources with air kerma strengths ranging between 21000-38000 U was studied. dsrc-det is optimized so as to balance signal-to-noise ratio (decreasing with increasing dsrc-det ) and temperature drift effects resulting from source self-heating. The irradiation times were adjusted to yield a minimum 1 Gy of dose at the measurement point. Successful measurements at dsrc-det ranging between 25-50 mm were performed. COMSOL MULTIPHYSICS™ software was used to determine the heat loss correction due to conduction defined as the ratio between temperature rise at a point under ideal conditions to realistic conditions (i.e., no conduction). An agreement of better than 6.5% was observed between TG-43 calculated and calorimetrically measured absorbed dose rates. The effects of convection where calculated to be negligible as the glass vessel provides a convective barrier significantly decoupling the water velocity in the interior and exterior of the vessel (water velocities were 1-2 orders of magnitude different). Our work paves the way to successful primary absorbed dose determination for radioactive sources using calorimetric techniques. © 2008 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  3. High level seismic/vibrational tests at the HDR: An overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kot, C.A.; Srinivasan, M.G.; Hsieh, B.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Schrammel, D.; Malcher, L. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany); Steinhilber, H. [Fachhochschule Giessen-Friedberg, Giessen (Germany); Costello, J.F. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research

    1991-12-31

    As part of the Phase II testing at the HDR Test Facility in Kahl/Main, FRG, two series of high-level seismic/vibrational experiments were performed. In the first of these (SHAG) a coast-down shaker, mounted on the reactor operating floor and capable of generating 1000 tonnes of force, was used to investigate full-scale structural response, soil-structure interaction (SSI), and piping/equipment response at load levels equivalent to those of a design basis earthquake. The HDR soil/structure system was tested to incipient failure exhibiting highly nonlinear response. In the load transmission from structure to piping/equipment significant response amplifications and shifts to higher frequencies occurred. The performance of various pipe support configurations was evaluated. This latter effort was continued in the second series of tests (SHAM), in which an in-plant piping system was investigated at simulated seismic loads (generated by two servo-hydraulic actuators each capable of generating 40 tonnes of force), that exceeded design levels manifold and resulted in considerable pipe plastification and failure of some supports (snubbers). The evaluation of six different support configurations demonstrated that proper system design (for a given spectrum) rather than number of supports or system stiffness is essential to limiting pipe stresses. Pipe strains at loads exceeding the design level eightfold were still tolerable, indicating that pipe failure even under extreme seismic loads is unlikely inspite of multiple support failures. Conservatively, an excess capacity (margin) of at least four was estimated for the piping system, and the pipe damping was found to be 4%. Comparisons of linear and nonlinear computational results with measurements showed that analytical predictions have wide scatter and do not necessarily yield conservative responses, underpredicting, in particular, peak support forces.

  4. High level seismic/vibrational tests at the HDR: An overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kot, C.A.; Srinivasan, M.G.; Hsieh, B.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Schrammel, D.; Malcher, L. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany)); Steinhilber, H. (Fachhochschule Giessen-Friedberg, Giessen (Germany)); Costello, J.F. (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research)

    1991-01-01

    As part of the Phase II testing at the HDR Test Facility in Kahl/Main, FRG, two series of high-level seismic/vibrational experiments were performed. In the first of these (SHAG) a coast-down shaker, mounted on the reactor operating floor and capable of generating 1000 tonnes of force, was used to investigate full-scale structural response, soil-structure interaction (SSI), and piping/equipment response at load levels equivalent to those of a design basis earthquake. The HDR soil/structure system was tested to incipient failure exhibiting highly nonlinear response. In the load transmission from structure to piping/equipment significant response amplifications and shifts to higher frequencies occurred. The performance of various pipe support configurations was evaluated. This latter effort was continued in the second series of tests (SHAM), in which an in-plant piping system was investigated at simulated seismic loads (generated by two servo-hydraulic actuators each capable of generating 40 tonnes of force), that exceeded design levels manifold and resulted in considerable pipe plastification and failure of some supports (snubbers). The evaluation of six different support configurations demonstrated that proper system design (for a given spectrum) rather than number of supports or system stiffness is essential to limiting pipe stresses. Pipe strains at loads exceeding the design level eightfold were still tolerable, indicating that pipe failure even under extreme seismic loads is unlikely inspite of multiple support failures. Conservatively, an excess capacity (margin) of at least four was estimated for the piping system, and the pipe damping was found to be 4%. Comparisons of linear and nonlinear computational results with measurements showed that analytical predictions have wide scatter and do not necessarily yield conservative responses, underpredicting, in particular, peak support forces.

  5. Dwell time modulation restrictions do not necessarily improve treatment plan quality for prostate HDR brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balvert, Marleen; Gorissen, Bram L.; den Hertog, Dick; Hoffmann, Aswin L.

    2015-01-01

    Inverse planning algorithms for dwell time optimisation in interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy may produce solutions with large dwell time variations within catheters, which may result in undesirable selective high-dose subvolumes. Extending the dwell time optimisation model with a dwell time modulation restriction (DTMR) that limits dwell time differences between neighboring dwell positions has been suggested to eliminate this problem. DTMRs may additionally reduce the sensitivity for uncertainties in dwell positions that inevitably result from catheter reconstruction errors and afterloader source positioning inaccuracies. This study quantifies the reduction of high-dose subvolumes and the robustness against these uncertainties by applying a DTMR to template-based prostate HDR brachytherapy implants. Three different DTMRs were consecutively applied to a linear dose-based penalty model (LD) and a dose-volume based model (LDV), both obtained from literature. The models were solved with DTMR levels ranging from no restriction to uniform dwell times within catheters in discrete steps. Uncertainties were simulated on clinical cases using in-house developed software, and dose-volume metrics were calculated in each simulation. For the assessment of high-dose subvolumes, the dose homogeneity index (DHI) and the contiguous dose volume histogram were analysed. Robustness was measured by the improvement of the lowest D90% of the planning target volume (PTV) observed in the simulations. For (LD), a DTMR yields an increase in DHI of approximately 30% and reduces the size of the largest high-dose volume by 2-5 cc. However, this comes at a cost of a reduction in D90% of the PTV of 10%, which often implies that it drops below the desired minimum of 100%. For (LDV), none of the DTMRs were able to improve high-dose volume measures. DTMRs were not capable of improving robustness of PTV D90% against uncertainty in dwell positions for both models.

  6. Ir-192 HDR transit dose and radial dose function determination using alanine/EPR dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calcina, Carmen S Guzman [Departamento de FIsica e Matematica, FFCLRP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av Bandeirantes 3900, 14040-901, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Almeida, Adelaide de [Departamento de FIsica e Matematica, FFCLRP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av Bandeirantes 3900, 14040-901, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Rocha, Jose R Oliveira [Setor de FIsica Medica-CEB-UNICAMP e Setor de Radioterapia-CAISM-UNICAMP (Brazil); Abrego, Felipe Chen [Departamento de FIsica e Matematica, FFCLRP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av Bandeirantes 3900, 14040-901, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Baffa, Oswaldo [Departamento de FIsica e Matematica, FFCLRP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av Bandeirantes 3900, 14040-901, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2005-03-21

    Source positioning close to the tumour in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy is not instantaneous. An increment of dose will be delivered during the movement of the source in the trajectory to its static position. This increment is the transit dose, often not taken into account in brachytherapeutic treatment planning. The transit dose depends on the prescribed dose, number of treatment fractions, velocity and activity of the source. Combining all these factors, the transit dose can be 5% higher than the prescribed absorbed dose value (Sang-Hyun and Muller-Runkel, 1994 Phys. Med. Biol. 39 1181-8, Nath et al 1995 Med. Phys. 22 209-34). However, it cannot exceed this percentage (Nath et al 1995). In this work, we use the alanine-EPR (electron paramagnetic resonance) dosimetric system using analysis of the first derivative of the signal. The transit dose was evaluated for an HDR system and is consistent with that already presented for TLD dosimeters (Bastin et al 1993 Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 26 695-702). Also using the same dosimetric system, the radial dose function, used to evaluate the geometric dose degradation around the source, was determined and its behaviour agrees better with those obtained by Monte Carlo simulations (Nath et al 1995, Williamson and Nath 1991 Med. Phys. 18 434-48, Ballester et al 1997 Med. Phys. 24 1221-8, Ballester et al 2001 Phys. Med. Biol. 46 N79-90) than with TLD measurements (Nath et al 1990 Med. Phys. 17 1032-40)

  7. High-Dynamic-Range CT Reconstruction Based on Varying Tube-Voltage Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    For complicated structural components characterized by wide X-ray attenuation ranges, the conventional computed tomography (CT) imaging using a single tube-voltage at each rotation angle cannot obtain all structural information. This limitation results in a shortage of CT information, because the effective thickness of the components along the direction of X-ray penetration exceeds the limitation of the dynamic range of the X-ray imaging system. To address this problem, high-dynamic-range CT (HDR-CT) reconstruction is proposed. For this new method, the tube’s voltage is adjusted several times to match the corresponding effective thickness about the local information from an object. Then, HDR fusion and HDR-CT are applied to obtain the full reconstruction information. An accompanying experiment demonstrates that this new technology can extend the dynamic range of X-ray imaging systems and provide the complete internal structures of complicated structural components. PMID:26544723

  8. High-Dynamic-Range CT Reconstruction Based on Varying Tube-Voltage Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Chen

    Full Text Available For complicated structural components characterized by wide X-ray attenuation ranges, the conventional computed tomography (CT imaging using a single tube-voltage at each rotation angle cannot obtain all structural information. This limitation results in a shortage of CT information, because the effective thickness of the components along the direction of X-ray penetration exceeds the limitation of the dynamic range of the X-ray imaging system. To address this problem, high-dynamic-range CT (HDR-CT reconstruction is proposed. For this new method, the tube's voltage is adjusted several times to match the corresponding effective thickness about the local information from an object. Then, HDR fusion and HDR-CT are applied to obtain the full reconstruction information. An accompanying experiment demonstrates that this new technology can extend the dynamic range of X-ray imaging systems and provide the complete internal structures of complicated structural components.

  9. High Dynamic Range Imaging by Perceptual Logarithmic Exposure Merging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florea Corneliu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we emphasize a similarity between the logarithmic type image processing (LTIP model and the Naka–Rushton model of the human visual system (HVS. LTIP is a derivation of logarithmic image processing (LIP, which further replaces the logarithmic function with a ratio of polynomial functions. Based on this similarity, we show that it is possible to present a unifying framework for the high dynamic range (HDR imaging problem, namely, that performing exposure merging under the LTIP model is equivalent to standard irradiance map fusion. The resulting HDR algorithm is shown to provide high quality in both subjective and objective evaluations.

  10. Virtual HDR CyberKnife SBRT for Localized Prostatic Carcinoma: 5-year Disease-free Survival and Toxicity Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Blake Fuller

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSEProstate stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT may substantially recapitulate the dose distribution of high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy, representing an externally delivered Virtual HDR treatment method. Herein we present 5-year outcomes from a cohort of consecutively treated Virtual HDR SBRT prostate cancer patients.METHODSSeventy-nine patients were treated from 2006 - 2009, 40 low-risk and 39 intermediate-risk, under IRB-approved clinical trial, to 38 Gy in 4 fractions. The planning target volume (PTV included prostate plus a 2-mm volume expansion in all directions, with selective use of a 5-mm prostate-to-PTV expansion and proximal seminal vesicle coverage in intermediate-risk patients, to better cover potential extraprostatic disease; rectal PTV margin reduced to zero in all cases. The prescription dose covered > 95% of the PTV (V100 >= 95%, with a minimum 150% PTV dose escalation to create HDR-like PTV dose distribution.RESULTSMedian pre-SBRT PSA level of 5.6 ng/mL decreased to 0.05 ng/mL 5 years out and 0.02 ng/mL 6 years out. At least one PSA bounce was seen in 55 patients (70% but only 3 of them subsequently relapsed, Biochemical-relapse-free survival was 100% and 92% for low-risk and intermediate-risk patients, respectively, by ASTRO definition (98% and 92% by Phoenix definition. Local relapse did not occur, distant metastasis-free survival was 100% and 95% by risk-group, and disease-specific survival was 100%. Acute and late grade 2 GU toxicity incidence was 10% and 9%, respectively; with 6% late grade 3 GU toxicity. Acute urinary retention did not occur. Acute and late grade 2 GI toxicity was 0% and 1%, respectively, with no grade 3 or higher toxicity. Of patients potent pre-SBRT, 65% remained so at 5 years.CONCLUSIONSVirtual HDR prostate SBRT creates a very low PSA nadir, a high rate of 5-year disease-free survival and an acceptable toxicity incidence, with results closely resembling those reported post-HDR brachytherapy.

  11. RADIANCE DOMAIN COMPOSITING FOR HIGH DYNAMIC RANGE IMAGING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Renu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available High dynamic range imaging aims at creating an image with a range of intensity variations larger than the range supported by a camera sensor. Most commonly used methods combine multiple exposure low dynamic range (LDR images, to obtain the high dynamic range (HDR image. Available methods typically neglect the noise term while finding appropriate weighting functions to estimate the camera response function as well as the radiance map. We look at the HDR imaging problem in a denoising frame work and aim at reconstructing a low noise radiance map from noisy low dynamic range images, which is tone mapped to get the LDR equivalent of the HDR image. We propose a maximum aposteriori probability (MAP based reconstruction of the HDR image using Gibb’s prior to model the radiance map, with total variation (TV as the prior to avoid unnecessary smoothing of the radiance field. To make the computation with TV prior efficient, we extend the majorize-minimize method of upper bounding the total variation by a quadratic function to our case which has a nonlinear term arising from the camera response function. A theoretical justification for doing radiance domain denoising as opposed to image domain denoising is also provided.

  12. Encoding of High Dynamic Range Video With a Model of Human Cones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hateren, J.H. van

    2006-01-01

    A recently developed quantitative model describing the dynamical response characteristics of primate cones is used for rendering high dynamic range (HDR) video. The model provides range compression, as well as luminance-dependent noise suppression. The steady-state (static) version of the model prov

  13. A Feasibility Study of Fricke Dosimetry as an Absorbed Dose to Water Standard for 192Ir HDR Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    deAlmeida, Carlos Eduardo; Ochoa, Ricardo; de Lima, Marilene Coelho; David, Mariano Gazineu; Pires, Evandro Jesus; Peixoto, José Guilherme; Salata, Camila; Bernal, Mario Antônio

    2014-01-01

    High dose rate brachytherapy (HDR) using 192Ir sources is well accepted as an important treatment option and thus requires an accurate dosimetry standard. However, a dosimetry standard for the direct measurement of the absolute dose to water for this particular source type is currently not available. An improved standard for the absorbed dose to water based on Fricke dosimetry of HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources is presented in this study. The main goal of this paper is to demonstrate the potential usefulness of the Fricke dosimetry technique for the standardization of the quantity absorbed dose to water for 192Ir sources. A molded, double-walled, spherical vessel for water containing the Fricke solution was constructed based on the Fricke system. The authors measured the absorbed dose to water and compared it with the doses calculated using the AAPM TG-43 report. The overall combined uncertainty associated with the measurements using Fricke dosimetry was 1.4% for k = 1, which is better than the uncertainties reported in previous studies. These results are promising; hence, the use of Fricke dosimetry to measure the absorbed dose to water as a standard for HDR 192Ir may be possible in the future. PMID:25521914

  14. A feasibility study of Fricke dosimetry as an absorbed dose to water standard for 192Ir HDR sources.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo deAlmeida

    Full Text Available High dose rate brachytherapy (HDR using 192Ir sources is well accepted as an important treatment option and thus requires an accurate dosimetry standard. However, a dosimetry standard for the direct measurement of the absolute dose to water for this particular source type is currently not available. An improved standard for the absorbed dose to water based on Fricke dosimetry of HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources is presented in this study. The main goal of this paper is to demonstrate the potential usefulness of the Fricke dosimetry technique for the standardization of the quantity absorbed dose to water for 192Ir sources. A molded, double-walled, spherical vessel for water containing the Fricke solution was constructed based on the Fricke system. The authors measured the absorbed dose to water and compared it with the doses calculated using the AAPM TG-43 report. The overall combined uncertainty associated with the measurements using Fricke dosimetry was 1.4% for k = 1, which is better than the uncertainties reported in previous studies. These results are promising; hence, the use of Fricke dosimetry to measure the absorbed dose to water as a standard for HDR 192Ir may be possible in the future.

  15. Correction factors for source strength determination in HDR brachytherapy using the in-phantom method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ubrich, Frank; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita [University Hospital Giessen-Marburg, Marburg (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology; Wulff, Joerg [University of Applied Sciences (THM) Giessen (Germany). Inst. of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection (IMPS); Zink, Klemens [University Hospital Giessen-Marburg, Marburg (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology; University of Applied Sciences (THM) Giessen (Germany). Inst. of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection (IMPS)

    2014-09-01

    For the purpose of clinical source strength determination for HDR brachytherapy sources, the German society for Medical Physics (DGMP) recommends in their report 13 the usage of a solid state phantom (Krieger-phantom) with a thimble ionization chamber. In this work, the calibration chain for the determination of the reference air-kerma rate K{sub a,100} and reference dose rate to water D{sub w,1} by ionization chamber measurement in the Krieger-phantom was modeled via Monte Carlo simulations. These calculations were used to determine global correction factors k{sub tot}, which allows a user to directly convert the reading of an ionization chamber calibrated in terms of absorbed dose to water, into the desired quantity K{sub a,100} or D{sub w,1}. The factor k{sub tot} was determined for four available {sup 192}Ir sources and one {sup 60}Co source with three different thimble ionization chambers. Finally, ionization chamber measurements on three μSelectron V2 HDR sources within the Krieger-phantom were performed and K{sub a,100} was determined according to three different methods: (1) using a calibration factor in terms of absorbed dose to water wth the global correction factor (k{sub tot}){sub K{sub a{sub ,{sub 1{sub 0{sub 0}}}}}} according DGMP 13 (2) using a global correction factor calculated via Monte Carlo (3) using a direct reference air-kerma rate calibration factor determined by the national metrology institute PTB. The comparison of Monte Carlo based (k{sub tot}){sub K{sub a{sub ,{sub 1{sub 0{sub 0}}}}}} with those from DGMP 13 showed that the DGMP data were systematically smaller by about 2-2.5%. The experimentally determined (k{sub tot}){sub K{sub a{sub ,{sub 1{sub 0{sub 0}}}}}}, based on the direct K{sub a,100} calibration were also systematically smaller by about 1.5%. Despite of these systematical deviations, the agreement of the different methods was in almost all cases within the 1σ level of confidence of the interval of their respective

  16. NPIP: A skew line needle configuration optimization system for HDR brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siauw, Timmy; Cunha, Adam; Berenson, Dmitry; Atamtuerk, Alper; Hsu, I-Chow; Goldberg, Ken; Pouliot, Jean [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, 760 Davis Hall, Berkeley, California 94720-1710 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, Comprehensive Cancer Center, 1600 Divisadero Street, Suite H1031, San Francisco, California 94143-1708 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of California, Berkeley, 4th Floor Sutardja Dai Hall, Berkeley, California 94720-1764 (United States); Department of Industrial Engineering and Operations, University of California, Berkeley, 4141 Etcheverry Hall, Berkeley, California 94720-1777 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, Comprehensive Cancer Center, 1600 Divisadero Street, Suite H1031, San Francisco, California 94143-1708 (United States); Department of Industrial Engineering and Operations Research and Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of California, Berkeley, 4141 Etcheverry Hall, Berkeley, California 94720-1777 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, Comprehensive Cancer Center, 1600 Divisadero Street, Suite H1031, San Francisco, California 94143-1708 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: In this study, the authors introduce skew line needle configurations for high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy and needle planning by integer program (NPIP), a computational method for generating these configurations. NPIP generates needle configurations that are specific to the anatomy of the patient, avoid critical structures near the penile bulb and other healthy structures, and avoid needle collisions inside the body. Methods: NPIP consisted of three major components: a method for generating a set of candidate needles, a needle selection component that chose a candidate needle subset to be inserted, and a dose planner for verifying that the final needle configuration could meet dose objectives. NPIP was used to compute needle configurations for prostate cancer data sets from patients previously treated at our clinic. NPIP took two user-parameters: a number of candidate needles, and needle coverage radius, {delta}. The candidate needle set consisted of 5000 needles, and a range of {delta} values was used to compute different needle configurations for each patient. Dose plans were computed for each needle configuration. The number of needles generated and dosimetry were analyzed and compared to the physician implant. Results: NPIP computed at least one needle configuration for every patient that met dose objectives, avoided healthy structures and needle collisions, and used as many or fewer needles than standard practice. These needle configurations corresponded to a narrow range of {delta} values, which could be used as default values if this system is used in practice. The average end-to-end runtime for this implementation of NPIP was 286 s, but there was a wide variation from case to case. Conclusions: The authors have shown that NPIP can automatically generate skew line needle configurations with the aforementioned properties, and that given the correct input parameters, NPIP can generate needle configurations which meet dose objectives and use as many

  17. Fast, automatic, and accurate catheter reconstruction in HDR brachytherapy using an electromagnetic 3D tracking system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulin, Eric; Racine, Emmanuel; Beaulieu, Luc, E-mail: Luc.Beaulieu@phy.ulaval.ca [Département de physique, de génie physique et d’optique et Centre de recherche sur le cancer de l’Université Laval, Université Laval, Québec, Québec G1V 0A6, Canada and Département de radio-oncologie et Axe Oncologie du Centre de recherche du CHU de Québec, CHU de Québec, 11 Côte du Palais, Québec, Québec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Binnekamp, Dirk [Integrated Clinical Solutions and Marketing, Philips Healthcare, Veenpluis 4-6, Best 5680 DA (Netherlands)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: In high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-B), current catheter reconstruction protocols are relatively slow and error prone. The purpose of this technical note is to evaluate the accuracy and the robustness of an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system for automated and real-time catheter reconstruction. Methods: For this preclinical study, a total of ten catheters were inserted in gelatin phantoms with different trajectories. Catheters were reconstructed using a 18G biopsy needle, used as an EM stylet and equipped with a miniaturized sensor, and the second generation Aurora{sup ®} Planar Field Generator from Northern Digital Inc. The Aurora EM system provides position and orientation value with precisions of 0.7 mm and 0.2°, respectively. Phantoms were also scanned using a μCT (GE Healthcare) and Philips Big Bore clinical computed tomography (CT) system with a spatial resolution of 89 μm and 2 mm, respectively. Reconstructions using the EM stylet were compared to μCT and CT. To assess the robustness of the EM reconstruction, five catheters were reconstructed twice and compared. Results: Reconstruction time for one catheter was 10 s, leading to a total reconstruction time inferior to 3 min for a typical 17-catheter implant. When compared to the μCT, the mean EM tip identification error was 0.69 ± 0.29 mm while the CT error was 1.08 ± 0.67 mm. The mean 3D distance error was found to be 0.66 ± 0.33 mm and 1.08 ± 0.72 mm for the EM and CT, respectively. EM 3D catheter trajectories were found to be more accurate. A maximum difference of less than 0.6 mm was found between successive EM reconstructions. Conclusions: The EM reconstruction was found to be more accurate and precise than the conventional methods used for catheter reconstruction in HDR-B. This approach can be applied to any type of catheters and applicators.

  18. An innovative method for {sup 192}Ir HDR calibration by farmer chamber, V-film, and solid phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Liyun; Ding, Hueisch-Jy [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Ho, Sheng-Yow, E-mail: shengho@seed.net.tw [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sinlau Christian Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan (China)

    2011-08-01

    A simple, practical and economical technique was proposed to calibrate an {sup 192}Ir HDR brachytherapy source in terms of air kerma strength. This technique makes use of the 0.6 cm{sup 3} Farmer type ion chamber, radiographic film and polystyrene phantom. These tools are commonly used for dosimetry quality assurance of the clinical linear accelerator. In this study, the Exradin A19, PTW N30004 and TM30001 Farmer type ion chambers were used for the calibration of the {sup 192}Ir HDR source. To perform the calibration, a 25.4x30.5 cm{sup 2} radiographic film was taped on a piece of polystyrene plate, and a straight applicator probe of a HDR brachytherapy unit and the Farmer type ion chamber were affixed to the film envelope. The film was irradiated by the {sup 192}Ir source, followed by an exposure in the simulator X-ray beam. The film set with the film removed was then placed on a 5 cm thick polystyrene phantom for calibration measurement. Based on the electrometer reading from the Farmer type ion chamber irradiated by {sup 192}Ir and the measured source-to-chamber distance by means of the images on the developed film, we can calculate the air kerma strength of the {sup 192}Ir using the new technique. Our calibration results were compared to the data provided by the manufacturer and that of five different well type ion chambers, namely, Sun Nuclear cooperation (SNC) 1008, Nucletron SDS 077.091, SDS 077.094, PTW TN33004 and Standard Imaging (SI) HDR-1000 Plus. The differences were all within 1.6%. Relative to the '7-distance measurement technique' by Stump et al., 2002, our method is more efficient if our empirical formula was used. In summary, our method is simpler and cost-effective to calibrate an {sup 192}Ir HDR brachytherapy source for those hospitals without a calibration jig or a well type ion chamber.

  19. A comprehensive study on HDR brachytherapy treatments of cervical cancers: using the first Co-60 BEBIG Multisource Unit in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naheed Rukhsana

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The report presents an extraordinary synthesis of customer acceptance procedures (CAP, quality assurance tests (QA in the treatment of cervical cancer patients, using the first Co-60 Multisource Unit® in Bangladesh. The QA and commissioning required measurements and emergency tests verifying the functional limits of parameters acceptable for the new HDR afterloader. Acceptable limits were: 1 the deviation between specified and measured source strength: ± 3%; 2 the positional accuracy and uniformity: ± 1 mm; 3 the temporal accuracy (i.e. timer error and linearity and end error: ± 1% or 30 sec.; 4 treatment planning system (digitizer and localization software: ± 3% or 1 mm; 5 the distance from line to first dwell position and all the others: 5 mm and 10 mm (± 1 mm. Material and methods: Till February 2011, 47 patients were treated with HDR with more than 140 insertions applied. Amongst them, 12 patients were in stage IIB and IIIB, 22 were postoperative (IA and IB while the remaining 13 patients were with unknown stage. All the cases with stage IIB and IIIB received concurrent chemo-radiation and brachytherapy. Postoperative patients received EBRT (50 Gy and HDR according to the institutional protocol. CT scans were completed before HDR-plus planning with a good reproducibility (± 2% and were documented in repeating the plan for the same set up of a patient. Absorbed dose (Gy to a point P, at a distance of “r” in centimeters from a source of the Reference Air Kerma Rate (RAKR has been utilized for the QA of the source, where source strength measurement was accomplished. Results: All methods and analysis applicable to the QA and commissioning of Co-60 have been investigated and systematically analyzed, measured and documented before the treatment of a patient. Studies and safety requirements of this HDR remote afterloader were carried out. Acceptance and the QA were imperative to justify functionality and dependability in

  20. Observing and characterizing avalanche activity in the Khumbu Himal, Nepal, using Pleiades and airborne HDR imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Sarah; Nicholson, Lindsey; Klug, Christoph; Rieg, Lorenzo; Sailer, Rudolf; Bucher, Tilman; Brauchle, Jörg

    2017-04-01

    In the high, steep terrain of the Khumbu Himal, Nepal, snow avalanches play an important role in glacier mass balance, and rockfall supplies much of the rock material that forms the extensive debris covers on glaciers in the region. Information on the frequency and size of gravitational mass movements is helpful for understanding current and future glacier behaviour but currently lacking. In this study we use a combination of high resolution Pleiades optical satellite imagery in conjunction with airborne HDR imagery of slopes in deep shadow or overexposed snow slopes, provided by the German Aerospace Center (DLR) MACS system (see Brauchle et al., MM3.2/GI2.12/GMPV6.4/HS11.13/NH8.9/SSS12.24), to undertake a qualitative observational study of the gravitational processes evident in these sets of imagery. We classify the features found and discuss their likely frequency in the context of previously published research findings. Terrain analysis based upon digital terrain models derived from the same Pleiades imagery is used to investigate the slope angle, degree of confinement, curvature and aspect of observed avalanche and rock fall tracks. This work presents a first overview of the types of gravitational slides affecting glaciers of the Khumbu Himal. Subsequent research efforts will focus on attempting to quantify volumes of mass movement using repeat satellite imagery.

  1. Monte Carlo characterization of the Gamma-Med Hdr plus Ir-192 brachytherapy source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes, E.; Sosa, M. A.; Gil V, A. [Universidad de Guanajuato, Division de Ciencias e Ingenierias, Av. Insurgentes 2354, 37150 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico); Monzon, E., E-mail: eric_1985@fisica.ugto.mx [IMSS, Unidad Medica de Alta Especialidad No. 1, Av. Adolfo Lopez Mateos 1813, 37340 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: The MCNP4C Monte Carlo code was used to simulate the dosimetry around the Gamma-Med Hdr Plus iridium-192 brachytherapy source in both air/vacuum and water environments. Dosimetry data in water was calculated and are presented into an away-along table. All dosimetric quantities recommended by the AAPM Task Group 43 report have been also calculated. These quantities are air kerma strength, dose rate constant, radial dose function and anisotropy function. The obtained data are compared to this source reference data, finding results in good agreement with them. In this study, recommendations of the AAPM TG-43U1 report have been followed and comply with the most recent AAPM and ESTRO physics committee recommendations about Monte Carlo techniques. The data in the present study complement published data and can be used as input in the Tps or as benchmark data to verify the results of the treatment planning systems as well as a means of comparison with other datasets from this source. (Author)

  2. A novel optical calorimetry dosimetry approach applied to an HDR Brachytherapy source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavan, A.; Meyer, J.

    2013-06-01

    The technique of Digital Holographic Interferometry (DHI) is applied to the measurement of radiation absorbed dose distribution in water. An optical interferometer has been developed that captures the small variations in the refractive index of water due to the radiation induced temperature increase ΔT. The absorbed dose D is then determined with high temporal and spatial resolution using the calorimetric relation D=cΔT (where c is the specific heat capacity of water). The method is capable of time resolving 3D spatial calorimetry. As a proof-of-principle of the approach, a prototype DHI dosimeter was applied to the measurement of absorbed dose from a High Dose Rate (HDR) Brachytherapy source. Initial results are in agreement with modelled doses from the Brachyvision treatment planning system, demonstrating the viability of the system for high dose rate applications. Future work will focus on applying corrections for heat diffusion and geometric effects. The method has potential to contribute to the dosimetry of diverse high dose rate applications which require high spatial resolution such as microbeam radiotherapy (MRT) or small field proton beam dosimetry but may potentially also be useful for interface dosimetry.

  3. Air-kerma evaluation at the maze entrance of HDR brachytherapy facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujades, M C; Granero, D; Vijande, J; Ballester, F; Perez-Calatayud, J; Papagiannis, P; Siebert, F A

    2014-12-01

    In the absence of procedures for evaluating the design of brachytherapy (BT) facilities for radiation protection purposes, the methodology used for external beam radiotherapy facilities is often adapted. The purpose of this study is to adapt the NCRP 151 methodology for estimating the air-kerma rate at the door in BT facilities. Such methodology was checked against Monte Carlo (MC) techniques using the code Geant4. Five different facility designs were studied for (192)Ir and (60)Co HDR applications to account for several different bunker layouts.For the estimation of the lead thickness needed at the door, the use of transmission data for the real spectra at the door instead of the ones emitted by (192)Ir and (60)Co will reduce the lead thickness by a factor of five for (192)Ir and ten for (60)Co. This will significantly lighten the door and hence simplify construction and operating requirements for all bunkers.The adaptation proposed in this study to estimate the air-kerma rate at the door depends on the complexity of the maze: it provides good results for bunkers with a maze (i.e. similar to those used for linacs for which the NCRP 151 methodology was developed) but fails for less conventional designs. For those facilities, a specific Monte Carlo study is in order for reasons of safety and cost-effectiveness.

  4. Commissioning and quality assurance procedures for the HDR Valencia skin applicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granero, Domingo; Candela-Juan, Cristian; Ballester, Facundo; Ouhib, Zoubir; Vijande, Javier; Richart, Jose; Perez-Calatayud, Jose

    2016-10-01

    The Valencia applicators (Nucletron, an Elekta company, Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) are cup-shaped tungsten applicators with a flattening filter used to collimate the radiation produced by a high-dose-rate (HDR) (192)Ir source, and provide a homogeneous absorbed dose at a given depth. This beam quality provides a good option for the treatment of skin lesions at shallow depth (3-4 mm). The user must perform commissioning and periodic testing of these applicators to guarantee the proper and safe delivery of the intended absorbed dose, as recommended in the standards in radiation oncology. In this study, based on AAPM and GEC-ESTRO guidelines for brachytherapy units and our experience, a set of tests for the commissioning and periodic testing of the Valencia applicators is proposed. These include general considerations, verification of the manufacturer documentation and physical integrity, evaluation of the source-to-indexer distance and reproducibility, setting the library plan in the treatment planning system, evaluation of flatness and symmetry, absolute output and percentage depth dose verification, independent calculation of the treatment time, and visual inspection of the applicator before each treatment. For each test, the proposed methodology, equipment, frequency, expected results, and tolerance levels (when applicable) are provided.

  5. Commissioning and quality assurance procedures for the HDR Valencia skin applicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domingo Granero

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The Valencia applicators (Nucletron, an Elekta company, Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden are cup-shaped tungsten applicators with a flattening filter used to collimate the radiation produced by a high-dose-rate (HDR 192 Ir source, and provide a homogeneous absorbed dose at a given depth. This beam quality provides a good option for the treatment of skin lesions at shallow depth (3-4 mm. The user must perform commissioning and periodic testing of these applicators to guarantee the proper and safe delivery of the intended absorbed dose, as recommended in the standards in radiation oncology. In this study, based on AAPM and GEC-ESTRO guidelines for brachytherapy units and our experience, a set of tests for the commissioning and periodic testing of the Valencia applicators is proposed. These include general considerations, verification of the manufacturer documentation and physical integrity, evaluation of the source-to-indexer distance and reproducibility, setting the library plan in the treatment planning system, evaluation of flatness and symmetry, absolute output and percentage depth dose verification, independent calculation of the treatment time, and visual inspection of the applicator before each treatment. For each test, the proposed methodology, equipment, frequency, expected results, and tolerance levels (when applicable are provided.

  6. Ahsa1 and Hsp90 activity confers more severe craniofacial phenotypes in a zebrafish model of hypoparathyroidism, sensorineural deafness and renal dysplasia (HDR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Sheehan-Rooney

    2013-09-01

    The severity of most human birth defects is highly variable. Our ability to diagnose, treat and prevent defects relies on our understanding of this variability. Mutation of the transcription factor GATA3 in humans causes the highly variable hypoparathyroidism, sensorineural deafness and renal dysplasia (HDR syndrome. Although named for a triad of defects, individuals with HDR can also exhibit craniofacial defects. Through a forward genetic screen for craniofacial mutants, we isolated a zebrafish mutant in which the first cysteine of the second zinc finger of Gata3 is mutated. Because mutation of the homologous cysteine causes HDR in humans, these zebrafish mutants could be a quick and effective animal model for understanding the role of gata3 in the HDR disease spectrum. We demonstrate that, unexpectedly, the chaperone proteins Ahsa1 and Hsp90 promote severe craniofacial phenotypes in our zebrafish model of HDR syndrome. The strengths of the zebrafish system, including rapid development, genetic tractability and live imaging, make this an important model for variability.

  7. Adaptive reshaper for high dynamic range and wide color gamut video compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Taoran; Pu, Fangjun; Yin, Peng; Pytlarz, Jaclyn; Chen, Tao; Husak, Walt

    2016-09-01

    High Dynamic Range (HDR) and Wider Color Gamut (WCG) content represents a greater range of luminance levels and a more complete reproduction of colors found in real-world scenes. The characteristics of HDR/WCG content are very different from the SDR content. It poses a challenge to the compression system which is originally designed for SDR content. Recently in MPEG/VCEG, two directions have been taken to improve compression performances for HDR/WCG video using HEVC Main10 codec. The first direction is to improve HDR-10 using encoder optimization. The second direction is to modify the video signal in pre/post processing to better fit compression system. The process therefore is out of coding loop and does not involve changes to the HEVC specification. Among many proposals in the second direction, reshaper is identified to be the key component. In this paper, a novel luma reshaper is presented which re-allocates the codewords to help codec improve subjective quality. In addition, encoder optimization can be performed jointly with reshaping. Experiments are conducted with ICtCp color difference signal. Simulation results show that if both joint optimization of reshaper and encoder are carried out, there is evidence that improvement over the HDR-10 anchor can be achieved.

  8. Observation and simulation of non-laminar flow phenomena at the HDR site near Soulth-sous-forets; Beobachtung und Simulation von nicht-laminarem Fliessverhalten am HDR-Standort Soultz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohl, T. [ETH Hoenggerberg, Zuerich (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Geophysik; Evans, K.F.; Hopkirk, R.J. [Polydynamics Engineering, Maennedorf (Switzerland); Jung, R. [Bundesanstalt fuer Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe, Hannover (Germany); Rybach, L. [ETH Hoenggerberg, Zuerich (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Geophysik und Radiometrie

    1997-12-01

    Three independent multi-rate flow experiments were conducted in 1994 and 1995 in the open hole depth interval of a wellbore at the Hot-Dry-Rocks (HDR) test site Soultz. The steady state and transient dowmhole pressure records gave clear indications of non-Darcian flow. A numerical model has been set-up to evaluate these two measurements. An excellent fit of the transient pressure responses of all three flow tests could be achieved by assuming a simple model geometry. The models predict fluid transport along a conduit with substantial surface area in which fully-turbulent flow is occurring. The parameters required by our best-fit simulation all fall into a physically reasonable range. Sensitivity analysis demonstrates a non-Darcian flow regime along highly conductive features. The existence of high capacity far-field faults as postulated in our model confirms earlier characterisations of the Soultz test site. (orig.) [Deutsch] In den Jahren 1994 und 1995 wurden drei unabhaengige Druck- bzw. Fliessratentests in den Bohrungen GPK1 und GPK2 des HDR Standortes Soultz durchgefuehrt. Sowohl die stationaeren wie auch die instationaeren Druckaufzeichnungen gaben bereits klare Hinweise auf nichtlaminare, turbulent-aehnliche Stroemungsverhaeltnisse. Zur genaueren Interpretation dieser Daten wurde das numerische Programm FRACTure erweitert. Unter der Annahme eines geometrisch einfachen Modells konnten die instationaeren Druckantworten sehr gut angepasst werden. Es gelang sogar, die beiden in GPK1 durchgefuehrten Tests durch dieselben Modelle zu erklaeren. Die hierfuer benoetigten Modellparameter liegen in einem physikalisch sinnvollem Rahmen und bestaetigen z.T. fruehere Untersuchungen. Die Existenz grosser Stoerungszonen, welche von den Modellen vorausgesetzt werden, bestaetigt ebenfalls fruehere Charakterisierungen des HDR Standortes Soultz als ein teilweise offenes hydraulisches System. (orig.)

  9. Mejora del rango dinámico en la digitalización de documentos desde una perspectiva patrimonial: evaluación de métodos de alto rango dinámico (HDR basados en exposiciones múltiples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robledano Arillo, Jesús

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the main quality problems in document digitization, especially with graphic documents, is the low dynamic range of the capture devices. A possible way to avoid this problem is to apply high dynamic range (HDR techniques based on multiple exposures. If these techniques prove to be suitable for the digitization of documents in the context of cultural heritage, it should be possible to obtain high quality digital captures while employing lower cost equipment, affordable enough for institutions with limited resources. In this paper we offer a theoretical and experimental approach to the concept and methods involved in the quality assessment of document digitization, the impact of dynamic range on image quality, and the viability of HDR techniques in the context of cultural heritage.

    Uno de los principales problemas de calidad en la digitalización de documentos, especialmente de carácter gráfico, es la falta de rango dinámico en los dispositivos de captura. Una posible vía de trabajo para evitarlo es la aplicación de técnicas de alto rango dinámico (HDR basadas en la fusión de múltiples capturas tomadas a diferentes exposiciones. Si se demuestra la idoneidad de estas técnicas en el contexto del patrimonio documental, podrían obtenerse capturas digitales de gran calidad con el empleo de equipamiento de menor coste y fácilmente asequible para instituciones con pocos recursos económicos. En este trabajo se realiza una aproximación teórica y experimental al concepto y métodos de evaluación de la calidad en la digitalización de documentos, la incidencia en la calidad del rango dinámico, y la viabilidad del uso de técnicas HDR en la digitalización de documentos con valor patrimonial.

  10. Lossy compression of floating point high-dynamic range images using JPEG2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Dominic; Kaup, Andre

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, a new technique called High Dynamic Range (HDR) has gained attention in the image processing field. By representing pixel values with floating point numbers, recorded images can hold significantly more luminance information than ordinary integer images. This paper focuses on the realization of a lossy compression scheme for HDR images. The JPEG2000 standard is used as a basic component and is efficiently integrated into the compression chain. Based on a detailed analysis of the floating point format and the human visual system, a concept for lossy compression is worked out and thoroughly optimized. Our scheme outperforms all other existing lossy HDR compression schemes and shows superior performance both at low and high bitrates.

  11. Comparison of methods for the measurement of radiation dose distributions in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy: Ge-doped optical fiber, EBT3 Gafchromic film, and PRESAGE{sup Registered-Sign} radiochromic plastic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, A. L. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Science, University of Surrey, Surrey GU2 7JP (United Kingdom); Department of Medical Physics, F-Level, Queen Alexandra Hospital, Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Portsmouth, Hampshire PO6 3LY (United Kingdom); Di Pietro, P.; Alobaidli, S.; Issa, F.; Doran, S.; Bradley, D. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Science, University of Surrey, Surrey GU2 7JP (United Kingdom); Nisbet, A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Science, University of Surrey, Surrey GU2 7JP (United Kingdom); Department of Medical Physics, Royal Surrey County Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XX (United Kingdom)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: Dose distribution measurement in clinical high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy is challenging, because of the high dose gradients, large dose variations, and small scale, but it is essential to verify accurate treatment planning and treatment equipment performance. The authors compare and evaluate three dosimetry systems for potential use in brachytherapy dose distribution measurement: Ge-doped optical fibers, EBT3 Gafchromic film with multichannel analysis, and the radiochromic material PRESAGE{sup Registered-Sign} with optical-CT readout. Methods: Ge-doped SiO{sub 2} fibers with 6 {mu}m active core and 5.0 mm length were sensitivity-batched and their thermoluminescent properties used via conventional heating and annealing cycles. EBT3 Gafchromic film of 30 {mu}m active thickness was calibrated in three color channels using a nominal 6 MV linear accelerator. A 48-bit transmission scanner and advanced multichannel analysis method were utilized to derive dose measurements. Samples of the solid radiochromic polymer PRESAGE{sup Registered-Sign }, 60 mm diameter and 100 mm height, were analyzed with a parallel beam optical CT scanner. Each dosimetry system was used to measure the dose as a function of radial distance from a Co-60 HDR source, with results compared to Monte Carlo TG-43 model data. Each system was then used to measure the dose distribution along one or more lines through typical clinical dose distributions for cervix brachytherapy, with results compared to treatment planning system (TPS) calculations. Purpose-designed test objects constructed of Solid Water and held within a full-scatter water tank were utilized. Results: All three dosimetry systems reproduced the general shape of the isolated source radial dose function and the TPS dose distribution. However, the dynamic range of EBT3 exceeded those of doped optical fibers and PRESAGE{sup Registered-Sign }, and the latter two suffered from unacceptable noise and artifact. For the experimental

  12. Evaluation of PC-ISO for customized, 3D printed, gynecologic 192Ir HDR brachytherapy applicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, J Adam M; Mellis, Katherine; Sethi, Rajni; Siauw, Timmy; Sudhyadhom, Atchar; Garg, Animesh; Goldberg, Ken; Hsu, I-Chow; Pouliot, Jean

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiation attenuation properties of PC-ISO, a commercially available, biocompatible, sterilizable 3D printing material, and its suitability for customized, single-use gynecologic (GYN) brachytherapy applicators that have the potential for accurate guiding of seeds through linear and curved internal channels. A custom radiochromic film dosimetry apparatus was 3D-printed in PC-ISO with a single catheter channel and a slit to hold a film segment. The apparatus was designed specifically to test geometry pertinent for use of this material in a clinical setting. A brachytherapy dose plan was computed to deliver a cylindrical dose distribution to the film. The dose plan used an 192Ir source and was normalized to 1500 cGy at 1 cm from the channel. The material was evaluated by comparing the film exposure to an identical test done in water. The Hounsfield unit (HU) distributions were computed from a CT scan of the apparatus and compared to the HU distribution of water and the HU distribution of a commercial GYN cylinder applicator. The dose depth curve of PC-ISO as measured by the radiochromic film was within 1% of water between 1 cm and 6 cm from the channel. The mean HU was -10 for PC-ISO and -1 for water. As expected, the honeycombed structure of the PC-ISO 3D printing process created a moderate spread of HU values, but the mean was comparable to water. PC-ISO is sufficiently water-equivalent to be compatible with our HDR brachytherapy planning system and clinical workflow and, therefore, it is suitable for creating custom GYN brachytherapy applicators. Our current clinical practice includes the use of custom GYN applicators made of commercially available PC-ISO when doing so can improve the patient's treatment. PACS number: none.

  13. Evaluation of PC-ISO for customized, 3D Printed, gynecologic 192-Ir HDR brachytherapy applicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, J Adam M; Mellis, Katherine; Sethi, Rajni; Siauw, Timmy; Sudhyadhom, Atchar; Garg, Animesh; Goldberg, Ken; Hsu, I-Chow; Pouliot, Jean

    2015-01-08

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiation attenuation properties of PC-ISO, a commercially available, biocompatible, sterilizable 3D printing material, and its suitability for customized, single-use gynecologic (GYN) brachytherapy applicators that have the potential for accurate guiding of seeds through linear and curved internal channels. A custom radiochromic film dosimetry apparatus was 3D-printed in PC-ISO with a single catheter channel and a slit to hold a film segment. The apparatus was designed specifically to test geometry pertinent for use of this material in a clinical setting. A brachytherapy dose plan was computed to deliver a cylindrical dose distribution to the film. The dose plan used an 192Ir source and was normalized to 1500 cGy at 1 cm from the channel. The material was evaluated by comparing the film exposure to an identical test done in water. The Hounsfield unit (HU) distributions were computed from a CT scan of the apparatus and compared to the HU distribution of water and the HU distribution of a commercial GYN cylinder applicator. The dose depth curve of PC-ISO as measured by the radiochromic film was within 1% of water between 1 cm and 6 cm from the channel. The mean HU was -10 for PC-ISO and -1 for water. As expected, the honeycombed structure of the PC-ISO 3D printing process created a moderate spread of HU values, but the mean was comparable to water. PC-ISO is sufficiently water-equivalent to be compatible with our HDR brachytherapy planning system and clinical workflow and, therefore, it is suitable for creating custom GYN brachytherapy applicators. Our current clinical practice includes the use of custom GYN applicators made of commercially available PC-ISO when doing so can improve the patient's treatment. 

  14. Accuracy Evaluation of Oncentra™ TPS in HDR Brachytherapy of Nasopharynx Cancer Using EGSnrc Monte Carlo Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadad K

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: HDR brachytherapy is one of the commonest methods of nasopharyngeal cancer treatment. In this method, depending on how advanced one tumor is, 2 to 6 Gy dose as intracavitary brachytherapy is prescribed. Due to high dose rate and tumor location, accuracy evaluation of treatment planning system (TPS is particularly important. Common methods used in TPS dosimetry are based on computations in a homogeneous phantom. Heterogeneous phantoms, especially patient-specific voxel phantoms can increase dosimetric accuracy. Materials and Methods: In this study, using CT images taken from a patient and ctcreate-which is a part of the DOSXYZnrc computational code, patient-specific phantom was made. Dose distribution was plotted by DOSXYZnrc and compared with TPS one. Also, by extracting the voxels absorbed dose in treatment volume, dosevolume histograms (DVH was plotted and compared with Oncentra™ TPS DVHs. Results: The results from calculations were compared with data from Oncentra™ treatment planning system and it was observed that TPS calculation predicts lower dose in areas near the source, and higher dose in areas far from the source relative to MC code. Absorbed dose values in the voxels also showed that TPS reports D90 value is 40% higher than the Monte Carlo method. Conclusion: Today, most treatment planning systems use TG-43 protocol. This protocol may results in errors such as neglecting tissue heterogeneity, scattered radiation as well as applicator attenuation. Due to these errors, AAPM emphasized departing from TG-43 protocol and approaching new brachytherapy protocol TG-186 in which patient-specific phantom is used and heterogeneities are affected in dosimetry

  15. HDR {sup 192}Ir source speed measurements using a high speed video camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonseca, Gabriel P. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares—IPEN-CNEN/SP, São Paulo 05508-000, Brazil and Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Viana, Rodrigo S. S.; Yoriyaz, Hélio [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares—IPEN-CNEN/SP, São Paulo 05508-000 (Brazil); Podesta, Mark [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Rubo, Rodrigo A.; Sales, Camila P. de [Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade de São Paulo—HC/FMUSP, São Paulo 05508-000 (Brazil); Reniers, Brigitte [Department of Radiation Oncology - MAASTRO, GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Research Group NuTeC, CMK, Hasselt University, Agoralaan Gebouw H, Diepenbeek B-3590 (Belgium); Verhaegen, Frank, E-mail: frank.verhaegen@maastro.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology - MAASTRO, GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Medical Physics Unit, Department of Oncology, McGill University, Montréal, Québec H3G 1A4 (Canada)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: The dose delivered with a HDR {sup 192}Ir afterloader can be separated into a dwell component, and a transit component resulting from the source movement. The transit component is directly dependent on the source speed profile and it is the goal of this study to measure accurate source speed profiles. Methods: A high speed video camera was used to record the movement of a {sup 192}Ir source (Nucletron, an Elekta company, Stockholm, Sweden) for interdwell distances of 0.25–5 cm with dwell times of 0.1, 1, and 2 s. Transit dose distributions were calculated using a Monte Carlo code simulating the source movement. Results: The source stops at each dwell position oscillating around the desired position for a duration up to (0.026 ± 0.005) s. The source speed profile shows variations between 0 and 81 cm/s with average speed of ∼33 cm/s for most of the interdwell distances. The source stops for up to (0.005 ± 0.001) s at nonprogrammed positions in between two programmed dwell positions. The dwell time correction applied by the manufacturer compensates the transit dose between the dwell positions leading to a maximum overdose of 41 mGy for the considered cases and assuming an air-kerma strength of 48 000 U. The transit dose component is not uniformly distributed leading to over and underdoses, which is within 1.4% for commonly prescribed doses (3–10 Gy). Conclusions: The source maintains its speed even for the short interdwell distances. Dose variations due to the transit dose component are much lower than the prescribed treatment doses for brachytherapy, although transit dose component should be evaluated individually for clinical cases.

  16. Additional androgen deprivation makes the difference. Biochemical recurrence-free survival in prostate cancer patients after HDR brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiffmann, Jonas; Tennstedt, Pierre; Beyer, Burkhard; Boehm, Katharina; Tilki, Derya; Salomon, Georg; Graefen, Markus [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martini-Clinic Prostate Cancer Center, Hamburg (Germany); Lesmana, Hans; Platz, Volker; Petersen, Cordula; Kruell, Andreas; Schwarz, Rudolf [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Radiation oncology, Hamburg (Germany)

    2015-04-01

    The role of additional androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) in prostate cancer (PCa) patients treated with combined HDR brachytherapy (HDR-BT) and external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) is still unknown. Consecutive PCa patients classified as D'Amico intermediate and high-risk who underwent HDR-BT and EBRT treatment ± ADT at our institution between January 1999 and February 2009 were assessed. Multivariable Cox regression models predicting biochemical recurrence (BCR) were performed. BCR-free survival was assessed with Kaplan-Meier analyses. Overall, 392 patients were assessable. Of these, 221 (56.4 %) underwent trimodality (HDR-BT and EBRT and ADT) and 171 (43.6 %) bimodality (HDR-BT and EBRT) treatment. Additional ADT administration reduced the risk of BCR (HR: 0.4, 95 % CI: 0.3-0.7, p < 0.001). D'Amico high-risk patients had superior BCR-free survival when additional ADT was administered (log-rank p < 0.001). No significant difference for BCR-free survival was recorded when additional ADT was administered to D'Amico intermediate-risk patients (log-rank p = 0.2). Additional ADT administration improves biochemical control in D'Amico high-risk patients when HDR-BT and EBRT are combined. Physicians should consider the oncological benefit of ADT administration for these patients during the decision-making process. (orig.) [German] Der Nutzen einer zusaetzlichen Hormonentzugstherapie (ADT, ''androgen deprivation therapy'') fuer Patienten mit Prostatakarzinom (PCa), welche mit einer Kombination aus HDR-Brachytherapie (HDR-BT) und perkutaner Bestrahlung (EBRT) behandelt werden, ist weiterhin ungeklaert. Fuer diese Studie wurden konsekutive, nach der D'Amico-Risikoklassifizierung in ''intermediate'' und ''high-risk'' eingeteilte Patienten ausgewaehlt, die zwischen Januar 1999 und Februar 2009 in unserem Institut eine kombinierte Therapie aus HDR-BT, EBRT ± ADT erhalten haben. Eine

  17. SU-E-T-783: Using Matrixx to Determine Transit Dose Contribution Over Clinically Useful Limits of HDR Source Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhagwat, M; O’Farrell, D; Wagar, M; Buzurovic, I; Friesen, S; Damato, A; Devlin, P; Cormack, R [Dana-Farber Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Most HDR brachytherapy treatment planning systems (TPS) use TG-43 formalism to calculate dose without including transit dose corrections. Historically, measurement of this contribution has required sophisticated apparatus unavailable in most hospitals. We use Matrixx to investigate several scenarios where transit dose contribution may effect a clinical treatment. Methods: Treatment plans were generated using Oncentra Brachy TPS (Version 4.3.0.410, Nucletron ) on a CT scan of a 24-catheter Freiburg applicator (Nucletron ) laid flat on the MatriXX (IBA) detector. This detector is an array of 1020 parallel plate ion chambers. All 24 catheters were digitized and dwells within a central square region of 5×5cm of the applicator were activated. Each of the active catheters had 6 dwells in increments of 1.0cm. The plans were normalized to 10mm. This places the 100% isodose line at the correct effective point of measurement, which lies half-way between the parallel plates of the ion chambers. It is also within the clinically relevant treatment depth for superficial applications. A total of 6 plans were delivered for 3 prescription doses, 1Gy, 2Gy and 4Gy using source activities of 2.9Ci and 11.2Ci. The MatriXX array was operated to capture dosimetric snaps every 500ms and yielded an integral dose at the end of treatment. Results: A comparison of integral dose from 2 different source activities shows that the transit dose contribution is larger when the source activity is higher. It is also observed that the relative transit dose contribution decreases as prescription dose increases. This is quantified by the Gamma analysis. Conclusion: We have demonstrated that the Matrixx detector can be used to evaluate the contribution for a HDR source during transit from the HDR afterloader to a dwell location, and between adjacent dwell locations.

  18. MO-FG-210-02: Implementation of Image-Guided Prostate HDR Brachytherapy Using MR-Ultrasound Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Libby, B. [University of Virginia (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Ultrasound (US) is one of the most widely used imaging modalities in medical practice. Since US imaging offers real-time imaging capability, it has becomes an excellent option to provide image guidance for brachytherapy (IGBT). (1) The physics and the fundamental principles of US imaging are presented, and the typical steps required to commission an US system for IGBT is provided for illustration. (2) Application of US for prostate HDR brachytherapy, including partial prostate treatments using MR-ultrasound co-registration to enable a focused treatment on the disease within the prostate is also presented. Prostate HDR with US image guidance planning can benefit from real time visualization of the needles, and fusion of the ultrasound images with T2 weighted MR allows the focusing of the treatment to the specific areas of disease within the prostate, so that the entire gland need not be treated. Finally, (3) ultrasound guidance for an eye plaque program is presented. US can be a key component of placement and QA for episcleral plaque brachytherapy for ocular cancer, and the UCLA eye plaque program with US for image guidance is presented to demonstrate the utility of US verification of plaque placement in improving the methods and QA in episcleral plaque brachytherapy. Learning Objectives: To understand the physics of an US system and the necessary aspects of commissioning US for image guided brachytherapy (IGBT). To understand real time planning of prostate HDR using ultrasound, and its application in partial prostate treatments using MR-ultrasound fusion to focus treatment on disease within the prostate. To understand the methods and QA in applying US for localizing the target and the implant during a episcleral plaque brachytherapy procedures.

  19. Estimation of distance error by fuzzy set theory required for strength determination of HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sudhir; Datta, D; Sharma, S D; Chourasiya, G; Babu, D A R; Sharma, D N

    2014-04-01

    Verification of the strength of high dose rate (HDR) (192)Ir brachytherapy sources on receipt from the vendor is an important component of institutional quality assurance program. Either reference air-kerma rate (RAKR) or air-kerma strength (AKS) is the recommended quantity to specify the strength of gamma-emitting brachytherapy sources. The use of Farmer-type cylindrical ionization chamber of sensitive volume 0.6 cm(3) is one of the recommended methods for measuring RAKR of HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy sources. While using the cylindrical chamber method, it is required to determine the positioning error of the ionization chamber with respect to the source which is called the distance error. An attempt has been made to apply the fuzzy set theory to estimate the subjective uncertainty associated with the distance error. A simplified approach of applying this fuzzy set theory has been proposed in the quantification of uncertainty associated with the distance error. In order to express the uncertainty in the framework of fuzzy sets, the uncertainty index was estimated and was found to be within 2.5%, which further indicates that the possibility of error in measuring such distance may be of this order. It is observed that the relative distance li estimated by analytical method and fuzzy set theoretic approach are consistent with each other. The crisp values of li estimated using analytical method lie within the bounds computed using fuzzy set theory. This indicates that li values estimated using analytical methods are within 2.5% uncertainty. This value of uncertainty in distance measurement should be incorporated in the uncertainty budget, while estimating the expanded uncertainty in HDR (192)Ir source strength measurement.

  20. SU-E-T-380: Evaluation of BEBIG HDR 60Co System for AccuBoost Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zehtabian, M; Sina, S [Shiraz University, Shiraz, Fars (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rivard, M [Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Meigooni, A Soleimani [Comprehensive Cancer Center of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In this project, the possibility of utilizing the BEBIG 60Co HDR system for AccuBoostTM treatment has been evaluated. Methods: Dose distributions in various breast sizes have been calculated for both Co-60 and Ir-192 sources using the MCNP5 code. These calculations were performed in breast tissues with thicknesses of 4cm, 6cm, and 8cm. The initial calculations were performed with the same applicator dimensions as the existing applicators used with the HDR Ir-192 system. The activity of the Co-60 source was selected such that the dose at the breast center was the same as the values from 192Ir. Then, the applicator thicknesses were increased to twice of those used with HDR Ir-192 system, for reducing skin and chest doses by Co-60 system. Dose to breast skin and chest wall were compared for both applicators types, with and without inclusion of a focusing cone at the applicator center. Results: The results showed that loading HDR Co-60 source inside the thin applicators impose higher doses to breast skin and chest wall compared to the 192Ir source. The area of the chest wall covered by 10Gy when treated by Co-60 with the thin and thick applicators, or treated by Ir-192 with thin applicator are 79cm2, 39cm2, and 3.8cm2, respectively. These values are reduced to 34cm2, 0cm2, and 0cm2 by using the focusing cone. It is worth noting that the breast skin areas covered by the 60Gy isodose line are 9.9cm2 and 7.8cm2 for Co-60 with the thin and thick applicators, respectively, while it is 20cm2 for Ir-192 when no focusing cone is present. These values are 0cm2, 0cm2, and 11cm2 in the presence of the focusing cone. Conclusion: The results indicate that using Co-60 with the thicker applicators is beneficial because of the higher half-life of Co-60, and the reduced maximum skin dose when compared with Ir-192.

  1. Dosimetric analysis of Co-60 source based high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy: A case series of ten patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurjar, Om Prakash; Batra, Manika; Bagdare, Priyusha; Kaushik, Sandeep; Tyagi, Atul; Naik, Ayush; Bhandari, Virendra; Gupta, Krishna Lal

    2016-01-01

    To analyse the dosimetric parameters of Co-60 based high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy plans for patients of carcinoma uterine cervix. Co-60 high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy unit has been introduced in past few years and is gaining importance owing to its long half life, economical benefits and comparable clinical outcome compared to Ir-192 HDR brachytherapy. A study was conducted on ten patients with locally advanced carcinoma of the uterine cervix (Ca Cx). Computed tomography (CT) images were taken after three channel applicator insertions. The planning for 7 Gray per fraction (7 Gy/#) was done for Co-60 HDR brachytherapy unit following the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) guidelines. All the patients were treated with 3# with one week interval between fractions. The mean dose to high risk clinical target volumes (HRCTV) for D90 (dose to 90% volume) was found to be 102.05% (Standard Deviation (SD): 3.07). The mean D2cc (dose to 2 cubic centimeter volume) of the bladder, rectum and sigmoid were found to be 15.9 Gy (SD: 0.58), 11.5 Gy (SD: 0.91) and 4.1 Gy (SD: 1.52), respectively. The target coverage and doses to organs at risk (OARs) were achieved as per the ABS guidelines. Hence, it can be concluded that the Co-60 HDR brachytherapy unit is a good choice especially for the centers with a small number of brachytherapy procedures as no frequent source replacement is required like in an Ir-192 HDR unit.

  2. Medically inoperable endometrial cancer in patients with a high body mass index (BMI): Patterns of failure after 3-D image-based high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Acharya, Sahaja; Esthappan, Jacqueline; Badiyan, Shahed

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: High BMI is a reason for medical inoperability in patients with endometrial cancer in the United States. Definitive radiation is an alternative therapy for these patients; however, data on patterns of failure after definitive radiotherapy are lacking. We describe...... the patterns of failure after definitive treatment with 3-D image-based high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy for medically inoperable endometrial cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty-three consecutive patients with endometrial cancer FIGO stages I-III were treated definitively with HDR brachytherapy...

  3. A case of a superficial spreading melanoma in situ diagnosed via digital dermoscopic monitoring with high dynamic range conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Toshitsugu; Tanaka, Masaru

    2014-01-01

    A 48-year-old woman presented with a 3 mm, pigmented macule at her first visit to our clinic. The macule, which showed complete symmetry and a typical network, was tentatively diagnosed as a Clark nevus; a 6-month follow-up was recommended, and the patient returned 7 months later. At the second visit, the lesion had enlarged to a diameter of 5 mm, and dermoscopy revealed that it had maintained its typical pigment network. At this point, evidence-based monitoring would have led to excision but the decision was made to continue monitoring. Owing to poor compliance, the patient went another 2 years without follow-up. When we assess small lesions, such as this, the usefulness of dermoscopy is apparent. Additionally, we examined the benefits and drawbacks of high dynamic range (HDR) conversion of the dermoscopy images and their helpfulness for inspecting small lesions. Although the delicate structures present in the lesion can be recognized by a dermoscopy expert and HDR image conversion has a capacity to highlight important structures, there is also a risk that HDR image conversion may mask some of the structural changes. However, a comparison of the original dermoscopy images with the HDR-converted images provides newly trained dermoscopists the opportunity to recognize new findings and to distinguish the differences in the findings between both the types of images. Therefore, such comparisons might be useful for obtaining an accurate diagnosis by using dermoscopy and HDR image conversion. PMID:25396087

  4. A thermo-hydro-mechanical coupled model in local thermal non-equilibrium for fractured HDR reservoir with double porosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelet, R.; Loret, B.; Khalili, N.

    2012-07-01

    The constitutive thermo-hydro-mechanical equations of fractured media are embodied in the theory of mixtures applied to three-phase poroelastic media. The solid skeleton contains two distinct cavities filled with the same fluid. Each of the three phases is endowed with its own temperature. The constitutive relations governing the thermomechanical behavior, generalized diffusion and transfer are structured by, and satisfy, the dissipation inequality. The cavities exchange both mass and energy. Mass exchanges are driven by the jump in scaled chemical potential, and energy exchanges by the jump in coldness. The finite element approximation uses the displacement vector, the two fluid pressures and the three temperatures as primary variables. It is used to analyze a generic hot dry rock geothermal reservoir. Three parameters of the model are calibrated from the thermal outputs of Fenton Hill and Rosemanowes HDR reservoirs. The calibrated model is next applied to simulate circulation tests at the Fenton Hill HDR reservoir. The finer thermo-hydro-mechanical response provided by the dual porosity model with respect to a single porosity model is highlighted in a parameter analysis. Emphasis is put on the influence of the fracture spacing, on the effective stress response and on the permeation of the fluid into the porous blocks. The dual porosity model yields a thermally induced effective stress that is less tensile compared with the single porosity response. This effect becomes significant for large fracture spacings. In agreement with field data, fluid loss is observed to be high initially and to decrease with time.

  5. A linear programming model for optimizing HDR brachytherapy dose distributions with respect to mean dose in the DVH-tail

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holm, Åsa; Larsson, Torbjörn [Department of Mathematics, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Tedgren, Åsa Carlsson [Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics, Linköping University, SE 581-83 Linköping, Sweden and Swedish Radiation Safety Authority, SE-171 16 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Recent research has shown that the optimization model hitherto used in high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy corresponds weakly to the dosimetric indices used to evaluate the quality of a dose distribution. Although alternative models that explicitly include such dosimetric indices have been presented, the inclusion of the dosimetric indices explicitly yields intractable models. The purpose of this paper is to develop a model for optimizing dosimetric indices that is easier to solve than those proposed earlier.Methods: In this paper, the authors present an alternative approach for optimizing dose distributions for HDR brachytherapy where dosimetric indices are taken into account through surrogates based on the conditional value-at-risk concept. This yields a linear optimization model that is easy to solve, and has the advantage that the constraints are easy to interpret and modify to obtain satisfactory dose distributions.Results: The authors show by experimental comparisons, carried out retrospectively for a set of prostate cancer patients, that their proposed model corresponds well with constraining dosimetric indices. All modifications of the parameters in the authors' model yield the expected result. The dose distributions generated are also comparable to those generated by the standard model with respect to the dosimetric indices that are used for evaluating quality.Conclusions: The authors' new model is a viable surrogate to optimizing dosimetric indices and quickly and easily yields high quality dose distributions.

  6. Investigation of Dosimetric Parameters of $^{192}$Ir MicroSelectron v2 HDR Brachytherapy Source Using EGSnrc Monte Carlo Code

    CERN Document Server

    Naeem, Hamza; Zheng, Huaqing; Cao, Ruifen; Pei, Xi; Hu, Liqin; Wu, Yican

    2016-01-01

    The $^{192}$Ir sources are widely used for high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatments. The aim of this study is to simulate $^{192}$Ir MicroSelectron v2 HDR brachytherapy source and calculate the air kerma strength, dose rate constant, radial dose function and anisotropy function established in the updated AAPM Task Group 43 protocol. The EGSnrc Monte Carlo (MC) code package is used to calculate these dosimetric parameters, including dose contribution from secondary electron source and also contribution of bremsstrahlung photons to air kerma strength. The Air kerma strength, dose rate constant and radial dose function while anisotropy functions for the distance greater than 0.5 cm away from the source center are in good agreement with previous published studies. Obtained value from MC simulation for air kerma strength is $9.762\\times 10^{-8} \\textrm{UBq}^{-1}$and dose rate constant is $1.108\\pm 0.13\\%\\textrm{cGyh}^{-1} \\textrm{U}^{-1}$.

  7. A CT-based analytical dose calculation method for HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poon, Emily; Verhaegen, Frank [Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, 1650 Cedar Avenue, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada); Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, 1650 Cedar Avenue, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada) and Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht 6229ET (Netherlands)

    2009-09-15

    esophagus patient plans, P{sub {gamma}{>=}1} are {>=}99% for both calculation methods. Conclusions: A correction-based dose calculation method has been validated for HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy. Its high calculation efficiency makes it feasible for use in treatment planning. Because tissue inhomogeneity effects are small and primary dose predominates in the near-source region, TG-43 is adequate for target dose estimation provided shielding and contrast solution are not used.

  8. A CT-based analytical dose calculation method for HDR 192Ir brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Emily; Verhaegen, Frank

    2009-09-01

    = 99% for both calculation methods. A correction-based dose calculation method has been validated for HDR 192Ir brachytherapy. Its high calculation efficiency makes it feasible for use in treatment planning. Because tissue inhomogeneity effects are small and primary dose predominates in the near-source region, TG-43 is adequate for target dose estimation provided shielding and contrast solution are not used.

  9. SU-C-16A-03: Direction Modulated Brachytherapy for HDR Treatment of Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, D; Webster, M; Scanderbeg, D; Yashar, C; Choi, D; Song, B; Song, W [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Devic, S [McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada); Ravi, A [Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate a new Directional Modulated Brachytherapy (DMBT) intra-uterine tandem using various 192-Ir after-loaders. Methods: Dose distributions from the 192-Ir sources were modulated using a 6.3mm diameter tungsten shield (18.0g/cm3). The source moved along 6 longitudinal grooves, each 1.3mm in diameter, evenly spaced along periphery of the shield, The tungsten rod was enclosqed by 0.5mm thick Delrin (1.41g/cc). Monte Carlo N particle (MCNPX) was used to calculate dose distributions. 51million particles were calculated on 504 cores of a supercomputer. Fifteen different patients originally treated with a traditional tandem-and-ovoid applicator, with 5 fractions each, (15 patients X 5 fxs = 75 plans) were re-planned with the DMBT applicator combined with traditional ovoids, on an in-house developed HDR brachytherapy planning platform, which used intensity modulated planning capabilities using a constrained gradient optimization algorithm. For all plans the prescription dose was 6 Gy and they were normalized to match the clinical treated V100. Results: Generally, the DMBT plan quality was a remarkable improvement from conventional T and O plans because of the anisotropic dose distribution of DMBT. The largest difference was to the bladder which had a 0.59±0.87 Gy (8.5±28.7%) reduction in dose. This was because of the the horseshoe shape (U-shape) of the bladder. The dose reduction to rectum and sigmoid were 0.48±0.55 Gy (21.1±27.2%) and 0.10±0.38 Gy (40.6±214.9%), respectively. The D90 to the HRCTV was 6.55±0.96 Gy (conventional T and O) and 6.59±1.06 Gy (DMBT). Conclusion: For image guided adaptive brachytherapy, greater flexibility of radiation intensity is essential and DMBT can be the solution.

  10. Commissioning of Varian ring & tandem HDR applicators: reproducibility and interobserver variability of dwell position offsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Ryan; Zhuang, Tingliang; Steffey, Beverly A; Song, Haijun; Craciunescu, Oana I

    2011-11-15

    Studies have shown that source dwells within Varian's HDR CT/MR compatible ring applicators can deviate from intended positions by several millimeters. Quantifying this offset is an important part of commissioning. The aims of this study were to: 1) determine the reproducibility of the offset, 2) study the interobserver variation in the offset's measurement, and 3) quantify the dosimetric impact of the offset. Offsets were measured for four ring applicators: two 30°, one 45°, and one 60°. Dwell positions were measured five times for each ring to determine the reproducibility of source positioning. Experiments were done to compare two separate source wires, as well as different time points within a single source wire's lifecycle. Data were analyzed by three independent observers. To quantify the dosimetric impact of the offset, a treatment plan was generated using BrachyVision. The dose to point A, and the D(2cc) metric for rectum and bladder were calculated with and without the offset. For the 45° and 60° rings, measured offsets were 3.0 mm and 3.6 mm, respectively. The 30° ring showed substantial variation in distal dwell positions (maximum difference between the five experiments of 2.9 mm). Subsequent testing of a replacement ring showed an offset of 2.4 mm that was more reproducible. Offsets varied less than 1 mm between different source wires, and changed less than 1 mm over the course of a source wire's lifecycle. When comparing observers, the average range in a measurement of a dwell position was 0. 5 mm (σ = 0.2 mm, max 1.3 mm). The offset resulted in dose variations to point A, bladder, and rectum of less than 1%, 2%, and 5%, respectively. Results indicate that Varian rings can show systematic and random offsets of more than 3 mm. Some can be considered defective and should be replaced. Each applicator should be individually commissioned and reproducibility should be confirmed with multiple tests.

  11. Faulting mechanisms and stress regime at the European HDR site of Soultz-sous-Forets, France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuenot, Nicolas; Charlety, Jean; Haessler, Henri [Institut de Physique du Globe de Strasbourg, Ecole et Observatoire des Sciences de la Terre (IPGS-EOST), 5 rue Rene Descartes, 67084 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Dorbath, Louis [Institut de Physique du Globe de Strasbourg, Ecole et Observatoire des Sciences de la Terre (IPGS-EOST), 5 rue Rene Descartes, 67084 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Institut de Recherche pour le Developpement, Laboratoire des Mecanismes et Transferts en Geologie (IRD, LMTG), 14 Avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse (France)

    2006-10-15

    The state of stress and its implications for shear on fault planes during fluid injection are crucial issues for the HDR (Hot Dry Rock) or EGS (Enhanced or Engineered Geothermal System) concept. This is especially true for hydraulic stimulation experiments, aimed at enhancing the connectivity of a borehole to the natural fracture network, since they tend to induce the shearing of fractures, which is controlled by the local stress regime. During the 2000 and 2003 stimulation tests at Soultz-sous-Forets, France, about 10,000 microearthquakes were located with a surface seismological network. Hundreds of double-couple (DC) focal mechanisms were automatically determined from first-motion polarities using the FPFIT program [Reasenberg, P.A., Oppenheimer, D., 1985. FPFIT, FPPLOT and FPPAGE: Fortran computer programs for calculating and displaying earthquake fault-plane solutions. US Geological Survey Open-File Report 85-739, 25 pp.]. The majority of these mechanisms indicate normal-faulting movement with a more or less pronounced strike-slip component. Some quasi-pure strike-slip events also occurred, especially in the deeper part of the stimulated rock volume, at more than 5 km depth. Although we found a double-couple solution for all events, we tried to observe and quantify the proportion of the non-double-couple (NDC) component in the seismic moment tensor for several microseisms from the 2003 data. The study shows that the NDC is higher for the events in the vicinity of the injection well than for the events far from the well. We used the method of Rivera and Cisternas [Rivera, L., Cisternas, A., 1990. Stress tensor and fault-plane solutions for a population of earthquakes. Bull. Seismol. Soc. Am. 80, 600-614.] to perform the inversion of the deviatoric part of the stress tensor from P-wave polarities. This method was applied to different datasets from the 2000 test, taken from the shallower and deeper parts of the stimulated region. The results show a stable

  12. Monte Carlo study of the impact of a magnetic field on the dose distribution in MRI-guided HDR brachytherapy using Ir-192

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beld, E; Seevinck, P R; Lagendijk, J J W; Viergever, M A; Moerland, M A

    2016-01-01

    In the process of developing a robotic MRI-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy treatment, the influence of the MRI scanner's magnetic field on the dose distribution needs to be investigated. A magnetic field causes a deflection of electrons in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic f

  13. Targeting Homology-Directed Recombinational Repair (HDR) of Chromosomal Breaks to Sensitize Prostate Cancer Cells to Poly (ADP-Ribose) Polymerase (PARP) Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN ABR Holman Research Scholar Nucletron Prostate HDR Training Course 2009 Chief Resident 2009-2010 2005...of North America (RSNA) Research & 2007 Education Foundation Grant • American Board of Radiology Holman Research Pathway 2006 • Alpha Omega...group, UAB-CCC 2011- • Holman Research Pathway Mentor 2010- • Residency applicant interviewer 2010- • Translational Breast Cancer

  14. HDR monotherapy for prostate cancer: A simulation study to determine the effect of catheter displacement on target coverage and normal tissue irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.-K.K. Kolkman-Deurloo (Inger-Karina); M.A. Roos (Martin); S. Aluwini (Shafak)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: The aim of this study was to systematically analyse the effect of catheter displacements both on target coverage and normal tissue irradiation in fractionated high dose rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy, using a simulation study, and to define tolerances for catheter displacemen

  15. Gold marker displacement due to needle insertion during HDR-brachytherapy for treatment of prostate cancer: A prospective cone beam computed tomography and kilovoltage on-board imaging (kV-OBI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herrmann Markus KA

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To evaluate gold marker displacement due to needle insertion during HDR-brachytherapy for therapy of prostate cancer. Patients and methods 18 patients entered into this prospective evaluation. Three gold markers were implanted into the prostate during the first HDR-brachytherapy procedure after the irradiation was administered. Three days after marker implantation all patients had a CT-scan for planning purpose of the percutaneous irradiation. Marker localization was defined on the digitally-reconstructed-radiographs (DRR for daily (VMAT technique or weekly (IMRT set-up error correction. Percutaneous therapy started one week after first HDR-brachytherapy. After the second HDR-brachytherapy, two weeks after first HDR-brachtherapy, a cone-beam CT-scan was done to evaluate marker displacement due to needle insertion. In case of marker displacement, the actual positions of the gold markers were adjusted on the DRR. Results The value of the gold marker displacement due to the second HDR-brachytherapy was analyzed in all patients and for each gold marker by comparison of the marker positions in the prostate after soft tissue registration of the prostate of the CT-scans prior the first and second HDR-brachytherapy. The maximum deviation was 5 mm, 7 mm and 12 mm for the anterior-posterior, lateral and superior-inferior direction. At least one marker in each patient showed a significant displacement and therefore new marker positions were adjusted on the DRRs for the ongoing percutaneous therapy. Conclusions Needle insertion in the prostate due to HDR-brachytherapy can lead to gold marker displacements. Therefore, it is necessary to verify the actual position of markers after the second HDR-brachytherapy. In case of significant deviations, a new DRR with the adjusted marker positions should be generated for precise positioning during the ongoing percutaneous irradiation.

  16. SU-E-T-459: Impact of Source Position and Traveling Time On HDR Skin Surface Applicator Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, J; Barker, C; Zaider, M; Cohen, G [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Observed dosimetric discrepancy between measured and treatment planning system (TPS) predicted values, during applicator commissioning, were traced to source position uncertainty in the applicator. We quantify the dosimetric impact of this geometric uncertainty, and of the source traveling time inside the applicator, and propose corrections for clinical use. Methods: We measured the dose profiles from the Varian Leipzig-style (horizontal) HDR skin applicator, using EBT3 film, photon diode, and optically stimulated luminescence dosimeter (OSLD) and three different GammaMed HDR afterloders. The dose profiles and depth dose of each aperture were measured at several depths (up to about 10 mm, depending on the dosimeter). The measured dose profiles were compared with Acuros calculated profiles in BrachyVision TPS. For the impact of the source position, EBT3 film measurements were performed with applicator, facing-down and facing-up orientations. The dose with and without source traveling was measured with diode detector using HDR timer and electrometer timer, respectively. Results: Depth doses measured using the three dosimeters were in good agreement, but were consistently higher than the Acuros dose calculations. Measurements with the applicator facing-up were significantly lower than those in the facing-down position with maximum difference of about 18% at the surface, due to source sag inside the applicator. Based on the inverse-square law, the effective source sag was evaluated to be about 0.5 mm from the planned position. The additional dose from the source traveling was about 2.8% for 30 seconds with 10 Ci source, decreasing with increased dwelling time and decreased source activity. Conclusion: Due to the short source-to-surface distance of the applicator, the small source sag inside the applicator has significant dosimetric impact, which should be considered before the clinical use of the applicator. Investigation of the effect for other applicators

  17. Radiobiological evaluation of the influence of dwell time modulation restriction in HIPO optimized HDR prostate brachytherapy implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimos Baltas

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: One of the issues that a planner is often facing in HDR brachytherapy is the selective existence of high dose volumes around some few dominating dwell positions. If there is no information available about its necessity (e.g. location of a GTV, then it is reasonable to investigate whether this can be avoided. This effect can be eliminated by limiting the free modulation of the dwell times. HIPO, an inverse treatment plan optimization algorithm, offers this option.In treatment plan optimization there are various methods that try to regularize the variation of dose non-uniformity using purely dosimetric measures. However, although these methods can help in finding a good dose distribution they do not provide any information regarding the expected treatment outcome as described by radiobiology based indices.Material and methods: The quality of 12 clinical HDR brachytherapy implants for prostate utilizing HIPO and modulation restriction (MR has been compared to alternative plans with HIPO and free modulation (without MR.All common dose-volume indices for the prostate and the organs at risk have been considered together with radiobiological measures. The clinical effectiveness of the different dose distributions was investigated by calculating the response probabilities of the tumors and organs-at-risk (OARs involved in these prostate cancer cases. The radiobiological models used are the Poisson and the relative seriality models. Furthermore, the complication-free tumor control probability, P+ and the biologically effective uniform dose (D = were used for treatment plan evaluation and comparison.Results: Our results demonstrate that HIPO with a modulation restriction value of 0.1-0.2 delivers high quality plans which are practically equivalent to those achieved with free modulation regarding the clinically used dosimetric indices.In the comparison, many of the dosimetric and radiobiological indices showed significantly different results. The

  18. Vibration testing and analysis of a multiply supported piping system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, B.J.; Kot, C.A.; Srinivasan, M.G.

    1987-01-01

    The behavior of nuclear power plant piping systems during earthquake, and the most appropriate and economical mode of supporting such piping, is an issue of major concern. Consequently, the verification and validation of piping analysis methods and assumptions used in the design and safety assessment of nuclear power plants are of great interest. As part of its program on the validation of seismic calculational methods the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is specifically interested in the validation of the multiple support piping analysis module of the SMACS (Seismic Methodology Analysis Chain with Statistics) computer code. Data for the comparison of the dynamic behavior of various pipe hanger configurations and for the validation of piping response analyses were recently obtained in the large shaker experiments (SHAG) conducted at the HDR (Heissdampfreaktor) test facility in Kahl/Main, Federal Republic of Germany. This paper describes preliminary results from the SHAG piping response tests and the approach taken in the validation of the SMACS code piping analysis.

  19. A Maximum a Posteriori Estimation Framework for Robust High Dynamic Range Video Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuelong; Lee, Chul; Monga, Vishal

    2017-03-01

    High dynamic range (HDR) image synthesis from multiple low dynamic range exposures continues to be actively researched. The extension to HDR video synthesis is a topic of significant current interest due to potential cost benefits. For HDR video, a stiff practical challenge presents itself in the form of accurate correspondence estimation of objects between video frames. In particular, loss of data resulting from poor exposures and varying intensity makes conventional optical flow methods highly inaccurate. We avoid exact correspondence estimation by proposing a statistical approach via maximum a posterior estimation, and under appropriate statistical assumptions and choice of priors and models, we reduce it to an optimization problem of solving for the foreground and background of the target frame. We obtain the background through rank minimization and estimate the foreground via a novel multiscale adaptive kernel regression technique, which implicitly captures local structure and temporal motion by solving an unconstrained optimization problem. Extensive experimental results on both real and synthetic data sets demonstrate that our algorithm is more capable of delivering high-quality HDR videos than current state-of-the-art methods, under both subjective and objective assessments. Furthermore, a thorough complexity analysis reveals that our algorithm achieves better complexity-performance tradeoff than conventional methods.

  20. SU-E-T-507: Interfractional Variation of Fiducial Marker Position During HDR Brachytherapy with Cervical Interstitial Needle Template

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, S; Kim, R; Benhabib, S; Araujo, J; Burnett, L; Duan, J; Popple, R; Wu, X; Cardan, R; Brezovich, I [UniversityAlabama Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: HDR brachytherapy using interstitial needle template for cervical cancer is commonly delivered in 4-5 fractions. Routine verification of needle positions before each fraction is often based on radiographic imaging of implanted fiducial markers. The current study evaluated interfractional displacement of implanted fiducial markers using CT images. Methods: 9 sequential patients with cervical interstitial needle implants were evaluated. The superior and inferior borders of the target volumes were defined by fiducial markers in planning CT. The implant position was verified with kV orthogonal images before each fraction. A second CT was acquired prior 3rd fraction (one or 2 days post planning CT). Distances from inferior and superior fiducial markers to pubic symphysis plane (perpendicular to vaginal obtulator)were measured. Distance from needle tip of a reference needle (next to the inferior marker) to the pubic symphysis plane was also determined. The difference in fiducial marker distance or needle tip distance between planning CT and CT prior 3rd fraction were measured to assess markers migration and needle displacement. Results: The mean inferior marker displacement was 4.5 mm and ranged 0.9 to 11.3 mm. The mean superior marker displacement was 2.7 mm and ranged 0 to 10.4 mm. There was a good association between inferior and superior marker displacement (r=0.95). Mean averaged inferior and superior marker displacement was 3.3 mm and ranged from 0.1 to 10.9 mm, with a standard deviation of 3.2 mm. The mean needle displacement was 5.6 mm and ranged 0.2 to 15.6 mm. Needle displacements were reduced (p<0.05) after adjusting according to needle-to-fiducials distance. Conclusion: There were small fiducial marker displacements between HDR fractions. Our study suggests a target margin of 9.7 mm to cover interfractional marker displacements (in 95% cases) for pretreatment verification based on radiographic imaging.

  1. An intrauterine ultrasound applicator for targeted delivery of thermal therapy in conjunction with HDR brachytherapy to the cervix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootton, Jeffery H.; Juang, Titania; Pouliot, Jean; Hsu, I.-Chow Joe; Diederich, Chris J.

    2009-02-01

    An intracavitary hyperthermia applicator for targeted heat delivery to the cervix was developed based on a linear array of sectored tubular ultrasound transducers that provides truly 3-D heating control (angular and along the length). A central conduit can incorporate an HDR source for sequential or simultaneous delivery of heat and radiation. Hyperthermia treatment volumes were determined from brachytherapy treatment planning data and used as a basis for biothermal simulations analyzing the effects of device parameters, tissue properties, and catheter materials on heating patterns. Devices were then developed with 1-3 elements at 6.5-8 MHz with 90-180° sectors and a 15-35 mm heating length, housed within a 6-mm diameter water-cooled PET catheter. Directional heating from sectored transducers could extend lateral penetration of therapeutic heating (41°C) >2 cm while maintaining rectum and bladder temperatures within 12 mm below thermal damage thresholds. Imaging artifacts were evaluated with standard CT, cone beam CT, and MR images. MR thermal imaging was used to demonstrate shaping of heating profiles in axial and coronal slices with artifact <2 mm from the device. The impact of the high-Z applicator materials on the HDR dose distribution was assessed using a well-type ionization chamber and was found to be less than 6% attenuation, which can readily be accounted for with treatment planning software. The intrauterine ultrasound device has demonstrated potential for 3-D conformal heating of clinical tumors in the delivery of targeted hyperthermia in conjunction with brachytherapy to the cervix.

  2. Dosimetric evaluation of PLATO and Oncentra treatment planning systems for High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy gynecological treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Hardev; Herman, Tania De La Fuente; Showalter, Barry; Thompson, Spencer J.; Syzek, Elizabeth J.; Herman, Terence; Ahmad, Salahuddin

    2012-10-01

    This study compares the dosimetric differences in HDR brachytherapy treatment plans calculated with Nucletron's PLATO and Oncentra MasterPlan treatment planning systems (TPS). Ten patients (1 T1b, 1 T2a, 6 T2b, 2 T4) having cervical carcinoma, median age of 43.5 years (range, 34-79 years) treated with tandem & ring applicator in our institution were selected retrospectively for this study. For both Plato and Oncentra TPS, the same orthogonal films anterior-posterior (AP) and lateral were used to manually draw the prescription and anatomical points using definitions from the Manchester system and recommendations from the ICRU report 38. Data input for PLATO was done using a digitizer and Epson Expression 10000XL scanner was used for Oncentra where the points were selected on the images in the screen. The prescription doses for these patients were 30 Gy to points right A (RA) and left A (LA) delivered in 5 fractions with Ir-192 HDR source. Two arrangements: one dwell position and two dwell positions on the tandem were used for dose calculation. The doses to the patient points right B (RB) and left B (LB), and to the organs at risk (OAR), bladder and rectum for each patient were calculated. The mean dose and the mean percentage difference in dose calculated by the two treatment planning systems were compared. Paired t-tests were used for statistical analysis. No significant differences in mean RB, LB, bladder and rectum doses were found with p-values > 0.14. The mean percent difference of doses in RB, LB, bladder and rectum are found to be less than 2.2%, 1.8%, 1.3% and 2.2%, respectively. Dose calculations based on the two different treatment planning systems were found to be consistent and the treatment plans can be made with either system in our department without any concern.

  3. TU-AB-201-04: Optimizing the Number of Catheter Implants and Their Tracks for Prostate HDR Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riofrio, D; Luan, S [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico (United States); Zhou, J [William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Ma, L [UCSF Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In prostate HDR brachytherapy, interstitial implants are placed manually on the fly. The aim for this research is to develop a computer algorithm to find optimal and reliable implant trajectories using minimal number of implants. Methods: Our new algorithm mainly uses these key ideas: (1) positive charged static particles are uniformly placed on the surface of prostate and critical structures such as urethra, bladder, and rectum. (2) Positive charged kinetic particles are placed at a cross-section of the prostate with an initial velocity parallel to the principal implant direction. (3) The kinetic particles move through the prostate, interacting with each other, spreading out, while staying away from the prostate surface and critical structures. The initial velocity ensures that the trajectories observe the curvature constraints of typical implant procedures. (4) The finial trajectories of kinetic particles are smoothed using a third-degree polynomial regression, which become the implant trajectories. (5) The dwelling times and final dose distribution are calculated using least-distance programming. Results: (1) We experimented with previously treated cases. Our plan achieves all prescription goals while reducing the number of implants by 41%! Our plan also has less uniform target dose, which implies a higher dose is delivered to the prostate. (2) We expect future implant procedures will be performed under the guidance of such pre-calculated trajectories. To assess the applicability, we randomly perturb the tracks to mimic the manual implant errors. Our studies showed the impact of these perturbations are negligible, which is compensated by the least distance programming. Conclusions: We developed a new inverse planning system for prostate HDR therapy that can find optimal implant trajectories while minimizing the number of implants. For future work, we plan to integrate our new inverse planning system with an existing needle tracking system.

  4. Dosimetric evaluation of PLATO and Oncentra treatment planning systems for High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy gynecological treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Hardev; De La Fuente Herman, Tania; Showalter, Barry; Thompson, Spencer J.; Syzek, Elizabeth J.; Herman, Terence; Ahmad, Salahuddin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peggy and Charles Stephenson Oklahoma Cancer Center, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK 73104 (United States)

    2012-10-23

    This study compares the dosimetric differences in HDR brachytherapy treatment plans calculated with Nucletron's PLATO and Oncentra MasterPlan treatment planning systems (TPS). Ten patients (1 T1b, 1 T2a, 6 T2b, 2 T4) having cervical carcinoma, median age of 43.5 years (range, 34-79 years) treated with tandem and ring applicator in our institution were selected retrospectively for this study. For both Plato and Oncentra TPS, the same orthogonal films anterior-posterior (AP) and lateral were used to manually draw the prescription and anatomical points using definitions from the Manchester system and recommendations from the ICRU report 38. Data input for PLATO was done using a digitizer and Epson Expression 10000XL scanner was used for Oncentra where the points were selected on the images in the screen. The prescription doses for these patients were 30 Gy to points right A (RA) and left A (LA) delivered in 5 fractions with Ir-192 HDR source. Two arrangements: one dwell position and two dwell positions on the tandem were used for dose calculation. The doses to the patient points right B (RB) and left B (LB), and to the organs at risk (OAR), bladder and rectum for each patient were calculated. The mean dose and the mean percentage difference in dose calculated by the two treatment planning systems were compared. Paired t-tests were used for statistical analysis. No significant differences in mean RB, LB, bladder and rectum doses were found with p-values > 0.14. The mean percent difference of doses in RB, LB, bladder and rectum are found to be less than 2.2%, 1.8%, 1.3% and 2.2%, respectively. Dose calculations based on the two different treatment planning systems were found to be consistent and the treatment plans can be made with either system in our department without any concern.

  5. High dynamic range subjective testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Brahim; Nilsson, Mike

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes of a set of subjective tests that the authors have carried out to assess the end user perception of video encoded with High Dynamic Range technology when viewed in a typical home environment. Viewers scored individual single clips of content, presented in High Definition (HD) and Ultra High Definition (UHD), in Standard Dynamic Range (SDR), and in High Dynamic Range (HDR) using both the Perceptual Quantizer (PQ) and Hybrid Log Gamma (HLG) transfer characteristics, and presented in SDR as the backwards compatible rendering of the HLG representation. The quality of SDR HD was improved by approximately equal amounts by either increasing the dynamic range or increasing the resolution to UHD. A further smaller increase in quality was observed in the Mean Opinion Scores of the viewers by increasing both the dynamic range and the resolution, but this was not quite statistically significant.

  6. In vivo dosimetry in the urethra using alanine/ESR during (192)Ir HDR brachytherapy of prostate cancer--a phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, Mathias; Wagner, Daniela; Selbach, Hans-Joachim; Hackel, Thomas; Hermann, Robert Michael; Hess, Clemens Friedrich; Vorwerk, Hilke

    2009-05-07

    A phantom study for dosimetry in the urethra using alanine/ESR during (192)Ir HDR brachytherapy of prostate cancer is presented. The measurement method of the secondary standard of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt had to be slightly modified in order to be able to measure inside a Foley catheter. The absorbed dose to water response of the alanine dosimetry system to (192)Ir was determined with a reproducibility of 1.8% relative to (60)Co. The resulting uncertainty for measurements inside the urethra was estimated to be 3.6%, excluding the uncertainty of the dose rate constant Lambda. The applied dose calculated by a treatment planning system is compared to the measured dose for a small series of (192)Ir HDR irradiations in a gel phantom. The differences between the measured and applied dose are well within the limits of uncertainty. Therefore, the method is considered to be suitable for measurements in vivo.

  7. In vivo dosimetry in the urethra using alanine/ESR during 192Ir HDR brachytherapy of prostate cancer—a phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, Mathias; Wagner, Daniela; Selbach, Hans-Joachim; Hackel, Thomas; Hermann, Robert Michael; Hess, Clemens Friedrich; Vorwerk, Hilke

    2009-05-01

    A phantom study for dosimetry in the urethra using alanine/ESR during 192Ir HDR brachytherapy of prostate cancer is presented. The measurement method of the secondary standard of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt had to be slightly modified in order to be able to measure inside a Foley catheter. The absorbed dose to water response of the alanine dosimetry system to 192Ir was determined with a reproducibility of 1.8% relative to 60Co. The resulting uncertainty for measurements inside the urethra was estimated to be 3.6%, excluding the uncertainty of the dose rate constant Λ. The applied dose calculated by a treatment planning system is compared to the measured dose for a small series of 192Ir HDR irradiations in a gel phantom. The differences between the measured and applied dose are well within the limits of uncertainty. Therefore, the method is considered to be suitable for measurements in vivo.

  8. In vivo dosimetry in the urethra using alanine/ESR during {sup 192}Ir HDR brachytherapy of prostate cancer-a phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anton, Mathias; Selbach, Hans-Joachim; Hackel, Thomas [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany); Wagner, Daniela; Hess, Clemens Friedrich; Vorwerk, Hilke [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, University Hospital Goettingen, Goettingen (Germany); Hermann, Robert Michael [Zentrum fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Bremen (Germany)], E-mail: mathias.anton@ptb.de

    2009-05-07

    A phantom study for dosimetry in the urethra using alanine/ESR during {sup 192}Ir HDR brachytherapy of prostate cancer is presented. The measurement method of the secondary standard of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt had to be slightly modified in order to be able to measure inside a Foley catheter. The absorbed dose to water response of the alanine dosimetry system to {sup 192}Ir was determined with a reproducibility of 1.8% relative to {sup 60}Co. The resulting uncertainty for measurements inside the urethra was estimated to be 3.6%, excluding the uncertainty of the dose rate constant {lambda}. The applied dose calculated by a treatment planning system is compared to the measured dose for a small series of {sup 192}Ir HDR irradiations in a gel phantom. The differences between the measured and applied dose are well within the limits of uncertainty. Therefore, the method is considered to be suitable for measurements in vivo.

  9. SU-E-T-254: Development of a HDR-BT QA Tool for Verification of Source Position with Oncentra Applicator Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumazaki, Y; Miyaura, K; Hirai, R; Miyazawa, K; Makino, S; Tamaki, T; Shikama, N; Kato, S [Saitama Medical University International Medical Center, Hidaka, Saitama (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a High Dose Rate Brachytherapy (HDR-BT) quality assurance (QA) tool for verification of source position with Oncentra applicator modeling, and to report the results of radiation source positions with this tool. Methods: We developed a HDR-BT QA phantom and automated analysis software for verification of source position with Oncentra applicator modeling for the Fletcher applicator used in the MicroSelectron HDR system. This tool is intended for end-to-end tests that mimic the clinical 3D image-guided brachytherapy (3D-IGBT) workflow. The phantom is a 30x30x3 cm cuboid phantom with radiopaque markers, which are inserted into the phantom to evaluate applicator tips and reference source positions; positions are laterally shifted 10 mm from the applicator axis. The markers are lead-based and scatter radiation to expose the films. Gafchromic RTQA2 films are placed on the applicators. The phantom includes spaces to embed the applicators. The source position is determined as the distance between the exposed source position and center position of two pairs of the first radiopaque markers. We generated a 3D-IGBT plan with applicator modeling. The first source position was 6 mm from the applicator tips, and the second source position was 10 mm from the first source position. Results: All source positions were consistent with the exposed positions within 1 mm for all Fletcher applicators using in-house software. Moreover, the distance between source positions was in good agreement with the reference distance. Applicator offset, determined as the distance from the applicator tips at the first source position in the treatment planning system, was accurate. Conclusion: Source position accuracy of applicator modeling used in 3D-IGBT was acceptable. This phantom and software will be useful as a HDR-BT QA tool for verification of source position with Oncentra applicator modeling.

  10. SU-E-T-758: To Determine the Source Dwell Positions of HDR Brachytherapy Using 2D 729 Ion Chamber Array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Syam [Malabar Cancer Centre, Kannur, Kerala (India); Sitha [University of Calicut, Calicut, Kerala (India)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Determination of source dwell positions of HDR brachytherapy using 2D 729 ion chamber array Methods: Nucletron microselectron HDR and PTW 2D array were used for the study. Different dwell positions were assigned in the HDR machine. Rigid interstitial needles and vaginal applicator were positioned on the 2D array. The 2D array was exposed for this programmed dwell positions. The positional accuracy of the source was analyzed after the irradiation of the 2D array. This was repeated for different dwell positions. Different test plans were transferred from the Oncentra planning system and irradiated with the same applicator position on the 2D array. The results were analyzed using the in house developed excel program. Results: Assigned dwell positions versus corresponding detector response were analyzed. The results show very good agreement with the film measurements. No significant variation found between the planned and measured dwell positions. Average dose response with 2D array between the planned and nearby dwell positions was found to be 0.0804 Gy for vaginal cylinder applicator and 0.1234 Gy for interstitial rigid needles. Standard deviation between the doses for all the measured dwell positions for interstitial rigid needle for 1 cm spaced positions were found to be 0.33 and 0.37 for 2cm spaced dwell positions. For intracavitory vaginal applicator this was found to be 0.21 for 1 cm spaced dwell positions and 0.06 for 2cm spaced dwell positions. Intracavitory test plans reproduced on the 2D array with the same applicator positions shows the ideal dose distribution with the TPS planned. Conclusion: 2D array is a good tool for determining the dwell position of HDR brachytherapy. With the in-house developed program in excel it is easy and accurate. The traditional way with film analysis can be replaced by this method, as the films will be more costly.

  11. SU-E-T-634: Analysis of Volume Based GYN HDR Brachytherapy Plans for Dose Calculation to Organs At Risk(OAR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nair, M; Li, C; White, M; Davis, J [Joe Arrington Cancer Center, Lubbock, TX (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: We have analyzed the dose volume histogram of 140 CT based HDR brachytherapy plans and evaluated the dose received to OAR ; rectum, bladder and sigmoid colon based on recommendations from ICRU and Image guided brachytherapy working group for cervical cancer . Methods: Our treatment protocol consist of XRT to whole pelvis with 45 Gy at 1.8Gy/fraction followed by 30 Gy at 6 Gy per fraction by HDR brachytherapy in 2 weeks . The CT compatible tandem and ovoid applicators were used and stabilized with radio opaque packing material. The patient was stabilized using special re-locatable implant table and stirrups for reproducibility of the geometry during treatment. The CT scan images were taken at 3mm slice thickness and exported to the treatment planning computer. The OAR structures, bladder, rectum and sigmoid colon were outlined on the images along with the applicators. The prescription dose was targeted to A left and A right as defined in Manchester system and optimized on geometry . The dosimetry was compared on all plans using the parameter Ci.sec.cGy-1 . Using the Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) obtained from the plans the doses to rectum, sigmoid colon and bladder for ICRU defined points and 2cc volume were analyzed and reported. The following criteria were used for limiting the tolerance dose by volume (D2cc) were calculated. The rectum and sigmoid colon doses were limited to <75Gy. The bladder dose was limited to < 90Gy from both XRT and HDR brachytherapy. Results: The average total (XRT+HDRBT) BED values to prescription volume was 120 Gy. Dose 2cc to rectum was 70Gy +/− 17Gy, dose to 2cc bladder was 82+/−32 Gy. The average Ci.sec.cGy-1 calculated for the HDR plans was 6.99 +/− 0.5 Conclusion: The image based treatment planning enabled to evaluati volume based dose to critical structures for clinical interpretation.

  12. Evaluation of wall correction factor of INER's air-kerma primary standard chamber and dose variation by source displacement for HDR ¹⁹²Ir brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J H; Wang, J N; Huang, T T; Su, S H; Chang, B J; Su, C H; Hsu, S M

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to estimate the wall effect of the self-made spherical graphite-walled cavity chamber with the Monte Carlo method for establishing the air-kerma primary standard of high-dose-rate (HDR) ¹⁹²Ir brachytherapy sources at the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER, Taiwan). The Monte Carlo method established in this paper was also employed to respectively simulate wall correction factors of the ¹⁹²Ir air-kerma standard chambers used at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST, USA) and the National Physical Laboratory (NPL, UK) for comparisons and verification. The chamber wall correction calculation results will be incorporated into INER's HDR ¹⁹²Ir primary standard in the future. For the brachytherapy treatment in the esophagus or in the bronchi, the position of the isotope may have displacement in the cavity. Thus the delivered dose would differ from the prescribed dose in the treatment plan. We also tried assessing dose distribution due to the position displacement of HDR ¹⁹²Ir brachytherapy source in a phantom with a central cavity by the Monte Carlo method. The calculated results could offer a clinical reference for the brachytherapy within the human organs with cavity.

  13. Endocervical ultrasound applicator for integrated hyperthermia and HDR brachytherapy in the treatment of locally advanced cervical carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wootton, Jeffery H.; Hsu, I-Chow Joe; Diederich, Chris J. [Thermal Therapy Research Group, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, California 94115 (United States) and Joint Graduate Group in Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley and San Francisco, California 94115 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: The clinical success of hyperthermia adjunct to radiotherapy depends on adequate temperature elevation in the tumor with minimal temperature rise in organs at risk. Existing technologies for thermal treatment of the cervix have limited spatial control or rapid energy falloff. The objective of this work is to develop an endocervical applicator using a linear array of multisectored tubular ultrasound transducers to provide 3-D conformal, locally targeted hyperthermia concomitant to radiotherapy in the uterine cervix. The catheter-based device is integrated within a HDR brachytherapy applicator to facilitate sequential and potentially simultaneous heat and radiation delivery. Methods: Treatment planning images from 35 patients who underwent HDR brachytherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer were inspected to assess the dimensions of radiation clinical target volumes (CTVs) and gross tumor volumes (GTVs) surrounding the cervix and the proximity of organs at risk. Biothermal simulation was used to identify applicator and catheter material parameters to adequately heat the cervix with minimal thermal dose accumulation in nontargeted structures. A family of ultrasound applicators was fabricated with two to three tubular transducers operating at 6.6-7.4 MHz that are unsectored (360 deg.), bisectored (2x180 deg.), or trisectored (3x120 deg.) for control of energy deposition in angle and along the device length in order to satisfy anatomical constraints. The device is housed in a 6 mm diameter PET catheter with cooling water flow for endocervical implantation. Devices were characterized by measuring acoustic efficiencies, rotational acoustic intensity distributions, and rotational temperature distributions in phantom. Results: The CTV in HDR brachytherapy plans extends 20.5{+-}5.0 mm from the endocervical tandem with the rectum and bladder typically <8 mm from the target boundary. The GTV extends 19.4{+-}7.3 mm from the tandem. Simulations indicate that for 60

  14. SU-F-P-42: “To Navigate, Or Not to Navigate: HDR BT in Recurrent Spine Lesions”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voros, L; Cohen, G; Zaider, M; Yamada, Y [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: We compare the accuracy of HDR catheter placement for paraspinal lesions using O-arm CBCT imaging combined with StealthStation navigation and traditional fluoroscopically guided catheter placement. Methods: CT and MRI scans were acquired pre-treatment to outline the lesions and design treatment plans (pre-plans) to meet dosimetric constrains. The pre-planned catheter trajectories were transferred into the StealthStation Navigation system prior to the surgery. The StealthStation is an infra red (IR) optical navigation system used for guidance of surgical instruments. An intraoperative CBCT scan (O-arm) was acquired with reference IR optical fiducials anchored onto the patient and registered with the preplan image study to guide surgical instruments in relation to the patients’ anatomy and to place the brachytherapy catheters along the pre-planned trajectories. The final treatment plan was generated based on a 2nd intraoperative CBCT scan reflecting achieved implant geometry. The 2nd CBCT was later registered with the initial CT scan to compare the preplanned dwell positions with actual dwell positions (catheter placements). Similar workflow was used in placement of 8 catheters (1 patient) without navigation, but under fluoroscopy guidance in an interventional radiology suite. Results: A total of 18 catheters (3 patients) were placed using navigation assisted surgery. Average displacement of 0.66 cm (STD=0.37cm) was observed between the pre-plan source positions and actual source positions in the 3 dimensional space. This translates into an average 0.38 cm positioning error in one direction including registration errors, digitization errors, and the surgeons ability to follow the planned trajectory. In comparison, average displacement of non-navigated catheters was 0.50 cm (STD=0.22cm). Conclusion: Spinal lesion HDR brachytherapy planning is a difficult task. Catheter placement has a direct impact on target coverage and dose to critical structures. While

  15. Implant strategies for endocervical and interstitial ultrasound hyperthermia adjunct to HDR brachytherapy for the treatment of cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wootton, Jeffery H; Prakash, Punit; Hsu, I-Chow Joe; Diederich, Chris J, E-mail: CDiederich@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94115 (United States)

    2011-07-07

    Catheter-based ultrasound devices provide a method to deliver 3D conformable heating integrated with HDR brachytherapy delivery. Theoretical characterization of heating patterns was performed to identify implant strategies for these devices which can best be used to apply hyperthermia to cervical cancer. A constrained optimization-based hyperthermia treatment planning platform was used for the analysis. The proportion of tissue {>=}41 deg. C in a hyperthermia treatment volume was maximized with constraints T{sub max} {<=} 47 deg. C, T{sub rectum} {<=} 41.5 deg. C, and T{sub bladder} {<=} 42.5 deg. C. Hyperthermia treatment was modeled for generalized implant configurations and complex configurations from a database of patients (n = 14) treated with HDR brachytherapy. Various combinations of endocervical (360{sup 0} or 2 x 180{sup 0} output; 6 mm OD) and interstitial (180{sup 0}, 270{sup 0}, or 360{sup 0} output; 2.4 mm OD) applicators within catheter locations from brachytherapy implants were modeled, with perfusion constant (1 or 3 kg m{sup -3} s{sup -1}) or varying with location or temperature. Device positioning, sectoring, active length and aiming were empirically optimized to maximize thermal coverage. Conformable heating of appreciable volumes (>200 cm{sup 3}) is possible using multiple sectored interstitial and endocervical ultrasound devices. The endocervical device can heat >41 deg. C to 4.6 cm diameter compared to 3.6 cm for the interstitial. Sectored applicators afford tight control of heating that is robust to perfusion changes in most regularly spaced configurations. T{sub 90} in example patient cases was 40.5-42.7 deg. C (1.9-39.6 EM{sub 43deg.C}) at 1 kg m{sup -3} s{sup -1} with 10/14 patients {>=}41 deg. C. Guidelines are presented for positioning of implant catheters during the initial surgery, selection of ultrasound applicator configurations, and tailored power schemes for achieving T{sub 90} {>=} 41 deg. C in clinically practical implant

  16. Implant strategies for endocervical and interstitial ultrasound hyperthermia adjunct to HDR brachytherapy for the treatment of cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootton, Jeffery H.; Prakash, Punit; Hsu, I.-Chow Joe; Diederich, Chris J.

    2011-07-01

    Catheter-based ultrasound devices provide a method to deliver 3D conformable heating integrated with HDR brachytherapy delivery. Theoretical characterization of heating patterns was performed to identify implant strategies for these devices which can best be used to apply hyperthermia to cervical cancer. A constrained optimization-based hyperthermia treatment planning platform was used for the analysis. The proportion of tissue >=41 °C in a hyperthermia treatment volume was maximized with constraints Tmax treatment was modeled for generalized implant configurations and complex configurations from a database of patients (n = 14) treated with HDR brachytherapy. Various combinations of endocervical (360° or 2 × 180° output; 6 mm OD) and interstitial (180°, 270°, or 360° output; 2.4 mm OD) applicators within catheter locations from brachytherapy implants were modeled, with perfusion constant (1 or 3 kg m-3 s-1) or varying with location or temperature. Device positioning, sectoring, active length and aiming were empirically optimized to maximize thermal coverage. Conformable heating of appreciable volumes (>200 cm3) is possible using multiple sectored interstitial and endocervical ultrasound devices. The endocervical device can heat >41 °C to 4.6 cm diameter compared to 3.6 cm for the interstitial. Sectored applicators afford tight control of heating that is robust to perfusion changes in most regularly spaced configurations. T90 in example patient cases was 40.5-42.7 °C (1.9-39.6 EM43 °C) at 1 kg m-3 s-1 with 10/14 patients >=41 °C. Guidelines are presented for positioning of implant catheters during the initial surgery, selection of ultrasound applicator configurations, and tailored power schemes for achieving T90 >= 41 °C in clinically practical implant configurations. Catheter-based ultrasound devices, when adhering to the guidelines, show potential to generate conformal therapeutic heating ranging from a single endocervical device targeting small

  17. Comparison of single and multiple dwell position methods in MammoSite high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yongbok; Trombetta, Mark G; Miften, Moyed

    2010-05-28

    The purpose of this study is to dosimetrically compare two plans generated using single dwell position method (SDPM) and multiple dwell position methods (MDPM) in MammoSite high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy planning for 19 breast cancer patients. In computed tomography (CT) image-based HDR planning, a surface optimization technique was used in both methods. Following dosimetric parameters were compared for fraction 1 plans: %PTV_EVAL (planning target volume for plan evaluation) coverage, dose homogeneity index (DHI), dose con-formal index (COIN), maximum dose to skin and ipsilateral lung, and breast tissue volume receiving 150% (V150[cc]) and 200% (V200[cc]) of the prescribed dose. In addition, a plan was retrospectively generated for each fraction 2-10 to simulate the clinical situation where the fraction 1 plan was used for fractions 2-10 without modification. In order to create nine derived plans for each method and for each of the 19 patients, the catheter location and contours of target and critical structures were defined on the CT images acquired prior to each fraction 2-10, while using the same dwell-time distribution as used for fraction 1 (original plan). Interfraction dose variations were evaluated for 19 patients by comparing the derived nine plans (each for fractions 2-10) with the original plan (fraction 1) using the same dosimetric parameters used for fraction 1 plan comparison. For the fraction 1 plan comparison, the MDPM resulted in slightly increased %PTV_EVAL coverage, COIN, V150[cc] and V200[cc] values by an average of 1.2%, 0.025, 0.5 cc and 0.7cc, respectively, while slightly decreased DHI, maximum skin and ipsilateral lung dose by an average of 0.003, 3.2 cGy and 5.8 cGy, respectively. For the inter-fraction dose variation comparison, the SDPM resulted in slightly smaller variations in %PTV_EVAL coverage, DHI, maximum skin dose and V150[cc] values by an average of 0.4%, 0.0005, 0.5 cGy and 0.2 cc, respectively, while slightly higher average

  18. Implant strategies for endocervical and interstitial ultrasound hyperthermia adjunct to HDR brachytherapy for the treatment of cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootton, Jeffery H; Prakash, Punit; Hsu, I-Chow Joe; Diederich, Chris J

    2011-07-07

    Catheter-based ultrasound devices provide a method to deliver 3D conformable heating integrated with HDR brachytherapy delivery. Theoretical characterization of heating patterns was performed to identify implant strategies for these devices which can best be used to apply hyperthermia to cervical cancer. A constrained optimization-based hyperthermia treatment planning platform was used for the analysis. The proportion of tissue ≥41 °C in a hyperthermia treatment volume was maximized with constraints T(max) ≤ 47 °C, T(rectum) ≤ 41.5 °C, and T(bladder) ≤ 42.5 °C. Hyperthermia treatment was modeled for generalized implant configurations and complex configurations from a database of patients (n = 14) treated with HDR brachytherapy. Various combinations of endocervical (360° or 2 × 180° output; 6 mm OD) and interstitial (180°, 270°, or 360° output; 2.4 mm OD) applicators within catheter locations from brachytherapy implants were modeled, with perfusion constant (1 or 3 kg m(-3) s(-1)) or varying with location or temperature. Device positioning, sectoring, active length and aiming were empirically optimized to maximize thermal coverage. Conformable heating of appreciable volumes (>200 cm(3)) is possible using multiple sectored interstitial and endocervical ultrasound devices. The endocervical device can heat >41 °C to 4.6 cm diameter compared to 3.6 cm for the interstitial. Sectored applicators afford tight control of heating that is robust to perfusion changes in most regularly spaced configurations. T(90) in example patient cases was 40.5-42.7 °C (1.9-39.6 EM(43 °C)) at 1 kg m(-3) s(-1) with 10/14 patients ≥41 °C. Guidelines are presented for positioning of implant catheters during the initial surgery, selection of ultrasound applicator configurations, and tailored power schemes for achieving T(90) ≥ 41 °C in clinically practical implant configurations. Catheter-based ultrasound devices, when adhering to the guidelines, show potential to

  19. SU-E-T-242: Design of a Novel Afterloader Clearance QA Device for Biliary HDR Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullins, JP; Deufel, CL [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Bile duct cancer affects 2–3 thousand people annually in the United States. Radiation therapy has been shown to double median survival, with combined external beam and intraluminal high dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy being most effective. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) biliary HDR, a less-invasive alternative to trans-hepatic brachytherapy, is delivered through a catheter that travels a tortuous path from nose to bile duct, requiring wire drive force and dexterity beyond typical afterloader performance specifications. Thus, specific afterloader quality assurance(QA) is recommended for this procedure. Our aim was to create a device and process for Varisource afterloader clearance QA with objectives that it be quantitative and can monitor afterloader performance over time, compare performance between two distinct afterloaders and potentially Result in a predictive nomogram for patient-specific clearance. Methods: Based on retrospective reconstruction of 20 ERCP patient anatomies, we designed a phantom to test afterloader ability to drive the source wire along an intended treatment path. The ability of the afterloader to fully extend the intended treatment path is a function of number and diameters of turns. We have determined experimentally that relative position of the turns does not impact performance. Results: Both patient and QA paths involve three common turns/loops: a large turn representing the stomach(10.8cm±2.0cm), an elliptical loop representing the duodenum(7.3cm±1.5cmx4.8cm±0.7cm), and a final turn at the end of the bile duct that may be tight for some patient-specific anatomies and absent in others(3.7cm±0.7cm, where present). Our phantom design uses anatomical average turn diameters for the stomach and duodenum then terminates in a turn of quantitatively selectable diameter. The smallest final turn diameter that an afterloader can pass is recorded as the QA parameter. Conclusion: With this device and QA process, we

  20. Adaptive error detection for HDR/PDR brachytherapy: Guidance for decision making during real-time in vivo point dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kertzscher, Gustavo, E-mail: guke@dtu.dk; Andersen, Claus E., E-mail: clan@dtu.dk [Centre for Nuclear Technologies, Technical University of Denmark, DTU Nutech, Frederiksborgvej 399, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Tanderup, Kari, E-mail: karitand@rm.dk [Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, Norrebrogade 44, DK-8000 Aarhus (Denmark)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: This study presents an adaptive error detection algorithm (AEDA) for real-timein vivo point dosimetry during high dose rate (HDR) or pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy (BT) where the error identification, in contrast to existing approaches, does not depend on an a priori reconstruction of the dosimeter position. Instead, the treatment is judged based on dose rate comparisons between measurements and calculations of the most viable dosimeter position provided by the AEDA in a data driven approach. As a result, the AEDA compensates for false error cases related to systematic effects of the dosimeter position reconstruction. Given its nearly exclusive dependence on stable dosimeter positioning, the AEDA allows for a substantially simplified and time efficient real-time in vivo BT dosimetry implementation. Methods: In the event of a measured potential treatment error, the AEDA proposes the most viable dosimeter position out of alternatives to the original reconstruction by means of a data driven matching procedure between dose rate distributions. If measured dose rates do not differ significantly from the most viable alternative, the initial error indication may be attributed to a mispositioned or misreconstructed dosimeter (false error). However, if the error declaration persists, no viable dosimeter position can be found to explain the error, hence the discrepancy is more likely to originate from a misplaced or misreconstructed source applicator or from erroneously connected source guide tubes (true error). Results: The AEDA applied on twoin vivo dosimetry implementations for pulsed dose rate BT demonstrated that the AEDA correctly described effects responsible for initial error indications. The AEDA was able to correctly identify the major part of all permutations of simulated guide tube swap errors and simulated shifts of individual needles from the original reconstruction. Unidentified errors corresponded to scenarios where the dosimeter position was

  1. Development and implementation of a remote audit tool for high dose rate (HDR) Ir-192 brachytherapy using optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, Kevin E.; Kry, Stephen F.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Followill, David [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Alvarez, Paola; Lawyer, Ann [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to create a mailable phantom with measurement accuracy suitable for Radiological Physics Center (RPC) audits of high dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy sources at institutions participating in National Cancer Institute-funded cooperative clinical trials. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) were chosen as the dosimeter to be used with the phantom.Methods: The authors designed and built an 8 × 8 × 10 cm{sup 3} prototype phantom that had two slots capable of holding Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C OSLDs (nanoDots; Landauer, Glenwood, IL) and a single channel capable of accepting all {sup 192}Ir HDR brachytherapy sources in current clinical use in the United States. The authors irradiated the phantom with Nucletron and Varian {sup 192}Ir HDR sources in order to determine correction factors for linearity with dose and the combined effects of irradiation energy and phantom characteristics. The phantom was then sent to eight institutions which volunteered to perform trial remote audits.Results: The linearity correction factor was k{sub L}= (−9.43 × 10{sup −5}× dose) + 1.009, where dose is in cGy, which differed from that determined by the RPC for the same batch of dosimeters using {sup 60}Co irradiation. Separate block correction factors were determined for current versions of both Nucletron and Varian {sup 192}Ir HDR sources and these vendor-specific correction factors differed by almost 2.6%. For the Nucletron source, the correction factor was 1.026 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.023–1.028], and for the Varian source, it was 1.000 (95% CI = 0.995–1.005). Variations in lateral source positioning up to 0.8 mm and distal/proximal source positioning up to 10 mm had minimal effect on dose measurement accuracy. The overall dose measurement uncertainty of the system was estimated to be 2.4% and 2.5% for the Nucletron and Varian sources, respectively (95% CI). This uncertainty was sufficient to establish a ±5% acceptance

  2. The drama of illumination: artist's approaches to the creation of HDR in paintings and prints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parraman, Carinna

    2010-02-01

    For many centuries artists have considered and depicted illumination in art, from the effect of sunlight on objects at different times of the day, of shadows and highlights as cast by the moon, through indirect light as that through an open window or the artificial light of the candle or firelight. The presentation will consider artists who were fascinated by the phenomena of natural and artificial illumination and how they were able to render the natural world as a form of dynamic range through pigment. Artists have been long aware of the psychological aspects of the juxtaposition of colour in exploiting the optical qualities and arranging visual effects in painting and prints. Artists in the 16th century were attempting to develop an extended dynamic range through multi-colour, wood-block printing. Artists working at the height of naturalist realism in the 17th through the 19th century were fascinated by the illusory nature of light on objects. The presentation will also consider the interpretation of dynamic range through the medium of mezzotint, possibly the most subtle of printing methods, which was used by printers to copy paintings, and to create highly original works of art containing a dynamic range of tones.

  3. Performance of VATA64HDR16 ASIC for medical physics applications based on continuous crystals and SiPMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrio, J.; Etxebeste, A.; Lacasta, C.; Muñoz, E.; Oliver, J. F.; Solaz, C.; Llosá, G.

    2015-12-01

    Detectors based on Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs) coupled to continuous crystals are being tested in medical physics applications due to their potential high resolution and sensitivity. To cope with the high granularity required for a very good spatial resolution, SiPM matrices with a large amount of elements are needed. To be able to read the information coming from each individual channel, dedicated ASICs are employed. The VATA64HDR16 ASIC is a 64-channel, charge-sensitive amplifier that converts the collected charge into a proportional current or voltage signal. A complete assessment of the suitability of that ASIC for medical physics applications based on continuous crystals and SiPMs has been carried out. The input charge range is linear from 0-2 pC up to 55 pC. The energy resolution obtained at 511 keV is 10% FWHM with a LaBr3 crystal and 16% FWHM with a LYSO crystal. A coincidence timing resolution of 24 ns FWHM is obtained with two LYSO crystals.

  4. Computed tomography-guided interstitial HDR brachytherapy (CT-HDRBT) of the liver in patients with irresectable intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnapauff, Dirk; Denecke, Timm; Grieser, Christian; Collettini, Federico; Colletini, Federico; Seehofer, Daniel; Sinn, Marianne; Banzer, Jan; Lopez-Hänninen, Enrique; Hamm, Bernd; Wust, Peter; Gebauer, Bernhard

    2012-06-01

    This study was designed to investigate the clinical outcome of patients with irresectable, intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (IHC) treated with computed tomography (CT)-guided HDR-brachytherapy (CT-HDRBT) for local tumor ablation. Fifteen consecutive patients with histologically proven cholangiocarcinoma were selected for this retrospective study. Patients were treated by high-dose-rate internal brachytherapy (HDRBT) using an Iridium-192 source in afterloading technique through CT-guided percutaneous placed catheters. A total of 27 brachytherapy treatments were performed in these patients between 2006 and 2009. Median tumor enclosing target dose was 20 Gy, and mean target volume of the radiated tumors was 131 (±90) ml (range, 10-257 ml). Follow-up consisted of clinical visits and magnetic resonance imaging of the liver every third month. Statistical evaluation included survival analysis using the Kaplan-Meier method. After a median follow-up of 18 (range, 1-27) months after local ablation, 6 of the 15 patients are still alive; 4 of them did not get further chemotherapy and are regarded as disease-free. The reached median local tumor control was 10 months; median local tumor control, including repetitive local ablation, was 11 months. Median survival after local ablation was 14 months and after primary diagnosis 21 months. In view of current clinical data on the clinical outcome of cholangiocarcinoma, locally ablative treatment with CT-HDRBT represents a promising and safe technique for patients who are not eligible for tumor resection.

  5. Clinical experience of high dose rate brachytherapy using Ir-192 remote afterloading system (microSELECTRON-HDR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukui, Akira; Yamamoto, Koji; Yoshioka, Shinji [Uwajima City Hospital, Ehime (Japan); Kataoka, Masaaki; Fujii, Takashi; Ikezoe, Junpei

    1999-03-01

    Twenty-one lesions were reviewed of 20 patients who were treated with high-dose-rate brachytherapy using Ir-192 remote afterloading system (microSELECTRON-HDR) between August, 1997 and August, 1998. Esophageal cancer (n=6), lung cancer (n=3), cholangioma (n=3), epipharyngeal cancer (n=2) and uterine cervical cancer (n=2) were treated with intracavitary irradiation. Regional skin recurrence of breast cancer (n=3) was treated with interstitial irradiation, and oral cavity cancer (n=2) was treated with the mold method. Eleven lesions were controlled locally with a short follow-up period. There was no significant complication related to the insertion procedures of the applicator or the tubes without pneumothorax in one patient with lung cancer. So far, this treatment is relatively safe and effective not only for curative therapy for early stage cancer but also for palliative therapy for the advanced cancer. Furthermore, it is very important that medical staffs are kept free from radiation exposure. There is no established treatment protocol in high-dose-rate brachytherapy, therefore, a careful longer follow-up is necessary to clarify the true tumor control rate and the development of the late effect on normal tissue. (author)

  6. High dynamic range infrared images detail enhancement based on local edge preserving filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qiong; Wang, Yuehuan; Bai, Kun

    2016-07-01

    In the field of infrared (IR) image processing, displaying a high dynamic range (HDR) image on a low dynamic range display equipment with a natural visual effect, clear details on local areas and less artifacts is an important issue. In this paper, we present a new approach to display HDR IR images with contrast enhancement. First, the local edge-preserving filter (LEPF) is utilized to separate the image into a base layer and detail layer(s). After the filtering procedure, we use an adaptive Gamma transformation to adjust the gray distribution of the base layer, and stretch the detail layer based on a human visual effect principle. Then, we recombine the detail layer and base layer to obtain the enhance output. Finally, we adjust the luminance of output by applying multiple exposure fusion method. The experimental results demonstrate that our proposed method can provide a significant performance in terms of enhancing details and less artifacts than the state of the arts.

  7. Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Goodman, Lawrence E

    2001-01-01

    Beginning text presents complete theoretical treatment of mechanical model systems and deals with technological applications. Topics include introduction to calculus of vectors, particle motion, dynamics of particle systems and plane rigid bodies, technical applications in plane motions, theory of mechanical vibrations, and more. Exercises and answers appear in each chapter.

  8. Calculated organ doses using Monte Carlo simulations in a reference male phantom undergoing HDR brachytherapy applied to localized prostate carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candela-Juan, Cristian [Radioprotection Department, La Fe University and Polytechnic Hospital, Valencia 46026 (Spain); Perez-Calatayud, Jose [Radiotherapy Department, La Fe University and Polytechnic Hospital, Valencia 46026 (Spain); Ballester, Facundo [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100 (Spain); Rivard, Mark J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to obtain equivalent doses in radiosensitive organs (aside from the bladder and rectum) when applying high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy to a localized prostate carcinoma using {sup 60}Co or {sup 192}Ir sources. These data are compared with results in a water phantom and with expected values in an infinite water medium. A comparison with reported values from proton therapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is also provided. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations in Geant4 were performed using a voxelized phantom described in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 110, which reproduces masses and shapes from an adult reference man defined in ICRP Publication 89. Point sources of {sup 60}Co or {sup 192}Ir with photon energy spectra corresponding to those exiting their capsules were placed in the center of the prostate, and equivalent doses per clinical absorbed dose in this target organ were obtained in several radiosensitive organs. Values were corrected to account for clinical circumstances with the source located at various positions with differing dwell times throughout the prostate. This was repeated for a homogeneous water phantom. Results: For the nearest organs considered (bladder, rectum, testes, small intestine, and colon), equivalent doses given by {sup 60}Co source were smaller (8%-19%) than from {sup 192}Ir. However, as the distance increases, the more penetrating gamma rays produced by {sup 60}Co deliver higher organ equivalent doses. The overall result is that effective dose per clinical absorbed dose from a {sup 60}Co source (11.1 mSv/Gy) is lower than from a {sup 192}Ir source (13.2 mSv/Gy). On the other hand, equivalent doses were the same in the tissue and the homogeneous water phantom for those soft tissues closer to the prostate than about 30 cm. As the distance increased, the differences of photoelectric effect in water and soft tissue, and appearance of other materials

  9. Evaluation of Dose Distribution Accuracy in HDR Brachytherapy of Esophagus Cancer Based on MRI Normoxic Polymer Gel Dosimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Taghi Bahreyni Toossi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this work was to study the ability of MRI normoxic polymer gel dosimetry for evaluating the dose distribution in HDR brachytherapy of esophagial cancer at Imam Reza brachytherapy center (Mashhad, Iran. Materials and Methods: Initially, 2liters of normoxic gel (MAGIC was fabricated and then poured into 12 calibration test tubes and placed in a perspex walled phantom. The gel phantom was irradiated with a brachytherapy remote-afterloader unit using a cobalt-60 brachytherapy source and the test tubes were irradiated with a range of known doses with a cobalt-60 teletherapy unit. Imaging was performed with a multi-spin-echo protocol and a T2 quantitative technique using a Siemens 1.5 T MRI machine. The MRI images were transferred to a computer and then image processing was performed in the MATLAB environment to extract R2 maps of the irradiated area. Results: In this study and at the reference point, the dose deviation between the gel dosimetry and the calculated data was 4.5%. The distance to agreement (DTA for dose profiles was 2.7 mm. Also, dose sensitivity of the MAGIC gel dosimeter was 0.693 S-1Gy-1 (R2 =0.9376. Conclusion: In this work, the data obtained from TPS calculations were found in very good agreement with the measured results provided by gel dosimetry. It was evaluated using a comparison of isodoses and dose at the reference point, and dose profile verification. It is also concluded that the gel dosimetry systems have proven to be a useful tool for dosimetry in clinical radiotherapy applications.

  10. Comparison between beta radiation dose distribution due to LDR and HDR ocular brachytherapy applicators using GATE Monte Carlo platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Laoues; Rachid, Khelifi; Ahmed, Sidi Moussa

    2016-08-01

    Eye applicators with 90Sr/90Y and 106Ru/106Rh beta-ray sources are generally used in brachytherapy for the treatment of eye diseases as uveal melanoma. Whenever, radiation is used in treatment, dosimetry is essential. However, knowledge of the exact dose distribution is a critical decision-making to the outcome of the treatment. The Monte Carlo technique provides a powerful tool for calculation of the dose and dose distributions which helps to predict and determine the doses from different shapes of various types of eye applicators more accurately. The aim of this work consisted in using the Monte Carlo GATE platform to calculate the 3D dose distribution on a mathematical model of the human eye according to international recommendations. Mathematical models were developed for four ophthalmic applicators, two HDR 90Sr applicators SIA.20 and SIA.6, and two LDR 106Ru applicators, a concave CCB model and a flat CCB model. In present work, considering a heterogeneous eye phantom and the chosen tumor, obtained results with the use of GATE for mean doses distributions in a phantom and according to international recommendations show a discrepancy with respect to those specified by the manufacturers. The QC of dosimetric parameters shows that contrarily to the other applicators, the SIA.20 applicator is consistent with recommendations. The GATE platform show that the SIA.20 applicator present better results, namely the dose delivered to critical structures were lower compared to those obtained for the other applicators, and the SIA.6 applicator, simulated with MCNPX generates higher lens doses than those generated by GATE.

  11. SU-E-T-205: Improving Quality Assurance of HDR Brachytherapy: Verifying Agreement Between Planned and Delivered Dose Distributions Using DICOM RTDose and Advanced Film Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, A L [Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Portsmouth, Hampshire (United Kingdom); University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey (United Kingdom); Bradley, D A [University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey (United Kingdom); Nisbet, A [University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey (United Kingdom); Royal Surrey County Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Guildford, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: HDR brachytherapy is undergoing significant development, and quality assurance (QA) checks must keep pace. Current recommendations do not adequately verify delivered against planned dose distributions: This is particularly relevant for new treatment planning system (TPS) calculation algorithms (non TG-43 based), and an era of significant patient-specific plan optimisation. Full system checks are desirable in modern QA recommendations, complementary to device-centric individual tests. We present a QA system incorporating TPS calculation, dose distribution export, HDR unit performance, and dose distribution measurement. Such an approach, more common in external beam radiotherapy, has not previously been reported in the literature for brachytherapy. Methods: Our QA method was tested at 24 UK brachytherapy centres. As a novel approach, we used the TPS DICOM RTDose file export to compare planned dose distribution with that measured using Gafchromic EBT3 films placed around clinical brachytherapy treatment applicators. Gamma analysis was used to compare the dose distributions. Dose difference and distance to agreement were determined at prescription Point A. Accurate film dosimetry was achieved using a glass compression plate at scanning to ensure physically-flat films, simultaneous scanning of known dose films with measurement films, and triple-channel dosimetric analysis. Results: The mean gamma pass rate of RTDose compared to film-measured dose distributions was 98.1% at 3%(local), 2 mm criteria. The mean dose difference, measured to planned, at Point A was -0.5% for plastic treatment applicators and -2.4% for metal applicators, due to shielding not accounted for in TPS. The mean distance to agreement was 0.6 mm. Conclusion: It is recommended to develop brachytherapy QA to include full-system verification of agreement between planned and delivered dose distributions. This is a novel approach for HDR brachytherapy QA. A methodology using advanced film

  12. SU-E-T-413: Examining Acquisition Rate for Using MatriXX Ion Chamber Array to Measure HDR Brachytherapy Treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagar, M; Bhagwat, M; O’Farrell, D; Friesen, S; Buzurovic, I; Damato, A; Devlin, P; Cormack, R [Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: There are unique obstacles to implementing the MatriXX ionchamber array as a QA tool in Brachytherapy given that the device is designed for use in the MV energy range. One of the challenges we investigate is the affect of acquisition rates on dose measurement accuracy for HDR treatment plans. Methods: A treatment plan was optimized in Oncentra Brachy TPS to deliver a planar dose to a 5×5cm region at 10mm depth. The applicator was affixed to the surface of the MatriXX array. The plan was delivered multiple times using a Nucleatron HDR afterloader with a 2.9Ci Ir192 source. For each measurement the sampling rate of the MatriXX movie mode was varied (30ms and 500ms). This experiment was repeated with identical parameters, following a source exchange, with an 11.2Ci Ir192 source. Finally, a single snap measurement was acquired. Analysis was preformed to evaluate the fidelity of the dose delivery for each iteration of the experiment. Evaluation was based on the comparison between the measured and TPS predicted dose. Results: Higher sample rates induce a greater discrepancy between the predicted and measured dose. Delivering the plan using a lower activity source also produced greater discrepancy in the measurement due to the increased delivery time. Analyzing the single snap measurement showed little difference from the 500ms integral dose measurement. Conclusion: The advantage of using movie mode for HDR treatment delivery QA is the ability for real time source tracking in addition to dose measurement. Our analysis indicates that 500ms is an optimal frame rate.

  13. A simplified analytical approach to estimate the parameters required for strength determination of HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources using a Farmer-type ionization chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sudhir; Srinivasan, P; Sharma, S D; Mayya, Y S

    2012-01-01

    Measuring the strength of high dose rate (HDR) (192)Ir brachytherapy sources on receipt from the vendor is an important component of a quality assurance program. Owing to their ready availability in radiotherapy departments, the Farmer-type ionization chambers are also used to determine the strength of HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy sources. The use of a Farmer-type ionization chamber requires the estimation of the scatter correction factor along with positioning error (c) and the constant of proportionality (f) to determine the strength of HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy sources. A simplified approach based on a least squares method was developed for estimating the values of f and M(s). The seven distance method was followed to record the ionization chamber readings for parameterization of f and M(s). Analytically calculated values of M(s) were used to determine the room scatter correction factor (K(sc)). The Monte Carlo simulations were also carried out to calculate f and K(sc) to verify the magnitude of the parameters determined by the proposed analytical approach. The value of f determined using the simplified analytical approach was found to be in excellent agreement with the Monte Carlo simulated value (within 0.7%). Analytically derived values of K(sc) were also found to be in good agreement with the Monte Carlo calculated values (within 1.47%). Being far simpler than the presently available methods of evaluating f, the proposed analytical approach can be adopted for routine use by clinical medical physicists to estimate f by hand calculations.

  14. A dosimetric comparison of 169Yb and 192Ir for HDR brachytherapy of the breast, accounting for the effect of finite patient dimensions and tissue inhomogeneities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lymperopoulou, G; Papagiannis, P; Angelopoulos, A; Karaiskos, P; Georgiou, E; Baltas, D

    2006-12-01

    Monte Carlo simulation dosimetry is used to compare 169Yb to 192Ir for breast high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy applications using multiple catheter implants. Results for bare point sources show that while 169Yb delivers a greater dose rate per unit air kerma strength at the radial distance range of interest to brachytherapy in homogeneous water phantoms, it suffers a greater dose rate deficit in missing scatter conditions relative to 192Ir. As a result of these two opposing factors, in the scatter conditions defined by the presence of the lung and the finite patient dimensions in breast brachytherapy the dose distributions calculated in a patient equivalent mathematical phantom by Monte Carlo simulations for the same implant of either 169Yb or 1921r commercially available sources are found comparable. Dose volume histogram results support that 169Yb could be at least as effective as 192Ir delivering the same dose to the lung and slightly reduced dose to the breast skin. The current treatment planning systems' approach of employing dosimetry data precalculated in a homogeneous water phantom of given shape and dimensions, however, is shown to notably overestimate the delivered dose distribution for 169Yb. Especially at the skin and the lung, the treatment planning system dose overestimation is on the order of 15%-30%. These findings do not undermine the potential of 169Yb HDR sources for breast brachytherapy relative to the most commonly used 192Ir HDR sources. They imply, however, that there could be a need for the amendment of dose calculation algorithms employed in clinical treatment planning of particular brachytherapy applications, especially for intermediate photon energy sources such as 169Yb.

  15. Implants quality in HDR prostate brachytherapy related to the number of needles used;Qualidade de implantes de prostata com BATD em funcao do numero de agulhas usadas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moura, Dayanne E.E.S; Martins, Homero L. [Hospital A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Servico de Fisica Medica

    2009-07-01

    This paper aims to relate the quality of prostate implants (HDR) with the amount of needles used. 51 needle insertions performed in the institution were analyzed. The maximum diameter, the maximum height and target volume delineated by radiation oncologist were measured and this compared with the prostate volume obtained by the radiologist. It was concluded that the prostate volume measured by the radiologist is not a reliable indication to determine how the implant will be done and that the increase in the number of needles implanted did not necessarily ensure a better dose distribution. (author)

  16. Identifying afterloading PDR and HDR brachytherapy errors using real-time fiber-coupled Al2O3:C dosimetry and a novel statistical error decision criterion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kertzscher, Gustavo; Andersen, Claus Erik; Siebert, Frank-André

    2011-01-01

    treatment errors, including interchanged pairs of afterloader guide tubes and 2–20mm source displacements, were monitored using a real-time fiber-coupled carbon doped aluminum oxide (Al2O3:C) crystal dosimeter that was positioned in the reconstructed tumor region. The error detection capacity was evaluated...... conditions, and (2) test a new statistical error decision concept based on full uncertainty analysis. Materials and methodsPhantom studies of two gynecological cancer PDR and one prostate cancer HDR patient treatment plans were performed using tandem ring applicators or interstitial needles. Imposed...

  17. Evaluation of radiation doses on critical organs in the treatment of cancer of the cervix using HDR-brachytherapy; Avaliacao das doses em orgaos criticos no tratamento do cancer de colo uterino com braquiterapia de alta taxa de dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Taciana; Jansem, Teresa [Pernambuco Univ., Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Biofisica e Radiobiologia; Amaral, Ademir [Pernambuco Univ., Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear; Cavalcanti, Homero; Vicente, Marcos [Centro de Radioterapia de Pernambuco (CERAPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2000-07-01

    High dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy is one type of treatment of the cervix carcinoma. During the planning for this therapy, especial attention is given to proximal normal organs such as bladder and rectum. In fact, due to their radiosensibility and localization, bladder and rectum are considered as critical organs. In this work we have studied the influence of the positioning of patient legs in the dose delivered to these critical organs in the treatment of cancer of the cervix using HDR-brachytherapy. (author)

  18. Monte Carlo study of the impact of a magnetic field on the dose distribution in MRI-guided HDR brachytherapy using Ir-192

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beld, E.; Seevinck, P. R.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Viergever, M. A.; Moerland, M. A.

    2016-09-01

    In the process of developing a robotic MRI-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy treatment, the influence of the MRI scanner’s magnetic field on the dose distribution needs to be investigated. A magnetic field causes a deflection of electrons in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field, and it leads to less lateral scattering along the direction parallel with the magnetic field. Monte Carlo simulations were carried out to determine the influence of the magnetic field on the electron behavior and on the total dose distribution around an Ir-192 source. Furthermore, the influence of air pockets being present near the source was studied. The Monte Carlo package Geant4 was utilized for the simulations. The simulated geometries consisted of a simplified point source inside a water phantom. Magnetic field strengths of 0 T, 1.5 T, 3 T, and 7 T were considered. The simulation results demonstrated that the dose distribution was nearly unaffected by the magnetic field for all investigated magnetic field strengths. Evidence was found that, from a dose perspective, the HDR prostate brachytherapy treatment using Ir-192 can be performed safely inside the MRI scanner. No need was found to account for the magnetic field during treatment planning. Nevertheless, the presence of air pockets in close vicinity to the source, particularly along the direction parallel with the magnetic field, appeared to be an important point for consideration.

  19. Design and implementation of a film dosimetry audit tool for comparison of planned and delivered dose distributions in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Antony L.; Lee, Chris; Ratcliffe, Ailsa J.; Bradley, David; Nisbet, Andrew

    2013-10-01

    A novel phantom is presented for ‘full system’ dosimetric audit comparing planned and delivered dose distributions in HDR gynaecological brachytherapy, using clinical treatment applicators. The brachytherapy applicator dosimetry test object consists of a near full-scatter water tank with applicator and film supports constructed of Solid Water, accommodating any typical cervix applicator. Film dosimeters are precisely held in four orthogonal planes bisecting the intrauterine tube, sampling dose distributions in the high risk clinical target volume, points A and B, bladder, rectum and sigmoid. The applicator position is fixed prior to CT scanning and through treatment planning and irradiation. The CT data is acquired with the applicator in a near clinical orientation to include applicator reconstruction in the system test. Gamma analysis is used to compare treatment planning system exported RTDose grid with measured multi-channel film dose maps. Results from two pilot audits are presented, using Ir-192 and Co-60 HDR sources, with a mean gamma passing rate of 98.6% using criteria of 3% local normalization and 3 mm distance to agreement (DTA). The mean DTA between prescribed dose and measured film dose at point A was 1.2 mm. The phantom was funded by IPEM and will be used for a UK national brachytherapy dosimetry audit.

  20. Comparison of air kerma standards of LNE-LNHB and NPL for 192Ir HDR brachytherapy sources: EUROMET project no 814.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douysset, Guilhem; Sander, Thorsten; Gouriou, Jean; Nutbrown, Rebecca

    2008-03-21

    An indirect comparison has been made in the air kerma standards for high dose rate (HDR) 192Ir brachytherapy sources at the Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel (LNHB) and the National Physical Laboratory (NPL). The measurements were carried out at both laboratories between November and December 2004. The comparison was based on measurements using well-type transfer ionization chambers and two different source types, Nucletron microSelectron HDR Classic and version 2. The results show the reported calibration coefficients to agree within 0.47% to 0.63%, which is within the overall standard uncertainty of 0.65% reported by both laboratories at the time of this comparison. Following this comparison, some of the NPL primary standard correction factors were re-evaluated resulting in a change of +0.17% in the overall correction factor. The new factor was implemented in May 2006. Applying the revised chamber factor to the measurements reported in this comparison report will reduce the difference between the two standards by 0.17%.

  1. Exploration of joint systems and major horizontal stress direction in HDR drillholes of the Soultz site (Alsace, France)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genter, A. [BRGM/GIG, Orleans (France); Tenzer, H. [Stadtwerke Bad Urach (Germany)

    1997-12-01

    Borehole imaging logs enable continuous recording of natural and artificial planar discontinuities on the drillhole wall and data of the drillhole geometry to be made. Efforts were made to resolve the orientation and characterization of the natural joint system, the active fault pattern, the alteration zones, the orientation of microcracks and the direction of maximum horizontal stress. Intense logging operations and measurements were carried out in the HDR drillholes GPK1 and EPS1 between 1000 and 3600 m depth in the Muschelkalk, Bunter and Granite at Soultz sous Forets. With the help of investigations on subvertical fractures the orientation of the maximum horizontal stress direction was determined as N175 E{+-}17 . These results are consistent with previous investigations performed in the horeholes GPK-1 and EPS-1. (orig./AKF) [Deutsch] Bohrlochmessungen mit dem akustschen Borehole Televiewer und elektrischen Formation MicroScanner (Imager) sowie dem Azimuthal Resistivity Imager und verschiedenen Sonic-Sonden ermoeglichen eine kontinuierliche Aufnahme sowohl von natuerlichen und kuenstlich erzeugten planaren Diskontinuitaeten an der Bohrlochwand als auch der Bohrlochgeometrie. Es wurden die Orientierung und Charakterisierung des natuerlichen Kluftsystems, das aktive Stoerungsmuster, die Alterationszonen, die Orientierung von Mikrorissen und die Orientierung der maximalen horizontalen Hauptspannungsrichtung ermittelt. Die Verfuegbarkeit von Strukturdaten aus Bohrloechern durch Bohrlochmessungen und hydraulischen Testen ermoeglicht die Bestimmung von hydraulisch aktiven Klueften und deren Beziehung zum regionalen Spannungsfeld. Mit Hilfe spezieller Bohrloch-Logs wurden die Orientierung und Haeufigkeit planarer Diskontinuitaeten und ihre scheinbare Oeffnungsweite sowie die Vorzugsrichtung der verschiedenen scheinbaren Weiten bestimmt. Innerhalb des gemeinsamen europaeischen Hot-Dry-Rock-Geothermal-Forschungsprogramms wurden vielfaeltige Bohrlochmessungen in den

  2. WE-A-17A-10: Fast, Automatic and Accurate Catheter Reconstruction in HDR Brachytherapy Using An Electromagnetic 3D Tracking System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulin, E; Racine, E; Beaulieu, L [CHU de Quebec - Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec (Canada); Binnekamp, D [Integrated Clinical Solutions and Marketing, Philips Healthcare, Best, DA (Netherlands)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-B), actual catheter reconstruction protocols are slow and errors prompt. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and robustness of an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system for improved catheter reconstruction in HDR-B protocols. Methods: For this proof-of-principle, a total of 10 catheters were inserted in gelatin phantoms with different trajectories. Catheters were reconstructed using a Philips-design 18G biopsy needle (used as an EM stylet) and the second generation Aurora Planar Field Generator from Northern Digital Inc. The Aurora EM system exploits alternating current technology and generates 3D points at 40 Hz. Phantoms were also scanned using a μCT (GE Healthcare) and Philips Big Bore clinical CT system with a resolution of 0.089 mm and 2 mm, respectively. Reconstructions using the EM stylet were compared to μCT and CT. To assess the robustness of the EM reconstruction, 5 catheters were reconstructed twice and compared. Results: Reconstruction time for one catheter was 10 seconds or less. This would imply that for a typical clinical implant of 17 catheters, the total reconstruction time would be less than 3 minutes. When compared to the μCT, the mean EM tip identification error was 0.69 ± 0.29 mm while the CT error was 1.08 ± 0.67 mm. The mean 3D distance error was found to be 0.92 ± 0.37 mm and 1.74 ± 1.39 mm for the EM and CT, respectively. EM 3D catheter trajectories were found to be significantly more accurate (unpaired t-test, p < 0.05). A mean difference of less than 0.5 mm was found between successive EM reconstructions. Conclusion: The EM reconstruction was found to be faster, more accurate and more robust than the conventional methods used for catheter reconstruction in HDR-B. This approach can be applied to any type of catheters and applicators. We would like to disclose that the equipments, used in this study, is coming from a collaboration with Philips Medical.

  3. SU-C-16A-01: In Vivo Source Position Verification in High Dose Rate (HDR) Prostate Brachytherapy Using a Flat Panel Imager: Initial Clinical Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franich, R; Smith, R; Millar, J [RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); The Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Haworth, A [RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Taylor, M [RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Australian Federal Police, Canberra, ACT (Australia); McDermott, L [RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: We report our initial clinical experience with a novel position-sensitive source-tracking system based on a flat panel imager. The system has been trialled with 4 prostate HDR brachytherapy patients (8 treatment fractions) in this initial study. Methods: The flat panel imaging system was mounted under a customised carbon fibre couch top assembly (Figure 1). Three gold fiducial markers were implanted into the prostate of each patient at the time of catheter placement. X-ray dwell position markers were inserted into three catheters and a radiograph acquired to locate the implant relative to the imaging device. During treatment, as the HDR source dwells were delivered, images were acquired and processed to determine the position of the source in the patient. Source positions measured by the imaging device were compared to the treatment plan for verification of treatment delivery. Results: Measured dwell positions provided verification of relative dwell spacing within and between catheters, in the coronal plane. Measurements were typically within 2.0mm (0.2mm – 3.3mm, s.d. 0.8mm) of the planned positions over 60 dwells (Figure 2). Discrimination between larger dwell intervals and catheter differentiation were clear. This confirms important delivery attributes such as correct transfer tube connection, source step size, relative catheter positions and therefore overall correct plan selection and delivery. The fiducial markers, visible on the radiograph, provided verification of treatment delivery to the correct anatomical location. The absolute position of the dwells was determined by comparing the measured dwell positions with the x-ray markers from the radiograph, validating the programmed treatment indexer length. The total impact on procedure time was less than 5 minutes. Conclusion: The novel, noninvasive HDR brachytherapy treatment verification system was used clinically with minor impact on workflow. The system allows verification of correct treatment

  4. SU-F-BRA-05: Utility of the Combined Use of Two Types of HDR Sources with the Direction Modulation Brachytherapy (DMBT) Tandem Applicator for Cervical Cancer Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safigholi, H; Soliman, A; Song, W [Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, U of T, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Han, D [Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, U of T, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Meigooni, A Soleimani [Comprehensive Cancer Center of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada (United States); Scanderbeg, D [UCSD Medical Center, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To maximize the dose to HRCTV while minimizing dose to the OARs, the combination of two HDR brachytherapy sources, 192-Ir and 169-Yb, used in combination with the recently-proposed novel direction modulated brachytherapy (DMBT) tandem applicator were examined. Methods: The DMBT tandem, made from nonmagnetic tungsten-alloy rod, with diameter of 5.4mm, has 6 symmetric peripheral holes of 1.3mm diameter. The 0.3mm thick bio-compatible plastic tubing wraps the tandem. MCNPX v.2.6 was used to simulate the mHDR 192-Ir V2 and 4140 HDR 169-Yb sources inside the DMBT applicator. Thought was by combining the higher energy 192-Ir (380keV) and lower energy 169-Yb (92.7keV) sources could create unprecedented level of dose conformality when combined with the high-degree intensity modulation capable DMBT tandem applicator. 3D dose matrices, with 1 mm3 resolution, were imported into an in-house-coded inverse optimization planning system to evaluate plan quality of 19 clinical patient cases. Prescription dose was 15Gy. All plans were normalized to receive the same HRCTV D90. Results: Generally, the use of dual sources produced better plans than using either of the sources alone, with significantly better performance in some patients. The mean D2cc for bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were 11.65±2.30Gy, 7.47±3.05Gy, and 9.84±2.48Gy for 192-Ir-only, respectively. For 169 -Yb-only, they were 11.67±2.26Gy, 7.44±3.02Gy, and 9.83±2.38Gy, respectively. The corresponding data for the dual sources were 11.51±2.24Gy, 7.30±3.00Gy, and 9.68 ±2.39Gy, respectively. The HRCTV D98 and V100 were 16.37±1.86Gy and 97.37±1.92Gy for Ir-192-only, respectively. For 169-Yb-only, they were 16.43±1.86Gy, and 97.51±1.91Gy, respectively. For the dual source, they were 16.42±1.87Gy and 97.47±1.93Gy, respectively. Conclusion: The plan quality improves, in some cases quite significantly, for when dual 192-Ir and 169-Yb sources are used in combination with highly intensity modulation capable

  5. Accelerated partial breast irradiation with iridium-192 multicatheter PDR/HDR brachytherapy. Preliminary results of the German-Austrian multicenter trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, O.J.; Lotter, M.; Sauer, R.; Strnad, V. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Poetter, R.; Resch, A. [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiobiology, Univ. Hospital AKH Wien, Vienna (Austria); Hammer, J. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Barmherzige Schwestern Hospital Linz, Linz (Austria); Hildebrandt, G. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. Hospital Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); Poehls, U.; Beckmann, M.W. [Dept. of Gynecology, Univ. Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany)

    2004-10-01

    Purpose: to evaluate perioperative morbidity, toxicity, and cosmetic outcome in patients treated with interstitial brachytherapy to the tumor bed as the sole irradiation modality after breast-conserving surgery. Patients and methods: from November 1, 2000 to January 31, 2004, 176 women with early-stage breast cancer became partakers in a protocol of tumor bed irradiation alone using pulsed-dose-rate (PDR) or high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial multicatheter implants. Patients became eligible, if their tumor was an infiltrating carcinoma {<=} 3 cm in diameter, the surgical margins were clear by at least 2 mm, the axilla was surgically staged node-negative, the tumor was estrogen and/or progesterone receptor-positive, well or moderately differentiated (G1/2), the tumor did not contain an extensive intraductal component (EIC) and the patient's age was > 35 years. Implants were positioned using a template guide, delivering either 49.8 Gy in 83 consecutive hours (PDR) or 32.0 Gy in two daily fractions over 4 days (HDR). Perioperative morbidity, toxicity, and cosmetic outcome were assessed. Interim findings of the first 69 patients, who were treated in this multicenter trial, after a median follow-up of 24 months (range, 15-39 months) are presented. Results: one of the 69 patients (1.4%) developed a bacterial infection of the implant. No other perioperative complications, for example bleeding or hematoma, were observed. Acute toxicity was low: 2.9% of the patients (2/69) experienced mild radiodermatitis. Late toxicity: hypersensation/mild pain 7.2% (5/69), intermittent but tolerable pain 1.4% (1/69), mild dyspigmentation 10.1% (7/69), mild fibrosis 11.6% (8/69), moderate fibrosis 1.4% (1/69), mild telangiectasia (< 1 cm{sup 2}) 11.6% (8/69), and moderate teleangiectasia (1-4 cm{sup 2}) 1.4% (1/69). Good to excellent cosmetic results were observed in 92.4% of the patients evaluated. All patients (n = 176) remained disease-free to the date of evaluation. Conclusion

  6. A simplified analytical approach to estimate the parameters required for strength determination of HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy sources using a Farmer-type ionization chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Sudhir [Radiological Physics and Advisory Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, CTCRS, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400094 (India); Srinivasan, P. [Radiation Safety Systems Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Sharma, S.D., E-mail: sdsharma_barc@rediffmail.com [Radiological Physics and Advisory Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, CTCRS, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400094 (India); Mayya, Y.S. [Radiological Physics and Advisory Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, CTCRS, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400094 (India)

    2012-01-15

    Measuring the strength of high dose rate (HDR) {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy sources on receipt from the vendor is an important component of a quality assurance program. Owing to their ready availability in radiotherapy departments, the Farmer-type ionization chambers are also used to determine the strength of HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy sources. The use of a Farmer-type ionization chamber requires the estimation of the scatter correction factor along with positioning error (c) and the constant of proportionality (f) to determine the strength of HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy sources. A simplified approach based on a least squares method was developed for estimating the values of f and M{sub s}. The seven distance method was followed to record the ionization chamber readings for parameterization of f and M{sub s}. Analytically calculated values of M{sub s} were used to determine the room scatter correction factor (K{sub sc}). The Monte Carlo simulations were also carried out to calculate f and K{sub sc} to verify the magnitude of the parameters determined by the proposed analytical approach. The value of f determined using the simplified analytical approach was found to be in excellent agreement with the Monte Carlo simulated value (within 0.7%). Analytically derived values of K{sub sc} were also found to be in good agreement with the Monte Carlo calculated values (within 1.47%). Being far simpler than the presently available methods of evaluating f, the proposed analytical approach can be adopted for routine use by clinical medical physicists to estimate f by hand calculations. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RAKR measurement of a brachytherapy source by 7 distance method requires the evaluation of 'f'. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A simplified analytical approach based on least square method to evaluate 'f' and 'M{sub s}' was developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Parameter 'f' calculated by proposed analytical

  7. Determination of absorbed dose in water at the reference point d(r0, theta0) for an 192Ir HDR brachytherapy source using a Fricke system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austerlitz, C; Mota, H C; Sempau, J; Benhabib, S M; Campos, D; Allison, R; DeAlmeida, C E; Zhu, D; Sibata, C H

    2008-12-01

    A ring-shaped Fricke device was developed to measure the absolute dose on the transverse bisector of a 192Ir high dose rate (HDR) source at 1 cm from its center in water, D(r0, theta0). It consists of a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) rod (axial axis) with a cylindrical cavity at its center to insert the 192Ir radioactive source. A ring cavity around the source with 1.5 mm thickness and 5 mm height is centered at 1 cm from the central axis of the source. This ring cavity is etched in a disk shaped base with 2.65 cm diameter and 0.90 cm thickness. The cavity has a wall around it 0.25 cm thick. This ring is filled with Fricke solution, sealed, and the whole assembly is immersed in water during irradiations. The device takes advantage of the cylindrical geometry to measure D(r0, theta0). Irradiations were performed with a Nucletron microselectron HDR unit loaded with an 192Ir Alpha Omega radioactive source. A Spectronic 1001 spectrophotometer was used to measure the optical absorbance using a 1 mL quartz cuvette with 1.00 cm light pathlength. The PENELOPE Monte Carlo code (MC) was utilized to simulate the Fricke device and the 192Ir Alpha Omega source in detail to calculate the perturbation introduced by the PMMA material. A NIST traceable calibrated well type ionization chamber was used to determine the air-kerma strength, and a published dose-rate constant was used to determine the dose rate at the reference point. The time to deliver 30.00 Gy to the reference point was calculated. This absorbed dose was then compared to the absorbed dose measured by the Fricke solution. Based on MC simulation, the PMMA of the Fricke device increases the D(r0, theta0) by 2.0%. Applying the corresponding correction factor, the D(r0, theta0) value assessed with the Fricke device agrees within 2.0% with the expected value with a total combined uncertainty of 3.43% (k=1). The Fricke device provides a promising method towards calibration of brachytherapy radiation sources in terms of D(r0

  8. Surface dose characterisation of the Varian Ir-192 HDR conical surface applicator set with a vertically orientated source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchauer, Konrad; Henke, Guido; Schiefer, Hans; Plasswilm, Ludwig [Kantonsspital St. Gallen, Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Gallen (Switzerland)

    2014-12-15

    etabliertes Mittel um mit Ir-192 HDR-Brachytherapie nichtmelanomatoese Hautkrebserkrankungen mit hohen Tumorkontrollraten zu behandeln. In dieser Arbeit wird eine hochaufloesende Analyse der Oberflaechendosis eines Varian-Varisource-GammaMed+ IX-Afterloader-Konus-Applikatorsatzes des vertikalen Typs dargestellt. Analyse der Oberflaechendosisverteilung des Applikatorsatzes im Hinblick auf Unregelmaessigkeiten, die fuer aehnliche Applikatoren bereits berichtet wurden. Weiterhin wird untersucht, ob Applikatoren des vertikalen Typs zusaetzliche Verfahren als Ergaenzung der aktuell vorgeschlagenen Methoden zur Verifikation des Dosisoutputs von konischen Oberflaechenapplikatoren benoetigen. Die Verifikation der absoluten Dosis wird nach Herstellerangaben durchgefuehrt. Die Dosisverteilung an der Oberflaeche wird zusaetzlich mit Gafchromic-EBT3-Filmdosimetrie bestimmt. Der Begriff ''therapeutische Dosis'' ist in dieser Arbeit mit 85 % der verschriebenen Dosis definiert. Zehn ausgewertete Applikatoren zeigen Unterdosierungen in der Applikatormitte, mit einer mittlere Groesse von 2,0 mm x 3,6 mm (± 0,6 mm), dosimetrisch deutlich unter 85 % der verschriebenen Dosis. Die Unterdosierung liegt 2,2 mm (1,4-2,7 mm) seitlich der Zentralachse und verursacht eine generelle Asymmetrie in der Dosisverteilung. Ein Schiefstand von 8 (± 1 ) wurde fuer die verwendete Quelle bestimmt. Eine um mehr als 15 % reduzierte Dosis in der Applikatormitte wurde bei Oberflaechenapplikatoren bislang nicht berichtet. Quellenschiefstand wurde als Parameter identifiziert, der die Handhabung dieser Oberflaechenapplikatoren und moeglicherweise den Therapieerfolg beeinflussen kann. Das beschriebene kleinraeumige Dosisartefakt kann systematischen Einfluss auf kammerbasierte Dosisverifikationsverfahren haben. Wir empfehlen daher bei der Applikatorkommissionierung eine zusaetzliche Absicherung mit Filmdosimetrie. (orig.)

  9. Image-Guided High-Dose-Rate (HDR) Boost Localization Using MRI/MR Spectroscopy: A Correlation Study with Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbodji, Khaly; Racine, Louis G; Chevrette, Eric; Lavallee, Marie C; Martin, André-Guy; Despres, Philippe; Beaulieu, Luc

    2016-01-01

    93.7% (84.5% - 98.2%) and 82.1% (66.5% - 92.5%), respectively, and a PPV and NPV of 89.4% (79.4% - 95.6%) and 88.9% (73.9% - 96.9%), respectively. Finally, after combining MRI, MRS, and DWI-ADC mapping, compared with biopsy, we obtained a Sn, Sp, PPV, and NPV of 100% (94.8% - 100%), 49% (34.8% - 63.4%), 72.6% (62.5% - 81.3%), and 100% (86.3% - 100%), respectively. Conclusions: The combination of MRI/MRS is a sensitive tool for both the structural and metabolic evaluation of prostate cancer location. MRI/MRS exams are useful to delineate a DIL for high-dose-rate (HDR) intraprostatic boost. PMID:27790388

  10. Imaging of implant needles for real-time HDR-brachytherapy prostate treatment using biplane ultrasound transducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebert, Frank-André; Hirt, Markus; Niehoff, Peter; Kovács, György

    2009-08-01

    Ultrasound imaging is becoming increasingly important in prostate brachytherapy. In high-dose-rate (HDR) real-time planning procedures the definition of the implant needles is often performed by transrectal ultrasound. This article describes absolute measurements of the visibility and accuracy of manual detection of implant needle tips and compares measurement results of different biplane ultrasound systems in transversal and longitudinal (i.e., sagittal) ultrasound modes. To obtain a fixed coordinate system and stable conditions the measurements were carried out in a water tank using a dedicated marker system. Needles were manually placed in the phantom until the observer decided by the real-time ultrasound image that the zero position was reached. A comparison of three different ultrasound systems yielded an offset between 0.8 and 3.1 mm for manual detection of the needle tip in ultrasound images by one observer. The direction of the offset was discovered to be in the proximal direction, i.e., the actual needle position was located more distally compared to the ultrasound-based definition. In the second part of the study, the ultrasound anisotropy of trocar implant needles is reported. It was shown that the integrated optical density in a region of interest around the needle tip changes with needle rotation. Three peaks were observed with a phase angle of 120 degrees. Peaks appear not only in transversal but also in longitudinal ultrasound images, with a phase shift of 60 degrees. The third section of this study shows results of observer dependent influences on needle tip detection in sagittal ultrasound images considering needle rotation. These experiments were carried out using the marker system in a water tank. The needle tip was placed exactly at the position z=0 mm. It was found that different users tend to differently interpret the same ultrasound images. The needle tip was manually detected five times in the ultrasound images by three experienced observers

  11. High Dynamic Range Video

    CERN Document Server

    Myszkowski, Karol

    2008-01-01

    This book presents a complete pipeline forHDR image and video processing fromacquisition, through compression and quality evaluation, to display. At the HDR image and video acquisition stage specialized HDR sensors or multi-exposure techniques suitable for traditional cameras are discussed. Then, we present a practical solution for pixel values calibration in terms of photometric or radiometric quantities, which are required in some technically oriented applications. Also, we cover the problem of efficient image and video compression and encoding either for storage or transmission purposes, in

  12. High Dynamic Range Image Based on Multiple Exposure Time Synthetization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshifumi Shimodaira

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available High dynamic range of illumination may cause serious distortions and otherproblems in viewing and further processing of digital images. In this paper a new tonereproduction preprocessing algorithm is introduced which may help in developing hardly ornon-viewable features and content of the images. The method is based on the synthetizationof multiple exposure images from which the dense part, i.e. regions having the maximumlevel of detail are included in the output image. The resulted high quality HDR image makeseasier the information extraction and effectively supports the further processing of theimage.

  13. Radical radiotherapy treatment (EBRT + HDR-ICRT of carcinoma of the uterine cervix: Outcome in patients treated at a rural center in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jain Vandana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To report the outcome of carcinoma of the uterine cervix patients treated radically by external beam radiotherapy (EBRT and high-dose-rate (HDR intracavitary radiotherapy (ICRT. Materials and Methods: Between January 1997 to December 2001, a total of 550 newly diagnosed cases of carcinoma of the uterine cervix were reported in the department. All cases were staged according to the International Federation of Gynecologists and Oncologists (FIGO staging system, but for analytical convenience, the staging was limited to stages I, II, III, and IV. Out of the 550 cases, 214 completed radical radiotherapy (EBRT + HDR-ICRT and were retrospectively analyzed for presence of local residual disease, local recurrence, distant metastases, radiation reactions, and disease-free survival. Results: There were 7 (3.27%, 88 (41.1%, 101 (47.1%, and 18 (8.4% patients in stage I, II, III, and IV, respectively. The median follow-up time for all patients was 43 months (range: 3-93 months and for patients who were disease free till the last follow-up it was 59 months (range: 24-93 months. The overall treatment time (OTT ranged from 52 to 73 days (median 61 days. The 5-year disease-free mean survival rate was 58%, 44%, 33%, and 15%, with 95% confidence interval of 48 to 68, 37 to 51, 24 to 35, and 6 to 24 for stages I, II, III, and IV, respectively. There were 62 (28.97% cases with local residual disease, 35 (16.3% developed local recurrence/distant metastases, 17 (7.9% developed distant metastases, and 9 (4.2% had local recurrence as well. Discussion and Conclusion: The overall outcome was poor in advanced stage disease, but might be improved by increasing the total dose, decreasing overall duration of treatment, and by adding chemotherapy in patients with disease limited to the pelvis.

  14. SU-E-P-38: Comparison of Capri Applicator HDR Planning Methods to Meet the NCCN Uterine Neoplasm 2.2015 Guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klash, S; Steinman, J [Radphys Oncology Services, LLC, Knoxville, TN (United States); Stanley, T [CCS Oncology Center, Kenmore, NY (United States); Kim, D; Yi, S [CCS Oncology, Williamsville, NY (United States); Yap, J [CCS Oncology, Williamsville, New York (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To establish a systematic planning approach for Capri intravaginal multichannel balloon applicators that meet updated Version 2.2015 NCCN guidelines for uterine neoplasms, which dictate delivery of 400 to 600 cGy in 2 to 3 fractions prescribed to the vaginal mucosa for HDR combined with EBRT as well as a regimen of 600 cGy x 5 (to the vaginal mucosa) for HDR brachytherapy alone. Methods: Studies have shown three different channel configurations of the Capri applicator are optimal for dosimetric conformity: central channel combined with the six inner ring channels (R12), all inner and outer ring channels (R23), or all thirteen channels (R123). To minimize the dose to the vaginal mucosa, a traditional 0.5cm expansion contour from the Capri surface was created. Optimization limits were set to push 600 cGy to 100% of the Capri volume, while simultaneously restricting dose to the expansion contour. Results: Plans were created using all three configurations (R12, R23, R123) and evaluated to determine which was best for delivering 600 cGy to the vaginal mucosa. Our criteria was: Capri V100 > 98%, Vaginal Mucosa Dmax < 125%, Bladder Dmax < 100%, Rectum Dmax < 100%. All configurations show Capri V100 values greater than 98.5%, with differences between plans varying by less than 1%. Vaginal mucosal Dmax values showed differences of roughly 5% of prescription. The R12 configuration proved the lowest vaginal mucosa Dmax, on average. The OAR Dmax values showed an average dose difference of roughly 2% of prescription, with the R23 configuration having the best results. Conclusion: The R12 channel configuration optimally fits our planning criteria and NCCN guidelines for 600 cGy prescribed to the vaginal mucosa. On average, it produced the highest Capri V100, the lowest vaginal mucosal Dmax, and a marginally higher OAR Dmax doses compared to the R23 and R123 plans.

  15. Dosimetric feasibility of ablative dose escalated focal monotherapy with MRI-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosni, Ali; Carlone, Marco; Rink, Alexandra; Ménard, Cynthia; Chung, Peter; Berlin, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    To determine the dosimetric feasibility of dose-escalated MRI-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) focal monotherapy for prostate cancer (PCa). In all patients, GTV was defined with mpMRI, and deformably registered onto post-catheter insertion planning MRI. PTV included the GTV plus 9mm craniocaudal and 5mm in every other direction. In discovery-cohort, plans were obtained for each PTV independently aiming to deliver ⩾16.5Gy/fraction (two fraction schedule) while respecting predefined organs-at-risk (OAR) constraints or halted when achieved equivalent single-dose plan (24Gy). Dosimetric results of original and focal HDR-BT plans were evaluated to develop a planning protocol for the validation-cohort. In discovery-cohort (20-patients, 32-GTVs): PTV D95% ⩾16.5Gy could not be reached in a single plan (3%) and was accomplished (range 16.5-23.8Gy) in 15 GTVs (47%). Single-dose schedule was feasible in 16 (50%) plans. In the validation-cohort (10-patients, 10-GTVs, two separate implants each): plans met acceptable and ideal criteria in 100% and 43-100% respectively. Migration to single-dose treatment schedule was feasible in 7 implants (35%), without relaxing OAR's constraints or increasing the dose (D100% and D35%) to mpMRI-normal prostate (p>0.05). Focal ablative dose-escalated radiation is feasible with the proposed protocol. Prospective studies are warranted to determine the clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. SU-E-T-615: Investigation of the Dosimetric Impact of Tandem Loading in the Treatment of Cervical Cancer for HDR Brachytherapy Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esquivel, C; Patton, L; Nelson, K; Lin, B [Cancer Care Centers of South Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the dosimetric impact of the tandem loading in the treatment of cervical cancer for HDR brachytherapy procedures. Methods: Ten patients were evaluated, each of whom received 5 fractions of treatment. Tandem and ovoid sets were inserted into the uterine cavity based on institutional protocols and procedures. Following insertion and stabilization, CT image sets of 1.5mm slice thickness were acquired and sent to the Oncentra V4.3 Treatment Planning System. Critical structures such as the CTV, bladder, rectum, sigmoid, and bowel were contoured and a fractional dose of 5.5Gy was prescribed to Point A for each patient. Six different treatment plans were created for each fraction using varying tandem weightings; from 0.5 to 1.4 times that of the ovoids. Surface dose evaluation of various ovoid diameters, 2.0-3.5cm, at the vaginal fornices was also investigated. Results: Critical structures were evaluated based on varying dose and volume constraints, in particular the 2.0 cc volume recommendation cited by the gynecological GEC-ESTRO working group. Based on dose volume histogram evaluation, a reduction of dose to the critical structures was most often discovered when the tandem weighting was increased. CTV coverage showed little change as the tandem weighting was varied. Ovoid surface dose decreased by 50-65% as the tandem weighting increased. Conclusion: The advantage of 3D planning with HDR brachytherapy is the dose optimization for each individual treatment plan. This investigation shows that by utilizing large tandem weightings, 1.4 times greater than the ovoid, one can still achieve adequate coverage of the CTV and relatively low doses to the critical structures. In some cases, one would still have to optimize further per individual case. In addition, the ovoid surface dose was greatly decreased when large tandem weighting was utilized; especially for small ovoid diameters.

  17. Assembly and dynamics of the bacteriophage T4 homologous recombination machinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morrical Scott W

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Homologous recombination (HR, a process involving the physical exchange of strands between homologous or nearly homologous DNA molecules, is critical for maintaining the genetic diversity and genome stability of species. Bacteriophage T4 is one of the classic systems for studies of homologous recombination. T4 uses HR for high-frequency genetic exchanges, for homology-directed DNA repair (HDR processes including DNA double-strand break repair, and for the initiation of DNA replication (RDR. T4 recombination proteins are expressed at high levels during T4 infection in E. coli, and share strong sequence, structural, and/or functional conservation with their counterparts in cellular organisms. Biochemical studies of T4 recombination have provided key insights on DNA strand exchange mechanisms, on the structure and function of recombination proteins, and on the coordination of recombination and DNA synthesis activities during RDR and HDR. Recent years have seen the development of detailed biochemical models for the assembly and dynamics of presynaptic filaments in the T4 recombination system, for the atomic structure of T4 UvsX recombinase, and for the roles of DNA helicases in T4 recombination. The goal of this chapter is to review these recent advances and their implications for HR and HDR mechanisms in all organisms.

  18. Definitive salvage for vaginal recurrence of endometrial cancer: the impact of modern intensity-modulated-radiotherapy with image-based HDR brachytherapy and the interplay of the PORTEC 1 risk stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargo, John A; Kim, Hayeon; Houser, Christopher J; Berhane, Hebist; Sukumvanich, Paniti; Olawaiye, Alexander B; Kelley, Joseph L; Edwards, Robert P; Comerci, John T; Huang, Marilyn; Courtney-Brooks, Madeleine; Beriwal, Sushil

    2014-10-01

    Data for salvage radiotherapy for recurrent endometrial cancer are limited especially in the era of modern radiotherapy including IMRT and 3-dimensional image-based HDR brachytherapy. Theoretically, modern radiotherapy reduces the dose to critical organs-at-risk and maximizes dose to the target volume, possibly decreasing morbidity and increasing tumor control. Forty-one patients completing definitive salvage radiotherapy for vaginal recurrence of endometrial cancer from June 2004 to December 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. HDR Brachytherapy was completed using image-based planning with contouring/optimization with each fraction to a median dose of 23.75 Gy in 5 fractions. HDR brachytherapy was preceded by external beam radiotherapy predominately using an IMRT technique (90%) to a median dose of 45 Gy in 25 fractions. Toxicity was reported according to CTCAEv4. At a median follow-up of 18 months (range: 3-78), the clinical complete response rate was 95%. The 3-year local control, distant control, recurrence free survival, and overall survival were 95%, 61%, 68%, and 67%. Significant predictors of both distant failure and overall survival were primary prognostic factors of depth of myometrial invasion, FIGO stage, and FIGO grade. There was no grade 3+ acute toxicity; the 3-year rate of grade 3+ late toxicity was 8%. Salvage IMRT plus 3-dimensional image-based HDR brachytherapy shows excellent tumor control and minimal morbidity for vaginal recurrence of endometrial cancer. Anticipated salvage rates must be taken in the context of primary risk factors including depth of myometrial invasion, FIGO stage, and FIGO grade. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. New method to compute the throughput capacity of HDR wireless networks%一种新的HDR无线网络吞吐率容量计算方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张源; 毕光国

    2004-01-01

    A new non-parameter method is proposed to compute the throughput capacity region of high data rate (HDR) wireless networks. We first transform the task of computing the throughput capacity region into a mathematical optimization problem without introducing any additional parameters. By using a greedy algorithm to solve the optimization problem, the non-parametric characterization of the throughput capacity region of HDR can be obtained. By using the new non-parameter method, the HDR throughput capacity region can be characterized by at most N(M2-M+1)N-1 linear constraints where N is the user number and M is the rate set size. The correctness of the new method is verified by several numerical examples.%基于一种新的非参数方法计算了HDR (high data rate)无线网络的吞吐率容量区域. 首先把HDR吞吐率容量区域的计算问题转化为一个不带参数的数学优化问题, 然后通过贪婪算法求解得到该优化问题的解, 从而最终给出了HDR吞吐率容量区域的非参数解析刻划. 与传统的参数化方法的庞大计算量相比, 该方法的计算复杂度降低很多, 最多只需要计算N(M2-M+1)N-1个线性约束即可, 其中N为用户数, M为系统支持速率数. 数值计算例子验证了这种非参数方法的正确性.

  20. TU-AB-201-05: Automatic Adaptive Per-Operative Re-Planning for HDR Prostate Brachytherapy - a Simulation Study On Errors in Needle Positioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borot de Battisti, M; Maenhout, M; Lagendijk, J J W; Van Vulpen, M; Moerland, M A [University Medical Center Utrecht, Dept. of Radiotherapy, Utrecht (Netherlands); Senneville, B Denis de [University Medical Center Utrecht, Dept. of Radiotherapy, Utrecht (Netherlands); IMB, UMR 5251 CNRS/University of Bordeaux (France); Hautvast, G; Binnekamp, D [Philips Group Innovation - Biomedical Systems, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop adaptive planning with feedback for MRI-guided focal HDR prostate brachytherapy with a single divergent needle robotic implant device. After each needle insertion, the dwell positions for that needle are calculated and the positioning of remaining needles and dosimetry are both updated based on MR imaging. Methods: Errors in needle positioning may occur due to inaccurate needle insertion (caused by e.g. the needle’s bending) and unpredictable changes in patient anatomy. Consequently, the dose plan quality might dramatically decrease compared to the preplan. In this study, a procedure was developed to re-optimize, after each needle insertion, the remaining needle angulations, source positions and dwell times in order to obtain an optimal coverage (D95% PTV>19 Gy) without exceeding the constraints of the organs at risk (OAR) (D10% urethra<21 Gy, D1cc bladder<12 Gy and D1cc rectum<12 Gy). Complete HDR procedures with 6 needle insertions were simulated for a patient MR-image set with PTV, prostate, urethra, bladder and rectum delineated. Random angulation errors, modeled by a Gaussian distribution (standard deviation of 3 mm at the needle’s tip), were generated for each needle insertion. We compared the final dose parameters for the situations (I) without re-optimization and (II) with the automatic feedback. Results: The computation time of replanning was below 100 seconds on a current desk computer. For the patient tested, a clinically acceptable dose plan was achieved while applying the automatic feedback (median(range) in Gy, D95% PTV: 19.9(19.3–20.3), D10% urethra: 13.4(11.9–18.0), D1cc rectum: 11.0(10.7–11.6), D1cc bladder: 4.9(3.6–6.8)). This was not the case without re-optimization (median(range) in Gy, D95% PTV: 19.4(14.9–21.3), D10% urethra: 12.6(11.0–15.7), D1cc rectum: 10.9(8.9–14.1), D1cc bladder: 4.8(4.4–5.2)). Conclusion: An automatic guidance strategy for HDR prostate brachytherapy was developed to compensate

  1. A multicenter study to quantify systematic variations and associated uncertainties in source positioning with commonly used HDR afterloaders and ring applicators for the treatment of cervical carcinomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awunor, O., E-mail: onuora.awunor@stees.nhs.uk [The Medical Physics Department, The James Cook University Hospital, Marton Road, Middlesbrough TS4 3BW, England (United Kingdom); Berger, D. [Department of Radiotherapy, General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna A-1090 (Austria); Kirisits, C. [Department of Radiotherapy, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna A-1090 (Austria)

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: The reconstruction of radiation source position in the treatment planning system is a key part of the applicator reconstruction process in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment of cervical carcinomas. The steep dose gradients, of as much as 12%/mm, associated with typical cervix treatments emphasize the importance of accurate and precise determination of source positions. However, a variety of methodologies with a range in associated measurement uncertainties, of up to ±2.5 mm, are currently employed by various centers to do this. In addition, a recent pilot study by Awunor et al. [“Direct reconstruction and associated uncertainties of {sup 192}Ir source dwell positions in ring applicators using gafchromic film in the treatment planning of HDR brachytherapy cervix patients,” Phys. Med. Biol. 58, 3207–3225 (2013)] reported source positional differences of up to 2.6 mm between ring sets of the same type and geometry. This suggests a need for a comprehensive study to assess and quantify systematic source position variations between commonly used ring applicators and HDR afterloaders across multiple centers. Methods: Eighty-six rings from 20 European brachytherapy centers were audited in the form of a postal audit with each center collecting the data independently. The data were collected by setting up the rings using a bespoke jig and irradiating gafchromic films at predetermined dwell positions using four afterloader types, MicroSelectron, Flexitron, GammaMed, and MultiSource, from three manufacturers, Nucletron, Varian, and Eckert & Ziegler BEBIG. Five different ring types in six sizes (Ø25–Ø35 mm) and two angles (45° and 60°) were used. Coordinates of irradiated positions relative to the ring center were determined and collated, and source position differences quantified by ring type, size, and angle. Results: The mean expanded measurement uncertainty (k = 2) along the direction of source travel was ±1.4 mm. The standard deviation

  2. A method for verification of treatment delivery in HDR prostate brachytherapy using a flat panel detector for both imaging and source tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Ryan L., E-mail: ryan.smith@wbrc.org.au; Millar, Jeremy L.; Franich, Rick D. [Alfred Health Radiation Oncology, The Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, VIC 3004, Australia and School of Science, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC 3000 (Australia); Haworth, Annette [School of Science, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC 3000, Australia and Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC 3002 (Australia); Panettieri, Vanessa [Alfred Health Radiation Oncology, The Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, VIC 3004 (Australia)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: Verification of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment delivery is an important step, but is generally difficult to achieve. A technique is required to monitor the treatment as it is delivered, allowing comparison with the treatment plan and error detection. In this work, we demonstrate a method for monitoring the treatment as it is delivered and directly comparing the delivered treatment with the treatment plan in the clinical workspace. This treatment verification system is based on a flat panel detector (FPD) used for both pre-treatment imaging and source tracking. Methods: A phantom study was conducted to establish the resolution and precision of the system. A pretreatment radiograph of a phantom containing brachytherapy catheters is acquired and registration between the measurement and treatment planning system (TPS) is performed using implanted fiducial markers. The measured catheter paths immediately prior to treatment were then compared with the plan. During treatment delivery, the position of the {sup 192}Ir source is determined at each dwell position by measuring the exit radiation with the FPD and directly compared to the planned source dwell positions. Results: The registration between the two corresponding sets of fiducial markers in the TPS and radiograph yielded a registration error (residual) of 1.0 mm. The measured catheter paths agreed with the planned catheter paths on average to within 0.5 mm. The source positions measured with the FPD matched the planned source positions for all dwells on average within 0.6 mm (s.d. 0.3, min. 0.1, max. 1.4 mm). Conclusions: We have demonstrated a method for directly comparing the treatment plan with the delivered treatment that can be easily implemented in the clinical workspace. Pretreatment imaging was performed, enabling visualization of the implant before treatment delivery and identification of possible catheter displacement. Treatment delivery verification was performed by measuring the

  3. Thermal dosimetry analysis combined with patient-specific thermal modeling of clinical interstitial ultrasound hyperthermia integrated within HDR brachytherapy for treatment of locally advanced prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Wootton, Jeff; Prakash, Punit; Scott, Serena; Hsu, I. C.; Diederich, Chris J.

    2017-03-01

    This study presents thermal dosimetry analysis from clinical treatments where ultrasound hyperthermia (HT) was administered following high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment for locally advanced prostate cancer as part of a clinical pilot study. HT was administered using ultrasound applicators from within multiple 13-g brachytherapy catheters implanted along the posterior periphery of the prostate. The heating applicators were linear arrays of sectored tubular transducers (˜7 MHz), with independently powered array elements enabling energy deposition with 3D spatial control. Typical heat treatments employed time-averaged peak acoustic intensities of 1 - 3 W/cm2 and lasted for 60 - 70 minutes. Throughout the treatments, temperatures at multiple points were monitored using multi-junction thermocouples, placed within available brachytherapy catheters throughout mid-gland prostate and identified as the hyperthermia target volume (HTV). Clinical constraints allowed placement of 8 - 12 thermocouple sensors in the HTV and patient-specific 3D thermal modeling based on finite element methods (FEM) was used to supplement limited thermometry. Patient anatomy, heating device positions, orientations, and thermometry junction locations were obtained from patient CT scans and HDR and hyperthermia planning software. The numerical models utilized the applied power levels recorded during the treatments. Tissue properties such as perfusion and acoustic absorption were varied within physiological ranges such that squared-errors between measured and simulated temperatures were minimized. This data-fitting was utilized for 6 HT treatments to estimate volumetric temperature distributions achieved in the HTV and surrounding anatomy devoid of thermocouples. For these treatments, the measured and simulated T50 values in the hyperthermia target volume (HTV) were between 40.1 - 43.9 °C and 40.3 - 44.9 °C, respectively. Maximum temperatures between 46.8 - 49.8 °C were measured during

  4. SU-F-BRF-09: A Non-Rigid Point Matching Method for Accurate Bladder Dose Summation in Cervical Cancer HDR Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H; Zhen, X; Zhou, L [Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Zhong, Z [The University of Texas at Dallas, Department of Computer Science, TX (United States); Pompos, A; Yan, H; Jiang, S; Gu, X [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To propose and validate a deformable point matching scheme for surface deformation to facilitate accurate bladder dose summation for fractionated HDR cervical cancer treatment. Method: A deformable point matching scheme based on the thin plate spline robust point matching (TPSRPM) algorithm is proposed for bladder surface registration. The surface of bladders segmented from fractional CT images is extracted and discretized with triangular surface mesh. Deformation between the two bladder surfaces are obtained by matching the two meshes' vertices via the TPS-RPM algorithm, and the deformation vector fields (DVFs) characteristic of this deformation is estimated by B-spline approximation. Numerically, the algorithm is quantitatively compared with the Demons algorithm using five clinical cervical cancer cases by several metrics: vertex-to-vertex distance (VVD), Hausdorff distance (HD), percent error (PE), and conformity index (CI). Experimentally, the algorithm is validated on a balloon phantom with 12 surface fiducial markers. The balloon is inflated with different amount of water, and the displacement of fiducial markers is benchmarked as ground truth to study TPS-RPM calculated DVFs' accuracy. Results: In numerical evaluation, the mean VVD is 3.7(±2.0) mm after Demons, and 1.3(±0.9) mm after TPS-RPM. The mean HD is 14.4 mm after Demons, and 5.3mm after TPS-RPM. The mean PE is 101.7% after Demons and decreases to 18.7% after TPS-RPM. The mean CI is 0.63 after Demons, and increases to 0.90 after TPS-RPM. In the phantom study, the mean Euclidean distance of the fiducials is 7.4±3.0mm and 4.2±1.8mm after Demons and TPS-RPM, respectively. Conclusions: The bladder wall deformation is more accurate using the feature-based TPS-RPM algorithm than the intensity-based Demons algorithm, indicating that TPS-RPM has the potential for accurate bladder dose deformation and dose summation for multi-fractional cervical HDR brachytherapy. This work is supported

  5. SU-F-19A-02: Comparison of Absorbed Dose to Water Standards for HDR Ir-192 Brachytherapy Between the LCR, Brazil and NRC, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salata, C; David, M; Almeida, C de [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio De Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); El Gamal, I; Cojocaru, C; Mainegra-Hing, E; McEwen, M [National Research Council, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To compare absorbed dose to water standards for HDR brachytherapy dosimetry developed by the Radiological Science Laboratory of Rio de Janeiro State University (LCR) and the National Research Council, Canada (NRC). Methods: The two institutions have separately developed absorbed dose standards based on the Fricke dosimetry system. There are important differences between the two standards, including: preparation and read-out of the Fricke solution, irradiation geometry of the Fricke holder in relation to the Ir-192 source, and determination of the G-value to be used at Ir-192 energies. All measurements for both standards were made directly at the NRC laboratory (i.e., no transfer instrument was used) using a single Ir-192 source (microSelectron v2). In addition, the NRC group has established a self-consistent method to determine the G-value for Ir-192, based on an interpolation between G-values obtained at Co-60 and 250kVp X-rays, and this measurement was repeated using the LCR Fricke solution to investigate possible systematic uncertainties. Results: G-values for Co-60 and 250 kVp x-rays, obtained using the LCR Fricke system, agreed with the NRC values within 0.5 % and 1 % respectively, indicating that the general assumption of universal G-values is appropriate in this case. The standard uncertainty in the determination of G for Ir-192 is estimated to be 0.6 %. For the comparison of absorbed dose measurements at the reference point for Ir-192 (1 cm depth in water, perpendicular to the seed long-axis), the ratio Dw(NRC)/Dw(LCR) was found to be 1.011 with a combined standard uncertainty of 1.7 %, k=1. Conclusion: The agreement in the absorbed dose to water values for the LCR and NRC systems is very encouraging. Combined with the lower uncertainty in this approach compared to the present air-kerma approach, these results reaffirm the use of Fricke solution as a potential primary standard for HDR Ir-192 brachytherapy.

  6. Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA as Predicting Marker for Clinical Outcome and Evaluation of Early Toxicity Rate after High-Dose Rate Brachytherapy (HDR-BT in Combination with Additional External Beam Radiation Therapy (EBRT for High Risk Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten H. Ecke

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available High-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT is a common treatment option for locally advanced prostate cancer (PCa. Seventy-nine male patients (median age 71 years, range 50 to 79 with high-risk PCa underwent HDR-BT following EBRT between December 2009 and January 2016 with a median follow-up of 21 months. HDR-BT was administered in two treatment sessions (one week interval with 9 Gy per fraction using a planning system and the Ir192 treatment unit GammaMed Plus iX. EBRT was performed with CT-based 3D-conformal treatment planning with a total dose administration of 50.4 Gy with 1.8 Gy per fraction and five fractions per week. Follow-up for all patients was organized one, three, and five years after radiation therapy to evaluate early and late toxicity side effects, metastases, local recurrence, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA value measured in ng/mL. The evaluated data included age, PSA at time of diagnosis, PSA density, BMI (body mass index, Gleason score, D’Amico risk classification for PCa, digital rectal examination (DRE, PSA value after one/three/five year(s follow-up (FU, time of follow-up, TNM classification, prostate volume, and early toxicity rates. Early toxicity rates were 8.86% for gastrointestinal, and 6.33% for genitourinary side effects. Of all treated patients, 84.81% had no side effects. All reported complications in early toxicity were grade 1. PSA density at time of diagnosis (p = 0.009, PSA on date of first HDR-BT (p = 0.033, and PSA on date of first follow-up after one year (p = 0.025 have statistical significance on a higher risk to get a local recurrence during follow-up. HDR-BT in combination with additional EBRT in the presented design for high-risk PCa results in high biochemical control rates with minimal side-effects. PSA is a negative predictive biomarker for local recurrence during follow-up. A longer follow-up is needed to assess long-term outcome and toxicities.

  7. 动静相宜,创享高清——索尼HDR-SR12E高清DV体验之旅

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kent

    2008-01-01

    毫无疑问,在高清风潮的影响下,数码摄像机也正在由传统的标清迈向高清。其中,硬盘式的高清DV由于其大容量、便于携带等特点而逐渐成为了DV市场的中坚主力。由于产品的多样与复杂性,如果你只是想要选择一款可以拍摄高清视频的数码摄像机,那么我们相信市场上绝大多数的产品都能满足你的需求。不过假如你想选择一款时尚、小巧,而且功能丰富、性能卓越、存储容量大的产品,而且你的钱包也不是太紧张,那么我们向你推荐SONY HDR-SR12E(后文简称SR12E),一款具备旗舰本色的硬盘式高清数码摄像机。

  8. Flow characteristics of Hijiori HDR reservoir form circulation test in 1995; Koon tantai Hijiori jikkenjo ni okeru shinbu choryuso yobi junkan shiken (1995 nendo) kekka to ryudo kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukushima, N.; Hyodo, M.; Shinohara, N.; Takasugi, S. [Geothermal Energy Research and Development Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    This paper reports the result of a preliminary circulation test conducted in fiscal 1995 on a deep reservoir (at a depth of about 2200 m) in the Hijiori hot dry rock experimental field. One water injection well and two production wells were drilled to constitute a circulation loop, to which the circulation test was performed to investigate the flow characteristics thereof. The result revealed the following matters: total amount of injected water of 51500 m{sup 3} resulted in a total fluid recovery rate of about 40%; as a result of well stimulation given twice during the initial stage of the water injection, the continuity impedance in the vicinity of the injection well decreased largely (however, the continuity improvement upon the second attempt was considerably inferior to that from the first attempt); and increase in the water injection amount does not necessarily lead to increase in the production amount. The paper describes additionally that it is extremely difficult to interpret non-linearity between the injection and production amounts by using a model prepared previously with a main objective to analyze the Hijiori HDR circulation system. 1 ref., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Flow characteristic of Hijiori HDR reservoir from circulation test in 1991; Koon tantai Hijiori jikkenjo ni okeru senbu choryuso shiken (1991 nendo) kekka to ryudo kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiga, T.; Hyodo, M.; Shinohara, N.; Takasugi, S. [Geothermal Energy Research and Development Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    This paper reports one example of flow analyses on a circulation test carried out in fiscal 1991 at the Hijiori hot dry rock experimental field (Yamagata Prefecture). A fluid circulation model was proposed to simulate an HDR circulation system for a shallow reservoir (at a depth of about 1800 m) demonstrated in the circulation test by using an electric circuit network (which expresses continuity impedance in resistance and fluid storage in capacitance). Storage capacity of the reservoir was estimated by deriving time constant of the system from data of time-based change in reservoir pressure associated with transition phenomena during the circulation test. The storage capacity was estimated separately by dividing change of storage in the reservoir by change in the reservoir pressure. To derive the storage in the reservoir, a method to calculate non-recovered flows in the circulation test was utilized. The results of evaluating the reservoir capacity in the shallow reservoir using the above two independent methods were found substantially consistent. 3 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  10. 秦艽1-羟基-2-甲基-2-(E)-丁烯基-4-焦磷酸还原酶基因(GmHDR)的克隆和表达分析%Cloning and expression analysis of 1-hydroxy-2-methyl-2-(E)-butenyl-4-diphosphate reductase gene (GmHDR)from Gentiana macrophylla

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    岑文; 孔维维; 郑鹏; 化文平

    2015-01-01

    Secoiri doids,such as gentiopicroside,are the main active compounds in “Qinj iao”,a traditional Chinese herbal medicine derived from the dried roots of Gentiana macrophylla.These compounds have widely biological and pharmacological effects,such as stomachic,choleretic,anti-hepatotoxic activities,anti-inflammatory,antifungal and antihistamine activities.Secoiridoids belonged to monoterpenoid,were biosynthesized via the secoiridoid pathway (sometimes also called“ridoid pathway”)in high plant.1-hydroxy-2-methyl-2-(E)-butenyl-4-diphosphate reductase (HDR)is one of the key enzymes in the pathway of iridoid biosynthesis.In this paper,we cloned the gene sequence of HDR from G.macrophylla,and analyzed the characteristic of sequence and expression patterns in order to know its roles in secoiridoid biosynthesis.Based on our library generated by high-through sequencing of G.macrophylla transcriptome,we cloned HDR gene from G.macrophylla(named as GmHDR)by RT-PCR.And the GmHDR coding amino acid sequence characterization,such as physicochemical characteristics,signal peptide,transit peptide, subcellular localization,conserved domain and secondary structure,analyzed with bioinformatics methods.Then we also detected the expression patterns of GmHDR in different parts of G.macrophylla by real time PCR.One 1 630-bp length sequence of GmHDR gene was obtained from G.macrophylla.GmHDR contains a completed open read-ing frame (ORF)of 1 392 bp,which encoded a polypeptide with 463 amino acids.GmHDR,the encoding protein by GmHDR,has high homology (identities ≥ 84%)to HDR proteins from Rauvolfia verticillata,Tanacetum parthenium and other plants.One neighbor joining tree was constructed to show evolution ship between GmHDR and HDR proteins from other plants using MEGA5.2 soft.The phylogenetic tree also gave a same conclusion that Gm-HDR had a closed relation with HDR proteins from Catharanthus roseus and Rauvolfia verticillata.Further analysis with bioinformatics methods showed

  11. High Dynamic Range Particle Image Velocimetry Applied to Heat Convection Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Persoons Tim

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Convective heat transfer occurs in a wide range of engineering applications, from nuclear reactors to portable electronic devices. Accurate whole-field turbulence and flow measurements are crucial to understanding convective heat transfer in complex flow fields, thereby enabling optimal design of these devices. Particle image velocimetry (PIV is the preferred whole-field flow measurement technique. However in many configurations the dynamic velocity range of conventional PIV is too limited to accurately resolve both high mean velocities and turbulence intensities in lower velocity regions. This paper employs high dynamic range (HDR PIV with an advanced acquisition and processing technique based on multiple pulse separation (MPS double-frame imaging. The methodology uses a conventional adaptive multi-grid algorithm for vector evaluation, and determines the optimal pulse separation in space and time in a post-processing routine. Two test cases are discussed: For an impinging synthetic jet flow (Case I, HDR PIV increases the dynamic velocity range 25-fold compared to conventional PIV. For an oscillatory buoyant plume from a pair of horizontal heated cylinders (Case II, the dynamic velocity range is increased 5.5 times. This technique has yielded new insights in synthetic jet heat transfer by correlating local surface heat transfer rates to near-wall turbulence intensity in a single whole-field measurement.

  12. Detective Quantum Efficiency of a CsI-CMOS X-ray Detector for Breast Tomosynthesis Operating in High Dynamic Range and High Sensitivity Modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Tushita; Klanian, Kelly; Gong, Zongyi; Williams, Mark B

    2012-07-01

    The spatial frequency dependent detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of a CsI-CMOS x-ray detector was measured in two operating modes: a high dynamic range (HDR) mode and a high sensitivity (HS) mode. DQE calculations were performed using the IEC-62220-1-2 Standard. For detector entrance air kerma values between ~7 µGy and 60 µGy the DQE is similar in either HDR mode or HS mode, with a value of ~0.7 at low frequency and ~ 0.15 - 0.20 at the Nyquist frequency fN = 6.7 mm(-1). In HDR mode the DQE remains virtually constant for operation with Ka values between ~7 µGy and 119 µGy but decreases for Ka levels below ~ 7 µGy. In HS mode the DQE is approximately constant over the full range of entrance air kerma tested between 1.7 µGy and 60 µGy but kerma values above ~75 µGy produce hard saturation. Quantum limited operation in HS mode for entrance kerma as small as 1.7 µGy makes it possible to use a large number of low dose views to improve angular sampling and decrease acquisition time.

  13. Comparison of 3D dose distributions for HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy sources with normoxic polymer gel dosimetry and treatment planning system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senkesen, Oznur [Department of Radiation Oncology, Acibadem Kozyatagi Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey); Tezcanli, Evrim, E-mail: tezcanlievrim@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Acibadem University, Istanbul (Turkey); Buyuksarac, Bora [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Bogazici University Istanbul (Turkey); Ozbay, Ismail [Istanbul University, Institute of Oncology, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2014-10-01

    Radiation fluence changes caused by the dosimeter itself and poor spatial resolution may lead to lack of 3-dimensional (3D) information depending on the features of the dosimeter and quality assurance of dose distributions for high–dose rate (HDR) iridium-192 ({sup 192}Ir) brachytherapy sources is challenging and experimental dosimetry methods used for brachytherapy sources are limited. In this study, we investigated 3D dose distributions of {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy sources for irradiation with single and multiple dwell positions using a normoxic gel dosimeter and compared them with treatment planning system (TPS) calculations. For dose calibration purposes, 100-mL gel-containing vials were irradiated at predefined doses and then scanned in an magnetic resonance (MR) imaging unit. Gel phantoms prepared in 2 spherical glasses were irradiated with {sup 192}Ir for the calculated dwell positions, and MR scans of the phantoms were obtained. The images were analyzed with MATLAB software. Dose distributions and profiles derived with 1-mm resolution were compared with TPS calculations. Linearity was observed between the delivered dose and the reciprocal of the T2 relaxation time constant of the gel. The x-, y-, and z-axes were defined as the sagittal, coronal, and axial planes, respectively, the sagittal and axial planes were defined parallel to the long axis of the source while the coronal plane was defined horizontally to the long axis of the source. The differences between measured and calculated profile widths of 3-cm source length and point source for 70%, 50%, and 30% isodose lines were evaluated at 3 dose levels using 18 profiles of comparison. The calculations for 3-cm source length revealed a difference of > 3 mm in 1 coordinate at 50% profile width on the sagittal plane and 3 coordinates at 70% profile width and 2 coordinates at 50% and 30% profile widths on the axial plane. Calculations on the coronal plane for 3-cm source length showed > 3-mm difference in 1

  14. Validation of a novel robot-assisted 3DUS system for real-time planning and guidance of breast interstitial HDR brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulin, Eric; Beaulieu, Luc, E-mail: Luc.Beaulieu@phy.ulaval.ca [Département de Physique, de Génie Physique et d’optique et Centre de Recherche sur le Cancer de l’Université Laval, Université Laval, Québec, Québec G1V 0A6, Canada and Département de Radio-oncologie et Axe Oncologie du Centre de Recherche du CHU de Québec, CHU de Québec, 11 Côte du Palais, Québec, Québec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Gardi, Lori; Barker, Kevin; Montreuil, Jacques; Fenster, Aaron [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: In current clinical practice, there is no integrated 3D ultrasound (3DUS) guidance system clinically available for breast brachytherapy. In this study, the authors present a novel robot-assisted 3DUS system for real-time planning and guidance of breast interstitial high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment. Methods: For this work, a new computer controlled robotic 3DUS system was built to perform a hybrid motion scan, which is a combination of a 6 cm linear translation with a 30° rotation at both ends. The new 3DUS scanner was designed to fit on a modified Kuske assembly, keeping the current template grid configuration but modifying the frame to allow the mounting of the 3DUS system at several positions. A finer grid was also tested. A user interface was developed to perform image reconstruction, semiautomatic segmentation of the surgical bed as well as catheter reconstruction and tracking. A 3D string phantom was used to validate the geometric accuracy of the reconstruction. The volumetric accuracy of the system was validated with phantoms using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) images. In order to accurately determine whether 3DUS can effectively replace CT for treatment planning, the authors have compared the 3DUS catheter reconstruction to the one obtained from CT images. In addition, in agarose-based phantoms, an end-to-end procedure was performed by executing six independent complete procedures with both 14 and 16 catheters, and for both standard and finer Kuske grids. Finally, in phantoms, five end-to-end procedures were performed with the final CT planning for the validation of 3DUS preplanning. Results: The 3DUS acquisition time is approximately 10 s. A paired Student t-test showed that there was no statistical significant difference between known and measured values of string separations in each direction. Both MRI and CT volume measurements were not statistically different from 3DUS volume (Student t-test: p > 0

  15. Application of a pelvic phantom in brachytherapy dosimetry for high-dose-rate (HDR) 192Ir source based on Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Woo Sang; Choi, Wonsik; Shin, Seong Soo; Jung, Jinhong

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we evaluate how the radial dose function is influenced by the source position as well as the phantom size and shape. A pelvic water phantom similar to the pelvic shape of a human body was designed by averaging dimensions obtained from computed tomography (CT) images of patients treated with brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Furthermore, for the study of the effects of source position on the dose distribution, the position of the source in the water phantom was determined by using the center of mass of the gross target volume (GTV) in the CT images. To obtain the dosimetric parameter of a high-dose-rate (HDR) 192Ir source, we performed Monte Carlo simulations by using the Monte Carlo n-particle extended code (MCNPX). The radial dose functions obtained using the pelvic water phantom were compared with those of spherical phantom with different sizes, including the Monte Carlo (MC) results of Williamson and Li. Differences between the radial dose functions from this study and the data in the literature increased with the radial distances. The largest differences appeared for spherical phantom with the smallest size. In contrast to the published MC results, the radial dose function of the pelvic water phantom significantly decreased with radial distance in the vertical direction because full scattering was not possible. When the source was located in posterior position 2 cm from the center in the pelvic water phantom, the differences between the radial dose functions rapidly decreased with the radial distance in the lower vertical direction. If the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements bladder and rectum points are considered, doses to these reference points could be underestimated by up to 1%-2% at a distance of 3 to 6 cm. Our simulation results provide a valid clinical reference data and can used to improve the accuracy of the doses delivered during brachytherapy applied to patients with cervical cancer.

  16. SU-E-T-491: Influence of Applicator Dimensions On Doses to Bladder, Rectum and Sigmoid in HDR Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumane, V; Rhome, R; Yuan, Y; Gupta, V [The Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To study the influence of dimensions of the tandem and ring applicator on bladder D2cc, rectum D2cc and sigmoid D2cc in HDR treatment planning for cervical cancer. Methods: 53 plans from 13 patients treated at our institution with the tandem and ring applicator were retrospectively reviewed. Prescription doses were one of the following: 8 Gy x 3, 7 Gy x 4 and 5.5 Gy x 5. Doses to the D2ccs of the bladder, rectum and the sigmoid were recorded. These doses were normalized to their relative prescriptions doses. Correlations between the normalized bladder D2cc, rectum D2cc and sigmoid D2cc were investigated and linear regression models were developed to study the dependence of these doses on the ring diameter and the applicator angle. Results: Normalized doses to the D2cc of the bladder, rectum and sigmoid showed statistically significant correlation (P < 0.05) to the applicator angle. Significant correlation was also noted for the normalized D2cc of the rectum and the sigmoid with the ring diameter. The normalized bladder D2cc was found to decrease with applicator angle on an average by 22.65% ± 4.43% while the same for the rectum and sigmoid were found to increase on an average by 14.43% ± 1.65% and 14.01% ± 1.42% respectively. Both the rectum and sigmoid D2cc reduced with increasing ring diameter by 12.93% ± 1.95% and 11.27% ± 1.79%. No correlation was observed between the normalized bladder D2cc and the ring diameter. Conclusion: Preliminary regression models developed in this study can potentially aid in the choice of the appropriate applicator angle and ring diameter for tandem and ring implant so as to optimize doses to the bladder, rectum and sigmoid.

  17. Radiobiological restrictions and tolerance doses of repeated single-fraction hdr-irradiation of intersecting small liver volumes for recurrent hepatic metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wust Peter

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess radiobiological restrictions and tolerance doses as well as other toxic effects derived from repeated applications of single-fraction high dose rate irradiation of small liver volumes in clinical practice. Methods Twenty patients with liver metastases were treated repeatedly (2 - 4 times at identical or intersecting locations by CT-guided interstitial brachytherapy with varying time intervals. Magnetic resonance imaging using the hepatocyte selective contrast media Gd-BOPTA was performed before and after treatment to determine the volume of hepatocyte function loss (called pseudolesion, and the last acquired MRI data set was merged with the dose distributions of all administered brachytherapies. We calculated the BED (biologically equivalent dose for a single dose d = 2 Gy for different α/β values (2, 3, 10, 20, 100 based on the linear-quadratic model and estimated the tolerance dose for liver parenchyma D90 as the BED exposing 90% of the pseudolesion in MRI. Results The tolerance doses D90 after repeated brachytherapy sessions were found between 22 - 24 Gy and proved only slightly dependent on α/β in the clinically relevant range of α/β = 2 - 10 Gy. Variance analysis showed a significant dependency of D90 with respect to the intervals between the first irradiation and the MRI control (p 90 and the pseudolesion's volume. No symptoms of liver dysfunction or other toxic effects such as abscess formation occurred during the follow-up time, neither acute nor on the long-term. Conclusions Inactivation of liver parenchyma occurs at a BED of approx. 22 - 24 Gy corresponding to a single dose of ~10 Gy (α/β ~ 5 Gy. This tolerance dose is consistent with the large potential to treat oligotopic and/or recurrent liver metastases by CT-guided HDR brachytherapy without radiation-induced liver disease (RILD. Repeated small volume irradiation may be applied safely within the limits of this study.

  18. SU-E-T-352: Effects of Skull Attenuation and Missing Backscatter On Brain Dose in HDR Treatment of the Head with Surface Applicators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cifter, F; Dhou, S; Lewis, J; Cormack, R [Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Altundal, Y; Sajo, E [University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To calculate the effect of lack of backscatter from air and attenuation of bone on dose distributions in brachytherapy surface treatment of head. Existing treatment planning systems based on TG43 do not account for heterogeneities, and thus may overestimate the dose to the brain. While brachytherapy generally has rapid dose falloff, the dose to the deeper tissues (in this case, the brain) can become significant when treating large curved surfaces. Methods: Applicator geometries representing a range of clinical cases were simulated in MCNP5. An Ir-192 source was modeled using the energy spectrum presented by TG-43. The head phantom was modeled as a 7.5-cm radius water sphere, with a 7 -mm thick skull embedded 5-mm beneath the surface. Dose values were calculated at 20 points inside the head, in which 10 of them were on the central axis and the other 10 on the axis connecting the central of the phantom with the second to last source from the applicator edge. Results: Central and peripheral dose distributions for a range of applicator and head sizes are presented. The distance along the central axis at which the dose falls to 80% of the prescribed dose (D80) was 7 mm for a representative small applicator and 9 mm for a large applicator. Corresponding D50 and D30 for the same small applicator were 17 mm and 32 mm respectively. D50 and D30 for the larger applicator were 32 mm and 60 mm respectively. These results reflect the slower falloff expected for larger applicators on a curved surface. Conclusion: Our results can provide guidance for clinicians to calculate the dose reduction effect due to bone attenuation and the lack of backscatter from air to estimate the brain dose for the HDR treatments of surface lesions.

  19. Interstitial HDR-brachytherapy of unresectable pancreatic carcinoma by 3D-CT-planning in combination with external beam radiation and chemotherapy, methodology and clinical results; 3D-CT-geplante interstitielle HDR-Brachytherapie + perkutane Bestrahlung und Chemotherapie bei inoperablen Pankreaskarzinomen. Methodik und klinische Ergebnisse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfreundner, L.; Baier, K.; Schwab, F.; Willner, J.; Bratengeier, K.; Flentje, M. [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie; Feustel, H. [Chirurgische Abt. der Missionsaerztlichen Klinik, Wuerzburg (Germany); Fuchs, K.H. [Chirurgische Universitaetsklinik, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    1998-03-01

    Nineteen patients (9 female, 10 male, median age 67 years) with unresectable carcinoma of the pancreas have been treated with interstitial brachytherapy. Distribution according to UICC stages showed 4, 10 and 5 patients in stage II to IV respectively. In all cases afterloading technique with 192-iridium in HDR-modus was used. A total dose of 10 to 34 Gy to the reference isodose was delivered (single dose 1.88 to 5 Gy, median 2.5 Gy). Brachytherapy was followed by external radiotherapy, delivering an additional dose of 40 to 58 Gy. Nine patients received simultaneous chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil, leucovorin). Treatment planning was performed based on CT scans, allowing spatial correlation of isodose curves to the patient`s anatomy. Median survival time was 6 months. A trend of lower survival rates with advanced stage of disease (median survival stage IV 4 months, stage II and III 6.5 months) was seen. Local control rate was 70%. Brachytherapy treatment was well tolerated, severe acute side effects were not observed. One patient developed pancreatic fistulae 4 months and 1 patient a gastric ulcer 7 months after treatment. Pain release was achieved in all patients. (orig./MG) [Deutsch] 19 Patienten (neun Frauen, zehn Maenner) mit einem inoperablen Adenokarzinom des Pankreas (UICC-Stadium IV n=5, Stadium III n=10, Stadium II n=4) im Alter von median 67 Jahren wurden mit einer interstitiellen Brachytherapie mit 192-Iridium HDR im Afterloadingverfahren behandelt. Die auf die Referenzisodose eingestrahlten Dosen lagen zwischen 10 und 34 Gy, bei Einzeldosen von 1,88 bis 5 Gy (median 2,0 Gy). Der interstitiellen Therapie schloss sich eine perkutane Radiatio mit Gesamtdosen zwischen 40 und 58 Gy an. Bei neun Patienten wurde zusaetzlich eine Chemotherapie mit 5-Fluorouracil und Leucovorin appliziert. Fuer die interstitielle Brachytherapie wurde ein CT-gestuetztes Planungsverfahren angewandt, das eine raeumliche Zuordnung der Isodosenverteilung zur Patientenanatomie gestattet

  20. SU-E-T-580: On the Significance of Model Based Dosimetry for Breast and Head and Neck 192Ir HDR Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peppa, V; Pappas, E; Pantelis, E; Papagiannis, P [Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Athens, Athens (Greece); Major, T; Polgar, C [National Institute of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the dosimetric and radiobiological differences between TG43-based and model-based dosimetry in the treatment planning of {sup 192}Ir HDR brachytherapy for breast and head and neck cancer. Methods: Two cohorts of 57 Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI) and 22 head and neck (H&N) patients with oral cavity carcinoma were studied. Dosimetry for the treatment plans was performed using the TG43 algorithm of the Oncentra Brachy v4.4 treatment planning system (TPS). Corresponding Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were performed using MCNP6 with input files automatically prepared by the BrachyGuide software tool from DICOM RT plan data. TG43 and MC data were compared in terms of % dose differences, Dose Volume Histograms (DVHs) and related indices of clinical interest for the Planning Target Volume (PTV) and the Organs-At-Risk (OARs). A radiobiological analysis was also performed using the Equivalent Uniform Dose (EUD), mean survival fraction (S) and Tumor Control Probability (TCP) for the PTV, and the Normal Tissue Control Probability (N TCP) and the generalized EUD (gEUD) for the OARs. Significance testing of the observed differences performed using the Wilcoxon paired sample test. Results: Differences between TG43 and MC DVH indices, associated with the increased corresponding local % dose differences observed, were statistically significant. This is mainly attributed to their consistency however, since TG43 agrees closely with MC for the majority of DVH and radiobiological parameters in both patient cohorts. Differences varied considerably among patients only for the ipsilateral lung and ribs in the APBI cohort, with a strong correlation to target location. Conclusion: While the consistency and magnitude of differences in the majority of clinically relevant DVH indices imply that no change is needed in the treatment planning practice, individualized dosimetry improves accuracy and addresses instances of inter-patient variability observed. Research

  1. SU-E-T-23: A Novel Two-Step Optimization Scheme for Tandem and Ovoid (T and O) HDR Brachytherapy Treatment for Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, M; Todor, D [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Fields, E [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To present a novel method allowing fast, true volumetric optimization of T and O HDR treatments and to quantify its benefits. Materials and Methods: 27 CT planning datasets and treatment plans from six consecutive cervical cancer patients treated with 4–5 intracavitary T and O insertions were used. Initial treatment plans were created with a goal of covering high risk (HR)-CTV with D90 > 90% and minimizing D2cc to rectum, bladder and sigmoid with manual optimization, approved and delivered. For the second step, each case was re-planned adding a new structure, created from the 100% prescription isodose line of the manually optimized plan to the existent physician delineated HR-CTV, rectum, bladder and sigmoid. New, more rigorous DVH constraints for the critical OARs were used for the optimization. D90 for the HR-CTV and D2cc for OARs were evaluated in both plans. Results: Two-step optimized plans had consistently smaller D2cc's for all three OARs while preserving good D90s for HR-CTV. On plans with “excellent” CTV coverage, average D90 of 96% (range 91–102), sigmoid D2cc was reduced on average by 37% (range 16–73), bladder by 28% (range 20–47) and rectum by 27% (range 15–45). Similar reductions were obtained on plans with “good” coverage, with an average D90 of 93% (range 90–99). For plans with inferior coverage, average D90 of 81%, an increase in coverage to 87% was achieved concurrently with D2cc reductions of 31%, 18% and 11% for sigmoid, bladder and rectum. Conclusions: A two-step DVH-based optimization can be added with minimal planning time increase, but with the potential of dramatic and systematic reductions of D2cc for OARs and in some cases with concurrent increases in target dose coverage. These single-fraction modifications would be magnified over the course of 4–5 intracavitary insertions and may have real clinical implications in terms of decreasing both acute and late toxicity.

  2. SU-F-19A-12: Split-Ring Applicator with Interstitial Needle for Improved Volumetric Coverage in HDR Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherertz, T; Ellis, R; Colussi, V; Mislmani, M; Traughber, B; Herrmann, K; Podder, T [University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate volumetric coverage of a Mick Radionuclear titanium Split-Ring applicator (SRA) with/without interstitial needle compared to an intracavitary Vienna applicator (VA), interstitial-intracavitary VA, and intracavitary ring and tandem applicator (RTA). Methods: A 57 year-old female with FIGO stage IIB cervical carcinoma was treated following chemoradiotherapy (45Gy pelvic and 5.4Gy parametrial boost) with highdose- rate (HDR) brachytherapy to 30Gy in 5 fractions using a SRA. A single interstitial needle was placed using the Ellis Interstitial Cap for the final three fractions to increase coverage of left-sided gross residual disease identified on 3T-MRI. High-risk (HR) clinical target volume (CTV) and intermediate-risk (IR) CTV were defined using axial T2-weighted 2D and 3D MRI sequences (Philips PET/MRI unit). Organs-at-risks (OARs) were delineated on CT. Oncentra planning system was used for treatment optimization satisfying GEC-ESTRO guidelines for target coverage and OAR constraints. Retrospectively, treatment plans (additional 20 plans) were simulated using intracavitary SRA (without needle), intracavitary VA (without needle), interstitial-intracavitary VA, and intracavitary RTA with this same patient case. Plans were optimized for each fraction to maintain coverage to HR-CTV. Results: Interstitial-intracavitary SRA achieved the following combined coverage for external radiation and brachytherapy (EQD2): D90 HR-CTV =94.6Gy; Bladder-2cc =88.9Gy; Rectum-2cc =65.1Gy; Sigmoid-2cc =48.9Gy; Left vaginal wall (VW) =103Gy, Right VW =99.2Gy. Interstitial-intracavitary VA was able to achieve identical D90 HR-CTV =94.6Gy, yet Bladder-2cc =91.9Gy (exceeding GEC-ESTRO recommendations of 2cc<90Gy) and Left VW =120.8Gy and Right VW =115.5Gy. Neither the SRA nor VA without interstitial needle could cover HR-CTV adequately without exceeding dose to Bladder-2cc. Conventional RTA was unable to achieve target coverage for the HR-CTV >80Gy without severely

  3. Measurement of absorbed dose-to-water for an HDR {sup 192}Ir source with ionization chambers in a sandwich setup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araki, Fujio; Kouno, Tomohiro; Ohno, Takeshi [Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, 4-24-1 Kuhonji, Kumamoto 862-0976 (Japan); Kakei, Kiyotaka; Yoshiyama, Fumiaki [Department of Radiotherapy, Kumamoto University Hospital, 1-1-1 Honjyo, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan); Kawamura, Shinji [Department of Radiotherapy, Miyazaki University Hospital, 5200 Kihara Ohaza Kiyotake-Machi, Miyazaki 889-1692 (Japan)

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: In this study, a dedicated device for ion chamber measurements of absorbed dose-to-water for a Nucletron microSelectron-v2 HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source is presented. The device uses two ionization chambers in a so-called sandwich assembly. Using this setup and by taking the average reading of the two chambers, any dose error due to difficulties in absolute positioning (centering) of the source in between the chambers is cancelled to first order. The method's accuracy was examined by comparing measurements with absorbed dose-to-water determination based on the AAPM TG-43 protocol.Methods: The optimal source-to-chamber distance (SCD) for {sup 192}Ir dosimetry was determined from ion chamber measurements in a water phantom. The {sup 192}Ir source was sandwiched between two Exradin A1SL chambers (0.057 cm{sup 3}) at the optimal SCD separation. The measured ionization was converted to the absorbed dose-to-water using a {sup 60}Co calibration factor and a Monte Carlo-calculated beam quality conversion factor, k{sub Q}, for {sup 60}Co to {sup 192}Ir. An uncertainty estimate of the proposed method was determined based on reproducibility of measurements at different institutions for the same type of source.Results: The optimal distance for the A1SL chamber measurements was determined to be 5 cm from the {sup 192}Ir source center, considering the depth dependency of k{sub Q} for {sup 60}Co to {sup 192}Ir and the chamber positioning. The absorbed dose to water measured at (5 cm, 90°) on the transverse axis was 1.3% lower than TG-43 values and its reproducibility and overall uncertainty were 0.8% and 1.7%, respectively. The measurement doses at anisotropic points agreed within 1.5% with TG-43 values.Conclusions: The ion chamber measurement of absorbed dose-to-water with a sandwich method for the {sup 192}Ir source provides a more accurate, direct, and reference dose compared to the dose-to-water determination based on air-kerma strength in the TG-43

  4. 4D analysis of influence of patient movement and anatomy alteration on the quality of 3D U/S-based prostate HDR brachytherapy treatment delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milickovic, Natasa; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Tselis, Nikolaos; Nikolova, Iliyana; Katsilieri, Zaira; Kefala, Vasiliki; Zamboglou, Nikolaos; Baltas, Dimos [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Offenbach Clinic, Starkenburgring 66, 63069 Offenbach am Main (Germany); Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University (Sweden); Department of Radiation Oncology, Offenbach Clinic, Starkenburgring 66, 63069 Offenbach am Main (Germany); Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Offenbach Clinic, Starkenburgring 66, 63069 Offenbach am Main (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Offenbach Clinic, Starkenburgring 66, 63069 Offenbach am Main (Germany); Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Offenbach Clinic, Starkenburgring 66, 63069 Offenbach am Main, Germany and Nuclear and Particle Physics Section, Physics Department, University of Athens, 15771 Athens (Greece)

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: Modern HDR brachytherapy treatment for prostate cancer based on the 3D ultrasound (U/S) plays increasingly important role. The purpose of this study is to investigate possible patient movement and anatomy alteration between the clinical image set acquisition, made after the needle implantation, and the patient irradiation and their influence on the quality of treatment. Methods: The authors used 3D U/S image sets and the corresponding treatment plans based on a 4D-treatment planning procedure: plans of 25 patients are obtained right after the needle implantation (clinical plan is based on this 3D image set) and just before and after the treatment delivery. The authors notice the slight decrease of treatment quality with increase of time gap between the clinical image set acquisition and the patient irradiation. 4D analysis of dose-volume-histograms (DVHs) for prostate: CTV1 = PTV, and urethra, rectum, and bladder as organs at risk (OARs) and conformity index (COIN) is presented, demonstrating the effect of prostate, OARs, and needles displacement. Results: The authors show that in the case that the patient body movement/anatomy alteration takes place, this results in modification of DVHs and radiobiological parameters, hence the plan quality. The observed average displacement of needles (1 mm) and of prostate (0.57 mm) is quite small as compared with the average displacement noted in several other reports [A. A. Martinez et al., Int. J. Radiat. Oncol., Biol., Phys. 49(1), 61-69 (2001); S. J. Damore et al., Int. J. Radiat. Oncol., Biol., Phys. 46(5), 1205-1211 (2000); P. J. Hoskin et al., Radiotherm. Oncol. 68(3), 285-288 (2003); E. Mullokandov et al., Int. J. Radiat. Oncol., Biol., Phys. 58(4), 1063-1071 (2004)] in the literature. Conclusions: Although the decrease of quality of dosimetric and radiobiological parameters occurs, this does not cause clinically unacceptable changes to the 3D dose distribution, according to our clinical protocol.

  5. A Novel Method to Increase LinLog CMOS Sensors’ Performance in High Dynamic Range Scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Iborra

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Images from high dynamic range (HDR scenes must be obtained with minimum loss of information. For this purpose it is necessary to take full advantage of the quantification levels provided by the CCD/CMOS image sensor. LinLog CMOS sensors satisfy the above demand by offering an adjustable response curve that combines linear and logarithmic responses. This paper presents a novel method to quickly adjust the parameters that control the response curve of a LinLog CMOS image sensor. We propose to use an Adaptive Proportional-Integral-Derivative controller to adjust the exposure time of the sensor, together with control algorithms based on the saturation level and the entropy of the images. With this method the sensor’s maximum dynamic range (120 dB can be used to acquire good quality images from HDR scenes with fast, automatic adaptation to scene conditions. Adaptation to a new scene is rapid, with a sensor response adjustment of less than eight frames when working in real time video mode. At least 67% of the scene entropy can be retained with this method.

  6. High Dynamic Range Imaging Concept-Based Signal Enhancement Method Reduced the Optical Coherence Tomography Measurement Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Chen, Chieh-Li; Wollstein, Gadi; Grimm, Jonathan L.; Ling, Yun; Bilonick, Richard A.; Sigal, Ian A.; Kagemann, Larry; Schuman, Joel S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To develop and test a novel signal enhancement method for optical coherence tomography (OCT) images based on the high dynamic range (HDR) imaging concept. Methods. Three virtual channels, which represent low, medium, and high signal components, were produced for each OCT signal dataset. The dynamic range of each signal component was normalized to the full gray scale range. Finally, the three components were recombined into one image using various weights. Fourteen eyes of 14 healthy volunteers were scanned multiple times using time-domain (TD)-OCT before and while preventing blinking in order to produce a wide variety of signal strength (SS) images on the same eye scanned on the same day. For each eye, a pair of scans with the highest and lowest SS with successful retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) segmentation was selected to test the signal enhancement effect. In addition, spectral-domain (SD)-OCT images with poor signal qualities were also processed. Results. Mean SS of good and poor quality scans were 9.0 ± 1.1 and 4.4 ± 0.9, respectively. TD-OCT RNFL thickness showed significant differences between good and poor quality scans on the same eye (mean difference 11.9 ± 6.0 μm, P < 0.0001, paired t-test), while there was no significant difference after signal enhancement (1.7 ± 6.2 μm, P = 0.33). However, HDR had weaker RNFL compensation effect on images with SS less than or equal to 4, while it maintained good compensation effect on images with SS greater than 4. Successful signal enhancement was also confirmed subjectively on SD-OCT images. Conclusion. The HDR imaging successfully restored OCT signal and image quality and reduced RNFL thickness differences due to variable signal level to the level within the expected measurement variability. This technique can be applied to both TD- and SD-OCT images. PMID:23299477

  7. Real-Time HDR-Rendering for Simulated TV-Graphics of Rendezvous and Docking in Astronaut Training%交会对接航天员训练电视图像实时高动态范围渲染

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵再骞; 晁建刚; 王金坤; 张炎; 陈学文

    2015-01-01

    应用基于人眼视觉系统的高动态范围实时渲染技术处理交会对接仿真场景,可以为航天员手控交会对接训练提供高逼真度的电视图像。文中结合交会对接电视图像的特点,分析了交会对接航天员训练电视图像高动态范围实时渲染的关键技术;根据两航天器相对距离,将交会对接过程分为远、中和近3个距离段,采用S-curve算法、自适应对数算法和 Reinhard算法分别对每个距离段进行调和映射处理;改进了自适应对数算法和 Reinhard算法,并基于 GPU处理技术实现仿真电视图像的实时显示。实验结果表明,采用基于距离变化调整调和映射算法的方法处理交会对接仿真电视图像可以高逼真地模拟实录视频场景,为航天员手控交会对接训练提供了视景支持。%Real-time human visual system (HVS)-based high dynamic range (HDR) rendering technology pro-vides high fidelity, and therefore can be used in the simulated TV-graphics for the astronaut rendezvous and docking (RVD) training. In this paper, first, according to the characteristics of the real video recorded from outer space in RVD mission, we analyzed key HDR rendering techniques used in the simulated RVD scene for real-time astronaut’s training. Then, based on the distance between two spacecraft, we employed three tone map-ping operators (TMO), the S-curve algorithm, the adaptive logarithmic algorithm and the Reinhard algorithm to reproduce the tone of the RVD scene at the far distance, the middle distance and the near distance respectively. To ensure the real-time computation, we improved the adaptive logarithmic algorithm and the Reinhard algorithm, and accelerated them by GPUs. By comparing the simulated RVD scene with the real video recorded from outer space in RVD mission, our distance-based method has a high fidelity, and supports the astronaut RVD training.

  8. WE-A-17A-06: Evaluation of An Automatic Interstitial Catheter Digitization Algorithm That Reduces Treatment Planning Time and Provide Means for Adaptive Re-Planning in HDR Brachytherapy of Gynecologic Cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dise, J [Philadelphia, PA (United States); Liang, X; Lin, L [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Teo, B [University of Pennsylvania, Wayne, PA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate an automatic interstitial catheter digitization algorithm that reduces treatment planning time and provide means for adaptive re-planning in HDR Brachytherapy of Gynecologic Cancers. Methods: The semi-automatic catheter digitization tool utilizes a region growing algorithm in conjunction with a spline model of the catheters. The CT images were first pre-processed to enhance the contrast between the catheters and soft tissue. Several seed locations were selected in each catheter for the region growing algorithm. The spline model of the catheters assisted in the region growing by preventing inter-catheter cross-over caused by air or metal artifacts. Source dwell positions from day one CT scans were applied to subsequent CTs and forward calculated using the automatically digitized catheter positions. This method was applied to 10 patients who had received HDR interstitial brachytherapy on an IRB approved image-guided radiation therapy protocol. The prescribed dose was 18.75 or 20 Gy delivered in 5 fractions, twice daily, over 3 consecutive days. Dosimetric comparisons were made between automatic and manual digitization on day two CTs. Results: The region growing algorithm, assisted by the spline model of the catheters, was able to digitize all catheters. The difference between automatic and manually digitized positions was 0.8±0.3 mm. The digitization time ranged from 34 minutes to 43 minutes with a mean digitization time of 37 minutes. The bulk of the time was spent on manual selection of initial seed positions and spline parameter adjustments. There was no significance difference in dosimetric parameters between the automatic and manually digitized plans. D90% to the CTV was 91.5±4.4% for the manual digitization versus 91.4±4.4% for the automatic digitization (p=0.56). Conclusion: A region growing algorithm was developed to semi-automatically digitize interstitial catheters in HDR brachytherapy using the Syed-Neblett template. This automatic

  9. Determination of absorbed dose in water at the reference point D(r{sub 0},{theta}{sub 0}) for an {sup 192}Ir HDR brachytherapy source using a Fricke system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Austerlitz, C.; Mota, H. C.; Sempau, J.; Benhabib, S. M.; Campos, D.; Allison, R.; Almeida, C. E. de; Zhu, D.; Sibata, C. H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina 27834 (United States); Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Department of Radiation Oncology, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina 27834 (United States); Laboratorio de Cie circumflex ncias Radiologicas, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, 20550 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Department of Radiation Oncology, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina 27834 (United States)

    2008-12-15

    A ring-shaped Fricke device was developed to measure the absolute dose on the transverse bisector of a {sup 192}Ir high dose rate (HDR) source at 1 cm from its center in water, D(r{sub 0},{theta}{sub 0}). It consists of a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) rod (axial axis) with a cylindrical cavity at its center to insert the {sup 192}Ir radioactive source. A ring cavity around the source with 1.5 mm thickness and 5 mm height is centered at 1 cm from the central axis of the source. This ring cavity is etched in a disk shaped base with 2.65 cm diameter and 0.90 cm thickness. The cavity has a wall around it 0.25 cm thick. This ring is filled with Fricke solution, sealed, and the whole assembly is immersed in water during irradiations. The device takes advantage of the cylindrical geometry to measure D(r{sub 0},{theta}{sub 0}). Irradiations were performed with a Nucletron microselectron HDR unit loaded with an {sup 192}Ir Alpha Omega radioactive source. A Spectronic 1001 spectrophotometer was used to measure the optical absorbance using a 1 mL quartz cuvette with 1.00 cm light pathlength. The PENELOPE Monte Carlo code (MC) was utilized to simulate the Fricke device and the {sup 192}Ir Alpha Omega source in detail to calculate the perturbation introduced by the PMMA material. A NIST traceable calibrated well type ionization chamber was used to determine the air-kerma strength, and a published dose-rate constant was used to determine the dose rate at the reference point. The time to deliver 30.00 Gy to the reference point was calculated. This absorbed dose was then compared to the absorbed dose measured by the Fricke solution. Based on MC simulation, the PMMA of the Fricke device increases the D(r{sub 0},{theta}{sub 0}) by 2.0%. Applying the corresponding correction factor, the D(r{sub 0},{theta}{sub 0}) value assessed with the Fricke device agrees within 2.0% with the expected value with a total combined uncertainty of 3.43%(k=1). The Fricke device provides a promising

  10. SU-E-T-525: Dose Volume Histograms (DVH) Analysis and Comparison with ICRU Point Doses in MRI Guided HDR Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badkul, R; McClinton, C; Kumar, P; Mitchell, M [University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2014-06-01

    .1 overestimated the bladder ICRU point dose up to 43% for conventional-techniques.Bladder-D2 provided a good estimation of ICRU bladder point-doses(within 3.6%) for conventional-techniques. This correlation is not observed for MGO plans perhaps due to steering of isodose line, leading to unpredictable dwell-weighting. Conclusion: MRI based HDR-planning provides accurate delineation of tumor volumes and normal structures, and optimized tumor-coverage can be achieved with acceptable normal-tissue doses. This study showed that for conventional techniques D0.1 rectum dose and D2 bladder dose are good representation of ICRU-reference-point doses.

  11. SU-E-T-263: Point Dose Variation Using a Single Ir-192 HDR Brachytherapy Plan for Two Treatments with a Single Tandem-Ovoid Insertion for Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, X; Morrill, S; Hardee, M; Han, E; Penagaricano, J; Zhang, X; Vaneerat, R [University of Arkansas Medical Science, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the point dose variations between Ir-192 HDR treatments on two consecutive days using a single tandem-ovoid insertion without replanning in cervical cancer patients. Methods: This study includes eleven cervical cancer patients undergoing HDR brachytherapy with a prescribed dose of 28 Gy in 4 fractions. Each patient had two tandemovoid insertions one week apart. Each insertion was treated on consecutive days with rescanning and replanning prior to each treatment. To study the effect of no replanning for day 2 treatments, the day 1 plan dwell position and dwell time with decay were applied to the day 2 CT dataset. The point dose variations on the prescription point H (defined according to American Brachytherapy Society), and normal tissue doses at point B, bladder, rectum and vaginal mucosa (based on ICRU Report 38) were obtained. Results: Without replanning, the mean point H dose variation was 4.6 ± 10.7% on the left; 2.3 ± 2.9% on the right. The mean B point variation was 3.8 ± 4.9% on the left; 3.6 ± 4.7% on the right. The variation in the left vaginal mucosal point was 12.2 ± 10.7%; 9.5 ± 12.5% on the right; the bladder point 5.5 ± 7.4%; and the rectal point 7.9 ± 9.1%. Conclusion: Without replanning, there are variations both in the prescription point and the normal tissue point doses. The latter can vary as much as 10% or more. This is likely due to the steep dose gradient from brachytherapy compounded by shifts in the positions of the applicator in relationship to the patients anatomy. Imaging prior to each treatment and replanning ensure effective and safe brachytherapy are recommended.

  12. High Dynamic Range adaptive ΔΣ-based Focal Plane Array architecture

    KAUST Repository

    Yao, Shun

    2012-10-16

    In this paper, an Adaptive Delta-Sigma based architecture for High Dynamic Range (HDR) Focal Plane Arrays is presented. The noise shaping effect of the Delta-Sigma modulation in the low end, and the distortion noise induced in the high end of Photo-diode current were analyzed in detail. The proposed architecture can extend the DR for about 20N log2 dB at the high end of Photo-diode current with an N bit Up-Down counter. At the low end, it can compensate for the larger readout noise by employing Extended Counting. The Adaptive Delta-Sigma architecture employing a 4-bit Up-Down counter achieved about 160dB in the DR, with a Peak SNR (PSNR) of 80dB at the high end. Compared to the other HDR architectures, the Adaptive Delta-Sigma based architecture provides the widest DR with the best SNR performance in the extended range.

  13. Using high-dynamic-range digital repeat photography to measure plant phenology in a subarctic mire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnello, A.; Dye, D. G.; Bogle, R.; Vogel, J.; Saleska, S. R.; Crill, P. M.

    2015-12-01

    A novel Visual Imaging System (VIS) was designed and deployed in a subarctic mire (68° 20' N, 19° 03'E) aimed at cataloging plant biological changes (phenology) and analyzing seasonal color shifts in relation to micrometeorological data along the summer growing season: June-November, 2015. The VIS is designed as a tower-based, solar-powered, automated phenology camera (Phenocam) that collects red, green, blue (RGB) and near-infrared (NIR) landscape images in High Dynamic Range (HDR) with fully programmable temporal resolution. HDR composite images are made through combining a series of rapid-capture photos with incremental increases of exposure times and a fixed focus, minimizing the spatial and visual data lost from shadows or from the over-saturation of light. This visual record of ecosystem phenology stages (Phenophases) is being used to (1) investigate vegetation-dependent spectral indices; (2) establish a cross-year comparison record of Phenophase seasonality; (3) investigate meteorological-dependent vegetation Phenophases; (4) provide ground-truthing measurements that enhance broader spatial-scale remote sensing analyses of subarctic wetlands.

  14. An objective method for High Dynamic Range source content selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Narwaria, Manish; Mantel, Claire; Da Silva, Matthieu Perreira

    2014-01-01

    component of such validation studies is the selection of a challenging and balanced set of source (reference) HDR content. In order to facilitate this, we present an objective method based on the premise that a more challenging HDR scene encapsulates higher contrast, and as a result will show up more...

  15. SU-E-T-787: Utility of the Two Candidate 192-Ir and 169-Yb HDR Sources for Use with a Novel Direction Modulated Brachytherapy Tandem Applicator for Cervical Cancer Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safigholi, H; Soliman, A; Song, W [Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, U of T, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Han, D [Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, U of T, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Meigooni, A Soleimani [Comprehensive Cancer Center of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A novel tungsten alloy shielded, MRI-compatible, direction modulated brachytherapy (DMBT) concept tandem applicator, which enables unprecedented intensity modulation, was used to evaluate treatment plan quality improvement over a conventional tandem. The utility of the 192-Ir and 169-Yb HDR sources, for use with the DMBT applicator, was evaluated. Methods: The total diameter of the DMBT tandem applicator is 6.0 mm, which consists of 5.4-mm diameter tungsten alloy and 0.3 mm thick plastic sheath. The tandem has 6 symmetric peripheral 1.3-mm diameter grooves for the source to travel. MCNPX v.2.6 was used to simulate the 192-Ir and 169-Yb sources inside the DMBT applicator. First, TG-43 source parameters were evaluated. Second, 3D dose matrix with 1 mm3 resolution were imported into an in-house-coded inverse optimization treatment planning program to obtain optimal plans for 19 clinical cases. All plans were compared with the standard tandem and ring plans. Prescription dose was 15.0 Gy. All plans were normalized to receive the same HRCTV D90. Results: Generally, the DMBT tandem (and ring) plans were better than the conventional tandem and ring plans for 192-Ir and 169-Yb HDR sources. The mean data of D2cc for bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were 11.65±2.30 Gy, 7.47±3.05 Gy, and 9.84±2.48 Gy for Ir-192 DMBT tandem, respectively. These data for Yb-169 were 11.67±2.26 Gy, 7.44±3.02 Gy, and 9.83±2.38 Gy, respectively. The HR-CTV D98 and V100 were 16.37±1.86 Gy and 97.37 ± 1.92 Gy for Ir-192 DMBT, respectively. The corresponding values for Yb-169 were 16.43±1.86 Gy, and 97.51 ± 1.91 Gy. Plans with the 169-Yb source generally produced more favorable results where V100 increased by 13.65% while D2cc across all OARs reduced by 0.54% compared with the 192-Ir plans. Conclusion: For the DMBT tandem applicator, 169-Yb source seems to produce more directional beams resulting in increased intensity modulation capacity, thus resulting in more conformal plans.

  16. SU-E-T-310: Dosimetric Comparison of Tandem and Ovoid (TO) Vs. Tandem and Ring (TR) Applicators in High-Dose Rate (HDR) Brachytherapy (BT) for the Treatment of Locally-Advanced Cervical-Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, L; Viswanathan, A; Damato, A [Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric differences associated with the use of TO or TR applicators for cervical-cancer HDR BT. Methods: The records of all cervical-cancer patients treated with image-guided HDR BT in 2013 were reviewed. Image-based planning based on isodose line and DVH metrics inspections was performed following the GEC-ESTRO recommendations. CTV volume, CTV D90, and rectum, bladder and sigmoid D2cc were collected as % of the prescription dose (80Gy EQD2). Patients receiving both TO and TR were identified and plans were compared (paired analysis). A Student T-test was used to evaluate statistical significance (p ≤ 0.05). Results: Twenty-eight patients were identified (20 TR only, 4 TO only, 4 TO and TR), associated with 116 plans (109 TR, 7 TO). Overall metrics: CTV volume, 26.5±10.4 cm3 (TR) and 39.1±14.0 cm3 (TO, p < 0.01); CTV D90, 126±28% (TR) and 110±15% (TO, p = 0.15); rectum D2cc, 56±11% (TR) and 58±19% (TO, p = 0.91); bladder D2cc, 74±20% (TR) and 88±19% (TO, p = 0.09); sigmoid D2cc, 52±17% (TR) and 49±20% (TO, p = 0.63). The paired analysis results were: CTV volume, 37.3±11.9 cm3 (TR) and 51.0±23.1 cm3 (TO, p = 0.23); CTV D90, 111±12% (TR) and 101±17% (TO, p = 0.50); rectum D2cc, 56±12% (TR) and 53±16% (TO, p = 0.71); bladder D2cc, 73±14% (TR) and 90±20% (TO, p = 0.22); sigmoid D2cc, 59±10% (TR) and 59±22% (TO, p = 0.98). Conclusion: TR and TO were both used with good dosimetric results. TO were used for patients with larger CTV volumes than TR, although paired analysis suggest that tissue distortion and contouring bias may partially explain this Result. CTV D90 on average > 80 Gy EQD2 were achieved in both groups despite the different CTV volume. Higher bladder D2cc for TO than TR was observed.

  17. Braquiterapia intersticial de alta tasa de rescate en cáncer cabeza cuello previamente radiado High-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy in previously irradiated recurrent head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía Gutiérrez-Bayard

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A pesar de los avances en el tratamiento de cáncer de cabeza y cuello (CCC, el 15-50% de los pacientes presentan recurrencia locorregional. Para los pacientes que presentan enfermedad localmente recurrente o un segundo tumor primario en un campo previamente irradiado, las opciones terapéuticas de rescate son limitadas, siendo la resección quirúrgica con intención curativa la opción de elección para los pacientes con enfermedad limitada. Reirradiación con o sin la adición de quimioterapia puede ser una buena opción, obteniendo en pacientes seleccionados supervivencia a largo plazo. La braquiterapia de alta tasa de dosis (HDRBT puede jugar un papel importante en el tratamiento de rescate en tumores de cabeza y cuello recurrentes. Presentamos un paciente de 56 años diagnosticado de cáncer de lengua sometido a cirugía y radioterapia externa adyuvante, y recurrencia metastásica ganglionar cervical contralateral a los 18 meses. Recibió tratamiento multidisciplinar con quimioterapia, cirugía y braquiterapia intersticial.Despite advances in the treatment of head and neck cancer (HNC, 15-50% of patients present locoregional disease recurrence. The therapeutic options are limited for patients who present locally recurrent disease or a second primary tumor in a previously irradiated field. Surgical salvage with curative intent is the preferred option for patients with limited-volume disease. Re-irradiation with or without the addition of chemotherapy may hold promise for long-term survival for selected patients. High-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy can play an important role in the salvage treatment of previously irradiated recurrent head and neck cancer. The case reported was a 56-year old man diagnosed of tongue cancer who presented recurrent metastatic contralateral cervical node 1.5 years after radical treatment with surgery and adjuvant external radiotherapy. He received multidisciplinary treatment with chemotherapy, surgery and HDR

  18. Dynamic range multiwavelength particle characterization using analytical ultracentrifugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Johannes; Peukert, Wolfgang

    2016-04-14

    We demonstrate how a sophisticated data analysis methodology enables us to perform multiwavelength evaluations of dynamic rotor speed gradient experiments obtained by analytical ultracentrifugation equipped with a multiwavelength detector. Our data evaluation tool HDR-MULTIFIT allows for the accurate analysis of sedimentation coefficient distributions which can be converted to particle size distributions. By means of multiwavelength evaluation, species dependent extinction spectra can be determined even for complex mixtures. Moreover, optical and hydrodynamic properties can be correlated for spherical particles of known optical properties applying multiwavelength evaluation and Mie's theory leading to a significant increase in the dynamic range of the experiment. We provide the theoretical background about the operation principle of our methodology and compare the performance of the multiwavelength analysis to the conventional single wavelength analysis as it is applied in turbidity analysis. We validate our technique using NIST traceable reference particles and show that our technique is universally applicable to materials of known and unknown optical properties, thus clearly extending the possibilities of particle analysis.

  19. Cloning and induced expression analysis of 4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl diphosphate reductase gene (SmHDR) of Salvia miltiorrhiza%丹参4-羟基-3-甲基-2-丁烯基焦磷酸还原酶基因的全长克隆与诱导表达分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程琪庆; 何云飞; 李耿; 蒋超; 袁媛; 高伟; 黄璐琦

    2013-01-01

    本研究根据转录组数据提供的基因片段设计特异引物,利用cDNA快速末端扩增方法克隆丹参4-羟基-3-甲基-2-丁烯基焦磷酸还原酶全长cDNA (SmHDR),GenBank注册号JX233817,并进行蛋白结构预测、序列多重比对和构建进化树等生物信息学分析;然后采用实时荧光定量PCR (RT-PCR)检测该基因在Ag+诱导后的表达情况,使用UPLC检测对应样品的丹参酮类化合物含量.获得的SmHDR全长基因由1 647个核苷酸组成,编码463个氨基酸,蛋白分子质量为51.88kD,等电点pI 5.72,二级结构中α-螺旋结构占35.64%、β-折叠占20.30%、无规则卷曲占44.06%.序列比对和系统进化分析表明,SmHDR与其他植物HDR家族具有较高的同源性,并与库洛胡黄连HDR两者的亲缘关系较近.RT-PCR结果显示,SmHDR受Ag+诱导后表达水平在12h时急剧上升后显著下降,丹参酮类成分含量受Ag+诱导后先缓慢上升,在120 h时有明显提高,两者的增加趋势呈正相关.推测SmHDR基因可能参与丹参酮类成分的生物合成,这为进一步研究丹参酮类成分生物合成及其次生代谢调控机制奠定了基础.%This study reported the obtainment of the full-length cDNA of Salvia miltiorrhiza hairy roots (Abbr: SmHDR, GenBank number: JX233817), via extracting Salvia miltiorrhiza hairy roots total RNA, designing specific primers according to the transcriptome data and using the RACE strategy, and then analyzed it with bioinformatics approaches. On this basis, using the real-time PCR to detect SmHDR gene expression after Ag+ induction, and testing tanshinones contents of corresponding samples by UPLC. SmHDR has 1 647 nucleotides, and an open reading frame (ORP) encoding a protein of 463 amino acid residues. The deduced protein has isoelectric point (pI) of 5.72 and a calculated molecular weight about 51.88 kD. In the secondary structure, the percentage of alpha helix, beta turn and random coil were 35.64%, 20.30% and 44

  20. High-dynamic-range microscope imaging based on exposure bracketing in full-field optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong-Hoi, Audrey; Montgomery, Paul C; Serio, Bruno; Twardowski, Patrice; Uhring, Wilfried

    2016-04-01

    By applying the proposed high-dynamic-range (HDR) technique based on exposure bracketing, we demonstrate a meaningful reduction in the spatial noise in image frames acquired with a CCD camera so as to improve the fringe contrast in full-field optical coherence tomography (FF-OCT). This new signal processing method thus allows improved probing within transparent or semitransparent samples. The proposed method is demonstrated on 3 μm thick transparent polymer films of Mylar, which, due to their transparency, produce low contrast fringe patterns in white-light interference microscopy. High-resolution tomographic analysis is performed using the technique. After performing appropriate signal processing, resulting XZ sections are observed. Submicrometer-sized defects can be lost in the noise that is present in the CCD images. With the proposed method, we show that by increasing the signal-to-noise ratio of the images, submicrometer-sized defect structures can thus be detected.

  1. A new device for dynamic luminance mapping and glare risk assessment in buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisuit, Apiparn; Münch, Mirjam; Deschamps, Laurent; Kämpf, Jérôme; Scartezzini, Jean-Louis

    2012-10-01

    High dynamic range imaging has been shown to be a reliable tool to assess luminance maps and glare risk probability in buildings. However, there are some limitations of image capturing time, especially when dealing with highly dynamic and contrasted daylight situations. We used a newly developed prototype of a digital camera which contains a high dynamic range pixel array chip, with a logarithmic scale for encoding. This type of camera allows to effectively assessing luminance, contrast and contrast directions, by taking only a single image or by performing real time recordings. The device was equipped with a fisheye lens and V-lambda filters to adapt the camera's spectral sensitivity to the human eye. After spectral as well as photometric calibration and vignetting correction, the device was tested to perform luminance mapping of real scenes. The results showed that luminance maps of a room can be efficiently assessed under dynamic daylight and mixed day- and electric lighting conditions in a very short time (i.e. 100 ms), when compared to classical HDR imaging techniques. This allows us to calculate glare indexes of a scene simultaneously. The camera opens a variety of new applications as a useful tool for architects, building designers and lighting experts. The device can be used to easily monitor daylight availability and glare indexes in existing buildings and further developments for advanced (day-) lighting control can be envisaged.

  2. Dynamic rotating-shield brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yunlong; Flynn, Ryan T; Kim, Yusung; Yang, Wenjun; Wu, Xiaodong

    2013-12-01

    To present dynamic rotating shield brachytherapy (D-RSBT), a novel form of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) with electronic brachytherapy source, where the radiation shield is capable of changing emission angles during the radiation delivery process. A D-RSBT system uses two layers of independently rotating tungsten alloy shields, each with a 180° azimuthal emission angle. The D-RSBT planning is separated into two stages: anchor plan optimization and optimal sequencing. In the anchor plan optimization, anchor plans are generated by maximizing the D90 for the high-risk clinical-tumor-volume (HR-CTV) assuming a fixed azimuthal emission angle of 11.25°. In the optimal sequencing, treatment plans that most closely approximate the anchor plans under the delivery-time constraint will be efficiently computed. Treatment plans for five cervical cancer patients were generated for D-RSBT, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT), and (192)Ir-based intracavitary brachytherapy with supplementary interstitial brachytherapy (IS + ICBT) assuming five treatment fractions. External beam radiotherapy doses of 45 Gy in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy each were accounted for. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated such that the D2cc of the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached its tolerance equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α∕β = 3 Gy) of 75 Gy, 75 Gy, or 90 Gy, respectively. For the patients considered, IS + ICBT had an average total dwell time of 5.7 minutes∕fraction (min∕fx) assuming a 10 Ci(192)Ir source, and the average HR-CTV D90 was 78.9 Gy. In order to match the HR-CTV D90 of IS + ICBT, D-RSBT required an average of 10.1 min∕fx more delivery time, and S-RSBT required 6.7 min∕fx more. If an additional 20 min∕fx of delivery time is allowed beyond that of the IS + ICBT case, D-RSBT and S-RSBT increased the HR-CTV D90 above IS + ICBT by an average of 16.3 Gy and 9.1 Gy, respectively. For cervical cancer patients, D-RSBT can boost HR-CTV D90

  3. Dynamic Logics of Dynamical Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Platzer, André

    2012-01-01

    We survey dynamic logics for specifying and verifying properties of dynamical systems, including hybrid systems, distributed hybrid systems, and stochastic hybrid systems. A dynamic logic is a first-order modal logic with a pair of parametrized modal operators for each dynamical system to express necessary or possible properties of their transition behavior. Due to their full basis of first-order modal logic operators, dynamic logics can express a rich variety of system properties, including safety, controllability, reactivity, liveness, and quantified parametrized properties, even about relations between multiple dynamical systems. In this survey, we focus on some of the representatives of the family of differential dynamic logics, which share the ability to express properties of dynamical systems having continuous dynamics described by various forms of differential equations. We explain the dynamical system models, dynamic logics of dynamical systems, their semantics, their axiomatizations, and proof calcul...

  4. Intraoperative HDR Brachytherapy: Present and Future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.-K.K. Kolkman-Deurloo (Inger-Karina)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractRadiotherapy is one of the most effective modalities in cancer treatment, and can be applied either by external beam radiotherapy or by brachytherapy. Brachytherapy is a treatment modality in which tumors are irradiated by positioning radioactive sources very close to or in the tumor

  5. Intraoperative HDR Brachytherapy: Present and Future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.-K.K. Kolkman-Deurloo (Inger-Karina)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractRadiotherapy is one of the most effective modalities in cancer treatment, and can be applied either by external beam radiotherapy or by brachytherapy. Brachytherapy is a treatment modality in which tumors are irradiated by positioning radioactive sources very close to or in the tumor vol

  6. The natural seismic hazard and induced seismicity of the european HDR (hot dry rock) geothermal energy project at Soultz-sous-Forets (Bas-Rhin, France); Alea sismique naturel et sismicite induite du projet geothermique europeen RCS (roche chaude seche) de Soultz-sous-Forets (Bas-Rhin, France)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helm, J.A.

    1996-06-07

    Development of the Soultz-sous-Forets HDR (Hot Dry Rock) geothermal energy project will involve important fluid injections which will induce micro-seismic events. This thesis discusses the natural seismicity of the region and induced seismicity associated with fluid injections. A catalogue of all historical and instrument seismicity of the Soultz-sous-Forets (SSF) region has been compiled. This seismicity does not correspond to movements along the major tectonic features of the region. The area around SSF has been identified as being one where high heat flow corresponds to low seismicity. The largest well documented seismic event in the region which took place in 1952 had an epicentral intensity of VI. All important data pertaining to the series of seismic events which took place in the region from August to October 1952 have been collected and are presented. This work details the installation and operation of a permanent 3 station network of accelerometers and seismometers around the HDR site. Also the installation and operation of a mobile network of vertical seismometers during fluid injections. 167 micro-seismic events were recorded on the surface network, with magnitudes from -0.5 to 1.9. The preferential alignment of the micro-seismic cloud is N160 deg. Individual focal mechanisms of the larger seismic events correspond to an extensional tectonic regime. Stress inversion of P wave polarities indicates that the maximum stress is vertical and the intermediate and minimum stress axes horizontal. The largest of the horizontal stresses is orientated N124 deg and the smallest N34 deg. Induced seismic movement is taking place on pre-existing fractures controlled by the in situ stress seismic movement is taking place on pre-existing tectonic fractures controlled by the in situ stress field, and the largest of the induced events had a magnitude 1.9. This level of seismicity does not pose any environmental hazard to the region around Soultz-sous-Forets. (author) 151

  7. Dynamical Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Huimin

    The following sections are included: * Definition of Dynamical Languages * Distinct Excluded Blocks * Definition and Properties * L and L″ in Chomsky Hierarchy * A Natural Equivalence Relation * Symbolic Flows * Symbolic Flows and Dynamical Languages * Subshifts of Finite Type * Sofic Systems * Graphs and Dynamical Languages * Graphs and Shannon-Graphs * Transitive Languages * Topological Entropy

  8. A high dynamic range structured light means for the 3D measurement of specular surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhan; Jiang, Hualie; Lin, Haibo; Tang, Suming

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents a novel structured light approach for the 3D reconstruction of specular surface. The binary shifting strip is adopted as structured light pattern instead of conventional sinusoidal pattern. Based on the framework of conventional High Dynamic Range (HDR) imaging technique, an efficient means is first introduced to estimate the camera response function. And then, dynamic range of the generated radiance map is compressed in the gradient domain by introducing an attenuation function. Subject to the change of lighting conditions caused by projecting different structured light patterns, the structure light image with middle exposure level is selected as the reference image and used for the slight adjustment of the primary fused image. Finally, the regenerated structured light images with well exposing condition are used for 3D reconstruction of the specular surface. To evaluate performance of the method, some stainless stamping parts with strong reflectivity are used for the experiments. And the results showed that, different specular targets with various shapes can be precisely reconstructed by the proposed method.

  9. Molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladd, A.J.C.

    1988-08-01

    The basic methodology of equilibrium molecular dynamics is described. Examples from the literature are used to illustrate how molecular dynamics has been used to resolve theoretical controversies, provide data to test theories, and occasionally to discover new phenomena. The emphasis is on the application of molecular dynamics to an understanding of the microscopic physics underlying the transport properties of simple fluids. 98 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Dynamics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Dynamics Lab replicates vibration environments for every Navy platform. Testing performed includes: Flight Clearance, Component Improvement, Qualification, Life...

  11. Dynamical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Sternberg, Shlomo

    2010-01-01

    Celebrated mathematician Shlomo Sternberg, a pioneer in the field of dynamical systems, created this modern one-semester introduction to the subject for his classes at Harvard University. Its wide-ranging treatment covers one-dimensional dynamics, differential equations, random walks, iterated function systems, symbolic dynamics, and Markov chains. Supplementary materials offer a variety of online components, including PowerPoint lecture slides for professors and MATLAB exercises.""Even though there are many dynamical systems books on the market, this book is bound to become a classic. The the

  12. Molecular dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergstra, J.A.; Bethke, I.

    2002-01-01

    Molecular dynamics is a model for the structure and meaning of object based programming systems. In molecular dynamics the memory state of a system is modeled as a fluid consisting of a collection of molecules. Each molecule is a collection of atoms with bindings between them. A computation is model

  13. Dynamic Squares

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blackburn, P.; Venema, Y.

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines various propositional logics in which the dynamic implication connective (discussed in Groenendijk and Stokhof's (1992) Dynamic Predicate Logic and Kamp's (1981) Discourse Representation Theory) plays the central role. Our approach is modal: the basic idea is to view as a binary

  14. Record dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robe, Dominic M.; Boettcher, Stefan; Sibani, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    When quenched rapidly beyond their glass transition, colloidal suspensions fall out of equilibrium. The pace of their dynamics then slows down with the system age, i.e., with the time elapsed after the quench. This breaking of time translational invariance is associated with dynamical observables...

  15. Fluid Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brorsen, Michael

    These lecture notes are intended mainly for the 7th semester course "Fluid Dynamics" offered by the Study Committee on Civil Engineering, Aalborg University.......These lecture notes are intended mainly for the 7th semester course "Fluid Dynamics" offered by the Study Committee on Civil Engineering, Aalborg University....

  16. Persuasion dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbuch, Gérard; Deffuant, Guillaume; Amblard, Frédéric

    2005-08-01

    We here discuss a model of continuous opinion dynamics in which agents adjust continuous opinions as a result of random binary encounters whenever their difference in opinion is below a given threshold. We concentrate on the version of the model in the presence of few extremists which might drive the dynamics to generalized extremism. A network version of the dynamics is presented here, and its results are compared to those previously obtained for the full-mixing case. The same dynamical regimes are observed, but in rather different parameter regions. We here show that the combination of meso-scale features resulting from the first interaction steps determines the asymptotic state of the dynamics.

  17. Dynamic Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, Philip

    1992-01-01

    We distinguish static and dynamic optimization of programs: whereas static optimization modifies a program before runtime and is based only on its syntactical structure, dynamic optimization is based on the statistical properties of the input source and examples of program execution. Explanation-based generalization is a commonly used dynamic optimization method, but its effectiveness as a speedup-learning method is limited, in part because it fails to separate the learning process from the program transformation process. This paper describes a dynamic optimization technique called a learn-optimize cycle that first uses a learning element to uncover predictable patterns in the program execution and then uses an optimization algorithm to map these patterns into beneficial transformations. The technique has been used successfully for dynamic optimization of pure Prolog.

  18. Long term effect of cervix carcinoma treated by HDR 192 Ir afterloding intracavitory radiotherapy combined with external irradiation.%高剂量率192Ir后装腔内加外照射治疗宫颈癌的远期疗效分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王青; 侯晓玲; 赵淑红

    2001-01-01

    Objective To analyze retrosrectively long- term effect of cervix carcinona treated by HDR 192Ir afterloading intracavitory radiotherapy combined with external irradiation. Methods From Mar 1993 to Dec 1994, 128 cases of cervix cancer(age from 29 years to 80 years) were treated with combination of external irradiation and HDR 192Ir afterloading intracavitory radiotherapy. 47 cases were stage Ⅱ and 81 were stage Ⅲ. The dose of external radiotherapy was 40 Gy or 50 Gy and afterloading irradiation was given in 6 or 7 fractions of 8 Gy. Results The overall local tumor control was 94.5%, the 1,3,5 year survival rates were 91.61%, 81.89%and 67.36%. The 1,3,5 year survival rates of stage Ⅱ and stage Ⅲ cases were 95.28% and 89. 47%, 87.19% and 79.50%, 72.76% and 64.95% (P>0.05). The rate of severe complications was 7.03% (9/128). Conclusion HDR 192Ir afterloading intracavitory radiotherapy combined with external irradiation for cervix carcinoma is effective and less side effects.%目的分析高剂量率192Ir后装腔内加外照射治疗宫颈癌的远期疗效及并发症。方法对128例Ⅱ、Ⅲ期放疗后宫颈癌进行了回顾分析。其中Ⅱ期47例,Ⅲ期81例。全盆腔外照射Dr20Gy/10次,全盆中间挡铅4cmDr20Gy~30Gy/10次~15次;后装A点剂量48Gy~56Gy/6次~7次。结果 1、3、5年生存率分别为91.61%、81.8%和67.36%;Ⅱ、Ⅲ期1、3、5年生存率无统计学差异(P>0.05);远期严重并发症的发生率7.03%(9/128)。结论高剂量率192Ir后装腔内加外照射治疗宫颈癌疗效肯定,并发症少。盆腔局部复发仍是放疗失败的主要原因。

  19. Validation of analysis methods for assessing flawed piping subjected to dynamic loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, R.J.; Wolterman, R.L.; Wilkowski, G.M. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States); Kot, C.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1994-08-01

    Argonne National Laboratory and Battelle have jointly conducted a research program for the USNRC to evaluate the ability of current engineering analysis methods and one state-of-the-art analysis method to predict the behavior of circumferentially surface-cracked pipe system water-hammer experiment. The experimental data used in the evaluation were from the HDR Test Group E31 series conducted by the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK) in Germany. The incentive for this evaluation was that simplified engineering methods, as well as newer ``state-of-the-art`` fracture analysis methods, have been typically validated only with static experimental data. Hence, these dynamic experiments were of high interest. High-rate dynamic loading can be classified as either repeating, e.g., seismic, or nonrepeating, e.g., water hammer. Development of experimental data and validation of cracked pipe analyses under seismic loading (repeating dynamic loads) are being pursued separately within the NRC`s International Piping Integrity Research Group (IPIRG) program. This report describes developmental and validation efforts to predict crack stability under water hammer loading, as well as comparisons using currently used analysis procedures. Current fracture analysis methods use the elastic stress analysis loads decoupled from the fracture mechanics analysis, while state-of-the-art methods employ nonlinear cracked-pipe time-history finite element analyses. The results showed that the current decoupled methods were conservative in their predictions, whereas the cracked pipe finite element analyses were more accurate, yet slightly conservative. The nonlinear time-history cracked-pipe finite element analyses conducted in this program were also attractive in that they were done on a small Apollo DN5500 workstation, whereas other cracked-pipe dynamic analyses conducted in Europe on the same experiments required the use of a CRAY2 supercomputer, and were less accurate.

  20. Dynamic triggering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, David P.; Prejean, Stephanie; Schubert, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic stresses propagating as seismic waves from large earthquakes trigger a spectrum of responses at global distances. In addition to locally triggered earthquakes in a variety of tectonic environments, dynamic stresses trigger tectonic (nonvolcanic) tremor in the brittle–plastic transition zone along major plate-boundary faults, activity changes in hydrothermal and volcanic systems, and, in hydrologic domains, changes in spring discharge, water well levels, soil liquefaction, and the eruption of mud volcanoes. Surface waves with periods of 15–200 s are the most effective triggering agents; body-wave trigger is less frequent. Triggering dynamic stresses can be < 1 kPa.

  1. Galactic dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Binney, James

    2008-01-01

    Since it was first published in 1987, Galactic Dynamics has become the most widely used advanced textbook on the structure and dynamics of galaxies and one of the most cited references in astrophysics. Now, in this extensively revised and updated edition, James Binney and Scott Tremaine describe the dramatic recent advances in this subject, making Galactic Dynamics the most authoritative introduction to galactic astrophysics available to advanced undergraduate students, graduate students, and researchers. Every part of the book has been thoroughly overhauled, and many section

  2. Realization of High Dynamic Range Imaging in the GLORIA Network and Its Effect on Astronomical Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav Vítek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Citizen science project GLORIA (GLObal Robotic-telescopes Intelligent Array is a first free- and open-access network of robotic telescopes in the world. It provides a web-based environment where users can do research in astronomy by observing with robotic telescopes and/or by analyzing data that other users have acquired with GLORIA or from other free-access databases. Network of 17 telescopes allows users to control selected telescopes in real time or schedule any more demanding observation. This paper deals with new opportunity that GLORIA project provides to teachers and students of various levels of education. At the moment, there are prepared educational materials related to events like Sun eclipse (measuring local atmosphere changes, Aurora Borealis (calculation of Northern Lights height, or transit of Venus (measurement of the Earth-Sun distance. Student should be able to learn principles of CCD imaging, spectral analysis, basic calibration like dark frames subtraction, or advanced methods of noise suppression. Every user of the network can design his own experiment. We propose advanced experiment aimed at obtaining astronomical image data with high dynamic range. We also introduce methods of objective image quality evaluation in order to discover how HDR methods are affecting astronomical measurements.

  3. Color correction for high dynamic range images using a chromatic adaptation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Byoung-Ju; Park, Jinhyung; Kim, Seunghae; Kim, Hyun-Deok; Choi, Ho-Hyoung

    2013-01-01

    In the image capturing process using a camera, poor illumination has an influence on the image quality, especially in regards to the contrast and details in the dark regions. Generally, high dynamic range (HDR) imaging techniques are used to match the quality between the real scene and the displayed image. However, in images using the multi-exposure technique or regular photography, the images are limited by the veiling glare, which is scene-, exposure-, lens-, aperture-, and camera-dependent. This study mainly addressed images using the multi-exposure technique and developed a color correction scheme that uses a chromatic adaptation method. In the tone mapping using a Gaussian pyramid, the adaptation level is obtained based on a linear Gaussian filter. The resulting image is then processed through the developed tone-mapping function. This allows the chromatic adaptation method to address the mismatches between the real world and the displayed image. The experiment results show that the proposed method yields a better color correction performance compared to conventional methods.

  4. Dynamic capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grünbaum, Niels Nolsøe; Stenger, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    it was dominated by a lack of systematism, assessment, monitoring, marketing speculations and feasibility calculation. Furthermore, the sphere was dictated by asymmetric supplier-customer relationships and negotiation power leading, among other possible factors, to meager profitability.......The consequences of dynamic capabilities (i.e. innovation performance and profitability) is an under researched area in the growing body of literature on dynamic capabilities and innovation management. This study aims to examine the relationship between dynamic capabilities, innovation performance...... and profitability of small and medium sized manufacturing enterprises operating in volatile environments. A multi-case study design was adopted as research strategy. The findings reveal a positive relationship between dynamic capabilities and innovation performance in the case companies, as we would expect. It was...

  5. Jumping Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sannino, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    We propose an alternative paradigm to the conjectured Miransky scaling potentially underlying the physics describing the transition from the conformally broken to the conformally restored phase when tuning certain parameters such as the number of flavors in gauge theories. According to the new...... paradigm the physical scale and henceforth also the massive spectrum of the theory jump at the lower boundary of the conformal window. In particular we propose that a theory can suddenly jump from a Quantum Chromodynamics type spectrum, at the lower boundary of the conformal window, to a conformal one...... without particle interpretation. The jumping scenario, therefore, does not support a near-conformal dynamics of walking type. We will also discuss the impact of jumping dynamics on the construction of models of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking....

  6. Dynamic Bifurcations

    CERN Document Server

    1991-01-01

    Dynamical Bifurcation Theory is concerned with the phenomena that occur in one parameter families of dynamical systems (usually ordinary differential equations), when the parameter is a slowly varying function of time. During the last decade these phenomena were observed and studied by many mathematicians, both pure and applied, from eastern and western countries, using classical and nonstandard analysis. It is the purpose of this book to give an account of these developments. The first paper, by C. Lobry, is an introduction: the reader will find here an explanation of the problems and some easy examples; this paper also explains the role of each of the other paper within the volume and their relationship to one another. CONTENTS: C. Lobry: Dynamic Bifurcations.- T. Erneux, E.L. Reiss, L.J. Holden, M. Georgiou: Slow Passage through Bifurcation and Limit Points. Asymptotic Theory and Applications.- M. Canalis-Durand: Formal Expansion of van der Pol Equation Canard Solutions are Gevrey.- V. Gautheron, E. Isambe...

  7. Dynamical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Birkhoff, George D

    1927-01-01

    His research in dynamics constitutes the middle period of Birkhoff's scientific career, that of maturity and greatest power. -Yearbook of the American Philosophical Society The author's great book€¦is well known to all, and the diverse active modern developments in mathematics which have been inspired by this volume bear the most eloquent testimony to its quality and influence. -Zentralblatt MATH In 1927, G. D. Birkhoff wrote a remarkable treatise on the theory of dynamical systems that would inspire many later mathematicians to do great work. To a large extent, Birkhoff was writing about his o

  8. Forest dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frelich, Lee

    2016-01-01

    Forest dynamics encompass changes in stand structure, species composition, and species interactions with disturbance and environment over a range of spatial and temporal scales. For convenience, spatial scale is defined as individual tree, neighborhood, stand, and landscape. Whether a given canopy-leveling disturbance will initiate a sequence of development in structure with little change in composition or initiate an episode of succession depends on a match or mismatch, respectively, with traits of the dominant tree species that allow the species to survive disturbance. When these match, certain species-disturbance type combinations lock in a pattern of stand and landscape dynamics that can persist for several generations of trees; thus, dominant tree species regulate, as well as respond to, disturbance. A complex interaction among tree species, neighborhood effects, disturbance type and severity, landform, and soils determines how stands of differing composition form and the mosaic of stands that compose the landscape. Neighborhood effects (e.g., serotinous seed rain, sprouting, shading, leaf-litter chemistry, and leaf-litter physical properties) operate at small spatial extents of the individual tree and its neighbors but play a central role in forest dynamics by contributing to patch formation at stand scales and dynamics of the entire landscape. Dominance by tree species with neutral to negative neighborhood effects leads to unstable landscape dynamics in disturbance-prone regions, wherein most stands are undergoing succession; stability can only occur under very low-severity disturbance regimes. Dominance by species with positive effects leads to stable landscape dynamics wherein only a small proportion of stands undergo succession at any one time. Positive neighborhood effects are common in temperate and boreal zones, whereas negative effects are more common in tropical climates. Landscapes with positive dynamics have alternate categories of dynamics

  9. Optimizing Low Light Level Imaging Techniques and Sensor Design Parameters using CCD Digital Cameras for Potential NASA Earth Science Research aboard a Small Satellite or ISS Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project made use of two computational photography techniques, high dynamic range (HDR) imagery formulation and bilateral filters to enable novel imaging...

  10. Internetwork dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    This review places current research in quiet-Sun chromospheric dynamics in the context of past and future work, concentrating on observational aspects of three-minute oscillations and Ca II K2V grains. The subject is of interest at present because observations and simulations come together to permit

  11. Structural dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Strømmen, Einar N

    2014-01-01

    This book introduces to the theory of structural dynamics, with focus on civil engineering structures that may be described by line-like beam or beam-column type of systems, or by a system of rectangular plates. Throughout this book the mathematical presentation contains a classical analytical description as well as a description in a discrete finite element format, covering the mathematical development from basic assumptions to the final equations ready for practical dynamic response predictions. Solutions are presented in time domain as well as in frequency domain. Structural Dynamics starts off at a basic level and step by step brings the reader up to a level where the necessary safety considerations to wind or horizontal ground motion induced dynamic design problems can be performed. The special theory of the tuned mass damper has been given a comprehensive treatment, as this is a theory not fully covered elsewhere. For the same reason a chapter on the problem of moving loads on beams has been included.

  12. Coastal Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, W.T.

    1998-01-01

    This book deals on "Coastal Dynamics", which will be defined in a narrow sense as a mathematical theory, which starts from given equations of motion for the sediment, which leads with the continuity equation and given boundary conditions to a calculated (eventually schematized) coastal topography,

  13. Membrane dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    Current topics include membrane-protein interactions with regard to membrane deformation or curvature sensing by BAR domains. Also, we study the dynamics of membrane tubes of both cells and simple model membrane tubes. Finally, we study membrane phase behavior which has important implications...... for the lateral organization of membranes as wells as for physical properties like bending, permeability and elasticity...

  14. Glassy Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik J.; Sibani, Paolo

    2007-01-01

    The term glassy dynamics is often used to refer to the extremely slow relaxation observed in several types of many component systems. The time span needed to reach a steady, time independent, state will typically be far beyond experimentally accessible time scales. When melted alloys are cooled d...

  15. Dynamic LIMIDS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Díez, F.J.; Gerven, M.A.J. van

    2011-01-01

    One of the objectives of artificial intelligence is to build decision-support models for systems that evolve over time and include several types of uncertainty. Dynamic limited-memory influence diagrams (DLIMIDs) are a new type of model proposed recently for this kind of problems. DLIMIDs are simila

  16. Dynamic LIMIDS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Díez, F.J.; Gerven, M.A.J. van

    2011-01-01

    One of the objectives of artificial intelligence is to build decision-support models for systems that evolve over time and include several types of uncertainty. Dynamic limited-memory influence diagrams (DLIMIDs) are a new type of model proposed recently for this kind of problems. DLIMIDs are simila

  17. Record dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robe, Dominic M.; Boettcher, Stefan; Sibani, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    -facto irreversible and become increasingly harder to achieve. Thus, a progression of record-sized dynamical barriers are traversed in the approach to equilibration. Accordingly, the statistics of the events is closely described by a log-Poisson process. Originally developed for relaxation in spin glasses...

  18. System Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morecroft, John

    System dynamics is an approach for thinking about and simulating situations and organisations of all kinds and sizes by visualising how the elements fit together, interact and change over time. This chapter, written by John Morecroft, describes modern system dynamics which retains the fundamentals developed in the 1950s by Jay W. Forrester of the MIT Sloan School of Management. It looks at feedback loops and time delays that affect system behaviour in a non-linear way, and illustrates how dynamic behaviour depends upon feedback loop structures. It also recognises improvements as part of the ongoing process of managing a situation in order to achieve goals. Significantly it recognises the importance of context, and practitioner skills. Feedback systems thinking views problems and solutions as being intertwined. The main concepts and tools: feedback structure and behaviour, causal loop diagrams, dynamics, are practically illustrated in a wide variety of contexts from a hot water shower through to a symphony orchestra and the practical application of the approach is described through several real examples of its use for strategic planning and evaluation.

  19. Classical dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Greenwood, Donald T

    1997-01-01

    Graduate-level text for science and technology students provides strong background in the more abstract and intellectually satisfying areas of dynamical theory. Topics include d'Alembert's principle and the idea of virtual work, Hamilton's equations, Hamilton-Jacobi theory, canonical transformations, more. Problems and references at chapter ends.

  20. Internetwork dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, R.J.

    2001-01-01

    This review places current research in quiet-Sun chromospheric dynamics in the context of past and future work, concentrating on observational aspects of three-minute oscillations and Ca II K2V grains. The subject is of interest at present because observations and simulations come together to permit

  1. Mitotic dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐孝威

    1996-01-01

    A new model for mitotic dynamics of eukaryotic cells is proposed. In the kinetochore mo-tor-midzone motor model two kinds of motors, the kinetochore motors and the midzone motors, play important roles in chromosome movement. Using this model the chromosome congression during prometaphase, the chromosome oscillation during metaphase and the chromatid segregation during anaphase are described in a unified way.

  2. Discrete dynamics versus analytic dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toxværd, Søren

    2014-01-01

    For discrete classical Molecular dynamics obtained by the “Verlet” algorithm (VA) with the time increment h there exists a shadow Hamiltonian H˜ with energy E˜(h) , for which the discrete particle positions lie on the analytic trajectories for H˜ . Here, we proof that there, independent...

  3. Applied dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Schiehlen, Werner

    2014-01-01

    Applied Dynamics is an important branch of engineering mechanics widely applied to mechanical and automotive engineering, aerospace and biomechanics as well as control engineering and mechatronics. The computational methods presented are based on common fundamentals. For this purpose analytical mechanics turns out to be very useful where D’Alembert’s principle in the Lagrangian formulation proves to be most efficient. The method of multibody systems, finite element systems and continuous systems are treated consistently. Thus, students get a much better understanding of dynamical phenomena, and engineers in design and development departments using computer codes may check the results more easily by choosing models of different complexity for vibration and stress analysis.

  4. Fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Bernard, Peter S

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a focused, readable account of the principal physical and mathematical ideas at the heart of fluid dynamics. Graduate students in engineering, applied math, and physics who are taking their first graduate course in fluids will find this book invaluable in providing the background in physics and mathematics necessary to pursue advanced study. The book includes a detailed derivation of the Navier-Stokes and energy equations, followed by many examples of their use in studying the dynamics of fluid flows. Modern tensor analysis is used to simplify the mathematical derivations, thus allowing a clearer view of the physics. Peter Bernard also covers the motivation behind many fundamental concepts such as Bernoulli's equation and the stream function. Many exercises are designed with a view toward using MATLAB or its equivalent to simplify and extend the analysis of fluid motion including developing flow simulations based on techniques described in the book.

  5. Dynamic capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grünbaum, Niels Nolsøe; Stenger, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    and profitability of small and medium sized manufacturing enterprises operating in volatile environments. A multi-case study design was adopted as research strategy. The findings reveal a positive relationship between dynamic capabilities and innovation performance in the case companies, as we would expect. It was...... it was dominated by a lack of systematism, assessment, monitoring, marketing speculations and feasibility calculation. Furthermore, the sphere was dictated by asymmetric supplier-customer relationships and negotiation power leading, among other possible factors, to meager profitability....

  6. Cybersecurity Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-20

    envisioned) Science of Cybersecurity:  Soul: Security (concepts)  Brain: Cybersecurity Dynamics (kind of Complexity Science)  Muscle & Blood ...Complexity Science)  Muscle & Blood : Probability Theory, Number Theory, Abstract Algebra, etc.  Thrust I: Building a systematic theory of...Under-specification, composition and emergent properties. In Proc. NSPW’97, pp. 83–93. [11] A. Kubík. Toward a formalization of emergence. Artif . Life

  7. Hamiltonian dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Vilasi, Gaetano

    2001-01-01

    This is both a textbook and a monograph. It is partially based on a two-semester course, held by the author for third-year students in physics and mathematics at the University of Salerno, on analytical mechanics, differential geometry, symplectic manifolds and integrable systems. As a textbook, it provides a systematic and self-consistent formulation of Hamiltonian dynamics both in a rigorous coordinate language and in the modern language of differential geometry. It also presents powerful mathematical methods of theoretical physics, especially in gauge theories and general relativity. As a m

  8. PREFACE: Cooperative dynamics Cooperative dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gov, Nir

    2011-09-01

    The dynamics within living cells are dominated by non-equilibrium processes that consume chemical energy (usually in the form of ATP, adenosine triphosphate) and convert it into mechanical forces and motion. The mechanisms that allow this conversion process are mostly driven by the components of the cytoskeleton: (i) directed (polar) polymerization of filaments (either actin or microtubules) and (ii) molecular motors. The forces and motions produced by these two components of the cytoskeleton give rise to the formation of cellular shapes, and drive the intracellular transport and organization. It is clear that these systems present a multi-scale challenge, from the physics of the molecular processes to the organization of many interacting units. Understanding the physical nature of these systems will have a large impact on many fundamental problems in biology and break new grounds in the field of non-equilibrium physics. This field of research has seen a rapid development over the last ten years. Activities in this area range from theoretical and experimental work on the underlying fundamental (bio)physics at the single-molecule level, to investigations (in vivo and in vitro) of the dynamics and patterns of macroscopic pieces of 'living matter'. In this special issue we have gathered contributions that span the whole spectrum of length- and complexity-scales in this field. Some of the works demonstrate how active forces self-organize within the polymerizing cytoskeleton, on the level of cooperative cargo transport via motors or due to active fluxes at the cell membrane. On a larger scale, it is shown that polar filaments coupled to molecular motors give rise to a huge variety of surprising dynamics and patterns: spontaneously looping rings of gliding microtubules, and emergent phases of self-organized filaments and motors in different geometries. All of these articles share the common feature of being out-of-equilibrium, driven by metabolism. As demonstrated here

  9. Complex dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Carleson, Lennart

    1993-01-01

    Complex dynamics is today very much a focus of interest. Though several fine expository articles were available, by P. Blanchard and by M. Yu. Lyubich in particular, until recently there was no single source where students could find the material with proofs. For anyone in our position, gathering and organizing the material required a great deal of work going through preprints and papers and in some cases even finding a proof. We hope that the results of our efforts will be of help to others who plan to learn about complex dynamics and perhaps even lecture. Meanwhile books in the field a. re beginning to appear. The Stony Brook course notes of J. Milnor were particularly welcome and useful. Still we hope that our special emphasis on the analytic side will satisfy a need. This book is a revised and expanded version of notes based on lectures of the first author at UCLA over several \\Vinter Quarters, particularly 1986 and 1990. We owe Chris Bishop a great deal of gratitude for supervising the production of cour...

  10. Population dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooch, E. G.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Increases or decreases in the size of populations over space and time are, arguably, the motivation for much of pure and applied ecological research. The fundamental model for the dynamics of any population is straightforward: the net change over time in the abundance of some population is the simple difference between the number of additions (individuals entering the population minus the number of subtractions (individuals leaving the population. Of course, the precise nature of the pattern and process of these additions and subtractions is often complex, and population biology is often replete with fairly dense mathematical representations of both processes. While there is no doubt that analysis of such abstract descriptions of populations has been of considerable value in advancing our, there has often existed a palpable discomfort when the ‘beautiful math’ is faced with the often ‘ugly realities’ of empirical data. In some cases, this attempted merger is abandoned altogether, because of the paucity of ‘good empirical data’ with which the theoretician can modify and evaluate more conceptually–based models. In some cases, the lack of ‘data’ is more accurately represented as a lack of robust estimates of one or more parameters. It is in this arena that methods developed to analyze multiple encounter data from individually marked organisms has seen perhaps the greatest advances. These methods have rapidly evolved to facilitate not only estimation of one or more vital rates, critical to population modeling and analysis, but also to allow for direct estimation of both the dynamics of populations (e.g., Pradel, 1996, and factors influencing those dynamics (e.g., Nichols et al., 2000. The interconnections between the various vital rates, their estimation, and incorporation into models, was the general subject of our plenary presentation by Hal Caswell (Caswell & Fujiwara, 2004. Caswell notes that although interest has traditionally

  11. Nonlinear dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turchetti, G. (Bologna Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica)

    1989-01-01

    Research in nonlinear dynamics is rapidly expanding and its range of applications is extending beyond the traditional areas of science where it was first developed. Indeed while linear analysis and modelling, which has been very successful in mathematical physics and engineering, has become a mature science, many elementary phenomena of intrinsic nonlinear nature were recently experimentally detected and investigated, suggesting new theoretical work. Complex systems, as turbulent fluids, were known to be governed by intrinsically nonlinear laws since a long time ago, but received purely phenomenological descriptions. The pioneering works of Boltzmann and Poincare, probably because of their intrinsic difficulty, did not have a revolutionary impact at their time; it is only very recently that their message is reaching a significant number of mathematicians and physicists. Certainly the development of computers and computer graphics played an important role in developing geometric intuition of complex phenomena through simple numerical experiments, while a new mathematical framework to understand them was being developed.

  12. Superconductor Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Gömöry, F

    2014-01-01

    Superconductors used in magnet technology could carry extreme currents because of their ability to keep the magnetic flux motionless. The dynamics of the magnetic flux interaction with superconductors is controlled by this property. The cases of electrical transport in a round wire and the magnetization of wires of various shapes (circular, elliptical, plate) in an external magnetic field are analysed. Resistance to the magnetic field penetration means that the field produced by the superconducting magnet is no longer proportional to the supplied current. It also leads to a dissipation of electromagnetic energy. In conductors with unequal transverse dimensions, such as flat cables, the orientation with respect to the magnetic field plays an essential role. A reduction of magnetization currents can be achieved by splitting the core of a superconducting wire into fine filaments; however, new kinds of electrical currents that couple the filaments consequently appear. Basic formulas allowing qualitative analyses ...

  13. Image Enhancement Using Linear Programming Method for High Dynamic Range Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yamini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Now a days in Telecommunication areas the contrast gain is considered as a major constraints. For the enhancement purpose, the technique called Histogram Equalization is involved, but due to over enhancement and not such gain is been obtained. So that for the OCTM is been proposed, where the constraints of HE is been rectified. OCTM gives better efficiency and it is been solved by Linear programming. In this paper the enhancement of HDR Image using linear Programming is done. According to it HDR Image is constructed using the multiple exposures and its contrast is enhanced using the OCTM method using Linear Programming.

  14. Fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ruban, Anatoly I

    This is the first book in a four-part series designed to give a comprehensive and coherent description of Fluid Dynamics, starting with chapters on classical theory suitable for an introductory undergraduate lecture course, and then progressing through more advanced material up to the level of modern research in the field. The present Part 1 consists of four chapters. Chapter 1 begins with a discussion of Continuum Hypothesis, which is followed by an introduction to macroscopic functions, the velocity vector, pressure, density, and enthalpy. We then analyse the forces acting inside a fluid, and deduce the Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible and compressible fluids in Cartesian and curvilinear coordinates. In Chapter 2 we study the properties of a number of flows that are presented by the so-called exact solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations, including the Couette flow between two parallel plates, Hagen-Poiseuille flow through a pipe, and Karman flow above an infinite rotating disk. Chapter 3 is d...

  15. Dynamic Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingshirn, C.

    The purpose of this chapter is to present the results of the dynamics of exciton (polariton)s or more generally of electron-hole pairs. For a recent review of this topic concentrating on quantum wells, see Davies and Jagadish (Laser Photon. Rev. 3(1), 1(2008)). We neither consider the dynamics of carriers, for example, their relaxation time entering in Hall mobility or electrical conductivity, nor the dynamics of phonons or spins, respectively. We give here only a very small selection of references to these topics (Baxter and Schmuttenmaer, J. Phys. Chem. B, 110:25229, 2006; Queiroz et al. Superlattice Microstruct. 42:270, 2007; Niehaus and Schwarz, Superlattice Microstruct. 42:299, 2007; Lee et al., J. Appl. Phys. 93:4939, 2003; A. K Azad, J. Han, W. Zhang, Appl. Phys. Lett. 88:021103, 2006; Janssen et al., QELS 2008 IEEE 2; D. Lagarde et al., Phys. Stat. Sol. C 4:472, 2007; S. Gosh et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 86:232507, 2005; W. K. Liu et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 98:186804, 2007). The main characteristic time constants relevant to optical properties close to the fundamental absorption edge are the dephasing time T 2, (i.e. the time after which the polarization amplitude of the optically excited electron-hole pair loses the coherence with the driving light field), the intra band or inter sub band relaxation times T 3 (i.e. the time it takes for the electron-hole pairs to relax from their initial state of excitation to a certain other state e.g. to a thermal distribution with a temperature equal to or possibly still above lattice temperature) and finally the lifetime T 1 (i.e. the time until the electron-hole pairs recombine). The characteristic time constants T 2 and T 1 are also known as transverse and longitudinal relaxation times, respectively. Their inverses are the corresponding rate constants. T 2 is inversely proportional to the homogeneous width Γ, and T 1 includes both the radiative and the generally dominating non-radiative recombination (Hauser et al., Appl

  16. Internet dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukose, Rajan Mathew

    The World Wide Web and the Internet are rapidly expanding spaces, of great economic and social significance, which offer an opportunity to study many phenomena, often previously inaccessible, on an unprecedented scale and resolution with relative ease. These phenomena are measurable on the scale of tens of millions of users and hundreds of millions of pages. By virtue of nearly complete electronic mediation, it is possible in principle to observe the time and ``spatial'' evolution of nearly all choices and interactions. This cyber-space therefore provides a view into a number of traditional research questions (from many academic disciplines) and creates its own new phenomena accessible for study. Despite its largely self-organized and dynamic nature, a number of robust quantitative regularities are found in the aggregate statistics of interesting and useful quantities. These regularities can be understood with the help of models that draw on ideas from statistical physics as well as other fields such as economics, psychology and decision theory. This thesis develops models that can account for regularities found in the statistics of Internet congestion and user surfing patterns and discusses some practical consequences. practical consequences.

  17. Void Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Nelson D.; Paz, Dante; Lares, Marcelo; Ceccarelli, Laura; Lambas, Diego Garcí A.; Cai, Yan-Chuan; Li, Baojiu

    2016-10-01

    Cosmic voids are becoming key players in testing the physics of our Universe.Here we concentrate on the abundances and the dynamics of voids as these are among the best candidatesto provide information on cosmological parameters. Cai, Padilla & Li (2014)use the abundance of voids to tell apart Hu & Sawicki f(R) models from General Relativity. An interestingresult is that even though, as expected, voids in the dark matter field are emptier in f(R) gravity due to the fifth force expellingaway from the void centres, this result is reversed when haloes are used to find voids. The abundance of voids in this casebecomes even lower in f(R) compared to GR for large voids. Still, the differences are significant and thisprovides a way to tell apart these models. The velocity field differences between f(R) and GR, on the other hand, arethe same for halo voids and for dark matter voids.Paz et al. (2013), concentrate on the velocity profiles around voids. First they show the necessityof four parameters to describe the density profiles around voids given two distinct voidpopulations, voids-in-voids and voids-in-clouds. This profile is used to predict peculiar velocities around voids,and the combination of the latter with void density profiles allows the construction of modelvoid-galaxy cross-correlation functions with redshift space distortions. When these modelsare tuned to fit the measured correlation functions for voids and galaxies in the SloanDigital Sky Survey, small voids are found to be of the void-in-cloud type, whereas largerones are consistent with being void-in-void. This is a novel result that is obtaineddirectly from redshift space data around voids. These profiles can be used toremove systematics on void-galaxy Alcock-Pacinsky tests coming from redshift-space distortions.

  18. Dynamical system synchronization

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Albert C J

    2013-01-01

    Dynamical System Synchronization (DSS) meticulously presents for the first time the theory of dynamical systems synchronization based on the local singularity theory of discontinuous dynamical systems. The book details the sufficient and necessary conditions for dynamical systems synchronizations, through extensive mathematical expression. Techniques for engineering implementation of DSS are clearly presented compared with the existing techniques.  This book also:  Presents novel concepts and methods for dynamical system synchronization Extends beyond the Lyapunov theory for dynamical system synchronization Introduces companion and synchronization of discrete dynamical systems Includes local singularity theory for discontinuous dynamical systems Covers the invariant domains of synchronization Features more than 75 illustrations Dynamical System Synchronization is an ideal book for those interested in better understanding new concepts and methodology for dynamical system synchronization, local singularity...

  19. Fundamentals of structural dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Craig, Roy R

    2006-01-01

    From theory and fundamentals to the latest advances in computational and experimental modal analysis, this is the definitive, updated reference on structural dynamics.This edition updates Professor Craig's classic introduction to structural dynamics, which has been an invaluable resource for practicing engineers and a textbook for undergraduate and graduate courses in vibrations and/or structural dynamics. Along with comprehensive coverage of structural dynamics fundamentals, finite-element-based computational methods, and dynamic testing methods, this Second Edition includes new and e

  20. OTTO MOTOR DYNAMICS

    OpenAIRE

    Petrescu, Florian Ion Tiberiu; Polytechnic University of Bucharest; Petrescu, Relly Victoria Virgil; Polytechnic University of Bucharest

    2016-01-01

    Otto engine dynamics are similar in almost all common internal combustion engines. We can speak so about dynamics of engines: Lenoir, Otto, and Diesel. The dynamic presented model is simple and original. The first thing necessary in the calculation of Otto engine dynamics, is to determine the inertial mass reduced at the piston. It uses then the Lagrange equation. The dynamic equation of motion of the piston, obtained by integrating the Lagrange equation, takes a new form. It presents a new r...

  1. Dynamical systems theory for music dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Boon, J P

    1994-01-01

    Abstract:We show that, when music pieces are cast in the form of time series of pitch variations, the concepts and tools of dynamical systems theory can be applied to the analysis of {\\it temporal dynamics} in music. (i) Phase space portraits are constructed from the time series wherefrom the dimensionality is evaluated as a measure of the {\\pit global} dynamics of each piece. (ii) Spectral analysis of the time series yields power spectra (\\sim f^{-\

  2. Varian HDR surface applicators - commissioning and clinical implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iftimia, Ileana; McKee, Andrea B; Halvorsen, Per H

    2016-03-08

    The purpose of this study was to validate the dosimetric performance of Varian surface applicators with the source vertically positioned and develop procedures for clinical implementation. The Varian surface applicators with the source vertically positioned provide a wide range of apertures making them clinically advantageous, though the steep dose gradient in the region of 3-4 mm prescription depth presents multiple challenges. The following commissioning tests were performed: 1) verification of functional integrity and physical dimensions; and 2) dosimetric measurements to validate data provided by Varian as well as data obtained using the Acuros algorithm for heterogeneity corrected dose calculation. A solid water (SW) phantom was scanned and the Acuros algorithm was used to compute the dose at 5 mm depth and at surface for all applicators. Two sets of reference dose measurements were performed, with the source positioned at (i) -10 mm and (ii) -15 mm from the center of the first nominal dwell position. Measurements were taken at 5 mm depth in a SW phantom and in air at the applicator surface. The results were then compared to the vendor's data and to the Acuros calculated dose. Relative dose measurements using Gafchromic films were taken at a depth of 4 mm in SW. Percent depth ionization (PDI) measurements using ion chamber were performed in SW. The profiles generated from film measurements and the PDI plots were compared with those computed using the Acuros algorithm and vendor's data, when available. Preliminary leakage tests were performed using optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) and the results were compared with Acuros predictions. All applicators were found to be functional with physical dimensions within 1 mm of specifications. For scenario (ii) measurements taken in SW at 5 mm depth and in air at the surface of each applicator were within 10% and 4% agreement with vendor's data, respectively. Compared with Acuros predictions, these measurements were within 6% and 5%, respectively. Measurements taken for scenario (i) showed reduced agreement with both the vendor's data as well as the Acuros calculations, especially when using the 10 mm applicator. The full widths of the measured dose profiles were within 2 mm of those predicted by Acuros at the 90% dose level. The PDI plots and measured leakage dose were in good agreement with vendor's data and Acuros predictions. Based on the dosimetric results, a quality assurance program and procedures for clinical implementation were developed. Treatment planning will be performed using scenario (ii). The 10mm applicator will not be released for clinical use. A prescription depth of 4mm is recommended, to ensure full coverage at 3 mm and a minimum dose of 90% of prescribed dose at 4 mm depth.

  3. Dosimetric equivalence of nonstandard HDR brachytherapy catheter patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, J. A. M.; Hsu, I-C.; Pouliot, J. [University of California, San Francisco, California 94115 (United States)

    2009-01-15

    Purpose: To determine whether alternative high dose rate prostate brachytherapy catheter patterns can result in similar or improved dose distributions while providing better access and reducing trauma. Materials and Methods: Standard prostate cancer high dose rate brachytherapy uses a regular grid of parallel needle positions to guide the catheter insertion. This geometry does not easily allow the physician to avoid piercing the critical structures near the penile bulb nor does it provide position flexibility in the case of pubic arch interference. This study used CT datasets with 3 mm slice spacing from ten previously treated patients and digitized new catheters following three hypothetical catheter patterns: conical, bi-conical, and fireworks. The conical patterns were used to accommodate a robotic delivery using a single entry point. The bi-conical and fireworks patterns were specifically designed to avoid the critical structures near the penile bulb. For each catheter distribution, a plan was optimized with the inverse planning algorithm, IPSA, and compared with the plan used for treatment. Irrelevant of catheter geometry, a plan must fulfill the RTOG-0321 dose criteria for target dose coverage (V{sub 100}{sup Prostate}>90%) and organ-at-risk dose sparing (V{sub 75}{sup Bladder}<1 cc, V{sub 75}{sup Rectum}<1 cc, V{sub 125}{sup Urethra}<<1 cc). Results: The three nonstandard catheter patterns used 16 nonparallel, straight divergent catheters, with entry points in the perineum. Thirty plans from ten patients with prostate sizes ranging from 26 to 89 cc were optimized. All nonstandard patterns fulfilled the RTOG criteria when the clinical plan did. In some cases, the dose distribution was improved by better sparing the organs-at-risk. Conclusion: Alternative catheter patterns can provide the physician with additional ways to treat patients previously considered unsuited for brachytherapy treatment (pubic arch interference) and facilitate robotic guidance of catheter insertion. In addition, alternative catheter patterns may decrease toxicity by avoidance of the critical structures near the penile bulb while still fulfilling the RTOG criteria.

  4. for hybrid dynamical systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wassim M. Haddad

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we develop a unified dynamical systems framework for a general class of systems possessing left-continuous flows; that is, left-continuous dynamical systems. These systems are shown to generalize virtually all existing notions of dynamical systems and include hybrid, impulsive, and switching dynamical systems as special cases. Furthermore, we generalize dissipativity, passivity, and nonexpansivity theory to left-continuous dynamical systems. Specifically, the classical concepts of system storage functions and supply rates are extended to left-continuous dynamical systems providing a generalized hybrid system energy interpretation in terms of stored energy, dissipated energy over the continuous-time dynamics, and dissipated energy over the resetting events. Finally, the generalized dissipativity notions are used to develop general stability criteria for feedback interconnections of left-continuous dynamical systems. These results generalize the positivity and small gain theorems to the case of left-continuous, hybrid, and impulsive dynamical systems.

  5. Vibro-impact dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Albert C J

    2012-01-01

    Presents a systematic view of vibro-impact dynamics based on the nonlinear dynamics analysis Comprehensive understanding of any vibro-impact system is critically impeded by the lack of analytical tools viable for properly characterizing grazing bifurcation. The authors establish vibro-impact dynamics as a subset of the theory of discontinuous systems, thus enabling all vibro-impact systems to be explored and characterized for applications.  Vibro-impact Dynamics presents an original theoretical way of analyzing the behavior of vibro-impact dynamics that can be extended to discontinuous dynamic

  6. Dynamic statistical information theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XING; Xiusan

    2006-01-01

    In recent years we extended Shannon static statistical information theory to dynamic processes and established a Shannon dynamic statistical information theory, whose core is the evolution law of dynamic entropy and dynamic information. We also proposed a corresponding Boltzmman dynamic statistical information theory. Based on the fact that the state variable evolution equation of respective dynamic systems, i.e. Fokker-Planck equation and Liouville diffusion equation can be regarded as their information symbol evolution equation, we derived the nonlinear evolution equations of Shannon dynamic entropy density and dynamic information density and the nonlinear evolution equations of Boltzmann dynamic entropy density and dynamic information density, that describe respectively the evolution law of dynamic entropy and dynamic information. The evolution equations of these two kinds of dynamic entropies and dynamic informations show in unison that the time rate of change of dynamic entropy densities is caused by their drift, diffusion and production in state variable space inside the systems and coordinate space in the transmission processes; and that the time rate of change of dynamic information densities originates from their drift, diffusion and dissipation in state variable space inside the systems and coordinate space in the transmission processes. Entropy and information have been combined with the state and its law of motion of the systems. Furthermore we presented the formulas of two kinds of entropy production rates and information dissipation rates, the expressions of two kinds of drift information flows and diffusion information flows. We proved that two kinds of information dissipation rates (or the decrease rates of the total information) were equal to their corresponding entropy production rates (or the increase rates of the total entropy) in the same dynamic system. We obtained the formulas of two kinds of dynamic mutual informations and dynamic channel

  7. Solar Dynamics Observatory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A searchable database of all Solar Dynamics Observatory data including EUV, magnetograms, visible light and X-ray. SDO: The Solar Dynamics Observatory is the first...

  8. Dynamic Interactive Learning Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabry, Khaled; Barker, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews and discusses the notions of interactivity and dynamicity of learning systems in relation to information technologies and design principles that can contribute to interactive and dynamic learning. It explores the concept of dynamic interactive learning systems based on the emerging generation of information as part of a…

  9. Intramolecular and nonlinear dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, M.J. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Research in this program focuses on three interconnected areas. The first involves the study of intramolecular dynamics, particularly of highly excited systems. The second area involves the use of nonlinear dynamics as a tool for the study of molecular dynamics and complex kinetics. The third area is the study of the classical/quantum correspondence for highly excited systems, particularly systems exhibiting classical chaos.

  10. Dynamics of Carroll particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, Eric; Gomis, Joaquim; Longhi, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    We investigate particles whose dynamics are invariant under the Carroll group. Although a single, free such Carroll particle has no non-trivial dynamics (the Carroll particle does not move), we show that non-trivial dynamics exists for a set of interacting Carroll particles. Furthermore, we gauge th

  11. The dynamics of scaffolding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Geert, P. L. C.; Steenbeek, H.W.

    2005-01-01

    In this article we have reinterpreted a relatively standard definition of scaffolding in the context of dynamic systems theory. Our main point is that scaffolding cannot be understood outside the context of a dynamic approach of learning and (formal or informal) teaching. We provide a dynamic system

  12. Dynamics at Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sylvia Ceyer, Nancy Ryan Gray

    2010-05-04

    The 2009 Gordon Conference on Dynamics at Surfaces is the 30th anniversary of a meeting held every two years that is attended by leading researchers in the area of experimental and theoretical dynamics at liquid and solid surfaces. The conference focuses on the dynamics of the interaction of molecules with either liquid or solid surfaces, the dynamics of the outermost layer of liquid and solid surfaces and the dynamics at the liquid-solid interface. Specific topics that are featured include state-to-state dynamics, non-adiabatic interactions in molecule-metal systems, photon induced desorption from semiconductor and metal surfaces, ultrafast x-ray and electron diffraction as probes of the dynamics of ablation, ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy of water surface dynamics, dynamics of a single adsorbate, growth at nano-scale mineral surfaces, dynamics of atom recombination on interstellar dust grains and the dynamics of the interaction of water with lipid bilayers. The conference brings together investigators from a variety of scientific disciplines including chemistry, physics, materials science, geology and biophysics.

  13. Variable Dynamic Testbed Vehicle: Dynamics Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, A. Y.; Le, N. T.; Marriott, A. T.

    1997-01-01

    The Variable Dynamic Testbed Vehicle (VDTV) concept has been proposed as a tool to evaluate collision avoidance systems and to perform driving-related human factors research. The goal of this study is to analytically investigate to what extent a VDTV with adjustable front and rear anti-roll bar stiffnesses, programmable damping rates, and four-wheel-steering can emulate the lateral dynamics of a broad range of passenger vehicles.

  14. Complexity and Dynamical Depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terrence Deacon

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We argue that a critical difference distinguishing machines from organisms and computers from brains is not complexity in a structural sense, but a difference in dynamical organization that is not well accounted for by current complexity measures. We propose a measure of the complexity of a system that is largely orthogonal to computational, information theoretic, or thermodynamic conceptions of structural complexity. What we call a system’s dynamical depth is a separate dimension of system complexity that measures the degree to which it exhibits discrete levels of nonlinear dynamical organization in which successive levels are distinguished by local entropy reduction and constraint generation. A system with greater dynamical depth than another consists of a greater number of such nested dynamical levels. Thus, a mechanical or linear thermodynamic system has less dynamical depth than an inorganic self-organized system, which has less dynamical depth than a living system. Including an assessment of dynamical depth can provide a more precise and systematic account of the fundamental difference between inorganic systems (low dynamical depth and living systems (high dynamical depth, irrespective of the number of their parts and the causal relations between them.

  15. Synchronization dynamics of two different dynamical systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Albert C.J., E-mail: aluo@siue.edu [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, Edwardsville, IL 62026-1805 (United States); Min Fuhong [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, Edwardsville, IL 62026-1805 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: > Synchronization dynamics of two distinct dynamical systems. > Synchronization, de-synchronization and instantaneous synchronization. > A controlled pendulum synchronizing with the Duffing oscillator. > Synchronization invariant set. > Synchronization parameter map. - Abstract: In this paper, synchronization dynamics of two different dynamical systems is investigated through the theory of discontinuous dynamical systems. The necessary and sufficient conditions for the synchronization, de-synchronization and instantaneous synchronization (penetration or grazing) are presented. Using such a synchronization theory, the synchronization of a controlled pendulum with the Duffing oscillator is systematically discussed as a sampled problem, and the corresponding analytical conditions for the synchronization are presented. The synchronization parameter study is carried out for a better understanding of synchronization characteristics of the controlled pendulum and the Duffing oscillator. Finally, the partial and full synchronizations of the controlled pendulum with periodic and chaotic motions are presented to illustrate the analytical conditions. The synchronization of the Duffing oscillator and pendulum are investigated in order to show the usefulness and efficiency of the methodology in this paper. The synchronization invariant domain is obtained. The technique presented in this paper should have a wide spectrum of applications in engineering. For example, this technique can be applied to the maneuvering target tracking, and the others.

  16. Multiscale Gentlest Ascent Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    The gentlest ascent dynamics (E and Zhou in {\\it Nonlinearity} vol 24, p1831, 2011) locally converges to a nearby saddle point with one dimensional unstable manifold. Here we present a multiscale gentlest ascent dynamics for stochastic slow-fast systems in order to compute saddle point associated with the effective dynamics of the slow variable. Such saddle points, as the candidates of transition states, are important in non-equilibrium transitions for the coarse-grained slow variables; they are also helpful to explore free energy surface. We derive the expressions of the gentlest ascent dynamics for the averaged system, and propose the multiscale numerical methods to efficiently solve the multiscale gentlest ascent dynamics for search of saddle point. The examples of stochastic ordinary and partial differential equations are presented to illustrate the performance of this multiscale gentlest ascent dynamics.

  17. Dynamics of Media Attention

    CERN Document Server

    Traag, V A; Hicks, J; van Klinken, G

    2014-01-01

    Studies of human attention dynamics analyses how attention is focused on specific topics, issues or people. In online social media, there are clear signs of exogenous shocks, bursty dynamics, and an exponential or powerlaw lifetime distribution. We here analyse the attention dynamics of traditional media, focussing on co-occurrence of people in newspaper articles. The results are quite different from online social networks and attention. Different regimes seem to be operating at two different time scales. At short time scales we see evidence of bursty dynamics and fast decaying edge lifetimes and attention. This behaviour disappears for longer time scales, and in that regime we find Poissonian dynamics and slower decaying lifetimes. We propose that a cascading Poisson process may take place, with issues arising at a constant rate over a long time scale, and faster dynamics at a shorter time scale.

  18. Dynamic Boiler Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kim

    Traditionally, boilers have been designed mainly focussing on the static operation of the plant. The dynamic capability has been given lower priority and the analysis has typically been limited to assuring that the plant was not over-stressed due to large temperature gradients. New possibilities...... for buying and selling energy has increased the focus on the dynamic operation capability, efciency, emissions etc. For optimizing the design of boilers for dynamic operation a quantication of the dynamic capability is needed. A framework for optimizing design of boilers for dynamic operation has been...... developed. Analyzing boilers for dynamic operation gives rise to a number of opposing aims: shrinking and swelling, steam quality, stress levels, control system/philosophy, pressurization etc. Common for these opposing aims is that an optimum can be found for selected operation conditions. The framework has...

  19. Dynamic Capabilities and Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilden, Ralf; Gudergan, Siegfried P.; Nielsen, Bo Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic capabilities are widely considered to incorporate those processes that enable organizations to sustain superior performance over time. In this paper, we argue theoretically and demonstrate empirically that these effects are contingent on organizational structure and the competitive...... are contingent on the competitive intensity faced by firms. Our findings demonstrate the performance effects of internal alignment between organizational structure and dynamic capabilities, as well as the external fit of dynamic capabilities with competitive intensity. We outline the advantages of PLS...

  20. Dynamical Constraints on Exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Horner, Jonti; Tinney, Chris; Hinse, Tobias C; Marshall, Jonathan P

    2013-01-01

    Dynamical studies of new exoplanet systems are a critical component of the discovery and characterisation process. Such studies can provide firmer constraints on the parameters of the newly discovered planets, and may even reveal that the proposed planets do not stand up to dynamical scrutiny. Here, we demonstrate how dynamical studies can assist the characterisation of such systems through two examples: QS Virginis and HD 73526.

  1. ON NONDETERMINISTIC DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    R. Bellman left a lot of research problems in his work “Dynamic Programming" (1957). Having received ideas from Bellman, S. Iwamoto has extracted, out of his problems, a problem on nondeterministic dynamic programming (NDP). Instead of stochastic dynamic programming which has been well studied, Iwamoto has opened a gate to NDP. This report presents speci_c optimal solutions for NDPs on continuous state and decision spaces.

  2. Dynamical Systems Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Gils, S; Hoveijn, I; Takens, F; Nonlinear Dynamical Systems and Chaos

    1996-01-01

    Symmetries in dynamical systems, "KAM theory and other perturbation theories", "Infinite dimensional systems", "Time series analysis" and "Numerical continuation and bifurcation analysis" were the main topics of the December 1995 Dynamical Systems Conference held in Groningen in honour of Johann Bernoulli. They now form the core of this work which seeks to present the state of the art in various branches of the theory of dynamical systems. A number of articles have a survey character whereas others deal with recent results in current research. It contains interesting material for all members of the dynamical systems community, ranging from geometric and analytic aspects from a mathematical point of view to applications in various sciences.

  3. Dynamics of machinery

    CERN Document Server

    Dresig, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic loads and disturbing oscillations increase with higher speed of the machines and more lightweight constructions. Industrial safety standards require better oscillation reduction and noise control. The book by Dresig/Holzweissig deals with these topics. It presents the classical areas of modeling, dynamics of rigid bodies, balancing, torsional and bending vibrations, problems of vibration isolation and the dynamic behavior of complex vibrating systems. Typical dynamic effects, i.e., the gyroscopic effect, the damping of oscillations, resonances of k-th order, subharmonic and nonlinear f

  4. Structural Dynamics Laboratory (SDL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Structural dynamic testing is performed to verify the survivability of a component or assembly when exposed to vibration stress screening, or a controlled simulation...

  5. Symplectic algebraic dynamics algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Based on the algebraic dynamics solution of ordinary differential equations andintegration of  ,the symplectic algebraic dynamics algorithm sn is designed,which preserves the local symplectic geometric structure of a Hamiltonian systemand possesses the same precision of the na ve algebraic dynamics algorithm n.Computer experiments for the 4th order algorithms are made for five test modelsand the numerical results are compared with the conventional symplectic geometric algorithm,indicating that sn has higher precision,the algorithm-inducedphase shift of the conventional symplectic geometric algorithm can be reduced,and the dynamical fidelity can be improved by one order of magnitude.

  6. Nonlinear dynamics and complexity

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Albert; Fu, Xilin

    2014-01-01

    This important collection presents recent advances in nonlinear dynamics including analytical solutions, chaos in Hamiltonian systems, time-delay, uncertainty, and bio-network dynamics. Nonlinear Dynamics and Complexity equips readers to appreciate this increasingly main-stream approach to understanding complex phenomena in nonlinear systems as they are examined in a broad array of disciplines. The book facilitates a better understanding of the mechanisms and phenomena in nonlinear dynamics and develops the corresponding mathematical theory to apply nonlinear design to practical engineering.

  7. Essential dynamics and relativity

    CERN Document Server

    O'Donnell, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Essential Dynamics & Relativity provides students with an introduction to the core aspects of dynamics and special relativity. The author reiterates important ideas and terms throughout and covers concepts that are often missing from other textbooks at this level. He also places each topic within the wider constructs of the theory, without jumping from topic to topic to illustrate a point.The first section of the book focuses on dynamics, discussing the basic aspects of single particle motion and analyzing the motion of multi-particle systems. The book also explains the dynamical behavior of b

  8. Introduction to dynamic programming

    CERN Document Server

    Cooper, Leon; Rodin, E Y

    1981-01-01

    Introduction to Dynamic Programming provides information pertinent to the fundamental aspects of dynamic programming. This book considers problems that can be quantitatively formulated and deals with mathematical models of situations or phenomena that exists in the real world.Organized into 10 chapters, this book begins with an overview of the fundamental components of any mathematical optimization model. This text then presents the details of the application of dynamic programming to variational problems. Other chapters consider the application of dynamic programming to inventory theory, Mark

  9. Dynamic power flow controllers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divan, Deepakraj M.; Prasai, Anish

    2017-03-07

    Dynamic power flow controllers are provided. A dynamic power flow controller may comprise a transformer and a power converter. The power converter is subject to low voltage stresses and not floated at line voltage. In addition, the power converter is rated at a fraction of the total power controlled. A dynamic power flow controller controls both the real and the reactive power flow between two AC sources having the same frequency. A dynamic power flow controller inserts a voltage with controllable magnitude and phase between two AC sources; thereby effecting control of active and reactive power flows between two AC sources.

  10. Partial Dynamical Symmetry and Mixed Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Leviatan, A

    1996-01-01

    Partial dynamical symmetry describes a situation in which some eigenstates have a symmetry which the quantum Hamiltonian does not share. This property is shown to have a classical analogue in which some tori in phase space are associated with a symmetry which the classical Hamiltonian does not share. A local analysis in the vicinity of these special tori reveals a neighbourhood of phase space foliated by tori. This clarifies the suppression of classical chaos associated with partial dynamical symmetry. The results are used to divide the states of a mixed system into ``chaotic'' and ``regular'' classes.

  11. Dynamical Non-Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Ciccotti

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we discuss the Dynamical approach to Non-Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics (D-NEMD, which extends stationary NEMD to time-dependent situations, be they responses or relaxations. Based on the original Onsager regression hypothesis, implemented in the nineteen-seventies by Ciccotti, Jacucci and MacDonald, the approach permits one to separate the problem of dynamical evolution from the problem of sampling the initial condition. D-NEMD provides the theoretical framework to compute time-dependent macroscopic dynamical behaviors by averaging on a large sample of non-equilibrium trajectories starting from an ensemble of initial conditions generated from a suitable (equilibrium or non-equilibrium distribution at time zero. We also discuss how to generate a large class of initial distributions. The same approach applies also to the calculation of the rate constants of activated processes. The range of problems treatable by this method is illustrated by discussing applications to a few key hydrodynamic processes (the “classical” flow under shear, the formation of convective cells and the relaxation of an interface between two immiscible liquids.

  12. Dynamic normal forms and dynamic characteristic polynomial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Gudmund Skovbjerg; Sankowski, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    with relative error 2−b in additional O(nlog2nlogb) time. Furthermore, it can be used to dynamically maintain the singular value decomposition (SVD) of a generic matrix. Together with the algorithm, the hardness of the problem is studied. For the symmetric case, we present an Ω(n2) lower bound for rank...

  13. Bisimulation of Dynamical Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaft, Arjan van der

    2004-01-01

    A general notion of bisimulation is studied for dynamical systems. An algebraic characterization of bisimulation together with an algorithm for computing the maximal bisimulation relation is derived using geometric control theory. Bisimulation of dynamical systems is shown to be a concept which

  14. Dynamic Calorimetry for Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2007-01-01

    A student experiment on dynamic calorimetry is described. Dynamic calorimetry is a powerful technique for calorimetric studies, especially at high temperatures and pressures. A low-power incandescent lamp serves as the sample. The ScienceWorkshop data-acquisition system with DataStudio software from PASCO Scientific displays the results of the…

  15. Dynamic Latent Classification Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhong, Shengtong; Martínez, Ana M.; Nielsen, Thomas Dyhre

    as possible. Motivated by this problem setting, we propose a generative model for dynamic classification in continuous domains. At each time point the model can be seen as combining a naive Bayes model with a mixture of factor analyzers (FA). The latent variables of the FA are used to capture the dynamics...... in the process as well as modeling dependences between attributes....

  16. Space Manifold dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez, Gerard; Barrabés Vera, Esther

    2011-01-01

    The term Space Manifold Dynamics (SMD) has been proposed for encompassing the various applications of Dynamical Systems methods to spacecraft mission analysis and design, ranging from the exploitation of libration orbits around the collinear Lagrangian points to the design of optimal station-keeping and eclipse avoidance manoeuvres or the determination of low energy lunar and interplanetary transfers

  17. Team coordination dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Jamie C; Amazeen, Polemnia G; Cooke, Nancy J

    2010-07-01

    Team coordination consists of both the dynamics of team member interaction and the environmental dynamics to which a team is subjected. Focusing on dynamics, an approach is developed that contrasts with traditional aggregate-static concepts of team coordination as characterized by the shared mental model approach. A team coordination order parameter was developed to capture momentary fluctuations in coordination. Team coordination was observed in three-person uninhabited air vehicle teams across two experimental sessions. The dynamics of the order parameter were observed under changes of a team familiarity control parameter. Team members returned for the second session to either the same (Intact) or different (Mixed) team. 'Roadblock' perturbations, or novel changes in the task environment, were introduced in order to probe the stability of team coordination. Nonlinear dynamic methods revealed differences that a traditional approach did not: Intact and Mixed team coordination dynamics looked very different; Mixed teams were more stable than Intact teams and explored the space of solutions without the need for correction. Stability was positively correlated with the number of roadblock perturbations that were overcome successfully. The novel and non-intuitive contribution of a dynamical analysis was that Mixed teams, who did not have a long history working together, were more adaptive. Team coordination dynamics carries new implications for traditional problems such as training adaptive teams.

  18. Dynamic defense workshop :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crosby, Sean Michael; Doak, Justin E.; Haas, Jason Juedes.; Helinski, Ryan; Lamb, Christopher C.

    2013-02-01

    On September 5th and 6th, 2012, the Dynamic Defense Workshop: From Research to Practice brought together researchers from academia, industry, and Sandia with the goals of increasing collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories and external organizations, de ning and un- derstanding dynamic, or moving target, defense concepts and directions, and gaining a greater understanding of the state of the art for dynamic defense. Through the workshop, we broadened and re ned our de nition and understanding, identi ed new approaches to inherent challenges, and de ned principles of dynamic defense. Half of the workshop was devoted to presentations of current state-of-the-art work. Presentation topics included areas such as the failure of current defenses, threats, techniques, goals of dynamic defense, theory, foundations of dynamic defense, future directions and open research questions related to dynamic defense. The remainder of the workshop was discussion, which was broken down into sessions on de ning challenges, applications to host or mobile environments, applications to enterprise network environments, exploring research and operational taxonomies, and determining how to apply scienti c rigor to and investigating the eld of dynamic defense.

  19. Dynamical inverse problems

    CERN Document Server

    Gladwell, Graham ML

    2011-01-01

    The papers in this volume present an overview of the general aspects and practical applications of dynamic inverse methods, through the interaction of several topics, ranging from classical and advanced inverse problems in vibration, isospectral systems, dynamic methods for structural identification, active vibration control and damage detection, imaging shear stiffness in biological tissues, wave propagation, to computational and experimental aspects relevant for engineering problems.

  20. Transformations, Dynamics and Complexity

    CERN Document Server

    Glazunov, Nikolaj

    2011-01-01

    We review and investigate some new problems and results in the field of dynamical systems generated by iteration of maps, {\\beta}-transformations, partitions, group actions, bundle dynamical systems, Hasse-Kloosterman maps, and some aspects of complexity of the systems.

  1. EU Budgetary Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Citi, Manuele

    2013-01-01

    and change in the EU in light of the two models of policy dynamics currently existing in the literature: the incrementalist model and the punctuated equilibrium model. The analysis of long series of original data extracted from the EU budget shows that EU policies do not evolve following an incrementalist...... pattern, but by a punctuated equilibrium dynamic....

  2. Dynamic public service mediation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofman, W.; Staalduinen, M. van

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to dynamic public service mediation. It is based on a conceptual model and the use of search and ranking algorithms. The conceptual model is based on Abstract State Machine theory. Requirements for dynamic service mediation were derived from a real-world case. The con

  3. Probabilistic Dynamic Epistemic Logic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooi, B.P.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper I combine the dynamic epistemic logic of Gerbrandy (1999) with the probabilistic logic of Fagin and Halpern (1999). The result is a new probabilistic dynamic epistemic logic, a logic for reasoning about probability, information, and information change that takes higher order informatio

  4. Visualizing Dynamic Memory Allocations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreta, Sergio; Telea, Alexandru

    2007-01-01

    We present a visualization tool for dynamic memory allocation information obtained from instrumenting the runtime allocator used by C programs. The goal of the presented visualization techniques is to convey insight in the dynamic behavior of the allocator. The purpose is to help the allocator desig

  5. Dynamic covalent surfactants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minkenberg, C.B.

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis the development of surfactant aggregates with fast exchange dynamics between the aggregated and non-aggregated state is described. Dynamic surfactant exchange plays an important role in natural systems, for instance in cell signaling, cell division, and uptake and release of cargo. Re

  6. Applications of fluid dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Round, G.R.; Garg, V.K.

    1986-01-01

    This book describes flexible and practical approach to learning the basics of fluid dynamics. Each chapter is a self-contained work session and includes a fluid dynamics concept, an explanation of the principles involved, an illustration of their application and references on where more detailed discussions can be found.

  7. Dynamic Calorimetry for Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2007-01-01

    A student experiment on dynamic calorimetry is described. Dynamic calorimetry is a powerful technique for calorimetric studies, especially at high temperatures and pressures. A low-power incandescent lamp serves as the sample. The ScienceWorkshop data-acquisition system with DataStudio software from PASCO Scientific displays the results of the…

  8. Dynamic reservoir well interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sturm, W.L.; Belfroid, S.P.C.; Wolfswinkel, O. van; Peters, M.C.A.M.; Verhelst, F.J.P.C.M.

    2004-01-01

    In order to develop smart well control systems for unstable oil wells, realistic modeling of the dynamics of the well is essential. Most dynamic well models use a semi-steady state inflow model to describe the inflow of oil and gas from the reservoir. On the other hand, reservoir models use steady s

  9. Vehicle Dynamics and Control

    CERN Document Server

    Rajamani, Rajesh

    2012-01-01

    Vehicle Dynamics and Control provides a comprehensive coverage of vehicle control systems and the dynamic models used in the development of these control systems. The control system applications covered in the book include cruise control, adaptive cruise control, ABS, automated lane keeping, automated highway systems, yaw stability control, engine control, passive, active and semi-active suspensions, tire-road friction coefficient estimation, rollover prevention, and hybrid electric vehicle. In developing the dynamic model for each application, an effort is made to both keep the model simple enough for control system design but at the same time rich enough to capture the essential features of the dynamics. A special effort has been made to explain the several different tire models commonly used in literature and to interpret them physically. In the second edition of the book, chapters on roll dynamics, rollover prevention and hybrid electric vehicles have been added, and the chapter on electronic stability co...

  10. Nonlinear dynamics of structures

    CERN Document Server

    Oller, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    This book lays the foundation of knowledge that will allow a better understanding of nonlinear phenomena that occur in structural dynamics.   This work is intended for graduate engineering students who want to expand their knowledge on the dynamic behavior of structures, specifically in the nonlinear field, by presenting the basis of dynamic balance in non‐linear behavior structures due to the material and kinematics mechanical effects.   Particularly, this publication shows the solution of the equation of dynamic equilibrium for structure with nonlinear time‐independent materials (plasticity, damage and frequencies evolution), as well as those time dependent non‐linear behavior materials (viscoelasticity and viscoplasticity). The convergence conditions for the non‐linear dynamic structure solution  are studied, and the theoretical concepts and its programming algorithms are presented.  

  11. Financial market dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Fredrick; Johnson, M. D.

    2003-03-01

    A necessary precondition for modeling financial markets is a complete understanding of their statistics, including dynamics. Distributions derived from nonextensive Tsallis statistics are closely connected with dynamics described by a nonlinear Fokker-Planck equation. The combination shows promise in describing stochastic processes with power-law distributions and superdiffusive dynamics. We investigate intra-day price changes in the S& P500 stock index within this framework. We find that the power-law tails of the distributions, and the index's anomalously diffusing dynamics, are very accurately described by this approach. Our results show good agreement between market data and Fokker-Planck dynamics. This approach may be applicable in any anomalously diffusing system in which the correlations in time can be accounted for by an Ito-Langevin process with a simple time-dependent diffusion coefficient.

  12. Dynamic fracture mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, A. S.; Ramulu, M.

    1985-01-01

    Dynamic fracture and crack propagation concepts for ductile materials are reviewed. The equations for calculating dynamic stress integrity and the dynamic energy release rate in order to study dynamic crack propagation are provided. The stress intensity factor versus crack velocity relation is investigated. The uses of optical experimental techniques and finite element methods for fracture analyses are described. The fracture criteria for a rapidly propagating crack under mixed mode conditions are discussed; crack extension and fracture criteria under combined tension and shear loading are based on maximum circumferential stress or energy criteria such as strain energy density. The development and use of a Dugdale model and finite element models to represent crack and fracture dynamics are examined.

  13. Dynamics of aesthetic appreciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon, Claus-Christian

    2012-03-01

    Aesthetic appreciation is a complex cognitive processing with inherent aspects of cold as well as hot cognition. Research from the last decades of empirical has shown that evaluations of aesthetic appreciation are highly reliable. Most frequently, facial attractiveness was used as the corner case for investigating aesthetic appreciation. Evaluating facial attractiveness shows indeed high internal consistencies and impressively high inter-rater reliabilities, even across cultures. Although this indicates general and stable mechanisms underlying aesthetic appreciation, it is also obvious that our taste for specific objects changes dynamically. Aesthetic appreciation on artificial object categories, such as fashion, design or art is inherently very dynamic. Gaining insights into the cognitive mechanisms that trigger and enable corresponding changes of aesthetic appreciation is of particular interest for research as this will provide possibilities to modeling aesthetic appreciation for longer durations and from a dynamic perspective. The present paper refers to a recent two-step model ("the dynamical two-step-model of aesthetic appreciation"), dynamically adapting itself, which accounts for typical dynamics of aesthetic appreciation found in different research areas such as art history, philosophy and psychology. The first step assumes singular creative sources creating and establishing innovative material towards which, in a second step, people adapt by integrating it into their visual habits. This inherently leads to dynamic changes of the beholders' aesthetic appreciation.

  14. From Molecular Dynamics to Brownian Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Erban, Radek

    2014-01-01

    Three coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD) models are investigated with the aim of developing and analyzing multiscale methods which use MD simulations in parts of the computational domain and (less detailed) Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations in the remainder of the domain. The first MD model is formulated in one spatial dimension. It is based on elastic collisions of heavy molecules (e.g. proteins) with light point particles (e.g. water molecules). Two three-dimensional MD models are then investigated. The obtained results are applied to a simplified model of protein binding to receptors on the cellular membrane. It is shown that modern BD simulators of intracellular processes can be used in the bulk and accurately coupled with a (more detailed) MD model of protein binding which is used close to the membrane.

  15. Dynamic Recrystallization: The Dynamic Deformation Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murr, L. E.; Pizaña, C.

    2007-11-01

    Severe plastic deformation (PD), especially involving high strain rates (>103 s 1), occurs through solid-state flow, which is accommodated by dynamic recrystallization (DRX), either in a continuous or discontinuous mode. This flow can be localized in shear instability zones (or adiabatic shear bands (ASBs)) with dimensions smaller than 5 μ, or can include large volumes with flow zone dimensions exceeding centimeters. This article illustrates these microstructural features using optical and electron metallography to examine a host of dynamic deformation examples: shaped charge jet formation, high-velocity and hypervelocity impact crater formation, rod penetration into thick targets (which includes rod and target DRX flow and mixing), large projectile-induced target plug formation and failure, explosive welding, and friction-stir welding and processing. The DRX is shown to be a universal mechanism that accommodates solid-state flow in extreme (or severe) PD regimes.

  16. Fundamentals of gas dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Babu, V

    2014-01-01

    Fundamentals of Gas Dynamics, Second Edition isa comprehensively updated new edition and now includes a chapter on the gas dynamics of steam. It covers the fundamental concepts and governing equations of different flows, and includes end of chapter exercises based on the practical applications. A number of useful tables on the thermodynamic properties of steam are also included.Fundamentals of Gas Dynamics, Second Edition begins with an introduction to compressible and incompressible flows before covering the fundamentals of one dimensional flows and normal shock wav

  17. The dynamics of leadership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. A. Vos

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of leadership This article reflects on the need for dynamic leadership. An organisation'sfunctionality is dependent on the intellectual, emotional andphysical energy which the people involved in the organisation arewilling to contribute. The process of energy release is determined mainlyby two concepts: vision and mission. A vision is inextricably linked to astrategy. Leadership plays an essential part in the realisation of anorganisation's vision and mission. In this article different leadershipmodels are discussed. Autocratic leadership is critically analysed.Dynamic leadership, which encompasses inspirational and imaginativeleadership is discussed. The community of faith and society both have alife-long need for inspirational leadership.

  18. Shadowing in dynamical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Pilyugin, Sergei Yu

    1999-01-01

    This book is an introduction to the theory of shadowing of approximate trajectories in dynamical systems by exact ones. This is the first book completely devoted to the theory of shadowing. It shows the importance of shadowing theory for both the qualitative theory of dynamical systems and the theory of numerical methods. Shadowing Methods allow us to estimate differences between exact and approximate solutions on infinite time intervals and to understand the influence of error terms. The book is intended for specialists in dynamical systems, for researchers and graduate students in the theory of numerical methods.

  19. Stability of dynamical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Liao, Xiaoxin; Yu, P 0

    2007-01-01

    The main purpose of developing stability theory is to examine dynamic responses of a system to disturbances as the time approaches infinity. It has been and still is the object of intense investigations due to its intrinsic interest and its relevance to all practical systems in engineering, finance, natural science and social science. This monograph provides some state-of-the-art expositions of major advances in fundamental stability theories and methods for dynamic systems of ODE and DDE types and in limit cycle, normal form and Hopf bifurcation control of nonlinear dynamic systems.ʺ Presents

  20. Elements of analytical dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Kurth, Rudolph; Stark, M

    1976-01-01

    Elements of Analytical Dynamics deals with dynamics, which studies the relationship between motion of material bodies and the forces acting on them. This book is a compilation of lectures given by the author at the Georgia and Institute of Technology and formed a part of a course in Topological Dynamics. The book begins by discussing the notions of space and time and their basic properties. It then discusses the Hamilton-Jacobi theory and Hamilton's principle and first integrals. The text concludes with a discussion on Jacobi's geometric interpretation of conservative systems. This book will

  1. Real estate investment dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Gruber, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    This thesis is motivated by the steadily increasing interest in the dynamic relationship between the macro-economy and the real estate sector. One of the main issues in this respect is to study the investment dynamics. Since the bursting of the U.S. housing bubble in 2006 is identified as the point of origin of the so called subprime crises, which led to the collapse of the U.S. financial system, the dynamics of real estate investments is of particular interest. In the first part of my the...

  2. High enthalpy gas dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Rathakrishnan, Ethirajan

    2014-01-01

    This is an introductory level textbook which explains the elements of high temperature and high-speed gas dynamics. written in a clear and easy to follow style, the author covers all the latest developments in the field including basic thermodynamic principles, compressible flow regimes and waves propagation in one volume covers theoretical modeling of High Enthalpy Flows, with particular focus on problems in internal and external gas-dynamic flows, of interest in the fields of rockets propulsion and hypersonic aerodynamics High enthalpy gas dynamics is a compulsory course for aerospace engine

  3. Basic structural dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, James C

    2012-01-01

    A concise introduction to structural dynamics and earthquake engineering Basic Structural Dynamics serves as a fundamental introduction to the topic of structural dynamics. Covering single and multiple-degree-of-freedom systems while providing an introduction to earthquake engineering, the book keeps the coverage succinct and on topic at a level that is appropriate for undergraduate and graduate students. Through dozens of worked examples based on actual structures, it also introduces readers to MATLAB, a powerful software for solving both simple and complex structural d

  4. Recovery of dynamic interference

    CERN Document Server

    Baghery, Mehrdad; Rost, Jan M

    2016-01-01

    We develop general quantitative criteria for dynamic interference, a manifestation of double-slit interference in time which should be realizable with brilliant state-of-the-art high-frequency laser sources. Our analysis reveals that the observation of dynamic interference hinges upon maximizing the difference between the dynamic polarization of the initial bound and the final continuum state of the electron during the light pulse, while keeping depletion of the initial state small. Confirmed by numerical results, we predict that this is impossible for the hydrogen ground-state but feasible with excited states explicitly exemplified with the hydrogen 2p-state.

  5. Theoretical Fluid Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Shivamoggi, Bhimsen K

    1998-01-01

    "Although there are many texts and monographs on fluid dynamics, I do not know of any which is as comprehensive as the present book. It surveys nearly the entire field of classical fluid dynamics in an advanced, compact, and clear manner, and discusses the various conceptual and analytical models of fluid flow." - Foundations of Physics on the first edition. Theoretical Fluid Dynamics functions equally well as a graduate-level text and a professional reference. Steering a middle course between the empiricism of engineering and the abstractions of pure mathematics, the author focuses

  6. Discrete Dynamics Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuensche, Andrew

    DDLab is interactive graphics software for creating, visualizing, and analyzing many aspects of Cellular Automata, Random Boolean Networks, and Discrete Dynamical Networks in general and studying their behavior, both from the time-series perspective — space-time patterns, and from the state-space perspective — attractor basins. DDLab is relevant to research, applications, and education in the fields of complexity, self-organization, emergent phenomena, chaos, collision-based computing, neural networks, content addressable memory, genetic regulatory networks, dynamical encryption, generative art and music, and the study of the abstract mathematical/physical/dynamical phenomena in their own right.

  7. Thermofield dynamics and Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Nair, V P

    2015-01-01

    Thermofield dynamics is presented in terms of a path-integral using coherent states, equivalently, using a coadjoint orbit action. A field theoretic formulation in terms of fields on a manifold ${\\mathcal M} \\times {\\tilde{\\mathcal M}}$ where the two components have opposite orientation is also presented. We propose formulating gravitational dynamics for noncommutative geometry using thermofield dynamics, doubling the Hilbert space modeling the noncommutative space. We consider 2+1 dimensions in some detail and since ${\\mathcal M}$ and ${\\tilde{\\mathcal M}}$ have opposite orientation, the commutative limit leads to the Einstein-Hilbert action as the difference of two Chern-Simons actions.

  8. Dynamics of Tectonic Plates

    CERN Document Server

    Pechersky, E; Sadowski, G; Yambartsev, A

    2014-01-01

    We suggest a model that describes a mutual dynamic of tectonic plates. The dynamic is a sort of stick-slip one which is modeled by a Markov random process. The process defines a microlevel of the dynamic. A macrolevel is obtained by a scaling limit which leads to a system of integro-differential equations which determines a kind of mean field systems. Conditions when Gutenberg-Richter empirical law are presented on the mean field level. These conditions are rather universal and do not depend on features of resistant forces.

  9. Dynamics of Tectonic Plates

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    We suggest a model that describes a mutual dynamic of tectonic plates. The dynamic is a sort of stick-slip one which is modeled by a Markov random process. The process defines a microlevel of the dynamic. A macrolevel is obtained by a scaling limit which leads to a system of integro-differential equations which determines a kind of mean field systems. Conditions when Gutenberg-Richter empirical law are presented on the mean field level. These conditions are rather universal and do not depend ...

  10. Fluid dynamics transactions

    CERN Document Server

    Fiszdon, W

    1965-01-01

    Fluid Dynamics Transactions, Volume 2 compiles 46 papers on fluid dynamics, a subdiscipline of fluid mechanics that deals with fluid flow. The topics discussed in this book include developments in interference theory for aeronautical applications; diffusion from sources in a turbulent boundary layer; unsteady motion of a finite wing span in a compressible medium; and wall pressure covariance and comparison with experiment. The certain classes of non-stationary axially symmetric flows in magneto-gas-dynamics; description of the phenomenon of secondary flows in curved channels by means of co

  11. Process Fairness and Dynamic Consistency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.T. Trautmann (Stefan); P.P. Wakker (Peter)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractAbstract: When process fairness deviates from outcome fairness, dynamic inconsistencies can arise as in nonexpected utility. Resolute choice (Machina) can restore dynamic consistency under nonexpected utility without using Strotz's precommitment. It can similarly justify dynamically

  12. Chiral Gauge Dynamics and Dynamical Supersymmetry Breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poppitz, Erich; /Toronto U.; Unsal, Mithat; /SLAC /Stanford U.

    2009-05-07

    We study the dynamics of a chiral SU(2) gauge theory with a Weyl fermion in the I = 3/2 representation and of its supersymmetric generalization. In the former, we find a new and exotic mechanism of confinement, induced by topological excitations that we refer to as magnetic quintets. The supersymmetric version was examined earlier in the context of dynamical supersymmetry breaking by Intriligator, Seiberg, and Shenker, who showed that if this gauge theory confines at the origin of moduli space, one may break supersymmetry by adding a tree level superpotential. We examine the dynamics by deforming the theory on S{sup 1} x R{sup 3}, and show that the infrared behavior of this theory is an interacting CFT at small S{sup 1}. We argue that this continues to hold at large S{sup 1}, and if so, that supersymmetry must remain unbroken. Our methods also provide the microscopic origin of various superpotentials in SQCD on S{sup 1} x R{sup 3}--which were previously obtained by using symmetry and holomorphy--and resolve a long standing interpretational puzzle concerning a flux operator discovered by Affleck, Harvey, and Witten. It is generated by a topological excitation, a 'magnetic bion', whose stability is due to fermion pair exchange between its constituents. We also briefly comment on composite monopole operators as leading effects in two dimensional antiferromagnets.

  13. Assimilation Dynamic Network (ADN) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Assimilation Dynamic Network (ADN) is a dynamic inter-processor communication network that spans heterogeneous processor architectures, unifying components,...

  14. Dynamic Boolean Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossé, Michael J.; Adu-Gyamfi, Kwaku; Chandler, Kayla; Lynch-Davis, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic mathematical environments allow users to reify mathematical concepts through multiple representations, transform mathematical relations and organically explore mathematical properties, investigate integrated mathematics, and develop conceptual understanding. Herein, we integrate Boolean algebra, the functionalities of a dynamic…

  15. Dynamic plasmonic colour display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xiaoyang; Kamin, Simon; Liu, Na

    2017-02-01

    Plasmonic colour printing based on engineered metasurfaces has revolutionized colour display science due to its unprecedented subwavelength resolution and high-density optical data storage. However, advanced plasmonic displays with novel functionalities including dynamic multicolour printing, animations, and highly secure encryption have remained in their infancy. Here we demonstrate a dynamic plasmonic colour display technique that enables all the aforementioned functionalities using catalytic magnesium metasurfaces. Controlled hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of the constituent magnesium nanoparticles, which serve as dynamic pixels, allow for plasmonic colour printing, tuning, erasing and restoration of colour. Different dynamic pixels feature distinct colour transformation kinetics, enabling plasmonic animations. Through smart material processing, information encoded on selected pixels, which are indiscernible to both optical and scanning electron microscopies, can only be read out using hydrogen as a decoding key, suggesting a new generation of information encryption and anti-counterfeiting applications.

  16. Ansatz for dynamical hierarchies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, S.; Baas, N.A.; Mayer, B.

    2001-01-01

    Complex, robust functionalities can be generated naturally in at least two ways: by the assembly of structures and by the evolution of structures. This work is concerned with spontaneous formation of structures. We define the notion of dynamical hierarchies in natural systems and show...... the importance of this particular kind of organization for living systems. We then define a framework that enables us to formulate, investigate, and manipulate such dynamical hierarchies. This framework allows us to simultaneously investigate different levels of description together with them interrelationship...... three. Formulating this system as a simple two-dimensional molecular dynamics (MD) lattice gas allows us within one dynamical system to demonstrate the successive emergence of two higher levels (three levels all together) of robust structures with associated properties. Second, we demonstrate how...

  17. The Dynamics of Standardization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunsson, Nils; Rasche, Andreas; Seidl, David

    2012-01-01

    This paper suggests that when the phenomenon of standards and standardization is examined from the perspective of organization studies, three aspects stand out: the standardization of organizations, standardization by organizations and standardization as (a form of) organization. Following......, and show that, while standards and standardization are typically associated with stability and sameness, they are essentially a dynamic phenomenon. The paper highlights the contributions of this special issue to the topic of standards as a dynamic phenomenon in organization studies and makes suggestions...... a comprehensive overview of existing research in these three areas, we argue that the dynamic aspects of standardization are under-represented in the scholarly discourse. Furthermore, we identify the main types of tension associated with standardization and the dynamics they generate in each of those three areas...

  18. Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) is a continuous flow wind-tunnel facility capable of speeds up to Mach 1.2 at stagnation pressures up to one atmosphere. The TDT...

  19. Market Squid Population Dynamics

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains population dynamics data on paralarvae, juvenile and adult market squid collected off California and the US Pacific Northwest. These data were...

  20. Network-behavior dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenstra, René; Dijkstra, Jan; Steglich, Christian; Van Zalk, Maarten H. W.

    2013-01-01

    Researchers have become increasingly interested in disentangling selection and influence processes. This literature review provides context for the special issue on network-behavior dynamics. It brings together important conceptual, methodological, and empirical contributions focusing on longitudina

  1. Fractional Dynamical Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Edelman, Mark

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the author presents the results of the preliminary investigation of fractional dynamical systems based on the results of numerical simulations of fractional maps. Fractional maps are equivalent to fractional differential equations describing systems experiencing periodic kicks. Their properties depend on the value of two parameters: the non-linearity parameter, which arises from the corresponding regular dynamical systems; and the memory parameter which is the order of the fractional derivative in the corresponding non-linear fractional differential equations. The examples of the fractional Standard and Logistic maps demonstrate that phase space of non-linear fractional dynamical systems may contain periodic sinks, attracting slow diverging trajectories, attracting accelerator mode trajectories, chaotic attractors, and cascade of bifurcations type trajectories whose properties are different from properties of attractors in regular dynamical systems. The author argues that discovered properties s...

  2. Gun Dynamics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Gun Dynamics Laboratory is a research multi-task facility, which includes two firing bays, a high bay area and a second floor laboratory space. The high bay area...

  3. Discrete dynamical models

    CERN Document Server

    Salinelli, Ernesto

    2014-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to the analysis of discrete dynamical systems. The content is presented by an unitary approach that blends the perspective of mathematical modeling together with the ones of several discipline as Mathematical Analysis, Linear Algebra, Numerical Analysis, Systems Theory and Probability. After a preliminary discussion of several models, the main tools for the study of linear and non-linear scalar dynamical systems are presented, paying particular attention to the stability analysis. Linear difference equations are studied in detail and an elementary introduction of Z and Discrete Fourier Transform is presented. A whole chapter is devoted to the study of bifurcations and chaotic dynamics. One-step vector-valued dynamical systems are the subject of three chapters, where the reader can find the applications to positive systems, Markov chains, networks and search engines. The book is addressed mainly to students in Mathematics, Engineering, Physics, Chemistry, Biology and Economic...

  4. Invitation to dynamical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Scheinerman, Edward R

    2012-01-01

    This text is designed for those who wish to study mathematics beyond linear algebra but are unready for abstract material. Rather than a theorem-proof-corollary exposition, it stresses geometry, intuition, and dynamical systems. 1996 edition.

  5. Polymer Fluid Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, R. Byron

    1980-01-01

    Problems in polymer fluid dynamics are described, including development of constitutive equations, rheometry, kinetic theory, flow visualization, heat transfer studies, flows with phase change, two-phase flow, polymer unit operations, and drag reduction. (JN)

  6. Causal graph dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Arrighi, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    We generalize the theory of Cellular Automata to arbitrary, time-varying graphs. In other words we formalize, and prove theorems about, the intuitive idea of a labelled graph which evolves in time - but under the natural constraint that information can only ever be transmitted at a bounded speed, with respect to the distance given by the graph. The notion of translation-invariance is also generalized. The definition we provide for these `causal graph dynamics' is simple and axiomatic. The theorems we provide also show that it is robust. For instance, causal graph dynamics are stable under composition and under restriction to radius one. In the finite case some fundamental facts of Cellular Automata theory carry through: causal graph dynamics admit a characterization as continuous functions and they are stable under inversion. The provided examples suggest a wide range of applications of this mathematical object, from complex systems science to theoretical physics. Keywords: Dynamical networks, Boolean network...

  7. Discrete Wigner function dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klimov, A B; Munoz, C [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Guadalajara, Revolucion 1500, 44410, Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico)

    2005-12-01

    We study the evolution of the discrete Wigner function for prime and the power of prime dimensions using the discrete version of the star-product operation. Exact and semiclassical dynamics in the limit of large dimensions are considered.

  8. Advances in soil dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Advances in Soil Dynamics, Volume 3, represents the culmination of the work undertaken by the Advances in Soil Dynamics Monograph Committee, PM-45-01, about 15 years ago to summarize important developments in this field over the last 35 years. When this project was initiated, the main goal...... was to abridge major strides made in the general area of soil dynamics during the sixties, seventies, and eighties. However, by about the mid-nineties soil dynamics research in the US and much of the developed world had come to a virtual standstill. Although significant progress was made prior to the mid......-nineties, we still do not have a sound fundamental knowledge of soil-machine and soil-plant interactions. It is the hope of the editors that these three volumes will provide a ready reference for much needed future research in this area....

  9. Advances in soil dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Advances in Soil Dynamics, Volume 3, represents the culmination of the work undertaken by the Advances in Soil Dynamics Monograph Committee, PM-45-01, about 15 years ago to summarize important developments in this field over the last 35 years. When this project was initiated, the main goal...... was to abridge major strides made in the general area of soil dynamics during the sixties, seventies, and eighties. However, by about the mid-nineties soil dynamics research in the US and much of the developed world had come to a virtual standstill. Although significant progress was made prior to the mid......-nineties, we still do not have a sound fundamental knowledge of soil-machine and soil-plant interactions. It is the hope of the editors that these three volumes will provide a ready reference for much needed future research in this area....

  10. ON PERIODIC DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU WENLIAN; CHEN TIANPING

    2004-01-01

    The authors investigate the existence and the global stability of periodic solution for dynamical systems with periodic interconnections, inputs and self-inhibitions. The model is very general, the conditions are quite weak and the results obtained are universal.

  11. Stochastic dynamics and irreversibility

    CERN Document Server

    Tomé, Tânia

    2015-01-01

    This textbook presents an exposition of stochastic dynamics and irreversibility. It comprises the principles of probability theory and the stochastic dynamics in continuous spaces, described by Langevin and Fokker-Planck equations, and in discrete spaces, described by Markov chains and master equations. Special concern is given to the study of irreversibility, both in systems that evolve to equilibrium and in nonequilibrium stationary states. Attention is also given to the study of models displaying phase transitions and critical phenomema both in thermodynamic equilibrium and out of equilibrium. These models include the linear Glauber model, the Glauber-Ising model, lattice models with absorbing states such as the contact process and those used in population dynamic and spreading of epidemic, probabilistic cellular automata, reaction-diffusion processes, random sequential adsorption and dynamic percolation. A stochastic approach to chemical reaction is also presented.The textbook is intended for students of ...

  12. Supervision and group dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Søren; Jensen, Lars Peter

    2004-01-01

    as well as at Aalborg University. The first visible result has been participating supervisors telling us that the course has inspired them to try supervising group dynamics in the future. This paper will explore some aspects of supervising group dynamics as well as, how to develop the Aalborg model...... An important aspect of the problem based and project organized study at Aalborg University is the supervision of the project groups. At the basic education (first year) it is stated in the curriculum that part of the supervisors' job is to deal with group dynamics. This is due to the experience...... that many students are having difficulties with practical issues such as collaboration, communication, and project management. Most supervisors either ignore this demand, because they do not find it important or they find it frustrating, because they do not know, how to supervise group dynamics...

  13. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoover, W.G. (California Univ., Davis, CA (USA). Dept. of Applied Science Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA))

    1990-11-01

    The development of nonequilibrium molecular dynamics is described, with emphasis on massively-parallel simulations involving the motion of millions, soon to be billions, of atoms. Corresponding continuum simulations are also discussed. 14 refs., 8 figs.

  14. Dynamic Stage Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Florian von Hofen[GER

    2013-01-01

    Concepts and methods for dynamic stage designs were introduced ranging from different ifelds of TV live shows, exhibitions and theatre performances, and a special emphasis was put on solution to the theatre stage design.

  15. Dynamic performance management system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    An integrated, efficient and effective performance management system, "dynamic performance management system", is presented, which covers the entire performance management process including measures design, analysis, and dynamic update. The analysis of performance measures using causal loop diagrams, qualitative inference and analytic network process is mainly discussed. A real world case study is carried out throughout the paper to explain how the framework works. A software tool for DPMS, Performance Analyzer, is also introduced.

  16. Photochemical reaction dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, B.C. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of the program is to develop a fundamental understanding of unimolecular and bimolecular reaction dynamics with application in combustion and energy systems. The energy dependence in ketene isomerization, ketene dissociation dynamics, and carbonyl substitution on organometallic rhodium complexes in liquid xenon have been studied. Future studies concerning unimolecular processes in ketene as well as energy transfer and kinetic studies of methylene radicals are discussed.

  17. Dynamics in artifact ecologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Klokmose, Clemens Nylandsted

    2012-01-01

    We increasingly interact with multiple interactive artifacts with overlapping capabilities during our daily activities. It has previously been shown that the use of an interactive artifact cannot be understood in isolation, but artifacts must be understood as part of an artifact ecology, where ar...... in artifact ecologies cannot be understood as static, instead they evolve dynamically over time. We provide activity theory-based concepts to explain these dynamics....

  18. Dynamics of curved fronts

    CERN Document Server

    Pelce, Pierre

    1989-01-01

    In recent years, much progress has been made in the understanding of interface dynamics of various systems: hydrodynamics, crystal growth, chemical reactions, and combustion. Dynamics of Curved Fronts is an important contribution to this field and will be an indispensable reference work for researchers and graduate students in physics, applied mathematics, and chemical engineering. The book consist of a 100 page introduction by the editor and 33 seminal articles from various disciplines.

  19. Dynamics of Soft Matter

    CERN Document Server

    García Sakai, Victoria; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2012-01-01

    Dynamics of Soft Matter: Neutron Applications provides an overview of neutron scattering techniques that measure temporal and spatial correlations simultaneously, at the microscopic and/or mesoscopic scale. These techniques offer answers to new questions arising at the interface of physics, chemistry, and biology. Knowledge of the dynamics at these levels is crucial to understanding the soft matter field, which includes colloids, polymers, membranes, biological macromolecules, foams, emulsions towards biological & biomimetic systems, and phenomena involving wetting, friction, adhesion, or micr

  20. Dynamically Generated $\\Xi (1690)$

    CERN Document Server

    Sekihara, Takayasu

    2016-01-01

    We show that the $\\Xi (1690)$ resonance can be dynamically generated in the $s$-wave $\\bar{K} \\Sigma$-$\\bar{K} \\Lambda$-$\\pi \\Xi$-$\\eta \\Xi$ coupled-channels chiral unitary approach. In our model, the $\\Xi (1690)$ resonance appears near the $\\bar{K} \\Sigma$ threshold as a $\\bar{K} \\Sigma$ molecular state and the experimental data are reproduced well. We discuss properties of the dynamically generated $\\Xi (1690)$.

  1. Nonuniversality in level dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Kunstman, P; Zakrzewski, J A; Kunstman, Pawe{\\l}; Zyczkowski, Karol \\.; Zakrzewski, Jakub

    1997-01-01

    Statistical properties of parametric motion in ensembles of Hermitian banded random matrices are studied. We analyze the distribution of level velocities and level curvatures as well as their correlation functions in the crossover regime between three universality classes. It is shown that the statistical properties of level dynamics are in general non-universal and strongly depend on the way in which the parametric dynamics is introduced.

  2. Nonuniversality in level dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunstman, P.; Zyczkowski, K.; Zakrzewski, J. [Instytut Fizyki Mariana Smoluchowskiego, Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, ulica Reymonta 4, 30-059 Krakow (Poland)

    1997-03-01

    Statistical properties of parametric motion in ensembles of Hermitian banded random matrices are studied. We analyze the distribution of level velocities and level curvatures as well as their correlation functions in the crossover regime between three universality classes. It is shown that the statistical properties of level dynamics are in general {ital nonuniversal} and strongly depend on the way in which the parametric dynamics is introduced. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. Ocean Dynamics: Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Ocean Dynamics: Dynamo Robert Pinkel Marine Physical...execution of the Dynamo Leg IV Experiment in December 2011. Our objective was to document the development of the diurnal surface layer and its...2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ocean Dynamics: Dynamo 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  4. Chaotic dynamics with Maxima

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    We present an introduction to the study of chaos in discrete and continuous dynamical systems using the CAS Maxima. These notes are intended to cover the standard topics and techniques: discrete and continuous logistic equation to model growth population, staircase plots, bifurcation diagrams and chaos transition, nonlinear continuous dynamics (Lorentz system and Duffing oscillator), Lyapunov exponents, Poincar\\'e sections, fractal dimension and strange attractors. The distinctive feature her...

  5. Ocean Dynamics: Vietnam DRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    Dynamics: Vietnam DRI Robert Pinkel Marine Physical Laboratory Scripps Institution of Oceanography La Jolla California 92093-0213 Phone: (858) 534...DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ocean Dynamics: Vietnam DRI 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...cycle.. The Thorpe-scale estimates are local to Site III. South China Sea Process Cruise 2014 Under Vietnam DRI funding, Researcher Drew Lucas

  6. Dynamical quantum teleportation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muschik, Christine [ICFO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques (Spain); Polzik, Eugene [Niels Bohr Institute (Denmark); Cirac, Ignacio [Max-Planck-Institute (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    We introduce two protocols for inducing non-local dynamics between two separate parties. The first scheme allows for the engineering of an interaction between the two remote systems, while the second protocol induces a dynamics in one of the parties, which is controlled by the other one. Both schemes apply to continuous variable systems, run continuously in time and are based on instantaneous feedback.

  7. Assimilating seizure dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanim Ullah

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Observability of a dynamical system requires an understanding of its state-the collective values of its variables. However, existing techniques are too limited to measure all but a small fraction of the physical variables and parameters of neuronal networks. We constructed models of the biophysical properties of neuronal membrane, synaptic, and microenvironment dynamics, and incorporated them into a model-based predictor-controller framework from modern control theory. We demonstrate that it is now possible to meaningfully estimate the dynamics of small neuronal networks using as few as a single measured variable. Specifically, we assimilate noisy membrane potential measurements from individual hippocampal neurons to reconstruct the dynamics of networks of these cells, their extracellular microenvironment, and the activities of different neuronal types during seizures. We use reconstruction to account for unmeasured parts of the neuronal system, relating micro-domain metabolic processes to cellular excitability, and validate the reconstruction of cellular dynamical interactions against actual measurements. Data assimilation, the fusing of measurement with computational models, has significant potential to improve the way we observe and understand brain dynamics.

  8. Dynamic hardness of metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xuecheng

    Dynamic hardness (Pd) of 22 different pure metals and alloys having a wide range of elastic modulus, static hardness, and crystal structure were measured in a gas pulse system. The indentation contact diameter with an indenting sphere and the radius (r2) of curvature of the indentation were determined by the curve fitting of the indentation profile data. r 2 measured by the profilometer was compared with that calculated from Hertz equation in both dynamic and static conditions. The results indicated that the curvature change due to elastic recovery after unloading is approximately proportional to the parameters predicted by Hertz equation. However, r 2 is less than the radius of indenting sphere in many cases which is contradictory to Hertz analysis. This discrepancy is believed due to the difference between Hertzian and actual stress distributions underneath the indentation. Factors which influence indentation elastic recovery were also discussed. It was found that Tabor dynamic hardness formula always gives a lower value than that directly from dynamic hardness definition DeltaE/V because of errors mainly from Tabor's rebound equation and the assumption that dynamic hardness at the beginning of rebound process (Pr) is equal to kinetic energy change of an impact sphere over the formed crater volume (Pd) in the derivation process for Tabor's dynamic hardness formula. Experimental results also suggested that dynamic to static hardness ratio of a material is primarily determined by its crystal structure and static hardness. The effects of strain rate and temperature rise on this ratio were discussed. A vacuum rotating arm apparatus was built to measure Pd at 70, 127, and 381 mum sphere sizes, these results exhibited that Pd is highly depended on the sphere size due to the strain rate effects. P d was also used to substitute for static hardness to correlate with abrasion and erosion resistance of metals and alloys. The particle size effects observed in erosion were

  9. A HYBRID DYNAMIC PROGRAM SLICING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Tong; Wu Fangjun

    2005-01-01

    This letter proposes a hybrid method for computing dynamic program slicing. The key element is to construct a Coverage-Testing-based Dynamic Dependence Graph (CTDDG),which makes use of both dynamic and static information to get execution status. The approach overcomes the limitations of previous dynamic slicing methods, which have to redo slicing if slice criterion changes.

  10. Dynamics in Epistasis Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awdeh, Aseel; Phenix, Hilary; Kaern, Mads; Perkins, Theodore

    2017-01-16

    Finding regulatory relationships between genes, including the direction and nature of influence between them, is a fundamental challenge in the field of molecular genetics. One classical approach to this problem is epistasis analysis. Broadly speaking, epistasis analysis infers the regulatory relationships between a pair of genes in a genetic pathway by considering the patterns of change in an observable trait resulting from single and double deletion of genes. While classical epistasis analysis has yielded deep insights on numerous genetic pathways, it is not without limitations. Here, we explore the possibility of dynamic epistasis analysis, in which, in addition to performing genetic perturbations of a pathway, we drive the pathway by a time-varying upstream signal. We explore the theoretical power of dynamical epistasis analysis by conducting an identifiability analysis of Boolean models of genetic pathways, comparing static and dynamic approaches. We find that even relatively simple input dynamics greatly increases the power of epistasis analysis to discriminate alternative network structures. Further, we explore the question of experiment design, and show that a subset of short time-varying signals, which we call dynamic primitives, allow maximum discriminative power with a reduced number of experiments.

  11. Astrophysical fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvie, Gordon I.

    2016-06-01

    > These lecture notes and example problems are based on a course given at the University of Cambridge in Part III of the Mathematical Tripos. Fluid dynamics is involved in a very wide range of astrophysical phenomena, such as the formation and internal dynamics of stars and giant planets, the workings of jets and accretion discs around stars and black holes and the dynamics of the expanding Universe. Effects that can be important in astrophysical fluids include compressibility, self-gravitation and the dynamical influence of the magnetic field that is `frozen in' to a highly conducting plasma. The basic models introduced and applied in this course are Newtonian gas dynamics and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) for an ideal compressible fluid. The mathematical structure of the governing equations and the associated conservation laws are explored in some detail because of their importance for both analytical and numerical methods of solution, as well as for physical interpretation. Linear and nonlinear waves, including shocks and other discontinuities, are discussed. The spherical blast wave resulting from a supernova, and involving a strong shock, is a classic problem that can be solved analytically. Steady solutions with spherical or axial symmetry reveal the physics of winds and jets from stars and discs. The linearized equations determine the oscillation modes of astrophysical bodies, as well as their stability and their response to tidal forcing.

  12. Semipredictable dynamical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Morales, Vladimir

    2016-10-01

    A new class of deterministic dynamical systems, termed semipredictable dynamical systems, is presented. The spatiotemporal evolution of these systems have both predictable and unpredictable traits, as found in natural complex systems. We prove a general result: The dynamics of any deterministic nonlinear cellular automaton (CA) with p possible dynamical states can be decomposed at each instant of time in a superposition of N layers involving p0, p1, …, pN - 1 dynamical states each, where the pk ∈ N , k ∈ [ 0 , N - 1 ] are divisors of p. If the divisors coincide with the prime factors of p this decomposition is unique. Conversely, we also prove that N CA working on symbols p0, p1, …, pN - 1 can be composed to create a graded CA rule with N different layers. We then show that, even when the full spatiotemporal evolution can be unpredictable, certain traits (layers) can exactly be predicted. We present explicit examples of such systems involving compositions of Wolfram's 256 elementary CA and a more complex CA rule acting on a neighborhood of two sites and 12 symbols and whose rule table corresponds to the smallest Moufang loop M12(S3, 2).

  13. Modeling dynamic swarms

    KAUST Repository

    Ghanem, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes the problem of modeling video sequences of dynamic swarms (DSs). We define a DS as a large layout of stochastically repetitive spatial configurations of dynamic objects (swarm elements) whose motions exhibit local spatiotemporal interdependency and stationarity, i.e., the motions are similar in any small spatiotemporal neighborhood. Examples of DS abound in nature, e.g., herds of animals and flocks of birds. To capture the local spatiotemporal properties of the DS, we present a probabilistic model that learns both the spatial layout of swarm elements (based on low-level image segmentation) and their joint dynamics that are modeled as linear transformations. To this end, a spatiotemporal neighborhood is associated with each swarm element, in which local stationarity is enforced both spatially and temporally. We assume that the prior on the swarm dynamics is distributed according to an MRF in both space and time. Embedding this model in a MAP framework, we iterate between learning the spatial layout of the swarm and its dynamics. We learn the swarm transformations using ICM, which iterates between estimating these transformations and updating their distribution in the spatiotemporal neighborhoods. We demonstrate the validity of our method by conducting experiments on real and synthetic video sequences. Real sequences of birds, geese, robot swarms, and pedestrians evaluate the applicability of our model to real world data. © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Dynamic stiffness of suction caissons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Liingaard, Morten; Andersen, Lars

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate the dynamic soil-structure interaction of suction caissons for offshore wind turbines. The investigation is limited to a determination of the vertical dynamic stiffness of suction caissons. The soil surrounding the foundation is homogenous with linear...... of the skirt length, Poisson's ratio and the ratio between soil stiffness and skirt stiffness. Finally the dynamic behaviour at high frequencies is investigated....... viscoelastic properties. The dynamic stiffness of the suction caisson is expressed by dimensionless frequency-dependent dynamic stiffness coefficients corresponding to the vertical degree of freedom. The dynamic stiffness coefficients for the foundations are evaluated by means of a dynamic three...

  15. System dynamics with interaction discontinuity

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Albert C J

    2015-01-01

    This book describes system dynamics with discontinuity caused by system interactions and presents the theory of flow singularity and switchability at the boundary in discontinuous dynamical systems. Based on such a theory, the authors address dynamics and motion mechanism of engineering discontinuous systems due to interaction. Stability and bifurcations of fixed points in nonlinear discrete dynamical systems are presented, and mapping dynamics are developed for analytical predictions of periodic motions in engineering discontinuous dynamical systems. Ultimately, the book provides an alternative way to discuss the periodic and chaotic behaviors in discontinuous dynamical systems.

  16. Vehicle dynamics theory and application

    CERN Document Server

    Jazar, Reza N

    2017-01-01

    This intermediate textbook is appropriate for students in vehicle dynamics courses, in their last year of undergraduate study or their first year of graduate study. It is also appropriate for mechanical engineers, automotive engineers, and researchers in the area of vehicle dynamics for continuing education or as a reference. It addresses fundamental and advanced topics, and a basic knowledge of kinematics and dynamics, as well as numerical methods, is expected. The contents are kept at a theoretical-practical level, with a strong emphasis on application. This third edition has been reduced by 25%, to allow for coverage over one semester, as opposed to the previous edition that needed two semesters for coverage. The textbook is composed of four parts: Vehicle Motion: covers tire dynamics, forward vehicle dynamics, and driveline dynamics Vehicle Kinematics: covers applied kinematics, applied mechanisms, steering dynamics, and suspension mechanisms Vehicle Dynamics: covers applied dynamics, vehicle planar dynam...

  17. Conference on Multibody Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Multibody Dynamics : Computational Methods and Applications

    2014-01-01

    By having its origin in analytical and continuum mechanics, as well as in computer science and applied mathematics, multibody dynamics provides a basis for analysis and virtual prototyping of innovative applications in many fields of contemporary engineering. With the utilization of computational models and algorithms that classically belonged to different fields of applied science, multibody dynamics delivers reliable simulation platforms for diverse highly-developed industrial products such as vehicle and railway systems, aeronautical and space vehicles, robotic manipulators, smart structures, biomechanical applications and nano-technologies. The chapters of this volume are based on the revised and extended versions of the selected scientific papers from amongst 255 original contributions that have been accepted to be presented within the program of the distinguished international ECCOMAS conference. It reflects state-of-the-art in the advances of multibody dynamics, providing excellent insight in the recen...

  18. Fractional Dynamics and Control

    CERN Document Server

    Machado, José; Luo, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Fractional Dynamics and Control provides a comprehensive overview of recent advances in the areas of nonlinear dynamics, vibration and control with analytical, numerical, and experimental results. This book provides an overview of recent discoveries in fractional control, delves into fractional variational principles and differential equations, and applies advanced techniques in fractional calculus to solving complicated mathematical and physical problems.Finally, this book also discusses the role that fractional order modeling can play in complex systems for engineering and science. Discusses how fractional dynamics and control can be used to solve nonlinear science and complexity issues Shows how fractional differential equations and models can be used to solve turbulence and wave equations in mechanics and gravity theories and Schrodinger’s equation  Presents factional relaxation modeling of dielectric materials and wave equations for dielectrics  Develops new methods for control and synchronization of...

  19. Complex dynamics in nanosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Xuan; Ying, Lei; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Do, Younghae; Grebogi, Celso

    2013-05-01

    Complex dynamics associated with multistability have been studied extensively in the past but mostly for low-dimensional nonlinear dynamical systems. A question of fundamental interest is whether multistability can arise in high-dimensional physical systems. Motivated by the ever increasing widespread use of nanoscale systems, we investigate a prototypical class of nanoelectromechanical systems: electrostatically driven Si nanowires, mathematically described by a set of driven, nonlinear partial differential equations. We develop a computationally efficient algorithm to solve the equations. Our finding is that multistability and complicated structures of basins of attraction are common types of dynamics, and the latter can be attributed to extensive transient chaos. Implications of these phenomena to device operations are discussed.

  20. Dynamical laser spike processing

    CERN Document Server

    Shastri, Bhavin J; Tait, Alexander N; Rodriguez, Alejandro W; Wu, Ben; Prucnal, Paul R

    2015-01-01

    Novel materials and devices in photonics have the potential to revolutionize optical information processing, beyond conventional binary-logic approaches. Laser systems offer a rich repertoire of useful dynamical behaviors, including the excitable dynamics also found in the time-resolved "spiking" of neurons. Spiking reconciles the expressiveness and efficiency of analog processing with the robustness and scalability of digital processing. We demonstrate that graphene-coupled laser systems offer a unified low-level spike optical processing paradigm that goes well beyond previously studied laser dynamics. We show that this platform can simultaneously exhibit logic-level restoration, cascadability and input-output isolation---fundamental challenges in optical information processing. We also implement low-level spike-processing tasks that are critical for higher level processing: temporal pattern detection and stable recurrent memory. We study these properties in the context of a fiber laser system, but the addit...

  1. Dynamics of Paroxysmal Tachycardia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Leon

    2004-03-01

    Parosxysmal tachycardia refers to abnormally fast cardiac arrhythmias that suddenly start and stop. Paroxysmal tachycardias can occur in many regions of the heart and may be associated with many different mechanisms. In order to study paroxysmal tachycardias, we have analyzed tissue cultures of cells from embryonic chick heart that are imaged using calcium and voltage sensitive dyes. This model system displays a number of different types of dynamics including dynamics originating from pacemakers, triggered dynamics in which an excitation leads to the initiation of a sequence of waves originating from a single source, and spontaneously iniitiating and terminating rotating spiral waves. Theoretical models that include heterogeneity, spontaneous pacemaker activity, and fatigue or reduced excitability arising as a consequence of rapid excitation can be used to account for these behaviors.

  2. Dynamics of aerospace vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, David K.

    1991-01-01

    The focus of this research was to address the modeling, including model reduction, of flexible aerospace vehicles, with special emphasis on models used in dynamic analysis and/or guidance and control system design. In the modeling, it is critical that the key aspects of the system being modeled be captured in the model. In this work, therefore, aspects of the vehicle dynamics critical to control design were important. In this regard, fundamental contributions were made in the areas of stability robustness analysis techniques, model reduction techniques, and literal approximations for key dynamic characteristics of flexible vehicles. All these areas are related. In the development of a model, approximations are always involved, so control systems designed using these models must be robust against uncertainties in these models.

  3. Dynamic Data Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsakalidis, Konstantinos

    We study dynamic data structures for different variants of orthogonal range reporting query problems. In particular, we consider (1) the planar orthogonal 3-sided range reporting problem: given a set of points in the plane, report the points that lie within a given 3-sided rectangle with one....... Dynamic problems like the above arise in various applications of network optimization, VLSI layout design, computer graphics and distributed computing. For the first problem, we present dynamic data structures for internal and external memory that support planar orthogonal 3-sided range reporting queries......, and insertions and deletions of points efficiently over an average case sequence of update operations. The external memory data structures find applications in constraint and temporal databases. In particular, we assume that the coordinates of the points are drawn from different probabilistic distributions...

  4. Safe Dynamic Multiple Inheritance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Erik

    2002-01-01

    Multiple inheritance and similar mechanisms are usually only supported at compile time in statically typed languages. Nevertheless, dynamic multiple inheritance would be very useful in the development of complex systems, because it allows the creation of many related classes without an explosion...... in the size and level of redundancy in the source code. In fact, dynamic multiple inheritance is already available. The language gbeta is statically typed and has supported run-time combination of classes and methods since 1997, by means of the combination operator '&'. However, with certain combinations...... of operands the '&' operator fails; as a result, dynamic creation of new classes and methods was considered a dangerous operation in all cases. This paper presents a large and useful category of combinations, and proves that combinations in this category will always succeed....

  5. Introduction to dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Pfeiffer, Friedrich

    2015-01-01

    This concise textbook for students preferably of a postgraduate level, but also for engineers in practice, contains the basic kinematical and kinetic structures of dynamics together with carefully selected applications. The book is a condensed introduction to the fundamental laws of kinematics and kinetics, on the most important principles of mechanics and presents the equations of motion in the form of Lagrange and Newton-Euler. Selected problems of linear and nonlinear dynamics are treated, as well as problems of vibration formation. The presented selection of topics gives a useful basis for stepping into more advanced problems of dynamics. The contents of this book represent the result of a regularly revised course, which has been and still is given for masters students at the Technische Universität München. .

  6. Flight Dynamics Laboratory overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandford, Thaddeus

    1986-01-01

    The Flight Dynamics Laboratory (FDL) is one of four Air Force Wright Aeronautical Laboratories (AFWAL) and part of the Aeronautical Systems Division located at Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio. The FDL is responsible for the planning and execution of research and development programs in the areas of structures and dynamics, flight controls, vehicle equipment/subsystems, and aeromechanics. Some of the areas being researched in the four FDL divisions are as follows: large space structures (LSS) materials and controls; advanced cockpit designs; bird-strike-tolerant windshields; and hypersonic interceptor system studies. Two of the FDL divisions are actively involved in programs that deal directly with LSS control/structures interaction: the Flight Controls Division and the Structures and Dynamics Division.

  7. Dynamics of Immobilized Flagella

    CERN Document Server

    Fry, D; Ludu, A

    2003-01-01

    Although the auger-like 'swimming' motility of the African trypanosome was described upon its discovery over one hundred years ago, the precise biomechanical and biophysical properties of trypanosome flagellar motion has not been elucidated. In this study, we describe five different modes of flagellar beat/wave patterns in African trypanosomes by microscopically examining the flagellar movements of chemically tethered cells. The dynamic nature of the different beat/wave patterns suggests that flagellar motion in Trypanosoma brucei is a complex mixture of oscillating waves, rigid bends, helical twists and non-linear waves. Interestingly, we have observed soliton-like depression waves along the flagellar membrane, suggesting a nonlinear mechanism for the dynamics of this system. The physical model is inspired by the 2-dimensional elastic dynamics of a beam, and by taking into account uniform distribution of molecular motors torque and nonlinear terms in the curvature.

  8. Dynamics in geometrical confinement

    CERN Document Server

    Kremer, Friedrich

    2014-01-01

    This book describes the dynamics of low molecular weight and polymeric molecules when they are constrained under conditions of geometrical confinement. It covers geometrical confinement in different dimensionalities: (i) in nanometer thin layers or self supporting films (1-dimensional confinement) (ii) in pores or tubes with nanometric diameters (2-dimensional confinement) (iii) as micelles embedded in matrices (3-dimensional) or as nanodroplets.The dynamics under such conditions have been a much discussed and central topic in the focus of intense worldwide research activities within the last two decades. The present book discusses how the resulting molecular mobility is influenced by the subtle counterbalance between surface effects (typically slowing down molecular dynamics through attractive guest/host interactions) and confinement effects (typically increasing the mobility). It also explains how these influences can be modified and tuned, e.g. through appropriate surface coatings, film thicknesses or pore...

  9. Dynamic Data Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsakalidis, Konstantinos

    We study dynamic data structures for different variants of orthogonal range reporting query problems. In particular, we consider (1) the planar orthogonal 3-sided range reporting problem: given a set of points in the plane, report the points that lie within a given 3-sided rectangle with one....... Dynamic problems like the above arise in various applications of network optimization, VLSI layout design, computer graphics and distributed computing. For the first problem, we present dynamic data structures for internal and external memory that support planar orthogonal 3-sided range reporting queries...... unbounded side, (2) the planar orthogonal range maxima reporting problem: given a set of points in the plane, report the points that lie within a given orthogonal range and are not dominated by any other point in the range, and (3) the problem of designing fully persistent B-trees for external memory...

  10. Fundamental composite electroweak dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arbey, Alexandre; Cacciapaglia, Giacomo; Cai, Haiying

    2017-01-01

    Using the recent joint results from the ATLAS and CMS collaborations on the Higgs boson, we determine the current status of composite electroweak dynamics models based on the expected scalar sector. Our analysis can be used as a minimal template for a wider class of models between the two limiting...... cases of composite Goldstone Higgs and Technicolor-like ones. This is possible due to the existence of a unified description, both at the effective and fundamental Lagrangian levels, of models of composite Higgs dynamics where the Higgs boson itself can emerge, depending on the way the electroweak...... space at the effective Lagrangian level. We show that a wide class of models of fundamental composite electroweak dynamics are still compatible with the present constraints. The results are relevant for the ongoing and future searches at the Large Hadron Collider....

  11. Effect of Conductor Verbalization, Dynamic Markings, Conductor Gesture, and Choir Dynamic Level on Singers' Dynamic Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skadsem, Julie A.

    1997-01-01

    Examines the effects of conductor verbalization, dynamic markings, conductor gesture, and choir dynamic level on individual singers' dynamic responses. Indicates that verbal instructions from the conductor elicited significantly stronger dynamic performance responses than did the other instructional conditions. Suggests that additional research…

  12. Principles of dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, Rodney

    2013-01-01

    Principles of Dynamics presents classical dynamics primarily as an exemplar of scientific theory and method. This book is divided into three major parts concerned with gravitational theory of planetary systems; general principles of the foundations of mechanics; and general motion of a rigid body. Some of the specific topics covered are Keplerian Laws of Planetary Motion; gravitational potential and potential energy; and fields of axisymmetric bodies. The principles of work and energy, fictitious body-forces, and inertial mass are also looked into. Other specific topics examined are kinematics

  13. Dynamics of structures

    CERN Document Server

    Paultre, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    This book covers structural dynamics from a theoretical and algorithmic approach. It covers systems with both single and multiple degrees-of-freedom. Numerous case studies are given to provide the reader with a deeper insight into the practicalities of the area, and the solutions to these case studies are given in terms of real-time and frequency in both geometric and modal spaces. Emphasis is also given to the subject of seismic loading. The text is based on many lectures on the subject of structural dynamics given at numerous institutions and thus will be an accessible and practical aid to

  14. Computational fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Blazek, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics: Principles and Applications, Third Edition presents students, engineers, and scientists with all they need to gain a solid understanding of the numerical methods and principles underlying modern computation techniques in fluid dynamics. By providing complete coverage of the essential knowledge required in order to write codes or understand commercial codes, the book gives the reader an overview of fundamentals and solution strategies in the early chapters before moving on to cover the details of different solution techniques. This updated edition includes new

  15. Partial Dynamical Symmetries

    CERN Document Server

    Leviatan, A

    2010-01-01

    This overview focuses on the notion of partial dynamical symmetry (PDS), for which a prescribed symmetry is obeyed by a subset of solvable eigenstates, but is not shared by the Hamiltonian. General algorithms are presented to identify interactions, of a given order, with such intermediate-symmetry structure. Explicit bosonic and fermionic Hamiltonians with PDS are constructed in the framework of models based on spectrum generating algebras. PDSs of various types are shown to be relevant to nuclear spectroscopy, quantum phase transitions and systems with mixed chaotic and regular dynamics.

  16. Statistics of football dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Mendes, R S; Anteneodo, C

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of football matches. Our goal is to characterize statistically the temporal sequence of ball movements in this collective sport game, searching for traits of complex behavior. Data were collected over a variety of matches in South American, European and World championships throughout 2005 and 2006. We show that the statistics of ball touches presents power-law tails and can be described by $q$-gamma distributions. To explain such behavior we propose a model that provides information on the characteristics of football dynamics. Furthermore, we discuss the statistics of duration of out-of-play intervals, not directly related to the previous scenario.

  17. Gas Dynamics Equations: Computation

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Gui-Qiang G

    2012-01-01

    Shock waves, vorticity waves, and entropy waves are fundamental discontinuity waves in nature and arise in supersonic or transonic gas flow, or from a very sudden release (explosion) of chemical, nuclear, electrical, radiation, or mechanical energy in a limited space. Tracking these discontinuities and their interactions, especially when and where new waves arise and interact in the motion of gases, is one of the main motivations for numerical computation for the gas dynamics equations. In this paper, we discuss some historic and recent developments, as well as mathematical challenges, in designing and formulating efficient numerical methods and algorithms to compute weak entropy solutions for the Euler equations for gas dynamics.

  18. Substructured multibody molecular dynamics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grest, Gary Stephen; Stevens, Mark Jackson; Plimpton, Steven James; Woolf, Thomas B. (Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD); Lehoucq, Richard B.; Crozier, Paul Stewart; Ismail, Ahmed E.; Mukherjee, Rudranarayan M. (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY); Draganescu, Andrei I.

    2006-11-01

    We have enhanced our parallel molecular dynamics (MD) simulation software LAMMPS (Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator, lammps.sandia.gov) to include many new features for accelerated simulation including articulated rigid body dynamics via coupling to the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute code POEMS (Parallelizable Open-source Efficient Multibody Software). We use new features of the LAMMPS software package to investigate rhodopsin photoisomerization, and water model surface tension and capillary waves at the vapor-liquid interface. Finally, we motivate the recipes of MD for practitioners and researchers in numerical analysis and computational mechanics.

  19. Dynamical Structure of Baryons

    CERN Document Server

    Aleksejevs, A

    2013-01-01

    Compton scattering offers a unique opportunity to study the dynamical structure of hadrons over a wide kinematic range, with polarizabilities characterizing the hadron active internal degrees of freedom. We present calculations and detailed analysis of electric and magnetic and the spin-dependent dynamical polarizabilities for the lowest in mass SU(3) octet of baryons. These extensive calculations are made possible by the recent implementation of semi-automatized calculations in chiral perturbation theory which allows evaluating polarizabilities from Compton scattering up to next-to-the-leading order. The dependencies for the range of photon energies covering the majority of the meson photoproduction channels are analyzed.

  20. Dynamically assisted Schwinger mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schützhold, Ralf; Gies, Holger; Dunne, Gerald

    2008-09-26

    We study electron-positron pair creation from the Dirac vacuum induced by a strong and slowly varying electric field (Schwinger effect) which is superimposed by a weak and rapidly changing electromagnetic field (dynamical pair creation). In the subcritical regime where both mechanisms separately are strongly suppressed, their combined impact yields a pair creation rate which is dramatically enhanced. Intuitively speaking, the strong electric field lowers the threshold for dynamical particle creation--or, alternatively, the fast electromagnetic field generates additional seeds for the Schwinger mechanism. These findings could be relevant for planned ultrahigh intensity lasers.